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Sample records for vps10p domain receptor

  1. (WO/2009/140972) MODULATION OF THE VPS10P-DOMAIN RECEPTORS FOR THE TREATMENT OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods for modulating the activity of one or more Vps10p-domain receptors selected from the group consisting of Sortilin, SorLA, SorCS1, SorCS2 and SorCS3, in an animal and methods for preparation of a medicament for the treatment of abnormal plasma lipid...... concentrations and associated diseases and/or disorders.The modulation is carried out by inhibiting or promoting the binding of ligands to the Vps10p-domain receptor. In vitro and in vivo methods for screening for agents capable of modulation of said Vps10p-domain receptor activity are also provided...

  2. Ligand recognition and domain structure of Vps10p, a vacuolar protein sorting receptor in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, M U; Emr, S D; Winther, Jakob R.

    1999-01-01

    Vp10p is a receptor that sorts several different vacuolar proteins by cycling between a late Golgi compartment and the endosome. The cytoplasmic tail of Vps10p is necessary for the recycling, whereas the lumenal domain is predicted to interact with the soluble ligands. We have studied ligand bind...

  3. Syntaxin 7 complexes with mouse Vps10p tail interactor 1b, syntaxin 6, vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)8, and VAMP7 in b16 melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, N; Bryant, N J; Connolly, L M; Simpson, R J; Luzio, J P; Piper, R C; James, D E

    2001-06-01

    Syntaxin 7 is a mammalian target soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) involved in membrane transport between late endosomes and lysosomes. The aim of the present study was to use immunoaffinity techniques to identify proteins that interact with Syntaxin 7. We reasoned that this would be facilitated by the use of cells producing high levels of Syntaxin 7. Screening of a large number of tissues and cell lines revealed that Syntaxin 7 is expressed at very high levels in B16 melanoma cells. Moreover, the expression of Syntaxin 7 increased in these cells as they underwent melanogenesis. From a large scale Syntaxin 7 immunoprecipitation, we have identified six polypeptides using a combination of electrospray mass spectrometry and immunoblotting. These polypeptides corresponded to Syntaxin 7, Syntaxin 6, mouse Vps10p tail interactor 1b (mVti1b), alpha-synaptosome-associated protein (SNAP), vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)8, VAMP7, and the protein phosphatase 1M regulatory subunit. We also observed partial colocalization between Syntaxin 6 and Syntaxin 7, between Syntaxin 6 and mVti1b, but not between Syntaxin 6 and the early endosomal t-SNARE Syntaxin 13. Based on these and data reported previously, we propose that Syntaxin 7/mVti1b/Syntaxin 6 may form discrete SNARE complexes with either VAMP7 or VAMP8 to regulate fusion events within the late endosomal pathway and that these events may play a critical role in melanogenesis.

  4. Establishing a cellular FRET-based fluorescence plate reader assay to monitor proNGF-induced cross-linking of sortilin and the neurotrophin receptor p75(NTR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skeldal, Sune; Kjaergaard, Maj M; Alwasel, Saleh

    2015-01-01

    the vps10p domain receptor sortilin and the neurotrophin receptor p75(NTR). However, proNGF-induced receptor complex formation has been difficult to directly assess other than by western blotting. We here describe a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) based fluorescence plate reader assay...... to monitor the interaction between fluorescently tagged sortilin and p75(NTR) in live cells. The method is based on a standard fluorescent plate reader found in many biochemical laboratories and the results are evaluated using a microscopy-based quantified sensitized acceptor emission FRET approach making...

  5. Molecular characterization of a novel human hybrid-type receptor that binds the alpha2-macroglobulin receptor-associated protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Linda; Madsen, P; Moestrup, S K;

    1996-01-01

    the corresponding cDNA. The gene, designated SORL1, maps to chromosome 11q 23/24 and encodes a 2214-residue type 1 receptor containing a furin cleavage site immediately preceding the N terminus determined in the purified protein. The receptor, designated sorLA-1, has a short cytoplasmic tail containing a tyrosine......-based internalization signal and a large external part containing (from the N-terminal): 1) a segment homologous to domains in the yeast vacuolar protein sorting 10 protein, Vps10p, that binds carboxypeptidase Y, 2) five tandemly arranged YWTD repeats and a cluster of 11 class A repeats characteristic of the low...... density lipoprotein receptor gene family receptors, and 3) six tandemly arranged fibronectin type III repeats also found in certain neural adhesion proteins. sorLA-1 may therefore be classified as a hybrid receptor. Northern blotting revealed specific mRNA transcripts in brain, spinal cord, and testis...

  6. Discoidin Domain Receptor 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sunmi; Shackel, Nicholas A.; Wang, Xin M.; Ajami, Katerina; McCaughan, Geoffrey W.; Gorrell, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that binds and is activated by collagens. Transcriptional profiling of cirrhosis in human liver using a DNA array and quantitative PCR detected elevated mRNA expression of DDR1 compared with that in nondiseased liver. The present study characterized DDR1 expression in cirrhotic and nondiseased human liver and examined the cellular effects of DDR1 expression. mRNA expression of all five isoforms of DDR1 was detected in human liver, whereas DDR1a demonstrated differential expression in liver with hepatitis C virus and primary biliary cirrhosis compared with nondiseased liver. In addition, immunoblot analysis detected shed fragments of DDR1 more readily in cirrhotic liver than in nondiseased liver. Inasmuch as DDR1 is subject to protease-mediated cleavage after prolonged interaction with collagen, this differential expression may indicate more intense activation of DDR1 protein in cirrhotic compared with nondiseased liver. In situ hybridization and immunofluorescence localized intense DDR1 mRNA and protein expression to epithelial cells including hepatocytes at the portal-parenchymal interface and the luminal aspect of the biliary epithelium. Overexpression of DDR1a altered hepatocyte behavior including increased adhesion and less migration on extracelular matrix substrates. DDR1a regulated extracellular expression of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 2. These data elucidate DDR1 function pertinent to cirrhosis and indicate the importance of epithelial cell–collagen interactions in chronic liver injury. PMID:21356365

  7. Discoidin Domain Receptors Role in Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iker BADIOLA

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 and Discodin Domain Receptor 2 are the two only members of the DDR family. The DDR family is a Tyrosine Kinase Receptor (TKR family with some peculiarities compared with other Tyrosine Kinase Receptors such as their natural ligand; which in this case is the fibrillar collagen; or the slow phosphorylation pattern. These peculiarities confer a special role to the receptors present in many diseases development processes as cancer, cirrhosis or lung fibrosis. In this review it is described the overview of the DDRs structure and their role in the different disease development and the possibility to consider them as therapeutic targets.

  8. Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0226 TITLE: Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Rafael Fridman...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0226 Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15...DDRs in prostate cancer . During the first funding period, we conducted immunohistochemical studies by staining a 200 case Grade/Stage tissue

  9. Functional domains of the poliovirus receptor

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    Koike, Satoshi; Ise, Iku; Nomoto, Akio (Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science (Japan))

    1991-05-15

    A number of mutant cDNAs of the human poliovirus receptor were constructed to identify essential regions of the molecule as the receptor. All mutant cDNAs carrying the sequence coding for the entire N-terminal immunoglobulin-like domain (domain I) confer permissiveness for poliovirus to mouse L cells, but a mutant cDNA lacking the sequence for domain I does not. The transformants permissive for poliovirus were able to bind the virus and were also recognized by monoclonal antibody D171, which competes with poliovirus for the cellular receptor. These results strongly suggest that the poliovirus binding site resides in domain I of the receptor. Mutant cDNAs for the sequence encoding the intracellular peptide were also constructed and expressed in mouse L cells. Susceptibility of these cells to poliovirus revealed that the entire putative cytoplasmic domain is not essential for virus infection. Thus, the cytoplasmic domain of the molecule appears not to play a role in the penetration of poliovirus.

  10. Formyl peptide receptor chimeras define domains involved in ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, H D; Holmes, R; Vilander, L R; Adams, R R; Manzana, W; Jolley, D; Andrews, W H

    1993-02-05

    We have begun to study the structural requirements for the binding of formyl peptides to their specific receptors. As an initial approach, we constructed C5a-formyl peptide receptor chimeras. Unique (and identical) restriction sites were introduced within the transmembrane domains of these receptors that allowed for the exchange of specific areas. Four types of chimeric receptors were generated. 1) The C5a receptor was progressively substituted by the formyl peptide receptor. 2) The formyl peptide receptor was progressively substituted by the C5a receptor. 3) Specific domains of the C5a receptor were substituted by the corresponding domain of the formyl peptide receptor. 4) Specific domains of the formyl peptide receptor were replaced by the same corresponding domain of the C5a receptor. Wild type and chimeric receptors were transfected into COS 7 cells and their ability to bind formyl peptide determined, taking into account efficiency of transfection and expression of chimeric protein. Based on these results, a ligand binding model is presented in which the second, third, and fourth extracellular (and/or their transmembrane) domains together with the first transmembrane domain form a ligand binding pocket for formyl peptides. It is proposed that the amino-terminal domain plays a role by presumably providing a "lid" to the pocket. The carboxyl-terminal cytoplasmic tail appears to modulate ligand binding by regulating receptor affinity.

  11. Discoidin Domain Receptors: Novel Targets in Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0046 TITLE: Discoidin Domain Receptors: Novel Targets in Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Discoidin Domain Receptors: Novel Targets in Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0046 5c...14. ABSTRACT Here we report major findings for our project aimed at studying the expression of Discoidin Domain Receptors (DDRs) in breast cancer

  12. Establishing a cellular FRET-based fluorescence plate reader assay to monitor proNGF-induced cross-linking of sortilin and the neurotrophin receptor p75(NTR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeldal, Sune; Kjaergaard, Maj M; Alwasel, Saleh; Nyengaard, Jens R

    2015-01-01

    Whereas the proform of the nerve growth factor (proNGF) is crucial for eliminating superfluous cells during neuronal development it also promotes apoptosis following brain trauma and neuronal injury. The apoptotic signal is elicited upon formation of a trimeric receptor complex also containing the vps10p domain receptor sortilin and the neurotrophin receptor p75(NTR). However, proNGF-induced receptor complex formation has been difficult to directly assess other than by western blotting. We here describe a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) based fluorescence plate reader assay to monitor the interaction between fluorescently tagged sortilin and p75(NTR) in live cells. The method is based on a standard fluorescent plate reader found in many biochemical laboratories and the results are evaluated using a microscopy-based quantified sensitized acceptor emission FRET approach making use of a pair of FRET standard constructs. As a result, the effect of proNGF on the interaction between sortilin and p75(NTR) can be evaluated in live cells allowing for screening and selection of therapeutic compounds interfering with proNGF-induced cell death.

  13. Domain interplay in the urokinase receptor. Requirement for the third domain in high affinity ligand binding and demonstration of ligand contact sites in distinct receptor domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Ronne, E; Dano, K

    1996-01-01

    The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a membrane protein comprised of three extracellular domains. In order to study the importance of this domain organization in the ligand-binding process of the receptor we subjected a recombinant, soluble uPAR (suPAR) to specific proteolytic c...

  14. Kainate induces various domain closures in AMPA and kainate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venskutonyte, Raminta; Frydenvang, Karla; Hald, Helle

    2012-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors are key players in fast excitatory synaptic transmission within the central nervous system. These receptors have been divided into three subfamilies: the N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA), 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (AMPA) and kainate...... receptors. Kainate has previously been crystallized with the ligand binding domain (LBD) of AMPA receptors (GluA2 and GluA4) and kainate receptors (GluK1 and GluK2). Here, we report the structures of the kainate receptor GluK3 LBD in complex with kainate and GluK1 LBD in complex with kainate in the absence...... in the three kainate receptors, which is in contrast to the AMPA receptors where similar contacts are seen. It was revealed by patch clamp electrophysiology studies that kainate is a partial agonist at GluK1 with 36% efficacy compared to glutamate, which is in between the published efficacies of kainate at Glu...

  15. Sushi domains confer distinct trafficking profiles on GABAB receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Saad; Wilkins, Megan E.; Smart, Trevor G.

    2012-01-01

    GABAB receptors mediate slow inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain and feature during excitatory synaptic plasticity, as well as various neurological conditions. These receptors are obligate heterodimers composed of GABABR1 and R2 subunits. The two predominant R1 isoforms differ by the presence of two complement control protein modules or Sushi domains (SDs) in the N terminus of R1a. By using live imaging, with an α-bungarotoxin-binding site (BBS) and fluorophore-linked bungarotoxin, we studied how R2 stabilizes R1b subunits at the cell surface. Heterodimerization with R2 reduced the rate of internalization of R1b, compared with R1b homomers. However, R1aR2 heteromers exhibited increased cell surface stability compared with R1bR2 receptors in hippocampal neurons, suggesting that for receptors containing the R1a subunit, the SDs play an additional role in the surface stability of GABAB receptors. Both SDs were necessary to increase the stability of R1aR2 because single deletions caused the receptors to be internalized at the same rate and extent as R1bR2 receptors. Consistent with these findings, a chimera formed from the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)2 and the SDs from R1a increased the surface stability of mGluR2. These results suggest a role for SDs in stabilizing cell surface receptors that could impart different pre- and postsynaptic trafficking itineraries on GABAB receptors, thereby contributing to their physiological and pathological roles. PMID:22778417

  16. Discoidin Domain Receptors: Potential Actors and Targets in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan eRammal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix critically controls cancer cell behavior by inducing several signaling pathways through cell membrane receptors. Besides conferring structural properties to tissues around the tumor, the extracellular matrix is able to regulate cell proliferation, survival, migration and invasion. Among these receptors, the integrins family constitutes a major class of receptors that mediate cell interactions with extracellular matrix components.Twenty years ago, a new class of extracellular matrix receptors has been discovered. These tyrosine kinase receptors are the two discoidin domain receptors DDR1 and DDR2. DDR1 was first identified in the Dictyostelium discoideum and was shown to mediate cell aggregation. DDR2 shares highly conserved sequences with DDR1. Both receptors are activated upon binding to collagen, one of the most abundant proteins in extracellular matrix. While DDR2 can only be activated by fibrillar collagen, particularly types I and III, DDR1 is mostly activated by type I and IV collagens. In contrast with classical growth factor tyrosine kinase receptors which display a rapid and transient activation, DDR1 and DDR2 are unique in that they exhibit delayed and sustained receptor phosphorylation upon binding to collagen. Recent studies have reported differential expression and mutations of DDR1 and DDR2 in several cancer types and indicate clearly that these receptors have to be taken into account as new players in the different aspects of tumor progression, from non-malignant to highly malignant and invasive stages. This review will discuss the current knowledge on the role DDR1 and DDR2 in malignant transformation, cell proliferation, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, migratory and invasive processes, and finally the modulation of the response to chemotherapy. These new insights suggest that DDR1 and DDR2 are new potential targets in cancer therapy.

  17. Targeting Extracellular Domains D4 and D7 of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 Reveals Allosteric Receptor Regulatory Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Hyde, Caroline A. C.; Giese, Alexandra; Stuttfeld, Edward; Abram Saliba, Johan; Villemagne, Denis; Schleier, Thomas; Binz, H. Kaspar; Ballmer-Hofer, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) activate three receptor tyrosine kinases, VEGFR-1, -2, and -3, which regulate angiogenic and lymphangiogenic signaling. VEGFR-2 is the most prominent receptor in angiogenic signaling by VEGF ligands. The extracellular part of VEGF receptors consists of seven immunoglobulin homology domains (Ig domains). Earlier studies showed that domains 2 and 3 (D23) mediate ligand binding, while structural analysis of dimeric ligand/receptor complexes by electron...

  18. The Evolution of the Scavenger Receptor Cysteine-Rich Domain of the Class A Scavenger Receptors

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    Nicholas eYap

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The class A Scavenger Receptor (cA-SR family is a group of five evolutionarily related innate immune receptors. The cA-SRs are known for their promiscuous ligand binding; as they have been shown to bind bacteria such as Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli, as well as different modified forms of low-density lipoprotein. Three of the five family members possess a Scavenger Receptor Cysteine Rich (SRCR domain while the remaining two receptors lack the domain. Previous work has suggested that the Macrophage Associated Receptor with COllagenous structure (MARCO shares a recent common ancestor with the non-SRCR-containing receptors; however the origin of the SRCR domain within the cA-SRs remains unknown. We hypothesize that the SRCR domains of the cA-SRs have a common origin that predates teleost fish. Using the newly available sequence data from sea lamprey and ghost shark genome projects, we have shown that MARCO shares a common ancestor with the SRCR-containing proteins. In addition, we explored the evolutionary relationships within the SRCR domain by reconstructing the ancestral SRCR domains of the cA-SRs. We identified a motif that is highly conserved between the cA-SR SRCR domains and the ancestral SRCR domain that consist of WGTVCDD. We also show that the GRAEVYY motif, a functionally important motif within MARCO, is poorly conserved in the other cA-SRs and in the reconstructed ancestral domain. Further, we identified three sites within MARCO’s SRCR domain which are under positive selection. Two of these sites lie adjacent to the conserved WGTVCDD motif, and may indicate a potential biological function for these sites. Together these findings indicate a common origin of the SRCR domain within the cA-SRs; however different selective pressures between the proteins may have caused MARCOs SRCR domain to evolve to contain different functional motifs when compared to the other SRCR-containing cA-SRs.

  19. Antibodies recognizing different domains of the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solari, R; Kühn, L; Kraehenbuhl, J P

    1985-01-25

    The receptor responsible for the transepithelial transport of IgA dimer antibodies is a transmembrane glycoprotein known as membrane secretory component (SCm). During transport, the membrane anchoring domain is cleaved and the ectoplasmic domain of the receptor (SCs) remains tightly bound to the IgA dimer in exosecretions. We have produced monoclonal antibodies with distinct specificities against both cytoplasmic and ectoplasmic epitopes of rabbit SCm. One antibody (anti-SC303) reacted both with SCm and free SCs but not with SCs bound to IgA dimer (SIgA). Therefore, it recognized an epitope close to the IgA dimer binding site. The other monoclonal antibody (anti-SC166), which was unable to react with SCs, bound to the 15-kDa cytoplasmic extension of the membrane-spanning domain of the receptor. A polyclonal antibody (GaR-SC), raised in a goat against rabbit milk SCs, reacted with a subpopulation of SCs not recognized by the anti-SC303 monoclonal antibody and in addition also reacted with covalently bound sIgA. The three antibodies cross-reacted with rat SCm. We demonstrate the ability of the anti-SC166 monoclonal antibody to immunoadsorb subcellular organelles as a result of the cytoplasmic orientation of its epitope. Our data indicate that there are functional differences between the high- and low-molecular-weight families of SC in terms of IgA dimer binding.

  20. Molecular Insights into the Transmembrane Domain of the Thyrotropin Receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Chantreau

    Full Text Available The thyrotropin receptor (TSHR is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR that is member of the leucine-rich repeat subfamily (LGR. In the absence of crystal structure, the success of rational design of ligands targeting the receptor internal cavity depends on the quality of the TSHR models built. In this subfamily, transmembrane helices (TM 2 and 5 are characterized by the absence of proline compared to most receptors, raising the question of the structural conformation of these helices. To gain insight into the structural properties of these helices, we carried out bioinformatics and experimental studies. Evolutionary analysis of the LGR family revealed a deletion in TM5 but provided no information on TM2. Wild type residues at positions 2.58, 2.59 or 2.60 in TM2 and/or at position 5.50 in TM5 were substituted to proline. Depending on the position of the proline substitution, different effects were observed on membrane expression, glycosylation, constitutive cAMP activity and responses to thyrotropin. Only proline substitution at position 2.59 maintained complex glycosylation and high membrane expression, supporting occurrence of a bulged TM2. The TSHR transmembrane domain was modeled by homology with the orexin 2 receptor, using a protocol that forced the deletion of one residue in the TM5 bulge of the template. The stability of the model was assessed by molecular dynamics simulations. TM5 straightened during the equilibration phase and was stable for the remainder of the simulations. Our data support a structural model of the TSHR transmembrane domain with a bulged TM2 and a straight TM5 that is specific of glycoprotein hormone receptors.

  1. Receptor domains of two-component signal transduction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Julie; Koteva, Kalinka; Wright, Gerard

    2011-05-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems are found ubiquitously in prokaryotes, and in archaea, fungi, yeast and some plants, where they regulate physiologic and molecular processes at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Two-component systems sense changes in environmental conditions when a specific ligand binds to the receptor domain of the histidine kinase sensory component. The structures of many histidine kinase receptors are known, including those which sense extracellular and cytoplasmic signals. In this review, we discuss the basic architecture of two-component signalling circuits, including known system ligands, structure and function of both receptor and signalling domains, the chemistry of phosphotransfer, and cross-talk between different two-component pathways. Given the importance of these systems in regulating cellular responses, many biochemical techniques have been developed for their study and analysis. We therefore also review current methods used to study two-component signalling, including a new affinity-based proteomics approach used to study inducible resistance to the antibiotic vancomycin through the VanSR two-component signal transduction system.

  2. The discoidin domain receptor DDR2 is a receptor for type X collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitinger, Birgit; Kwan, Alvin P L

    2006-08-01

    During endochondral ossification, collagen X is deposited in the hypertrophic zone of the growth plate. Our previous results have shown that collagen X is capable of interacting directly with chondrocytes, primarily via integrin alpha2beta1. In this study, we determined whether collagen X could also interact with the non-integrin collagen receptors, discoidin domain receptors (DDRs), DDR1 or DDR2. The widely expressed DDRs are receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated by a number of different collagen types. Collagen X was found to be a much better ligand for DDR2 than for DDR1. Collagen X bound to the DDR2 extracellular domain with high affinity and stimulated DDR2 autophosphorylation, the first step in transmembrane signalling. Expression of DDR2 in the epiphyseal plate was confirmed by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The spatial expression of DDR2 in the hypertrophic zone of the growth plate is consistent with a physiological interaction of DDR2 with collagen X. Surprisingly, the discoidin domain of DDR2, which fully contains the binding sites for the fibrillar collagens I and II, was not sufficient for collagen X binding. The nature of the DDR2 binding site(s) within collagen X was further analysed. In addition to a collagenous domain, collagen X contains a C-terminal NC1 domain. DDR2 was found to recognise the triple-helical region of collagen X as well as the NC1 domain. Binding to the collagenous region was dependent on the triple-helical conformation. DDR2 autophosphorylation was induced by the collagen X triple-helical region but not the NC1 domain, indicating that the triple-helical region of collagen X contains a specific DDR2 binding site that is capable of receptor activation. Our study is the first to describe a non-fibrillar collagen ligand for DDR2 and will form the basis for further studies into the biological function of collagen X during endochondral ossification.

  3. Solution structure of the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor domain 2

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Shaokai; Caffrey, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) mediates entry of coxsackievirus and adenovirus. CAR possesses an extracellular region that is comprised of 2 immunoglobulin domains termed CAR–D1 and CAR–D2. In the present work, the solution structure of CAR–D2, consisting of residues 142–235 of human CAR, has been determined by NMR spectroscopy. CAR–D2 is shown to be a β-sandwich motif comprised of two β-sheets, which are stabilized by two disulfide bonds. The first β-sheet is comprised of β...

  4. Human formyl peptide receptor ligand binding domain(s). Studies using an improved mutagenesis/expression vector reveal a novel mechanism for the regulation of receptor occupancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, H D; Vilander, L; Andrews, W H; Holmes, R

    1994-09-09

    Recently, we reported the domain requirements for the binding of formyl peptide to its specific receptor. Based on experiments using receptor chimeras, we also postulated an importance for the amino-terminal domain of the receptor in ligand binding (Perez, H. D., Holmes, R., Vilander, L., Adams, R., Manzana, W., Jolley, D., and Andrews, W. H. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 2292-2295). We have begun to perform a detailed analysis of the regions within the formyl peptide receptor involved in ligand binding. To address the importance of the receptor amino-terminal domain, we substituted (or inserted) hydrophilic sequences within the amino-terminal domain, expressed the receptors, and determined their ability to bind ligand. A stretch of nine amino acids next to the initial methionine was identified as crucial for receptor occupancy. A peptide containing such a sequence specifically completed binding of the ligand to the receptor. Alanine screen mutagenesis of the second extracellular domain also identified amino acids involved in ligand binding as well as a disulfide bond (Cys98 to Cys176) crucial for maintaining the binding pocket. These studies provide evidence for a novel mechanism involved in regulation of receptor occupancy. Binding of the ligand induces conformational changes in the receptor that result in the apposition of the amino-terminal domain over the ligand, providing a lid to the binding pocket.

  5. Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 Mediates Myosin-Dependent Collagen Contraction

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    Nuno M. Coelho

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1 is a tyrosine kinase collagen adhesion receptor that mediates cell migration through association with non-muscle myosin IIA (NMIIA. Because DDR1 is implicated in cancer fibrosis, we hypothesized that DDR1 interacts with NMIIA to enable collagen compaction by traction forces. Mechanical splinting of rat dermal wounds increased DDR1 expression and collagen alignment. In periodontal ligament of DDR1 knockout mice, collagen mechanical reorganization was reduced >30%. Similarly, cultured cells with DDR1 knockdown or expressing kinase-deficient DDR1d showed 50% reduction of aligned collagen. Tractional remodeling of collagen was dependent on DDR1 clustering, activation, and interaction of the DDR1 C-terminal kinase domain with NMIIA filaments. Collagen remodeling by traction forces, DDR1 tyrosine phosphorylation, and myosin light chain phosphorylation were increased on stiff versus soft substrates. Thus, DDR1 clustering, activation, and interaction with NMIIA filaments enhance the collagen tractional remodeling that is important for collagen compaction in fibrosis.

  6. SorCS2 is required for BDNF-dependent plasticity in the hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glerup, S; Bolcho, U; Bøggild, S;

    2016-01-01

    SorCS2 is a member of the Vps10p-domain receptor gene family receptors with critical roles in the control of neuronal viability and function. Several genetic studies have suggested SORCS2 to confer risk of bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder. Here we repor...

  7. Structure of the homodimeric androgen receptor ligand-binding domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal, Marta; Prekovic, Stefan; Gallastegui, Nerea; Helsen, Christine; Abella, Montserrat; Zielinska, Karolina; Gay, Marina; Vilaseca, Marta; Taulès, Marta; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; van Royen, Martin E.; Claessens, Frank; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo; Estébanez-Perpiñá, Eva

    2017-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a crucial role in normal physiology, development and metabolism as well as in the aetiology and treatment of diverse pathologies such as androgen insensitivity syndromes (AIS), male infertility and prostate cancer (PCa). Here we show that dimerization of AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) is induced by receptor agonists but not by antagonists. The 2.15-Å crystal structure of homodimeric, agonist- and coactivator peptide-bound AR-LBD unveils a 1,000-Å2 large dimerization surface, which harbours over 40 previously unexplained AIS- and PCa-associated point mutations. An AIS mutation in the self-association interface (P767A) disrupts dimer formation in vivo, and has a detrimental effect on the transactivating properties of full-length AR, despite retained hormone-binding capacity. The conservation of essential residues suggests that the unveiled dimerization mechanism might be shared by other nuclear receptors. Our work defines AR-LBD homodimerization as an essential step in the proper functioning of this important transcription factor. PMID:28165461

  8. The agonist-binding domain of the calcium-sensing receptor is located at the amino-terminal domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, H; Jensen, Anders A.; Sheppard, P O

    1999-01-01

    has been shown to bind the endogenous agonist. To investigate whether the agonist-binding domain of the CaR also is located in the ATD, we constructed a chimeric receptor named Ca/1a consisting of the ATD of CaR and the seven transmembrane region and C terminus of mGlu1a. The Ca/1a receptor stimulated......The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor that displays 19-25% sequence identity to the gamma-aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB) and metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors. All three groups of receptors have a large amino-terminal domain (ATD), which for the mGlu receptors...

  9. Role of Bacillus thuringiensis toxin domains in toxicity and receptor binding in the Diamondback moth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballester, V.; Granero, F.; Maagd, de R.A.; Bosch, D.; Mensua, J.L.; Ferre, J.

    1999-01-01

    The toxic fragment of Bacillus thuringiensis crystal proteins consists of three distinct structural domains. There is evidence that domain I is involved in pore formation and that domain II is involved in receptor binding and specificity. It has been found that, in some cases, domain III is also

  10. Crystal structure of mouse coronavirus receptor-binding domain complexed with its murine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Guiqing; Sun, Dawei; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Qian, Zhaohui; Holmes, Kathryn V.; Li, Fang (Cornell); (UMM-MED); (Colorado)

    2011-09-28

    Coronaviruses have evolved diverse mechanisms to recognize different receptors for their cross-species transmission and host-range expansion. Mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV) uses the N-terminal domain (NTD) of its spike protein as its receptor-binding domain. Here we present the crystal structure of MHV NTD complexed with its receptor murine carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1a (mCEACAM1a). Unexpectedly, MHV NTD contains a core structure that has the same {beta}-sandwich fold as human galectins (S-lectins) and additional structural motifs that bind to the N-terminal Ig-like domain of mCEACAM1a. Despite its galectin fold, MHV NTD does not bind sugars, but instead binds mCEACAM1a through exclusive protein-protein interactions. Critical contacts at the interface have been confirmed by mutagenesis, providing a structural basis for viral and host specificities of coronavirus/CEACAM1 interactions. Sugar-binding assays reveal that galectin-like NTDs of some coronaviruses such as human coronavirus OC43 and bovine coronavirus bind sugars. Structural analysis and mutagenesis localize the sugar-binding site in coronavirus NTDs to be above the {beta}-sandwich core. We propose that coronavirus NTDs originated from a host galectin and retained sugar-binding functions in some contemporary coronaviruses, but evolved new structural features in MHV for mCEACAM1a binding.

  11. Isolated Toll-like receptor transmembrane domains are capable of oligomerization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James I Godfroy

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs act as the first line of defense against bacterial and viral pathogens by initiating critical defense signals upon dimer activation. The contribution of the transmembrane domain in the dimerization and signaling process has heretofore been overlooked in favor of the extracellular and intracellular domains. As mounting evidence suggests that the transmembrane domain is a critical region in several protein families, we hypothesized that this was also the case for Toll-like receptors. Using a combined biochemical and biophysical approach, we investigated the ability of isolated Toll-like receptor transmembrane domains to interact independently of extracellular domain dimerization. Our results showed that the transmembrane domains had a preference for the native dimer partners in bacterial membranes for the entire receptor family. All TLR transmembrane domains showed strong homotypic interaction potential. The TLR2 transmembrane domain demonstrated strong heterotypic interactions in bacterial membranes with its known interaction partners, TLR1 and TLR6, as well as with a proposed interaction partner, TLR10, but not with TLR4, TLR5, or unrelated transmembrane receptors providing evidence for the specificity of TLR2 transmembrane domain interactions. Peptides for the transmembrane domains of TLR1, TLR2, and TLR6 were synthesized to further study this subfamily of receptors. These peptides validated the heterotypic interactions seen in bacterial membranes and demonstrated that the TLR2 transmembrane domain had moderately strong interactions with both TLR1 and TLR6. Combined, these results suggest a role for the transmembrane domain in Toll-like receptor oligomerization and as such, may be a novel target for further investigation of new therapeutic treatments of Toll-like receptor mediated diseases.

  12. Distinct Subunit Domains Govern Synaptic Stability and Specificity of the Kainate Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Straub

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic communication between neurons requires the precise localization of neurotransmitter receptors to the correct synapse type. Kainate-type glutamate receptors restrict synaptic localization that is determined by the afferent presynaptic connection. The mechanisms that govern this input-specific synaptic localization remain unclear. Here, we examine how subunit composition and specific subunit domains contribute to synaptic localization of kainate receptors. The cytoplasmic domain of the GluK2 low-affinity subunit stabilizes kainate receptors at synapses. In contrast, the extracellular domain of the GluK4/5 high-affinity subunit synergistically controls the synaptic specificity of kainate receptors through interaction with C1q-like proteins. Thus, the input-specific synaptic localization of the native kainate receptor complex involves two mechanisms that underlie specificity and stabilization of the receptor at synapses.

  13. The intracellular juxtamembrane domain of discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is essential for receptor activation and DDR2-mediated cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daehwan; Ko, Panseon; You, Eunae; Rhee, Sangmyung

    2014-12-01

    Discoidin domain receptors (DDRs) are unusual receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) that are activated by fibrillar collagens instead of soluble growth factors. DDRs play an important role in various cellular functions and disease processes, including malignant progression. Compared to other RTKs, DDRs have relatively long juxtamembrane domains, which are believed to contribute to receptor function. Despite this possibility, the function and mechanism of the juxtamembrane domain of DDRs have not yet been fully elucidated. In this study, we found that the cytoplasmic juxtamembrane 2 (JM2) region of DDR2 contributed to receptor dimerization, which is critical for receptor activation in response to collagen stimulation. A collagen-binding assay showed that JM2 was required for efficient binding of collagen to the discoidin (DS) domain. Immunohistochemical analysis of DDR2 expression using a tissue microarray demonstrated that DDR2 was overexpressed in several carcinoma tissues, including bladder, testis, lung, kidney, prostate and stomach. In H1299 cells, inhibition of DDR2 activity by overexpressing the juxtamembrane domain containing JM2 suppressed collagen-induced colony formation, cell proliferation and invasion via the inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9. Taken together, our results suggest that JM2-mediated dimerization is likely to be essential for DDR2 activation and cancer progression. Thus, inhibition of DDR2 function using a JM2-containing peptide might be a useful strategy for the treatment of DDR2-positive cancers.

  14. Recognition of coxiella burnetii by toll-like receptors and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ammerdorffer, Anne; Schoffelen, Teske; Gresnigt, Mark S.; Oosting, Marije; Brok, Den Martijn H.; Abdollahi-Roodsaz, Shahla; Kanneganti, Thirumala Devi; Jong, De Dirk J.; Deuren, Van Marcel; Roest, Hendrik Jan; Rebel, Johanna M.J.; Netea, Mihai G.; Joosten, Leo A.B.; Sprong, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Background. Infection with Coxiella burnetii can lead to acute and chronic Q fever. Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1), TLR2, TLR4, TLR6, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain receptor 1 (NOD1), NOD2, and the mitogen-activated protein kinases are central in the innate immune response against

  15. Recognition of Coxiella burnetii by Toll-like Receptors and Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain-like Receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ammerdorffer, A.; Schoffelen, T.; Gresnigt, M.S.; Oosting, M.; Brok, M.H.M.G.M. den; Abdollahi-Roodsaz, S.; Kanneganti, T.D.; Jong, D.J. de; Deuren, M. van; Roest, H.J.; Rebel, J.M.; Netea, M.G.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Sprong, T.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infection with Coxiella burnetii can lead to acute and chronic Q fever. Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1), TLR2, TLR4, TLR6, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain receptor 1 (NOD1), NOD2, and the mitogen-activated protein kinases are central in the innate immune response against

  16. Identification of intracellular domains in the growth hormone receptor involved in signal transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billestrup, N.; Allevato, G.; Moldrup, A. [Hagedorn Research Lab., Gentofte (Denmark)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    The growth hormone (GH) receptor belongs to the GH/prolactin/cytokine super-family of receptors. The signal transduction mechanism utilized by this class of receptors remains largely unknown. In order to identify functional domains in the intracellular region of the GH receptor we generated a number of GH receptor mutants and analyzed their function after transfection into various cell lines. A truncated GH receptor missing 184 amino acids at the C-terminus was unable to medite GH effects on transcription of the Spi 2.1 and insulin genes. However, this mutant was fully active in mediating GH-stimulated metabolic effects such as protein synthesis and lipolysis. Furthermore, this mutant GH receptor internalized rapidly following GH binding. Another truncated GH receptor lacking all but five amino acids of the cytoplasmic domain could not mediate any effects of GH nor did it internalize. Deletion of the proline-rich region or changing the four prolines to alanines also resulted in a GH receptor deficient in signaling. Mutation of phenylalanine 346 to alanine resulted in a GH receptor which did not internalize rapidly; however, this mutant GH receptor was capable of mediating GH-stimulated transcription as well as metabolic effects. These results indicate that the intracellular part of the GH receptor can be divided into at least three functional domains: (1) for transcriptional activity, two domains are involved, one located in the C-terminal 184 amino acids and the other in the proline-rich domain; (2) for metabolic effects, a domain located in or near the proline-rich region is of importance; and (3) for internalization, phenylalanine 346 is necessary. 28 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Identification of intracellular domains in the growth hormone receptor involved in signal transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, N; Allevato, G; Norstedt, G

    1994-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH) receptor belongs to the GH/prolactin/cytokine super-family of receptors. The signal transduction mechanism utilized by this class of receptors remains largely unknown. In order to identify functional domains in the intracellular region of the GH receptor we generated...... a number of GH receptor mutants and analyzed their function after transfection into various cell lines. A truncated GH receptor missing 184 amino acids at the C-terminus was unable to mediate GH effects on transcription of the Spi 2.1 and insulin genes. However, this mutant was fully active in mediating GH...

  18. Intrinsically disordered cytoplasmic domains of two cytokine receptors mediate conserved interactions with membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haxholm, Gitte Wolfsberg; Nikolajsen, Louise Fletcher; Olsen, Johan Gotthardt;

    2015-01-01

    Class 1 cytokine receptors regulate essential biological processes through complex intracellular signaling networks. However, the structural platform for understanding their functions is currently incomplete as structure-function studies of the intracellular domains (ICDs) are critically lacking...

  19. Expression analysis of the Toll-like receptor and TIR domain adaptor families of zebrafish.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, A.H.; Krens, SF Gabby; Rodriguez, IA Medina; He, S; Bitter, W.; Snaar-Jagalska, B Ewa; Spaink, H.P.

    2004-01-01

    The zebrafish genomic sequence database was analysed for the presence of genes encoding members of the Toll-like receptors (TLR) and interleukin receptors (IL-R) and associated adaptor proteins containing a TIR domain. The resulting predictions show the presence of one or more counterparts for the

  20. Biocomputational analysis of evolutionary relationship between toll-like receptor and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabia Bhardwaj

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The active domains (TIR and NACHT of the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs: Toll-like receptors [TLRs] and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain [NOD]-like receptors [NLR], respectively are the major hotspots of evolution as natural selection has crafted their final structure by substitution of residues over time. This paper addresses the evolutionary perspectives of the TLR and NLR genes with respect to the active domains in terms of their chronological fruition, functional diversification, and species-specific stipulation. Materials and Methods: A total of 48 full-length cds (and corresponding peptide of the domains were selected as representatives of each type of PRRs, belonging to divergent animal species, for the biocomputational analyses. The secondary and tertiary structure of the taurine TIR and NACHT domains was predicted to compare the relatedness among the domains under study. Results: Multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree results indicated that these host-specific PRRs formed entirely different clusters, with active domains of NLRs (NACHT evolved earlier as compared to the active domains of TLRs (TIR. Each type of TLR or NLR shows comparatively less variation among the animal species due to the specificity of action against the type of microbes. Conclusion: It can be concluded from the study that there has been no positive selection acting on the domains associated with disease resistance which is a fitness trait indicating the extent of purifying pressure on the domains. Gene duplication could be a possible reason of genesis of similar kinds of TLRs (virus or bacteria specific.

  1. Biocomputational analysis of evolutionary relationship between toll-like receptor and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Rabia; Mukhopadhyay, Chandra Shekhar; Deka, Dipak; Verma, Ramneek; Dubey, P. P.; Arora, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The active domains (TIR and NACHT) of the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs: Toll-like receptors [TLRs] and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain [NOD]-like receptors [NLR], respectively) are the major hotspots of evolution as natural selection has crafted their final structure by substitution of residues over time. This paper addresses the evolutionary perspectives of the TLR and NLR genes with respect to the active domains in terms of their chronological fruition, functional diversification, and species-specific stipulation. Materials and Methods: A total of 48 full-length cds (and corresponding peptide) of the domains were selected as representatives of each type of PRRs, belonging to divergent animal species, for the biocomputational analyses. The secondary and tertiary structure of the taurine TIR and NACHT domains was predicted to compare the relatedness among the domains under study. Results: Multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree results indicated that these host-specific PRRs formed entirely different clusters, with active domains of NLRs (NACHT) evolved earlier as compared to the active domains of TLRs (TIR). Each type of TLR or NLR shows comparatively less variation among the animal species due to the specificity of action against the type of microbes. Conclusion: It can be concluded from the study that there has been no positive selection acting on the domains associated with disease resistance which is a fitness trait indicating the extent of purifying pressure on the domains. Gene duplication could be a possible reason of genesis of similar kinds of TLRs (virus or bacteria specific). PMID:27956772

  2. Structure of MERS-CoV spike receptor-binding domain complexed with human receptor DPP4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nianshuang Wang; Xuanling Shi; Liwei Jiang; Senyan Zhang; Dongli Wang; Pei Tong; Dongxing Guo

    2013-01-01

    The spike glycoprotein (S) of recently identified Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) targets the cellular receptor,dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4).Sequence comparison and modeling analysis have revealed a putative receptor-binding domain (RBD) on the viral spike,which mediates this interaction.We report the 3.0 (A)resolution crystal structure of MERS-CoV RBD bound to the extracellular domain of human DPP4.Our results show that MERS-CoV RBD consists of a core and a receptor-binding subdomain.The receptor-binding subdomain interacts with DPP4 p-propeller but not its intrinsic hydrolase domain.MERS-CoV RBD and related SARS-CoV RBD share a high degree of structural similarity in their core subdomains,but are notably divergent in the receptorbinding subdomain.Mutagenesis studies have identified several key residues in the receptor-binding subdomain that are critical for viral binding to DPP4 and entry into the target cell.The atomic details at the interface between MERS-CoV RBD and DPP4 provide structural understanding of the virus and receptor interaction,which can guide development of therapeutics and vaccines against MERS-CoV infection.

  3. Agonist-regulated Cleavage of the Extracellular Domain of Parathyroid Hormone Receptor Type 1*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenk, Christoph; Schulz, Stefan; Calebiro, Davide; Lohse, Martin J.

    2010-01-01

    The receptor for parathyroid hormone (PTHR) is a main regulator of calcium homeostasis and bone maintenance. As a member of class B of G protein-coupled receptors, it harbors a large extracellular domain, which is required for ligand binding. Here, we demonstrate that the PTHR extracellular domain is cleaved by a protease belonging to the family of extracellular metalloproteinases. We show that the cleavage takes place in a region of the extracellular domain that belongs to an unstructured loop connecting the ligand-binding parts and that the N-terminal 10-kDa fragment is connected to the receptor core by a disulfide bond. Cleaved receptor revealed reduced protein stability compared with noncleaved receptor, suggesting degradation of the whole receptor. In the presence of the agonistic peptides PTH(1–34), PTH(1–14), or PTH(1–31), the processing of the PTHR extracellular domain was inhibited, and receptor protein levels were stabilized. A processed form of the PTHR was also detected in human kidney. These findings suggest a new model of PTHR processing and regulation of its stability. PMID:20080964

  4. Agonist-regulated cleavage of the extracellular domain of parathyroid hormone receptor type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenk, Christoph; Schulz, Stefan; Calebiro, Davide; Lohse, Martin J

    2010-03-19

    The receptor for parathyroid hormone (PTHR) is a main regulator of calcium homeostasis and bone maintenance. As a member of class B of G protein-coupled receptors, it harbors a large extracellular domain, which is required for ligand binding. Here, we demonstrate that the PTHR extracellular domain is cleaved by a protease belonging to the family of extracellular metalloproteinases. We show that the cleavage takes place in a region of the extracellular domain that belongs to an unstructured loop connecting the ligand-binding parts and that the N-terminal 10-kDa fragment is connected to the receptor core by a disulfide bond. Cleaved receptor revealed reduced protein stability compared with noncleaved receptor, suggesting degradation of the whole receptor. In the presence of the agonistic peptides PTH(1-34), PTH(1-14), or PTH(1-31), the processing of the PTHR extracellular domain was inhibited, and receptor protein levels were stabilized. A processed form of the PTHR was also detected in human kidney. These findings suggest a new model of PTHR processing and regulation of its stability.

  5. Evolution of NMDA receptor cytoplasmic interaction domains: implications for organisation of synaptic signalling complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emes Richard D

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutamate gated postsynaptic receptors in the central nervous system (CNS are essential for environmentally stimulated behaviours including learning and memory in both invertebrates and vertebrates. Though their genetics, biochemistry, physiology, and role in behaviour have been intensely studied in vitro and in vivo, their molecular evolution and structural aspects remain poorly understood. To understand how these receptors have evolved different physiological requirements we have investigated the molecular evolution of glutamate gated receptors and ion channels, in particular the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor, which is essential for higher cognitive function. Studies of rodent NMDA receptors show that the C-terminal intracellular domain forms a signalling complex with enzymes and scaffold proteins, which is important for neuronal and behavioural plasticity Results The vertebrate NMDA receptor was found to have subunits with C-terminal domains up to 500 amino acids longer than invertebrates. This extension was specific to the NR2 subunit and occurred before the duplication and subsequent divergence of NR2 in the vertebrate lineage. The shorter invertebrate C-terminus lacked vertebrate protein interaction motifs involved with forming a signaling complex although the terminal PDZ interaction domain was conserved. The vertebrate NR2 C-terminal domain was predicted to be intrinsically disordered but with a conserved secondary structure. Conclusion We highlight an evolutionary adaptation specific to vertebrate NMDA receptor NR2 subunits. Using in silico methods we find that evolution has shaped the NMDA receptor C-terminus into an unstructured but modular intracellular domain that parallels the expansion in complexity of an NMDA receptor signalling complex in the vertebrate lineage. We propose the NR2 C-terminus has evolved to be a natively unstructured yet flexible hub organising postsynaptic signalling. The evolution of

  6. LysM domain receptor kinases regulating rhizobial Nod factor-induced infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limpens, Erik; Franken, Carolien; Smit, Patrick; Willemse, Joost; Bisseling, Ton; Geurts, René

    2003-10-24

    The rhizobial infection of legumes has the most stringent demand toward Nod factor structure of all host responses, and therefore a specific Nod factor entry receptor has been proposed. The SYM2 gene identified in certain ecotypes of pea (Pisum sativum) is a good candidate for such an entry receptor. We exploited the close phylogenetic relationship of pea and the model legume Medicago truncatula to identify genes specifically involved in rhizobial infection. The SYM2 orthologous region of M. truncatula contains 15 putative receptor-like genes, of which 7 are LysM domain-containing receptor-like kinases (LYKs). Using reverse genetics in M. truncatula, we show that two LYK genes are specifically involved in infection thread formation. This, as well as the properties of the LysM domains, strongly suggests that they are Nod factor entry receptors.

  7. Domain-based identification and analysis of glutamate receptor ion channels and their relatives in prokaryotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-Feng Ger

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated and ligand-gated ion channels are used in eukaryotic organisms for the purpose of electrochemical signaling. There are prokaryotic homologues to major eukaryotic channels of these sorts, including voltage-gated sodium, potassium, and calcium channels, Ach-receptor and glutamate-receptor channels. The prokaryotic homologues have been less well characterized functionally than their eukaryotic counterparts. In this study we identify likely prokaryotic functional counterparts of eukaryotic glutamate receptor channels by comprehensive analysis of the prokaryotic sequences in the context of known functional domains present in the eukaryotic members of this family. In particular, we searched the nonredundant protein database for all proteins containing the following motif: the two sections of the extracellular glutamate binding domain flanking two transmembrane helices. We discovered 100 prokaryotic sequences containing this motif, with a wide variety of functional annotations. Two groups within this family have the same topology as eukaryotic glutamate receptor channels. Group 1 has a potassium-like selectivity filter. Group 2 is most closely related to eukaryotic glutamate receptor channels. We present analysis of the functional domain architecture for the group of 100, a putative phylogenetic tree, comparison of the protein phylogeny with the corresponding species phylogeny, consideration of the distribution of these proteins among classes of prokaryotes, and orthologous relationships between prokaryotic and human glutamate receptor channels. We introduce a construct called the Evolutionary Domain Network, which represents a putative pathway of domain rearrangements underlying the domain composition of present channels. We believe that scientists interested in ion channels in general, and ligand-gated ion channels in particular, will be interested in this work. The work should also be of interest to bioinformatics researchers who are

  8. Ethylene Controls Autophosphorylation of the Histidine Kinase Domain in Ethylene Receptor ETR1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan Voet-van-Vormizeele; Georg Groth

    2008-01-01

    Perception of the phytohormone ethylene is accomplished by a small family of integral membrane receptors.In Arabidopsis,five ethylene receptor proteins are known,including ethylene resistant 1 (ETR1).The hydrophobic aminoterminal domain of these receptors contains the ethylene-binding site while the carboxyl-terminal part consists of a histidine kinase domain and a response regulator domain,which are well known elements found in bacterial two-component signaling.The soluble membrane-extrinsic carboxyl-terminal part of the receptor,which is likely to play an important role in signal transduction,showed intrinsic kinase activity when expressed and purified on its own.However,a correlation between signal input and autokinase activity was not established in these studies,as receptors were missing the transmembrane amino-terminal sensor domain.Thus,it is still unclear whether autophosphorylation occurs in response to perception of the ethylene signal.Here,we report on autophosphorylation studies of purified full-length ETR1.Autokinase activity of the purified receptor is controlled by ethylene or by ethylene agonists like the π-acceptor compound cyanide.In fact,both signal molecules were able to completely turn off the intrinsic kinase activity.Furthermore,the observed inhibition of autophosphorylation in ETR1 by both molecules could be prevented when the ethylene antagonist 1-methyl-cyclopropene (MCP) was applied.

  9. Structural rearrangement of the intracellular domains during AMPA receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariassen, Linda Grønborg; Katchan, Ljudmila; Jensen, Anna Guldvang

    2016-01-01

    α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate the majority of fast excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. Despite recent advances in structural studies of AMPARs, information about the specific conformational...... changes that underlie receptor function is lacking. Here, we used single and dual insertion of GFP variants at various positions in AMPAR subunits to enable measurements of conformational changes using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in live cells. We produced dual CFP/YFP-tagged GluA2...... subunit constructs that had normal activity and displayed intrareceptor FRET. We used fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) in live HEK293 cells to determine distinct steady-state FRET efficiencies in the presence of different ligands, suggesting a dynamic picture of the resting state. Patch...

  10. Chromosomal Loop Domains Direct the Recombination of Antigen Receptor Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiazhi; Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Lijuan; Frock, Richard L; Du, Zhou; Meyers, Robin M; Meng, Fei-long; Schatz, David G; Alt, Frederick W

    2015-11-05

    RAG initiates antibody V(D)J recombination in developing lymphocytes by generating "on-target" DNA breaks at matched pairs of bona fide recombination signal sequences (RSSs). We employ bait RAG-generated breaks in endogenous or ectopically inserted RSS pairs to identify huge numbers of RAG "off-target" breaks. Such breaks occur at the simple CAC motif that defines the RSS cleavage site and are largely confined within convergent CTCF-binding element (CBE)-flanked loop domains containing bait RSS pairs. Marked orientation dependence of RAG off-target activity within loops spanning up to 2 megabases implies involvement of linear tracking. In this regard, major RAG off-targets in chromosomal translocations occur as convergent RSS pairs at enhancers within a loop. Finally, deletion of a CBE-based IgH locus element disrupts V(D)J recombination domains and, correspondingly, alters RAG on- and off-target distributions within IgH. Our findings reveal how RAG activity is developmentally focused and implicate mechanisms by which chromatin domains harness biological processes within them. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A Globin Domain in a Neuronal Transmembrane Receptor of Caenorhabditis elegans and Ascaris suum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilleman, Lesley; Germani, Francesca; De Henau, Sasha; Helbo, Signe; Desmet, Filip; Berghmans, Herald; Van Doorslaer, Sabine; Hoogewijs, David; Schoofs, Liliane; Braeckman, Bart P.; Moens, Luc; Fago, Angela; Dewilde, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    We report the structural and biochemical characterization of GLB-33, a putative neuropeptide receptor that is exclusively expressed in the nervous system of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. This unique chimeric protein is composed of a 7-transmembrane domain (7TM), GLB-33 7TM, typical of a G-protein-coupled receptor, and of a globin domain (GD), GLB-33 GD. Comprehensive sequence similarity searches in the genome of the parasitic nematode, Ascaris suum, revealed a chimeric protein that is similar to a Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-amide neuropeptide receptor. The three-dimensional structures of the separate domains of both species and of the full-length proteins were modeled. The 7TM domains of both proteins appeared very similar, but the globin domain of the A. suum receptor surprisingly seemed to lack several helices, suggesting a novel truncated globin fold. The globin domain of C. elegans GLB-33, however, was very similar to a genuine myoglobin-type molecule. Spectroscopic analysis of the recombinant GLB-33 GD showed that the heme is pentacoordinate when ferrous and in the hydroxide-ligated form when ferric, even at neutral pH. Flash-photolysis experiments showed overall fast biphasic CO rebinding kinetics. In its ferrous deoxy form, GLB-33 GD is capable of reversibly binding O2 with a very high affinity and of reducing nitrite to nitric oxide faster than other globins. Collectively, these properties suggest that the globin domain of GLB-33 may serve as a highly sensitive oxygen sensor and/or as a nitrite reductase. Both properties are potentially able to modulate the neuropeptide sensitivity of the neuronal transmembrane receptor. PMID:25666609

  12. Structure and Notch receptor binding of the tandem WWE domain of Deltex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweifel, Mark E; Leahy, Daniel J; Barrick, Doug

    2005-11-01

    Deltex is a cytosolic effector of Notch signaling thought to bind through its N-terminal domain to the Notch receptor. Here we report the structure of the Drosophila Deltex N-terminal domain, which contains two tandem WWE sequence repeats. The WWE repeats, which adopt a novel fold, are related by an approximate two-fold axis of rotation. Although the WWE repeats are structurally distinct, they interact extensively and form a deep cleft at their junction that appears well suited for ligand binding. The two repeats are thermodynamically coupled; this coupling is mediated in part by a conserved segment that is immediately C-terminal to the second WWE domain. We demonstrate that although the Deltex WWE tandem is monomeric in solution, it forms a heterodimer with the ankyrin domain of the Notch receptor. These results provide structural and functional insight into how Deltex modulates Notch signaling, and how WWE modules recognize targets for ubiquitination.

  13. Discoidin domain receptor 1 is activated independently of beta(1) integrin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, W; Brakebusch, C; Fässler, R

    2000-01-01

    Various types of collagen have been identified as potential ligands for the two mammalian discoidin domain receptor (DDR) tyrosine kinases, DDR1 and DDR2. It is presently unclear whether collagen-induced DDR receptor activation, which occurs with very slow kinetics, involves additional proteins...... with kinase activity or membrane-anchored proteins serving as coreceptors. In particular, the role of the collagen-binding integrins alpha(1)beta(1) or alpha(2)beta(1) in the DDR activation process is undefined. Here, we provide three lines of evidence suggesting that DDR1 signaling is distinct from integrin...... activation. First we demonstrate that the enzymatic activity of DDR1 is essential for receptor tyrosine phosphorylation. Collagen-induced DDR receptor autophosphorylation can be blocked either by a dominant negative mutant or by a preparation of recombinant extracellular domain. Second, we show DDR1 signals...

  14. Discoidin domain receptors guide axons along longitudinal tracts in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsoeld, Thomas; Park, Ja-On; Hutter, Harald

    2013-02-01

    Discoidin domain receptors are a family of receptor tyrosine kinases activated by collagens. Here we characterize the role of the two discoidin domain receptors, ddr-1 and ddr-2, of the nematode C. elegans during nervous system development. ddr-2 mutant animals exhibit axon guidance defects in major longitudinal tracts most prominently in the ventral nerve cord. ddr-1 mutants show no significant phenotype on their own but significantly enhance guidance defects of ddr-2 in double mutants. ddr-1 and ddr-2 GFP-reporter constructs are expressed in neurons with axons in all affected nerve tracts. DDR-1 and DDR-2 GFP fusion proteins localize to axons. DDR-2 is required cell-autonomously in the PVPR neuron for the guidance of the PVPR pioneer axon, which establishes the left ventral nerve cord tract and serves as substrate for later outgrowing follower axons. Our results provide the first insight on discoidin domain receptor function in invertebrates and establish a novel role for discoidin domain receptors in axon navigation and axon tract formation.

  15. Structural Dynamics of the Glycine-binding Domain of the N-Methyl-d-Aspartate Receptor*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolino, Drew M.; Cooper, David; Ramaswamy, Swarna; Jaurich, Henriette; Landes, Christy F.; Jayaraman, Vasanthi

    2015-01-01

    N-Methyl-d-aspartate receptors mediate the slow component of excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. These receptors are obligate heteromers containing glycine- and glutamate-binding subunits. The ligands bind to a bilobed agonist-binding domain of the receptor. Previous x-ray structures of the glycine-binding domain of NMDA receptors showed no significant changes between the partial and full agonist-bound structures. Here we have used single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) to investigate the cleft closure conformational states that the glycine-binding domain of the receptor adopts in the presence of the antagonist 5,7-dichlorokynurenic acid (DCKA), the partial agonists 1-amino-1-cyclobutanecarboxylic acid (ACBC) and l-alanine, and full agonists glycine and d-serine. For these studies, we have incorporated the unnatural amino acid p-acetyl-l-phenylalanine for specific labeling of the protein with hydrazide derivatives of fluorophores. The single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer data show that the agonist-binding domain can adopt a wide range of cleft closure states with significant overlap in the states occupied by ligands of varying efficacy. The difference lies in the fraction of the protein in a more closed-cleft form, with full agonists having a larger fraction in the closed-cleft form, suggesting that the ability of ligands to select for these states could dictate the extent of activation. PMID:25404733

  16. Adeno-associated Virus (AAV) Serotypes Have Distinctive Interactions with Domains of the Cellular AAV Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Sirika; Zou, Wei; Cheng, Fang; Puschnik, Andreas S.; Meyer, Nancy L.; Ganaie, Safder S.; Deng, Xuefeng; Wosen, Jonathan E.; Davulcu, Omar; Yan, Ziying; Engelhardt, John F.; Brown, Kevin E.; Chapman, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adeno-associated virus (AAV) entry is determined by its interactions with specific surface glycans and a proteinaceous receptor(s). Adeno-associated virus receptor (AAVR) (also named KIAA0319L) is an essential cellular receptor required for the transduction of vectors derived from multiple AAV serotypes, including the evolutionarily distant serotypes AAV2 and AAV5. Here, we further biochemically characterize the AAV-AAVR interaction and define the domains within the ectodomain of AAVR that facilitate this interaction. By using a virus overlay assay, it was previously shown that the major AAV2 binding protein in membrane preparations of human cells corresponds to a glycoprotein with a molecular mass of 150 kDa. By establishing a purification procedure, performing further protein separation by two-dimensional electrophoresis, and utilizing mass spectrometry, we now show that this glycoprotein is identical to AAVR. While we find that AAVR is an N-linked glycosylated protein, this glycosylation is not a strict requirement for AAV2 binding or functional transduction. Using a combination of genetic complementation with deletion constructs and virus overlay assays with individual domains, we find that AAV2 functionally interacts predominantly with the second Ig-like polycystic kidney disease (PKD) repeat domain (PKD2) present in the ectodomain of AAVR. In contrast, AAV5 interacts primarily through the first, most membrane-distal, PKD domain (PKD1) of AAVR to promote transduction. Furthermore, other AAV serotypes, including AAV1 and -8, require a combination of PKD1 and PKD2 for optimal transduction. These results suggest that despite their shared dependence on AAVR as a critical entry receptor, different AAV serotypes have evolved distinctive interactions with the same receptor. IMPORTANCE Over the past decade, AAV vectors have emerged as leading gene delivery tools for therapeutic applications and biomedical research. However, fundamental aspects of the AAV life

  17. Receptor-binding domain of ephrin-A1: production in bacterial expression system and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekrasova, O V; Sharonov, G V; Tikhonov, R V; Kolosov, P M; Astapova, M V; Yakimov, S A; Tagvey, A I; Korchagina, A A; Bocharova, O V; Wulfson, A N; Feofanov, A V; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2012-12-01

    Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and their ligands, the ephrins, perform an important regulatory function in tissue organization, as well as participate in malignant transformation of cells. Ephrin-A1, a ligand of A class Eph receptors, is a modulator of tumor growth and progression, and the mechanism of its action needs detailed investigation. Here we report on the development of a system for bacterial expression of an ephrin-A1 receptor-binding domain (eA1), a procedure for its purification, and its renaturation with final yield of 50 mg/liter of culture. Functional activity of eA1 was confirmed by immunoblotting, laser scanning confocal microscopy, and flow cytometry. It is shown that monomeric non-glycosylated receptor-binding domain of ephrin-A1 is able to activate cellular EphA2 receptors, stimulating their phosphorylation. Ligand eA1 can be used to study the features of ephrin-A1 interactions with different A class Eph receptors. The created expression cassette is suitable for the development of ligands with increased activity and selectivity and experimental systems for the delivery of cytotoxins into tumor cells that overexpress EphA2 or other class A Eph receptors.

  18. Perspectives on cognitive domains, H3 receptor ligands and neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Arthur A; Fox, Gerard B

    2004-10-01

    Histamine H(3) receptor agonists and antagonists have been evaluated in numerous in vitro and in vivo animal models to better understand how H(3) receptors modulate neurotransmitter function in the central nervous system. Likewise, behavioural models have explored the hypothesis that changes in neurotransmitter release could enhance cognitive function in human diseases. This review examines the reported effects of H(3) receptor ligands and how they influence cognitive behaviour. These data are interpreted on the basis of different cognitive domains that are relevant to neuropsychiatric diseases. Because of the diversity of H(3) receptors, their function and their influence on neurotransmitter systems, considerable promise exists for H(3) ligands to treat diseases in which aspects of learning and memory are impaired. However, because of the complexities of the histaminergic system and H(3) receptors and the lack of clinical data so far, proof of principle for use in human disease remains to be established.

  19. On the Denaturation Mechanisms of the Ligand Binding Domain of Thyroid Hormone Receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martínez, Leandro; Telles de Souza, P C; Garcia, Wanius; Batista, Fernanda A H; Portugal, Rodrigo V; Nascimento, Alessandro S; Nakahira, Marcel; Lima, Luis M T R; Polikarpov, Igor; Skaf, Munir S

    2010-01-01

    The ligand binding domain (LBD) of nuclear hormone receptors adopts a very compact, mostly alpha-helical structure that binds specific ligands with very high affinity. We use circular dichroism spectroscopy and high-temperature molecular dynamics Simulations to investigate unfolding of the LBDs of t

  20. PDZ domain-mediated interactions of G protein-coupled receptors with postsynaptic density protein 95

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thor C; Wirth, Volker F; Roberts, Nina Ingerslev;

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of membrane proteins in the human genome. Their signaling is regulated by scaffold proteins containing PDZ domains, but although these interactions are important for GPCR function, they are still poorly understood. We here present...

  1. On the denaturation mechanisms of the ligand binding domain of thyroid hormone receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martínez, Leandro; Souza, Paulo C T; Garcia, Wanius; Batista, Fernanda A H; Portugal, Rodrigo V; Nascimento, Alessandro S; Nakahira, Marcel; Lima, Luis M T R; Polikarpov, Igor; Skaf, Munir S

    2010-01-01

    The ligand binding domain (LBD) of nuclear hormone receptors adopts a very compact, mostly alpha-helical structure that binds specific ligands with very high affinity. We use circular dichroism spectroscopy and high-temperature molecular dynamics simulations to investigate unfolding of the LBDs of t

  2. On the Denaturation Mechanisms of the Ligand Binding Domain of Thyroid Hormone Receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martínez, Leandro; Telles de Souza, P C; Garcia, Wanius; Batista, Fernanda A H; Portugal, Rodrigo V; Nascimento, Alessandro S; Nakahira, Marcel; Lima, Luis M T R; Polikarpov, Igor; Skaf, Munir S

    2010-01-01

    The ligand binding domain (LBD) of nuclear hormone receptors adopts a very compact, mostly alpha-helical structure that binds specific ligands with very high affinity. We use circular dichroism spectroscopy and high-temperature molecular dynamics Simulations to investigate unfolding of the LBDs of t

  3. Why Do Some T Cell Receptor Cytoplasmic Domains Associate with the Plasma Membrane?

    OpenAIRE

    Philip Anton evan der Merwe; Hao eZhang; Shaun-Paul eCordoba

    2012-01-01

    Based on studies in model systems it has been proposed that the cytoplasmic domains of T cell receptor signaling subunits that have polybasic motifs associate with the plasma membrane, and that this regulates their phosphorylation. Recent experiments in more physiological systems have confirmed membrane association but raised questions as to its function.

  4. Functional diversity of Robo receptor immunoglobulin domains promotes distinct axon guidance decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Timothy A; Bashaw, Greg J

    2010-03-23

    Recognition molecules of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily control axon guidance in the developing nervous system. Ig-like domains are among the most widely represented protein domains in the human genome, and the number of Ig superfamily proteins is strongly correlated with cellular complexity. In Drosophila, three Roundabout (Robo) Ig superfamily receptors respond to their common Slit ligand to regulate axon guidance at the midline: Robo and Robo2 mediate midline repulsion, Robo2 and Robo3 control longitudinal pathway selection, and Robo2 can promote midline crossing. How these closely related receptors mediate distinct guidance functions is not understood. We report that the differential functions of Robo2 and Robo3 are specified by their ectodomains and do not reflect differences in cytoplasmic signaling. Functional modularity of Robo2's ectodomain facilitates multiple guidance decisions: Ig1 and Ig3 of Robo2 confer lateral positioning activity, whereas Ig2 confers promidline crossing activity. Robo2's distinct functions are not dependent on greater Slit affinity but are instead due in part to differences in multimerization and receptor-ligand stoichiometry conferred by Robo2's Ig domains. Together, our findings suggest that diverse responses to the Slit guidance cue are imparted by intrinsic structural differences encoded in the extracellular Ig domains of the Robo receptors.

  5. Conformational variability of the glycine receptor M2 domain in response to activation by different agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pless, Stephan A; Dibas, Mohammed I; Lester, Henry A; Lynch, Joseph W

    2007-12-07

    Models describing the structural changes mediating Cys loop receptor activation generally give little attention to the possibility that different agonists may promote activation via distinct M2 pore-lining domain structural rearrangements. We investigated this question by comparing the effects of different ligands on the conformation of the external portion of the homomeric alpha1 glycine receptor M2 domain. Conformational flexibility was assessed by tethering a rhodamine fluorophore to cysteines introduced at the 19' or 22' positions and monitoring fluorescence and current changes during channel activation. During glycine activation, fluorescence of the label attached to R19'C increased by approximately 20%, and the emission peak shifted to lower wavelengths, consistent with a more hydrophobic fluorophore environment. In contrast, ivermectin activated the receptors without producing a fluorescence change. Although taurine and beta-alanine were weak partial agonists at the alpha1R19'C glycine receptor, they induced large fluorescence changes. Propofol, which drastically enhanced these currents, did not induce a glycine-like blue shift in the spectral emission peak. The inhibitors strychnine and picrotoxin elicited fluorescence and current changes as expected for a competitive antagonist and an open channel blocker, respectively. Glycine and taurine (or beta-alanine) also produced an increase and a decrease, respectively, in the fluorescence of a label attached to the nearby L22'C residue. Thus, results from two separate labeled residues support the conclusion that the glycine receptor M2 domain responds with distinct conformational changes to activation by different agonists.

  6. Structural and functional characterization of alternative transmembrane domain conformations in VEGF receptor 2 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manni, Sandro; Mineev, Konstantin S; Usmanova, Dinara; Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Winter, Jonas; Matkovic, Milos; Deupi, Xavier; Arseniev, Alexander S; Ballmer-Hofer, Kurt

    2014-08-05

    Transmembrane signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) entails ligand-mediated dimerization and structural rearrangement of the extracellular domains. RTK activation also depends on the specific orientation of the transmembrane domain (TMD) helices, as suggested by pathogenic, constitutively active RTK mutants. Such mutant TMDs carry polar amino acids promoting stable transmembrane helix dimerization, which is essential for kinase activation. We investigated the effect of polar amino acids introduced into the TMD of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, regulating blood vessel homeostasis. Two mutants showed constitutive kinase activity, suggesting that precise TMD orientation is mandatory for kinase activation. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed that TMD helices in activated constructs were rotated by 180° relative to the interface of the wild-type conformation, confirming that ligand-mediated receptor activation indeed results from transmembrane helix rearrangement. A molecular dynamics simulation confirmed the transmembrane helix arrangement of wild-type and mutant TMDs revealed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  7. Malignant hyperthermia domain in the regulation of ca(2+) release channel (ryanodine receptor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzato, F; Ronjat, M; Treves, S

    1997-11-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a potentially lethal condition that is manifested in humans as an acute increase of body temperature in response to stress and exposure to volatile anaesthetics (halothane, enflurane) and muscle relaxants. To date, eight point mutations in the ryanodine receptor gene, the Ca(2+) release channel of the skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum, segregate with the MH phenotype, yet direct evidence linking altered [Ca(2+)](i) homeostasis to mutation in recombinant RYR has been obtained only for one such mutation. Most of these mutations appear in an "MH domain" that is localized at the NH(2) terminus of the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor Ca(2+) channel. In this review, we summarize the available data concerning the role of the MH domain in the altered functions of the ryanodine receptor Ca(2+) channel. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:312-316). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  8. Shark Variable New Antigen Receptor (VNAR Single Domain Antibody Fragments: Stability and Diagnostic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart Nuttall

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The single variable new antigen receptor domain antibody fragments (VNARs derived from shark immunoglobulin new antigen receptor antibodies (IgNARs represent some of the smallest known immunoglobulin-based protein scaffolds. As single domains, they demonstrate favorable size and cryptic epitope recognition properties, making them attractive in diagnosis and therapy of numerous disease states. Here, we examine the stability of VNAR domains with a focus on a family of VNARs specific for apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1 from Plasmodium falciparum. The VNARs are compared to traditional monoclonal antibodies (mAbs in liquid, lyophilized and immobilized nitrocellulose formats. When maintained in various formats at 45 °C, VNARs have improved stability compared to mAbs for periods of up to four weeks. Using circular dichroism spectroscopy we demonstrate that VNAR domains are able to refold following heating to 80 °C. We also demonstrate that VNAR domains are stable during incubation under potential in vivo conditions such as stomach acid, but not to the protease rich environment of murine stomach scrapings. Taken together, our results demonstrate the suitability of shark VNAR domains for various diagnostic platforms and related applications.

