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Sample records for vrtsjrv north-east europe

  1. RAISED BOGS ON THE NORTH-EAST OF EUROPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. YURKOVSKAYA

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Northeastern Europe 2 types of raised bogs are distinguished: coastal (Southern White Sea raised hogs and continental (Pechora-Onega raised bogs. They have been compared as to their flora, prevailing syntaxa, characteristics of their complexes, structure of mire massifs and composition of peat deposits.

  2. European Workshop on Renewable Rural Energy Applications in North-East Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This workshop is a part of the E.C. Thermie B project `Dissemination of Promising Renewable Rural Energy Applications in North-Eastern Europe`. The presentations held in the workshop are collected in this publication. The subjects are: TEKES (Technology Development Centre) Boost Technology; Renewable Energy in Latvia; Rural Renewable energy (Prospects) in Estonia; Renewable energy from Rural Electrification; Techno-Economic Analysis published as a summary; Practical Experiences of Small-Scale Heat Generation from Fuelwood in Finland; Solar systems for Domestic Hot Water and Space Heating; Biomass for Energy: Small-Scale Technologies; Photovoltaic Applications for Rural Areas in the North-East Europe

  3. Ancient DNA Reveals Prehistoric Gene-Flow from Siberia in the Complex Human Population History of North East Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Der Sarkissian, Clio; Balanovsky, Oleg; Brandt, Guido; Khartanovich, Valery; Buzhilova, Alexandra; Koshel, Sergey; Zaporozhchenko, Valery; Gronenborn, Detlef; Moiseyev, Vyacheslav; Kolpakov, Eugen; Shumkin, Vladimir; Alt, Kurt W.; Balanovska, Elena; Cooper, Alan; Haak, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    North East Europe harbors a high diversity of cultures and languages, suggesting a complex genetic history. Archaeological, anthropological, and genetic research has revealed a series of influences from Western and Eastern Eurasia in the past. While genetic data from modern-day populations is commonly used to make inferences about their origins and past migrations, ancient DNA provides a powerful test of such hypotheses by giving a snapshot of the past genetic diversity. In order to better understand the dynamics that have shaped the gene pool of North East Europeans, we generated and analyzed 34 mitochondrial genotypes from the skeletal remains of three archaeological sites in northwest Russia. These sites were dated to the Mesolithic and the Early Metal Age (7,500 and 3,500 uncalibrated years Before Present). We applied a suite of population genetic analyses (principal component analysis, genetic distance mapping, haplotype sharing analyses) and compared past demographic models through coalescent simulations using Bayesian Serial SimCoal and Approximate Bayesian Computation. Comparisons of genetic data from ancient and modern-day populations revealed significant changes in the mitochondrial makeup of North East Europeans through time. Mesolithic foragers showed high frequencies and diversity of haplogroups U (U2e, U4, U5a), a pattern observed previously in European hunter-gatherers from Iberia to Scandinavia. In contrast, the presence of mitochondrial DNA haplogroups C, D, and Z in Early Metal Age individuals suggested discontinuity with Mesolithic hunter-gatherers and genetic influx from central/eastern Siberia. We identified remarkable genetic dissimilarities between prehistoric and modern-day North East Europeans/Saami, which suggests an important role of post-Mesolithic migrations from Western Europe and subsequent population replacement/extinctions. This work demonstrates how ancient DNA can improve our understanding of human population movements across

  4. Ancient DNA reveals prehistoric gene-flow from siberia in the complex human population history of North East Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clio Der Sarkissian

    Full Text Available North East Europe harbors a high diversity of cultures and languages, suggesting a complex genetic history. Archaeological, anthropological, and genetic research has revealed a series of influences from Western and Eastern Eurasia in the past. While genetic data from modern-day populations is commonly used to make inferences about their origins and past migrations, ancient DNA provides a powerful test of such hypotheses by giving a snapshot of the past genetic diversity. In order to better understand the dynamics that have shaped the gene pool of North East Europeans, we generated and analyzed 34 mitochondrial genotypes from the skeletal remains of three archaeological sites in northwest Russia. These sites were dated to the Mesolithic and the Early Metal Age (7,500 and 3,500 uncalibrated years Before Present. We applied a suite of population genetic analyses (principal component analysis, genetic distance mapping, haplotype sharing analyses and compared past demographic models through coalescent simulations using Bayesian Serial SimCoal and Approximate Bayesian Computation. Comparisons of genetic data from ancient and modern-day populations revealed significant changes in the mitochondrial makeup of North East Europeans through time. Mesolithic foragers showed high frequencies and diversity of haplogroups U (U2e, U4, U5a, a pattern observed previously in European hunter-gatherers from Iberia to Scandinavia. In contrast, the presence of mitochondrial DNA haplogroups C, D, and Z in Early Metal Age individuals suggested discontinuity with Mesolithic hunter-gatherers and genetic influx from central/eastern Siberia. We identified remarkable genetic dissimilarities between prehistoric and modern-day North East Europeans/Saami, which suggests an important role of post-Mesolithic migrations from Western Europe and subsequent population replacement/extinctions. This work demonstrates how ancient DNA can improve our understanding of human population

  5. Mitochondrial genome sequencing in Mesolithic North East Europe Unearths a new sub-clade within the broadly distributed human haplogroup C1.

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    Clio Der Sarkissian

    Full Text Available The human mitochondrial haplogroup C1 has a broad global distribution but is extremely rare in Europe today. Recent ancient DNA evidence has demonstrated its presence in European Mesolithic individuals. Three individuals from the 7,500 year old Mesolithic site of Yuzhnyy Oleni Ostrov, Western Russia, could be assigned to haplogroup C1 based on mitochondrial hypervariable region I sequences. However, hypervariable region I data alone could not provide enough resolution to establish the phylogenetic relationship of these Mesolithic haplotypes with haplogroup C1 mitochondrial DNA sequences found today in populations of Europe, Asia and the Americas. In order to obtain high-resolution data and shed light on the origin of this European Mesolithic C1 haplotype, we target-enriched and sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of one Yuzhnyy Oleni Ostrov C1 individual. The updated phylogeny of C1 haplogroups indicated that the Yuzhnyy Oleni Ostrov haplotype represents a new distinct clade, provisionally coined "C1f". We show that all three C1 carriers of Yuzhnyy Oleni Ostrov belong to this clade. No haplotype closely related to the C1f sequence could be found in the large current database of ancient and present-day mitochondrial genomes. Hence, we have discovered past human mitochondrial diversity that has not been observed in modern-day populations so far. The lack of positive matches in modern populations may be explained by under-sampling of rare modern C1 carriers or by demographic processes, population extinction or replacement, that may have impacted on populations of Northeast Europe since prehistoric times.

  6. Gender Inequality in North East India

    OpenAIRE

    Mahanta, Bidisha; Nayak, Purusottam

    2013-01-01

    The present paper is an attempt to analyze the status of gender inequality in North East India using various indicators based on secondary data. The study reveals that the northeast is better off than that of the nation as a whole in terms of gender equality. However inequality between women and men exists in the region in spite of the predominance of various ethnic groups who by and large do not believe in sex discrimination. The study reveals that women are relatively disempowered and enjoy...

  7. A role of the Atlantic Ocean in predicting summer surface air temperature over North East Asia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monerie, Paul-Arthur; Robson, Jon; Dong, Buwen; Dunstone, Nick

    2017-10-01

    We assess the ability of the DePreSys3 prediction system to predict the summer (JJAS) surface-air temperature over North East Asia. DePreSys3 is based on a high resolution ocean-atmosphere coupled climate prediction system ( 60 km in the atmosphere and 25 km in the ocean), which is full-field initialized from 1960 to 2014 (26 start-dates). We find skill in predicting surface-air temperature, relative to a long-term trend, for 1 and 2-5 year lead-times over North East Asia, the North Atlantic Ocean and Eastern Europe. DePreSys3 also reproduces the interdecadal evolution of surface-air temperature over the North Atlantic subpolar gyre and North East Asia for both lead times, along with the strong warming that occurred in the mid-1990s over both areas. Composite analysis reveals that the skill at capturing interdecadal changes in North East Asia is associated with the propagation of an atmospheric Rossby wave, which follows the subtropical jet and modulates surface-air temperature from Europe to Eastern Asia. We hypothesise that this `circumglobal teleconnection' pattern is excited over the Atlantic Ocean and is related to Atlantic multi-decadal variability and the associated changes in precipitation over the Sahel and the subtropical Atlantic Ocean. This mechanism is robust for the 2-5 year lead-time. For the 1 year lead-time the Pacific Ocean also plays an important role in leading to skill in predicting SAT over Northeast Asia. Increased temperatures and precipitation over the western Pacific Ocean was found to be associated with a Pacific-Japan like-pattern, which can affect East Asia's climate.

  8. North East Race Equality Forum Information Briefing No. 4: The North East: A warm and friendly welcome?

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzgerald, Ian

    2015-01-01

    This is a research briefing for the North East Race Equality Forum. It briefly details the hate crime findings of a project undertaken in collaboration with Rafał Smoczyński of the Polish Academy of Sciences.

  9. Photovoltaic applications for rural areas in North-East Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, P. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland); Faninger-Lund, H. [Solpros Ay, Helsinki (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    The photovoltaic (PV) markets have grown in the EU by ca 25 % per year during the past decade. World-wide the production of photovoltaic cells has exceeded the 80 MW{sub e}/a limit. The costs of PV modules have dropped by a factor of 5 during the last ten years and is now at the level of 4-5 USD/W{sub p}. The cost reductions mean on the hand new market segments for PV in the future. The market potential of photovoltaics, the financial issues connected to this, the PV system technology, the basic system design and the examples of typical projects are discussed in the presentation

  10. The European practice database (EPD): results of the study in thte North-East of Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampieron, A; Elseviers, M; De Vos, J Y; Favaretto, A; Geatti, S; Harrington, M

    2005-01-01

    The survey, realized in 2002-03 in the North-East of Italy, describes renal care in dialysis services. A questionnaire, structured at European level, was sent to all dialysis centres by mail. The questionnaire was returned from 21 centres (61.8%) and related satellite units. Results show nonhomogeneity in renal care. Some important results were: low use of peritoneal dialysis (18%), compared to the rest of Europe, elevated presence of older people on haemodialysis, reduced percentage of patients on transplantation waiting list, diffused use of isolation for HCV positive patients, high use of AV fistulae (84%), low employment of renal technicians, absence of renal dieticians and social workers and nurses performing prevalently direct care. Data can be used for different goals: benchmarking activities, selection of deeper research topics and development of more oriented continuous education activities.

  11. Assessing the obesogenic environment of North East England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgoine, Thomas; Alvanides, Seraphim; Lake, Amelia A

    2011-05-01

    This study examines the influence of the environment (defined as 'walkability', food availability and deprivation), alongside individual factors, on Body Mass Index (BMI) and fruit and vegetable consumption. The aim of this unique study was to objectively scrutinise the concept of the obesogenic environment in the North East of England. A set of theoretical obesogenic indices based on the availability of food to consume within and outside of the home, residential density, street connectivity and land use mix were created for North East England. A pooled sample of 893 individuals (aged 16+) over 3 years (2003, 2004, 2005) from the Health Survey for England (HSE) was isolated for further analysis and correlation with the obesogenic indices. Results suggest that few elements of both walkability and food availability are significantly associated with BMI and fruit and vegetable intake. Some methodological concerns are highlighted, such as the appropriateness of walkability calculations for rural areas. The study concludes by strongly recommending a multi-faceted approach be taken when trying to tackle current levels of obesity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Food in health security in North East Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hyun-Kyung

    2009-01-01

    Food and health security in North East Asia including South Korea, North Korea, China and Japan was compared. Because this region contains countries with many complex problems, it is worthwhile to study the current situation. With about 24% of the world's population, all North East Asian countries supply between 2400 and 3000 Kcal of energy. Regarding health status, two extreme problems exist. One is malnutrition in North Korea and China and the other is chronic degenerative disease in Japan, South Korea and China. Because quality, quantity and safety of the food supply have to be secured for health security, some topics are selected and discussed. 1) World food price can have an effect on food security for countries with a low food self sufficiency rate such as Japan and Korea; specially, for the urban poor. 2) Population aging can increase the number of aged people without food security. An aged population with less income and no support from their off-spring, because of disappearing traditional values, may have food insecurity. 3) Population growth and economic growth in this region may worsen food problems. Since a quarter of the world's population resides in this region, populations will continue to increase. With economic growth, people will consume more animal products. 4) Climate change generates food production problems. As the progress of industry continues, there will be less land for food and more pollutants in the environment. 5) Political instability will cause food insecurity and conflict will cause problems with regard to food aid.

  13. Pitmatic: the talk of the north east coalfields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bill Griffiths (comp.)

    2007-07-15

    The dictionary of Pitmatic, the oddly-named argot of north-east Englands miners for more than 150 years, has been compiled through detailed research in archives and interviews with the last generation to talk of kips, corf-batters and arse-loops. First recorded in Victorian newspapers, the language was part of the intense camaraderie of underground working which excluded even friendly outsiders such as the parliamentary commissioners pressing for better conditions in the pits in 1842. 'The barriers to our intercourse were formidable,' they wrote in their report on encountering the Pitmatic dialect. 'Numerous mining technicalities, northern provincialisms, peculiar intonation and accents and rapid and indistinct utterance rendered it essential for us to devote time to the study of these peculiarities ere we could translate and write the evidence.' The book includes pit recollections and analysis of the origins of the dialect's words. It reveals a rich combination of borrowings from Old Norse, Dutch and a score of other languages, with inventive usages dreamed up by the miners themselves. Part-financed by the Heritage Lottery Fund, in a three-stage dialect study of the north-east called Wor Language, the dictionary reveals the deeply practical nature of Pitmatic. The dialect was originally called Pitmatical, and its curious name was a parallel to mathematics, intended to stress the skill, precision and craft of the colliers' work.

  14. Rhachotropis (Eusiroidea, Amphipoda from the North East Atlantic

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    Anne-Nina Lörz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The genus Rhachotropis has the widest geographic and bathymetric distribution of all amphipod genera worldwide. Molecular and morphological investigations of specimens sampled around Iceland and off the Norwegian coast allow the first insights into the relationships of North East Atlantic Rhachotropis. The 31 cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI sequences generated for this study were assigned 13 Barcode Index Numbers (BINs in the Barcode of Life database (BOLD, of which 12 are new to the database. Molecular analyses of COI and 16S sequences could not confirm a theory that depth has a greater influence on the phylogeny of Rhachotropis than geographic distance. Although the North East Atlantic is a well-studied area, our molecular investigations revealed the genus Rhachotropis may contain cryptic species, which indicates a higher biodiversity than currently known. For example, the specimens which key to Rhachotropis helleri is a complex of three COI clades, two of which cannot be identified with morphological traits. One specimen of each of the clades in the cladogram was documented by high definition photographs. A special focus was on the visual morphology of the eyes, as this character shows interspecific differences within the genus Rhachotropis in response to fixation in ethanol. Detailed morphological investigation showed that some clades thought to be indistinguishable can be separated by minute but consistent morphological characters. Datamining Genbank to examine all registered COI-sequences of R. aculeata, the only previously known Rhachotropis BIN in the North Atlantic and sub-Arctic, showed R. aculeata to be subdivided by an Arctic and a North Atlantic population.

  15. Women Entrepreneurship in Romania: the Case of North East Development Region

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    Sebastian Ion CEPTUREANU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Women entrepreneurship benefit from a process of expansion all over the world. Business established and developed by women are an important source of wealth and improved living standards in many countries. Even though women represent 46% of Europe's working population, which means in theory that trend of this type entrepreneurship can only go upward, however entrepreneurship is still considered an activity for men. Entrepreneurship has an active role in employment, economic development and quality of life, constituting a dynamic part of any developed economy. Supporting women in their involvement in setting up new start-ups and small business and unlock their potential is an important part of government actions to foster entrepreneurial activities. Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM study found out that economies of Eastern European countries are in poor condition in terms of women's participation in entrepreneurial activity. Romania is no exception. This paper analyze women entrepreneurship in the poorest region of Romania, North East region, through an empirical survey but provide also some insights on overall Romanian situation based on National Trade Register Office data.

  16. Regional High Resolution Reanalysis Covered European North East Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdalle-Badie, R.; Benkiran, M.; Chanut, J.; Drillet, Y.; Reffray, G.

    2011-12-01

    Mercator-Ocean has developed a regional forecasting system at 1/12° resolution over the North East Atlantic (IBI: Iberia, Biscay and Irish), taking advantage of the recent developments in NEMO. This regional forecasting system uses boundary conditions from the Mercator-Ocean global reanalysis (GLORYS: Global Ocean ReanalYses and Simulations). The assimilation component of the Mercator Ocean system, is based on a reduced-order Kalman filter (the SEEK or Singular Extended Evolutive Kalman filter). An IAU method (Incremental Analysis Updates) is used to apply the increments in the system. The error statistics are represented in a sub-space spanned by a small number of dominant 3D error directions. The data assimilation system allows to constrain the model in a multivariate way with Sea Surface Temperature (AVHRR + Multi-satellite High resolution), together with all available satellite Sea Level Anomalies, and with in situ observations from the CORA-03 data base, including ARGO floats temperature and salinity measurements. This reanalysis covers the period from January 2002 to December 2009. In this presentation, the results obtained with this reanalysis system (1/12°) are compared to the GLORYS ones. A special focus will be made on the gain thanks to the higher resolution of the model and higher resolution of the SST assimilated in this reanalysis.

  17. Vitamin D in North-East Asian clinical nutrition practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlqvist, Mark L

    2013-01-01

    Sound clinical nutrition practice is grounded in evidence and stimulated by research. Yet, there are unanswered questions about food-health relationships. Clinical nutrition involves the identification of nutritional disorders and the motivation to rectify them with all required care. Vitamin D health exemplifies the biomedical, societal and environmental dimensions of clinical nutrition, its science and practice. It depends most of all on access to sunshine and food and probably represents a paradigm in human health which is still at its beginning. Nevertheless, the problem of its deficiency is much more widespread and common than has been thought since it was first identified as a cause of rickets and osteomalacia. It is now known to spare no body organ or system. The problem in North-East Asia is comparable to much of the rest of the world, but the risk profile for it is exaggerated by atmospheric pollution, cultures with sun-avoidance on account of skin colour and potentially mitigated by foodstuffs like fish, eggs, organ meats and mushrooms which can partially offset sunshine-deficiency. Diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion and confirmation by biochemistry which may not be affordable. Therefore a close working relationship between public health and clinical nutritionist is essential.

  18. The Jurassic of North-East Greenland: Jurassic dinoflagellate cysts from Hochstetter Forland, North-East Greenland

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    Piasecki, Stefan

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Three sections in Hochstetter Forland, North-East Greenland, referred to the Jurassic Payer Dal and Bernbjerg Formations, have been analysed for dinoflagellate cysts. The dinoflagellate cysts,new finds of ammonites and previously recorded marine faunas form the basis for improved dating of the succession. The basal strata of the Payer Dal Formation at Kulhus is here dated as Late Callovian, Peltoceras athleta Chronozone, based on the presence of relatively abundant Limbicysta bjaerkei, Mendicodinium groenlandicum, Rhychoniopsis cladophora and Tubotuberella dangeardii in an otherwise poor Upper Callovian dinoflagellate assemblage. Ammoniteshave not been recorded from these strata. The upper Payer Dal Formation at Agnetesøelven is dated as Late Oxfordian, Amoeboceras glosense – Amoeboceras serratum Chronozones, based onthe presence of Sciniodinium crystallinum, together with Cribroperidinium granuligera and Stephanelytron sp. The age is in accordance with ammonites present in the uppermost part ofthe formation at Søndre Muslingebjerg. New ammonites in the Bernbjerg Formation at Agnetesøelven together with dinoflagellate cysts indicate an earliest Kimmeridgian age, Raseniacymodoce and Aulacostephanoides mutabilis Chronozones.The Upper Callovian dinoflagellate cysts from Hochstetter Forland belong to a local brackish to marginal marine assemblage, which only allows a fairly broad correlation to coeval assemblagesin central East Greenland. In contrast, the Oxfordian and Kimmeridgian assemblages are fully marine and can be correlated from Milne Land in central East Greenland via Hochstetter Forland to Peary Land in eastern North Greenland.

  19. A statistical analysis of North East Atlantic (submicron aerosol size distributions

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    M. Dall'Osto

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Global Atmospheric Watch research station at Mace Head (Ireland offers the possibility to sample some of the cleanest air masses being imported into Europe as well as some of the most polluted being exported out of Europe. We present a statistical cluster analysis of the physical characteristics of aerosol size distributions in air ranging from the cleanest to the most polluted for the year 2008. Data coverage achieved was 75% throughout the year. By applying the Hartigan-Wong k-Means method, 12 clusters were identified as systematically occurring. These 12 clusters could be further combined into 4 categories with similar characteristics, namely: coastal nucleation category (occurring 21.3 % of the time, open ocean nucleation category (occurring 32.6% of the time, background clean marine category (occurring 26.1% of the time and anthropogenic category (occurring 20% of the time aerosol size distributions. The coastal nucleation category is characterised by a clear and dominant nucleation mode at sizes less than 10 nm while the open ocean nucleation category is characterised by a dominant Aitken mode between 15 nm and 50 nm. The background clean marine aerosol exhibited a clear bimodality in the sub-micron size distribution, with although it should be noted that either the Aitken mode or the accumulation mode may dominate the number concentration. However, peculiar background clean marine size distributions with coarser accumulation modes are also observed during winter months. By contrast, the continentally-influenced size distributions are generally more monomodal (accumulation, albeit with traces of bimodality. The open ocean category occurs more often during May, June and July, corresponding with the North East (NE Atlantic high biological period. Combined with the relatively high percentage frequency of occurrence (32.6%, this suggests that the marine biota is an important source of new nano aerosol particles in NE Atlantic Air.

  20. Investigating the potential for "water piracy" in North East Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Nanna B.; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe

    2013-04-01

    The incorporation of subglacial processes in ice flow models remains a challenge while at the same time observational evidence increasingly underscores the important role liquid water plays in ice flow dynamics. One of the many problems ice flow models face (that also includes scarcity of data at the bed and the deformational properties of water-saturated sediments) is the different time-scales on which the processes operate. For example, observations indicate that subglacial water may be re-routed to a neighbouring ice stream in response to changes in surface elevation. This implies that ice flow models have to allow for changes in ice flow mode where, depending on the basal properties, the flow may be dominated by deformation or basal sliding. The re-routing of water between neighbouring ice streams is often termed "water piracy" and in this study we demonstrate that the potential for water piracy exists even in regions with very small surface elevation changes. We use a simple, vertically integrated, 2D-plane ice flow model based on the shallow ice flow approximation to model the large-scale changes in surface elevation of North East Greenland in response to gravity and mass balance. Considering time-scales of 100-500 years the model predicts changes in elevation of less than a metre per year which is in agreement with data from remote sensing. We then calculate the corresponding changes in hydrological pressure potential and use evidence from radio-echo sounding data to identify areas with basal melting and thus potential liquid water production. The corresponding change in hydrological pressure potential in response to the surface elevation changes is sufficient to divert the subglacial water to different pathways. This change in subglacial water pathways could be sufficient to change the ice flow mode from deformation to sliding and might initiate speed-up and/or slow-down of the ice streams at the margins of the basin.

  1. Childhood injuries in a tertiary institution in north east Nigeria

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    Issa Abdul Razaq Esin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Injury has been recognised as a preventable cause of morbidity and mortality in children. The aim of this study was to determine the aetiology, pattern and location of childhood injuries in north east Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This is a 3-year retrospective hospital-based descriptive study. The study included 114 children (77 boys, 37 girls; mean age 6.4 ± 3.2 years; range 2 months to 15 years who were admitted for various injuries in the female/paediatric surgical ward from January 2007 to December 2009. Information obtained from their case notes included demographic data, mechanism of injury, location of injury, anatomical site of injury and outcome of treatment. Results: Records for 114 children (77 boys, 37 girls; mean age 6.2 years; range 2 months to 15 years were available for analysis. The highest number of injuries occurred in the age group 6-10 years. Home was the most common location of injury among the age group 0-5 years while older children sustained most of their injuries outside the home on the street/highways. Burns from hot water was the most common injury among children aged 0-5 years while pedestrian accident accounted for the highest cause of injury among older children. Fall accounted for 20.2% of the injuries. The most common specific anatomic injury was head injury followed by limb fractures. Two mortalities were recorded (1.8%. Conclusion: This study provided useful information on the characteristics of childhood injuries in our environment. There is the need for parents and children education about the risks of injury and preventive measures in addition to legislation and policy on environmental modifications and enforcements to significantly reduce childhood injury.

  2. Genetic assessment of ornamental fish species from North East India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Bishal; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar

    2015-01-25

    Ornamental fishes are traded with multiple names from various parts around the world, including North East India. Most are collected from the wild, due to lack of species-specific culture or breeding, and therefore, such unmanaged collection of the wild and endemic species could lead to severe threats to biodiversity. Despite many regulatory policies, trade of threatened species, including the IUCN listed species have been largely uncontrolled, due to species identification problems arising from the utilization of multiple trade names. So, the development of species-specific DNA marker is indispensable where DNA Barcoding is proved to be helpful in species identification. Here, we investigated, through DNA Barcoding and morphological assessment, the identification of 128 ornamental fish specimens exported from NE India from different exporters. The generated sequences were subjected to similarity match in BOLD-IDS as well as BLASTN, and analysed using MEGA5.2 for species identification through Neighbour-Joining (NJ) clustering, and K2P distance based approach. The analysis revealed straightforward identification of 84 specimens into 35 species, while 44 specimens were difficult to distinguish based on CO1 barcode alone. However, these cases were resolved through morphology, NJ and distanced based method and found to be belonging to 16 species. Among the 51 identified species, 14 species represented multiple trade names; 17 species belonged to threatened category. Species-level identification through DNA Barcoding along with traditional morphotaxonomy reflects its efficacy in regulating ornamental fish trade and therefore, appeals for their conservation in nature. The use of trade names rather than the zoological name created the passage for trafficking of the threatened species and demands immediate attention for sustaining wildlife conservation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Perspectives of Sustainable Development of Tourism in the North-East Region of Romania

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    Adrian-Liviu Scutariu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose to highlight the tourism evolution and its intensity in the North-East region of Romania, compared to two regions with similar touristic potential from the Eastern European Union: Subcarpathia from Poland and Central Slovakia. We analysed if the EU attachment of Romania, Poland, and Slovakia had some effects on tourism development in the three regions mentioned. Issues arising from the analysis of the current situation of tourism will allow us to draw some sustainable development directions of tourism in the North-East region based on conserving and capitalizing the uniqueness of the area. We will consider the experience of the other two regions, trying to adapt them to the situation of the North-East region. Based on the analysis we have made, we consider that other countries can inspire us by authorities’ initiatives in supporting tourism, good human resources training, entrepreneurship stimulation, and assistance in accessing financial resources, including EU ones.

  4. The meiofauna : macrofauna ratio across the continental slope of the Goban Spur (north-east Atlantic)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flach, E.; Van Averbeke, J.; Heip, C.H.R.

    1999-01-01

    Meio- and macrofauna density and biomass were estimated at the OMEX-transect across the continental slope of the Goban Spur at water depths ranging from 208 to 4460 m in the north-east Atlantic. A linear increase in the ratio between meio- and macrofauna densities with increasing water depth was

  5. Wildlife conservation in fragmented tropical forests: A case of South Garo Hills, Meghalaya, North East India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashish. Kumar; Bruce G. Marcot; Rohitkumar. Patel

    2017-01-01

    This volume presents findings on, and implications for, wildlife conservation in the tropical forests in Garo Hills of Meghalaya state in the North East India. A companion volume presented the findings on forest fragmentation due to practice of slash and burn agriculture in the region. Both of the volumes summarize work completed over more than a decade on...

  6. Survival of non-Western first generations immigrants with stomach cancer in North East Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siemerink, E.J.M.; van der Aa, M.A.; Siesling, Sabine; Hospers, G.A.P.; Mulder, N.H.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Isolated groups, such as first generation non-Western immigrants, are at risk for suboptimal utilisation of the health care system resulting in a worse outcome. Methods: From 1989 to 2007, all patients with stomach cancer were selected from the Comprehensive Cancer Centre North-East

  7. The Challenges in Communication A Perspective from the North-East

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. The Challenges in Communication A Perspective from the North-East · Issues · Basic Services · Security Concerns · Reliance Cell Operator · Reliance (contd) · Reliance (contd) · CellOne Current Status · Unified Services · VSAT Services · PowerPoint Presentation · VSATs (contd) · Land Lines · Slide 14.

  8. Seamount physiography and biology in the north-east Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Morato

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This work aims at characterising the seamount physiography and biology in the OSPAR Convention limits (north-east Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea. We first inferred potential abundance, location and morphological characteristics of seamounts, and secondly, summarized the existing biological, geological and oceanographic in situ research, identifying examples of well-studied seamounts. Our study showed that the seamount population in the OSPAR area (north-east Atlantic and in the Mediterranean Sea is large with around 557 and 101 seamount-like features, respectively. Similarly, seamounts occupy large areas of about 616 000 km2 in the OSPAR region and of about 89 500 km2 in the Mediterranean Sea. The presence of seamounts in the north-east Atlantic has been known since the late 19th century, but overall knowledge regarding seamount ecology and geology is still relatively poor. Only 37 seamounts in the OSPAR area (3.5% of all seamounts in the region, 22 in the Mediterranean Sea (9.2% of all seamounts in the region and 25 in the north-east Atlantic south of the OSPAR area have in situ information. Seamounts mapped in both areas are in general very heterogeneous, showing diverse geophysical characteristics. These differences will likely affect the biological diversity and production of resident and associated organisms.

  9. [Congenital hyperinsulinism in the north-east Netherlands. Clinical features and DNA diagnostics in 22 children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheul, J.C.; Ris-Stalpers, C.; Bikker, H.; Bakker-van Waarde, W.M.; Noordam, C.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical features and relevant genetic mutations in 22 children with congenital hyperinsulinism in the north-east Netherlands. DESIGN: Retrospective, descriptive study. METHOD: Children born between June 1988 and June 2009, who were presented at the academic medical

  10. Child Marriage or Forced Marriage? South Asian Communities in North East England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangoli, Geetanjali; McCarry, Melanie; Razak, Amina

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the links between child marriage and forced marriage in the UK, drawing from a research study on South Asian communities in North East England. It looks at definitional issues through an analysis of UK and South Asian policies. It also analyses how these concepts are understood by service providers, survivors of child…

  11. Parasitic anemone infects the invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi in the North East Atlantic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selander, Erik; Møller, Lene Friis; Sundberg, Per

    2010-01-01

    We report of the first finding of parasitic sea anemone larvae infecting the invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi in the North East Atlantic. Parasitic anemone larvae are common in the native habitat of Mnemiopsis, but have not previously been reported from any of the locations where Mnemiopsis...

  12. Genetic population structure of the malaria vector Anopheles baimaii in north-east India using mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarma Devojit K

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anopheles baimaii is a primary vector of human malaria in the forest settings of Southeast Asia including the north-eastern region of India. Here, the genetic population structure and the basic population genetic parameters of An. baimaii in north-east India were estimated using DNA sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase sub unit II (COII gene. Methods Anopheles baimaii were collected from 26 geo-referenced locations across the seven north-east Indian states and the COII gene was sequenced from 176 individuals across these sites. Fifty-seven COII sequences of An. baimaii from six locations in Bangladesh, Myanmar and Thailand from a previous study were added to this dataset. Altogether, 233 sequences were grouped into eight population groups, to facilitate analyses of genetic diversity, population structure and population history. Results A star-shaped median joining haplotype network, unimodal mismatch distribution and significantly negative neutrality tests indicated population expansion in An. baimaii with the start of expansion estimated to be ~0.243 million years before present (MYBP in north-east India. The populations of An. baimaii from north-east India had the highest haplotype and nucleotide diversity with all other populations having a subset of this diversity, likely as the result of range expansion from north-east India. The north-east Indian populations were genetically distinct from those in Bangladesh, Myanmar and Thailand, indicating that mountains, such as the Arakan mountain range between north-east India and Myanmar, are a significant barrier to gene flow. Within north-east India, there was no genetic differentiation among populations with the exception of the Central 2 population in the Barail hills area that was significantly differentiated from other populations. Conclusions The high genetic distinctiveness of the Central 2 population in the Barail hills area of the north-east India should be

  13. North-East Germany, one of the most challenging regions of the world for the grid integration of renewable energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Harald [Center for Energy Technology Brandenburg (CEBra), Cottbus (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The North-East of Germany is one the regions of the world with the highest density of renewable energies. The consumer demand will vary between 4 - 11 GW. In addition to the conventional generation of 15 GW actually another 12 GW from renewable sources and 7 GW from urban combined cycle were installed in the past decade. It will be expected that this generation capacity will exceed from 34 GW to 50 GW until 2020. This high overcapacity, combined with limitations in the transmission and distribution grids will be a future challenge. Brandenburg University of Technology (BTU) in Cottbus made a detailed governmental study (download www.tu-cottbus.de/cebra/) in 2006-08, how to improve the grid structure for these future needs. Based on this initial work we now focus on the one hand side on different storage solutions, e.g. wide spread use of e-car batteries or use of electrolysers, to store energy in the gas grid. Furthermore we offer professional training of grid control staff together with 50-Hertz Transmission in a new grid training center, which is one of the most powerfully in Europe. (orig.)

  14. 9th Annual Conference of the North East Polytechnics Mathematical Modelling & Computer Simulation Group

    CERN Document Server

    Bradley, R

    1987-01-01

    In recent years, mathematical modelling allied to computer simulation has emerged as en effective and invaluable design tool for industry and a discipline in its own right. This has been reflected in the popularity of the growing number of courses and conferences devoted to the area. The North East Polytechnics Mathematical Modelling and Computer Simulation Group has a balanced representation of academics and industrialists and, as a Group, has the objective of promoting a continuing partnership between the Polytechnics in the North East and local industry. Prior to the present conference the Group has organised eight conferences with a variety of themes related to mathematical modelling and computer simulation. The theme chosen for the Polymodel 9 Conference held in Newcastle upon Tyne in May 1986 was Industrial Vibration Modelling, which is particularly approp riate for 'Industry Year' and is an area which continues to present industry and academics with new and challenging problems. The aim of the Conferen...

  15. Humic substances elemental composition of selected taiga and tundra soils from Russian European North-East

    OpenAIRE

    Lodygin Evgeny; Beznosikov Vasily; Abakumov Evgeny

    2017-01-01

    Soils of Russian European North were investigated in terms of stability and quality of organic matter as well as in terms of soils organic matter elemental composi­tion. Therefore, soil humic acids (HAs), extracted from soils of different natural zones of Russian North-East were studied to characterize the degree of soil organic matter stabilization along a zonal gradient. HAs were extracted from soil of different zonal environments of the Komi Republic: south, middle and north taiga as well ...

  16. The Importance of Food Onboard: Attitudes Amongst Air Travellers In North-East Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Samuel; Jones, Peter

    2004-01-01

    This report investigates passenger attitudes towards on-board catering in North East Asia. The study is based upon a stratified sample of 374 respondents interviewed at Incheon International Airport (ICN) in Seoul, Korea and assesses the level of importance of in-flight food products in the context of short haul international flights. The data collected through these questionnaires showed that factors such as ticket price, destination and various passenger demographics had an effect on...

  17. TEMPORAL LOCALITY OF CLIMATE OF NORTH-EAST CAUCASUS’ FOOTHILL LANDSCAPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Bratkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the variability of climatic parameters of foothill landscapes of the North-East Caucasus: annual air temperature and precipitation and also the coefficient of moisture in last 60 years. Large temporal heterogeneity of these parameters for landscapes are characterized for the whole period, but no less – for short periods (3-5 years. In this regard, it is concluded that the short changes can reverse the effects for the landscape structure of modern climate changes.

  18. Leadership and transformational change in healthcare organisations: a qualitative analysis of the North East Transformation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erskine, Jonathan; Hunter, David J; Small, Adrian; Hicks, Chris; McGovern, Tom; Lugsden, Ed; Whitty, Paula; Steen, Nick; Eccles, Martin Paul

    2013-02-01

    The research project 'An Evaluation of Transformational Change in NHS North East' examines the progress and success of National Health Service (NHS) organisations in north east England in implementing and embedding the North East Transformation System (NETS), a region-wide programme to improve healthcare quality and safety, and to reduce waste, using a combination of Vision, Compact, and Lean-based Method. This paper concentrates on findings concerning the role of leadership in enabling tranformational change, based on semi-structured interviews with a mix of senior NHS managers and quality improvement staff in 14 study sites. Most interviewees felt that implementing the NETS requires committed, stable leadership, attention to team-building across disciplines and leadership development at many levels. We conclude that without senior leader commitment to continuous improvement over a long time scale and serious efforts to distribute leadership tasks to all levels, healthcare organisations are less likely to achieve positive changes in managerial-clinical relations, sustainable improvements to organisational culture and, ultimately, the region-wide step change in quality, safety and efficiency that the NETS was designed to deliver. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  19. Biostratigraphy of the Abderaz Formation in Sheikh stratigraphic section (north east of Bojnurd based on planktonic foraminifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mohammad Hasan kazemzadeh

    2016-12-01

    Finally, according to the recognized planktonic foraminifera and indicated biozones, the Early Turonian to Late Campanian age for deposits of the Abderaz Formation in the Sheikh stratigraphic section at north east of Bojnurd is proposed

  20. GIS Applied to Landslide Hazard Mapping and Evaluation in North-East Wales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S. A.; Degg, M.

    2009-04-01

    Slope instability is a significant environmental hazard in North-East Wales, responsible for important damage to roads and built-up areas. During the late 1980s and the 1990s, systematic landslide mapping and hazard modelling was completed for a number of landslide prone areas within Great Britain, but no such study has to date been carried out for North Wales. This research reports on the creation of a digital landslide inventory for North-East Wales and the use of a Geographical Information System (GIS) to create the first landslide susceptibility models for the area. The research has resulted in the most comprehensive landslide inventory of North-East Wales completed to date. This was accomplished through a combination of aerial photograph interpretation, field mapping and data collection from secondary sources (e.g. consultancy reports, newspapers), yielding a database that records 430 landslides for the area. This represents a 76% (186 landslides) increase on the number of landslides recorded for the area in the UK national landslides database. The landslides in North-East Wales are almost entirely situated inland, with less than 1% on the coast. Approximately 84% of the landslides occur within drift geology and 16% in solid geology. For the slides of known type, 46% are translational slides, 47% rotational slides, 3% flows, 3% falls and 1% complex failures. The type and distribution of landsliding in the area shows notable differences to that found in areas of similar bedrock geology elsewhere in the UK (e.g. Derbyshire and South Wales). Analysis shows that the main landslide controlling parameters in North-East Wales are: lithology, drift material, slope angle, proximity to known faults (structural weaknesses) and proximity to fluvial channels (undercutting). These factors were weighted statistically based on their estimated contribution to slope instability, and combined to create the landslide susceptibility models using a statistical (multiple logistic

  1. Proceedings of International Symposium on Energy Co-operation in North East Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-06-01

    This proceedings are for the International Symposium on Energy Co-operation in North-East Asia, organized by Korea Energy Economics Institute, Institute of Energy Economics, Japan, and United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, held on June 2001 at Sheraton Walker Hill Hotel in Seoul, Korea. The major themes discussed are following: 1.Energy Profile, Outlook and Perspectives on Regional Co-operation in Northeast Asia 2.Future Challenges in the Energy Sector in Northeast Asia 3.Perspectives of Energy Co-operation in Northeast Asia.

  2. Meiofaunal distribution across the oxygen minimum zone of continental margin, North East Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ansari, Z.A.; Badesab, S.; Singh, R.; Kitazato, H.

    of Marine Science, 2017, Vol.7, No.7, 59-66 http://ijms.biopublisher.ca 60 pattern metazoan meiofauna of the OMZ area in the north east Arabian Sea, the west coast of India. The data generated are based on samples collected from a submersible robotic... samples by using the robotic arms. The samples for metazoan meiofauna were collected using the push core device. Only one set of samples were made available due to limited number of samples. The cores collected were then sectioned onboard at an interval...

  3. Essential Oil Constituents of the Iranian Yarrow Growing Wild in North-East of Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suleiman Afsharypuor

    1995-08-01

    Full Text Available Essential oil constituents of the dried aerial parts of yarrow (Achiiiea millefolium L. ssp. millefolium growing wild in Emamzadeh Aii (Haraz road, north-east of Tehran-lranwere studied by TLC , GC,and GC/MS methods. Twelve volatile constituents were identified. The oil consisted mainly of monoterpenes (72.04%.1,8-Cineole (14.25% was the dominant component of the oil, while, 4-terpineol (11.71 %, pulegone (8.57 %, borneol (8.21 %,"n-terpineol (8.21 %, and camphor (5.35 % were the other main constituents of the oil.

  4. Ethnomyocological data from Siberia and North-East Asia on the effect of Amanita muscaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saar, M

    1991-02-01

    The paper includes literary data on the use of Amanita muscaria in Siberia and North-East Asia as well as information collected from ethnographers investigating these areas during the past decades. A survey is given on the cases and rules of Amanita muscaria consumption and the ways of its administration. The peoples having the tradition of Amanita muscaria consumption were aware of its different psychotrophic qualities and were able to use for several purposes. The fungus has been used by them as a psychostimulant having a simultaneous effect on several psychic functions.

  5. Mapping Glauconite Unites with Using Remote Sensing Techniques in North East of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadirouhani, R.; Samiee, S.

    2014-10-01

    Glauconite is a greenish ferric-iron silicate mineral with micaceous structure, characteristically formed in shallow marine environments. Glauconite has been used as a pigmentation agent for oil paint, contaminants remover in environmental studies and a source of potassium in plant fertilizers, and other industries. Koppeh-dagh basin is extended in Iran, Afghanistan and Turkmenistan countries and Glauconite units exist in this basin. In this research for enhancing and mapping glauconitic units in Koppeh-dagh structural zone in north east of Iran, remote sensing techniques such as Spectral Angle Mapper classification (SAM), band ratio and band composition methods on SPOT, ASTER and Landsat data in 3 steps were applied.

  6. The identity of the North East of England has been shaped by the rocks beneath our feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Deborah

    2017-04-01

    Geology and Geography students within England learn about the earth's processes and human processes, however it is not always easy for them to see the link between them and to their own lives. The changes to the specification within A-level Geography has seen an emphasis on how processes are linked to their own lives and the local area. I am fortunate to teach both Geography and Geology and I want my students who study both subjects to appreciate the links within the subjects. I also want them to appreciate the local geology and see how it has shaped the North East of England. I have therefore, created a series of lessons to help them to explore the local geology and place identity of the North East of England. To help them to develop an understanding of how the local geology influences place identity. I have used an enquiry based approach which uses the KWL chart and a concept map for students to demonstrate their understanding. These lessons are structured using the learning cycle. The lessons are differentiated through the use of cheat sheets, different levels of hand-outs and grouping of students. The learning objectives are:- 1. Describe the Geology of the North East of England. 2. Explain at least one process which has formed local geology. 3. Define place identity. 4. Discuss the North East of England's identity. 5. Discuss how the local Geology has influenced the North East of England's identity. The North East of England's geology mainly consists of coal and limestone. There is rich industrial heritage of the North East which is based around coal mining. Therefore, coal mining has had a great impact on the identity of the North East of England. There are also a number of different SSSIs which is due to the Magnesium limestone in the area, which has helped to shape the identity of the region. There are a number of areas of outstanding natural beauty due to the local geology and this has helped to create a positive identity for the North East of England.

  7. Distribution, abundance and habitat use of deep diving cetaceans in the North-East Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogan, Emer; Cañadas, Ana; Macleod, Kelly; Santos, M. Begoña; Mikkelsen, Bjarni; Uriarte, Ainhize; Van Canneyt, Olivier; Vázquez, José Antonio; Hammond, Philip S.

    2017-07-01

    In spite of their oceanic habitat, deep diving cetacean species have been found to be affected by anthropogenic activities, with potential population impacts of high intensity sounds generated by naval research and oil prospecting receiving the most attention. Improving the knowledge of the distribution and abundance of this poorly known group is an essential prerequisite to inform mitigation strategies seeking to minimize their spatial and temporal overlap with human activities. We provide for the first time abundance estimates for five deep diving cetacean species (sperm whale, long-finned pilot whale, northern bottlenose whale, Cuvier's beaked whale and Sowerby's beaked whale) using data from three dedicated cetacean sighting surveys that covered the oceanic and shelf waters of the North-East Atlantic. Density surface modelling was used to obtain model-based estimates of abundance and to explore the physical and biological characteristics of the habitat used by these species. Distribution of all species was found to be significantly related to depth, distance from the 2000m depth contour, the contour index (a measure of variability in the seabed) and sea surface temperature. Predicted distribution maps also suggest that there is little spatial overlap between these species. Our results represent the best abundance estimates for deep-diving whales in the North-East Atlantic, predict areas of high density during summer and constitute important baseline information to guide future risk assessments of human activities on these species, evaluate potential spatial and temporal trends and inform EU Directives and future conservation efforts.

  8. MULTI-SECTORIAL IMPACTS OF ATMOSPHERIC EXTREME EVENTS AND CLIMATE CHANGE IN NORTH-EAST HUNGARY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. MIKA

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to comprehend possible impacts of the atmospheric extreme events and of the expected climate change in three different spatial levels. They are first collected at the national level, i.e. all impacts are included in matrices, where the rows are the extremities in the first aspect and the regional climate change in the second aspect. The columns are the impacts on the natural resources, i.e. on hydrology & water management, on natural ecosystems and on agriculture & food supply, as well, as on the human dimensions, i.e. on urban settlements, on energy and transportation and on human health, in both aspects. The impacts most relevant in the two other levels, i.e. North-East Hungary and the Bükk-Miskolc microregion are also unequivocally indicated in the matrices. Importance of the impacts is preliminarily illustrated by quantitative information on the extremes, the changes and some impacts already happened at the selected space scales. The paper is closing by the related adaptation measures in North-East Hungary.

  9. Reproductive efficiency of Thoroughbred and Standardbred horses in north-east Victoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, L C; Anderson, G A; McKinnon, A O

    2010-05-01

    To evaluate the reproductive efficiency of horse farms in north-east Victoria and identify aspects of management to be targeted for improving reproductive efficiency. Retrospective study. Records from seven Thoroughbred (TB) and four Standardbred (STB) studs in north-east Victoria from 1990 to 2001 were reviewed; 8813 cycles in 4455 mares were analysed. TB mares were inseminated by natural mating, whereas STB mares (89%) were artificially inseminated. The overall early pregnancy rate per cycle was 68.8% for TB mares and for STB mares, 68.3%. Multiple pregnancy per cycle was more frequent in TB (8.3%) than in STB (4.6%) mares (P reproductive status within the TB than the STB mares. Pregnancy rate per cycle among stallions ranged from 48% to 79%. On-farm pregnancy rates in both breeds were higher than previously reported and likely reflect improvements in reproductive management. The disparity between breeds in the inseminations per cycle and proportion of barren mares exposed the differing structures of the two industries, and presents a target for improving the reproductive efficiency in STBs. The difference between breeds in the multiple pregnancy rate per cycle likely reflects the higher ovulation rate of TB mares. The variability in pregnancy rate per cycle between the 22 stallions was associated with differences in individual inherent fertility and the quality of stallion management.

  10. The Tourism Development Strategy of the North-East Region of Romania. Myth or Reality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GEORGE GAMAN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Tourism development strategies play an increasingly important role, representing parts of those documents that aim to socio-economic development, undertaken at local, zonal, county, regional or national level. Frequently, tourism is viewed as one the best solutions for economic recovery, but without a detalied and realistic analysis of what territory offers from this point of view, this new trend for resolving the economic dysfunctions remains at a mirage level. The North-East Region of Romania, the fifth less developed region of the European Union, with a GDP per capita (in purchasing power standard that amounted to only 34% of the EU-28 average in 2013, rushes to come with a development strategy for tourism, relying on “relief and environmental factors, diversity and beauty of landscape, cultural heritage”, strengthening the specific offers relying especially on mountain, cultural, and religious tourism. The present study uses multiple research methods (quantitative and qualitative analysis, graphical and cartographical representation of data, comparison in order to establish the reliability of the concerned document and to provide solid arguments for the type of tourism that has the largest premises of affirmation in each county of the North-East Region of Romania.

  11. Humic substances elemental composition of selected taiga and tundra soils from Russian European North-East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lodygin Evgeny

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Soils of Russian European North were investigated in terms of stability and quality of organic matter as well as in terms of soils organic matter elemental composi­tion. Therefore, soil humic acids (HAs, extracted from soils of different natural zones of Russian North-East were studied to characterize the degree of soil organic matter stabilization along a zonal gradient. HAs were extracted from soil of different zonal environments of the Komi Republic: south, middle and north taiga as well as south tundra. Data on elemental composition of humic acids and fulvic acids (FAs extracted from different soil types were obtained to assess humus formation mechanisms in the soils of taiga and tundra of the European North-East of Russia. The specificity of HAs elemental composition are discussed in relation to environmental conditions. The higher moisture degree of taiga soils results in the higher H/C ratio in humic substances. This reflects the reduced microbiologic activity in Albeluvisols sods and subsequent conser­vation of carbohydrate and amino acid fragments in HAs. HAs of tundra soils, shows the H/C values decreasing within the depth of the soils, which reflects increasing of aromatic compounds in HA structure of mineral soil horizons. FAs were more oxidized and contains less carbon while compared with the HAs. Humic acids, extracted from soil of different polar and boreal environments differ in terms of elemental composition winch reflects the climatic and hydrological regimes of humification.

  12. Acute Rheumatic Fever in the North East of Iran: A Study of 80 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Talebi

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: To evaluate the frequency, clinical presentation and cardiac involvement of children with RF in the North-East of Iran. Methods: A case series analysis was conducted on 80 patients with acute rheumatic fever (ARF, who were hospitalized at Ghaem hospital in Mashad between 1994 and 2000, were studied. Laboratory tests and results from echocardiographic examinations, and clinical findings were analyzed. All patients received standard care for children with ARF. The X2 test was used for comparison of binary data. Results: When compared to similar studies from developed countries, our study demonstrates a decreased frequency of RF in North-East Iran over the past few years. However, it is still a major health problem and the most common cause of acquired heart disease in childhood. The distribution of the major modified Jones criteria in our study is slightly different from that described in the literature, with a higher incidence of carditis. Conclusion: It appears that carditis is endemic in this region. Considering the high morbidity and complications involved in this disease, there is an immediate need for effective preventive programs for the initiating cause streptococcal infections, especially since it is treatable.

  13. Action research to strengthen women weavers' self-care in North-East Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilvarangkul, Kessarawan; Srithongchai, Niramol; Saensom, Donwiwat; Smith, John F; Supornpan, Ausa; Tumnong, Chuanpit

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this research was to improve self-care and work safety practices among women weavers in North-East Thailand. Action research was used with a sample of 107 weavers and 15 community and local government stakeholders from six rural villages. Formative and summative evaluation was carried out over 10 months following initial implementation of five action plans, and after 5 years. Qualitative data were collected via focus groups, formal and informal interviews and research field notes. Women's self-care issues and safety problems, and weaving-related environmental pollution emerged from the content analyses. Five action plans were created. Results showed that through action research the women were empowered to identify personal and work-related health issues, environmental contamination concerns, and lack of social and community support systems. Over time they developed capacity for working collectively to address these. Five year follow-up revealed many of the changes made were ongoing, and well-integrated into community life. The study reaffirmed the potential for public health or community nurses and other health personnel for enhancing community health status via action research with vulnerable populations; in this case, rural village women weavers in North-East Thailand. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. My first time: initiation into injecting drug use in Manipur and Nagaland, north-east India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langkham Biangtung

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The north-east Indian states of Manipur and Nagaland are two of the six high HIV prevalence states in the country, and the main route of HIV transmission is injecting drug use. Understanding the pathways to injecting drug use can facilitate early intervention with HIV prevention programs. While several studies of initiation into injecting drug use have been conducted in developed countries, little is known about the situation in developing country settings. The aim of this study was to increase understanding of the contextual factors associated with initiation into injecting drug use in north-east India, and the influence of these factors on subsequent initiation of others. Method In mid 2006 a cross-sectional survey among 200 injecting drug users (IDUs was undertaken in partnership with local NGOs that provide HIV prevention and care services and advocacy for IDUs in Imphal, Manipur and Dimapur, Nagaland. The questionnaire elicited detailed information about the circumstances of the first injection and the contexts of participants' lives. Demographic information, self-reported HIV status, and details about initiation of others were also recorded. Results Initiation into injecting drug use occurred at 20 years of age. The drugs most commonly injected were Spasmo-proxyvon (65.5% and heroin (30.5%. In 53.5% cases, a needle belonging to someone else was used. Two-thirds (66.7% had used the drug previously, and 91.0% had known other IDUs prior to initiation (mean = 7.5 others. The first injection was usually administered by another person (94.5%, mostly a friend (84.1%. Initiation is a social event; 98% had others present (mean = 2.7 others. Almost 70% of participants had initiated at least one other (mean = 5 others. Initiation of others was independently associated with being male and unemployed; having IDU friends and using alcohol around the time of initiation; and having been taught to inject and not paid for the drug at the

  15. A millennium of north-east Atlantic cod juvenile growth trajectories inferred from archaeological otoliths.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guðbjörg Ásta Ólafsdóttir

    Full Text Available Archaeological excavations of historical fishing sites across the North Atlantic have recovered high quantities of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua bones. In the current study we use Atlantic cod otoliths from archaeological excavations of a historical fishing sites in north-west Iceland, dated to AD 970 -AD 1910 to examine historical growth trajectories of cod. No large scale growth variations or shifts in growth patterns were observed in the current chronologies, supporting the stability of historical Atlantic cod growth trajectories. The most significant variation in growth patterns was consistent with those that have been observed in recent times, for example, reduced early juvenile growth during periods of colder ocean temperature. The current results represent a high resolution chronological record of north-east Atlantic cod growth, greatly increasing the prior temporal range of such data, thereby providing a valuable baseline for a broad range of studies on Atlantic cod growth.

  16. Air quality management on the areas of North-East Estonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liblik, V.; Kundel, H.; Raetsep, A. [Estonian Academy of Sciences, Tallinn (Estonia). North-East Estonian Dept.

    1995-12-31

    Most biggest polluters of atmospheric air among Estonian enterprises are located in the north-eastern part of republic. Volatile gases, vapours and fly ash from thermal power plants, chemical and other industries form a considerable aerotechnogenic load upon landscapes and dwelling regions, reaching also the areas of Gulf of Finland, and even the neighbouring states. Complicated pollution situation needs serious attention and systematic air quality control, assessing, forecasting and management, which is now organized on local, regional and state levels. It is well-known that for studies of various pollution situations the atmospheric dispersion models will be used. This present article deals with the special imitation system for maintenance of information about polluters and air contamination state in North-East (NE) Estonia, also for estimation of pollutants spreading and overground concentration fields by computer-based modelling. The system consists of regional Data Banks, imitation model for calculation of pollutants dispersion, common and application programs. (author)

  17. Large-scale hydrological modelling in the semi-arid north-east of Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guentner, A.

    2002-09-01

    Semi-arid areas are characterized by small water resources. An increasing water demand due to population growth and economic development as well as a possible decreasing water availability in the course of climate change may aggravate water scarcity in future in these areas. The quantitative assessment of the water resources is a prerequisite for the development of sustainable measures of water management. For this task, hydrological models within a dynamic integrated framework are indispensable tools. The main objective of this study is to develop a hydrological model for the quantification of water availability over a large geographic domain of semi-arid environments. The study area is the Federal State of Ceara in the semi-arid north-east of Brazil. Surface water from reservoirs provides the largest part of water supply. The area has recurrently been affected by droughts which caused serious economic losses and social impacts like migration from the rural regions. (orig.)

  18. THE TERRITORIAL DISTRIBUTION OF STRUCTURAL FUNDS IN THE NORTH-EAST REGION OF ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Alexandru MOROŞAN

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stimulating economic growth is one of the key issues of economic sciences. The European Union has developed several policies and has allocated a considerable budget to reduce economic disparities among its members. The states that joined the EU in 2004 and 2007 undertake extensive efforts to align their economy with the community level. But a new problem arises, there is a risk that more economically developed areas absorb more funds that less developed ones, and thus amplifying the disparities within the region. This paper shows that this problem is found in the North-East Region of Romania, and as a consequence additional problems appear, that affect the sustainable economic development.

  19. NORTH-EAST REGION - SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT INDICATORS FORECAST 2014-2022

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania NISTOR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims to forecast the evolution of the main sustainable development indicators for the North-Eastern region of Romania in accordance with their trends from the 2000-2013 and 2007-2013 periods. Our purpose was to compare and complete the result indicators of the Regional Development Strategy of the North-East Region for 2014-2020 and to improve, in this way, the monitoring process in the future. With this objective in mind, we concentrate our quantitative analysis on the main sustainable indicators which can be correlated with the strategic objectives. The results revealed that many indicators are over-dimensioned and that many sustainable indicators are not included in the monitoring process

  20. A millennium of north-east Atlantic cod juvenile growth trajectories inferred from archaeological otoliths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ólafsdóttir, Guðbjörg Ásta; Pétursdóttir, Gróa; Bárðarson, Hlynur; Edvardsson, Ragnar

    2017-01-01

    Archaeological excavations of historical fishing sites across the North Atlantic have recovered high quantities of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) bones. In the current study we use Atlantic cod otoliths from archaeological excavations of a historical fishing sites in north-west Iceland, dated to AD 970 -AD 1910 to examine historical growth trajectories of cod. No large scale growth variations or shifts in growth patterns were observed in the current chronologies, supporting the stability of historical Atlantic cod growth trajectories. The most significant variation in growth patterns was consistent with those that have been observed in recent times, for example, reduced early juvenile growth during periods of colder ocean temperature. The current results represent a high resolution chronological record of north-east Atlantic cod growth, greatly increasing the prior temporal range of such data, thereby providing a valuable baseline for a broad range of studies on Atlantic cod growth.

  1. [Parasitic Crustacea of fishes from the north-east Atlantic Ocean].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaevskaja, A V

    1991-01-01

    Fish from the north-east Atlantic, including neighbouring aquens are host of 3 species of Branchiura, 163 Copepoda, 37 Isopoda, 2 Amphipoda, and 1 of parasitic Cirripedia. Chondrichthyes have more species of parasitic crustaceans than Osteichthyes. Many specific parasites of Osteichthyes and the facultative parasites of fish include species of crustaceans to fish of both classes. 165 species of parasitic crustaceans are found in benthic and near-benthic fish, and 55 in pelagic fish. The greatest variety of species parasitic crustaceans is found in fishes in the North Sea (139); it is much smaller in the Baltic Sea (15). Endemic species constitute 15% of the total number of parasitic crustacean. The irregular distribution of parasitic crustaceans is among others connected with the biology and ecology of both hosts and their parasites.

  2. MAPPING GLAUCONITE UNITES WITH USING REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES IN NORTH EAST OF IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ahmadirouhani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Glauconite is a greenish ferric-iron silicate mineral with micaceous structure, characteristically formed in shallow marine environments. Glauconite has been used as a pigmentation agent for oil paint, contaminants remover in environmental studies and a source of potassium in plant fertilizers, and other industries. Koppeh-dagh basin is extended in Iran, Afghanistan and Turkmenistan countries and Glauconite units exist in this basin. In this research for enhancing and mapping glauconitic units in Koppeh-dagh structural zone in north east of Iran, remote sensing techniques such as Spectral Angle Mapper classification (SAM, band ratio and band composition methods on SPOT, ASTER and Landsat data in 3 steps were applied.

  3. Human activities on the deep seafloor in the North East Atlantic: an assessment of spatial extent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela R Benn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Environmental impacts of human activities on the deep seafloor are of increasing concern. While activities within waters shallower than 200 m have been the focus of previous assessments of anthropogenic impacts, no study has quantified the extent of individual activities or determined the relative severity of each type of impact in the deep sea. METHODOLOGY: The OSPAR maritime area of the North East Atlantic was chosen for the study because it is considered to be one of the most heavily impacted by human activities. In addition, it was assumed data would be accessible and comprehensive. Using the available data we map and estimate the spatial extent of five major human activities in the North East Atlantic that impact the deep seafloor: submarine communication cables, marine scientific research, oil and gas industry, bottom trawling and the historical dumping of radioactive waste, munitions and chemical weapons. It was not possible to map military activities. The extent of each activity has been quantified for a single year, 2005. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human activities on the deep seafloor of the OSPAR area of the North Atlantic are significant but their footprints vary. Some activities have an immediate impact after which seafloor communities could re-establish, while others can continue to make an impact for many years and the impact could extend far beyond the physical disturbance. The spatial extent of waste disposal, telecommunication cables, the hydrocarbon industry and marine research activities is relatively small. The extent of bottom trawling is very significant and, even on the lowest possible estimates, is an order of magnitude greater than the total extent of all the other activities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: To meet future ecosystem-based management and governance objectives for the deep sea significant improvements are required in data collection and availability as well as a greater awareness of the relative impact of

  4. Modeling concentrations and fluxes of atmospheric CO2 in the North East Atlantic region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geels, C.; Christensen, J.H.; Hansen, A.W.

    2001-01-01

    As part of the Danish NEAREX project a three-dimensional Eulerian hemispheric air pollution model is used to study the transport and concentrations of atmospheric CO2 in the North East Atlantic region. The model domain covers the major part of the Northern Hemisphere and currently the model inclu...

  5. e-Agriculture Prototype for Knowledge Facilitation among Tribal Farmers of North-East India: Innovations, Impact and Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Saravanan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This case study deals with the implementation methodology, innovations and lessons of the ICT initiative in providing agricultural extension services to the rural tribal farming community of North-East India. Methodology: This study documents the ICT project implementation challenges, impact among farmers and briefly indicates lessons of…

  6. 2011 U.S. Geological Survey Topographic LiDAR: LiDAR for the North East

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — USGS Contract: G10PC00026, Task Order Number: G10PD02143 Task Order Numbers: G10PD01027 (ARRA) and G10PD02143 (non-ARRA) The LiDAR for the North East Project, funded...

  7. Consumer interest in social sustainability issues of whitefish from capture fisheries in the north-east Atlantic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuizen, Linda J.L.; Lans, van der Ivo A.; Berentsen, Paul B.M.; Boer, de Imke J.M.; Bokkers, Eddy

    2017-01-01

    Capture fisheries in the north-east Atlantic account for approximately 10% of all fish consumed from capture fisheries globally. The literature shows that consumers show considerable interest in social sustainability of products in general and of fish specifically. This interest, however, has not

  8. Modelled spatial and seasonal distribution of Blue Whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) larvae in the North-East Atlantic (1951 to 2005)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou, http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=126439) is a small mesopelagic planktivorous gadoid found throughout the North-East Atlantic. This data contains the results of a model-based analysis of larvae captured by the Continuous Plankton...

  9. Temporal fluctuation in North East Baltic Sea region cattle population revealed by mitochondrial and Y-chromosomal DNA analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Niemi

    Full Text Available Ancient DNA analysis offers a way to detect changes in populations over time. To date, most studies of ancient cattle have focused on their domestication in prehistory, while only a limited number of studies have analysed later periods. Conversely, the genetic structure of modern cattle populations is well known given the undertaking of several molecular and population genetic studies.Bones and teeth from ancient cattle populations from the North-East Baltic Sea region dated to the Prehistoric (Late Bronze and Iron Age, 5 samples, Medieval (14, and Post-Medieval (26 periods were investigated by sequencing 667 base pairs (bp from the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA and 155 bp of intron 19 in the Y-chromosomal UTY gene. Comparison of maternal (mtDNA haplotypes genetic diversity in ancient cattle (45 samples with modern cattle populations in Europe and Asia (2094 samples revealed 30 ancient mtDNA haplotypes, 24 of which were shared with modern breeds, while 6 were unique to the ancient samples. Of seven Y-chromosomal sequences determined from ancient samples, six were Y2 and one Y1 haplotype. Combined data including Swedish samples from the same periods (64 samples was compared with the occurrence of Y-chromosomal haplotypes in modern cattle (1614 samples.The diversity of haplogroups was highest in the Prehistoric samples, where many haplotypes were unique. The Medieval and Post-Medieval samples also show a high diversity with new haplotypes. Some of these haplotypes have become frequent in modern breeds in the Nordic Countries and North-Western Russia while other haplotypes have remained in only a few local breeds or seem to have been lost. A temporal shift in Y-chromosomal haplotypes from Y2 to Y1 was detected that corresponds with the appearance of new mtDNA haplotypes in the Medieval and Post-Medieval period. This suggests a replacement of the Prehistoric mtDNA and Y chromosomal haplotypes by new types of cattle.