  9. Domain interplay in the urokinase receptor. Requirement for the third domain in high affinity ligand binding and demonstration of ligand contact sites in distinct receptor domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Ronne, E; Dano, K

    1996-01-01

    . The purified suPAR was cross-linked to the radiolabeled amino-terminal fragment (ATF) of urokinase, followed by cleavage with chymotrypsin. In accordance with the cleavage pattern found for the uncomplexed receptor, this treatment led to cleavage between D1 and D(2 + 3). Analysis of the radiolabeled fragments...... revealed the expected ligand labeling of D1 but a clear labeling of D(2 + 3) was also found, indicating that this part of the molecule is also situated in close contact with ATF in the receptor-ligand complex. The latter contact site may contribute to the role of molecular regions outside D1 in high...

  10. Novel receptor-like kinases in cacao contain PR-1 extracellular domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Paulo José Pereira Lima; Costa, Gustavo Gilson Lacerda; Fiorin, Gabriel Lorencini; Pereira, Gonçalo Amarante Guimarães; Mondego, Jorge Maurício Costa

    2013-08-01

    Members of the pathogenesis-related protein 1 (PR-1) family are well-known markers of plant defence responses, forming part of the arsenal of the secreted proteins produced on pathogen recognition. Here, we report the identification of two cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) PR-1s that are fused to transmembrane regions and serine/threonine kinase domains, in a manner characteristic of receptor-like kinases (RLKs). These proteins (TcPR-1f and TcPR-1g) were named PR-1 receptor kinases (PR-1RKs). Phylogenetic analysis of RLKs and PR-1 proteins from cacao indicated that PR-1RKs originated from a fusion between sequences encoding PR-1 and the kinase domain of a LecRLK (Lectin Receptor-Like Kinase). Retrotransposition marks surround TcPR-1f, suggesting that retrotransposition was involved in the origin of PR-1RKs. Genes with a similar domain architecture to cacao PR-1RKs were found in rice (Oryza sativa), barrel medic (Medicago truncatula) and a nonphototrophic bacterium (Herpetosiphon aurantiacus). However, their kinase domains differed from those found in LecRLKs, indicating the occurrence of convergent evolution. TcPR-1g expression was up-regulated in the biotrophic stage of witches' broom disease, suggesting a role for PR-1RKs during cacao defence responses. We hypothesize that PR-1RKs transduce a defence signal by interacting with a PR-1 ligand. © 2013 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  11. A chemokine-binding domain in the tumor necrosis factor receptor from variola (smallpox) virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, Alí; Ruiz-Argüello, M Begoña; Ho, Yin; Smith, Vincent P; Saraiva, Margarida; Alcami, Antonio

    2006-04-11

    Variola virus (VaV) is the causative agent of smallpox, one of the most devastating diseases encountered by man, that was eradicated in 1980. The deliberate release of VaV would have catastrophic consequences on global public health. However, the mechanisms that contribute to smallpox pathogenesis are poorly understood at the molecular level. The ability of viruses to evade the host defense mechanisms is an important determinant of viral pathogenesis. Here we show that the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) homologue CrmB encoded by VaV functions not only as a soluble decoy TNFR but also as a highly specific binding protein for several chemokines that mediate recruitment of immune cells to mucosal surfaces and the skin, sites of virus entry and viral replication at late stages of smallpox. CrmB binds chemokines through its C-terminal domain, which is unrelated to TNFRs, was named smallpox virus-encoded chemokine receptor (SECRET) domain and uncovers a family of poxvirus chemokine inhibitors. An active SECRET domain was found in another viral TNFR (CrmD) and three secreted proteins encoded by orthopoxviruses. These findings identify a previously undescribed chemokine-binding and inhibitory domain unrelated to host chemokine receptors and a mechanism of immune modulation in VaV that may influence smallpox pathogenesis.

  12. Domain architecture of a calcium-permeable AMPA receptor in a ligand-free conformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles R. Midgett

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ligand-gated ion channels couple the free energy of agonist binding to the gating of selective transmembrane ion pores, permitting cells to regulate ion flux in response to external chemical stimuli. However, the stereochemical mechanisms responsible for this coupling remain obscure. In the case of the ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs, the modular nature of receptor subunits has facilitated structural analysis of the N-terminal domain (NTD, and of multiple conformations of the ligand-binding domain (LBD. Recently, the crystallographic structure of an antagonist-bound form of the receptor was determined. However, disulfide trapping of this conformation blocks channel opening, suggesting that channel activation involves additional quaternary packing arrangements. To explore the conformational space available to iGluR channels, we report here a second, clearly distinct domain architecture of homotetrameric, calcium-permeable AMPARs, determined by single-particle electron microscopy of untagged and fluorescently tagged constructs in a ligand-free state. It reveals a novel packing of NTD dimers, and a separation of LBD dimers across a central vestibule. In this arrangement, which reconciles diverse functional observations, agonist-induced cleft closure across LBD dimers can be converted into a twisting motion that provides a basis for receptor activation.

  13. Structure of metabotropic glutamate receptor C-terminal domains in contact with interacting proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enz, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) regulate intracellular signal pathways that control several physiological tasks, including neuronal excitability, learning, and memory. This is achieved by the formation of synaptic signal complexes, in which mGluRs assemble with functionally related proteins such as enzymes, scaffolds, and cytoskeletal anchor proteins. Thus, mGluR associated proteins actively participate in the regulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission. Importantly, dysfunction of mGluRs and interacting proteins may lead to impaired signal transduction and finally result in neurological disorders, e.g., night blindness, addiction, epilepsy, schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders and Parkinson's disease. In contrast to solved crystal structures of extracellular N-terminal domains of some mGluR types, only a few studies analyzed the conformation of intracellular receptor domains. Intracellular C-termini of most mGluR types are subject to alternative splicing and can be further modified by phosphorylation and SUMOylation. In this way, diverse interaction sites for intracellular proteins that bind to and regulate the glutamate receptors are generated. Indeed, most of the known mGluR binding partners interact with the receptors' C-terminal domains. Within the last years, different laboratories analyzed the structure of these domains and described the geometry of the contact surface between mGluR C-termini and interacting proteins. Here, I will review recent progress in the structure characterization of mGluR C-termini and provide an up-to-date summary of the geometry of these domains in contact with binding partners.

  14. Structure of metabotropic glutamate receptor C-terminal domains in contact with interacting proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf eEnz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs regulate intracellular signal pathways that control several physiological tasks, including neuronal excitability, learning and memory. This is achieved by the formation of synaptic signal complexes, in which mGluRs assemble with functionally related proteins such as enzymes, scaffolds and cytoskeletal anchor proteins. Thus, mGluR associated proteins actively participate in the regulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission. Importantly, dysfunction of mGluRs and interacting proteins may lead to impaired signal transduction and finally result in neurological disorders, e.g. night blindness, addiction, epilepsy, schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders and Parkinson´s disease. In contrast to solved crystal structures of extracellular N-terminal domains of some mGluR types, only a few studies analyzed the conformation of intracellular receptor domains. Intracellular C-termini of most mGluR types are subject to alternative splicing and can be further modified by phosphorylation and SUMOylation. In this way, diverse interaction sites for intracellular proteins that bind to and regulate the glutamate receptors are generated. Indeed, most of the known mGluR binding partners interact with the receptors´ C-terminal domains. Within the last years, different laboratories analyzed the structure of these domains and described the geometry of the contact surface between mGluR C-termini and interacting proteins. Here, I will review recent progress in the structure characterization of mGluR C-termini and provide an up-to-date summary of the geometry of these domains in contact with binding partners.

  15. Regulation of growth factor receptor degradation by ADP-ribosylation factor domain protein (ARD) 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza-Carmen, Victor; Pacheco-Rodriguez, Gustavo; Kang, Gi Soo; Kato, Jiro; Donati, Chiara; Zhang, Chun-Yi; Vichi, Alessandro; Payne, D Michael; El-Chemaly, Souheil; Stylianou, Mario; Moss, Joel; Vaughan, Martha

    2011-06-28

    ADP-ribosylation factor domain protein 1 (ARD1) is a 64-kDa protein containing a functional ADP-ribosylation factor (GTP hydrolase, GTPase), GTPase-activating protein, and E3 ubiquitin ligase domains. ARD1 activation by the guanine nucleotide-exchange factor cytohesin-1 was known. GTPase and E3 ligase activities of ARD1 suggest roles in protein transport and turnover. To explore this hypothesis, we used mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) from ARD1-/- mice stably transfected with plasmids for inducible expression of wild-type ARD1 protein (KO-WT), or ARD1 protein with inactivating mutations in E3 ligase domain (KO-E3), or containing persistently active GTP-bound (KO-GTP), or inactive GDP-bound (KO-GDP) GTPase domains. Inhibition of proteasomal proteases in mifepristone-induced KO-WT, KO-GDP, or KO-GTP MEFs resulted in accumulation of these ARD1 proteins, whereas KO-E3 accumulated without inhibitors. All data were consistent with the conclusion that ARD1 regulates its own steady-state levels in cells by autoubiquitination. Based on reported growth factor receptor-cytohesin interactions, EGF receptor (EGFR) was investigated in induced MEFs. Amounts of cell-surface and total EGFR were higher in KO-GDP and lower in KO-GTP than in KO-WT MEFs, with levels in both mutants greater (p = 0.001) after proteasomal inhibition. Significant differences among MEF lines in content of TGF-β receptor III were similar to those in EGFR, albeit not as large. Differences in amounts of insulin receptor mirrored those in EGFR, but did not reach statistical significance. Overall, the capacity of ARD1 GTPase to cycle between active and inactive forms and its autoubiquitination both appear to be necessary for the appropriate turnover of EGFR and perhaps additional growth factor receptors.

  16. A Complete Backbone Assignment of the Apolipoprotein E LDL Receptor Binding Domain [Letter to the Editor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Chao; Sivashanmugam, Arun; Hoyt, David W.; Wang, Jianjun

    2005-06-01

    Human apolipoprotein E (apoE) is a 299-residue exchangeable apolipoprotein that was initially recognized as a major determinant in lipoprotein metabolism and cardiovascular diseases. Recent evidence has indicated that apoE also plays critical roles in several other important biological processes not directly related to its lipid transport function, including Alzheimer's disease, cognitive function, immunoregulation, cell signaling, and possibly even infectious diseases. ApoE contains two structural/functional domains: A N-terminal domain spanning residues 1-191 that is responsible for apoE's LDL receptor binding activity and a C-terminal domain (residues 216-199) that is responsible for lipoprotein-binding (1). The x-ray crystal structure of the lipid-free apoE N-terminal domain was solved by Wilson et al in 1991 which represented the only high-resolution structure of this protein. This structure showed an unusually elongated four-helix bundle (2) that was organized in such 2 a way that its hydrophobic faces were directed towards the protein interior, whereas the hydrophilic faces were oriented towards the solvent. The major receptor-binding region, residues 130-150, was located on the fourth helix. The amphipathic a-helices were connected by short loops, giving rise to a compact, globular structure. However, this structure only contained residues 23-165. Recent studies have shown that residues beyond residues 23-165 are also very important to the apoE LDL receptor binding activity. For example, a mutation at position R172 reduces the receptor binding activity of apoE to only {approx}2% (3). In addition, an E3K mutant significantly increased the apoE receptor binding activity as well (4). While the x-ray crystal structure of the apoE N-terminal domain provided detailed structural information for most region of this domain, this structure does not provide an explanation of the above experimental results regarding the structural contribution to apo

  17. The Emerging Role of TPR-Domain Immunophilins in the Mechanism of Action of Steroid Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. I. Mazaira

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the absence of ligand, some members of nuclear receptor family such as corticosteroid receptors are primarily located in the cytoplasm, and they rapidly accumulate in the nucleus upon ligand-binding. Other members of the family such as the estrogen receptor are mostly nuclear. Regardless of their primary location, these oligomeric proteins undergo a dynamic nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling, and their transport through the cytoplasmic compartment has always been assumed to occur in a stochastic manner by simple diffusion. Although heuristic, this oversimplified model has never been demonstrated. Moreover, it has always been assumed that the first step related to receptor activation is the dissociation of the Hsp90-based heterocomplex, a process referred to as `transformation.' Nonetheless, recent experimental evidence indicates that the chaperone machinery is required for the retrotransport of the receptor throughout the cytoplasm and facilitates its active passage through the nuclear pore. Therefore, transformation is actually a nuclear event. A group of Hsp90-binding cochaperones belonging to the immunophilin family plays a cardinal role not only in the mechanism for receptor movement, but also in nuclear events leading to interactions with nuclear sites of action and the regulation of transcriptional activity. In this article we analyze the importance of molecular chaperones and TPR-domain immunophilins in the molecular mechanism of action of steroid receptors.

  18. Comprehensive binary interaction mapping of SH2 domains via fluorescence polarization reveals novel functional diversification of ErbB receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald J Hause

    Full Text Available First-generation interaction maps of Src homology 2 (SH2 domains with receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK phosphosites have previously been generated using protein microarray (PM technologies. Here, we developed a large-scale fluorescence polarization (FP methodology that was able to characterize interactions between SH2 domains and ErbB receptor phosphosites with higher fidelity and sensitivity than was previously achieved with PMs. We used the FP assay to query the interaction of synthetic phosphopeptides corresponding to 89 ErbB receptor intracellular tyrosine sites against 93 human SH2 domains and 2 phosphotyrosine binding (PTB domains. From 358,944 polarization measurements, the affinities for 1,405 unique biological interactions were determined, 83% of which are novel. In contrast to data from previous reports, our analyses suggested that ErbB2 was not more promiscuous than the other ErbB receptors. Our results showed that each receptor displays unique preferences in the affinity and location of recruited SH2 domains that may contribute to differences in downstream signaling potential. ErbB1 was enriched versus the other receptors for recruitment of domains from RAS GEFs whereas ErbB2 was enriched for recruitment of domains from tyrosine and phosphatidyl inositol phosphatases. ErbB3, the kinase inactive ErbB receptor family member, was predictably enriched for recruitment of domains from phosphatidyl inositol kinases and surprisingly, was enriched for recruitment of domains from tyrosine kinases, cytoskeletal regulatory proteins, and RHO GEFs but depleted for recruitment of domains from phosphatidyl inositol phosphatases. Many novel interactions were also observed with phosphopeptides corresponding to ErbB receptor tyrosines not previously reported to be phosphorylated by mass spectrometry, suggesting the existence of many biologically relevant RTK sites that may be phosphorylated but below the detection threshold of standard mass spectrometry

  19. PDZ domain-mediated interactions of G protein-coupled receptors with postsynaptic density protein 95

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thor C; Wirth, Volker F; Roberts, Nina Ingerslev;

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of membrane proteins in the human genome. Their signaling is regulated by scaffold proteins containing PDZ domains, but although these interactions are important for GPCR function, they are still poorly understood. We here present...... with colocalization of the full-length proteins in cells and with previous studies, we suggest that the range of relevant interactions might extend to interactions with K i = 450 µM in the in vitro assays. Within this range, we identify novel PSD-95 interactions with the chemokine receptor CXCR2, the neuropeptide Y...

  20. The Architecture of the TIR Domain Signalosome in the Toll-like Receptor-4 Signaling Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Emine Guven-Maiorov; Ozlem Keskin; Attila Gursoy; Carter VanWaes; Zhong Chen; Chung-Jung Tsai; Ruth Nussinov

    2015-01-01

    Scientific Reports | 5:13128 | DOI: 10.1038/srep13128 1 www.nature.com/scientificreports The Architecture of the TIR Domain Signalosome in the Toll-like Receptor-4 Signaling Pathway Emine Guven-Maiorov1,2, Ozlem Keskin1,2, Attila Gursoy2,3, Carter VanWaes4, Zhong Chen4, Chung-Jung Tsai5 & Ruth Nussinov5,6 Activated Toll-like receptors (TLRs) cluster in lipid rafts and induce pro- and anti-tumor responses. The organization of the assembly is critical to the understandin...

  1. The receptor binding domain of MERS-CoV: the dawn of vaccine and treatment development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Nan; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Jin-Chun; Feng, Ling; Bao, Jin-Ku

    2014-03-01

    The newly emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is becoming another "SARS-like" threat to the world. It has an extremely high death rate (∼50%) as there is no vaccine or efficient therapeutics. The identification of the structures of both the MERS-CoV receptor binding domain (RBD) and its complex with dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4), raises the hope of alleviating this currently severe situation. In this review, we examined the molecular basis of the RBD-receptor interaction to outline why/how could we use MERS-CoV RBD to develop vaccines and antiviral drugs.

  2. The extracellular domain of neurotrophin receptor p75 as a candidate biomarker for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie R Shepheard

    Full Text Available Objective biomarkers for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis would facilitate the discovery of new treatments. The common neurotrophin receptor p75 is up regulated and the extracellular domain cleaved from injured neurons and peripheral glia in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We have tested the hypothesis that urinary levels of extracellular neurotrophin receptor p75 serve as a biomarker for both human motor amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and the SOD1(G93A mouse model of the disease. The extracellular domain of neurotrophin receptor p75 was identified in the urine of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients by an immuno-precipitation/western blot procedure and confirmed by mass spectrometry. An ELISA was established to measure urinary extracellular neurotrophin receptor p75. The mean value for urinary extracellular neurotrophin receptor p75 from 28 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients measured by ELISA was 7.9±0.5 ng/mg creatinine and this was significantly higher (p<0.001 than 12 controls (2.6±0.2 ng/mg creatinine and 19 patients with other neurological disease (Parkinson's disease and Multiple Sclerosis; 4.1±0.2 ng/mg creatinine. Pilot data of disease progression rates in 14 MND patients indicates that p75NTR(ECD levels were significantly higher (p = 0.0041 in 7 rapidly progressing patients as compared to 7 with slowly progressing disease. Extracellular neurotrophin receptor p75 was also readily detected in SOD1(G93A mice by immuno-precipitation/western blot before the onset of clinical symptoms. These findings indicate a significant relation between urinary extracellular neurotrophin receptor p75 levels and disease progression and suggests that it may be a useful marker of disease activity and progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  3. The extracellular domain of neurotrophin receptor p75 as a candidate biomarker for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepheard, Stephanie R; Chataway, Tim; Schultz, David W; Rush, Robert A; Rogers, Mary-Louise

    2014-01-01

    Objective biomarkers for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis would facilitate the discovery of new treatments. The common neurotrophin receptor p75 is up regulated and the extracellular domain cleaved from injured neurons and peripheral glia in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We have tested the hypothesis that urinary levels of extracellular neurotrophin receptor p75 serve as a biomarker for both human motor amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and the SOD1(G93A) mouse model of the disease. The extracellular domain of neurotrophin receptor p75 was identified in the urine of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients by an immuno-precipitation/western blot procedure and confirmed by mass spectrometry. An ELISA was established to measure urinary extracellular neurotrophin receptor p75. The mean value for urinary extracellular neurotrophin receptor p75 from 28 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients measured by ELISA was 7.9±0.5 ng/mg creatinine and this was significantly higher (pSclerosis; 4.1±0.2 ng/mg creatinine). Pilot data of disease progression rates in 14 MND patients indicates that p75NTR(ECD) levels were significantly higher (p = 0.0041) in 7 rapidly progressing patients as compared to 7 with slowly progressing disease. Extracellular neurotrophin receptor p75 was also readily detected in SOD1(G93A) mice by immuno-precipitation/western blot before the onset of clinical symptoms. These findings indicate a significant relation between urinary extracellular neurotrophin receptor p75 levels and disease progression and suggests that it may be a useful marker of disease activity and progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  4. Prognostic significance of discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) expression in ovarian cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Yi; Xu, Zhe; Fan, Jin; Huang, Liu; Ye, Ming; Shi, Kun; Huang, Zheng; Liu, Yaqiong; He, Langchi; Huang, Jiezhen; Wang, Yibin; Li, Qiufeng

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has suggested that discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) plays an important role in cancer development and metastasis. However, the correlation between DDR2 expression and clinical outcome in ovarian cancer has not been investigated. In this study, DDR2 expression was examined by Real-time PCR in surgically resected ovarian cancer and normal ovary tissues. Besides, DDR2 expression was analyzed immunohistochemically in 103 ovarian cancer patients, and the correlation between D...

  5. All-Atom Structural Models of the Transmembrane Domains of Insulin and Type 1 Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadiarani, Hossein; Vashisth, Harish

    2016-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase superfamily comprises many cell-surface receptors including the insulin receptor (IR) and type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) that are constitutively homodimeric transmembrane glycoproteins. Therefore, these receptors require ligand-triggered domain rearrangements rather than receptor dimerization for activation. Specifically, binding of peptide ligands to receptor ectodomains transduces signals across the transmembrane domains for trans-autophosphorylation in cytoplasmic kinase domains. The molecular details of these processes are poorly understood in part due to the absence of structures of full-length receptors. Using MD simulations and enhanced conformational sampling algorithms, we present all-atom structural models of peptides containing 51 residues from the transmembrane and juxtamembrane regions of IR and IGF1R. In our models, the transmembrane regions of both receptors adopt helical conformations with kinks at Pro961 (IR) and Pro941 (IGF1R), but the C-terminal residues corresponding to the juxtamembrane region of each receptor adopt unfolded and flexible conformations in IR as opposed to a helix in IGF1R. We also observe that the N-terminal residues in IR form a kinked-helix sitting at the membrane-solvent interface, while homologous residues in IGF1R are unfolded and flexible. These conformational differences result in a larger tilt-angle of the membrane-embedded helix in IGF1R in comparison to IR to compensate for interactions with water molecules at the membrane-solvent interfaces. Our metastable/stable states for the transmembrane domain of IR, observed in a lipid bilayer, are consistent with a known NMR structure of this domain determined in detergent micelles, and similar states in IGF1R are consistent with a previously reported model of the dimerized transmembrane domains of IGF1R. Our all-atom structural models suggest potentially unique structural organization of kinase domains in each receptor.

  6. Phosphorylation of the dimeric cytoplasmic domain of the phytosulfokine receptor, PSKR1

    KAUST Repository

    Muleya, V.

    2016-08-04

    Phytosulfokines (PSKs) are plant peptide hormones that co-regulate plant growth, differentiation and defense responses. PSKs signal through a plasma membrane localized leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase (phytosulfokine receptor 1, PSKR1) that also contains a functional cytosolic guanylate cyclase with its cyclase catalytic center embedded within the kinase domain. To functionally characterize this novel type of overlapping dual catalytic function, we investigated the phosphorylation of PSKR1 in vitro Tandem mass spectrometry of the cytoplasmic domain of PSKR1 (PSKR1cd) revealed at least 11 phosphorylation sites (8 serines, 2 threonines and 1 tyrosine) within the PSKR1cd. Phosphomimetic mutations of three serine residues (Ser686, Ser696 and Ser698) in tandem at the juxta-membrane position resulted in enhanced kinase activity in the on-mutant that was suppressed in the off-mutant, but both mutations reduced guanylate cyclase activity. Both the on and off phosphomimetic mutations of the phosphotyrosine (Tyr888) residue in the activation loop suppressed kinase activity, while neither mutation affected guanylate cyclase activity. Size exclusion and analytical ultracentrifugation analysis of the PSKR1cd suggest that it is reversibly dimeric in solution, which was further confirmed by biflourescence complementation. Taken together, these data suggest that in this novel type of receptor domain architecture, specific phosphorylation and dimerization are possibly essential mechanisms for ligand-mediated catalysis and signaling.

  7. Structural Analysis of Sensor Domains from the TMAO-Responsive Histidine Kinase Receptor TorS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, J.; Hendrickson, W

    2009-01-01

    Histidine kinase receptors respond to diverse signals and mediate signal transduction across the plasma membrane in all prokaryotes and certain eukaryotes. Each receptor is part of a two-component system that regulates a particular cellular process. Organisms that use trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) as a terminal electron acceptor typically control their anaerobic respiration through the TMAO reductase (Tor) pathway, which the TorS histidine kinase activates when sensing TMAO in the environment. We have determined crystal structures for the periplasmic sensor domains of TorS receptors from Escherichia coli and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. TorS sensor domains have a novel fold consisting of a membrane-proximal right-handed four-helical bundle and a membrane-distal left-handed four-helical bundle, but conformational dispositions differ significantly in the two structures. Isolated TorS sensor domains dimerize in solution; and from comparisons with dimeric NarX and Tar sensors, we postulate that signaling through TorS dimers involves a piston-type displacement between helices.

  8. Binding of N-methylscopolamine to the extracellular domain of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubík, Jan; Randáková, Alena; Zimčík, Pavel; El-Fakahany, Esam E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    Interaction of orthosteric ligands with extracellular domain was described at several aminergic G protein-coupled receptors, including muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. The orthosteric antagonists quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and N-methylscopolamine (NMS) bind to the binding pocket of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor formed by transmembrane α-helices. We show that high concentrations of either QNB or NMS slow down dissociation of their radiolabeled species from all five subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, suggesting allosteric binding. The affinity of NMS at the allosteric site is in the micromolar range for all receptor subtypes. Using molecular modelling of the M2 receptor we found that E172 and E175 in the second extracellular loop and N419 in the third extracellular loop are involved in allosteric binding of NMS. Mutation of these amino acids to alanine decreased affinity of NMS for the allosteric binding site confirming results of molecular modelling. The allosteric binding site of NMS overlaps with the binding site of some allosteric, ectopic and bitopic ligands. Understanding of interactions of NMS at the allosteric binding site is essential for correct analysis of binding and action of these ligands.

  9. Ligand-specific conformational changes in the alpha1 glycine receptor ligand-binding domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Lynch, Joseph W

    2009-01-01

    indicate that channel opening is accompanied by conformational rearrangements in both beta-sheets. In an attempt to resolve ligand-dependent movements in the ligand-binding domain, we employed voltage-clamp fluorometry on alpha1 glycine receptors to compare changes mediated by the agonist, glycine......, and by the antagonist, strychnine. Voltage-clamp fluorometry involves labeling introduced cysteines with environmentally sensitive fluorophores and inferring structural rearrangements from ligand-induced fluorescence changes. In the inner beta-sheet, we labeled residues in loop 2 and in binding domain loops D and E....... At each position, strychnine and glycine induced distinct maximal fluorescence responses. The pre-M1 domain responded similarly; at each of four labeled positions glycine produced a strong fluorescence signal, whereas strychnine did not. This suggests that glycine induces conformational changes...

  10. The Role of Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain-Like Receptors in Pulmonary Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, Kristin M; Coates, Bria M; Ridge, Karen M

    2017-08-01

    Pneumonia is caused by both viral and bacterial pathogens and is responsible for a significant health burden in the Unites States. The innate immune system is the human body's first line of defense against these pathogens. The recognition of invading pathogens via pattern recognition receptors leads to proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production, followed by recruitment and activation of effector immune cells. The nonspecific inflammatory nature of the innate immune response can result in immunopathology that is detrimental to the host. In this review, we focus on one class of pattern recognition receptors, the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors, specifically NOD1 and NOD2, and their role in host defense against viral and bacterial pathogens of the lung, including influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus aureus. It is hoped that improved understanding of NOD1 and NOD2 activity in pneumonia will facilitate the development of novel therapies and promote improved patient outcomes.

  11. The ligand binding domain controls glucocorticoid receptor dynamics independent of ligand release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijsing, Sebastiaan H; Elbi, Cem; Luecke, Hans F; Hager, Gordon L; Yamamoto, Keith R

    2007-04-01

    Ligand binding to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) results in receptor binding to glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) and the formation of transcriptional regulatory complexes. Equally important, these complexes are continuously disassembled, with active processes driving GR off GREs. We found that co-chaperone p23-dependent disruption of GR-driven transcription depended on the ligand binding domain (LBD). Next, we examined the importance of the LBD and of ligand dissociation in GR-GRE dissociation in living cells. We showed in fluorescence recovery after photobleaching studies that dissociation of GR from GREs is faster in the absence of the LBD. Furthermore, GR interaction with a target promoter revealed ligand-specific exchange rates. However, using covalently binding ligands, we demonstrated that ligand dissociation is not required for receptor dissociation from GREs. Overall, these studies showed that activities impinging on the LBD regulate GR exchange with GREs but that the dissociation of GR from GREs is independent from ligand dissociation.

  12. Foreign or Domestic CARs: Receptor Ligands as Antigen-Binding Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald R. Shaffer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are increasingly being used in clinical trials to treat a variety of malignant conditions and recent results with CD19-specific CARs showing complete tumor regressions has sparked the interest of researchers and the public alike. Traditional CARs have been generated using single-chain variable fragments (scFv, often derived from murine monoclonal antibodies, for antigen specificity. As the clinical experience with CAR T cells grows, so does the potential for unwanted immune responses against the foreign transgene. Strategies that may reduce the immunogenicity of CAR T cells are humanization of the scFv and the use of naturally occurring receptor ligands as antigen-binding domains. Herein, we review the experience with alternatively designed CARs that contain receptor ligands rather than scFv. While most of the experiences have been in the pre-clinical setting, clinical data is also emerging.

  13. Structural evidence for evolution of shark Ig new antigen receptor variable domain antibodies from a cell-surface receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streltsov, V A; Varghese, J N; Carmichael, J A; Irving, R A; Hudson, P J; Nuttall, S D

    2004-08-24

    The Ig new antigen receptors (IgNARs) are single-domain antibodies found in the serum of sharks. Here, we report 2.2- and 2.8-A structures of the type 2 IgNAR variable domains 12Y-1 and 12Y-2. Structural features include, first, an Ig superfamily topology transitional between cell adhesion molecules, antibodies, and T cell receptors; and, second, a vestigial complementarity-determining region 2 at the "bottom" of the molecule, apparently discontinuous from the antigen-binding paratope and similar to that observed in cell adhesion molecules. Thus, we suggest that IgNARs originated as cell-surface adhesion molecules coopted to the immune repertoire and represent an evolutionary lineage independent of variable heavy chain/variable light chain type antibodies. Additionally, both 12Y-1 and 12Y-2 form unique crystallographic dimers, predominantly mediated by main-chain framework interactions, which represent a possible model for primordial cell-based interactions. Unusually, the 12Y-2 complementarity-determining region 3 also adopts an extended beta-hairpin structure, suggesting a distinct selective advantage in accessing cryptic antigenic epitopes.

  14. Mapping C-terminal transactivation domains of the nuclear HER family receptor tyrosine kinase HER3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Toni M; Iida, Mari; Luthar, Neha; Wleklinski, Matthew J; Starr, Megan M; Wheeler, Deric L

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear localized HER family receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) have been observed in primary tumor specimens and cancer cell lines for nearly two decades. Inside the nucleus, HER family members (EGFR, HER2, and HER3) have been shown to function as co-transcriptional activators for various cancer-promoting genes. However, the regions of each receptor that confer transcriptional potential remain poorly defined. The current study aimed to map the putative transactivation domains (TADs) of the HER3 receptor. To accomplish this goal, various intracellular regions of HER3 were fused to the DNA binding domain of the yeast transcription factor Gal4 (Gal4DBD) and tested for their ability to transactivate Gal4 UAS-luciferase. Results from these analyses demonstrated that the C-terminal domain of HER3 (CTD, amino acids distal to the tyrosine kinase domain) contained potent transactivation potential. Next, nine HER3-CTD truncation mutants were constructed to map minimal regions of transactivation potential using the Gal4 UAS-luciferase based system. These analyses identified a bipartite region of 34 (B₁) and 27 (B₂) amino acids in length that conferred the majority of HER3's transactivation potential. Next, we identified full-length nuclear HER3 association and regulation of a 122 bp region of the cyclin D1 promoter. To understand how the B₁ and B₂ regions influenced the transcriptional functions of nuclear HER3, we performed cyclin D1 promoter-luciferase assays in which HER3 deleted of the B₁ and B₂ regions was severely hindered in regulating this promoter. Further, the overexpression of HER3 enhanced cyclin D1 mRNA expression, while HER3 deleted of its identified TADs was hindered at doing so. Thus, the ability for HER3 to function as a transcriptional co-activator may be dependent on specific C-terminal TADs.

  15. Cardiac 7-transmembrane-spanning domain receptor portfolios: diversify, diversify, diversify.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liggett, Stephen B

    2006-04-01

    Enhanced signaling in myocytes by the G protein Gq has been implicated in cardiac hypertrophy and the transition to heart failure. alpha1-Adrenergic receptors (alpha1-ARs) are members of the 7-transmembrane-spanning domain (7-TM) receptor family and signal via interaction with Gq in the heart. The specific effects of a loss of alpha1-AR signaling in the heart are explored by O'Connell et al. in this issue of the JCI (see the related article beginning on page 1005). Paradoxically, gene ablation of the alpha 1A and alpha 1B subtypes in mice results in a maladaptive form of reactive cardiac hypertrophy from pressure overload, with a predisposition to heart failure. Thus signaling to the alpha1-AR (compared with signaling from other receptors such as angiotensin receptors, which also couple to Gq) appears to be specifically required for a normal hypertrophic response. This represents another example of how receptors that share common G proteins have diversified, developing unique signaling programs. These findings may have particular clinical relevance because of the widespread use of alpha1-AR antagonists in the treatment of hypertension and symptomatic prostate enlargement.

  16. Molecular characterization of the haptoglobin.hemoglobin receptor CD163. Ligand binding properties of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mette; Møller, Holger J; Nielsen, Marianne Jensby

    2004-01-01

    CD163 is the macrophage receptor for endocytosis of haptoglobin.hemoglobin complexes. The extracellular region consisting of nine scavenger receptor cysteine rich (SRCR) domains also circulates in plasma as a soluble protein. By ligand binding analysis of a broad spectrum of soluble CD163...

  17. C-type lectin-like domain and fibronectin-like type II domain of phospholipase A(2) receptor 1 modulate binding and migratory responses to collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Soichiro; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Yosuke; Fujioka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Takamitsu; Nakamura, Kazuto; Obata, Jun-ei; Kugiyama, Kiyotaka

    2015-03-24

    Phospholipase A2 receptor 1 (PLA2R) mediates collagen-dependent migration. The mechanisms by which PLA2R interacts with collagen remain unclear. We produced HEK293 cells expressing full-length wild-type PLA2R or a truncated PLA2R that lacks fibronectin-like type II (FNII) domains or several regions of C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD). We show that the CTLD1-2 as well as the FNII domain of PLA2R are responsible for binding to collagen and for collagen-dependent migration. Thus, multiple regions and domains of the extracellular portion of PLA2R participate in the responses to collagen. These data suggest a potentially new mechanism for PLA2R-mediated biological response beyond that of a receptor for secretory PLA2.

  18. TBP binding-induced folding of the glucocorticoid receptor AF1 domain facilitates its interaction with steroid receptor coactivator-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shagufta H Khan

    Full Text Available The precise mechanism by which glucocorticoid receptor (GR regulates the transcription of its target genes is largely unknown. This is, in part, due to the lack of structural and functional information about GR's N-terminal activation function domain, AF1. Like many steroid hormone receptors (SHRs, the GR AF1 exists in an intrinsically disordered (ID conformation or an ensemble of conformers that collectively appears to be unstructured. The GR AF1 is known to recruit several coregulatory proteins, including those from the basal transcriptional machinery, e.g., TATA box binding protein (TBP that forms the basis for the multiprotein transcription initiation complex. However, the precise mechanism of this process is unknown. We have earlier shown that conditional folding of the GR AF1 is the key for its interactions with critical coactivator proteins. We hypothesize that binding of TBP to AF1 results in the structural rearrangement of the ID AF1 domain such that its surfaces become easily accessible for interaction with other coactivators. To test this hypothesis, we determined whether TBP binding-induced structure formation in the GR AF1 facilitates its interaction with steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1, a critical coactivator that is important for GR-mediated transcriptional activity. Our data show that stoichiometric binding of TBP induces significantly higher helical content at the expense of random coil configuration in the GR AF1. Further, we found that this induced AF1 conformation facilitates its interaction with SRC-1, and subsequent AF1-mediated transcriptional activity. Our results may provide a potential mechanism through which GR and by large other SHRs may regulate the expression of the GR-target genes.

  19. Intracellular domains of NMDA receptor subtypes are determinants for long-term potentiation induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhr, Georg; Jensen, Vidar; Koester, Helmut J; Mihaljevic, Andre L A; Utvik, Jo K; Kvello, Ane; Ottersen, Ole P; Seeburg, Peter H; Sprengel, Rolf; Hvalby, Øivind

    2003-11-26

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) are essential for modulating synaptic strength at central synapses. At hippocampal CA3-to-CA1 synapses of adult mice, different NMDAR subtypes with distinct functionality assemble from NR1 with NR2A and/or NR2B subunits. Here we investigated the role of these NMDA receptor subtypes in long-term potentiation (LTP) induction. Because of the higher NR2B contribution in the young hippocampus, LTP of extracellular field potentials could be enhanced by repeated tetanic stimulation in young but not in adult mice. Similarly, NR2B-specific antagonists reduced LTP in young but only marginally in adult wild-type mice, further demonstrating that in mature CA3-to-CA1 connections LTP induction results primarily from NR2A-type signaling. This finding is also supported by gene-targeted mutant mice expressing C-terminally truncated NR2A subunits, which participate in synaptic NMDAR channel formation and Ca2+ signaling, as indicated by immunopurified synaptic receptors, postembedding immunogold labeling, and spinous Ca2+ transients in the presence of NR2B blockers. These blockers abolished LTP in the mutant at all ages, revealing that, without the intracellular C-terminal domain, NR2A-type receptors are deficient in LTP signaling. Without NR2B blockade, CA3-to-CA1 LTP was more strongly reduced in adult than young mutant mice but could be restored to wild-type levels by repeated tetanic stimulation. Thus, besides NMDA receptor-mediated Ca2+ influx, subtype-specific signaling is critical for LTP induction, with the intracellular C-terminal domain of the NR2 subunits directing signaling pathways with an age-dependent preference.

  20. Characterization of high affinity binding motifs for the discoidin domain receptor DDR2 in collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konitsiotis, Antonios D; Raynal, Nicolas; Bihan, Dominique; Hohenester, Erhard; Farndale, Richard W; Leitinger, Birgit

    2008-03-14

    The discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2, are receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated by native triple-helical collagen. Here we have located three specific DDR2 binding sites by screening the entire triple-helical domain of collagen II, using the Collagen II Toolkit, a set of overlapping triple-helical peptides. The peptide sequence that bound DDR2 with highest affinity interestingly contained the sequence for the high affinity binding site for von Willebrand factor in collagen III. Focusing on this sequence, we used a set of truncated and alanine-substituted peptides to characterize the sequence GVMGFO (O is hydroxyproline) as the minimal collagen sequence required for DDR2 binding. Based on a recent NMR analysis of the DDR2 collagen binding domain, we generated a model of the DDR2-collagen interaction that explains why a triple-helical conformation is required for binding. Triple-helical peptides comprising the DDR2 binding motif not only inhibited DDR2 binding to collagen II but also activated DDR2 transmembrane signaling. Thus, DDR2 activation may be effected by single triple-helices rather than fibrillar collagen.

  1. Expression and Purification of the Bacillus anthracis Protective Antigen Receptor-binding Domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛猛; 徐俊杰; 李冰; 董大勇; 宋小红; 郭强; 赵剑; 陈薇

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to express the receptor-binding domain of Bacillus anthracis protective antigen in E. coli. Signal sequence of the outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of E. coli was attached to the 5' end of the gene encoding protective antigen receptor-binding domain (the 4th domain of PA, PALM). The plasmid carrying the fusion gene was then transformed into E. coli and induced to express recombinant PAlM by IFFG. The recombinant protein was purified by chromatography and then identified by N-terrainal sequencing and Western blot. The recombinant protein, about 10% of the total bacterial protein in volume, was secreted to the periplasmic space of the cell. After a purification procedure including ionexchange chromatography and gel filtration, about 10 mg of homogenous recombinant PAD4 was obtained from 1 L culture. Data from N-terminal sequencing suggested that the amino acid sequence of recombinant PAD4 was identical with its natural counterpart. And the result of Western blot showed the recombinant protein could bind with anti-PA serum from rabbit. High level secreted expression of PAD4 was obtained in E. coli. The results reported here are parts of a continuing research to evaluate PAD4 as a potential drug for anthrax therapy or a candidate of new vaccine.

  2. A Point Mutation in a Domain of Gamma Interferon Receptor 1 Provokes Severe Immunodeficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allende, Luis M.; López-Goyanes, Alberto; Paz-Artal, Estela; Corell, Alfredo; García-Pérez, M. Angel; Varela, Pilar; Scarpellini, Atilio; Negreira, Sagrario; Palenque, Elia; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio

    2001-01-01

    Gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and the cellular responses induced by it are essential for controlling mycobacterial infections. Most patients bearing an IFN-γ receptor ligand-binding chain (IFN-γR1) deficiency present gross mutations that truncate the protein and prevent its expression, giving rise to severe mycobacterial infections and, frequently, a fatal outcome. In this report a new mutation that affects the IFN-γR1 ligand-binding domain in a Spanish patient with mycobacterial disseminated infection and multifocal osteomyelitis is characterized. The mutation generates an amino acid change that does not abrogate protein expression on the cellular surface but that severely impairs responses after the binding of IFN-γ (CD64 and HLA class II induction and tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-12 production). A patient's younger brother, who was also probably homozygous for the mutation, died from meningitis due to Mycobacterium bovis. These findings suggest that a point mutation may be fatal when it affects functionally important domains of the receptor and that the severity is not directly related to a lack of IFN-γ receptor expression. Future research on these nontruncating mutations will make it possible to develop new therapeutical alternatives in this group of patients. PMID:11139207

  3. Synaptic transmission and plasticity require AMPA receptor anchoring via its N-terminal domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jake F; Ho, Hinze; Greger, Ingo H

    2017-01-01

    AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) mediate fast excitatory neurotransmission and are selectively recruited during activity-dependent plasticity to increase synaptic strength. A prerequisite for faithful signal transmission is the positioning and clustering of AMPARs at postsynaptic sites. The mechanisms underlying this positioning have largely been ascribed to the receptor cytoplasmic C-termini and to AMPAR-associated auxiliary subunits, both interacting with the postsynaptic scaffold. Here, using mouse organotypic hippocampal slices, we show that the extracellular AMPAR N-terminal domain (NTD), which projects midway into the synaptic cleft, plays a fundamental role in this process. This highly sequence-diverse domain mediates synaptic anchoring in a subunit-selective manner. Receptors lacking the NTD exhibit increased mobility in synapses, depress synaptic transmission and are unable to sustain long-term potentiation (LTP). Thus, synaptic transmission and the expression of LTP are dependent upon an AMPAR anchoring mechanism that is driven by the NTD. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23024.001 PMID:28290985

  4. A point mutation in a domain of gamma interferon receptor 1 provokes severe immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allende, L M; López-Goyanes, A; Paz-Artal, E; Corell, A; García-Pérez, M A; Varela, P; Scarpellini, A; Negreira, S; Palenque, E; Arnaiz-Villena, A

    2001-01-01

    Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and the cellular responses induced by it are essential for controlling mycobacterial infections. Most patients bearing an IFN-gamma receptor ligand-binding chain (IFN-gammaR1) deficiency present gross mutations that truncate the protein and prevent its expression, giving rise to severe mycobacterial infections and, frequently, a fatal outcome. In this report a new mutation that affects the IFN-gammaR1 ligand-binding domain in a Spanish patient with mycobacterial disseminated infection and multifocal osteomyelitis is characterized. The mutation generates an amino acid change that does not abrogate protein expression on the cellular surface but that severely impairs responses after the binding of IFN-gamma (CD64 and HLA class II induction and tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-12 production). A patient's younger brother, who was also probably homozygous for the mutation, died from meningitis due to Mycobacterium bovis. These findings suggest that a point mutation may be fatal when it affects functionally important domains of the receptor and that the severity is not directly related to a lack of IFN-gamma receptor expression. Future research on these nontruncating mutations will make it possible to develop new therapeutical alternatives in this group of patients.

  5. The intracellular domain of the low affinity p75 nerve growth factor receptor is a death effector domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun H

    2009-01-01

    The death domain superfamily, comprising the death domain, death effector domain, caspase recruitment domain and pyrin domain subfamilies, is one of the largest classes of protein interaction modules, and plays a particularly critical function in the assembly and activation of apoptotic and inflammatory complexes. Members of the death domain superfamily share a common structural feature, the 6-helical bundle fold. However, individual subfamilies exhibit distinct structural and sequence characteristics. The most distinct feature identified in structural studies is that only the death effector domain contains a charge triad, which is formed by the E/D-RxDL motif. However, using sequence alignment and structural comparison, in the present study we found that the p75-NGFR death domain also contains a charge triad. We therefore suggest that the p75-NGFR death domain should be classified as belonging to the death effector domain.

  6. A novel PAN/apple domain-containing protein from Toxoplasma gondii: characterization and receptor identification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Gong

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular parasite that invades nucleated cells, causing toxoplasmosis in humans and animals worldwide. The extremely wide range of hosts susceptible to T. gondii is thought to be the result of interactions between T. gondii ligands and receptors on its target cells. In this study, a host cell-binding protein from T. gondii was characterized, and one of its receptors was identified. P104 (GenBank Access. No. CAJ20677 is 991 amino acids in length, containing a putative 26 amino acid signal peptide and 10 PAN/apple domains, and shows low homology to other identified PAN/apple domain-containing molecules. A 104-kDa host cell-binding protein was detected in the T. gondii lysate. Immunofluorescence assays detected P104 at the apical end of extracellular T. gondii. An Fc-fusion protein of the P104 N-terminus, which contains two PAN/apple domains, showed strong affinity for the mammalian and insect cells evaluated. This binding was not related to protein-protein or protein-lipid interactions, but to a protein-glycosaminoglycan (GAG interaction. Chondroitin sulfate (CS, a kind of GAG, was shown to be involved in adhesion of the Fc-P104 N-terminus fusion protein to host cells. These results suggest that P104, expressed at the apical end of the extracellular parasite, may function as a ligand in the attachment of T. gondii to CS or other receptors on the host cell, facilitating invasion by the parasite.

  7. The hemopexin and O-glycosylated domains tune gelatinase B/MMP-9 bioavailability via inhibition and binding to cargo receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van den Steen, Philippe E; Van Aelst, Ilse; Hvidberg, Vibeke;

    2006-01-01

    with a compact three-dimensional structure. The OG and hemopexin domains have no influence on the cleavage efficiency of MMP-9 substrates. In contrast, the hemopexin domain contains a binding site for the cargo receptor low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1). Furthermore, megalin/LRP-2...... domains down-regulate the bioavailability of active MMP-9 and the interactions with the cargo receptors are proposed to be the original function of hemopexin domains in MMPs....

  8. Cross-talk between the ligand- and DNA-binding domains of estrogen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Greene, Geoffrey L; Ravikumar, Krishnakumar M; Yang, Sichun

    2013-11-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is a hormone-responsive transcription factor that contains several discrete functional domains, including a ligand-binding domain (LBD) and a DNA-binding domain (DBD). Despite a wealth of knowledge about the behaviors of individual domains, the molecular mechanisms of cross-talk between LBD and DBD during signal transduction from hormone to DNA-binding of ERα remain elusive. Here, we apply a multiscale approach combining coarse-grained (CG) and atomistically detailed simulations to characterize this cross-talk mechanism via an investigation of the ERα conformational landscape. First, a CG model of ERα is built based on crystal structures of individual LBDs and DBDs, with more emphasis on their interdomain interactions. Second, molecular dynamics simulations are implemented and enhanced sampling is achieved via the "push-pull-release" strategy in the search for different LBD-DBD orientations. Third, multiple energetically stable ERα conformations are identified on the landscape. A key finding is that estradiol-bound LBDs utilize the well-described activation helix H12 to pack and stabilize LBD-DBD interactions. Our results suggest that the estradiol-bound LBDs can serve as a scaffold to position and stabilize the DBD-DNA complex, consistent with experimental observations of enhanced DNA binding with the LBD. Final assessment using atomic-level simulations shows that these CG-predicted models are significantly stable within a 15-ns simulation window and that specific pairs of lysine residues in close proximity at the domain interfaces could serve as candidate sites for chemical cross-linking studies. Together, these simulation results provide a molecular view of the role of ERα domain interactions in response to hormone binding.

  9. Peptides identify multiple hotspots within the ligand binding domain of the TNF receptor 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennick Michael

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hotspots are defined as the minimal functional domains involved in protein:protein interactions and sufficient to induce a biological response. Results Here we describe the use of complex and high diversity phage display libraries to isolate peptides (called Hotspot Ligands or HSPLs which sub-divide the ligand binding domain of the tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2; p75 into multiple hotspots. We have shown that these libraries could generate HSPLs which not only subdivide hotspots on protein and non-protein targets but act as agonists or antagonists. Using this approach, we generated peptides which were specific for human TNFR2, could be competed by the natural ligands, TNFα and TNFβ and induced an unexpected biological response in a TNFR2-specific manner. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the dissection of the TNFR2 into biologically active hotspots with the concomitant identification of a novel and unexpected biological activity.

  10. In vivo regulation of erythropoiesis by chemically inducible dimerization of the erythropoietin receptor intracellular domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norio Suzuki

    Full Text Available Erythropoietin (Epo and its receptor (EpoR are required for the regulation of erythropoiesis. Epo binds to the EpoR homodimer on the surface of erythroid progenitors and erythroblasts, and positions the intracellular domains of the homodimer to be in close proximity with each other. This conformational change is sufficient for the initiation of Epo-EpoR signal transduction. Here, we established a system of chemically regulated erythropoiesis in transgenic mice expressing a modified EpoR intracellular domain (amino acids 247-406 in which dimerization is induced using a specific compound (chemical inducer of dimerization, CID. Erythropoiesis is reversibly induced by oral administration of the CID to the transgenic mice. Because transgene expression is limited to hematopoietic cells by the Gata1 gene regulatory region, the effect of the CID is limited to erythropoiesis without adverse effects. Additionally, we show that the 160 amino acid sequence is the minimal essential domain of EpoR for intracellular signaling of chemically inducible erythropoiesis in vivo. We propose that the CID-dependent dimerization system combined with the EpoR intracellular domain and the Gata1 gene regulatory region generates a novel peroral strategy for the treatment of anemia.

  11. Molecular scaffolds regulate bidirectional crosstalk between Wnt and classical seven-transmembrane-domain receptor signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Force, Thomas; Woulfe, Kathleen; Koch, Walter J; Kerkelä, Risto

    2007-07-31

    Signaling downstream of classical seven-transmembrane domain receptors (7TMRs) had generally been thought to recruit factors that are in large part separate from those recruited by atypical 7TMRs, such as Frizzleds (Fzs), receptors for the Wnt family of glycoproteins. Classical 7TMRs are also known as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and are mediated by signaling factors such as heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins), GPCR kinases (GRKs), and beta-arrestins. Over the past few years, it has become increasingly apparent that classical and atypical 7TMRs share these factors, which are often associated with mediating classical 7TMR signaling, as well as the scaffolding proteins that were initially thought to be involved in transmitting atypical 7TMR signals. This sharing of signaling components by agonists that bind classical 7TMRs and those binding to atypical 7TMRs establishes the possibility of extensive crosstalk between these receptor classes. We discuss the evidence for, and against, crosstalk, and examine mechanisms by which this can occur.

  12. Homology modeling of NR2B modulatory domain of NMDA receptor and analysis of ifenprodil binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Luciana; Cosconati, Sandro; Steinbrecher, Thomas; Limongelli, Vittorio; Bertamino, Alessia; Novellino, Ettore; Case, David A

    2007-10-01

    NMDA receptors are glutamate-gated ion channels (iGluRs) that are involved in several important physiological functions such as neuronal development, synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. Among iGluRs, NMDA receptors have been perhaps the most actively investigated for their role in chronic neurodegeneration such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases. Recent studies have shown that the NTD of subunit NR2B modulates ion channel gating through the binding of allosteric modulators such as the prototypical compound ifenprodil. In the present paper, the construction of a three-dimensional model for the NR2B modulatory domain is described and docking calculations allow, for the first time, definition of the ifenprodil binding pose at an atomic level and fully explain all the available structure-activity relationships. Moreover, in an attempt to add further insight into the ifenprodil mechanism of action, as it is not completely clear if it binds and stabilizes an open or a closed conformation of the NR2B modulatory domain, a matter, which is fundamental for the rational design of NMDA antagonists, MD simulations followed by an MM-PBSA analysis were performed. These calculations reveal that the closed conformation of the R1-R2 domain, rather than the open, constitutes the high affinity binding site for ifenprodil and that a profound stabilization of the closed conformation upon ifenprodil binding occurs. Thus, for a rational design and/or for virtual screening experiments, the closed conformation of the R1-R2 domain should be taken into account and our 3D model can provide valuable hints for the design of NR2B-selective antagonists.

  13. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) regulates proliferation of endochondral cells in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawai, Ikuma; Hisaki, Tomoka; Sugiura, Koji; Naito, Kunihiko [Laboratory of Applied Genetics, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Kano, Kiyoshi, E-mail: kanokiyo@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Developmental Biology, Joint Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi 753-8515, Japan. (Japan); Biomedical Science Center for Translational Research (BSCTR), The United Graduate School of Veterinary Science, Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi 753-8515 (Japan)

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a receptor tyrosine kinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DDR2 regulates cell proliferation, cell adhesion, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We produced in vitro and in vivo model to better understand the role of DDR2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DDR2 might play an inhibitory role in the proliferation of chondrocyte. -- Abstract: Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is activated by fibrillar collagens. DDR2 regulates cell proliferation, cell adhesion, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling. The decrement of endogenous DDR2 represses osteoblastic marker gene expression and osteogenic differentiation in murine preosteoblastic cells, but the functions of DDR2 in chondrogenic cellular proliferation remain unclear. To better understand the role of DDR2 signaling in cellular proliferation in endochondral ossification, we inhibited Ddr2 expression via the inhibitory effect of miRNA on Ddr2 mRNA (miDdr2) and analyzed the cellular proliferation and differentiation in the prechondrocyte ATDC5 cell lines. To investigate DDR2's molecular role in endochondral cellular proliferation in vivo, we also produced transgenic mice in which the expression of truncated, kinase dead (KD) DDR2 protein is induced, and evaluated the DDR2 function in cellular proliferation in chondrocytes. Although the miDdr2-transfected ATDC5 cell lines retained normal differentiation ability, DDR2 reduction finally promoted cellular proliferation in proportion to the decreasing ratio of Ddr2 expression, and it also promoted earlier differentiation to cartilage cells by insulin induction. The layer of hypertrophic chondrocytes in KD Ddr2 transgenic mice was not significantly thicker than that of normal littermates, but the layer of proliferative chondrocytes in KD-Ddr2 transgenic mice was significantly thicker than that of normal littermates

  14. Identification of human somatostatin receptor 2 domains involved in internalization and signaling in QGP-1 pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambiaghi, Valeria; Vitali, Eleonora; Morone, Diego; Peverelli, Erika; Spada, Anna; Mantovani, Giovanna; Lania, Andrea Gerardo

    2016-07-12

    Somatostatin exerts inhibitory effects on hormone secretion and cell proliferation via five receptor subtypes (SST1-SST5), whose internalization is regulated by β-arrestins. The receptor domains involved in these effects have been only partially elucidated. The aim of the study is to characterize the molecular mechanism and determinants responsible for somatostatin receptor 2 internalization and signaling in pancreatic neuroendocrine QGP-1 cell line, focusing on the third intracellular loop and carboxyl terminal domains. We demonstrated that in cells transfected with somatostatin receptor 2 third intracellular loop mutant, no differences in β-arrestins recruitment and receptor internalization were observed after somatostatin receptor 2 activation in comparison with cells bearing wild-type somatostatin receptor 2. Conversely, the truncated somatostatin receptor 2 failed to recruit β-arrestins and to internalize after somatostatin receptor 2 agonist (BIM23120) incubation. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of BIM23120 on cell proliferation, cyclin D1 expression, P-ERK1/2 levels, apoptosis and vascular endothelial growth factor secretion was completely lost in cells transfected with either third intracellular loop or carboxyl terminal mutants. In conclusion, we demonstrated that somatostatin receptor 2 internalization requires intact carboxyl terminal while the effects of SS on cell proliferation, angiogenesis and apoptosis mediated by somatostatin receptor 2 need the integrity of both third intracellular loop and carboxyl terminal.

  15. Phototropins and Their LOV Domains: Versatile Plant Blue-Light Receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Winslow R. Briggs; Tong-Seung Tseng; Hae-Young Cho; Trevor E. Swartz; Stuart Sullivan; Roberto A. Bogomolni; Eirini Kaiserli; John M. Christie

    2007-01-01

    The phototropins phot1 and phot2 are plant blue-light receptors that mediate phototropism, chloroplast movements, stomatal opening, leaf expansion, the rapid inhibition of hypocotyl growth in etiolated seedlings,and possibly solar tracking by leaves in those species in which it occurs. The phototropins are plasma membrane-associated hydrophilic proteins with two chromophore domains (designated LOV1 and LOV2for their resemblance to domains in other signaling proteins that detect light, oxygen, or voltage) in their Nterminal half and a classic serine/threonine kinase domain in their C-terminal half. Both chromophore domains bind flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and both undergo light-activated formation of a covalent bond between a nearby cysteine and the C(4a) carbon of the FMN to form the signaling state. LOV2-cysteinyl adduct formation leads to the release downstream of a tightly bound amphipathic α-helix, a step required for activation of the kinase function. This cysteinyl adduct then slowly decays over a matter of seconds or minutes to return the photoreceptor chromophore modules to their ground state. Functional LOV2 is required for light-activated phosphorylation and for various blue-light responses mediated by the phototropins. The function of LOV1 is still unknown, although it may serve to modulate the signal generated by LOV2. The LOV domain is an ancient chromophore module found in a wide range of otherwise unrelated proteins in fungi and prokaryotes, the latter including cyanobacteria, eubacteria, and archaea.Further general reviews on the phototropins are those by Celaya and Liscum (2005) and Christie and Briggs(2005).

  16. Signal transduction by the formyl peptide receptor. Studies using chimeric receptors and site-directed mutagenesis define a novel domain for interaction with G-proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amatruda, T T; Dragas-Graonic, S; Holmes, R; Perez, H D

    1995-11-24

    The binding of small peptide ligands to high affinity chemoattractant receptors on the surface of neutrophils and monocytes leads to activation of heterotrimeric G-proteins, stimulation of phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C (PI-PLC), and subsequently to the inflammatory response. It was recently shown (Amatruda, T. T., Gerard, N. P., Gerard, C., and Simon, M. I. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 10139-10144) that the receptor for the chemoattractant peptide C5a specifically interacts with G alpha 16, a G-protein alpha subunit of the Gq class, to trigger ligand-dependent stimulation of PI-PLC in transfected cells. In order to further characterize this chemoattractant peptide signal transduction pathway, we transfected cDNAs encoding the formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine receptor (fMLPR) into COS cells and measured the production of inositol phosphates. Ligand-dependent activation of PI-PLC was seen in COS cells transfected with the fMLPR and G alpha 16 and stimulated with fMLP but not in cells transfected with receptor alone or with receptor plus G alpha q. Chimeric receptors in which the N-terminal extracellular domain, the second intracellular domain, or the intracellular C-terminal tail of the fMLP receptor was replaced with C5a receptor domains (Perez, H. D., Holmes, R., Vilander, L. R., Adams, R. R., Manzana, W., Jolley, D., and Andrews, W. H. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 2292-2295) were capable of ligand-dependent activation of PI-PLC when co-transfected with G alpha 16. A chimeric receptor exchanging the first intracellular domain of the fMLPR was constitutively activated, stimulating PI-PLC in the absence of ligand. Constitutive activation of PI-PLC, to a level 233% of that seen in cells transfected with wild-type fMLP receptors, was dependent on G alpha 16. Site-directed mutagenesis of the first intracellular domain of the fMLPR (amino acids 54-62) reveals this to be a domain necessary for ligand-dependent activation of G alpha 16. These results suggest that

  17. DDR2 (discoidin domain receptor 2) suppresses osteoclastogenesis and is a potential therapeutic target in osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Su, Jin; Wu, Shufang; Teng, Yue; Yin, Zhanhai; Guo, Yan; Li, Jing; Li, Kun; Yao, Libo; Li, Xu

    2015-03-24

    Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by abnormal skeletal fragility due to an imbalance in bone homeostasis. Finding therapeutic targets that promote bone formation is valuable for treating osteoporosis. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that promotes the differentiation of bone-depositing cells, osteoblasts, and bone formation. We investigated the role of DDR2 in osteoclastogenesis, the formation of cells responsible for bone resorption. We found that, although differentiated osteoclasts had catalytically active DDR2, its abundance was decreased. Overexpression of DDR2 inhibited the expression of osteoclastic markers, osteoclast maturation, and osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in a culture model of bone matrix. Conversely, knocking down Ddr2 through RNA interference accelerated osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption in mice. Further, we identified the co-receptor Neuropilin-1 (Nrp1) as a DDR2-interacting protein. DDR2 facilitated the binding of Nrp1 and the co-receptor PlexinA1 by forming a DDR2-Nrp1-PlexinA1 complex, which blocked PlexinA1-mediated stimulation of osteoclastogenesis. DDR2 prevented PlexinA1 from interacting with the receptor TREM2 and the adaptor DAP12. Moreover, knocking down Nrp1 rescued the expression of osteoclastic markers observed in DDR2-overexpressing cells, whereas ectopic expression of Nrp1 in DDR2-silenced cells inhibited the induction of osteoclastogenesis. Nrp1 enhanced the function of DDR2 in promoting osteoblast differentiation and bone formation in mice. In an ovariectomized mouse model of osteoporosis, adenovirus-mediated delivery of DDR2 to the femur bone alleviated osteopenic phenotypes. Our results revealed that DDR2 functions as an inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis, as well as a promoter of osteoblastogenesis, suggesting that enhancing DDR2 may be therapeutic for patients with osteoporosis.

  18. A camelid single-domain antibody neutralizes botulinum neurotoxin A by blocking host receptor binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Guorui; Lam, Kwok-ho; Weisemann, Jasmin; Peng, Lisheng; Krez, Nadja; Perry, Kay; Shoemaker, Charles B.; Dong, Min; Rummel, Andreas; Jin, Rongsheng (BCH); (Cornell); (Tufts CTSI); (UCI); (MHH)

    2017-08-07

    Antibody treatment is currently the only available countermeasure for botulism, a fatal illness caused by flaccid paralysis of muscles due to botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) intoxication. Among the seven major serotypes of BoNT/A-G, BoNT/A poses the most serious threat to humans because of its high potency and long duration of action. Prior to entering neurons and blocking neurotransmitter release, BoNT/A recognizes motoneurons via a dual-receptor binding process in which it engages both the neuron surface polysialoganglioside (PSG) and synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2 (SV2). Previously, we identified a potent neutralizing antitoxin against BoNT/A1 termed ciA-C2, derived from a camelid heavy-chain-only antibody (VHH). In this study, we demonstrate that ciA-C2 prevents BoNT/A1 intoxication by inhibiting its binding to neuronal receptor SV2. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structure of ciA-C2 in complex with the receptor-binding domain of BoNT/A1 (HCA1) at 1.68 Å resolution. The structure revealed that ciA-C2 partially occupies the SV2-binding site on HCA1, causing direct interference of HCA1 interaction with both the N-glycan and peptide-moiety of SV2. Interestingly, this neutralization mechanism is similar to that of a monoclonal antibody in clinical trials, despite that ciA-C2 is more than 10-times smaller. Taken together, these results enlighten our understanding of BoNT/A1 interactions with its neuronal receptor, and further demonstrate that inhibiting toxin binding to the host receptor is an efficient countermeasure strategy.

  19. The Influence of Adnectin Binding on the Extracellular Domain of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacob, Roxana E.; Chen, Guodong; Ahn, Joomi; Houel, Stephane; Wei, Hui; Mo, Jingjie; Tao, Li; Cohen, Daniel; Xie, Dianlin; Lin, Zheng; Morin, Paul E.; Doyle, Michael L.; Tymiak, Adrienne A.; Engen, John R.

    2014-12-01

    The precise and unambiguous elucidation and characterization of interactions between a high affinity recognition entity and its cognate protein provides important insights for the design and development of drugs with optimized properties and efficacy. In oncology, one important target protein has been shown to be the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) through the development of therapeutic anticancer antibodies that are selective inhibitors of EGFR activity. More recently, smaller protein derived from the 10th type III domain of human fibronectin termed an adnectin has also been shown to inhibit EGFR in clinical studies. The mechanism of EGFR inhibition by either an adnectin or an antibody results from specific binding of the high affinity protein to the extracellular portion of EGFR (exEGFR) in a manner that prevents phosphorylation of the intracellular kinase domain of the receptor and thereby blocks intracellular signaling. Here, the structural changes induced upon binding were studied by probing the solution conformations of full length exEGFR alone and bound to a cognate adnectin through hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS). The effects of binding in solution were identified and compared with the structure of a bound complex determined by X-ray crystallography.

  20. DMPD: Critical role of toll-like receptors and nucleotide oligomerisation domain inthe regulation of health and disease. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17535871 Critical role of toll-like receptors and nucleotide oligomerisation domain... Endocrinol. 2007 Jun;193(3):323-30. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Critical role of toll-like receptors...bmedID 17535871 Title Critical role of toll-like receptors and nucleotide oligomerisation domain inthe regul

  1. Characterization of niphatenones that inhibit androgen receptor N-terminal domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen A Banuelos

    Full Text Available Androgen ablation therapy causes a temporary reduction in tumor burden in patients with advanced prostate cancer. Unfortunately the malignancy will return to form lethal castration-recurrent prostate cancer (CRPC. The androgen receptor (AR remains transcriptionally active in CRPC in spite of castrate levels of androgens in the blood. AR transcriptional activity resides in its N-terminal domain (NTD. Possible mechanisms of continued AR transcriptional activity may include, at least in part, expression of constitutively active splice variants of AR that lack the C-terminal ligand-binding domain (LBD. Current therapies that target the AR LBD, would not be effective against these AR variants. Currently no drugs are clinically available that target the AR NTD which should be effective against these AR variants as well as full-length AR. Niphatenones were originally isolated and identified in active extracts from Niphates digitalis marine sponge. Here we begin to characterize the mechanism of niphatenones in blocking AR transcriptional activity. Both enantiomers had similar IC50 values of 6 µM for inhibiting the full-length AR in a functional transcriptional assay. However, (S-niphatenone had significantly better activity against the AR NTD compared to (R-niphatenone. Consistent with niphatenones binding to and inhibiting transactivation of AR NTD, niphatenones inhibited AR splice variant. Niphatenone did not affect the transcriptional activity of the related progesterone receptor, but slightly decreased glucocorticoid receptor (GR activity and covalently bound to GR activation function-1 (AF-1 region. Niphatenone blocked N/C interactions of AR without altering either AR protein levels or its intracellular localization in response to androgen. Alkylation with glutathione suggests that niphatenones are not a feasible scaffold for further drug development.

  2. Characterization of the Receptor-binding Domain of Ebola Glycoprotein in Viral Entry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jizhen Wang; Balaji Manicassamy; Michael Caffrey; Lijun Rong

    2011-01-01

    Ebola virus infection causes severe hemorrhagic fever in human and non-human primates with high mortality.Viral entry/infection is initiated by binding of glycoprotein GP protein on Ebola virion to host cells,followed by fusion of virus-cell membrane also mediated by GP.Using an human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-based pseudotyping system,the roles of 41 Ebola GP1 residues in the receptor-binding domain in viral entry were studied by alanine scanning substitutions.We identified that four residues appear to be involved in protein folding/structure and four residues are important for viral entry.An improved entry interference assay was developed and used to study the role of these residues that are important for viral entry.It was found that R64 and K95 are involved in receptor binding.In contrast,some residues such as I170 are important for viral entry,but do not play a major role in receptor binding as indicated by entry interference assay and/or protein binding data,suggesting that these residues are involved in post-binding steps of viral entry.Furthermore,our results also suggested that Ebola and Marburg viruses share a common cellular molecule for entry.

  3. Identification and Preparation of a Novel Chemokine Receptor-Binding Domain in the Cytoplasmic Regulator FROUNT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoda, Akihiro; Yoshinaga, Sosuke; Yunoki, Kaori; Ezaki, Soichiro; Yano, Kotaro; Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Toda, Etsuko; Terashima, Yuya; Matsushima, Kouji; Terasawa, Hiroaki

    2017-03-24

    FROUNT is a cytoplasmic protein that binds to the membrane-proximal C-terminal regions (Pro-Cs) of chemokine receptors, CCR2 and CCR5. The FROUNT-chemokine receptor interactions play a pivotal role in the migration of inflammatory immune cells, indicating the potential of FROUNT as a drug target for inflammatory diseases. To provide the foundation for drug development, structural information of the Pro-C binding region of FROUNT is desired. Here, we defined the novel structural domain (FNT-CB), which mediates the interaction with the chemokine receptors. A recombinant GST-tag-fused FNT-CB protein expression system was constructed. The protein was purified by affinity chromatography and then subjected to in-gel protease digestion of the GST-tag. The released FNT-CB was further purified by anion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. Purified FNT-CB adopts a helical structure, as indicated by CD. NMR line-broadening indicated that weak aggregation occurred at sub-millimolar concentrations, but the line-broadening was mitigated by using a deuterated sample in concert with transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy. The specific binding of FNT-CB to CCR2 Pro-C was confirmed by the fluorescence-based assay. The improved NMR spectral quality and the retained functional activity of FNT-CB support the feasibility of further structural and functional studies targeted at the anti-inflammatory drug development.

  4. Tyrosine Kinase Domain Gene Polymorphism of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Gastric Cancer in Northern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeivad F

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gastric cancer is one of the most common diseases of digestive system with a low 5-year survival rate and metastasis is the main cause of death. Multi-factors, such as changes in molecular pathways and deregulation of cells are involved in the disease development. Epidermal growth factor receptor pathway (EGFR which is associated with cell proliferation and survival can influence cancer development. EGFR function is governed by its genetic polymorphism; thus, we aimed to study the tyrosine kinase domain gene mutations of the receptor in patients with gastric cancer.Methods : In this experimental study, 123 subjects (83 patients with gastric cancer and 40 normal subjects were investigated in north of Iran for EGFR gene polymorphisms during 1 year. Genomic DNA was extracted by DNA extraction kit according to the manufacture's protocol. Polymerase chain reaction single-stranded conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP and silver staining were performed for investigating EGFR gene polymorphisms. Results : The participants included 72 men and 44 women. Gene polymorphism in exon 18 was present in 10% of the study population but SSCP pattern in exon 19 did not show different migrate bands neither in patients nor in normal subjects.Conclusion: It seems that screening for tyrosine kinas gene polymorphism of epidermal growth factor receptor in patients with gastric cancer and use of tyrosine kinas inhibitors could be useful in the prevention of disease progress and improvement of treatment process for a better quality of life in these patients.

  5. Prediction on the binding domain between human interleukin-6 and its receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on the spatial conformations of human interleukin-6 (hIL-6) derived from nuclear magnetic resonance analysis and human interleukin-6 receptor (hIL-6R) modeled with homology modeling method using human growth hormone receptor as template, the interaction between hIL-6 and its receptor (hIL-6R) is studied with docking program according to the surface electrostatic potential analysis and spatial conformation complement. The stable region structure composed of hIL-6 and hIL-6R is obtained on the basis of molecular mechanism optimization and molecular dynamics simulation. The binding domain between hIL-6 and hIL-6R is predicted theoretically. Furthermore, the especial binding sites that influence the interaction between hIL-6 and hIL-6R are confirmed. The results lay a theoretical foundation for confirming the active regions of hIL-6 and designing novel antagonist with computer-guided techniques.

  6. Prediction on the binding domain between human interleukin-6 and its receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯健男; 任蕴芳; 沈倍奋

    2000-01-01

    Based on the spatial conformations of human interleukin-6 (hlL-6) derived from nuclear magnetic resonance analysis and human interleukin-6 receptor (hlL-6R) modeled with homology modeling method using human growth hormone receptor as template, the interaction between hlL-6 and its receptor (hIL-6R) is studied with docking program according to the surface electrostatic potential analysis and spatial conformation complement. The stable region structure composed of hlL-6 and hlL-6R is obtained on the basis of molecular mechanism optimization and molecular dynamics simulation. The binding domain between hIL-6 and hIL-6R is predicted theoretically. Furthermore, the especial binding sites that influence the interaction between hlL-6 and hlL-6R are confirmed. The results lay a theoretical foundation for confirming the active regions of hlL-6 and designing novel antagonist with computer-guided techniques.

  7. Evolution of S-domain receptor-like kinases in land plants and origination of S-locus receptor kinases in Brassicaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Shilai; Li, Mengya; Liu, Pei

    2013-03-19

    The S-domain serine/threonine receptor-like kinases (SRLKs) comprise one of the largest and most rapidly expanding subfamilies in the plant receptor-like/Pelle kinase (RLKs) family. The founding member of this subfamily, the S-locus receptor kinase (SRK), functions as the female determinant of specificity in the self-incompatibility (SI) responses of crucifers. Two classes of proteins resembling the extracellular S domain (designated S-domain receptor-like proteins, SRLPs) or the intracellular kinase domain (designated S-domain receptor-like cytoplasmic kinases, SRLCKs) of SRK are also ubiquitous in land plants, indicating that the SRLKs are composite molecules that originated by domain fusion of the two component proteins. Here, we explored the origin and diversification of SRLKs by phylogenomic methods. Based on the distribution patterns of SRLKs and SRLCKs in a reconciled species-domain tree, a maximum parsimony model was then established for simultaneously inferring and dating gene duplication/loss and fusion /fission events in SRLK evolution. Various SRK alleles from crucifer species were then included in our phylogenetic analyses to infer the origination of SRKs by identifying the proper outgroups. Two gene fusion events were inferred and the major gene fusion event occurred in the common ancestor of land plants generated almost all of extant SRLKs. The functional diversification of duplicated SRLKs was illustrated by molecular evolution analyses of SRKs. Our findings support that SRKs originated as two ancient haplotypes derived from a pair of tandem duplicate genes through random regulatory neo-/sub- functionalization in the common ancestor of the Brassicaceae.

  8. Structural insights of homotypic interaction domains in the ligand-receptor signal transduction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Hoon; Jeong, Mi Suk; Jang, Se Bok

    2016-01-01

    Several members of tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily that these members activate caspase-8 from death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) in TNF ligand-receptor signal transduction have been identified. In the extrinsic pathway, apoptotic signal transduction is induced in death domain (DD) superfamily; it consists of a hexahelical bundle that contains 80 amino acids. The DD superfamily includes about 100 members that belong to four subfamilies: death domain (DD), caspase recruitment domain (CARD), pyrin domain (PYD), and death effector domain (DED). This superfamily contains key building blocks: with these blocks, multimeric complexes are formed through homotypic interactions. Furthermore, each DD-binding event occurs exclusively. The DD superfamily regulates the balance between death and survival of cells. In this study, the structures, functions, and unique features of DD superfamily members are compared with their complexes. By elucidating structural insights of DD superfamily members, we investigate the interaction mechanisms of DD domains; these domains are involved in TNF ligand-receptor signaling. These DD superfamily members play a pivotal role in the development of more specific treatments of cancer. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(3): 159-166] PMID:26615973

  9. Hydrophobic side chain dynamics of a glutamate receptor ligand binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Alexander S; Oswald, Robert E

    2010-03-26

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate much of the fast excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. The extracellular ligand binding core (S1S2) of the GluR2 subtype of ionotropic glutamate receptors can be produced as a soluble protein with properties essentially identical to the corresponding domain in the intact, membrane-bound protein. Using a variety of biophysical techniques, much has been learned about the structure and dynamics of S1S2 and the relationship between its ligand-induced conformational changes and the function of the receptor. It is clear that dynamic processes are essential to the function of ionotropic glutamate receptors. We have isotopically labeled side chain methyls of GluR2 S1S2 and used NMR spectroscopy to study their dynamics on the ps-ns and mus-ms time scales. Increased disorder is seen in regions that are part of the key dimer interface in the intact protein. When glutamate is bound, the degree of ps-ns motion is less than that observed with other ligands, suggesting that the physiological agonist binds to a preformed binding site. At the slower time scales, the degree of S1S2 flexibility induced by ligand binding is greatest for willardiine partial agonists, least for antagonists, and intermediate for full agonists. Notable differences among bound ligands are in the region of the protein that forms a hinge between two lobes that close upon agonist binding, and along the beta-sheet in Lobe 2. These motions provide clues as to the functional properties of partial agonists and to the conformational changes associated with lobe closure and channel activation.

  10. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is required for maintenance of spermatogenesis in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Kiyoshi; Kitamura, Ayami; Matsuwaki, Takashi; Morimatsu, Masami; Naito, Kunihiko

    2010-01-01

    Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK). We recently identified homozygous smallie mutant mice (BKS.HRS. Ddr2(slie/slie)/J, Ddr2(slie/slie) mutants), which lack a functional DDR2. Ddr2(slie/slie) mutant mice are dwarfed and infertile due to peripheral dysregulation of the endocrine system. To understand the role of DDR2 signaling in spermatogenesis, we studied the expression of several receptors, enzymes, and proteins related to spermatogenesis in wild-type and Ddr2(slie/slie) mutant mice at 10 weeks and 5 months of age. DDR2 were expressed in adult wild-type male mice in Leydig cells. The number of differentiated spermatozoa in the seminal fluid was significantly lower in the Ddr2(slie/slie) mutant mice than in the wild-type mice. The number of TUNEL-positive cells was significantly greater in 5-month-old Ddr2(slie/slie) mutants. Testosterone was significantly reduced at 5 months of age, but LH was similar in both types of mice at both 10 weeks and 5 months of age. The expression levels of LH receptors (Lhcgr), StAR, P450scc, and Hsd3beta6 were not significantly different between the two types of mice at 10 weeks of age, but they were significantly reduced in 5-month-old Ddr2(slie/slie) mutants compared to wild-type mice of the same age. DDR2 was expressed in the Leydig cells of adult wild-type male mice. In conclusion, our results indicated that DDR2 signaling plays a critical role in the maintenance of male spermatogenesis.

  11. Structural analysis of the intracellular domain of (pro)renin receptor fused to maltose-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Gao, Xiaoli; Michael Garavito, R

    2011-04-22

    The (pro)renin receptor (PRR) is an important component of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), which regulates blood pressure and cardiovascular function. The integral membrane protein PRR contains a large extracellular domain (∼310 amino acids), a single transmembrane domain (∼20 amino acids) and an intracellular domain (∼19 amino acids). Although short, the intracellular (IC) domain of the PRR has functionally important roles in a number of signal transduction pathways activated by (pro)renin binding. Meanwhile, together with the transmembrane domain and a small portion of the extracellular domain (∼30 amino acids), the IC domain is also involved in assembly of V(0) portion of the vacuolar proton-translocating ATPase (V-ATPase). To better understand structural and multifunctional roles of the PRR-IC, we report the crystal structure of the PRR-IC domain as maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion proteins at 2.0Å (maltose-free) and 2.15Å (maltose-bound). In the two separate crystal forms having significantly different unit-cell dimensions and molecular packing, MBP-PRR-IC fusion protein was found to be a dimer, which is different with the natural monomer of native MBP. The PRR-IC domain appears as a relatively flexible loop and is responsible for the dimerization of MBP fusion protein. Residues in the PRR-IC domain, particularly two tyrosines, dominate the intermonomer interactions, suggesting a role for the PRR-IC domain in protein oligomerization.

  12. A globin domain in a neuronal transmembrane receptor of Caenorhabditis elegans and Ascaris suum: molecular modeling and functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilleman, Lesley; Germani, Francesca; De Henau, Sasha; Helbo, Signe; Desmet, Filip; Berghmans, Herald; Van Doorslaer, Sabine; Hoogewijs, David; Schoofs, Liliane; Braeckman, Bart P; Moens, Luc; Fago, Angela; Dewilde, Sylvia

    2015-04-17

    We report the structural and biochemical characterization of GLB-33, a putative neuropeptide receptor that is exclusively expressed in the nervous system of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. This unique chimeric protein is composed of a 7-transmembrane domain (7TM), GLB-33 7TM, typical of a G-protein-coupled receptor, and of a globin domain (GD), GLB-33 GD. Comprehensive sequence similarity searches in the genome of the parasitic nematode, Ascaris suum, revealed a chimeric protein that is similar to a Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-amide neuropeptide receptor. The three-dimensional structures of the separate domains of both species and of the full-length proteins were modeled. The 7TM domains of both proteins appeared very similar, but the globin domain of the A. suum receptor surprisingly seemed to lack several helices, suggesting a novel truncated globin fold. The globin domain of C. elegans GLB-33, however, was very similar to a genuine myoglobin-type molecule. Spectroscopic analysis of the recombinant GLB-33 GD showed that the heme is pentacoordinate when ferrous and in the hydroxide-ligated form when ferric, even at neutral pH. Flash-photolysis experiments showed overall fast biphasic CO rebinding kinetics. In its ferrous deoxy form, GLB-33 GD is capable of reversibly binding O2 with a very high affinity and of reducing nitrite to nitric oxide faster than other globins. Collectively, these properties suggest that the globin domain of GLB-33 may serve as a highly sensitive oxygen sensor and/or as a nitrite reductase. Both properties are potentially able to modulate the neuropeptide sensitivity of the neuronal transmembrane receptor. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Energetic modeling and single-molecule verification of dynamic regulation on receptor complexes by actin corrals and lipid raft domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien Y.; Huang, Jung Y.; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2014-12-01

    We developed an energetic model by integrating the generalized Langevin equation with the Cahn-Hilliard equation to simulate the diffusive behaviors of receptor proteins in the plasma membrane of a living cell. Simulation results are presented to elaborate the confinement effects from actin corrals and protein-induced lipid domains. Single-molecule tracking data of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) acquired on live HeLa cells agree with the simulation results and the mechanism that controls the diffusion of single-molecule receptors is clarified. We discovered that after ligand binding, EGFR molecules move into lipid nanodomains. The transition rates between different diffusion states of liganded EGFR molecules are regulated by the lipid domains. Our method successfully captures dynamic interactions of receptors at the single-molecule level and provides insight into the functional architecture of both the diffusing EGFR molecules and their local cellular environment.

  14. Mutations in the ligand-binding domain of the androgen receptor gene cluster in two regions of the gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhaul, M J; Marcelli, M; Zoppi, S; Wilson, C M; Griffin, J E; Wilson, J D

    1992-11-01

    We have analyzed the nucleotide sequence of the androgen receptor from 22 unrelated subjects with substitution mutations of the hormone-binding domain. Eleven had the phenotype of complete testicular feminization, four had incomplete testicular feminization, and seven had Reifenstein syndrome. The underlying functional defect in cultured skin fibroblasts included individuals with absent, qualitative, or quantitative defects in ligand binding. 19 of the 21 substitution mutations (90%) cluster in two regions that account for approximately 35% of the hormone-binding domain, namely, between amino acids 726 and 772 and between amino acids 826 and 864. The fact that one of these regions is homologous to a region of the human thyroid hormone receptor (hTR-beta) which is a known cluster site for mutations that cause thyroid hormone resistance implies that this localization of mutations is not a coincidence. These regions of the androgen receptor may be of particular importance for the formation and function of the hormone-receptor complex.

  15. The Role of Nuclear Receptor-Binding SET Domain Family Histone Lysine Methyltransferases in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Richard L; Swaroop, Alok; Troche, Catalina; Licht, Jonathan D

    2017-06-01

    The nuclear receptor-binding SET Domain (NSD) family of histone H3 lysine 36 methyltransferases is comprised of NSD1, NSD2 (MMSET/WHSC1), and NSD3 (WHSC1L1). These enzymes recognize and catalyze methylation of histone lysine marks to regulate chromatin integrity and gene expression. The growing number of reports demonstrating that alterations or translocations of these genes fundamentally affect cell growth and differentiation leading to developmental defects illustrates the importance of this family. In addition, overexpression, gain of function somatic mutations, and translocations of NSDs are associated with human cancer and can trigger cellular transformation in model systems. Here we review the functions of NSD family members and the accumulating evidence that these proteins play key roles in tumorigenesis. Because epigenetic therapy is an important emerging anticancer strategy, understanding the function of NSD family members may lead to the development of novel therapies. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  16. Role of the intracellular receptor domain of gp130 (exon 17) in human inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christoph J. Auernhammer; Thomas Ochsenkühn; Kathrin Zitzmann; Fabian Schnitzler; Julia Seiderer; Peter Lohse; George Vlotides; Dieter Engelhardt; Michael Sackmann; Burkhard G(o)ke

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the role of the intracellular receptor domain of gp130 in human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).METHODS: We amplified and sequenced the complete exon 17 of the human gp130 gene in 146 patients with IBD. According to clinical and histopathological signs,the 146 patients with IBD were classified as having Crohn's disease (n = 73) or ulcerative colitis (n = 63),or as indeterminate status (n = 10).RESULTS: No mutations in exon 17 of the gp130 gene could be detected in any of the 146 patients with IBD examined.CONCLUSION: There is no evidence that mutations in exon 17 of the gp130 gene are involved in the pathogenesis of human IBD.

  17. The Receptor-Binding Domain of Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin Produced in Escherichia coli Folds into Its Native, Immunogenic Structure ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBois, Rebecca M.; Aguilar-Yañez, José Manuel; Mendoza-Ochoa, Gonzalo I.; Oropeza-Almazán, Yuriana; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Alvarez, Mario Moisés; White, Stephen W.; Russell, Charles J.

    2011-01-01

    The hemagglutinin (HA) surface glycoprotein promotes influenza virus entry and is the key protective antigen in natural immunity and vaccines. The HA protein is a trimeric envelope glycoprotein consisting of a globular receptor-binding domain (HA-RBD) that is inserted into a membrane fusion-mediating stalk domain. Similar to other class I viral fusion proteins, the fusogenic stalk domain spontaneously refolds into its postfusion conformation when expressed in isolation, consistent with this domain being trapped in a metastable conformation. Using X-ray crystallography, we show that the influenza virus HA-RBD refolds spontaneously into its native, immunogenic structure even when expressed in an unglycosylated form in Escherichia coli. In the 2.10-Å structure of the HA-RBD, the receptor-binding pocket is intact and its conformational epitopes are preserved. Recombinant HA-RBD is immunogenic and protective in ferrets, and the protein also binds with specificity to sera from influenza virus-infected humans. Overall, the data provide a structural basis for the rapid production of influenza vaccines in E. coli. From an evolutionary standpoint, the ability of the HA-RBD to refold spontaneously into its native conformation suggests that influenza virus acquired this domain as an insertion into an ancestral membrane-fusion domain. The insertion of independently folding domains into fusogenic stalk domains may be a common feature of class I viral fusion proteins. PMID:21068239

  18. N-terminal truncation enables crystallization of the receptor-binding domain of the FedF bacterial adhesin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Kerpel, Maia; Van Molle, Inge [Department of Ultrastructure, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Brys, Lea [Department of Cellular and Molecular Immunology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Wyns, Lode; De Greve, Henri; Bouckaert, Julie, E-mail: bouckaej@vub.ac.be [Department of Ultrastructure, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2006-12-01

    The N-terminal receptor-binding domain of the FedF adhesin from enterotoxigenic E. coli has been crystallized. This required the deletion of its first 14 residues, which are also cleaved off naturally. FedF is the two-domain tip adhesin of F18 fimbriae from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. Bacterial adherence, mediated by the N-terminal receptor-binding domain of FedF to carbohydrate receptors on intestinal microvilli, causes diarrhoea and oedema disease in newly weaned piglets and induces the secretion of Shiga toxins. A truncate containing only the receptor-binding domain of FedF was found to be further cleaved at its N-terminus. Reconstruction of this N-terminal truncate rendered FedF amenable to crystallization, resulting in crystals with space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and unit-cell parameters a = 36.20, b = 74.64, c = 99.03 Å that diffracted to beyond 2 Å resolution. The binding specificity of FedF was screened for on a glycan array, exposing 264 glycoconjugates, to identify specific receptors for cocrystallization with FedF.

  19. Allosteric Regulation in the Ligand Binding Domain of Retinoic Acid Receptorγ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amal, Ismail; Lutzing, Régis; Stote, Roland H.; Rochette-Egly, Cécile; Rochel, Natacha; Dejaegere, Annick

    2017-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) plays key roles in cell differentiation and growth arrest through nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs), which are ligand-dependent transcription factors. While the main trigger of RAR activation is the binding of RA, phosphorylation of the receptors has also emerged as an important regulatory signal. Phosphorylation of the RARγ N-terminal domain (NTD) is known to play a functional role in neuronal differentiation. In this work, we investigated the phosphorylation of RARγ ligand binding domain (LBD), and present evidence that the phosphorylation status of the LBD affects the phosphorylation of the NTD region. We solved the X-ray structure of a phospho-mimetic mutant of the LBD (RARγ S371E), which we used in molecular dynamics simulations to characterize the consequences of the S371E mutation on the RARγ structural dynamics. Combined with simulations of the wild-type LBD, we show that the conformational equilibria of LBD salt bridges (notably R387-D340) are affected by the S371E mutation, which likely affects the recruitment of the kinase complex that phosphorylates the NTD. The molecular dynamics simulations also showed that a conservative mutation in this salt bridge (R387K) affects the dynamics of the LBD without inducing large conformational changes. Finally, cellular assays showed that the phosphorylation of the NTD of RARγ is differentially regulated by retinoic acid in RARγWT and in the S371N, S371E and R387K mutants. This multidisciplinary work highlights an allosteric coupling between phosphorylations of the LBD and the NTD of RARγ and supports the importance of structural dynamics involving electrostatic interactions in the regulation of RARs activity. PMID:28125680

  20. Interaction of the growth hormone receptor cytoplasmic domain with the JAK2 tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, S J; Gilliland, G; Kraft, A S; Arnold, C S

    1994-11-01

    An early step in GH action involves tyrosine phosphorylation of various cellular proteins. Recently, it has been shown in murine preadipocytes that GH promotes the association of its receptor (the GHR) with and the activation of the JAK2 tyrosine kinase. In this study, we confirmed the human (h) GH-induced association of JAK2 with hGHR in IM-9 cells by coimmunoprecipitation experiments using anti-hGHR serum. We further examined the interaction of JAK2 with the GHR cytoplasmic domain by two lines of investigation. For in vitro studies, we assayed by immunoblotting the ability of cell-derived JAK2 to interact with glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins containing elements of the hGHR cytoplasmic domain. A fusion protein containing the entire hGHR cytoplasmic domain (residues 271-620) specifically associated with JAK2 independent of prior stimulation of cells with hGH. This interaction was not dependent on tyrosine phosphorylation of either partner. Mutational analysis of the hGHR cytoplasmic domain component of the fusions indicated that a membrane-proximal 20-residue region that includes the proline-rich box 1 was necessary for the interaction. This region appeared to cooperate with another region(s), largely in the N-terminal one third of the cytoplasmic domain, to promote full interaction with JAK2. For in vivo reconstitution experiments, wild-type (WT) and mutant rabbit GHRs (rGHRs) along with murine JAK2 were expressed by transient transfection in COS-7 cells. rGHR mutations were confined to the cytoplasmic domain and included C-terminal truncations as well as internal deletions of residues 297-406 and 278-292 (the latter contains box 1). All mutant rGHRs were expressed at the cell surface and bound hGH to a degree similar to the WT rGHR. Receptors were tested for their ability to mediate the hGH-induced immunoprecipitability of JAK2 with phosphotyrosine (APT) antibodies. A rGHR truncated to residue 275 [rGHR-(1-275)], which contains only five cytoplasmic

  1. A Novel Loop Domain in Superantigens Extends Their T Cell Receptor Recognition Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunther,S.; Varma, A.; Moza, B.; Kasper, K.; Wyatt, A.; Zhu, P.; Nur-ur Rahman, A.; Li, Y.; Mariuzza, R.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    Superantigens (SAGs) interact with host immune receptors to induce a massive release of inflammatory cytokines that can lead to toxic shock syndrome and death. Bacterial SAGs can be classified into five distinct evolutionary groups. Group V SAGs are characterized by the {alpha}3-{beta}8 loop, a unique {approx}15 amino acid residue extension that is required for optimal T cell activation. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structures of the group V SAG staphylococcal enterotoxin K (SEK) alone and in complex with the TCR hV{beta}5.1 domain. SEK adopts a unique TCR binding orientation relative to other SAG-TCR complexes, which results in the {alpha}3-{beta}8 loop contacting the apical loop of framework region 4, thereby extending the known TCR recognition site of SAGs. These interactions are absolutely required for TCR binding and T cell activation by SEK, and dictate the TCR V{beta} domain specificity of SEK and other group V SAGs.

  2. The Dentin Sialoprotein (DSP) Domain Regulates Dental Mesenchymal Cell Differentiation through a Novel Surface Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Chunyan; Yuan, Guohua; Luo, Daoshu; Zhang, Lu; Lin, Heng; Liu, Huan; Chen, Lei; Yang, Guobin; Chen, Shuo; Chen, Zhi

    2016-07-19

    Dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) is a dentin extracellular matrix protein that is processed into dentin sialoprotein (DSP), dentin glycoprotein (DGP) and dentin phosphoprotein (DPP). DSP is mainly expressed in odontoblasts. We hypothesized that DSP interacts with cell surface receptors and subsequently activates intracellular signaling. Using DSP as bait for screening a protein library, we demonstrate that DSP acts as a ligand and binds to integrin β6. The 36 amino acid residues of DSP are sufficient to bind to integrin β6. This peptide promoted cell attachment, migration, differentiation and mineralization of dental mesenchymal cells. In addition, DSP (aa183-219) stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and P38 kinases. This activation was inhibited by an anti-integrin β6 antibody and siRNA. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this DSP fragment induces SMAD1/5/8 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation via ERK1/2 and P38 signaling. SMAD1/5/8 binds to SMAD binding elements (SBEs) in the DSPP gene promoter. SBE mutations result in a decrease in DSPP transcriptional activity. Endogenous DSPP expression was up-regulated by DSP (aa183-219) in dental mesenchymal cells. The data in the current study demonstrate for the first time that this DSP domain acts as a ligand in a RGD-independent manner and is involved in intracellular signaling via interacting with integrin β6. The DSP domain regulates DSPP expression and odontoblast homeostasis via a positive feedback loop.

  3. Disease Mutations in the Ryanodine Receptor Central Region: Crystal Structures of a Phosphorylation Hot Spot Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuchi, Zhiguang; Lau, Kelvin; Van Petegem, Filip (UBC)

    2015-02-09

    Ryanodine Receptors (RyRs) are huge Ca{sup 2+} release channels in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and form targets for phosphorylation and disease mutations. We present crystal structures of a domain in three RyR isoforms, containing the Ser2843 (RyR1) and Ser2808/Ser2814 (RyR2) phosphorylation sites. The RyR1 domain is the target for 11 disease mutations. Several of these are clustered near the phosphorylation sites, suggesting that phosphorylation and disease mutations may affect the same interface. The L2867G mutation causes a drastic thermal destabilization and aggregation at room temperature. Crystal structures for other disease mutants show that they affect surface properties and intradomain salt bridges. In vitro phosphorylation experiments show that up to five residues in one long loop of RyR2 can be phosphorylated by PKA or CaMKII. Docking into cryo-electron microscopy maps suggests a putative location in the clamp region, implying that mutations and phosphorylation may affect the allosteric motions within this area.

  4. Receptor-binding domain as a target for developing SARS vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaojie; Liu, Qi; Du, Lanying; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Shibo

    2013-08-01

    A decade ago, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (SARS-CoV) caused a global pandemic with a mortality rate of 10%. Reports of recent outbreaks of a SARS-like disease caused by Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) have raised serious concerns of a possible reemergence of SARS-CoV, either by laboratory escape or the presence of a natural reservoir. Therefore, the development of effective and safe SARS vaccines is still needed. Based on our previous studies, we believe that the receptor-binding domain (RBD) in the S1 subunit of the SARS-CoV spike (S) protein is the most important target for developing a SARS vaccine. In particular, RBD of S protein contains the critical neutralizing domain (CND), which is able to induce highly potent neutralizing antibody response and cross-protection against divergent SARS-CoV strains. Furthermore, a RBD-based subunit vaccine is expected to be safer than other vaccines that may induce Th2-type immunopathology. This review will discuss key advances in the development of RBD-based SARS vaccines and the possibility of using a similar strategy to develop vaccines against MERS-CoV.

  5. Epidermal growth factor receptor activation in glioblastoma through novel missense mutations in the extracellular domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey C Lee

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein tyrosine kinases are important regulators of cellular homeostasis with tightly controlled catalytic activity. Mutations in kinase-encoding genes can relieve the autoinhibitory constraints on kinase activity, can promote malignant transformation, and appear to be a major determinant of response to kinase inhibitor therapy. Missense mutations in the EGFR kinase domain, for example, have recently been identified in patients who showed clinical responses to EGFR kinase inhibitor therapy. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Encouraged by the promising clinical activity of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR kinase inhibitors in treating glioblastoma in humans, we have sequenced the complete EGFR coding sequence in glioma tumor samples and cell lines. We identified novel missense mutations in the extracellular domain of EGFR in 13.6% (18/132 of glioblastomas and 12.5% (1/8 of glioblastoma cell lines. These EGFR mutations were associated with increased EGFR gene dosage and conferred anchorage-independent growth and tumorigenicity to NIH-3T3 cells. Cells transformed by expression of these EGFR mutants were sensitive to small-molecule EGFR kinase inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest extracellular missense mutations as a novel mechanism for oncogenic EGFR activation and may help identify patients who can benefit from EGFR kinase inhibitors for treatment of glioblastoma.

  6. i-bodies, Human Single Domain Antibodies That Antagonize Chemokine Receptor CXCR4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Katherine; Dolezal, Olan; Cao, Benjamin; Nilsson, Susan K; See, Heng B; Pfleger, Kevin D G; Roche, Michael; Gorry, Paul R; Pow, Andrew; Viduka, Katerina; Lim, Kevin; Lu, Bernadine G C; Chang, Denison H C; Murray-Rust, Thomas; Kvansakul, Marc; Perugini, Matthew A; Dogovski, Con; Doerflinger, Marcel; Zhang, Yuan; Parisi, Kathy; Casey, Joanne L; Nuttall, Stewart D; Foley, Michael

    2016-06-10

    CXCR4 is a G protein-coupled receptor with excellent potential as a therapeutic target for a range of clinical conditions, including stem cell mobilization, cancer prognosis and treatment, fibrosis therapy, and HIV infection. We report here the development of a fully human single-domain antibody-like scaffold termed an "i-body," the engineering of which produces an i-body library possessing a long complementarity determining region binding loop, and the isolation and characterization of a panel of i-bodies with activity against human CXCR4. The CXCR4-specific i-bodies show antagonistic activity in a range of in vitro and in vivo assays, including inhibition of HIV infection, cell migration, and leukocyte recruitment but, importantly, not the mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells. Epitope mapping of the three CXCR4 i-bodies AM3-114, AM4-272, and AM3-523 revealed binding deep in the binding pocket of the receptor.

  7. The Receptor Binding Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin Stereotype C Binds Phosphoinositides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Varnum, Susan M.

    2012-03-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most toxic proteins known for humans and animals with an extremely low LD50 of {approx} 1 ng/kg. BoNTs generally require a protein and a ganglioside on the cell membrane surface for binding, which is known as a 'dual receptor' mechanism for host intoxication. Recent studies have suggested that in addition to gangliosides, other membrane lipids such as phosphoinositides may be involved in the interactions with the receptor binding domain (HCR) of BoNTs for better membrane penetration. Here, using two independent lipid-binding assays, we tested the interactions of BoNT/C-HCR with lipids in vitro. BoNT/C-HCR was found to bind negatively charged phospholipids, preferentially phosphoinositides. Additional interactions to phosphoinositides may help BoNT/C bind membrane more tightly and transduct signals for subsequent steps of intoxication. Our results provide new insights into the mechanisms of host cell membrane recognition by BoNTs.

  8. Discoidin domain receptor 1 activity drives an aggressive phenotype in gastric carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Hoon; Ham, In-Hye; Lee, Dakeun; Jin, Hyejin; Aguilera, Kristina Y; Oh, Hye Jeong; Han, Sang-Uk; Kwon, Ji Eun; Kim, Young-Bae; Ding, Ke; Brekken, Rolf A

    2017-01-31

    Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a receptor tyrosine kinase that utilizes collagen as a ligand, is a key molecule in the progression of solid tumors as it regulates the interaction of cancer cells with the tumor stroma. However, the clinical relevance of DDR1 expression in gastric carcinoma is yet to be investigated. Here, we assessed the role of DDR1 in mediating the aggressive phenotype of gastric carcinoma and its potential as a therapeutic target. We conducted DDR1 immunohistochemistry using a tissue microarray of 202 gastric carcinoma specimens. We examined the effect of collagen-induced activation of DDR1 on cell signaling, tumorigenesis, and cell migration in gastric cancer cell lines, and tumor growth in a xenograft animal model of gastric cancer. Our results showed that 50.5% of gastric cancer tissues are positive for DDR1 expression, and positive DDR1 expression was significantly correlated with a poor prognosis (P = 0.015). In a subgroup analysis, DDR1 expression was prognostically meaningful only in patients receiving adjuvant treatment (P = 0.013). We also demonstrated that collagen was able to activate DDR1 and increase the clonogenicity and migration of gastric cancer cells. We observed that a DDR1 inhibitor, 7rh benzamide, suppressed tumor growth in gastric cancer xenografts. Our findings suggest a key role for DDR1 signaling in mediating the aggressive phenotype of gastric carcinoma. Importantly, inhibition of DDR1 is an attractive strategy for gastric carcinoma therapy.

  9. Discoidin domain receptor 1: isoform expression and potential functions in cirrhotic human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sunmi; Shackel, Nicholas A; Wang, Xin M; Ajami, Katerina; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Gorrell, Mark D

    2011-03-01

    Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that binds and is activated by collagens. Transcriptional profiling of cirrhosis in human liver using a DNA array and quantitative PCR detected elevated mRNA expression of DDR1 compared with that in nondiseased liver. The present study characterized DDR1 expression in cirrhotic and nondiseased human liver and examined the cellular effects of DDR1 expression. mRNA expression of all five isoforms of DDR1 was detected in human liver, whereas DDR1a demonstrated differential expression in liver with hepatitis C virus and primary biliary cirrhosis compared with nondiseased liver. In addition, immunoblot analysis detected shed fragments of DDR1 more readily in cirrhotic liver than in nondiseased liver. Inasmuch as DDR1 is subject to protease-mediated cleavage after prolonged interaction with collagen, this differential expression may indicate more intense activation of DDR1 protein in cirrhotic compared with nondiseased liver. In situ hybridization and immunofluorescence localized intense DDR1 mRNA and protein expression to epithelial cells including hepatocytes at the portal-parenchymal interface and the luminal aspect of the biliary epithelium. Overexpression of DDR1a altered hepatocyte behavior including increased adhesion and less migration on extracelular matrix substrates. DDR1a regulated extracellular expression of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 2. These data elucidate DDR1 function pertinent to cirrhosis and indicate the importance of epithelial cell-collagen interactions in chronic liver injury.

  10. Regulation of EGF receptor signaling by the MARVEL domain-containing protein CKLFSF8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Caining; Ding, Peiguo; Wang, Ying; Ma, Dalong

    2005-11-21

    It is known that chemokine-like factor superfamily 8 (CKLFSF8), a member of the CKLF superfamily, has four putative transmembrane regions and a MARVEL domain. Its structure is similar to TM4SF11 (plasmolipin) and widely distributed in normal tissue. However, its function is not yet known. We show here that CKLFSF8 is associated with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and that ectopic expression of CKLFSF8 in several cell lines suppresses EGF-induced cell proliferation, whereas knockdown of CKLFSF8 by siRNA promotes cell proliferation. In cells overexpressing CKLFSF8, the initial activation of EGFR was not affected, but subsequent desensitization of EGF-induced signaling occurred rapidly. This attenuation was correlated with an increased rate of receptor endocytosis. In contrast, knockdown of CKLFSF8 by siCKLFSF8 delayed EGFR endocytosis. These results identify CKLFSF8 as a novel regulator of EGF-induced signaling and indicate that the association of EGFR with four transmembrane proteins is critical for EGFR desensitization.

  11. Small molecule mimetics of an interferon-α receptor interacting domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Angelica M; Wei, Lianhu; Majchrzak-Kita, Beata; Salum, Noruê; Purohit, Meena K; Fish, Eleanor N; Kotra, Lakshmi P

    2014-02-01

    Small molecules that mimic IFN-α epitopes that interact with the cell surface receptor, IFNAR, would be useful therapeutics. One such 8-amino acid region in IFN-α2, designated IRRP-1, was used to derive 11 chemical compounds that belong to 5 distinct chemotypes, containing the molecular features represented by the key residues Leu30, Arg33, and Asp35 in IRRP-1. Three of these compounds exhibited potential mimicry to IRRP-1 and, in cell based assays, as predicted, effectively inhibited IFNAR activation by IFN-α. Of these, compound 3 did not display cell toxicity and reduced IFN-α-inducible STAT1 phosphorylation and STAT-DNA binding. Based on physicochemical properties' analyses, our data suggest that moieties with acidic pKa on the small molecule may be a necessary element for mimicking the carboxyl group of Asp35 in IRRP-1. Our data confirm the relevance of this strategy of molecular mimicry of ligand-receptor interaction domains of protein partners for small molecule drug discovery.

  12. RNA interference against discoidin domain receptor 2 ameliorates alcoholic liver disease in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Luo

    Full Text Available Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2 is involved in fibrotic disease. However, the exact pathogenic implications of the receptor in early alcoholic liver disease are still controversial. We constructed plasmid vectors encoding short-hairpin RNA against DDR2 to investigate its role in alcoholic liver disease in an immortalized rat hepatic stellate cell line, HSC-T6, and in rats by MTT, RT-PCR and western blot analyses; immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Alcohol-induced upregulation of DDR2 was associated with the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2, the transforming growth factor β1 signaling pathway and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1; collagen deposition; and extracellular matrix remodeling. Inhibition of DDR2 decreased HSC-T6 cell proliferation and liver injury in rats with 10-week-induced alcoholic liver disease. DDR2 may have an important role in the pathogenesis of early-stage alcoholic liver disease. Silencing DDR2 may be effective in preventing early-stage alcoholic liver disease.

  13. Discoidin domain receptor 2 regulates the adhesion of fibroblasts to 3D collagen matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daehwan; You, Eunae; Min, Na Young; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Rhee, Sangmyung

    2013-05-01

    The collagen matrix constitutes the primary extracellular matrix (ECM) portion of mammalian connective tissues in which the interaction of the cell and the surrounding collagen fibers has a significant impact on cell and tissue physiology, including morphogenesis, development and motility. Discoidin domain receptors (DDR1 and DDR2) have been identified as the receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated upon collagen binding. However, there is a lack of evidence regarding the effect of DDRs on the mechanical interaction between fibroblasts and ECM. In this study, we demonstrated that one of the major phosphotyrosine proteins in human fibroblasts during 3D collagen matrix polymerization is DDR2. Treatment of fibroblasts in 3D collagen matrices with platelet-derived growth factor (PDFG) has been shown to increase DDR2 phosphorylation. Silencing of DDR2 with siRNA in fibroblasts significantly reduced the number of dendritic extensions regardless of whether cells were cultured in the collagen or fibronectin 3D matrices. Decreasing dendritic extensions in DDR2-silenced cells has also been shown to decrease the ability of fibroblast entanglement to collagen fibrils in 3D collagen matrices. Finally, we also showed that the silencing of DDR2 decreased the cell migration in 3D nested collagen matrices but had no effect on 3D floating matrix contraction. Collectively, these results suggest that DDR2 functioning is required for the membrane dynamics to control the mechanical attachment of fibroblasts to the 3D collagen matrices in an integrin-independent manner.

  14. A host deficiency of discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) inhibits both tumour angiogenesis and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuya; Bu, Xin; Zhao, Hu; Yu, Jiangtian; Wang, Yingmei; Li, Di; Zhu, Chuchao; Zhu, Tong; Ren, Tingting; Liu, Xinping; Yao, Libo; Su, Jin

    2014-03-01

    Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a unique receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) that signals in response to collagen binding and is implicated in tumour malignant phenotypes such as invasion and metastasis. Although it has been reported that DDR2 expression is up-regulated in activated endothelial cells (ECs), functional studies are lacking. Herein, we found that enforced expression of DDR2 promoted proliferation, migration and tube formation of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The results of immunohistochemical analysis showed a strikingly high level of DDR2 in human tumour ECs. Most significantly, we discovered that a host deficiency of DDR2 inhibits subcutaneous angiogenesis induced by either VEGF or tumour cells. In addition, the remaining tumour vessels in DDR2-deficient mice exhibit some normalized properties. These vascular phenotypes are accompanied by the up-regulation of anti-angiogenic genes and down-regulation of pro-angiogenic genes, as well as by alleviated tumour hypoxia. By use of a tail vein metastasis model of melanoma, we uncovered that loss of stromal DDR2 also suppresses tumour metastasis to the lung. Hence, our current data disclose a new mechanism by which DDR2 affects tumour progression, and may strengthen the feasibility of targeting DDR2 as an anticancer strategy.

  15. RNA interference against discoidin domain receptor 2 ameliorates alcoholic liver disease in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zheng; Liu, Huimin; Sun, Xiaomeng; Guo, Rong; Cui, Ruibing; Ma, Xiangxing; Yan, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is involved in fibrotic disease. However, the exact pathogenic implications of the receptor in early alcoholic liver disease are still controversial. We constructed plasmid vectors encoding short-hairpin RNA against DDR2 to investigate its role in alcoholic liver disease in an immortalized rat hepatic stellate cell line, HSC-T6, and in rats by MTT, RT-PCR and western blot analyses; immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Alcohol-induced upregulation of DDR2 was associated with the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2, the transforming growth factor β1 signaling pathway and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1; collagen deposition; and extracellular matrix remodeling. Inhibition of DDR2 decreased HSC-T6 cell proliferation and liver injury in rats with 10-week-induced alcoholic liver disease. DDR2 may have an important role in the pathogenesis of early-stage alcoholic liver disease. Silencing DDR2 may be effective in preventing early-stage alcoholic liver disease.

  16. Characterization of αX I-Domain Binding to Receptors for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyannemekh, Dolgorsuren; Nham, Sang-Uk

    2017-05-31

    The β2 integrins are cell surface transmembrane proteins regulating leukocyte functions, such as adhesion and migration. Two members of β2 integrin, αMβ2 and αXβ2, share the leukocyte distribution profile and integrin αXβ2 is involved in antigen presentation in dendritic cells and transendothelial migration of monocytes and macrophages to atherosclerotic lesions. Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), a member of cell adhesion molecules, plays an important role in chronic inflammation and atherosclerosis. Although RAGE and αXβ2 play an important role in inflammatory response and the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, the nature of their interaction and structure involved in the binding remain poorly defined. In this study, using I-domain as a ligand binding motif of αXβ2, we characterize the binding nature and the interacting moieties of αX I-domain and RAGE. Their binding requires divalent cations (Mg(2+) and Mn(2+)) and shows an affinity on the sub-micro molar level: the dissociation constant of αX I-domains binding to RAGE being 0.49 μM. Furthermore, the αX I-domains recognize the V-domain, but not the C1 and C2-domains of RAGE. The acidic amino acid substitutions on the ligand binding site of αX I-domain significantly reduce the I-domain binding activity to soluble RAGE and the alanine substitutions of basic amino acids on the flat surface of the V-domain prevent the V-domain binding to αX I-domain. In conclusion, the main mechanism of αX I-domain binding to RAGE is a charge interaction, in which the acidic moieties of αX I-domains, including E244, and D249, recognize the basic residues on the RAGE V-domain encompassing K39, K43, K44, R104, and K107.

  17. Canid progesterone receptors lack activation function 3 domain-dependent activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracanin, Ana; van Wolferen, Monique E; Sartorius, Carol A; Brenkman, Arjan B; Schoonen, Willem G; Mol, Jan A

    2012-12-01

    Progesterone regulates multiple behavioral, physiological, and pathological aspects of female reproductive biology through its two progesterone receptors (PRs), PR-B and the truncated PR-A. PR-B is necessary for mammary gland development in mice and, compared with PR-A, is overall a stronger transactivator of target genes due to an additional activation function 3 (AF3) domain. In dogs, known for their high sensitivity to progesterone-induced mammary cancer, the PR-B function was studied. Canine PR (cPR)-B appeared to contain multiple mutations within AF3 core sequence motifs and lacks N-terminal ligand-independent posttranslational modifications. Consequently, cPR-B has a weak transactivation potential on progesterone-responsive mouse mammary tumor virus-luc and progesterone response element 2-luc reporters transiently transfected in hamster, human, or canine cells and also on known target genes FKBP5 and SGK in doxycycline-inducible, stable transfected cPR-B in canine mammary cells. The cPR-B function was restored to the level of human PR-B by the replacement of canine AF3 domain with the human one. The lack of AF3 domain-dependent transcriptional activity was unique for canids (gray wolf, red fox, and raccoon dog) and not present in closely related caniform species (brown bear, gray seal, and domestic ferret). Despite the limited transactivation potential, canids develop normal mammary glands and frequently mammary tumors. Therefore, these results question the role of PR-B in breast cancer development and may explain unique features of canid reproduction.

  18. Discoidin domain receptor 1 contributes to tumorigenesis through modulation of TGFBI expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudra-Ganguly, Nandini; Lowe, Christine; Mattie, Michael; Chang, Mi Sook; Satpayev, Daulet; Verlinsky, Alla; An, Zili; Hu, Liping; Yang, Peng; Challita-Eid, Pia; Stover, David R; Pereira, Daniel S

    2014-01-01

    Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) is a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family. The receptor is activated upon binding to its ligand, collagen, and plays a crucial role in many fundamental processes such as cell differentiation, adhesion, migration and invasion. Although DDR1 is expressed in many normal tissues, upregulated expression of DDR1 in a variety of human cancers such as lung, colon and brain cancers is known to be associated with poor prognosis. Using shRNA silencing, we assessed the oncogenic potential of DDR1. DDR1 knockdown impaired tumor cell proliferation and migration in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Microarray analysis of tumor cells demonstrated upregulation of TGFBI expression upon DDR1 knockdown, which was subsequently confirmed at the protein level. TGFBI is a TGFβ-induced extracellular matrix protein secreted by the tumor cells and is known to act either as a tumor promoter or tumor suppressor, depending on the tumor environment. Here, we show that exogenous addition of recombinant TGFBI to BXPC3 tumor cells inhibited clonogenic growth and migration, thus recapitulating the phenotypic effect observed from DDR1 silencing. BXPC3 tumor xenografts demonstrated reduced growth with DDR1 knockdown, and the same xenograft tumors exhibited an increase in TGFBI expression level. Together, these data suggest that DDR1 expression level influences tumor growth in part via modulation of TGFBI expression. The reciprocal expression of DDR1 and TGFBI may help to elucidate the contribution of DDR1 in tumorigenesis and TGFBI may also be used as a biomarker for the therapeutic development of DDR1 specific inhibitors.

  19. Discoidin domain receptor 1 contributes to tumorigenesis through modulation of TGFBI expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandini Rudra-Ganguly

    Full Text Available Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1 is a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family. The receptor is activated upon binding to its ligand, collagen, and plays a crucial role in many fundamental processes such as cell differentiation, adhesion, migration and invasion. Although DDR1 is expressed in many normal tissues, upregulated expression of DDR1 in a variety of human cancers such as lung, colon and brain cancers is known to be associated with poor prognosis. Using shRNA silencing, we assessed the oncogenic potential of DDR1. DDR1 knockdown impaired tumor cell proliferation and migration in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Microarray analysis of tumor cells demonstrated upregulation of TGFBI expression upon DDR1 knockdown, which was subsequently confirmed at the protein level. TGFBI is a TGFβ-induced extracellular matrix protein secreted by the tumor cells and is known to act either as a tumor promoter or tumor suppressor, depending on the tumor environment. Here, we show that exogenous addition of recombinant TGFBI to BXPC3 tumor cells inhibited clonogenic growth and migration, thus recapitulating the phenotypic effect observed from DDR1 silencing. BXPC3 tumor xenografts demonstrated reduced growth with DDR1 knockdown, and the same xenograft tumors exhibited an increase in TGFBI expression level. Together, these data suggest that DDR1 expression level influences tumor growth in part via modulation of TGFBI expression. The reciprocal expression of DDR1 and TGFBI may help to elucidate the contribution of DDR1 in tumorigenesis and TGFBI may also be used as a biomarker for the therapeutic development of DDR1 specific inhibitors.

  20. Antagonism of ligand-gated ion channel receptors: two domains of the glycine receptor alpha subunit form the strychnine-binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, R J; French, C R; Barry, P H; Shine, J; Schofield, P R

    1992-01-01

    The inhibitory glycine receptor (GlyR) is a member of the ligand-gated ion channel receptor superfamily. Glycine activation of the receptor is antagonized by the convulsant alkaloid strychnine. Using in vitro mutagenesis and functional analysis of the cDNA encoding the alpha 1 subunit of the human GlyR, we have identified several amino acid residues that form the strychnine-binding site. These residues were identified by transient expression of mutated cDNAs in mammalian (293) cells and examination of resultant [3H]strychnine binding, glycine displacement of [3H]strychnine, and electrophysiological responses to the application of glycine and strychnine. This mutational analysis revealed that residues from two separate domains within the alpha 1 subunit form the binding site for the antagonist strychnine. The first domain includes the amino acid residues Gly-160 and Tyr-161, and the second domain includes the residues Lys-200 and Tyr-202. These results, combined with analyses of other ligand-gated ion channel receptors, suggest a conserved tertiary structure and a common mechanism for antagonism in this receptor superfamily. PMID:1311851

  1. Participation of the extracellular domain in (pro)renin receptor dimerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki-Nakagawa, Chiharu [The United Graduate School of Agricultural Sciences, Gifu University, Gifu (Japan); Nishimura, Misa; Tsukamoto, Tomoko; Aoyama, Sho [Department of Applied Life Science, Faculty of Applied Biological Sciences, Gifu University, Gifu (Japan); Ebihara, Akio; Suzuki, Fumiaki [The United Graduate School of Agricultural Sciences, Gifu University, Gifu (Japan); Department of Applied Life Science, Faculty of Applied Biological Sciences, Gifu University, Gifu (Japan); Nakagawa, Tsutomu, E-mail: nakagawa@gifu-u.ac.jp [The United Graduate School of Agricultural Sciences, Gifu University, Gifu (Japan); Department of Applied Life Science, Faculty of Applied Biological Sciences, Gifu University, Gifu (Japan)

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • The (pro)renin receptor [(P)RR] is a regulator of the renin–angiotensin system. • The region responsible for (P)RR dimerization was investigated. • (P)RR extracellular domain constructs were retained intracellularly. • The extracellular domain of (P)RR is responsible for its dimerization. • Novel insight into the regulatory mechanism of soluble (P)RR secretion is provided. - Abstract: The (pro)renin receptor [(P)RR] induces the catalytic activation of prorenin, as well as the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway; as such, it plays an important regulatory role in the renin–angiotensin system. (P)RR is known to form a homodimer, but the region participating in its dimerization is unknown. Using glutathione S-transferase (GST) as a carrier protein and a GST pull-down assay, we investigated the interaction of several (P)RR constructs with full-length (FL) (P)RR in mammalian cells. GST fusion proteins with FL (P)RR (GST-FL), the C-terminal M8-9 fragment (GST-M8-9), the extracellular domain (ECD) of (P)RR (GST-ECD), and the (P)RR ECD with a deletion of 32 amino acids encoded by exon 4 (GST-ECDd4) were retained intracellularly, whereas GST alone was efficiently secreted into the culture medium when transiently expressed in COS-7 cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed prominent localization of GST-ECD to the endoplasmic reticulum. The GST pull-down analysis revealed that GST-FL, GST-ECD, and GST-ECDd4 bound FLAG-tagged FL (P)RR, whereas GST-M8-9 showed little or no binding when transiently co-expressed in HEK293T cells. Furthermore, pull-down analysis using His-tag affinity resin showed co-precipitation of soluble (P)RR with FL (P)RR from a stable CHO cell line expressing FL h(P)RR with a C-terminal decahistidine tag. These results indicate that the (P)RR ECD participates in dimerization.

  2. The Scavenger Receptor SSc5D Physically Interacts with Bacteria through the SRCR-Containing N-Terminal Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessa Pereira, Catarina; Bocková, Markéta; Santos, Rita F.; Santos, Ana Mafalda; Martins de Araújo, Mafalda; Oliveira, Liliana; Homola, Jiří; Carmo, Alexandre M.

    2016-01-01

    The scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) family comprises a group of membrane-attached or secreted proteins that contain one or more modules/domains structurally similar to the membrane distal domain of type I macrophage scavenger receptor. Although no all-inclusive biological function has been ascribed to the SRCR family, some of these receptors have been shown to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP) of bacteria, fungi, or other microbes. SSc5D is a recently described soluble SRCR receptor produced by monocytes/macrophages and T lymphocytes, consisting of an N-terminal portion, which contains five SRCR modules, and a large C-terminal mucin-like domain. Toward establishing a global common role for SRCR domains, we interrogated whether the set of five SRCR domains of SSc5D displayed pattern recognition receptor (PRR) properties. For that purpose, we have expressed in a mammalian expression system the N-terminal SRCR-containing moiety of SSc5D (N-SSc5D), thus excluding the mucin-like domain likely by nature to bind microorganisms, and tested the capacity of the SRCR functional groups to physically interact with bacteria. Using conventional protein–bacteria binding assays, we showed that N-SSc5D had a superior capacity to bind to Escherichia coli strains RS218 and IHE3034 compared with that of the extracellular domains of the SRCR proteins CD5 and CD6 (sCD5 and sCD6, respectively), and similar E. coli-binding properties as Spα, a proven PRR of the SRCR family. We have further designed a more sensitive, real-time, and label-free surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based assay and examined the capacity of N-SSc5D, Spα, sCD5, and sCD6 to bind to different bacteria. We demonstrated that N-SSc5D compares with Spα in the capacity to bind to E. coli and Listeria monocytogenes, and further that it can distinguish between pathogenic E. coli RS218 and IHE3034 strains and the non-pathogenic laboratory E. coli strain BL21(DE3). Our work thus advocates the

  3. The scavenger receptor SSc5D physically interacts with bacteria through the SRCR-containing N-terminal domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Bessa-Pereira

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR family comprises a group of membrane-attached or secreted proteins that contain one or more modules/domains structurally similar to the membrane distal domain of type I macrophage scavenger receptor. Although no all-inclusive biological function has been ascribed to the SRCR family, some of these receptors have been shown to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP of bacteria, fungi or other microbes. SSc5D is a recently described soluble SRCR receptor produced by monocytes/macrophages and T lymphocytes, consisting of an N-terminal portion which contains five SRCR modules, and a large C-terminal mucin-like domain. Towards establishing a global common role for SRCR domains, we interrogated whether the set of five SRCR domains of SSc5D displayed pattern recognition receptor (PRR properties. For that purpose, we have expressed in a mammalian expression system the N-terminal SRCR-containing moiety of SSC5D (N-SSc5D, thus excluding the mucin-like domain likely by nature to bind microorganisms, and tested the capacity of the SRCR functional groups to physically interact with bacteria. Using conventional protein-bacteria binding assays, we showed that N-SSc5D had a superior capacity to bind to E. coli strains RS218 and IHE3034 compared with that of the extracellular domains of the SRCR proteins CD5 and CD6 (sCD5 and sCD6, respectively, and similar E. coli-binding properties as Spα, a proven PRR of the SRCR family. We have further designed a more sensitive, real-time and label-free surface plasmon resonance (SPR-based assay, and examined the capacity of N-SSc5D, Spα, sCD5 and sCD6 to bind to different bacteria. We demonstrated that the N-SSc5D compares with Spα in the capacity to bind to E. coli and L. monocytogenes, and further that it can distinguish between pathogenic E. coli RS218 and IHE3034 strains and the non-pathogenic laboratory E. coli strain BL21(DE3. Our work thus advocates the

  4. Nanoscale organization of {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor-Venus fusion protein domains on the surface of mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vobornik, Dusan; Rouleau, Yanouchka; Haley, Jennifer [Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0R6 (Canada); Bani-Yaghoub, Mahmud [Institute for Biological Sciences, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0R6 (Canada); Taylor, Rod [Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0R6 (Canada); Johnston, Linda J., E-mail: Linda.Johnston@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0R6 (Canada); Pezacki, John Paul, E-mail: John.Pezacki@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0R6 (Canada)

    2009-04-24

    Adrenergic receptors are a key component of nanoscale multiprotein complexes that are responsible for controlling the beat rate in a mammalian heart. We demonstrate the ability of near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) to visualize {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptors ({beta}{sub 2}AR) fused to the GFP analogue Venus at the nanoscale on HEK293 cells. The expression of the {beta}{sub 2}AR-Venus fusion protein was tightly controlled using a tetracycline-induced promoter. Both the size and density of the observed nanoscale domains are dependent on the level of induction and thus the level of protein expression. At concentrations between 100 and 700 ng/ml of inducer doxycycline, the size of domains containing the {beta}{sub 2}AR-Venus fusion protein appears to remain roughly constant, but the number of domains per cell increase. At 700 ng/ml doxycycline the functional receptors are organized into domains with an average diameter of 150 nm with a density similar to that observed for the native protein on primary murine cells. By contrast, larger micron-sized domains of {beta}{sub 2}AR are observed in the membrane of the HEK293 cells that stably overexpress {beta}{sub 2}AR-GFP and {beta}{sub 2}AR-eYFP. We conclude that precise chemical control of gene expression is highly advantageous for the use {beta}{sub 2}AR-Venus fusion proteins as models for {beta}{sub 2}AR function. These observations are critical for designing future cell models and assays based on {beta}{sub 2}AR, since the receptor biology is consistent with a relatively low density of nanoscale receptor domains.

  5. Active conformation of the erythropoietin receptor: random and cysteine-scanning mutagenesis of the extracellular juxtamembrane and transmembrane domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaohui; Gross, Alec W; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-03-17

    In the absence of erythropoietin (Epo) cell surface Epo receptors (EpoR) are dimeric; dimerization is mediated mainly by the transmembrane domain. Binding of Epo changes the orientation of the two receptor subunits. This conformational change is transmitted through the juxtamembrane and transmembrane domains, leading to activation of JAK2 kinase and induction of proliferation and survival signals. To define the active EpoR conformation(s) we screened libraries of EpoRs with random mutations in the transmembrane domain and identified several point mutations that activate the EpoR in the absence of ligand, including changes of either of the first two transmembrane domain residues (Leu(226) and Ile(227)) to cysteine. Following this discovery, we performed cysteine-scanning mutagenesis in the EpoR juxtamembrane and transmembrane domains. Many mutants formed disulfide-linked receptor dimers, but only EpoR dimers linked by cysteines at positions 223, 226, or 227 activated EpoR signal transduction pathways and supported proliferation of Ba/F3 cells in the absence of cytokines. These data suggest that activation of dimeric EpoR by Epo binding is achieved by reorienting the EpoR transmembrane and the connected cytosolic domains and that certain disulfide-bonded dimers represent the activated dimeric conformation of the EpoR, constitutively activating downstream signaling. Based on our data and the previously determined structure of Epo bound to a dimer of the EpoR extracellular domain, we present a model of the active and inactive conformations of the Epo receptor.

  6. The Structure of a High-Affinity Kainate Receptor: GluK4 Ligand-Binding Domain Crystallized with Kainate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Ole; Kristensen, Lise Baadsgaard; Møllerud, Stine; Frydenvang, Karla; Pickering, Darryl S; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm

    2016-09-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors play a key role in fast neurotransmission in the CNS and have been linked to several neurological diseases and disorders. One subfamily is the kainate receptors, which are grouped into low-affinity (GluK1-3) and high-affinity (GluK4-5) receptors based on their affinity for kainate. Although structures of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of all low-affinity kainate receptors have been reported, no structures of the high-affinity receptor subunits are available. Here, we present the X-ray structure of GluK4-LBD with kainate at 2.05 Å resolution, together with thermofluor and radiolabel binding affinity data. Whereas binding-site residues in GluK4 are most similar to the AMPA receptor subfamily, the domain closure and D1-D2 interlobe contacts induced by kainate are similar to the low-affinity kainate receptor GluK1. These observations provide a likely explanation for the high binding affinity of kainate at GluK4-LBD.

  7. Evidence of positive selection at codon sites localized in extracellular domains of mammalian CC motif chemokine receptor proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metzger Kelsey J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CC chemokine receptor proteins (CCR1 through CCR10 are seven-transmembrane G-protein coupled receptors whose signaling pathways are known for their important roles coordinating immune system responses through targeted trafficking of white blood cells. In addition, some of these receptors have been identified as fusion proteins for viral pathogens: for example, HIV-1 strains utilize CCR5, CCR2 and CCR3 proteins to obtain cellular entry in humans. The extracellular domains of these receptor proteins are involved in ligand-binding specificity as well as pathogen recognition interactions. In mammals, the majority of chemokine receptor genes are clustered together; in humans, seven of the ten genes are clustered in the 3p21-24 chromosome region. Gene conversion events, or exchange of DNA sequence between genes, have been reported in chemokine receptor paralogs in various mammalian lineages, especially between the cytogenetically closely located pairs CCR2/5 and CCR1/3. Datasets of mammalian orthologs for each gene were analyzed separately to minimize the potential confounding impact of analyzing highly similar sequences resulting from gene conversion events. Molecular evolution approaches and the software package Phylogenetic Analyses by Maximum Likelihood (PAML were utilized to investigate the signature of selection that has acted on the mammalian CC chemokine receptor (CCR gene family. The results of neutral vs. adaptive evolution (positive selection hypothesis testing using Site Models are reported. In general, positive selection is defined by a ratio of nonsynonymous/synonymous nucleotide changes (dN/dS, or ω >1. Results Of the ten mammalian CC motif chemokine receptor sequence datasets analyzed, only CCR2 and CCR3 contain amino acid codon sites that exhibit evidence of positive selection using site based hypothesis testing in PAML. Nineteen of the twenty codon sites putatively indentified as likely to be under positive

  8. Nucleic acid sequences encoding D1 and D1/D2 domains of human coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2010-04-06

    The invention provides recombinant human CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor) polypeptides which bind adenovirus. Specifically, polypeptides corresponding to adenovirus binding domain D1 and the entire extracellular domain of human CAR protein comprising D1 and D2 are provided. In another aspect, the invention provides nucleic acid sequences encoding these domains and expression vectors for producing the domains and bacterial cells containing such vectors. The invention also includes an isolated fusion protein comprised of the D1 polypeptide fused to a polypeptide which facilitates folding of D1 when expressed in bacteria. The functional D1 domain finds application in a therapeutic method for treating a patient infected with a CAR D1-binding virus, and also in a method for identifying an antiviral compound which interferes with viral attachment. The invention also provides a method for specifically targeting a cell for infection by a virus which binds to D1.

  9. The N-terminal extracellular domain 23-60 of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor in chimeras with the parathyroid hormone receptor mediates association with receptor activity-modifying protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ittner, Lars M; Koller, Daniela; Muff, Roman; Fischer, Jan A; Born, Walter

    2005-04-19

    The calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) requires the associated receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP)1 to reveal a calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor. Here, the subdomain of the CLR that associates with RAMP1 has been identified in chimeras between the CLR and the parathyroid hormone (PTH) receptor 1 (PTHR). The PTHR alone does not interact with RAMP1. RAMP1 requires the CLR for its transport to the cell surface. Thus, receptor-dependent RAMP1 delivery to the plasma membrane and coimmunoprecipitation from the cell surface were used as measures for receptor/RAMP1 interaction. Several chimeric CLR-PTHR included the N-terminal amino acids 23-60 of the CLR transported RAMP1 to the surface of COS-7 cells much like the intact CLR. Moreover, RAMP1 coimmunoprecipitated with these receptors from the cell surface. A CLR deletion mutant, consisting of the N-terminal extracellular domain, the first transmembrane domain, and the C-terminal intracellular region, revealed the same results. Cyclic AMP was stimulated by CGRP in CLR/RAMP1 expressing cells (58 +/- 19-fold, EC(50) = 0.12 +/- 0.03 nM) and by PTH-related protein in cells expressing the PTHR (50 +/- 10-fold, EC(50) = 0.25 +/- 0.03 nM) or a PTHR with the N-terminal amino acids 23-60 of the CLR (23 +/- 5-fold, EC(50) > 1000 nM). Other chimeric CLR-PTHR were inactive. In conclusion, structural elements in the extreme N-terminus of the CLR between amino acids 23-60 are required and sufficient for CLR/RAMP1 cotransport to the plasma membrane and heterodimerization.

  10. Strychnine activates neuronal α7 nicotinic receptors after mutations in the leucine ring and transmitter binding site domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Eleonora; Fucile, Sergio; Barabino, Benedetta; Miledi, Ricardo; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    1999-01-01

    Recent work has shown that strychnine, the potent and selective antagonist of glycine receptors, is also an antagonist of nicotinic acetylcholine (AcCho) receptors including neuronal homomeric α7 receptors, and that mutating Leu-247 of the α7 nicotinic AcCho receptor-channel domain (L247Tα7; mut1) converts some nicotinic antagonists into agonists. Therefore, a study was made of the effects of strychnine on Xenopus oocytes expressing the chick wild-type α7 or L247Tα7 receptors. In these oocytes, strychnine itself did not elicit appreciable membrane currents but reduced the currents elicited by AcCho in a reversible and dose-dependent manner. In sharp contrast, in oocytes expressing L247Tα7 receptors with additional mutations at Cys-189 and Cys-190, in the extracellular N-terminal domain (L247T/C189–190Sα7; mut2), micromolar concentrations of strychnine elicited inward currents that were reversibly inhibited by the nicotinic receptor blocker α-bungarotoxin. Single-channel recordings showed that strychnine gated mut2-channels with two conductance levels, 56 pS and 42 pS, and with kinetic properties similar to AcCho-activated channels. We conclude that strychnine is a modulator, as well as an activator, of some homomeric nicotinic α7 receptors. After injecting oocytes with mixtures of cDNAs encoding mut1 and mut2 subunits, the expressed hybrid receptors were activated by strychnine, similar to the mut2, and had a high affinity to AcCho like the mut1. A pentameric symmetrical model yields the striking conclusion that two identical α7 subunits may be sufficient to determine the functional properties of α7 receptors. PMID:10557336

  11. Dissecting domain-specific evolutionary pressure profiles of transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily members 1 to 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doñate-Macián, Pau; Perálvarez-Marín, Alex

    2014-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid family includes four ion channels-TRPV1, TRPV2, TRPV3 and TRPV4-that are represented within the vertebrate subphylum and involved in several sensory and physiological processes. These channels are related to adaptation to the environment, and probably under strong evolutionary pressure. Using multiple sequence alignments as source for evolutionary, bioinformatics and statistical analysis, we have analyzed the evolutionary profiles for TRPV1, TRPV2, TRPV3 and TRPV4. The evolutionary pressure exerted over vertebrate TRPV2 sequences compared to the other channels argues for a positive selection profile for TRPV2 compared to TRPV1, TRPV3 and TRPV4. We have analyzed the selective pressure on specific protein domains, observing a common selective pressure trend for the common TRPV scaffold, consisting of the ankyrin repeat domain, the membrane proximal domain, the transmembrane domain, and the TRP domain. Through a more detailed analysis we have identified evolutionary constraints involved in the subunit contact at the transmembrane domain level. Performing evolutionary comparison, we have translated specific channel structural information such as the transmembrane topology, and the interaction between the membrane proximal domain and the TRP box. We have also identified potential common regulatory domains among all TRPV1-4 members, such as protein-protein, lipid-protein and vesicle trafficking domains.

  12. Genetically engineered T cells bearing chimeric nanoconstructed receptors harboring TAG-72-specific camelid single domain antibodies as targeting agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharifzadeh, Zahra; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad A

    2013-01-01

    Despite the preclinical success of adoptive therapy with T cells bearing chimeric nanoconstructed antigen receptors (CARs), certain limitations of this therapeutic approach such as the immunogenicity of the antigen binding domain, the emergence of tumor cell escape variants and the blocking capac...... to reverse multiple tumor immune evasion mechanisms, avoid CAR immunogenicity, and overcome problems in cancer gene therapy with engineered nanoconstructs....

  13. Structural Insights into the Functional Role of the Hcn Sub-domain of the Receptor-Binding Domain of the Botulinum Neurotoxin Mosaic Serotype C/D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Gardberg, Anna; Edwards, Tom E.; Sankaran, Banumathi; Robinson, Howard; Varnum, Susan M.; Buchko, Garry W.

    2013-07-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), the causative agent of the deadly neuroparalytic disease botulism, is the most poisonous protein known for humans. Produced by different strains of the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum, BoNT effects cellular intoxication via a multistep mechanism executed by the three modules of the activated protein. Endocytosis, the first step of cellular intoxication, is triggered by the ~50 kDa, heavy-chain receptor-binding module (HCR) that is specific for a ganglioside and a protein receptor on neuronal cell surfaces. This dual receptor recognition mechanism between BoNT and the host cell’s membrane is well documented and occurs via specific intermolecular interactions with the C-terminal sub-domain, Hcc, of BoNT-HCR. The N-terminal sub-domain of BoNT-HCR, Hcn, comprises ~50% of BoNT-HCR and adopts a B-sheet jelly roll fold. While suspected in assisting cell surface recognition, no unambiguous function for the Hcn sub-domain in BoNT has been indentified. To obtain insights into the potential function of the Hcn sub-domain in BoNT, the first crystal structure of a BoNT with an organic ligand bound to the Hcn sub-domain has been obtained. Here, we describe the crystal structure of BoNT/CD-HCR determined at 1.70 Å resolution with a tetraethylene glycol (PG4) molecule bound in an hydrophobic cleft between B-strands in the B-sheet jelly fold roll of the Hcn sub-domain. The molecule is completely engulfed in the cleft, making numerous hydrophobic (Y932, S959, W966, and D1042) and hydrophilic (S935, W977, L979, N1013, and I1066) contacts with the protein’s side chain and backbone that may mimic in vivo interactions with the phospholipid membranes on neuronal cell surfaces. A sulfate ion was also observed bound to residues T1176, D1177, K1196, and R1243 in the Hcc sub-domain of BoNT/CD-HCR. In the crystal structure of a similar protein, BoNT/D-HCR, a sialic acid

  14. Characterization of TREM-3, an activating receptor on mouse macrophages: definition of a family of single Ig domain receptors on mouse chromosome 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Dong-Hui; Seaman, William E; Daws, Michael R

    2002-01-01

    We recently reported the cloning of two triggering receptors expressed by myeloid cells (TREM), TREM-2a and TREM-2b, which are highly homologous to each other. These receptors associate with DAP12, and ligation of TREM-2 on the surface of macrophages leads to the release of nitric oxide. Using the immunoglobulin (Ig) domain of TREM-2 to screen a mouse EST database we have isolated a novel receptor, derived from a WEHI-3 macrophage library, which shows homology to TREM-2 (20%). The DNA sequence of this receptor has been submitted to Genbank with the name TREM-3. The predicted amino acid sequence contains a single Ig domain and a transmembrane lysine residue. We found transcripts for TREM-3 in two macrophage cell lines (RAW264.7 and MT2) but not in P388D1 macrophage cells. TREM-3 transcripts could also be detected at low levels in T cell lines, but were not detectable in NK, B cell, or mast cell lines. Furthermore, in macrophage cells, transcripts for TREM-3 were up-regulated by LPS, but were down-regulated by IFN-gamma. Like TREM-1 and TREM-2, TREM-3 signals through DAP12, and when TREM-3 is transfected into an NK cell line it mediates redirected lysis. Thus, TREM-3 functions as an activating receptor. Analysis of the mouse genome reveals that the gene for TREM-3 lies adjacent to the gene for TREM-1 and in close proximity to a number of other single Ig domain receptors, including TREM-2. Thus, TREM-3 is a novel member of a family of immunoglobulin receptors that form an innate immune gene complex on chromosome 17.