  10. The Jurassic of North-East Greenland: A new Middle–Upper Jurassic succession on Hold with Hope, North-East Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vosgerau, Henrik

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available A succession of marine, Jurassic sediments was recently discovered on Hold with Hope, North-East Greenland. The discovery shows that the area was covered by the sea during Middle–Late Jurassic transgressive events and thus adds to the understanding of the palaeogeography of the area. The Jurassic succession on northern Hold with Hope is exposed in the hangingwalls of small fault blocks formed by rifting in Late Jurassic – Early Cretaceous times. It unconformably overlies Lower Triassic siltstones and sandstones and is overlain by Lower Cretaceous coarsegrained sandstones with an angular unconformity. The succession is up to 360 m thick andincludes sandstones of the Lower–Upper Callovian Pelion and Middle–Upper Oxfordian Payer Dal Formations (Vardekløft Group and heteroliths and mudstones of the Upper Oxfordian – Lower Kimmeridgian Bernbjerg Formation (Hall Bredning Group. The Pelion Formation includes the new Spath Plateau Member (defined herein.The palaeogeographic setting was a narrow rift-controlled embayment along the western margin of the rifted Jurassic seaway between Greenland and Norway. It was open to marine circulation to the south as indicated by the distribution and lateral facies variations and a dominant south-westwards marine palaeocurrent direction. The Pelion and Payer Dal Formations represent upper shoreface and tidally influenced delta deposits formed by the migration of dunes in distributary channels and mouthbars over the delta front. The boundary between the two formations is unconformable and represents a Late Callovian – Middle Oxfordian hiatus. It is interpreted to have formed by subaerial erosion related to a sea-level fall combined with minor tilting of fault blocks and erosion of uplifted block crests.In Late Jurassic time, the sand-rich depositional systems of the Pelion and Payer Dal Formations drowned and offshore transition – lower shoreface heteroliths and offshore mudstones of the Bernbjerg

  11. Probabilistic tsunami hazard in the North East Atlantic due to seismic sources, implications for NEAMTWS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omira, R.; Baptista, M.; Matias, L. M.; Miranda, J. M.; Carrilho, F.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, several studies on tsunami hazard assessment for the North East Atlantic coasts have been published. These studies use deterministic approach based upon the most credible earthquake scenario and/or the worst case scenario to derive tsunami coastal hazard in terms of wave elevation and inundation maps. In this work, we present the first thorough study on probabilistic tsunami hazard assessment due to earthquake sources for the North East Atlantic area. We consider three main seismogenic areas: the Gulf of Cadiz, the Gloria Fault and the Caribbean arc. For each seismogenic zone we derive the annual recurrence rate for each magnitude range, starting from Mw7.5 to Mw9.0, using the Bayesian method that incorporates seismic information from historical catalog and instrumental periods. A numerical code, solving the linear shallow water equations is employed to simulate the tsunami propagation and compute near shore wave heights along the entire NE Atlantic coast and at the forecast points of the NEAMTWS. To establish, for multiple sources, the joint probability that wave height exceeds a particular value for a given time period, we consider that the sources are independent (like in the Poison distribution). This process allows calculating the time-independent probability that wave height, simulated by numerical code, will be exceeded due to the occurrence of a tsunami source with a known average rate, derived from sources' recurrence assessment, during a period of time. The results are presented in terms of the probability of exceedance of a given tsunami amplitude for 100, 500 and 1000 years, and hazard curves for selected forecast points of the NEAMTWS countries. The level of hazard varies along the coast being maximum along the northern segment of the Morocco Atlantic coast, the southern Portuguese coast and the Spanish coast of the Gulf of Cadiz. The results show that the probability of a tsunami wave exceeding 1 m in the next 500 years reaches 100% in some

  12. Above ground standing biomass and carbon storage in village bamboos in North East India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jyoti Nath, Arun; Das, Ashesh Kumar [Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Assam University, Silchar 788011, Assam (India); Das, Gitasree [Department of Statistics, North Eastern Hill University, Shillong 793022, Meghalaya (India)

    2009-09-15

    Bamboo forms an important component in the traditional landscape of North East India. For biomass estimation of village bamboos of Barak Valley, North East India, allometric relationships were developed by harvest method describing leaf, branch and culm biomass with DBH as an independent variable using a log linear model. The culm density of the stand was 8950 culms ha{sup -1} during 2005 of which 67% of growing stock was represented by Bambusa cacharensis, 17.88% by Bambusa vulgaris and 15.12% by Bambusa balcooa. Above ground stand biomass was 121.51 t ha{sup -1} of which 86% was contributed by culm component followed by branch (10%) and leaf (4%). With respect to species, B. cacharensis made up to 46% of total stand biomass followed by B. vulgaris (28%) and B. balcooa (26%). Carbon storage in the above ground biomass was 61.05 t ha{sup -1}. Allocation of C was more in culm components (53.05 t ha{sup -1}) than in branch (5.81 t ha{sup -1}) and leaf (2.19 t ha{sup -1}). Carbon storage in the litter floor mass was 2.40 t ha{sup -1}, of which leaf litter made up the highest amount (1.37 t ha{sup -1}) followed by sheath (0.86 t ha{sup -1}) and branch (0.17 t ha{sup -1}). Carbon stock in the soil up to 30 cm depth was 57.3 t ha{sup -1}. Gross C stock in the plantation was estimated to be 120.75 t ha{sup -1}. Carbon storage estimated in the bamboo stand of present study offers insights into the opportunity of village bamboos in the rural landscape for carbon storage through carbon sequestration. Management and utilization of village bamboos as a potential source of carbon sink by smallholder farmers are discussed in the context of their livelihood security and the Millennium Development Goals of the United Nations. (author)

  13. An outbreak of an unusual strain of Listeria monocytogenes infection in North-East Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okpo, Emmanuel; Leith, Jayne; Smith-Palmer, Alison; Bell, John; Parks, Duncan; Browning, Fiona; Byers, Lynn; Corrigan, Helen; Webster, Diana; Karcher, Anne M; Murray, Andrew; Storey, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes infection is an important cause of illness and hospitalization in vulnerable individuals. In the present study, we describe a community outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes in the North-East region of Scotland, which was epidemiologically, environmentally and microbiologically linked to a local meat product and ready-to-eat product manufacturer. Infected individuals were interviewed, and an environmental investigation was conducted. Clinical and environmental samples were tested by culture, and isolates were typed by fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (fAFLP). Three cases of Listeria monocytogenes were linked geographically, had the same serotype (1/2a) and were indistinguishable by fAFLP type XII.6. The human, food and environmental isolates were of the same serotype and were indistinguishable by molecular typing. This is the first community outbreak of L. monocytogenes reported in Scotland since the current outbreak surveillance was established in 1996. Epidemiological and laboratory evidence indicated poor hand hygiene, unhygienic practices and cross-contamination throughout the manufacturing process of ready-to-eat foods as a possible cause of the outbreak. More stringent control of commercial food establishments that provide ready-to-eat food and the need to advise specifically vulnerable groups, e.g., pregnant women, of the risk of L. monocytogenes in ready-to-eat food is urgently needed. Copyright © 2015 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. In vitro regeneration of Drosera burmannii Vahl.: a carnivorous plant of north-east India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanthan, J Sureni; Kehie, Mechuselie; Kumaria, Suman; Tandon, Pramod

    2017-06-01

    An efficient in vitro regeneration protocol has been developed from shoot tips of Drosera burmannii Vahl., a carnivorous plant of north-east India. Various plant growth regulators were used to study their efficacy in the induction of multiple shoots and roots. Of the various treatments, the maximum number of shoots (28.8 ± 1.5) and roots (9.7 ± 0.6) was observed in one-fourth strength standard medium (MS with 50 mg/l citric acid and 10 mg/l ascorbic acid) supplemented with 4 mg/l 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) and 4 mg/l α-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) followed by 26.8 ± 1.4 shoots in one-fourth strength SM fortified with 4 mg/l kinetin (KN) and 4 mg/l NAA. The well-developed plantlets with shoots and roots were potted in small plastic glasses filled with a mixture of sand and farmyard manure (3:1); these plantlets when transferred to a glasshouse for hardening and acclimatization showed 90% survival.

  15. Regional-Scale Ozone Deposition to North-East Atlantic Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Coleman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A regional climate model is used to evaluate dry deposition of ozone over the North East Atlantic. Results are presented for a deposition scheme accounting for turbulent and chemical enhancement of oceanic ozone deposition and a second non-chemical, parameterised gaseous dry deposition scheme. The first deposition scheme was constrained to account for sea-surface ozone-iodide reactions and the sensitivity of modelled ozone concentrations to oceanic iodide concentration was investigated. Simulations were also performed using nominal reaction rate derived from in-situ ozone deposition measurements and using a preliminary representation of organic chemistry. Results show insensitivity of ambient ozone concentrations modelled by the chemical-enhanced scheme to oceanic iodide concentrations, and iodide reactions alone cannot account for observed deposition velocities. Consequently, we suggest a missing chemical sink due to reactions of ozone with organic matter at the air-sea interface. Ozone loss rates are estimated to be in the range of 0.5–6 ppb per day. A potentially significant ozone-driven flux of iodine to the atmosphere is estimated to be in the range of 2.5–500 M molec cm−2  s−1, leading to a mixing-layer enhancement of organo-iodine concentrations of 0.1–22.0 ppt, with an average increase in the N.E. Atlantic of around 4 ppt per day.

  16. Varied presentations of moyamoya disease in a tertiary care hospital of north-east India

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    Papori Borah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Moyamoya disease is a chronic progressive cerebrovascular disorder, characterized by stenosis or occlusion of bilateral internal carotid arteries (ICAs, anterior cerebral arteries (ACAs and middle cerebral arteries (MCAs, accompanied by a collateral network of vessels formed at the base of the brain. Ischemia and intracranial hemorrhage are the common typical manifestations. However moyamoya disease has been associated with atypical presentations like headache, seizures and involuntary movements. Although frequently reported from Asian countries like Japan, China and Korea, only few studies reported on clinical manifestations of moyamoya disease from India. Objectives: To study the varied presentations of moyamoya disease in a tertiary care hospital of north-east India. Material and Methods: Relevant investigations were done to rule out other causes of moyamoya syndrome. Results: We report 6 cases of moyamoya disease with varied presentations from a tertiary care referral government hospital. Case 1, 2 and 6 presented with alternating hemiparesis. Case 3 had amaurosis fugax. Case 4 had history suggestive of ischemic stroke and presented with hemichorea. Case 4 had focal seizure as the only manifestation. Cases 4 and 5 notably had stenosis of posterior cerebral artery (PCA in addition to stenosis of bilateral ICAs, ACAs and MCAs. Conclusion: Owing to its low incidence in India, moyamoya disease is easily overlooked as a possible diagnosis. However, because of its progressive nature, it is imperative to diagnose this disease early and offer surgical treatment to the patients.

  17. Access to intensive care units: a survey in North-East Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzoletti, Antonio Boscolo; Buja, Alessandra; Bortolusso, Valeria; Zampieron, Alessandra

    2008-12-01

    The factors associated with policies for allowing visitors into intensive care units (ICUs) are a debated issue in the nursing literature. The aim of this survey was to describe visiting policies in the ICUs of North-East Italy and to verify the hypothesis of an association between attitudes regarding accessibility to visitors and environmental, organisational or logistic variables. Data were collected by means of questionnaires sent by mail to head nurses of ICUs. The questionnaires were completed for 104 of the 110 ICUs contacted (94.5%). Visiting hours were generally less than 4h a day (86%) and only 14% of the ICUs reported imposing no restrictions. Children under 12 years old were rarely admitted (22%). Twenty-one percent of the ICUs reported always allowing exceptions, while 77% did so only under 'particular' circumstances. Visiting times were not associated with logistic and organisational factors, but rather with the type of ICU (p=0.000), city setting (p=0.009), exceptions to rules (p=0.029), allowing more than one person (p=0.016) and opening to children (p=0.001). Restrictive visiting policies emerged; paediatric units were generally more flexible. The association between the variables regarding visiting policy, such as visiting times and exceptions to rules, or allowing more than one person or children, seem to confirm how the rules are influenced mainly by the staff's attitude, which could be changed by continuing professional education.

  18. Nutrition and cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx in north-east Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschi, S; Bidoli, E; Barón, A E; Barra, S; Talamini, R; Serraino, D; La Vecchia, C

    1991-01-02

    The relation between dietary indicators and the risk of cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx was investigated in a case-control study conducted in Pordenone province, north-east Italy, on 302 cases (266 males and 36 females) and 699 controls admitted to hospital for acute, non-neoplastic and non-digestive disorders. Positive associations were observed, after allowing for occupation, smoking and drinking habits, with more frequent consumption of pasta or rice, polenta, cheese, eggs and pulses (odds ratios - ORs = 1.6, 2.1, 1.9, 1.9 and 2.0 for highest vs. lowest tertile), whereas reduced ORs emerged in subjects reporting more frequent consumption of carrots, fresh tomatoes and green peppers (ORs = 0.6, 0.5 and 0.5, respectively). Higher frequency of daily meals was also associated with a significantly elevated OR (1.7 for greater than or equal to 4 vs. less than or equal to 2 meals). The role of various indicator foods must be assessed in the context of the very high levels of alcohol consumption in the study area (greater than or equal to 8 alcoholic drinks/day in 2/3 cancer cases).

  19. The evolution of north-east Atlantic gadfly petrels using statistical phylogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangloff, B; Zino, F; Shirihai, H; González-Solís, J; Couloux, A; Pasquet, E; Bretagnolle, V

    2013-01-01

    Macaronesia (north-east Atlantic archipelagos) has been host to complex patterns of colonization and differentiation in many groups of organisms including seabirds such as gadfly petrels (genus Pterodroma). Considering the subspecies of widely distributed soft-plumaged petrel for many years, the taxonomic status of the three gadfly petrel taxa breeding in Macaronesia is not yet settled, some authors advocating the presence of three, two or one species. These birds have already been the subject of genetic studies with only one mtDNA gene and relatively modest sample sizes. In this study, using a total of five genes (two mitochondrial genes and three nuclear introns), we investigated the population and phylogeographical histories of petrel populations breeding on Madeira and Cape Verde archipelagos. Despite confirming complete lineage sorting with mtDNA, analyses with nucDNA failed to reveal any population structuring and Isolation with Migration analysis revealed the absence of gene flow during the differentiation process of these populations. It appears that the three populations diverged in the late Pleistocene in the last 150 000 years, that is 10 times more recently than previous estimates based solely on one mtDNA gene. Finally, our results suggest that the Madeira petrel population is ancestral rather than that from Cape Verde. This study strongly advocates the use of nuclear loci in addition to mtDNA in demographical and phylogeographical history studies. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. PHENOLIC PROFILE OF HONEYDEW HONEYS FROM THE NORTH-EAST PART OF ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea OROIAN

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the physicochemical (moisture content, pH, free acidity, electrical conductivity, colour (L*, a*, b*, chroma, hue angle, ash content, fructose and glucose content and to determine the phenolic profile (quercetin, apigenin, myricetin, isorhamnetin, kaempherol, caffeic acid, chrysin, galangin, luteolin, p-coumaric acid, gallic acid and pinocembrin of five samples of honeydew honeys from the North East part of Romania. The honey samples analysed respected the maximum allowable level of the moisture content, which is established by the European Union at 20%. The acidic nature of the honeydew is confirmed by the level of the pH and free acidity of the samples, and is influenced in principal by the organic acids; all the samples had a free acidity lower than 50 meq acid/kg. The honey colour is dark which is confirmed by the level of the CIE L*a*b* parameters (lower values of L*, a* and b*. The inverted sugar level (fructose and glucose content is higher than 60 g/ 100g, respecting the European Union directive. The phenolic profile of the honeydew samples do not presented one compound that can be considered a chemical marker, the major polyphenols presented into the honeydew honeys are quercetin and pinocembrin.

  1. Phytoplankton community of Lake Baskandi anua, Cachar District, Assam, North East India – An ecological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi M.B.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diversity, relative abundance and dominance of phytoplankton community of the Lake Baskandi anua, an oxbow lake of Assam, North east India were studied during December 2009 to November 2010. Chlorophyll content and biomass of phytoplankton along with physico-chemical properties of water of the lake were also estimated. The lake is covered with Hydrilla and other macrophytes like Eichhornia, Trapa, Altrnenthera, Polygonum, Ludwizia sp., etc. Seasonal fluctuations of 41 genera of phytoplankton, belonging to 5 groups (Chlorophyceae, Cyanobacteria, Bacillariophyceae, Euglenophyceae and Dinophyceae were encountered in the lake. Chlorophyceae was found to be highest in winter, Cyanobacteria and Euglena in monsoon and Bacillariophyceae in pre monsoon. According to Engelmann’s scale, Spirogyra indica was found eudominant followed by 10 dominant, 24 subdominant and 20 recedent species. Chlorophyll- a content of phytoplankton varied from 14.18 to 33.89 μg·L-1, during the study period. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA revealed significant seasonal variation in physico-chemical properties of water like Water temperature, pH, Conductivity, Dissolved oxygen, Free CO2, Total alkalinity, Calcium, Chloride, Nitrate and Ammonia. Relationship between phytoplankton group assemblage and environmental variables were explored by the ordination method CCA (Canonical Correspondence Analysis.

  2. Isolation and characterization of Bacillus thuringiensis strains native to Assam soil of North East India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabha, Mihir; Sharma, Shaswati; Acharjee, Sumita; Sarmah, Bidyut Kumar

    2017-10-01

    We have identified both crystalliferous and acrystalliferous Bt isolates from the Assam soil of North East India for the first time. A total of 301 Bacillus type colonies were selected based on their appearance and colony morphology. Out of these colonies, 42 isolates had characteristics similar to Bt isolates on MYP (Mannitol Egg Yolk Polymyxin) agar base medium. The ERIC-PCR and 16S rDNA analyses confirmed that 42 isolates are Bacillus thuringiensis. Phase contrast microscopy showed that 37 isolates produced crystal endospore during the sporulation phase and 5 acrystalliferous isolates were also found. Amplification of cry gene was carried out using general Cry primers along with one cry2 gene specific primer. Out of 42 isolates, 50% of the isolates showed presence of cry2 gene followed by cry9 (40.47) and cry1 (40.47). Moreover, 21.42% of isolates showed the presence of more than one cry genes. We also screened these isolates for the possibility of having new Bt genes using universal primer and found two strains having a new type of Cry1I gene with 82 and 85% similarities with the available Cry1I gene sequences. Thus, these new types of Bt gene could be useful for Bt-based bioformulations and generation of transgenic plants.

  3. New propolis type from north-east Brazil: chemical composition, antioxidant activity and botanical origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Joselena M; Fernandes-Silva, Caroline C; Salatino, Antonio; Negri, Giuseppina; Message, Dejair

    2017-08-01

    Propolis is a bee product with wide diversity of biological activity. It has a complex composition, which is dependent on its botanical source. The present study aimed to determine the chemical profile, antioxidant activity and botanical origin of two samples of a propolis type from two locations of the state of Rio Grande do Norte (RN, north-east Brazil). The standard chemical characteristics of the RN propolis are similar or superior to the internationally marketed Brazilian green propolis. RN propolis from two locations have high antioxidant activity, corresponding to 10% (municipality of Afonso Bezerra) and 13% (municipality of Alto do Rodrigues) of quercetin activity by the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl method and to 15% (both locations) by the β-carotene discoloration method. High-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD)-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry analyses revealed that most constituents of the RN propolis are flavonoids, mainly flavonols and chalcones. HPLC-DAD analysis of ethanol extracts revealed a great similarity between the chemical profile of RN propolis and shoot apices of 'jurema-preta' (Mimosa tenuiflora, Leguminosae, Mimosoideae). 'Jurema-preta' shoot apices are likely resin sources of RN propolis. The chemical characteristics and antioxidant property of RN propolis provide promising prospects for the introduction of this type of propolis into the apicultural market. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Socio-economic and demographic correlates of stunting among adolescents of Assam, North- east India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seb Rengma Melody

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of stunting (low height-for-age is a key indicator of long-term chronic undernutrition which reflects an anthropometric failure to reach linear growth potentials due to prolonged food deprivation and/or disease or illness during the early stage of life. The present study assesses the prevalence and socio-economic and demographic correlates of stunting among adolescents of the North-east India. This cross-sectional study was undertaken among 1,818 (830 boys; 988 girls adolescents (aged 10-18 years belonging to ethnically heterogeneous populations of Karbi Anglong district of Assam, using stratified random sampling method. Anthropometric measurements of height and weight were recorded using standard procedures. Socio-economic and demographic variables were obtained using pre-structured schedule. The age-sex specific L, M and S reference values were used to calculate height-for-age Z-score (HAZ. According to WHO, HAZ found to be 0.05. The binary logistic regression analysis showed that several socio-economic and demographic variables were significantly associated with stunting (p<0.05. The step-wise multiple logistic regression analysis showed that sex (boys, age groups (13-15 years and 16-18 years, father’s occupation (cultivator and Rupees ≤5000 household income was significantly associated with stunting (p<0.05. Appropriate nutritional intervention programmes and dissemination of knowledge at population level related to undernutrition are necessary to ameliorate their nutritional status.

  5. Informal care for stroke survivors: results from the North East Melbourne Stroke Incidence Study (NEMESIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, H M; Thrift, A G; Mihalopoulos, C; Carter, R; Macdonell, R A L; McNeil, J J; Donnan, G A

    2002-04-01

    Informal caregivers play an important role in the lives of stroke patients, but the cost of providing this care has not been estimated. The purpose of this study was to determine the nature and amount of informal care provided to stroke patients and to estimate the economic cost of that care. The primary caregivers of stroke patients registered in the North East Melbourne Stroke Incidence Study (NEMESIS) were interviewed at 3, 6, and 12 months after stroke, and the nature and amount of informal care provided were documented. The opportunity and replacement costs of informal care for all first-ever-in-a-lifetime strokes (excluding subarachnoid hemorrhages) that occurred in 1997 in Australia were estimated. Among 3-month stroke survivors, 74% required assistance with activities of daily living and received informal care from family or friends. Two thirds of primary caregivers were women, and most primary caregivers (>90%) provided care during family or leisure time. Total first-year caregiver time costs for all first-ever-in-a-lifetime strokes were estimated to be A$21.7 million (opportunity cost approach) or A$42.5 million (replacement cost approach), and the present values of lifetime caregiver time costs were estimated to be A$171.4 million (opportunity cost approach) or A$331.8 million (replacement cost approach). Informal care for stroke survivors represents a significant hidden cost to Australian society. Because our community is rapidly aging, this informal care burden may increase significantly in the future.

  6. Determinants of Occupational Injury in Kombolcha Textile Factory, North-East Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Yessuf Serkalem

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Textile factory is among the most common manufacturing industries that has higher rate of work-related injuries. Knowing the associated factors of work-related injuries can be a critical step for improving the working condition of workers in the sector. Objective: To assess the major determinants of occupational injury among workers in Kombolcha textile factory, North-East Ethiopia. Methods: An institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted from April 1 to 15, 2013 on 455 randomly selected workers after stratification by working departments. The data was collected using a structured questionnaire through face-to-face interview by data collectors of 6 occupational health experts and 6 nurses. Results: Working >48 hrs/wk (aOR: 2.71, 95% CI: 1.18–6.24, handling objects >20 kg (aOR: 2.35, 95% CI: 1.24–4.45, visual concentration (aOR: 3.10, 95% CI: 1.42–6.75, timely maintenance of machine (aOR: 1.80, 95% CI: 1.11–2.93, and sleep disorder (aOR: 2.95, 95% CI: 1.47–5.92 were significant factors for the occurrence of occupational injuries. Conclusion: Many factors including working for a long time with accurate instruments and sleep disorders can cause occupational injury in textile industries.

  7. The relief formed by the descent phenomenon in the north-east part of Kosova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulliqi, Shpejtim; Isufi, Florim; Ramadani, Ibrahim; Gashi, Gani

    2012-04-01

    In the diverse relief of north-east part of Kosova a relatively wide range occupies the relief modelled by the descent phenomenon, which is conditioned by morph-structural and climatic factors quite suitable for their development. The morphogenesis activity of descent phenomenon is conditioned by the types of rocks, tectonic process of this region and climatic conditions. These factors condition horizontal and vertical relief fragmentation, slope, especially in Gollaku mountains and in SE part of Kopaonik mountain. Along the tectonic descents, the steepness is detaching and the detaching lines consisting of magmatic rocks show overthrows, demolitions and stony torrents, but the Teri gene composition formations are modelled by sliding and muddy torrents, depending upon the presence of clayey and alevrolite belts on these Teri gene ones. The impact of factors and conditions on the relief of this part, the phenomena like demolitions, overthrows, sliding, muddy torrents, stony torrents, etc, operate here, which play an important morphological role in the modelling of relief.

  8. Effect of severity of disability on survival in north east England cerebral palsy cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, J L; Colver, A F; Mackie, P C

    2000-12-01

    To investigate the effect of motor and cognitive disabilities on the survival of people on the North of England Collaborative Cerebral Palsy Survey, and compare this with other published results. The cerebral palsy cohort consists of 1960-1990 births in Northumberland, Newcastle, and North Tyneside health districts. Survival and cause of death were analysed in relation to data on birth, disabilities, and a unique measure of the impact of disability. Disability strongly influences survival. More than a third of those with a severe disability die before age 30. Fewer than a third of deaths are attributed to cerebral palsy on death certificates. Of those with severe cognitive disability, 63% live to age 35 (58% with severe ambulatory disability and 53% with severe manual disability), whereas at least 98% without severe disabilities live to age 35. The Lifestyle Assessment Score (LAS) allows a finer categorisation of impact of disability, and is strongly associated with survival: a ten point increase in LAS is associated with a doubling of the hazard rate. People who had LAS of at least 70, and had survived to age 5 have a 39% chance of dying before age 35. The majority of people with cerebral palsy attain adulthood. There appears to be more variation in survival rates associated with severe disability between regions of England, than between north east England, British Columbia, and California. Instantaneous risks of dying vary widely between England and California. This variation is not obviously attributable to differing rates of severe disability.

  9. A new skink (Scincidae: Saproscincus) from rocky rainforest habitat on Cape Melville, north-east Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskin, Conrad J

    2013-01-01

    Saproscincus skinks are restricted to wet forest habitats of eastern Australia. Eleven species have previously been described, with most having small distributions in disjunct areas of subtropical and tropical rainforest. The localized distributions and specific habitat requirements of Saproscincus have made them a key group for understanding the biogeographic history of Australia's rainforests. Here I describe a new species of Saproscincus from the Melville Range on Cape Melville, north-east Australia. The Melville Range is composed of boulder-fields and areas of rainforest in the uplands, and is highly isolated from other areas of elevated rainforest. All individuals of the new species were found on a moist ridgeline, active on boulders under a rainforest canopy or on boulder-field immediately adjacent to rainforest. Saproscincus saltus sp. nov. is highly distinct in morphology and colour pattern. Of particular interest are its long limbs and digits compared to congeners, which in conjunction with the observed ecology, suggest a long history of association with rock. The discovery of S. saltus sp. nov. extends the distribution of the genus over 100 km north from the nearest congeners in the Wet Tropics region. This species brings the number of vertebrates known to be endemic to the Melville Range to six, which is remarkable for such a small area.

  10. Environment and Health - Bridging South, North, East and West. Basel, Switzerland 19-23 August 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    EHP is pleased to present the abstracts from the 2013 conference Environment and Health-Bridging South, North, East and West, held 19-23 August 2013 in Basel, Switzerland, and hosted by the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute. The conference was a joint meeting of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE), the International Society of Exposure Science (ISES), and the International Society of Indoor Air Quality and Climate (ISIAQ). More than 1,700 participants from all continents and over 70 countries attended. The abstracts are searchable by abstract number, author name, and any word that appears anywhere in the abstract. Use the Filtered Search option to narrow search results by author-assigned keyword. Suggested citation: Abstracts of the 2013 Conference of the International Society of Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE), the International Society of Exposure Science (ISES), and the International Society of Indoor Air Quality and Climate (ISIAQ), August 19-23, 2013, Basel, Switzerland. 2013. Environ Health Perspect. Read how the organizers reduced the environmental footprint of the conference in "The Vision of a Green(er) Scientific Conference," an editorial in the August issue of EHP by Nino Künzli and Martin Röösli, conference chairs, and Martina S. Ragettli, chair of the local organizing committee "green club." For more information on the conference, be sure to check out the press release and photos from the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute.

  11. Prevalence of Dermanyssus gallinae (Mesostigmata: Dermanyssidae) in industrial poultry farms in North-East Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharbi, Mohamed; Sakly, Nadhem; Darghouth, Mohamed Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Dermanyssus gallinae (Mesostigmata: Dermanyssidae), a mite of poultry, represents the most important ecotoparasite of egg-laying poultry in several countries. We estimated the prevalence of D. gallinae infestation in 38 industrial poultry farms (28 egg-laying and 10 reproductive hen farms) in the governorate of Nabeul (North-East Tunisia). Traps were placed in two locations of each farm during 24 h in August. The overall prevalence at the farms was estimated to be 34%. A total number of 329 D. gallinae were collected, giving an intensity of 0.0028 and an abundance of 0.0015. Infestation intensity and abundance were significantly higher in egg production farms than reproductive farms. There was no correlation between the intensity of infestation and temperature. An exponential correlation was observed between the birds' age and infestation intensity. We recommend a systematic survey of poultry farms during the whole breeding period. Prompt treatment is recommended to avoid the exponential increase of mite population. © M. Gharbi et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2013.

  12. Mitogenome sequence variation in migratory and stationary ecotypes of North-east Atlantic cod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Bård O; Emblem, Åse; Jørgensen, Tor E; Klingan, Kevin A; Nordeide, Jarle T; Moum, Truls; Johansen, Steinar D

    2014-06-01

    Sequencing of mitochondrial gene fragments from specimens representing a wide range of geographical locations has indicated limited population structuring in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). We recently performed whole genome analysis based on next-generation sequencing of two pooled ecotype samples representing offshore migratory and inshore stationary cod from the North-east Atlantic Ocean. Here we report molecular features and variability of the 16.7kb mitogenome component that was collected from the datasets. These sequences represented more than 25 times coverage of each individual and more than 1100 times coverage of each ecotype sample. We estimated the mitogenome to have evolved 14 times more rapidly than the nuclear genome. Among the 365 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites identified, 121 were shared between ecotypes, and 151 and 93 were private within the migratory and stationary cod, respectively. We found 323 SNPs to be located in protein coding genes, of which 29 were non-synonymous. One synonymous site in ND2 was likely to be under positive selection. FST measurements indicated weak differentiation in ND1 and ND2 between ecotypes. We conclude that the Atlantic cod mitogenome and the nuclear genome apparently evolved by distinct evolutionary constraints, and that the reproductive isolation observed from whole genome analysis was not visible in the mtDNA sequences. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Meiobenthic and Macrobenthic Community Structure in Carbonate Sediments of Rocas Atoll (North-east, Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, S. A.; Warwick, R. M.; Attrill, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Rocas is the only atoll of the South Atlantic and it is built almost exclusively by coralline red algae, vermetid gastropods and encrusting foraminiferans. Patterns in the community structure of meiofauna and macrofauna, particularly nematodes and polychaetes, at Rocas Atoll, north-east Brazil, are determined and compared for different habitats: sublittoral, tidal flat, reef pools and lagoon. Nematodes and copepods were the most abundant meiofaunal taxa. In all studied habitats at Rocas Atoll, oligochaetes, nematodes and polychaetes numerically dominate the macrofauna. Univariate and multivariate analyses reveal clear differences in community structure between the habitats of the atoll, especially between the sublittoral and the inner habitats. The number of species, total density, diversity (H') and trophic structure vary significantly between the habitats, but the differences are dependent on which faunistic category (meiobenthic or macrobenthic) is analysed. Nematodes belonging to the Epsilonematidae and Draconematidae, together with a diverse community of meiobenthic polychaetes, characterize the sublittoral habitat of Rocas Atoll. Both meiofauna and macrofauna are depressed in the tidal flat, and the local sediment instability particularly affects the polychaete abundance. Reef pools and lagoons support a very dense aggregation of invertebrates, particularly the macrofauna, when compared with other carbonate reef sediments. However, differences in the structure of meiofauna and macrofauna communities between reef pools and lagoons are not significant. Changes in meiobenthic and macrobenthic community structure are related to the gradation in the physical environment of the atoll.

  14. Self-Reported Digital Literacy of the Pharmacy Workforce in North East Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLure, Katie; Stewart, Derek

    2015-10-15

    In their day-to-day practice, pharmacists, graduate (pre-registration) pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, dispensing assistants and medicines counter assistants use widely available office, retail and management information systems alongside dedicated pharmacy management and electronic health (ehealth) applications. The ability of pharmacy staff to use these applications at home and at work, also known as digital literacy or digital competence or e-skills, depends on personal experience and related education and training. The aim of this research was to gain insight into the self-reported digital literacy of the pharmacy workforce in the North East of Scotland. A purposive case sample survey was conducted across NHS Grampian in the NE of Scotland. Data collection was based on five items: sex, age band, role, pharmacy experience plus a final question about self-reported digital literacy. The study was conducted between August 2012 and March 2013 in 17 community and two hospital pharmacies. With few exceptions, pharmacy staff perceived their own digital literacy to be at a basic level. Secondary outcome measures of role, age, gender and work experience were not found to be clear determinants of digital literacy. Pharmacy staff need to be more digitally literate to harness technologies in pharmacy practice more effectively and efficiently.

  15. Distribution of Hepatitis C virus genotypes in city of Mashhad, North-east of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastin, M; Mahmoudi, M; Rezaee, S A; Assarehzadegan, M A; Tabasi, N; Zamani, S; Nosratabadi, R; Haghmorad, D; Sheikh, A; Khazaee, M; Panah, H R

    2014-01-01

    Six major hepatitis C virus genotypes have been characterised, which vary in their geographical distribution. The prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in an area is not constant, and depends on the changes in route of infection, which may change over time. In this study, the distribution of HCV genotypes in Mashhad, the capital of Razavi Khorasan province in north-east of Iran was investigated. Mashhad is a holy city of Shiate Moslems, which attracts more than 20 million tourists and pilgrims every year. Two hundred and seventy-eight HCV infected subjects (227 males and 51 females) were included in this study. HCV genotypes were analysed by type specific reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Genotype 3a was detected in 49.6%, 1a in 36.3%, 1b in 12.6% and 2a in 0.4%. Two HCV genotypes were detected in 1.1% cases; 1a +3a in 1%, 3a + 1b in 0.4%. Genotypes 2b and 3b were not detected in any samples. We demonstrated that despite the previous reports on the frequency of HCV genotypes in Iran, 3a is the predominant genotype in Mashhad.

  16. Heavy metals in raw cow and ewe milk from north-east Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najarnezhad, Vahid; Akbarabadi, Masoome

    2013-01-01

    The presence of toxic metals in milk may create significant health problems for the population. In this study, 1440 raw cow and ewe milk samples from 18 townships in north-east Iran were analysed in four different seasons. Lead, cadmium and mercury levels were determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Mean concentration of lead, cadmium and mercury in cow milk samples was 12.9 ± 6.0, 0.3 ± 0.3 and 3.1 ± 0.3 ng g⁻¹, respectively, and in ewe milk samples, these mean values were 14.9 ± 7.8, 1.6 ± 1.2 and 3.1 ± 0.3 ng g⁻¹, respectively. Statistical analyses showed that lead and cadmium concentrations in ewe milk were significantly higher than in cow milk. Concentrations of these metals in ewe milk varied significantly with different seasons. As the concentrations did not exceed the safety limits, they could not pose a serious danger to public health.

  17. Seroepidemiology of bluetongue disease in small ruminants of north-east of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najarnezhad, Vahid; Rajae, Mahin

    2013-06-01

    To estimate the prevalence and distribution of bluetongue virus antibody in sheep and goats in 25 townships of Khorasan Razavi. Bluetongue is an infectious, non-contagious, arthropod born viral disease of ruminants and has been reported from most of the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. A total number of 1 034 serum samples from sheep and goats were collected and transmitted to Serological Laboratory of Veterinary Council of Khorasan Razavi. Serums were screened for the presence of group-specific bluetongue virus antibody using competitive Enzyme Linked Immuno Sorbent Assay (c-ELISA). The seropositivity of sheep and goats for bluetongue was found to be 89.2%. The highest prevalence rate was seen in Taybad, Khalil-abad and Torbat-jam (100%) and the least prevalence rate was seen in Jovein (55%). The results showed that the majority of animals in the north-east of Iran are infected with bluetongue virus. High correlation between abortion history and seroposivity emphasize the economical importance of bluetongue virus in the sheep herds of the region.

  18. Evaluating machine-learning techniques for recruitment forecasting of seven North East Atlantic fish species

    KAUST Repository

    Fernandes, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The effect of different factors (spawning biomass, environmental conditions) on recruitment is a subject of great importance in the management of fisheries, recovery plans and scenario exploration. In this study, recently proposed supervised classification techniques, tested by the machine-learning community, are applied to forecast the recruitment of seven fish species of North East Atlantic (anchovy, sardine, mackerel, horse mackerel, hake, blue whiting and albacore), using spawning, environmental and climatic data. In addition, the use of the probabilistic flexible naive Bayes classifier (FNBC) is proposed as modelling approach in order to reduce uncertainty for fisheries management purposes. Those improvements aim is to improve probability estimations of each possible outcome (low, medium and high recruitment) based in kernel density estimation, which is crucial for informed management decision making with high uncertainty. Finally, a comparison between goodness-of-fit and generalization power is provided, in order to assess the reliability of the final forecasting models. It is found that in most cases the proposed methodology provides useful information for management whereas the case of horse mackerel is an example of the limitations of the approach. The proposed improvements allow for a better probabilistic estimation of the different scenarios, i.e. to reduce the uncertainty in the provided forecasts.

  19. Ecological classification of European transitional waters in the North-East Atlantic eco-region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, Cristina; Juanes, José Antonio; Puente, Araceli

    2010-04-01

    A new methodology to classify European North-East Atlantic transitional waters into ecological types has been developed based on the most important hydrological and morphological features that are likely to determine the ecology of aquatic systems in transitional waters. Hydrological indicators help identifying if a transitional water area is dominated by fresh or sea water and/or by intertidal or subtidal areas, while morphological indicators allow an estimation of the complexity of the transitional water and the diversity of the habitats involved. Twelve transitional waters of the southern Bay of Biscay were classified using this methodology and the five hydro-morphological types obtained were validated with benthic macro-invertebrate data. Transitional waters with a complex morphology showed the highest values of species diversity, while those with a smaller tidal influence showed lower species diversity. The ' Scrobicularia' and ' Abra' assemblages, previously identified in the study area, were found to be related to different types of transitional waters. The ' Abra' assemblage only appeared in estuaries with a complex morphology and dominated by tidal influences, while the ' Scrobicularia' assemblage was detected in all the transitional waters except for a single coastal lagoon. This classification of transitional waters may therefore be useful to establish the biological reference conditions needed for European Directives.

  20. Phytoplankton community and limnology of Chatla floodplain wetland of Barak valley, Assam, North-East India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultana Laskar H.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton diversity was investigated over a period of two years (2006 to 2008 in Chatla floodplain wetland in Barak valley, Assam, North-East India. Site 1 and site 2 are two inlets and site 3 is a lentic system associated with vegetation cover of Calamus tenuis and Baringtonia acutangula. The floodplain has a unique hydrology because of the presence of different types of habitats (inlets, fisheries, beels and outlets which maintains a network among the floodplains, rivers and streams. Phytoplankton community composition, density and diversity were studied in relation to environmental variables. All the variables were estimated by following standard methods. Phytoplankton was collected by plankton net and quantitative estimation was made by using Sedgwick Rafter counting cell. Phytoplankton community comprised 53 taxa represented by Chlorophyceae (31, Cyanophyceae (11, Bacillariophyceae (7, Euglenophyceae (1 and Dinophyceae (3. Phytoplankton taxa was dominated by Volvox sp., Nostoc sp., Eunotia sp., Navicula sp., Euglena spp. and density was found highest in site 3 and lowest in site 1. Shannon diversity index (H′ for phytoplankton community varied between 2.4 to 2.65 indicating fairly high species diversity. The varying magnitude of correlationship among environmental variables and phytoplankton species density as shown by Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA indicated that some of the environmental variables (water temperature, transparency, rainfall, nitrate and ammonia are the driving factors for governing the phytoplankton species assemblages in Chatla floodplain wetland. Fluctuation of phytoplankton density and community composition in different habitats indicated various niche apportionment as well as anthropogenic influences.

  1. Self-Reported Digital Literacy of the Pharmacy Workforce in North East Scotland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie MacLure

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In their day-to-day practice, pharmacists, graduate (pre-registration pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, dispensing assistants and medicines counter assistants use widely available office, retail and management information systems alongside dedicated pharmacy management and electronic health (ehealth applications. The ability of pharmacy staff to use these applications at home and at work, also known as digital literacy or digital competence or e-skills, depends on personal experience and related education and training. The aim of this research was to gain insight into the self-reported digital literacy of the pharmacy workforce in the North East of Scotland. A purposive case sample survey was conducted across NHS Grampian in the NE of Scotland. Data collection was based on five items: sex, age band, role, pharmacy experience plus a final question about self-reported digital literacy. The study was conducted between August 2012 and March 2013 in 17 community and two hospital pharmacies. With few exceptions, pharmacy staff perceived their own digital literacy to be at a basic level. Secondary outcome measures of role, age, gender and work experience were not found to be clear determinants of digital literacy. Pharmacy staff need to be more digitally literate to harness technologies in pharmacy practice more effectively and efficiently.

  2. Statistical analysis of annual maximum rainfall in North-East India: an application of LH-moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, Surobhi; Borah, Munindra; Kakaty, Sarat Chandra

    2011-05-01

    An attempt has been made to determine the best fitting distribution to describe the annual series of maximum daily rainfall data for the period 1966 to 2007 of nine distantly located stations in North East India. The LH-moments of order zero (L) to order four (L4) are used to estimate the parameters of three extreme value distributions viz. generalized extreme value distribution (GEV), generalized logistic distribution (GLD), and generalized Pareto distribution (GPD). The performances of the distributions are assessed by evaluating the relative bias (RBIAS) and relative root mean square error (RRMSE) of quantile estimates through Monte Carlo simulations. Then, the boxplot is used to show the location of the median and the associated dispersion of the data. Finally, it can be revealed from the results of boxplots that zero level of LH-moments of the generalized Pareto distribution would be appropriate to the majority of the stations for describing the annual maximum rainfall series in North East India.

  3. Clinical assessment and treatment in paediatric wards in the north-east of the United Republic of Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reyburn, Hugh; Mwakasungula, Emmanuel; Chonya, Semkini

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We assessed paediatric care in the 13 public hospitals in the north-east of the United Republic of Tanzania to determine if diagnoses and treatments were consistent with current guidelines for care. METHODS: Data were collected over a five-day period in each site where paediatric...... and associated with missed diagnoses and inappropriate treatments. Improved assessment and records are essential to initiate change, but achieving this will be a challenging task....

  4. [Somatotype-dependent cardiorespiratory system adaption in children and adolsescents in the north-east of Russia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartosh, O P; Sokolov, A Ia

    2006-01-01

    The authors have revealed the tension of cardiovascular performance in 11-14-year-old children and adolescents with the macrosomatotype (MaS) and a lower bronchial patency in 13-14-year-old adolescents in the winter-spring period. This points to the decreased reserves of the cardiorespiratory system in the teenagers with MaS during their adaptation the environment of the north-east of Russia.

  5. ICU-COE North East Asian Dialogue (NEAD) Project, Year III ーJapan, China, Korea, and Russiaー

    OpenAIRE

    Wasilewski, Jacqueline; Jacqueline, Wasilewski

    2008-01-01

    This paper is divided into five main sections. It 1) reviews the first two years of the North East Asian Dialogue (NEAD) Project, 2) explains the nine major activities of the third year of the Project, activities meant to cultivate a new generation of transnational non-state actors, 3) lists presentations, networking, media coverage and other activities associated with the third year of the Project, 4) outlines future activities stemming from the Project and 5) describes the emergence of a cl...

  6. Seroprevalence and Risk Factors of Ehrlichia canis Infection among Companion Dogs of Mashhad, North East of Iran, 2009–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maneli Ansari-Mood

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aims of this study were to determine the seroprevalence of canine ehrlichiosis and risk factors of this disease in companion dogs’ population of Mashhad, North East of Iran. Canine Monocytic Ehrlichiosis (CME is a zoonotic disease transmitted by ticks, Rhipicephalus sanguineus, and caused by an obligate intracellular bacterium, Ehrlichia canis.Methods: During September 2009 until November 2010, 250 companion dogs from Mashhad, North-East of Iran, were examined for serum antibody detection against E. canis by means of immunofluorescence assay test (IFAT and factors associated with a positive antibody response.Results: There was a very low prevalence of anti-E. canis antibodies (0.8%, 2/250 among studied dogs. The antibody titers for two seropositive dogs were 1:80 and 1:160, respectively. One (0.4% of seropositive dogs was infested with, R. sanguineus. In blood smears from one of infested dogs (0.4%, typical morulae of E. canis was observed in lymphocytes. The results confirm that the lowest occurrence of reactive dogs indoors probably related to low tick infestion.Conclusion: This is the first report that describes serological evidences of canine monocytic ehrlichiosis in North- East of Iran. Results suggested that E. canis infection in owned pet dogs from North of Khorasan was not endemic from 2009 to 2010. Additional molecular studies are necessary to confirm E. canis infection and to identify the local strains of the organism.

  7. Seroprevalence and Risk Factors of Ehrlichia canis Infection among Companion Dogs of Mashhad, North East of Iran, 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari-Mood, Maneli; Khoshnegah, Javad; Mohri, Mehrdad; Rajaei, Seyed Mehdi

    2015-12-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the seroprevalence of canine ehrlichiosis and risk factors of this disease in companion dogs' population of Mashhad, North East of Iran. Canine Monocytic Ehrlichiosis (CME) is a zoonotic disease transmitted by ticks, Rhipicephalus sanguineus, and caused by an obligate intracellular bacterium, Ehrlichia canis. During September 2009 until November 2010, 250 companion dogs from Mashhad, North-East of Iran, were examined for serum antibody detection against E. canis by means of immunofluorescence assay test (IFAT) and factors associated with a positive antibody response. There was a very low prevalence of anti-E. canis antibodies (0.8%, 2/250) among studied dogs. The antibody titers for two seropositive dogs were 1:80 and 1:160, respectively. One (0.4%) of seropositive dogs was infested with, R. sanguineus. In blood smears from one of infested dogs (0.4%), typical morulae of E. canis was observed in lymphocytes. The results confirm that the lowest occurrence of reactive dogs indoors probably related to low tick infestion. This is the first report that describes serological evidences of canine monocytic ehrlichiosis in North-East of Iran. Results suggested that E. canis infection in owned pet dogs from North of Khorasan was not endemic from 2009 to 2010. Additional molecular studies are necessary to confirm E. canis infection and to identify the local strains of the organism.

  8. Seroprevalence and Risk Factors of Ehrlichia canis Infection among Companion Dogs of Mashhad, North East of Iran, 2009–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari-Mood, Maneli; Khoshnegah, Javad; Mohri, Mehrdad; Rajaei, Seyed Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aims of this study were to determine the seroprevalence of canine ehrlichiosis and risk factors of this disease in companion dogs’ population of Mashhad, North East of Iran. Canine Monocytic Ehrlichiosis (CME) is a zoonotic disease transmitted by ticks, Rhipicephalus sanguineus, and caused by an obligate intracellular bacterium, Ehrlichia canis. Methods: During September 2009 until November 2010, 250 companion dogs from Mashhad, North-East of Iran, were examined for serum antibody detection against E. canis by means of immunofluorescence assay test (IFAT) and factors associated with a positive antibody response. Results: There was a very low prevalence of anti-E. canis antibodies (0.8%, 2/250) among studied dogs. The antibody titers for two seropositive dogs were 1:80 and 1:160, respectively. One (0.4%) of seropositive dogs was infested with, R. sanguineus. In blood smears from one of infested dogs (0.4%), typical morulae of E. canis was observed in lymphocytes. The results confirm that the lowest occurrence of reactive dogs indoors probably related to low tick infestion. Conclusion: This is the first report that describes serological evidences of canine monocytic ehrlichiosis in North-East of Iran. Results suggested that E. canis infection in owned pet dogs from North of Khorasan was not endemic from 2009 to 2010. Additional molecular studies are necessary to confirm E. canis infection and to identify the local strains of the organism. PMID:26623430

  9. Demographic Evolution of the Small Towns in the North-East Development Region in the Post-Communist Period

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    GABRIEL CAMARĂ

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Romania's population has declined steadily from 23.2 million in 1990 to 21.5 million inhabitants in 2007. This overall decline in population is not entirely true for the towns and cities of the North-East Region, as during the same period they recorded both decreases and increases in population due to positive natural balance. The North-East Region (partially superimposed over the historic region of the western Moldova is considered the poorest region in the European Union and a disadvantaged area. The rural young population of Moldova is a reservoir which supplies urban areas and especially large cities. In these circumstances, the small towns of the North-East Region are seeking balance (demographic, economic, functional. This paper examines the demographic evolution of the small towns located in the area under analysis, in the post-communist period, illustrating the types of fluctuations in statistical methods as regards demographic changes and the risk of depopulation in the future, correlated with a lower overall population of Romania.

  10. Rats: if you can't beat them eat them! (Tricks of the trade observed among the Adi and other North-East Indian tribals)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meyer-Rochow, Victor Benno; Megu, Karsing; Chakravorty, Jharna

    2015-01-01

    Since outside the tribal areas of North-East India it is not widely known, neither in the world nor in India itself, that rats are considered a delicious food item, this was one of several reasons why...

  11. Composition and structure of the parasite faunas of cod, Gadus morhua L. (Teleostei: Gadidae, in the North East Atlantic

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    Kostadinova Aneta

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although numerous studies on parasites of the Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua L. have been conducted in the North Atlantic, comparative analyses on local cod parasite faunas are virtually lacking. The present study is based on examination of large samples of cod from six geographical areas of the North East Atlantic which yielded abundant baseline data on parasite distribution and abundance. Materials and Methods A total of 826 fish was sampled in the Baltic, Celtic, Irish and North seas, Icelandic waters and Trondheimsfjord (Norway in 2002 (spring and autumn and 2003 (spring. The gills and internal organs (oesophagus, stomach, intestine, pyloric caeca, liver, heart, spleen, gall bladder and gonads were examined for macroparasites following a standardised protocol. The taxonomic consistency of the identification was ensured thorough the entire study. Results We discuss some problems in parasite identification, outline the composition of the parasite faunas in cod in the six North East Atlantic regions, provide novel data on parasite prevalence and abundance and a comparative assessment of the structure of the regional parasite faunas with respect to the higher-level taxonomic groupings, host specificity and zoogeographical distribution of the parasites. Altogether 57 different parasite forms were found including seven new host records (Diclidophora merlangi, Rhipidocotyle sp., Fellodistomum sp., Steringotrema sp., Cucullanus sp., Spinitectus sp., and Chondracanthus ornatus. The predominant groups of cod parasites were trematodes (19 species and nematodes (13 species including larval anisakids which comprised 58.2% of the total number of individuals. Conclusion Our study reveals relatively rich regional parasite faunas in cod from the North East Atlantic which are dominated by generalist parasites with Arcto-Boreal distribution. Further, it provides more detailed data on the distribution in the North East Atlantic of the majority

  12. High Resolution Map of Water Supply and Demand for North East United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsani, N.; Vorosmarty, C. J.; Fekete, B. M.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate estimates of water supply and demand are crucial elements in water resources management and modeling. As part of our NSF-funded EaSM effort to build a Northeast Regional Earth System Model (NE-RESM) as a framework to improve our understanding and capacity to forecast the implications of planning decisions on the region's environment, ecosystem services, energy and economic systems through the 21st century, we are producing a high resolution map (3' x 3' lat/long) of estimated water supply and use for the north east region of United States. Focusing on water demand, results from this study enables us to quantify how demand sources affect the hydrology and thermal-chemical water pollution across the region. In an attempt to generate this 3-minute resolution map in which each grid cell has a specific estimated monthly domestic, agriculture, thermoelectric and industrial water use. Estimated Use of Water in the United States in 2005 (Kenny et al., 2009) is being coupled to high resolution land cover and land use, irrigation, power plant and population data sets. In addition to water demands, we tried to improve estimates of water supply from the WBM model by improving the way it controls discharge from reservoirs. Reservoirs are key characteristics of the modern hydrologic system, with a particular impact on altering the natural stream flow, thermal characteristics, and biogeochemical fluxes of rivers. Depending on dam characteristics, watershed characteristics and the purpose of building a dam, each reservoir has a specific optimum operating rule. It means that literally 84,000 dams in the National Inventory of Dams potentially follow 84,000 different sets of rules for storing and releasing water which must somehow be accounted for in our modeling exercise. In reality, there is no comprehensive observational dataset depicting these operating rules. Thus, we will simulate these rules. Our perspective is not to find the optimum operating rule per se but to find

  13. The rise of clinical nutrition science in North-East Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlqvist, Mark L

    2016-01-01

    Effective clinical nutrition practice depends on a sound knowledge of biomedical, societal and environmental science and the skills to diagnose, prevent and manage the health problems related to food patterns, energy equilibrium (mostly to do with physical activity) and nutrient metabolism. Its delivery needs to be accessible, equitable, affordable and sustainable. Ordinarily, this will require both local and widely distributed health services. In North-East (NE) Asia, these requisites are being met to an ever increasing extent. The roots of this progress are steeped in cultures which acknowledge the food-health connections and support education which pays regard to these connections. As elsewhere, however, the food and health systems, their safety and security are threatened by exploitative operatives. In China, a concerted effort was made in the mid-1980s to foster clinical nutrition in major hospitals throughout the country by programs directed at medical graduates, nursing and kitchen staff; dietetics has appeared much more recently. By contrast, Japan has had an extensive and well-trained dietetic workforce for much longer, alongside a vibrant basic nutrition science constituency in its universities and foodnutraceutical industry. South Korea and Taiwan have traversed a similar course to that in Japan. Now, all of these NE Asian economies have gathered rapid momentum in the publication of innovative approaches to public health and clinical nutrition which have the prospect of not only improving health outcomes, but also reducing the societal and financial burden of health care. This is particularly important in rapidly ageing societies, which they are. It is also a growing challenge where climate change threatens to engulf the lives and destinies of hundreds of millions of Asians on account of natural disasters, water and food insecurity.

  14. Mapping soil textural fractions across a large watershed in north-east Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamsal, S; Mishra, U

    2010-08-01

    Assessment of regional scale soil spatial variation and mapping their distribution is constrained by sparse data which are collected using field surveys that are labor intensive and cost prohibitive. We explored geostatistical (ordinary kriging-OK), regression (Regression Tree-RT), and hybrid methods (RT plus residual Sequential Gaussian Simulation-SGS) to map soil textural fractions across the Santa Fe River Watershed (3585 km(2)) in north-east Florida. Soil samples collected from four depths (L1: 0-30 cm, L2: 30-60 cm, L3: 60-120 cm, and L4: 120-180 cm) at 141 locations were analyzed for soil textural fractions (sand, silt and clay contents), and combined with textural data (15 profiles) assembled under the Florida Soil Characterization program. Textural fractions in L1 and L2 were autocorrelated, and spatially mapped across the watershed. OK performance was poor, which may be attributed to the sparse sampling. RT model structure varied among textural fractions, and the model explained variations ranged from 25% for L1 silt to 61% for L2 clay content. Regression residuals were simulated using SGS, and the average of simulated residuals were used to approximate regression residual distribution map, which were added to regression trend maps. Independent validation of the prediction maps showed that regression models performed slightly better than OK, and regression combined with average of simulated regression residuals improved predictions beyond the regression model. Sand content >90% in both 0-30 and 30-60 cm covered 80.6% of the watershed area. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Burnout and its Influencing Factors among Primary Health Care Providers in the North East of Iran.

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    Mohammad Amiri

    Full Text Available Burnout is a popular research topics in service providing jobs, including the health care field. This study aimed at assessing the level of job burnout and to consider the important antecedents which might be related to job burnout among primary health care providers in Iran.The participants in this applied cross-sectional study which was conducted in 2013 were 548 primary health care providers who were randomly selected from among those working in Shahroud, Sabzevar, Neishabour, Bojnord (provinces located in the north east of Iran. Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI was administered to the participants and the collected data were analyzed using SPSS through chi-square test and ordinal logistic regression model.The burnout mean score among the participants was 54.1 ± 27.2 and the mean scores of burnout components i.e., emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishment were 15.5 ± 13.6, 3.7 ± 5.4 and 35.5 ± 13.5 respectively. In terms of levels of burnout, 64.2% of the participants showed low levels (n = 352, 18.4% average levels (n = 101 and 17.3% high levels (n = 95. A significant relationship was observed between burnout, job resources and interest in job (p ≤ 0.05. However, no significant relationship was observed between burnout and the place (university of working, age, satisfaction with income, experience, gender, level of education, marital status, housing status, having a second job and place of residence (p ≥0.05.Lack of personal accomplishment was highly prevalent among the participating primary health care providers. Lack of career advancement and job transfer opportunities may play a role in the burnout of primary health care providers. Therefore, paying attention to this aspect may help to reduce burnout and even increase job engagement.

  16. Summer distribution of seabirds in the North-East Water polynya, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiris, Claude R.; Kampp, Kaj; Tahon, Jacques; Kristensen, Reinhardt Møbjerg

    1997-10-01

    The distribution at sea of seabirds was studied in the North-East Water (NEW) polynya, Greenland, during transect counts in the summers of 1991, 1992 and 1993 on board the ice-breaking RVs Polarstern and Polar Sea. Data collected within the polynya 'box' (78-82°N; 5-18°W) concern observations of 8000 birds counted during 1350 half-hour counts. Distribution is presented as density (N/km 2) and calculated daily food intake. Five bird species were selected for discussion, representing more than 95% of the total numbers encountered: Fulmar ( Fulmarus glacialis), Ivory Gull ( Pagophila eburnea), Kittiwake ( Rissa tridactyla), Glaucous Gull ( Larus hyperboreus) and Ross's Gull ( Rhodostethia rosea). For these species, densities are comparable in the NE Greenland polynya and in other European Arctic seas. The main difference is the absence in NEW of the species playing the main role in Arctic seas: Brünnich's Guillemot ( Uria lomvia) and Little Auk ( Alle alle). In the absence of fish-eating birds and of birds consuming zooplankton in the water column, the NEW polynya ecosystem is thus dominated by surface feeders and, closer to the coast, by benthic feeders like eiders, Somateria mollissima and S. spectabilis, and walrus, Odobenus rosmarus. The density and daily food intake for all seabirds are one order of magnitude lower in the polynya than in the Arctic seas. The distribution and abundance of seabirds in the NEW polynya seems to reflect a very low density of pelagic fish and Zooplankton in the water column, while Zooplankton must be present at 'normal' concentrations in the upper layer.

  17. Late Pleistocene to early Holocene environmental changes on Store Koldewey, coastal north-east Greenland

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    Martin Klug

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A lake sediment sequence from southern Store Koldewey, north-east Greenland, has been investigated using a multidisciplinary approach, including geophysical, geochemical, biogeochemical, biological and sedimentological methods. Chronological constraints are provided by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS 14C dating of bulk sediment and complemented with published water moss ages. The record consists of three major sediment units. Their individual structural, textural, geophysical and geochemical characteristics indicate variable input of sediment and meltwater due to variable proximity of the ice margin and therefore reflect the growth and decay of a local glacier during the late Weichselian. Radiocarbon dating of bulk sediment samples from the lowermost unit gave ages of 42 to 34 calibrated thousand years (cal Ky B.P. and indicates that this material is redeposited in the lake basin during or after the ice advance at the end of the Pleistocene. Increased meltwater and sediment input from a retreating ice margin following the Younger Dryas is indicated by the occurrence of a sandy to gravely section. Fine-grained and laminated sediments were deposited during the Pleistocene–Holocene transition and indicate calm sedimentation conditions with an ice margin outside of the lake catchment. The reoccurrence of coarse sediments during the early Holocene may indicate increased meltwater input in response to the cold spell at about 9.3 Kya with increased snow accumulation rather than fluctuations of local glaciers. The dating results furthermore show that AMS 14C dating of bulk sediment samples deposited during glacier decay in High Arctic environments can give problematic ages.

  18. Prevalence of autism and parentally reported triggers in a north east London population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingam, R; Simmons, A; Andrews, N; Miller, E; Stowe, J; Taylor, B

    2003-08-01

    The recorded prevalence of autistic spectrum disorders has risen over recent decades. Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine has been blamed, by causing a "new variant" form of "regressive autism" associated with "autistic enterocolitis". To estimate the prevalence of autism and to assess any changes in parental perception regarding the onset or causes of autism. A total of 567 children with autistic spectrum disorder in five districts in north east London were identified, born 1979-98. Reported autism, excluding the 94 cases of Asperger's syndrome, increased by year of birth until 1992, since when prevalence has plateaued. This flattening off persisted after allowing for expected delay in diagnosis in more recent birth cohorts. The age at diagnosis of autistic spectrum disorder was estimated to have decreased per five year period since 1983, by 8.7% for childhood autism and by 11.0% for atypical autism. There was some evidence that MMR was more likely to be mentioned as a trigger after August 1997 than before. The prevalence of autism, which was apparently rising from 1979 to 1992, reached a plateau from 1992 to 1996 at a rate of some 2.6 per 1000 live births. This levelling off, together with the reducing age at diagnosis, suggests that the earlier recorded rise in prevalence was not a real increase but was likely due to factors such as increased recognition, a greater willingness on the part of educationalists and families to accept the diagnostic label, and better recording systems. The proportion of parents attributing their child's autism to MMR appears to have increased since August 1997.

  19. HIV infection among injecting drug users in north-east Malaysia, 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S; Crofts, N

    1993-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has spread widely among injecting drug users (IDUs) in countries to the north and west of the 'Golden Triangle' region of South-East Asia; it is likely to have spread southwards to Malaysia as well. In order to assess HIV seroprevalence among IDUs in north-east Malaysia and describe risk factors for HIV infection in this population, we performed a cross-sectional seroepidemiological study among 210 IDUs recruited at the detoxification ward of the General Hospital in the capital city of the north-eastern Malaysian state, Kelantan. Subjects were sequential entrants to the detoxification ward, interviewed about HIV risk behaviour, and tested for antibody to HIV and to syphilis. Nearly a third (62/210, 30%) of these IDUs were HIV seropositive. Three-quarters (159/210) had travelled to Thailand in the preceding 5 years, of whom 32% (51/159) were HIV seropositive; this was associated with injecting in Thailand, but not with sexual contact there. Of those who had not left Malaysia in the preceding 5 years, 26% (11/43) were HIV seropositive, a rate not significantly different from those who had travelled. Travel within Malaysia was common (144/210, 69%) among IDUs interviewed, as was unsafe injecting and unsafe sexual behaviour (20% had shared injecting equipment and 21% had had unprotected intercourse) in other states. In every locale, rates of unsafe injecting behaviour were high (55% sharing in last month), even among those who knew they were HIV infected, and rates of condom usage were low (93% of 160 sexually active IDUs had never used a condom). Syphilis was not associated with HIV infection, but with contact with Thai prostitutes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Community-based prevalence of undiagnosed mycobacterial diseases in the Afar Region, north-east Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legesse, Mengistu; Mamo, Gezahegne; Ameni, Gobena; Medhin, Girmay; Bjune, Gunnar; Abebe, Fekadu

    2013-06-01

    Information on the community-based prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) in different settings is vital for planning, execution and evaluation of strategies to control the disease. To assess community-based prevalence of undetected active pulmonary TB (PTB) in pastoralists of the Amibara District. Between March and April 2010, a community-based cross-sectional survey of undiagnosed active PTB was conducted in the pastoralists of the Amibara District of the Afar Region, north-east Ethiopia. The study participants were interviewed for symptoms suggestive of PTB using a structured questionnaire. Sputum samples were collected and processed for smear microscopy and culture. Mycobacterium genus typing was performed using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Out of 222 individuals who had symptoms suggestive of PTB, 4 (1.8%) were found positive by smear microscopy, while mycobacterial growth was observed on 62 (27.9%) samples. Mycobacterium genus typing was carried out for 42 of these 62 samples; 39 (92.9%) gave a positive signal for the genus Mycobacterium. Of these, 23 (59%) isolates proved to be members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) complex, while the remaining 16 (41.0%) were found to be members of non-tuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) species. Sputum culture is highly sensitive, and it is the gold standard for the bacteriological diagnosis of PTB, while smear microscopy is less sensitive to detect acid fast bacilli (AFB) in stained sputum smears. The findings of the present study warrant the strengthening of culture facility services in the study area. The study also provides important preliminary information on the status of NTM infection in the pastoral setting. Nevertheless, further investigations into the species identification of the NTM infections would be useful in the study area. Copyright © 2013 Asian-African Society for Mycobacteriology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessment of radiological protection systems among diagnostic radiology facilities in North East India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Thokchom Dewan; Jayaraman, T; Arunkumar Sharma, B

    2017-03-01

    This study aims to assess the adequacy level of radiological protection systems available in the diagnostic radiology facilities located in three capital cities of North East (NE) India. It further attempts to understand, using a multi-disciplinary approach, how the safety codes/standards in diagnostic radiology framed by the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to achieve adequate radiological protection in facilities, have been perceived, conceptualized, and applied accordingly in these facilities. About 30 diagnostic radiology facilities were randomly selected from three capitals of states in NE India; namely Imphal (Manipur), Shillong (Meghalaya) and Guwahati (Assam). A semi-structured questionnaire developed based on a multi-disciplinary approach was used for this study. It was observed that radiological practices undertaken in these facilities were not exactly in line with safety codes/standards in diagnostic radiology of the AERB and the IAEA. About 50% of the facilities had registered/licensed x-ray equipment with the AERB. More than 80% of the workers did not use radiation protective devices, although these devices were available in the facilities. About 85% of facilities had no institutional risk management system. About 70% of the facilities did not carry out periodic quality assurance testing of their x-ray equipment or surveys of radiation leakage around the x-ray room, and did not display radiation safety indicators in the x-ray rooms. Workers in these facilities exhibited low risk perception about the risks associated with these practices. The majority of diagnostic radiology facilities in NE India did not comply with the radiological safety codes/standards framed by the AERB and IAEA. The study found inadequate levels of radiological protection systems in the majority of facilities. This study suggests a need to establish firm measures that comply with the radiological safety codes/standards of the

  2. PREVALENCE OF ANAEMIA AMONG CHILDREN AGED 12 YEARS AND YOUNGER IN NORTH EAST INDIA

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    Rajkumari Rupabati

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE Anaemia is one of the most important public health problem among children. The infants, preschool children, adolescents and pregnant women are at highest risk of nutritional anaemia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of anaemia and its correlation to age, gender, haemoglobin values and magnitude of anaemia among the children of North East India. METHODS A cross sectional study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital between October 2013 to September 2014. A total of 500 children in the age group 0 to 12 years were enrolled after obtaining written informed consent from the parents. Haemoglobin estimation was done by Sahli’s method using finger prick blood samples. As per WHO recommendation, haemoglobin values below 11 gm/dl was considered anaemic. Statistical data were analysed. RESULTS The overall prevalence of anaemia was 71.2% with males having 5.2%higher than females. The majority of age group comprises 1 to ≤5 years (36.0% and 83.3% of them were anaemic. The highest value of haemoglobin estimated was 14.8 gm/dl with the lowest value of 5.2 gm/dl. The mean haemoglobin level was 10.76±1.21 gm/dl. 53.4% children were mildly anaemic. Both male and female children were affected more with mild anaemia than other types of anaemia. CONCLUSION Our results suggest that all the children should be screened for anaemia irrespective of age and sex as the prevalence is high. Early intervention and appropriate measures should be taken to prevent from anaemia and its associated diseases.