  15. Structural analysis of the intracellular domain of (pro)renin receptor fused to maltose-binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Gao, Xiaoli [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University (United States); Michael Garavito, R., E-mail: garavito@msu.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University (United States)

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} Crystal structure of the intracellular domain of (pro)renin receptor (PRR-IC) as MBP fusion protein at 2.0 A (maltose-free) and 2.15 A (maltose-bound). {yields} MBP fusion protein is a dimer in crystals in the presence and absence of maltose. {yields} PRR-IC domain is responsible for the dimerization of the fusion protein. {yields} Residues in the PRR-IC domain, particularly two tyrosines, dominate the intermolecular interactions, suggesting a role for the PRR-IC domain in PRR dimerization. -- Abstract: The (pro)renin receptor (PRR) is an important component of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), which regulates blood pressure and cardiovascular function. The integral membrane protein PRR contains a large extracellular domain ({approx}310 amino acids), a single transmembrane domain ({approx}20 amino acids) and an intracellular domain ({approx}19 amino acids). Although short, the intracellular (IC) domain of the PRR has functionally important roles in a number of signal transduction pathways activated by (pro)renin binding. Meanwhile, together with the transmembrane domain and a small portion of the extracellular domain ({approx}30 amino acids), the IC domain is also involved in assembly of V{sub 0} portion of the vacuolar proton-translocating ATPase (V-ATPase). To better understand structural and multifunctional roles of the PRR-IC, we report the crystal structure of the PRR-IC domain as maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion proteins at 2.0 A (maltose-free) and 2.15 A (maltose-bound). In the two separate crystal forms having significantly different unit-cell dimensions and molecular packing, MBP-PRR-IC fusion protein was found to be a dimer, which is different with the natural monomer of native MBP. The PRR-IC domain appears as a relatively flexible loop and is responsible for the dimerization of MBP fusion protein. Residues in the PRR-IC domain, particularly two tyrosines, dominate the intermonomer interactions, suggesting a role for the PRR

  16. Soluble Expression and Purification of the Catalytic Domain of Human Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jia; Cao, Xiaodan; Zhou, Shengmin; Chen, Chao; Yu, Haijun; Zhou, Yao; Wang, Ping

    2015-08-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a key role in angiogenesis through binding to its specific receptors, which mainly occurs to VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR-2), a kinase insert domain-containing receptor. Therefore, the disruption of VEGFR-2 signaling provides a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer by inhibiting abnormal or tumorinduced angiogenesis. To explore this potential, we expressed the catalytic domain of VEGFR- 2 (VEGFR-2-CD) as a soluble active kinase in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein was purified and the VEGFR-2-CD activity was investigated. The obtained VEGFR-2-CD showed autophosphorylation activity and phosphate transfer activity comparable to the commercial enzyme. Furthermore, the IC50 value of known VEGFR-2 inhibitor was determined using the purified VEGFR-2-CD. These results indicated a possibility for functional and economical VEGFR-2-CD expression in E. coli to use for inhibitor screening.

  17. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor ligand interactions: structural cross talk between ligands and the extracellular domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham M West

    Full Text Available Activation of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R in pancreatic β-cells potentiates insulin production and is a current therapeutic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Like other class B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, the GLP-1R contains an N-terminal extracellular ligand binding domain. N-terminal truncations on the peptide agonist generate antagonists capable of binding to the extracellular domain, but not capable of activating full length receptor. The main objective of this study was to use Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX to identify how the amide hydrogen bonding network of peptide ligands and the extracellular domain of GLP-1R (nGLP-1R were altered by binding interactions and to then use this platform to validate direct binding events for putative GLP-1R small molecule ligands. The HDX studies presented here for two glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R peptide ligands indicates that the antagonist exendin-4[9-39] is significantly destabilized in the presence of nonionic detergents as compared to the agonist exendin-4. Furthermore, HDX can detect stabilization of exendin-4 and exendin-4[9-39] hydrogen bonding networks at the N-terminal helix [Val19 to Lys27] upon binding to the N-terminal extracellular domain of GLP-1R (nGLP-1R. In addition we show hydrogen bonding network stabilization on nGLP-1R in response to ligand binding, and validate direct binding events with the extracellular domain of the receptor for putative GLP-1R small molecule ligands.

  18. Influence of the hinge region and its adjacent domains on binding and signaling patterns of the thyrotropin and follitropin receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Schaarschmidt

    Full Text Available Glycoprotein hormone receptors (GPHR have a large extracellular domain (ECD divided into the leucine rich repeat (LRR domain for binding of the glycoprotein hormones and the hinge region (HinR, which connects the LRR domain with the transmembrane domain (TMD. Understanding of the activation mechanism of GPHRs is hindered by the unknown interaction of the ECD with the TMD and the structural changes upon ligand binding responsible for receptor activation. Recently, our group showed that the HinR of the thyrotropin receptor (TSHR can be replaced by those of the follitropin (FSHR and lutropin receptor (LHCGR without effects on surface expression and hTSH signaling. However, differences in binding characteristics for bovine TSH at the various HinRs were obvious. To gain further insights into the interplay between LRR domain, HinR and TMD we generated chimeras between the TSHR and FSHR. Our results obtained by the determination of cell surface expression, ligand binding and G protein activation confirm the similar characteristics of GPHR HinRs but they also demonstrate an involvement of the HinR in ligand selectivity indicated by the observed promiscuity of some chimeras. While the TSHR HinR contributes to specific binding of TSH and its variants, no such contribution is observed for FSH and its analog TR4401 at the HinR of the FSHR. Furthermore, the charge distribution at the poorly characterized LRR domain/HinR transition affected ligand binding and signaling even though this area is not in direct contact with the ligand. In addition our results also demonstrate the importance of the TMD/HinR interface. Especially the combination of the TSHR HinR with the FSHR-TMD resulted in a loss of cell surface expression of the respective chimeras. In conclusion, the HinRs of GPHRs do not only share similar characteristics but also behave as ligand specific structural and functional entities.

  19. The amino-terminal domain of the CCR2 chemokine receptor acts as coreceptor for HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frade, J M; Llorente, M; Mellado, M; Alcamí, J; Gutiérrez-Ramos, J C; Zaballos, A; Real, G; Martínez-A, C

    1997-08-01

    The chemokines are a homologous serum protein family characterized by their ability to induce activation of integrin adhesion molecules and leukocyte migration. Chemokines interact with their receptors, which are composed of a single-chain, seven-helix, membrane-spanning protein coupled to G proteins. Two CC chemokine receptors, CCR3 and CCR5, as well as the CXCR4 chemokine receptor, have been shown necessary for infection by several HIV-1 virus isolates. We studied the effect of the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and of a panel of MCP-1 receptor (CCR2)-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb) on the suppression of HIV-1 replication in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We have compelling evidence that MCP-1 has potent HIV-1 suppressive activity when HIV-1-infected peripheral blood lymphocytes are used as target cells. Furthermore, mAb specific for the MCP-1R CCR2 which recognize the third extracellular CCR2 domain inhibit all MCP-1 activity and also block MCP-1 suppressive activity. Finally, a set of mAb specific for the CCR2 amino-terminal domain, one of which mimics MCP-1 activity, has a potent suppressive effect on HIV-1 replication in M- and T-tropic HIV-1 viral isolates. We conjecture a role for CCR2 as a coreceptor for HIV-1 infection and map the HIV-1 binding site to the amino-terminal part of this receptor. This concurs with results showing that the CCR5 amino terminus is relevant in HIV-1 infection, although chimeric fusion of various extracellular domains shows that other domains are also implicated. We discuss the importance of CCR2 structure relative to its coreceptor role and the role of anti-CCR2 receptor antibodies in the prevention of HIV-1 infection.

  20. Relationship of Structure and Function of DNA-Binding Domain in Vitamin D Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-Yan Wan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While the structure of the DNA-binding domain (DBD of the vitamin D receptor (VDR has been determined in great detail, the roles of its domains and how to bind the motif of its target genes are still under debate. The VDR DBD consists of two zinc finger modules and a C-terminal extension (CTE, at the end of the C-terminal of each structure presenting α-helix. For the first zinc finger structure, N37 and S-box take part in forming a dimer with 9-cis retinoid X receptor (RXR, while V26, R50, P-box and S-box participate in binding with VDR response elements (VDRE. For the second zinc finger structure, P61, F62 and H75 are essential in the structure of the VDR homodimer with the residues N37, E92 and F93 of the downstream of partner VDR, which form the inter-DBD interface. T-box of the CTE, especially the F93 and I94, plays a critical role in heterodimerization and heterodimers–VDRE binding. Six essential residues (R102, K103, M106, I107, K109, and R110 of the CTE α-helix of VDR construct one interaction face, which packs against the DBD core of the adjacent symmetry mate. In 1,25(OH2D3-activated signaling, the VDR-RXR heterodimer may bind to DR3-type VDRE and ER9-type VDREs of its target gene directly resulting in transactivation and also bind to DR3-liked nVDRE of its target gene directly resulting in transrepression. Except for this, 1α,25(OH2D3 ligand VDR-RXR may bind to 1αnVDRE indirectly through VDIR, resulting in transrepression of the target gene. Upon binding of 1α,25(OH2D3, VDR can transactivate and transrepress its target genes depending on the DNA motif that DBD binds.

  1. A potential peptide therapeutic derived from the juxtamembrane domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aislyn D W Boran

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is involved in many cancers and EGFR has been heavily pursued as a drug target. Drugs targeting EGFR have shown promising clinical results for several cancer types. However, resistance to EGFR inhibitors often occurs, such as with KRAS mutant cancers, therefore new methods of targeting EGFR are needed. The juxtamembrane (JXM domain of EGFR is critical for receptor activation and targeting this region could potentially be a new method of inhibiting EGFR. We hypothesized that the structural role of the JXM region could be mimicked by peptides encoding a JXM amino acid sequence, which could interfere with EGFR signaling and consequently could have anti-cancer activity. A peptide encoding EGFR 645-662 conjugated to the Tat sequence (TE-64562 displayed anti-cancer activity in multiple human cancer cell types with diminished activity in non-EGFR expressing cells and non-cancerous cells. In nude mice, TE-64562 delayed MDA-MB-231 tumor growth and prolonged survival, without inducing toxicity. TE-64562 induced non-apoptotic cell death after several hours and caspase-3-mediated apoptotic cell death with longer treatment. Mechanistically, TE-64562 bound to EGFR, inhibited its dimerization and caused its down-regulation. TE-64562 reduced phosphorylated and total EGFR levels but did not inhibit kinase activity and instead prolonged it. Our analysis of patient data from The Cancer Genome Atlas supported the hypothesis that down-regulation of EGFR is a potential therapeutic strategy, since phospho- and total-EGFR levels were strongly correlated in a large majority of patient tumor samples, indicating that lower EGFR levels are associated with lower phospho-EGFR levels and presumably less proliferative signals in breast cancer. Akt and Erk were inhibited by TE-64562 and this inhibition was observed in vivo in tumor tissue upon treatment with TE-64562. These results are the first to indicate that the JXM domain of EGFR

  2. Promoter-dependent activity on androgen receptor N-terminal domain mutations in androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadokoro-Cuccaro, Rieko; Davies, John; Mongan, Nigel P; Bunch, Trevor; Brown, Rosalind S; Audi, Laura; Watt, Kate; McEwan, Iain J; Hughes, Ieuan A

    2014-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) mutations are associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). Missense mutations identified in the AR-N-terminal domain (AR-NTD) are rare, and clinical phenotypes are typically mild. We investigated 7 missense mutations and 2 insertion/deletions located in the AR-NTD. This study aimed to elucidate the pathogenic role of AR-NTD mutants in AIS and to use this knowledge to further define AR-NTD function. AR-NTD mutations (Q120E, A159T, G216R, N235K, G248V, L272F, and P380R) were introduced into AR-expression plasmids. Stably expressing cell lines were established for del57L and ins58L. Transactivation was measured using luciferase reporter constructs under the control of GRE and Pem promoters. Intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy and partial proteolysis studies were performed for mutations which showed reduced activities by using a purified AR-AF1 protein. Pem-luciferase reporter activation was reduced for A159T, N235K, and G248V but not the GRE-luciferase reporter. Protein structure analysis detected no significant change in the AR-AF1 region for these mutations. Reduced cellular expression and transactivation activity were observed for ins58L. The mutations Q120E, G216R, L272F, P380R, and del57L showed small or no detectable changes in function. Thus, clinical and experimental analyses have identified novel AR-signalling defects associated with mutations in the structurally disordered AR-NTD domain in patients with AIS.

  3. Discoidin domain receptor 2 facilitates prostate cancer bone metastasis via regulating parathyroid hormone-related protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhang; Jin, Su; Wei, Zhang; Huilian, Hou; Zhanhai, Yin; Yue, Teng; Juan, Li; Jing, Li; Libo, Yao; Xu, Li

    2014-09-01

    Prostate cancer frequently metastasizes to the skeleton but the underlying mechanism remains largely undefined. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a member of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) family and is activated by collagen binding. This study aimed to investigate the function and detailed mechanism of DDR2 in prostate cancer bone dissemination. Herein we found that DDR2 was strongly expressed in bone-metastatic prostate cancer cells and tissues compared to that in normal controls. Enhanced expression of constitutively activated DDR2 led to elevation in motility and invasiveness of prostate cancer cells, whereas knockdown of DDR2 through specific shRNA caused a dramatic repression. Knockdown of DDR2 in prostate cancer cells resulted in significant decrease in the proliferation, differentiation and function of osteoblast. Over-expression of DDR2 in prostate cancer cells resulted in notable acceleration of osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption, whereas knockdown of DDR2 exhibited the opposite effects. An intrabone injection bone metastasis animal model demonstrated that DDR2 promoted osteolytic metastasis in vivo. Molecular evidence demonstrated that DDR2 regulated the expression, secretion, and promoter activity of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), via modulating Runx2 phosphorylation and transactivity. DDR2 was responsive to TGF-β and involved in TGF-β-mediated osteoclast activation and bone resorption. In addition, DDR2 facilitated prostate cancer cells adhere to type I collagen. This study reveals for the first time that DDR2 plays an essential role in prostate cancer bone metastasis. The mechanism disclosure may provide therapeutic targets for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  4. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) regulates proliferation of endochondral cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Ikuma; Hisaki, Tomoka; Sugiura, Koji; Naito, Kunihiko; Kano, Kiyoshi

    2012-10-26

    Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is activated by fibrillar collagens. DDR2 regulates cell proliferation, cell adhesion, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling. The decrement of endogenous DDR2 represses osteoblastic marker gene expression and osteogenic differentiation in murine preosteoblastic cells, but the functions of DDR2 in chondrogenic cellular proliferation remain unclear. To better understand the role of DDR2 signaling in cellular proliferation in endochondral ossification, we inhibited Ddr2 expression via the inhibitory effect of miRNA on Ddr2 mRNA (miDdr2) and analyzed the cellular proliferation and differentiation in the prechondrocyte ATDC5 cell lines. To investigate DDR2's molecular role in endochondral cellular proliferation in vivo, we also produced transgenic mice in which the expression of truncated, kinase dead (KD) DDR2 protein is induced, and evaluated the DDR2 function in cellular proliferation in chondrocytes. Although the miDdr2-transfected ATDC5 cell lines retained normal differentiation ability, DDR2 reduction finally promoted cellular proliferation in proportion to the decreasing ratio of Ddr2 expression, and it also promoted earlier differentiation to cartilage cells by insulin induction. The layer of hypertrophic chondrocytes in KD Ddr2 transgenic mice was not significantly thicker than that of normal littermates, but the layer of proliferative chondrocytes in KD-Ddr2 transgenic mice was significantly thicker than that of normal littermates. Taken together, our data demonstrated that DDR2 might play a local and essential role in the proliferation of chondrocytes.

  5. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) regulates body size and fat metabolism in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Ikuma; Matsumura, Hirokazu; Fujii, Wataru; Naito, Kunihiko; Kusakabe, Ken; Kiso, Yasuo; Kano, Kiyoshi

    2014-02-01

    Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is activated by fibrillar collagens, which act as its endogenous ligand. DDR2 regulates cell proliferation, cell adhesion, migration, extracellular matrix remodeling and reproductive functions. Both DDR2 null allele mice and mice with a recessive, loss-of-function allele for Ddr2 exhibit dwarfing and a reduction in body weight. However, the detailed mechanisms by which DDR2 exerts its positive systemic regulation of whole body size, local skeletal size and fat tissue volume remain to be clarified. To investigate the systemic role of DDR2 in body size regulation, we produced transgenic mice in which the DDR2 protein is overexpressed, then screened the transgenic mice for abnormalities using systematic mouse abnormality screening. The modified-SHIPRA screen revealed that only the parameter of body size was significantly different among the genotypes. We also discovered that the body length was significantly increased, while the body weight was significantly decreased in transgenic mice compared to their littermate controls. We also found that the epididymal fat pads were significantly decreased in transgenic mice compared to normal littermate mice, which may have been the cause of the leptin decrement in the transgenic mice. The new insight that DDR2 might promote metabolism in adipocyte cells is very interesting, but more experiments will be needed to elucidate the direct relation between DDR2 and adipose-derived hormones. Taken together, our data demonstrated that DDR2 might play a systemic role in the regulation of body size thorough skeletal formation and fat metabolism.

  6. Discoidin domain receptors regulate the migration of primary human lung fibroblasts through collagen matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz Pedro A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The two discoidin domain receptors (DDRs, DDR1 and DDR2 are receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs with the unique ability among RTKs to respond to collagen. We have previously shown that collagen I induces DDR1 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-10 expression through DDR2 activation and a Janus kinase (JAK2 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2-mediated mechanism in primary human lung fibroblasts suggesting that these signaling pathways play a role in fibroblast function. Fibroblasts can traverse basement membrane barriers during development, wound healing and pathological conditions such as cancer and fibrosis by activating tissue-invasive programs, the identity of which remain largely undefined. In the present work, we investigated the role of DDRs and DDR-associated signal transduction in these processes. Results Transwell migration experiments showed that normal human lung fibroblast (NHLF transmigration through collagen I-coated inserts is mediated by DDR2 and the DDR2-associated signaling kinases JAK2 and ERK1/2, but not DDR1. Additionally, experiments with specific small interfering (siRNAs revealed that collagen I-induced expression of MMP-10 and MMP-2 is DDR2 but not DDR1 dependent in NHLFs. Our data showed that collagen I increases NHLF migration through collagen IV, the main component of basement membranes. Furthermore, basal and collagen I-induced NHLF migration through collagen IV-coated inserts was both DDR2 and DDR1 dependent. Finally, DDR2, but not DDR1 was shown to be involved in fibroblast proliferation. Conclusions Our results suggest a mechanism by which the presence of collagen I in situations of excessive matrix deposition could induce fibroblast migration through basement membranes through DDR2 activation and subsequent DDR1 and MMP-2 gene expression. This work provides new insights into the role of DDRs in fibroblast function.

  7. IMGT unique numbering for immunoglobulin and T cell receptor constant domains and Ig superfamily C-like domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Pommié, Christelle; Kaas, Quentin

    2005-01-01

    IMGT, the international ImMunoGeneTics information system (http://imgt.cines.fr) provides a common access to expertly annotated data on the genome, proteome, genetics and structure of immunoglobulins (IG), T cell receptors (TR), major histocompatibility complex (MHC), and related proteins...

  8. The SARS Coronavirus S Glycoprotein Receptor Binding Domain: Fine Mapping and Functional Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Xiaodong

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The entry of the SARS coronavirus (SCV into cells is initiated by binding of its spike envelope glycoprotein (S to a receptor, ACE2. We and others identified the receptor-binding domain (RBD by using S fragments of various lengths but all including the amino acid residue 318 and two other potential glycosylation sites. To further characterize the role of glycosylation and identify residues important for its function as an interacting partner of ACE2, we have cloned, expressed and characterized various soluble fragments of S containing RBD, and mutated all potential glycosylation sites and 32 other residues. The shortest of these fragments still able to bind the receptor ACE2 did not include residue 318 (which is a potential glycosylation site, but started at residue 319, and has only two potential glycosylation sites (residues 330 and 357. Mutation of each of these sites to either alanine or glutamine, as well as mutation of residue 318 to alanine in longer fragments resulted in the same decrease of molecular weight (by approximately 3 kDa suggesting that all glycosylation sites are functional. Simultaneous mutation of all glycosylation sites resulted in lack of expression suggesting that at least one glycosylation site (any of the three is required for expression. Glycosylation did not affect binding to ACE2. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of the fragment S319–518 resulted in the identification of ten residues (K390, R426, D429, T431, I455, N473, F483, Q492, Y494, R495 that significantly reduced binding to ACE2, and one residue (D393 that appears to increase binding. Mutation of residue T431 reduced binding by about 2-fold, and mutation of the other eight residues – by more than 10-fold. Analysis of these data and the mapping of these mutations on the recently determined crystal structure of a fragment containing the RBD complexed to ACE2 (Li, F, Li, W, Farzan, M, and Harrison, S. C., submitted suggested the existence of two hot

  9. Intracellular catalytic domain of symbiosis receptor kinase hyperactivates spontaneous nodulation in absence of rhizobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Sudip; Dutta, Ayan; Bhattacharya, Avisek; DasGupta, Maitrayee

    2014-12-01

    Symbiosis Receptor Kinase (SYMRK), a member of the Nod factor signaling pathway, is indispensible for both nodule organogenesis and intracellular colonization of symbionts in rhizobia-legume symbiosis. Here, we show that the intracellular kinase domain of a SYMRK (SYMRK-kd) but not its inactive or full-length version leads to hyperactivation of the nodule organogenic program in Medicago truncatula TR25 (symrk knockout mutant) in the absence of rhizobia. Spontaneous nodulation in TR25/SYMRK-kd was 6-fold higher than rhizobia-induced nodulation in TR25/SYMRK roots. The merged clusters of spontaneous nodules indicated that TR25 roots in the presence of SYMRK-kd have overcome the control over both nodule numbers and their spatial position. In the presence of rhizobia, SYMRK-kd could rescue the epidermal infection processes in TR25, but colonization of symbionts in the nodule interior was significantly compromised. In summary, ligand-independent deregulated activation of SYMRK hyperactivates nodule organogenesis in the absence of rhizobia, but its ectodomain is required for proper symbiont colonization.

  10. Protective effects of genetic inhibition of Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 in experimental renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerroch, Monique; Alfieri, Carlo; Dorison, Aude; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Dussaule, Jean-Claude

    2016-02-16

    Chronic kidney disease is a progressive incurable pathology affecting millions of people. Intensive investigations aim to identify targets for therapy. We have previously demonstrated that abnormal expression of the Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 (DDR1) is a key factor of renal disease by promoting inflammation and fibrosis. The present study investigates whether blocking the expression of DDR1 after the initiation of renal disease can delay or arrest the progression of this pathology. Severe renal disease was induced by either injecting nephrotoxic serum (NTS) or performing unilateral ureteral obstruction in mice, and the expression of DDR1 was inhibited by administering antisense oligodeoxynucleotides either at 4 or 8 days after NTS (corresponding to early or more established phases of disease, respectively), or at day 2 after ligation. DDR1 antisense administration at day 4 stopped the increase of proteinuria and protected animals against the progression of glomeruloneprhitis, as evidenced by functional, structural and cellular indexes. Antisense administration at day 8 delayed progression -but to a smaller degree- of renal disease. Similar beneficial effects on renal structure and inflammation were observed with the antisense administration of DDR1 after ureteral ligation. Thus, targeting DDR1 can be a promising strategy in the treatment of chronic kidney disease.

  11. Expression of Intracellular Domain of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Generation of Its Monoclonal Antibody

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Lin; Zhiduo Liu; Jianmin Jiang; Ziqing Jiang; Yongyong Ji; Bing Sun

    2004-01-01

    To prepare monoclonal antibody specific to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) intracellular domain, its gene was amplified from total RNA of A431 cell by RT-PCR. Then the gene was cloned into prokaryotic vector pET30a(+). The recombinant plasmid was transformed into E. Coli BL21 (DE3) strain for protein expression.Recombinant protein was induced with IPTG and purified using Ni2+-NTA agarose. Then the anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody (nAb) was prepared with classical hybridoma technique. Positive clones were selected using indirect enzyme-linked inmunoabsorbent assay (ELISA). Totally 4 hybridoma clones were obtained and these mAbs were IgG1 (3 clones) and IgG2a (1 clone), respectively. Their light chains were all kappa chains.Western blotting analysis and confocal immunofluorescence assays demonstrated that mAbs could specifically recognize EGFR expressing on A431 carcinoma cell line. The mAbs will be useful in the study of EGFR-mediated signal transduction.

  12. Expression of Intracellular Domain of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Generation of Its Monoclonal Antibody

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YingLin; ZhiduoLiu; JianminJiang; ZiqingJiang; Yongyongji; BingSun

    2004-01-01

    To prepare monoclonal antibody specific to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) intracellular domain, its gene was amplified from total RNA of A431 cell by RT-PCR. Then the gene was cloned into prokaryotic vector pET30a(+). The recombinant plasmid was transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3) strain for protein expression. Recombinant protein was induced with IPTG and purified using Nie2+-NTA agarose. Then the anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody (mAb) was prepared with classical hybridoma technique. Positive clones were selected using indirect enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA). Totally 4 hybridoma clones were obtained and these mAbs were IgG1 (3 clones) and IgG2a (1 clone), respectively. Their light chains were all kappa chains. Western blotting analysis and confocal immunofluorescence assays demonstrated that mAbs could specifically recognize EGFR expressing on A431 carcinoma cell line. The mAbs will be useful in the study of EGFR-mediated signal transduction. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(2):137-141.

  13. Critical role of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor 3 in vascular repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlaweck, Sebastian; Zimmer, Sebastian; Struck, Rafael [Department of Medicine/Cardiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Bartok, Eva [Institute for Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Pharmacology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Werner, Nikos [Department of Medicine/Cardiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Bauernfeind, Franz [Institute for Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Pharmacology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Latz, Eicke [Institute of Innate Immunity, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Nickenig, Georg [Department of Medicine/Cardiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Hornung, Veit [Institute for Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Pharmacology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Ghanem, Alexander, E-mail: ghanem@uni-bonn.de [Department of Medicine/Cardiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany)

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} NLRP3 is not required for systemic cardiovascular function in healthy mice. {yields} NLRP3 deficiency itself does not affect the functional cardiovascular phenotype and that it does not alter peripheral differential blood counts. {yields} NLRP3 is critical in neointima formation following vascular injury. -- Abstract: Vascular remodeling characterized by hyperproliferative neointima formation is an unfavorable repair process that is triggered by vascular damage. This process is characterized by an increased local inflammatory and proliferative response that critically involves the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}). IL-1{beta} is expressed and cytosolically retained as a procytokine that requires additional processing prior to exerting its pro-inflammatory function. Maturation and release of pro IL-1{beta} is governed by a cytosolic protein scaffold that is known as the inflammasome. Here we show that NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor family, pryin domain containing 3), an important activating component of the inflammasome, is involved in neointima formation after vascular injury. NLRP3 deficiency itself does not affect the functional cardiovascular phenotype and does not alter peripheral differential blood counts. However, neointima development following wire injury of the carotid artery was significantly decreased in NLRP3-deficient mice as compared to wild-type controls. In all, NLRP3 plays a non-redundant role in vascular damage mediated neointima formation. Our data establish NLRP3 as a key player in the response to vascular damage, which could open new avenues to therapeutic intervention.

  14. Prognostic significance of discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) expression in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yi; Xu, Zhe; Fan, Jin; Huang, Liu; Ye, Ming; Shi, Kun; Huang, Zheng; Liu, Yaqiong; He, Langchi; Huang, Jiezhen; Wang, Yibin; Li, Qiufeng

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has suggested that discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) plays an important role in cancer development and metastasis. However, the correlation between DDR2 expression and clinical outcome in ovarian cancer has not been investigated. In this study, DDR2 expression was examined by Real-time PCR in surgically resected ovarian cancer and normal ovary tissues. Besides, DDR2 expression was analyzed immunohistochemically in 103 ovarian cancer patients, and the correlation between DDR2 expression with clinicopathologic factors was analyzed. The result showed that DDR2 mRNA expression was upregulated in ovarian cancer tissues compared with normal ovary tissues. Statistical analysis revealed that DDR2 expression correlated with tumor stage (P = 0.008) and peritoneal metastasis (P = 0.009). Patients with high DDR2 expression showed poorer 5-year overall survival (P = 0.005), and DDR2 remained an independent prognostic marker for OS (P = 0.013) in multivariate analysis. Our results suggest that DDR2 might be closely associated with ovarian cancer progression and metastasis. Its high expression may serve as a potential prognostic biomarker in human ovarian cancer.

  15. Type I collagen aging impairs discoidin domain receptor 2-mediated tumor cell growth suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saby, Charles; Buache, Emilie; Brassart-Pasco, Sylvie; El Btaouri, Hassan; Courageot, Marie-Pierre; Van Gulick, Laurence; Garnotel, Roselyne; Jeannesson, Pierre; Morjani, Hamid

    2016-05-03

    Tumor cells are confronted to a type I collagen rich environment which regulates cell proliferation and invasion. Biological aging has been associated with structural changes of type I collagen. Here, we address the effect of collagen aging on cell proliferation in a three-dimensional context (3D).We provide evidence for an inhibitory effect of adult collagen, but not of the old one, on proliferation of human fibrosarcoma HT-1080 cells. This effect involves both the activation of the tyrosine kinase Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2) and the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2. DDR2 and SHP-2 were less activated in old collagen. DDR2 inhibition decreased SHP-2 phosphorylation in adult collagen and increased cell proliferation to a level similar to that observed in old collagen.In the presence of old collagen, a high level of JAK2 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation was observed while expression of the cell cycle negative regulator p21CIP1 was decreased. Inhibition of DDR2 kinase function also led to an increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation and a decrease in p21CIP1 expression. Similar signaling profile was observed when DDR2 was inhibited in adult collagen. Altogether, these data suggest that biological collagen aging could increase tumor cell proliferation by reducingthe activation of the key matrix sensor DDR2.

  16. Expression of Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2) in the Developing Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Mary O.; Price, Robert L.; Goldsmith, Edie C.

    2005-06-01

    Interactions between cells and the surrounding extracellular matrix are important for a number of developmental events. In the heart, cardiac fibroblasts produce the majority of extracellular matrix proteins, particularly collagen types I and III. Cells originating from the proepicardial organ migrate over the surface of the heart, invade the underlying myocardium and ultimately give rise to smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, and coronary endothelium. Although integrin expression in the developing heart has been well characterized, the expression of Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2) remains to be defined. Using confocal microscopy, the expression of DDR2 was examined at several points during cardiac development. Initially, DDR2 expression was detected on the epicardial surface of the heart and on endothelial and mesenchymal cells within the cardiac cushions. As development progressed, DDR2 expression increased at localized regions in the apex and atrioventricular sulcus, although this expression decreased from epicardial to endocardial surface. Eventually, DDR2 expression spanned the myocardial free wall and was detected within the septum. Not until postnatal development was DDR2 expression detected uniformly throughout the myocardium and this distribution was maintained in the adult heart. In summary, the data presented demonstrate that the distribution of DDR2-positive cells changes within the heart during development.

  17. Solution structure of the transmembrane domain of the insulin receptor in detergent micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingxin; Wong, Ying Lei; Kang, CongBao

    2014-05-01

    The insulin receptor (IR) binds insulin and plays important roles in glucose homeostasis by regulating the tyrosine kinase activity at its C-terminus. Its transmembrane domain (TMD) is shown to be important for transferring conformational changes induced by insulin across the cell membrane to regulate kinase activity. In this study, a construct IR(940-988) containing the TMD was expressed and purified for structural studies. Its solution structure in dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles was determined. The sequence containing residues L962 to Y976 of the TMD of the IR in micelles adopts a well-defined helical structure with a kink formed by glycine and proline residues present at its N-terminus, which might be important for its function. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) and relaxation experimental results suggest that residues following the TMD are flexible and expose to aqueous solution. Although purified IR(940-988) in micelles existed mainly as a monomeric form verified by gel filtration and relaxation analysis, cross-linking study suggests that it may form a dimer or oligomers under micelle conditions.

  18. Regulation of β2-adrenergic receptor function by conformationally selective single-domain intrabodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staus, Dean P; Wingler, Laura M; Strachan, Ryan T;

    2014-01-01

    to selectively bind agonist- or antagonist-occupied receptors. When expressed as intrabodies, they inhibited G protein activation (cyclic AMP accumulation), G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK)-mediated receptor phosphorylation, β-arrestin recruitment, and receptor internalization to varying extents...

  19. Ligand-controlled interaction of histone acetyltransferase binding to ORC-1 (HBO1) with the N-terminal transactivating domain of progesterone receptor induces steroid receptor coactivator 1-dependent coactivation of transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Georgiakaki (Maria); L.J. Blok (Leen); R. Milgrom (Roni); M. Lombès (Marc); A. Guiochon-Mantel (Anne); H. Loosfelt (Hugues); N. Chabbert-Buffet (Nathalie); B. Dasen (Boris); G. Meduri (Geri); S. Wenk (Sandra); L. Rajhi (Leila); L. Amazit (Larbi); A. Chauchereau (Anne); C.W. Burger (Curt)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractModulators of cofactor recruitment by nuclear receptors are expected to play an important role in the coordination of hormone-induced transactivation processes. To identify such factors interacting with the N-terminal domain (NTD) of the progesterone receptor (PR), we used this domain as

  20. Ligand-controlled interaction of histone acetyltransferase binding to ORC-1 (HBO1) with the N-terminal transactivating domain of progesterone receptor induces steroid receptor coactivator 1-dependent coactivation of transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Georgiakaki (Maria); L.J. Blok (Leen); R. Milgrom (Roni); M. Lombès (Marc); A. Guiochon-Mantel (Anne); H. Loosfelt (Hugues); N. Chabbert-Buffet (Nathalie); B. Dasen (Boris); G. Meduri (Geri); S. Wenk (Sandra); L. Rajhi (Leila); L. Amazit (Larbi); A. Chauchereau (Anne); C.W. Burger (Curt)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractModulators of cofactor recruitment by nuclear receptors are expected to play an important role in the coordination of hormone-induced transactivation processes. To identify such factors interacting with the N-terminal domain (NTD) of the progesterone receptor (PR), we used this domain as

  1. Structural Determinants at the Interface of the ARC2 and LRR Domains Control the Activation of the NB-LRR Plant Immune Receptors Rx1 and Gpa2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slootweg, E.J.; Spiridon, L.N.; Roosien, J.; Butterbach, P.B.E.; Pomp, H.; Westerhof, L.B.; Wilbers, R.H.P.; Bakker, E.H.; Bakker, J.; Petrescu, A.J.; Smant, G.; Goverse, A.

    2013-01-01

    Many plant and animal immune receptors have a modular NB-LRR architecture in which a nucleotide-binding switch domain (NB-ARC) is tethered to a leucine-rich repeat sensor domain (LRR). The cooperation between the switch and sensor domains, which regulates the activation of these proteins, is poorly

  2. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor N-terminal domain controls isotype-selective gene expression and adipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummasti, Sarah; Tontonoz, Peter

    2006-06-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARgamma, PPARalpha, and PPARdelta) are important regulators of lipid metabolism. Although they share significant structural similarity, the biological effects associated with each PPAR isotype are distinct. For example, PPARalpha and PPARdelta regulate fatty acid catabolism, whereas PPARgamma controls lipid storage and adipogenesis. The different functions of PPARs in vivo can be explained at least in part by the different tissue distributions of the three receptors. The question of whether the receptors have different intrinsic activities and regulate distinct target genes, however, has not been adequately explored. We have engineered cell lines that express comparable amounts of each receptor. Transcriptional profiling of these cells in the presence of selective agonists reveals partially overlapping but distinct patterns of gene regulation by the three PPARs. Moreover, analysis of chimeric receptors points to the N terminus of each receptor as the key determinant of isotype-selective gene expression. For example, the N terminus of PPARgamma confers the ability to promote adipocyte differentiation when fused to the PPARdelta DNA binding domain and ligand binding domain, whereas the N terminus of PPARdelta leads to the inappropriate expression of fatty acid oxidation genes in differentiated adipocytes when fused to PPARgamma. Finally, we demonstrate that the N terminus of each receptor functions in part to limit receptor activity because deletion of the N terminus leads to nonselective activation of target genes. A more detailed understanding of the mechanisms by which the individual PPARs differentially regulate gene expression should aid in the design of more effective drugs, including tissue- and target gene-selective PPAR modulators.

  3. Positive Modulatory Interactions of NMDA Receptor GluN1/2B Ligand Binding Domains Attenuate Antagonists Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Bledsoe

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available N-methyl D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR play crucial role in normal brain function and pathogenesis of neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. Functional tetra-heteromeric NMDAR contains two obligatory GluN1 subunits and two identical or different non-GluN1 subunits that include six different gene products; four GluN2 (A–D and two GluN3 (A–B subunits. The heterogeneity of subunit combination facilities the distinct function of NMDARs. All GluN subunits contain an extracellular N-terminal Domain (NTD and ligand binding domain (LBD, transmembrane domain (TMD and an intracellular C-terminal domain (CTD. Interaction between the GluN1 and co-assembling GluN2/3 subunits through the LBD has been proven crucial for defining receptor deactivation mechanisms that are unique for each combination of NMDAR. Modulating the LBD interactions has great therapeutic potential. In the present work, by amino acid point mutations and electrophysiology techniques, we have studied the role of LBD interactions in determining the effect of well-characterized pharmacological agents including agonists, competitive antagonists, and allosteric modulators. The results reveal that agonists (glycine and glutamate potency was altered based on mutant amino acid sidechain chemistry and/or mutation site. Most antagonists inhibited mutant receptors with higher potency; interestingly, clinically used NMDAR channel blocker memantine was about three-fold more potent on mutated receptors (N521A, N521D, and K531A than wild type receptors. These results provide novel insights on the clinical pharmacology of memantine, which is used for the treatment of mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. In addition, these findings demonstrate the central role of LBD interactions that can be exploited to develop novel NMDAR based therapeutics.

  4. Significant role of PB1 and UBA domains in multimerization of Joka2, a selective autophagy cargo receptor from tobacco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna eZientara-Rytter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco Joka2 protein is a hybrid homolog of two mammalian selective autophagy cargo receptors, p62 and NBR1. These proteins can directly interact with the members of ATG8 family and the polyubiquitinated cargoes designed for degradation. Function of the selective autophagy cargo receptors relies on their ability to form protein aggregates. It has been shown that the N-terminal PB1 domain of p62 is involved in formation of aggregates, while the UBA domains of p62 and NBR1 have been associated mainly with cargo binding. Here we focus on roles of PB1 and UBA domains in localization and aggregation of Joka2 in plant cells. We show that Joka2 can homodimerize not only through its N-terminal PB1-PB1 interactions but also via interaction between N-terminal PB1 and C-terminal UBA domains. We also demonstrate that Joka2 co-localizes with recombinant ubiquitin and sequestrates it into aggregates and that C-terminal part (containing UBA domains is sufficient for this effect. Our results indicate that Joka2 accumulates in cytoplasmic aggregates and suggest that in addition to these multimeric forms it also exists in the nucleus and cytoplasm in a monomeric form.

  5. Evaluation of discoidin domain receptor-2 (DDR2) expression level in normal, benign, and malignant human prostate tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azemikhah, Mitra; Ashtiani, Hamidreza Ahmadi; Aghaei, Mahmoud; Rastegar, Hosein

    2015-01-01

    Discoidin domain receptor (DDR) is a new member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family. There are two isoforms of discoidin domain receptor (DDR), DDR1 and DDR2. These receptors play a major role in the adhesion, motility and cell proliferation. Due to the important role of DDR2 in the development of tumor extension, this receptor is pivotal in the field of carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the mRNA and protein expression of DDR2, in the malignant, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and normal tissues of patients with prostate cancer. In this study the gene and protein expression of DDR2 in adjacent normal (n=40), BPH (n=40), and malignant (n=40) prostate tissue were measured using real-time PCR and Western blotting. Then, the correlation of DDR2 gene and protein expression with prognostic factors such as age, tumor grade, tumor stage, lymph node involvement, and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration were evaluated. The relative mRNA and protein expression level of DDR2 in malignant and benign prostate tissue was significantly higher than those of adjacent normal tissues (PDDR2 mRNA and protein expression with prognostic factors such as tumor grade, stage, lymph node involvement, and serum PSA concentration. However, significant correlation with age was not observed. These findings suggest that DDR2 is a cancer-related gene associated with the aggressive progression of prostate cancer patients.

  6. 3D Mapping of the SPRY2 domain of ryanodine receptor 1 by single-particle cryo-EM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Perálvarez-Marín

    Full Text Available The type 1 skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RyR1 is principally responsible for Ca(2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and for the subsequent muscle contraction. The RyR1 contains three SPRY domains. SPRY domains are generally known to mediate protein-protein interactions, however the location of the three SPRY domains in the 3D structure of the RyR1 is not known. Combining immunolabeling and single-particle cryo-electron microscopy we have mapped the SPRY2 domain (S1085-V1208 in the 3D structure of RyR1 using three different antibodies against the SPRY2 domain. Two obstacles for the image processing procedure; limited amount of data and signal dilution introduced by the multiple orientations of the antibody bound in the tetrameric RyR1, were overcome by modifying the 3D reconstruction scheme. This approach enabled us to ascertain that the three antibodies bind to the same region, to obtain a 3D reconstruction of RyR1 with the antibody bound, and to map SPRY2 to the periphery of the cytoplasmic domain of RyR1. We report here the first 3D localization of a SPRY2 domain in any known RyR isoform.

  7. Higher-Resolution Structure of the Human Insulin Receptor Ectodomain: Multi-Modal Inclusion of the Insert Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, Tristan I; Smith, Brian J; Margetts, Mai B; Whittaker, Jonathan; Weiss, Michael A; Ward, Colin W; Lawrence, Michael C

    2016-03-01

    Insulin receptor (IR) signaling is critical to controlling nutrient uptake and metabolism. However, only a low-resolution (3.8 Å) structure currently exists for the IR ectodomain, with some segments ill-defined or unmodeled due to disorder. Here, we revise this structure using new diffraction data to 3.3 Å resolution that allow improved modeling of the N-linked glycans, the first and third fibronectin type III domains, and the insert domain. A novel haptic interactive molecular dynamics strategy was used to aid fitting to low-resolution electron density maps. The resulting model provides a foundation for investigation of structural transitions in IR upon ligand binding.

  8. p59fyn tyrosine kinase associates with multiple T-cell receptor subunits through its unique amino-terminal domain.

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Several lines of evidence link the protein tyrosine kinase p59fyn to the T-cell receptor. The molecular basis of this interaction has not been established. Here we show that the tyrosine kinase p59fyn can associate with chimeric proteins that contain the cytoplasmic domains of CD3 epsilon, gamma, zeta (zeta), and eta. Mutational analysis of the zeta cytoplasmic domain demonstrated that the membrane-proximal 41 residues of zeta are sufficient for p59fyn binding and that at least two p59fyn bin...

  9. Homodimerization enhances both sensitivity and dynamic range of the ligand-binding domain of type 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebryany, Eugene; Folta-Stogniew, Ewa; Liu, Jian; Yan, Elsa C Y

    2016-12-01

    Cooperativity in ligand binding is a key emergent property of protein oligomers. Positive cooperativity (higher affinity for subsequent binding events than for initial binding) is frequent. However, the symmetrically homodimeric ligand-binding domain (LBD) of metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1 exhibits negative cooperativity. To investigate its origin and functional significance, we measured the response to glutamate in vitro of wild-type and C140S LBD as a function of the extent of dimerization. Our results indicate that homodimerization enhances the affinity of the first, but not the second, binding site, relative to the monomer, giving the dimeric receptor both greater sensitivity and a broader dynamic range.

  10. Identification of the Calmodulin-Binding Domains of Fas Death Receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bliss J Chang

    Full Text Available The extrinsic apoptotic pathway is initiated by binding of a Fas ligand to the ectodomain of the surface death receptor Fas protein. Subsequently, the intracellular death domain of Fas (FasDD and that of the Fas-associated protein (FADD interact to form the core of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC, a crucial step for activation of caspases that induce cell death. Previous studies have shown that calmodulin (CaM is recruited into the DISC in cholangiocarcinoma cells and specifically interacts with FasDD to regulate the apoptotic/survival signaling pathway. Inhibition of CaM activity in DISC stimulates apoptosis significantly. We have recently shown that CaM forms a ternary complex with FasDD (2:1 CaM:FasDD. However, the molecular mechanism by which CaM binds to two distinct FasDD motifs is not fully understood. Here, we employed mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, biophysical, and biochemical methods to identify the binding regions of FasDD and provide a molecular basis for the role of CaM in Fas-mediated apoptosis. Proteolytic digestion and mass spectrometry data revealed that peptides spanning residues 209-239 (Fas-Pep1 and 251-288 (Fas-Pep2 constitute the two CaM-binding regions of FasDD. To determine the molecular mechanism of interaction, we have characterized the binding of recombinant/synthetic Fas-Pep1 and Fas-Pep2 peptides with CaM. Our data show that both peptides engage the N- and C-terminal lobes of CaM simultaneously. Binding of Fas-Pep1 to CaM is entropically driven while that of Fas-Pep2 to CaM is enthalpically driven, indicating that a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic forces contribute to the stabilization of the FasDD-CaM complex. Our data suggest that because Fas-Pep1 and Fas-Pep2 are involved in extensive intermolecular contacts with the death domain of FADD, binding of CaM to these regions may hinder its ability to bind to FADD, thus greatly inhibiting the initiation of apoptotic signaling

  11. Differential Contribution of Transmembrane Domains IV, V, VI, and VII to Human Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Homomer Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Brent M; Nguyen, Elaine; Chedrawe, Matthew A J; Rainey, Jan K; Dupré, Denis J

    2017-02-24

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play an important role in drug therapy and represent one of the largest families of drug targets. The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) is notable as it has a central role in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Blockade of AT1R signaling has been shown to alleviate hypertension and improve outcomes in patients with heart failure. Despite this, it has become apparent that our initial understanding of AT1R signaling is oversimplified. There is considerable evidence to suggest that AT1R signaling is highly modified in the presence of receptor-receptor interactions, but there is very little structural data available to explain this phenomenon even with the recent elucidation of the AT1R crystal structure. The current study investigates the involvement of transmembrane domains in AT1R homomer assembly with the goal of identifying hydrophobic interfaces that contribute to receptor-receptor affinity. A recently published crystal structure of the AT1R was used to guide site-directed mutagenesis of outward-facing hydrophobic residues within the transmembrane region of the AT1R. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer was employed to analyze how receptor mutation affects the assembly of AT1R homomers with a specific focus on hydrophobic residues. Mutations within transmembrane domains IV, V, VI, and VII had no effect on angiotensin-mediated β-arrestin1 recruitment; however, they exhibited differential effects on the assembly of AT1R into oligomeric complexes. Our results demonstrate the importance of hydrophobic amino acids at the AT1R transmembrane interface and provide the first glimpse of the requirements for AT1R complex assembly.

  12. Inhibition of discoidin domain receptor 2-mediated lung cancer cells progression by gold nanoparticle-aptamer-assisted delivery of peptides containing transmembrane-juxtamembrane 1/2 domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Daehwan; Yeom, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Boeun; Lee, Kangseok [Department of Life Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jeehyeon, E-mail: jeehyeon@cau.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, Sangmyung, E-mail: sangmyung.rhee@cau.ac.kr [Department of Life Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-21

    The delivery of biologically functional peptides into mammalian cells can be a direct and effective method for cancer therapy and treatment of other diseases. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a collagen-induced receptor tyrosine kinase recently identified as a novel therapeutic target in lung cancer. In this study, we report that peptides containing the functional domain of DDR2 can be efficiently delivered into lung malignant cancer cells via a gold nanoparticle-DNA aptamer conjugate (AuNP-Apt)-based system. Peptide delivery resulted in the abrogation of DDR2 activation triggered by collagen. Moreover, the peptide delivered by the AuNP-Apt system inhibited cancer cell proliferation and invasion mediated by DDR2 activation. Thus, these results suggest that peptide loaded onto AuNP-Apt conjugates can be used for the development of peptide-based biomedical applications for the treatment of DDR2-positive cancer. - Highlights: • TM-JM1/2 peptides are efficiently delivered into cells by AuNP-Apt-conjugates. • TM-JM1/2 peptides loaded onto AuNP-Apt conjugates inhibit DDR2 activation. • Inhibition of DDR2 activation by TM-JM1/2 peptides decreases tumor progression.

  13. Structure of the LDL receptor extracellular domain at endosomalpH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudenko, Gabby; Henry, Lisa; Henderson, Keith; Ichtchenko,Konstantin; Brown, Michael S.; Goldstein, Joseph L.; Deisenhofer, Johann

    2002-09-05

    The structure of the low-density lipoprotein receptor extracellular portion has been determined. The document proposes a mechanism for the release of lipoprotein in the endosome. Without this release, the mechanism of receptor recycling cannot function.

  14. Structure of the LDL receptor extracellular domain at endosomalpH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudenko, Gabby; Henry, Lisa; Henderson, Keith; Ichtchenko,Konstantin; Brown, Michael S.; Goldstein, Joseph L.; Deisenhofer, Johann

    2002-09-05

    The structure of the low-density lipoprotein receptor extracellular portion has been determined. The document proposes a mechanism for the release of lipoprotein in the endosome. Without this release, the mechanism of receptor recycling cannot function.

  15. Kinase domain insert containing receptor promotor controlled suicide gene system kills human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zong-Hai Huang; Wen-Yu Yang; Qi Cheng; Jing-Long Yu; Zhou Li; Zong-Yan Tong; Hui-Juan Song; Xiao-Yan Che

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the killing effect of double suicide gene mediated by adenovirus and regulated under kinase domain insert containing receptor (KDR) promoter on human umbilical vein endothelial cells. METHODS: By PCR technology, human KDR promoter gene, Escherichia coli(E. coli) cytosine deaminase (CD) gene and the herpes simple virus-thymidine kinase (TK) gene were cloned. Plasmid pKDR-CDglyTK was constructed with them. Then, a recombinant adenoviral plasmid pAdKDRCDglyTK was constructed in a "two-step transformation protocol". The newly constructed plasmids were transfected to 293 packaging cells to grow adenoviruses, which were further propagated and purified. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were infected with a different multiplicity of infection (MOI) of resultant recombinant adenovirus, the infection rate was measured with the aid of (GFP) expression. Infected cells were cultured in culture media containing different concentrations of (GCV) and/or 5-(FC), and the killing effects were measured.RESULTS: Recombinant adenoviruses AdKDR-CDglyTK were successfully constructed, and they infected HUVEC cells efficiently. Our data indicated that the infection rate was relevant to MOI of recombinant adenoviruses. HUVEC cells infected with AdKDR-CDglyTK were highly sensitive to the prodrugs, their survival rate correlated to both the concentration of the prodrugs and the MOI of recombinant adenoviruses. Our data also indicated that the two prodrugs used in combination were much more effective on killing transgeneic cells than GCV or 5-FC used alone. CONCLUSION: Prodrug/KDR-CDglyTK system is effective on killing HUVEC cells, its killing effect correlates to the concentration of prodrugs and recombinant adenovirus' MOI. Combined use of the two prodrugs confers better killing effects on transgeneic cells.

  16. Association of oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene variants with multiple phenotype domains of autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Daniel B; Datta, Dibyadeep; Jones, Shaine T; Batey Lee, Evon; Sutcliffe, James S; Hammock, Elizabeth A D; Levitt, Pat

    2011-06-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by core deficits in social behavior, communication, and behavioral flexibility. Several lines of evidence indicate that oxytocin, signaling through its receptor (OXTR), is important in a wide range of social behaviors. In attempts to determine whether genetic variations in the oxytocin signaling system contribute to ASD susceptibility, seven recent reports indicated association of common genetic polymorphisms in the OXTR gene with ASD. Each involved relatively small sample sizes (57 to 436 families) and, where it was examined, failed to identify association of OXTR polymorphisms with measures of social behavior in individuals with ASD. We report genetic association analysis of 25 markers spanning the OXTR locus in 1,238 pedigrees including 2,333 individuals with ASD. Association of three markers previously implicated in ASD susceptibility, rs2268493 (P = 0.043), rs1042778 (P = 0.037), and rs7632287 (P = 0.016), was observed. Further, these genetic markers were associated with multiple core ASD phenotypes, including social domain dysfunction, measured by standardized instruments used to diagnose and describe ASD. The data suggest association of OXTR genetic polymorphisms with ASD, although the results should be interpreted with caution because none of the significant associations would survive appropriate correction for multiple comparisons. However, the current findings of association in a large independent cohort are consistent with previous results, and the biological plausibility of participation of the oxytocin signaling system in modulating social disruptions characteristic of ASD, suggest that functional polymorphisms of OXTR may contribute to ASD risk in a subset of families.

  17. Mutations in the ligand-binding domain of the androgen receptor gene cluster in two regions of the gene.

    OpenAIRE

    McPhaul, M J; Marcelli, M; Zoppi, S; Wilson, C. M.; Griffin, J E; Wilson, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    We have analyzed the nucleotide sequence of the androgen receptor from 22 unrelated subjects with substitution mutations of the hormone-binding domain. Eleven had the phenotype of complete testicular feminization, four had incomplete testicular feminization, and seven had Reifenstein syndrome. The underlying functional defect in cultured skin fibroblasts included individuals with absent, qualitative, or quantitative defects in ligand binding. 19 of the 21 substitution mutations (90%) cluster ...

  18. The C-terminal domains of the GABA(b) receptor subunits mediate intracellular trafficking but are not required for receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calver, A R; Robbins, M J; Cosio, C; Rice, S Q; Babbs, A J; Hirst, W D; Boyfield, I; Wood, M D; Russell, R B; Price, G W; Couve, A; Moss, S J; Pangalos, M N

    2001-02-15

    GABA(B) receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the brain and spinal cord. These receptors are heterodimers assembled from GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) subunits, neither of which is capable of producing functional GABA(B) receptors on homomeric expression. GABA(B1,) although able to bind GABA, is retained within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) when expressed alone. In contrast, GABA(B2) is able to access the cell surface when expressed alone but does not couple efficiently to the appropriate effector systems or produce any detectable GABA-binding sites. In the present study, we have constructed chimeric and truncated GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) subunits to explore further GABA(B) receptor signaling and assembly. Removal of the entire C-terminal intracellular domain of GABA(B1) results in plasma membrane expression without the production of a functional GABA(B) receptor. However, coexpression of this truncated GABA(B1) subunit with either GABA(B2) or a truncated GABA(B2) subunit in which the C terminal has also been removed is capable of functional signaling via G-proteins. In contrast, transferring the entire C-terminal tail of GABA(B1) to GABA(B2) leads to the ER retention of the GABA(B2) subunit when expressed alone. These results indicate that the C terminal of GABA(B1) mediates the ER retention of this protein and that neither of the C-terminal tails of GABA(B1) or GABA(B2) is an absolute requirement for functional coupling of heteromeric receptors. Furthermore although GABA(B1) is capable of producing GABA-binding sites, GABA(B2) is of central importance in the functional coupling of heteromeric GABA(B) receptors to G-proteins and the subsequent activation of effector systems.

  19. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the BRI1 receptor kinase occurs via a posttranslational modification and is activated by the juxtamembrane domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man-Ho eOh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In metazoans, receptor kinases control many essential processes related to growth and development and response to the environment. The receptor kinases in plants and animals are structurally similar but evolutionarily distinct and thus while most animal receptor kinases are tyrosine kinases the plant receptor kinases are classified as serine/threonine kinases. One of the best studied plant receptor kinases is BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE 1 (BRI1, which functions in brassinosteroid (BR signaling. Consistent with its classification, BRI1 was shown in early studies to autophosphorylate in vitro exclusively on serine and threonine residues and subsequently numerous specific phosphoserine and phosphothreonine sites were identified. However, several sites of tyrosine autophosphorylation have recently been identified establishing that BRI1 is a dual-specificity kinase. This raises the paradox that BRI1 contains phosphotyrosine but was only observed to autophosphorylate on serine and threonine sites. In the present study, we demonstrate that autophosphorylation on threonine and tyrosine (and presumably serine residues is a post-translational modification, ruling out a co-translational mechanism that could explain the paradox. Moreover, we show that in general, autophosphorylation of the recombinant protein appears to be hierarchal and proceeds in the order: phosphoserine > phosphothreonine > phosphotyrosine. This may explain why tyrosine autophosphorylation was not observed in some studies. Finally, we also show that the juxtamembrane domain of BRI1 is an activator of the kinase domain, and that kinase specificity (serine/threonine versus tyrosine can be affected by residues outside of the kinase domain. This may have implications for identification of signature motifs that distinguish serine/threonine kinases from dual-specificity kinases.

  20. A Structural Model for the Membrane-Bound Form of the Juxtamembrane Domain of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Carlin, Cathleen R.; Sonnichsen, Frank D.

    2005-06-24

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family involved in the regulation of cellular proliferation and differentiation. Its juxtamembrane domain (JX), the region located between the transmembrane and kinase domains, plays important roles in receptor trafficking. Two sorting signals, a PXXP motif and a 658LL659 motif, are responsible for basolateral sorting in polarized epithelial cells, and a 679LL680 motif targets the ligand-activated receptor for lysosomal degradation. To understand the regulation of these signals, we characterized the structural properties of recombinant JX domain in aqueous solution and in dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) detergent. JX is inherently unstructured in aqueous solution, albeit a nascent helix encompasses the lysosomal sorting signal. In DPC micelles, structures derived from NMR data showed three amphipathic, helical segments. A large, internally inconsistent group of long range nuclear Overhauser effects suggest a close proximity of the helices, and the presence of significant conformational averaging. Models were determined for the average JX conformation using restraints representing the translational restriction due to micelle-surface adsorption, and the helix orientations were determined from residual dipolar couplings. Two equivalent average structural models were obtained that differ only in the relative orientation between first and second helices. In these models, the 658LL659 and 679LL680 motifs are located in the first and second helices and face the micelle surface, whereas the PXXP motif is located in a flexible helix-connecting region. The data suggest that the activity of these signals may be regulated by their membrane association and restricted accessibility in the intact receptor.

  1. The D2 period of collagen II contains a specific binding site for the human discoidin domain receptor, DDR2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitinger, Birgit; Steplewski, Andrzej; Fertala, Andrzej

    2004-12-03

    The human discoidin domain receptors (DDRs), DDR1 and DDR2, are expressed widely and, uniquely among receptor tyrosine kinases, activated by the extracellular matrix protein collagen. This activation is due to a direct interaction of collagen with the DDR discoidin domain. Here, we localised a specific DDR2 binding site on the triple-helical region of collagen II. Collagen II was found to be a much better ligand for DDR2 than for DDR1. As expected, DDR2 binding to collagen II was dependent on triple-helical collagen and was mediated by the DDR2 discoidin domain. Collagen II served as a potent stimulator of DDR2 autophosphorylation, the first step in transmembrane signalling. To map the DDR2 binding site(s) on collagen II, we used recombinant collagen II variants with specific deletions of one of the four repeating D periods. We found that the D2 period of collagen II was essential for DDR2 binding and receptor autophosphorylation, whereas the D3 and D4 periods were dispensable. The DDR2 binding site on collagen II was further defined by recombinant collagen II-like proteins consisting predominantly of tandem repeats of the D2 or D4 period. The D2 construct, but not the D4 construct, mediated DDR2 binding and receptor autophosphorylation, demonstrating that the D2 period of collagen II harbours a specific DDR2 recognition site. The discovery of a site-specific interaction of DDR2 with collagen II gives novel insight into the nature of the interaction of collagen II with matrix receptors.

  2. Crystal Structure of the Ligand Binding Suppressor Domain of Type 1 Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosanac, Ivan; Yamazaki, Haruka; Matsu-ura, Toru; Michikawa, Takayuki; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Ikura, Mitsuhiko (U. of Texas-SMED)

    2010-11-10

    Binding of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) to the amino-terminal region of IP{sub 3} receptor promotes Ca{sup 2+} release from the endoplasmic reticulum. Within the amino terminus, the first 220 residues directly preceding the IP{sub 3} binding core domain play a key role in IP{sub 3} binding suppression and regulatory protein interaction. Here we present a crystal structure of the suppressor domain of the mouse type 1 IP{sub 3} receptor at 1.8 {angstrom}. Displaying a shape akin to a hammer, the suppressor region contains a Head subdomain forming the {beta}-trefoil fold and an Arm subdomain possessing a helix-turn-helix structure. The conserved region on the Head subdomain appeared to interact with the IP{sub 3} binding core domain and is in close proximity to the previously proposed binding sites of Homer, RACK1, calmodulin, and CaBP1. The present study sheds light onto the mechanism underlying the receptor's sensitivity to the ligand and its communication with cellular signaling proteins.

  3. Characterization of the hormone-binding domain of the chicken c-erbA/thyroid hormone receptor protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz, A; Zenke, M; Gehring, U

    1988-01-01

    mutations present in the carboxy-terminal half of P75gag-v-erbA co-operate in abolishing hormone binding, and that the ligand-binding domain resides in a position analogous to that of steroid receptors. Furthermore, a point mutation that is located between the putative DNA and ligand-binding domains of P75......To identify and characterize the hormone-binding domain of the thyroid hormone receptor, we analyzed the ligand-binding capacities of proteins representing chimeras between the normal receptor and P75gag-v-erbA, the retrovirus-encoded form deficient in binding ligand. Our results show that several......gag-v-erbA and that renders it biologically inactive fails to affect hormone binding by the c-erbA protein. These results suggest that the mutation changed the ability of P75gag-v-erbA to affect transcription since it also had no effect on DNA binding. Our data also suggest that hormone...

  4. Expression of discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) extracellular domain in pichia pastoris and functional analysis in synovial fibroblasts and NIT3T3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Ding, Tianbing; Zhang, Jian; Su, Jin; Li, Fuyang; Liu, Xinping; Ma, Wenyu; Yao, Libo

    2006-10-01

    Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a kind of protein tyrosine kinases associated with cell proliferation and tumor metastasis, and collagen, identified as a ligand for DDR2, up-regulates matrix metallloproteinase 1 (MMP-1) and MMP-2 expression in cellular matrix. To investigate the roles of DDR2 in destruction of cartilage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and tumor metastasis, we tried to express extracellular domain of DDR2 fused with a His tag to increase protein solubility and facilitate purification (without signal peptide and transmembrane domain, designated DR) in Pichia pastoris, purify the expressed protein, and characterize its function, for purpose of future application as a specific DDR2 antagonist. Two clones of relative high expression of His-DR were obtained. After purification by a Ni-NTA (nitric-tri-acetic acid) chromatographic column, soluble fused His-DR over 90% purity were obtained. Competitive binding inhibition assay demonstrated that expressed His-DR could block the binding of DDR2 and natural DDR2 receptors on NIT3T3 and synovial cell surfaces. Results of RT-PCR, Western blotting, and gelatinase zymography showed that His-DR was capable of inhibiting MMP-1 and MMP-2 secretion from NIT3T3 cells and RA synoviocytes stimulated by collagen II. For MMP-1, the inhibitory effect was displayed at the levels of mRNA and protein, whereas for MMP-2 it was demonstrated at the level of protein physiological activity. All these findings suggested that the fused expressed His-DR inhibited the activity of natural DDR2, and relevant MMP-1 and MMP-2 expression in synoviocytes and NIH3T3 cells provoked by collagen II.

  5. Implications of Human Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 8 (TRPM8) Channel Gating from Menthol Binding Studies of the Sensing Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Parthasarathi; Hilton, Jacob K; Sisco, Nicholas J; Van Horn, Wade D

    2016-01-12

    The transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) ion channel is the primary cold sensor in humans. TRPM8 is gated by physiologically relevant cold temperatures and chemical ligands that induce cold sensations, such as the analgesic compound menthol. Characterization of TRPM8 ligand-gated channel activation will lead to a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that underlie TRPM8 function. Here, the direct binding of menthol to the isolated hTRPM8 sensing domain (transmembrane helices S1-S4) is investigated. These data are compared with two mutant sensing domain proteins, Y745H (S2 helix) and R842H (S4 helix), which have been previously identified in full length TRPM8 to be menthol insensitive. The data presented herein show that menthol specifically binds to the wild type, Y745H, and R842H TRPM8 sensing domain proteins. These results are the first to show that menthol directly binds to the TRPM8 sensing domain and indicates that Y745 and R842 residues, previously identified in functional studies as crucial to menthol sensitivity, do not affect menthol binding but instead alter coupling between the sensing domain and the pore domain.

  6. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the bacteriophage CUS-3 virion reveal a conserved coat protein I-domain but a distinct tailspike receptor-binding domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parent, Kristin N., E-mail: kparent@msu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0378 (United States); Tang, Jinghua; Cardone, Giovanni [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0378 (United States); Gilcrease, Eddie B. [University of Utah School of Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Immunology, Department of Pathology, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Janssen, Mandy E.; Olson, Norman H. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0378 (United States); Casjens, Sherwood R., E-mail: sherwood.casjens@path.utah.edu [University of Utah School of Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Immunology, Department of Pathology, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Baker, Timothy S., E-mail: tsb@ucsd.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0378 (United States); University of California, San Diego, Division of Biological Sciences, La Jolla, CA, 92093 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    CUS-3 is a short-tailed, dsDNA bacteriophage that infects serotype K1 Escherichia coli. We report icosahedrally averaged and asymmetric, three-dimensional, cryo-electron microscopic reconstructions of the CUS-3 virion. Its coat protein structure adopts the “HK97-fold” shared by other tailed phages and is quite similar to that in phages P22 and Sf6 despite only weak amino acid sequence similarity. In addition, these coat proteins share a unique extra external domain (“I-domain”), suggesting that the group of P22-like phages has evolved over a very long time period without acquiring a new coat protein gene from another phage group. On the other hand, the morphology of the CUS-3 tailspike differs significantly from that of P22 or Sf6, but is similar to the tailspike of phage K1F, a member of the extremely distantly related T7 group of phages. We conclude that CUS-3 obtained its tailspike gene from a distantly related phage quite recently. - Highlights: • Asymmetric and symmetric three-dimensional reconstructions of phage CUS-3 are presented. • CUS-3 major capsid protein has a conserved I-domain, which is found in all three categories of “P22-like phage”. • CUS-3 has very different tailspike receptor binding domain from those of P22 and Sf6. • The CUS-3 tailspike likely was acquired by horizontal gene transfer.

  7. Binding of spermine and ifenprodil to a purified, soluble regulatory domain of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Xia; Tomitori, Hideyuki; Mizuno, Satomi; Higashi, Kyohei; Füll, Christine; Fukiwake, Tomohide; Terui, Yusuke; Leewanich, Pathama; Nishimura, Kazuhiro; Toida, Toshihiko; Williams, Keith; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Igarashi, Kazuei

    2008-01-01

    The binding of spermine and ifenprodil to the amino terminal regulatory (R) domain of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor was studied using purified regulatory domains of the NR1, NR2A and NR2B subunits, termed NR1-R, NR2A-R and NR2B-R. The R domains were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified to near homogeneity. The Kd values for binding of [14C]spermine to NR1-R, NR2A-R and NR2B-R were 19, 140 and 33 µM, respectively. [3H]Ifenprodil bound to NR1-R (Kd, 0.18 µM) and NR2B-R (Kd, 0.21 µ...

  8. Ligand binding reduces SUMOylation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ activation function 1 (AF1 domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Diezko

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ is a ligand-activated nuclear receptor regulating adipogenesis, glucose homeostasis and inflammatory responses. The activity of PPARγ is controlled by post-translational modifications including SUMOylation and phosphorylation that affects its biological and molecular functions. Several important aspects of PPARγ SUMOylation including SUMO isoform-specificity and the impact of ligand binding on SUMOylation remain unresolved or contradictory. Here, we present a comprehensive study of PPARγ1 SUMOylation. We show that PPARγ1 can be modified by SUMO1 and SUMO2. Mutational analyses revealed that SUMOylation occurs exclusively within the N-terminal activation function 1 (AF1 domain predominantly at lysines 33 and 77. Ligand binding to the C-terminal ligand-binding domain (LBD of PPARγ1 reduces SUMOylation of lysine 33 but not of lysine 77. SUMOylation of lysine 33 and lysine 77 represses basal and ligand-induced activation by PPARγ1. We further show that lysine 365 within the LBD is not a target for SUMOylation as suggested in a previous report, but it is essential for full LBD activity. Our results suggest that PPARγ ligands negatively affect SUMOylation by interdomain communication between the C-terminal LBD and the N-terminal AF1 domain. The ability of the LBD to regulate the AF1 domain may have important implications for the evaluation and mechanism of action of therapeutic ligands that bind PPARγ.

  9. A point mutation in the extracellular domain activates LET-23, the Caenorhabditis elegans epidermal growth factor receptor homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, W S; Lesa, G M; Yannoukakos, D; Clandinin, T R; Schlessinger, J; Sternberg, P W

    1996-01-01

    The let-23 gene encodes a Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) necessary for vulval development. We have characterized a mutation of let-23 that activates the receptor and downstream signal transduction, leading to excess vulval differentiation. This mutation alters a conserved cysteine residue in the extracellular domain and is the first such point mutation in the EGFR subfamily of tyrosine kinases. Mutation of a different cysteine in the same subdomain causes a strong loss-of-function phenotype, suggesting that cysteines in this region are important for function and nonequivalent. Vulval precursor cells can generate either of two subsets of vulval cells (distinct fates) in response to sa62 activity. The fates produced depended on the copy number of the mutation, suggesting that quantitative differences in receptor activity influence the decision between these two fates. PMID:8552080

  10. Structure of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of human androgen receptor in complex with a selective modulator LGD2226

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Feng; Liu, Xiao-qin; Li, He; Liang, Kai-ni [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China); Miner, Jeffrey N.; Hong, Mei; Kallel, E. Adam; Oeveren, Arjan van; Zhi, Lin [Discovery Research, Ligand Pharmaceuticals Inc., 10275 Science Center Drive, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Jiang, Tao, E-mail: x-ray@sun5.ibp.ac.cn [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2006-11-01

    Crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain of androgen receptor in complex with LGD2226. The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-inducible steroid hormone receptor that mediates androgen action, determining male sexual phenotypes and promoting spermatogenesis. As the androgens play a dominant role in male sexual development and function, steroidal androgen agonists have been used clinically for some years. However, there is a risk of potential side effects and most steroidal androgens cannot be dosed orally, which limits the use of these substances. 1,2-Dihydro-6-N,N-bis(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) amino-4-trifluoromethyl-2-quinolinone (LGD2226) is a synthetic nonsteroidal ligand and a novel selective AR modulator. The crystal structure of the complex of LGD2226 with the androgen receptor ligand-binding domain (AR LBD) at 2.1 Å was solved and compared with the structure of the AR LBD–R1881 complex. It is hoped that this will aid in further explaining the selectivity of LGD2226 observed in in vitro and in vivo assays and in developing more selective and effective therapeutic agents.