  3. HIV/AIDS among pastoralists and refugees in north-east Africa: a neglected problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbessa, Mirgissa Kaba; Mariam, Damen Haile; Kassa, Afework; Alwan, Fathia; Kloos, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    The eight member states (Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan and Uganda) of the Intergovernmental Authority for Development (IGAD) have the largest proportions of cross-border mobile pastoralists and refugees in Africa. Although all IGAD countries have had national HIV/AIDS prevention, care and treatment programmes since the late 1980s, the IGAD Regional HIV & AIDS Partnership Program was (IRAPP) established in 2007 to mitigate the challenges of HIV among neglected pastoral and refugee communities. This article assesses vulnerability of pastoralists and refugee communities to HIV and interventions targeting these groups in the IGAD countries. Outcomes from this study may serve as a baseline for further research and to improve interventions. Published articles were accessed through web searches using PubMed and Google Scholar engines and unpublished documents were collected manually. The search terms were HIV risk behaviour, vulnerability, HIV prevalence and interventions, under the headings pastoralists, refugees, IGAD and north-east Africa for the period 2001-2014. Of the 214 documents reviewed, 78 met the inclusion criteria and were included. Most HIV/AIDS related studies focusing of pastoral communities in IGAD countries were found to be limited in scope and coverage but reveal precarious situations. Sero-prevalence among various pastoral populations ranged from 1% to 21% in Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia and Uganda and from 1% to 5% among refugees in Sudan, Kenya and Uganda. Socioeconomic, cultural, logistic, infrastructure and programmatic factors were found to contribute to continuing vulnerability to HIV. Interventions need to be further contextualised to the needs of those impoverished populations and integrated into national HIV/AIDS programmes. HIV/AIDS remains a major public health concern among the pastoral and refugee communities of IGAD countries. This calls for IGAD to collaborate with national and international partners in

  4. Burnout and its Influencing Factors among Primary Health Care Providers in the North East of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Mohammad; Khosravi, Ahmad; Eghtesadi, Ahmad Reza; Sadeghi, Zakieh; Abedi, Ghasem; Ranjbar, Mansour; Mehrabian, Fardin

    2016-01-01

    Burnout is a popular research topics in service providing jobs, including the health care field. This study aimed at assessing the level of job burnout and to consider the important antecedents which might be related to job burnout among primary health care providers in Iran. The participants in this applied cross-sectional study which was conducted in 2013 were 548 primary health care providers who were randomly selected from among those working in Shahroud, Sabzevar, Neishabour, Bojnord (provinces located in the north east of Iran). Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was administered to the participants and the collected data were analyzed using SPSS through chi-square test and ordinal logistic regression model. The burnout mean score among the participants was 54.1 ± 27.2 and the mean scores of burnout components i.e., emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishment were 15.5 ± 13.6, 3.7 ± 5.4 and 35.5 ± 13.5 respectively. In terms of levels of burnout, 64.2% of the participants showed low levels (n = 352), 18.4% average levels (n = 101) and 17.3% high levels (n = 95). A significant relationship was observed between burnout, job resources and interest in job (p ≤ 0.05). However, no significant relationship was observed between burnout and the place (university) of working, age, satisfaction with income, experience, gender, level of education, marital status, housing status, having a second job and place of residence (p ≥0.05). Lack of personal accomplishment was highly prevalent among the participating primary health care providers. Lack of career advancement and job transfer opportunities may play a role in the burnout of primary health care providers. Therefore, paying attention to this aspect may help to reduce burnout and even increase job engagement.

  5. Vitamin D status and food security in North-East Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlqvist, Mark L

    2013-01-01

    The functions of vitamin D are pleiotropic affecting all body organs and systems in some way. Its adequacy depends principally on sunshine for UV light to stimulate its synthesis in skin and on foods which contain it, either animal-derived or obtained from fungi or mushrooms, with the UV-responsive substrates dehydrocholesterol for vitamin D-3 or ergosterol for vitamin D-2, respectively. Thus, vitamin D health is very environmentally dependent. With ecosytem degradation, whether by atmospheric pollution or food systems which do not derive UV irradiation, as with fish farming or mushroom processing, then this nutrient input into human biology may falter. Vitamin D deficiency is now common and widespread in North-East Asia as elsewhere. When discovered early in the 20th century it was linked to rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults and, for a generation or so, children were given fish, usually cod, liver oil to prevent bone disease. Now cod as a species and many edible fish are threatened. Over-exposure to sun-light increases the risk of skin cancer. We may tackle this problem by vitamin D supplementation with an alternative to fish liver. But the demographic pressures of population size and ageing (when the skin is less UV responsive) make the clinical and public health decisions and strategies demanding. Vitamin D health has become indicative of food security whose usual indicator is food diversity; such diversity may allow lesser concentrations to be more effective in organ and system function, but we have little evidence to support this at present.

  6. Diverse staghorn coral fauna on the mesophotic reefs of north-east Australia.

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    Paul Muir

    Full Text Available Concern for the future of reef-building corals in conditions of rising sea temperatures combined with recent technological advances has led to a renewed interest in documenting the biodiversity of mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs and their potential to provide lineage continuation for coral taxa. Here, we examine species diversity of staghorn corals (genera Acropora and Isopora in the mesophotic zone (below 30 m depth of the Great Barrier Reef and western Coral Sea. Using specimen-based records we found 38 staghorn species in the mesophotic zone, including three species newly recorded for Australia and five species that only occurred below 30 m. Staghorn corals became scarce at depths below 50 m but were found growing in-situ to 73 m depth. Of the 76 staghorn coral species recorded for shallow waters (depth ≤ 30 m in north-east Australia, 21% extended to mesophotic depths with a further 22% recorded only rarely to 40 m depth. Extending into the mesophotic zone provided shallow water species no significant advantage in terms of their estimated global range-size relative to species restricted to shallow waters (means 86.2 X 10(6 km2 and 85.7 X 10(6 km2 respectively, p = 0.98. We found four staghorn coral species at mesophotic depths on the Great Barrier Reef that were previously considered rare and endangered on the basis of their limited distribution in central Indonesia and the far western Pacific. Colonies below 40 m depth showed laterally flattened branches, light and fragile skeletal structure and increased spacing between branches and corallites. The morphological changes are discussed in relation to decreased light, water movement and down-welling coarse sediments. Staghorn corals have long been regarded as typical shallow-water genera, but here we demonstrate the significant contribution of this group to the region's mesophotic fauna and the importance of considering MCEs in reef biodiversity estimates and management.

  7. Diverse staghorn coral fauna on the mesophotic reefs of north-east Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Paul; Wallace, Carden; Bridge, Tom C L; Bongaerts, Pim

    2015-01-01

    Concern for the future of reef-building corals in conditions of rising sea temperatures combined with recent technological advances has led to a renewed interest in documenting the biodiversity of mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs) and their potential to provide lineage continuation for coral taxa. Here, we examine species diversity of staghorn corals (genera Acropora and Isopora) in the mesophotic zone (below 30 m depth) of the Great Barrier Reef and western Coral Sea. Using specimen-based records we found 38 staghorn species in the mesophotic zone, including three species newly recorded for Australia and five species that only occurred below 30 m. Staghorn corals became scarce at depths below 50 m but were found growing in-situ to 73 m depth. Of the 76 staghorn coral species recorded for shallow waters (depth ≤ 30 m) in north-east Australia, 21% extended to mesophotic depths with a further 22% recorded only rarely to 40 m depth. Extending into the mesophotic zone provided shallow water species no significant advantage in terms of their estimated global range-size relative to species restricted to shallow waters (means 86.2 X 10(6) km2 and 85.7 X 10(6) km2 respectively, p = 0.98). We found four staghorn coral species at mesophotic depths on the Great Barrier Reef that were previously considered rare and endangered on the basis of their limited distribution in central Indonesia and the far western Pacific. Colonies below 40 m depth showed laterally flattened branches, light and fragile skeletal structure and increased spacing between branches and corallites. The morphological changes are discussed in relation to decreased light, water movement and down-welling coarse sediments. Staghorn corals have long been regarded as typical shallow-water genera, but here we demonstrate the significant contribution of this group to the region's mesophotic fauna and the importance of considering MCEs in reef biodiversity estimates and management.

  8. Tattoo Practices in North-East India: A Hospital-based Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Binod Kumar; Verma, Shikha

    2016-01-01

    Tattooing has become increasingly popular, particularly among young people. However, little is known about the tattoo practices in North-East India. The primary objective of this study was to know the reasons and motivations of tattoo application and tattoo removal in individuals asking for tattoo removal. The secondary objective was to identify the demography, methods and safety of tattoo practices in these tattooed individuals. A hospital-based cross-sectional study was carried out in 212 consecutive individuals seeking tattoo removal. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were performed for intergroup comparisons. There were 178 (84%) males and 34 (16%) females. The mean ± standard deviation (SD) age of individuals seeking tattoo removal was 21.8 ± 4 years. The mean ± SD age of doing tattoo was 15.8 ± 3 years. Most individuals possessed an amateur tattoo (94.3%), 4.2% a professional one and 1.4% had a combination. Sewing needle was the most common instrument used for making tattoos in 51.4%. The individuals made their tattoos in an unsterile manner in 49.1%. The most common reason for doing tattoo was for fashion in 87.7%. The participants wanted tattoo removal to qualify for jobs, especially in armed forces in 49.5% and due to regret in 21.7%. Black was the most preferred colour in 37.3% followed by green in 28.3%. The fabric ink was the choice of ink in maximum number of individuals, i.e. 93.9%. It was a hospital-based study done only on individuals seeking tattoo removal. It needs caution to generalise the findings in population. In addition, there may be recall bias in the participants. The tattoo was done mostly below 18 years of age in a crude unsterile way. The individuals had poor risk perceptions about various infections and complications of tattooing. There is an urgent need to caution and educate the youngsters and school-going children about safe tattooing and consequences of tattooing.

  9. Evolution and genesis of permafrost peatlands in southern limit of cryolithozone in Europen North-East

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastukhov, Alexander; Kaverin, Dmitry; Marchenko-Vagapova, Tatiana

    2015-04-01

    The North-East of the European part of Russia is currently experiencing a degradation of permafrost due to climate warming. Permafrost peat plateaus extending only about 20% of the territory contain almost 50% of stocks of soil organic carbon (Pastukhov & Kaverin, 2013). Currently in the region extreme southern limit of the permafrost zone with permafrost temperature 0 ... -1 ° C is the far north taiga. Sporadic island permafrost is preserved only in peat plateaus, which are an ideal object for assessing climate change impacts in the event of further thawing of permafrost. On the basis of the macrofossil, palynological and 14C data of peat, Holocene evolution and current state of permafrost peatlands were studed in the extreme southern limit of the East European Cryolithozone. Palynological and radiocarbon data provides evidence of the start of peat accumulation in the early Holocene, about 8000 years ago, in the late Boreal (BO-2). Then the accumulation of peat first significantly slowed down, and then almost stopped between 2500-850 years ago. I.e. about 2500 years ago permafrost was aggradated, which manifested itself in the heave of peatland mounds and a sharp decline in peat accumulation due to dry conditions in raised surface peat. There was the formation of permafrost peat plateaus of modern appearance. Fens occurred from the late-modern Subatlantic (SA-3-SA-R) Holocene period, i.e. after the Little Ice Age and the beginning of the small climatic optimum (about 850 years ago), when the permafrost partially degraded, and formed non-permafrost sphagnum bogs. At the same time (SA-3-SA-R), the gradual and slower peat accumulation proceeded. Vegetation of peat mounds prevents permafrost thawing in the current climate warming. As mounds surface dry out, lichens succeed mosses and bare peat circles are formed. But dry peat has higher insulating properties and prevents from further thawing. Thawing of permafrost peatlands starting from the surface occurs only as

  10. Evaluation and Selection of Potential Biomass Sources of North-East India towards Sustainable Bioethanol Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grihalakshmi D. Nongthombam

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Vegetation biomass production in North-East India within Indo-Burma biodiversity hotspot is luxuriant and available from April to October to consider their potential for bioethanol production. Potential of six lignocellulosic biomass (LCB sources; namely, sugarcane bagasse (BG, cassava aerial parts (CS, ficus fruits (Ficus cunia (FF, “phumdi” (floating biomass, rice straw (RS, and sawdust were investigated for bioethanol production using standard techniques. Morphological and chemical changes were evaluated by Scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and quantity of sugars and inhibitors in LCB were determined by High performance liquid chromatography. Hydrothermally treated BG, CS, and FF released 954.54, 1,354.33, and 1,347.94 mg/L glucose and 779.31, 612.27, and 1,570.11 mg/L of xylose, respectively. Inhibitors produced due to effect of hydrothermal pretreatment ranged from 42.8 to 145.78 mg/L acetic acid, below detection level (BDL to 17.7 µg/L 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, and BDL to 56.78 µg/L furfural. The saccharification efficiency of hydrothermally treated LCB (1.35–28.64% was significantly higher compared with their native counterparts (0.81–17.97%. Consolidated bioprocessing of the LCB using MTCC 1755 (Fusarium oxysporum resulted in maximum ethanol concentration of 0.85 g/L and corresponded to 42 mg ethanol per gram of hydrothermally treated BG in 120 h followed by 0.83 g/L corresponding to 41.5 mg/g of untreated CS in 144 h. These ethanol concentrations corresponded to 23.43 and 21.54% of theoretical ethanol yield, respectively. LCB of CS and FF emerged as a suitable material to be subjected to test for enhanced ethanol production in future experiments through efficient fermentative microbial strains, appropriate enzyme loadings, and standardization of other fermentation parameters.

  11. Stable isotope tracing of Ni and Cu pollution in North-East Norway: Potentials and drawbacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šillerová, Hana; Chrastný, Vladislav; Vítková, Martina; Francová, Anna; Jehlička, Jan; Gutsch, Marissa R; Kocourková, Jana; Aspholm, Paul E; Nilsson, Lars O; Berglen, Tore F; Jensen, Henning K B; Komárek, Michael

    2017-09-01

    The use of Ni and Cu isotopes for tracing contamination sources in the environment remains a challenging task due to the limited information about the influence of various biogeochemical processes influencing stable isotope fractionation. This work focuses on a relatively simple system in north-east Norway with two possible endmembers (smelter-bedrock) and various environmental samples (snow, soil, lichens, PM10). In general, the whole area is enriched in heavy Ni and Cu isotopes highlighting the impact of the smelting activity. However, the environmental samples exhibit a large range of δ60Ni (-0.01 ± 0.03‰ to 1.71 ± 0.02‰) and δ65Cu (-0.06 ± 0.06‰ to -3.94 ± 0.3‰) values which exceeds the range of δ60Ni and δ65Cu values determined in the smelter, i.e. in feeding material and slag (δ60Ni from 0.56 ± 0.06‰ to 1.00 ± 0.06‰ and δ65Cu from -1.67 ± 0.04‰ to -1.68 ± 0.15‰). The shift toward heavier Ni and Cu δ values was the most significant in organic rich topsoil samples in the case of Ni (δ60Ni up to 1.71 ± 0.02‰) and in lichens and snow in the case of Cu (δ65Cu up to -0.06 ± 0.06‰ and -0.24 ± 0.04‰, respectively). These data suggest an important biological and biochemical fractionation (microorganisms and/or metal uptake by higher plants, organo-complexation etc.) of Ni and Cu isotopes, which should be quantified separately for each process and taken into account when using the stable isotopes for tracing contamination in the environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Tattoo practices in north-east India: A hospital-based cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binod Kumar Thakur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tattooing has become increasingly popular, particularly among young people. However, little is known about the tattoo practices in North-East India. Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to know the reasons and motivations of tattoo application and tattoo removal in individuals asking for tattoo removal. The secondary objective was to identify the demography, methods and safety of tattoo practices in these tattooed individuals. Materials and Methods: A hospital-based cross-sectional study was carried out in 212 consecutive individuals seeking tattoo removal. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were performed for intergroup comparisons. Results: There were 178 (84% males and 34 (16% females. The mean ± standard deviation (SD age of individuals seeking tattoo removal was 21.8 ± 4 years. The mean ± SD age of doing tattoo was 15.8 ± 3 years. Most individuals possessed an amateur tattoo (94.3%, 4.2% a professional one and 1.4% had a combination. Sewing needle was the most common instrument used for making tattoos in 51.4%. The individuals made their tattoos in an unsterile manner in 49.1%. The most common reason for doing tattoo was for fashion in 87.7%. The participants wanted tattoo removal to qualify for jobs, especially in armed forces in 49.5% and due to regret in 21.7%. Black was the most preferred colour in 37.3% followed by green in 28.3%. The fabric ink was the choice of ink in maximum number of individuals, i.e. 93.9%. Limitations: It was a hospital-based study done only on individuals seeking tattoo removal. It needs caution to generalise the findings in population. In addition, there may be recall bias in the participants. Conclusion: The tattoo was done mostly below 18 years of age in a crude unsterile way. The individuals had poor risk perceptions about various infections and complications of tattooing. There is an urgent need to caution and educate the youngsters and school-going children about safe

  13. Tattoo Practices in North-East India: A Hospital-based Cross-sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Binod Kumar; Verma, Shikha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tattooing has become increasingly popular, particularly among young people. However, little is known about the tattoo practices in North-East India. Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to know the reasons and motivations of tattoo application and tattoo removal in individuals asking for tattoo removal. The secondary objective was to identify the demography, methods and safety of tattoo practices in these tattooed individuals. Materials and Methods: A hospital-based cross-sectional study was carried out in 212 consecutive individuals seeking tattoo removal. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were performed for intergroup comparisons. Results: There were 178 (84%) males and 34 (16%) females. The mean ± standard deviation (SD) age of individuals seeking tattoo removal was 21.8 ± 4 years. The mean ± SD age of doing tattoo was 15.8 ± 3 years. Most individuals possessed an amateur tattoo (94.3%), 4.2% a professional one and 1.4% had a combination. Sewing needle was the most common instrument used for making tattoos in 51.4%. The individuals made their tattoos in an unsterile manner in 49.1%. The most common reason for doing tattoo was for fashion in 87.7%. The participants wanted tattoo removal to qualify for jobs, especially in armed forces in 49.5% and due to regret in 21.7%. Black was the most preferred colour in 37.3% followed by green in 28.3%. The fabric ink was the choice of ink in maximum number of individuals, i.e. 93.9%. Limitations: It was a hospital-based study done only on individuals seeking tattoo removal. It needs caution to generalise the findings in population. In addition, there may be recall bias in the participants. Conclusion: The tattoo was done mostly below 18 years of age in a crude unsterile way. The individuals had poor risk perceptions about various infections and complications of tattooing. There is an urgent need to caution and educate the youngsters and school-going children about safe tattooing and

  14. Epidemiology and survival of hepatocellular carcinoma in north-east Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norsa'adah, Bachok; Nurhazalini-Zayani, Che Ghazali Che

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is relatively high in Southeast Asia. Globally, HCC has a high fatality rate and short survival. The objectives of this retrospective cohort study were to review the epidemiology and survival of HCC patients at a tertiary centre in north-east of Peninsular Malaysia. Subjects were adult HCC patients diagnosed by histopathology or radio-imaging. Secondary liver carcinoma was excluded. Kaplan Meier and multiple Cox proportional hazard survival analyses were used. Only 210 HCC cases from years 1987-2008, were included in the final analysis. The number of cases was increasing annually. The mean age was 55.0 (SD 13.9) years with male:female ratio of 3.7:1. Approximately 57.6% had positive hepatitis B virus, 2.4% hepatitis C virus, 20% liver cirrhosis and 8.1% chronic liver disease. Only 2.9% had family history and 9.0% had frequently consumed alcohol. Most patients presented with abdominal pain or discomfort and had hepatomegaly, 47.9% had an elevated α-fetoprotein level of 800 IU/ml or more, 51.9% had multiple tumors and 44.8% involved multiple liver lobes. Approximately 63.3% were in stage 3 and 23.4% in stage 4, and 82.9% did not receive any treatment. The overall median survival time was 1.9 months (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.5, 2.3). The 1-month, 6-month, 1-year and 2-year survival rates were 71.8%, 23.3%, 13.0% and 7.3% respectively. Significant prognostic factors were Malay ethnicity [Adjusted hazard ratio (AHR) 1.6; 95%CI: 1.0, 2.5; p=0.030], no chemotherapy [AHR 1.7; 95%CI: 1.1, 2.5; p=0.017] and Child-Pugh class C [AHR 2.6; 95%CI: 1.4, 4.9; p=0.002]. HCC in our study affected a wide age range, mostly male, in advanced stage of disease, with no treatment and very low survival rates. Primary prevention should be advocated in view of late presentation and difficulty of treatment. Vaccination of hepatitis virus and avoidance of liver toxins are to be encouraged.

  15. Opioid substitution therapy in manipur and nagaland, north-east india: operational research in action

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    Langkham Biangtung

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is good evidence for the effectiveness of opioid substitution therapy (OST for injecting drug users (IDUs in middle and high-income countries but little evidence regarding the provision of OST by non-government organisations (NGOs in resource-poor settings. This paper reports on outcomes of an NGO-based OST program providing sub-lingual buprenorphine to opiate dependent IDUs in two north-east Indian states (Manipur and Nagaland, a region where conflict, under-development and injecting of heroin and Spasmoproxyvon (SP are ongoing problems. The objectives of the study were: 1 to calculate OST treatment retention, 2 to assess the impact on HIV risk behaviours and quality of life, and 3 to identify client characteristics associated with cessation of treatment due to relapse. Methods This study involves analysis of data that were routinely and prospectively collected from all clients enrolled in an OST program in Manipur and Nagaland between May 2006 and December 2007 (n = 2569, 1853 in Manipur and 716 in Nagaland using standardised questionnaires, and is best classified as operational research. The data were recorded at intake into the program, after three months, and at cessation. Outcome measures included HIV risk behaviours and quality of life indicators. Predictors of relapse were modelled using binary logistic regression. Results Of all clients enrolled in OST during the month of May 2006 (n = 713, 72.8% remained on treatment after three months, and 63.3% after six months. Statistically significant (p = 0.05 improvements were observed in relation to needle sharing, unsafe sex, incidents of detention, and a range of quality of life measures. Greater spending on drugs at intake (OR 1.20, frequently missing doses (OR 8.82, and having heroin rather than SP as the most problematic drug (OR 1.95 were factors that increased the likelihood of relapse, and longer duration in treatment (OR 0.76 and regular family involvement in

  16. Mineralogy and Geochemistry of Neogene Terrestrial Sediments from North- East of Malatya (Eastern Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkoca, Dicle Bal; Tatar, Cihan

    2017-04-01

    This study focuses on the Neogene alluvial fan deposits at the North- East of Malatya (Eastern Turkey). These alluvial fan sediments are largely the products of stream deposition during Upper Miocene - Pliocene. Previous sedimentary studies suggest that most of the alluvial input into the basin was from the the north, northeast, and east. Paleozoic-Mesozoic Metamorphics, the Oligocene - marine sediments, the Miocene Yamadaǧ Volcanics, and Neogene alluvial and intercalated lacustrine rocks comprise the main lithologic units in the area. Alluvial sediments are ocur in successive mudstone, sandstone and conglomerates. Macroscobic determinations show that clastics in the alluviums are derived from Yamadaǧ Volcanics which are at the north, northeast, and east of the alluviums. Previous petrographic studies show that these volcanics are composed of basaltic andesite to dacite in composition with typical calc-alkaline character. The aim of this study is to interpret the mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of source area of these alluviums. Samples were collected from these alluvial fan alluviums, and X - ray powder diffraction (XRD), ICP-AES, ICP-MS were performed on these samples, Samples consist of clay minerals, calcite, feldspar, quartz and dolomite. Clay minerals were smectite, illite, mixed layer smectite-illite,and palygorskite, with Ca-smectite being the dominant clay phase. Smectite was derived from the transformation of volcanic glass and volcanic rock fragments. These samples are convenient with Fe shales and shales. The ratios of Zr/TiO2, Th/Sc, Zr/Sc, Y/Ni-Cr/V, Al/(Al+Fe+Mn) show dominance of neutral-basic volcanism in the area. Chondrite-normalized REE diagram show the presence of REE-bearing accessory minerals resulted in a positive LREE anomaly with respect to chondrite. Eu/Eu* values are between 0.77 and 1.53, (average 1.17). The absence of Eu anomalies shows that our samples are generally neutral-basic in composition. Key Words: Mineralogy

  17. Food-Safety Hazards in the Pork Chain in Nagaland, North East India: Implications for Human Health

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Sophie Fahrion; Lanu Jamir; Kenivole Richa; Sonuwara Begum; Vilatuo Rutsa; Simon Ao; Padmakumar, Varijaksha P.; Ram Pratim Deka; Delia Grace

    2013-01-01

    Pork occupies an important place in the diet of the population of Nagaland, one of the North East Indian states. We carried out a pilot study along the pork meat production chain, from live animal to end consumer. The goal was to obtain information about the presence of selected food borne hazards in pork in order to assess the risk deriving from these hazards to the health of the local consumers and make recommendations for improving food safety. A secondary objective was to evaluate the ut...

  18. Bournonia excavata (D’Orbigny from the Campanian-Maastrichtian of Stranice (north-east of Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Caffau

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The rudist fauna of Stranice, in the north-east of Slovenia, has been studied for a long time thanks to the good preservation-state of the specimens found in the calcareous breccias from Campanian-Maastrichtian. The presence of Bournonia excavata (d’Orbignyat Stranice is reported for the first time in this work. The specimen described in this paper is compared with other specimens from other carbonate platform deposits, previously described by different authors. In addition, a complete individual with both valves ofRadiolites angeiodes (Lapeirouse is described.

  19. Investigation of Meteorological Extreme Events in the North-East of Iran

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    S. Kouzegaran

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Over the past hundred years, human activity has significantly altered the atmosphere and increase of concentration of greenhouse gases lead to warm the earth's surface. This global warming leads to change of climatic extreme index and increases the intensity and frequency of occurrence of extreme climate events. Investigation of extreme values for planning and policy for the agricultural sector and water resource management is important.In this study, a comprehensive review of extreme indices of temperature and precipitation are discussed. This paper aims to investigate extreme temperature and precipitation indices defined in accordance with CCL, and the study of other climatic parameters in the North East of Iran. Materials and Methods: In this research, statistics and data of some stations in the North East of Iran during the period 1992-2012 were used. To evaluate the extreme climate indices trend, 27 indices of rainfall and temperature, were defined by the ETCCDMI. They were calculated by RClimdex software. In this software, prior to the index calculation, data by quality control software became quantitative and incorrect data were controlled and outlier data were examined. The indices were calculated by daily data. 11 rainfall and 16 temperature indices were calculated by this software.The target of the ETCCDMI process is to delineate a standardized set of indices allowing for comparison across regions. These extreme indices were classified in five categories which included the percentile-based extreme indices, the absolute extreme indices, the threshold extreme indices, the periodic extreme indices, and the other indices. They were estimated at the 0.05 significant levels. The Mann-Kendall test was used to investigate the climatic parameters, maximum relative humidity, sunshine duration and maximum wind speed. Results and Discussion: Thermal analysis results are consistent with warming patterns, and they have showed that hot

  20. The prevalence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in preschool-age children in Mashhad, north-East of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebrani, Paria; Abdolahian, Ebrahim; Behdani, Fatemeh; Vosoogh, Iraj; Javanbakht, Arash

    2007-04-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common childhood-onset psychiatric disorders. Although the onset of ADHD is frequently prior to the age of seven years, there is a paucity of data on the prevalence of the disorder in preschool-age children. This study was performed to determine the prevalence rate of ADHD in preschool-age children in kindergartens of Mashhad, North-East of Iran. One thousand eighty-three (553 males and 530 females) children aged between five and six years, were selected at random from 155 kindergartens in ten districts of Mashhad. The ten-item Conner's Index questionnaire was completed for each child by teachers and parents. Parents of children whose scores were positive for ADHD (>15) were interviewed by a psychiatrist and the ADHD was diagnosed based on DSM-IV diagnostic criteria and the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children Present and Lifetime Version. One hundred thirty-three (12.3%; CI 95%: 10.3 -14.2%) children were diagnosed to have ADHD. The prevalence of ADHD in preschool-age children in North-East of Iran is consistent with previous studies in other countries. This study recommends the need for diagnosis and treatment of ADHD in preschool-age children.

  1. A geochronological study of mafic and acidic lavas from Veneto Volcanic province (North-East Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brombin, Valentina; Webb, Laura; Bonadiman, Costanza; Marzoli, Andrea; Coltorti, Massimo

    2017-04-01

    The Veneto Volcanic Province (VVP), in the North-East of Italy represents one of the most important magmatic province of the Adria Plate. VVP magmatism occurred in a period ranging from late Paleocene to late Oligocene (De Vecchi et al., 1976). Five main volcanic districts can be defined from north-west to south-east: Val d'Adige, Marosticano, Lessini Hills, Berici Hills and Euganean Hills. Most of the volcanic products are relatively undifferentiated lavas, ranging in compostion from mela-nephelinites to quartz-normative tholeiites (Beccaluva et al., 2007). By contrast in the Euganean Hills volcanic and subvolcanic rocks range from subordinate basalts to prevalently acidic types, mostly quartz-trachytes and rhyolites (Milani et al., 1999). Despite of the deep petrological knowledge about this province, the radioisotopic ages of the related volcanic activities for each district are still poorly defined or even totally missing. 40Ar/39Ar ages on 9 samples have been obtained to determine the age range for the VVP. 40Ar/39Ar whole rock step heating analyses yielded ages ranging from 40.7 ± 0.2 Ma to 23.3 ± 1.5 Ma for basanites of Val d'Adige and Marosticano area, respectively. For the Lessinean district, 40Ar/39Ar whole rock analyses for two basanites, one trachybasalt and one alkali basalt close to 40 Ma, while a tholeiite from the same area yielded the youngest age for this district (i.e. 32.9 ± 1.8 Ma). This young age is comparable to 40Ar/39Ar ages obtained for the Euganean Hills intermediate-acidic rocks (Jourdan, pers. comm., 2016), suggesting a time-related shift from more alkaline to Si-saturated magmatism in the whole province. References Barbieri G., Medizza F. (1969). Contributo alla conoscenza geologica della regione di Bolca (Monti Lessini). Memorie dell'Istituto di Geologia e Mineralogia dell'Università di Padova, 27, 1-36. Beccaluva L., Bianchini G., Bonadiman C., Coltorti M., Milani L., Salvini L., Siena F., Tassinari R. (2007). Intraplate

  2. Microplastics Baseline Surveys at the Water Surface and in Sediments of the North-East Atlantic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maes, Thomas; van der Meulen, Myra; Devriese, Lisa; Leslie, H.A.; Huvet, Arnaud; Frère, Laura; Robbens, Johan; Vethaak, A.D.

    2017-01-01

    Microplastic contamination was determined in sediments of the Southern North Sea and floating at the sea surface of NorthWest Europe. Floating concentrations ranged between 0 and 1.5 microplastic/m3, whereas microplastic concentrations in sediments ranged between 0 and 3,146 particles/kg dry weight

  3. A Case Study of Ika North East Local Government Area of Delta

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    2011-01-18

    Jan 18, 2011 ... culture is a product of industrial and urban transformations of the 19th century. Europe. In addition, the industrial and urban life are seen as agents of substantial modifications of the role of the .... lighting, ventilation, basic, infrastructure, and adequate location with regards to work and basic facilities which ...

  4. Phylogeography of amphi-boreal fish: tracing the history of the Pacific herring Clupea pallasii in North-East European seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The relationships between North Atlantic and North Pacific faunas through times have been controlled by the variation of hydrographic circumstances in the intervening Arctic Ocean and Bering Strait. We address the history of trans-Arctic connections in a clade of amphi-boreal pelagic fishes using genealogical information from mitochondrial DNA sequence data. The Pacific and Atlantic herrings (Clupea pallasii and C. harengus) have basically vicarious distributions in the two oceans since pre-Pleistocene times. However, remote populations of C. pallasii are also present in the border waters of the North-East Atlantic in Europe. These populations show considerable regional and life history differentiation and have been recognized in subspecies classification. The chronology of the inter-oceanic invasions and genetic basis of the phenotypic structuring however remain unclear. Results The Atlantic and Pacific herrings both feature high mtDNA diversities (large long-term population sizes) in their native basins, but an ocean-wide homogeneity of C. harengus is contrasted by deep east-west Pacific subdivision within Pacific C. pallasii. The outpost populations of C. pallasii in NE Europe are identified as members of the western Pacific C. pallasii clade, with some retained inter-oceanic haplotype sharing. They have lost diversity in colonization bottlenecks, but have also thereafter accumulated abundant new variation. The data delineate three phylogeographic groups within the European C. pallasii: herring from the inner White Sea; herring from the Mezen and Chesha Bays; and a strongly bottlenecked peripheral population in Balsfjord of the Norwegian Sea. Conclusions The NE European outposts of C. pallasii are judged to be early post-glacial colonists from the NW Pacific. A strong regional substructure has evolved since that time, in contrast to the apparent broad-scale uniformity maintained by herrings in their native basins. The structure only partly matches the

  5. SEISMIC FACIES ANALYSIS ON 2D SEISMIC REFLECTION PROFILE IN BARUNA AND JAYA LINE AT NORTH EAST JAVA BASIN

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    Taufan Wiguna

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Two dimension (2D seismic profile of Baruna and Jaya lines at North-East Java Basin show seismic reflector characteristics that can be used to interpret sediment thickness and continuity. Those reflector characteristics that can be applied for seismic facies analysis that represent depositional environment. This study starts from seismic data processing that using Kirchhoff Post Stack Time Migration method which is 2D seismic profile as result. Seismic reflector characterization has been done to both 2D profiles. Seismic reflector characterization was grouped as (i individual reflection, (ii reflection  configuration, (iii reflection termination, (iv external form. Individual reflection characteristics show high and medium amplitude, medium and low frequency, and continuous. Configuration reflection is continuous with parallel and subparallel type. Reflection termination shows onlap, and external form shows sheet drape. Local mound appearance can be interpreted as paleo-reef. Facies seismic anlysis result for this study area is shelf.

  6. The Challenges and Opportunities of Social Media in the Hospitality Industry. A Study of the North East Region of Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Maha

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to explain what are the key benefits and challenges of Social Media adoption and to underline the importance of Social Media for hotel industry. The importance of Internet in sales and promotion of tourism products is reflected in the figures of recent studies. Social Media represents a new form of communication between hotels and consumers. In tourism, one of the most popular topics for Social Media is to share your experience: writing reviews, post photos, videos and comments. This consumergenerated content is considered credible and unbiased. Hotel industry is facing a similar situation now with Social Media, as they were hesitating to create a website. One of the major errors is that hotels do not respond to social media posts. We assessed the presence and visibility of each 84 hotels on the three major Social Media channels (namely Facebook, Twitter and YouTube at the end of the year 2014. Where the official presence was not immediately found (usually the visitor is redirected from the official website, the first three pages search results were examined to try to establish the hotels official Facebook/Twitter/YouTube account. We carried out content analysis off all hotel Social Media accounts categorized between 3 to 5 stars in the North-East Region of Romania. Following our analysis, it was observed that North-East’s hotel units own in a 95% proportion an online presence. We cannot say the same thing about their presence on the Social Media platform. Surprisingly, most of the hotels we have analyzed have a functional website, 80 out of 84 hotels. We also noticed that the presence in Social Media is at the opposite pole (compared to the number of existing web pages, so that only 48 hotels have a Facebook page, 10 hotels have a Twitter account and 10 hotels have an YouTube account. Of the three networks we notice that Facebook is the most used network by hoteliers in the North-East region of Romania, Twitter

  7. Applying the natural disasters vulnerability evaluation model to the March 2011 north-east Japan earthquake and tsunami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Estrada, Mario Arturo; Yap, Su Fei; Park, Donghyun

    2014-07-01

    Natural hazards have a potentially large impact on economic growth, but measuring their economic impact is subject to a great deal of uncertainty. The central objective of this paper is to demonstrate a model--the natural disasters vulnerability evaluation (NDVE) model--that can be used to evaluate the impact of natural hazards on gross national product growth. The model is based on five basic indicators-natural hazards growth rates (αi), the national natural hazards vulnerability rate (ΩT), the natural disaster devastation magnitude rate (Π), the economic desgrowth rate (i.e. shrinkage of the economy) (δ), and the NHV surface. In addition, we apply the NDVE model to the north-east Japan earthquake and tsunami of March 2011 to evaluate its impact on the Japanese economy. © 2014 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2014.

  8. Cross-sectional study of cattle lice infestation in the region of Nabeul in north-east Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharbi, M; Ben Abdallah, H; Mbarek, Y; Jedidi, M; Darghouth, M A

    2013-12-01

    This cross-sectional study is the first to estimate the prevalence of cattle pediculosis in Tunisia. A total of 39 cattle farms in the region of Nabeul in north-east Tunisia were visited and lice were collected by intensively brushing 789 cattle. The prevalence was estimated to be 20.5% on the farms (8/39) and 4.7% in animals (37/789). Collected parasites were examined under a stereomicroscope and three lice species were identified: Bovicola bovis, Linognathus vituli and Haematopinus eurysternus. Thirty-two animals were infested with the chewing lice B. bovis (4%), three with H. eurysternus (0.4%) and two with L. vituli (0.2%). The infestation prevalence was higher in calves under eight months of age (21.6%)than in adults (0.8%). Decision-makers in animal health should consider this parasitic disease in their control and eradication programmes.

  9. Three years (2008-2010) of measurements of atmospheric concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) at Station Nord, North East Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossi, Rossana; Skjøth, Carsten Ambelas; Skov, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) have been measured for the first time at Station Nord, North-East Greenland, from 2008 to 2010. The data obtained are reported here. Hexachlorobenzene (HCB), endosulfan I and hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) were the predominant compounds...... mechanism for these compounds. A significant correlation with temperature was found for all the other studied pesticides and pesticide degradation products, which indicates that re-emission of these compounds from previously contaminated surfaces is an important factor for the observed variation...... in concentrations. Pesticide concentrations were also correlated with sea ice cover. Concentrations of the compounds that have not been in use for decades correlated with temperature and ice cover, while concentrations of compounds still in use did not correlate with either of these parameters. These observations...

  10. Modeling and forecasting rainfall patterns of southwest monsoons in North-East India as a SARIMA process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimha Murthy, K. V.; Saravana, R.; Vijaya Kumar, K.

    2018-02-01

    Weather forecasting is an important issue in the field of meteorology all over the world. The pattern and amount of rainfall are the essential factors that affect agricultural systems. India experiences the precious Southwest monsoon season for four months from June to September. The present paper describes an empirical study for modeling and forecasting the time series of Southwest monsoon rainfall patterns in the North-East India. The Box-Jenkins Seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (SARIMA) methodology has been adopted for model identification, diagnostic checking and forecasting for this region. The study has shown that the SARIMA (0, 1, 1) (1, 0, 1)4 model is appropriate for analyzing and forecasting the future rainfall patterns. The Analysis of Means (ANOM) is a useful alternative to the analysis of variance (ANOVA) for comparing the group of treatments to study the variations and critical comparisons of rainfall patterns in different months of the season.

  11. THE ONLINE VISIBILITY OF THE ROMANIAN HOTELS. EMPHASIS ON THE HOTELS FROM THE NORTH-EAST REGION OF ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea MAHA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present research is to analyze the online visibility of Romanian hotel websites and what mistakes are identified once we analyze the hotel content. At the same time we want to provide a complex overview of how Romanian hotels use the Internet for their business. The research method used for creating this article is documentary study and content analysis. We have carried out the content analysis of all hotel websites categorized between 3 to 5 stars in the North-East region of Romania. The main mistakes identified consist in the use of websites just for information purposes, the information are often not up to date which promote hotels that no longer exist, and not allow reservations/payments in real time. Many links and services that apparently exist on the website are inactive.

  12. Cancer: scenario and relationship of different geographical areas of the globe with special reference to North East-India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Jagannath Dev; Kalit, Manoj; Nirmolia, Tulika; Saikia, Sidhartha Protim; Sharma, Arpita; Barman, Debanjana

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is becoming the most important public health burden around the globe. As per the GLOBOCAN 2008 estimates, about 12.7 million cancer cases and 7.6 million cancer deaths were estimated to have occurred in 2008. The burden of cancer cases for India in the year 2020 is calculated to be 1,148,757 (male 534,353; female 614,404) compared to 979,786 in 2010. The pattern of cancer incidence is varying among geographical regions, esophageal cancer for example being high in China, lung cancer in USA, and gallbladder cancer in Chile. The question remains why? Is it due to the diversity in genome pool, food habits, risk factor association and role of genetic susceptibility or some other factors associated with it? In India, the North East (NE)-India region is seeing a marked increase in cancer incidence and deaths, with a very different cancer incidence pattern compared to mainland India. The genome pool of the region is also quite distinct from the rest of India. Northeastern tribes are quite distinct from other groups; they are more closely related to East Asians than to other Indians. In this paper an attempt was made to see whether there is any similarity among the pattern of cancer incidence cases for different sites of NE-India region to South or East-Asia. Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA), Pearson Correlation coefficient test was assessed to evaluate the linkage of North-East India region to other regions. A p value India with South and East-Asian regions, which may lead to the conclusion that there might be a genetic linkage between these regions.

  13. Effect of Complement Factor B Gene Polymorphisms on Age-Related Macular Degeneration in North-East of Iran Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Roshani Pour

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the most prevalent cause of irreversible blindness and debilitating in old stages, in developed and developing countries that engage the central part of the retina or macula. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship of the rs4151667 position of the complement factor B gene polymorphism with AMD (dry type with geographic atrophy phenotype in the North East of Iran population. ­Materials & Methods:­ In this descriptive cross-sectional study in 2015-2016, 44 AMD patients (dry type with geographic atrophy phenotype were randomly selected from Gonabad City, Iran, health centers as the patient group. 50 healthy individuals from the same society that have no relative relations with each other or the patients, but were adapted by age and sex to the patient group, were selected as the control group. The ­­polymorphism of rs4151667 (c.26T>A­ position of the complement factor B gene was determined for all samples by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP. Data was analyzed the Chi-square test in 2x2.Contingency software. Findings: The frequency of TT genotype in AMD patients (95.5% was significantly (p=0.048 more than the control group (88.0%, but the frequency of AT genotype in AMD patients (4.5% was significantly (p=0.025 less than the control group (12.0%. Conclusion: The polymorphism of rs4151667 (c.26T>A position of complement factor B is effective on the development of AMD in North East of Iran population.

  14. LIDAR Products, State of Rhode Island: LIDAR for the North East – ARRA and LiDAR for the North East Part II; LiDAR was collected in the Winter and Spring 2011 at a 1 meter or better nominal post spacing (1m GSD) for approximately 1,074 square miles of Rhode Island, whi, Published in 2012, 1:9600 (1in=800ft) scale, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — LIDAR Products dataset current as of 2012. State of Rhode Island: LIDAR for the North East – ARRA and LiDAR for the North East Part II; LiDAR was collected in the...

  15. Open For Business? An Historical, Comparative Study of Public Access to Information about Two Controversial Coastal Developments in North-East Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This paper compares public access to information about two controversial coastal developments in North-east Scotland: the construction of a gas terminal by the British Gas Council and Total in the 1970s, and the current development of "the world's greatest golf course" by the tycoon Donald Trump. Method: Data has been…

  16. A preliminary report on the biomass of chaetognaths in the Indian Ocean comparing the south-west and north-east monsoon periods

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, V.R.

    sorted and the total number of chaetognaths in the samples were then computed The average number of chaetognaths for all samples from each 5 degrees Marsden Square is separately estimated for the south-west and north-east monsoon periods The period mid...

  17. Genetic structure of Europeans: a view from the North-East.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Nelis

    Full Text Available Using principal component (PC analysis, we studied the genetic constitution of 3,112 individuals from Europe as portrayed by more than 270,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs genotyped with the Illumina Infinium platform. In cohorts where the sample size was >100, one hundred randomly chosen samples were used for analysis to minimize the sample size effect, resulting in a total of 1,564 samples. This analysis revealed that the genetic structure of the European population correlates closely with geography. The first two PCs highlight the genetic diversity corresponding to the northwest to southeast gradient and position the populations according to their approximate geographic origin. The resulting genetic map forms a triangular structure with a Finland, b the Baltic region, Poland and Western Russia, and c Italy as its vertexes, and with d Central- and Western Europe in its centre. Inter- and intra- population genetic differences were quantified by the inflation factor lambda (lambda (ranging from 1.00 to 4.21, fixation index (F(st (ranging from 0.000 to 0.023, and by the number of markers exhibiting significant allele frequency differences in pair-wise population comparisons. The estimated lambda was used to assess the real diminishing impact to association statistics when two distinct populations are merged directly in an analysis. When the PC analysis was confined to the 1,019 Estonian individuals (0.1% of the Estonian population, a fine structure emerged that correlated with the geography of individual counties. With at least two cohorts available from several countries, genetic substructures were investigated in Czech, Finnish, German, Estonian and Italian populations. Together with previously published data, our results allow the creation of a comprehensive European genetic map that will greatly facilitate inter-population genetic studies including genome wide association studies (GWAS.

  18. Large-scale hydrological modelling in the semi-arid north-east of Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güntner, Andreas

    2002-07-01

    Semi-arid areas are, due to their climatic setting, characterized by small water resources. An increasing water demand as a consequence of population growth and economic development as well as a decreasing water availability in the course of possible climate change may aggravate water scarcity in future, which often exists already for present-day conditions in these areas. Understanding the mechanisms and feedbacks of complex natural and human systems, together with the quantitative assessment of future changes in volume, timing and quality of water resources are a prerequisite for the development of sustainable measures of water management to enhance the adaptive capacity of these regions. For this task, dynamic integrated models, containing a hydrological model as one component, are indispensable tools. The main objective of this study is to develop a hydrological model for the quantification of water availability in view of environmental change over a large geographic domain of semi-arid environments. The study area is the Federal State of Ceará (150 000 km2) in the semi-arid north-east of Brazil. Mean annual precipitation in this area is 850 mm, falling in a rainy season with duration of about five months. Being mainly characterized by crystalline bedrock and shallow soils, surface water provides the largest part of the water supply. The area has recurrently been affected by droughts which caused serious economic losses and social impacts like migration from the rural regions. The hydrological model Wasa (Model of Water Availability in Semi-Arid Environments) developed in this study is a deterministic, spatially distributed model being composed of conceptual, process-based approaches. Water availability (river discharge, storage volumes in reservoirs, soil moisture) is determined with daily resolution. Sub-basins, grid cells or administrative units (municipalities) can be chosen as spatial target units. The administrative units enable the coupling of Wasa in

  19. Microplastics Baseline Surveys at the Water Surface and in Sediments of the North-East Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Maes

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Microplastic contamination was determined in sediments of the Southern North Sea and floating at the sea surface of North West Europe. Floating concentrations ranged between 0 and 1.5 microplastic/m3, whereas microplastic concentrations in sediments ranged between 0 and 3,146 particles/kg dry weight sediment. In sediments, mainly fibers and spheres were found, whereas at the sea surface fragments were dominant. At the sea surface, concentrations of microplastics are lower and more variable than in sediments, meaning that larger sample sizes and water volumes are required to find detectable concentrations. We have calculated the widths of the confidence intervals (CI for different sample sizes, to give a first indication of the necessary sample size for a microplastic survey at the water surface. Higher concentrations of floating microplastics were found near estuaries. In sediments, estuaries and areas with a high organic carbon content were likely hotspots. Standardization of monitoring methods within marine regions is recommended to compare and assess microplastics pollution over time.

  20. Tracking Seed Fates of Tropical Tree Species: Evidence for Seed Caching in a Tropical Forest in North-East India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Swati; Datta, Aparajita

    2015-01-01

    Rodents affect the post-dispersal fate of seeds by acting either as on-site seed predators or as secondary dispersers when they scatter-hoard seeds. The tropical forests of north-east India harbour a high diversity of little-studied terrestrial murid and hystricid rodents. We examined the role played by these rodents in determining the seed fates of tropical evergreen tree species in a forest site in north-east India. We selected ten tree species (3 mammal-dispersed and 7 bird-dispersed) that varied in seed size and followed the fates of 10,777 tagged seeds. We used camera traps to determine the identity of rodent visitors, visitation rates and their seed-handling behavior. Seeds of all tree species were handled by at least one rodent taxon. Overall rates of seed removal (44.5%) were much higher than direct on-site seed predation (9.9%), but seed-handling behavior differed between the terrestrial rodent groups: two species of murid rodents removed and cached seeds, and two species of porcupines were on-site seed predators. In addition, a true cricket, Brachytrupes sp., cached seeds of three species underground. We found 309 caches formed by the rodents and the cricket; most were single-seeded (79%) and seeds were moved up to 19 m. Over 40% of seeds were re-cached from primary cache locations, while about 12% germinated in the primary caches. Seed removal rates varied widely amongst tree species, from 3% in Beilschmiedia assamica to 97% in Actinodaphne obovata. Seed predation was observed in nine species. Chisocheton cumingianus (57%) and Prunus ceylanica (25%) had moderate levels of seed predation while the remaining species had less than 10% seed predation. We hypothesized that seed traits that provide information on resource quantity would influence rodent choice of a seed, while traits that determine resource accessibility would influence whether seeds are removed or eaten. Removal rates significantly decreased (p seed size. Removal rates were significantly

  1. Treatment-seeking for febrile illness in north-east India: an epidemiological study in the malaria endemic zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahanta Jagadish

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper studies the determinants of utilization of health care services, especially for treatment of febrile illness in the malaria endemic area of north-east India. Methods An area served by two districts of Upper Assam representing people living in malaria endemic area was selected for household survey. A sample of 1,989 households, in which at least one member of household suffered from febrile illness during last three months and received treatment from health service providers, were selected randomly and interviewed by using the structured questionnaire. The individual characteristics of patients including social indicators, area of residence and distance of health service centers has been used to discriminate or group the patients with respect to their initial and final choice of service providers. Results Of 1,989 surveyed households, initial choice of treatment-seeking for febrile illness was self-medication (17.8%, traditional healer (Vaidya(39.2%, government (29.3% and private (13.7% health services. Multinomial logistic regression (MLR analysis exhibits the influence of occupation, area of residence and ethnicity on choice of health service providers. The traditional system of medicine was commonly used by the people living in remote areas compared with towns. As all the febrile cases finally received treatment either from government or private health service providers, the odds (Multivariate Rate Ratio was almost three-times higher in favour of government services for lower households income people compared to private. Conclusion The study indicates the popular use of self-medication and traditional system especially in remote areas, which may be the main cause of delay in diagnosis of malaria. The malaria training given to the paramedical staff to assist the health care delivery needs to be intensified and expanded in north-east India. The people who are economically poor and living in remote areas mainly

  2. Molecular identification and phenotypic characterisation of Sporothrix globosa from clinical cases of Eastern Assam, North-east India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reema Nath

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sporotrichosis is known to be endemic in the state of Assam, North-east India, which is situated in the Sub-Himalayan region. This disease is an acute or chronic infection caused by Sporothrix schenckii species complex which currently includes several species of clinical relevance such as Sporothrix brasiliensis, Sporothrix globosa, Sporothrix schenckii sensu stricto, Sporothrix albicans, Sporothrix mexicana, Sporothrix pallida and Sporothrix luriei. S. globosa is the prevalent species in India. Eight culture-positive patients were diagnosed from suspected consecutive cases of two lymphocutaneous and six fixed cutaneous forms over a period of 4 years in a clinical mycology laboratory of a tertiary care centre in Eastern Assam. Phenotypic speciation was inconclusive using the criteria of Marimon et al. because of atypical growth pattern shown by the isolates. Our isolates showed good growth at 37°C ranging from 6 to 27 mm; four of the isolates showed growth of 11–27 mm unlike S. globosa strains reported earlier. Molecular identification was done by sequencing both the internal transcribed spacer (ITS region and the calmodulin (CAL protein encoding gene (partial. All the isolates were identified as S. globosa. Molecular confirmation of species using ITS region and CAL protein encoding gene (partial is necessary for isolates of S. globosa showing atypical biopatterns.

  3. Food-Safety Hazards in the Pork Chain in Nagaland, North East India: Implications for Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sophie Fahrion

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Pork occupies an important place in the diet of the population of Nagaland, one of the North East Indian states. We carried out a pilot study along the pork meat production chain, from live animal to end consumer. The goal was to obtain information about the presence of selected food borne hazards in pork in order to assess the risk deriving from these hazards to the health of the local consumers and make recommendations for improving food safety. A secondary objective was to evaluate the utility of risk-based approaches to food safety in an informal food system. We investigated samples from pigs and pork sourced at slaughter in urban and rural environments, and at retail, to assess a selection of food-borne hazards. In addition, consumer exposure was characterized using information about hygiene and practices related to handling and preparing pork. A qualitative hazard characterization, exposure assessment and hazard characterization for three representative hazards or hazard proxies, namely Enterobacteriaceae, T. solium cysticercosis and antibiotic residues, is presented. Several important potential food-borne pathogens are reported for the first time including Listeria spp. and Brucella suis. This descriptive pilot study is the first risk-based assessment of food safety in Nagaland. We also characterise possible interventions to be addressed by policy makers, and supply data to inform future risk assessments.

  4. Crustal seismic anisotropy beneath Shillong plateau - Assam valley in North East India: Shear-wave splitting analysis using local earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Antara; Baruah, Santanu; Piccinini, Davide; Saikia, Sowrav; Phukan, Manoj K.; Chetia, Monisha; Kayal, J. R.

    2017-10-01

    We present crustal anisotropy estimates constrained by shear wave splitting (SWS) analysis using local earthquakes in the Shillong plateau and Assam valley area, North East India (NE India) region. Splitting parameters are determined using an automated cross-correlation (CC) method. We located 330 earthquakes recorded by 17 broadband seismic stations during 2001-2014 in the study area. Out of these 330 events, seismograms of 163 events are selected for the SWS analysis. Relatively small average delay times (0.039-0.084 s) indicate existence of moderate crack density in the crust below the study area. It is found that fast polarization directions vary from station to station depending on the regional stress system as well as geological conditions. The spatial pattern of crustal anisotropy in the area is controlled mostly by tectonic movement of the Indian plate towards NE. Presence of several E-W and N-S trending active faults in the area also play an important role on the observed pattern of crustal anisotropy.

  5. Assessment of marine debris on the coastal wetland of Martil in the North-East of Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshawafi, Adel; Analla, Mohamed; Alwashali, Ebrahim; Aksissou, Mustapha

    2017-04-15

    Plastic waste at the coastal wetland in Martil beach in the North-East of Morocco is one of the problems that have appeared recently. This study aims to characterize the marine debris in the coast of Martil during the year 2015. The sampling is seasonally by type and size. The result shows, for the macro debris, the abundance of plastic (57%), lumber and paper (21.93%), cloth and fabric (7.8%), glass (5.42%), metal (4.40%), and rubber (3.4%). Micro debris is also present in the area in several forms such as wood, plants, and others by 75,63%. This was followed by the foam (26,95%), line (7,8%), and the film (1,23%). The seasonal variation (S1: January-March and S3: July to September) are the most polluted months of the year. The sources of marine debris are mainly tourism (beach users), land (run off), and commercial fishing in the four seasons of the year. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevalence of Echinococcus granulosus taeniasis in stray dogs in the region of Constantine (North-East Algeria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohil, K; Benchikh El Fegoun, M C; Gharbi, M

    2017-10-01

    In North Africa, the domestic dog is regarded as the main reservoir for infection by Echinococcus granulosus of domestic livestock and man. In Algeria, there is very little data on the rate of infestation of dogs, while the prevalence of E. granulosus in the definitive host is a very reliable marker of the potential risk of transmission of cystic tapeworm to humans and livestock. To find out this information, a survey was conducted to assess the prevalence of infection with E. granulosus in stray dogs in the region of Constantine (North-East Algeria). We autopsied and examined 120 stray dogs, 22 (18.3%) of which were infected with E. granulosus, with an average intensity of infestation of 249 worms. The prevalence in the area of survey was evaluated: 15.5% (14/90) and 26.6% (8/30) dogs were parasitized by E. granulosus in urban and rural areas respectively. The influence of age on the rate of infection was very marked. In addition, the appreciation of the prevalence of parasitism by cestodes as a whole showed that 56 (46.6%) animals out of 120 were infected. Facing such a situation of endemic tapeworm parasitism, with a potential risk of transmission to humans, there is an urgent need to take measures to control and break the epidemiological cycles of the parasite.

  7. Haematological and biochemical indicators of tropical theileriosis diseased cattle in wilaya of Sétif (North East Algeria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayadi, Ouarda; Gharbi, Mohamed; Benchikh-Elfegoun, Mohammed Cherif

    2017-06-01

    The authors investigated biochemical and haematological parameters in 40 healthy and 40 tropical theileriosis (Theileria annulata) clinically infected cattle in El Eulma region (North East Algeria). The mean haematological and biochemical parameters including the number of erythrocytes, haemoglobin, haematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration and mean corpuscular haemoglobin were estimated. The mean hematological and biochemical parameters including the number of leukocytes, erythrocytes, hemoglobin, hematocrit, glucose, albumin, total proteins decreased significantly (p = 0.005; 0.008; 0.03 0.048; 0.002; 0.027 and 0.018; respectively) in Montbéliard breed clinically infected with T. annulata. In all diseased animals, the concentration of total and direct bilirubin increased significantly (p < 0.001). In cross breed cattle, the erythrocytes, hemoglobin, hematocrit means decreased significantly (p = 0.027; 0.003 and <0.001, respectively). Two types of anemia were detected: a microcytic hypochromic anemia in Montbéliard breed clinically infected cattle and normocytic normochromic anemia in local and cross breed cattle. Tropical theileriosis induces severe biochemical and haematological alterations that should be taken into consideration by field veterinarians for both the diagnosis of the disease and its treatment.

  8. Biochemical and biological characterization of Naja kaouthia venom from North-East India and its neutralization by polyvalent antivenom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Diganta; Urs, Nanjaraj; Hiremath, Vilas; Vishwanath, Bannikuppe Sannanaik; Doley, Robin

    2013-01-01

    This study describes biochemical and biological properties of Naja kaouthia (Indian monocled cobra) venom of North-East India. The LD50 of the crude venom was found to be 0.148mg/kg and neurotoxicitic symptoms like paralysis of lower limbs and heavy difficulty in breathing at sub-lethal dose in mice was observed. The venom exhibited PLA2, indirect hemolytic and myotoxic activities but showed weak proteolytic and low direct hemolytic activities. It did not exhibit any hemorrhage when injected intradermally to mice. Anticoagulant activity was prominent when recalcification, prothrombin and activated partial thrombinplastin time were tested on platelet poor plasma. Rotem analysis of whole citrated blood in presence of venom showed delay in coagulation time and clot formation time. Fibrinogen of whole citrated blood was depleted by venom when analyzed in Sonoclot. Crude venom at 10µg and after 16hr of incubation was found to degrade α chain of fibrinogen. Neutralization study showed that Indian polyvalent antivenom could neutralize some of the biochemical and biological activities as well as its fibrinogenolytic activity. PMID:24349704

  9. Purification and Characterization of Nk-3FTx: A Three Finger Toxin from the Venom of North East Indian Monocled Cobra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Diganta; Sharma, Maitreyee; Kumar Das, Hemanga; Pratim Sahu, Partha; Doley, Robin

    2016-02-01

    Snake venom three finger toxins (3FTxs) are a non-enzymatic family of venom proteins abundantly found in elapids. We have purified a 7579.5 ± 0.591 Da 3FTx named as Nk-3FTx from the venom of Naja kaouthia of North East India origin. The primary structure was determined by a combination of N-terminal sequencing and electrospray ionization liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. Biochemical and biological characterization reveal that it is nontoxic to human cell lines and exhibit mild anticoagulant activity when tested on citrated human plasma. Nk-3FTx was found to affect the compound action potential (CAP) and nerve conduction velocity of isolated toad sciatic nerve. This is the first report of a non-conventional 3FTx from Naja kaouthia venom that reduces CAP for its neurotoxic effect. Further studies can be carried out to understand the mechanism of action and to explore its potential therapeutic application. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Nutritional Assessment of Patients with Head and Neck Cancer in North-East India and Dietary Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Abhinandan; Bahar, Iqbal; Saikia, Abijit

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancer (HNCA) patients have poor nutritional status which clearly bears a negative prognosis in cancer. There is no study and consensus on nutritional assessment tools and diet structure for such patients. This study intends to determine the prevalence of malnutrition and formulate a diet chart keeping in view the general food habit and economic condition of HNCA patients of North East (NE) region. To find out an affordable dietary intervention for HNCA patients based on dietary principles. To assess the role of nutritional assessment tools in these group of patients. This is a 1-year prospective interventional study on HNCA patients attending the Dept of ENT of a teaching hospital. The outcome of the nutritional intervention using a specific diet were assessed using clinical, laboratory and anthropomorphic assessment tools and indices like Prognostic Nutritional Index (PNI) and Nutritional Assessment Index (NAI). The study diet provided appropriate amounts of nutrients to HNCA patients as evident from improvements in anthropomorphic parameters and nutritional indices. Clinically, Hemoglobin percentage (Hb%), Body Mass Index (BMI), Mid Arm Circumference (MAC) and triceps skin fold thickness (TST) were found to be reliable malnutrition markers. Nutritional Assessment Index has been found to be the best index to evaluate malnutrition. The daily requirement of nutrients for HNCA patients can be satisfactorily met by adopting specific diet chart presented in our study. As no structured diet plan are available in literature, our diet chart can act as a template diet appropriate for HNCA patients of this region.

  11. Analyzing Land Use/Land Cover Changes Using Remote Sensing and GIS in Rize, North-East Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selçuk Reis

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Mapping land use/land cover (LULC changes at regional scales is essential for a wide range of applications, including landslide, erosion, land planning, global warming etc. LULC alterations (based especially on human activities, negatively effect the patterns of climate, the patterns of natural hazard and socio-economic dynamics in global and local scale. In this study, LULC changes are investigated by using of Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems (GIS in Rize, North-East Turkey. For this purpose, firstly supervised classification technique is applied to Landsat images acquired in 1976 and 2000. Image Classification of six reflective bands of two Landsat images is carried out by using maximum likelihood method with the aid of ground truth data obtained from aerial images dated 1973 and 2002. The second part focused on land use land cover changes by using change detection comparison (pixel by pixel. In third part of the study, the land cover changes are analyzed according to the topographic structure (slope and altitude by using GIS functions. The results indicate that severe land cover changes have occurred in agricultural (36.2% (especially in tea gardens, urban (117%, pasture (-72.8% and forestry (-12.8% areas has been experienced in the region between 1976 and 2000. It was seen that the LULC changes were mostly occurred in coastal areas and in areas having low slope values.

  12. Analyzing Land Use/Land Cover Changes Using Remote Sensing and GIS in Rize, North-East Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Selçuk

    2008-10-01

    Mapping land use/land cover (LULC) changes at regional scales is essential for a wide range of applications, including landslide, erosion, land planning, global warming etc. LULC alterations (based especially on human activities), negatively effect the patterns of climate, the patterns of natural hazard and socio-economic dynamics in global and local scale. In this study, LULC changes are investigated by using of Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in Rize, North-East Turkey. For this purpose, firstly supervised classification technique is applied to Landsat images acquired in 1976 and 2000. Image Classification of six reflective bands of two Landsat images is carried out by using maximum likelihood method with the aid of ground truth data obtained from aerial images dated 1973 and 2002. The second part focused on land use land cover changes by using change detection comparison (pixel by pixel). In third part of the study, the land cover changes are analyzed according to the topographic structure (slope and altitude) by using GIS functions. The results indicate that severe land cover changes have occurred in agricultural (36.2%) (especially in tea gardens), urban (117%), pasture (-72.8%) and forestry (-12.8%) areas has been experienced in the region between 1976 and 2000. It was seen that the LULC changes were mostly occurred in coastal areas and in areas having low slope values.

  13. Freshwater ostracods (Crustacea and environmental variability of polygon ponds in the tundra of the Indigirka Lowland, north-east Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Schneider

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater ostracods (Crustacea, Ostracoda are valuable biological indicators. In Arctic environments, their habitat conditions are barely known and the abundance and diversity of ostracods is documented only in scattered records with incomplete ecological characterization. To determine the taxonomic range of ostracod assemblages and their habitat conditions in polygon ponds in the Indigirka Lowland, north-east Siberia, we collected more than 100 living ostracod individuals per site with a plankton net (mesh size 65 µm and an exhaustor system from 27 water bodies and studied them in the context of substrate and hydrochemical data. During the summer of 2011, a single pond site and its ostracod population was selected for special study. This first record of the ostracod fauna in the Indigirka Lowland comprises eight species and three additional taxa. Fabaeformiscandona krochini and F. groenlandica were documented for the first time in continental Siberia. Repeated sampling of a low-centre polygon pond yielded insights into the population dynamics of F. pedata. We identified air temperature and precipitation as the main external drivers of water temperatures, water levels, ion concentrations and water stable isotope composition on diurnal and seasonal scales.

  14. Food-safety hazards in the pork chain in Nagaland, North East India: implications for human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrion, Anna Sophie; Jamir, Lanu; Richa, Kenivole; Begum, Sonuwara; Rutsa, Vilatuo; Ao, Simon; Padmakumar, Varijaksha P; Deka, Ram Pratim; Grace, Delia

    2013-12-24

    Pork occupies an important place in the diet of the population of Nagaland, one of the North East Indian states. We carried out a pilot study along the pork meat production chain, from live animal to end consumer. The goal was to obtain information about the presence of selected food borne hazards in pork in order to assess the risk deriving from these hazards to the health of the local consumers and make recommendations for improving food safety. A secondary objective was to evaluate the utility of risk-based approaches to food safety in an informal food system. We investigated samples from pigs and pork sourced at slaughter in urban and rural environments, and at retail, to assess a selection of food-borne hazards. In addition, consumer exposure was characterized using information about hygiene and practices related to handling and preparing pork. A qualitative hazard characterization, exposure assessment and hazard characterization for three representative hazards or hazard proxies, namely Enterobacteriaceae, T. solium cysticercosis and antibiotic residues, is presented. Several important potential food-borne pathogens are reported for the first time including Listeria spp. and Brucella suis. This descriptive pilot study is the first risk-based assessment of food safety in Nagaland. We also characterise possible interventions to be addressed by policy makers, and supply data to inform future risk assessments.

  15. Evolution of quadrupole and octupole collectivity north-east of $^{132}$ Sn: the even Te and Xe isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to study excited states in isotopes north-east of the doubly-magic $^{132}$Sn by $\\gamma$-ray spectroscopy following "safe" Coulomb excitation. The experiment aims to the determine B(E2) and B(E3) values to follow the evolution of quadrupole and octupole collectivity when going away from the shell closures at Z = 50 and N = 82. The B(E2; 0$^+_{gs}$ $\\rightarrow$ 2$^+_{1}$) values in the even isotopes $^{138-144}$Xe have been measured at REX-ISOLDE and the systematic trend towards neutron-rich nuclei is well described even by an empirical Grodzins-type formula. An increasing dipole moment observed for $^{140,142}$Xe is interpreted as indirect signature of increasing octupole correlations peaking at N = 88. So far, no B(E3) values are known. In contrast to the Xe isotopes, the Te ones, in particular $^{136}$Te, are known for their notoriously irregular behaviour. In order to understand the nuclear structure also on a microscopic basis, the isotope $^{136}$Te with just one pair of protons and neutrons...

  16. RESEARCH CONCERNING THE EFFECTS OF THE PUBLIC POLICIES ON THE UNEMPLOYMENT AMONG THE YOUNG PEOPLE IN THE NORTH-EAST REGION OF ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulian CONDRATOV

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper has the goal to identify the specific role that various regulatory institutions of the labor market have on the variation of the macroeconomic indicators which describe the employment situation of the young people on the labor market in the North-East Region of Romania. In this research we have used statistic data provided by the National Institute of Statistics of Romania among which we have selected a series of relevant variables regarding the characterization of the public policies for the labor market and the legislation of employees’ protection. Their influence on the variation of the unemployment rate and the employment rate concerning the young people in the North-East Region was studied using the method of the statistics regression, undergoing a filtration using the Stepwise procedure, implemented within the informatics program SPSS.

  17. Prehospital characteristics in the North East Department of Haiti: a cross-sectional study from a low-income setting without prehospital systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluisio, Adam R; Gore, Robert; Decome, Isnelle; De Wulf, Annelies; Bloem, Christina

    2014-06-01

    Although prehospital care is recognized as key in health systems development, it has been largely neglected in Haiti. The North East Department is one of the poorest areas of Haiti, and is a region where no data on out-of-hospital health care exists. This research assessed prehospital characteristics in the North East Department with the aim of providing baseline data to inform prehospital systems development. In this observational study, data were collected from patients presenting at the Fort Liberté Hospital, the public regional referral health center in the North East Department. Data were accrued from April 2, 2012 through June 5, 2012. All patients accessing acute care at the hospital were eligible for enrollment. After obtaining consent, data on demographics, health needs, and prehospital information were gathered via a standardized questionnaire administered by hospital staff trained in study protocols. Data were collected from 441 patient visits. The median age was 24 years, with 62% of the population being female. Medical complaints comprised 75% of visits, with fever and gastrointestinal complaints being the most common reasons for presentation. Traumatic injuries accounted for 25% of encounters, with an equal distribution of blunt and penetrating events. Extremity injuries were the most common traumatic subclassification. The majority of patients (67.2%) were transported by motorcycle taxi and paid transport fees. Trauma patients were more likely to be transported without charge (OR = 9.10; 95% CI, 2.19-37.76; P income setting that lacks surveillance systems was feasible and required minimal resources. Motorcycle taxi drivers function as the primary emergency transport mechanism and may represent an access point for prehospital interventions in the North East Department of Haiti. Out-of-hospital care is nearly nonexistent in the region and its development has the potential to yield public health benefits.

  18. 'Northern Lights’: an assessment of the political and economic challenges facing North East England in the context of greater Scottish autonomy

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw, Keith

    2017-01-01

    Drawing on recent research on the Anglo-Scottish border, this article examines the social and economic impact of a more powerful Scotland on its “nearest neighbors” in the North East of England. In examining a series of competing narratives that shape how the significance of the Anglo-Scottish border and borderlands have been understood, the discussion begins by highlighting the longevity of a traditional conflictual narrative that a more powerful Scotland will undermine the North East’s econ...

  19. Distribution of calcifying and silicifying phytoplankton in relation to environmental and biogeochemical parameters during the late stages of the 2005 North East Atlantic Spring Bloom

    OpenAIRE

    LeBlanc, K.; Hare, C. E.; Feng, Y.; Berg, G. M.; G. R. DiTullio; A. Neeley; I. Benner; Sprengel, C.; Beck, A.; Sanudo-Wilhelmy, S. A.; Passow, U.; Klinck, K.; Rowe, J. M.; Wilhelm, S W; Brown, C W

    2009-01-01

    The late stage of the North East Atlantic (NEA) spring bloom was investigated during June 2005 along a transect section from 45 to 66° N between 15 and 20° W in order to characterize the contribution of siliceous and calcareous phytoplankton groups and describe their distribution in relation to environmental factors. We measured several biogeochemical parameters such as nutrients, surface trace metals, algal pigments, biogenic silica (BSi), particulate inorganic carbon ...

  20. Current meter - direction and other data from FIXED PLATFORMS from the North East Greenland Sea in support of the Northeast Water Polyna Study from 1992-07-18 to 1993-07-27 (NODC Accession 9500078)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter - direction and other data were collected from FIXED PLATFORMS in the North East Greenland Sea from 18 July 1992 to 27 July 1993. Data were collected...

  1. Distribution of blood pressure & correlates of hypertension in school children aged 5-14 years from North East India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borah, Prasanta Kr; Devi, Utpala; Biswas, Dipankar; Kalita, Hem Ch; Sharma, Meenakshi; Mahanta, Jagadish

    2015-09-01

    Elevated blood pressure (BP) in the young predicts serious cardiovascular events in the adults. High prevalence of adult hypertension reported from Assam, North East (NE) India may be linked with elevated blood pressure in the childhood. The present study was an attempt to describe the distribution of BP and correlates of hypertension in children aged 5-14 yr. A total of 10,003 school children from 99 schools of Dibrugarh district, Assam, NE India, were surveyed by stratified random cluster method. Blood pressure, demographic and anthropometric information were recorded. Blood pressure was categorized in to normal, prehypertension, stage I and stage II hypertension. Girls had significantly higher (104.2 ± 12.0 vs. 103.2 ± 11.6 mm Hg, p0 blood pressure (SBP) than boys. Both SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) revealed significant correlation with age, height, weight and BMI in overall and in gender specific analysis. Hypertension was found in 7.6 per cent school children (Boys: 7.3%, Girls: 7.8%). In multivariable analysis older age (OR 3.3, 95% CI: 2.82-3.91), children from tea garden community (OR 1.3, 95% CI: 1.08-1.55) and other community (OR 1.4, 95% CI: 1.18-1.73) and overweight (OR 1.5, 95% CI: 1.1-2.1) were independently associated with hypertension. Mean blood pressure in the young school children of 5-14 yr was high. A programme comprising screening, early detection and health promotion through school health programmes may help prevent future complications of hypertension.

  2. Prevalence of molecular subtypes and prognosis of invasive breast cancer in north-east of Morocco: retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennis Sanae

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast carcinoma is known as a heterogeneous disease because gene expression analyses identify several subtypes and the molecular profiles are prognostic and predictive for patients. Our aim, in this study, is to estimate the prevalence of breast cancer subtypes and to determine the relationship between clinico-pathological characteristics, overall survival (OS and disease free survival (DFS for patients coming from north-east of Morocco. Methods We reviewed 366 cases of breast cancer diagnosed between January 2007 to June 2010 at the Department of pathology. Age, size tumor, metastatic profile, node involvement profile, OS and DFS were analyzed on 181 patients. These last parameters were estimated by Kaplan-Meier analysis and log-rank test to estimate outcome differences among subgroups. Results The average age was 45 years, our patients were diagnosed late (57% stage III, 17.5% stage IV with a high average tumor size. Luminal A subtype was more prevalent (53.6% associated with favorable clinic-pathological characteristics, followed by luminal B (16.4%, Her2-overexpressing (12.6%, basal-like (12.6% and unclassified subtype (4.9%. Survival analysis showed a significant difference between subtypes. The triple negative tumors were associated with poor prognosis (49% OS, 39% DFS, whereas the luminal A were associated with a better prognosis (88% OS, 59% DFS. The luminal B and the Her2-overexpressing subtypes were associated with an intermediate prognosis (77% and 75% OS, and 41% and 38% DFS respectively. Conclusion This study showed that molecular classification by immunohistochemistry was necessary for therapeutic decision and prognosis of breast carcinoma. The luminal A subtype was associated with favorable biological characteristics and a better prognosis than triple negative tumors that were associated with a poor prognosis and unfavorable clinic-pathological characteristics.

  3. The North East Italy (NI) broadband seismic network run by OGS: experience in improving the long period performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesaresi, D.

    2009-04-01

    The NI broadband seismic network is designed to monitor regional seismic activity of North East Italy and surroundings as well as to provide high quality data for various research projects in regional and global broadband seismology, like moment tensor determination. The network, grown during the last 30 years within local Civil Defence agencies and neighbouring scientific institutions cooperation, currently consists of 11 digital broadband stations equipped with Streckeisen STS-2 and STS-1, Nanometrics Trillium 40 and Guralp CMG-3T seismometers with 120 and 40 seconds long period corners; most of the seismic stations are also equipped with accelerometers. Waveforms and parametric data of the NI seismic network are transmitted in real time to the Friuli-Venezia Giulia,Veneto and Provincia di Trento Civil Defence Agencies, to the Italian National Institute for Geophysics and Volcanology (INGV) and to the Earth Science Department (DST) of the Trieste University in Italy, to the Austrian Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG) in Vienna, Austria and to the Environmental Agency of the Republic of Slovenia (ARSO) in Ljubljana, Slovenia to support emergency management and seismological studies in the whole Alps-Dinarides junction zone. The commercial Antelope software suite from BRTT has been chosen as the common basis for real time data exchange, rapid location of earthquakes and alerting. In order to guarantee high quality installations, we sustain a continuous effort that involves searches for appropriate sites, away from sources of long period noise, improvements in installation procedures and insulation techniques, maintenance of transfer function files and routine monitoring of noise conditions at individual existing station. The quality of the seismic data is checked through the noise Power Spectral Density (PSD) analysis. The insulation equipment that we designed for our network is a local adaptation of the pressure-thermal insulation

  4. Regression modeling of the North East Atlantic Spring Bloom suggests previously unrecognized biological roles for V and Mo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick J Klein

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify the biogeochemical parameters controlling pCO2, total chlorophyll a, and dimethylsulfide (DMS concentrations during the North East Atlantic Spring Bloom (NASB, we used previously unpublished particulate and dissolved elemental concentrations to construct several linear regression models; first by hypothesis-testing, and then with exhaustive stepwise linear regression followed by leave-one-out cross-validation. The field data was obtained along a latitudinal transect from the Azores Islands to the North Atlantic, and best-fit models (determined by lowest predictive error of up to three variables are presented. Total chlorophyll a is predicted best by biomass (POC, PON parameters and by pigments characteristic of picophytoplankton for the southern section of the sampling transect (from the Azores to the Rockhall-Hatton Plateau and coccolithophores in the northern portion (from the Rockhall-Hatton Plateau to the Denmark Strait. Both the pCO2 and DMS models included variables traditionally associated with the development of the NASB such as mixed-layer depth and with Fe, Si and P-deplete conditions (dissolved Fe, dissolved and biogenic silica, dissolved PO43-. However, the regressions for pCO2 and DMS also include intracellular V and Mo concentrations, respectively. Mo is involved in DMS production as a cofactor in dimethylsulfoxide reductase. No significant biological role for V has yet been determined, although intracellular V is significantly correlated (p-value < 0.05 with biogenic silica (R2 = 0.72 and total chlorophyll a (R2 = 0.49 while the same is not true for its biogeochemical analogue Mo, suggesting active uptake of V by phytoplankton. Our statistical analysis suggests these two lesser-studied metals may play more important roles in bloom dynamics than previously thought, and highlights a need for studies focused on determining their potential biological requirements and cell quotas.

  5. Genetic structure of the population with rheumatoid arthritis in north east England: a genetic approach to define different subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papiha, S S; Lanchbury, J S; Pal, B

    1986-11-01

    Clinically and immunologically rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is possibly a heterogeneous disorder. Despite numerous efforts clearer definition of this heterogeneity has been of limited success. Measurements of rheumatoid factor (RF) and antinuclear antibodies (ANA) by conventional methods define subpopulations of patients with RA and in a few recent studies an association of human leucocyte antigens (HLA) undoubtedly indicates the immunogenetic differences in the susceptibility of RA patients with different status of autoantibodies. The studies on a few isolated non-HLA genetic markers in RA are controversial. To understand the role of genetic factors in susceptibility 24 single gene characters other than HLA were investigated in 225 patients with RA classified by humoral status (presence or absence of RF and ANA) into three groups and in 104 healthy control individuals from the north east of England. Locus by locus comparison suggested associations of MN, Lewis, and Bf system with RF positive patients. Although the associations with MN and Lewis blood groups require further investigations, the involvement of the Bf locus is in agreement with the immunological component of the disease suggested by HLA associations and it could be due to the phenomenon of linkage disequilibrium. Measures of genetic distance applied to the subpopulations of patients with RA, divided according to the presence or absence of humoral factors, suggest that RF+ ANA+, RF- ANA-, and RF+ ANA- subgroups are distinct genetic diseases, each affecting a different subsection of the population which is genetically distinct. Such genetic heterogeneity may suggest a different pathogenetic mechanism for each of these subpopulations of rheumatoid arthritis.

  6. Source apportionment of particles at Station Nord, North East Greenland during 2008-2010 using COPREM and PMF analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Q. T.; Skov, H.; Sørensen, L. L.; Jensen, B. J.; Grube, A. G.; Massling, A.; Glasius, M.; Nøjgaard, J. K.

    2013-01-01

    In order to develop strategies for controlling and reducing Arctic air pollution, there is a need to understand the basic mechanisms for determining the fate of air pollution in the Arctic. Sources of atmospheric particles at Station Nord (81° 36' N, 16° 40' W) in North East Greenland were evaluated for a two-year period from March 2008 to February 2010. Source apportionment using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) and COnstrained Physical REceptor Model (COPREM) was based on measurements of black carbon, elements (Al, Si, S, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr, Pb) and inorganic ions (SO2, SO42-, Na+, NH4+, NO3-, Cl2-. In general, source apportionment results by PMF and COPREM showed good agreement. Five sources adequately explained the measurements, which included a Marine and a Soil source of natural origin and three additional anthropogenic sources, which were all influenced by metal industries. One anthropogenic source was dominated by Zn of which air mass back trajectories using the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model suggested a Canadian Arctic origin, despite certain influences from Southern and Eastern origins. Another anthropogenic source was characterised by high concentrations of Pb and As, which has been historically referred to as a Combustion source at Station Nord. The impacts of large-scale industry in Siberia, Russia were evident through high Cu concentrations in both the Combustion source and an additional Cu/Ni source. Br correlated well with the anthropogenic species S and Pb though the elements are unlikely to have a common origin. More likely, sulphuric acid aerosols serve as transport containers for Br species of marine origin. Of particular relevance to climate, sources of black carbon were identified to be mainly anthropogenic and most probably of Siberian origin (80-98%).

  7. Evaluation of mechanism for antihypertensive action of Clerodendrum colebrookianum Walp., used by folklore healers in north-east India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokesh, Deb; Amitsankar, Dutta

    2012-08-30

    The present investigation was aimed to justify the pharmacological basis in traditional use of Clerodendrum colebrookianum as antihypertensive agent in north-east India. The aqueous extract (AECc), its aqueous, n-butanol (nBFCc), Ethyl-acetate (EtFCc) and Chloroform fractions of C. colebrookianum leaves were evaluated for antihypertensive potential by using fructose-induced hypertension model in rats and in isolated frog heart. The ex-vivo muscarinic action in isolated rat ileum, in-vitro assay for Rho-kinase (ROCK -II), phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5) and angiotension converting enzyme (ACE) were also carried out to establish the mechanism of action of samples. The total phenolic and flavonoied contents in test samples were estimated to establish phyto-pharmacological relationship. The 100μg/mL test samples were showed calcium antagonism in rat ileum and at 50μg/mL and 75μg/mL doses exhibited ROCK-II and PDE-5 inhibition respectively where, EtFCc was caused maximum 68.62% (ROCK-II) and 52.28% (PDE-5) inhibition, but none of the sample was exhibit effect in ACE at 100μg/mL. The test samples also showed negative inotropic and chronotropic effect on isolated frog heart and significant (Pheart rate in hypertensive rats compared to control. The total phenolic content maximum 80μg gallic acid equivalents in nBFCc and flavonoids content maximum 69.57μg Quercetin equivalent in AECc were estimated. These observations established the traditional claim and thus C. colebrookianum could be a potent antihypertensive agent for use in future. The antihypertensive effect mediated by cholinergic action and following ROCK - II, PDE-5 inhibition of C. colebrookianum. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. An evaluation of the predictive performance of distributional models for flora and fauna in north-east New South Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, J; Ferrier, S; Scotts, D

    2001-06-01

    To use models of species distributions effectively in conservation planning, it is important to determine the predictive accuracy of such models. Extensive modelling of the distribution of vascular plant and vertebrate fauna species within north-east New South Wales has been undertaken by linking field survey data to environmental and geographical predictors using logistic regression. These models have been used in the development of a comprehensive and adequate reserve system within the region. We evaluate the predictive accuracy of models for 153 small reptile, arboreal marsupial, diurnal bird and vascular plant species for which independent evaluation data were available. The predictive performance of each model was evaluated using the relative operating characteristic curve to measure discrimination capacity. Good discrimination ability implies that a model's predictions provide an acceptable index of species occurrence. The discrimination capacity of 89% of the models was significantly better than random, with 70% of the models providing high levels of discrimination. Predictions generated by this type of modelling therefore provide a reasonably sound basis for regional conservation planning. The discrimination ability of models was highest for the less mobile biological groups, particularly the vascular plants and small reptiles. In the case of diurnal birds, poor performing models tended to be for species which occur mainly within specific habitats not well sampled by either the model development or evaluation data, highly mobile species, species that are locally nomadic or those that display very broad habitat requirements. Particular care needs to be exercised when employing models for these types of species in conservation planning.

  9. Cost of stroke in Australia from a societal perspective: results from the North East Melbourne Stroke Incidence Study (NEMESIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, H M; Thrift, A G; Mihalopoulos, C; Carter, R; Macdonell, R A; McNeil, J J; Donnan, G A

    2001-10-01

    Accurate information about resource use and costs of stroke is necessary for informed health service planning. The purpose of this study was to determine the patterns of resource use among stroke patients and to estimate the total costs (direct service use and indirect production losses) of stroke (excluding SAH) in Australia for 1997. An incidence-based cost-of-illness model was developed, incorporating data obtained from the North East Melbourne Stroke Incidence Study (NEMESIS). The costs of stroke during the first year after stroke and the present value of total lifetime costs of stroke were estimated. The total first-year costs of all first-ever-in-a lifetime strokes (SAH excluded) that occurred in Australia during 1997 were estimated to be A$555 million (US$420 million), and the present value of lifetime costs was estimated to be A$1.3 billion (US$985 million). The average cost per case during the first 12 months and over a lifetime was A$18 956 (US$14 361) and A$44 428 (US$33 658), respectively. The most important categories of cost during the first year were acute hospitalization (A$154 million), inpatient rehabilitation (A$150 million), and nursing home care (A$63 million). The present value of lifetime indirect costs was estimated to be A$34 million. Similar to other studies, hospital and nursing home costs contributed most to the total cost of stroke (excluding SAH) in Australia. Inpatient rehabilitation accounts for approximately 27% of total first-year costs. Given the magnitude of these costs, investigation of the cost-effectiveness of rehabilitation services should become a priority in this community.

  10. Lifetime cost of stroke subtypes in Australia: findings from the North East Melbourne Stroke Incidence Study (NEMESIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, Helen M; Thrift, Amanda G; Mihalopoulos, Cathy; Carter, Robert; Macdonell, Richard A L; McNeil, John J; Donnan, Geoffrey A

    2003-10-01

    Little is known about any variations in resource use and costs of care between stroke subtypes, especially nonhospital costs. The purpose of this study was to describe the patterns of resource use and to estimate the first-year and lifetime costs for stroke subtypes. A cost-of-illness model was used to estimate the total first-year costs and lifetime costs of stroke subtypes for all strokes (subarachnoid hemorrhages excluded) that occurred in Australia during 1997. For each subtype, average cost per case during the first year and the present value of average cost per case over a lifetime were calculated. Resource use data obtained in the North East Melbourne Stroke Incidence Study (NEMESIS) were used. The present value of total lifetime costs for all strokes was Aus 1.3 billion dollars (US 985 million dollars). Total lifetime costs were greatest for ischemic stroke (72%; Aus 936.8 million dollars; US 709.7 million dollars), followed by intracerebral hemorrhage (26%; Aus 334.5 million dollars; US 253.4 million dollars) and unclassified stroke (2%; Aus 30 million dollars; US 22.7 million dollars). The average cost per case during the first year was greatest for total anterior circulation infarction (Aus 28 266 dollars). Over a lifetime, the present value of average costs was greatest for intracerebral hemorrhage (Aus 73 542 dollars), followed by total anterior circulation infarction (Aus 53 020 dollars), partial anterior circulation infarction (Aus 50 692 dollars), posterior circulation infarction (Aus 37 270 dollars), lacunar infarction (Aus 34 470 dollars), and unclassified stroke (Aus 12 031 dollars). First-year and lifetime costs vary considerably between stroke subtypes. Variation in average length of total hospital stay is the main explanation for differences in first-year costs.

  11. [Abundance of sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus (Lamarck) on North, East and West coasts of Margarita Island (Venezuela) ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Gaspar, Alfredo

    2002-01-01

    The sea urchin roe reach a very high price in the international fish product market favoring the increase in the catches of this resource and overfishing in some countries. In the Island of Margarita (Venezuela) some species, Lytechinus variegatus (Lamarck) among others, are consumed as food but studies to determine abundance of the resource are unknown. Nine sample stations (depth less than 2 m) on the North, East and West coast of Margarita Island were visited in six different occasions between February/1998 and February/1999 to study the population density (urchins/m2) of L. variegatus. Using a quadrat (0.25 m2) thrown 8 times over seagrasses (Thalassia testudinum) beds and over submerged rocks and the urchins removed by dive. The diameter of each specimen was measured and returned to the sea. The water temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen of each site was measured. Were collected a total of 2,073 urchins with a diameter ranging from 11.0 to 84.5 mm and population density between 1 to 52 urchins/m2. The mean size of specimens collected in the stations was between 30.44 and 55.09 mm and average density fluctuated between 3.2 to 43.2 urchins/m2. The station where sea urchins were found to be most abundant was the North coast (Manzanillo fishing villae) where they live on rocks with a density (38 a 52/m2) far over the values previously cited for the Caribbean sea and Florida.

  12. Fluoride concentrations in a range of ready-to-drink beverages consumed in Heilongjiang Province, north-east China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Maguire, Anne; Tianqui, Guan; Yanguo, Shi; Zohoori, Fatemeh V

    2017-03-01

    Consumption of ready-to-drink beverages, as a potential source of fluoride (F), has increased considerably in China over the last decade. To help inform the public and policy makers, this study aimed to measure F concentration of ready-to-drink beverages on sale in Heilongjiang province, north east China. Three batches of 106 drink products manufactured by 26 companies were purchased from the main national supermarkets in Harbin, Heilongjiang province, China. The F concentration of all samples was determined, in triplicate, using a fluoride ion-selective electrode in conjunction with a meter and a direct method of analysis. The products were categorised into 10 groups according to product type. F concentrations of the samples ranged from 0.012-1.625 mg/l with a mean of 0.189 mg/l and a median of 0.076 mg/l. More than half of the products (55%) had an F concentration of ≤0.1 mg/l, while 0.7 mg/l. The 'tea with milk' group contained the highest mean F concentration (1.350 mg/l), whereas the lowest mean F concentration (0.027 mg/l) was found for the 'fruit juice' group. For some products, such as tea, fruit juice and carbonated beverages, there were substantial variations in F concentration between batches, manufacturers and production sites. In conclusion, ready-to-drink products (apart from tea), sold in Heilongjiang province, China, when consumed in moderation are unlikely to constitute a substantial risk factor for the development of dental or skeletal fluorosis.

  13. Changes in Nematode Communities in Different Physiographic Sites of the Condor Seamount (North-East Atlantic Ocean) and Adjacent Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeppilli, Daniela; Bongiorni, Lucia; Serrão Santos, Ricardo; Vanreusel, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Several seamounts are known as ‘oases’ of high abundances and biomass and hotspots of biodiversity in contrast to the surrounding deep-sea environments. Recent studies have indicated that each single seamount can exhibit a high intricate habitat turnover. Information on alpha and beta diversity of single seamount is needed in order to fully understand seamounts contribution to regional and global biodiversity. However, while most of the seamount research has been focused on summits, studies considering the whole seamount structure are still rather poor. In the present study we analysed abundance, biomass and diversity of nematodes collected in distinct physiographic sites and surrounding sediments of the Condor Seamount (Azores, North-East Atlantic Ocean). Our study revealed higher nematode biomass in the seamount bases and values 10 times higher in the Condor sediments than in the far-field site. Although biodiversity indices did not showed significant differences comparing seamount sites and far-field sites, significant differences were observed in term of nematode composition. The Condor summit harboured a completely different nematode community when compared to the other seamount sites, with a high number of exclusive species and important differences in term of nematode trophic diversity. The oceanographic conditions observed around the Condor Seamount and the associated sediment mixing, together with the high quality of food resources available in seamount base could explain the observed patterns. Our results support the hypothesis that seamounts maintain high biodiversity through heightened beta diversity and showed that not only summits but also seamount bases can support rich benthic community in terms of standing stocks and diversity. Furthermore functional diversity of nematodes strongly depends on environmental conditions link to the local setting and seamount structure. This finding should be considered in future studies on seamounts, especially in

  14. Why are some patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy dying young: An analysis of causes of death in North East England.

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    Van Ruiten, H J A; Marini Bettolo, C; Cheetham, T; Eagle, M; Lochmuller, H; Straub, V; Bushby, K; Guglieri, M

    2016-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common inherited muscle disease in children. Recent years have seen an increase in age of survival into adulthood following the introduction of proactive standards of care. We reviewed mortality in DMD in our population in order to identify potential underlying risk factors for premature death and improve clinical care. A retrospective case note review of all deaths in the DMD population over the last 10 years in North East England. We identified 2 groups of patients: patients who died from underlying cardiac and/or respiratory failure (group 1) and patients who died unexpectedly in the absence of underlying cardio-respiratory failure (group 2). Detailed information was available on 21 patients. Mean age of death in group 1 (17 patients) was 23.9 (14.4-39.5) years, in group 2 (4 patients) 14 (12.7-14.9) years. Causes of death in group 2 were acute pneumonia, cardiac arrest, acute respiratory distress and multi-organ failure. Across both groups we identified concerns regarding respiratory failure, inadequate nutrition, non-attendance at appointments, suboptimal coordination of care and decreased psychological wellbeing. In group 2, fat embolism, cardiac arrhythmia and adrenal insufficiency were also potential contributing factors. The main cause of death in DMD in our population remains cardio-respiratory failure. Four patients (19%) died in their teenage years in the absence of severe cardiorespiratory failure. A more thorough understanding of the impact of DMD and its treatment on all organs systems is required to minimise the risk of an untimely death. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Tower-based greenhouse gas measurement network design—The National Institute of Standards and Technology North East Corridor Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Coto, Israel; Ghosh, Subhomoy; Prasad, Kuldeep; Whetstone, James

    2017-09-01

    The North-East Corridor (NEC) Testbed project is the 3rd of three NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) greenhouse gas emissions testbeds designed to advance greenhouse gas measurements capabilities. A design approach for a dense observing network combined with atmospheric inversion methodologies is described. The Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting Model with the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport model were used to derive the sensitivity of hypothetical observations to surface greenhouse gas emissions (footprints). Unlike other network design algorithms, an iterative selection algorithm, based on a k-means clustering method, was applied to minimize the similarities between the temporal response of each site and maximize sensitivity to the urban emissions contribution. Once a network was selected, a synthetic inversion Bayesian Kalman filter was used to evaluate observing system performance. We present the performances of various measurement network configurations consisting of differing numbers of towers and tower locations. Results show that an overly spatially compact network has decreased spatial coverage, as the spatial information added per site is then suboptimal as to cover the largest possible area, whilst networks dispersed too broadly lose capabilities of constraining flux uncertainties. In addition, we explore the possibility of using a very high density network of lower cost and performance sensors characterized by larger uncertainties and temporal drift. Analysis convergence is faster with a large number of observing locations, reducing the response time of the filter. Larger uncertainties in the observations implies lower values of uncertainty reduction. On the other hand, the drift is a bias in nature, which is added to the observations and, therefore, biasing the retrieved fluxes.

  16. Assessment of atmospheric acidified pollutants trends observed by EANET in North-East Asia in the first decade of XXI century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromov, Sergey A.; Trifonova-Yakovleva, Alisa; Gromov, Sergey S.

    2015-04-01

    Owing to rapid development and subsequent enormous increase in energy consumption/fossil fuel use, anthropogenic emissions of sulphur and nitrogen oxides in China and other Asian countries surpass those in North America and Europe since mid-1990s. Consequently, regional air pollution has become an issue for the most of developing countries in North-East Asia. Since 1998, the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia (EANET, http://www.eanet.asia/) provides constant monitoring of the air quality and precipitation (including gaseous and particulate phase chemistry) in 13 countries of the region. The measurements are conducted at 45 rural and remote stations using both filter pack sampling techniques and automatic monitoring equipment. In this study we present a comprehensive trend analysis of the long-term (last 15 years) air pollution monitoring data from selected EANET monitoring sites. Using several statistical approaches, we estimate the quality of the data and perform distribution tests, single out special events (detect outliers) and calculate an ensemble of trends (monthly, seasonal, long-term and quartile) and their statistical significance for a suite of observed compounds. Based on this analysis, we further estimate the statistics and overall significance of the observed temporal dynamics for each pollutant. Ultimately we derive more than 20 trend estimates for a total of up to 12 gas-phase and particulate compounds for each station. Our calculations ascertain that about half of the trends (either negative or positive) observed at the EANET stations in Russia, Korea and Japan are significant. Whilst an increase in SO2, HCl, Cl-, NO3 (except for the stations in Russia) concentrations is distinct, small or insignificant trends are reckoned for HNO3-. A marked decrease in K+ content is seen at all regarded stations. We commonly find station-wise correlation for the trends of the remaining compounds, and for several species we conclude a general spatial

  17. Assessing the delivery of alcohol screening and brief intervention in sexual health clinics in the north east of England

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    C. Sullivan

    2017-11-01

    , services may consider more targeted rather than universal alcohol screening to specific population groups. The study was undertaken in one GUM service in the North East of England and therefore findings may not be generalizable. The study did not assess efficacy of alcohol brief intervention in this setting.

  18. Vitamin D levels in subjects with or without chronic kidney disease among Veterans with diabetes in North East United States

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    Yaturu, Subhashini; Youngberg, Barbara; Zdunek, Sonya

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and its relation to diabetes and kidney disease in Veterans residing in the North East United States (VISN 2). METHODS In this retrospective study, we used data from the computerized patient record system at Stratton Veterans Administration Medical Center at Albany, NY (VHA) for those patients who had 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and 1,25 (OH) vitamin D levels measured between 2007 and 2010. We collected demographic information including age, sex, body mass index and race; clinical data including diabetes, hypertension and CAD; and laboratory data including calcium, creatinine and parathyroid hormone (PTH) (intact). Vitamin D deficiency is defined as a serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level of less than 20 ng/mL (50 nmol/L), and insufficiency is defined as a serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level of 20 to 30 ng/mL (50 to 75 nmol/L). RESULTS Data was available for approximately 68000 subjects. We identified 64144 subjects for analysis after exclusion of duplicates. Among them, 27098 had diabetes. The mean age of subjects with diabetes was 68 ± 11 with a mean body mass index (BMI) of 32 ± 7 and duration of diabetes of 5.6 ± 3.2 years. The mean 25 (OH) vitamin D level among subjects with diabetes was 27 ± 11.6. There was no significant difference in 25 (OH) vitamin D levels between subjects with diabetes and glomerular filtration rate (e-GFR) < 60 compared to those with e-GFR ≥ 60. As expected, subjects with e-GFR < 60 had significantly lower 1,25 (OH) vitamin D levels and significantly elevated PTH-intact. Of the 64144 subjects, 580 had end-stage renal disease. Of those, 407 had diabetes and 173 did not. Vitamin D levels in both groups were in the insufficiency range and there was no significant difference irrespective of presence or absence of diabetes. Subjects with vitamin D levels less than 20 ng/mL had a higher BMI and elevated PTH, and higher HbA1C levels compared to those with vitamin D levels more than 20 ng

  19. The health loss from ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage: evidence from the North East Melbourne Stroke Incidence Study (NEMESIS

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    Dewey Helen M

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People suffering different types of stroke have differing demographic characteristics and survival. However, current estimates of disease burden are based on the same underlying assumptions irrespective of stroke type. We hypothesized that average Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALYs lost from stroke would be different for ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH. Methods We used 1 and 5-year data collected from patients with first-ever stroke participating in the North East Melbourne Stroke Incidence Study (NEMESIS. We calculated case fatality rates, health-adjusted life expectancy, and quality-of-life (QoL weights specific to each age and gender category. Lifetime 'health loss' for first-ever ischemic stroke and ICH surviving 28-days for the 2004 Australian population cohort was then estimated. Multivariable uncertainty analyses and sensitivity analyses (SA were used to assess the impact of varying input parameters e.g. case fatality and QoL weights. Results Paired QoL data at 1 and 5 years were available for 237 NEMESIS participants. Extrapolating NEMESIS rates, 31,539 first-ever strokes were expected for Australia in 2004. Average discounted (3% QALYs lost per first-ever stroke were estimated to be 5.09 (SD 0.20; SA 5.49 for ischemic stroke (n = 27,660 and 6.17 (SD 0.26; SA 6.45 for ICH (n = 4,291; p Discussion People with ICH incurred greater loss of health over a lifetime than people with ischemic stroke. This is explained by greater stroke related case fatality at a younger age, but longer life expectancy with disability after the first 12 months for people with ICH. Thus, studies of disease burden in stroke should account for these differences between subtype and gender. Otherwise, in countries where ICH is more common, health loss for stroke may be underestimated. Similar to other studies of this type, the generalisability of the results may be limited. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses were used to provide

  20. The health loss from ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage: evidence from the North East Melbourne Stroke Incidence Study (NEMESIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadilhac, Dominique A; Dewey, Helen M; Vos, Theo; Carter, Rob; Thrift, Amanda G

    2010-05-14

    People suffering different types of stroke have differing demographic characteristics and survival. However, current estimates of disease burden are based on the same underlying assumptions irrespective of stroke type. We hypothesized that average Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALYs) lost from stroke would be different for ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). We used 1 and 5-year data collected from patients with first-ever stroke participating in the North East Melbourne Stroke Incidence Study (NEMESIS). We calculated case fatality rates, health-adjusted life expectancy, and quality-of-life (QoL) weights specific to each age and gender category. Lifetime 'health loss' for first-ever ischemic stroke and ICH surviving 28-days for the 2004 Australian population cohort was then estimated. Multivariable uncertainty analyses and sensitivity analyses (SA) were used to assess the impact of varying input parameters e.g. case fatality and QoL weights. Paired QoL data at 1 and 5 years were available for 237 NEMESIS participants. Extrapolating NEMESIS rates, 31,539 first-ever strokes were expected for Australia in 2004. Average discounted (3%) QALYs lost per first-ever stroke were estimated to be 5.09 (SD 0.20; SA 5.49) for ischemic stroke (n = 27,660) and 6.17 (SD 0.26; SA 6.45) for ICH (n = 4,291; p < 0.001). QALYs lost also differed according to gender for both subtypes (ischemic stroke: males 4.69 SD 0.38, females 5.51 SD 0.46; ICH: males 5.82 SD 0.67, females 6.50 SD 0.40). People with ICH incurred greater loss of health over a lifetime than people with ischemic stroke. This is explained by greater stroke related case fatality at a younger age, but longer life expectancy with disability after the first 12 months for people with ICH. Thus, studies of disease burden in stroke should account for these differences between subtype and gender. Otherwise, in countries where ICH is more common, health loss for stroke may be underestimated. Similar to other studies

  1. Methane emissions from a landfill in north-east India: Performance of various landfill gas emission models.

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    Gollapalli, Muralidhar; Kota, Sri Harsha

    2017-11-22

    Rapid urbanization and economic growth has led to significant increase in municipal solid waste generation in India during the last few decades and its management has become a major issue because of poor waste management practices. Solid waste generated is deposited into open dumping sites with hardly any segregation and processing. Carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are the major greenhouse gases that are released from the landfill sites due to the biodegradation of organic matter. In this present study, CH4 and CO2 emissions from a landfill in north-east India are estimated using a flux chamber during September, 2015 to August, 2016. The average emission rates of CH4 and CO2 are 68 and 92 mg/min/m2, respectively. The emissions are highest in the summer whilst being lowest in winter. The diurnal variation of emissions indicated that the emissions follow a trend similar to temperature in all the seasons. Correlation coefficients of CH4 and temperature in summer, monsoon and winter are 0.99, 0.87 and 0.97, respectively. The measured CH4 in this study is in the range of other studies around the world. Modified Triangular Method (MTM), IPCC model and the USEPA Landfill gas emissions model (LandGEM) were used to predict the CH4 emissions during the study year. The consequent simulation results indicate that the MTM, LandGEM-Clean Air Act, LandGEM-Inventory and IPCC models predict 1.9, 3.3, 1.6 and 1.4 times of the measured CH4 emission flux in this study. Assuming that this higher prediction of CH4 levels observed in this study holds well for other landfills in this region, a new CH4 emission inventory (Units: Tonnes/year), with a resolution of 0.10 × 0.10 has been developed. This study stresses the importance of biodegradable composition of waste and meteorology, and also points out the drawbacks of the widely used landfill emission models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Capelin and herring as key species for the yield of north-east Arctic cod. Results from multispecies model runs

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    Johannes Hamre

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available A conceptual temperature dependent multispecies model for stock interactions and harvesting of herring, capelin and cod in the Norwegian Sea-Barents Sea region has been developed. The concept presupposes that good recruitment of herring and cod is linked to warm ocean climate, which may occur with a frequency of 8 to 10 years. Strong herring year classes overlap the distribution of capelin larvae in 3-4 years causing mass mortality of the capelin fry, and depletion of the capelin stock. At the same time the herring is about to leave the Barents Sea, and lack of food in subsequent years reduces the potential yield of cod. Immature cod is the main predator on mature capelin and cannibalism is an important factor in reducing the abundance of juvenile cod when the capelin stock is rebuilding. The model is used in a study of the effects of different fishery management strategies on stocks and yield. Results show that optimum yield of cod is obtained by high fishing mortality on immature cod from the end of a warm period until the spawning stock of capelin is rebuilt. This fishing strategy will result in large fluctuation in the yearly cod catches but yield an optimum average biomass production of capelin and an optimum potential catch of cod. These results are in accordance with the catch history of cod. Prior to the 1970s, the effort of the fishery in the Barents Sea followed to a large extent the abundance of immature cod, resulting in large catches when the stock was abundant. The yearly catches varied from 0.4 to 1.3 million tonnes, but the average catch obtained in the two periods 1950-1958 and 1959-1969 are the highest on record. Moreover, the trawlers fished with small meshes in the cod end, discarding considerable quantities of the smallest fish. It is concluded that the interaction between climate and fish stocks, and fish stock interactions in the north east Atlantic region, are of fundamental importance to the dynamic of the processes

  3. Prevalence of haemoparasites in pet, working and stray dogs of Assam and North-East India: A hospital based study

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    K. Bhattacharjee

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim:This research work is aimed to find out the prevalence of haemoparasitic infections in different categories of dogs.Materials and Methods: Out of 2104 dogs registered in the Teaching Veterinary Clinical Complex of the College ofVeterinary Science, Khanapara, Guwahati during January 2009 to December 2010, blood of 424 cases suspected forhaemoparasites on the basis of clinical history were microscopically examined in wet blood film and giemsa stained bloodsmears.Results: The prevalence was 57.31% in the hospital population comprising pet (58.03% and working (54.54% dogs and63.64% in stray dog population. A total of 7 species viz. Babesia gibsoni (47.16%, Ehrlichia (Anaplasma platys (8.49%,Dirofilaria immitis (2.83%, Ehrlichia canis (2.12%, Babesia canis (1.41%, Hepatozoon canis (1.41% and Ehrlichiaewingii (0.47% in single or mixed infections were recorded. B. gibsoni was found to be most predominant haemoprotozoanspecies. However, B. canis, the large form of Babesia was detected in very few dogs. Similarly, inclusion of E. platys insideblood platelets, although rare in occurrence, was more easily detectable than that of E. canis inside the monocytes andlymphocytes. Infection with D. immitis in pet dogs (2.38% was comparatively lower than in working dogs (4.54% and foundin single and mixed infections with B. gibsoni, B. canis and E. platys. Hepatozoon canis was recorded in 6 hospital dogs eitherin single or mixed infection with B. gibsoni and E. platys. Six species of haemoparasites namely B. gibsoni (47.72%, D.immitis (27.27%, E. platys (4.54%, E. canis (2.27%, E. ewingii (2.27% and H. canis (2.27% were detected in blood ofstray dogs. Trypanosoma evansi as recorded in dogs from other parts of the country was not detected in this study.Conclusion: Present findings led to a significant conclusion that Assam and adjoining states of North East region of India arehighly enzootic for the vector borne haemoparasites of dog.

  4. Magnetospheric disturbances associated with the 13 December 2006 solar flare and their ionospheric effects over North-East Asia

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    Zolotukhina, N.; Polekh, N.; Kurkin, V.; Pirog, O.; Samsonov, S.; Moiseyev, A.

    2012-03-01

    We present an observational study of magnetospheric and ionospheric disturbances during the December 2006 intense magnetic storm associated with the 4В/Х3.4 class solar flare. To perform the study we utilize the ground data from North-East Asian ionospheric and magnetic observatories (60-72°N, 88-152°E) and in situ measurements from LANL, GOES, Geotail and ACE satellites. The comparative analysis of ionospheric, magnetospheric and heliospheric disturbances shows that the interaction of the magnetosphere with heavily compressed solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field caused the initial phase of the magnetic storm. It was accompanied by the intense sporadic E and F2 layers and the total black-out in the nocturnal subauroral ionosphere. During the storm main phase, LANL-97A, LANL 1994_084, LANL 1989-046 and GOES_11 satellites registered a compression of the dayside magnetosphere up to their orbits. In the morning-noon sector the compression was accompanied by an absence of reflections from ionosphere over subauroral ionospheric station Zhigansk (66.8°N, 123.3°E), and a drastic decrease in the F2 layer critical frequency (foF2) up to 54% of the quite one over subauroral Yakutsk station (62°N, 129.7°E). At the end of the main phase, these stations registered a sharp foF2 increase in the afternoon sector. At Yakutsk the peak foF2 was 1.9 time higher than the undisturbed one. The mentioned ionospheric disturbances occurred simultaneously with changes in the temperature, density and temperature anisotropy of particles at geosynchronous orbit, registered by the LANL-97A satellite nearby the meridian of ionospheric and magnetic measurements. The whole complex of disturbances may be caused by radial displacement of the main magnetospheric domains (magnetopause, cusp/cleft, plasma sheet) with respect to the observation points, caused by changes in the solar wind dynamic pressure, the field of magnetospheric convection, and rotation of the Earth.

  5. A cross-sectional questionnaire study of the rules governing pupils’ carriage of inhalers for asthma treatment in secondary schools in North East England

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    Wendy Funston

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The primary objective of this study was to assess the rules governing secondary school pupils’ carriage of inhalers for emergency treatment of asthma in the North East of England. Design. This study was based upon a postal questionnaire survey. Setting. The setting for this study was mainstream free-to-attend secondary schools which admit 16 year old pupils within the 12 Local Authority areas which make up the North East of England. Participants. All 153 schools meeting the inclusion criteria were invited to participate in the study, of which 106 (69% took part. Main Outcome Measures. Our three main outcome measures were: whether pupils are permitted to carry inhalers on their person while at school; whether advance permission is required for pupils to carry inhalers, and from whom; and whether the school has an emergency ‘standby’ salbutamol inhaler for use in asthma emergencies, as permitted since October 2014 under recent amendments to The Human Medicines Regulations 2012. Results. Of 98 schools submitting valid responses to the question, 99% (n = 97 permitted pupils to carry inhalers on their person while at school; the remaining school stored pupils’ inhalers in a central location within the school. A total of 22% of included schools (n = 22 required parental permission before pupils were permitted to carry inhalers. Of 102 schools submitting valid responses to the question, 44% (n = 45 had purchased a ‘standby’ salbutamol inhaler for use in asthma emergencies. Conclusions. Most secondary schools in North East England permit pupils to carry inhalers on their person. The requirement in a minority of schools for parental permission to be given possibly contravenes the standard ethical practices in clinical medicine for children of this age. Only a minority of schools hold a ‘standby’ salbutamol inhaler for use in asthma emergencies. Wider availability may improve outcomes for asthma emergencies occurring in schools.

  6. Some studies on three known and a new species of the genus Binema Travassos, 1925 (Travassosinematidae: Thelastomatoidea) from Manipur, North-East India.

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    Manjur Shah, M; Rizvi, A N

    2004-09-01

    During the investigation of insect nematodes of North-East India, a new species of Binema (Travassosinematidae: Thelastomatoidea) was recovered from the intestine of Gryllotalpa africana Beauv. It is described and illustrated as Binema anulinervus n.sp. Three known species namely B. ornata Travassos, 1925, B. mirzaia (Basir, 1942) Basir, 1956 and B. korsakowi (Sergiev, 1923) Basir, 1956 have also been collected, redescribed and illustrated in the present study. The new species differs from all known species and only comes close to B. pseudornatum Leibersperger, 1960 for having caudal flagellate appendage. Key to species of the genus and a comparative measurement chart are given in Table 1.

  7. Ethno-Demographic Processes in the North-East Black Sea Area in the 19th – Early 21th Centuries (through the Example of Greater Sochi

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    Aleksandr A. Cherkasov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines ethno-demographic processes in the north-east Black Sea area, more specifically the territory of Greater Sochi, in the 19th – early 21th centuries. In writing the article, the authors have relied on archive materials from the archives department of the administration of the city of Novorossiysk and the archives department of the administration of the city of Sochi. The authors have consulted reference pre-revolution literature, Soviet-era and present-day population censuses, as well as the findings of present-day research studies. The methodological basis of this study are the principles of historicism, objectivity, and systemicity, which helps to get an insight into the general patterns and regional peculiarities in the demographic development of the major ethnicities in the north-east Black Sea area in the 19th-20th centuries. The authors touch upon the process of colonization of the territory and its ethnic composition. In the end, the authors come to the conclusion that the ethno-demographic picture of Greater Sochi had been forming in a complicated fashion. As a consequence, in the second half of the 19th century, following the Caucasian War, the territory had to be repopulated. Resettlement flows from different locations in the Russian Empire and overseas had formed by 1917 an ethno-picture that featured Russians and Armenians as two principal ethnicities. The authors note that this picture has not changed in a major way to this day.

  8. Prevalence and etiological agents of subclinical mastitis at the end of lactation in nine dairy herds in North-East Poland.

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    Sztachańska, M; Barański, W; Janowski, T; Pogorzelska, J; Zduńczyk, S

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and etiological agents of subclinical mastitis at the end of lactation in nine dairy herds in North-East Poland. In total, 387 Polish HF were involved in the study. The diagnosis of mastitis was performed on the basis of clinical examination of the udder, macroscopic evaluation of milk, determination of somatic cell count and bacteriological examination of milk. Subclinical mastitis was found in an average of 36.7% (range from 21.0% to 53.1%) of cows and of 15.7% (range from 9.6% to 25.2%) of quarters. Coagulase negative staphylococci (CNS; 31.6% of quarters), Streptococcus (Str.) agalactiae (15.6% of quarters), Staphylococcus (Staph.) aureus (12.1% of quarters) and fungi (12.2% of quarters) were most frequently isolated from subclinical mastitis. Etiological agents of subclinical mastitis differed strongly between herds. The results of this study showed that the incidence of subclinical mastitis at the end of lactation in dairy herds in North-East Poland is high. CNS were the most frequently isolated from subclinical mastitis cases, however mastitis caused by the contagious pathogens Str. agalactiae and Staph. aureus is still a problem. The fungal infections of the mammary gland also play an important role.

  9. Molecular Detection of Leishmania major and L. turanica in Phlebotomus papatasi and First Natural Infection of P. salehi to L. major in North-east of Iran

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    Sayena Rafizadeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leishmaniasis is an important public health disease in many developing countries as well in Iran. The main objective of this study was to investigate on leishmania infection of wild caught sand flies in an endemic focus of disease in Esfarayen district, north east of Iran.Methods: Sand flies were collected by sticky papers and mounted in a drop of Puri’s medium for species identification. Polymerase chain reaction techniques of kDNA, ITS1-rDNA, followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism were used for identification of DNA of Leishmania parasites within infected sand flies.Results: Among the collected female sand flies, two species of Phlebotomus papatasi and Phlebotomus salehi were found naturally infected with Leishmania major. Furthermore, mixed infection of Leishmania turanica and L. major was observed in one specimen of P. papatasi. Sequence analysis revealed two parasite ITS1 haplotypes including three L. major with accession numbers: KJ425408, KJ425407, KM056403 and one L. turanica. (KJ425406. The haplotype of L. major was identical (100% to several L. major sequences deposited in GenBank, including isolates from Iran, (Gen Bank accession nos.AY573187, KC505421, KJ194178 and Uzbekistan (Accession no.FN677357.Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first detection of L. major within wild caught P. salehi in north- east of Iran.

  10. Manual accidents, biological risk control, and quality indicators at a children's hospital in north-east Italy

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    Parco S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sergio Parco, Fulvia Vascotto, Roberto Simeone, Patrizia Visconti Department of Health Technology Assessment, Institute for Maternal and Child Health, Trieste, Italy Background: Working in health care carries the risk of transmission of infected blood to patients by hospital workers and to other health personnel in the form of occupational infections. Conscientious application of the standard precautions is the main method used to avoid needle stick injuries, contamination of skin and mucous membranes, cuts with sharp tools, and inadequate disposal and recapping of needles. The aim of this work was to investigate in Friuli Venezia Giulia, a region in north-east Italy, the enhancement carried out to prevent situations of biologic risk for health care workers, and to verify the related laboratory analyses. Methods: Biological accidents occurring during the years 2012–2013 in the departments of oncology and pediatric-obstetric surgery, and in the intensive care unit at Burlo Garofolo Children's Hospital in Trieste (a large town in Friuli Venezia Giulia were reviewed, and a new panel of tests was introduced for patients and health care workers, to also detect human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, hepatitis C virus (HCV, hepatitis B virus (HBV, and aspartate transaminase and immunoglobulin G. All tests were submitted for external quality assessment. Results: In total, 230 nosocomial events were reported by health care workers in the above-mentioned hospital departments in 2012–2013. There were 158 accidents in 2012, including 55 accidental needle stick injuries (34.81%, 59 blood splashes (37.34%, and 44 cuts with infected instruments (27.84%. The risk of sustaining a cut was related to movement error during surgery when the appropriate procedure was not followed or when devices were being assembled and passed between doctors and nurses. Most accidents happened among physicians compared to nurses; the high percentage of needle stick injuries (34

  11. North-East monsoon rainfall extremes over the southern peninsular India and their association with El Niño

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    Singh, Prem; Gnanaseelan, C.; Chowdary, J. S.

    2017-12-01

    The present study investigates the relationship between extreme north-east (NE) monsoon rainfall (NEMR) over the Indian peninsula region and El Niño forcing. This turns out to be a critical science issue especially after the 2015 Chennai flood. The puzzle being while most El Niños favour good NE monsoon, some don't. In fact some El Niño years witnessed deficit NE monsoon. Therefore two different cases (or classes) of El Niños are considered for analysis based on standardized NEMR index and Niño 3.4 index with case-1 being both Niño-3.4 and NEMR indices greater than +1 and case-2 being Niño-3.4 index greater than +1 and NEMR index less than -1. Composite analysis suggests that SST anomalies in the central and eastern Pacific are strong in both cases but large differences are noted in the spatial distribution of SST over the Indo-western Pacific region. This questions our understanding of NEMR as mirror image of El Niño conditions in the Pacific. It is noted that the favourable excess NEMR in case-1 is due to anomalous moisture transport from Bay of Bengal and equatorial Indian Ocean to southern peninsular India. Strong SST gradient between warm western Indian Ocean (and Bay of Bengal) and cool western Pacific induced strong easterly wind anomalies during NE monsoon season favour moisture transport towards the core NE monsoon region. Further anomalous moisture convergence and convection over the core NE monsoon region supported positive rainfall anomalies in case-1. While in case-2, weak SST gradients over the Indo-western Pacific and absence of local low level convergence over NE monsoon region are mainly responsible for deficit rainfall. The ocean dynamics in the Indian Ocean displayed large differences during case-1 and case-2, suggesting the key role of Rossby wave dynamics in the Indian Ocean on NE monsoon extremes. Apart from the large scale circulation differences the number of cyclonic systems land fall for case-1 and case-2 have also contributed for

  12. Future changes in cyclone climatology over Europe as inferred from a regional climate simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lionello, P. [University of Salento, Department of Material Science, Lecce (Italy); Boldrin, U. [University of Padua, Padua (Italy); Giorgi, F. [ICTP, Trieste (Italy)

    2008-05-15

    This study analyzes the cyclone climatology in regional climate model simulations of present day (1961-1990) and future (2071-2100, A2 and B2 emission scenarios) european climate conditions. The model domain covers the area from Scandinavia to Northern Africa and from the Eastern Atlantic to Russia at a horizontal grid spacing of 50 km. Compared to present day, in the A2 and B2 scenario conditions the annual average storm track intensity increases over the North-East Atlantic and decreases over Russia and the Eastern Mediterranean region. This overall change pattern is larger in the A2 than in the B2 simulations. However, the cyclone climatology change signal shows a large intermonthly variability and important differences across European regions. The largest changes are found over the North-East Atlantic, where the storm track intensity increases in winter and decreases in summer. A significant reduction of storm track intensity is found during late summer and autumn over the Mediterranean region, and from October to January over Russia. The number of cyclones decreases in future conditions throughout Europe, except over the Central Europe and Mediterranean regions in summer (where it increases). The frequency of intense cyclones and the depth of extreme cyclones increase over the North-East Atlantic, decrease over Russia and show an irregular response over the rest of the domain. (orig.)

  13. Future changes in cyclone climatology over Europe as inferred from a regional climate simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionello, P.; Boldrin, U.; Giorgi, F.

    2008-05-01

    This study analyzes the cyclone climatology in regional climate model simulations of present day (1961 1990) and future (2071 2100, A2 and B2 emission scenarios) european climate conditions. The model domain covers the area from Scandinavia to Northern Africa and from the Eastern Atlantic to Russia at a horizontal grid spacing of 50 km. Compared to present day, in the A2 and B2 scenario conditions the annual average storm track intensity increases over the North-East Atlantic and decreases over Russia and the Eastern Mediterranean region. This overall change pattern is larger in the A2 than in the B2 simulations. However, the cyclone climatology change signal shows a large intermonthly variability and important differences across European regions. The largest changes are found over the North-East Atlantic, where the storm track intensity increases in winter and decreases in summer. A significant reduction of storm track intensity is found during late summer and autumn over the Mediterranean region, and from October to January over Russia. The number of cyclones decreases in future conditions throughout Europe, except over the Central Europe and Mediterranean regions in summer (where it increases). The frequency of intense cyclones and the depth of extreme cyclones increase over the North-East Atlantic, decrease over Russia and show an irregular response over the rest of the domain.

  14. In-Migration, Entrepreneurship and Rural-Urban Interdependencies: The Case of East Cleveland, North East England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantaridis, Christos

    2010-01-01

    In-migration is a key influence in the process of rural economic development in England, Continental Europe and the US. New arrivals are often viewed in the literature as contributors in new venture creation, as well as catalysts in enhancing rural-urban interdependencies in the countryside. This paper sets out to explore the validity of this view…

  15. A phenomenological study giving voice to the 11-16 year old senior school populations’ experience of ‘cyberbullying’ via the social media site, Facebook(TM) within Bath and North East Somerset

    OpenAIRE

    Selby, S

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on the experiences of the 11-16 year old school population of Bath and North East Somerset, situated in the South West of England, and specifically gives voice to the victims within that sample who have been Cyberbullied through the social media site Facebook. \\ud \\ud The objectives were: to discover what are the lived experiences of the 11-16 year old schoolchildren from the Bath and North East Somerset area who have been cyberbullied through the Facebook social media webs...

  16. Rats: if you can't beat them eat them! (Tricks of the trade observed among the Adi and other North-East Indian tribals).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Rochow, Victor Benno; Megu, Karsing; Chakravorty, Jharna

    2015-05-30

    Since outside the tribal areas of North-East India it is not widely known, neither in the world nor in India itself, that rats are considered a delicious food item, this was one of several reasons why we decided to present this ethnographic account of rat procurement and preparation (together with some additional comments on the cultural role that rats have especially amongst members of the Adi tribe). Consumption of rats by humans as a biological control method far superior to the use of rodenticide poisoning and rat consumption as a way to reduce hunting pressure on rare wild animals were further considerations to publish this account. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with male and female members of eight tribal communities in Arunachal Pradesh (North-East India) on the uses of rats as food and as cultural objects. The construction of rat traps as well as the preparation of rat dishes were observed and recorded photographically. Numerous species of small rodents, collectively called "rats" by the locals of North-East Indian tribes and comprising the species Rattus rattus Linnaeus, R. nitidus Hodgson, R. burrus Miller, R. tanezumi Temminck as well as Bandicota bengalensis Gray and Hardwicke, B. indica Bechstein, and Mus musculus Linnaeus, are regularly trapped and consumed in roasted, cooked or smoked form. In this well-illustrated report the kinds of devices used to catch these animals are described and information is provided on how to prepare rats for human consumption. The role that rats as food and gift-exchange items play in the context of local culture is explained and the locals' most highly appreciated meat dish, known as bule-bulak oying and consisting of boiled rat's tail, legs and inner organs, is introduced. Given the need to meet the world's future food demands and the environmental consequences of an expanding livestock production with regard to global warming, water availability, deforestation, soil erosion etc., rats as a food item, as

  17. Phenotypic features and genetic characterization of male breast cancer families: identification of two recurrent BRCA2 mutations in north-east of Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miolo GianMaria

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer in men is an infrequent occurrence, accounting for ~1% of all breast tumors with an incidence of about 1:100,000. The relative rarity of male breast cancer (MBC limits our understanding of the epidemiologic, genetic and clinical features of this tumor. Methods From 1997 to 2003, 10 MBC patients were referred to our Institute for genetic counselling and BRCA1/2 testing. Here we report on the genetic and phenotypic characterization of 10 families with MBC from the North East of Italy. In particular, we wished to assess the occurrence of specific cancer types in relatives of MBC probands in families with and without BRCA2 predisposing mutations. Moreover, families with recurrent BRCA2 mutations were also characterized by haplotype analysis using 5 BRCA2-linked dinucleotide repeat markers and 8 intragenic BRCA2 polymorphisms. Results Two pathogenic mutations in the BRCA2 gene were observed: the 9106C>T (Q2960X and the IVS16-2A>G (splicing mutations, each in 2 cases. A BRCA1 mutation of uncertain significance 4590C>G (P1491A was also observed. In families with BRCA2 mutations, female breast cancer was more frequent in the first and second-degree relatives compared to the families with wild type BRCA1/2 (31.9% vs. 8.0% p = 0.001. Reconstruction of the chromosome phasing in three families and the analysis of three isolated cases with the IVS16-2A>G BRCA2 mutation identified the same haplotype associated with MBC, supporting the possibility that this founder mutation previously detected in Slovenian families is also present in the North East of our Country. Moreover, analysis of one family with the 9106C>T BRCA2 mutation allowed the identification of common haplotypes for both microsatellite and intragenic polymorphisms segregating with the mutation. Three isolated cases with the same mutation shared the same intragenic polymorphisms and three 5' microsatellite markers, but showed a different haplotype for 3' markers

  18. Impact of tree cutting on water-soluble organic compounds in podzolic soils of the European North-East

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapteva, Elena; Bondarenko, Natalia; Shamrikova, Elena; Kubik, Olesya; Punegov, Vasili

    2016-04-01

    Water-soluble organic compounds (WOCs) and their single components, i.e. low-molecular organic acids, alcohols, and carbohydrates, attain a great deal of attention among soil scientists. WOCs are an important component of soil organic matter (SOM) and form as a results of different biological and chemical processes in soils. These processes are mainly responsible for formation and development of soils in aboveground ecosystems. The purpose of the work was identifying qualitative and quantitative composition of low-molecular organic substances which form in podzolic loamy soils against natural reforestation after spruce forest cutting. The studies were conducted on the territory of the European North-East of Russia, in the middle taiga subzone (Komi Republic, Ust-Kulom region). The study materials were soil of undisturbed bilberry spruce forest (Sample Plot 1 (SP1)) and soils of different-aged tree stands where cutting activities took place in winter 2001/2002 (SP2) and 1969/1970 (SP3). Description of soils and vegetation cover on the plots is given in [1]. Low-molecular organic compounds in soil water extracts were identified by the method of gas chromatography mass-spectrometry [2, 3]. Finally, reforestationafterspruceforestcutting was found to be accompanied by different changes in soil chemical composition. In contrast with soils under undisturbed spruce forest, organic soil horizons under different-aged cuts decreased in organic carbon reserves and production of low-molecular organic compounds, changed in soil acidity. Within the soil series of SP1→SP2→SP3, the highest content of WOCs was identified for undisturbed spruce forest (738 mg kg-1 soil). In soils of coniferous-deciduous forests on SP1 and SP3, WOC content was 294 and 441 mg kg-1 soil, correspondingly. Soils at cuts decreased in concentration of any water-soluble low-molecular SOM components as low-molecular acids, alcohols, and carbohydrates. Structure of low-molecular WOCs in the study podzolic

  19. Crude petroleum-oil biodegradation efficiency of Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from a petroleum-oil contaminated soil from North-East India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Kishore; Mukherjee, Ashis K

    2007-05-01

    The efficiency of Bacillus subtilis DM-04 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa M and NM strains isolated from a petroleum contaminated soil sample from North-East India was compared for the biodegradation of crude petroleum-oil hydrocarbons in soil and shake flask study. These bacterial strains could utilize crude petroleum-oil hydrocarbons as sole source of carbon and energy. Bioaugmentation of TPH contaminated microcosm with P. aeruginosa M and NM consortia and B. subtilis strain showed a significant reduction of TPH levels in treated soil as compared to control soil at the end of experiment (120 d). P. aeruginosa strains were more efficient than B. subtilis strain in reducing the TPH content from the medium. The plate count technique indicated expressive growth and biosurfactant production by exogenously seeded bacteria in crude petroleum-oil rich soil. The results showed that B. subtilis DM-04 and P. aeruginosa M and NM strains could be effective for in situ bioremediation.