  11. S cysteine-rich (SCR) binding domain analysis of the Brassica self-incompatibility S-locus receptor kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Benjamin P; Doughty, James

    2007-01-01

    Brassica self-incompatibility, a highly discriminating outbreeding mechanism, has become a paradigm for the study of plant cell-cell communications. When self-pollen lands on a stigma, the male ligand S cysteine-rich (SCR), which is present in the pollen coat, is transmitted to the female receptor, S-locus receptor kinase (SRK). SRK is a membrane-spanning serine/threonine receptor kinase present in the stigmatic papillar cell membrane. Haplotype-specific binding of SCR to SRK brings about pollen rejection. The extracellular receptor domain of SRK (eSRK) is responsible for binding SCR. Based on sequence homology, eSRK can be divided into three subdomains: B lectin-like, hypervariable, and PAN. Biochemical analysis of these subdomains showed that the hypervariable subdomain is responsible for most of the SCR binding capacity of eSRK, whereas the B lectin-like and PAN domains have little, if any, affinity for SCR. Fine mapping of the SCR binding region of SRK using a peptide array revealed a region of the hypervariable subdomain that plays a key role in binding the SCR molecule. We show that residues within the hypervariable subdomain define SRK binding and are likely to be involved in defining haplotype specificity.

  12. Internalization of LDL-receptor superfamily yolk-protein receptors during mosquito oogenesis involves transcriptional regulation of PTB-domain adaptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sanjay K; Jha, Anupma; Steinhauser, Amie L; Kokoza, Vladimir A; Washabaugh, Charles H; Raikhel, Alexander S; Foster, Woodbridge A; Traub, Linton M

    2008-04-15

    In the anautogenous disease vector mosquitoes Anopheles gambiae and Aedes aegypti, egg development is nutritionally controlled. A blood meal permits further maturation of developmentally repressed previtellogenic egg chambers. This entails massive storage of extraovarian yolk precursors by the oocyte, which occurs through a burst of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Yolk precursors are concentrated at clathrin-coated structures on the oolemma by two endocytic receptors, the vitellogenin and lipophorin receptors. Both these mosquito receptors are members of the low-density-lipoprotein-receptor superfamily that contain FxNPxY-type internalization signals. In mammals, this tyrosine-based signal is not decoded by the endocytic AP-2 adaptor complex directly. Instead, two functionally redundant phosphotyrosine-binding domain adaptors, Disabled 2 and the autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia protein (ARH) manage the internalization of the FxNPxY sorting signal. Here, we report that a mosquito ARH-like protein, which we designate trephin, possess similar functional properties to the orthologous vertebrate proteins despite engaging AP-2 in an atypical manner, and that mRNA expression in the egg chamber is strongly upregulated shortly following a blood meal. Temporally regulated trephin transcription and translation suggests a mechanism for controlling yolk uptake when vitellogenin and lipophorin receptors are expressed and clathrin coats operate in previtellogenic ovaries.

  13. Functional interactions of the AF-2 activation domain core region of the human androgen receptor with the amino-terminal domain and with the transcriptional coactivator TIF2 (transcriptional intermediary factor2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Berrevoets (Cor); P. Doesburg (Paul); K. Steketee (Karine); J. Trapman (Jan); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractPrevious studies in yeast and mammalian cells showed a functional interaction between the amino-terminal domain and the carboxy-terminal, ligand-binding domain (LBD) of the human androgen receptor (AR). In the present study, the AR subdomains involved in thi

  14. Increased Eps15 homology domain 1 and RAB11FIP3 expression regulate breast cancer progression via promoting epithelial growth factor receptor recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Dandan; Liang, Ya-Nan; Stepanova, A A; Liu, Yu; Li, Xiaobo; Wang, Letian; Zhang, Fengmin; Vasilyeva, N V

    2017-02-01

    Recent research indicates that the C-terminal Eps15 homology domain 1 is associated with epithelial growth factor receptor-mediated endocytosis recycling in non-small-cell lung cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical significance of Eps15 homology domain 1 gene expression in relation to phosphorylation of epithelial growth factor receptor expression in patients with breast cancer. Primary breast cancer samples from 306 patients were analyzed for Eps15 homology domain 1, RAB11FIP3, and phosphorylation of epithelial growth factor receptor expression via immunohistochemistry. The clinical significance was assessed via a multivariate Cox regression analysis, Kaplan-Meier curves, and the log-rank test. Eps15 homology domain 1 and phosphorylation of epithelial growth factor receptor were upregulated in 60.46% (185/306) and 53.92% (165/306) of tumor tissues, respectively, as assessed by immunohistochemistry. The statistical correlation analysis indicated that Eps15 homology domain 1 overexpression was positively correlated with the increases in phosphorylation of epithelial growth factor receptor ( r = 0.242, p homology domain 1 alone is a significant prognostic marker of breast cancer for the overall survival in the total, chemotherapy, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (-) groups. However, the use of combined expression of Eps15 homology domain 1 and phosphorylation of epithelial growth factor receptor markers is more effective for the disease-free survival in the overall population, chemotherapy, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (-) groups. Moreover, the combined markers are also significant prognostic markers of breast cancer in the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (+), estrogen receptor (+), and estrogen receptor (-) groups. Eps15 homology domain 1 has a tumor suppressor function, and the combined marker of Eps15 homology domain 1/phosphorylation of epithelial growth factor receptor expression was identified as

  15. Energetic modeling and single-molecule verification of dynamic regulation on receptor protein diffusion by actin corrals and lipid raft domains receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien Yu; Huang, Jung Y.; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2015-03-01

    To faithfully estimate a signal that varies in both space and time, the optimization strategy used by a live cell is to organize a collection of distributed and mobile receptors into a mobile active clustering. However, living eukaryotic cells are highly heterogeneous and stochastically dynamic. It is therefore important to develop an energetic model based on fundamental laws to verify that the underlying processes are energetically favorable. We developed an energetic model based on the generalized Langevin equation and the Cahn-Hilliard equation to simulate the diffusive behaviors of receptor proteins in the plasma membrane with a hierarchical structure of actin corrals, lipid domains, and receptor proteins. Single-molecule tracking data of EGFR acquired on live HeLa cells agrees with the simulation results. We discovered that after ligand binding, EGFR molecules move into lipid nanodomains. The transition rates between different diffusion states of liganded EGFR molecules are regulated by the lipid domains. Our method captures both the sensitivity of single-molecule processes, statistic accuracy of data analysis, and the hierarchical structure of plasma membranes.

  16. Preliminary Molecular Dynamic Simulations of the Estrogen Receptor Alpha Ligand Binding Domain from Antagonist to Apo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian E. Roitberg

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen receptors (ER are known as nuclear receptors. They exist in the cytoplasm of human cells and serves as a DNA binding transcription factor that regulates gene expression. However the estrogen receptor also has additional functions independent of DNA binding. The human estrogen receptor comes in two forms, alpha and beta. This work focuses on the alpha form of the estrogen receptor. The ERα is found in breast cancer cells, ovarian stroma cells, endometrium, and the hypothalamus. It has been suggested that exposure to DDE, a metabolite of DDT, and other pesticides causes conformational changes in the estrogen receptor. Before examining these factors, this work examines the protein unfolding from the antagonist form found in the 3ERT PDB crystal structure. The 3ERT PDB crystal structure has the estrogen receptor bound to the cancer drug 4-hydroxytamoxifen. The 4-hydroxytamoxifen ligand was extracted before the simulation, resulting in new conformational freedom due to absence of van der Waals contacts between the ligand and the receptor. The conformational changes that result expose the binding clef of the co peptide beside Helix 12 of the receptor forming an apo conformation. Two key conformations in the loops at either end of the H12 are produced resulting in the antagonist to apo conformation transformation. The results were produced over a 42ns Molecular Dynamics simulation using the AMBER FF99SB force field.

  17. Structural Basis of Native CXCL7 Monomer Binding to CXCR2 Receptor N-Domain and Glycosaminoglycan Heparin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron J. Brown

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available CXCL7, a chemokine highly expressed in platelets, orchestrates neutrophil recruitment during thrombosis and related pathophysiological processes by interacting with CXCR2 receptor and sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAG. CXCL7 exists as monomers and dimers, and dimerization (~50 μM and CXCR2 binding (~10 nM constants indicate that CXCL7 is a potent agonist as a monomer. Currently, nothing is known regarding the structural basis by which receptor and GAG interactions mediate CXCL7 function. Using solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy, we characterized the binding of CXCL7 monomer to the CXCR2 N-terminal domain (CXCR2Nd that constitutes a critical docking site and to GAG heparin. We found that CXCR2Nd binds a hydrophobic groove and that ionic interactions also play a role in mediating binding. Heparin binds a set of contiguous basic residues indicating a prominent role for ionic interactions. Modeling studies reveal that the binding interface is dynamic and that GAG adopts different binding geometries. Most importantly, several residues involved in GAG binding are also involved in receptor interactions, suggesting that GAG-bound monomer cannot activate the receptor. Further, this is the first study that describes the structural basis of receptor and GAG interactions of a native monomer of the neutrophil-activating chemokine family.

  18. Effect of receptor binding domain mutations on receptor binding and transmissibility of avian influenza H5N1 viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maines, Taronna R; Chen, Li-Mei; Van Hoeven, Neal;

    2011-01-01

    Although H5N1 influenza viruses have been responsible for hundreds of human infections, these avian influenza viruses have not fully adapted to the human host. The lack of sustained transmission in humans may be due, in part, to their avian-like receptor preference. Here, we have introduced...

  19. Isolation and characterization of an IgNAR variable domain specific for the human mitochondrial translocase receptor Tom70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttall, Stewart D; Krishnan, Usha V; Doughty, Larissa; Pearson, Kylie; Ryan, Michael T; Hoogenraad, Nicholas J; Hattarki, Meghan; Carmichael, Jennifer A; Irving, Robert A; Hudson, Peter J

    2003-09-01

    The new antigen receptor (IgNAR) from sharks is a disulphide bonded dimer of two protein chains, each containing one variable and five constant domains, and functions as an antibody. In order to assess the antigen-binding capabilities of isolated IgNAR variable domains (VNAR), we have constructed an in vitro library incorporating synthetic CDR3 regions of 15-18 residues in length. Screening of this library against the 60 kDa cytosolic domain of the 70 kDa outer membrane translocase receptor from human mitochondria (Tom70) resulted in one dominant antigen-specific clone (VNAR 12F-11) after four rounds of in vitro selection. VNAR 12F-11 was expressed into the Escherichia coli periplasm and purified by anti-FLAG affinity chromatography at yields of 3 mg x L(-1). Purified protein eluted from gel filtration columns as a single monomeric protein and CD spectrum analysis indicated correct folding into the expected beta-sheet conformation. Specific binding to Tom70 was demonstrated by ELISA and BIAcore (Kd = 2.2 +/- 0.31 x 10(-9) m-1) indicating that these VNAR domains can be efficiently displayed as bacteriophage libraries, and selected against target antigens with an affinity and stability equivalent to that obtained for other single domain antibodies. As an initial step in producing 'intrabody' variants of 12F-11, the impact of modifying or removing the conserved immunoglobulin intradomain disulphide bond was assessed. High affinity binding was only retained in the wild-type protein, which combined with our inability to affinity mature 12F-11, suggests that this particular VNAR is critically dependent upon precise CDR loop conformations for its binding affinity.

  20. The Membrane-anchoring Domain of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Ligands Dictates Their Ability to Operate in Juxtacrine Mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Jianying; Opresko, Lee; Chrisler, William B.; Orr, Galya; Quesenberry, Ryan D.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Wiley, H S.

    2005-06-01

    All ligands of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are synthesized as membrane-anchored precursors. Previous work has suggested that some ligands, such as EGF, must be proteolytically released to be active, whereas others, such as heparin binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) can function while still anchored to the membrane (i.e., juxtacrine signaling). To explore the structural basis for these differences in ligand activity, we engineered a series of membrane-anchored ligands in which the core, receptor-binding domain of EGF was combined with different domains of both EGF and HB-EGF. We found that ligands having the N-terminal extension of EGF could not bind to the EGFR, even when released from the membrane. Ligands lacking an N-terminal extension, but possessing the membrane-anchoring domain of EGF still required proteolytic release for activity, whereas ligands with the membrane anchoring domain of HB-EGF could elicit full biological activity while still membrane anchored. Ligands containing the HB-EGF membrane anchor, but lacking an N-terminal extension, activated EGFR during their transit through the Golgi apparatus . However, cell-mixing experiments and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) studies showed that juxtacrine signaling typically occurred in trans at the cell surface, at points of cell-cell contact. Our data suggest that the membrane-anchoring domain of ligands selectively controls their ability to participate in juxtacrine signaling and thus, only a subclass of EGFR ligands can act in a juxtacrine mode.

  1. Urokinase plasminogen activator cleaves its cell surface receptor releasing the ligand-binding domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer-Hansen, G; Rønne, E; Solberg, H

    1992-01-01

    -domain form, uPAR(2+3), lacking ligand-binding domain 1. Trypsin treatment showed that both variants are present on the outside of the cells. Addition to the culture medium of an anticatalytic monoclonal antibody to uPA inhibited the formation of the uPAR(2+3), indicating that uPA is involved in its...

  2. LysM domain receptor kinases regulating rhizobial Nod factor-induced infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limpens, E.H.M.; Franken, C.L.; Smit, P.E.J.; Willemse, J.J.; Bisseling, T.; Geurts, R.

    2003-01-01

    The rhizobial infection of legumes has the most stringent demand toward Nod factor structure of all host responses, and therefore a specific Nod factor entry receptor has been proposed. The SYM2 gene identfied in certain ecotypes of pea (Pisum sativum) is a good candidate for such an entry receptor.

  3. Conformational entropic maps of functional coupling domains in GPCR activation: A case study with beta2 adrenergic receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fan; Abrol, Ravinder; Goddard, William, III; Dougherty, Dennis

    2014-03-01

    Entropic effect in GPCR activation is poorly understood. Based on the recent solved structures, researchers in the GPCR structural biology field have proposed several ``local activating switches'' that consisted of a few number of conserved residues, but have long ignored the collective dynamical effect (conformational entropy) of a domain comprised of an ensemble of residues. A new paradigm has been proposed recently that a GPCR can be viewed as a composition of several functional coupling domains, each of which undergoes order-to-disorder or disorder-to-order transitions upon activation. Here we identified and studied these functional coupling domains by comparing the local entropy changes of each residue between the inactive and active states of the β2 adrenergic receptor from computational simulation. We found that agonist and G-protein binding increases the heterogeneity of the entropy distribution in the receptor. This new activation paradigm and computational entropy analysis scheme provides novel ways to design functionally modified mutant and identify new allosteric sites for GPCRs. The authors thank NIH and Sanofi for funding this project.

  4. Pyridoxal phosphate as a probe of the cytoplasmic domains of transmembrane proteins: Application to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Ramirez, B.; Martinez-Carrion, M. (Univ. of Missouri, Kansas City (USA))

    1989-06-13

    A novel procedure has been developed to specifically label the cytoplasmic domains of transmembrane proteins with the aldehyde pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP). Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor (AcChR) vesicles were loaded with ({sup 3}H)pyridoxine 5-phosphate (({sup 3}H)PNP) and pyridoxine-5-phosphate oxidase, followed by intravesicular enzymatic oxidation of ({sup 3}H)PNP at 37{degree}C in the presence of externally added cytochrome c as a scavenger of possible leaking PLP product. The four receptor subunits were labeled whether the reaction was carried out on the internal surface or separately designed to mark the external one. On the other hand, the relative pyridoxylation of the subunits differed in both cases, reflecting differences in accessible lysyl residues in each side of the membrane. Even though there are no large differences in the total lysine content among the subunits and there are two copies of the {alpha}-subunit, internal surface labeling by PLP was greatest for the highest molecular weight ({delta}) subunit, reinforcing the concept that the four receptor subunits are transmembranous and may protrude into the cytoplasmic face in a fashion that is proportional to their subunit molecular weight. Yet, the labeling data do not fit well to any of the models proposed for AcChR subunit folding. The method described can be used for selective labeling of the cytoplasmic domains of transmembrane proteins in sealed membrane vesicles.

  5. The matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-3 cleaves laminin receptor at two distinct sites between the transmembrane domain and laminin binding sequence within the extracellular domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tosikazu AMANO; Olivia KWAK; Liezhen FU; Anastasia MARSHAK; Yun-Bo SHI

    2005-01-01

    The matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) stromelysin-3 (ST3) has long been implicated to play an important role in extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and cell fate determination during normal and pathological processes. However,like other MMPs, the molecular basis of ST3 function in vivo remains unclear due to the lack of information on its physiological substrates. Furthermore, ST3 has only weak activities toward all tested ECM proteins. Using thyroid hormone-dependent Xenopus laevis metamorphosis as a model, we demonstrated previously that ST3 is important for apoptosis and tissue morphogenesis during intestinal remodeling. Here, we used yeast two-hybrid screen with mRNAs from metamorphosing tadpoles to identify potential substrate of ST3 during development. We thus isolated the 37 kd laminin receptor precursor (LR). We showed that LR binds to ST3 in vitro and can be cleaved by ST3 at two sites,distinct from where other MMPs cleave. Through peptide sequencing, we determined that the two cleavage sites are in the extracellular domain between the transmembrane domain and laminin binding sequence. Furthermore, we demonstrated that these cleavage sites are conserved in human LR. These results together with high levels of human LR and ST3 expression in carcinomas suggest that LR is a likely in vivo substrate of ST3 and that its cleavage by ST3 may alter cell-extracellular matrix interaction, thus, playing a role in mediating the effects of ST3 on cell fate and behavior observed during development and pathogenesis.

  6. Molecular analysis of collagen binding by the human discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2. Identification of collagen binding sites in DDR2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitinger, Birgit

    2003-05-09

    The widely expressed mammalian discoidin domain receptors (DDRs), DDR1 and DDR2, are unique among receptor tyrosine kinases in that they are activated by the extracellular matrix protein collagen. Various collagen types bind to and activate the DDRs, but the molecular details of collagen recognition have not been well defined. In this study, recombinant extracellular domains of DDR1 and DDR2 were produced to explore DDR-collagen binding in detail. In solid phase assays, both DDRs bound collagen I with high affinity. DDR1 recognized collagen I only as a dimeric and not as a monomeric construct, indicating a requirement for receptor dimerization in the DDR1-collagen interaction. The DDRs contain a discoidin homology domain in their extracellular domains, and the isolated discoidin domain of DDR2 bound collagen I with high affinity. Furthermore, the discoidin domain of DDR2, but not of DDR1, was sufficient for transmembrane receptor signaling. To map the collagen binding site within the discoidin domain of DDR2, mutant constructs were created, in which potential surface-exposed loops in DDR2 were exchanged for the corresponding loops of functionally unrelated discoidin domains. Three spatially adjacent surface loops within the DDR2 discoidin domain were found to be critically involved in collagen binding of the isolated DDR2 extracellular domain. In addition, the same loops were required for collagen-dependent receptor activation. It is concluded that the loop region opposite to the polypeptide chain termini of the DDR2 discoidin domain constitutes the collagen recognition site.

  7. Primary photophysics of the FMN binding LOV2 domain of the plant blue light receptor phototropin of Avena sativa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüttrigkeit, Tanja A.; Kompa, Christian K.; Salomon, Michael; Rüdiger, Wolfhart; Michel-Beyerle, Maria E.

    2003-11-01

    The temporal evolution of the initially excited singlet state of flavine mononucleotide, which is the cofactor in the LOV2 domain of the blue photoreceptor phototropin, has been studied in picosecond time-resolved fluorescence and femtosecond time-resolved absorption experiments. In the LOV2-WT protein of Avena sativa singlet-triplet intersystem crossing proceeding within 2.3 ns is the primary process which increases the triplet yield by a factor of 1.23 as compared to a mutant where cysteine 39 is replaced by alanine. This flavin triplet state is responsible for the formation of a cysteinyl-flavin adduct which triggers the unique photocycle of the LOV2 domain and thus the sensoric function of the blue light receptor phototropin.

  8. A second disulfide bridge from the N-terminal domain to extracellular loop 2 dampens receptor activity in GPR39

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storjohann, Laura; Holst, Birgitte; Schwartz, Thue W

    2008-01-01

    A highly conserved feature across all families of 7TM receptors is a disulfide bridge between a Cys residue located at the extracellular end of transmembrane segment III (TM-III) and one in extracellular loop 2 (ECL-2). The zinc sensor GPR39 contains four Cys residues in the extracellular domains....... By using mutagenesis, treatment with the reducing agent TCEP, and a labeling procedure for free sulfhydryl groups, we identify the pairing of these Cys residues in two disulfide bridges: the prototypical bridge between Cys (108) in TM-III and Cys (210) in ECL-2 and a second disulfide bridge connecting Cys...... (11) in the N-terminal domain with Cys (191) in ECL-2. Disruption of the conserved disulfide bond by mutagenesis greatly reduced the level of cell surface expression and eliminated agonist-induced increases in inositol phosphate production but surprisingly enhanced constitutive signaling. Disruption...

  9. Targeting of Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2) Prevents Myofibroblast Activation and Neovessel Formation During Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hu; Bian, Huan; Bu, Xin; Zhang, Shuya; Zhang, Pan; Yu, Jiangtian; Lai, Xiaofeng; Li, Di; Zhu, Chuchao; Yao, Libo; Su, Jin

    2016-10-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a lethal human disease with short survival time and few treatment options. Herein, we demonstrated that discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2), a receptor tyrosine kinase that predominantly transduces signals from fibrillar collagens, plays a critical role in the induction of fibrosis and angiogenesis in the lung. In vitro cell studies showed that DDR2 can synergize the actions of both transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and fibrillar collagen to stimulate lung fibroblasts to undergo myofibroblastic changes and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. In addition, we confirmed that late treatment of the injured mice with specific siRNA against DDR2 or its kinase inhibitor exhibited therapeutic efficacy against lung fibrosis. Thus, this study not only elucidated novel mechanisms by which DDR2 controls the development of pulmonary fibrosis, but also provided candidate target for the intervention of this stubborn disease.

  10. Distinct protein domains and expression patterns confer divergent axon guidance functions for Drosophila Robo receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzweck, Bettina; Brankatschk, Marko; Dickson, Barry J

    2010-02-05

    The orthogonal array of axon pathways in the Drosophila CNS is constructed in part under the control of three Robo family axon guidance receptors: Robo1, Robo2 and Robo3. Each of these receptors is responsible for a distinct set of guidance decisions. To determine the molecular basis for these functional specializations, we used homologous recombination to create a series of 9 "robo swap" alleles: expressing each of the three Robo receptors from each of the three robo loci. We demonstrate that the lateral positioning of longitudinal axon pathways relies primarily on differences in gene regulation, not distinct combinations of Robo proteins as previously thought. In contrast, specific features of the Robo1 and Robo2 proteins contribute to their distinct functions in commissure formation. These specializations allow Robo1 to prevent crossing and Robo2 to promote crossing. These data demonstrate how diversification of expression and structure within a single family of guidance receptors can shape complex patterns of neuronal wiring.

  11. Crystal structures of ryanodine receptor SPRY1 and tandem-repeat domains reveal a critical FKBP12 binding determinant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuchi, Zhiguang; Yuen, Siobhan M Wong King; Lau, Kelvin; Underhill, Ainsley Q; Cornea, Razvan L; Fessenden, James D; Van Petegem, Filip

    2015-08-06

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) form calcium release channels located in the membranes of the sarcoplasmic and endoplasmic reticulum. RyRs play a major role in excitation-contraction coupling and other Ca(2+)-dependent signalling events, and consist of several globular domains that together form a large assembly. Here we describe the crystal structures of the SPRY1 and tandem-repeat domains at 1.2-1.5 Å resolution, which reveal several structural elements not detected in recent cryo-EM reconstructions of RyRs. The cryo-EM studies disagree on the position of SPRY domains, which had been proposed based on homology modelling. Computational docking of the crystal structures, combined with FRET studies, show that the SPRY1 domain is located next to FK506-binding protein (FKBP). Molecular dynamics flexible fitting and mutagenesis experiments suggest a hydrophobic cluster within SPRY1 that is crucial for FKBP binding. A RyR1 disease mutation, N760D, appears to directly impact FKBP binding through interfering with SPRY1 folding.

  12. Clinical and Pharmacotherapeutic Relevance of the Double-Chain Domain of the Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blocker Olmesartan

    OpenAIRE

    Kiya, Yoshihiro; Miura, Shin-ichiro; Fujino, Masahiro; Imaizumi, Satoshi; Karnik, Sadashiva S.; Saku, Keijiro

    2010-01-01

    We previously reported that the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor blocker (ARB) olmesartan has two important interactions to evoke inverse agonism (IA). We refer to these interactions as the “double-chain domain (DCD).” Since the clinical pharmacotherapeutic relevance of olmesartan is still unclear, we examined these effects in rats and humans. We analyzed the effects at an advanced stage of renal insufficiency in Dahl salt-sensitive hypertensive rats (Study 1). Rats were fed a high-salt d...

  13. Molecular determinants and interaction data of cyclic peptide inhibitor with the extracellular domain of TrkB receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Chitranshi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available TrkB is a high affinity receptor for the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and its phosphorylation stimulates activation of several intracellular signalling pathways linked to cellular growth, differentiation and maintenance. Identification of various activators and inhibitors of the TrkB receptor and greater understanding their binding mechanisms is critical to elucidate the biochemical and pharmacological pathways and analyse various protein crystallization studies. The data presented here is related to the research article entitled “Brain Derived neurotrophic factor is involved in the regulation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β signalling” [1]. Cyclotraxin B (CTXB is a disulphide bridge linked cyclic peptide molecule that interacts with TrkB receptor and inhibits the BDNF/TrkB downstream signalling. This article reports for the first time binding mechanism and interaction parameters of CTXB with the TrkB receptor. The molecular model of CTXB has been generated and it’s docking with TrkB domain carried out to determine the critical residues involved in the protein peptide interaction.

  14. L1CAM Binds ErbB Receptors through Ig-Like Domains Coupling Cell Adhesion and Neuregulin Signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijota-Martinez, Carmen; Lakomá, Jarmila; Baars, Sigrid; Garcia-Alonso, Luis; Cabedo, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    During nervous system development different cell-to-cell communication mechanisms operate in parallel guiding migrating neurons and growing axons to generate complex arrays of neural circuits. How such a system works in coordination is not well understood. Cross-regulatory interactions between different signalling pathways and redundancy between them can increase precision and fidelity of guidance systems. Immunoglobulin superfamily proteins of the NCAM and L1 families couple specific substrate recognition and cell adhesion with the activation of receptor tyrosine kinases. Thus it has been shown that L1CAM-mediated cell adhesion promotes the activation of the EGFR (erbB1) from Drosophila to humans. Here we explore the specificity of the molecular interaction between L1CAM and the erbB receptor family. We show that L1CAM binds physically erbB receptors in both heterologous systems and the mammalian developing brain. Different Ig-like domains located in the extracellular part of L1CAM can support this interaction. Interestingly, binding of L1CAM to erbB enhances its response to neuregulins. During development this may synergize with the activation of erbB receptors through L1CAM homophilic interactions, conferring diffusible neuregulins specificity for cells or axons that interact with the substrate through L1CAM. PMID:22815787

  15. Review of the Third Domain Receptor Binding Fragment of Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP): Plausible Binding of AFP to Lysophospholipid Receptor Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizejewski, G J

    2016-01-31

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is a 69 kD fetal- and tumor-associated single-chain glycoprotein belonging to the albuminoid gene family. AFP functions as a carrier/transport molecule as well as a growth regulator and has been utilized as a clinical biomarker for both fetal defects and cancer growth. Lysophospholipids (LPLs) are plasma membrane-derived bioactive lipid signaling mediators composed of a small molecular weight single acyl carbon chain (palmitic, oleic acid) attached to a polar headgroup; they range in molecular mass from 250-750 daltons. The LPLs consist of either sphingosine-1-phosphate or lysophosphatidic acid, and mostly their choline, ethanolamine, serine or inositol derivatives. They are present only in vertebrates. These bioactive paracrine lipid mediators are ubiquitously distributed in tissues and are released from many different cell types (platelets, macrophages, monocytes, etc.) involved in developmental, physiological, and pathological processes. The LPLs bind to four different classes of G-protein coupled receptors described herein which transduce a multiple of cell effects encompassing activities such as morphogenesis, neural development, angiogenesis, and carcinogenesis. The identification of potential binding sites of LPL receptors on the AFP third domain receptor binding fragment were derived by computer modeling analysis. It is conceivable, but not proven, that AFP might bind not only to the LPL receptors, but also to LPLs themselves since AFP binds medium and long chain fatty acids. It is proposed that some of the activities ascribed to AFP in the past might be due in part to the presence of bound LPLs and/or their receptors.

  16. Deletion of the sequence encoding the tail domain of the bone morphogenetic protein type 2 receptor reveals a bone morphogenetic protein 7-specific gain of function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyton, Patricio A; Beppu, Hideyuki; Pappas, Alexandra; Martyn, Trejeeve M; Derwall, Matthias; Baron, David M; Galdos, Rita; Bloch, Donald B; Bloch, Kenneth D

    2013-01-01

    The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) type II receptor (BMPR2) has a long cytoplasmic tail domain whose function is incompletely elucidated. Mutations in the tail domain of BMPR2 are found in familial cases of pulmonary arterial hypertension. To investigate the role of the tail domain of BMPR2 in BMP signaling, we generated a mouse carrying a Bmpr2 allele encoding a non-sense mediated decay-resistant mutant receptor lacking the tail domain of Bmpr2. We found that homozygous mutant mice died during gastrulation, whereas heterozygous mice grew normally without developing pulmonary arterial hypertension. Using pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PaSMC) from heterozygous mice, we determined that the mutant receptor was expressed and retained its ability to transduce BMP signaling. Heterozygous PaSMCs exhibited a BMP7‑specific gain of function, which was transduced via the mutant receptor. Using siRNA knockdown and cells from conditional knockout mice to selectively deplete BMP receptors, we observed that the tail domain of Bmpr2 inhibits Alk2‑mediated BMP7 signaling. These findings suggest that the tail domain of Bmpr2 is essential for normal embryogenesis and inhibits Alk2‑mediated BMP7 signaling in PaSMCs.

  17. Solution behavior of the intrinsically disordered N-terminal domain of the Retinoid X Receptor alpha in the context of full-length protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluso-Iltis, Carole; Kieffer, Bruno; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Rochel, Natacha

    2016-01-01

    Retinoid X receptors (RXRs) are transcription factors with important functions in embryonic development, metabolic processes, differentiation and apoptosis. A particular feature of RXRs is their ability to act as obligatory heterodimerisation partners of class II nuclear receptors. At the same time, these receptors are also able to form homodimers that bind to direct repeat (DR1) hormone response elements. Since the discovery of RXRs, most of the studies focused on its ligand binding and DNA-binding domains, while its N-terminal domain (NTD) harboring a ligand-independent activation function remained poorly characterized. Here, we investigated the solution properties of the NTD domain of RXRα alone and in the context of the full-length receptor using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. We report the solution structure of the full-length homodimeric RXRα on DNA and show that the NTD remains highly flexible within this complex. PMID:26937780

  18. Activation of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 1 Involves Interactions between Its N-Terminal Region and Its Kinase Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chih-chin; Orban, Tivadar; Jastrzebska, Beata; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Tesmer, John J.G. (Case Western); (Michigan)

    2012-03-16

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to initiate receptor desensitization. In addition to the canonical phosphoacceptor site of the kinase domain, activated receptors bind to a distinct docking site that confers higher affinity and activates GRKs allosterically. Recent mutagenesis and structural studies support a model in which receptor docking activates a GRK by stabilizing the interaction of its 20-amino acid N-terminal region with the kinase domain. This interaction in turn stabilizes a closed, more active conformation of the enzyme. To investigate the importance of this interaction for the process of GRK activation, we first validated the functionality of the N-terminal region in rhodopsin kinase (GRK1) by site-directed mutagenesis and then introduced a disulfide bond to cross-link the N-terminal region of GRK1 with its specific binding site on the kinase domain. Characterization of the kinetic and biophysical properties of the cross-linked protein showed that disulfide bond formation greatly enhances the catalytic efficiency of the peptide phosphorylation, but receptor-dependent phosphorylation, Meta II stabilization, and inhibition of transducin activation were unaffected. These data indicate that the interaction of the N-terminal region with the kinase domain is important for GRK activation but does not dictate the affinity of GRKs for activated receptors.

  19. CHASE domain-containing receptors play an essential role in the cytokinin response of the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Schwartzenberg, Klaus; Lindner, Ann-Cathrin; Gruhn, Njuscha; Šimura, Jan; Novák, Ondřej; Strnad, Miroslav; Gonneau, Martine; Nogué, Fabien; Heyl, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    While the molecular basis for cytokinin action is quite well understood in flowering plants, little is known about the cytokinin signal transduction in early diverging land plants. The genome of the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens (Hedw.) B.S. encodes three classical cytokinin receptors, the CHASE domain-containing histidine kinases, CHK1, CHK2, and CHK3. In a complementation assay with protoplasts of receptor-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana as well as in cytokinin binding assays, we found evidence that CHK1 and CHK2 receptors can function in cytokinin perception. Using gene targeting, we generated a collection of CHK knockout mutants comprising single (Δchk1, Δchk2, Δchk3), double (Δchk1,2, Δchk1,3, Δchk2,3), and triple (Δchk1,2,3) mutants. Mutants were characterized for their cytokinin response and differentiation capacities. While the wild type did not grow on high doses of cytokinin (1 µM benzyladenine), the Δchk1,2,3 mutant exhibited normal protonema growth. Bud induction assays showed that all three cytokinin receptors contribute to the triggering of budding, albeit to different extents. Furthermore, while the triple mutant showed no response in this bioassay, the remaining mutants displayed budding responses in a diverse manner to different types and concentrations of cytokinins. Determination of cytokinin levels in mutants showed no drastic changes for any of the cytokinins; thus, in contrast to Arabidopsis, revealing only small impacts of cytokinin signaling on homeostasis. In summary, our study provides a first insight into the molecular action of cytokinin in an early diverging land plant and demonstrates that CHK receptors play an essential role in bud induction and gametophore development.

  20. Receptor-binding domain of SARS-Cov spike protein: Soluble expression in purification and functional characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Chen; Lin Miao; Jia-Ming Li; Yan-Ying Li; Qing-Yu Zhu; Chang-Lin Zhou; Hong-Qing Fang; Hui-Peng Chen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To find a soluble and functional recombinant receptor-binding domain of severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-Cov), and to analyze its receptor binding ability.METHODS: Three fusion tags (glutathione S-transferase,GST; thioredoxin, Trx; maltose-binding protein, MBP),which preferably contributes to increasing solubility and to facilitating the proper folding of heteroprotein, were used to acquire the soluble and functional expression of RBD protein in Escherichia coli( BL21( DE3 ) and Rosetta-gamiB(DE3) strains). The receptor binding ability of the purified soluble RBD protein was then detected by ELISA and flow cytometry assay.RESULTS: RBD of SARS-Cov spike protein was expressed as inclusion body when fused as TrxA tag form in both BL21 (DE3) and Rosetta-gamiB (DE3) under many different cultures and induction conditions. And there was no visible expression band on SDS-PAGE when RBD was expressed as MBP tagged form. Only GST tagged RBD was soluble expressed in BL21(DE3), and the protein was purified by AKTA Prime Chromatography system. The ELISA data anti-RBD mouse monoclonal antibody 1A5. Further flow cytometry assay demonstrated the high efficiency of RBD's binding ability to ACE2 (angiotensin-converting enzyme 2)positive Vero E6 cell. And ACE2 was proved as a cellular receptor that meditated an initial-affinity interaction with SARS-Cov spike protein. The geometrical mean of GST and respectively.CONCLUSION: In this paper, we get sufficient soluble N terminal GST tagged RBD protein expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3); data from ELISA and flow cytometry assay demonstrate that the recombinant protein is functional and binding to ACE2 positive Vero E6 cell efficiently. And the recombinant RBD derived from E. coli can be used to developing subunit vaccine to block S protein binding with receptor and to neutralizing SARS-Cov infection.

  1. Structural basis for the interaction of the free SH2 domain EAT-2 with SLAM receptors in hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morra, M; Lu, J; Poy, F; Martin, M; Sayos, J; Calpe, S; Gullo, C; Howie, D; Rietdijk, S; Thompson, A; Coyle, A J; Denny, C; Yaffe, M B; Engel, P; Eck, M J; Terhorst, C

    2001-11-01

    The T and natural killer (NK) cell-specific gene SAP (SH2D1A) encodes a 'free SH2 domain' that binds a specific tyrosine motif in the cytoplasmic tail of SLAM (CD150) and related cell surface proteins. Mutations in SH2D1A cause the X-linked lymphoproliferative disease, a primary immunodeficiency. Here we report that a second gene encoding a free SH2 domain, EAT-2, is expressed in macrophages and B lympho cytes. The EAT-2 structure in complex with a phosphotyrosine peptide containing a sequence motif with Tyr281 of the cytoplasmic tail of CD150 is very similar to the structure of SH2D1A complexed with the same peptide. This explains the high affinity of EAT-2 for the pTyr motif in the cytoplasmic tail of CD150 but, unlike SH2D1A, EAT-2 does not bind to non-phosphorylated CD150. EAT-2 binds to the phosphorylated receptors CD84, CD150, CD229 and CD244, and acts as a natural inhibitor, which interferes with the recruitment of the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2. We conclude that EAT-2 plays a role in controlling signal transduction through at least four receptors expressed on the surface of professional antigen-presenting cells.

  2. Structural basis for antibody recognition in the receptor-binding domains of toxins A and B from Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Tomohiko; Eugenio, Luiz; Schorr, Melissa; Hussack, Greg; Tanha, Jamshid; Kitova, Elena N; Klassen, John S; Ng, Kenneth K S

    2014-01-24

    Clostridium difficile infection is a serious and highly prevalent nosocomial disease in which the two large, Rho-glucosylating toxins TcdA and TcdB are the main virulence factors. We report for the first time crystal structures revealing how neutralizing and non-neutralizing single-domain antibodies (sdAbs) recognize the receptor-binding domains (RBDs) of TcdA and TcdB. Surprisingly, the complexes formed by two neutralizing antibodies recognizing TcdA do not show direct interference with the previously identified carbohydrate-binding sites, suggesting that neutralization of toxin activity may be mediated by mechanisms distinct from steric blockage of receptor binding. A camelid sdAb complex also reveals the molecular structure of the TcdB RBD for the first time, facilitating the crystallization of a strongly negatively charged protein fragment that has resisted previous attempts at crystallization and structure determination. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry measurements confirm the stoichiometries of sdAbs observed in the crystal structures. These studies indicate how key epitopes in the RBDs from TcdA and TcdB are recognized by sdAbs, providing molecular insights into toxin structure and function and providing for the first time a basis for the design of highly specific toxin-specific therapeutic and diagnostic agents.

  3. Heteromerization of ligand binding domains of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor requires both coagonists, L-glutamate and glycine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheriyan, John; Mezes, Christina; Zhou, Ning; Balsara, Rashna D; Castellino, Francis J

    2015-01-27

    NMDA receptors (NMDAR) are voltage- and glutamate-gated heteromeric ion channels found at excitatory neuronal synapses, the functions of which are to mediate the mechanisms of brain plasticity and, thereby, its higher order functions. In addition to Glu, the activation of these heteromeric receptors requires Gly or d-Ser as a coagonist. However, it is not fully known as to why coagonism is required for the opening of NMDAR ion channels. We show herein that the ligand binding domains (LBD) of the GluN1 and GluN2A subunits of the NMDAR heterodimerize only when both coagonists, Glu and Gly/d-Ser, bind to their respective sites on GluN2 and GluN1. In the agonist-free state, these domains form homomeric interactions, which are disrupted by binding of their respective agonists. Also, in a heteromer formed by the LBDs, GluN2A is more sensitized to bind Glu, while the affinity of Gly for GluN1 remains unchanged. We thus provide direct evidence to show that coagonism is necessary for heteromeric pairing of LBDs, which is an essential step in forming functional ion channels in NMDARs.

  4. Betaglycan has two independent domains required for high affinity TGF-β binding: proteolytic cleavage separates the domains and inactivates the neutralizing activity of the soluble receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Valentín; Vilchis-Landeros, M. Magdalena; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Huang, Tao; Villarreal, Maria M.; Hinck, Andrew P.; López-Casillas, Fernando; Montiel, Jose-Luis

    2009-01-01

    Summary Betaglycan is a co-receptor for members of the TGF-β superfamily. Mutagenesis has identified two ligand binding regions, one at the membrane-distal and the other at the membrane-proximal half of the betaglycan ectodomain. Here we show that partial plasmin digestion of soluble betaglycan produces two proteolysis-resistant fragments of 45 and 55 kDa, consistent with the predicted secondary structure, which indicates an intervening non-structured linker region separating the highly structured N- and C-terminal domains. Amino terminal sequencing indicates that the 45 and 55 kDa fragments correspond, respectively, to the membrane-distal and -proximal regions. Plasmin treatment of membrane betaglycan results in the production of equivalent proteolysis-resistant fragments. The 45 and 55 kDa fragments, as well as their recombinant soluble counterparts, Sol Δ10 and Sol Δ11, bind TGF-β, nonetheless, compared to intact soluble betaglycan, have severely diminished ability to block TGF-β activity. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis indicates that soluble betaglycan has Kds in the low nanomolar range for the three TGF-β isoforms, while those for Sol Δ10 and Sol Δ11 are 1 – 2 orders of magnitude higher. SPR analysis further shows that the Kds of Sol Δ11 are not changed in the presence of Sol Δ10, indicating that the high affinity of soluble betaglycan is a consequence of tethering of the domains together. Overall, these results, suggest that betaglycan ectodomain exhibits a bi-lobular structure in which each lobule folds independently, binds TGF-β through distinct non-overlapping interfaces, and that linker modification may be an approach to improve soluble betaglycan’s TGF-β neutralizing activity. PMID:19842711

  5. Identification of MDP (muramyl dipeptide)-binding key domains in NOD2 (nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain-2) receptor of Labeo rohita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharana, Jitendra; Swain, Banikalyan; Sahoo, Bikash R; Dikhit, Manas R; Basu, Madhubanti; Mahapatra, Abhijit S; Jayasankar, Pallipuram; Samanta, Mrinal

    2013-08-01

    In lower eukaryotes-like fish, innate immunity contributed by various pattern recognition receptor (PRR) plays an essential role in protection against diseases. Nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-2 is a cytoplasmic PRR that recognizes MDP (muramyl dipeptide) of the Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria as ligand and activates signalling to induce innate immunity. Hypothesizing a similar NOD2 signalling pathway of higher eukaryotes, the peripheral blood leucocytes (PBLs) of rohu (Labeo rohita) was stimulated with MDP. The data of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed MDP-mediated inductive expression of NOD2 and its down-stream molecule RICK/RIP2 (receptor-interacting serine-threonine protein kinase-2). This observation suggested the existence of MDP-binding sites in rohu NOD2 (rNOD2). To investigate it, 3D model of ligand-binding leucine-rich repeat (LRR) region of rNOD2 (rNOD2-LRR) was constructed following ab initio and threading approaches in I-TASSER web server. Structural refinement of the model was performed by energy minimization, and MD (molecular dynamics) simulation was performed in GROMACS (Groningen Machine for Chemical Simulations). The refined model of rNOD2-LRR was validated through SAVES, ProSA, ProQ, WHAT IF and MolProbity servers, and molecular docking with MDP was carried out in GOLD 4.1. The result of docking identified LRR3-7 comprising Lys820, Phe821, Asn822, Arg847, Gly849, Trp877, Trp901 and Trp931 as MDP-binding critical amino acids in rNOD2. This is the first study in fish to provide an insight into the 3D structure of NOD2-LRR region and its important motifs that are expected to be engaged in MDP binding and innate immunity.

  6. Sorting by the cytoplasmic domain of the amyloid precursor protein binding receptor SorLA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten S; Gustafsen, Camilla; Madsen, Peder

    2007-01-01

    -formation with the amyloid precursor protein it downregulates generation of Alzheimer's disease-associated Abeta-peptide. The receptor is mainly located in vesicles, suggesting a function in protein sorting and transport. Here we examined SorLA's trafficking using full-length and chimeric receptors and find that its...... established that the AP-1 adaptor complex is essential to SorLA's transport between Golgi membranes and endosomes. Our results further implicate the GGA proteins in SorLA trafficking and provide evidence that SNX1 and Vps35, as parts of the retromer complex or possibly in a separate context, are engaged...

  7. Crystallographic Analysis of Murine Constitutive Androstane Receptor Ligand-Binding Domain Complexed with 5[alpha]-androst-16-en-3[alpha]-ol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent, J.; Shan, L.; Fan, M.; Brunzelle, J.S.; Forman, B.M.; Fernandez, E.J. (Tennessee-K); (NWU); (CHNMC)

    2010-03-08

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. In contrast to classical nuclear receptors, which possess small-molecule ligand-inducible activity, CAR exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity in the apparent absence of ligand. CAR is among the most important transcription factors; it coordinately regulates the expression of microsomal cytochrome P450 genes and other drug-metabolizing enzymes. The murine CAR ligand-binding domain (LBD) was coexpressed with the steroid receptor coactivator protein (SRC-1) receptor-interacting domain (RID) in Escherichia coli. The mCAR LBD subunit was purified away from SRC-1 by affinity, anion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography, crystallized with androstenol and the structure of the complex determined by molecular replacement.

  8. Molecular Aspects of HTLV-1 Entry: Functional Domains of the HTLV-1 Surface Subunit (SU and Their Relationships to the Entry Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Lambert

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The initial step in retroviral infection involves specific interactions between viral envelope proteins (Env and specific receptors on the surface of target cells. For many years, little was known about the entry receptors for HTLV-1. During this time, however, functional domains of the HTLV-1 Env were identified by analyzing the effects of neutralizing antibodies and specific mutations in Env on HTLV-1 infectivity. More recent studies have revealed that HTLV-1 infectivity involves interactions with three different molecules: heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG, the VEGF-165 receptor Neuropilin 1 (NRP-1 and glucose transporter type 1 (GLUT1. Here, we revisit previously published data on the functional domains of Env in regard to the recent knowledge acquired about this multi-receptor complex. We also discuss the similarities and differences between HTLV-1 and other deltaretroviruses in regards to receptor usage.

  9. The 15 SCR flexible extracellular domains of human complement receptor type 2 can mediate multiple ligand and antigen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Hannah E; Asokan, Rengasamy; Holers, V Michael; Perkins, Stephen J

    2006-10-01

    Complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21) is a cell surface protein that links the innate and adaptive immune response during the activation of B cells. The extracellular portion of CR2 comprises 15 or 16 short complement regulator (SCR) domains, for which the overall arrangement in solution is unknown. This was determined by constrained scattering and ultracentrifugation modelling. The radius of gyration of CR2 SCR 1-15 was determined to be 11.5 nm by both X-ray and neutron scattering, and that of its cross-section was 1.8 nm. The distance distribution function P(r) showed that the overall length of CR2 SCR 1-15 was 38 nm. Sedimentation equilibrium curve fits gave a mean molecular weight of 135,000 (+/- 13,000) Da, in agreement with a fully glycosylated structure. Velocity experiments using the g*(s) derivative method gave a sedimentation coefficient of 4.2 (+/- 0.1) S. In order to construct a model of CR2 SCR 1-15 for constrained fitting, homology models for the 15 SCR domains were combined with randomised linker peptides generated by molecular dynamics simulations. Using an automated procedure, the analysis of 15,000 possible CR2 SCR 1-15 models showed that only those models in which the 15 SCR domains were flexible but partially folded back accounted for the scattering and sedimentation data. The best-fit CR2 models provided a visual explanation for the versatile interaction of CR2 with four ligands C3d, CD23, gp350 and IFN-alpha. The flexible location of CR2 SCR 1-2 is likely to facilitate interactions of C3d-antigen complexes with the B cell receptor.

  10. The ligand-binding domain of the cell surface receptor for urokinase-type plasminogen activator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Ploug, M; Patthy, L;

    1991-01-01

    part of the intact receptor, probably including the whole sequence 1-87, and contained N-linked carbohydrate. After detergent phase separation in the Triton X-114 system, the fragment was present in the water phase where its binding activity could be demonstrated in the absence of the rest...... applications in interfering with cell-surface plasmin-mediated proteolysis....

  11. Live cell imaging unveils multiple domain requirements for in vivo dimerization of the glucocorticoid receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Presman, Diego M; Ogara, M Florencia; Stortz, Martín;

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are essential for life, but are also implicated in disease pathogenesis and may produce unwanted effects when given in high doses. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) transcriptional activity and clinical outcome have been linked to its oligomerization state. Although a point mutation wi...

  12. Essential domain of receptor tyrosine phosphatase beta (RPTPbeta) for interaction with Helicobacter pylori vacuolating cytotoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yahiro, Kinnosuke; Wada, Akihiro; Yamasaki, Eiki

    2004-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori produces a potent exotoxin, VacA, which causes progressive vacuolation as well as gastric injury. Although VacA was able to interact with two receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatases, RPTPbeta and RPTPalpha, RPTPbeta was found to be responsible for gastric damage caused...

  13. Domains of the growth hormone receptor required for association and activation of JAK2 tyrosine kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    VanderKuur, J A; Wang, X; Zhang, L

    1994-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) has recently been shown to activate the GH receptor (GHR)-associated tyrosine kinase JAK2. In the present study, regions of the GHR required for JAK2 association with GHR were identified. GH-dependent JAK2 association with GHR was detected in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells...

  14. Binding Sites for Acylated Trehalose Analogs of Glycolipid Ligands on an Extended Carbohydrate Recognition Domain of the Macrophage Receptor Mincle*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Hadar; Rambaruth, Neela D. S.; Jégouzo, Sabine A. F.; Jacobsen, Kristian M.; Djurhuus, Rasmus; Poulsen, Thomas B.; Weis, William I.; Taylor, Maureen E.; Drickamer, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    The macrophage receptor mincle binds to trehalose dimycolate on the surface of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Signaling initiated by this interaction leads to cytokine production, which underlies the ability of mycobacteria to evade the immune system and also to function as adjuvants. In previous work the mechanism for binding of the sugar headgroup of trehalose dimycolate to mincle has been elucidated, but the basis for enhanced binding to glycolipid ligands, in which hydrophobic substituents are attached to the 6-hydroxyl groups, has been the subject of speculation. In the work reported here, the interaction of trehalose derivatives with bovine mincle has been probed with a series of synthetic mimics of trehalose dimycolate in binding assays, in structural studies by x-ray crystallography, and by site-directed mutagenesis. Binding studies reveal that, rather than reflecting specific structural preference, the apparent affinity of mincle for ligands with hydrophobic substituents correlates with their overall size. Structural and mutagenesis analysis provides evidence for interaction of the hydrophobic substituents with multiple different portions of the surface of mincle and confirms the presence of three Ca2+-binding sites. The structure of an extended portion of the extracellular domain of mincle, beyond the minimal C-type carbohydrate recognition domain, also constrains the way the binding domains may interact on the surface of macrophages. PMID:27542410

  15. Role of the extracellular transmembrane domain interface in gating and pharmacology of a heteromeric neuronal nicotinic receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldea, Marcos; Castillo, Mar; Mulet, José; Sala, Salvador; Criado, Manuel; Sala, Francisco

    2010-05-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) transmit the agonist signal to the channel gate through a number of extracellular domains. We have previously shown that particular details of the process of coupling binding to gating could be quantitative and qualitatively different in muscle and neuronal type nAChRs. We have extended previous studies on homomeric alpha7 nAChRs to heteromeric alpha3beta4 nAChRs, by mutating residues located at loops 2 and 7, and M2-M3 linker of both alpha3 and beta4 subunits which, in order to monitor surface expression, were modified to bind alpha-bungarotoxin, and expressed in Xenopus oocytes. We show that, in general, mutations in these domains of both alpha3 and beta4 subunits affect the gating function, although the effects are slightly larger if they are inserted in the alpha3 subunit. However, the involvement of a previously reported intrasubunit interaction in coupling (Gln48-Ile130) seems to be restricted to the beta4 subunit. We also show that mutations at these domains, particularly loop 2 of the alpha3 subunit, change the pharmacological profile of alpha3beta4 nAChRs, decreasing nicotine's and increasing cytisine's effectiveness relative to acetylcholine. It is concluded that, unlike muscle nAChRs, the non-alpha subunits play a relevant role in the coupling process of neuronal alpha3beta4 nAChRs.

  16. Azadirachtin interacts with the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) binding domain of its receptors and inhibits TNF-induced biological responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoh, Maikho; Kumar, Pankaj; Nagarajaram, Hampathalu A; Manna, Sunil K

    2010-02-19

    The role of azadirachtin, an active component of a medicinal plant Neem (Azadirachta indica), on TNF-induced cell signaling in human cell lines was investigated. Azadirachtin blocks TNF-induced activation of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) and also expression of NF-kappaB-dependent genes such as adhesion molecules and cyclooxygenase 2. Azadirachtin inhibits the inhibitory subunit of NF-kappaB (IkappaB alpha) phosphorylation and thereby its degradation and RelA (p65) nuclear translocation. It blocks IkappaB alpha kinase (IKK) activity ex vivo, but not in vitro. Surprisingly, azadirachtin blocks NF-kappaB DNA binding activity in transfected cells with TNF receptor-associated factor (TRAF)2, TNF receptor-associated death domain (TRADD), IKK, or p65, but not with TNFR, suggesting its effect is at the TNFR level. Azadirachtin blocks binding of TNF, but not IL-1, IL-4, IL-8, or TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) with its respective receptors. Anti-TNFR antibody or TNF protects azadirachtin-mediated down-regulation of TNFRs. Further, in silico data suggest that azadirachtin strongly binds in the TNF binding site of TNFR. Overall, our data suggest that azadirachtin modulates cell surface TNFRs thereby decreasing TNF-induced biological responses. Thus, azadirachtin exerts an anti-inflammatory response by a novel pathway, which may be beneficial for anti-inflammatory therapy.

  17. In silico prediction of B cell epitopes of the extracellular domain of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Bayrami

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R is a transmembrane receptor with tyrosine kinase activity. The receptor plays a critical role in cancer. Using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs against the IGF-1R, typically blocks ligand binding and enhances down-regulation of the cell-surface IGF-1R. Some MAbs such as cixutumumab are under clinical trial investigation. Targeting multiple distinct epitopes on IGF-1R, might be an effective strategy to inhibit IGF-1R pathway in cancer. In this study, new linear B cell epitopes for the extracellular domains of IGF-1R were predicted by in silico methods using a combination of linear B cell epitope prediction web servers such as ABCpred, Bepired, BCPREDs, Bcepred and Elliprro. Moreover, Discotope, B-pred and PEPOP web server tools were employed to predict new conformational B cell epitopes. In contrast to previously reported epitopes from extracellular region of the IGF-1R, we predicted new linear P8: (RQPQDGYLYRHNYCSK and conformational Pc4: (HYYYAGVCVPACPPNTYRFE, Ppc6: (KMCPSTGKRENNESAPDNDT and Ppc20: (ANILSAESSDSEFMQEPSGFI epitopes. These epitopes are useful for further study as peptide antigens to actively immune host animals to develop new MAbs. Furthermore, the epitopes can be used in peptide-based cancer vaccines design.

  18. Characterization of a novel five-transmembrane domain cholecystokinin-2 receptor splice variant identified in human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Claire; Escrieut, Chantal; Clerc, Pascal; Gigoux, Véronique; Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean Claude; Fourmy, Daniel

    2012-02-26

    The cholecystokinin-2 receptor (CCK2R), is expressed in cancers where it contributes to tumor progression. The CCK2R is over-expressed in a sub-set of tumors, allowing its use in tumor targeting with a radiolabel ligand. Since discrepancies between mRNA levels and CCK2R binding sites were noticed, we searched for abnormally spliced variants in tumors from various origins having been previously reported to frequently express cholecystokinin receptors, such as medullary thyroid carcinomas, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas, and gastroenteropancreatic tumors. A variant of the CCK2R coding for a putative five-transmembrane domains receptor has been cloned. This variant represented as much as 6% of CCK2R levels. Ectopic expression in COS-7 cells revealed that this variant lacks biological activity due to its sequestration in endoplasmic reticulum. When co-expressed with the CCK2R, this variant diminished membrane density of the CCK2R and CCK2R-mediated activity (phospholipase-C and ERK activation). In conclusion, a novel splice variant acting as a dominant negative on membrane density of the CCK2R may be of importance for the pathophysiology of certain tumors and for their in vivo CCK2R-targeting.

  19. Distinct Functional Domains Contribute to Degradation of the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor (LDLR) by the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Inducible Degrader of the LDLR (IDOL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Vincenzo; Scheer, Lilith; Santos, Ana; Reits, Eric; Bleijlevens, Boris; Zelcer, Noam

    2011-01-01

    We recently identified the liver X receptor-regulated E3 ubiquitin ligase inducible degrader of the LDL receptor (IDOL) as a modulator of lipoprotein metabolism. Acting as an E3 ubiquitin ligase, IDOL triggers ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). We demonstrate here that this outcome requires the conserved FERM and RING domains present in IDOL. The RING domain promotes ubiquitination in vitro and Lys-63-specific ubiquitination of the LDLR in vivo in response to IDOL or liver X receptor activation. We further identify RING residues that differentially influence ubiquitination of the LDLR or stability of IDOL. The FERM domain interacts with the LDLR and in living cells co-localizes with the receptor at the plasma membrane. Homology modeling revealed a phosphotyrosine-binding element embedded in the FERM domain. Mutating residues within this region or residues in the LDLR preceding the NPVY endocytosis motif abrogate LDLR degradation by IDOL. Collectively, our results indicate that both the FERM and RING domains are required for promoting lysosomal degradation of the LDLR by IDOL. Our findings may facilitate development of structure-based IDOL inhibitors aimed at increasing LDLR abundance in therapeutic strategies to treat cardiovascular disease. PMID:21734303

  20. Olfactory receptor signaling is regulated by the post-synaptic density 95, Drosophila discs large, zona-occludens 1 (PDZ) scaffold multi-PDZ domain protein 1.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dooley, Ruth

    2009-12-01

    The unique ability of mammals to detect and discriminate between thousands of different odorant molecules is governed by the diverse array of olfactory receptors expressed by olfactory sensory neurons in the nasal epithelium. Olfactory receptors consist of seven transmembrane domain G protein-coupled receptors and comprise the largest gene superfamily in the mammalian genome. We found that approximately 30% of olfactory receptors possess a classical post-synaptic density 95, Drosophila discs large, zona-occludens 1 (PDZ) domain binding motif in their C-termini. PDZ domains have been established as sites for protein-protein interaction and play a central role in organizing diverse cell signaling assemblies. In the present study, we show that multi-PDZ domain protein 1 (MUPP1) is expressed in the apical compartment of olfactory sensory neurons. Furthermore, on heterologous co-expression with olfactory sensory neurons, MUPP1 was shown to translocate to the plasma membrane. We found direct interaction of PDZ domains 1 + 2 of MUPP1 with the C-terminus of olfactory receptors in vitro. Moreover, the odorant-elicited calcium response of OR2AG1 showed a prolonged decay in MUPP1 small interfering RNA-treated cells. We have therefore elucidated the first building blocks of the putative \\'olfactosome\\

  1. RIC-3 affects properties and quantity of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors via a mechanism that does not require the coiled-coil domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ami, Hagit Cohen; Yassin, Lina; Farah, Hanna; Michaeli, Avner; Eshel, Margalit; Treinin, Millet

    2005-07-29

    Members of the RIC-3 gene family are effectors of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) expression in vertebrates and invertebrates. In Caenorhabditis elegans RIC-3 is needed for functional expression of multiple nAChRs, including the DEG-3/DES-2 nAChR. Effects of RIC-3 on DEG-3/DES-2 functional expression are found in vivo and following heterologous expression in Xenopus leavis oocytes. We now show that in X. leavis oocytes RIC-3 also affects the kinetics and agonist affinity properties of the DEG-3/DES-2 receptor. Because these effects are mimicked by increasing the ratio of DEG-3 subunits within DEG-3/DES-2 receptors, this suggests that RIC-3 may preferentially promote maturation of DEG-3-rich receptors. Indeed, effects of RIC-3 on functional expression of DEG-3/DES-2 positively correlate with the DEG-3 to DES-2 ratio. All RIC-3 family members have two transmembrane domains followed by one or two coiled-coil domains. Here we show that the effects of RIC-3 on functional expression and on receptor properties are mediated by the transmembrane domains and do not require the coiled-coil domains. In agreement with this, mammals express a RIC-3 transcript lacking the coiled-coil domain that is capable of promoting DEG-3/DES-2 functional expression. Last, we show that RIC-3 affects DEG-3 quantity, suggesting stabilization of receptors or receptor intermediates by RIC-3. Together our results suggest that subunit-specific interactions of RIC-3 with nAChR subunits, mediated by the transmembrane domains, are sufficient for the effects of RIC-3 on nAChR quantity and quality.

  2. From defense to symbiosis: limited alterations in the kinase domain of LysM receptor-like kinases are crucial for evolution of legume-Rhizobium symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Tomomi; Kaku, Hanae; Shimoda, Yoshikazu; Sugiyama, Akifumi; Shimamura, Masayuki; Takanashi, Kojiro; Yazaki, Kazufumi; Aoki, Toshio; Shibuya, Naoto; Kouchi, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen-fixing symbiosis between legumes and rhizobia is initiated by the recognition of rhizobial Nod factors (NFs) by host plants. NFs are diversely modified derivatives of chitin oligosaccharide, a fungal elicitor that induces defense responses in plants. Recent evidence has shown that both NFs and chitin elicitors are recognized by structurally related LysM receptor kinases. Transcriptome analyses of Lotus japonicus roots indicated that NFs not only activate symbiosis genes but also transiently activate defense-related genes through NF receptors. Conversely, chitin oligosaccharides were able to activate symbiosis genes independently of NF receptors. Analyses using chimeric genes consisting of the LysM receptor domain of a Lotus japonicus NF receptor, NFR1, and the kinase domain of an Arabidopsis chitin receptor, CERK1, demonstrated that substitution of a portion of the αEF helix in CERK1 with the amino acid sequence YAQ from the corresponding region of NFR1 enables L. japonicus nfr1 mutants to establish symbiosis with Mesorhizobium loti. We also showed that the kinase domains of two Lotus japonicus LysM receptor kinases, Lys6 and Lys7, which also possess the YAQ sequence, suppress the symbiotic defect of nfr1. These results strongly suggest that, in addition to adaptation of extracellular LysM domains to NFs, limited alterations in the kinase domain of chitin receptors have played a crucial role in shifting the intracellular signaling to symbiosis from defense responses, thus constituting one of the key genetic events in the evolution of root nodule symbiosis in legume plants. © 2010 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Structure, dynamics and interactions of the N-terminal domain of the androgen receptor

    OpenAIRE

    De Mol, Eva

    2014-01-01

    [spa] El cáncer de próstata (PCa) es el segundo tipo de cáncer más común en hombres después del cáncer de pulmón. Alrededor de 1.1 millones de hombres en todo el mundo se les diagnosticó PCa durante el año 2012. El cáncer de próstata depende esencialmente de la estimulación de los andrógenos para el crecimiento y la supervivencia celular. El receptor androgénico (AR) es un receptor de hormonas nuclear que es activado por las hormonas andrógenas y la proteína mediante la cual los efectos fisio...

  4. Structure of metabotropic glutamate receptor C-terminal domains in contact with interacting proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Enz, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) regulate intracellular signal pathways that control several physiological tasks, including neuronal excitability, learning, and memory. This is achieved by the formation of synaptic signal complexes, in which mGluRs assemble with functionally related proteins such as enzymes, scaffolds, and cytoskeletal anchor proteins. Thus, mGluR associated proteins actively participate in the regulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission. Importantly, dysfunction o...

  5. Molecular analysis of the prostacyclin receptor's interaction with the PDZ1 domain of its adaptor protein PDZK1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Birrane

    Full Text Available The prostanoid prostacyclin, or prostaglandin I2, plays an essential role in many aspects of cardiovascular disease. The actions of prostacyclin are mainly mediated through its activation of the prostacyclin receptor or, in short, the IP. In recent studies, the cytoplasmic carboxy-terminal domain of the IP was shown to bind several PDZ domains of the multi-PDZ adaptor PDZK1. The interaction between the two proteins was found to enhance cell surface expression of the IP and to be functionally important in promoting prostacyclin-induced endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis. To investigate the interaction of the IP with the first PDZ domain (PDZ1 of PDZK1, we generated a nine residue peptide (KK(411IAACSLC(417 containing the seven carboxy-terminal amino acids of the IP and measured its binding affinity to a recombinant protein corresponding to PDZ1 by isothermal titration calorimetry. We determined that the IP interacts with PDZ1 with a binding affinity of 8.2 µM. Using the same technique, we also determined that the farnesylated form of carboxy-terminus of the IP does not bind to PDZ1. To understand the molecular basis of these findings, we solved the high resolution crystal structure of PDZ1 bound to a 7-residue peptide derived from the carboxy-terminus of the non-farnesylated form of IP ((411IAACSLC(417. Analysis of the structure demonstrates a critical role for the three carboxy-terminal amino acids in establishing a strong interaction with PDZ1 and explains the inability of the farnesylated form of IP to interact with the PDZ1 domain of PDZK1 at least in vitro.

  6. A new family of receptor tyrosine kinases with a venus flytrap binding domain in insects and other invertebrates activated by aminoacids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Ahier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tyrosine kinase receptors (RTKs comprise a large family of membrane receptors that regulate various cellular processes in cell biology of diverse organisms. We previously described an atypical RTK in the platyhelminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni, composed of an extracellular Venus flytrap module (VFT linked through a single transmembrane domain to an intracellular tyrosine kinase domain similar to that of the insulin receptor. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here we show that this receptor is a member of a new family of RTKs found in invertebrates, and particularly in insects. Sixteen new members of this family, named Venus Kinase Receptor (VKR, were identified in many insects. Structural and phylogenetic studies performed on VFT and TK domains showed that VKR sequences formed monophyletic groups, the VFT group being close to that of GABA(B receptors and the TK one being close to that of insulin receptors. We show that a recombinant VKR is able to autophosphorylate on tyrosine residues, and report that it can be activated by L-arginine. This is in agreement with the high degree of conservation of the alpha amino acid binding residues found in many amino acid binding VFTs. The presence of high levels of vkr transcripts in larval forms and in female gonads indicates a putative function of VKR in reproduction and/or development. CONCLUSION: The identification of RTKs specific for parasites and insect vectors raises new perspectives for the control of human parasitic and infectious diseases.

  7. A new family of receptor tyrosine kinases with a venus flytrap binding domain in insects and other invertebrates activated by aminoacids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahier, Arnaud; Rondard, Philippe; Gouignard, Nadège; Khayath, Naji; Huang, Siluo; Trolet, Jacques; Donoghue, Daniel J; Gauthier, Monique; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Dissous, Colette

    2009-05-21

    Tyrosine kinase receptors (RTKs) comprise a large family of membrane receptors that regulate various cellular processes in cell biology of diverse organisms. We previously described an atypical RTK in the platyhelminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni, composed of an extracellular Venus flytrap module (VFT) linked through a single transmembrane domain to an intracellular tyrosine kinase domain similar to that of the insulin receptor. Here we show that this receptor is a member of a new family of RTKs found in invertebrates, and particularly in insects. Sixteen new members of this family, named Venus Kinase Receptor (VKR), were identified in many insects. Structural and phylogenetic studies performed on VFT and TK domains showed that VKR sequences formed monophyletic groups, the VFT group being close to that of GABA(B) receptors and the TK one being close to that of insulin receptors. We show that a recombinant VKR is able to autophosphorylate on tyrosine residues, and report that it can be activated by L-arginine. This is in agreement with the high degree of conservation of the alpha amino acid binding residues found in many amino acid binding VFTs. The presence of high levels of vkr transcripts in larval forms and in female gonads indicates a putative function of VKR in reproduction and/or development. The identification of RTKs specific for parasites and insect vectors raises new perspectives for the control of human parasitic and infectious diseases.

  8. The Src homology 3 binding domain is required for lysophosphatidic acid 3 receptor-mediated cellular viability in melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Wei; Tran, Sterling K; Ruddick, Caitlin A; Murph, Mandi M

    2015-01-28

    The LPA3 receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor that binds extracellular lysophosphatidic acid and mediates intracellular signaling cascades. Although we previously reported that receptor inhibition using siRNA or chemical inhibition obliterates the viability of melanoma cells, the mechanism was unclear. Herein we hypothesized that amino acids comprising the Src homology 3 (SH3) ligand binding motif, R/K-X-X-V/P-X-X-P or (216)-KTNVLSP-(222), within the third intracellular loop of LPA3 were critical in mediating this outcome. Therefore, we performed site-directed mutagenesis of the lysine, valine and proline, replacing these amino acids with alanines, and evaluated the changes in viability, proliferation, ERK1/2 signaling and calcium in response to lysophosphatidic acid. Our results show that enforced LPA3 expression in SK-MEL-2 cells enhanced their resiliency by allowing these cells to oppose any loss of viability during growth in serum-free medium for up to 96 h, in contrast to parental SK-MEL-2 cells, which show a significant decline in viability. Similarly, site-directed alanine substitutions of valine and proline, V219A/P222A or 2aa-SK-MEL-2 cells, did not significantly alter viability, but adding a further alanine to replace the lysine, K216A/V219A/P222A or 3aa-SK-MEL-2 cells, obliterated this function. In addition, an inhibitor of the LPA3 receptor had no impact on the parental SK-MEL-2, 2aa-SK-MEL-2 or 3aa-SK-MEL-2 cells, but significantly reduced viability among wt-LPA3-SK-MEL-2 cells. Taken together, the data suggest that the SH3 ligand binding domain of LPA3 is required to mediate viability in melanoma cells.

  9. Extracellular domain determinants of LET-23 (EGF) receptor tyrosine kinase activity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghal, Nadeem; Sternberg, Paul W

    2003-08-21

    Negative regulation of ErbB/EGFR signalling pathways is important for normal development and the prevention of cancer. In a genetic screen to uncover mechanisms that negatively regulate ErbB signalling in Caenorhabditis elegans, we isolated a second-site mutation (sy621) that promotes the activity of a gain-of-function allele (sa62gf) of the let-23 (EGF) receptor tyrosine kinase. We show that activation by the sa62 mutation (C359Y) likely results from a break in the conserved disulphide-bonded eighth module at the junction of CR1 and L2. The sy621 mutation causes a G270E change in the third disulphide-bonded module of CR1, and causes no phenotype on its own, but cooperates with the sa62 mutation to promote receptor activity. Although both sa62 single- and double-mutant receptors can function in the absence of ligand, they can be further activated by ligand. Our results support the current model for ligand-induced dimerization based on the recent crystal structures of HER3 and the EGFR, and provide more evidence for the generation of distinctly activated ErbB family members through mutation.

  10. Identification of the first small-molecule ligand of the neuronal receptor sortilin and structure determination of the receptor–ligand complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Jacob Lauwring, E-mail: jla@mb.au.dk [Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Schrøder, Tenna Juul; Christensen, Søren [H. Lundbeck A/S, Ottiliavej 9, 2500 Valby (Denmark); Strandbygård, Dorthe [Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Pallesen, Lone Tjener [Aarhus University, Ole Worms Allé 3, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); García-Alai, Maria Marta [Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Lindberg, Samsa; Langgård, Morten; Eskildsen, Jørgen Calí; David, Laurent; Tagmose, Lena; Simonsen, Klaus Baek; Maltas, Philip James; Rønn, Lars Christian Biilmann; Jong, Inge E. M. de; Malik, Ibrahim John; Egebjerg, Jan; Karlsson, Jens-Jacob [H. Lundbeck A/S, Ottiliavej 9, 2500 Valby (Denmark); Uppalanchi, Srinivas; Sakumudi, Durga Rao; Eradi, Pradheep [GVK BioScience, Plot No. 28 A, IDA Nacharam, Hyderabad 500 076 (India); Watson, Steven P., E-mail: jla@mb.au.dk [H. Lundbeck A/S, Ottiliavej 9, 2500 Valby (Denmark); Thirup, Søren, E-mail: jla@mb.au.dk [Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2014-02-01

    The identification of the first small-molecule ligand of the neuronal receptor sortilin and structure determination of the receptor–ligand complex are reported. Sortilin is a type I membrane glycoprotein belonging to the vacuolar protein sorting 10 protein (Vps10p) family of sorting receptors and is most abundantly expressed in the central nervous system. Sortilin has emerged as a key player in the regulation of neuronal viability and has been implicated as a possible therapeutic target in a range of disorders. Here, the identification of AF40431, the first reported small-molecule ligand of sortilin, is reported. Crystals of the sortilin–AF40431 complex were obtained by co-crystallization and the structure of the complex was solved to 2.7 Å resolution. AF40431 is bound in the neurotensin-binding site of sortilin, with the leucine moiety of AF40431 mimicking the binding mode of the C-terminal leucine of neurotensin and the 4-methylumbelliferone moiety of AF40431 forming π-stacking with a phenylalanine.

  11. Sequence and expression pattern of a novel human orphan G-protein-coupled receptor, GPRC5B, a family C receptor with a short amino-terminal domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P

    2000-01-01

    the receptors currently assigned to family C. However, our results strongly indicate that RAIG1 and GPRC5B form a new subgroup of family C characterized by short ATDs. GPRC5B mRNA is widely expressed in peripheral and central tissues with highest abundance in kidney, pancreas, and testis. This mRNA expression...... from an expressed sequence tag clone that contained the entire open reading frame of the transcript encoding a protein of 395 amino acids. Analysis of the protein sequence reveal that GPRC5B contains a signal peptide and seven transmembrane alpha-helices, which is a hallmark of G......-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). GPRC5B displays homology to retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RAIG1, 33% sequence identity) and to several family C (mGluR-like) GPCRs (20-25% sequence identity). Both RAIG1 and GPRC5B have short extracellular amino-terminal domains (ATDs) that contrast the very long ATDs characterizing...

  12. Identification of the bacteria-binding peptide domain on salivary agglutinin (gp-340/DMBT1), a member of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bikker, Floris J; Ligtenberg, Antoon J M; Nazmi, Kamran

    2002-01-01

    Salivary agglutinin is encoded by DMBT1 and identical to gp-340, a member of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) superfamily. Salivary agglutinin/DMBT1 is known for its Streptococcus mutans agglutinating properties. This 300-400 kDa glycoprotein is composed of conserved peptide motifs: 14...... SRCR domains that are separated by SRCR-interspersed domains (SIDs), 2 CUB (C1r/C1s Uegf Bmp1) domains, and a zona pellucida domain. We have searched for the peptide domains of agglutinin/DMBT1 responsible for bacteria binding. Digestion with endoproteinase Lys-C resulted in a protein fragment...... for the first time that the polymorphic SRCR domains of salivary agglutinin/DMBT1 mediate ligand interactions....

  13. Conformational variability of the glycine receptor M2 domain in response to activation by different agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Dibas, Mohammed I; Lester, Henry A

    2007-01-01

    change. Although taurine and beta-alanine were weak partial agonists at the alpha1R19'C glycine receptor, they induced large fluorescence changes. Propofol, which drastically enhanced these currents, did not induce a glycine-like blue shift in the spectral emission peak. The inhibitors strychnine...... and picrotoxin elicited fluorescence and current changes as expected for a competitive antagonist and an open channel blocker, respectively. Glycine and taurine (or beta-alanine) also produced an increase and a decrease, respectively, in the fluorescence of a label attached to the nearby L22'C residue. Thus...

  14. Amino substituted nitrogen heterocycle ureas as kinase insert domain containing receptor (KDR inhibitors: Performance of structure–activity relationship approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayriye Yilmaz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR study was performed on a set of amino-substituted nitrogen heterocyclic urea derivatives. Two novel approaches were applied: (1 the simplified molecular input-line entry systems (SMILES based optimal descriptors approach; and (2 the fragment-based simplex representation of molecular structure (SiRMS approach. Comparison with the classic scheme of building up the model and balance of correlation (BC for optimal descriptors approach shows that the BC scheme provides more robust predictions than the classic scheme for the considered pIC50 of the heterocyclic urea derivatives. Comparison of the SMILES-based optimal descriptors and SiRMS approaches has confirmed good performance of both techniques in prediction of kinase insert domain containing receptor (KDR inhibitory activity, expressed as a logarithm of inhibitory concentration (pIC50 of studied compounds.

  15. Five out of six tryptophan residues in the N-terminal extracellular domain of the rat GLP-1 receptor are essential for its ability to bind GLP-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmen, A; Van Eyll, B; Göke, B; Göke, R

    1997-01-01

    Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis was utilized to investigate the requirement of tryptophan residues located in the N-terminal domain of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor for the ability to bind its ligand and to induce cAMP generation. W39, W72, W87, W91, W110, and W120 were mutated into alanine. Two of the six tryptophan residues, W72 and W110, are highly conserved within the receptor subfamily. After transfection of mutated cDNAs in COS-7 or CHL cells, it appeared that mutant W87 A bound [125I] GLP-1 with the same affinity as wild-type receptor and induced signal transduction to a comparable extent. In contrast, mutant receptors W39A, W72A, W91A, W110A, and W120A lost the ability to bind [125I] GLP-1. Because all mutated receptor cDNAs were transcribed on RNA level (Northern blot) and the receptor proteins were expressed at the plasma membrane level (Western blot), it is concluded that with the exception of W87 all trytophan residues are essential for receptor ligand interaction. This indicates the significance of hydrophobic interactions within the N-terminal domain of the GLP-1 receptor.

  16. Crystal structure of the human LRH-1 DBD-DNA complex reveals Ftz-F1 domain positioning is required for receptor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Isaac H; Hager, Janet M; Safi, Rachid; McDonnell, Donald P; Redinbo, Matthew R; Ortlund, Eric A

    2005-12-16

    The DNA-binding and ligand-binding functions of nuclear receptors are localized to independent domains separated by a flexible hinge. The DNA-binding domain (DBD) of the human liver receptor homologue-1 (hLRH-1), which controls genes central to development and metabolic homeostasis, interacts with monomeric DNA response elements and contains an Ftz-F1 motif that is unique to the NR5A nuclear receptor subfamily. Here, we present the 2.2A resolution crystal structure of the hLRH-1 DBD in complex with duplex DNA, and elucidate the sequence-specific DNA contacts essential for the ability of LRH-1 to bind to DNA as a monomer. We show that the unique Ftz-F1 domain folds into a novel helix that packs against the DBD but does not contact DNA. Mutations expected to disrupt the positioning of the Ftz-F1 helix do not eliminate DNA binding but reduce the transcriptional activity of full-length LRH-1 significantly. Moreover, we find that altering the Ftz-F1 helix positioning eliminates the enhancement of LRH-1-mediated transcription by the coactivator GRIP1, an action that is associated primarily with the distantly located ligand-binding domain (LBD). Taken together, these results indicate that subtle structural changes in a nuclear receptor DBD can exert long-range functional effects on the LBD of a receptor, and significantly impact transcriptional regulation.

  17. Novel human G protein-coupled receptors with long N-terminals containing GPS domains and Ser/Thr-rich regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksson, Robert; Lagerström, Malin C; Höglund, Pär J; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2002-11-20

    We report eight novel members of the superfamily of human G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) found by searches in the human genome databases, termed GPR97, GPR110, GPR111, GPR112, GPR113, GPR114, GPR115 and GPR116. Phylogenetic analysis shows that these are additional members of a family of GPCRs with long N-termini, previously termed EGF-7TM, LNB-7TM, B2 or LN-7TM. Five of the receptors form their own phylogenetic cluster, while three others form a cluster with the previously reported HE6 and GPR56 (TM7XN1). All the receptors have a GPS domain in their N-terminus and long Ser/Thr-rich regions forming mucin-like stalks. GPR113 has a hormone binding domain and one EGF domain. GPR112 has over 20 Ser/Thr repeats and a pentraxin domain. GPR116 has two immunoglobulin-like repeats and a SEA box. We found several human EST sequences for most of the receptors showing differential expression patterns, which may indicate that some of these receptors participate in reproductive functions while others are more likely to have a role in the immune system.

  18. Crystal Structure of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 in Complex with the Extracellular Domain of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Underwood, Christina Rye; Garibay, P.; Knudsen, L.B.;

    2010-01-01

    GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1) is an incretin released from intestinal L-cells in response to food intake. Activation of the GLP-1 receptor potentiates the synthesis and release of insulin from pancreatic beta-cells in a glucose-dependent manner. The GLP-1 receptor belongs to class B of the G......-protein-coupled receptors, a subfamily characterized by a large N-terminal extracellular ligand binding domain. Exendin-4 and GLP-1 are 50% identical, and exendin-4 is a full agonist with similar affinity and potency for the GLP-1 receptor. We recently solved the crystal structure of the GLP-1 receptor extracellular domain...... in complex with the competitive antagonist exendin-4(9-39). Interestingly, the isolated extra-cellular domain binds exendin-4 with much higher affinity than the endogenous agonist GLP-1. Here, we have solved the crystal structure of the extracellular domain in complex with GLP-1 to 2.1 angstrom resolution...

  19. Evolutionarily conserved paired immunoglobulin-like receptor α (PILRα) domain mediates its interaction with diverse sialylated ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yonglian; Senger, Kate; Baginski, Tomasz K; Mazloom, Anita; Chinn, Yvonne; Pantua, Homer; Hamidzadeh, Kajal; Ramani, Sree Ranjani; Luis, Elizabeth; Tom, Irene; Sebrell, Andrew; Quinones, Gabriel; Ma, Yan; Mukhyala, Kiran; Sai, Tao; Ding, Jiabing; Haley, Benjamin; Shadnia, Hooman; Kapadia, Sharookh B; Gonzalez, Lino C; Hass, Philip E; Zarrin, Ali A

    2012-05-04

    Paired immunoglobulin-like receptor (PILR) α is an inhibitory receptor that recognizes several ligands, including mouse CD99, PILR-associating neural protein, and Herpes simplex virus-1 glycoprotein B. The physiological function(s) of interactions between PILRα and its cellular ligands are not well understood, as are the molecular determinants of PILRα/ligand interactions. To address these uncertainties, we sought to identify additional PILRα ligands and further define the molecular basis for PILRα/ligand interactions. Here, we identify two novel PILRα binding partners, neuronal differentiation and proliferation factor-1 (NPDC1), and collectin-12 (COLEC12). We find that sialylated O-glycans on these novel PILRα ligands, and on known PILRα ligands, are compulsory for PILRα binding. Sialylation-dependent ligand recognition is also a property of SIGLEC1, a member of the sialic acid-binding Ig-like lectins. SIGLEC1 Ig domain shares ∼22% sequence identity with PILRα, an identity that includes a conserved arginine localized to position 97 in mouse and human SIGLEC1, position 133 in mouse PILRα and position 126 in human PILRα. We observe that PILRα/ligand interactions require conserved PILRα Arg-133 (mouse) and Arg-126 (human), in correspondence with a previously reported requirement for SIGLEC1 Arg-197 in SIGLEC1/ligand interactions. Homology modeling identifies striking similarities between PILRα and SIGLEC1 ligand binding pockets as well as at least one set of distinctive interactions in the galactoxyl-binding site. Binding studies suggest that PILRα recognizes a complex ligand domain involving both sialic acid and protein motif(s). Thus, PILRα is evolved to engage multiple ligands with common molecular determinants to modulate myeloid cell functions in anatomical settings where PILRα ligands are expressed.

  20. Collagen binding specificity of the discoidin domain receptors: Binding sites on collagens II and III and molecular determinants for collagen IV recognition by DDR1

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Huifang; Raynal, Nicolas; Stathopoulos, Stavros; Myllyharju, Johanna; Farndale, Richard W.; Leitinger, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    The discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2 are cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated by triple-helical collagen. While normal DDR signalling regulates fundamental cellular processes, aberrant DDR signalling is associated with several human diseases. We previously identified GVMGFO (O is hydroxyproline) as a major DDR2 binding site in collagens I–III, and located two additional DDR2 binding sites in collagen II. Here we extend these studies to the homologous DDR1 and the...

  1. The relationship between the L1 and L2 domains of the insulin and epidermal growth factor receptors and leucine-rich repeat modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ward Colin W

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leucine-rich repeats are one of the more common modules found in proteins. The leucine-rich repeat consensus motif is LxxLxLxxNxLxxLxxLxxLxx- where the first 11–12 residues are highly conserved and the remainder of the repeat can vary in size Leucine-rich repeat proteins have been subdivided into seven subfamilies, none of which include members of the epidermal growth factor receptor or insulin receptor families despite the similarity between the 3D structure of the L domains of the type I insulin-like growth factor receptor and some leucine-rich repeat proteins. Results Here we have used profile searches and multiple sequence alignments to identify the repeat motif Ixx-LxIxx-Nx-Lxx-Lxx-Lxx-Lxx- in the L1 and L2 domains of the insulin receptor and epidermal growth factor receptors. These analyses were aided by reference to the known three dimensional structures of the insulin-like growth factor type I receptor L domains and two members of the leucine rich repeat family, porcine ribonuclease inhibitor and internalin 1B. Pectate lyase, another beta helix protein, can also be seen to contain the sequence motif and much of the structural features characteristic of leucine-rich repeat proteins, despite the existence of major insertions in some of its repeats. Conclusion Multiple sequence alignments and comparisons of the 3D structures has shown that right-handed beta helix proteins such as pectate lyase and the L domains of members of the insulin receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor families, are members of the leucine-rich repeat superfamily.

  2. Generation and characterization of small single domain antibodies inhibiting human tumor necrosis factor receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeland, Sophie; Puimège, Leen; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E; Van Hauwermeiren, Filip; Haustraete, Jurgen; Devoogdt, Nick; Hulpiau, Paco; Leroux-Roels, Geert; Laukens, Debby; Meuleman, Philip; De Vos, Martine; Libert, Claude

    2015-02-13

    The cytokine TNF is a well known drug target for several inflammatory diseases such as Crohn disease. Despite the great success of TNF blockers, therapy could be improved because of high costs and side effects. Selective inhibition of TNF receptor (TNFR) 1 signaling holds the potential to greatly reduce the pro-inflammatory activity of TNF, thereby preserving the advantageous immunomodulatory signals mediated by TNFR2. We generated a selective human TNFR1 inhibitor based on Nanobody (Nb) technology. Two anti-human TNFR1 Nbs were linked with an anti-albumin Nb to generate Nb Alb-70-96 named "TNF Receptor-One Silencer" (TROS). TROS selectively binds and inhibits TNF/TNFR1 and lymphotoxin-α/TNFR1 signaling with good affinity and IC50 values, both of which are in the nanomolar range. Surface plasmon resonance analysis reveals that TROS competes with TNF for binding to human TNFR1. In HEK293T cells, TROS strongly reduces TNF-induced gene expression, like IL8 and TNF, in a dose-dependent manner; and in ex vivo cultured colon biopsies of CD patients, TROS inhibits inflammation. Finally, in liver chimeric humanized mice, TROS antagonizes inflammation in a model of acute TNF-induced liver inflammation, reflected in reduced human IL8 expression in liver and reduced IL6 levels in serum. These results demonstrate the considerable potential of TROS and justify the evaluation of TROS in relevant disease animal models of both acute and chronic inflammation and eventually in patients.

  3. Characterization of unique truncated prolactin receptor transcripts, corresponding to the intracellular domain, in the testis of the sexually mature chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, J N; Burnside, J; Li, L; Tang, J; Davolos, C; Cogburn, L A

    1999-03-01

    We have examined expression of the chicken PRL receptor (cPRLR) gene in different tissues of the chicken by Northern blot analysis. Most tissues examined (ovary, testis, oviduct, kidney, and fat) possess a prominent full-length (4.6-kb) cPRLR transcript. A larger (11.7-kb) transcript is also detected in ovary, oviduct, testis, and kidney after longer exposure. A unique pattern of cPRLR expression was found in the testis of sexually mature chickens, which have an unusually high abundance of three small transcripts (1.2, 1.7, and 2 kb) in addition to the 4.6-kb transcript found in other tissues. Three domain-specific complementary DNA (cDNA) probes were constructed that correspond to the first and second ligand-binding regions in the extracellular domain and the transmembrane-intracellular domain. With these probes, Northern blot analysis of polyadenylated RNA prepared from the testes of a mature (22-week-old) chicken indicates that the highly abundant (1.2- and 1.7-kb) and less abundant (2.0-kb) cPRLR transcripts in testis hybridize only to the intracellular domain probe. Two types of truncated testis-specific cPRLR transcripts were identified using 5'-RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) analysis of polyadenylated RNA from the testis of a 22-week-old chicken. The predominant truncated cDNA sequence contains the highly conserved box 1 motif [(+)box 1 cDNA] and diverges (at nucleotide 1396) from that of the cPRLR cDNA, just downstream of the transmembrane domain. The other truncated cDNA lacks the box 1 motif [(-)box 1 cDNA], which is replaced by 39 bases that could encode a hydrophobic N-terminus with a putative 5'-untranslated region of 131 bases. Young chickens predominately express the full-length cPRLR messenger RNA (4.6 kb) in the testis. At the onset of sexual maturity, there is a dramatic increase in abundance of the testis-specific (+)box 1 transcript, whereas expression of the full-length cPRLR is depressed. The presence of truncated [(+) or (-)box 1] c

  4. Nucleotide binding by the widespread high-affinity cyclic di-GMP receptor MshEN domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Chuan; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Tu, Zhi-Le; He, Jin; Jones, Christopher J; Sanchez, David Zamorano; Yildiz, Fitnat H; Galperin, Michael Y; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2016-01-01

    C-di-GMP is a bacterial second messenger regulating various cellular functions. Many bacteria contain c-di-GMP-metabolizing enzymes but lack known c-di-GMP receptors. Recently, two MshE-type ATPases associated with bacterial type II secretion system and type IV pilus formation were shown to specifically bind c-di-GMP. Here we report crystal structure of the MshE N-terminal domain (MshEN1-145) from Vibrio cholerae in complex with c-di-GMP at a 1.37 Å resolution. This structure reveals a unique c-di-GMP-binding mode, featuring a tandem array of two highly conserved binding motifs, each comprising a 24-residue sequence RLGxx(L/V/I)(L/V/I)xxG(L/V/I)(L/V/I)xxxxLxxxLxxQ that binds half of the c-di-GMP molecule, primarily through hydrophobic interactions. Mutating these highly conserved residues markedly reduces c-di-GMP binding and biofilm formation by V. cholerae. This c-di-GMP-binding motif is present in diverse bacterial proteins exhibiting binding affinities ranging from 0.5 μM to as low as 14 nM. The MshEN domain contains the longest nucleotide-binding motif reported to date.

  5. Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a promising biomarker, induces epithelial to mesenchymal transition in renal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jingyuan; Chen, Xiao; Bai, Jin; Liu, Qinghua; Li, Hui; Xie, Jianwan; Jing, Hui; Zheng, Junnian

    2016-08-01

    Discoidin domain receptor I (DDR1) is confirmed as a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), which plays a consequential role in a variety of cancers. Nevertheless, the influence of DDR1 expression and development in renal clear cell carcinoma (RCCC) are still not well corroborated. In our research, we firstly discovered that the expression level of DDR1 was remarkable related to TNM stage (p = 0.032), depth of tumor invasion (p = 0.047), and lymph node metastasis (p = 0.034) in 119 RCCC tissue samples using tissue microarray. The function of DDR1 was then evaluated in vitro using collagen I and DDR1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) to regulate the expression of DDR1 in OS-RC-2 and ACHN renal cancer cells (RCC). DDR1 expression correlated with increased RCC cell migration, invasion, and angiogenesis. Further study revealed that high expression of DDR1 can result in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) activation. Western blot assay showed that the N-cadherin protein and vimentin were induced while E-cadherin was reduced after DDR1 over expression. Our results suggest that DDR1 is both a prognostic marker for RCCC and a potential functional target for therapy.

  6. Neto1 is a novel CUB-domain NMDA receptor-interacting protein required for synaptic plasticity and learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ng

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR, a major excitatory ligand-gated ion channel in the central nervous system (CNS, is a principal mediator of synaptic plasticity. Here we report that neuropilin tolloid-like 1 (Neto1, a complement C1r/C1s, Uegf, Bmp1 (CUB domain-containing transmembrane protein, is a novel component of the NMDAR complex critical for maintaining the abundance of NR2A-containing NMDARs in the postsynaptic density. Neto1-null mice have depressed long-term potentiation (LTP at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses, with the subunit dependency of LTP induction switching from the normal predominance of NR2A- to NR2B-NMDARs. NMDAR-dependent spatial learning and memory is depressed in Neto1-null mice, indicating that Neto1 regulates NMDA receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity and cognition. Remarkably, we also found that the deficits in LTP, learning, and memory in Neto1-null mice were rescued by the ampakine CX546 at doses without effect in wild-type. Together, our results establish the principle that auxiliary proteins are required for the normal abundance of NMDAR subunits at synapses, and demonstrate that an inherited learning defect can be rescued pharmacologically, a finding with therapeutic implications for humans.

  7. Discovery of small-molecule inhibitors selectively targeting the DNA-binding domain of the human androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huifang; Ban, Fuqiang; Dalal, Kush; Leblanc, Eric; Frewin, Kate; Ma, Dennis; Adomat, Hans; Rennie, Paul S; Cherkasov, Artem

    2014-08-14

    The human androgen receptor (AR) is considered as a master regulator in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa). As resistance to clinically used anti-AR drugs remains a major challenge for the treatment of advanced PCa, there is a pressing need for new anti-AR therapeutic avenues. In this study, we identified a binding site on the DNA binding domain (DBD) of the receptor and utilized virtual screening to discover a set of micromolar hits for the target. Through further exploration of the most potent hit (1), a structural analogue (6) was identified demonstrating 10-fold improved anti-AR potency. Further optimization resulted in a more potent synthetic analogue (25) with anti-AR potency comparable to a newly FDA-approved drug Enzalutamide. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the developed inhibitors do interact with the intended target site. Importantly, the AR DBD inhibitors could effectively inhibit the growth of Enzalutamide-resistant cells as well as block the transcriptional activity of constitutively active AR splice variants, such as V7.

  8. Evolution of a novel subfamily of nuclear receptors with members that each contain two DNA binding domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirai Hirohisa

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nuclear receptors (NRs are important transcriptional modulators in metazoans which regulate transcription through binding to the promoter region of their target gene by the DNA binding domain (DBD and activation or repression of mRNA synthesis through co-regulators bound to the ligand binding domain (LBD. NRs typically have a single DBD with a LBD. Results Three nuclear receptors named 2DBD-NRs, were identified from the flatworm Schistosoma mansoni that each possess a novel set of two DBDs in tandem with a LBD. They represent a novel NR modular structure: A/B-DBD-DBD-hinge-LBD. The 2DBD-NRs form a new subfamily of NRs, VII. By database mining, 2DBD-NR genes from other flatworm species (Schmidtea mediterranea and Dugesia japonica, from Mollusks (Lottia gigantean and from arthropods (Daphnia pulex were also identified. All 2DBD-NRs possess a P-box sequence of CEACKK in the first DBD, which is unique to 2DBD-NRs, and a P-box sequence of CEGCKG in the second DBD. Phylogenetic analyses of both DBD and ligand binding domain sequences showed that 2DBD-NR genes originate from a common two DBD-containing ancestor gene. A single 2DBD-NR orthologue was found in Arthropoda, Platyhelminths and Mollusca. Subsequent 2DBD-NR gene evolution in Mollusks and Platyhelminths involved gene duplication. Chromosome localization of S. mansoni 2DBD-NR genes by Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH suggests that 2DBD-NR genes duplicated on different chromosomes in the Platyhelminths. Dimerization of Sm2DBDα indicates that 2DBD-NRs may act as homodimers, suggesting either that two repeats of a half-site are necessary for each DBD of 2DBD-NRs to bind to its target gene, or that each 2DBD-NR can recognize multiple sites. Conclusion 2DBD-NRs share a common ancestor gene which possessed an extra DBD that likely resulted from a recombination event. After the split of the Arthropods, Mollusks and Platyhelminths, 2DBD-NR underwent a recent duplication in a

  9. Mutation G805R in the transmembrane domain of the LDL receptor gene causes familial hypercholesterolemia by inducing ectodomain cleavage of the LDL receptor in the endoplasmic reticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thea Bismo Strøm

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available More than 1700 mutations in the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR gene have been found to cause familial hypercholesterolemia (FH. These are commonly divided into five classes based upon their effects on the structure and function of the LDLR. However, little is known about the mechanism by which mutations in the transmembrane domain of the LDLR gene cause FH. We have studied how the transmembrane mutation G805R affects the function of the LDLR. Based upon Western blot analyses of transfected HepG2 cells, mutation G805R reduced the amounts of the 120 kDa precursor LDLR in the endoplasmic reticulum. This led to reduced amounts of the mature 160 kDa LDLR at the cell surface. However, significant amounts of a secreted 140 kDa G805R-LDLR ectodomain fragment was observed in the culture media. Treatment of the cells with the metalloproteinase inhibitor batimastat largely restored the amounts of the 120 and 160 kDa forms in cell lysates, and prevented secretion of the 140 kDa ectodomain fragment. Together, these data indicate that a metalloproteinase cleaved the ectodomain of the 120 kDa precursor G805R-LDLR in the endoplasmic reticulum. It was the presence of the polar Arg805 and not the lack of Gly805 which led to ectodomain cleavage. Arg805 also prevented γ-secretase cleavage within the transmembrane domain. It is conceivable that introducing a charged residue within the hydrophobic membrane lipid bilayer, results in less efficient incorporation of the 120 kDa G805R-LDLR in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and makes it a substrate for metalloproteinase cleavage.

  10. Gas Sensing and Signaling in the PAS-Heme Domain of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Aer2 Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Darysbel; Orillard, Emilie; Johnson, Mark S; Watts, Kylie J

    2017-09-15

    unclear but has been implicated in virulence. The Che2 system contains a chemoreceptor called Aer2, which contains a PAS sensing domain that binds heme and senses oxygen. Here, we show that Aer2 uses unprecedented mechanisms to bind O2 and initiate signaling. These studies provide both the first functional corroboration of the Aer2-PAS signaling mechanism previously proposed from structure as well as a signaling model for Aer2-PAS receptors. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. A new tagging system for production of recombinant proteins in Drosophila S2 cells using the third domain of the urokinase receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Hansen, Line V.; Jørgensen, Thomas J D

    2007-01-01

    The use of protein fusion tag technology greatly facilitates detection, expression and purification of recombinant proteins, and the demands for new and more effective systems are therefore expanding. We have used a soluble truncated form of the third domain of the urokinase receptor as a conveni...

  12. Collagen-induced expression of collagenase-3 by primary chondrocytes is mediated by integrin a1 and discoidin domain receptor 2: a protein kinase C-dependent pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, L.A.; Doulabi, B.Z.; Huang, C.L.; Helder, M.N.; Everts, V.; Bank, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate whether maintaining the chondrocyte’s native pericellular matrix prevents collagen-induced up-regulation of collagenase-3 (MMP-13) and whether integrin α1 (ITGα1) and/or discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) modulate MMP-13 expression and which signalling pathway plays a role

  13. The Toll Interleukin-1 Receptor (IL-1R) 8/Single Ig Domain IL-1R-Related Molecule Modulates the Renal Response to Bacterial Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemans, J.C.; Butter, L.M.; Teske, G.J.; Stroo, I.; Pulskens, W.P.; Florquin, S.

    2012-01-01

    Our immune system has to constantly strike a balance between activation and inhibition of an inflammatory response to combat invading pathogens and avoid inflammation-induced collateral tissue damage. Toll interleukin-1 receptor 8 (IL-1R-8)/single Ig domain IL-1R-related molecule (TIR8/SIGIRR) is an

  14. Structure of the activation domain of the GM-CSF/IL-3/IL-5 receptor common beta-chain bound to an antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossjohn, J; McKinstry, W J; Woodcock, J M; McClure, B J; Hercus, T R; Parker, M W; Lopez, A F; Bagley, C J

    2000-04-15

    Heterodimeric cytokine receptors generally consist of a major cytokine-binding subunit and a signaling subunit. The latter can transduce signals by more than 1 cytokine, as exemplified by the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin-2 (IL-2), and IL-6 receptor systems. However, often the signaling subunits in isolation are unable to bind cytokines, a fact that has made it more difficult to obtain structural definition of their ligand-binding sites. This report details the crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain of the GM-CSF/IL-3/IL-5 receptor beta-chain (beta(c)) signaling subunit in complex with the Fab fragment of the antagonistic monoclonal antibody, BION-1. This is the first single antagonist of all 3 known eosinophil-producing cytokines, and it is therefore capable of regulating eosinophil-related diseases such as asthma. The structure reveals a fibronectin type III domain, and the antagonist-binding site involves major contributions from the loop between the B and C strands and overlaps the cytokine-binding site. Furthermore, tyrosine(421) (Tyr(421)), a key residue involved in receptor activation, lies in the neighboring loop between the F and G strands, although it is not immediately adjacent to the cytokine-binding residues in the B-C loop. Interestingly, functional experiments using receptors mutated across these loops demonstrate that they are cooperatively involved in full receptor activation. The experiments, however, reveal subtle differences between the B-C loop and Tyr(421), which is suggestive of distinct functional roles. The elucidation of the structure of the ligand-binding domain of beta(c) also suggests how different cytokines recognize a single receptor subunit, which may have implications for homologous receptor systems. (Blood. 2000;95:2491-2498)

  15. A Novel Mutation in the Pyrin Domain of the NOD-like Receptor Family Pyrin Domain Containing Protein 3 in Muckle-Wells Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jian; Zhu, Yun; Zhang, Jian-Zhong; Zhang, Rong-Guang; Li, Hou-Min

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) is a group of rare, heterogeneous autoinflammatory disease characterized by interleukin (IL)-1β-mediated systemic inflammation and clinical symptoms involving skin, joints, central nervous system, and eyes. It encompasses a spectrum of three clinically overlapping autoinflammatory syndromes including familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease. CAPS is associated with gain-of-function missense mutations in NOD-like receptor family pyrin domain-containing protein 3 (NLRP3), the gene encoding NLRP3. Moreover, most mutations leading to MWS occurred in exon 3 of NLRP3 gene. Here, we reported a novel mutation occurred in exon 1 of NLRP3 gene in an MWS patient and attempted to explore the pathogenic mechanism. Methods: Genetic sequence analysis of NLRP3 was performed in an MWS patient who presented with periodic fever, arthralgia, and multiform skin lesions. NLRP3 was also analyzed in this patient's parents and 50 healthy individuals. Clinical examinations including X-ray examination, skin biopsy, bone marrow aspiration smear, and blood test of C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), serum levels of IL-1β, immunoglobulin E (IgE), antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies, antinuclear antibodies, and extractable nuclear antigen were also analyzed. The protein structure of mutant NLRP3 inflammasome was calculated by SWISS-MODEL software. Proteins of wild type and mutant components of NLRP3 inflammasome were expressed and purified, and the interaction abilities between these proteins were tested by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay. Results: X-ray examination showed no abnormality in the patient's knees. Laboratory tests indicated an elevation of CRP (233.24 mg/L) and ESR (67 mm/h) when the patient had fever. Serum IL-1β increased to 24.37 pg/ml, and serum IgE was higher than 2500.00 IU/ml. Other blood tests were

  16. High affinity receptor labeling based on basic leucine zipper domain peptides conjugated with pH-sensitive fluorescent dye: Visualization of AMPA-type glutamate receptor endocytosis in living neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Ayako; Asanuma, Daisuke; Kamiya, Mako; Urano, Yasuteru; Okabe, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Techniques to visualize receptor trafficking in living neurons are important, but currently available methods are limited in their labeling efficiency, specificity and reliability. Here we report a method for receptor labeling with a basic leucine zipper domain peptide (ZIP) and a binding cassette specific to ZIP. Receptors are tagged with a ZIP-binding cassette at their extracellular domain. Tagged receptors expressed in cultured cells were labeled with exogenously applied fluorescently labeled ZIP with low background and high affinity. To test if ZIP labeling is useful in monitoring endocytosis and intracellular trafficking, we next conjugated ZIP with a pH-sensitive dye RhP-M (ZIP-RhP-M). ZIP binding to its binding cassette was pH-resistant and RhP-M fluorescence dramatically increased in acidic environment. Thus AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) labeled by ZIP-RhP-M can report receptor endocytosis and subsequent intracellular trafficking. Application of ZIP-RhP-M to cultured hippocampal neurons expressing AMPARs tagged with a ZIP-binding cassette resulted in appearance of fluorescent puncta in PSD-95-positive large spines, suggesting local endocytosis and acidification of AMPARs in individual mature spines. This spine pool of AMPARs in acidic environment was distinct from the early endosomes labeled by transferrin uptake. These results suggest that receptor labeling by ZIP-RhP-M is a useful technique for monitoring endocytosis and intracellular trafficking. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Synaptopathy--from Biology to Therapy'.

  17. Biochemical and Immunological Characterization of Truncated Fragments of the Receptor-Binding Domains of C. difficile Toxin A.

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    Jui-Hsin Huang

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is an emerging pathogen responsible for opportunistic infections in hospitals worldwide and is the main cause of antibiotic-associated pseudo-membranous colitis and diarrhea in humans. Clostridial toxins A and B (TcdA and TcdB specifically bind to unknown glycoprotein(s on the surface of epithelial cells in the host intestine, disrupting the intestinal barrier and ultimately leading to acute inflammation and diarrhea. The C-terminal receptor-binding domain (RBD of TcdA, which is responsible for the initial binding of the toxin to host glycoproteins, has been predicted to contain 7 potential oligosaccharide-binding sites. To study the specific roles and functions of these 7 putative lectin-like binding regions, a consensus sequence of TcdA RBD derived from different C. difficile strains deposited in the NCBI protein database and three truncated fragments corresponding to the N-terminal (residues 1-411, middle (residues 296-701, and C-terminal portions (residues 524-911 of the RBD (F1, F2 and F3, respectively were designed and expressed in Escherichia coli. In this study, the recombinant RBD (rRBD and its truncated fragments were purified, characterized biologically and found to have the following similar properties: (a are capable of binding to the cell surface of both Vero and Caco-2 cells; (b possess Toll-like receptor agonist-like adjuvant activities that can activate dendritic cell maturation and increase the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines; and (c function as potent adjuvants in the intramuscular immunization route to enhance immune responses against weak immunogens. Although F1, F2 and F3 have similar repetitive amino acid sequences and putative oligosaccharide-binding domains, they do not possess the same biological and immunological properties: (i TcdA rRBD and its fragments bind to the cell surface, but only TcdA rRBD and F3 internalize into Vero cells within 15 min; (ii the fragments exhibit various levels

  18. Arabidopsis TNL-WRKY domain receptor RRS1 contributes to temperature-conditioned RPS4 auto-immunity

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    Katharina eHeidrich

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In plant effector-triggered immunity (ETI, intracellular nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat (NLR receptors are activated by specific pathogen effectors. The Arabidopsis TIR (Toll Interleukin1 receptor domain-NLR (denoted TNL gene pair, RPS4 and RRS1, confers resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst strain DC3000 expressing the Type III-secreted effector, AvrRps4. Nuclear accumulation of AvrRps4, RPS4 and the TNL resistance regulator EDS1 is necessary for ETI. RRS1 possesses a C-terminal ‘WRKY’ transcription factor DNA binding domain suggesting that important RPS4/RRS1 recognition and/or resistance signaling events occur at the nuclear chromatin. In Arabidopsis accession Ws-0, the RPS4Ws/RRS1Ws allelic pair governs resistance to Pst/AvrRps4 accompanied by host programmed cell death (pcd. In accession Col-0, RPS4Col/RRS1Col effectively limits Pst/AvrRps4 growth without pcd. Constitutive expression of HA-StrepII tagged RPS4Col (in a 35S:RPS4-HS line confers temperature conditioned EDS1-dependent auto-immunity. Here we show that a high (28oC, non-permissive to moderate (19oC, permissive temperature shift of 35S:RPS4-HS plants can be used to follow defense-related transcriptional dynamics without a pathogen effector trigger. By comparing responses of 35S:RPS4-HS with 35S:RPS4-HS rrs1-11 and 35S:RPS4-HS eds1-2 mutants, we establish that RPS4Col auto-immunity depends entirely on EDS1 and partially on RRS1Col. Examination of gene expression microarray data over 24h after temperature shift reveals a mainly quantitative RRS1Col contribution to up- or down-regulation of a small subset of RPS4Col-reprogrammed, EDS1-dependent genes. We find significant over-representation of WRKY transcription factor binding W-box cis-elements within the promoters of these genes. Our data show that RRS1Col contributes to temperature-conditioned RPS4Col auto-immunity and are consistent with activated RPS4Col engaging RRS1Col for resistance signaling.

  19. Arabidopsis TNL-WRKY domain receptor RRS1 contributes to temperature-conditioned RPS4 auto-immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidrich, Katharina; Tsuda, Kenichi; Blanvillain-Baufumé, Servane; Wirthmueller, Lennart; Bautor, Jaqueline; Parker, Jane E

    2013-01-01

    In plant effector-triggered immunity (ETI), intracellular nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat (NLR) receptors are activated by specific pathogen effectors. The Arabidopsis TIR (Toll-Interleukin-1 receptor domain)-NLR (denoted TNL) gene pair, RPS4 and RRS1, confers resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst) strain DC3000 expressing the Type III-secreted effector, AvrRps4. Nuclear accumulation of AvrRps4, RPS4, and the TNL resistance regulator EDS1 is necessary for ETI. RRS1 possesses a C-terminal "WRKY" transcription factor DNA binding domain suggesting that important RPS4/RRS1 recognition and/or resistance signaling events occur at the nuclear chromatin. In Arabidopsis accession Ws-0, the RPS4(Ws) /RRS1(Ws) allelic pair governs resistance to Pst/AvrRps4 accompanied by host programed cell death (pcd). In accession Col-0, RPS4(Col) /RRS1(Col) effectively limits Pst/AvrRps4 growth without pcd. Constitutive expression of HA-StrepII tagged RPS4(Col) (in a 35S:RPS4-HS line) confers temperature-conditioned EDS1-dependent auto-immunity. Here we show that a high (28°C, non-permissive) to moderate (19°C, permissive) temperature shift of 35S:RPS4-HS plants can be used to follow defense-related transcriptional dynamics without a pathogen effector trigger. By comparing responses of 35S:RPS4-HS with 35S:RPS4-HS rrs1-11 and 35S:RPS4-HS eds1-2 mutants, we establish that RPS4(Col) auto-immunity depends entirely on EDS1 and partially on RRS1(Col) . Examination of gene expression microarray data over 24 h after temperature shift reveals a mainly quantitative RRS1(Col) contribution to up- or down-regulation of a small subset of RPS4(Col) -reprogramed, EDS1-dependent genes. We find significant over-representation of WRKY transcription factor binding W-box cis-elements within the promoters of these genes. Our data show that RRS1(Col) contributes to temperature-conditioned RPS4(Col) auto-immunity and are consistent with activated RPS4(Col) engaging RRS1(Col) for resistance

  20. Characteristics of the somatic hypermutation in the Camelus dromedarius T cell receptor gamma (TRG) and delta (TRD) variable domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarese, Salvatrice; Vaccarelli, Giovanna; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Tasco, Gianluca; Consiglio, Arianna; Casadio, Rita; Linguiti, Giovanna; Antonacci, Rachele

    2014-10-01

    In previous reports, we had shown in Camelus dromedarius that diversity in T cell receptor gamma (TRG) and delta (TRD) variable domains can be generated by somatic hypermutation (SHM). In the present paper, we further the previous finding by analyzing 85 unique spleen cDNA sequences encoding a total of 331 mutations from a single animal, and comparing the properties of the mutation profiles of dromedary TRG and TRD variable domains. The transition preference and the significant mutation frequency in the AID motifs (dgyw/wrch and wa/tw) demonstrate a strong dependence of the enzymes mediating SHM in TRG and TRD genes of dromedary similar to that of immunoglobulin genes in mammals. Overall, results reveal no asymmetry in the motifs targeting, i.e. mutations are equally distributed among g:c and a:t base pairs and replacement mutations are favored at the AID motifs, whereas neutral mutations appear to be more prone to accumulate in bases outside of the motifs. A detailed analysis of clonal lineages in TRG and TRD cDNA sequences also suggests that clonal expansion of mutated productive rearrangements may be crucial in shaping the somatic diversification in the dromedary. This is confirmed by the fact that our structural models, computed by adopting a comparative procedure, are consistent with the possibility that, irrespective of where (in the CDR-IMGT or in FR-IMGT) the diversity was generated by mutations, both clonal expansion and selection seem to be strictly related to an enhanced structural stability of the γδ subunits.

  1. Insulin Resistance Induced by Hyperinsulinemia Coincides with a Persistent Alteration at the Insulin Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Karyn J.; Maddux, Betty A.; Szary, Jaroslaw; Youngren, Jack F.; Goldfine, Ira D.; Schaufele, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance, the diminished response of target tissues to insulin, is associated with the metabolic syndrome and a predisposition towards diabetes in a growing proportion of the worldwide population. Under insulin resistant states, the cellular response of the insulin signaling pathway is diminished and the body typically responds by increasing serum insulin concentrations to maintain insulin signaling. Some evidence indicates that the increased insulin concentration may itself further dampen insulin response. If so, insulin resistance would worsen as the level of circulating insulin increases during compensation, which could contribute to the transition of insulin resistance to more severe disease. Here, we investigated the consequences of excess insulin exposure to insulin receptor (IR) activity. Cells chronically exposed to insulin show a diminished the level of IR tyrosine and serine autophosphorylation below that observed after short-term insulin exposure. The diminished IR response did not originate with IR internalization since IR amounts at the cell membrane were similar after short- and long-term insulin incubation. Förster resonance energy transfer between fluorophores attached to the IR tyrosine kinase (TK) domain showed that a change in the TK domain occurred upon prolonged, but not short-term, insulin exposure. Even though the altered ‘insulin refractory’ IR TK FRET and IR autophosphorylation levels returned to baseline (non-stimulated) levels after wash-out of the original insulin stimulus, subsequent short-term exposure to insulin caused immediate re-establishment of the insulin-refractory levels. This suggests that some cell-based ‘memory’ of chronic hyperinsulinemic exposure acts directly at the IR. An improved understanding of that memory may help define interventions to reset the IR to full insulin responsiveness and impede the progression of insulin resistance to more severe disease states. PMID:25259572

  2. An Activating Mutation in sos-1 Identifies Its Dbl Domain as a Critical Inhibitor of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Pathway during Caenorhabditis elegans Vulval Development▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modzelewska, Katarzyna; Elgort, Marc G.; Huang, Jingyu; Jongeward, Gregg; Lauritzen, Amara; Yoon, Charles H.; Sternberg, Paul W.; Moghal, Nadeem

    2007-01-01

    Proper regulation of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)-Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways is critical for normal development and the prevention of cancer. SOS is a dual-function guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that catalyzes exchange on Ras and Rac. Although the physiologic role of SOS and its CDC25 domain in RTK-mediated Ras activation is well established, the in vivo function of its Dbl Rac GEF domain is less clear. We have identified a novel gain-of-function missense mutation in the Dbl domain of Caenorhabditis elegans SOS-1 that promotes epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling in vivo. Our data indicate that a major developmental function of the Dbl domain is to inhibit EGF-dependent MAPK activation. The amount of inhibition conferred by the Dbl domain is equal to that of established trans-acting inhibitors of the EGFR pathway, including c-Cbl and RasGAP, and more than that of MAPK phosphatase. In conjunction with molecular modeling, our data suggest that the C. elegans mutation, as well as an equivalent mutation in human SOS1, activates the MAPK pathway by disrupting an autoinhibitory function of the Dbl domain on Ras activation. Our work suggests that functionally similar point mutations in humans could directly contribute to disease. PMID:17339331

  3. An activating mutation in sos-1 identifies its Dbl domain as a critical inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor pathway during Caenorhabditis elegans vulval development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modzelewska, Katarzyna; Elgort, Marc G; Huang, Jingyu; Jongeward, Gregg; Lauritzen, Amara; Yoon, Charles H; Sternberg, Paul W; Moghal, Nadeem

    2007-05-01

    Proper regulation of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)-Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways is critical for normal development and the prevention of cancer. SOS is a dual-function guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that catalyzes exchange on Ras and Rac. Although the physiologic role of SOS and its CDC25 domain in RTK-mediated Ras activation is well established, the in vivo function of its Dbl Rac GEF domain is less clear. We have identified a novel gain-of-function missense mutation in the Dbl domain of Caenorhabditis elegans SOS-1 that promotes epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling in vivo. Our data indicate that a major developmental function of the Dbl domain is to inhibit EGF-dependent MAPK activation. The amount of inhibition conferred by the Dbl domain is equal to that of established trans-acting inhibitors of the EGFR pathway, including c-Cbl and RasGAP, and more than that of MAPK phosphatase. In conjunction with molecular modeling, our data suggest that the C. elegans mutation, as well as an equivalent mutation in human SOS1, activates the MAPK pathway by disrupting an autoinhibitory function of the Dbl domain on Ras activation. Our work suggests that functionally similar point mutations in humans could directly contribute to disease.

  4. A TIR domain receptor-associated protein (TIRAP) variant SNP (rs8177374) confers protection against premature birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karody, V R; Le, M; Nelson, S; Meskin, K; Klemm, S; Simpson, P; Hines, R; Sampath, V

    2013-05-01

    To investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding the Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway modulate susceptibility to preterm birth (PTB). Prospective case-control study examining the contribution of nine TLR SNPs to PTB (<37 weeks) and PTB <32 weeks. Genotyping was done on neonatal blood using a multiplexed single-base extension assay. Chi-square test, Fischer's exact test and classification trees were used for data analysis. Preterm infants (n=177) were more likely to be African American (P=0.02), and were more likely to be born to mothers who smoked (P=0.007), had pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH; P=0.002) and placental abruption (P=0.0004) when compared with term infants (n=146). The TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, TLR9, nuclear factor-kappa B1 (NFκB1), NFκBIA and IRAK1 variants were not associated with PTB whereas the TIR domain receptor-associated protein (TIRAP) variant was more prevalent in term infants when compared with preterm infants born <32 weeks (P=0.004). PTB <32 weeks was more prevalent in infants without the TIRAP variant whose mothers had PIH and did not smoke (P=0.001). Presence of the TIRAP variant protected against PTB <32 weeks (P=0.015) in Caucasian infants. In our study, a TLR pathway adapter variant (TIRAP (rs8177374)) protected against PTB<32 weeks, supporting our hypothesis that genetic variation in the innate immune signaling pathway contributes to altered risk of PTB.

  5. Crystal Structure of the Receptor-Binding Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type HA, Also Known as Type FA or H

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guorui Yao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs, which have been exploited as cosmetics and muscle-disorder treatment medicines for decades, are well known for their extreme neurotoxicity to humans. They pose a potential bioterrorism threat because they cause botulism, a flaccid muscular paralysis-associated disease that requires immediate antitoxin treatment and intensive care over a long period of time. In addition to the existing seven established BoNT serotypes (BoNT/A–G, a new mosaic toxin type termed BoNT/HA (aka type FA or H was reported recently. Sequence analyses indicate that the receptor-binding domain (HC of BoNT/HA is ~84% identical to that of BoNT/A1. However, BoNT/HA responds differently to some potent BoNT/A-neutralizing antibodies (e.g., CR2 that target the HC. Therefore, it raises a serious concern as to whether BoNT/HA poses a new threat to our biosecurity. In this study, we report the first high-resolution crystal structure of BoNT/HA-HC at 1.8 Å. Sequence and structure analyses reveal that BoNT/HA and BoNT/A1 are different regarding their binding to cell-surface receptors including both polysialoganglioside (PSG and synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2 (SV2. Furthermore, the new structure also provides explanations for the ~540-fold decreased affinity of antibody CR2 towards BoNT/HA compared to BoNT/A1. Taken together, these new findings advance our understanding of the structure and function of this newly identified toxin at the molecular level, and pave the way for the future development of more effective countermeasures.

  6. MRT-92 inhibits Hedgehog signaling by blocking overlapping binding sites in the transmembrane domain of the Smoothened receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Lucile; Faure, Helene; Roudaut, Hermine; Schoenfelder, Angele; Mann, Andre; Girard, Nicolas; Bihannic, Laure; Ayrault, Olivier; Petricci, Elena; Taddei, Maurizio; Rognan, Didier; Ruat, Martial

    2015-05-01

    The Smoothened (Smo) receptor, a member of class F G protein-coupled receptors, is the main transducer of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway implicated in a wide range of developmental and adult processes. Smo is the target of anticancer drugs that bind to a long and narrow cavity in the 7-transmembrane (7TM) domain. X-ray structures of human Smo (hSmo) bound to several ligands have revealed 2 types of 7TM-directed antagonists: those binding mostly to extracellular loops (site 1, e.g., LY2940680) and those penetrating deeply in the 7TM cavity (site 2, e.g., SANT-1). Here we report the development of the acylguanidine MRT-92, which displays subnanomolar antagonist activity against Smo in various Hh cell-based assays. MRT-92 inhibits rodent cerebellar granule cell proliferation induced by Hh pathway activation through pharmacologic (half maximal inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 0.4 nM) or genetic manipulation. Using [(3)H]MRT-92 (Kd = 0.3 nM for hSmo), we created a comprehensive framework for the interaction of small molecule modulators with hSmo and for understanding chemoresistance linked to hSmo mutations. Guided by molecular docking and site-directed mutagenesis data, our work convincingly confirms that MRT-92 simultaneously recognized and occupied both sites 1 and 2. Our data demonstrate the existence of a third type of Smo antagonists, those entirely filling the Smo binding cavity from the upper extracellular part to the lower cytoplasmic-proximal subpocket. Our studies should help design novel potent Smo antagonists and more effective therapeutic strategies for treating Hh-linked cancers and associated chemoresistance. © FASEB.

  7. Crystal Structure of the Receptor-Binding Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type HA, Also Known as Type FA or H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Guorui; Lam, Kwok-ho; Perry, Kay; Weisemann, Jasmin; Rummel, Andreas; Jin, Rongsheng (Cornell); (Dusseldorf); (UCI)

    2017-03-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), which have been exploited as cosmetics and muscle-disorder treatment medicines for decades, are well known for their extreme neurotoxicity to humans. They pose a potential bioterrorism threat because they cause botulism, a flaccid muscular paralysis-associated disease that requires immediate antitoxin treatment and intensive care over a long period of time. In addition to the existing seven established BoNT serotypes (BoNT/A–G), a new mosaic toxin type termed BoNT/HA (aka type FA or H) was reported recently. Sequence analyses indicate that the receptor-binding domain (HC) of BoNT/HA is ~84% identical to that of BoNT/A1. However, BoNT/HA responds differently to some potent BoNT/A-neutralizing antibodies (e.g., CR2) that target the HC. Therefore, it raises a serious concern as to whether BoNT/HA poses a new threat to our biosecurity. In this study, we report the first high-resolution crystal structure of BoNT/HA-HC at 1.8 Å. Sequence and structure analyses reveal that BoNT/HA and BoNT/A1 are different regarding their binding to cell-surface receptors including both polysialoganglioside (PSG) and synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2 (SV2). Furthermore, the new structure also provides explanations for the ~540-fold decreased affinity of antibody CR2 towards BoNT/HA compared to BoNT/A1. Taken together, these new findings advance our understanding of the structure and function of this newly identified toxin at the molecular level, and pave the way for the future development of more effective countermeasures

  8. Tyrosine kinase discoidin domain receptors DDR1 and DDR2 are coordinately deregulated in triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toy, Kathy A; Valiathan, Rajeshwari R; Núñez, Fernando; Kidwell, Kelley M; Gonzalez, Maria E; Fridman, Rafael; Kleer, Celina G

    2015-02-01

    Receptor kinases Discoidin Domain Receptors (DDRs) 1 and 2 are emerging as new therapeutic targets in breast cancer (BC). However, the expression of DDR proteins during BC progression and their association with BC subtypes remain poorly defined. Herein we report the first comprehensive immunohistochemical analyses of DDR protein expression in a wide range of breast tissues. DDR1 and DDR2 expression was investigated by immunohistochemistry in 218 samples of normal breast (n = 10), ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS, n = 10), and invasive carcinomas (n = 198), arrayed in tissue microarrays with comprehensive clinical and follow-up information. Staining was evaluated for cell type, subcellular localization, percentage and intensity (scores 1-4), and association with disease subtype and outcome. In normal epithelium and DCIS, DDR1 was highly expressed, while DDR2 was negative in normal epithelium, and in DCIS it localized to cells at the epithelial-stromal interface. Of the 198 invasive carcinomas, DDR1 was high in 87 (44 %) and low in 103 (52 %), and DDR2 was high in 110 (56 %) and low in 87 (44 %). High DDR2 was associated with high tumor grade (P = 0.002), triple-negative subtype (TNBC) (P DDR2(High) profile significantly associated with TNBC, compared to luminal tumors (P = 0.012), and with worse overall survival. In conclusion, DDR2 upregulation occurs in DCIS, before stromal invasion, and may reflect epithelial-stromal cross-talk. A DDR1(Low)/DDR2(High) protein profile is associated with TNBC and may identify invasive carcinomas with worse prognosis.

  9. Collagen advanced glycation inhibits its Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2)-mediated induction of lysyl oxidase in osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Roozbeh; Sodek, Katharine L; Faibish, Michael; Trackman, Philip C

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes increases the risk of bone fracture. Organic and inorganic bone extracellular matrix components determine bone strength. Previous studies indicate that in diabetes, glycation of collagen causes abnormal arrangements of collagen molecules and fragile bones. Diabetic bone fragility is additionally attributed to reduced levels of lysyl oxidase enzyme-dependent collagen cross-links. The mechanism underlying the presence of lower enzymatic collagen cross-links in diabetic bone has not been directly investigated. Here we determine in primary osteoblast cultures the regulation of lysyl oxidase protein by type I collagen and collagen modified by carboxymethylation (CML-collagen), a form of advanced glycation endproducts. Data indicate that non-glycated collagen up-regulates lysyl oxidase levels both in primary non-differentiated and in differentiating mouse and rat osteoblast cultures, while CML-collagen fails to regulate lysyl oxidase in these cells. Collagen binding to Discoidin Domain Receptor-2 (DDR2) mediates lysyl oxidase increases, determined in DDR2 shRNA knockdown studies. DDR2 binding and activation were disrupted by collagen glycation, pointing to a mechanism for the diminished levels of lysyl oxidase and consequently low lysyl oxidase-derived cross-links in diabetic bone. Our studies indicate that collagen-integrin interactions may not play a major role in up-regulating lysyl oxidase. Furthermore, non-collagenous ligands for the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) failed to alter lysyl oxidase levels. Taken together with published studies a new understanding emerges in which diabetes- and age-dependent inhibition of normal collagen-stimulated DDR2- and integrin-signaling, and independent advanced glycation-stimulated RAGE-signaling, each contributes to different aspects of diabetic osteopenia.

  10. Downregulation of discoidin domain receptor 2 in A375 human melanoma cells reduces its experimental liver metastasis ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiola, Iker; Villacé, Patricia; Basaldua, Iratxe; Olaso, Elvira

    2011-10-01

    Discoidin domain receptors (DDR1 and DDR2) are tyrosine kinase receptors for fibrillar collagen implicated in postnatal development, tissue repair, and primary and metastatic cancer progression. While DDR1 has been described in tumor cells, DDR2 has been localized in the tumor stroma, but its presence in the tumor cells remains unknown. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of DDR2 signaling in tumor cells during hepatic metastasis progression. DDR2 expression and phosphorylation in cultured human A375 melanoma cells was documented by Western blot analysis. A375 cells were stably transfected with a small interfering RNA (siRNA) against DDR2 and two clones were selected: A375R2-70 and A375R2-40, with 70 and 40% of the DDR2 protein expression respectively, compared to mock-transfected cells (A375R2-100). Development of experimental liver metastasis by intrasplenic inoculation of A375R2-70 and A37R2-40 clones was reduced by 60 and 75%, respectively, measured as tumor volume, compared to livers injected with A375R2-100 cells. Accordingly, A375R2-70 and A37R2-40 clones showed reduced in vitro gelatinase activity and JNK phosphorylation, compared to mock transfected cells, with maximal inhibition in A375R2-40. Additionally, A375 melanoma, SK-HEP hepatoma and HT-29 colon carcinoma human cell lines transiently transfected with siRNA against DDR2 also showed reduced proliferation and migration rates compared to mock-transfected ones. In conclusion, DDR2 promotes A375 melanoma metastasis to the liver and the underlying mechanism implicates regulation of metalloproteinase release, cell growth and chemotactic invasion of the host tissue.

  11. The anti-angiogenic role of discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) in laser-induced choroidal neovascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tong; Zhu, Jie; Bu, Xin; Zhao, Hu; Zhang, Shuya; Chang, Yuan; Li, Rong; Yao, Libo; Wang, Yusheng; Su, Jin

    2015-02-01

    Choroidal neovascularization (CNV), an aberrant growth of blood vessels in the choroid layer of the eye, is a major cause of vision loss. In view of our recent finding that discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2), a collagen-binding receptor tyrosine kinase, is involved in control of vascular endothelial activity and tumor angiogenesis, the present study aims to investigate whether and how DDR2 affects the pathogenesis of CNV. We initially found that a spontaneous DDR2 mutant mouse colony (slie) exhibited enhanced amplitude of laser-induced CNV. The inhibitory role of DDR2 in CNV development was further confirmed by experiments through intravitreous injection of DDR2 small interference RNA (siRNA) or DDR2-expressing adenovirus. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and immunoblot analysis showed that DDR2 regulates the expression of several major pro-angiogenic factors in the laser-injured choroid as well as in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. In addition, it was demonstrated that the CNV-induced increases in the phosphorylation levels of Akt and mTOR were affected by the upregulation or downregulation of DDR2. Thus, the data from this study for the first time revealed that DDR2 negatively regulates the development of experimental CNV in vivo, which may provide a novel target for preventing human pathological ocular neovascularization. Key messages: DDR2 does not affect retinal development. DDR2 inhibits laser-induced CNV. DDR2 regulates angiogenic factor expression in CNV lesion as well as in RPE cells. DDR2 is involved in modulation of CNV-induced activation of PI3K pathway.

  12. Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 Mediates Collagen-Induced Activation of Membrane-Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase in Human Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majkowska, Iwona; Shitomi, Yasuyuki; Ito, Noriko; Gray, Nathanael S; Itoh, Yoshifumi

    2017-03-07

    Membrane-Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is a membrane-bound MMP that is highly expressed in cells with invading capacity including fibroblasts and invasive cancer cell. A potential physiological stimulus for MT1-MMP expression is fibrillar collagen, and it has been shown that it upregulates both MT1-MMP gene and functions in various cell types. However, the mechanisms of collagen-mediated MT1-MMP activation is not clearly understood. In this study we identified discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) as a crucial receptor that mediates this process in human fibroblasts. Knocking down DDR2, but not β1 integrin subunit, a common subunit for all collagen-binding integrins, inhibited collagen-induced activation of proMMP-2 and upregulation of MT1-MMP at the gene and protein level. Interestingly DDR2 knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of DDR2 also inhibited MT1-MMP-dependent cellular degradation of collagen film, suggesting that cell surface collagen degradation by MT1-MMP involves DDR2-mediated collagen signalling. This DDR2-mediated mechanism is only present in non-transformed mesenchymal cells, as collagen-induced MT1-MMP activation in HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells and MT1-MMP function in MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells were not affected by DDR kinase inhibition. DDR2 activation was found to be noticeably more effective when cells were stimulated by collagen without non-helical telopeptides region compared to intact collagen fibrils. Those data suggest that DDR2 is a microenvironmental sensor that regulates fibroblasts migration in collagen-rich environment.

  13. Association between SAP and FynT: Inducible SH3 domain-mediated interaction controlled by engagement of the SLAM receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Riyan; Latour, Sylvain; Shi, Xiaochu; Veillette, André

    2006-08-01

    SAP is an intracellular adaptor molecule composed almost exclusively of an SH2 domain. It is mutated in patients with X-linked lymphoproliferative disease, a human immunodeficiency. Several immune abnormalities were also identified in SAP-deficient mice. By way of its SH2 domain, SAP interacts with tyrosine-based motifs in the cytoplasmic domain of SLAM family receptors. SAP promotes SLAM family receptor-induced protein tyrosine phosphorylation, due to its capacity to recruit the Src-related kinase FynT. This unusual property relies on the existence of a second binding surface in the SAP SH2 domain, centered on arginine 78 of SAP, that binds directly to the FynT SH3 domain. Herein, we wanted to further understand the mechanisms controlling the interaction between SLAM-SAP and FynT. Our experiments showed that, unlike conventional associations mediated by SH3 domains, the interaction of the FynT SH3 domain with SLAM-SAP was strictly inducible. It was absolutely dependent on engagement of SLAM by extracellular ligands. We obtained evidence that this inducibility was not due to increased binding of SLAM to SAP following SLAM engagement. Furthermore, it could occur independently of any appreciable SLAM-dependent biochemical signal. In fact, our data indicated that the induced association of the FynT SH3 domain with SLAM-SAP was triggered by a change in the conformation of SLAM-associated SAP caused by SLAM engagement. Together, these data elucidate further the events initiating SLAM-SAP signaling in immune cells. Moreover, they identify a strictly inducible interaction mediated by an SH3 domain.

  14. Phosphorylation of the rat Ins(1,4,5)P₃ receptor at T930 within the coupling domain decreases its affinity to Ins(1,4,5)P₃.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun, Shirley; Sun, Lu; Hubrack, Satanay; Yule, David; Machaca, Khaled

    2012-01-01

    The Ins(1,4,5)P 3 receptor acts as a central hub for Ca ( 2+) signaling by integrating multiple signaling modalities into Ca ( 2+) release from intracellular stores downstream of G-protein and tyrosine kinase-coupled receptor stimulation. As such, the Ins(1,4,5)P 3 receptor plays fundamental roles in cellular physiology. The regulation of the Ins(1,4,5)P 3 receptor is complex and involves protein-protein interactions, post-translational modifications, allosteric modulation, and regulation of its sub-cellular distribution. Phosphorylation has been implicated in the sensitization of Ins(1,4,5)P 3-dependent Ca ( 2+) release observed during oocyte maturation. Here we investigate the role of phosphorylation at T-930, a residue phosphorylated specifically during meiosis. We show that a phosphomimetic mutation at T-930 of the rat Ins(1,4,5)P 3 receptor results in decreased Ins(1,4,5)P 3-dependent Ca ( 2+) release and lowers the Ins(1,4,5)P 3 binding affinity of the receptor. These data, coupled to the sensitization of Ins(1,4,5)P 3-dependent Ca ( 2+) release during meiosis, argue that phosphorylation within the coupling domain of the Ins(1,4,5)P 3 receptor acts in a combinatorial fashion to regulate Ins(1,4,5)P 3 receptor function.

  15. Inherent dynamics of head domain correlates with ATP-recognition of P2X4 receptors: insights gained from molecular simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Dong Huang

    Full Text Available P2X receptors are ATP-gated ion channels involved in many physiological functions, and determination of ATP-recognition (AR of P2X receptors will promote the development of new therapeutic agents for pain, inflammation, bladder dysfunction and osteoporosis. Recent crystal structures of the zebrafish P2X4 (zfP2X4 receptor reveal a large ATP-binding pocket (ABP located at the subunit interface of zfP2X4 receptors, which is occupied by a conspicuous cluster of basic residues to recognize triphosphate moiety of ATP. Using the engineered affinity labeling and molecular modeling, at least three sites (S1, S2 and S3 within ABP have been identified that are able to recognize the adenine ring of ATP, implying the existence of at least three distinct AR modes in ABP. The open crystal structure of zfP2X4 confirms one of three AR modes (named AR1, in which the adenine ring of ATP is buried into site S1 while the triphosphate moiety interacts with clustered basic residues. Why architecture of ABP favors AR1 not the other two AR modes still remains unexplored. Here, we examine the potential role of inherent dynamics of head domain, a domain involved in ABP formation, in AR determinant of P2X4 receptors. In silico docking and binding free energy calculation revealed comparable characters of three distinct AR modes. Inherent dynamics of head domain, especially the downward motion favors the preference of ABP for AR1 rather than AR2 and AR3. Along with the downward motion of head domain, the closing movement of loop139-146 and loop169-183, and structural rearrangements of K70, K72, R298 and R143 enabled ABP to discriminate AR1 from other AR modes. Our observations suggest the essential role of head domain dynamics in determining AR of P2X4 receptors, allowing evaluation of new strategies aimed at developing specific blockers/allosteric modulators by preventing the dynamics of head domain associated with both AR and channel activation of P2X4 receptors.

  16. Modeling transmembrane domain dimers/trimers of plexin receptors: implications for mechanisms of signal transmission across the membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqun Zhang

    Full Text Available Single-pass transmembrane (TM receptors transmit signals across lipid bilayers by helix association or by configurational changes within preformed dimers. The structure determination for such TM regions is challenging and has mostly been accomplished by NMR spectroscopy. Recently, the computational prediction of TM dimer structures is becoming recognized for providing models, including alternate conformational states, which are important for receptor regulation. Here we pursued a strategy to predict helix oligomers that is based on packing considerations (using the PREDDIMER webserver and is followed by a refinement of structures, utilizing microsecond all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We applied this method to plexin TM receptors, a family of 9 human proteins, involved in the regulation of cell guidance and motility. The predicted models show that, overall, the preferences identified by PREDDIMER are preserved in the unrestrained simulations and that TM structures are likely to be diverse across the plexin family. Plexin-B1 and -B3 TM helices are regular and tend to associate, whereas plexin-A1, -A2, -A3, -A4, -C1 and -D1 contain sequence elements, such as poly-Glycine or aromatic residues that distort helix conformation and association. Plexin-B2 does not form stable dimers due to the presence of TM prolines. No experimental structural information on the TM region is available for these proteins, except for plexin-C1 dimeric and plexin-B1 - trimeric structures inferred from X-ray crystal structures of the intracellular regions. Plexin-B1 TM trimers utilize Ser and Thr sidechains for interhelical contacts. We also modeled the juxta-membrane (JM region of plexin-C1 and plexin-B1 and show that it synergizes with the TM structures. The structure and dynamics of the JM region and TM-JM junction provide determinants for the distance and distribution of the intracellular domains, and for their binding partners relative to the membrane. The

  17. Clinical and Pharmacotherapeutic Relevance of the Double-Chain Domain of the Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blocker Olmesartan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiya, Yoshihiro; Miura, Shin-ichiro; Fujino, Masahiro; Imaizumi, Satoshi; Karnik, Sadashiva S.; Saku, Keijiro

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor blocker (ARB) olmesartan has two important interactions to evoke inverse agonism (IA). We refer to these interactions as the “double-chain domain (DCD).” Since the clinical pharmacotherapeutic relevance of olmesartan is still unclear, we examined these effects in rats and humans. We analyzed the effects at an advanced stage of renal insufficiency in Dahl salt-sensitive hypertensive rats (Study 1). Rats were fed a high-salt diet from age 9 weeks and arbitrarily assigned to three treatment regimens at age 16 to 21 weeks: olmesartan (2 mg/kg/day) with DCD, a compound related to olmesartan without DCD (6 mg/kg/day, R-239470) or placebo. We also compared the depressor effects of olmesartan to those of other ARBs in patients with essential hypertension (Study 2). Thirty essential hypertensive outpatients who had been receiving ARBs other than olmesartan were recruited for this study. Our protocol was approved by the hospital ethics committee and informed consent was obtained from all patients 12 weeks prior to switching from ARBs other than olmesartan to olmesartan. In Study 1, olmesartan induced a more prominent suppression of the ratio of urinary protein excretion to creatinine at age 21 weeks without lowering blood pressure among the three groups. In Study 2, the depressor effect of olmesartan was significantly stronger than those of other ARBs, which do not contain the DCD. These additive effects by olmesartan may be due to DCD. PMID:20374187

  18. Intact Pericellular Matrix of Articular Cartilage Is Required for Unactivated Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 in the Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lin; Polur, Ilona; Servais, Jacqueline M.; Hsieh, Sirena; Lee, Peter L.; Goldring, Mary B.; Li, Yefu

    2011-01-01

    Increased expression of the discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) results from its interaction with collagen type II. This induces expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, leading to osteoarthritis (OA). To investigate the impact of the pericellular matrix of chondrocytes on DDR2, we generated a mouse model with inducible overexpression of DDR2 in cartilage. Conditional overexpression of DDR2 in mature mouse articular cartilage was controlled via the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein promoter using the Tet-Off-inducible system. Doxycycline was withdrawn at 1 month of age, and knee joints were examined at 2, 3, and 4 months of age. Microsurgery was performed on 3-month-old transgenic mice overexpressing DDR2 to destabilize the medial meniscus, and serial paraffin sections were examined at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery. DDR2 expression increased in the knee joints of transgenic mice. However, the increased DDR2 did not induce MMP-13 expression. No OA-like changes were observed in the transgenic mice at the age of 4 months. When transgenic mice were subjected to destabilizing of the medial meniscus, we observed accelerated progression to OA, which was associated with DDR2 activation. Therefore, conditionally overexpressing DDR2 in the mature articular cartilage of mouse knee joints requires activation to induce OA, and altered biomechanical stress can accelerate the onset of cartilage loss and progression to OA in transgenic mice. PMID:21855682

  19. Regulation of Murine Ovarian Epithelial Carcinoma by Vaccination against the Cytoplasmic Domain of Anti-Müllerian Hormone Receptor II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cagri Sakalar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-Müllerian hormone receptor, type II (AMHR2, is a differentiation protein expressed in 90% of primary epithelial ovarian carcinomas (EOCs, the most deadly gynecologic malignancy. We propose that AMHR2 may serve as a useful target for vaccination against EOC. To this end, we generated the recombinant 399-amino acid cytoplasmic domain of mouse AMHR2 (AMHR2-CD and tested its efficacy as a vaccine target in inhibiting growth of the ID8 transplantable EOC cell line in C57BL/6 mice and in preventing growth of autochthonous EOCs that occur spontaneously in transgenic mice. We found that AMHR2-CD immunization of C57BL/6 females induced a prominent antigen-specific proinflammatory CD4+ T cell response that resulted in a mild transient autoimmune oophoritis that resolved rapidly with no detectable lingering adverse effects on ovarian function. AMHR2-CD vaccination significantly inhibited ID8 tumor growth when administered either prophylactically or therapeutically, and protection against EOC growth was passively transferred into naive recipients with AMHR2-CD-primed CD4+ T cells but not with primed B cells. In addition, prophylactic AMHR2-CD vaccination of TgMISIIR-TAg transgenic mice significantly inhibited growth of autochthonous EOCs and provided a 41.7% increase in mean overall survival. We conclude that AMHR2-CD vaccination provides effective immunotherapy of EOC with relatively benign autoimmune complications.