  20. [EEG correlates of geno-phenotypical features of the brain development in children of the native and newcomers' population of the Russian North-East].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroko, S I; Bekshaev, S S; Rozhkov, V P

    2012-01-01

    Traditional and original methods of EEG analysis were used to study the brain electrical activity maturation in 156 children and adolescents from 7 to 17 years old who represented the native (Koryaks and Evenks) and newcomers' populations living in severe climatic and geographic conditions of the Russian North-East. New data revealing age-, sex- and ethnic-related features in quantitative EEG parameters are presented. Markers are obtained that characterize alterations in the structure of interaction between different EEG rhythms. The results demonstrate age-dependent transformation of this structure separated in time for both different cortical areas and different EEG frequency bands. These alterations show time lag from 2 to 3 years in children of native population compared to the newcomers. The revealed differences are assumed to reflect geno-phenotypical features of morpho-functional CNS development in children of the native and newcomers' population that depend on strong adaptation tension for extreme environmental conditions.

  1. Epidemiological pattern of leprosy in an endemic area of North-East Brazil, 1996-2005: the supporting role of a Nongovernmental Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Scoizzato, Luca; Fadda, Emanuela; Silva, Gilberto Valentim da; Santos, Luimar De Jesus; Cegolon, Luca

    2009-01-01

    In an endemic area of North-East Brazil (the town of Picos, State of Piauí), a nongovernmental organization (NGO) supported the activity against leprosy in connection with governmental health organizations and local agents. The indicators of leprosy elimination were compared over time (within Picos) and across space (Picos versus Piauí). The case detection rate, above 8 per 10,000 people in the last two years of observation, increased over time in Picos (p=0.010). This finding could be due to active detection activities rather than expanding endemicity, as suggested by the reduction in leprosy in children (p=0.053) and the decrease in the proportion of new cases with grade 2 disability (p<0.001). These indicators showed a more favorable time trend in the city than in the State, suggesting that NGO activity was supportive in the battle towards leprosy control.

  2. Characterization of threatened endemic fish Osteobrama belangeri (Valenciennes, 1844) and related species from North-East India based on morphological and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisnam, Manorama; Chandra, Suresh; Lal, Kuldeep K; Singh, Rajeev K; Mohindra, Vindhya

    2017-11-02

    Four species of the genus Osteobrama collected from five different sampling sites of Chindwin and Barak river basin of North-East India, namely O. belangeri, O. cotio, O. cunma and O. feae, were characterized. Meristic study showed differences in anal fin rays count and lateral line scales. Morphometric analysis revealed significant differences among Osteobrama species. In Truss analysis, a clear pattern of differentiation was observed among the four species with discriminant function analysis assigning 100% correctly to the particular species. In molecular analysis, four Osteobrama species collected were barcoded with COI and 16S rRNA sequences and phylogenetically these four species formed two distinct clusters, O. belangeri form one separate cluster, from the other three species i.e. O. cotio, O. cunma and O. feae. High-resolution clusters generated (NJ trees) aided the groupings of species corresponding to their genera and families which are in confirmation to the values generated by COI Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery bioinformatics platform.

  3. Identification and characterization of Fusarium sp. using ITS and RAPD causing fusarium wilt of tomato isolated from Assam, North East India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irom Manoj Singha

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium oxysporum which causes wilt is a serious pathogen. Fusarium isolates were isolated from Assam located in North East region of India. Morphological identification of Fusarium isolates was done using conidial and hyphal structures. Molecular identification of Fusarium isolates was done by amplifying the internal transcribed spacer (ITS region of the conserved ribosomal DNA using primers ITS1 and ITS4. All the ITS sequences were compared for gaps and similarity. Further, characterization of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD was carried out using 40 primers. 15 primers that gave reproducible results were selected. RAPD was used to observe the relatedness among these isolates. Thus, it was concluded that molecular profiling using ITS is an indispensable method for identification studies.

  4. Summer monsoon rainfall variability over North East regions of India and its association with Eurasian snow, Atlantic Sea Surface temperature and Arctic Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Amita; Oh, Jaiho; Kim, In-won; Kripalani, R. H.; Mitra, A. K.; Pandithurai, G.

    2017-10-01

    This observational study during the 29-year period from 1979 to 2007 evaluates the potential role of Eurasian snow in modulating the North East-Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall with a lead time of almost 6 months. This link is manifested by the changes in high-latitude atmospheric winter snow variability over Eurasia associated with Arctic Oscillation (AO). Excessive wintertime Eurasian snow leads to an anomalous cooling of the overlying atmosphere and is associated with the negative mode of AO, inducing a meridional wave-train descending over the tropical north Atlantic and is associated with cooling of this region. Once the cold anomalies are established over the tropical Atlantic, it persists up to the following summer leading to an anomalous zonal wave-train further inducing a descending branch over NE-India resulting in weak summer monsoon rainfall.

  5. Inventory and new records of polychaete species from the Cap Bon Peninsula, north-east coast of Tunisia, Western Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. ZAABI

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available An inventory of Polychaete species is recorded from the North east coast of Tunisia with an historic review of the previous literature from Tunisian coasts. Altogether 40 families, 146 genera, and 238 species are currently known from the area in which 86 taxa, 4 families (Chrysopetalidae, Pilargidae, Protodrilidae and Saccocirridae and 40 genera (Saccocirrus, Protodrilus, Parathelepus, Thelepus, Petta, Isolda, Brada, Tharyx, Paraprionospio, Jasmineira, Hypsicomus, Euchone, Pseudobranchiomma, Laonome, Galathowenia, Lugia, Pseudomystides, Protomystides, Pirakia, Mysta, Eurysyllis, Parapionosyllis, Streptosyllis, Paraehlersia, Sigambra, Ancistrosyllis, Kefersteinia, Chrysopetalum, Bhawania, Fimbriosthenelais, Subadyte, Panthalis, Dorvillea, Scalibregma, Paradoneis, Cirrophorus, Metasychis, Websterinereis, Euniphysa and Mastobranchus are new additions to the Polychaete fauna of Tunisia. The list, which provides a synthesis of the regional taxonomica work, including coastal areas from Sidi Daoud to the area of Menzel Hurr (Cap Bon Peninsula, Western Mediterranean Sea, can serve as a baseline survey for future studies.

  6. Impact of stress, coping, social support, and resilience of families having children with autism: A North East India-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shyamanta; Das, Bornali; Nath, Kakoli; Dutta, Arunima; Bora, Priyanka; Hazarika, Mythili

    2017-08-01

    Children with autism (CWA) is a segment of population in North East India who are marginalized due to lack of resources like skilled manpower and perceived stress. In comparison to other states and countries whether these children are unique in terms of care and rehabilitation from adult caregivers was the focus of our study. The study assessed level of parental stress, social support, coping mechanisms used by family and resilience in meeting the challenges as caregivers. Parents were selected by simple random sampling from a multi-specialty center dedicated to CWA. They were assessed with the help of structured tools like the Parental Stress Scale, the social support appraisals scale, the coping self-efficacy scale, and the Family Resilience Assessment Scale. Results were analyzed with descriptive statistics and findings suggest definite stress among the parents of CWA. Personal time constraint was noticed in majority of parents, which had adversely affected their professional lives. Despite wide array of stress factors, family members had satisfactory coping skills to work in harmony in adverse circumstances. Regarding secondary social support in terms of family, friends, and neighbors, responses were mixed; religious and spirituality were often resorted avenues. Social desirability, fatigue and the sample being restricted to only one center were though the limitations but, this study throws light on pertinent issues related to families with CWA from a region where specialty centers are a rarity. The future implication could focus on CWA's future, rehabilitation, care and parental concerns which are grossly neglected in North East India. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The Estimated Annual Effective Dose Caused By Radon and Thoron Gases in the Vicinity of Active Faults in the North East of Iran

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    Ali Asghar Mowlavi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Active faults are actually the most important factor in the entry of radon and thoron to the surface of Earth. The location of residential areas on these faults is one of the main reasons for increasing the concentration of these radioactive gases in them. Materials and Methods: By using RTM1688, the concentration of Radon and Thoron was measured in 200 houses in rural residential areas placed on the active faults in Northern Khorasan in the north-east of Iran. Results: Radon measurements range was registered from 12Bqm-3 and 188 Bqm-3 with an average of 75.43 Bqm-3. The highest annual effective dose in samples was 5.45 mSv and the lowest was 0.35 mSv with an average of 2.187mSv. The range of Thoron was registered between 0.0 Bqm-3 and 840Bqm-3 with an average of 325.48 Bqm-3. The highest annual effective dose in samples was 21.17 mSv and the lowest was 0 mSv with an average of 8.20 mSv. Conclusion: The results show that in close areas to active faults of north-east of Iran the concentration of Thoron and Radon is two to three times more than the safe level. It was found that 20 percent of residential areas are subject to annual effective dose greater than the limit for radon and 54 percent for Thoron. The high concentration of Thoron and Radon in these areas show that the active faults play the main role of producing of these gases which may increase of lung diseases.

  8. Seroprevalence of canine dirofilariosis, granulocytic anaplasmosis and lyme borreliosis of public health importance in dogs from India’s North East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Borthakur

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Vector-borne infections namely dirofilariosis, ehrlichiosis, anaplasmosis and lyme borreliosis are being recognized as emerging and/or re-emerging problems in dogs and man due to rapid extension of zoogeographical ranges of many causative agents through international tourism and increase mobility of dogs at national and international level towards meeting the demand for companion animals in the present day society. Anticipating such situation, a serological study was conducted in dogs from North East India to estimate the prevalence of zoonotically important Dirofilaria immitis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Borrelia burgdorferi along with Ehrlichia canis. Materials and Methods: Serological study was carried out using enzyme immunoassay in commercial SNAP 4DX® test kit (Idexx Laboratories, USA. The study was conducted in 191 dogs comprising 82 pets, 57 stray and 52 working dogs owned by defence organizations. Results: The study revealed seroprevalence of mosquito-borne D. immitis (17.80%, tick-borne E. canis (22.51% and A. phagocytophilum (4.71% with an overall 41.88% prevalence of pathogens in single or co-infection. Serological evidence of tick-borne lyme borreliosis due to B. burgdorferi could not be established in dogs in the present study. Of the zoonotic species, highest prevalence of D. immitis was found in the stray dogs (22.80% and that of A. phagocytophilum in pet dogs (6.09%. Conclusion: The results of the present serological study serve as baseline information on the prevalence of A. phagocytophilum in dogs reported for the first time in India and reaffirmation on the high prevalence of D. immitis and E. canis in the North East India.

  9. Prevalence and causes of visual impairment in a rural North-east China adult population: a population-based survey in Bin County, Harbin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wulian; Sun, Xian; Shao, Zhengbo; Zhou, Xinrong; Kang, Yang; Sui, Hong; Yuan, Huiping

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the prevalence and causes of visual impairment in a rural population in north-east China.   A population-based study was conducted within Bin County, Harbin of north-east China. Low vision and blindness were defined using the World Health Organization categories of visual impairment. The prevalence of visual impairment was estimated, and causes were identified based on best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) as well as presenting visual acuity (VA). Out of 5764 people, 4956 (86.01%) aged older than 40 participated in the study. The prevalence of visual impairment, low vision and blindness based on presenting VA was 9.6% (BCVA, 6.6%), 7.7% (BCVA, 4.9%) and 1.9% (BCVA, 1.7%), respectively. Taking the presenting VA, cataract (44%) was the most common cause for visual impairment followed by uncorrected refractive error (24%), treatable causes of visual impairment accounted for 68% of the total cases. Cataract (59%) and glaucoma (15%) were leading causes for blindness based on presenting VA. According to BCVA, cataract was the leading cause of visual impairment and blindness (58% and 60%, respectively), followed by glaucoma (17% and 15%, respectively). The prevalence of visual impairment was higher among women than men (pVisual impairment was a serious public health problem in this rural population, with most of it easily remedied. Results highlighted the need for visual impairment prevention programs to an increasing number of elderly people, with a special emphasis on female and those with little or no education. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Acta Ophthalmol.

  10. Translating Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Chevrel

    2007-07-01

    Europe thinks in many languages and Europe is a land of translation. Translation is a means of transmitting culture, a means of making it available to others and an invitation to share. It is a cement which binds Europe together.

  11. Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus Habitats in North East Germany: Reemergence of TBEV in Ticks after 15 Years of Inactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvius Frimmel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of tick-borne encephalitis has risen in Europe since 1990 and the tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV has been documented to be spreading into regions where it was not previously endemic. In Mecklenburg-West Pomerania, a federal state in Northern Germany, TBEV was not detectable in over 16,000 collected ticks between 1992 and 2004. Until 2004, the last human case of TBE in the region was reported in 1985. Following the occurrence of three autochthonous human cases of TBE after 2004, however, we collected ticks from the areas in which the infections were contracted. To increase the chance of detecting TBEV-RNA, some of the ticks were fed on mice. Using nested RT-PCR, we were able to confirm the presence of TBEV in ticks for the first time after 15 years. A phylogenetic analysis revealed a close relationship between the sequences we obtained and a TBEV sequence from Mecklenburg-East Pomerania published in 1992 and pointed to the reemergence of a natural focus of TBEV after years of low activity. Our results imply that natural foci of TBEV may either persist at low levels of activity for years or reemerge through the agency of migrating birds.

  12. Applying Earth Observation Data to agriculture risk management: a public-private collaboration to develop drought maps in North-East China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surminski, S.; Holt Andersen, B.; Hohl, R.; Andersen, S.

    2012-04-01

    Earth Observation Data (EO) can improve climate risk assessment particularly in developing countries where densities of weather stations are low. Access to data that reflects exposure to weather and climate risks is a key condition for any successful risk management approach. This is of particular importance in the context of agriculture and drought risk, where historical data sets, accurate current data about crop growth and weather conditions, as well as information about potential future changes based on climate projections and socio-economic factors are all relevant, but often not available to stakeholders. Efforts to overcome these challenges in using EO data have so far been predominantly focused on developed countries, where satellite-derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Indexes (NDVI) and the MERIS Global Vegetation Indexes (MGVI), are already used within the agricultural sector for assessing and managing crop risks and to parameterize crop yields. This paper assesses how public-private collaboration can foster the application of these data techniques. The findings are based on a pilot project in North-East China where severe droughts frequently impact the country's largest corn and soybeans areas. With support from the European Space Agency (ESA), a consortium of meteorological experts, mapping firms and (re)insurance experts has worked to explore the potential use and value of EO data for managing crop risk and assessing exposure to drought for four provinces in North-East China (Heilongjiang, Jilin, Inner Mongolia and Liaoning). Combining NDVI and MGVI data with meteorological observations to help alleviate shortcomings of NDVI specific to crop types and region has resulted in the development of new drought maps for the time 2000-2011 in digital format at a high resolution (1x1 km). The observed benefits of this data application range from improved risk management to cost effective drought monitoring and claims verification for insurance purposes

  13. Tracking of the origin of recurrent mutations of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in the North-East of Italy and improved mutation analysis strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cini, Giulia; Mezzavilla, Massimo; Della Puppa, Lara; Cupelli, Elisa; Fornasin, Alessio; D'Elia, Angela Valentina; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Damante, Giuseppe; Bertok, Sara; Miolo, Gianmaria; Maestro, Roberta; de Paoli, Paolo; Amoroso, Antonio; Viel, Alessandra

    2016-02-06

    About 20 % of hereditary breast cancers are caused by mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Since BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations may be spread throughout the gene, genetic testing is usually performed by direct sequencing of entire coding regions. In some populations, especially if relatively isolated, a few number of recurrent mutations is reported, sometimes caused by founder effect. BRCA1 and BRCA2 screening for mutations was carried out on 1114 breast and/or ovarian cancer patients complying with the eligibility criteria for BRCA testing. Haplotype analysis was performed on the probands carrying recurrent mutations and their relatives, using two sets of microsatellite markers covering the BRCA1 (D17S588, D17S806, D17S902, D17S1325, D17S855, D17S1328, D17S800, and D17S250) and BRCA2 (D13S220, D13S267, D13S171, D13S1701, D13S1698, D13S260, D13S290, D13S1246) loci. The DMLE + 2.2 software was used to estimate the age of BRCA1 c.676delT and BRCA2 c.7806-2A > G. A multiplex PCR and two different primer extension assays were optimized and used for genotyping the recurrent mutations of the two genes. In the time frame of almost 20 years of genetic testing, we have found that five BRCA1 and three BRCA2 mutations are recurrent in a substantial subset of carriers from North-East Italy and neighboring Istria, where they represent more than 50 % of all mutations. Microsatellite analyses identified a common haplotype of different length for each mutation. Age estimation of BRCA1 c.676delT and BRCA2 c.7806-2A > G mutations revealed that they arose in the Friuli Venezia Giulia area about 86 and 94 generations ago, respectively. Suggestion of an association between BRCA2 c.7806-2A > G and risk of breast cancer in males has emerged. Finally, we developed a simple and efficient pre-screening test, performing an in-house primer extension SNaPshot® assay for the rapid identification of the eight recurrent mutations. Proofs of common ancestry has been obtained for the eight recurrent

  14. Forecasting the mixed layer depth in the north east Atlantic: an ensemble approach, with uncertainties based on data from operational oceanic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drillet, Y.; Lellouche, J. M.; Levier, B.; Drévillon, M.; Le Galloudec, O.; Reffray, G.; Regnier, C.; Greiner, E.; Clavier, M.

    2014-06-01

    Operational systems operated by Mercator Océan provide daily ocean forecasts, and combining these forecasts we can produce ensemble forecast and uncertainty estimates. This study focuses on the mixed layer depth in the North East Atlantic near the Porcupine Abyssal Plain for May 2013. This period is of interest for several reasons: (1) four Mercator Océan operational systems provide daily forecasts at a horizontal resolution of 1/4°, 1/12° and 1/36° with different physics; (2) glider deployment under the OSMOSIS project provides observation of the changes in mixed layer depth; (3) the ocean stratifies in May, but mixing events induced by gale force wind are observed and forecasted by the systems. A statistical approach and forecast error quantification for each system and for the combined products are presented. Skill scores indicate that forecasts are in any case better than persistence, and temporal correlations between forecast and observations are greater than 0.8 even for the 4 day forecast. The impact of atmospheric forecast error, and for the wind field in particular, is also quantified in terms of the forecast time delay and the intensity of mixing or stratification events.

  15. Influence of short-term hydrographic variations during the north-east monsoon on picophytoplankton community structure in the eastern Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaneesh, K. M.; Mitbavkar, Smita; Anil, A. C.

    2017-08-01

    The eastern Arabian Sea over the continental margin is a dynamic region subjected to short-term variability in hydrography as a result of various physical forcing such as coastal advection and vertical mixing. In order to assess the influence of hydrography on the picophytoplankton community, a temporal high resolution (every 3 h for nine days) study was carried out at a fixed location (15° 18‧ 46″N, 72° 41‧ 53″E) in the eastern Arabian Sea during the early north-east monsoon (November 2011). The picophytoplankton community comprised of Synechococcus, Prochlorococcus, and picoeukaryotes. Based on the temperature and salinity distribution, the study period was divided into phase I representing a stratified water column and phase II representing a vertically mixed water column. Phase I had higher picophytoplankton abundance with the initial dominance of Prochlorococcus which was later taken over by picoeukaryotes. Towards the end of phase I, with the initiation of vertical mixing, picoeukaryotes were the first to respond to the nutrient influx. As the vertical mixing intensified during phase II, the picophytoplankton abundance declined. Picophytoplankton carbon biomass and their contribution to total phytoplankton biomass was relatively higher during phase I with picoeukaryotes as the major contributors. These transient variations in picophytoplankton abundance highlights the importance of high frequency observations at the single cell level for better understanding the population dynamics in such environments.

  16. 'It is not a quick fix' structural and contextual issues that affect implementation of integrated health and well-being services: a qualitative study from North East England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheetham, M; Visram, S; Rushmer, R; Greig, G; Gibson, E; Khazaeli, B; Wiseman, A

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this article is to examine the factors affecting the design, commissioning and delivery of integrated health and well-being services (IHWSs), which seek to address multiple health-related behaviours, improve well-being and tackle health inequalities using holistic approaches. Qualitative studies embedded within iterative process evaluations. Semi-structured interviews conducted with 16 key informants as part of two separate evaluations of IHWSs in North East England, supplemented by informal observations of service delivery. Transcripts and fieldnotes were analysed thematically. The study findings identify a challenging organisational context in which to implement innovative service redesign, as a result of budget cuts and changes in NHS and local authority capacity. Pressures to demonstrate outcomes affected the ability to negotiate the practicalities of joint working. Progress is at risk of being undermined by pressures to disinvest before the long-term benefits to population health and well-being are realised. The findings raise important questions about contract management and relationships between commissioners and providers involved in implementing these new ways of working. These findings provide useful learning in terms of the delivery and commissioning of similar IHWSs, contributing to understanding of the benefits and challenges of this model of working. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Contribution of efflux pumps in fluroquinolone resistance in multi-drug resistant nosocomial isolates of Pseudomanas aeruginosa from a tertiary referral hospital in north east India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Choudhury

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the leading opportunistic pathogen and its ability to acquire resistance against series of antimicrobial agents confine treatment option for nosocomial infections. Increasing resistance to fluroquinolone (FQ agents has further worsened the scenario. The major mechanism of resistance to FQs includes mutation in FQs target genes in bacteria (DNA gyrase and/or topoisomerases and overexpression of antibiotic efflux pumps. Objective: We have investigated the role of efflux pump mediated FQ resistance in nosocomial isolates of P. aeruginosa from a tertiary referral hospital in north eastern part of India. Materials and Methods: A total of 234 non-duplicate, consecutive clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were obtained from a tertiary referral hospital of north-east India. An efflux pump inhibitor (EPI, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP based method was used for determination of efflux pump activity and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR was performed for molecular characterisation of efflux pump. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC reduction assay was also performed for all the isolates. Results and Conclusion: A total number of 56 (23% have shown efflux mediated FQ resistance. MexAB-OprM efflux system was predominant type. This is the first report of efflux pump mediated FQ resistance from this part of the world and the continued emergence of these mutants with such high MIC range from this part of the world demands serious awareness, diagnostic intervention, and proper therapeutic option.

  18. The Advantages and Disadvantages of Breakfast Clubs According to Parents, Children, and School Staff in the North East of England, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Pamela Louise; Russo, Riccardo; Defeyter, Margaret Anne

    2015-01-01

    The provision of school breakfast has become increasingly popular in the UK in recent years. However, UK-based studies highlighting the views of parents, children, and school staff on school breakfast clubs are lacking. The current study set out to address this dearth in the literature by investigating the views of these key user and stakeholder groups on breakfast clubs within the North East of England. Fourteen parents, 21 children, and 17 school staff were recruited from four primary schools where breakfast clubs were available on site. Parents and school staff took part in semistructured interviews and children participated in focus groups, through which the advantages and disadvantages of breakfast clubs were discussed. Thematic analysis revealed that breakfast clubs provided children with a settled and enjoyable start to the school day. As well as providing children with a healthy and varied breakfast meal and unique opportunities for social interaction, breakfast clubs were recognized as an integral part of the school system that offered support to parents, particularly those who worked and relied on breakfast clubs as a means of affordable and reliable childcare. The few disadvantages identified related to practical issues such as a lack of adherence to school food standards, breakfast club staff missing class preparation time and concerns that some children were being excluded from participating in breakfast clubs particularly due to costs associated with attendance. The findings are discussed in relation to the School Food Plan, and areas for further investigation are proposed.

  19. The effect of an exceptionally wet summer on methane effluxes from a 15-year re-wetted fen in north-east Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Huth

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Re-wetting minerotrophic fens has become an important strategy to mitigate climate change in Germany. However, recent studies report raised methane (CH4 effluxes during the first years after flooding. A minerotrophic fen in north-east Germany that was re-wetted 15 years ago was exposed to exceptionally heavy rainfall and freshwater flooding in August 2011. We measured CH4 effluxes from wetland vegetation stands dominated by Phragmites australis (Cav. Trin. ex Steud., Typha latifolia L. and Carex acutiformis Ehrh., using the closed-chamber method, fortnightly from March 2011 to March 2012 with extra sampling during the flooding. The respective annual effluxes of CH4 (mean ± 1 standard error from the three vegetation types were 18.5 ± 1.3, 21.1 ± 1.2 and 47.5 ± 5.0 g m-2 a-1, with the August effluxes contributing 40 %, 50 % and 10 % of the annual effluxes. Despite the freshwater flooding in August, annual CH4 effluxes from the 15-year re-wetted fen are similar to those reported from pristine fens. These results are promising because they indicate that, although CH4 effluxes are elevated after re-wetting, they may return to values typical for pristine fens after 15 years. Hence, re-wetting can achieve the purpose of reducing greenhouse gas effluxes from drained minerotrophic fens.

  20. Sprawl Dynamics in Rural–Urban Territories Highly Suited for Wine Production. Mapping Urban Growth and Changing Territorial Shapes in North-East Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Simone Rizzo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In Italy, large-scale changes in the structure of land use can be observed. These are caused primarily by socio-economic pressures, generally determining the conversion of agricultural land into artificial surfaces. Our aim was to investigate if and how sprawl dynamics influence viticultural landscapes (that is, if they result in scattered, intermediate, or compact urban developments. We focused on selected territories in North-East Italy, where vine-growing provides almost uninterrupted land cover, as case study areas. Using GIS-based techniques, we documented the processes of land use, analyzing the resulting changes of urban-rural forms and in territorial shapes. Results at the Provincial level showed decreasing dispersed artificial surfaces and increasing clustered urban developments. This trend is also detected in areas under vine, but in general is more modest. Our research indicates that typical agricultural productions can determine resistance to the alienation of land, maintaining a sufficient consistency for areas to develop in a more varied and articulated (for example touristic manner.

  1. SOFA OR APACHE II, WHICH DESERVES MORE ATTENTION IN SEPSIS PATIENTS IN ICU? AN EXPERIENCE FROM A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN NORTH EAST INDIA

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    Deepak Chaudhury

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND There are several well recognised scoring systems for evaluation and prognostication of critically ill patients. While APACHE II (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scoring system uses a point score based on physiologic parameters, age and previous health status, the SOFA (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scoring system takes into account the organ failure in critically ill patients. In the assessment of critically ill patients with suspected multiorgan dysfunction admitted in ICU, the role of SOFA in predictive validity for in-hospital mortality is being widely discussed. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a prospective study undertaken in emergency ICU of a government tertiary care hospital in North East India over a period of one year to prognosticate the patients by using two different established scoring systems, e.g. SOFA and APACHE II. RESULTS The results showed that serial measurement of SOFA score during first week is a very useful tool in predicting the outcome especially on the day 3. The APACHE II score on day of admission, though reliable, was not very effective in predicting the mortality rate in our setup. CONCLUSION Serial measurement of SOFA score during first week is very useful tool in predicting the outcome of sepsis patients in ICU and better than admission APACHE II scoring in predicting mortality.

  2. Geographical markers for Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with similar technological origins domesticated for rice-based ethnic fermented beverages production in North East India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyaram, Kumaraswamy; Tamang, Jyoti Prakash; Capece, Angela; Romano, Patrizia

    2011-11-01

    Autochthonous strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae from traditional starters used for the production of rice-based ethnic fermented beverage in North East India were examined for their genetic polymorphism using mitochondrial DNA-RFLP and electrophoretic karyotyping. Mitochondrial DNA-RFLP analysis of S. cerevisiae strains with similar technological origins from hamei starter of Manipur and marcha starter of Sikkim revealed widely separated clusters based on their geographical origin. Electrophoretic karyotyping showed high polymorphism amongst the hamei strains within similar mitochondrial DNA-RFLP cluster and one unique karyotype of marcha strain was widely distributed in the Sikkim-Himalayan region. We conceptualized the possibility of separate domestication events for hamei strains in Manipur (located in the Indo-Burma biodiversity hotspot) and marcha strains in Sikkim (located in Himalayan biodiversity hotspot), as a consequence of less homogeneity in the genomic structure between these two groups, their clear separation being based on geographical origin, but not on technological origin and low strain level diversity within each group. The molecular markers developed based on HinfI-mtDNA-RFLP profile and the chromosomal doublets in chromosome VIII position of Sikkim-Himalayan strains could be effectively used as geographical markers for authenticating the above starter strains and differentiating them from other commercial strains.

  3. Prevalence and Genetic Variability in Capsid L1 Gene of Rare Human Papillomaviruses (HPV Found in Cervical Lesions of Women from North-East Brazil

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    Ana Pavla Almeida Diniz Gurgel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and genetic variability of the capsid L1 gene of rare HPV genotypes that were found in the cervical lesions of women from North-East Brazil. A total number of 263 patients were included in this study. HPV detection was performed using PCR followed by direct sequencing of MY09/11, as well as type-specific PCR to detect the Alpha-9 species. Epitope prediction was performed to determine whether or not the genetic variants are inserted in B-cell and T-cell epitopes. The prevalence of rare HPV types in cervical lesions was found to be 9.47%. The rare HPV genotypes that were detected were HPV-53, 54, 56, 61, 62, 66, 70, and 81. The genetic variability in the L1 gene of rare HPV types involved thirty nucleotide changes, eight of which were detected for the first time in this study. Moreover, some of these variants are embedded in B-cell or T-cell epitope regions. The results of this research suggest that rare HPV types might be involved in cervical lesions and some of these variants can be found in B-cell and T-cell epitopes. Data on the prevalence and variability of rare HPV types will assist in clarifying the role of these viruses in carcinogenesis.

  4. Seroprevalence of West Nile virus antibodies in equids in the North-East of Algeria and detection of virus circulation in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafri, Ismail; Prat, Christine M; Bitam, Idir; Gravier, Patrick; Besbaci, Mohamed; Zeroual, Fayçal; Ben-Mahdi, Meriem Hind; Davoust, Bernard; Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle

    2017-02-01

    West Nile fever (WNF) is a viral disease of wild birds transmitted by mosquitoes. Humans and equids can also be affected and suffer from meningoencephalitis. In Algeria, since the 1994 epidemic, no data on WNV circulation was available until 2012. In September 2012, a fatal human case of WNV neuro-invasive infection occurred in Jijel province. This study describes the first seroprevalence study of West Nile virus (WNV) antibodies conducted in the equine population in Algeria. During 2014, serum samples were collected from 293 equids (222 donkeys and 71 horses) asymptomatic and unvaccinated for WNV in three localities in Northeastern wetlands of Algeria. Antibodies against WNV were found in 51 samples (seroprevalence 17.4%) of sampled equids, distributed as follows: 19 (seroprevalence 26.8%) horses and 32 (seroprevalence 14.4%) donkeys. Moreover 7 horses coming from Blida, in the center of Algeria, were tested before and after an 8-months stay in North-East Algeria. We observe a seroconversion in 2 horses, showing WNV circulation in 2014 in this specific region of Algeria. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. "I used to be as fit as a linnet" - beliefs, attitudes, and environmental supportiveness for physical activity in former mining areas in the North-East of England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rind, Esther; Jones, Andy

    2015-02-01

    Studies of geographical variations in physical activity behaviours have suggested that activity levels are particularly low in areas that have undergone employment loss associated with the decline of industry. This is of concern given that affected populations are already at risk of poor health. Applying focus group methodology amongst 19 participants in four groups, this study aims to unpack how broader societal and environmental changes associated with industrial decline affect beliefs and attitudes towards physical activity in ex-mining communities in the North-East of England. Identified core themes comprise the direct impact of deindustrialisation on social and physical environments. Based on our findings, we provide evidence for mechanisms that operate via loss of occupational physical activity as well as the progressive development of environments that are not fit to support population activity levels. Particularly important was the loss of recreational facilities, public green spaces and sports facilities that were owned and organised by the miners themselves with support from the mining companies. Attitudes and beliefs directly related to the areas' industrial past were also seen to be key. We suggest that the development of interventions considering the socio-cultural history and socio-economic reality of communities could be a promising route to encourage more active lifestyles in deprived areas with particularly low levels of physical activity. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Students’ consumption of beverages and snacks at school and away from school: a case study in the North East of Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen eLosasso

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In North-East Italy (the Veneto region several public school nutrition policies have been developed to reduce the consumption of high caloric snacks and beverages. However, little is known about whether the policies actually influence students’ dietary behaviours. In order to address this point, a multi-centre cross-sectional survey of 691 Italian students was conducted. Students completed the Beverage and Snack Questionnaire (BSQ, which assesses the consumption of beverages and snacks at school and out-of-school. Three levels Poisson Models with random intercept with students (level 1 units nested into classroom (level 2 units, and nested into schools (level 3 units, were used to examine the influence of the school setting versus the out-of-school environment (independent variable on students’ consumption of sweet beverages, snacks, milk based beverages, low carbohydrate drinks, fruit and vegetables (dependent variable (p≤0.05. The results showed a significantly higher consumption of sweet beverages, snacks, milk-based beverages, low-carbohydrate drinks, fruit and vegetables out-of-the school, suggesting a school-protective association Thus, the policies aimed to limit or deny access to unhealthy foods in the school environment may play an important role in promoting more healthful dietary patterns for school children. Additional studies should be conducted to compare students’ dietary behaviours between schools with nutrition policies to those without nutrition policies.

  7. The advantages and disadvantages of breakfast clubs according to parents, children and school staff in the North East of England, UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Louise Graham

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The provision of school breakfast has become increasingly popular in the UK in recent years. However, UK based studies highlighting the views of parents, children and school staff on school breakfast clubs are lacking. The current study set out to address this dearth in the literature by investigating the views of these key user and stakeholder groups on breakfast clubs within the North East of England. Fourteen parents, 21 children and 17 school staff were recruited from 4 primary schools where breakfast clubs were available on site. Parents and school staff took part in semi-structured interviews and children participated in focus groups, through which the advantages and disadvantages of breakfast clubs were discussed. Thematic analysis revealed that breakfast clubs provided children with a settled and enjoyable start to the school day. As well as providing children with a healthy and varied breakfast meal and unique opportunities for social interaction, breakfast clubs were recognized as an integral part of the school system that offered support to parents, particularly those who worked and relied on breakfast clubs as a means of affordable and reliable childcare. The few disadvantages identified related to practical issues such as a lack of adherence to school food standards, breakfast club staff missing class preparation time and concerns that some children were being excluded from participating in breakfast clubs particularly due to costs associated with attendance. The findings are discussed in relation to the School Food Plan and areas for further investigation are proposed.

  8. Students’ Consumption of Beverages and Snacks at School and Away from School: A Case Study in the North East of Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losasso, Carmen; Cappa, Veronica; Neuhouser, Marian L.; Giaccone, Valerio; Andrighetto, Igino; Ricci, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    In North-East Italy (the Veneto region), several public school nutrition policies have been developed to reduce the consumption of high-caloric snacks and beverages. However, little is known about whether the policies actually influence students’ dietary behaviors. In order to address this point, a multi-center cross-sectional survey of 691 Italian students was conducted. Students completed the Beverage and Snack Questionnaire, which assesses the consumption of beverages and snacks at school and out of school. Three-level Poisson Models with random intercept with students (level 1 units) nested into classroom (level 2 units), and nested into schools (level 3 units), were used to examine the influence of the school setting vs. the out of school environment (independent variable) on students’ consumption of sweet beverages, snacks, milk-based beverages, low-carbohydrate drinks, fruit, and vegetables (dependent variable) (p ≤ 0.05). The results showed a significantly higher consumption of sweet beverages, snacks, milk-based beverages, low-carbohydrate drinks, fruit, and vegetables out-of-the school, suggesting a school-protective association Thus, the policies aimed to limit or deny access to unhealthy foods in the school environment may play an important role in promoting more healthful dietary patterns for school children. Additional studies should be conducted to compare students’ dietary behaviors between schools with nutrition policies to those without nutrition policies. PMID:26501063

  9. The Advantages and Disadvantages of Breakfast Clubs According to Parents, Children, and School Staff in the North East of England, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Pamela Louise; Russo, Riccardo; Defeyter, Margaret Anne

    2015-01-01

    The provision of school breakfast has become increasingly popular in the UK in recent years. However, UK-based studies highlighting the views of parents, children, and school staff on school breakfast clubs are lacking. The current study set out to address this dearth in the literature by investigating the views of these key user and stakeholder groups on breakfast clubs within the North East of England. Fourteen parents, 21 children, and 17 school staff were recruited from four primary schools where breakfast clubs were available on site. Parents and school staff took part in semistructured interviews and children participated in focus groups, through which the advantages and disadvantages of breakfast clubs were discussed. Thematic analysis revealed that breakfast clubs provided children with a settled and enjoyable start to the school day. As well as providing children with a healthy and varied breakfast meal and unique opportunities for social interaction, breakfast clubs were recognized as an integral part of the school system that offered support to parents, particularly those who worked and relied on breakfast clubs as a means of affordable and reliable childcare. The few disadvantages identified related to practical issues such as a lack of adherence to school food standards, breakfast club staff missing class preparation time and concerns that some children were being excluded from participating in breakfast clubs particularly due to costs associated with attendance. The findings are discussed in relation to the School Food Plan, and areas for further investigation are proposed. PMID:26097840

  10. Measurements of natural gamma radiation in beach sediments of north east coast of Tamilnadu, India by gamma ray spectrometry with multivariate statistical approach

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    M. SureshGandhi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of natural gamma ray emitting 238U, 232Th and 40K radionuclides in beach sediments along north east coast of Tamilnadu, India has been carried out using a NaI(Tl gamma ray spectrometric technique. The total average concentrations of radionuclides 238U, 232Th, and 40K were 35.12, 713.16, and 349.60 Bq kg−1, respectively. Correlations made among these radionuclides prove the existence of secular equilibrium in the investigated sediments. The total average absorbed dose rate in the study areas is found to be 504.75 nGyh−1, whereas the annual effective dose rate has an average value of 0.62 mSvy−1. The mean activity concentrations of measured radionuclides were compared with other literature values. The ratios between the detected radioisotopes have been calculated for spatial distribution of natural radionuclides in studied area. Also the radiological hazard of the natural radionuclides content, radium equivalent activity, external hazard index of the sediment samples in the area under consideration were calculated. Multivariate Statistical analyses (Pearson Correlation, Cluster and Factor analysis were carried out between the parameters obtained from radioactivity to know the existing relations.

  11. Correlation Between Chemical Composition and Antibacterial Activity of Essential Oils from Fifteen Eucalyptus Species Growing in the Korbous and Jbel Abderrahman Arboreta (North East Tunisia

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    Fethia Harzallah-Skhiri

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The essential oils of fifteen Eucalyptus species harvested from the Jbel Abderrahman and Korbous arboreta (North East Tunisia were screened for their antibacterial activities by the agar disc diffusion method. Eighteen major components as identified by GC/FID and GC/MS were selected for a study of the chemical and biological activity variability. The main one was 1,8-cineole, followed by spathulenol, trans-pinocarveol, α-pinene, p-cymene, globulol, cryptone, β-phellandrene, viridiflorol, borneol, limonene and isospathulenol. The chemical principal component analysis identified five species groups and subgroups, where each group constituted a chemotype, however that of the values of zone diameter of the inhibition (zdi identified six groups of Eucalyptus oils, characterized by their antibacterial inhibition ability. The strongest activity was shown by E. platypus oil against Enterococcus faecalis and by E. lamannii oil against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. A correlation between the levels of some major components and the antibacterial activities was observed.

  12. Trophic ecology of European sardine Sardina pilchardus and European anchovy Engraulis encrasicolus in the Bay of Biscay (north-east Atlantic) inferred from delta C-13 and delta N-15 values of fish and identified mesozooplanktonic organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Chouvelon, Tiphaine; Chappuis, A.; Bustamante, Paco; Lefebvre, Sebastien; Mornet, Francoise; Guillou, G.; Violamer, L.; Dupuy, Christine

    2014-01-01

    European sardine (Sardina pilchardus) and European anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus) are two species of economical and ecological significance in the Bay of Biscay (north-east Atlantic). However, the trophic ecology of both species is still poorly known in the area, and more generally, few studies have considered the potential trophic overlap between sardines and anchovies worldwide. This study aims to highlight the trophic links between the mesozooplankton and adults of these two pelagic fish...

  13. Small pelagic fish feeding patterns in relation to food resource variability: an isotopic investigation for Sardina pilchardus and Engraulis encrasicolus from the Bay of Biscay (north-east Atlantic)

    OpenAIRE

    Chouvelon, Tiphaine; Violamer, Laurie; Dessier, Aurélie; Bustamante, Paco; Mornet, Françoise; Pignon‑Mussaud, Cécilia; Christine, Dupuy

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Small pelagic fish represent an essential link between lower and upper trophic levels in marine pelagic ecosystems and often support important fisheries. In the Bay of Biscay in the north-east Atlantic, no obvious controlling factors have yet been described that explain observed fluctuations in European sardine Sardina pilchardus and European anchovy Engraulis encrasicolus stocks, in contrast to other systems. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate to which...

  14. Enhanced bioaccumulation of mercury in deep-sea fauna from the Bay of Biscay (north-east Atlantic) in relation to trophic positions identified by analysis of carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Chouvelon, Tiphaine; Spitz, Jérôme; Caurant, Florence; Mèndez-Fernandez, Paula; Autier, Julien; Lassus-Débat, Aurélie; Chappuis, Alexis; Bustamante, Paco

    2012-01-01

    International audience; The Bay of Biscay (north-east Atlantic) is an open marine ecosystem of particular concern in current European environmental policies. Indeed, it supports both a high biological diversity and numerous anthropogenic activities such as important fisheries. For the first time, stable isotope analyses (SIA) of carbon and nitrogen and analysis of total mercury (T-Hg) concentrations in the muscle (edible flesh) were performed on adult stages of a wide range of species (i.e., ...

  15. The Archival Sources for the Histoty of the Liquorstrade in the North-East of Russia in the Late XIX – Early XX Centuries (Funds of the National Archives of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia

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    Oxana P. Kolomiets

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the article the complex documents of the end XIX - the first quarter of the twentieth centuries is researched which are stored in the collections of the National Archives of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia (NARS (Ya and concerned the sale of alcoholic beverages to indigenous people of the North-East of Russia. Documents have different safety and value of source, some of them shed light on the problem of the liquor trade in the late XIX - early XX centuries. Yakut and Kolyma merchants, American entrepreneurs were active in trade with the aboriginal population of the North-East of Russia including the Chukchi, Yukagirs, Eskimos. Legislation of the Russian Empire prohibited alcohol trade in resettlement sites of the indigenous population but the facts of illegal trade were repeatedly documented and analyzed by the administrative authorities. Using of the described above historical documents and taking into account available materials allow more deeply reveal the questions on the role of Russian merchants in the liquor trade, on the administrative regulation of wine and liquor market, on the specific actions of the authorities to solve the problem of indigenous alcohol takers including the Chukchi population. With the introduction of the new documentary sources in the research process it will be possible to explore the problem of liquor trade in the North-East of Russia in the late XIX - early XX centuries.

  16. Tracing the distribution and evolution of lactase persistence in Southern Europe through the study of the T(-13910) variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostou, Paolo; Battaggia, Cinzia; Coia, Valentina; Capelli, Cristian; Fabbri, Cristina; Pettener, Davide; Destro-Bisol, Giovanni; Luiselli, Donata

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the occurrence and intra-allelic variability of the T(-13910) variant located upstream of the lactase gene in 965 individuals from 20 different locations of Italy and Greece. The T(-13910) frequency ranges from 0.072 (Sardinia) to 0.237 (North-East Italy), with a statistically significant difference between North-East Italians and other Italian populations. The comparison of the lactose tolerance predicted by T(-13910) and that assessed by other studies using physiological tests shows a one-way statistically significant discrepancy that could be due to sampling differences. However, the possible role of other genetic factors underlying lactase persistence is worth exploring. The time of the most recent common ancestor and departures from neutrality of the T(-13910) allele were assessed using three microsatellite loci. Time estimates were found to be congruent with the appearance of dairy farming in Southern Europe and the occurrence of a single introgression event. Robust signals of selection can be observed in North-East Italy only. We discuss the possible role of cultural traits and genetic history in determining these observed micro-evolutionary patterns.

  17. Hydrological connectivity and Burkholderia pseudomallei prevalence in wetland environments: investigating rice-farming community's risk of exposure to melioidosis in North-East Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuah, C Joon; Tan, Esther K H; Sermswan, Rasana W; Ziegler, Alan D

    2017-06-01

    In our analysis of 136 water samples from wetland environments (rice paddies, natural wetland sites, man-made water bodies) in rural areas of North-East Thailand, Burkholderia pseudomallei was most prevalent in rice paddies (15 of the 30 positive sites). The high prevalence in the water of rice fields is indicative of the inherent vulnerability of farmers in rural agricultural areas in this area of Thailand and likely other locations in the tropics. Nearly all B. pseudomallei-positive sites were found within the vicinity of a large wetland associated with the Chi River, in the month of July 2014. Positive samples were found in water ranging in pH from 5.9 to 8.7, salinity ranging from 0.04 to 1.58 ppt, nitrate ranging from 0 to 10.8 ppm, and iron ranging from 0.003 to 1.519 ppm. Of these variables, only iron content was statistically higher in B. pseudomallei-positive versus B. pseudomallei-negative sites, suggesting that increasing concentrations of iron may encourage the growth of this bacterium, which is responsible for melioidosis. Our results, when combined with data from other published studies, support the notion that B. pseudomallei can exist in a wide range of environmental conditions. Thus, we argue that health safety education is a more appropriate means of addressing farmer vulnerability than chemical or physical alterations to fields at large scales. Further, it may be important to investigate melioidosis through transdisciplinary approaches that consider the complex social and ecological contexts in which the disease occurs.

  18. Analysis of serpentinophytes from north-east of Portugal for trace metal accumulation--relevance to the management of mine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, H; Prasad, M N V; Pratas, J

    2004-03-01

    In north-east of Portugal, the serpentinized area is about 8000 ha with a characteristic geology and flora. The serpentine plant community and respective soils were analyzed to examine the trace metal budget in different tissues of the plants exhibiting resistance to trace metals. One hundred and thirty five plant species belonging to 39 families and respective soils have been analyzed for total Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn. Substantial amounts of Ni, Cr, Co and Mn were detected in plant tissues which are listed below: NI: Alyssum serpyllifolium (38105); Bromus hordeaceus (1467); Linaria spartea (492); Plantago radicata (140); Lavandula stoechas (118) and Cistus salvifolius (114); CR: L. spartea (706.7); Ulmus procera (173.4); A. serpyllifolium (129.3); Cistus ladanifer (40.8); L. stoechas (29.5); P. radicata (27.81); Setariopsis verticillata (25.7); Plantago lanceolata (24); Digitalis purpurea (23.4); Logfia minima (23.1); Arenaria querioides (23); Hieracium peleteranum (22.7); Arenaria montana (14.5); CO: A. serpyllifolium (145.1); L. spartea (63.2); P. radicata (10.4); H. peleteranum (7.3); Lepidium heterophyllum (6.9); A. querioides (6.6); C. salvifolius (6.5); C. ladanifer (6.3); L. stoechas (6.1); Anthyllis lotoides (6.1); L. minima (6.1); Euphorbia falcata (5.7) and B. hordeaceus (5.6); MN: A. serpyllifolium (830); L. spartea (339); L. stoechas (187.1); L. minima (182.7); Castanea sativa (125); Spergula pentandra (124); P. radicata (119); Cytisus striatus (115.4); Quercus pyrenaica (110); Teucrium scorodonia (109.4); Fraxinus vulgaris (109); Anthyllis sampaiana (108); Quercus ilex (108). The significance of serpentine flora, need for conservation of these fragile and environmentally invaluable plant resources for possible use for in situ remediation of metalliferous substrates are presented in this paper.

  19. Rough Justice? Exploring the Relationship Between Information Access and Environmental and Ecological Justice Pertaining to Two Controversial Coastal Developments in North-east Scotland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme Baxter

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the relationship between information access and environmental and ecological justice through an historical comparison of two controversial coastal developments in Aberdeenshire, North-east Scotland: the building of a North Sea gas reception terminal by the British Gas Council and the French exploration company Total Oil Marine in the 1970s; and the more recent construction of ‘the greatest golf course anywhere in the world’ by the American property tycoon, Donald Trump. These two projects have much in common, not least because each one has had actual or potential impacts on an environmentally sensitive site, and because each has also been affected by plans for another major structure in its immediate vicinity. But the Trump golf course project has taken place during a period when access to information and citizens’ influence on major planning decisions in Scotland has been significantly greater, at least theoretically. With these points in mind, the paper considers whether or not environmental justice (more specifically, procedural environmental justice and ecological justice are now more attainable in the current era of supposed openness, transparency and public engagement, than in the more secretive and less participative 1970s. It reveals that, at the planning application stage, information on the potential environmental impact of Trump’s golf resort was more readily obtainable, compared with that provided by the Gas Council and Total forty years earlier. However, during and after the construction stage, when considering whether or not the developments have met environmental planning conditions – and whether or not ecological justice has been done – the situation with the gas terminal has been far clearer than with Trump’s golf resort. Despite the golf course being built in an era of government openness, there remain a number of unanswered questions concerning its environmental impact.

  20. Distribution of calcifying and silicifying phytoplankton in relation to environmental and biogeochemical parameters during the late stages of the 2005 North East Atlantic Spring Bloom

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    K. Leblanc

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The late stage of the North East Atlantic (NEA spring bloom was investigated during June 2005 along a transect section from 45 to 66° N between 15 and 20° W in order to characterize the contribution of siliceous and calcareous phytoplankton groups and describe their distribution in relation to environmental factors. We measured several biogeochemical parameters such as nutrients, surface trace metals, algal pigments, biogenic silica (BSi, particulate inorganic carbon (PIC or calcium carbonate, particulate organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus (POC, PON and POP, respectively, as well as transparent exopolymer particles (TEP. Results were compared with other studies undertaken in this area since the JGOFS NABE program. Characteristics of the spring bloom generally agreed well with the accepted scenario for the development of the autotrophic community. The NEA seasonal diatom bloom was in the late stages when we sampled the area and diatoms were constrained to the northern part of our transect, over the Icelandic Basin (IB and Icelandic Shelf (IS. Coccolithophores dominated the phytoplankton community, with a large distribution over the Rockall-Hatton Plateau (RHP and IB. The Porcupine Abyssal Plain (PAP region at the southern end of our transect was the region with the lowest biomass, as demonstrated by very low Chla concentrations and a community dominated by picophytoplankton. Early depletion of dissolved silicic acid (DSi and increased stratification of the surface layer most likely triggered the end of the diatom bloom, leading to coccolithophore dominance. The chronic Si deficiency observed in the NEA could be linked to moderate Fe limitation, which increases the efficiency of the Si pump. TEP closely mirrored the distribution of both biogenic silica at depth and prymnesiophytes in the surface layer suggesting the sedimentation of the diatom bloom in the form of aggregates, but the relative contribution of diatoms and

  1. The effects of megafaunal burrows on radiotracer profiles and organic composition in deep-sea sediments: preliminary results from two sites in the bathyal north-east Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, D. J.; Brown, L.; Cook, G. T.; Cowie, G.; Gage, J. D.; Good, E.; Kennedy, H.; MacKenzie, A. B.; Papadimitriou, S.; Shimmield, G. B.; Thomson, J.; Williams, M.

    2005-01-01

    Megafaunal burrows were detected in boxcores from two sites in the bathyal north-east Atlantic. Burrow contents were analysed to assess their significance to sediment radiotracer profiles and organic composition. At 1100 m depth, burrow openings up to 3 cm diameter occurred at a density of approximately 5 m -2. Burrows at 12-18 cm sediment depth extending horizontally for up to 35 cm and linked to the surface by vertical shafts were provisionally attributed to echiuran worms, although no occupants were found in situ. In one example the horizontal burrow section was filled with green slurry, for which scanning electron microscopy, 210Pb excess and organic content all indicated a phytodetrital origin. At 1920 m depth no large burrow openings were found in five boxcores examined, but large subsurface biogenic structures were present. Galleries at 15-26 cm depth were traced horizontally for up to 30 cm, but contained no occupants or filling. Extended linear bands of faecal pellets were found in three boxcores at 13-17 cm depth. Excess 210Pb content indicated that most of these structures resulted from surface deposit feeding. Faecal pellet bands may partially explain the occurrence of subsurface peaks detected in profiles of 210Pb excess at this site. Results suggest that 'caching' of phytodetritus and subsurface deposition of faeces are two mechanisms for the rapid, deep burial of relatively fresh organic matter, but the significance of these processes to sediment geochemistry cannot be quantified without much information on the distribution, identity and abundance of burrowing megafauna in the deep sea.

  2. A STUDY OF CLINICAL PROFILE OF ADULT PATIENTS WITH ACUTE ENCEPHALITIS SYNDROME COMING TO A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL OF NORTH EAST INDIA

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    Anupam Dutta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT Acute encephalitis syndrome (AES is a public health problem in north east India with Japanese encephalitis being a major aetiology. Government of India initiated an adult JE vaccination in Assam in 2011. AIMS We aim to study the clinical profile and outcome in adult AES and JE patients after Government’s JE vaccination. SETTINGS AND DESIGN Adult AES patients from 1st May 2014 to 31 st October 2014 were included in this open label, observational, prospective study. METHODS AND MATERIALS Data was collected regarding clinical history and outcome. JE confirmation was done by CSF and sera samples screened to detect JEV- specific immunoglobulin M (IgM. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED Data analysis was done using GraphPad Prism software version 6.0. RESULTS 141 (96 males, 45 females patients of AES, were studied. With average hospital stay of 5.87 days, 100% had fever, 99.3% headache, 56.7% vomiting, 93.6% altered sensorium, 87.2% dizziness and 51.1% had seizure. 44% AES improved, 29.07% suffered residual neurological deficit and 26.65% expired. Out of 38 patients who died, 29(76.31% patients had a GCS ≤ 7. JE was detected in 26 patients, equivocal in 2 patients and negative in 113 patients. 14(53.84% JE patients improved, 9(34.61% suffered residual neurological deficit and 3(11.53% expired. JE vaccination was present in 7(4.96% patients. CONCLUSIONS JE positive cases have reduced in adults AES patients after Government vaccination program but vaccination coverage among the AES patients was low. Clinical presentation of adult AES patients differs from most reported paediatric AES cases. However, the mortality and morbidity of AES and JE still remains high, GCS < 7 being a bad prognostic marker.

  3. Suitability for human consumption and agriculture purposes of Sminja aquifer groundwater in Zaghouan (north-east of Tunisia) using GIS and geochemistry techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameur, Meriem; Hamzaoui-Azaza, Fadoua; Gueddari, Moncef

    2016-10-01

    In Tunisia, the water resources are limited, partially renewable and unequally distributed between the wet north and the dry south of the country. The Sminja aquifer in Zaghouan city is located in north-east of Tunisia, between latitudes 36°38' and 36°47' and longitudes 9°95' and 10°12'. This aquifer is used to satisfy the population needs for their domestic purposes and agricultural activities. Water analyses results are expressed by many methods, among which are geochemical methods combined with the geographic information system (GIS) (all schematic presentations of the diagram software (Piper, Riverside, Wilcox…), which can be used to assess the suitability of the Sminja aquifer groundwater for human consumption and irrigation purposes. A total of 23 wells were sampled in January 2013, and the concentrations of major cations (Na(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and K(+)), major anions (Cl(-), SO4 (2-) and HCO3 (-)), electrical conductivity and total dissolved solids were analysed. In the Sminja groundwater, the order of the cations dominance was Na > Ca > Mg > K and that of the anions was Cl > HCO3 > SO4. All of the analysed samples of the study area exceed chemical values recommended by the World Health Organisation guidelines and Tunisian Standards (NT.09.14) for potability but with different percentages. The aquifer spatial distribution of saturation indices reveals that all groundwater samples are under-saturated with gypsum, halite and anhydrite and are over-saturated with respect to calcite and dolomite based on water quality evaluation parameters for irrigation purposes; here, 87 % of samples in Sminja aquifer groundwater are suitable, whereas 13 % are unsuitable for irrigation uses.

  4. Changing gender roles and relations in food provisioning among matrilineal Khasi and patrilineal Chakhesang Indigenous rural People of North-East India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellena, Rachele; Nongkynrih, Kyrham Aurelius

    2017-11-01

    Women's position in society, gender roles, and gender division of labour affect household food security, dietary diversity, nutritional status, and well-being of all household members, especially children. Building on both primary and secondary data, this study explores gender roles and relations in food provisioning among the North-East India Indigenous matrilineal Khasi and patrilineal Chakhesang Peoples, amid societal transition. With the use of a combination of ethnographic and ethnobotanical research tools, a total number of 200 informants participated in 20 focus group discussions and 28 key informant interviews. The feminist political ecology framework was used to analyse the structural power relations influencing gender food-provisioning labour. Results show that both matrilineal and patrilineal women play equally crucial roles in agrobiodiversity management, subsistence agricultural production, and household food provisioning. However, customary laws shape different gender relations, women's status, and appreciation of women's work in the two societies. Gender roles appeared more flexible in the matrilineal society and more clearly defined in the patrilineal society, and gender relations more egalitarian among the Khasis while more hierarchical among the Chakhesangs. Household food-provisioning work and engagement in agricultural production did not seem to positively contribute to the social status of Chakhesang women, because these were expected as structural elements of the patriarchy. Current socio-cultural and economic changes in both Indigenous societies have altered the traditional food system, traditional livelihoods, and resource management practices, affecting women's role in household food provisioning and leading to the deterioration of women's status, influencing household dietary diversity, food, and nutritional security. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Growth and Yield of Black Locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L. Stands in Nyírség Growing Region (North-East Hungary

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    Károly Rédei

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: In Hungary the black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L. can be considered as the most important fast-growing stand-forming exotic tree species. Due to its favourite growing technological characteristics as well as its wood utilization possibilities the present area occupied by black locust stands amounts to 460 thousand hectares. Of its growing districts Nyírség (North-East Hungary has a distinguished importance where the area of black locust stands is appr. 22 700 hectares. The Nyírség region can also be considered as one of the best black locust growing regions in the Carpathian basin. To determine their growth rate and yield as exact as possible a local numerical yield table has been constructed on the basis of surveys of the experimental plots established in pure, managed black locust stands. Material and Methods: The local black locust yield table was constructed from data gathered on 105 sampling plots with average area of 1 000 m2. The total area of the experimental plots was 9.295 ha. In the course of the stand surveys the key stand characteristics were measured, and then, on the basis of data collected, were calculated the average height, diameter (DBH, volume, basal area and stem number given separately for the main (remaining, secondary (removal and total stands per hectare. Results and Conclusion: Black locust yield table presented in this paper is the first local one in the history of the Hungarian black locust research. The programmable editing procedure allows extension and formal change of information content of the yield table according to different demands. This type of yield tables (standards somewhat reflects the local growing-technological (forest tending characteristics better way, on the other hand refer to the trend of quality and quantity changing of black locust stands growing in a given area.

  6. Estimating the long-term costs of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke for Australia: new evidence derived from the North East Melbourne Stroke Incidence Study (NEMESIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadilhac, Dominique A; Carter, Rob; Thrift, Amanda G; Dewey, Helen M

    2009-03-01

    Stroke is associated with considerable societal costs. Cost-of-illness studies have been undertaken to estimate lifetime costs; most incorporating data up to 12 months after stroke. Costs of stroke, incorporating data collected up to 12 months, have previously been reported from the North East Melbourne Stroke Incidence Study (NEMESIS). NEMESIS now has patient-level resource use data for 5 years. We aimed to recalculate the long-term resource utilization of first-ever stroke patients and compare these to previous estimates obtained using data collected to 12 months. Population structure, life expectancy, and unit prices within the original cost-of-illness models were updated from 1997 to 2004. New Australian stroke survival and recurrence data up to 10 years were incorporated, as well as cross-sectional resource utilization data at 3, 4, and 5 years from NEMESIS. To enable comparisons, 1997 costs were inflated to 2004 prices and discounting was standardized. In 2004, 27 291 ischemic stroke (IS) and 4291 intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke (ICH) first-ever events were estimated. Average annual resource use after 12 months was AU$6022 for IS and AU$3977 for ICH. This is greater than the 1997 estimates for IS (AU$4848) and less than those for ICH (previously AU$10 692). The recalculated average lifetime costs per first-ever case differed for IS (AU$57 106 versus AU$52 855 [1997]), but differed more for ICH (AU$49 995 versus AU$92 308 [1997]). Basing lifetime cost estimates on short-term data overestimated the costs for ICH and underestimated those for IS. Patterns of resource use varied by stroke subtype and, overall, the societal cost impact was large.

  7. Brief comprehensive quality of life assessment after stroke: the assessment of quality of life instrument in the north East melbourne stroke incidence study (NEMESIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Jonathan W; Osborne, Richard H; Dewey, Helen M; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Macdonell, Richard A L; Thrift, Amanda G

    2002-12-01

    Generic utility health-related quality of life instruments are useful in assessing stroke outcome because they facilitate a broader description of the disease and outcomes, allow comparisons between diseases, and can be used in cost-benefit analysis. The aim of this study was to validate the Assessment of Quality of Life (AQoL) instrument in a stroke population. Ninety-three patients recruited from the community-based North East Melbourne Stroke Incidence Study between July 13, 1996, and April 30, 1997, were interviewed 3 months after stroke. Validity of the AQoL was assessed by examining associations between the AQoL and comparator instruments: the Medical Outcomes Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36); London Handicap Scale; Barthel Index; National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale; and Irritability, Depression, Anxiety scale. Sensitivity of the AQoL was assessed by comparing AQoL scores from groups of patients categorized by severity of impairment and disability and with total anterior circulation syndrome (TACS) versus non-TACS. Predictive validity was assessed by examining the association between 3-month AQoL scores and outcomes of death or institutionalization 12 months after stroke. Overall AQoL utility scores and individual dimension scores were most highly correlated with relevant scales on the comparator instruments. AQoL scores clearly differentiated between patients in categories of severity of impairment and disability and between patients with TACS and non-TACS. AQoL scores at 3 months after stroke predicted death and institutionalization at 12 months. The AQoL demonstrated strong psychometric properties and appears to be a valid and sensitive measure of health-related QoL after stroke.

  8. Geographic information system-based analysis of the spatial and spatio-temporal distribution of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis in Golestan Province, north-east of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollalo, A; Alimohammadi, A; Shirzadi, M R; Malek, M R

    2015-02-01

    Zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL), a vector-borne disease, poses serious psychological as well as social and economic burden to many rural areas of Iran. The main objectives of this study were to analyse yearly spatial distribution and the possible spatial and spatio-temporal clusters of the disease to better understand spatio-temporal epidemiological aspects of ZCL in rural areas of an endemic province, located in north-east of Iran. Cross-sectional survey was performed on 2983 recorded cases during the period of 2010-2012 at village level throughout the study area. Global clustering methods including the average nearest-neighbour distance, Moran's I, general G indices and Ripley's K-function were applied to investigate the annual spatial distribution of the existing point patterns. Presence of spatial and spatio-temporal clusters was investigated using the spatial and space-time scan statistics. For each year, semivariogram analysis and all global clustering methods indicated meaningful persistent spatial autocorrelation and highly clustered distribution of ZCL, respectively. Eight significant spatial clusters, mainly located in north and northeast of the province, and one space-time cluster, observed in northern part of the province and during the period of September 2010-November 2010, were detected. Comparison of the location of ZCL clusters with environmental conditions of the study area showed that 97.8% of cases in clusters were located at low altitudes below 725 m above sea level with predominantly arid and semi-arid climates and poor socio-economic conditions. The identified clusters highlight high-risk areas requiring special plans and resources for more close monitoring and control of the disease. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. [Genetic variation at the pantophysin (PanI) locus in North-East Arctic cod Gadus morhua L. (Gadiformes: Gadidae) population in the Barents Sea and adjacent waters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makeenko, G A; Volkov, A A; Mugue, N S; Zelenina, D A

    2014-12-01

    We investigated polymorphisms in the pantophysin gene (Pan I locus) in a population of North-East Arctic cod, Gadus morhua L., throughout its foraging area in the Barents Sea and adjacent waters. Correlations between the frequencies of Pan I alleles and habitat conditions, such as depth and temperature, were explored. This study was based on a large number of specimens (2210 individuals) of different age and wide geographic sampling coverage. The frequency of the Pan I(A) allele, a known genetic marker of coastal cod, varied from zero to 0.47. Allele frequencies correlated with depth at the sampling location but not with bottom water temperatures. We observed variations in Pan I(A) frequencies among different age cohorts from the same area. The most prominent shift in Pan I polymorphism was detected at the early stages of the fish life cycle, between pelagic juveniles and benthic cod. We found that the Pan I(A) allele frequency in pelagic yearling cod was essentially same throughout the studied areas in the Barents Sea. In turn, juveniles settling at the northern and deep water locations showed a significant decrease in the allele frequency. In contrast, the frequency of the Pan I(A) allele remained constant in juveniles settling in shallow waters when compared to the pelagic stage. These results confirm the selective nature of the cod Pan I locus and indicate that selection process acting on individuals with different genotypes at the Pan I locus leads to the formation of a stable spatial distribution of allele frequencies observed in adult cod.

  10. Risk factors of diabetes mellitus amongst the executives of an industrial area of North East India: A community based cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sultana Jesmin; Siddique, Mir Alam; Barua, Alak; Saikia, Hiranya

    2017-11-01

    To assess risk factors of diabetes mellitus amongst the executives of an industrial area of North East India. Executive the aged 20 to 60 years were selected by simple random sampling in a community based cross-sectional study. The sample size was 340. Data was collected by a predesigned pretested proforma to know about different risk factors. Fasting capillary blood glucose and 2h capillary blood glucose were taken to assess diabetes mellitus. 30.7% of the male and 18.4% of the female participants had family history of DM. 29.3% of the male and 39.5% of the female had family history of hypertension. 24.7%, 0.6% and 2.9% smoked regularly, occasionally and in the past respectively. 2.9% subjects consumed chewed tobacco regularly, 0.3% consumed occasionally and 1.6% consumed tobacco in the past. 44.5%, 10.7%, 2.3% of the study subjects took alcohol regularly, occasionally, in the past respectively. 44.5%, 47.4% and 8.1% of the participants were involved in sedentary work, active work and heavy work respectively. Prevalence of diabetes mellitus was significantly associated with advancement of age, family history of diabetes mellitus, family history of hypertension and sedentary life style. No significant association of diabetes mellitus with gender, tobacco consumption and alcohol intake. A package for the early diagnosis and management of diabetes may be initiated to bring down the morbidity and mortality in industrial population. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Plant co-existence patterns and High-Arctic vegetation composition in three common plant communities in north-east Greenland

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    Oriol Grau

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Arctic regions are expected to experience substantial changes in climate in the coming decades. In order to predict potential changes of Arctic vegetation, it is important to understand the distinct role of life forms of plants and of individual species in relation to plant co-existence patterns. Our aim is to investigate if three common Arctic plant patch types dominated by contrasting life forms (by the dwarf shrubs Salix arctica or Dryas octopetala×intermedia or by mosses are related (a to the co-existence of vascular plants and species richness at patch scale and (b to the floristic composition in three distinct plant communities (Salix snowbed, Dryas heath and fell-field associated with contrasting abiotic regimes. The study was conducted at Zackenberg, in north-east Greenland. Dryas patches showed a clear negative effect on small-scale plant richness and co-existence in the fell-field. Salix and moss patches showed a similar pattern in all the plant communities, although the number of individuals growing in Salix patches was lower than in moss patches. Salix and mosses in the fell-fields hosted a high number of species in spite of the much less vegetated aspect of this harsh, upper zone. The floristic composition varied between plant communities, but it did not change substantially between patch types within each community. This study provides novel background knowledge of plant co-existence patterns at patch scale and of the structure of contrasting Arctic plant communities, which will help to better assess the potential effects of varying abiotic stress regimes on Arctic vegetation.

  12. A non-polyenic antifungal produced by a Streptomyces yatensis strain isolated from Mellah Lake in El Kala, North-East of Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benouagueni, S; Ranque, S; Gacemi Kirane, D

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed at describing one actinomycete strain E65 that was isolated from the water of Mellah Lake in El Kala, North-East of Algeria that produces a non-polyenic antifungal. Actinomycetes were isolated from Mellah Lake water and screened for antimicrobial activity. Antimicrobial assays were performed on ISP2 agar. The taxonomic position of the strain E65 was determined regarding phenotypic and 16S DNA sequences features. Time course of antifungal metabolites production was evaluated against Candida albicans on ISP2, ISP1 and GYEA broth. The active antifungal compound was extracted using dichloromethane and revealed by a thin layer of chromatography, chemical reagents, UV-visible and infrared spectroscopy. A total of 104 actinomycetes were isolated and screened for antimicrobial activity; 21 strains were active against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans. The strain E65 showed a high in vitro activity against S. aureus and C. albicans and a good antifungal activity against a clinical C. albicans strain resistant to 5-fluorocytosine. Its 16S rRNA sequence shared 99% similarity with the Streptomyces yatensis type strain within the Streptomyces violaceusniger subclade of the Streptomyces hygroscopicus clade. It produced a non-polyenic antifungal, the IR spectrum of the antifungal extract corresponded to none of the antimicrobials compounds known to be produced by actinomycete of the S. hygroscopicus clade. The wetlands of El Kala, Algeria are a potential source of bioactive actinomycete that deserves to be explored and exploited. The Streptomyces yatensis E65 strain isolated from Mellah Lake brackish water produces a remarkable antifungal compound which original non-polyenic structure warrants further characterization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Tuna and dolphin associations in the North-east Atlantic: Evidence of different ecological niches from stable isotope and heavy metal measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, K.; Lepoint, G.; Loizeau, V.; Debacker, V.; Dauby, P.; Bouquegneau, J.M

    2000-02-01

    Associations of tunas and dolphins in the wild are quite frequent events and the question arises how predators requiring similar diet in the same habitat share their environmental resources. As isotopic composition of an animal is related to that of its preys, stable isotope ({sup 13}C/{sup 12}C and {sup 15}N/{sup 14}N) analyses were performed in three predator species from the North-east Atlantic: the striped dolphin, Stenella coeruleoalba, the common dolphin Delphinus delphis and the albacore tuna, Thunnus alalunga, and compared to their previously described stomach content. Heavy metals (Cd, Zn, Cu and Fe) are mainly transferred through the diet and so, have been determined in the tissues of the animals. Tuna muscles display higher {delta}{sup 15}N than in common and striped dolphins (mean: 11.4 vs. 10.3%o and 10.4%o, respectively) which reflects their higher trophic level nutrition. Higher {delta}{sup 13}C are found in common (-18.4%o) and striped dolphin (-18.1%o) muscles than in albacore tuna (-19.3%o) probably in relation with its migratory pattern. The most striking feature is the presence of two levels of cadmium concentrations in the livers of the tunas (32 mg kg{sup -1} dry weight (DW) vs. 5 mg kg{sup -1} DW). These two groups also differ by their iron concentrations and their {delta}{sup 15}N and {delta}{sup 13}C liver values. These results suggest that in the Biscay Bay, tunas occupy two different ecological niches probably based on different squid inputs in their diet.

  14. Postcolonial Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    How has European identity been shaped through its colonial empires? Does this history of imperialism influence the conceptualisation of Europe in the contemporary globalised world? How has coloniality shaped geopolitical differences within Europe? What does this mean for the future of Europe......? Postcolonial Europe: Comparative Reflections after the Empires brings together scholars from across disciplines to rethink European colonialism in the light of its vanishing empires and the rise of new global power structures. Taking an interdisciplinary approach to the postcolonial European legacy the book...... argues that the commonly used nation-centric approach does not effectively capture the overlap between different colonial and postcolonial experiences across Europe....

  15. Prevalence of overweight and obesity among children six to ten years of age in the north-east health region of Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake-Scarlettl, B E; Younger, N; McKenzie, C A; Van den Broeck, J; Powell, C; Edwards, S; Win, S S; Wilks, R J

    2013-03-01

    To estimate the prevalence and correlates of overweight and obesity among children six to ten years old in the North-East Health Region (NEHR) ofJamaica. Weights and heights were measured in a representative sample of 5710 children between the ages of six and ten years in 34 schools between October 2008 and March 2009. Overweight and obesity were defined as body mass index (BMI) Z-score > 1SD and >2SD, respectively based on the World Health Organization (WHO)-endorsed age and gender-specific growth standards for children. Point prevalence estimates of overweight and obesity were calculated. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used to estimate associations between overweight and obesity and age, gender and school location. Overweight and obesity prevalence among children six to ten years old in NEHR, Jamaica, was 10.6% and 7.1%, respectively. Overweight (OR = 1.11, 95% CI: 1.04, 1.18) and obesity (OR = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.08, 1.26) prevalence increased significantly with age. Overweight (OR = 1.51, 95% CI: 1.27, 1.80) and obesity (OR = 1.36, 95% CI: 1.11, 1.67) prevalence was significantly higher among girls than boys. Children attending rural-public schools had less risk of being overweight (OR = 0.57, 95% CI: 0.46, 0.70) and obese (OR = 0.35, 95% CI: 0.28, 0.44) when compared with urban-public schools and private schools. Both overweight (OR = 2.11, 95% CI: 1.60, 2.78) and obesity (OR = 1.68, 95% CI: 1.24, 2.28) were significantly more common among children attending private schools. After adjusting for age and gender the results still remained statistically significant. Overweight/obesity prevalence among children six to ten years old in NEHR of Jamaica is 17.7% with older children and girls having higher rates. Children attending urban-public and private schools have higher prevalence than those attending rural schools. Appropriately targeted interventions are needed to combat this problem.

  16. Survival after definitive (chemo)radiotherapy in esophageal cancer patients: a population-based study in the north-East Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Justin K; Muijs, Christina T; Burgerhof, Johannes G M; Paardekooper, Gabriel; Timmer, Paul R; Muller, Karin; Woutersen, Dankert; Mul, Véronique E; Beukema, Jannet C; Hospers, Geke A P; van Dijk, Boukje A C; Langendijk, Johannes A; Plukker, John Th M

    2013-06-01

    Definitive (chemo)radiotherapy is employed in esophageal cancer patients as an alternative for patients considered medically unfit for surgery or having unresectable tumors. We evaluated a population-based cohort to improve the selection for intensified nonsurgical strategies and to identify prognostic factors. Patients who had squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) or adenocarcinoma (AC) were treated in four referral centers in the north-east Netherlands with definitive chemoradiotherapy (dCRT) or radiotherapy (dRT) between 1996 and 2008. Of the 287 included patients, 110 were treated with dCRT and 177 with dRT. Median overall survival (OS) was 11 months (95 % confidence interval: 10-12 months), with OS of 22 and 8 % and disease-free survival (DFS) of 16 and 5 % at 2 and 5 years, respectively. DFS at 2 and 5 years was 24 and 9 % for SCC versus 10 and 2 % for AC patients (P = 0.006). OS after 2 and 5 years was 29 and 14 % for SCC patients versus 17 and 3 % for AC patients (P = 0.044). On multivariate Cox regression, SCC was an independent prognostic factor for DFS [P = 0.020, hazard ratio (HR) = 0.71] and OS (P = 0.047, HR = 0.76). On matched cohort analysis, DFS was higher in the dCRT group compared with dRT patients (P = 0.016). The locoregional failure rate was lower in the dCRT group and in SCC patients (P = 0.001 and 0.046). Long-term results and the local control rate in SCC patients were better after definitive (chemo)radiotherapy compared with in AC patients. SCC was an independent prognostic factor for survival. Definitive chemoradiotherapy leads to improved local control rate and DFS.

  17. Effects of a Reservoir Water on the GW Quality in a Coastal Aquifer of Semi-arid Region, North-east of Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, C.; Kawachi, A.; Tsujimura, M.; Tarhouni, J.

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated effects of a reservoir water in a salinized shallow aquifer based on spatial distribution of geochemical properties in groundwater (GW). In many coastal shallow aquifers of arid and semi-arid regions, groundwater table (GWT) depression and salinization have occurred due to GW overexploitation. In Korba aquifer, north-east of Tunisia, after a dam reservoir has been constructed in order to assure a water resource for irrigation, improvement of GW level and quality have been observed in the downstream area of the dam (area-A), while the GW in the other area (area-B) still has high salinity. This study, therefore, aimed to investigate the effects of the reservoir water on the GW quality. In June 2013, water quality survey and sampling were carried out at 60 wells (GW), a dam reservoir, river and the sea. Major ions, boron, bromide, and oxygen-18 and deuterium in collected samples were analyzed. From the results, in the area-B, the GWT was lower than the sea level and the high salinity were observed. The Br- concentration of the GW was correlated with the Cl- concentration, and the values of B/Cl- and Br-/Cl- of the GW were similar to the seawater. Since the GWT depression allowed the seawater to intrude into the aquifer, the GW salinization occurred in this area. On the other hand, in the area-A, GWT was higher than the seawater level, and the Na+ and Cl- concentrations were lower than the area-B. Especially, in the irrigated areas by using the reservoir water, the isotopic values, B/Cl- and Br-/Cl- of the GW were relatively higher than the others. The reservoir water has high isotopic values due to evaporation effect, and the B/Cl- and Br-/Cl- values become higher due to organic matters in sediment of the reservoir or soil in the filtration process. Thus, in addition to the direct infiltration from the reservoir into the aquifer, irrigation using a reservoir water probably has a positive impact on the GW quality in this area.

  18. Primary stroke prevention for sickle cell disease in north-east Italy: the role of ethnic issues in establishing a Transcranial Doppler screening program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierobon Marta

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is a serious complication of sickle cell disease (SCD in children. Transcranic Doppler (TCD is a well-established predictor of future cerebrovascular symptoms: a blood flow velocity >200 cm/sec in the Middle Cerebral Artery (MCA correlates with a high risk of stroke in cohorts of African-american HbS/HbS patients. In North-East Italy the recent increase in SCD patients is mainly due to immigration from Africa. A comprehensive care program for children with SCD was established in our Center since 2004, but a wide and routine screening for Primary stroke prevention needs to be developed. Methods In order to verify the feasibility of TCD and Transcranial color coded Sonography (TCCS screening in our setting and the applicability of international reference values of blood velocities to our population of African immigrants with HbS/HbS SCD, we performed TCD and TCCD in 12 HbS/HbS African children and two groups of age-matched controls of Caucasian and African origin respectively. TCD and TCCS were performed on the same day of the scheduled routine hematologic visit after parental education. Results All parents accepted to perform the sonography to their children. TCD and TCCD were performed in all patients and an adequate temporal window could be obtained in all of them. Pulsatility index and depth values in both the MCA and the Basilar Artery (BA were similar at TCD and TCCS evaluation in the three groups while time-average maximum velocities (TAMM, peak systolic velocity and diastolic velocity in the MCA and BA were higher in the patients' group on both TCD and TCCS evaluation. African and Caucasian healthy controls had similar lower values. Conclusion Our preliminary data set the base to further evaluate the implementation of a primary stroke prevention program in our setting of HbS/HbS African immigrants and HbS/beta thalassemia Italians. Parental education-preferably in the native language- on stroke risk and

  19. Crustal and upper mantle structure of the north-east of Egypt and the Afro-Arabian plate boundary region from Rayleigh-wave analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corchete, V.; Chourak, M.; Hussein, H. M.; Atiya, K.; Timoulali, Y.

    2017-05-01

    The crustal and mantle structure of the north-eastern part of Egypt and the surrounding area is shown by means of S-velocity maps for depths ranging from zero to 45 km, determined by the regionalization and inversion of Rayleigh-wave dispersion. This analysis shows several types of crust with an average S-velocity ranging from 2.5 to 3.9 km/s. The values of S-velocity range from 2.5 km/s at the surface to 3.4 km/s at 10 km depth for the Sinai Peninsula, Gulf of Aqaba, Gulf of Suez, Red Sea, Dead Sea, western part of Dead sea and Arabian Plate. In the lower crust, the values of the S-velocity reach 4.0 km/s. In the uppermost mantle, the S-velocities range from 4.4 to 4.7 km/s. The crustal thickness ranges from the oceanic thin crust (around 15-20 km of thickness), for Red Sea and the extended continental margins, to 35-45 km of thickness for the Arabian plate. A gradual increasing crustal thickness is observed from north-east to south-west. While the Moho is located at 30-35 km of depth under the Sinai Peninsula, Gulf of Aqaba, Dead Sea Fault (DSF) and Dead Sea, a thinner crust (20-25 km of thickness) is found at the east of DSF and under the northern and the southern part of the Gulf of Suez. The crustal thickness varies within Sinai from the southern edge to the north, which provided an evidence for the presence of an Early Mesozoic passive margin with thinned continental crust in the north of Sinai. The change of crustal structure between the Gulf of Aqaba and the Gulf of Suez is due to the different tectonic and geodynamic processes affecting Sinai. In general, our results are consistent with surface geology and the Moho depth inferred from reflection and refraction data, receiver function, surface-wave analysis and P-S tomography. The strong variations in the base of the Moho reflect the complex evolution of the African and Arabian plate boundary region.

  20. Amino acid composition of lamb meat from the North East Bulgarian fine fleece breed and its crossbreds with Australian merino and Ile de France from internal breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Slavov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. A comparative analysis of amino acid composition of lamb meat from the North East Bulgarian fine fleece breed (I gr. and its crossbreds from internal breeding with 25% heredity from the Australian merino (II gr. and Ile de France (III gr. breeds was conducted. Upon starting the experiment lambs were equal and during the experiment they were placed under similar conditions of feeding and rearing. To establish the amino acid composition of meat slaughter analyses were performed at 100 and 130 days of age. From the carcass of each slaughtered animal individual mean samples were taken. Studies were carried out in the Research Laboratory of the Faculty of Agriculture at Trakia University. As a result of the studies the following conclusions were made: ¼ Ile de France crossbreds in a sophisticated crossing have the highest total amino acid content, including essential amino acids in the meat of 100- and 130-day-old lambs, 6.87% and 7.36%, respectively. The lysine/arginine ratio, relating to protein atherogenicity, varies within narrow ranges among groups and marks slight increase with age – from 1.31-1.37 at 100 days to 1.41-1.46 at 130 days. With the increase of age in crossbreds from internal breeding total protein amino acid content grows, that being most prominent in lambs from the III group – from 41.92 to 43.49%. The values of total protein indices increase compared to the reference protein (from 117.97% to 118.22% for II group and from 116.44% to 120.80% for III group and the whole egg protein (from 89.39% to 91.92% for II group and from 90.53% to 93.93 for III group. It has been found that internal breeding of crossbreds with 25% heredity from the Ile de France breed has positive effect concerning the total amino acid content of lamb meat at 100 and 130 days of age, essential amino acid content in it and the levels of total amino acid indices. Internal breeding of crossbreds with 25% heredity from the Australian merino breed

  1. Molecular evidence of increased resistance to anti-folate drugs in Plasmodium falciparum in North-East India: a signal for potential failure of artemisinin plus sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Pradyumna Kishore; Sarma, Devojit Kumar; Prakash, Anil; Bora, Khukumoni; Ahmed, Md Atique; Sarma, Bibhas; Goswami, Basanta Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Dibya Ranjan; Mahanta, Jagadish

    2014-01-01

    North-east India, being a corridor to South-east Asia, is believed to play an important role in transmitting drug resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria to India and South Asia. North-east India was the first place in India to record the emergence of drug resistance to chloroquine as well as sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine. Presently chloroquine resistance is widespread all over the North-east India and resistance to other anti-malarials is increasing. In this study both in vivo therapeutic efficacy and molecular assays were used to screen the spectrum of drug resistance to chloroquine and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine in the circulating P. falciparum strains. A total of 220 P. falciparum positives subjects were enrolled in the study for therapeutic assessment of chloroquine and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine and assessment of point mutations conferring resistances to these drugs were carried out by genotyping the isolates following standard methods. Overall clinical failures in sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine and chloroquine were found 12.6 and 69.5% respectively, while overall treatment failures recorded were 13.7 and 81.5% in the two arms. Nearly all (99.0%) the isolates had mutant pfcrt genotype (76 T), while 68% had mutant pfmdr-1 genotype (86 Y). Mutation in dhps 437 codon was the most prevalent one while dhfr codon 108 showed 100% mutation. A total of 23 unique haplotypes at the dhps locus and 7 at dhfr locus were found while dhps-dhfr combined loci revealed 49 unique haplotypes. Prevalence of double, triple and quadruple mutations were common while 1 haplotype was found with all five mutated codons (F/AGEGS/T) at dhps locus. Detection of quadruple mutants (51 I/59 R/108 N/164 L) in the present study, earlier recorded from Car Nicobar Island, India only, indicates the presence of high levels of resistance to sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine in north-east India. Associations between resistant haplotypes and the clinical outcomes and emerging resistance in sulphadoxine

  2. Molecular evidence of increased resistance to anti-folate drugs in Plasmodium falciparum in North-East India: a signal for potential failure of artemisinin plus sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine combination therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradyumna Kishore Mohapatra

    Full Text Available North-east India, being a corridor to South-east Asia, is believed to play an important role in transmitting drug resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria to India and South Asia. North-east India was the first place in India to record the emergence of drug resistance to chloroquine as well as sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine. Presently chloroquine resistance is widespread all over the North-east India and resistance to other anti-malarials is increasing. In this study both in vivo therapeutic efficacy and molecular assays were used to screen the spectrum of drug resistance to chloroquine and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine in the circulating P. falciparum strains. A total of 220 P. falciparum positives subjects were enrolled in the study for therapeutic assessment of chloroquine and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine and assessment of point mutations conferring resistances to these drugs were carried out by genotyping the isolates following standard methods. Overall clinical failures in sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine and chloroquine were found 12.6 and 69.5% respectively, while overall treatment failures recorded were 13.7 and 81.5% in the two arms. Nearly all (99.0% the isolates had mutant pfcrt genotype (76 T, while 68% had mutant pfmdr-1 genotype (86 Y. Mutation in dhps 437 codon was the most prevalent one while dhfr codon 108 showed 100% mutation. A total of 23 unique haplotypes at the dhps locus and 7 at dhfr locus were found while dhps-dhfr combined loci revealed 49 unique haplotypes. Prevalence of double, triple and quadruple mutations were common while 1 haplotype was found with all five mutated codons (F/AGEGS/T at dhps locus. Detection of quadruple mutants (51 I/59 R/108 N/164 L in the present study, earlier recorded from Car Nicobar Island, India only, indicates the presence of high levels of resistance to sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine in north-east India. Associations between resistant haplotypes and the clinical outcomes and emerging resistance in

  3. Geochemical monitoring of the Tenerife North-East Rift Zone (NERZ) volcano (Canary Islands) by means of diffuse CO_{2} degassing surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrancos, José; O'Neill, Ryan; Gould, Catherine E.; Padilla, Germán; Rodríguez, Fátima; Amonte, Cecilia; Padrón, Eleazar; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2017-04-01

    Tenerife is the largest of the Canary Islands (2100 km2) and the North East Rift (NERZ) volcano is one of the three active volcanic rift-zones of the island (210 km2). The last eruptive activity at NERZ volcano occurred in 1704 and 1705, with three volcanic eruptions: Siete Fuentes, Fasnia and Arafo. In order to provide a multidisciplinary approach to monitor potential volcanic activity changes at the NERZ volcano, diffuse CO2 emission surveys have been undertaken in a yearly basis since 2001. This study shows the results of the last soil CO2 efflux survey undertaken in summer 2016, with 600 soil gas sampling sites homogenously distributed. Soil CO2 efflux measurements were performed at the surface environment by means of a portable non-dispersive infrared spectrophotometer (NDIR) LICOR Li800 following the accumulation chamber method. Soil CO2 efflux values ranged from non-detectable (˜0.5 g m-2 d-1) up to 70 g m-2 d-1, with an average value of 8.8 g m-2 d-1. In order to distinguish the existence of different geochemical populations on the soil CO2 efflux data, a Sinclair graphical analysis was done. The average value of background population was 2.9 g m-2 d-1 and that of peak population was 67.8 g m-2 d-1, value that has been increasing since the year 2014. To quantify the total CO2 emission rate from the NERZ volcano a sequential Gaussian simulation (sGs) was used as interpolation method to construct soil CO2 emission contour maps. The diffuse CO2 emission rate for the studied area was estimated in 1,675 ± 47 t d-1. If we compare the 2016 results with those ones obtained in previous surveys since 2001, two main pulses on diffuse CO2 emission are identified, the first one in 2007 and the second one between during 2014 and 2016. This long-term variation on the diffuse CO2 emission doesn't seem to be masked by the external-meteorological variations. However, the first peak precedes the anomalous seismicity recorded in and around Tenerife Island between 2009 and

  4. Multilingual Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillipson, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Review of: Multilingual Europe: Multilingual Europeans. (European Studies: An Interdisciplinary Series in European Culture, History and Politics, Vol. 29). Eds. Láslá Maràcz & Mireille Rosello. Rodopi, 2012. 323 pp.......Review of: Multilingual Europe: Multilingual Europeans. (European Studies: An Interdisciplinary Series in European Culture, History and Politics, Vol. 29). Eds. Láslá Maràcz & Mireille Rosello. Rodopi, 2012. 323 pp....

  5. Tratamento de esgoto para uso na agricultura do semi-árido nordestino Treatment of sewage for use in the agriculture of the semi-arid north east Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Tavares de Sousa

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho relata o desempenho de três sistemas de pós-tratamento de efluente anaeróbio: wetland, leito de brita não vegetado e lagoas de polimento, operados com o objetivo de produzir efluentes para reúso na agricultura do semi-árido do Nordeste do Brasil. Para tanto, foram investigados os parâmetros: DQO, pH, sólidos e suas frações, macronutrientes, ovos de helmintos e indicadores de contaminação fecal. Apenas a Lagoa de Polimento produziu um efluente compatível com as recomendações da OMS para irrigação irrestrita. Os efluentes dos sistemas wetland e leito de brita não vegetado, embora isentos de ovos de helmintos, apresentaram concentração de coliformes termotolerantes acima dessas recomendações. A quantidade de macro e micronutrientes contida nos três efluentes é suficiente para a maioria das culturas cultivadas na região semi-árida do Nordeste do Brasil.The performance of three systems for the post treatment of digested sewage is discussed. The investigated systems were wetlands, rock beds and polishing ponds. The objective of the post treatment was to produce a final effluent for irrigation of cultures in semi-arid areas in North-East Brazil. From the obtained data COD, pH, solids, macronutrients, helminths eggs and thermo tolerant coliforms it was concluded that only polishing ponds were compatible with the WHO recommendation for unrestricted irrigation. Effluents from the wetland and rock bed systems, although free from helminths eggs, contained a higher thermo tolerant coliform concentration than that recommended by WHO. The macro and micronutrient concentrations in all three post treatment systems effluents were high enough for the demand of most cultures in the semi-arid region of North-East Brazil .

  6. Social Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul Dekker; Sjef Ederveen; Gerda Jehoel-Gijsbers; Ruud de Mooij

    2003-01-01

    There is broad support for the European Union (EU) in the Netherlands: 73% of Dutch believe that EU membership is a 'good thing'. The figure in Germany is 59%, in France it is 50% and in the United Kingdom 30%. By contrast, engagement with Europe is very low in the Netherlands. In late 2002 fewer

  7. Europe phrasebook

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    This book replaces "Western Europe Phrasbook". It includes Basque, Catalan, Dutch, French, German, Greek, Irish, Italian, Maltese, Portugese, Scottish Gaelic, Spanish and Welsh. This fully updated edition includes special sections on going out, sports and festivals, as well as local dishes, shopping and sightseeing.

  8. Database Urban Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sleutjes, B.; de Valk, H.A.G.

    2016-01-01

    Database Urban Europe: ResSegr database on segregation in The Netherlands. Collaborative research on residential segregation in Europe 2014–2016 funded by JPI Urban Europe (Joint Programming Initiative Urban Europe).

  9. Transnational Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondebjerg, Ib

    2016-01-01

    in this development. The article concludes that encounters of the kind we find in different forms of TV drama will make Europe more diverse and richer for a much broader audience. The interaction between the particular and universal in “narratives” on our past and contemporary social and cultural order contribute......This article deals with the social and cultural dimensions of globalization and uses both qualitative and quantitative methods to analyse the effects of stronger European integration on media production and reception. It combines theories and methods from sociology, anthropology and media studies......-productions has increased the distribution of original and often local stories in Europe. The article analyses examples of some successful European drama series, their audiences and reception. The analysis is discussed in the context of national and transnational media policy and the impact of globalisation...

  10. Unhomely Europes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitris Eleftheriotis

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of PORTAL constitutes an indirect, sideways reflection on the EU’s move toward (re-discovering, establishing, and promoting shared cultural values. It seeks to unveil not the official historical contexts and traditions in which contemporary inventions of cultural identity occur. Rather, its aim is to discover and listen to competing voices and alternative visions—be they cultural, social, political, literary or cinematic—that give different shape to trans-European identities and model union, commonality, and belonging, according to transregional or translocal values. The special issue, then, is an exploration of possible forms of frictions occurring across the European cultural and historical landscape. It questions the pre-eminence of formal EU discourses on values, and the branding of Europe in the global marketplace, by listening to marginalised, unheard or discordant Euro-voices. The issue demonstrates the need for more rigorous theorisations of notions such as ‘value,’ whether ‘shared’ or ‘cultural,’ in the European region, and posits alternative mappings and visions of European belonging and identity. The essays included in this special issue consider Europe as a locus of frictions, consensus, tension, contestation and reconciliation. This locus is capable of co-locating Scotland with the Costa Brava, crossing Swedish views of Russia with their converse, recognising a Europe of borders that continuously unfold, acknowledging the interference of historical memories, and inflecting the Houellebecquian Euro-futurescape with Greco-Australian undertones; to cite a few examples of vibrant transvaluation occurring in the issue.

  11. Fortress Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castan Pinos, Jaume

    Ceuta and Melilla are two Spanish coastal-enclaves located in Northern Africa that constitute the only territories in mainland Africa belonging to an EU member state and, as a result, the only land border between the two continents. This book aims to study the role of these enclaves as EU border...... lookouts, as they are on the front line of the migration route between Europe and Africa. In effect, one of the most relevant contributions that this book aims to bring is to connect the study of the border in Ceuta and Melilla with the European dimension, that is, with the European policies that affect...

  12. Aerosol properties associated with air masses arriving into the North East Atlantic during the 2008 Mace Head EUCAARI intensive observing period: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dall'Osto

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available As part of the EUCAARI Intensive Observing Period, a 4-week campaign to measure aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties, atmospheric structure, and cloud microphysics was conducted from mid-May to mid-June, 2008 at the Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station, located at the interface of Western Europe and the N. E. Atlantic and centered on the west Irish coastline. During the campaign, continental air masses comprising both young and aged continental plumes were encountered, along with polar, Arctic and tropical air masses. Polluted-continental aerosol concentrations were of the order of 3000 cm−3, while background marine air aerosol concentrations were between 400–600 cm−3. The highest marine air concentrations occurred in polar air masses in which a 15 nm nucleation mode, with concentration of 1100 cm−3, was observed and attributed to open ocean particle formation. Continental air submicron chemical composition (excluding refractory sea salt was dominated by organic matter, closely followed by sulphate mass. Although the concentrations and size distribution spectral shape were almost identical for the young and aged continental cases, hygroscopic growth factors (GF and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN to total condensation nuclei (CN concentration ratios were significantly less in the younger pollution plume, indicating a more oxidized organic component to the aged continental plume. The difference in chemical composition and hygroscopic growth factor appear to result in a 40–50% impact on aerosol scattering coefficients and Aerosol Optical Depth, despite almost identical aerosol microphysical properties in both cases, with the higher values been recorded for the more aged case. For the CCN/CN ratio, the highest ratios were seen in the more age plume. In marine air, sulphate mass dominated the sub-micron component, followed by water soluble organic carbon, which, in turn, was dominated by

  13. Bayesian analysis of zero inflated spatiotemporal HIV/TB child mortality data through the INLA and SPDE approaches: Applied to data observed between 1992 and 2010 in rural North East South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musenge, Eustasius; Chirwa, Tobias Freeman; Kahn, Kathleen; Vounatsou, Penelope

    2013-06-01

    Longitudinal mortality data with few deaths usually have problems of zero-inflation. This paper presents and applies two Bayesian models which cater for zero-inflation, spatial and temporal random effects. To reduce the computational burden experienced when a large number of geo-locations are treated as a Gaussian field (GF) we transformed the field to a Gaussian Markov Random Fields (GMRF) by triangulation. We then modelled the spatial random effects using the Stochastic Partial Differential Equations (SPDEs). Inference was done using a computationally efficient alternative to Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) called Integrated Nested Laplace Approximation (INLA) suited for GMRF. The models were applied to data from 71,057 children aged 0 to under 10 years from rural north-east South Africa living in 15,703 households over the years 1992-2010. We found protective effects on HIV/TB mortality due to greater birth weight, older age and more antenatal clinic visits during pregnancy (adjusted RR (95% CI)): 0.73(0.53;0.99), 0.18(0.14;0.22) and 0.96(0.94;0.97) respectively. Therefore childhood HIV/TB mortality could be reduced if mothers are better catered for during pregnancy as this can reduce mother-to-child transmissions and contribute to improved birth weights. The INLA and SPDE approaches are computationally good alternatives in modelling large multilevel spatiotemporal GMRF data structures.

  14. A study on characterization of new bacteriocin produced from a novel strain of Lactobacillus spicheri G2 isolated from Gundruk- a fermented vegetable product of North East India: A novel bacteriocin production from Lactobacillus spicheri G2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Neha; Sharma, Nivedita

    2015-09-01

    Bacteriocin producing Lactobacillus spicheri G2, isolated from Gundruk - a traditional fermented vegetable product of North East India. L. spicheri G2 identified by morphological, biochemical techniques followed by 16S rRNA gene technique. The 16Sr RNA sequence of bacteriocin producer is registered in NCBI under accession no. JX481912. The bacteriocin producing potential of L. spicheri is being reported for the first time in the present investigation. Bacteriocin of L. spicheri G2 showed strong antagonism against food spoiling and pathogenic bacteria viz. Listeria monocytogenes, Staphlococcus aureus, Clostridium perfringens, Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus plantarum, Leuconostoc mesenteroides and Bacillus cereus. Bacteriocin production of L. spicheri G2 was enhanced by optimization of production time, pH of medium and incubation temperature by following one variable at a time method. Maximum bacteriocin activity (2000 AU/ml) was recorded in MRS broth at 34 h with an initial pH of 4.0 after incubating at 35 °C. The bacteriocin was purified by single step gel exclusion chromatography. Molecular weight of this novel bacteriocin was determined by SDS PAGE which was found to be 43 kDa. Purified bacteriocin was found resistant to high temperature and varied pH range but sensitive to proteolytic enzymes like trypsin and proteinase k, the characters desirable for food preservation.

  15. Enhanced bioaccumulation of mercury in deep-sea fauna from the Bay of Biscay (north-east Atlantic) in relation to trophic positions identified by analysis of carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouvelon, T.; Spitz, J.; Caurant, F.; Mèndez-Fernandez, P.; Autier, J.; Lassus-Débat, A.; Chappuis, A.; Bustamante, P.

    The Bay of Biscay (north-east Atlantic) is an open marine ecosystem of particular concern in current European environmental policies. Indeed, it supports both a high biological diversity and numerous anthropogenic activities such as important fisheries. For the first time, stable isotope analyses (SIA) of carbon and nitrogen and analysis of total mercury (T-Hg) concentrations in the muscle (edible flesh) were performed on adult stages of a wide range of species (i.e., 120 species) from various taxa and various habitats of this ecosystem. Concentrations of this non-essential metal, toxic to all living organisms, ranged from 39 to 5074 ng g-1 dry weight. Calculations of species' trophic positions (TPs) through SIA revealed a limited effect of TP in explaining Hg bioaccumulation by high trophic level consumers in particular. On the contrary, our results suggest an important role of habitat and/or feeding zone, which strongly influence muscle Hg bioaccumulation. Deep-sea fish species effectively presented the highest Hg concentrations. Possible interactions between biological factors (e.g., age of deep-sea organisms) and bioavailability of the metal in the deep-sea environment are discussed to explain such enhanced bioaccumulation of Hg by deep-sea fauna in the Bay of Biscay. This study also highlights a potential risk for human health when deep-sea fish are consumed frequently.

  16. Faecal contamination of water and fingertip-rinses as a method for evaluating the effect of low-cost water supply and sanitation activities on faeco-oral disease transmission. I. A case study in rural north-east Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinfold, J V

    1990-10-01

    Most villagers in north-east Thailand carry water to their homes and store it in separate containers depending on its subsequent use. In one village, information on water use was collated with the bacteriological quality of stored water, water sources and fingertip-rinses. Stored water quality was a function of water-related activities rather than quality at source (P less than 0.0001). Specifically water used for toilet, washing dishes and cooking-related activities was much more contaminated with faecal bacteria than that used for drinking and cooking. Salmonella spp. was significantly more common in water used for washing dishes than drinking (P less than 0.05). Escherichia coli contamination of fingertip-rinses was strongly associated with the individual's activity prior to testing (P less than 0.0001); child care, food and water-related activities produced much higher levels of fingertip contamination than others. Dirty utensils used for cooking and eating were usually left to soak and faecal bacterial growth occurred in this grossly contaminated soak-water. Cross-contamination via water handling was the main mechanism of stored water pollution. These results were used to develop a hygiene intervention study presented in a companion paper.

  17. An appraisal of the prevalence and attributes of traumatic dental injuries in the permanent anterior teeth among 7–14-Year-Old school children of North East Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopal Garg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence, associated risk factors, characteristics, and pattern of traumatic dental injuries (TDIs in the permanent anterior teeth among school children of North East Delhi area. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study was done in 3000 school-going children aged 7–14 years. Materials and Methods: A detailed case history and clinical examination were performed on the entire sample population. TDIs were recorded according to Andreasen's epidemiological classification of TDIs including World Health Organization codes. Statistical Analysis Used: For finding the independent association of the significant variables with outcome, multivariable logistic regression analysis was used. Results: A prevalence of 10.7% was observed in the sample being studied. Dental trauma was significantly (P < 0.05 associated with male gender, and high statistical significance (P < 0.001 was noted with age, participation in sports, lip seal, and overjet. Fall of the child while playing by himself/herself was the most common cause; afternoon and schools were the most common time and place of occurrence of TDIs, respectively. Single tooth enamel fractures in the left maxillary central incisors were most commonly seen. Adhesive restorations were the most frequent form of treatment required. Conclusions: Organizing studies addressing the prevention and treatment needs of TDIs and educational programs aimed toward parents and school teachers are of paramount importance. Furthermore, recognizing the tremendous treatment negligence is extremely critical to adequately analyze indifference of the people toward dental trauma and its consequences.

  18. Modèle sédimentaire et évolution géodynamique du Nord-Est de la Méséta occidentale marocaine au cours du Carbonifère inférieurSedimentary model and geodynamic evolution of the North-East of the Moroccan western Meseta during Lower Carboniferous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkhli, Mostafa; Vachard, Daniel; Paicheler, Jean-Claude; Tahiri, Abdelfattah

    2000-08-01

    The Early Carboniferous sediments of the North-East of the Moroccan western Meseta are very diversified. They contain numerous types of carbonates, deposited upon shallow shelves, as well as deeper gravity and hemipelagic deposits. The progressive Early Carboniferous transgression, starts from the Agouraï area at V2a and reaches Imouzzer of Kandar at V3bγ. The opening of the North-East of the western Meseta basin by strike-slip NE-SW faults, is V2a in age. This basin evolved in an extensive context during all of the Early Carboniferous. These sediments were stricken by a compressive deformation between the Late Namurian and Permian times.

  19. Too much detention? Street Triage and detentions under Section 136 Mental Health Act in the North-East of England: a descriptive study of the effects of a Street Triage intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keown, Patrick; French, Jo; Gibson, Graham; Newton, Eddy; Cull, Steve; Brown, Paul; Parry, Jo; Lyons, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To describe the impact of Street Triage (ST) on the number and rate of Section 136 Mental Health Act (S136) detentions in one NHS Mental Health and Disability Trust (Northumberland, Tyne and Wear (NTW)). Design Comparative descriptive study of numbers and rates of S136 detentions prior to and following the introduction of ST in NTW. More detailed data were obtained from one local authority in the NTW area. Setting NTW, a secondary care NHS Foundation Trust providing mental health and disability services in the north-east of England, in conjunction with Northumbria Police Service. Participants People being detained under S136 Mental Health Act (MHA). Routine data on S136 detentions and ST interventions were obtained from NTW, Northumbria Police, Sunderland Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and Sunderland Local Authority. Interventions Introduction of a ST service in NTW. The main outcome measures were routinely collected data on the number and rate of ST interventions as well as patterns of the numbers and rates of S136 detentions. These were collected retrospectively. Results The annual rate of S136 detentions reduced by 56% in the first year of ST (from 59.8 per 100 000 population to 26.4 per 100 000). There was a linear relationship between the rate of ST in each locality and the reduction in rate of S136 detentions. There were 1623 ST contacts in the first 3 localities to have a ST service during its first year; there were also 403 fewer S136 detentions. Data from Sunderland indicate a 78% reduction in S136 use and a significant reduction in the number and proportion of adult admissions that originated from S136 detentions. Conclusions There is evidence to support the hypothesis that ST decreases the rate of s136 detention. When operating across the whole of NTW, ST resulted in 50 fewer S136 detentions a month, which represents a substantial reduction. PMID:27872112

  20. Trophic ecology of European sardine Sardina pilchardus and European anchovy Engraulis encrasicolus in the Bay of Biscay (north-east Atlantic) inferred from δ13C and δ15N values of fish and identified mesozooplanktonic organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouvelon, T.; Chappuis, A.; Bustamante, P.; Lefebvre, S.; Mornet, F.; Guillou, G.; Violamer, L.; Dupuy, C.

    2014-01-01

    European sardine (Sardina pilchardus) and European anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus) are two species of economical and ecological significance in the Bay of Biscay (north-east Atlantic). However, the trophic ecology of both species is still poorly known in the area, and more generally, few studies have considered the potential trophic overlap between sardines and anchovies worldwide. This study aims to highlight the trophic links between the mesozooplankton and adults of these two pelagic fish in the Bay of Biscay, through carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis (SIA). Mesozooplankton and individuals of sardines and anchovies were collected during one season (spring 2010), over spatially contrasted stations within the study area. First, the potential effect of preservation (ethanol vs. freezing) and of delipidation (by cyclohexane) on mesozooplankton δ13C and δ15N values was assessed. Results demonstrated the necessity to correct for the preservation effect and for lipid contents in mesozooplankton for further analyses of sardines' and anchovies' diet through SIA. Next, this study highlighted the interest of working on identified mesozooplanktonic organisms instead of undetermined assemblages when unravelling food sources of planktivorous fish using stable isotopes. The inter-specific variability of isotope values within a planktonic assemblage was effectively high, probably depending on the various feeding behaviours that can occur among mesozooplankton species. Intra-specific variability was also significant and related to the spatial variations of baseline signatures in the area. To investigate the foraging areas and potential diet overlap of S. pilchardus and E. encrasicolus, mixing models (SIAR) were applied. Both fish species appeared to feed mainly in the neritic waters of the Bay of Biscay in spring and to select mainly small- to medium-sized copepods (e.g. Acartia sp., Temora sp.). However, E. encrasicolus showed a greater trophic plasticity by

  1. North-East Iowa Groundwater Vulnerability Regions

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — The regions on this map represent areas with similar hydro-geologic characteristics thought to represent similar potentials for contamination of groundwater and/or...

  2. ATMOSPHERIC POLLUTION IN NORTH-EAST NIGERIA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentrations from Maiduguri and Yola areas of North-Eastern Nigeria were measured. Also determined were the concentrations of Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb, and Zn in the SPM. Mean SPM levels were 28.3 µg/m3 (range, 1.3-144 µg/m3) and 13.6 µg/m3 (range, 1.1-52 µg/m3) for Maiduguri ...

  3. Arrow injuries in North East Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    men 13%, and cattle theft 8%. Majority were clinically stable on presentation with arrows in the head, neck, chest and abdomen this resulted in various surgical procedures in order to remove the ar: rows and repair damaged viscera. Unstable presentations resulted in mortalities (4.1%) preoperatively. Wound in—.

  4. Occidental diffusion of cucumber (Cucumis sativus) 500–1300 CE: two routes to Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Harry S.; Daunay, Marie-Christine; Janick, Jules

    2012-01-01

    Background The cucumber, Cucumis sativus, is one of the most widely consumed fruit vegetables the world over. The history of its dispersal to the Occident from its centre of origin, the Indian subcontinent, has been incorrectly understood for some time, due to the confusion of cucumbers with vegetable melons. Iconographic and literary evidence has shown that cucumber was absent in Roman times, up to 500 CE, but present in Europe by late medieval times, 1300. The objective of the present investigation was to determine more accurately when the cucumber arrived in Europe and by what route. Findings and Conclusions The evidence for the movement of C. sativus westward is entirely lexicographical until the 10th century. Syriac, Persian and Byzantine Greek sources suggest the presence of cucumbers, to the east and north-east of the Mediterranean Sea (modern Iran, Iraq and Turkey), by the 6th or 7th century. Arabic medical writings suggest the presence of cucumbers in Spain as early as the mid-9th century and in Tunisia by the early 10th century. Descriptive evidence in Arabic establishes the presence of cucumbers in Andalusia by the second half of the 10th century. Latin translations from Arabic sources indicate the presence of cucumbers in southern Italy by the second half of the 11th century. These writings, together with lexicographical discrepancies in names of cucurbits in late medieval Latin writings, suggest that cucumber was introduced to Europe by two independent diffusions. One diffusion appears to have been overland from Persia into eastern and northern Europe and preceded the Islamic conquests. The other, subsequent diffusion into western and southern Europe, was probably by a mostly maritime route from Persia or the Indian subcontinent into Andalusia. PMID:22104164

  5. Adverse obstetrical and perinatal outcome in adolescent mothers associated with first birth: a hospital-based case-control study in a tertiary care hospital in North-East India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medhi, Robin; Das, Banani; Das, Arpana; Ahmed, Mansur; Bawri, Sonika; Rai, Suditi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the adverse obstetrical and perinatal outcome of adolescent mothers associated with first birth. Patients and methods This prospective case-control study was conducted in a tertiary care teaching hospital of North-East India between January 2014 and December 2014. All adolescent primigravidae completing 28 weeks of gestation with singleton pregnancy and delivered at our institution were included in the study group. Primigravidae aged between 20 and 25 years were taken as a control group. Mothers having pregnancy complicated with diabetes mellitus, renal disorder, thyroid disorders, and cardiac diseases were excluded from the study. Demographic data, maternal complications like severe anemia, pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, gestational age at delivery, mode of delivery, and postpartum complications were compared. Among fetal complications, low-birth weight, preterm birth, neonatal intensive care unit admission, still birth, and early neonatal death were compared. All the patients were interviewed regarding contraceptive knowledge and its use preceding the pregnancy. Results Quality antenatal care was received by 80.6% of adolescent mothers. The adolescent mothers had a higher incidence of pre-eclampsia (odds ratio [OR] 2.017 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.045–3.894, P=0.03), preterm deliveries (OR: 1.655, 95% CI: 1.039–2.636, P=0.03). Among fetal outcomes, the low- birth weight babies (OR: 1.59, 95% CI: 1.016–2.478), low mean birth weight (2,544.4±622.09 g versus 2,701.6±582.51 g), and higher admission to neonatal intensive care unit (OR: 1.957, 95% CI: 1.120–3.417) were significantly associated with adolescent mothers. There was no significant difference found regarding the mode of delivery, still birth, and early neonatal death. Moreover, contraceptive knowledge and its use were found to be poor among adolescent mothers. Conclusion With quality antenatal, intranatal, and postnatal care, the obstetric risk of childbirth in adolescent mothers

  6. Revisiting the use of δ15N in meso-scale studies of marine food webs by considering spatio-temporal variations in stable isotopic signatures - The case of an open ecosystem: The Bay of Biscay (North-East Atlantic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouvelon, T.; Spitz, J.; Caurant, F.; Mèndez-Fernandez, P.; Chappuis, A.; Laugier, F.; Le Goff, E.; Bustamante, P.

    2012-08-01

    Most of the recent framework directives and environmental policies argue for the development and the use of indicators - notably trophodynamic indicators - that should be able to follow ecosystems' evolution in space and time, particularly under anthropogenic perturbations. In the last decades, the use of stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes ratios has increased exponentially, particularly in studies of marine ecosystems' trophic structure and functioning. This method is principally based on the assumption that the isotopic composition of a consumer directly reflects that of its food. Nevertheless, few studies have attempted to define the limits of this tool, before using it and drawing ecological conclusions from isotopic analysis. This study aimed to assess the importance of considering spatio-temporal variations in isotopic signatures of consumers when using δ13C and especially δ15N values in open ecosystems with complex food webs, using the Bay of Biscay (North-East Atlantic) as a case study. To this end, more than 140 species from this marine ecosystem were analysed for the isotopic signatures in their muscle tissue. They were sampled from coastal to oceanic and deep-sea areas and at different latitudes, to evaluate spatial variations of isotopic signatures. Selected species were also sampled over several years and in two seasons to account for inter-annual and seasonal variations. In the Bay of Biscay temperate ecosystem, which is subject to both coastal and oceanic influences - two main river inputs and upwelling areas - , δ13C and δ15N values significantly decreased from inshore to offshore species, and to a lesser extent from benthic to pelagic organisms. River discharges appeared to be the first factor influencing δ13C and δ15N values in consumers. From the important spatial variations detected in δ15N values in particular, we suggest that in such contrasted ecosystem, nitrogen isotopic ratios may also be revisited as an indicator of the feeding

  7. Convergent evidence of eagle talons used by late Neanderthals in Europe: a further assessment on symbolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romandini, Matteo; Peresani, Marco; Laroulandie, Véronique; Metz, Laure; Pastoors, Andreas; Vaquero, Manuel; Slimak, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    To contribute to have a better understanding of the symbolic or not use of certain items by Neanderthals, this work presents new evidence of the deliberate removal of raptor claws occurred in Mediterranean Europe during the recent phases of the Mousterian. Rio Secco Cave in the north-east of Italy and Mandrin Cave in the Middle Rhône valley have recently produced two golden eagle pedal phalanges from contexts not younger than 49.1-48.0 ky cal BP at Rio Secco and dated around 50.0 ky cal BP at Mandrin. The bones show cut-marks located on the proximal end ascribable to the cutting of the tendons and the incision of the cortical organic tissues. Also supported by an experimental removal of large raptor claws, our reconstruction explains that the deliberate detachment occurred without damaging the claw, in a way comparable at a general level with other Mousterian contexts across Europe. After excluding that these specimens met the nutritional requirements for human subsistence, we discuss the possible implications these findings perform in our current knowledge of the European Middle Palaeolithic context.

  8. Convergent Evidence of Eagle Talons Used by Late Neanderthals in Europe: A Further Assessment on Symbolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romandini, Matteo; Peresani, Marco; Laroulandie, Véronique; Metz, Laure; Pastoors, Andreas; Vaquero, Manuel; Slimak, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    To contribute to have a better understanding of the symbolic or not use of certain items by Neanderthals, this work presents new evidence of the deliberate removal of raptor claws occurred in Mediterranean Europe during the recent phases of the Mousterian. Rio Secco Cave in the north-east of Italy and Mandrin Cave in the Middle Rhône valley have recently produced two golden eagle pedal phalanges from contexts not younger than 49.1–48.0 ky cal BP at Rio Secco and dated around 50.0 ky cal BP at Mandrin. The bones show cut-marks located on the proximal end ascribable to the cutting of the tendons and the incision of the cortical organic tissues. Also supported by an experimental removal of large raptor claws, our reconstruction explains that the deliberate detachment occurred without damaging the claw, in a way comparable at a general level with other Mousterian contexts across Europe. After excluding that these specimens met the nutritional requirements for human subsistence, we discuss the possible implications these findings perform in our current knowledge of the European Middle Palaeolithic context. PMID:25010346

  9. Convergent evidence of eagle talons used by late Neanderthals in Europe: a further assessment on symbolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Romandini

    Full Text Available To contribute to have a better understanding of the symbolic or not use of certain items by Neanderthals, this work presents new evidence of the deliberate removal of raptor claws occurred in Mediterranean Europe during the recent phases of the Mousterian. Rio Secco Cave in the north-east of Italy and Mandrin Cave in the Middle Rhône valley have recently produced two golden eagle pedal phalanges from contexts not younger than 49.1-48.0 ky cal BP at Rio Secco and dated around 50.0 ky cal BP at Mandrin. The bones show cut-marks located on the proximal end ascribable to the cutting of the tendons and the incision of the cortical organic tissues. Also supported by an experimental removal of large raptor claws, our reconstruction explains that the deliberate detachment occurred without damaging the claw, in a way comparable at a general level with other Mousterian contexts across Europe. After excluding that these specimens met the nutritional requirements for human subsistence, we discuss the possible implications these findings perform in our current knowledge of the European Middle Palaeolithic context.

  10. The partially denuclearized area of North-East Asia. Status of ten years of informal 'new diplomacy'; La zone partiellement denuclearisee de l'Asie du Nord-Est. Bilan de dix annees de 'nouvelle diplomatie' informelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sionneau, B. [Bordeaux-4 Univ.- Montesquieu, Centre d' Analyse Politique Comparee, de Geostrategie et de Relations Internationales, 33 (France); Ecole de Management, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Dusclaud, M. [Bordeaux-4 Univ.- Montesquieu, Centre d' Analyse Politique Comparee, de Geostrategie et de Relations Internationales, 33 (France); Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 33 (France)

    2003-07-01

    In 1991, the G. Bush administration decided to remove away all US surface tactic nuclear weapons everywhere in the world in order to reduce the nuclear warfare risk. This decision has led to the ratification by both Northern Korea and Southern Korea of the declaration on the denuclearization of the Korean peninsula, followed the same year by Mongolia which has become nuclear weapons free. As a consequence of these initiatives, the Center for international strategy, technology and policy (CISTP) of the Georgia institute of technology (Atlanta, USA) has decided the creation of a 'limited nuclear weapons free zone North-East Asia'(LNWFZ), based on cooperation, arms control and non-proliferation. This article describes the genesis of this inter-governmental process of informal diplomacy: proposal of creation of a league for non-nuclear states for North-East Asia, of implementation of an inspection regime and of a cooperative security community, of establishment of confidence building measures and of economic incentives. Then it describes the main components of the LNWFZ project and the obstacles that must be cleared away before its official implementation. (J.S.)

  11. Biología reproductiva de la serpiente semiacuática Liophis semiaureus (Serpentes, Colubridae en el nordeste de Argentina Reproductive biology of the semi-aquatic snake Liophis semiaureus (Serpentes, Colubridae in the north-east of Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOLEDAD M LÓPEZ

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Las serpientes tienen una notable flexibilidad y diversidad en sus tácticas reproductivas, a pesar de ello, los estudios acerca de la biología reproductiva de especies sudamericanas en zonas subtropicales-templadas son escasos. Se analizó la biología reproductiva de Liophis semiaureus en el nordeste de Argentina, incluyendo la madurez y dimorfismo sexual, fecundidad y ciclo reproductivo. Las hembras maduras fueron significativamente más largas, presentaron mayor peso corporal y alcanzaron la madurez sexual a una longitud mayor que los machos. Los machos tuvieron colas más largas que las hembras. El ciclo reproductivo fue estacional con mayor actividad en los períodos templados del año aunque previos a la época de inundaciones. Liophis semiaureus invirtió más energía en la reproducción que en el crecimiento, lo que posibilita que comiencen a reproducirse con tamaños más pequeños con respecto a otras poblaciones, sin retrasar su reproducción hasta alcanzar mayores tamaños. Esta puede ser una estrategia ventajosa en climas estacionales. Las características reproductivas y de dimorfismo sexual en L. semiaureus se encontrarían influenciadas por aspectos filogenéticos, geográficos y ecológicos, lo que determina que la especie responda de manera general al patrón reproductivo del grupo taxonómico pero con particularidades propias determinadas por los factores geográficos y los requerimientos ecológicos.Snakes in subtropical warm zones have a wide flexibility and diversity in your reproductive tactics. In spite of it, the studies in South America about that are scanty yet. We analyzed sexual dimorphism, sexual maturity, fecundity and reproductive cycle of a semi-aquatic snake, Liophis semiaureus, in north-east of Argentina. Females were significantly longer and heavier than the males. Females reach sexual maturity with longer snout-vent length than the males. Males had longer tails than the females. The reproductive cycle was

  12. Past and future evolution of Abies alba forests in Europe - comparison of a dynamic vegetation model with palaeo data and observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruosch, Melanie; Spahni, Renato; Joos, Fortunat; Henne, Paul D; van der Knaap, Willem O; Tinner, Willy

    2016-02-01

    Information on how species distributions and ecosystem services are impacted by anthropogenic climate change is important for adaptation planning. Palaeo data suggest that Abies alba formed forests under significantly warmer-than-present conditions in Europe and might be a native substitute for widespread drought-sensitive temperate and boreal tree species such as beech (Fagus sylvatica) and spruce (Picea abies) under future global warming conditions. Here, we combine pollen and macrofossil data, modern observations, and results from transient simulations with the LPX-Bern dynamic global vegetation model to assess past and future distributions of A. alba in Europe. LPX-Bern is forced with climate anomalies from a run over the past 21 000 years with the Community Earth System Model, modern climatology, and with 21st-century multimodel ensemble results for the high-emission RCP8.5 and the stringent mitigation RCP2.6 pathway. The simulated distribution for present climate encompasses the modern range of A. alba, with the model exceeding the present distribution in north-western and southern Europe. Mid-Holocene pollen data and model results agree for southern Europe, suggesting that at present, human impacts suppress the distribution in southern Europe. Pollen and model results both show range expansion starting during the Bølling-Allerød warm period, interrupted by the Younger Dryas cold, and resuming during the Holocene. The distribution of A. alba expands to the north-east in all future scenarios, whereas the potential (currently unrealized) range would be substantially reduced in southern Europe under RCP8.5. A. alba maintains its current range in central Europe despite competition by other thermophilous tree species. Our combined palaeoecological and model evidence suggest that A. alba may ensure important ecosystem services including stand and slope stability, infrastructure protection, and carbon sequestration under significantly warmer

  13. How Changing Human Lifestyles are Shaping Europe's Regional Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee, L. D.; Lowe, C. D.; Langmead, O.; McQuatters-Gollop, A.; Attrill, M.; Cooper, P.; Gilbert, A.; Knudsen, S.; Garnacho, E.

    2007-05-01

    European society is experiencing unprecedented changes triggered by expansion of the European Union, the fall of Communism, economic growth and the onset of globalisation. Europe's regional seas, the Baltic, Black Sea, Mediterranean and North-East Atlantic (including the North Sea), provide key goods and services to the human population but have suffered from severe degradation in past decades. Their integrity as coupled social and ecological systems depends on how humanity will anticipate potential problems and deal with its ecological footprint in the future. We report the outcome of an EU-funded 15-country, 28 institution project entitled European Lifestyles and Marine Ecosystems (ELME). Our studies were designed to inform new EU policy and legislation that incorporates Ecosystem-Based Management. ELME has modelled the key relationships between economic and social drivers (D), environmental pressures (P) and changes in the state of the environment (S) in Europe's regional seas. We examined four key issues in each sea: habitat change, eutrophication, chemical pollution and fisheries. We developed conceptual models for each regional sea and employed a novel stochastic modelling technique to examine the interrelationship between key components of the conceptual models. We used the models to examine 2-3 decade projections of current trends in D, P and S and how a number of alternative development scenarios might modify these trends. These simulations demonstrate the vulnerability of Europe's seas to human pressure. As affluence increases in countries acceding to the EU, so does the demand for marine goods and services. There are `winners' and `losers' amongst marine species; the winners are often species that are opportunistic invaders or those with low economic value. In the case of eutrophication, semi-enclosed seas such as the Baltic or Black Sea are already affected by the `legacy of the past'; nutrients that have accumulated in soils, ground waters and

  14. Creationism in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    For decades, the creationist movement was primarily situated in the United States. Then, in the 1970s, American creationists found their ideas welcomed abroad, first in Australia and New Zealand, then in Korea, India, South Africa, Brazil, and elsewhere—including Europe, where creationism plays...... the teaching of creationism as a scientific discipline on an equal footing with the theory of evolution." Creationism in Europe offers a discerning introduction to the cultural history of modern Europe, the variety of worldviews in Europe, and the interplay of science and religion in a global context...

  15. The Reshaping of Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    the different paths Europe may follow, this study treats Soviet reform and new -vi- dinking as an independent variable that propels systemic change...Europe dating back to the Bolshevik Revolution to reinstate Russia in the European family of nations. Whether the Soviet Union chooses to behave as a

  16. Islam in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen Schøler

    2008-01-01

    A discussion of various approaches to Islam and Muslims in Europe in seven books published in the USA and the UK between 2005 and 2007.......A discussion of various approaches to Islam and Muslims in Europe in seven books published in the USA and the UK between 2005 and 2007....

  17. Small States in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book offers an accessible, coherent and informative analysis of contemporary and future foreign policy challenges facing small states in Europe.......This book offers an accessible, coherent and informative analysis of contemporary and future foreign policy challenges facing small states in Europe....

  18. Taenia solium in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devleesschauwer, Brecht; Allepuz, Alberto; Dermauw, Veronique

    2017-01-01

    The pork tapeworm, Taenia solium, causes an important economic and health burden, mainly in rural or marginalized communities of sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and Latin-America. Although improved pig rearing conditions seem to have eliminated the parasite in most Western European countries, little...... is known about the true endemicity status of T. solium throughout Europe. Three recent reviews indicate that autochthonous human T. solium taeniasis/cysticercosis may be possible in Europe, but that current peer-reviewed literature is biased towards Western Europe. Officially reported data on porcine...... cysticercosis are highly insufficient. Favourable conditions for local T. solium transmission still exist in eastern parts of Europe, although the ongoing integration of the European Union is speeding up modernisation and intensification of the pig sector. Further evidence is urgently needed to fill the gaps...

  19. Churchill, Europe and Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren Dockter

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available From the early 1930s until his peace time premiership (1951-1955, Winston Churchill was one of the strongest advocates of the concept of a United Europe. While this is well known among scholars of 20th century British history, Churchill’s actual vision for what a United Europe might look like has received less attention. Still less attention has been paid to Churchill’s opinions of the roles other nations might play within the new Europe. This article will examine Churchill’s view of Turkey in the new European order and will reveal that Churchill saw Turkey as a part of, (or at least an extension of Europe. However, this article will also reveal that Churchill’s conceptualisation of Turkey’s role was largely predicated on 19th century geostrategic thinking.

  20. EPA Collaboration with Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    By working together to achieve common goals, the U.S. and Europe can enhance our respective environmental protection efforts while creating a cleaner environment on both continents and around the world.

  1. Creationism in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    For decades, the creationist movement was primarily situated in the United States. Then, in the 1970s, American creationists found their ideas welcomed abroad, first in Australia and New Zealand, then in Korea, India, South Africa, Brazil, and elsewhere—including Europe, where creationism plays...... an expanding role in public debates about science policy and school curricula. In this, the first comprehensive history of creationism in Europe, leading historians, philosophers, and scientists narrate the rise of—and response to—scientific creationism, creation science, intelligent design, and organized...... antievolutionism in countries and religions throughout Europe. Providing a unique map of creationism in Europe, the authors chart the surprising history of creationist activities and strategies there. Over the past forty years, creationism has spread swiftly among European Catholics, Protestants, Jews, Hindus...

  2. Towards a New Europe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Karen-Margrethe

    2015-01-01

    This article raises two questions: What are the challenges for an understanding of Europe and European future? How can we rethink literary history so that it reflects the present historical and political moment of Europe? The aim of bringing these two concerns together is to argue that European...... literary history has the potential of being an agent in the forming a new understanding of Europe. The article takes its point of departure in Etienne Balibar’s suggestion that Europe should base its future ‘identity’ in palimpsestic collaboration and anti-essential agency in stead of basing it in a common...... culture. It argues that if we want the genre of literary history to adapt to a new and dynamic world, we have to rethink the term of ‘historicity’ and the function of history within literary history. The article suggests that literary histories could be developed through a strategic use of the concepts...