  20. [High-efficiency expression of a receptor-binding domain of SARS-CoV spike protein in tobacco chloroplasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xue; Qi, Guangxun; Yang, Jing; Xing, Guojie; Liu, Jianfeng; Yang, Xiangdong

    2014-06-01

    Chloroplast-based expression system is promising for the hyper-expression of plant-derived recombinant therapeutic proteins and vaccines. To verify the feasibility of obtaining high-level expression of the SARS subunit vaccine and to provide a suitable plant-derived vaccine production platform against the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), a 193-amino acid fragment of SARS CoV spike protein receptor-binding domain (RBD), fused with the peptide vector cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), was expressed in tobacco chloroplasts. Codon-optimized CTB-RBD sequence was integrated into the chloroplast genome and homoplasmy was obtained, as confirmed by PCR and Southern blot analysis. Western blot showed expression of the recombinant fusion protein mostly in soluble monomeric form. Quantification of the recombinant fusion protein CTB-RBD was conducted by ELISA analysis from the transplastomic leaves at different developmental stages, attachment positions and time points in a day and the different expression levels of the CTB-RBD were observed with the highest expression of 10.2% total soluble protein obtained from mature transplastomic leaves. Taken together, our results demonstrate the feasibility of highly expressing SARS subunit vaccine RBD, indicating its potential in subsequent development of a plant-derived recombinant subunit vaccine and reagents production for antibody detection in SARS serological tests.

  1. REGULAR EXPRESSION OF DISCOIDIN DOMAIN RECEPTOR 2 IN THE IMPROVED ADJUVANT-INDUCED ANIMAL MODEL FOR RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Li; Yuan-qiang Zhang; Xin-ping Liu; Li-bo Yao; Lan Sun

    2005-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) of fibroblast-like synovial cells in improved adjuvant-induced animal (AIA) model for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to provide evidence for DDR2′s antagonist use clinically.Methods AIA was modified by administrating 0.1 mL of complete Freund′s adjuvant (CFA, mixed with 5 mg Bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccine/mL) into rats′ right hind paws and 0.125 mL tumor necrosis factor-α (2 U/mL) into right ankles and subpatellar fatty tissue. The expression of DDR2 in fibroblast-like synovial cells was assessed using immunohistochemistry,immunofluorescence histochemistry, and in situ hybridization methods. Levels of anti-collagen Ⅱ antibody were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Results Given the terms mentioned above, we found a more practical rat model, apparently decreasing immunization time (average 3-5 days). DDR2 can be detected upon the 15th day of immunization; expression gradually increased with time going on, and reaching a peak 35 days after immunization before gradually decreasing. Serum anti-collagen Ⅱ antibody showed similar expression patterns as DDR2, but reached peak later than DDR2, about 40 days after immunization.Conclusion Regular expression of DDR2 in animal models infers its important role in the pathological process of RA.

  2. Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 as a Potential Therapeutic Target for Development of Disease-Modifying Osteoarthritis Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Lauren B; Li, Yefu; Chickmagalur, Nithya S; Li, Xiaolong; Xu, Lin

    2016-11-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis disorders, but the identification of therapeutic targets to effectively prevent OA has been increasingly difficult. The goal of this investigation is to provide experimental evidence that discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) may be an ideal target for the development of disease-modifying OA drugs. Ddr2 was conditionally deleted from articular cartilage of adult mouse knee joints. Aggrecan-CreERT2;floxed Ddr2 mice, which were generated by crossing Aggrecan-CreERT2 mice with floxed Ddr2 mice, then received tamoxifen injections at the age of 8 weeks. The mice were then subjected to destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) surgery. At 8 and 16 weeks after DMM, mice were euthanized for the collection of knee joints. In a separate experiment, Aggrecan-CreERT2;floxed Ddr2 mice were subjected to DMM at the age of 10 weeks. The mice then received tamoxifen injections at 8 weeks after DMM. The mice were euthanized for the collection of knee joints at 16 weeks after DMM. The progressive process of articular cartilage degeneration was significantly delayed in the knee joints of Ddr2-deficient mice in comparison to their control littermates. Articular cartilage damage in the knee joints of the mice was associated with increased expression profiles of both Ddr2 and matrix metalloproteinase 13. These findings suggest that DDR2 may be an ideal target for the development of disease-modifying OA drugs.

  3. Intact pericellular matrix of articular cartilage is required for unactivated discoidin domain receptor 2 in the mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lin; Polur, Ilona; Servais, Jacqueline M; Hsieh, Sirena; Lee, Peter L; Goldring, Mary B; Li, Yefu

    2011-09-01

    Increased expression of the discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) results from its interaction with collagen type II. This induces expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, leading to osteoarthritis (OA). To investigate the impact of the pericellular matrix of chondrocytes on DDR2, we generated a mouse model with inducible overexpression of DDR2 in cartilage. Conditional overexpression of DDR2 in mature mouse articular cartilage was controlled via the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein promoter using the Tet-Off-inducible system. Doxycycline was withdrawn at 1 month of age, and knee joints were examined at 2, 3, and 4 months of age. Microsurgery was performed on 3-month-old transgenic mice overexpressing DDR2 to destabilize the medial meniscus, and serial paraffin sections were examined at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery. DDR2 expression increased in the knee joints of transgenic mice. However, the increased DDR2 did not induce MMP-13 expression. No OA-like changes were observed in the transgenic mice at the age of 4 months. When transgenic mice were subjected to destabilizing of the medial meniscus, we observed accelerated progression to OA, which was associated with DDR2 activation. Therefore, conditionally overexpressing DDR2 in the mature articular cartilage of mouse knee joints requires activation to induce OA, and altered biomechanical stress can accelerate the onset of cartilage loss and progression to OA in transgenic mice.

  4. Partial agonism through a zinc-Ion switch constructed between transmembrane domains III and VII in the tachykinin NK(1) receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, B; Elling, C E; Schwartz, T W

    2000-01-01

    Partly due to lack of detailed knowledge of the molecular recognition of ligands the structural basis for partial versus full agonism is not known. In the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor the agonist binding site has previously been structurally and functionally exchanged with an activating metal......-ion site located between AspIII:08-or a His residue introduced at this position in transmembrane domain (TM)-III-and a Cys residue substituted for AsnVII:06 in TM-VII. Here, this interhelical, bidentate metal-ion site is without loss of Zn(2+) affinity transferred to the tachykinin NK(1) receptor....... In contrast to the similarly mutated beta(2)-adrenergic receptor, signal transduction-i.e., inositol phosphate turnover-could be stimulated by both Zn(2+) and by the natural agonist, Substance P in the mutated NK(1) receptor. The metal-ion acted as a 25% partial agonist through binding to the bidentate zinc...

  5. Structure-based design of PDZ ligands as inhibitors of 5-HT(2A) receptor/PSD-95 PDZ1 domain interaction possessing anti-hyperalgesic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogrig, Alexandre; Dorr, Liam; Bouzidi, Naoual; Boucherle, Benjamin; Wattiez, Anne-Sophie; Cassier, Elisabeth; Vallon, Gary; Ripoche, Isabelle; Abrunhosa-Thomas, Isabelle; Marin, Philippe; Nauton, Lionel; Thery, Vincent; Courteix, Christine; Lian, Lu-Yun; Ducki, Sylvie

    2013-10-18

    Disrupting the interaction between the PDZ protein PSD-95 and the C-terminal domain of the 5-HT2A serotonin receptor has been shown to reduce hyperalgesia in a rodent model of neuropathic pain. Here, we designed and synthesized PDZ ligands capable of binding to the first PDZ domain (PDZ1) of the PSD-95 protein and evaluated their biological activity in vitro and in vivo. A series of substituted indoles was identified by docking simulations, and six novel analogues were synthesized. Three analogues displayed strong interactions with the first PDZ domain (PDZ1) of PDZ-95 in (1)H-(15)N heteronuclear single-quantum coherence (HSQC) experiments and two of them were able to inhibit the interaction between PSD-95 and the 5-HT2A receptor in vitro. We identified compound 8b as the analogue able to significantly suppress mechanical hyperalgesia in an experimental model of traumatic neuropathic pain in the rat. This effect was suppressed by the coadministration of the 5-HT2A receptor antagonist M100907, consistent with an inhibitory effect upon 5-HT2A receptor/PSD-95 interaction. Finally, we determined an NMR-restraint driven model structure for the PSD95 PDZ1/8b complex, which confirms that indole 8b binds to the putative PDZ-ligand binding site.

  6. Relative impact of residues at the intracellular and extracellular ends of the human GABAC rho1 receptor M2 domain on picrotoxinin activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carland, Jane E; Johnston, Graham A R; Chebib, Mary

    2008-02-02

    The relative impact on picrotoxinin activity of residues at the intracellular (2' and 6' residues) and extracellular (15' and 17' residues) ends of the second transmembrane (M2) domain of the human gamma-aminobutyric acid-C (GABA(C)) rho1 receptor was investigated. A series of GABA(C) rho1 subunits were produced containing either single or multiple mutations at the positions of interest. Wild-type and mutant subunits (containing one or more of the following mutations: P2'S, T6'M, I15'N, G17'H) were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and characterized using agonists, partial agonists and antagonists. Changes in agonist activity were observed for mutant receptors. Most notably, mutation at the 2' position resulted in decreased agonist potency, while mutation at the 15' and 17' residues increased agonist potency. The affinity of the competitive antagonist (1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridine-4-yl)methylphosphinic acid (TPMPA) was unchanged compared to wild-type at all mutant receptors. Of the four residues studied, mutation of residues at the 2' and 6' positions had the greatest impact on picrotoxinin activity. Inclusion of the P2'S mutation typically produced receptors with increased picrotoxinin potency, while the T6'M mutation reduced picrotoxinin potency. Picrotoxinin is a mixed antagonist at wild-type and all mutant receptors, with the exception of the double mutant rho1P2'S/T6'M receptors at which the non-competitive component was isolated. It is proposed that the contribution of M2 domain residues to picrotoxinin activity is potentially two-fold: (1) their role as a potential picrotoxinin binding site within the pore; and (2) they are critical for receptor activation properties of the receptor, thus may alter the allosteric mechanism of picrotoxinin.

  7. An anti-phospholipase A2 receptor quantitative immunoassay and epitope analysis in membranous nephropathy reveals different antigenic domains of the receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnert, Astrid; Fritzler, Marvin J; Teng, Beina; Zhang, Meifeng; Bollig, Frank; Haller, Hermann; Skoberne, Andrej; Mahler, Michael; Schiffer, Mario

    2013-01-01

    The phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) was recently discovered as a target autoantigen in patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy (IMN). Published evidence suggests that the autoantibodies directed towards a conformation dependent epitope are currently effectively detected by a cell based assay (CBA) utilizing indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) on tissue culture cells transfected with the PLA2R cDNA. Limitations of such IIF-CBA assays include observer dependent subjective evaluation of semi-quantitative test results and the protocols are not amenable to high throughput diagnostic testing. We developed a quantitative, observer independent, high throughput capture immunoassay for detecting PLA2R autoantibodies on an addressable laser bead immunoassay (ALBIA) platform. Since reactive domains of PLA2R (i.e. epitopes) could be used to improve diagnostic tests by using small peptides in various high throughput diagnostic platforms, we identified PLA2R epitopes that bound autoantibodies of IMN patients. These studies confirmed that inter-molecular epitope spreading occurs in IMN but use of the cognate synthetic peptides in immunoassays was unable to conclusively distinguish between IMN patients and normal controls. However, combinations of these peptides were able to effectively absorb anti-PLA2R reactivity in IIF-CBA and an immunoassay that employed a lysate derived from HEK cells tranfected with and overexpressing PLA2R. While we provide evidence of intermolecular epitope spreading, our data indicates that in addition to conformational epitopes, human anti-PLA2R reactivity in a commercially available CBA and an addressable laser bead immunoassay is significantly absorbed by peptides representing epitopes of PLA2R.

  8. An anti-phospholipase A2 receptor quantitative immunoassay and epitope analysis in membranous nephropathy reveals different antigenic domains of the receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Behnert

    Full Text Available The phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R was recently discovered as a target autoantigen in patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy (IMN. Published evidence suggests that the autoantibodies directed towards a conformation dependent epitope are currently effectively detected by a cell based assay (CBA utilizing indirect immunofluorescence (IIF on tissue culture cells transfected with the PLA2R cDNA. Limitations of such IIF-CBA assays include observer dependent subjective evaluation of semi-quantitative test results and the protocols are not amenable to high throughput diagnostic testing. We developed a quantitative, observer independent, high throughput capture immunoassay for detecting PLA2R autoantibodies on an addressable laser bead immunoassay (ALBIA platform. Since reactive domains of PLA2R (i.e. epitopes could be used to improve diagnostic tests by using small peptides in various high throughput diagnostic platforms, we identified PLA2R epitopes that bound autoantibodies of IMN patients. These studies confirmed that inter-molecular epitope spreading occurs in IMN but use of the cognate synthetic peptides in immunoassays was unable to conclusively distinguish between IMN patients and normal controls. However, combinations of these peptides were able to effectively absorb anti-PLA2R reactivity in IIF-CBA and an immunoassay that employed a lysate derived from HEK cells tranfected with and overexpressing PLA2R. While we provide evidence of intermolecular epitope spreading, our data indicates that in addition to conformational epitopes, human anti-PLA2R reactivity in a commercially available CBA and an addressable laser bead immunoassay is significantly absorbed by peptides representing epitopes of PLA2R.

  9. WW domain binding protein-2, an E6-associated protein interacting protein, acts as a coactivator of estrogen and progesterone receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhananjayan, Sarath C; Ramamoorthy, Sivapriya; Khan, Obaid Y; Ismail, Ayesha; Sun, Jun; Slingerland, Joyce; O'Malley, Bert W; Nawaz, Zafar

    2006-10-01

    WW domain binding protein-2 (WBP-2) was cloned as an E6-associated protein interacting protein, and its role in steroid hormone receptors functions was investigated. We show that WBP-2 specifically enhanced the transactivation functions of progesterone receptor (PR) and estrogen receptor (ER), whereas it did not have any significant effect on the androgen receptor, glucocorticoid receptor, or the activation functions of p53 and VP-16. Depletion of endogenous WBP-2 with small interfering RNAs indicated that WBP-2 was required for the proper functioning of PR and ER. We also demonstrated that WBP-2 contains an intrinsic activation domain. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrate the hormone-dependent recruitment of WBP-2 onto an estrogen-responsive promoter. Mutational analysis suggests that one of three polyproline (PY) motifs of WBP-2 is essential for its coactivation and intrinsic activation functions. We show that WBP-2 and E6-associated protein each enhance PR function, and their effect on PR action are additive when coexpressed, suggesting a common signaling pathway. In this study, we also demonstrate that the WBP-2 binding protein, Yes kinase-associated protein (YAP) enhances PR transactivation, but YAP's coactivation function is absolutely dependent on WBP-2. Taken together, our data establish the role of WBP-2 and YAP as coactivators for ER and PR transactivation pathways.

  10. A substitution in the ligand binding domain of the porcine glucocorticoid receptor affects activity of the adrenal gland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Murani

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids produced in the adrenal cortex under the control of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis play a vital role in the maintenance of basal and stress-related homeostasis and influence health and well-being. To identify loci affecting regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis in the pig we performed a genome-wide association study for two parameters of acute and long-term adrenal activity: plasma cortisol level and adrenal weight. We detected a major quantitative trait locus at the position of the glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1 - a key regulator of HPA axis activity. To determine the causal variant(s, we resequenced the coding region of NR3C1 and found three missense single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. SNP c.1829C>T, leading to a p.Ala610Val substitution in the ligand binding domain, showed large (about 0.6× and 1.2× phenotypic standard deviations for cortisol level and adrenal weight, respectively, and highly significant (2.1E-39≤log10(1/p≤1.7E+0 negative effects on both traits. We were able to replicate the association in three commercial pig populations with different breed origins. We analyzed effects of the p.Ala610Val substitution on glucocorticoid-induced transcriptional activity of porcine glucocorticoid receptor (GR in vitro and determined that the substitution introduced by SNP c.1829C>T increased sensitivity of GR by about two-fold. Finally, we found that non-coding polymorphisms in linkage disequilibrium with SNP c.1829C>T have only a minor effect on the expression of NR3C1 in tissues related to the HPA axis. Our findings provide compelling evidence that SNP c.1829C>T in porcine NR3C1 is a gain-of-function mutation with a major effect on the activity of the adrenal gland. Pigs carrying this SNP could provide a new animal model to study neurobiological and physiological consequences of genetically based GR hypersensitivity and adrenal hypofunction.

  11. Impaired dermal wound healing in discoidin domain receptor 2-deficient mice associated with defective extracellular matrix remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaso Elvira

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The wounding response relies on tightly regulated crosstalk between recruited fibroblasts and the collagenous extracellular matrix (ECM. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2 is a tyrosine kinase receptor for fibrillar collagen expressed during pathologic scarring, for example wound healing, arthritis and cancer. We have previously shown that DDR2 phosphorylation drives key wounding responses in skin fibroblasts including proliferation, chemotactic migration and secretion of both metalloproteinases and fibrillar collagen. In this study we compared healing of cutaneous wounds in DDR2+/+ and DDR2-/- mice and analyzed specific fibroblast responses. Results Cutaneous wound healing was significantly delayed in DDR2-/- mice compared with DDR2+/+ animals. Reduced α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA expression and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2 activity in the DDR2-/- wound extracts indicated defective recruitment of skin fibroblasts. DDR2-/- wounds showed decreased tensile strength during healing, which correlated with a significant reduction in collagen content and defective collagen crosslinking. Non-wounded skin in DDR2-/- mice expressed less mRNA of the crosslinking enzymes lysyl oxidase (LOX, lysyl hydroxylase1 (LH1 and matricellular 'secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine' (SPARC; also known as osteonectin. Skin fibroblasts isolated from DDR2-/- mice displayed altered mRNA expression of a cluster of collagens, proteoglycans, integrins and MMPs that have been previously correlated with DDR2 expression, and reduced LOX, LH1 and SPARC mRNA levels and proteins. Stable reconstitution of wild-type DDR2 by retroviral infection restored LOX, LH1 and SPARC mRNA and protein levels in DDR2-/- fibroblasts. Contraction of collagen gels was reduced in DDR2-/- fibroblasts, accompanied by significantly reduced phosphorylated SrcY418. Inhibition of either LOX activity by β-aminoproprionitrile or MMP activity by N-[(2R-2-(hydroxamido

  12. A dimer of the Toll-like receptor 4 cytoplasmic domain provides a specific scaffold for the recruitment of signalling adaptor proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Núñez Miguel

    Full Text Available The Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 is a class I transmembrane receptor expressed on the surface of immune system cells. TLR4 is activated by exposure to lipopolysaccharides derived from the outer membrane of Gram negative bacteria and forms part of the innate immune response in mammals. Like other class 1 receptors, TLR4 is activated by ligand induced dimerization, and recent studies suggest that this causes concerted conformational changes in the receptor leading to self association of the cytoplasmic Toll/Interleukin 1 receptor (TIR signalling domain. This homodimerization event is proposed to provide a new scaffold that is able to bind downstream signalling adaptor proteins. TLR4 uses two different sets of adaptors; TRAM and TRIF, and Mal and MyD88. These adaptor pairs couple two distinct signalling pathways leading to the activation of interferon response factor 3 (IRF-3 and nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB respectively. In this paper we have generated a structural model of the TLR4 TIR dimer and used molecular docking to probe for potential sites of interaction between the receptor homodimer and the adaptor molecules. Remarkably, both the Mal and TRAM adaptors are strongly predicted to bind at two symmetry-related sites at the homodimer interface. This model of TLR4 activation is supported by extensive functional studies involving site directed mutagenesis, inhibition by cell permeable peptides and stable protein phosphorylation of receptor and adaptor TIR domains. Our results also suggest a molecular mechanism for two recent findings, the caspase 1 dependence of Mal signalling and the protective effects conferred by the Mal polymorphism Ser180Leu.

  13. Characterization of a region of the lutropin receptor extracellular domain near transmembrane helix 1 that is important in ligand-mediated signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, C A; Narayan, P; Huang, J; Puett, D

    1999-04-01

    The lutropin receptor (LHR), a member of the G protein-coupled receptor family, contains a relatively large N-terminal extracellular domain, accounting for about half of the receptor and responsible for high affinity ligand binding, and a standard heptahelical portion with connecting loops and a C-terminal tail. LHR and the other two glycoprotein hormone receptors, i.e. the follitropin and TSH receptors, contain an invariant 10-amino acid residue sequence, FNPCEDIMGY (residues 328-337 in rat LHR), in the extracellular domain separated by only a few amino acid residues from the beginning of transmembrane helix 1. In view of the invariant nature of this region in the three glycoprotein hormone receptors and preliminary data in the literature on the importance of Glu332 and Asp333 in signal transduction, we undertook a systematic investigation of all 10 amino acid residues because this region may function as a switch or trigger for communicating ligand binding to the extracellular domain with a conformational change of the membrane-embedded C-terminal half of the receptor to activate G proteins, particularly Gs. A total of 36 single, double, and multiple replacements, as well as two deletions, of LHR were prepared and characterized in transiently transfected COS-7 cells. Of these mutants LHRs, 26 expressed on the cell surface in sufficient numbers that quantitative assessments could be made of human choriogonadotropin binding and ligand-mediated cAMP production. Replacements of Cys331 abolished ligand binding to intact cells, although binding could be detected after solubilization of the cells. Replacements of the other nine amino acid residues that did not interfere with receptor folding or trafficking had no significant effect on ligand binding affinity; however, replacements of Pro330, Glu332, and Asp333 resulted in diminished signaling, especially for the two acidic residues. An interesting observation was made in which replacement of Tyr337 with Ala or Asp, while

  14. NMR structure and action on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors of water-soluble domain of human LYNX1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Mineev, Konstantin S; D'Hoedt, Dieter; Kasheverov, Igor E; Filkin, Sergey Yu; Krivolapova, Alexandra P; Janickova, Helena; Dolezal, Vladimir; Dolgikh, Dmitry A; Arseniev, Alexander S; Bertrand, Daniel; Tsetlin, Victor I; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P

    2011-03-25

    Discovery of proteins expressed in the central nervous system sharing the three-finger structure with snake α-neurotoxins provoked much interest to their role in brain functions. Prototoxin LYNX1, having homology both to Ly6 proteins and three-finger neurotoxins, is the first identified member of this family membrane-tethered by a GPI anchor, which considerably complicates in vitro studies. We report for the first time the NMR spatial structure for the water-soluble domain of human LYNX1 lacking a GPI anchor (ws-LYNX1) and its concentration-dependent activity on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). At 5-30 μM, ws-LYNX1 competed with (125)I-α-bungarotoxin for binding to the acetylcholine-binding proteins (AChBPs) and to Torpedo nAChR. Exposure of Xenopus oocytes expressing α7 nAChRs to 1 μM ws-LYNX1 enhanced the response to acetylcholine, but no effect was detected on α4β2 and α3β2 nAChRs. Increasing ws-LYNX1 concentration to 10 μM caused a modest inhibition of these three nAChR subtypes. A common feature for ws-LYNX1 and LYNX1 is a decrease of nAChR sensitivity to high concentrations of acetylcholine. NMR and functional analysis both demonstrate that ws-LYNX1 is an appropriate model to shed light on the mechanism of LYNX1 action. Computer modeling, based on ws-LYNX1 NMR structure and AChBP x-ray structure, revealed a possible mode of ws-LYNX1 binding.

  15. NMR Structure and Action on Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors of Water-soluble Domain of Human LYNX1*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N.; Shenkarev, Zakhar O.; Shulepko, Mikhail A.; Mineev, Konstantin S.; D'Hoedt, Dieter; Kasheverov, Igor E.; Filkin, Sergey Yu.; Krivolapova, Alexandra P.; Janickova, Helena; Dolezal, Vladimir; Dolgikh, Dmitry A.; Arseniev, Alexander S.; Bertrand, Daniel; Tsetlin, Victor I.; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P.

    2011-01-01

    Discovery of proteins expressed in the central nervous system sharing the three-finger structure with snake α-neurotoxins provoked much interest to their role in brain functions. Prototoxin LYNX1, having homology both to Ly6 proteins and three-finger neurotoxins, is the first identified member of this family membrane-tethered by a GPI anchor, which considerably complicates in vitro studies. We report for the first time the NMR spatial structure for the water-soluble domain of human LYNX1 lacking a GPI anchor (ws-LYNX1) and its concentration-dependent activity on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). At 5–30 μm, ws-LYNX1 competed with 125I-α-bungarotoxin for binding to the acetylcholine-binding proteins (AChBPs) and to Torpedo nAChR. Exposure of Xenopus oocytes expressing α7 nAChRs to 1 μm ws-LYNX1 enhanced the response to acetylcholine, but no effect was detected on α4β2 and α3β2 nAChRs. Increasing ws-LYNX1 concentration to 10 μm caused a modest inhibition of these three nAChR subtypes. A common feature for ws-LYNX1 and LYNX1 is a decrease of nAChR sensitivity to high concentrations of acetylcholine. NMR and functional analysis both demonstrate that ws-LYNX1 is an appropriate model to shed light on the mechanism of LYNX1 action. Computer modeling, based on ws-LYNX1 NMR structure and AChBP x-ray structure, revealed a possible mode of ws-LYNX1 binding. PMID:21252236

  16. Kinase domain insert containing receptor promoter controlled suicide gene system selectively kills human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Yu Yang; Zong-Hai Huang; Li-Jun Lin; Zhou Li; Jing-Long Yu; Hui-Juan Song; Yong Qian; Xiao-Yan Che

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the selective killing of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by a double suicide gene under the regulation of a kinase domain insert containing receptor (KDR) promoter and mediated by an adenoviral gene vector.METHODS: Human KDR promoter was cloned by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and two recombinant adenoviral plasmids pAdKDR-CdglyTK, pAdCMV-CDglyTK were constructed according to a two-step transformation protocol. These two newly constructed plasmids were then transfected into 293 packaging cells to grow adenovirus, which were further multiplied and purified.HUVECs and LoVo cells were infected with either of the two resultant recombinant adenoviruses (AdKDR-CDglyTK and AdCMV-CDglyTK) respectively, and the infection rates were estimated by detection of green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression. Infected cells were cultured in culture media containing different concentrations of 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) and ganciclovir (GCV), and the killing effects were measured.RESULTS: The two recombinant adenoviral plasmids pAdKDR-CdglyTK, pAdCMV-CDglyTK were successfully constructed and transfected into 293 cells. The resultant recombinant adenoviruses infected cells caused similar infection rates; and the infected cells exhibited different sensitivity to the prodrugs: HUVECs infected with AdCMV-CDglyTK and LoVo cells infected with AdCMVCDglyTK were highly sensitive to the prodrugs, and HUVECs infected with AdKDR-CDglyTK were similarly sensitive but significantly more sensitive than the LoVo cells infected with AdKDR-CdglyTK (P<0.001).CONCLJSION: Selective killing of HUVECs may be achieved by gene transfer of double suicide gene under the regulation of the KDR promoter. This finding may provide an optional way to target gene therapy of malignant tumors by abrogation of tumor blood vessels.

  17. Toll-Like Receptor (TLR and Nucleosome-binding Oligomerization Domain (NOD gene polymorphisms and endometrial cancer risk

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    McEvoy Mark

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endometrial cancer is the most common gynaecological malignancy in women of developed countries. Many risk factors implicated in endometrial cancer trigger inflammatory events; therefore, alterations in immune response may predispose an individual to disease. Toll-like receptors (TLRs and nucleosome-binding oligomerization domain (NOD genes are integral to the recognition of pathogens and are highly polymorphic. For these reasons, the aim of the study was to assess the frequency of polymorphic variants in TLR and NOD genes in an Australian endometrial cancer population. Methods Ten polymorphisms were genotyped in 191 endometrial cancer cases and 291 controls using real-time PCR: NOD1 (rs2075822, rs2907749, rs2907748, NOD2 (rs5743260, rs2066844, rs2066845, TLR2 (rs5743708, TLR4 (rs4986790 and TLR9 (rs5743836, rs187084. Results Haplotype analysis revealed that the combination of the variant alleles of the two TLR9 polymorphisms, rs5743836 and rs187084, were protective for endometrial cancer risk: OR 0.11, 95% CI (0.03-0.44, p = 0.002. This result remained highly significant after adjustment for endometrial cancer risk factors and Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. There were no other associations observed for the other polymorphisms in TLR2, TLR4, NOD1 and NOD2. Conclusions The variant 'C' allele of rs5743836 causes greater TLR9 transcriptional activity compared to the 'T' allele, therefore, higher TLR9 activity may be related to efficient removal of microbial pathogens within the endometrium. Clearly, the association of these TLR9 polymorphisms and endometrial cancer risk must be further examined in an independent population. The results point towards the importance of examining immune response in endometrial tumourigenesis to understand new pathways that may be implicated in disease.

  18. Tranilast Blocks the Interaction between the Protein S100A11 and Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) V Domain and Inhibits Cell Proliferation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yen-Kai; Chou, Ruey-Hwang; Yu, Chin

    2016-01-01

    The human S100 calcium-binding protein A11 (S100A11) is a member of the S100 protein family. Once S100A11 proteins bind to calcium ions at EF-hand motifs, S100A11 changes its conformation, promoting interaction with target proteins. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) consists of three extracellular domains, including the V domain, C1 domain, and C2 domain. In this case, the V domain is the target for mutant S100A11 (mS100A11) binding. RAGE binds to the ligands, resulting in cell proliferation, cell growth, and several signal transduction cascades. We used NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy to demonstrate the interactions between mS100A11and RAGE V domain. The tranilast molecule is a drug used for treating allergic disorders. We discovered that the RAGE V domain and tranilast would interact with mS100A11 by using 1H-15N HSQC NMR titrations. According to the results, we obtained two binary complex models from the HADDOCK program, S100A11-RAGE V domain and S100A11-tranilast, respectively. We overlapped two binary complex models with the same orientation of S100A11 homodimer and demonstrated that tranilast would block the binding site between S100A11 and the RAGE V domain. We further utilized a water-soluble tetrazolium-1 assay to confirm this result. We think that the results will be potentially useful in the development of new anti-cancer drugs. PMID:27226584

  19. Tranilast Blocks the Interaction between the Protein S100A11 and Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) V Domain and Inhibits Cell Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yen-Kai; Chou, Ruey-Hwang; Yu, Chin

    2016-07-01

    The human S100 calcium-binding protein A11 (S100A11) is a member of the S100 protein family. Once S100A11 proteins bind to calcium ions at EF-hand motifs, S100A11 changes its conformation, promoting interaction with target proteins. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) consists of three extracellular domains, including the V domain, C1 domain, and C2 domain. In this case, the V domain is the target for mutant S100A11 (mS100A11) binding. RAGE binds to the ligands, resulting in cell proliferation, cell growth, and several signal transduction cascades. We used NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy to demonstrate the interactions between mS100A11and RAGE V domain. The tranilast molecule is a drug used for treating allergic disorders. We discovered that the RAGE V domain and tranilast would interact with mS100A11 by using (1)H-(15)N HSQC NMR titrations. According to the results, we obtained two binary complex models from the HADDOCK program, S100A11-RAGE V domain and S100A11-tranilast, respectively. We overlapped two binary complex models with the same orientation of S100A11 homodimer and demonstrated that tranilast would block the binding site between S100A11 and the RAGE V domain. We further utilized a water-soluble tetrazolium-1 assay to confirm this result. We think that the results will be potentially useful in the development of new anti-cancer drugs. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Distinct domains of M-T2, the myxoma virus tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor homolog, mediate extracellular TNF binding and intracellular apoptosis inhibition.

    OpenAIRE

    Schreiber, M; Sedger, L; McFadden, G

    1997-01-01

    The myxoma virus tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor homolog, M-T2, is expressed both as a secreted glycoprotein that inhibits the cytolytic activity of rabbit TNF-alpha and as an endoglycosidase H-sensitive intracellular species that prevents myxoma virus-infected CD4+ T lymphocytes from undergoing apoptosis. To compare the domains of M-T2 mediating extracellular TNF inhibition and intracellular apoptosis inhibition, recombinant myxoma viruses expressing nested C-terminal truncations of M-T...

  1. Loss of Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 Promotes Hepatic Fibrosis after Chronic Carbon Tetrachloride through Altered Paracrine Interactions between Hepatic Stellate Cells and Liver-Associated Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Olaso, Elvira; ARTETA, BEATRIZ; BENEDICTO, AITOR; Crende, Olatz; Friedman, Scott L.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) interact with fibrillar collagen through the discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) in acute hepatic injury, generating increased fibrosis. However, the contribution of DDR2 signaling to chronic liver fibrosis in vivo is unclear, despite its relevance to chronic human liver disease. We administered carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) to DDR2+/+ and DDR2−/− mice twice weekly, and liver tissues and isolated HSCs were analyzed. In contrast to changes seen in acute injury, after...

  2. Mutational analysis of the cytoplasmic tail of the human transferrin receptor. Identification of a sub-domain that is required for rapid endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gironès, N; Alverez, E; Seth, A; Lin, I M; Latour, D A; Davis, R J

    1991-10-05

    It has been reported that the sequence Tyr20-X-Arg-Phe23 present within the cytoplasmic tail of the transferrin receptor may represent a tyrosine internalization signal (Collawn, J.F., Stangel, M., Kuhn, L.A., Esekogwu, V., Jing, S., Trowbridge, I.S., and Tainer, J. A. (1990) Cell 63, 1061-1072). However, as Tyr20 is not conserved between species (Alvarez, E., Gironès, N., and Davis, R. J. (1990) Biochem. J. 267, 31-35), the functional role of the putative tyrosine internalization signal is not clear. To address this question, we constructed a series of 32 deletions and point mutations within the cytoplasmic tail of the human transferrin receptor. The effect of these mutations on the apparent first order rate constant for receptor endocytosis was examined. It was found that the region of the cytoplasmic tail that is proximal to the transmembrane domain (residues 28-58) is dispensable for rapid endocytosis. In contrast, the distal region of the cytoplasmic tail (residues 1-27) was found to be both necessary and sufficient for the rapid internalization of the transferrin receptor. The region identified includes Tyr20-X-Arg-Phe23, but is significantly larger than this tetrapeptide. It is therefore likely that structural information in addition to the proposed tyrosine internalization signal is required for endocytosis. To test this hypothesis, we investigated whether a heterologous tyrosine internalization signal (from the low density lipoprotein receptor) could function to cause the rapid endocytosis of the transferrin receptor. It was observed that this heterologous tyrosine internalization signal did not allow rapid endocytosis. We conclude that the putative tyrosine internalization signal (Tyr20-Thr-Arg-Phe23) is not sufficient to determine rapid endocytosis of the transferrin receptor. The data reported here indicate that the transferrin receptor internalization signal is formed by a larger cytoplasmic tail structure located at the amino terminus of the receptor.

  3. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the BRI1 receptor kinase occurs via a posttranslational modification and is activated by the juxtamembrane domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    In metazoans, receptor kinases control many essential processes related to growth and development and response to the environment. The receptor kinases in plants and animals are structurally similar but evolutionarily distinct from one another, and thus while most animal receptor kinases are tyrosin...

  4. Inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling by a soluble collagen-derived frizzled domain interacting with Wnt3a and the receptors frizzled 1 and 8.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismaïl Hendaoui

    Full Text Available The Wnt/β-catenin pathway controls cell proliferation, death and differentiation. Several families of extracellular proteins can antagonize Wnt/β-catenin signaling, including the decoy receptors known as secreted frizzled related proteins (SFRPs, which have a cysteine-rich domain (CRD structurally similar to the extracellular Wnt-binding domain of the frizzled receptors. SFRPs inhibit Wnt signaling by sequestering Wnts through the CRD or by forming inactive complexes with the frizzled receptors. Other endogenous molecules carrying frizzled CRDs inhibit Wnt signaling, such as V3Nter, which is proteolytically derived from the cell surface component collagen XVIII and contains a biologically active frizzled domain (FZC18 inhibiting in vivo cell proliferation and tumor growth in mice. We recently showed that FZC18 expressing cells deliver short-range signals to neighboring cells, decreasing their proliferation in vitro and in vivo through the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Here, using low concentrations of soluble FZC18 and Wnt3a, we show that they physically interact in a cell-free system. In addition, soluble FZC18 binds the frizzled 1 and 8 receptors' CRDs, reducing cell sensitivity to Wnt3a. Conversely, inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling was partially rescued by the expression of full-length frizzled 1 and 8 receptors, but enhanced by the expression of a chimeric cell-membrane-tethered frizzled 8 CRD. Moreover, soluble, partially purified recombinant FZC18_CRD inhibited Wnt3a-induced β-catenin activation. Taken together, the data indicate that collagen XVIII-derived frizzled CRD shifts Wnt sensitivity of normal cells to a lower pitch and controls their growth.

  5. A region in urokinase plasminogen receptor domain III controlling a functional association with alpha5beta1 integrin and tumor growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaurasia, Pratima; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio; Liang, Olin D

    2006-01-01

    Highly expressed urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) can interact with alpha5beta1 integrin leading to persistent ERK activation and tumorigenicity. Disrupting this interaction reduces ERK activity, forcing cancer cells into dormancy. We identified a site in uPAR domain III that is in......Highly expressed urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) can interact with alpha5beta1 integrin leading to persistent ERK activation and tumorigenicity. Disrupting this interaction reduces ERK activity, forcing cancer cells into dormancy. We identified a site in uPAR domain III...... that is indispensable for these effects. A 9-mer peptide derived from a sequence in domain III (residues 240-248) binds purified alpha5beta1 integrin. Substituting a single amino acid (S245A) in this peptide, or in full-length soluble uPAR, impairs binding of the purified integrin. In the recently solved crystal...... structure of uPAR the Ser-245 is confined to the large external surface of the receptor, a location that is well separated from the central urokinase plasminogen binding cavity. The impact of this site on alpha5beta1 integrin-dependent cell functions was examined by comparing cells induced to express u...

  6. Single-domain antibodies that compete with the natural ligand fibroblast growth factor block the internalization of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veggiani, Gianluca; Ossolengo, Giuseppe; Aliprandi, Marisa; Cavallaro, Ugo [IFOM-IEO Campus, Via Adamello 16, 20139 Milano (Italy); Marco, Ario de, E-mail: ario.demarco@ung.si [IFOM-IEO Campus, Via Adamello 16, 20139 Milano (Italy); Dept. Environmental Sciences, University of Nova Gorica (UNG), Vipavska 13, P.O. Box 301-SI-5000, Rozna Dolina, Nova Gorica (Slovenia)

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} Recombinant antibodies for FGFR1 were isolated from a llama naive library in VHH format. {yields} These antibodies compete with the natural ligand FGF-2 for the same epitope on FGFR1. {yields} The antibody competition inhibits the FGF-2-dependent internalization of FGFR1. -- Abstract: Single-domain antibodies in VHH format specific for fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) were isolated from a phage-display llama naive library. In particular, phage elution in the presence of the natural receptor ligand fibroblast growth factor (FGF) allowed for the identification of recombinant antibodies that compete with FGF for the same region on the receptor surface. These antibodies posses a relatively low affinity for FGFR1 and were never identified when unspecific elution conditions favoring highly affine binders were applied to panning procedures. Two populations of competitive antibodies were identified that labeled specifically the receptor-expressing cells in immunofluorescence and recognize distinct epitopes. Antibodies from both populations effectively prevented FGF-dependent internalization and nuclear accumulation of the receptor in cultured cells. This achievement indicates that these antibodies have a capacity to modulate the receptor physiology and, therefore, constitute powerful reagents for basic research and a potential lead for therapeutic applications.

  7. Structures of the HIN Domain:DNA Complexes Reveal Ligand Binding and Activation Mechanisms of the AIM2 Inflammasome and IFI16 Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Tengchuan; Perry, Andrew; Jiang, Jiansheng; Smith, Patrick; Curry, James A.; Unterholzner, Leonie; Jiang, Zhaozhao; Horvath, Gabor; Rathinam, Vijay A.; Johnstone, Ricky W.; Hornung, Veit; Latz, Eicke; Bowie, Andrew G.; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Xiao, T. Sam (UMASS, MED); (Bonn); (Trinity); (PMCI-A); (NIH)

    2012-05-21

    Recognition of DNA by the innate immune system is central to antiviral and antibacterial defenses, as well as an important contributor to autoimmune diseases involving self DNA. AIM2 (absent in melanoma 2) and IFI16 (interferon-inducible protein 16) have been identified as DNA receptors that induce inflammasome formation and interferon production, respectively. Here we present the crystal structures of their HIN domains in complex with double-stranded (ds) DNA. Non-sequence-specific DNA recognition is accomplished through electrostatic attraction between the positively charged HIN domain residues and the dsDNA sugar-phosphate backbone. An intramolecular complex of the AIM2 Pyrin and HIN domains in an autoinhibited state is liberated by DNA binding, which may facilitate the assembly of inflammasomes along the DNA staircase. These findings provide mechanistic insights into dsDNA as the activation trigger and oligomerization platform for the assembly of large innate signaling complexes such as the inflammasomes.

  8. Bacteria binding by DMBT1/SAG/gp-340 is confined to the VEVLXXXXW motif in its scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bikker, Floris J; Ligtenberg, Antoon J M; End, Caroline

    2004-01-01

    for group B. The protein DMBT1 (deleted in malignant brain tumors 1), which is identical to salivary agglutinin and lung gp-340, belongs to the group B SRCR proteins and is considered to be involved in tumor suppression and host defense by pathogen binding. In a previous study we used nonoverlapping......The scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) proteins form an archaic group of metazoan proteins characterized by the presence of SRCR domains. These proteins are classified in group A and B based on the number of conserved cysteine residues in their SRCR domains, i.e. six for group A and eight...... synthetic peptides covering the SRCR consensus sequence to identify a 16-amino acid bacteria-binding protein loop (peptide SRCRP2; QGRVEVLYRGSWGTVC) within the SRCR domains. In this study, using overlapping peptides, we pinpointed the minimal bacteria-binding site on SRCRP2, and thus DMBT1, to an 11-amino...

  9. CD229 (Ly9) lymphocyte cell surface receptor interacts homophilically through its N-terminal domain and relocalizes to the immunological synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Xavier; Zapater, Nuria; Calvo, María; Kalko, Susana G; de la Fuente, Miguel Angel; Tovar, Victoria; Ockeloen, Charlotte; Pizcueta, Pilar; Engel, Pablo

    2005-06-01

    CD229 is a member of the CD150 family of the Ig superfamily expressed on T and B cells. Receptors of this family regulate cytokine production and cytotoxicity of lymphocytes and NK cells. The cytoplasmic tail of CD229 binds to SAP, a protein that is defective in X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome. To identify the CD229 ligand, we generated a soluble Ig fusion protein containing the two N-terminal extracellular domains of human CD229 (CD229-Ig). CD229-Ig bound to CD229-transfected cells, whereas no binding was detected on cells expressing other CD150 family receptors, showing that CD229 binds homophilically. Both human and mouse CD229 interacted with itself. Domain deletion mutants showed that the N-terminal Ig-domain mediates homophilic adhesion. CD229-CD229 binding was severely compromised when the charged amino acids E27 and E29 on the predicted B-C loop and R89 on the F-G loop of the N-terminal domain were mutated to alanine. In contrast, one mutation, R44A, enhanced the homophilic interaction. Confocal microscopy image analysis revealed relocalization of CD229 to the contact area of T and B cells during Ag-dependent immune synapse formation. Thus, CD229 is its own ligand and participates in the immunological synapse.

  10. Non-charged amino acids from three different domains contribute to link agonist binding to channel gating in alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldea, Marcos; Mulet, José; Sala, Salvador; Sala, Francisco; Criado, Manuel

    2007-10-01

    Binding of agonists to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors results in channel opening. Previously, we have shown that several charged residues at three different domains of the alpha7 nicotinic receptor are involved in coupling binding and gating, probably through a network of electrostatic interactions. This network, however, could also be integrated by other residues. To test this hypothesis, non-charged amino acids were mutated and expression levels and electrophysiological responses of mutant receptors were determined. Mutants at positions Asn47 and Gln48 (loop 2), Ile130, Trp134, and Gln140 (loop 7), and Thr264 (M2-M3 linker) showed poor or null functional responses, despite significant membrane expression. By contrast, mutants F137A and S265A exhibited a gain of function effect. In all cases, changes in dose-response relationships were small, EC(50) values being between threefold smaller and fivefold larger, arguing against large modifications of agonist binding. Peak currents decayed at the same rate in all receptors except two, excluding large effects on desensitization. Thus, the observed changes could be mostly caused by alterations of the gating characteristics. Moreover, analysis of double mutants showed an interconnection between some residues in these domains, especially Gln48 with Ile130, suggesting a potential coupling between agonist binding and channel gating through these amino acids.

  11. Potent inhibition of angiotensin AT1 receptor signaling by RGS8: importance of the C-terminal third exon part of its RGS domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dan; Nishiyama, Mariko; Kimura, Sadao

    2016-10-01

    R4/B subfamily RGS (regulator of G protein signaling) proteins play roles in regulation of many GPCR-mediated responses. Multiple RGS proteins are usually expressed in a cell, and it is difficult to point out which RGS protein species are functionally important in the cell. To evaluate intrinsic potency of these RGS proteins, we compared inhibitory effects of RGS1, RGS2, RGS3, RGS4, RGS5, RGS8 and RGS16 on AT1 receptor signaling. Intracellular Ca(2+) responses to angiotensin II were markedly attenuated by transiently expressed RGS2, RGS3 and RGS8, compared to weak inhibition by RGS1, RGS4, RGS5 and RGS16. N-terminally deleted RGS2 (RGS2 domain) lost this potent inhibitory effect, whereas RGS domains of RGS3 and RGS8 showed strong inhibition similar to those of the full-length proteins. To investigate key determinants that specify the differences in potency, we constructed chimeric domains by replacing one or two of three exon parts of RGS8 domain with the corresponding part of RGS5. The chimeric RGS8 domains containing the first or the second exon part of RGS5 showed strong inhibitory effects similar to that of wild type RGS8, but the chimeric domain with the third exon part of RGS5 lost its activity. On the contrary, replacement of the third exon part of RGS5 with the corresponding residues of RGS8 increased the inhibitory effect. The role of the third exon part of RGS8 domain was further confirmed with the chimeric RGS8/RGS4 domains. These results indicate the potent inhibitory activity of RGS8 among R4/B subfamily proteins and importance of the third exon.

  12. Analysis and functional characterization of sequence variations in ligand binding domain of thyroid hormone receptors in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalikiri, Mahesh Kumar; Mamidala, Madhu Poornima; Rao, Ananth N; Rajesh, Vidya

    2017-08-30

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neuro developmental disorder, reported to be on a rise in the past two decades. Thyroid hormone-T3 plays an important role in early embryonic and central nervous system development. T3 mediates its function by binding to thyroid hormone receptors, TRα and TRβ. Alterations in T3 levels and thyroid receptor mutations have been earlier implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders and have been linked to environmental toxins. Limited reports from earlier studies have shown the effectiveness of T3 treatment with promising results in children with ASD and that the thyroid hormone levels in these children was also normal. This necessitates the need to explore the genetic variations in the components of the thyroid hormone pathway in ASD children. To achieve this objective, we performed genetic analysis of ligand binding domain of THRA and THRB receptor genes in 30 ASD subjects and in age matched controls from India. Our study for the first time reports novel single nucleotide polymorphisms in the THRA and THRB receptor genes of ASD individuals. Autism Res 2017. ©2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Thyroid hormone (T3) and thyroid receptors (TRα and TRβ) are the major components of the thyroid hormone pathway. The link between thyroid pathway and neuronal development is proven in clinical medicine. Since the thyroid hormone levels in Autistic children are normal, variations in their receptors needs to be explored. To achieve this objective, changes in THRA and THRB receptor genes was studied in 30 ASD and normal children from India. The impact of some of these mutations on receptor function was also studied. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Effects of Air Pollutants on Innate Immunity: The Role of Toll-like receptors and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interactions between exposure to ambient air pollutants and respiratory pathogens have been shown to modify respiratory immune responses. Emerging data suggest key roles for toll-like receptor (TLR) and NOD-like receptor (NLR) signaling in pathogen-induced immune responses. Simil...

  14. Computational analysis of the extracellular domain of the Ca²⁺-sensing receptor: an alternate model for the Ca²⁺ sensing region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, Gene A; Kostellow, Adele B; Gupta, Raj K

    2015-03-27

    The extracellular Ca(2+) sensing receptor (CaSR) belongs to Class C G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) which include receptors for amino acids, γ-aminobutyric acid and glutamate neurotransmitters. CaSR has been described as having an extended sequence containing a Ca(2+) binding pocket within an extracellular amino (N)-terminal domain, called a Venus Fly Trap (VFT) module. CaSR is thought to consist of three domains: 1) a Ca(2+-)sensory domain, 2) a region containing 7 transmembrane (TM) helices, and 3) a carboxy (C)-terminal tail. We find that SPOCTOPUS (a combination of hidden Markov models and artificial neural networks) predicts that Homo sapiens CaSR contains two additional TM helices ((190)D - G(210); (262)S-E(282)), with the second TM helix containing a pore-lining region ((265)K - I(280)). This predicts that the putative Ca(2+) sensory domain is within an extracellular loop, N-terminal to the highly conserved heptahelical bundle. This loop contains both the cysteine-rich domain ((537)V - C(598)) and a 14 residue "linker" sequence ((599)I - F(612)) thought to support signal transmission to the heptahelical bundle. Thus domain 1 may contain a 189 residue N-terminal extracellular region followed successively by TM-1, a short intracellular loop, TM-2 and a 329 residue extracellular loop; rather than the proposed 620 residue VFT module based on crystallography of the N-terminal region of mGluR1. Since the topologies of the two proteins differ, the published CaSR VFT model is questionable. CaSR also contains multiple caveolin-binding motifs and cholesterol-binding (CRAC/CARC) domains, facilitating localization to plasma membrane lipid rafts. Ion sensing may involve combination of pore-lining regions from CaSR dimers and CaSR-bound caveolins to form ion channels capable of monitoring ionized Ca(2+) levels. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The amino-terminal domain of the CCR2 chemokine receptor acts as coreceptor for HIV-1 infection

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    The chemokines are a homologous serum protein family characterized by their ability to induce activation of integrin adhesion molecules and leukocyte migration. Chemokines interact with their receptors, which are composed of a single-chain, seven-helix, membrane-spanning protein coupled to G proteins. Two CC chemokine receptors, CCR3 and CCR5, as well as the CXCR4 chemokine receptor, have been shown necessary for infection by several HIV-1 virus isolates. We studied the effect of the chemokin...

  16. Generation of a Potent Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein 1 (LRP1) Antagonist by Engineering a Stable Form of the Receptor-associated Protein (RAP) D3 Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Joni M; Migliorini, Mary; Galisteo, Rebeca; Strickland, Dudley K

    2015-07-10

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor family and plays important roles in a number of physiological and pathological processes. Expression of LRP1 requires the receptor-associated protein (RAP), a molecular chaperone that binds LRP1 and other low density lipoprotein receptor family members in the endoplasmic reticulum and traffics with them to the Golgi where the acidic environment causes its dissociation. Exogenously added RAP is a potent LRP1 antagonist and binds to LRP1 on the cell surface, preventing ligands from binding. Following endocytosis, RAP dissociates in the acidic endosome, allowing LRP1 to recycle back to the cell surface. The acid-induced dissociation of RAP is mediated by its D3 domain, a relatively unstable three-helical bundle that denatures at pH RAP D3 domain. By combining this disulfide bond with elimination of key histidine residues, we generated a stable RAP molecule that is resistant to both pH- and heat-induced denaturation. This molecule bound to LRP1 with high affinity at both neutral and acidic pH and proved to be a potent inhibitor of LRP1 function both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that our stable RAP molecule may be useful in multiple pathological settings where LRP1 blockade has been shown to be effective. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Generation of a Potent Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein 1 (LRP1) Antagonist by Engineering a Stable Form of the Receptor-associated Protein (RAP) D3 Domain*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Joni M.; Migliorini, Mary; Galisteo, Rebeca; Strickland, Dudley K.

    2015-01-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor family and plays important roles in a number of physiological and pathological processes. Expression of LRP1 requires the receptor-associated protein (RAP), a molecular chaperone that binds LRP1 and other low density lipoprotein receptor family members in the endoplasmic reticulum and traffics with them to the Golgi where the acidic environment causes its dissociation. Exogenously added RAP is a potent LRP1 antagonist and binds to LRP1 on the cell surface, preventing ligands from binding. Following endocytosis, RAP dissociates in the acidic endosome, allowing LRP1 to recycle back to the cell surface. The acid-induced dissociation of RAP is mediated by its D3 domain, a relatively unstable three-helical bundle that denatures at pH RAP D3 domain. By combining this disulfide bond with elimination of key histidine residues, we generated a stable RAP molecule that is resistant to both pH- and heat-induced denaturation. This molecule bound to LRP1 with high affinity at both neutral and acidic pH and proved to be a potent inhibitor of LRP1 function both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that our stable RAP molecule may be useful in multiple pathological settings where LRP1 blockade has been shown to be effective. PMID:26013822

  18. The β-domain of cluster 2b streptokinase is a major determinant for the regulation of its plasminogen activation activity by cellular plasminogen receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yueling; Mayfield, Jeffrey A; Ploplis, Victoria A; Castellino, Francis J

    2014-02-21

    Cluster 2b streptokinase (SK2b), secreted by invasive skin-trophic strains of Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS), is a human plasminogen (hPg) activator that optimally functions when human plasma hPg is bound, via its kringle-2 domain, to cognizant bacterial cells through the a1a2 domain of the major cellular hPg receptor, Plasminogen-binding group A streptococcal M-like protein (PAM). Another class of streptokinases (SK1), secreted primarily by GAS strains that possess affinity for pharyngeal infections, does not require PAM-bound hPg for optimal activity. We find herein that replacement of the central β-domain of SK2b with the same module from SK1 reduces the dependency of SK2b on PAM, and the converse is true when the β-domain of SK1 is replaced with this same region of SK2b. These data suggest that simple evolutionary shuttling of protein domains in GAS can be employed by GAS to rapidly generate strains that differ in tissue tropism and invasive capability and allow the bacteria to survive different challenges by the host.

  19. Crystal structure of the PAC1R extracellular domain unifies a consensus fold for hormone recognition by class B G-protein coupled receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Kumar

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP is a member of the PACAP/glucagon family of peptide hormones, which controls many physiological functions in the immune, nervous, endocrine, and muscular systems. It activates adenylate cyclase by binding to its receptor, PAC1R, a member of class B G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR. Crystal structures of a number of Class B GPCR extracellular domains (ECD bound to their respective peptide hormones have revealed a consensus mechanism of hormone binding. However, the mechanism of how PACAP binds to its receptor remains controversial as an NMR structure of the PAC1R ECD/PACAP complex reveals a different topology of the ECD and a distinct mode of ligand recognition. Here we report a 1.9 Å crystal structure of the PAC1R ECD, which adopts the same fold as commonly observed for other members of Class B GPCR. Binding studies and cell-based assays with alanine-scanned peptides and mutated receptor support a model that PAC1R uses the same conserved fold of Class B GPCR ECD for PACAP binding, thus unifying the consensus mechanism of hormone binding for this family of receptors.

  20. Crystal Structure of the PAC1R Extracellular Domain Unifies a Consensus Fold for Hormone Recognition by Class B G-Protein Coupled Receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Shiva; Pioszak, Augen; Zhang, Chenghai; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Xu, H. Eric (Van Andel); (NU Singapore)

    2012-02-21

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a member of the PACAP/glucagon family of peptide hormones, which controls many physiological functions in the immune, nervous, endocrine, and muscular systems. It activates adenylate cyclase by binding to its receptor, PAC1R, a member of class B G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR). Crystal structures of a number of Class B GPCR extracellular domains (ECD) bound to their respective peptide hormones have revealed a consensus mechanism of hormone binding. However, the mechanism of how PACAP binds to its receptor remains controversial as an NMR structure of the PAC1R ECD/PACAP complex reveals a different topology of the ECD and a distinct mode of ligand recognition. Here we report a 1.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of the PAC1R ECD, which adopts the same fold as commonly observed for other members of Class B GPCR. Binding studies and cell-based assays with alanine-scanned peptides and mutated receptor support a model that PAC1R uses the same conserved fold of Class B GPCR ECD for PACAP binding, thus unifying the consensus mechanism of hormone binding for this family of receptors.

  1. A capture method based on the VC1 domain reveals new binding properties of the human receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genny Degani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The Advanced Glycation and Lipoxidation End products (AGEs and ALEs are a heterogeneous class of compounds derived from the non-enzymatic glycation or protein adduction by lipoxidation break-down products. The receptor for AGEs (RAGE is involved in the progression of chronic diseases based on persistent inflammatory state and oxidative stress. RAGE is a pattern recognition receptor (PRR and the inhibition of the interaction with its ligands or of the ligand accumulation have a potential therapeutic effect. The N-terminal domain of RAGE, the V domain, is the major site of AGEs binding and is stabilized by the adjacent C1 domain. In this study, we set up an affinity assay relying on the extremely specific biological interaction AGEs ligands have for the VC1 domain. A glycosylated form of VC1, produced in the yeast Pichia pastoris, was attached to magnetic beads and used as insoluble affinity matrix (VC1-resin. The VC1 interaction assay was employed to isolate specific VC1 binding partners from in vitro generated AGE-albumins and modifications were identified/localized by mass spectrometry analysis. Interestingly, this method also led to the isolation of ALEs produced by malondialdehyde treatment of albumins. Computational studies provided a rational-based interpretation of the contacts established by specific modified residues and amino acids of the V domain. The validation of VC1-resin in capturing AGE-albumins from complex biological mixtures such as plasma and milk, may lead to the identification of new RAGE ligands potentially involved in pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic responses, independently of their structures or physical properties, and without the use of any covalent derivatization process. In addition, the method can be applied to the identification of antagonists of RAGE-ligand interaction.

  2. The structure of the two amino-terminal domains of human intercellular adhesion molecule-1 suggests how it functions as a rhinovirus receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bella, J; Kolatkar, P R; Marlor, C W; Greve, J M; Rossmann, M G

    1999-08-01

    The normal function of human intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is to provide adhesion between endothelial cells and leukocytes after injury or stress. ICAM-1 binds to leukocyte function-associated antigen (LFA-1) or macrophage-1 antigen (Mac-1). However, ICAM-1 is also utilized as a receptor by the major group of human rhinoviruses and is a catalyst for the subsequent viral uncoating during cell entry. The three-dimensional atomic structure of the two amino-terminal domains (D1 and D2) of ICAM-1 has been determined to 2.2 A resolution and fitted into a cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of a rhinovirus-ICAM-1 complex. Rhinovirus attachment is confined to the BC, CD, DE and FG loops of the amino-terminal immunoglobulin-like domain (D1) at the end distal to the cellular membrane. The loops are considerably different in structure to those of human ICAM-2 or murine ICAM-1 which do not bind rhinoviruses. There are extensive charge interactions between ICAM-1 and human rhinoviruses, which are mostly conserved in both major and minor receptor groups of rhinoviruses. The interaction of ICAMs with LFA-1 is known to be mediated by a divalent cation bound to the I-(insertion) domain on the alpha chain of LFA-1 and the carboxy group of a conserved glutamic acid residue on ICAMs. Domain D1 has been docked with the known structure of the I-domain. The resultant model is consistent with mutational data and provides a structural framework for the adhesion between these molecules.

  3. The structure of the two amino-terminal domains of human ICAM-1 suggests how it functions as a rhinovirus receptor and as an LFA-1 integrin ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bella, J; Kolatkar, P R; Marlor, C W; Greve, J M; Rossmann, M G

    1998-04-14

    The normal function of human intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is to provide adhesion between endothelial cells and leukocytes after injury or stress. ICAM-1 binds to leukocyte function-associated antigen (LFA-1) or macrophage-1 antigen (Mac-1). However, ICAM-1 is also used as a receptor by the major group of human rhinoviruses and is a catalyst for the subsequent viral uncoating during cell entry. The three-dimensional atomic structure of the two amino-terminal domains (D1 and D2) of ICAM-1 has been determined to 2.2-A resolution and fitted into a cryoelectron microscopy reconstruction of a rhinovirus-ICAM-1 complex. Rhinovirus attachment is confined to the BC, CD, DE, and FG loops of the amino-terminal Ig-like domain (D1) at the end distal to the cellular membrane. The loops are considerably different in structure to those of human ICAM-2 or murine ICAM-1, which do not bind rhinoviruses. There are extensive charge interactions between ICAM-1 and human rhinoviruses, which are mostly conserved in both major and minor receptor groups of rhinoviruses. The interaction of ICAMs with LFA-1 is known to be mediated by a divalent cation bound to the insertion (I)-domain on the alpha chain of LFA-1 and the carboxyl group of a conserved glutamic acid residue on ICAMs. Domain D1 has been docked with the known structure of the I-domain. The resultant model is consistent with mutational data and provides a structural framework for the adhesion between these molecules.

  4. Interaction of the S100A6 mutant (C3S) with the V domain of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohan, Sepuru K., E-mail: mohansepuri@gmail.com; Gupta, Arun A., E-mail: ninja14gupta@gmail.com; Yu, Chin, E-mail: cyu.nthu@gmail.com

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •The halo human S100A6 (C3S) NMR chemical shifts were assigned. •The interactions between S100A6m and RAGE V domain was investigated by ITC. •The residues involved in the S100A6m–RAGE V domain binding were mapped by {sup 1}H–{sup 15}N HSQC titration. •S100A6–RAGE V domain tetrameric complex model was generated from NMR studies. •The S100A6–RAGE V domain interface regions were elucidated based on HADDOCK model. -- Abstract: S100A6 is involved in several vital biological functions, such as calcium sensing and cell proliferation. It is a homodimeric protein that belongs to the S100 protein family. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) has been shown to play a role in the progression of various disease conditions, such as diabetes and immune/inflammatory disorders. Information regarding the association of RAGE with S100 proteins at a molecular level is useful to understand the diversity of the RAGE signaling pathways. In this report, biomolecular NMR techniques were utilized for the resonance assignment of the C3S mutation in human S100A6 and characterizing its interaction with the RAGE V domain. Further binding affinity between S100A6m and the RAGE V domain was determined by isothermal titration calorimetric studies. HADDOCK was used to generate a heterotetramer model of the S100A6m–RAGE V domain complex. This model provides an important insights into the S100–RAGE cellular signaling pathway.

  5. Functional analysis of chimeric lysin motif domain receptors mediating Nod factor-induced defense signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana and chitin-induced nodulation signaling in Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Staehelin, Christian

    2014-04-01

    The expression of chimeric receptors in plants is a way to activate specific signaling pathways by corresponding signal molecules. Defense signaling induced by chitin from pathogens and nodulation signaling of legumes induced by rhizobial Nod factors (NFs) depend on receptors with extracellular lysin motif (LysM) domains. Here, we constructed chimeras by replacing the ectodomain of chitin elicitor receptor kinase 1 (AtCERK1) of Arabidopsis thaliana with ectodomains of NF receptors of Lotus japonicus (LjNFR1 and LjNFR5). The hybrid constructs, named LjNFR1-AtCERK1 and LjNFR5-AtCERK1, were expressed in cerk1-2, an A. thaliana CERK1 mutant lacking chitin-induced defense signaling. When treated with NFs from Rhizobium sp. NGR234, cerk1-2 expressing both chimeras accumulated reactive oxygen species, expressed chitin-responsive defense genes and showed increased resistance to Fusarium oxysporum. In contrast, expression of a single chimera showed no effects. Likewise, the ectodomains of LjNFR1 and LjNFR5 were replaced by those of OsCERK1 (Oryza sativa chitin elicitor receptor kinase 1) and OsCEBiP (O. sativa chitin elicitor-binding protein), respectively. The chimeras, named OsCERK1-LjNFR1 and OsCEBiP-LjNFR5, were expressed in L. japonicus NF receptor mutants (nfr1-1; nfr5-2) carrying a GUS (β-glucuronidase) gene under the control of the NIN (nodule inception) promoter. Upon chitin treatment, GUS activation reflecting nodulation signaling was observed in the roots of NF receptor mutants expressing both chimeras, whereas a single construct was not sufficient for activation. Hence, replacement of ectodomains in LysM domain receptors provides a way to specifically trigger NF-induced defense signaling in non-legumes and chitin-induced nodulation signaling in legumes. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Homophilic interactions mediated by receptor tyrosine phosphatases mu and kappa. A critical role for the novel extracellular MAM domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zondag, G C; Koningstein, G M; Jiang, Y P

    1995-01-01

    in a heterophilic manner. To examine the role of the MAM domain in homophilic binding, we expressed a mutant RPTP mu lacking the MAM domain in insect Sf9 cells. Truncated RPTP mu is properly expressed at the cell surface but fails to promote cell-cell adhesion. Homophilic cell adhesion is fully restored...

  7. Crystal structure of an ACh-binding protein reveals the ligand-binding domain of nicotinic receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brejc, K.; Dijk, van W.J.; Klaassen, R.V.; Schuurmans, M.; Oost, van der J.; Smit, A.B.; Sixma, T.K.

    2001-01-01

    Pentameric ligand gated ion-channels, or Cys-loop receptors, mediate rapid chemical transmission of signals. This superfamily of allosteric transmembrane proteins includes the nicotinic acetylcholine (nAChR), serotonin 5-HT3, -aminobutyric-acid (GABAA and GABAC) and glycine receptors. Biochemical an

  8. Computational modeling of the Fc αRI receptor binding in the Fc α domain of the human antibody IgA: Normal Modes Analysis (NMA) study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, Manori; Posgai, Monica; Tonddast-Navaei, Sam; Ibrahim, George; Stan, George; Herr, Andrew; George Stan Group Collaboration; Herr's Group Team

    2014-03-01

    Fc αRI receptor binding in the Fc α domain of the antibody IgA triggers immune effector responses such as phagocytosis and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in eukaryotic cells. Fc α is a dimer of heavy chains of the IgA antibody and each Fc α heavy chain which consisted of two immunoglobulin constant domains, CH2 and CH3, can bind one Fc αRI molecule at the CH2-CH3 interface forming a 2:1 stoichiometry. Experimental evidences confirmed that Fc αRI binding to the Fc α CH2-CH3 junction altered the kinetics of HAA lectin binding at the distant IgA1 hinge. Our focus in this research was to understand the conformational changes and the network of residues which co-ordinate the receptor binding dynamics of the Fc α dimer complex. Structure-based elastic network modeling was used to compute normal modes of distinct Fc α configurations. Asymmetric and un-liganded Fc α configurations were obtained from the high resolution crystal structure of Fc α-Fc αRI 2:1 symmetric complex of PDB ID 1OW0. Our findings confirmed that Fc αRI binding, either in asymmetric or symmetric complex with Fc α, propagated long-range conformational changes across the Fc domains, potentially also impacting the distant IgA1 hinge.

  9. The MIT domain of UBPY constitutes a CHMP binding and endosomal localization signal required for efficient epidermal growth factor receptor degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Row, Paula E; Liu, Han; Hayes, Sebastian; Welchman, Rebecca; Charalabous, Panagoula; Hofmann, Kay; Clague, Michael J; Sanderson, Christopher M; Urbé, Sylvie

    2007-10-19

    We have identified and characterized a Microtubule Interacting and Transport (MIT) domain at the N terminus of the deubiquitinating enzyme UBPY/USP8. In common with other MIT-containing proteins such as AMSH and VPS4, UBPY can interact with CHMP proteins, which are known to regulate endosomal sorting of ubiquitinated receptors. Comparison of binding preferences for the 11 members of the human CHMP family between the UBPY MIT domain and another ubiquitin isopeptidase, AMSH, reveals common interactions with CHMP1A and CHMP1B but a distinct selectivity of AMSH for CHMP3/VPS24, a core subunit of the ESCRT-III complex, and UBPY for CHMP7. We also show that in common with AMSH, UBPY deubiquitinating enzyme activity can be stimulated by STAM but is unresponsive to its cognate CHMPs. The UBPY MIT domain is dispensable for its catalytic activity but is essential for its localization to endosomes. This is functionally significant as an MIT-deleted UBPY mutant is unable to rescue its binding partner STAM from proteasomal degradation or reverse a block to epidermal growth factor receptor degradation imposed by small interfering RNA-mediated depletion of UBPY.