  3. Relationship of suicide rates with climate and economic variables in Europe during 2000-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N; Chatzikosta, Isaia; Pastiadis, Konstantinos; Zanis, Prodromos; Kawohl, Wolfram; Kerkhof, Ad J F M; Navickas, Alvydas; Höschl, Cyril; Lecic-Tosevski, Dusica; Sorel, Eliot; Rancans, Elmars; Palova, Eva; Juckel, Georg; Isacsson, Goran; Jagodic, Helena Korosec; Botezat-Antonescu, Ileana; Rybakowski, Janusz; Azorin, Jean Michel; Cookson, John; Waddington, John; Pregelj, Peter; Demyttenaere, Koen; Hranov, Luchezar G; Stevovic, Lidija Injac; Pezawas, Lucas; Adida, Marc; Figuera, Maria Luisa; Jakovljević, Miro; Vichi, Monica; Perugi, Giulio; Andreassen, Ole A; Vukovic, Olivera; Mavrogiorgou, Paraskevi; Varnik, Peeter; Dome, Peter; Winkler, Petr; Salokangas, Raimo K R; From, Tiina; Danileviciute, Vita; Gonda, Xenia; Rihmer, Zoltan; Forsman, Jonas; Grady, Anne; Hyphantis, Thomas; Dieset, Ingrid; Soendergaard, Susan; Pompili, Maurizio; Bech, Per

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that suicidal rates vary considerably among European countries and the reasons for this are unknown, although several theories have been proposed. The effect of economic variables has been extensively studied but not that of climate. Data from 29 European countries covering the years 2000-2012 and concerning male and female standardized suicidal rates (according to WHO), economic variables (according World Bank) and climate variables were gathered. The statistical analysis included cluster and principal component analysis and categorical regression. The derived models explained 62.4 % of the variability of male suicidal rates. Economic variables alone explained 26.9 % and climate variables 37.6 %. For females, the respective figures were 41.7, 11.5 and 28.1 %. Male suicides correlated with high unemployment rate in the frame of high growth rate and high inflation and low GDP per capita, while female suicides correlated negatively with inflation. Both male and female suicides correlated with low temperature. The current study reports that the climatic effect (cold climate) is stronger than the economic one, but both are present. It seems that in Europe suicidality follows the climate/temperature cline which interestingly is not from south to north but from south to north-east. This raises concerns that climate change could lead to an increase in suicide rates. The current study is essentially the first successful attempt to explain the differences across countries in Europe; however, it is an observational analysis based on aggregate data and thus there is a lack of control for confounders.

  4. Heat Roadmap Europe 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, David; Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Østergaard, Poul Alberg

    2012-01-01

    Heat Roadmap Europe (Pre-study 1) investigates the role of district heating in the EU27 energy system by mapping local conditions across Europe, identifying the potential for district heating expansion, and subsequently simulating the potential resource in an hourly model of the EU27 energy system....... In 2010, approximately 12% of the space heating demand in Europe is met by district heating, but in this study four alternative scenarios are considered for the EU27 energy system: 1. 2010 with 30% district heating 2. 2010 with 50% district heating 3. 2030 with 30% district heating 4. 2050 with 50......% district heating These scenarios are investigated in two steps. Firstly, district heating replaces individual boilers by converting condensing power plants to combined heat and power plants (CHP) to illustrate how district heating improves the overall efficiency of the energy system. In the second step...

  5. Heat Roadmap Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, David; Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Lund, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    information systems (GIS) and energy system analyses. In this report, the inputs for other modelling tools such as PRIMES are presented, in order to enable other researches to generate similar heating scenarios for Europe. Although Heat Roadmap Europe presents a complete heat strategy for Europe, which...... includes energy efficiency, individual heating units (such as boilers and heat pumps), and heat networks, the recommendations here are primarily relating to the potential and modelling of district heating. Although other solutions will play a significant role in decarbonising the heating and cooling sector...... in a low-carbon energy system context, so we have focused on this area based on our extensive experience in this area [1-10]. This report includes guidelines on the potential heat demand in European buildings that can be met by district heating as well as some general guidelines on how this district...

  6. Cultural participation in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevenson, David; Kann-Rasmussen, Nanna; Balling, Gitte

    2015-01-01

    Europe has a ‘problem’; it is becoming a ‘less cultural continent’ as fewer Europeans are ‘engaging in cultural activities’. This conclusion has been reached due to the findings of the latest cross national cultural participation survey. This paper questions the existence of this ‘problem......’ and instead suggests that there is a shared problematisation across Europe sustained by common discursive archaeology that employs various discursive strands in relation to a dominant institutional discourse. The argument is that the ‘problem’ of ‘non-participation’ legitimates a ‘solution’ that predates its...

  7. Cosmopolitan Futures for Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Wallgren, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    A Nordic proverb tells us that a prudent man does not make the goat his gardener. But that is exactly what we have done. In the garden of Europe we have handed over power to the goat of transnational companies and banks and to democratically weakly accountable bureaucrats. The harvest we have reaped is the euro-crisis. I will first present the basic features of what I consider to be the standard view of the political situation in Europe. In the discussion that follows I will try to show that ...

  8. Mapping Europe: Images of Europe in the Eurovision Song Contest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pajala, Mari

    2012-01-01

    abstractThe Eurovision Song Contest (ESC) offers a unique viewpoint to the ways Europe has been imagined on television from the 1950s to the present. This paper looks at the use of a key visual symbol for Europe, the European map, to outline the history of the ESC’s representation of Europe. Whilst

  9. Spain: Europe's California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilvert, Calvin

    1994-01-01

    Contends that, as Spain integrates into the European Economic Community, it is considered to be Europe's California. Asserts that making regional comparisons between California and Spain can be an effective teaching method. Provides comparisons in such areas as agriculture and tourism. (CFR)

  10. JPRS Report, West Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-15

    European dimension in its foreign policy. Hardly Satisfactory It is in the cards that Norway can become the Conmunity’s 13th member country...equal strategic importance. It is known that the Azores are an "important trampoline for U.S. intervention in Europe and the Middle East and on the

  11. Chytrid fungus in Europe

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garner, Trenton W J; Walker, Susan; Bosch, Jaime; Hyatt, Alex D; Cunningham, Andrew A; Fisher, Matthew C

    2005-01-01

    ...-offs that will likely lead to local extinction (4,5) (J. Bosch et al., unpub, data). We screened 1,664 current and archived samples of wild amphibians collected in Europe from 1994 to 2004 by researchers using amphibians as study organisms. B. dendrobatidis infects the skin of adult amphibians and the mouthparts of anuran larvae; samples included toe clip...

  12. NMC Horizon Report Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. Jos Fransen

    2014-01-01

    The NMC Horizon Report Europe > 2014 Schools Edition was produced by the NMC in collaboration with the European Commission’s Directorate General for Education and Culture (EC DG EAC), the Joint Research Centre - Institute for Prospective Technological Studies (JRC-IPTS), Inholland University, QIN

  13. Social cohesion in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nol Reverda

    2010-01-01

    This chapter explores the current discussions and policies towards social exclusion and cohesion in Europe. In a first section will briefly be identified how the wording in the social work discourse changed from originally the thinking in terms of poverty to the ideas of social cohesion nowadays.

  14. Rickettsioses in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo, Aránzazu; Santibáñez, Sonia; García-Álvarez, Lara; Palomar, Ana M; Oteo, José A

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria of the genera Rickettsia and Orientia (family rickettsiaceae, order rickettsiales) cause rickettsioses worldwide, and are transmitted by lice, fleas, ticks and mites. In Europe, only Rickettsia spp. cause rickettsioses. With improvement of hygiene, the risk of louse-borne rickettsiosis (epidemic typhus) is low in Europe. Nevertheless, recrudescent form of Rickettsia prowazekii infection persists. There could be an epidemic typhus outbreak if a body lice epidemic occurs under unfavorable sanitary conditions. In Europe, endemic typhus or Rickettsia typhi infection, transmitted by rats and fleas, causes febrile illness. At the beginning of this century, flea-borne spotted fever cases caused by Rickettsia felis were diagnosed. Flea-borne rickettsiosis should be suspected after flea bites if fever, with or without rash, is developed. Tick-borne rickettsioses are the main source of rickettsia infections in Europe. Apart from Rickettsia conorii, the Mediterranean Spotted Fever (MSF) agent, other Rickettsia spp. cause MSF-like: Rickettsia helvetica, Rickettsia monacensis, Rickettsia massiliae or Rickettsia aeschlimannii. In the 1990s, two 'new' rickettsioses were diagnosed: Lymphangitis Associated Rickettsiosis (LAR) caused by Rickettsia sibirica mongolitimonae, and Tick-Borne Lymphadenopathy/Dermacentor-Borne-Necrosis-Erythema-Lymphadenopathy/Scalp Eschar Neck Lymphadenopathy (TIBOLA/DEBONEL/SENLAT), caused by Rickettsia slovaca, Candidatus Rickettsia rioja and Rickettsia raoultii. Lastly, European reports about mite-borne rickettsiosis are scarce. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Normative Power Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manners, Ian

    2009-01-01

    The chapter develops a normative power approach to European studies that can be applied across and beyond its constitutive disciplines in order to interrogate and transgress the ideas and spaces on/of Europe. In four parts the chapter explores the terms ‘normative', ‘power', and ‘Europe', before......' - in order to make sense of ideas of the common good. Part two looks at three different types of power - ‘relational', ‘structural', and ‘normative' - as a means of understanding the power of ideas of the common good. Part three considers three different means of understanding Europe - ‘civilizational......', ‘categorical', and ‘cultural' - to show how the power of ideas of the common good shape our means of comprehending contemporary Europe. Part four attempts to apply the approach to the question of a European counter-terrorist response. This example was chosen because of the challenges it presents...

  16. Policy evaluation in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pattyn, V.; Voorst, S. van; Mastenbroek, E.; Dunlop, C.; Thiel, S. van; Ongaro, E.

    2018-01-01

    Policy evaluations are increasingly considered a taken-for-granted prerequisite for a well-performing public sector. In this chapter, we address the question whether this view reflects the actual situation concerning evaluation capacity and culture in Europe. First, we reflect on the history of

  17. A Europe of science

    CERN Multimedia

    Banda, E

    2000-01-01

    The GDP of the EU is roughly equivalent to that of the USA but the EU invests $60 billion less a year in research and development. To ensure that Europe can remain competitive it is vital that the EU increases investment in R&D and renews its mechanisms for collaboration (1 page).

  18. Conservation Agriculture in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Á. Kertész

    2014-03-01

    Yield performance and stability, operating costs, environmental policies and programs of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP, and climate change will likely be the major driving forces defining the direction and for the extension of CA in Europe. The role of agriculture in climate change mitigation in the EU is discussed in the paper.

  19. Europe in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atzbach, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the presence of European ‘contacts’ during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance period, i.e. elements of culture derived from Central Europe that were introduced into historical Denmark, on the basis of three examples. First, Baltic Ware, a specific pottery type, was developed ...

  20. Connecting Europe: Postcolonial Mediations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponzanesi, S.

    2016-01-01

    The current refugee crisis, magnified by media sensationalism and political opportunism, brings into sharp focus internal tensions that threaten the very notion of Europe. In a wave of nostalgia for the false security of the old sovereign states, old borders are being re-established and Fortress

  1. Shadows at Europe's heart

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Ülevaade Kesk- ja Ida-Euroopa riikide sisepoliitilistest konfliktidest, ebakompetentsuse ning korruptsiooni ilmingutest valitsustes. Toomas Hendrik Ilves kui positiivne näide Brüsselist kodumaale naasnud poliitikust. Vt. ka lk. 13-14: Europe's fraying fringe

  2. Populism in Europe: Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartlett, J.; Birdwell, J.; de Lange, S.

    2012-01-01

    Nationalist populist parties and movements are growing in support throughout Europe. These groups are known for their opposition to immigration, their ‘anti-establishment’ views and their concern for protecting national culture. Their rise in popularity has gone hand-in-hand with the advent of

  3. Business Law, Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomcenco, Alex; Werlauff, Erik

    be the book within your reach. We call it “Our Corporate Bible”. In an easily comprehendible way we address some of the most essential issues of business law, and provide guidelines and clarity for understanding and proper application of the legal provisions that govern business law in Europe....

  4. PERIODONTAL CONDITIONS IN EUROPE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PILOT, T; MIYAZAKI, H

    The aim of the present overview is to evaluate the periodontal conditions in European populations. Study was made of a number of extensive surveys of periodontal diseases carried out in a number of European countries, primarily North West Europe. These surveys often provide considerable detail.

  5. Postgraduate education in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses recent developments in doctoral education in business studies in Europe. Six key dilemmas relating to fundamental differences between two generic approaches in contemporary doctoral education have been identified. The theoretical basis of the paper is borrowed from institutio...

  6. Mammographic screening programmes in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giordano, Livia; von Karsa, Lawrence; Tomatis, Mariano

    2012-01-01

    To summarize participation and coverage rates in population mammographic screening programmes for breast cancer in Europe.......To summarize participation and coverage rates in population mammographic screening programmes for breast cancer in Europe....

  7. E-prescription across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kierkegaard, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The use of electronic prescription has been designated as an important strategic policy to improve health care in Europe. The aim of the European Union is to have a cross-border electronic healthcare system in Europe which will enable EU citizens to obtain e-Prescriptions anywhere in Europe. Cross...

  8. Mapping Europe: Images of Europe in the Eurovision Song Contest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Pajala

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Eurovision Song Contest (ESC offers a unique viewpoint to the ways Europe has been imagined on television from the 1950s to the present. This paper looks at the use of a key visual symbol for Europe, the European map, to outline the history of the ESC’s representation of Europe. Whilst the European map was rarely used during the first decades of the ESC, it became a central visual element of the show in the 1990s, a period of great political change in Europe. Since then, the ESC maps have pictured an ever widening image of Europe, gradually moving towards a dynamic, moving image of Europe and finally, dispensing with a coherent map of Europe altogether.

  9. Academic streaming in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falaschi, Alessandro; Mønster, Dan; Doležal, Ivan

    2004-01-01

    The TF-NETCAST task force was active from March 2003 to March 2004, and during this time the mem- bers worked on various aspects of streaming media related to the ultimate goal of setting up common services and infrastructures to enable netcasting of high quality content to the academic community...... in Europe. We report on a survey of the use of streaming media in the academic community in Europe, an open source content delivery network, and a portal for announcing live streaming events to the global academic community.......The TF-NETCAST task force was active from March 2003 to March 2004, and during this time the mem- bers worked on various aspects of streaming media related to the ultimate goal of setting up common services and infrastructures to enable netcasting of high quality content to the academic community...

  10. Biobanking for Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuille, Martin; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; Bréchot, Christian; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Dagher, Georges; Landegren, Ulf; Litton, Jan-Eric; Pasterk, Markus; Peltonen, Leena; Taussig, Mike; Wichmann, H-Erich; Zatloukal, Kurt

    2008-01-01

    Biobanks are well-organized resources comprising biological samples and associated information that are accessible to scientific investigation. Across Europe, millions of samples with related data are held in different types of collections. While individual collections can be well organized and accessible, the resources are subject to fragmentation, insecurity of funding and incompleteness. To address these issues, a Biobanking and BioMolecular Resources Infrastructure (BBMRI) is to be developed across Europe, thereby implementing a European 'roadmap' for research infrastructures that was developed by a forum of EU member states and that has been received by the European Commission. In this review, we describe the work involved in preparing for the construction of BBMRI in a European and global context.

  11. Smart Energy Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, D.; Lund, H.; Mathiesen, B. V.

    2016-01-01

    is presented in terms of energy (primary energy supply), environment (carbon dioxide emissions), and economy (total annual socio-economic cost). The steps are ordered in terms of their scientific and political certainty as follows: Decommissioning nuclear power, implementing a large amount of heat savings......This study presents one scenario for a 100% renewable energy system in Europe by the year 2050. The transition from a business-as-usual situation in 2050, to a 100% renewable energy Europe is analysed in a series of steps. Each step reflects one major technological change. For each step, the impact......, converting the private car fleet to electricity, providing heat in rural areas with heat pumps, providing heat in urban areas with district heating, converting fuel in heavy-duty vehicles to a renewable electrofuel, and replacing natural gas with methane. The results indicate that by using the Smart Energy...

  12. Severe malaria in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurth, Florian; Develoux, Michel; Mechain, Matthieu

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Malaria remains one of the most serious infections for travellers to tropical countries. Due to the lack of harmonized guidelines a large variety of treatment regimens is used in Europe to treat severe malaria. METHODS: The European Network for Tropical Medicine and Travel Health (Trop......Net) conducted an 8-year, multicentre, observational study to analyse epidemiology, treatment practices and outcomes of severe malaria in its member sites across Europe. Physicians at participating TropNet centres were asked to report pseudonymized retrospective data from all patients treated at their centre...... for microscopically confirmed severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria according to the 2006 WHO criteria. RESULTS: From 2006 to 2014 a total of 185 patients with severe malaria treated in 12 European countries were included. Three patients died, resulting in a 28-day survival rate of 98.4%. The majority of infections...

  13. SOCRATES Invades Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Slowinski

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to explore the current reality faced by higher education students in Central and Eastern Europe and to draw out the implications of this current reality for policy makers in the future. In the article, I explore the influence of transnational corporations' training programs on education as it currently pertains to Central and Eastern European higher education and employment. In addition, multinational corporate entities exercise influence on European Union policy through the role of lobby organizations and activities. I explore the influence of these practices on education with an emphasis on the emerging importance of Western language skills. In addition, I focus on the European Union and its efforts to expand into Central and Eastern Europe in order to provide a focal point for analysis.

  14. Creationism in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjermitslev, Hans Henrik; Kjærgaard, Peter C.; Blancke, Stefaan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of our article is threefold. First, we present and discuss the extant literature on creationism in Europe (the “facts”). Within this section, we offer a review of the literature as well as an overview of the most remarkable developments and events recorded therein. Second, we indicate...... a sustained study of European creationism can contribute to other research domains such as the study of cultural evolution and the relation between science and religion....

  15. East Europe Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-15

    European nations make it necessary to continue the road mapped out in Helsinki , but our task is not only to reduce and elimi- nate various dangers...and security and disarmament in Europe, by the Helsinki meeting of the foreign ministers of the countries that signed the CSCE final act, and pay the...Embarrassed by ’Their Split’ — Belgrade Sees Organized Provocations Back of the Excesses of Hajduk Fans"] [Text] Split, 25 Nov—The cathedral of Split

  16. Violent Radicalization in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard-Nielsen, Anja

    2010-01-01

    and foiled plots inspired by militant Islamism have grabbed European and American headlines. This article identifies and discusses empirical studies of radicalization and points to the strengths as well as the weaknesses characterizing these studies. The aim is to take stock of the current state of research...... within this field and to answer the question: From an empirical point of view, what is known and what is not known about radicalization connected to militant Islamism in Europe?...

  17. Role of Housing Reconstruction Between Years 2000 - 2014 in Merging of Urban Structure of The North East Wrocław / Rola Zabudowy Mieszkaniowej z Lat 2000-2014 w Scalaniu Struktury Urbanistycznej Północno-Wschodniego Wrocławia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masztalski Robert

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the urban structure of the North-East of Wroclaw, where in the vicinity of the historic buildings and residential buildings from the 70s of the last century, and between, in the last 20 years there were built new buildings, as binding material of the urban structure. The new multifamily housing development of years 2000-2014 of Psie Pole as a housing development in Wroclaw, closes the gap between the historic district residential buildings in the old Psie Pole and the buildings of large slabs of the 70s of the twentieth century. The contemporary residential development uses the existing social infrastructure centre of the old Psie Pole district, and also the social infrastructure of the housing development of 70s of the twentieth century. The authors analyze, in the first part, the spatial development of these areas on the basis of historical materials. In the following, based on an analysis of urban structure created in the last 15 years of development, analyze existing conditions, context and value (in terms of urban planning - the wealth of social infrastructure, the contemporary housing development of Psie Pole.

  18. The Alternatives of Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei MARGA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The specialised investigations in the last century and a half have led us to thecomprehensive understanding of Europe as a culture that was set up and has developed beingnurtured by three major sources: Jerusalem, Athens and Rome, plus other numerous sources. Thetriangle of the three cultural metropolitan cities in history, which have essentially given us thereligion and the vision upon the human fate, science and philosophy, law and civil dignity, remainthe most adequate metaphor to summarise the decisive sources of Europe. The destiny of Europecannot be thematised without examining these sources.Europeans today live in captivity with the present, with a culture somehow amputated by thelived dimension of the future.For this reason, the future has to become again a priority objective in democratic societies,and philosophy has the opportunity to develop a concept of rationality that includes science in anintegrative understanding, which clarifies its meaning, without preventing the success of scientificaction.Such a reason may set Europe in motion again with everything that is specific to it.

  19. Mineral facilities of Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almanzar, Francisco; Baker, Michael S.; Elias, Nurudeen; Guzman, Eric

    2010-01-01

    This map displays over 1,700 records of mineral facilities within the countries of Europe and western Eurasia. Each record represents one commodity and one facility type at a single geographic location. Facility types include mines, oil and gas fields, and plants, such as refineries, smelters, and mills. Common commodities of interest include aluminum, cement, coal, copper, gold, iron and steel, lead, nickel, petroleum, salt, silver, and zinc. Records include attributes, such as commodity, country, location, company name, facility type and capacity (if applicable), and latitude and longitude geographical coordinates (in both degrees-minutes-seconds and decimal degrees). The data shown on this map and in table 1 were compiled from multiple sources, including (1) the most recently available data from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook (Europe and Central Eurasia volume), (2) mineral statistics and information from the USGS Minerals Information Web site (http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/country/europe.html), and (3) data collected by the USGS minerals information country specialists from sources, such as statistical publications of individual countries, annual reports and press releases of operating companies, and trade journals. Data reflect the most recently published table of industry structure for each country at the time of this publication. Additional information is available from the country specialists listed in table 2.

  20. Europe PMC in 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levchenko, Maria; Gou, Yuci; Graef, Florian; Hamelers, Audrey; Huang, Zhan; Ide-Smith, Michele; Iyer, Anusha; Kilian, Oliver; Katuri, Jyothi; Kim, Jee-Hyub; Marinos, Nikos; Nambiar, Rakesh; Parkin, Michael; Pi, Xingjun; Rogers, Frances; Talo, Francesco; Vartak, Vid; Venkatesan, Aravind; McEntyre, Johanna

    2018-01-04

    Europe PMC (https://europepmc.org) is a comprehensive resource of biomedical research publications that offers advanced tools for search, retrieval, and interaction with the scientific literature. This article outlines new developments since 2014. In addition to delivering the core database and services, Europe PMC focuses on three areas of development: individual user services, data integration, and infrastructure to support text and data mining. Europe PMC now provides user accounts to save search queries and claim publications to ORCIDs, as well as open access profiles for authors based on public ORCID records. We continue to foster connections between scientific data and literature in a number of ways. All the data behind the paper - whether in structured archives, generic archives or as supplemental files - are now available via links to the BioStudies database. Text-mined biological concepts, including database accession numbers and data DOIs, are highlighted in the text and linked to the appropriate data resources. The SciLite community annotation platform accepts text-mining results from various contributors and overlays them on research articles as licence allows. In addition, text miners and developers can access all open content via APIs or via the FTP site. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. Archeomagnetism in Western Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, A.; Lanos, P.

    2001-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a short review of the archeomagnetic research conducted in Europe. Reference curves of the directional variations of the geomagnetic field over the last two thousand years are now available for France, Great Britain, Bulgaria, Hungary, Ukraine and Caucasus. A reference curve, built using historical volcanic rocks was also published for Italy. Less detailed results were obtained in Germany, Greece, Switzerland, Denmark and Belgium. Our knowledge of the secular variation of the field for older periods is more limited, except in Bulgaria. Very recently, data covering the first millennium BC were obtained in France and Germany. Few paleointensity data have been collected in Western Europe in comparison with other archaeomagnetic areas, such as Bulgaria. More knowledge about the variations of the geomagnetic field strength will allow for developing better models of the past geomagnetic field and should also be useful for future archaeomagnetic dating, especially in the case of pottery and for displaced objects such as tiles, where only the paleoinclination and the paleointensity can be determined. For paleointensity determinations, different experimental techniques (methods of Thellier, Shaw, Tanguy) and different materials (tiles, bricks, pottery) were used. The effect of thermoremanent magnetization (TRM) anisotropy upon the paleointensity values was investigated by different teams. The most efficient method of correction for this effect is to determine the TRM anisotropy tensors for each sample. The effect of the cooling rate upon the TRM intensity seems more difficult to correct. An analysis of the paleointensity data available for the last two thousand years, obtained from sites in Western Europe, was performed using a weighting factor which takes into account the number and type of the samples studied as well as the technique used for the paleointensity determination. This analysis clearly shows that some of the existing data

  2. Market Power Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelstrup, Jesper Dahl

    2015-01-01

    Market Power Europe (MPE) constitutes an important contribution to the literature on the global role and actorness of the EU. In order to develop MPE as a theory, this contribution provides an assessment of how Russia, the USA and China have converged towards three EU trade policies in 2013....... The analysis finds that MPE fails to account for important dynamics related to externalization in the three cases. In order to improve MPE analytically, the article suggests that MPE should include three intervening variables to account for the EU’s ability to externalize its policies and act as MPE...

  3. Emerging Power Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zank, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    the only one to influence matters on a global scale besides, the US. Of particular importance in this context has been the growing attractiveness of the EU market and the considerable “soft power” which the EU exerts in some parts of the world. The paper reconstructs the most important steps of Europe......’s rise, with emphasis on the “expansionist” character of the EU. Internal developments in the EU have been crucial for its growing external influence. The “expansionism” of the EU and its system has until recently been peaceful. In the case of Ukraine, however, another (regional) power has applied...

  4. Europe debates its destiny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Camargo

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I propose to examine the issue that at present most mobilizes the European states and public opinion within them: the modification of the institutional-political model, in the form of a Constitutional Treaty for Europe, requiring parliamentary or popular ratification by its twenty-five member States, within a period that remains undecided. Events surrounding the consultation proposed to the European governments and their citizens, indicate – particularly if we take into account the negative votes in France and Holland, and others that may yet occur – that the European Union is divided, raising the concern that its process of regional integration could suffer interruption or even reversal. My analysis of the reasons European citizens and European states find themselves divided, with emphasis on those that separate the bureaucracy in Brussels from the EU’s citizens and national governments, will revolve on two basic axes: the enlargement of the EU, recently grown from fifteen states to twenty-five, and the transformation of the EU’s political-institutional model, which in securing itself to a constitutional anchor modifies both symbolically and substantively the degrees of sovereignty and autonomy of Europe’s numerous political actors. So doing, this analysis will seek support in theoretical currents that, stimulated by the importance and singularity of the process of European construction, have been brought to bear on the examination of the political instruments and procedures involved, their determinants, and their consequences. Beginning with the matter of enlargement, this article will look at the recurrent problems arising from admission of the ten new member countries from the Center and East of the continent – that is, the “other Europe” – formally incorporated in May 2004, and at the decisive weight this had in the decision to formulate a Constitution for Europe. Arriving thus at my second topic, I will

  5. Wolf population genetics in Europe: a systematic review, meta-analysis and suggestions for conservation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindrikson, Maris; Remm, Jaanus; Pilot, Malgorzata; Godinho, Raquel; Stronen, Astrid Vik; Baltrūnaité, Laima; Czarnomska, Sylwia D; Leonard, Jennifer A; Randi, Ettore; Nowak, Carsten; Åkesson, Mikael; López-Bao, José Vicente; Álvares, Francisco; Llaneza, Luis; Echegaray, Jorge; Vilà, Carles; Ozolins, Janis; Rungis, Dainis; Aspi, Jouni; Paule, Ladislav; Skrbinšek, Tomaž; Saarma, Urmas

    2017-08-01

    The grey wolf (Canis lupus) is an iconic large carnivore that has increasingly been recognized as an apex predator with intrinsic value and a keystone species. However, wolves have also long represented a primary source of human-carnivore conflict, which has led to long-term persecution of wolves, resulting in a significant decrease in their numbers, genetic diversity and gene flow between populations. For more effective protection and management of wolf populations in Europe, robust scientific evidence is crucial. This review serves as an analytical summary of the main findings from wolf population genetic studies in Europe, covering major studies from the 'pre-genomic era' and the first insights of the 'genomics era'. We analyse, summarize and discuss findings derived from analyses of three compartments of the mammalian genome with different inheritance modes: maternal (mitochondrial DNA), paternal (Y chromosome) and biparental [autosomal microsatellites and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)]. To describe large-scale trends and patterns of genetic variation in European wolf populations, we conducted a meta-analysis based on the results of previous microsatellite studies and also included new data, covering all 19 European countries for which wolf genetic information is available: Norway, Sweden, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Germany, Belarus, Russia, Italy, Croatia, Bulgaria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Greece, Spain and Portugal. We compared different indices of genetic diversity in wolf populations and found a significant spatial trend in heterozygosity across Europe from south-west (lowest genetic diversity) to north-east (highest). The range of spatial autocorrelation calculated on the basis of three characteristics of genetic diversity was 650-850 km, suggesting that the genetic diversity of a given wolf population can be influenced by populations up to 850 km away. As an important outcome of this synthesis, we

  6. Gas strategies in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Floch-Prigent, L. (Elf Aquitaine (France))

    1992-12-01

    The different factors affecting gas supply and demand in Europe are examined and the strategies considered necessary to ensure a successful European gas market in the 21st century are outlined. A number of conclusions are drawn. Even though a significant rise in the total demand for gas in Europe is forecast, there are enough sources to cover this demand. However, to think that this gas will be available at cheap conditions is an illusion. These sources are located further and further away which means that their costs will increase. Given the risks inherent in exploring, producing, transporting and marketing these reserves, all the concerned parties must be allowed an acceptable rate of return on their investment. The environmental positive assets inherent in natural gas will guarantee the industry a bright future if they can be fully exploited. New regulations must not hinder the development of new markets or the construction of new infrastructures. The transit directive already permits the softening of the rules regarding transportation; but in order for it to come into real effect there must be gas available on the market. (author)

  7. Pleistocene Paleoart of Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Bednarik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available As in Australia, Pleistocene rock art is relatively abundant in Europe, but it has so far received much more attention than the combined Ice Age paleoart of the rest of the world. Since archaeology initially rejected its authenticity for several decades, the cave art of France and Spain and the portable paleoart from various regions of Europe have been the subjects of thousands of studies. It is shown, however, that much of the published information is unreliable and subjective, and that fundamental trends in the evidence have been misunderstood. In particular, the data implies that the paleoart of the Early Upper Paleolithic, the work of robust humans such as Neanderthals, is considerably more sophisticated and developed that that of more recent times. Thus, the European paleoart demonstrates that the teleological model of cultural “evolution” is false, which is to be expected because evolution is purely dysteleological. This is confirmed by the extensive record of pre-Upper Paleolithic European paleoart, which is comprehensively reviewed in this paper.

  8. Crescimento e estado nutricional de crianças de 0-11 anos, Estado da Paraíba (nordeste brasileiro Growth and health status of children from 0 to 11 years of age in Paraíba, North-East Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Cariri Benigna

    1987-12-01

    Full Text Available Compara-se o crescimento do peso-idade e da altura-idade de 7.990 crianças de 0-11 anos, aleatoriamente selecionadas e medidas em 1981-1982 no Estado da Paraíba (nordeste do Brasil, com o de estudo global realizado no nordeste em 1974-1975, com as curvas de crescimento das referências nacional e internacional. Os resultados colocam em evidência um déficit de crescimento muito acentuado, sobretudo com relação à referência internacional. A 11 anos nítidas diferenças se manifestam: 8 ou 9 quilos para o peso, segundo o sexo, e em torno de 11 cm para a altura. Os déficits de crescimento observados poderiam ser atribuídos à grande seca de 1978-1983, em particular o déficit de crescimento do peso em função da idade. No entanto, o déficit de crescimento da altura em função da idade mostra a existência de alterações mais profundas e mais insidiosas, ao longo do crescimento, manifestando-se por má nutrição crônica, atribuída sobretudo a fatores de ordem estrutural socioeconômica. Constata-se, portanto, no decorrer da última década, que eles têm sido cada vez mais deteriorados, como testemunham as alterações do modelo de crescimento - ele mesmo exprimindo o agravamento da situação nutricional da região.Growth in terms of weight/age and height/age of 7,990 children from 0 to 11 years of age, randomly selected and measured in the State of Paraíba, North-East Brazil, in 1981 and 1982, is compared with other data collected in a global study made in the North-East during 1974-1975 and with national and international references. The results show a very remarkable deficit in growth especially when compared to the international references; clear differences are manifest at the age of 11 years: 8 to 9 kilos in weight and 11 centimeters in height, according to sex. The observed growth deficits could be due to the great drought of 1978-83, particularly in regard to the deficit of growth in weight according to age. However the

  9. Area Studies and Eastern Europe: How Eastern Europe Collapsed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Kasapović

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the first part, the author outlines the development of area studies in contemporary comparative politics, and points to their importance for the development of political science. In the second part, she examines the methodology – research design and methods – of regional comparatistics, paying particular attention to the problem of defining the region as a central category in this field of comparative politics. The third and central part is focused on the emergence of Eastern Europe as a historical-political and socio-cultural region in the course of history, especially after World War II, and on its dissolution in the processes of democratic transformation of communist regimes in the last two decades. The dissolution of Eastern Europe has resulted in restoration of a tripartite political geography in the area which it used to take up, made up of Central Europe, Southeast Europe and the proper Eastern Europe.

  10. Training in psychiatry throughout Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brittlebank, A.; Hermans, M.; Bhugra, D.; Costa, M.; Rojnic-Kuzman, M.; Fiorillo, A.; Kurimay, T.; Hanon, C.; Wasserman, D.; Gaag, R.J. van der

    2016-01-01

    Psychiatry is the largest medical specialty in Europe. Despite efforts to bring harmonisation, training in psychiatry in Europe continues to be very diverse. The Union Europeenne des Medecins Specialistes (UEMS) has issued as from 2000 a charter of requirements for the training in psychiatry with an

  11. Cancer rehabilitation indicators for Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baili, Paolo; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette; Van Hoof, Elke; Bartsch, Hans Helge; Travado, Luzia; Garami, Miklos; Di Salvo, Francesca; Micheli, Andrea; Veerus, Piret

    Little is known of cancer rehabilitation needs in Europe. EUROCHIP-3 organised a group of experts to propose a list of population-based indicators used for describing cancer rehabilitation across Europe. The aim of this study is to present and discuss these indicators. A EUROCHIP-3 expert panel

  12. The second generation in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crul, M.

    2008-01-01

    The second generation in Europe is coming of age. The first group is making the transition to the labour market. This gives us, for the first time, the opportunity to compare the position of the second generation across Europe. If we look at one group - children of Turkish immigrants - in five

  13. A Geopolitical Overview of Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berentsen, William H.

    1993-01-01

    Contends that political instability in Europe and the rise and fall of European nations has occurred regularly throughout history. Reviews European geopolitical events and trends from 1815 to the present. Maintains that the rise of a strong Central Europe with German leadership will determine the future of the European Community. (CFR)

  14. NOTES in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meining, A; Spaun, G; Fernández-Esparrach, G

    2013-01-01

    The sixth EURO-NOTES workshop (4 - 6 October 2012, Prague, Czech Republic) focused on enabling intensive scientific dialogue and interaction between surgeons, gastroenterologists, and engineers/industry representatives and discussion of the state of the practice and development of natural orifice...... transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) in Europe. In accordance with previous meetings, five working groups were formed. In 2012, emphasis was put on specific indications for NOTES and interventional endoscopy. Each group was assigned an important indication related to ongoing research in NOTES...... and interventional endoscopy: cholecystectomy and appendectomy, therapy of colorectal diseases, therapy of adenocarcinoma and neoplasia in the upper gastrointestinal tract, treating obesity, and new therapeutic approaches for achalasia. This review summarizes consensus statements of the working groups....

  15. Functional foods in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Larsen, Tino; Scholderer, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    The fact that the European markets for functional foods generally are less developed, compared to the US and the Japanese markets, has often been attributed to a restrictive and inconsistent health claim legislation in and between the European countries. With the European Parliament's second...... reading of the main principles of the harmonized regulation COM/2003/0424, this situation is about to change. This article reviews the regulatory aspects, the results of consumer research and the marketing strategies regarding the use of health claims for functional foods in Europe, and it comments...... on the lack of correspondence between the new regulation and the marketing experiences and research as regard consumer reactions to health claims....

  16. Heat Roadmap Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    David, Andrei; Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Averfalk, Helge

    2017-01-01

    The Heat Roadmap Europe (HRE) studies estimated a potential increase of the district heating (DH) share to 50% of the entire heat demand by 2050, with approximately 25–30% of it being supplied using large-scale electric heat pumps. This study builds on this potential and aims to document...... that such developments can begin now with technologies currently available. We present a database and the status of the technology and its ability of expansion to other European locations by reviewing experiences aimed at further research or application in the heating industry. This is based on a survey of the existing...... capacity of electric large-scale heat pumps with more than 1 MW thermal output, operating in European DH systems. The survey is the first database of its kind containing the technical characteristics of these heat pumps, and provides the basis for the analysis of this paper. By quantifying the heat sources...

  17. Europe without Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hein A.M. Klemann

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Middelaar, Luuk van, De passage naar Europa. Geschiedenis van een begin (Dissertatie Universiteit van Amsterdam 2009; Groningen: Historische Uitgeverij, 2009, 531 blz., ISBN 978 90 6554 236 6.De passage naar Europa [The Passage to Europe] is an interesting book – creative, original and readable, but for a doctoral dissertation it is also remarkably devoid of theory. Van Middelaar introduces various interesting notions and ideas (European ‘discourses’, ‘policy spheres’ and ‘zones of interactions’, but these remain ambiguous, and therefore rather noncommittal. The book stands out for its interpretative richness, its analytical sensitivity and its imaginative prose. It lacks an overall theoretical framework, however. It fails to link up with the wider academic debate on European integration.

  18. Rainfall Erosivity in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagos, Panos; Ballabio, Cristiano; Borrelli, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Rainfall is one the main drivers of soil erosion. The erosive force of rainfall is expressed as rainfall erosivity. Rainfall erosivity considers the rainfall amount and intensity, and is most commonly expressed as the Rfactor in the USLE model and its revised version, RUSLE. At national...... and continental levels, the scarce availability of data obliges soil erosion modellers to estimate this factor based on rainfall data with only low temporal resolution (daily, monthly, annual averages). The purpose of this study is to assess rainfall erosivity in Europe in the form of the RUSLE R-factor, based....... Gaussian Process Regression (GPR) has been used to interpolate the R-factor station values to a European rainfall erosivity map at 1 km resolution. The covariates used for the R-factor interpolation were climatic data (total precipitation, seasonal precipitation, precipitation of driest/wettest months...

  19. Safe havens in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paldam, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Eleven safe havens exist in Europe providing offshore banking and low taxes. Ten of these states are very small while Switzerland is moderately small. All 11 countries are richer than their large neighbors. It is shown that causality is from small to safe haven to wealth, and that theoretically...... equilibriums are likely to exist where a certain regulation is substantially lower in a small country than in its big neighbor. This generates a large capital inflow to the safe havens. The pool of funds that may reach the safe havens is shown to be huge. It is far in excess of the absorptive capacity...... of the safe havens, but it still explains, why they are rich. Microstates offer a veil of anonymity to funds passing through, and Switzerland offers safe storage of funds....

  20. Smart Energy Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, David; Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Lund, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    The European Union has some of the most ambitious targets to decarbonise its energy system in the coming decades. To do so, it is likely that many countries will depend on intermittent renewable energy sources such as wind and solar power. There is still a lot of uncertainty in relation...... in excess of 80% are possible in the electricity sector. Hence, this approach is one potential solution that will enable the European energy system to significantly reduce its carbon emissions. In this study, the Smart Energy System approach is applied to Europe, which achieves two key objectives: firstly...... to the integration of these resources, since the current energy system is not designed to handle intermittency on the supply side. The Smart Energy System concept is one approach which can accommodate very large penetrations of these intermittent resources, with some analysis demonstrating how penetration levels...

  1. Urban Scaling in Europe

    CERN Document Server

    Bettencourt, Luis M A

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades, in disciplines as diverse as economics, geography, and complex systems, a perspective has arisen proposing that many properties of cities are quantitatively predictable due to agglomeration or scaling effects. Using new harmonized definitions for functional urban areas, we examine to what extent these ideas apply to European cities. We show that while most large urban systems in Western Europe (France, Germany, Italy, Spain, UK) approximately agree with theoretical expectations, the small number of cities in each nation and their natural variability preclude drawing strong conclusions. We demonstrate how this problem can be overcome so that cities from different urban systems can be pooled together to construct larger datasets. This leads to a simple statistical procedure to identify urban scaling relations, which then clearly emerge as a property of European cities. We compare the predictions of urban scaling to Zipf's law for the size distribution of cities and show that while the for...

  2. Patenting Nanomedicine in Europe:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordberg, Ana

    . The main question addressed is whether it is viable and advisable the reinterpretation, reformulation or replacement of Article 53 (c) EPC – a provision restricting the patenting of medical methods. The subject is approached by reference to emerging technologies, and using nanomedicine innovation......Patenting Nanomedicine in Europe: Applying the ‘medical methods exception’ to emerging technologies is based on the authors PhD dissertation, defended in March 2014, at the University of Copenhagen. The book debates restrictions on the patentability of medical methods in European Patent Law...... as example and point of departure. Nanotechnology inventions blur the lines between patentable subject matter and what may fall under the exception from patentability. It is a good example of how in recent years, emerging technologies have been challenging the patent system and exposing the need for re...

  3. Music Therapy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Professional development and recognition is an 'old' issue in music therapy but still a relevant, complex and crucial one. Burning questions regarding professionalisation are at the forefront of most music therapy associations’ agendas across Europe and beyond, and feed back directly to the work...... of the EMTC. Considering the wider political, socio-economic, cultural and disciplinary aspects of professionalisation, different development pathways impact directly on music therapy practice, training, ethics, professional collaboration and employment conditions. Although a number of endeavours have been...... implemented regarding music therapy’s professional development and recognition in different countries, documentation and sharing of such endeavours on international level has been limited and scattered. Drawing from the EMTC’s work since the early ‘90s, as well as from colleagues’ experiences (and struggles...

  4. Disparities in multimorbidity across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Camilla Riis; Halling, Anders; Andersen-Ranberg, Karen

    2017-01-01

    education in Central and Eastern Europe compared to Northern Europe. Conclusion: Multimorbidity is highly prevalent among older Europeans, but more so among Europeans in the Eastern and Central regions. Societal initiatives to improve health care for older adults are warranted in order to decrease old age......Introduction: Europe is the continent with the highest share of older adults, many of which suffer from multiple chronic conditions (multimorbidity) and the associated negative outcomes. Health inequalities across European regions exist, but little is known about regional differences...... multimorbidity prevalence was 31.4% [30.7; 32.2]. Northern Europe had the lowest multimorbidity prevalence of 26.2% [25.2; 27.1], while Eastern and Central Europe had the highest, 35.2% [33.8; 36.5] and 34.8% [33.8; 35.9], respectively. In all regions female gender, increasing age, lower education, and lower...

  5. "europe Towards the Stars"

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-06-01

    YOUNG EUROPEANS AND THEIR TEACHERS TO OBSERVE WITH SUPER-TELESCOPE With the above title, and following the very successful events of the past two years [1], ESO again organises an "educational adventure" in 1995. It takes place within the framework of the "Third European Week for Scientific and Technological Culture", initiated and supported by the European Commission. This time ESO will invite about fifty 17-18 year old grammar school pupils with their teachers to try their skills at one of the world's most advanced astronomical telescopes. The young people are the winners of a Europe-wide astronomy contest that will take place during the summer and early autumn. The main event involves a free, week-long stay at the Headquarters of the European Southern Observatory in November this year. During this time, the participants will experience modern astronomy and astrophysics at one of the world's foremost international centres and also have the opportunity to perform remote observations via a satellite link with two telescopes at the ESO La Silla observatory in Chile. THE CONTEST This year's programme will begin with national competitions in sixteen European countries. It is devised as a contest between joint teams of pupils and teachers. Each team is expected to consist of (up to) three pupils and their teacher. They can choose between four different subjects requiring either practical or theoretical work. Each subject has a strong scientific and technological component. Here are short descriptions: At the telescope - Catching and interpreting the signals. "You observe with an existing telescope and instrument of your own choice. In your observational report you describe the scientific goal, the capability of your equipment, the execution of the observation. You discuss the observational data including an error analysis, and describe the conclusions." Technology for Science - Building an Instrument. "You build an astronomical instrument (e.g. a photometer or a

  6. Iron deficiency in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercberg, S; Preziosi, P; Galan, P

    2001-04-01

    In Europe, iron deficiency is considered to be one of the main nutritional deficiency disorders affecting large fractions of the population, particularly such physiological groups as children, menstruating women and pregnant women. Some factors such as type of contraception in women, blood donation or minor pathological blood loss (haemorrhoids, gynaecological bleeding...) considerably increase the difficulty of covering iron needs. Moreover, women, especially adolescents consuming low-energy diets, vegetarians and vegans are at high risk of iron deficiency. Although there is no evidence that an absence of iron stores has any adverse consequences, it does indicate that iron nutrition is borderline, since any further reduction in body iron is associated with a decrease in the level of functional compounds such as haemoglobin. The prevalence of iron-deficient anaemia has slightly decreased in infants and menstruating women. Some positive factors may have contributed to reducing the prevalence of iron-deficiency anaemia in some groups of population: the use of iron-fortified formulas and iron-fortified cereals; the use of oral contraceptives and increased enrichment of iron in several countries; and the use of iron supplements during pregnancy in some European countries. It is possible to prevent and control iron deficiency by counseling individuals and families about sound iron nutrition during infancy and beyond, and about iron supplementation during pregnancy, by screening persons on the basis of their risk for iron deficiency, and by treating and following up persons with presumptive iron deficiency. This may help to reduce manifestations of iron deficiency and thus improve public health. Evidence linking iron status with risk of cardiovascular disease or cancer is unconvincing and does not justify changes in food fortification or medical practice, particularly because the benefits of assuring adequate iron intake during growth and development are well established

  7. Adaptation to the Impacts of Climate Extremes in Central Europe: A Case Study in a Rural Area in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Stojanov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this paper is to analyse households’ adaptation measures to the impacts of repeated extreme weather events, specifically floods, which belong amongst the most serious manifestation of ongoing climate change in Europe. The case study focuses on a rural area in the north-east part of the Czech Republic, in the catchment basin of the Bečva River. A total of 605 households were addressed within the framework of the questionnaire survey. On the basis of the conducted research, we determined that the total amount of adaptation measures adopted by those dwelling in residential homes within the investigated catchment area was relatively low. In contrast, however, one of the most important adaptation measures—house elevation—was applied by 46.94% of the houses (up to 1 m and by 21.16% houses (elevated more than 1 m respectively. We also found that the amount and scope of adaptation measures realized by households were influenced by certain socio-demographic factors of the inhabitants. The most statistically significant factors included households with more residents or families with more children living in the household, as well as those with a higher level of education. Flood experience, the level of damage, and individual flood risk perception also played an important role.

  8. Provenancing Archaeological Wool Textiles from Medieval Northern Europe by Light Stable Isotope Analysis (δ13C, δ15N, δ2H).

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Holstein, Isabella C C; Walton Rogers, Penelope; Craig, Oliver E; Penkman, Kirsty E H; Newton, Jason; Collins, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the origin of archaeological wool textiles preserved by anoxic waterlogging from seven medieval archaeological deposits in north-western Europe (c. 700-1600 AD), using geospatial patterning in carbon (δ13C), nitrogen (δ15N) and non-exchangeable hydrogen (δ2H) composition of modern and ancient sheep proteins. δ13C, δ15N and δ2H values from archaeological wool keratin (n = 83) and bone collagen (n = 59) from four sites were interpreted with reference to the composition of modern sheep wool from the same regions. The isotopic composition of wool and bone collagen samples clustered strongly by settlement; inter-regional relationships were largely parallel in modern and ancient samples, though landscape change was also significant. Degradation in archaeological wool samples, examined by elemental and amino acid composition, was greater in samples from Iceland (Reykholt) than in samples from north-east England (York, Newcastle) or northern Germany (Hessens). A nominal assignment approach was used to classify textiles into local/non-local at each site, based on maximal estimates of isotopic variability in modern sheep wool. Light element stable isotope analysis provided new insights into the origins of wool textiles, and demonstrates that isotopic provenancing of keratin preserved in anoxic waterlogged contexts is feasible. We also demonstrate the utility of δ2H analysis to understand the location of origin of archaeological protein samples.

  9. The ASTARTE Paleotsunami Deposits data base - a web-based reference for tsunami research around Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Martini, Paolo Marco; Orefice, Simone; Patera, Antonio; Paris, Raphael; Terrinha, Pedro; Noiva, Joao; Hunt, James; Pantosti, Daniela

    2016-04-01

    EU project ASTARTE aims at developing a higher level of tsunami hazard assessment in the North East Atlantic and Mediterranean (NEAM) region by a combination of field work, experimental work, numerical modeling and technical development. The project is a cooperative work of 26 institutes from 16 countries and links together the description of past tsunamigenic events, the characterization of tsunami sources, the calculation of the impact of such events, and the development of adequate resilience strategies (www.astarte.eu). Within ASTARTE a web-based data base on Paleotsunami Deposits in the NEAM areas is being created that will be the future reference source for this kind of research in Europe. The aim is to integrate every existing scientific reference on the topic and update on new entries every six months, hosting information and detailed data that are crucial, e.g for tsunami modeling. At present 127 sites with evidence for at least one paleotsunami deposit have been collected. A relational database managed by ArcGIS for Desktop 10.3 software has been implemented to allow all partners to collaborate through a common platform for archiving and exchanging data and interpretations, such as paleotsunami type of evidence (sediment, blocks, geomorphological signature, etc), geometric characteristics (thickness, depth, etc), but also age and dating method and type of analysis supporting the tsunami interpretation. Moreover, information on the type of the site (natural or artificial exposure, exploratory trench, hand or engine core, etc), on its geomorphic setting (coastal lake, marsh, fluvial plain, offshore, etc) and on its elevation and distance from the present shoreline are provided. One of the final goals of the project is the public sharing of the archived datasets through a web-based map service that will allow to visualize, question, analyze, and interpret all datasets. The interactive map service will be hosted by ArcGIS Online and will deploy the cloud

  10. Atmospheric pollution in North-East Nigeria: Measurement and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bull. Chem. Soc. Ethiop. 2001, 15(2). 110. Health effects as thyroid enlargement, lung cancer and pneumoconiosis (lung disease due to inhalation of hard metals from welding fumes) have long been associated with prolonged exposure to polluted air. In addition, known cancer-producing agents such as benzo-pyrene are.

  11. Business risks in the SMEs from the North East region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leronard Ovidiu TURCU

    2014-04-01

    The vulnerabilities of the SMEs are mainly linked to the decreasing available resources, to the excessive dependence on the entrepreneurs’ financial decisions and to the changing business environment. In order to revive the SMEs sector in Romania there is a need for more rigorous approaches, based on the implementation of business strategies.

  12. Some aspects of climate variability in the north east Ethiopian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To date little work has been done on climate reconstruction in Tigray and Wollo, however, a number of ongoing studies in the area using palaeosoil analysis, archaeological techniques and lake level reconstruction will help reveal the magnitude of past climate variability in the region. On recent time scales, rainfall over ...

  13. [Children enteroparasitosis in north east Argentine urban area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Alicia M F; Oscherov, Elena B; Palladino, Alberto C; Bar, Anibal R

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the importance of enteroparasitosis in a young urban population. The relationship between enteroparasitosis in this population and biological and environmental conditions was established for 113 infants between 0 and 14 years. Serial stool samples were analyzed and Graham tests were performed in each infant. The degree of nutrition of each infant was also assessed. Environmental data were collected via semi-structured surveys. Soil samples were tested to determine the degree of soil contamination. The following species were identified: Blastocystis hominis, Enterobius vermicularis, coccidios, Giardia intestinalis, hookworms, Strongyloides stercoralis, Trichuris trichura, Ascaris lumbricoides, Entamoeba coli, Endolimax nana and Taenia sp. Children infection prevalence was 73.5%. The frequency of enteroparasitosis was largest in the population from 3 to 8 years. The homes of the children analyzed were brick houses with tin roof and access to tap water. A 79.5% of these houses had bathrooms. The remaining used outdoors latrines. In 95.5% of these houses, the residents lived with one or more dogs and cats. The soil collected from nine houses was contaminated with infectious forms of Toxocara canis and ancilostomideos. The relationship between parasitosis and latrines and overcrowding was verified. Five cases of malnutrition were detected (4.4%). The relevance of physical and cultural factors in relation to enteric parasitosis suggests that the pharmacological treatment should be accompanied with preventive measures regarding hygiene and proper elimination of human and pet faeces.

  14. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in North-east Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tajana Pastuović

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this 5-year study was to determine the frequency and antibiotic susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA-related infections at Osijek Clinical Hospital. Materials and methods. A total of 1987 staphylococci-infected clinical isolates were collected and analysed at the Microbiology Department of the Public Health Institute of Osijek-Baranja County. Results. Between 2008 and 2012, the average rate of MRSA-related infections in staphylococci-infected patients was 27.4%. The proportion of MRSArelated infections on all Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus isolates from clinical specimens showed a decreasing trend, from 32.6% in 2008 to 25.5% in 2012. MRSA-related infections were mostly detected in wound swabs (50.6% and aspirates (28.8% of patients hospitalized in the surgical (49.8% and intensive care units (27.9%. MRSA-related infection showed an increase compared to S. aureus-infections in samples of wounds and aspirates in 2011 and 2012 (57.9%/34.9% and 35.2%/16.3%, respectively. The majority of strains of MRSA-related infections were resistant to several antibiotics, including erythromycin and clindamycin, where susceptibility were less than 10%. All MRSA isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, teicoplanin and linezolid. Therefore, antibiotic therapies for MRSA infections include vancomycin, teicoplanin and linezolid, but microbiological diagnostics need to be performed in order to know when the use of glycopeptides and oxazolidinones is indicated. Conclusion. Our results suggest that appropriate prevention measures, combined with the more rational use of antibiotics are crucial to reduce the spread of MRSA-related infection in healthcare settings. Further monitoring is necessary of the incidence and antibiotic susceptibility of MRSA-related infections in our community.

  15. Assessment of water quality of Obueyinomo River, Ovia North East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to assess the water quality of Obueyinomo River using water quality index. Ambient and water temperatures were determined in-situ while total dissolved solids (TDS), total suspended solids (TSS), total solids (TS), turbidity, pH, conductivity, hardness, alkalinity, dissolved Oxygen (DO), ...

  16. HEALTH IMPLICATION OF CHILD MARRIAGE IN NORTH-EAST NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abimbola Adebimpe ALLEN

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Marriage at its right time and with the right and self-selected person is one of the best things that can happen to a man. Unfortunately, as glamorous such a day of espousal would have been, child marriage has made it sour for child brides as most of them are forced into it, particularly in their mid-teens; thereby aborting beautiful and achievable life goals and future ambitions. This paper examines the factors inducing child marriage in the most endemic location in the country North-Eastern Nigeria and the health implications on victims. Primary data i.e. questionnaire andsecondary data from Nigerian Demographic and Health Survey (NDHS, 2008 were used. A Focus Group Discussion (FGD was also held with a group of child wives, all of who are less than 18 years. Results show that povertyand limited educational attainment are the two main cause of child marriage in the study resulting to different health problems. Recommendations were made to curb this infamous practice in Northeastern Nigeria as is a globally acceptable fact that delaying marriage until a lady is physically and physiologically mature improves her health.

  17. Soil Health Management under Hill Agroecosystem of North East India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Saha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The deterioration of soil quality/health is the combined result of soil fertility, biological degradation (decline of organic matter, biomass C, decrease in activity and diversity of soil fauna, increase in erodibility, acidity, and salinity, and exposure of compact subsoil of poor physicochemical properties. Northeast India is characterized by high soil acidity/Al+3 toxicity, heavy soil, and carbon loss, severe water scarcity during most parts of year though it is known as high rainfall area. The extent of soil and nutrient transfer, causing environmental degradation in North eastern India, has been estimated to be about 601 million tones of soil, and 685.8, 99.8, 511.1, 22.6, 14.0, 57.1, and 43.0 thousand tones of N, P, K, Mn, Zn, Ca, and Mg, respectively. Excessive deforestation coupled with shifting cultivation practices have resulted in tremendous soil loss (200 t/ha/yr, poor soil physical health in this region. Studies on soil erodibility characteristics under various land use systems in Northeastern Hill (NEH Region depicted that shifting cultivation had the highest erosion ratio (12.46 and soil loss (30.2–170.2 t/ha/yr, followed by conventional agriculture system (10.42 and 5.10–68.20 t/ha/yr, resp.. The challenge before us is to maintain equilibrium between resources and their use to have a stable ecosystem. Agroforestry systems like agri-horti-silvi-pastoral system performed better over shifting cultivation in terms of improvement in soil organic carbon; SOC (44.8%, mean weight diameter; MWD (29.4%, dispersion ratio (52.9%, soil loss (99.3%, soil erosion ratio (45.9%, and in-situ soil moisture conservation (20.6% under the high rainfall, moderate to steep slopes, and shallow soil depth conditions. Multipurpose trees (MPTs also played an important role on soil rejuvenation. Michelia oblonga is reported to be a better choice as bioameliorant for these soils as continuous leaf litter and root exudates improved soil physical behaviour and SOC considerably. Considering the present level of resource degradation, some resource conservation techniques like zero tillage/minimum tillage, hedge crop, mulching, cover crop need due attention for building up of organic matter status for sustaining soil health.

  18. Ectopic Pregnancy in Bauchi, North-East Nigeria | Dattijo | Tropical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: During the period under review, a total of 19,412 deliveries were recorded in the hospital and 119 ectopic pregnancies were managed. This gives an incidence of 0.61%. Majority of the patients were 30 years and below with mean age of 26.8 years. The common clinical features at presentation were abdominal pain ...

  19. Arrow injuries in North East Nigeria | Madziga | West African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... mortalités (4,1%) préopératoire. Blessure d'infection est une complication la plus fréquente chez des patients qui se sont présenté bien trop tard. Améliorations dans des conditions socioéconomiques général dans la région et une législation sur l'utilisation de ces armes pourraient diminuer la fréquence de ces blessures.

  20. [Euthanasia outside Europe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julesz, Máté

    2014-08-10

    The passive form of euthanasia is legalized almost in every civilized country. Its active form is not a generally accepted legal institution. In Europe, active euthanasia is legalized only in The Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg and Switzerland. In Australia, the Act on the Rights of the Terminally Ill of 1995 legalized the institution of assisted suicide, which is not identical to active euthanasia. The difference lies in the fact that legalized active euthanasia means that the author of a murder is not punishable (under certain circumstances), whilst assisted suicide is not about murder, rather about suicide. In the first case, the patient is killed on his or her request by someone else. In the second case, the patient himself or herself executes the act of self-killing (by the assistance of a healthcare worker). In Australia, the institution of assisted suicide was repealed in 1997. Assisted suicide is legal in four USA member states: in Vermont, Washington, Montana and Oregon. In Uruguay, the active form of euthanasia has been legal since 1932.

  1. Inequality, Unemployment and Contemporary Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Amartya

    1997-01-01

    Unemployment has social costs such as psychological harm, social exclusion, family breakdown, and loss of political voice. It can exacerbate inequality and technological conservatism. Reducing unemployment would contribute to solving many of Europe's social ills. (SK)

  2. The anthropological demography of Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernardi, Laura; Hutter, Inge

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces a collection of related research studies on the anthropological demography of Europe. Anthropological demography is a specialty within demography that uses anthropological theory and methods to provide a better understanding of demographic phenomena in current and past

  3. Mapping earthworm communities in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, M.; Orgiazzi, A.; Gardi, C.; Römbke, J.; Jansch, S.; Keith, A.; Neilson, R.; Boag, B.; Schmidt, O.; Murchie, A.K.; Blackshaw, R.P.; Pérès, G.; Cluzeau, D.; Guernion, M.; Briones, M.J.I.; Rodeiro, J.; Pineiro, R.; Diaz Cosin, D.J.; Sousa, J.P.; Suhadolc, M.; Kos, I.; Krogh, P.H.; Faber, J.H.; Mulder, C.; Bogte, J.J.; Wijnen, van H.J.; Schouten, A.J.; Zwart, de D.

    2016-01-01

    Existing data sets on earthworm communities in Europe were collected, harmonized, collated, modelled and depicted on a soil biodiversity map. Digital Soil Mapping was applied using multiple regressions relating relatively low density earthworm community data to soil characteristics, land use,

  4. Bat Rabies Surveillance in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schatz, J.; Fooks, A. R.; McElhinney, L.

    2013-01-01

    Rabies is the oldest known zoonotic disease and was also the first recognized bat associated infection in humans. To date, four different lyssavirus species are the causative agents of rabies in European bats: the European Bat Lyssaviruses type 1 and 2 (EBLV-1, EBLV-2), the recently discovered...... putative new lyssavirus species Bokeloh Bat Lyssavirus (BBLV) and the West Caucasian Bat Virus (WCBV). Unlike in the new world, bat rabies cases in Europe are comparatively less frequent, possibly as a result of varying intensity of surveillance. Thus, the objective was to provide an assessment of the bat...... rabies surveillance data in Europe, taking both reported data to the WHO Rabies Bulletin Europe and published results into account. In Europe, 959 bat rabies cases were reported to the RBE in the time period 1977–2010 with the vast majority characterized as EBLV-1, frequently isolated in the Netherlands...

  5. On the Move towards "Europe"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne

    2006-01-01

    This article explores the link between ideas of mobility in European policy-making and the "Europeanization of Europe". A critical approach to policy analysis of mobility related polices is used as an entrance to understanding the role of ideas of mobilities in the ongoing formation of ‘Europe......'. It is demonstrated how ideas of mobility appear as an emerging story-line within European transport policy-making. In connecting policy analysis with policy discourses, story-lines and discourse coalitions within the field of European transport policy, the article demonstrates how mobility within the Euro......-polity becomes closely connected to policy discourses of e.g. Network Europe, freedom, zero-friction Europe and in particular the promotion of the internal market, thus linking intimately to the European project. From this position, ideas of mobility add to the formation of a unified European territory as well...

  6. HARMONIZED EUROPE OR EUROPEAN HARMONY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosmin Marinescu

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent evolutions in Europe raise questions on the viability of the present economic and social model that defines the European construction project. In this paper, the author will try to explain the viability of institutional European model that sticks between free market mechanisms and protectionism. The main challenge for the EU is about the possibility to bring together the institutional convergence and the welfare for all Europeans. This is the result of the view, still dominant, of European politics elite, according to which institutional harmonization is the solution of a more dynamic and prosper Europe. But, economic realities convince us that, more and more, a harmonized, standardized Europe is not necessarily identical with a Europe of harmony and social cooperation. If „development through integration” seems to be harmonization through „institutional transplant”, how could then be the European model one sufficiently wide open to market, which creates the prosperity so long waited for by new member countries?

  7. A significant time for Europe

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    European Science ministers have unaminously approved a "Resolution on establishing a European area of research and innovation", a good start for scientific research to be co-ordinated at an Europe-wide level (1/2 page).

  8. Where Europe meets Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Data from a portion of the imagery acquired by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera during 2000-2002 were combined to create this cloud-free natural-color mosaic of southwestern Europe and northwestern Morocco and Algeria. The image extends from 48oN, 16oW in the northwest to 32oN, 8oE in the southeast. It is displayed in Albers conic equal-area projection (a projection which is frequently used for equal-area maps of regions that are predominantly east-west in extent). From the northeast, the image traverses a portion of the Swiss Alps (partially snow-covered) and a small part of Italy's Po Valley. The northern portion of the image also includes the western coast of France and much of southern and southwestern France's undulating terrain, which continues until reaching the hills of the Pyrenees. The Pyrenees act as the natural frontier to the Iberian Peninsula -- a landmass comprised of Spain and Portugal. The Peninsular landscapes are extremely varied, with some almost desert-like, others green and fertile. About half of Spain is situated atop a high plain, known as the Central Plateau, and many mountain ranges, rivers, geological basement rock and vegetation types are found across this great plateau. The largest alluvial plain is Andalusia in the south, where the valley of the Guadalquivir River is shut in by mountain ranges on every side except the southwest, where the valley descends to the Atlantic. The islands of Mallorca, Menorca and Ibiza are Spanish territories in the western Mediterranean. At the Strait of Gibralter, Spain and Morocco very nearly kiss, and Morocco appears relatively verdant along its northern coastal corner. The rugged Atlas Mountain ranges traverse northern Algeria and Morocco. The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously from pole to pole, and every 9 days views the entire globe between 82 degrees north and 82 degrees south latitude. This data product was

  9. Training in psychiatry throughout Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittlebank, Andrew; Hermans, Marc; Bhugra, Dinesh; Pinto da Costa, Mariana; Rojnic-Kuzman, Martina; Fiorillo, Andrea; Kurimay, Tamas; Hanon, Cecile; Wasserman, Danuta; van der Gaag, Rutger Jan

    2016-03-01

    Psychiatry is the largest medical specialty in Europe. Despite efforts to bring harmonisation, training in psychiatry in Europe continues to be very diverse. The Union Européenne des Médecins Spécialistes (UEMS) has issued as from 2000 a charter of requirements for the training in psychiatry with an additional European Framework for Competencies in Psychiatry in 2009. Yet these have not been implemented throughout Europe. In this paper, the diversity in training throughout Europe is approached from different angles: the cultural differences between countries with regards to how mental health care is considered and founded on, the cultural differences between people throughout Europe in all states. The position of psychotherapy is emphasised. What once was the cornerstone of psychiatry as medical specialty seems to have become a neglected area. Seeing the patient with mental health problems within his cultural context is important, but considering him within his family context. The purpose of any training is enabling the trainee to gain the knowledge and acquire the competencies necessary to become a well-equipped professional is the subject of the last paragraph in which trainees consider their position and early career psychiatrists look back to see whether what they were trained in matches with what they need in the working situation. Common standard for training and certification are a necessity within Europe, for the benefit of the profession of psychiatrist but also for patient safety. UEMS is advised to join forces with the Council of National Psychiatric Associations (NPAs) within the EPA and trainings and early career psychiatrist, to discuss with the users what standards should be implemented in all European countries and how a European board examination could ensure professional quality of psychiatrists throughout the continent.

  10. Cost of depression in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobocki, Patrik; Jönsson, Bengt; Angst, Jules; Rehnberg, Clas

    2006-06-01

    Depression is one of the most disabling diseases, and causes a significant burden both to the individual and to society. WHO data suggests that depression causes 6% of the burden of all diseases in Europe in terms of disability adjusted life years (DALYs). Yet, the knowledge of the economic impact of depression has been relatively little researched in Europe. The present study aims at estimating the total cost of depression in Europe based on published epidemiologic and economic evidence. A model was developed to combine epidemiological and economic data on depression in Europe to estimate the cost. The model was populated with data collected from extensive literature reviews of the epidemiology and economic burden of depression in Europe. The cost data was calculated as annual cost per patient, and epidemiologic data was reported as 12-month prevalence estimates. National and international statistics for the model were retrieved from the OECD and Eurostat databases. The aggregated annual cost estimates were presented in Euro for 2004. In 28 countries with a population of 466 million, at least 21 million were affected by depression. The total annual cost of depression in Europe was estimated at Euro 118 billion in 2004, which corresponds to a cost of Euro 253 per inhabitant. Direct costs alone totalled dollar 42 billion, comprised of outpatient care (Euro 22 billion), drug cost (Euro 9 billion) and hospitalization (Euro 10 billion). Indirect costs due to morbidity and mortality were estimated at Euro 76 billion. This makes depression the most costly brain disorder in Europe, accounting for 33% of the total cost. The cost of depression corresponds to 1% of the total economy of Europe (GDP). Our cost results are in good agreement with previous research findings. The cost estimates in the present study are based on model simulations for countries where no data was available. The predictability of our model is limited to the accuracy of the input data employed. As

  11. Control of bluetongue in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zientara, Stéphan; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, José Manuel

    2013-07-26

    Since 1998, bluetongue virus (BTV) serotypes 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 9, 11 and 16 have spread throughout Europe. In 2006, BTV serotype 8 (BTV-8) emerged unexpectedly in northern Europe throughout a region including Belgium, France, Germany, Luxembourg and the Netherlands. In the following year, it spread rapidly throughout the rest of Europe. In 2008, two more BTV serotypes were detected in northern Europe: BTV-6 in the Netherlands and Germany and BTV-11 in Belgium. The European incursion of BTV has caused considerable economic losses, comprising not only direct losses from mortality and reduced production but also indirect losses because of ensuing bans on trade of ruminants between BTV-infected and non-infected areas. Given the significance of the disease, all affected countries have established control and eradication measures, which have evolved with the availability of detection and prevention tools such as vaccines. Before 2005, BTV vaccination campaigns in affected countries used only modified live virus vaccines and only sheep were vaccinated, except in Italy, where all susceptible domestic ruminant species were included. After 2005, inactivated vaccines became available and cattle and goats were included in the vaccination campaigns. This review looks at how bluetongue disease has evolved in Europe and how effective vaccination strategies have been. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Nuclear cardiology practice and associated radiation doses in Europe: results of the IAEA Nuclear Cardiology Protocols Study (INCAPS) for the 27 European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Oliver; Pascual, Thomas N B; Mercuri, Mathew; Acampa, Wanda; Burchert, Wolfgang; Flotats, Albert; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Kitsiou, Anastasia; Knuuti, Juhani; Underwood, S Richard; Vitola, João V; Mahmarian, John J; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Better, Nathan; Rehani, Madan M; Kashyap, Ravi; Dondi, Maurizio; Paez, Diana; Einstein, Andrew J

    2016-04-01

    Nuclear cardiology is widely used to diagnose coronary artery disease and to guide patient management, but data on current practices, radiation dose-related best practices, and radiation doses are scarce. To address these issues, the IAEA conducted a worldwide study of nuclear cardiology practice. We present the European subanalysis. In March 2013, the IAEA invited laboratories across the world to document all SPECT and PET studies performed in one week. The data included age, gender, weight, radiopharmaceuticals, injected activities, camera type, positioning, hardware and software. Radiation effective dose was calculated for each patient. A quality score was defined for each laboratory as the number followed of eight predefined best practices with a bearing on radiation exposure (range of quality score 0 - 8). The participating European countries were assigned to regions (North, East, South, and West). Comparisons were performed between the four European regions and between Europe and the rest-of-the-world (RoW). Data on 2,381 European patients undergoing nuclear cardiology procedures in 102 laboratories in 27 countries were collected. A cardiac SPECT study was performed in 97.9 % of the patients, and a PET study in 2.1 %. The average effective dose of SPECT was 8.0 ± 3.4 mSv (RoW 11.4 ± 4.3 mSv; P cardiology is lower and the average quality score is higher than in the RoW. There is regional variation in effective dose in relation to the best practice quality score. A possible reason for the differences between Europe and the RoW could be the safety culture fostered by actions under the Euratom directives and the implementation of diagnostic reference levels. Stress-only imaging and weight-adjusted activity might be targets for optimization of European nuclear cardiology practice.

  13. The ASTARTE Paleotsunami and Mass Transport Deposits data bases - web-based references for tsunami and submarine landslide research around Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Martini, Paolo Marco; Patera, Antonio; Orefice, Simone; Paris, Raphael; Völker, David; Lastras, Galderic; Terrinha, Pedro; Noiva, João; Smedile, Alessandra; Pantosti, Daniela; Hunt, James; Gutscher, Marc-Andre; Migeon, Sébastien; Papadopoulos, Gerassimos; Triantafyllou, Ioanna; Yalciner, Ahmet C.

    2017-04-01

    EU project ASTARTE aims at developing a higher level of tsunami hazard assessment in the North East Atlantic, Mediterranean and Connected seas (NEAM) region by a combination of field work, experimental work, numerical modeling and technical development. The project is a cooperative work of 26 institutes from 16 countries and links together the description of past tsunamigenic events, the identification and characterization of tsunami sources, the calculation of the impact of such events, and the development of adequate resilience and risks mitigation strategies (www.astarte.eu). Within ASTARTE two web-based data bases on Paleotsunami and Mass Transport Deposits in the NEAM areas were created with the purpose to be the future information repositories for tsunami research in Europe.The aim is to integrate every existing official scientific reports and peer reviewed papers on these topics and update on new entries every 6-12 months, hosting information and detailed data, that are crucial e.g for tsunami modeling. A relational database managed by ArcGIS for Desktop 10.x software has been implemented. One of the final goals of the project is the public sharing of the archived datasets through a web-based map service that will allow visualizing, querying, analyzing, and interpreting all datasets. The interactive map service will be hosted by ArcGIS Online and will deploy the cloud capabilities of the portal. Any interested users will be able to access the online GIS resources through any Internet browser or specific apps that run on desktop machines, smartphones, or tablets and will be able to use the analytical tools, key tasks, and workflows of the service.We will present the data bases structure and topics as well as their ArcGIS Online version. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n° 603839 (Project ASTARTE - Assessment, Strategy and Risk Reduction for

  14. Wood-pastures of Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plieninger, Tobias; Hartel, Tibor; Martín-López, Berta

    2015-01-01

    Wood-pastures are archetypes of High Nature Value Farmlands in Europe and hold exceptional ecological, social, and cultural values. Yet, wood-pastures have been through a sharp decline all over Europe, mainly due to processes of agricultural intensification and abandonment. Recently, wood......-pastures have found increasing attention from conservation science and policy across Europe. In this paper we (i) perform the first pan-European assessment of wood-pastures, considering individual countries and biogeographic regions, (ii) present the ecological and social-cultural values of a wide diversity......). They are distributed across all biogeographical regions, but more abundantly in the Mediterranean and Eastern European countries. Substantial ecological values are revealed in terms of landscape level biodiversity, ecosystem dynamics, and genetic resources. Social-cultural values are related to aesthetic values...

  15. Integrated landscape initiatives in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García-Martín, María; Bieling, Claudia; Hart, Abigail

    2016-01-01

    Landscapes are linked to human well-being in a multitude of ways, some of which are challenged by global market forces and traditional management approaches. In response to this situation there has been a rise in local initiatives to sustain the values of landscape. The aim of this paper...... is to provide a systematic analysis of the spectrum of these initiatives in Europe in terms of patterns of organisation, participants, resources, problems, and landscape values addressed. This review collects examples of integrated landscape initiatives from all over Europe through systematic internet key word...... searches and canvassing of European umbrella organisations; followed by an online survey of representatives from the identified initiatives (n??=??71). Our results show that the most relevant characteristics of integrated landscape initiatives in Europe are: a holistic approach to landscape management...

  16. Mapping earthworm communities in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rutgers, Michiel; Orgiazzi, Alberto; Gardi, Ciro

    Existing data sets on earthworm communities in Europe were collected, harmonized, modelled and depicted on a soil biodiversity map of Europe. Digital Soil Mapping was applied using multiple regressions relating relatively low density earthworm community data to soil characteristics, land use......, vegetation and climate factors (covariables) with a greater spatial resolution. Statistically significant relationships were used to build habitat-response models for constructing earthworm maps with abundance, species richness, and diversity data. While a good number of environmental predictors were...... significant in our multiple regressions, geographical factors alone seem to be less relevant than climatic factors. Despite differing sampling protocols, land use and geological history were the most relevant factors determining the demography and diversity of the earthworms across Europe. Case studies from...

  17. Science in Society in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejlgaard, Niels; Bloch, Carter Walter

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a special section of Science and Public Policy on science in society in Europe. Based on extensive data collected for the Monitoring Policy and Research Activities on Science in Society in Europe (MASIS) project, contributions to this special section explore pertinent issues...... related to the location, role and responsibility of science across EU member states and associated countries. By developing analytical typologies and classifying countries, the collection of papers provides a novel and detailed picture of Europe. It reveals considerable variation regarding...... the interactions of science and society at the national level, and it offers a platform for international learning. The identification of patterns and trends concerning the place of science in society may also feed into emerging European discussions about ‘responsible research and innovation’....

  18. The Social Economy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spear, Roger

    2010-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the social economy in Europe. Drawing on the most recent statistical data, the paper examines the social economy’s size in different European countries, and current trends and challenges in Europe; it also reviews its status and political context at the EU level....... The paper draws on the CIRIEC (2007) study of the Social Economy in the European Union (see: http://www2.ulg.ac.be/ciriec/en/), and the contribution on social enterprise draws on the work of the EMES Network (see www.emes.net)....

  19. Languages at Work in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berlin has led a string of European university cooperation projects, launched from within the membership of the Conseil Européen pour les Langues / European Language Council. The overarching aim of these projects has been to map out the needs for foreign language and intercultural communication skills......Foreign language competences are vital not only for the individual European citizen, but in a more encompassing perspective, for mobility, socio-economic development and the competitiveness of Europe in a global world. - For more than a decade, Professor Wolfgang Mackiewicz of the Freie Universität...

  20. The Inclusive Education in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzano-García, Beatriz; Fernández, María Tomé

    2016-01-01

    One of the phenomena that is of most concern to educational policy in Europe is immigration due to the fact that this is the source of new educational needs. This research looks at how European educational legislation deals with this topic. For this intercultural values that make inclusive education will be evaluated, we will analyze intercultural…

  1. Heat Roadmap Europe 3 (STRATEGO)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, David; Hansen, Kenneth; Drysdale, David

    Kingdom. These countries vary considerably in terms of population, climate, resources, and energy supply, so the key results, conclusions, and recommendations presented in this report can inform national energy policy across all of Europe. The results from this study indicate that a total investment...

  2. Prevalence of microcephaly in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morris, Joan K; Rankin, Judith; Garne, Ester

    2016-01-01

    .01). CONCLUSIONS: EUROCAT could detect increases in the prevalence of microcephaly from the Zika virus of a similar magnitude to those observed in Brazil. Because of the rarity of microcephaly and discrepant diagnostic criteria, however, the smaller increases expected in Europe would probably not be detected...

  3. Renal replacement therapy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noordzij, Marlies; Kramer, Anneke; Abad Diez, José M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This article provides a summary of the 2011 ERA-EDTA Registry Annual Report (available at www.era-edta-reg.org). METHODS: Data on renal replacement therapy (RRT) for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) from national and regional renal registries in 30 countries in Europe and bordering the ...

  4. Currency substitution in Eastern Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aarle, B.; Budina, N.

    1995-01-01

    Monetary instability during the transition process from a command economy to a market economy has induced a considerable increase in currency substitution in Eastern Europe. Currency substitution itself affects monetary stability since it reduces the stability of velocity. This paper investigates

  5. Computer Science Research in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-29

    Kuka sold about half that number. Volks- " properties of concurrent processes. wagen has approximately 1000 robots of Descriptions of concurrent...Europe are ASEA in Sweden and measured points as vertices. Polyhedra Kuka in West Germany. Two major auto- can be used to approximate any shape. 10

  6. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-13

    research at the Arts Lab, only simulate the structure of animal (and human) behavior, whereas intelligent computers, and therefore android robots...sophisticated studio for the production of HDTV programs. The purpose is to allow producers from all over Europe to gain experience with the new medium

  7. Do Not Track for Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuiderveen Borgesius, F.J.; McDonald, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Online tracking is the subject of heated debates. In Europe, policy debates focus on the e-Privacy Directive, which requires firms to obtain the consumer’s consent for the use of tracking cookies and similar technologies. A common complaint about the Directive is that clicking "I agree" to hundreds

  8. Mortality after surgery in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pearse, Rupert M; Moreno, Rui P; Bauer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Clinical outcomes after major surgery are poorly described at the national level. Evidence of heterogeneity between hospitals and health-care systems suggests potential to improve care for patients but this potential remains unconfirmed. The European Surgical Outcomes Study was an international...... study designed to assess outcomes after non-cardiac surgery in Europe....

  9. JPRS Report Science & Technology, Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-09

    cine , which, on the other hand, has proven its efficacy. This question can only be addressed in the light of economic data. The population to be...April 1992 WEST EUROPE 11 [Text] Houses whose electricity and heating demands are covered by sunlight are no longer Utopia today. Professor Adolf

  10. Living Apart Together in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. van Aubel; F.K.M. van Nispen tot Pannerden (Frans)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractA couple of years ago Joschka Fischer, the German minister of Foreign Affairs articulated his European dream, calling for a specification of the 'Finalität', that is the ultimate goal of the process of European integration. It came at a moment that Europe is challenged by two conflicting

  11. Citizenship norms in Eastern Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coffé, H.R.; Lippe, T. van der

    2010-01-01

    Research on Eastern Europe stresses the weakness of its civil society and the lack of political and social involvement, neglecting the question: What do people themselves think it means to be a good citizen? This study looks at citizens’ definitions of good citizenship in Poland, Slovenia, the Czech

  12. Citizenship Norms in Eastern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffe, Hilde; van der Lippe, Tanja

    2010-01-01

    Research on Eastern Europe stresses the weakness of its civil society and the lack of political and social involvement, neglecting the question: What do people themselves think it means to be a good citizen? This study looks at citizens' definitions of good citizenship in Poland, Slovenia, the Czech Republic and Hungary, using 2002 European Social…

  13. Competitive Think Tanks in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelstrup, Jesper Dahl

    the view that changing policy environments results in convergence of think tank strategies across Europe. As a perspective the paper shows that competitive think tanks do have a high average impact pr. staff on both mass and new media compared to other types of think tanks. This may indicate...

  14. Allergology in Europe, the blueprint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Monchy, J. G.; Demoly, P.; Akdis, C. A.; Cardona, V.; Papadopoulos, N. G.; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P.; Gayraud, J.

    2013-01-01

    The number of patients with allergic diseases in Europe, and thus relevant demand for health care, is continuously increasing. In this EAACI-UEMS position paper, a rationale is given for the medical specialty of allergology. General practitioners and general paediatricians usually cannot elucidate

  15. Current Migration Movements in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Zlatković Winter

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available After a brief historical review of migrations in Europe, the paper focuses on current migration trends and their consequences. At the end of the 1950s, Western Europe began to recruit labour from several Mediterranean countries – Italy, Spain, Portugal and former Yugoslavia, and later from Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and Turkey. Some countries, such as France, Great Britain and the Netherlands, recruited also workers from their former colonies. In 1970 Germany had the highest absolute number of foreigners, followed by France, and then Switzerland and Belgium. The total number of immigrants in Western Europe was twelve million. During the 1970s mass recruitment of foreign workers was abandoned, and only the arrival of their family members was permitted, which led to family reunification in the countries of employment. Europe closed its borders, with the result that clandestine migration increased. The year 1989 was a turning point in the history of international migrations. The political changes in Central and Eastern Europe brought about mass migration to the West, which culminated in the so-called “mass movement of 1989–1990”. The arrival of ethnic Germans in Germany, migration inside and outside of the territory of the former Soviet Union, an increase in the number of asylum seekers and displaced persons, due to armed conflicts, are – according to the author – the main traits of current migration. The main part of the paper discusses the causes and effects of this mass wave, as well as trends in labour migration, which is still present. The second part of the paper, after presenting a typology of migrations, deals with the complex processes that brought about the formation of new communities and led to the phenomenon of new ethnic minorities and to corresponding migration policies in Western European countries that had to address these issues.

  16. Europe as Façade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kloet, J.

    2014-01-01

    In China, numerous buildings employ an overtly baroque style, alluding to a hyper-Europe. In the context of an intensification of nationalistic Chinese sentiments that help maintain the Chinese nation-state, Europe remains an important constitutive outside. What cultural translations from Europe to

  17. Ismail Kadere’s Idea of Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossewaarde, Marinus R.R.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to reconstruct and pinpoint the peculiarities of Ismail Kadare’s idea of Europe. Kadare’s idea of Europe, it is argued, differs from the ideas of Europe embraced or presumed by intellectuals like Paul Valéry, Georg Simmel, Danilo Kiš, Václav Havel, Adam Michnik, or Milan

  18. Patient Blood Management in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, M T; Pendry, K; Georgsen, J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Patient Blood Management (PBM) in Europe is a working group of the European Blood Alliance with the initial objective to identify the starting position of the participating hospitals regarding PBM for benchmarking purposes, and to derive good practices in PBM from...... the experience and expertise in the participating teams with the further aim of implementing and strengthening these practices in the participating hospitals. METHODS: We conducted two surveys in seven university hospitals in Europe: Survey on top indications for red blood cell use regarding usage of red blood...... cells during 1 week and Survey on PBM organization and activities. RESULTS: A total of 3320 units of red blood cells were transfused in 1 week at the seven hospitals. Overall, 61% of red cell units were transfused to medical patients and 36% to surgical patients, although there was much variation...

  19. Cancer rehabilitation indicators for Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baili, Paolo; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette; Van Hoof, Elke

    2013-01-01

    Little is known of cancer rehabilitation needs in Europe. EUROCHIP-3 organised a group of experts to propose a list of population-based indicators used for describing cancer rehabilitation across Europe. The aim of this study is to present and discuss these indicators. A EUROCHIP-3 expert panel...... reached agreement on two types of indicators. (a) Cancer prevalence indicators. These were proposed as a means of characterising the burden of cancer rehabilitation needs by time from diagnosis and patient health status. These indicators can be estimated from cancer registry data or by collecting data...... on follow-up and treatments for samples of cases archived in cancer registries. (b) Indicators of rehabilitation success. These include: return to work, quality of life, and satisfaction of specific rehabilitation needs. Studies can be performed to estimate these indicators in individual countries...

  20. Re-membering Eastern Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilken, Lisanne

    2016-01-01

    -Soviet states into the “Eurovision” has been represented and discussed in Britain and Denmark, two countries with their own complex and complicated relationship to "Europe". Taking the cue from a growing scholarly production that argues for the importance of pop culture in the construction of social...... and political memories and perspectives (e.g. Couldry, Dittmer, Grey, Plate), this paper explores the ways that “Europe” is constructed and challenged in and by media in Denmark and Britain. The paper starts with a brief discussion of what the Eurovision Song Contest is and why it is an interesting framework......, Ukraine and Russia in order to explore how they are re-membered in relation to various perceptions of Europe....

  1. [Japanese encephalitis in Southern Europe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleton, Natalie; Koopmans, Marion; Braks, Marieta; Van Maanen, Kees; Reusken, Chantal

    2014-07-01

    In 2012, a fragment of the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) genome was isolated from a pool of Culex pipiens mosquitoes caught in 2010 and 2011 in Northern Italy. JEV has a broad geographical distribution in South and Southeast Asia and Oceania, and is the most important cause of viral encephalitis in Asia in humans and also causes encephalitis in horses and fertility problems in pigs. However, recently isolated JEV genome fragments in mosquitoes in Italy could be an indication of repeated introduction of JEV, enzootic circulation of JEV or a related virus in Southern Europe. Until more information is available, Japanese encephalitis remains a travel-related infectious disease for travellers to JEV endemic and epidemic areas outside of Europe.

  2. Bat rabies surveillance in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz, J; Fooks, A R; McElhinney, L; Horton, D; Echevarria, J; Vázquez-Moron, S; Kooi, E A; Rasmussen, T B; Müller, T; Freuling, C M

    2013-02-01

    Rabies is the oldest known zoonotic disease and was also the first recognized bat associated infection in humans. To date, four different lyssavirus species are the causative agents of rabies in European bats: the European Bat Lyssaviruses type 1 and 2 (EBLV-1, EBLV-2), the recently discovered putative new lyssavirus species Bokeloh Bat Lyssavirus (BBLV) and the West Caucasian Bat Virus (WCBV). Unlike in the new world, bat rabies cases in Europe are comparatively less frequent, possibly as a result of varying intensity of surveillance. Thus, the objective was to provide an assessment of the bat rabies surveillance data in Europe, taking both reported data to the WHO Rabies Bulletin Europe and published results into account. In Europe, 959 bat rabies cases were reported to the RBE in the time period 1977-2010 with the vast majority characterized as EBLV-1, frequently isolated in the Netherlands, North Germany, Denmark, Poland and also in parts of France and Spain. Most EBLV-2 isolates originated from the United Kingdom (UK) and the Netherlands, and EBLV-2 was also detected in Germany, Finland and Switzerland. Thus far, only one isolate of BBLV was found in Germany. Published passive bat rabies surveillance comprised testing of 28 of the 52 different European bat species for rabies. EBLV-1 was isolated exclusively from Serotine bats (Eptesicus serotinus and Eptesicus isabellinus), while EBLV-2 was detected in 14 Daubenton's bats (Myotis daubentonii) and 5 Pond bats (Myotis dasycneme). A virus from a single Natterer's bat (Myotis nattereri) was characterized as BBLV. During active surveillance, only oral swabs from 2 Daubenton's bats (EBLV-2) and from several Eptesicus bats (EBLV-1) yielded virus positive RNA. Virus neutralizing antibodies against lyssaviruses were detected in various European bat species from different countries, and its value and implications are discussed. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Organic Marketing Initiatives in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Sylvander, Bertil; Kristensen, Niels Heine

    2004-01-01

    In the second half of the 20th century, agriculture in Europe has undergone profound technological change, associated with and to an extent supporting the long post-war economic boom. This process has not gone unchallenged, however; some resistance to the process has come from a growing perception of environmental (and to an extent social) degradation, and some farms and businesses, particularly in Less Favoured Areas, have been simply unable to keep up. For both groups, organic farming has m...

  4. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    Carso region; the services are the usual ones such as telephone , telex, and cafeteria. Director Mirano Sancin, however, explains that the most...Europe Bares Its Teeth" first paragraph is SCIENCES & AVENIR introduction] [Excerpts] Until now, the Americans and the Japanese have had a monopoly on...the merger between the semiconductor activities of the French Thomson-CSF group and the Italian STET [Turin Telephone Company]. According to Geyres

  5. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-22

    OF THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITIES, 23 Jan 89] 34 EAST EUROPE COMPUTERS Hungarian Software Market Evaluated J Trade in Experts Rather Than Products... software . This simulator, together with a computerized image display system, offers excellent visualization conditions corresponding to patrol and...the diesel model, while 212,643 Pandas were sold (more than 2 million manu- factured since 1980). Sales of the " Tipo ," the new Fiat showpiece and

  6. Devonian tetrapod from western Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Clement, G.; Ahlberg, P.E.; Blieck, A.; Blom, H.; Clack, J.A.; Poty, E.; Thorez, J.; Janvier, P.

    2004-01-01

    Several discoveries of Late Devonian tetrapods (limbed vertebrates) have been made during the past two decades but each has been confined to one locality. Here we describe a tetrapod jaw of about 365 million years (Myr) old from the Famennian of Belgium, which is the first from western continental Europe. The jaw closely resembles that of Ichthyostega, a Famennian tetrapod hitherto known only from Greenland. The environment of this fossil provides information about the conditions that prevail...

  7. Youth Unemployment in Southern Europe

    OpenAIRE

    João Leão; Guida Nogueira

    2013-01-01

    The youth unemployment rate in Europe increased to very high levels after the great recession of 2008, reaching 23% in European Union and 45% in southern European countries. We examine the causes of the high youth unemployment rate which is consistently bigger than the overall unemployment rate. The empirical evidence shows that the youth unemployment rate depends crucially of the level of the overall unemployment rate and on the variation of the unemployment rate.

  8. Geomagnetically induced currents in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viljanen Ari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Statistics of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC in the European high-voltage power grids based on 1-min geomagnetic recordings in 1996–2008 and on 1-D models of the ground conductivity have been derived in the EURISGIC project (European Risk from Geomagnetically Induced Currents. The simplified yet realistic power grid model indicates that large GIC can occur anywhere in Europe. However, geomagnetic variations are clearly larger in North Europe, so it is the likely region of significant GIC events. Additionally, there are areas in the North with especially low ground conductivities, which further tend to increase GIC. The largest modelled GIC values at single substations in 1996–2008 are about 400 A in the Nordic Countries, about 100 A in the British Isles, about 80 A in the Baltic Countries, and less than 50 A in Central and South Europe. The largest GIC event in the period studied is the Halloween storm on 29–30 October 2003, and the next largest ones occurred on 15 July 2000 and 9 November 2004.

  9. Allergology in Europe, the blueprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Monchy, J G; Demoly, P; Akdis, C A; Cardona, V; Papadopoulos, N G; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P; Gayraud, J

    2013-10-01

    The number of patients with allergic diseases in Europe, and thus relevant demand for health care, is continuously increasing. In this EAACI-UEMS position paper, a rationale is given for the medical specialty of allergology. General practitioners and general paediatricians usually cannot elucidate and address all causative factors. Throughout Europe, therefore, the expertise of allergologists (allergists) is required. In collaboration with other medical professionals, they take care of allergic patients, in private practices or in specialized public centres. A well-structured collaboration between allergists and allergy centres offers the possibility of rapid signalling of new trends developing in the population of allergic patients (e.g., in food and drug allergy). Allergy centres also can perform clinical (and basic) research, teach medical students, future allergists and provide postgraduate training. To prevent that the quality of care in one or several countries within Europe lags behind developments in other countries, the UEMS Section and Board on Allergology together with the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology advocates the status of a full specialty of allergology in each European country, with a further intention to align their activities (blueprint, curriculum and centre visitation) with the UEMS Section of Paediatrics. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Christian identity of secular Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malešević Miroslava

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Among other things, intensification of process of European integrations has imposed the need for realization and strengthening of common European cultural identity, that is for creating a new set of values, which would be common to all European citizens and which would be the basis for their permanent feeling of community and an experience of belonging to Europe as a common area. What are the chances of such a project since, on one hand, Islam is appearing in Europe as a religion that does not know secularity and, on the other hand, an important part of European inhabitants is showing the rise of anti-immigrant and , especially, anti-Islamic feelings, opposition to the presence of foreigners, fear of majorization and the loss of one's own identity and the values of European culture? The existing conflict with Islam is, most often, described as a conflict between secularized West where religion is a matter of private choice and religious (primarily Islamic world where religion is regulating every aspect of life. However, innumerable examples all around us (starting with the fact that the time is counted according to the Christian calendar, Christian holidays and iconography, Biblical myths, moral codes, architecture, toponims-to mention only few constantly reminds how much Christianity (primarily as a cultural tradition is strongly present in the lives of the secular Europeans, how much is that secular context in fact permeated with Christian story. Vestiges of that past, which are all around us, are not in fact perceived as a Christian story - in meeting with European secularism such recognition comes only to "others" to whom that story is not familiar. On what premises then can such a common forum be created on which all would really feel equally at home? In this work I will try to consider possible directions in which, considering the existing circumstances, Europe could move in search of the new common denominator. Since nations, according to

  11. Mice plasma fibrinogen consumption by thrombin-like enzyme present in rattlesnake venom from the North-East region of Argentina Consumo de fibrinógeno plasmático en ratones por acción de enzima con actividad trombínica presente en el veneno de cascabel del nordeste argentino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana L. Maruñak

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to variability of venom components from the same species of snakes that inhabit different regions, particular properties of the venom of Crotalus durissus terrificus that inhabits the North-East of Argentina were studied. Gyroxin, a thrombin-like enzyme, was isolated from this venom by gel filtration and affinity chromatography, it was found to be homogeneous according to SDS-PAGE, with a molecular weight of 33 kDa. "Gyroxin syndrome" in mice was tested and it showed changes in the animal behavior, confirming that the isolated thrombin-like enzyme is gyroxin. Effects of this enzyme and the crude venom on mice plasmatic fibrinogen levels were determined. The mice plasma fibrinogen decreased rapidly until incoagulability during the first hour after thrombin-Iike enzyme injection, then reaching its normal level 10 hours after injection; whereas crude venom resulted in a 60% decrease of the mice plasma fibrinogen, reaching its normal level after the same period of time. After 1 hour of gyroxin inoculation, intravascular coagulation was observed in histological cuttings of lung, cardiac muscle and liver. The isolated enzyme showed strong hydrolyzing activity on fibrinogen and fibrin in vitro, whereas the crude venom exhibited weak hydrolyzing activity on both substrates. It is probable that this very low activity is due to the low percentage of the enzyme in the crude venom. Decreasing of plasmatic fibrinogen levels may be due to either the coagulant or hydrolyzing actions of the enzyme.Teniendo en cuenta la variabilidad de los componentes del veneno de serpientes de una misma especie que habitan regiones diferentes, se decidió estudiar las propiedades particulares del veneno de Crotalus durissus terrificus que habita el nordeste de Argentina, Giroxina, una enzima con actividad trombínica, fue aislada del veneno por cromatografía de filtración por gel y de afinidad; se comprobó su homogeneidad y se determinó su peso molecular, 33 kDa, por

  12. Prognosis with dementia in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagger, C; Andersen, K; Breteler, M M

    2000-01-01

    The effect of dementia on time to death and institutionalization in elderly populations is of importance to resource planning, as well as to patients and their carers. The authors report a collaborative reanalysis of nine population-based studies conducted in Europe to compare dementia cases...... and noncases in risk of and time to death and to institutionalization. Prevalent and incident cases were more likely than noncases to reside in an institution at baseline and were more likely to enter institutional care. Prevalent cases also had over twice the risk of death compared to noncases and survival...

  13. Managing Human Resources in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Henrik Holt; Mayrhofer, Wolfgang

    and individual level and the changes in employment relations; the importance of various organizational forms for HRM ('looking inside'), discussing the specifics of HRM in multinational corporations, small and medium sized enterprises and not-for-profit organizations; the roles and contributions of HRM within...... and diversity management and virtual HRM. Written and edited by leading European authorities, this text is essential reading for all those studying or working in HRM in Europe, and allows an exciting synthesis of theory and practice, illustrated with living case studies....

  14. Newborn screening in southeastern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groselj, Urh; Tansek, Mojca Zerjav; Smon, Andraz; Angelkova, Natalija; Anton, Dana; Baric, Ivo; Djordjevic, Maja; Grimci, Lindita; Ivanova, Maria; Kadam, Adil; Kotori, Vjosa Mulliqi; Maksic, Hajrija; Marginean, Oana; Margineanu, Otilia; Milijanovic, Olivera; Moldovanu, Florentina; Muresan, Mariana; Murko, Simona; Nanu, Michaela; Lampret, Barbka Repic; Samardzic, Mira; Sarnavka, Vladimir; Savov, Aleksei; Stojiljkovic, Maja; Suzic, Biljana; Tincheva, Radka; Tahirovic, Husref; Toromanovic, Alma; Usurelu, Natalia; Battelino, Tadej

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the current state of newborn screening (NBS) in the region of southeastern Europe, as an example of a developing region, focusing also on future plans. Responses were obtained from 11 countries. Phenylketonuria screening was not introduced in four of 11 countries, while congenital hypothyroidism screening was not introduced in three of them; extended NBS programs were non-existent. The primary challenges were identified. Implementation of NBS to developing countries worldwide should be considered as a priority. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Multiple Modernities of Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Bjørn

    What Europe? Eric Voegelin on the Mediterranean and the Atlantic modernities. The concept ‘multiple modernities’ has during the last decade established itself in social and political theory, not least due to contributions made by Shmul Eisenstadt. The debate on multiple moderntities has served......, Eric Voegelin. Eric Voegelin talked of two spatio-temporal specific modernities, the Mediterranean and the Atlantic modernities. In short, for Voegelin the Atlantic modernity with its breakthroughs in the 17th and 18th centuries was a specific figuration that should not be mistaken for ‘modernity...

  16. Commission européenne

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Le journaliste politique Derk-Jan EPPINK présente les coulisses de la Commission, où il a travaillé pendant plus de 7 ans. Rattaché au cabinet du commissaire Fritz Bolkestein en 1999/2004, puis à celui de Siim Kallas en 2004/07, il livre ici une galerie de portraits de ceux qui font l’Europe à Bruxelles, de Jacques De­lors à Pascal Lamy, en passant par Valéry Giscard d’Estaing. Un récit à la fois instructif et divertissant sur les dessous de l’UE. (sh)

  17. Patient Blood Management in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, M T; Pendry, K; Georgsen, J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Patient Blood Management (PBM) in Europe is a working group of the European Blood Alliance with the initial objective to identify the starting position of the participating hospitals regarding PBM for benchmarking purposes, and to derive good practices in PBM from...... a similar range of clinical services, there was variation in transfusion rates between them. Further, there was variable implementation of PBM activities and monitoring of transfusion practice. These findings provide a baseline to develop joint action plans to further implement and strengthen PBM across...

  18. Role of self-sufficiency, productivity and diversification on the economic sustainability of farming systems with autochthonous sheep breeds in less favoured areas in Southern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripoll-Bosch, R; Joy, M; Bernués, A

    2014-08-01

    Traditional mixed livestock cereal- and pasture-based sheep farming systems in Europe are threatened by intensification and specialisation processes. However, the intensification process does not always yield improved economic results or efficiency. This study involved a group of farmers that raised an autochthonous sheep breed (Ojinegra de Teruel) in an unfavourable area of North-East Spain. This study aimed to typify the farms and elucidate the existing links between economic performance and certain sustainability indicators (i.e. productivity, self-sufficiency and diversification). Information was obtained through direct interviews with 30 farms (73% of the farmers belonging to the breeders association). Interviews were conducted in 2009 and involved 32 indicators regarding farm structure, management and economic performance. With a principal component analysis, three factors were obtained explaining 77.9% of the original variance. This factors were named as inputs/self-sufficiency, which included the use of on-farm feeds, the amount of variable costs per ewe and economic performance; productivity, which included lamb productivity and economic autonomy; and productive orientation, which included the degree of specialisation in production. A cluster analysis identified the following four groups of farms: high-input intensive system; low-input self-sufficient system; specialised livestock system; and diversified crops-livestock system. In conclusion, despite the large variability between and within groups, the following factors that explain the economic profitability of farms were identified: (i) high feed self-sufficiency and low variable costs enhance the economic performance (per labour unit) of the farms; (ii) animal productivity reduces subsidy dependence, but does not necessarily imply better economic performance; and (iii) diversity of production enhances farm flexibility, but is not related to economic performance.

  19. Classification of Babesia canis strains in Europe based on polymorphism of the Bc28.1-gene from the Babesia canis Bc28 multigene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcy, B; Randazzo, S; Depoix, D; Adaszek, L; Cardoso, L; Baneth, G; Gorenflot, A; Schetters, T P

    2015-07-30

    The vast majority of clinical babesiosis cases in dogs in Europe is caused by Babesia canis. Although dogs can be vaccinated, the level of protection is highly variable, which might be due to genetic diversity of B. canis strains. One of the major merozoite surface antigens of B. canis is a protein with a Mr of 28 kDa that belongs to the Bc28 multigene family, that comprises at least two genes, Bc28.1 and a homologous Bc28.2 gene. The two genes are relatively conserved but they are very distinct in their 3' ends, enabling the design of specific primers. Sequencing of the Bc28.1 genes from 4 genetically distinct B. canis laboratory strains (A8, B, 34.01 and G) revealed 20 mutations at conserved positions of which three allowed the classification of B. canis strains into three main groups (A, B and 34.01/G) by RFLP. This assay was subsequently used to analyze blood samples of 394 dogs suspected of clinical babesiosis from nine countries in Europe. All blood samples were first analyzed with a previously described assay that allowed detection of the different Babesia species that infect dogs. Sixty one percent of the samples contained detectable levels of Babesia DNA. Of these, 98.3% were positive for B. canis, the remaining cases were positive for B. vogeli. Analysis of the Bc28.1 gene, performed on 178 of the B. canis samples, revealed an overall dominance of genotype B (62.4%), followed by genotypes A (37.1%) and 34 (11.8%). Interestingly, a great variation in the geographical distribution and prevalence of the three B. canis genotypes was observed; in the North-East genotype A predominated (72.1% A against 27.9% B), in contrast to the South-West where genotype B predominated (10.3% A against 89.7% B). In the central part of Europe intermediate levels were found (26.0-42.9% A against 74.0-57.1% B, from West to East). Genotype 34 was only identified in France (26.9% among 78 samples) and mostly as co-infection with genotypes A or B (61.9%). A comparative analysis of

  20. Nuclear cardiology practice and associated radiation doses in Europe: results of the IAEA Nuclear Cardiology Protocols Study (INCAPS) for the 27 European countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, Oliver; Burchert, Wolfgang [University Hospital of the Ruhr University, Institute of Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Heart and Diabetes Center North Rhine-Westphalia Bochum, Bad Oeynhausen (Germany); Pascual, Thomas N.B.; Kashyap, Ravi; Dondi, Maurizio; Paez, Diana [International Atomic Energy Agency, Section of Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Imaging, Division of Human Health, Vienna (Austria); Mercuri, Mathew [Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Acampa, Wanda [National Council of Research, Institute of Biostructures and Bioimaging, Naples (Italy); Flotats, Albert [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Nuclear Medicine Department, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Kaufmann, Philipp A. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Cardiac Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); Kitsiou, Anastasia [Sismanoglio Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Athens (Greece); Knuuti, Juhani [University of Turku, and Turku University Hospital, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Underwood, S.R. [Imperial College London, National Heart and Lung Institute, London (United Kingdom); Royal Brompton and Harefield Hospitals, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Vitola, Joao V. [Quanta Diagnostico and Terapia, Curitiba (Brazil); Mahmarian, John J. [Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart and Vascular Center, Department of Cardiology, Houston, TX (United States); Karthikeyan, Ganesan [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Cardiology, New Delhi (India); Better, Nathan [Royal Melbourne Hospital and University of Melbourne, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Melbourne (Australia); Rehani, Madan M. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Radiation Protection of Patients Unit, Vienna (Austria); Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Einstein, Andrew J. [Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Collaboration: for the INCAPS Investigators Group

    2016-04-15

    Nuclear cardiology is widely used to diagnose coronary artery disease and to guide patient management, but data on current practices, radiation dose-related best practices, and radiation doses are scarce. To address these issues, the IAEA conducted a worldwide study of nuclear cardiology practice. We present the European subanalysis. In March 2013, the IAEA invited laboratories across the world to document all SPECT and PET studies performed in one week. The data included age, gender, weight, radiopharmaceuticals, injected activities, camera type, positioning, hardware and software. Radiation effective dose was calculated for each patient. A quality score was defined for each laboratory as the number followed of eight predefined best practices with a bearing on radiation exposure (range of quality score 0 - 8). The participating European countries were assigned to regions (North, East, South, and West). Comparisons were performed between the four European regions and between Europe and the rest-of-the-world (RoW). Data on 2,381 European patients undergoing nuclear cardiology procedures in 102 laboratories in 27 countries were collected. A cardiac SPECT study was performed in 97.9 % of the patients, and a PET study in 2.1 %. The average effective dose of SPECT was 8.0 ± 3.4 mSv (RoW 11.4 ± 4.3 mSv; P < 0.001) and of PET was 2.6 ± 1.5 mSv (RoW 3.8 ± 2.5 mSv; P < 0.001). The mean effective doses of SPECT and PET differed between European regions (P < 0.001 and P = 0.002, respectively). The mean quality score was 6.2 ± 1.2, which was higher than the RoW score (5.0 ± 1.1; P < 0.001). Adherence to best practices did not differ significantly among the European regions (range 6 to 6.4; P = 0.73). Of the best practices, stress-only imaging and weight-adjusted dosing were the least commonly used. In Europe, the mean effective dose from nuclear cardiology is lower and the average quality score is higher than in the RoW. There is regional variation in effective dose in

  1. Antenna standards and laboratories in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemanczyk, Jerzy

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to present an overview on antenna standards and laboratories within Europe. In this context, Europe will be limited geographically to the member nations of the European Union (EU), formerly the European Community, and the European Space Agency (ESA). In addition to these......The goal of this paper is to present an overview on antenna standards and laboratories within Europe. In this context, Europe will be limited geographically to the member nations of the European Union (EU), formerly the European Community, and the European Space Agency (ESA). In addition...

  2. Europe as Façade

    OpenAIRE

    de Kloet, J.

    2014-01-01

    In China, numerous buildings employ an overtly baroque style, alluding to a hyper-Europe. In the context of an intensification of nationalistic Chinese sentiments that help maintain the Chinese nation-state, Europe remains an important constitutive outside. What cultural translations from Europe to China are at stake here, when Europe is turned into a façade? Inspired by the work of Rey Chow and Michel Foucault, this article reads these façades as constitutive mirrors, both heterotopian and u...

  3. Defending basic research in Europe

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2010-01-01

    « Research without a budget means a Europe without a future » On Wednesday 25th August 2010, 871 of you signed the Staff Council petition which carried this message. This is a resounding success for a month of August. Staff members and pensioners, you showed by your presence your mass support for our appeal to defend research budgets in Europe. The participation and messages of support from our colleagues in other European scientific organizations is confirmation that budget cuts in research are common practice far beyond the confines of CERN. If research had benefited from the promises made by the European Union in 2000 to increase investment in research and development (R&D) from 1.8% to 3% of GDP by 2010, the scientific community would more readily accept the current cuts. However, we are now in 2010 and the rate of 1.8% has remained the same. So, we have been hit twice: not only have we not had the good weather we were promised, we now find ourselves in the middl...

  4. Survey of Aquaponics in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Villarroel

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available International aquaponic production has increased over the past decade, but less is known about research activities and production facilities operating in Europe. We conducted an online survey to get a better idea about research and production in Europe, focusing on five areas of aquaponics (i.e., demographics, facilities used, fish and crops produced, funding sources, and personal or company priorities for further development. The 68 respondents were distributed among 21 European countries, 43% were working at a university, and 19% were commercial producers. Only 11.8% of those surveyed had sold fish or plants in the past 12 months. Most respondents were male (66.2% and had a post-graduate degree (91.7%. Facilities were generally new (74.5% constructed after 2010 and self-designed. Production figures were modest, with less than 10 respondents producing more than 1000 kg of fish or plants per year (mostly tilapia or catfish and herbs or lettuce. Systems were often funded by government grants (35.3%. The great majority of respondents (80.4% stated that aquaponics was not their main source of income. Most respondents prioritized using aquaponics for educational purposes, while few (25% used it to produce their own food or improve their health. Questions related to personal knowledge about aquaponics underlined the need for more training about fish diseases and plant pests.

  5. Renewable energy islands in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oestergaard, Iben [ed.

    1998-12-31

    This publication includes a compiled presentation of various aspects concerning the possible transformation of some European islands into renewable energy communities and these projects were presented by a selection of pioneer islands at the first European Seminar on Renewable Energy Islands, held on the Danish island of Samsoee, 29-30 June 1998. This issue has increased in importance with the presentation of the ambitious EU-White Paper: `Energy for the future: Renewable Sources of Energy` which was adopted in 1998. One of the key elements of the strategy for an accelerated implementation of renewable energy is to transform 100 localities within Europe into communities which are to be 100% self-sufficient with renewable energy before 2010. In line with this strategy, the Danish Government appointed the island of Samsoe towards the end of 1997 to be the first `official` Danish, renewable energy island. This is to serve as a demonstration project for other local communities, both in Denmark as well as in the rest Europe. Gothland, Madeira, Canary Islands, Cape Verde, Arki, Crete, Minorca and Orkney Islands were represented. Environmental advantages of wind, solar and wave power for distant island communities were indicated. Serious savings would be achieved by limitation of fossil fuel import and utilization of local resources. (EG)

  6. Community wind projects in Europe; Projets eolienne communautaires en Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renauld, M.A. [Enercon Gmbh (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Enercon has wind energy projects all over the world, including Canada, Europe, Australia, Brazil and Argentina. In Canada, the Enercon group has sales offices in Quebec and has operations in Edmonton, Calgary, Southern Ontario and Atlantic Canada. Their turbine manufacturing facility is in Quebec's Gaspe region. This presentation included illustrations of Enercon's simple and proven technologies that make it a leader in the industry. The presentation also highlighted the community wind energy projects that are underway or in operation in the United Kingdom, France and Germany. Most community projects produce 12 MW of power. Issues regarding investment and financing were also discussed. The level of local investment in community wind projects was shown to be strongly correlated to the level of social acceptance. The new trend for municipalities to generate their own electricity has made electricity production an election platform issue. figs.

  7. Council of Europe. Parliamentary Assembly: State of Media Freedom in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGonagle, T.

    2013-01-01

    The Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe (PACE) adopted its Resolution 1920 (2013) on the state of media freedom in Europe on 24 January 2013. The Resolution provides a critical audit of media freedom across Europe and thereby continues the PACE’s earlier work on the same theme, e.g. its

  8. From the Lisbon Strategy to EUROPE 2020

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundvall, Bengt-Åke; Lorenz, Edward

    2011-01-01

    This article compares the Lisbon Strategy and the EUROPE 2020 Strategy. It demonstrates while none of the two strategies are sufficient as support for the monetary integration and the Euro-collaboration.......This article compares the Lisbon Strategy and the EUROPE 2020 Strategy. It demonstrates while none of the two strategies are sufficient as support for the monetary integration and the Euro-collaboration....

  9. Molecular Epidemiology of Bat Lyssaviruses in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McElhinney, L.M.; Marston, D.A.; Leech, S.; Freuling, C.; Poel, van der W.H.M.; Echevarria, J.; Vazquez-Moron, S.; Horton, D.L.; Müller, T.; Fooks, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    Bat rabies cases in Europe are principally attributed to two lyssaviruses, namely European bat lyssavirus type 1 (EBLV-1) and European bat lyssavirus type 2 (EBLV-2). Between 1977 and 2011, 961 cases of bat rabies were reported to Rabies Bulletin Europe, with the vast majority (>97%) being

  10. Assisted reproductive technology in Europe, 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Mouzon, J; Goossens, V; Bhattacharya, S

    2012-01-01

    This 11th European IVF-monitoring report presents the results of assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatments initiated in Europe during 2007.......This 11th European IVF-monitoring report presents the results of assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatments initiated in Europe during 2007....

  11. Assisted reproductive technology in Europe, 2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferraretti, A P; Goossens, V; de Mouzon, J

    2012-01-01

    This 12th European IVF-monitoring (EIM) report presents the results of treatments involving assisted reproductive technology (ART) initiated in Europe during 2008.......This 12th European IVF-monitoring (EIM) report presents the results of treatments involving assisted reproductive technology (ART) initiated in Europe during 2008....

  12. Policies to promote healthy eating in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capacci, Sara; Mazzocchi, Mario; Macias, José Brambila

    2012-01-01

    This review provides a classification of public policies to promote healthier eating and a structured mapping of existing measures in Europe. Complete coverage of alternative policy types was ensured by complementing the review with a selection of major interventions from outside Europe. Within...

  13. Life in Europe under climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alcamo, J.; Olesen, Jørgen E

    Life in Europe will indeed go on as the climate changes, but not in the same way as before. The air will be warmer, winds will change, patterns of rainfall and snowfall will alter, and sea level is likely to rise. These phenomena are already being seen. Europe will in the future experience marked...

  14. Health care and general practice across Europe.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerma, W.G.W.; Jong, F.A.J.M. de; Mulder, P.H.

    1993-01-01

    This book contains an overview of general practice and primary care medicine in Europe. It includes a clear description of the rapidly changing situation in Eastern Europe, as far as this situation is clear at all. The book is meant for those who require a systematic general briefing on the

  15. Epidemiology of cardiovascular diseases in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kromhout, D.

    2001-01-01

    Within Europe large differences exist in mortality from coronary heart disease and stroke. These diseases show a clear West-East gradient with high rates in Eastern Europe. In spite the decreasing trend in age-adjusted cardiovascular disease mortality in Western European countries an increase in the

  16. Chinese outward foreign direct investments to Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blomkvist, Katarina; Drogendijk, Rian

    This paper addresses Chinese outward foreign direct investments (OFDI) in Europe. We aim to provide more knowledge on the ongoing research discussion about Chinese OFDI, more specifically, we answer questions about what is driving Chinese firms to invest in Europe, and whether Chinese investment

  17. Obesity in Europe : scaling an epidemic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidell, J C

    Obesity, defined as a body mass index > 30 kg/m2 is relatively common in Europe especially among women and especially in Southern and Eastern European countries. Among men the distribution of body mass index values is surprisingly similar in most countries of Europe despite a large variability among

  18. Molecular Epidemiology of Canine Parvovirus, Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desario, Costantina; Addie, Diane D.; Martella, Vito; Vieira, Maria João; Elia, Gabriella; Zicola, Angelique; Davis, Christopher; Thompson, Gertrude; Thiry, Ethienne; Truyen, Uwe; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2007-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV), which causes hemorrhagic enteritis in dogs, has 3 antigenic variants: types 2a, 2b, and 2c. Molecular method assessment of the distribution of the CPV variants in Europe showed that the new variant CPV-2c is widespread in Europe and that the viruses are distributed in different countries. PMID:17953097

  19. The future of astroparticle physics in Europe

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    ASPERA has published a roadmap that describes Europe's role in the field of astroparticle physics, including contributions made by Member States.ASPERA a publié une feuille de route qui décrit le rôle et l'apport de l'Europe dans le domaine de l'astroparticule.

  20. PET-container collection systems in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logtenberg, T.; Groot, J.L.B. de; Rink, T.

    1996-01-01

    This report presents the results of a TNO study of the present situation in Europe with regard to PET-bottle recycling. The overview concentrates on the main PET-bottles consuming countries in Europe i.e.: France, Italy, Spain and the UK. In addition the system in Belgium is presented. Applying a

  1. Travelers to Europe Need Measles Protection: CDC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... been reported in Europe. And 35 people across Europe have died from the highly contagious infection in the past year, the World Health Organization says. "Most measles cases in the United States are the result of international travel," said Dr. Gary Brunette, chief of the CDC's ...

  2. Demographic transitions in Europe and the world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willekens, F.J.; Matthijs, K.; Neels, K.; Timmerman, C.; Haers, J.; Mels, S.

    2016-01-01

    Willekens, F. (2015) Demographic transitions in Europe and the world. In: K. Matthijs, K. Neels, C. Timmerman. J. Haers and S. Mels eds. Population change at work in Europe, the Middle-East and North Africa. Beyond the demographic divide. Ashgate (International Population Studies Series) pp. 13-44.

  3. Consumption patterns and cultural values in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annemien van der Veen; Agnes Neulinger; Jacob Rosendahl; Tino Bech-Larsen

    2013-01-01

    Chapter 6 in Consumption culture in Europe. The chapter focuses on cultural differences in consumption across Europe and describes general attitudes towards consumption and brands, the significance of shopping, and how these are linked to the motives of consumption of alcoholic and non-alcoholic

  4. Potato developments in a changing Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haase, N.U.; Haverkort, A.J.

    2006-01-01

    The papers in this book reflect societal and commercial changes such as consumer behaviour and marketing aspects in relation to fresh and processed potatoes in western, central and eastern Europe. Seed trade between western and central Europe is entering a new stage with altered inspection

  5. Physics studies in Europe; a comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenstrup, S; dalle Rose, LFD; Jones, WG; Tugulea, L; van Steenwijk, FJ

    What are the differences and similarities between physics studies at different universities across Europe (here the definition of Europe is broad)? How much does a student have to work to obtain a degree in physics? Questions like those prompted EUPEN (European Physics Education Network) to make a

  6. Hacking Europe: from computer cultures to Demoscenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alberts, G.; Oldenziel, R.

    2014-01-01

    Describes how local hacker communities across Europe appropriated the computer and forged new cultures around it. Explores the mediating actors instrumental in introducing and spreading the cultures of computing around Europe. Highlights the role of mischief, humor, and play in hacker culture.

  7. Europe Versus Africa: Hegemony Versus Dependence | Ugwuanyi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper proposes an alternative basis of self-worth on the part of Africa and authentic humanism on the part of Europe and argues that these are the necessary basis for a more productive relationship between Europe and Africa and the basis for promoting a genuine cultural dialogue between these two world cultures.

  8. Key Data on Education in Europe 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranguelov, Stanislav; de Coster, Isabelle; Forsthuber, Bernadette; Noorani, Sogol; Ruffio, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    This seventh edition of "Key Data on Education in Europe" retains its main special feature which is the combination of statistical data and qualitative information to describe the organisation and functioning of education systems in Europe. The present 2009 edition maintains the subject-based structure defined by the previous one but…

  9. Governance and Enterprise Restructuring in Southeast Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Apostolov, Mico

    2010-01-01

    Purpose - The research in this paper is to be focused on examining governance and enterprise restructuring in Southeast Europe (Western Balkans) transition economies. International organizations classify the following countries in Southeast Europe (Western Balkans): Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Macedonia, Montenegro and Serbia. Design/methodology/approach - The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) has governance and enterprise restructuring as basic indicat...

  10. The genetic history of Ice Age Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fu, Qiaomei; Posth, Cosimo; Hajdinjak, Mateja

    2016-01-01

    founder population which forms part of the ancestry of present-day Europeans. An ~35,000-year-old individual from northwest Europe represents an early branch of this founder population which was then displaced across a broad region, before reappearing in southwest Europe at the height of the last Ice Age...

  11. Energy Foresight - Sweden in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The IVA-project 'Energy Foresight - Sweden in Europe' deals with possibilities and problems associated with our energy future. We take it for granted that various forms of energy will always be available for a multitude of purposes and at acceptable prices. Sweden also places high demands on health and environmental protection issues when it comes to the production of power and heat. During the last few years the climate issue has been highlighted, which in turn will change the conditions for the use of alternative sources of energy. Carbon dioxide is the most important of the greenhouse gases, and it is closely associated with the burning of coal, oil, and natural gas. These fossil fuels play dominant roles in the world 's energy supply. Far-reaching measures to decrease carbon dioxide emissions will thus greatly affect the ways in which we use fossil fuels and non-carbon dioxide generating sources of energy. We have chosen a global starting point for our energy study. From there we will zoom in on the energy systems of Europe and Sweden. The climate issue demands global approach. Deregulation of electricity and gas markets, and the development of integrated European systems related to these energy sources, requires an international perspective on he Swedish energy system. Our project differs from earlier governmental energy studies in the sense that we are not trying to present the most likely, nor the most desirable energy future. Instead we have opted to draw up some illustrations of Sweden's future energy system, with Europe as a backdrop. The climate issue differentiates the scenarios. Our time perspective is 20 years, with glimpses 50 years ahead. On the 18th of February 2003, the Steering Group of Energy Foresight - Sweden in Europe, presented it's final report. The bulk of the work has been done in four panels. Their reflections and conclusions are presented in separate panel reports. The 12 factual reports present different

  12. Harmonised human biomonitoring in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joas, Reinhard; Casteleyn, Ludwine; Biot, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    for policy making; (ii) to evaluate policy actions aimed at reducing exposure to potentially hazardous environmental stressors; and (iii) to promote more comprehensive health impact assessments of policy options. In support of the European Environment and Health Action Plan 2004-2010, European scientists......, experts from authorities and other stakeholders joined forces to work towards developing a functional framework and standards for a coherent HBM in Europe. Within the European coordination action on human biomonitoring, 35 partners from 27 European countries in the COPHES consortium aggregated...... health concerns, and political and health priorities. The harmonised approach includes sampling recruitment, and analytical procedures, communication strategies and biobanking initiatives. The protocols and the harmonised approach are a means to increase acceptance and policy support and to in the future...

  13. Europe is going to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-06-01

    The Agency's Science Programme Committee (SPC) approved Mars Express after ESA's Council, meeting at ministerial level in Brussels on 11 and 12 May, had agreed the level of the science budget for the next 4 years, just enough to make the mission affordable. "Mars Express is a mission of opportunity and we felt we just had to jump in and do it. We are convinced it will produce first-rate science", says Hans Balsiger, SPC chairman. As well as being a first for Europe in Mars exploration, Mars Express will pioneer new, cheaper ways of doing space science missions. "With a total cost of just 150 million euros, Mars Express will be the cheapest Mars mission ever undertaken", says Roger Bonnet, ESA's Director of Science. Mars Express will be launched in June 2003. When it arrives at the red planet six months later, it will begin to search for water and life. Seven instruments, provided by space research institutes throughout Europe, will make observations from the main spacecraft as it orbits the planet. Just before the spacecraft arrives, it will release a small lander, provided by research institutes in the UK, that will journey on to the surface to look for signs of life. The lander is called Beagle 2 after the ship in which Charles Darwin sailed round the world in search of evidence supporting his theory of evolution. But just as Darwin had to raise the money for his trip, so the search is on for public and private finance for Beagle 2. "Beagle 2 is an extremely important element of the mission", says Bonnet. Europe's space scientists have envisaged a mission to Mars for over fifteen years. But limited funding has prevented previous proposals from going ahead. The positioning of the planets in 2003, however, offers a particularly favourable passage to the red planet - an opportunity not to be missed. Mars Express will be joined by an international flotilla of spacecraft that will also be using this opportunity to work together on scientific questions and pave the way

  14. Religiousness and health in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenfeldt, Linda Juel; Möller, Sören; Andersen-Ranberg, Karen

    2017-01-01

    .87). Conversely, people who only prayed had higher odds of depressive symptoms than non-religious people 1.46 (95% CI 1.15, 1.86). Our findings suggest two types of religiousness: 1. Restful religiousness (praying, taking part in a religious organization and being religiously educated), which is associated......Recent research suggests that epidemiological forces in religion and health can have opposed effects. Using longitudinal data of people aged 50+ included in wave 1 (2004-2005) of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE), and followed up through waves 2 (2006-2007), 4 (2011......) and 5 (2013), we examined two forms of religious internalization and their association with health. Multivariate logistic regressions were used to examine all associations. Taking part in a religious organization was associated with lower odds of GALI (global activity limitation index) (OR = 0.86, 95...

  15. Leishmaniasis: diagnostic issues in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torpiano, Paul; Pace, David

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a parasitic disease with clinical presentations that vary from asymptomatic infection to cutaneous, mucocutaneous or visceral disease. Recent epidemiological studies have shown an increased prevalence in Europe largely caused by an increase in international travel, difficulty eradicating leishmanial infection in AIDS patients, and the use of immunosuppressive medications. Clinical diagnosis may be challenging, and parasitological diagnosis entails the use of invasive procedures which may be unrevealing in the immunosuppressed. A number of less invasive tests for the detection of anti-leishmanial antibodies or leishmanial antigen are available but their sensitivity and specificity may vary with the infective species and results have to be interpreted in light of the clinical presentation. The availability of polymerase chain reaction assays amplifying leishmanial genetic material has been a major step forward in improving the diagnosis of leishmanial disease and the response to treatment.

  16. Multiple Sclerosis Epidemiology in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezzini, Daiana; Battaglia, Mario A

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is characterized by a non-homogeneous distribution around the world. Some authors in past described a latitude gradient, with increasing risk from the equator to North and South Poles, but this theory is still controversial. Regarding Europe, there are many articles in the literature concerning the epidemiology of this disease but, unfortunately, they are not always comparable due to different methodologies, they do not cover all countries in the continent, and most of them reported data of small areas and rarely at a national level. In 2012 there were 20 national registries that could help to describe the epidemiology of the disease and, in addition, there is an European Register for Multiple Sclerosis that collect data from already existing national or regional MS registries and databases. Another valid alternative to obtain epidemiological data, also at national level, in a routinely and cost-saving way is through administrative data that are of increasing interest in the last years.

  17. Social Impact Assessment in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sanne Vammen; Hansen, Anne Merrild; Lyhne, Ivar

    2015-01-01

    Social impact assessment (SIA) is applied worldwide to assess social impacts of plans and projects. In Europe, directives on environmental assessment (EA) require attention to social impacts, however, there is a need to investigate the implementation in practise. To this end, we study three Danish...... cases, which are characterised by debates and conflicts on social issues. Analysis of the EA statements shows inclusion of a broad range of social impacts. However, the EAs do not fully match the concerns of the public, and social impacts are not always analysed in depth, mitigation measures...... are not suggested or are postponed and the geographical distribution of impacts assessed is biased towards including negative local impacts. We discuss the scope and handling of social impacts, and possible implications. Based on this, we conclude with the view that EA might do the job of handling social impacts...

  18. Intraoperative transfusion practices in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, J; Filipescu, D; Kozek-Langenecker, S

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transfusion of allogeneic blood influences outcome after surgery. Despite widespread availability of transfusion guidelines, transfusion practices might vary among physicians, departments, hospitals and countries. Our aim was to determine the amount of packed red blood cells (p......RBC) and blood products transfused intraoperatively, and to describe factors determining transfusion throughout Europe. METHODS: We did a prospective observational cohort study enrolling 5803 patients in 126 European centres that received at least one pRBC unit intraoperatively, during a continuous three month...... period in 2013. RESULTS: The overall intraoperative transfusion rate was 1.8%; 59% of transfusions were at least partially initiated as a result of a physiological transfusion trigger- mostly because of hypotension (55.4%) and/or tachycardia (30.7%). Haemoglobin (Hb)- based transfusion trigger alone...

  19. Api-tourism in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara WOŚ

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Api-tourism, as a form of tourism that deals with culture and traditions of rural communities could be considered as one of the most sustainable way of development and a niche tourism. Api-tourism is a form of tourism connected with beekeeping as a traditional profession and with bee products in ecological, food and medicinal aspects. The activities related to api-tourism include visits in apiaries, open-air museums and bee museums where tourists have the opportunity to observe a beekeeper’s work, a method of making honey, its properties and specifics, to find out about other bee products, to watch how bee colony live, to recognize ecological correlation between a man and bees. The purpose of this article is to show good practice in api-tourism observed in Europe. The study is based on field research conducted in apiaries, bee museums and educational farms in the years 2012-2014.

  20. Tolerable soil erosion in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheijen, Frank; Jones, Bob; Rickson, Jane; Smith, Celina

    2010-05-01

    Soil loss by erosion has been identified as an important threat to soils in Europe* and is recognised as a contributing process to soil degradation and associated deterioration, or loss, of soil functioning. From a policy perspective, it is imperative to establish well-defined baseline values to evaluate soil erosion monitoring data against. For this purpose, accurate baseline values - i.e. tolerable soil loss - need to be differentiated at appropriate scales for monitoring and, ideally, should take soil functions and even changing environmental conditions into account. The concept of tolerable soil erosion has been interpreted in the scientific literature in two ways: i) maintaining the dynamic equilibrium of soil quantity, and ii) maintaining biomass production, at a location. The first interpretation ignores soil quality by focusing only on soil quantity. The second approach ignores many soil functions by focusing only on the biomass (particularly crop) production function of soil. Considering recognised soil functions, tolerable soil erosion may be defined as 'any mean annual cumulative (all erosion types combined) soil erosion rate at which a deterioration or loss of one or more soil functions does not occur'. Assumptions and problems of this definition will be discussed. Soil functions can generally be judged not to deteriorate as long as soil erosion does not exceed soil formation. At present, this assumption remains largely untested, but applying the precautionary principle appears to be a reasonable starting point. Considering soil formation rates by both weathering and dust deposition, it is estimated that for the majority of soil forming factors in most European situations, soil formation rates probably range from ca. 0.3 - 1.4 t ha-1 yr-1. Although the current agreement on these values seems relatively strong, how the variation within the range is spatially distributed across Europe and how this may be affected by climate, land use and land management