  10. Full domain closure of the ligand-binding core of the ionotropic glutamate receptor iGluR5 induced by the high affinity agonist dysiherbaine and the functional antagonist 8,9-dideoxyneodysiherbaine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Lash, L Leanne; Naur, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The prevailing structural model for ligand activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors posits that agonist efficacy arises from the stability and magnitude of induced domain closure in the ligand-binding core structure. Here we describe an exception to the correlation between ligand efficacy...... and domain closure. A weakly efficacious partial agonist of very low potency for homomeric iGluR5 kainate receptors, 8,9-dideoxy-neodysiherbaine (MSVIII-19), induced a fully closed iGluR5 ligand-binding core. The degree of relative domain closure, ~30 degrees , was similar to that we resolved...... to inter-domain hydrogen bonds residues Glu441 and Ser721 in the iGluR5-S1S2 structure. The weaker interactions of MSVIII-19 with iGluR5 compared to DH, together with altered stability of the inter-domain interaction, may be responsible for the apparent uncoupling of domain closure and channel opening...

  11. Chicken Ig-like receptor B2, a member of a multigene family, is mainly expressed on B lymphocytes, recruits both Src homology 2 domain containing protein tyrosine phosphatase (SHP)-1 and SHP-2, and inhibits proliferation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viertlboeck, B.C.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Gobel, T.W.

    2004-01-01

    Ig-like inhibitory receptors have been the focus of intensive research particularly in mouse and human. We report the cloning and characterization of three novel inhibitory chicken Ig-like receptors (CHIR) that display a two Ig-domain extracellular structure, a transmembrane region lacking charged

  12. Substitution of Ala564 in the first zinc cluster of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-binding domain of the androgen receptor by Asp, Asn, or Leu exerts differential effects on DNA binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.T. Brüggenwirth (Hennie); A.L.M. Boehmer (Annemie); J.M. Lobaccaro; L. Chiche; C. Sultan; J. Trapman (Jan); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractIn the androgen receptor of a patient with androgen insensitivity, the alanine residue at position 564 in the first zinc cluster of the DNA-binding domain was substituted by aspartic acid. In other members of the steroid receptor family, either valine or ala

  13. Dipicrylamine Modulates GABAρ1 Receptors through Interactions with Residues in the TM4 and Cys-Loop Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limon, Agenor; Estrada-Mondragón, Argel; Ruiz, Jorge M Reyes; Miledi, Ricardo

    2016-04-01

    Dipicrylamine (DPA) is a commonly used acceptor agent in Förster resonance energy transfer experiments that allows the study of high-frequency neuronal activity in the optical monitoring of voltage in living cells. However, DPA potently antagonizes GABAA receptors that contain α1 and β2 subunits by a mechanism which is not clearly understood. In this work, we aimed to determine whether DPA modulation is a general phenomenon of Cys-loop ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs), and whether this modulation depends on particular amino acid residues. For this, we studied the effects of DPA on human homomeric GABAρ1, α7 nicotinic, and 5-HT3A serotonin receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Our results indicate that DPA is an allosteric modulator of GABAρ1 receptors with an IC50 of 1.6 µM, an enhancer of α7 nicotinic receptors at relatively high concentrations of DPA, and has little, if any, effect on 5-HT3A receptors. DPA antagonism of GABAρ1 was strongly enhanced by preincubation, was slightly voltage-dependent, and its washout was accelerated by bovine serum albumin. These results indicate that DPA modulation is not a general phenomenon of LGICs, and structural differences between receptors may account for disparities in DPA effects. In silico modeling of DPA docking to GABAρ1, α7 nicotinic, and 5-HT3A receptors suggests that a hydrophobic pocket within the Cys-loop and the M4 segment in GABAρ1, located at the extracellular/membrane interface, facilitates the interaction with DPA that leads to inhibition of the receptor. Functional examinations of mutant receptors support the involvement of the M4 segment in the allosteric modulation of GABAρ1 by DPA.

  14. A protein-binding domain, EH, identified in the receptor tyrosine kinase substrate Eps15 and conserved in evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, W T; Schumacher, C; Salcini, A E;

    1995-01-01

    heterogeneous proteins of yeast and nematode. The EH domain spans about 70 amino acids and shows approximately 60% overall amino acid conservation. We demonstrated the ability of the EH domain to specifically bind cytosolic proteins in normal and malignant cells of mesenchymal, epithelial, and hematopoietic...... origin. These observations prompted our search for additional EH-containing proteins in mammalian cells. Using an EH domain-specific probe derived from the eps15 cDNA, we cloned and characterized a cDNA encoding an EH-containing protein with overall similarity to Eps15; we designated this protein Eps15r...

  15. Transmembrane and ubiquitin-like domain-containing protein 1 (Tmub1/HOPS facilitates surface expression of GluR2-containing AMPA receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunjeong Yang

    Full Text Available Some ubiquitin-like (UBL domain-containing proteins are known to play roles in receptor trafficking. Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptors (AMPARs undergo constitutive cycling between the intracellular compartment and the cell surface in the central nervous system. However, the function of UBL domain-containing proteins in the recycling of the AMPARs to the synaptic surface has not yet been reported.Here, we report that the Transmembrane and ubiquitin-like domain-containing 1 (Tmub1 protein, formerly known as the Hepatocyte Odd Protein Shuttling (HOPS protein, which is abundantly expressed in the brain and which exists in a synaptosomal membrane fraction, facilitates the recycling of the AMPAR subunit GluR2 to the cell surface. Neurons transfected with Tmub1/HOPS-RNAi plasmids showed a significant reduction in the AMPAR current as compared to their control neurons. Consistently, the synaptic surface expression of GluR2, but not of GluR1, was significantly decreased in the neurons transfected with the Tmub1/HOPS-RNAi and increased in the neurons overexpressing EGFP-Tmub1/HOPS. The altered surface expression of GluR2 was speculated to be due to the altered surface-recycling of the internalized GluR2 in our recycling assay. Eventually, we found that GluR2 and glutamate receptor interacting protein (GRIP were coimmunoprecipitated by the anti-Tmub1/HOPS antibody from the mouse brain. Taken together, these observations show that the Tmub1/HOPS plays a role in regulating basal synaptic transmission; it contributes to maintain the synaptic surface number of the GluR2-containing AMPARs by facilitating the recycling of GluR2 to the plasma membrane.

  16. Identification of the critical sequence elements in the cytoplasmic domain of leptin receptor isoforms required for Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription activation by receptor heterodimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrenberg, Gregor; Behrmann, Iris; Barthel, Andreas; Hekerman, Paul; Heinrich, Peter Claus; Joost, Hans-Georg; Becker, Walter

    2002-04-01

    Two predominant splice variants of the leptin receptor (LEPR) are coexpressed in leptin-responsive tissues: the long form, LEPRb, characterized as the signal-transducing receptor, and the signaling-defective short form, LEPRa. It is unknown whether heterodimers of these isoforms are capable of signal transduction via the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway. To address this question, chimeric receptors were constructed consisting of the transmembrane and intracellular parts of LEPRb and LEPRa fused with the extracellular domains of either the alpha- or beta-subunit of the IL-5 receptor. This strategy allows the directed heterodimerization of different LEPR cytoplasmic tails and excludes homodimerization. In COS-7 and HEPG2 cells, chimeric receptor heterodimers of LEPRa and LEPRb failed to activate the JAK/STAT pathway, whereas receptor dimers of LEPRb gave rise to the expected ligand-dependent activation of JAK2, phosphorylation of STAT3, and STAT3-dependent promoter activity. Markedly lower amounts of JAK2 were found to be associated with immunoprecipitated LEPRa chimeras than with LEPRb chimeras. Analysis of a series of deletion constructs indicated that a segment of 15 amino acids in addition to the 29 amino acids common to LEPRa and LEPRb was required for partial restoration of JAK/STAT activation. Site-directed mutagenesis of the critical sequence indicated that two hydrophobic residues (Leu896, Phe897) not present in LEPRa were indispensable for receptor signaling. These findings show that LEPRa/LEPRb heterodimers cannot activate STAT3 and identify sequence elements within the LEPR that are critical for the activation of JAK2 and STAT3.

  17. Exon organization of the mouse entactin gene corresponds to the structural domains of the polypeptide and has regional homology to the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durkin, M E; Wewer, U M; Chung, A E

    1995-01-01

    Entactin is a widespread basement membrane protein of 150 kDa that binds to type IV collagen and laminin. The complete exon-intron structure of the mouse entactin gene has been determined from lambda genomic DNA clones. The gene spans at least 65 kb and contains 20 exons. The exon organization...... of the mouse entactin gene closely corresponds to the organization of the polypeptide into distinct structural and functional domains. The two amino-terminal globular domains are encoded by three exons each. Single exons encode the two protease-sensitive, O-glycosylated linking regions. The six EGF......-like repeats and the single thyroglobulin-type repeat are each encoded by separate exons. The carboxyl-terminal half of entactin displays sequence homology to the growth factor-like region of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, and in both genes this region is encoded by eight exons. The positions of four...

  18. Construction of a novel fusion protein harboring mouse inter- feron γ and epidermal growth factor receptor binding domain and enhancement of its antitumor activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁炎平; 谭维彦; 胡荣; 陈望秋; 侯云德

    1997-01-01

    A novel fusion protein harboring mouse interferon γ and epidermal growth factor receptor binding domain was constructed with the method of genetic and protein engineering. The fusion protein kept complete antiviral activity with the titer of 108 IU per liter of culture. The EGF-RBD of the fusion protein exhibited competitive binding activity against 125I-mEGF for mEGF receptors on A431 cells. The fusion protein was shown to be more potent in in-hibiting the growth of cultured mouse breast carcinoma cells than interferon γ. Experimental data on mouse B16 malig-nant melanoma model indicated that the tumor weight of fusion protein-treated group was statistically significantly smaller than that of interferon γ-treated group. The work here provides a necessarily reliable clue for the upcoming clinical employment of a novel class of targeting interferons.

  19. Ubiquitin ligase Cbl-b acts as a negative regulator in discoidin domain receptor 2 signaling via modulation of its stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiangtian; Zhao, Hu; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Yun-Cai; Yao, Libo; Li, Xia; Su, Jin

    2014-05-02

    Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2), a collagen receptor tyrosine kinase, initiates signal transduction upon collagen binding, but little is known as to how DDR2 signaling is negatively regulated. Herein we demonstrate that Cbl family member Cbl-b predominantly promotes the ubiquitination of DDR2 upon collagen II stimulation. Cbl-b-mediated ubiquitination accelerates the degradation of activated DDR2. Finally, the production of MMP-13, a downstream target of DDR2, is enhanced in Cbl-b-knocked down MC3T3-E1 cells and Cbl-b-deficient mouse primary synovial fibroblasts. Thus, Cbl-b, by promoting the ubiquitination and degradation of DDR2, functions as a negative regulator in the DDR2 signaling pathway.

  20. The Action of Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 in Basal Tumor Cells and Stromal Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts Is Critical for Breast Cancer Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsa, Callie A S; Brenot, Audrey; Grither, Whitney R; Van Hove, Samantha; Loza, Andrew J; Zhang, Kun; Ponik, Suzanne M; Liu, Yuming; DeNardo, David G; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Keely, Patricia J; Longmore, Gregory D

    2016-06-14

    High levels of collagen deposition in human and mouse breast tumors are associated with poor outcome due to increased local invasion and distant metastases. Using a genetic approach, we show that, in mice, the action of the fibrillar collagen receptor discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) in both tumor and tumor-stromal cells is critical for breast cancer metastasis yet does not affect primary tumor growth. In tumor cells, DDR2 in basal epithelial cells regulates the collective invasion of tumor organoids. In stromal cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), DDR2 is critical for extracellular matrix production and the organization of collagen fibers. The action of DDR2 in CAFs also enhances tumor cell collective invasion through a pathway distinct from the tumor-cell-intrinsic function of DDR2. This work identifies DDR2 as a potential therapeutic target that controls breast cancer metastases through its action in both tumor cells and tumor-stromal cells at the primary tumor site.

  1. Pathogenic Cysteine Removal Mutations in FGFR Extracellular Domains Stabilize Receptor Dimers and Perturb the TM Dimer Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-10-09

    Missense mutations that introduce or remove cysteine residues in receptor tyrosine kinases are believed to cause pathologies by stabilizing the active receptor tyrosine kinase dimers. However, the magnitude of this stabilizing effect has not been measured for full-length receptors. Here, we characterize the dimer stabilities of three full-length fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) mutants harboring pathogenic cysteine substitutions: the C178S FGFR1 mutant, the C342R FGFR2 mutant, and the C228R FGFR3 mutant. We find that the three mutations stabilize the FGFR dimers. We further see that the mutations alter the configuration of the FGFR transmembrane dimers. Thus, both aberrant dimerization and perturbed dimer structure likely contribute to the pathological phenotypes arising due to these mutations.

  2. Voltammetric Detection of S100B Protein Using His-Tagged Receptor Domains for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE Immobilized onto a Gold Electrode Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Mikuła

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work we report on an electrochemical biosensor for the determination of the S100B protein. The His-tagged VC1 domains of Receptors for Advanced Glycation End (RAGE products used as analytically active molecules were covalently immobilized on a monolayer of a thiol derivative of pentetic acid (DPTA complex with Cu(II deposited on a gold electrode surface. The recognition processes between the RAGE VC1 domain and the S100B protein results in changes in the redox activity of the DPTA-Cu(II centres which were measured by Osteryoung square-wave voltammetry (OSWV. In order to verify whether the observed analytical signal originates from the recognition process between the His6–RAGE VC1 domains and the S100B protein, the electrode modified with the His6–RAGE C2 and His6–RAGE VC1 deleted domains which have no ability to bind S100B peptides were applied. The proposed biosensor was quite sensitive, with a detection limit of 0.52 pM recorded in the buffer solution. The presence of diluted human plasma and 10 nM Aβ1-40 have no influence on the biosensor performance.

  3. Apo and InsP[subscript 3]-bound crystal structures of the ligand-binding domain of an InsP[subscript 3] receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Chi; Baek, Kyuwon; Lu, Zhe (UPENN)

    2012-05-08

    We report the crystal structures of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of a rat inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (InsP{sub 3}R) in its apo and InsP{sub 3}-bound conformations. Comparison of these two conformations reveals that LBD's first {beta}-trefoil fold ({beta}-TF1) and armadillo repeat fold (ARF) move together as a unit relative to its second {beta}-trefoil fold ({beta}-TF2). Whereas apo LBD may spontaneously transition between gating conformations, InsP{sub 3} binding shifts this equilibrium toward the active state.

  4. Molecular cloning and characterization of two novel genes from hexaploid wheat that encode double PR-1 domains coupled with a receptor-like protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shunwen; Faris, Justin D; Edwards, Michael C

    2017-04-01

    Hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) contains at least 23 TaPr-1 genes encoding the group 1 pathogenesis-related (PR-1) proteins as identified in our previous work. Here, we report the cloning and characterization of TaPr-1-rk1 and TaPr-1-rk2, two novel genes closely related to the wheat PR-1 family. The two TaPr-1-rk genes are located on homoeologous chromosomes 3D and 3A, respectively, and each contains a large open reading frame (7385 or 6060 bp) that is interrupted by seven introns and subjected to alternative splicing (AS) with five or six isoforms of mRNA transcripts. The deduced full-length TaPR-1-RK1 and TaPR-1-RK2 proteins (95% identity) contain two repeat PR-1 domains, the second of which is fused via a transmembrane helix to a serine/threonine kinase catalytic (STKc) domain characteristic of receptor-like protein kinases. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the two PR-1 domains of the TaPR-1-RK proteins form sister clades with their homologues identified in other monocot plants and are well separated from stand-alone PR-1 proteins, whereas the STKc domains may have originated from cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases (CRKs). Reverse-transcriptase-PCR analysis revealed that the TaPr-1-rk genes are predominantly expressed in wheat leaves and their expression levels are elevated in response to pathogen attack, such as infection by barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV), and also to stress conditions, most obviously, to soil salinity. This is the first report of PR-1-CRK hybrid proteins in wheat. The data may shed new insights into the function/evolutionary origin of the PR-1 family and the STKc-mediated defense/stress response pathways in plants.

  5. A C1q domain containing protein from Crassostrea gigas serves as pattern recognition receptor and opsonin with high binding affinity to LPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shuai; Li, Hui; Zhang, Daoxiang; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Lingling; Sun, Jinsheng; Song, Linsheng

    2015-08-01

    C1q proteins serve as pattern recognition receptors and involve in the pathogen recognition and complement pathway activation. In the present study, a novel C1q domain containing protein from Crassostrea gigas (designated CgC1qDC-1) was isolated by liposaccharide-Sepharose 6B affinity chromatography. The coding sequence of CgC1qDC-1 gene was determined by performing a homologous search of eight tryptic peptides identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS against the genome of C. gigas. The coding sequence of CgC1qDC-1 was of 387 bp encoding a polypeptide of 128 amino acids containing a typical globular C1q domain. The globular C1q domain possessed eight β strands with a jelly-roll topology structure, which was similar to the structure of human gC1q domain. The mRNA transcripts of CgC1qDC-1 were dominantly expressed in mantle and hemocytes, while low expressed in hepatopancreas, gonad, gill and muscle. The expression level of CgC1qDC-1 increased drastically at 6 h after Vibrio splendidus stimulation, and then gradually fell to the normal level at about 24 h. ELISA assay quantified that CgC1qDC-1 bound to LPS with high binding affinity (Kd = 0.09 × 10(-6) M). Moreover, CgC1qDC-1 significantly enhanced the phagocytosis of oyster hemocytes towards Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and V. splendidus. These results collectively indicated that CgC1qDC-1 could serve as pattern recognition receptor and opsonin in the innate immune response against invading Gram-negative bacteria.

  6. Poxvirus tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-like T2 proteins contain a conserved preligand assembly domain that inhibits cellular TNFR1-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedger, Lisa M; Osvath, Sarah R; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Li, Grace; Chan, Francis K-M; Barrett, John W; McFadden, Grant

    2006-09-01

    The poxvirus tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) homologue T2 has immunomodulatory properties; secreted myxoma virus T2 (M-T2) protein binds and inhibits rabbit TNF-alpha, while intracellular M-T2 blocks virus-induced lymphocyte apoptosis. Here, we define the antiapoptotic function as inhibition of TNFR-mediated death via a highly conserved viral preligand assembly domain (vPLAD). Jurkat cell lines constitutively expressing M-T2 were generated and shown to be resistant to UV irradiation-, etoposide-, and cycloheximide-induced death. These cells were also resistant to human TNF-alpha, but M-T2 expression did not alter surface expression levels of TNFRs. Previous studies indicated that T2's antiapoptotic function was conferred by the N-terminal region of the protein, and further examination of this region revealed a highly conserved N-terminal vPLAD, which is present in all poxvirus T2-like molecules. In cellular TNFRs and TNF-alpha-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptors (TRAILRs), PLAD controls receptor signaling competency prior to ligand binding. Here, we show that M-T2 potently inhibits TNFR1-induced death in a manner requiring the M-T2 vPLAD. Furthermore, we demonstrate that M-T2 physically associates with and colocalizes with human TNFRs but does not prevent human TNF-alpha binding to cellular receptors. Thus, M-T2 vPLAD is a species-nonspecific dominant-negative inhibitor of cellular TNFR1 function. Given that the PLAD is conserved in all known poxvirus T2-like molecules, we predict that it plays an important function in each of these proteins. Moreover, that the vPLAD confers an important antiapoptotic function confirms this domain as a potential target in the development of the next generation of TNF-alpha/TNFR therapeutics.

  7. An ion selectivity filter in the extracellular domain of Cys-loop receptors reveals determinants for ion conductance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Scott B; Wang, Hai-Long; Taylor, Palmer; Sine, Steven M

    2008-12-26

    Neurotransmitter binding to Cys-loop receptors promotes a prodigious transmembrane flux of several million ions/s, but to date, structural determinants of ion flux have been identified flanking the membrane-spanning region. Using x-ray crystallography, sequence analysis, and single-channel recording, we identified a novel determinant of ion conductance near the point of entry of permeant ions. Co-crystallization of acetylcholine-binding protein with sulfate anions revealed coordination of SO4(2-) with a ring of lysines at a position equivalent to 24 A above the lipid membrane in homologous Cys-loop receptors. Analysis of multiple sequence alignments revealed that residues equivalent to the ring of lysines are negatively charged in cation-selective receptors but are positively charged in anion-selective receptors. Charge reversal of side chains at homologous positions in the nicotinic receptor from the motor end plate decreases unitary conductance up to 80%. Selectivity filters stemming from transmembrane alpha-helices have similar pore diameters and compositions of amino acids. These findings establish that when the channel opens under a physiological electrochemical gradient, permeant ions are initially stabilized within the extracellular vestibule of Cys-loop receptors, and this stabilization is a major determinant of ion conductance.

  8. Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) Analysis of Dual CFP/YFP Labeled AMPA Receptors Reveals Structural Rearrangement within the C-Terminal Domain during Receptor Activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariassen, Linda Grønborg; Katchan, Mila; Plested, Andrew;

    2014-01-01

    AMPA receptors (AMPARs) are glutamate-gated cation channels that mediate the majority of fast excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. AMPARs are formed by homo- or heterotetramers of GluA1 to GluA4 sub- units. A recent X-ray crystal structure of a full-length homomeric GluA2 A...

  9. Structure and functional interaction of the extracellular domain of human GABA[subscript B] receptor GBR2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Yong; Xiong, Dazhi; Mosyak, Lidia; Malito, David L.; Kniazeff, Julie; Chen, Yan; Burmakina, Svetlana; Quick, Matthias; Bush, Martin; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Fan, Qing R. (CNRS-UMR); (Columbia)

    2012-10-24

    Inhibitory neurotransmission is mediated primarily by GABA. The metabotropic GABA{sub B} receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor central to mammalian brain function. Malfunction of GABA{sub B} receptor has been implicated in several neurological disorders. GABA{sub B} receptor functions as a heterodimeric assembly of GBR1 and GBR2 subunits, where GBR1 is responsible for ligand-binding and GBR2 is responsible for G protein coupling. Here we demonstrate that the GBR2 ectodomain directly interacts with the GBR1 ectodomain to increase agonist affinity by selectively stabilizing the agonist-bound conformation of GBR1. We present the crystal structure of the GBR2 ectodomain, which reveals a polar heterodimeric interface. We also identify specific heterodimer contacts from both subunits, and GBR1 residues involved in ligand recognition. Lastly, our structural and functional data indicate that the GBR2 ectodomain adopts a constitutively open conformation, suggesting a structural asymmetry in the active state of GABA{sub B} receptor that is unique to the GABAergic system.

  10. Structure of the Receptor-Binding Carboxy-Terminal Domain of the Bacteriophage T5 L-Shaped Tail Fibre with and without Its Intra-Molecular Chaperone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Doval, Carmela; Castón, José R.; Luque, Daniel; Granell, Meritxell; Otero, José M.; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Renouard, Madalena; Boulanger, Pascale; van Raaij, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophage T5, a Siphovirus belonging to the order Caudovirales, has a flexible, three-fold symmetric tail, to which three L-shaped fibres are attached. These fibres recognize oligo-mannose units on the bacterial cell surface prior to infection and are composed of homotrimers of the pb1 protein. Pb1 has 1396 amino acids, of which the carboxy-terminal 133 residues form a trimeric intra-molecular chaperone that is auto-proteolyzed after correct folding. The structure of a trimer of residues 970–1263 was determined by single anomalous dispersion phasing using incorporated selenomethionine residues and refined at 2.3 Å resolution using crystals grown from native, methionine-containing, protein. The protein inhibits phage infection by competition. The phage-distal receptor-binding domain resembles a bullet, with the walls formed by partially intertwined beta-sheets, conferring stability to the structure. The fold of the domain is novel and the topology unique to the pb1 structure. A site-directed mutant (Ser1264 to Ala), in which auto-proteolysis is impeded, was also produced, crystallized and its 2.5 Å structure solved by molecular replacement. The additional chaperone domain (residues 1263–1396) consists of a central trimeric alpha-helical coiled-coil flanked by a mixed alpha-beta domain. Three long beta-hairpin tentacles, one from each chaperone monomer, extend into long curved grooves of the bullet-shaped domain. The chaperone-containing mutant did not inhibit infection by competition. PMID:26670244

  11. Recognition of the 300-kDa mannose 6-phosphate receptor cytoplasmic domain by 47-kDa tail-interacting protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsel, Joke G.; Sincock, Paul M.; Krise, Jeffrey P.; Pfeffer, Suzanne R.

    2000-01-01

    Tail-interacting 47-kDa protein (TIP47) binds the cytoplasmic domains of the cation-dependent (CD) and cation-independent (CI) mannose 6-phosphate receptors (MPRs) and is required for their transport from endosomes to the Golgi complex. TIP47 recognizes a phenylalanine-tryptophan signal in the CD-MPR. We show here that TIP47 interaction with the 163-residue CI-MPR cytoplasmic domain is highly conformation dependent and requires CI-MPR residues that are proximal to the membrane. CI-MPR cytoplasmic domain residues 1–47 are dispensable, whereas residues 48–74 are essential for high-affinity binding. However, residues 48–74 are not sufficient for high-affinity binding; residues 75–163 alone display weak affinity for TIP47, yet they contribute to the presentation of residues 48–74 in the intact protein. Independent competition binding experiments confirm that TIP47 interacts with the membrane-proximal portion of the CI-MPR cytoplasmic domain. TIP47 binding is competed by the binding of the AP-2 clathrin adaptor at (and near) residues 24–29 but not by AP-1 binding at (and near) residues 160–161. Finally, TIP47 appears to recognize a putative loop generated by the sequence PPAPRPG and other hydrophobic residues in the membrane-proximal domain. Although crystallography will be needed to define the precise interaction interface, these data provide an initial structural basis for TIP47–CI-MPR association. PMID:10908666

  12. Receptor complementation and mutagenesis reveal SR-BI as an essential HCV entry factor and functionally imply its intra- and extra-cellular domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlène Dreux

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available HCV entry into cells is a multi-step and slow process. It is believed that the initial capture of HCV particles by glycosaminoglycans and/or lipoprotein receptors is followed by coordinated interactions with the scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI, a major receptor of high-density lipoprotein (HDL, the CD81 tetraspanin, and the tight junction protein Claudin-1, ultimately leading to uptake and cellular penetration of HCV via low-pH endosomes. Several reports have indicated that HDL promotes HCV entry through interaction with SR-BI. This pathway remains largely elusive, although it was shown that HDL neither associates with HCV particles nor modulates HCV binding to SR-BI. In contrast to CD81 and Claudin-1, the importance of SR-BI has only been addressed indirectly because of lack of cells in which functional complementation assays with mutant receptors could be performed. Here we identified for the first time two cell types that supported HCVpp and HCVcc entry upon ectopic SR-BI expression. Remarkably, the undetectable expression of SR-BI in rat hepatoma cells allowed unambiguous investigation of human SR-BI functions during HCV entry. By expressing different SR-BI mutants in either cell line, our results revealed features of SR-BI intracellular domains that influence HCV infectivity without affecting receptor binding and stimulation of HCV entry induced by HDL/SR-BI interaction. Conversely, we identified positions of SR-BI ectodomain that, by altering HCV binding, inhibit entry. Finally, we characterized alternative ectodomain determinants that, by reducing SR-BI cholesterol uptake and efflux functions, abolish HDL-mediated infection-enhancement. Altogether, we demonstrate that SR-BI is an essential HCV entry factor. Moreover, our results highlight specific SR-BI determinants required during HCV entry and physiological lipid transfer functions hijacked by HCV to favor infection.

  13. Receptor complementation and mutagenesis reveal SR-BI as an essential HCV entry factor and functionally imply its intra- and extra-cellular domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlène Dreux

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available HCV entry into cells is a multi-step and slow process. It is believed that the initial capture of HCV particles by glycosaminoglycans and/or lipoprotein receptors is followed by coordinated interactions with the scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI, a major receptor of high-density lipoprotein (HDL, the CD81 tetraspanin, and the tight junction protein Claudin-1, ultimately leading to uptake and cellular penetration of HCV via low-pH endosomes. Several reports have indicated that HDL promotes HCV entry through interaction with SR-BI. This pathway remains largely elusive, although it was shown that HDL neither associates with HCV particles nor modulates HCV binding to SR-BI. In contrast to CD81 and Claudin-1, the importance of SR-BI has only been addressed indirectly because of lack of cells in which functional complementation assays with mutant receptors could be performed. Here we identified for the first time two cell types that supported HCVpp and HCVcc entry upon ectopic SR-BI expression. Remarkably, the undetectable expression of SR-BI in rat hepatoma cells allowed unambiguous investigation of human SR-BI functions during HCV entry. By expressing different SR-BI mutants in either cell line, our results revealed features of SR-BI intracellular domains that influence HCV infectivity without affecting receptor binding and stimulation of HCV entry induced by HDL/SR-BI interaction. Conversely, we identified positions of SR-BI ectodomain that, by altering HCV binding, inhibit entry. Finally, we characterized alternative ectodomain determinants that, by reducing SR-BI cholesterol uptake and efflux functions, abolish HDL-mediated infection-enhancement. Altogether, we demonstrate that SR-BI is an essential HCV entry factor. Moreover, our results highlight specific SR-BI determinants required during HCV entry and physiological lipid transfer functions hijacked by HCV to favor infection.

  14. Discoidin domain receptors promote α1β1- and α2β1-integrin mediated cell adhesion to collagen by enhancing integrin activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huifang Xu

    Full Text Available The discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2, are receptor tyrosine kinases that bind to and are activated by collagens. Similar to collagen-binding β1 integrins, the DDRs bind to specific motifs within the collagen triple helix. However, these two types of collagen receptors recognize distinct collagen sequences. While GVMGFO (O is hydroxyproline functions as a major DDR binding motif in fibrillar collagens, integrins bind to sequences containing Gxx'GEx". The DDRs are thought to regulate cell adhesion, but their roles have hitherto only been studied indirectly. In this study we used synthetic triple-helical collagen-derived peptides that incorporate either the DDR-selective GVMGFO motif or integrin-selective motifs, such as GxOGER and GLOGEN, in order to selectively target either type of receptor and resolve their contributions to cell adhesion. Our data using HEK293 cells show that while cell adhesion to collagen I was completely inhibited by anti-integrin blocking antibodies, the DDRs could mediate cell attachment to the GVMGFO motif in an integrin-independent manner. Cell binding to GVMGFO was independent of DDR receptor signalling and occurred with limited cell spreading, indicating that the DDRs do not mediate firm adhesion. However, blocking the interaction of DDR-expressing cells with collagen I via the GVMGFO site diminished cell adhesion, suggesting that the DDRs positively modulate integrin-mediated cell adhesion. Indeed, overexpression of the DDRs or activation of the DDRs by the GVMGFO ligand promoted α1β1 and α2β1 integrin-mediated cell adhesion to medium- and low-affinity integrin ligands without regulating the cell surface expression levels of α1β1 or α2β1. Our data thus demonstrate an adhesion-promoting role of the DDRs, whereby overexpression and/or activation of the DDRs leads to enhanced integrin-mediated cell adhesion as a result of higher integrin activation state.

  15. Collagen binding specificity of the discoidin domain receptors: binding sites on collagens II and III and molecular determinants for collagen IV recognition by DDR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huifang; Raynal, Nicolas; Stathopoulos, Stavros; Myllyharju, Johanna; Farndale, Richard W; Leitinger, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    The discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2 are cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated by triple-helical collagen. While normal DDR signalling regulates fundamental cellular processes, aberrant DDR signalling is associated with several human diseases. We previously identified GVMGFO (O is hydroxyproline) as a major DDR2 binding site in collagens I-III, and located two additional DDR2 binding sites in collagen II. Here we extend these studies to the homologous DDR1 and the identification of DDR binding sites on collagen III. Using sets of overlapping triple-helical peptides, the Collagen II and Collagen III Toolkits, we located several DDR2 binding sites on both collagens. The interaction of DDR1 with Toolkit peptides was more restricted, with DDR1 mainly binding to peptides containing the GVMGFO motif. Triple-helical peptides containing the GVMGFO motif induced DDR1 transmembrane signalling, and DDR1 binding and receptor activation occurred with the same amino acid requirements as previously defined for DDR2. While both DDRs exhibit the same specificity for binding the GVMGFO motif, which is present only in fibrillar collagens, the two receptors display distinct preferences for certain non-fibrillar collagens, with the basement membrane collagen IV being exclusively recognised by DDR1. Based on our recent crystal structure of a DDR2-collagen complex, we designed mutations to identify the molecular determinants for DDR1 binding to collagen IV. By replacing five amino acids in DDR2 with the corresponding DDR1 residues we were able to create a DDR2 construct that could function as a collagen IV receptor.

  16. Crystal structure of the MrkD1P receptor binding domain of Klebsiella pneumoniae and identification of the human collagen V binding interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rêgo, Ana Toste; Johnson, Jeremiah G; Gelbel, Sebastian; Enguita, Francisco J; Clegg, Steven; Waksman, Gabriel

    2012-11-01

    Klebsiella species are members of the family enterobacteriaceae, opportunistic pathogens that are among the eight most prevalent infectious agents in hospitals. Among other virulence factors in Klebsiella, type 3 pili exhibit a unique binding pattern in the human kidney via interaction of two MrkD adhesion variants 1C1 and 1P to type IV and/or V collagen. However, very little is known about the nature of this recognition. Here we present the crystal structure of the plasmid born MrkD1P receptor domain (MrkDrd). The structure reveals a jelly-roll β-barrel fold comprising 17 β-strands very similar to the receptor domain of GafD, the tip adhesin from the F17 pilus that recognizes n-acetyl-d-glucosamine (GlcNAc). Analysis of collagen V binding of different MrkD1P mutants revealed that two regions were responsible for its binding: a pocket, that aligns approximately with the GlcNAc binding pocket of GafD involving residues R105 and Y155, and a transversally oriented patch that spans strands β2a, β9b and β6 including residues V49, T52, V91, R102 and I136. Taken together, these data provide structural and functional insights on MrkD1P recognition of host cells, providing a tool for future development of rationally designed drugs with the prospect of blocking Klebsiella adhesion to collagen V.

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the periplasmic domain of the Escherichia coli aspartate receptor Tar and its complex with aspartate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mise, Takeshi; Matsunami, Hideyuki; Samatey, Fadel A.; Maruyama, Ichiro N., E-mail: ichi@oist.jp [Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, 1919-1 Tancha, Onna-son, Kunigami, Okinawa 904-0495 (Japan)

    2014-08-27

    The periplasmic domain of the E. coli aspartate receptor Tar was cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized with and without bound ligand. The crystals obtained diffracted to resolutions of 1.58 and 1.95 Å, respectively. The cell-surface receptor Tar mediates bacterial chemotaxis toward an attractant, aspartate (Asp), and away from a repellent, Ni{sup 2+}. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of Tar activity by its ligands, the Escherichia coli Tar periplasmic domain with and without bound aspartate (Asp-Tar and apo-Tar, respectively) were each crystallized in two different forms. Using ammonium sulfate as a precipitant, crystals of apo-Tar1 and Asp-Tar1 were grown and diffracted to resolutions of 2.10 and 2.40 Å, respectively. Alternatively, using sodium chloride as a precipitant, crystals of apo-Tar2 and Asp-Tar2 were grown and diffracted to resolutions of 1.95 and 1.58 Å, respectively. Crystals of apo-Tar1 and Asp-Tar1 adopted space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, while those of apo-Tar2 and Asp-Tar2 adopted space groups P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and C2, respectively.

  18. SENESCENCE-SUPPRESSED PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE Directly Interacts with the Cytoplasmic Domain of SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE and Negatively Regulates Leaf Senescence in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dong; Cui, Yanjiao; Xu, Fan; Xu, Xinxin; Gao, Guanxiao; Wang, Yaxin; Guo, Zhaoxia; Wang, Dan; Wang, Ning Ning

    2015-10-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation mediated by protein kinases and phosphatases plays an important role in the regulation of leaf senescence. We previously reported that the leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE (AtSARK) positively regulates leaf senescence in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Here, we report the involvement of a protein serine/threonine phosphatase 2C-type protein phosphatase, SENESCENCE-SUPPRESSED PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE (SSPP), in the negative regulation of Arabidopsis leaf senescence. SSPP transcript levels decreased greatly during both natural senescence and SARK-induced precocious senescence. Overexpression of SSPP significantly delayed leaf senescence in Arabidopsis. Protein pull-down and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays demonstrated that the cytosol-localized SSPP could interact with the cytoplasmic domain of the plasma membrane-localized AtSARK. In vitro assays showed that SSPP has protein phosphatase function and can dephosphorylate the cytosolic domain of AtSARK. Consistent with these observations, overexpression of SSPP effectively rescued AtSARK-induced precocious leaf senescence and changes in hormonal responses. All our results suggested that SSPP functions in sustaining proper leaf longevity and preventing early senescence by suppressing or perturbing SARK-mediated senescence signal transduction.

  19. The human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR gene in European patients with advanced colorectal cancer harbors infrequent mutations in its tyrosine kinase domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delvenne Philippe

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, a member of the ErbB family of receptors, is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase (TK activated by the binding of extracellular ligands of the EGF-family and involved in triggering the MAPK signaling pathway, which leads to cell proliferation. Mutations in the EGFR tyrosine kinase domain are frequent in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. However, to date, only very few, mainly non-European, studies have reported rare EGFR mutations in colorectal cancer (CRC. Methods We screened 236 clinical tumor samples from European patients with advanced CRC by direct DNA sequencing to detect potential, as yet unknown mutations, in the EGFR gene exons 18 to 21, mainly covering the EGFR TK catalytic domain. Results EGFR sequences showed somatic missense mutations in exons 18 and 20 at a frequency of 2.1% and 0.4% respectively. Somatic SNPs were also found in exons 20 and 21 at a frequency of about 3.1% and 0.4% respectively. Of these mutations, four have not yet been described elsewhere. Conclusions These mutation frequencies are higher than in a similarly sized population characterized by Barber and colleagues, but still too low to account for a major role played by the EGFR gene in CRC.

  20. Lipid domain formation and ligand-receptor distribution in lipid bilayer membranes investigated by atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaasgaard, Thomas; Mouritsen, O.G.; Jørgensen, K.

    2002-01-01

    A novel experimental technique, based on atomic force microscopy (AFM), is proposed to visualize the lateral organization of membrane systems in the nanometer range. The technique involves the use of a ligand-receptor pair, biotin-avidin, which introduces a height variation on a solid-supported l......A novel experimental technique, based on atomic force microscopy (AFM), is proposed to visualize the lateral organization of membrane systems in the nanometer range. The technique involves the use of a ligand-receptor pair, biotin-avidin, which introduces a height variation on a solid...

  1. Structural and mutational analyses of the receptor binding domain of botulinum D/C mosaic neurotoxin: Insight into the ganglioside binding mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuemket, Nipawan [Graduate School of Life Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Tanaka, Yoshikazu [Creative Research Institution ' Sousei,' Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Tsukamoto, Kentaro; Tsuji, Takao [Department of Microbiology, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Toyoake, Aichi 470-1192 (Japan); Nakamura, Keiji; Kozaki, Shunji [Department of Veterinary Science, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, Osaka 598-8531 (Japan); Yao, Min [Graduate School of Life Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Tanaka, Isao, E-mail: tanaka@castor.sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Graduate School of Life Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} We determined the crystal structure of the receptor binding domain of BoNT in complex with 3'-sialyllactose. {yields} An electron density derived from the 3'-sialyllactose was confirmed at the cleft in the C-terminal subdomain. {yields} Alanine site-directed mutagenesis showed that GBS and GBL are important for ganglioside binding. {yields} A cell binding mechanism, which involves cooperative contribution of two sites, was proposed. -- Abstract: Clostridium botulinum type D strain OFD05, which produces the D/C mosaic neurotoxin, was isolated from cattle killed by the recent botulism outbreak in Japan. The D/C mosaic neurotoxin is the most toxic of the botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) characterized to date. Here, we determined the crystal structure of the receptor binding domain of BoNT from strain OFD05 in complex with 3'-sialyllactose at a resolution of 3.0 A. In the structure, an electron density derived from the 3'-sialyllactose was confirmed at the cleft in the C-terminal subdomain. Alanine site-directed mutagenesis showed the significant contribution of the residues surrounding the cleft to ganglioside recognition. In addition, a loop adjoining the cleft also plays an important role in ganglioside recognition. In contrast, little effect was observed when the residues located around the surface previously identified as the protein receptor binding site in other BoNTs were substituted. The results of cell binding analysis of the mutants were significantly correlated with the ganglioside binding properties. Based on these observations, a cell binding mechanism of BoNT from strain OFD05 is proposed, which involves cooperative contribution of two ganglioside binding sites.

  2. Cloning of a novel phosphotyrosine binding domain containing molecule, Odin, involved in signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, A.; Blagoev, B.; Kratchmarova, I.;

    2002-01-01

    We have used a proteomic approach using mass spectrometry to identify signaling molecules involved in receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathways. Using affinity purification by anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies to enrich for tyrosine phosphorylated proteins, we have identified a novel signaling mo...

  3. Addressing the Inflammatory Response to Clinically Relevant Polymers by Manipulating the Host Response Using ITIM Domain-Containing Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua B. Slee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tissue contacting surfaces of medical devices initiate a host inflammatory response, characterized by adsorption of blood proteins and inflammatory cells triggering the release of cytokines, reactive oxygen species (ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS, in an attempt to clear or isolate the foreign object from the body. This normal host response contributes to device-associated pathophysiology and addressing device biocompatibility remains an unmet need. Although widespread attempts have been made to render the device surfaces unreactive, the establishment of a completely bioinert coating has been untenable and demonstrates the need to develop strategies based upon the molecular mechanisms that define the interaction between host cells and synthetic surfaces. In this review, we discuss a family of transmembrane receptors, known as immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM-containing receptors, which show promise as potential targets to address aberrant biocompatibility. These receptors repress the immune response and ensure that the intensity of an immune response is appropriate for the stimuli. Particular emphasis will be placed on the known ITIM-containing receptor, Signal Regulatory Protein Alpha (SIRPα, and its cognate ligand CD47. In addition, this review will discuss the potential of other ITIM-containing proteins as targets for addressing the aberrant biocompatibility of polymeric biomaterials.

  4. Sorting of ligand-activated epidermal growth factor receptor to lysosomes requires its actin-binding domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoorvogel, W; Kerstens, S; Fritzsche, I; den Hartigh, JC; Oud, R; van der Heyden, MAG; Henegouwen, PMPVE

    2004-01-01

    Ligand-induced down-regulation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) comprises activation of two sequential transport steps. The first involves endocytic uptake by clathrin-coated vesicles, the second transfer of endocytosed EGFR from endosomes to lysosomes. Here we demonstrate that the sec

  5. Defining the Biological Domain of Applicability of Adverse Outcome Pathways Across Diverse Species: The Estrogen Receptor/Aromatase Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aromatase inhibitors (e.g. fadrozole, prochloraz) and estrogen receptor antagonists (e.g. tamoxifen) reduce the circulating concentration of 17β-estradiol, leading to reproductive dysfunction in affected organisms. While these toxic effects are well-characterized in fish and...

  6. Improved characterization of nod factors and genetically based variation in LysM Receptor domains identify amino acids expendable for nod factor recognition in Lotus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bek, Anita S; Sauer, Jørgen; Thygesen, Mikkel B; Duus, Jens Ø; Petersen, Bent O; Thirup, Søren; James, Euan; Jensen, Knud J; Stougaard, Jens; Radutoiu, Simona

    2010-01-01

    Formation of functional nodules is a complex process depending on host-microsymbiont compatibility in all developmental stages. This report uses the contrasting symbiotic phenotypes of Lotus japonicus and L. pedunculatus, inoculated with Mesorhizobium loti or the Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lotus), to investigate the role of Nod factor structure and Nod factor receptors (NFR) for rhizobial recognition, infection thread progression, and bacterial persistence within nodule cells. A key contribution was the use of 800 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry for Nod factor analysis. The Nod factor decorations at the nonreducing end differ between Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lotus) and M. loti, and the NFR1/NFR5 extracellular regions of L. pedunculatus and L. japonicus were found to vary in amino acid composition. Genetic transformation experiments using chimeric and wild-type receptors showed that both receptor variants recognize the structurally different Nod factors but the later symbiotic phenotype remained unchanged. These results highlight the importance of additional checkpoints during nitrogen-fixing symbiosis and define several amino acids in the LysM domains as expendable for perception of the two differentially carbamoylated Nod factors.

  7. X-ray crystallographic studies of the extracellular domain of the first plant ATP receptor, DORN1, and the orthologous protein from Camelina sativa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhijie; Chakraborty, Sayan; Xu, Guozhou (NCSU)

    2016-10-26

    Does not respond to nucleotides 1 (DORN1) has recently been identified as the first membrane-integral plant ATP receptor, which is required for ATP-induced calcium response, mitogen-activated protein kinase activation and defense responses inArabidopsis thaliana. In order to understand DORN1-mediated ATP sensing and signal transduction, crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies were conducted on the extracellular domain of DORN1 (atDORN1-ECD) and that of an orthologous protein,Camelina sativalectin receptor kinase I.9 (csLecRK-I.9-ECD or csI.9-ECD). A variety of deglycosylation strategies were employed to optimize the glycosylated recombinant atDORN1-ECD for crystallization. In addition, the glycosylated csI.9-ECD protein was crystallized at 291 K. X-ray diffraction data were collected at 4.6 Å resolution from a single crystal. The crystal belonged to space groupC222 orC2221, with unit-cell parametersa= 94.7,b= 191.5,c= 302.8 Å. These preliminary studies have laid the foundation for structural determination of the DORN1 and I.9 receptor proteins, which will lead to a better understanding of the perception and function of extracellular ATP in plants.

  8. The LIM domain protein FHL2 interacts with the NR5A family of nuclear receptors and CREB to activate the inhibin-α subunit gene in ovarian granulosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matulis, Christina K; Mayo, Kelly E

    2012-08-01

    Nuclear receptor transcriptional activity is enhanced by interaction with coactivators. The highly related nuclear receptor 5A (NR5A) subfamily members liver receptor homolog 1 and steroidogenic factor 1 bind to and activate several of the same genes, many of which are important for reproductive function. To better understand transcriptional activation by these nuclear receptors, we sought to identify interacting proteins that might function as coactivators. The LIM domain protein four and a half LIM domain 2 (FHL2) was identified as interacting with the NR5A receptors in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a human ovary cDNA library. FHL2, and the closely related FHL1, are both expressed in the rodent ovary and in granulosa cells. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of FHL1 and FHL2 in primary mouse granulosa cells reduced expression of the NR5A target genes encoding inhibin-α and P450scc. In vitro assays confirmed the interaction between the FHL and NR5A proteins and revealed that a single LIM domain of FHL2 is sufficient for this interaction, whereas determinants in both the ligand binding domain and DNA binding domain of NR5A proteins are important. FHL2 enhances the ability of both liver receptor homolog 1 and steroidogenic factor 1 to activate the inhibin-α subunit gene promoter in granulosa cells and thus functions as a transcriptional coactivator. FHL2 also interacts with cAMP response element-binding protein and substantially augments activation of inhibin gene expression by the combination of NR5A receptors and forskolin, suggesting that FHL2 may facilitate integration of these two signals. Collectively these results identify FHL2 as a novel coactivator of NR5A nuclear receptors in ovarian granulosa cells and suggest its involvement in regulating target genes important for mammalian reproduction.

  9. Convergent Signaling Pathways Controlled by LRP1 (Receptor-related Protein 1) Cytoplasmic and Extracellular Domains Limit Cellular Cholesterol Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Asmar, Zeina; Terrand, Jérome; Jenty, Marion; Host, Lionel; Mlih, Mohamed; Zerr, Aurélie; Justiniano, Hélène; Matz, Rachel L; Boudier, Christian; Scholler, Estelle; Garnier, Jean-Marie; Bertaccini, Diego; Thiersé, Danièle; Schaeffer, Christine; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Herz, Joachim; Bruban, Véronique; Boucher, Philippe

    2016-03-04

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is a ubiquitously expressed cell surface receptor that protects from intracellular cholesterol accumulation. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here we show that the extracellular (α) chain of LRP1 mediates TGFβ-induced enhancement of Wnt5a, which limits intracellular cholesterol accumulation by inhibiting cholesterol biosynthesis and by promoting cholesterol export. Moreover, we demonstrate that the cytoplasmic (β) chain of LRP1 suffices to limit cholesterol accumulation in LRP1(-/-) cells. Through binding of Erk2 to the second of its carboxyl-terminal NPXY motifs, LRP1 β-chain positively regulates the expression of ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and of neutral cholesterol ester hydrolase (NCEH1). These results highlight the unexpected functions of LRP1 and the canonical Wnt5a pathway and new therapeutic potential in cholesterol-associated disorders including cardiovascular diseases.

  10. Conformational Entropic Maps of Functional Coupling Domains in GPCR Activation: A Case Study of β2 Adrenergic Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Fan; Abrol, Ravinder; Goddard, William A.; Dougherty, Dennis A.

    2013-01-01

    Enthalpic and entropic changes during GPCR activation are poorly understood. Based on the recent solved structures, researchers in the GPCR structural biology field have proposed several 'local activating switches' that consisted of a few number of conserved residues, but have long ignored the collective dynamical effect (conformational entropy) of a domain composed of an ensemble of residues. A new paradigm has been proposed recently that a GPCR can be viewed as a composition of several func...

  11. An antibody against the surfactant protein A (SP-A)-binding domain of the SP-A receptor inhibits T cell-mediated immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samten, Buka; Townsend, James C; Sever-Chroneos, Zvjezdana; Pasquinelli, Virginia; Barnes, Peter F; Chroneos, Zissis C

    2008-07-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) suppresses lymphocyte proliferation and IL-2 secretion, in part, by binding to its receptor, SP-R210. However, the mechanisms underlying this effect are not well understood. Here, we studied the effect of antibodies against the SP-A-binding (neck) domain (alpha-SP-R210n) or nonbinding C-terminal domain (alpha-SP-R210ct) of SP-R210 on human peripheral blood T cell immune responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We demonstrated that both antibodies bind to more than 90% of monocytes and 5-10% of CD3+ T cells in freshly isolated PBMC. Stimulation of PBMC from healthy tuberculin reactors [purified protein derivative-positive (PPD+)] with heat-killed M. tuberculosis induced increased antibody binding to CD3+ cells. Increased antibody binding suggested enhanced expression of SP-R210, and this was confirmed by Western blotting. The antibodies (alpha-SP-R210n) cross-linking the SP-R210 through the SP-A-binding domain markedly inhibited cell proliferation and IFN-gamma secretion by PBMC from PPD+ donors in response to heat-killed M. tuberculosis, whereas preimmune IgG and antibodies (alpha-SP-R210ct) cross-linking SP-R210 through the non-SP-A-binding, C-terminal domain had no effect. Anti-SP-R210n also decreased M. tuberculosis-induced production of TNF-alpha but increased production of IL-10. Inhibition of IFN-gamma production by alpha-SP-R210n was abrogated by the combination of neutralizing antibodies to IL-10 and TGF-beta1. Together, these findings support the hypothesis that SP-A, via SP-R210, suppresses cell-mediated immunity against M. tuberculosis via a mechanism that up-regulates secretion of IL-10 and TGF-beta1.

  12. Llama-derived single variable domains (nanobodies) directed against chemokine receptor CXCR7 reduce head and neck cancer cell growth in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maussang, David; Mujić-Delić, Azra; Descamps, Francis J; Stortelers, Catelijne; Vanlandschoot, Peter; Stigter-van Walsum, Marijke; Vischer, Henry F; van Roy, Maarten; Vosjan, Maria; Gonzalez-Pajuelo, Maria; van Dongen, Guus A M S; Merchiers, Pascal; van Rompaey, Philippe; Smit, Martine J

    2013-10-11

    The chemokine receptor CXCR7, belonging to the membrane-bound G protein-coupled receptor superfamily, is expressed in several tumor types. Inhibition of CXCR7 with either small molecules or small interference (si)RNA has shown promising therapeutic benefits in several tumor models. With the increased interest and effectiveness of biologicals inhibiting membrane-bound receptors we made use of the "Nanobody platform" to target CXCR7. Previously we showed that Nanobodies, i.e. immunoglobulin single variable domains derived from naturally occurring heavy chain-only camelids antibodies, represent new biological tools to efficiently tackle difficult drug targets such as G protein-coupled receptors. In this study we developed and characterized highly selective and potent Nanobodies against CXCR7. Interestingly, the CXCR7-targeting Nanobodies displayed antagonistic properties in contrast with previously reported CXCR7-targeting agents. Several high affinity CXCR7-specific Nanobodies potently inhibited CXCL12-induced β-arrestin2 recruitment in vitro. A wide variety of tumor biopsies was profiled, showing for the first time high expression of CXCR7 in head and neck cancer. Using a patient-derived CXCR7-expressing head and neck cancer xenograft model in nude mice, tumor growth was inhibited by CXCR7-targeting Nanobody therapy. Mechanistically, CXCR7-targeting Nanobodies did not inhibit cell cycle progression but instead reduced secretion of the angiogenic chemokine CXCL1 from head and neck cancer cells in vitro, thus acting here as inverse agonists, and subsequent angiogenesis in vivo. Hence, with this novel class of CXCR7 inhibitors, we further substantiate the therapeutic relevance of targeting CXCR7 in head and neck cancer.

  13. Interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with the Estrogen Receptor Alpha F domain provides a drug target interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vries-van Leeuwen, Ingrid J.; da Costa Pereira, Daniel; Flach, Koen D.; Piersma, Sander R.; Haase, Christian; Bier, David; Yalcin, Zeliha; Michalides, Rob; Feenstra, K. Anton; Jiménez, Connie R.; de Greef, Tom F. A.; Brunsveld, Luc; Ottmann, Christian; Zwart, Wilbert; de Boer, Albertus H.

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is involved in numerous physiological and pathological processes, including breast cancer. Breast cancer therapy is therefore currently directed at inhibiting the transcriptional potency of ERα, either by blocking estrogen production through aromatase inhibitors or antiestrogens that compete for hormone binding. Due to resistance, new treatment modalities are needed and as ERα dimerization is essential for its activity, interference with receptor dimerization offers a new opportunity to exploit in drug design. Here we describe a unique mechanism of how ERα dimerization is negatively controlled by interaction with 14-3-3 proteins at the extreme C terminus of the receptor. Moreover, the small-molecule fusicoccin (FC) stabilizes this ERα/14-3-3 interaction. Cocrystallization of the trimeric ERα/14-3-3/FC complex provides the structural basis for this stabilization and shows the importance of phosphorylation of the penultimate Threonine (ERα-T594) for high-affinity interaction. We confirm that T594 is a distinct ERα phosphorylation site in the breast cancer cell line MCF-7 using a phospho-T594–specific antibody and by mass spectrometry. In line with its ERα/14-3-3 interaction stabilizing effect, fusicoccin reduces the estradiol-stimulated ERα dimerization, inhibits ERα/chromatin interactions and downstream gene expression, resulting in decreased cell proliferation. Herewith, a unique functional phosphosite and an alternative regulation mechanism of ERα are provided, together with a small molecule that selectively targets this ERα/14-3-3 interface. PMID:23676274

  14. [Bacterial expression of water-soluble domain of Lynx1, endogenic neuromodulator of human nicotinic acetylcholine receptors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulepko, M A; Liukmanova, E N; Kasheverov, I E; Dolgikh, D A; Tsetlin, V I; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2011-01-01

    Lynx1 expresses in the central nervous system and plays important role in a regulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Successful milligram-quantitive expression of ws-Lynx1 was achieved only in the case of its production in the form of cytoplasm inclusion bodies. Different conditions of ws-Lynx1 refolding for yield optimization were performed. The obtained recombinant protein was characterized by means of mass spectrometry and CD spectroscopy. The binding experiments on the nAChRs from Torpedo californica membranes revealed that ws-Lynxl is biologically active and blocks muscle nAChR with IC50-20-30 microM.

  15. Mutational library analysis of selected amino acids in the receptor binding domain of envelope of Akv murine leukemia virus by conditionally replication competent bicistronic vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahrami, Shervin; Pedersen, Finn Skou; Duch, Mogens R.

    2003-01-01

    envelope expression. This vector functions as a replication competent mini-virus in a culture of NIH 3T3 derived semi-packaging cells that express the viral Gag and Pol proteins. Titers comparable to those of wild type virus were achieved by this system. To test this vector system, we created a random......The envelope protein of retroviruses is responsible for viral entry into host cells. Here, we describe a mutational library approach to dissect functional domains of the envelope protein involving a retroviral vector, which expresses both the envelope protein of Akv murine leukemia virus (MLV...... mutational library of Arg 85 and Asp 86 in the first variable region of Akv envelope protein. Homologous amino acids to Asp 86 in Moloney and Friend murine leukemia viruses are thought to be directly involved in receptor binding. Subsequent selection of mutants capable of infecting murine NIH 3T3 cells...

  16. Blocking metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 7 (mGlu7) via the Venus flytrap domain (VFTD) inhibits amygdala plasticity, stress, and anxiety-related behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Christine E; Peterlik, Daniel; Neuhäuser, Christoph; Bouhelal, Rochdi; Kaupmann, Klemens; Laue, Grit; Uschold-Schmidt, Nicole; Feuerbach, Dominik; Zimmermann, Kaspar; Ofner, Silvio; Cryan, John F; van der Putten, Herman; Fendt, Markus; Vranesic, Ivo; Glatthar, Ralf; Flor, Peter J

    2014-04-18

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 7 (mGlu7) is an important presynaptic regulator of neurotransmission in the mammalian CNS. mGlu7 function has been linked to autism, drug abuse, anxiety, and depression. Despite this, it has been difficult to develop specific blockers of native mGlu7 signaling in relevant brain areas such as amygdala and limbic cortex. Here, we present the mGlu7-selective antagonist 7-hydroxy-3-(4-iodophenoxy)-4H-chromen-4-one (XAP044), which inhibits lateral amygdala long term potentiation (LTP) in brain slices from wild type mice with a half-maximal blockade at 88 nm. There was no effect of XAP044 on LTP of mGlu7-deficient mice, indicating that this pharmacological effect is mGlu7-dependent. Unexpectedly and in contrast to all previous mGlu7-selective drugs, XAP044 does not act via the seven-transmembrane region but rather via a binding pocket localized in mGlu7's extracellular Venus flytrap domain, a region generally known for orthosteric agonist binding. This was shown by chimeric receptor studies in recombinant cell line assays. XAP044 demonstrates good brain exposure and wide spectrum anti-stress and antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like efficacy in rodent behavioral paradigms. XAP044 reduces freezing during acquisition of Pavlovian fear and reduces innate anxiety, which is consistent with the phenotypes of mGlu7-deficient mice, the results of mGlu7 siRNA knockdown studies, and the inhibition of amygdala LTP by XAP044. Thus, we present an mGlu7 antagonist with a novel molecular mode of pharmacological action, providing significant application potential in psychiatry. Modeling the selective interaction between XAP044 and mGlu7's Venus flytrap domain, whose three-dimensional structure is already known, will facilitate future drug development supported by computer-assisted drug design.

  17. Molecular variation and evolution of the tyrosine kinase domains of insulin receptor IRa and IRb genes in Cyprinidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, XiangHui; Wang, XuZhen; He, ShunPing

    2011-07-01

    The insulin receptor (IR) gene plays an important role in regulating cell growth, differentiation and development. In the present study, DNA sequences of insulin receptor genes, IRa and IRb, were amplified and sequenced from 37 representative species of the Cyprinidae and from five outgroup species from non-cyprinid Cypriniformes. Based on coding sequences (CDS) of tyrosine kinase regions of IRa and IRb, molecular evolution and phylogenetic relationships were analyzed to better understand the characteristics of IR gene divergence in the family Cyprinidae. IRa and IRb were clustered into one lineage in the gene tree of the IR gene family, reconstructed using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA). IRa and IRb have evolved into distinct genes after IR gene duplication in Cyprinidae. For each gene, molecular evolution analyses showed that there was no significant difference among different groups in the reconstructed maximum parsimony (MP) tree of Cyprinidae; IRa and IRb have been subjected to similar evolutionary pressure among different lineages. Although the amino acid sequences of IRa and IRb tyrosine kinase regions were highly conserved, our analyses showed that there were clear sequence variations between the tyrosine kinase regions of IRa and IRb proteins. This indicates that IRa and IRb proteins might play different roles in the insulin signaling pathway.

  18. Discoidin domain receptor 2 is associated with the increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase-13 in synovial fibroblasts of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jin; Yu, Jiangtian; Ren, Tingting; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yuanqiang; Liu, Xinping; Sun, Tiezheng; Lu, Houshan; Miyazawa, Keiji; Yao, Libo

    2009-10-01

    Regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) by collagen matrix in the synovial fibroblasts of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is critical event in the progressive joint destruction. Our previous study indicated that a collagen receptor, discoidin receptor 2 (DDR2), was highly expressed in the synovial fibroblasts of RA. However, the functional role of DDR2 in the regulation of MMP-13 production in synovial fibroblasts has not been elucidated. In this study, we initially demonstrated that the DDR2 and MMP-13 proteins are both highly expressed in the synovial lining layer of RA. MMP-13 mRNA and protein in synovial fibroblasts of RA were preferentially induced by collagen type II compared with MMP-1. Furthermore, stable overexpression of wild type DDR2 in murine synoviocytes dramatically augments the production of MMP-13. The activation of DDR2 also mediates the up-regulation of MMP-13 promoter activity in 293T cells. Inhibitor specific for extracellular signal-regulated kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK MAPK) cascade was shown to decrease MMP-13 level induced by collagen II in RA synovial fibroblasts and DDR2-induced MMP-13 promoter activity. Runx2 and activator protein-1 (AP-1) binding sites in MMP-13 promoter region are required for DDR2-induced transcription. The data in this study suggest that DDR2-mediated MMP-13 induction by collagen matrix in synovial fibroblasts of RA contributed to articular cartilage destruction.

  19. Regulation of FcϵRI Signaling in Mast Cells by G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase 2 and Its RH Domain*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Hariharan; Gupta, Kshitij; Parameswaran, Narayanan; Ali, Hydar

    2014-01-01

    Agonist-induced phosphorylation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) by GPCR kinases (GRKs) promotes their desensitization and internalization. Here, we sought to determine the role of GRK2 on FcϵRI signaling and mediator release in mast cells. The strategies utilized included lentiviral shRNA-mediated GRK2 knockdown, GRK2 gene deletion (GRK2flox/flox/cre recombinase) and overexpression of GRK2 and its regulator of G protein signaling homology (RH) domain (GRK2-RH). We found that silencing GRK2 expression caused ∼50% decrease in antigen-induced Ca2+ mobilization and degranulation but resulted in ablation of cytokine (IL-6 and IL-13) generation. The effect of GRK2 on cytokine generation does not require its catalytic activity but is mediated via the phosphorylation of p38 and Akt. Overexpression of GRK2 or its RH domain (GRK2-RH) enhanced antigen-induced mast cell degranulation and cytokine generation without affecting the expression levels of any of the FcϵRI subunits (α, β, and γ). GRK2 or GRK2-RH had no effect on antigen-induced phosphorylation of FcϵRIγ or Src but enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk. These data demonstrate that GRK2 modulates FcϵRI signaling in mast cells via at least two mechanisms. One involves GRK2-RH and modulates tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk, and the other is mediated via the phosphorylation of p38 and Akt. PMID:24904059

  20. A Structural Switch between Agonist and Antagonist Bound Conformations for a Ligand-Optimized Model of the Human Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Ligand Binding Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arden Perkins

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR is a ligand-activated transcription factor that regulates the expression of a diverse group of genes. Exogenous AHR ligands include the environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, which is a potent agonist, and the synthetic AHR antagonist N-2-(1H-indol-3ylethyl-9-isopropyl-2- (5-methylpyridin-3-yl-9H-purin-6-amine (GNF351. As no experimentally determined structure of the ligand binding domain exists, homology models have been utilized for virtual ligand screening (VLS to search for novel ligands. Here, we have developed an “agonist-optimized” homology model of the human AHR ligand binding domain, and this model aided in the discovery of two human AHR agonists by VLS. In addition, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of an agonist TCDD-bound and antagonist GNF351-bound version of this model in order to gain insights into the mechanics of the AHR ligand-binding pocket. These simulations identified residues 307–329 as a flexible segment of the AHR ligand pocket that adopts discrete conformations upon agonist or antagonist binding. This flexible segment of the AHR may act as a structural switch that determines the agonist or antagonist activity of a given AHR ligand.

  1. Expression and purification of a natural N-terminal pre-ligand assembly domain of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1 PLAD) and preliminary activity determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jin; Meng, Fang; Gao, Xiangdong; Dong, Hongxia; Yao, Wenbing

    2011-04-01

    A domain at the NH(2) terminal (N-terminal) of tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) termed the pre-ligand binding assembly domain (PLAD). The finding that PLAD can mediate a selective TNFR assembly in previously researches provides a novel target to the prevention of TNFR signaling in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMID). In this study, a natural N-terminal TNFR1 PLAD was obtained for the first time through the methods of GST-tag fusion protein expression and enterokinase cleavage. After purification with a Q Sepharose Fast Flow column, a natural N-terminal TNFR1 PLAD which purity was up to 95%, was obtained and was identified using Nano LC-ECI-MS/MS. Secondary structure analysis of PLAD was carried out using circular dichroism spectra (CD). After that, the TNFR1 PLAD in vitro anti-TNFα activity and the specific TNFR1 affinity were determined. The results proved that the natural N-terminal TNFR1 PLAD can selectively inhibit TNFα bioactivity mainly through TNFR1. It infers an effective and safe strategy for treating variety of IMID with a low risk of side effects in future.

  2. Chemotaxis and oospore formation in Phytophthora sojae are controlled by G-protein-coupled receptors with a phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X; Zhao, W; Hua, C; Zheng, X; Jing, M; Li, D; Govers, F; Meijer, H J G; Wang, Y

    2013-04-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are key cellular components that mediate extracellular signals into intracellular responses. Genome mining revealed that Phytophthora spp. have over 60 GPCR genes among which a prominent class of 12 encoding novel proteins with an N-terminal GPCR domain fused to a C-terminal phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase (PIPK) domain. This study focuses on two GPCR-PIPKs (GKs) in Phytophthora sojae. PsGK4 and PsGK5 are differentially expressed during the life cycle with the highest expression in cysts and during cyst germination, and at late infection stages. In P. sojae transformants that constitutively express RFP-tagged PsGK4 and PsGK5, the fusion proteins in hyphae reside in small, rapidly moving vesicular-like structures. Functional analysis using gene silencing showed that PsGK4-silenced transformants displayed higher levels of encystment and a reduced cyst germination rate when compared with the recipient strain. Moreover, GK4 deficiency (or reduction) resulted in severe defects in zoospore chemotaxis towards isoflavones and soybean roots. In contrast, PsGK5-silenced transformants exhibited no obvious defects in asexual development but oospore production was severely impaired. Both, PsGK4- and PsGK5-silenced transformants showed reduced pathogenicity. These results point to involvement of GKs in zoospore behaviour, chemotaxis and oospore development, and suggest that PsGK4 and PsGK5 each head independent signalling pathways.

  3. The Action of Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 in Basal Tumor Cells and Stromal Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts Is Critical for Breast Cancer Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callie A.S. Corsa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available High levels of collagen deposition in human and mouse breast tumors are associated with poor outcome due to increased local invasion and distant metastases. Using a genetic approach, we show that, in mice, the action of the fibrillar collagen receptor discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2 in both tumor and tumor-stromal cells is critical for breast cancer metastasis yet does not affect primary tumor growth. In tumor cells, DDR2 in basal epithelial cells regulates the collective invasion of tumor organoids. In stromal cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs, DDR2 is critical for extracellular matrix production and the organization of collagen fibers. The action of DDR2 in CAFs also enhances tumor cell collective invasion through a pathway distinct from the tumor-cell-intrinsic function of DDR2. This work identifies DDR2 as a potential therapeutic target that controls breast cancer metastases through its action in both tumor cells and tumor-stromal cells at the primary tumor site.

  4. Hypoxia induces discoidin domain receptor-2 expression via the p38 pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells to increase their migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Chung; Wang, Bao-Wei; Wang, Danny Ling; Shyu, Kou-Gi

    2008-10-03

    Discoidin domain receptor-2 (DDR2) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that binds to the extracellular matrix. We investigated the role of hypoxia in DDR2 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and the underlying mechanism. Subjecting VSMCs to hypoxia (2.5% O(2)) induced DDR2 expression; treatments with a specific inhibitor (SB203580) of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) or p38-specific small interference RNA (siRNA) abolished this hypoxia-induced DDR2 expression. Gel shifting assays showed that hypoxia increased the Myc-Max-DNA binding activity in the promoter region of DDR2; inhibition of p38 MAPK activation by SB203580 and p38-specific siRNA blocked hypoxia-induced DDR2 promoter activity. Hypoxia also induced matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) activity in VSMCs and increased their migration. These VSMC responses to hypoxia were inhibited by DDR2- and p38-specific siRNAs. Our results suggested that hypoxia induces DDR2 expression in VSMCs at the transcriptional level, which is mediated by the p38 MAPK pathway and contributes to VSMC migration.

  5. The Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain-Like Receptor Family Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Inflammasome Regulates Bronchial Epithelial Cell Injury and Proapoptosis after Exposure to Biomass Fuel Smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Zhihong, Huang; Wenlong, Li; Xiaoyan, Liu; Qing, Chen; Wenzhi, Luo; Siming, Xie; Shengming, Liu

    2016-12-01

    The number of individuals in the population exposed to biomass fuel smoke (BS) is far greater than the number of cigarette smokers. About 20% of cigarette smokers develop chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) due to smoke-induced irreversible damage and sustained inflammation of the airway epithelium. However, the role of BS in COPD pathogenesis remains to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the expression of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor family pyrin domain-containing (NLRP) 3 and caspase-1 in the bronchial epithelium from patients with COPD, and further determined the specific role of the NLRP3 inflammasome in bronchial epithelium injury using two in vitro models (BS and cigarette smoke [CS]) in the human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cell line (16HBE). After exposure to BS and CS, the release of damage-associated molecular patterns, the transcriptional and translational up-regulation of NLRP3, and the activation of caspase-1 were observed in cells at different time points. Because IL-1β secretion was dependent on the NLRP3 inflammasome, we assessed CXCL-8 production in response to smoke. Using a transwell migration assay in which 16HBE cells and human alveolar macrophages were cocultured, we showed that smoke-induced NLRP3 activation in 16HBE cells increased the migration of human alveolar macrophages. When the NLRP3 expression was silenced, the average migration distance of 16HBE was increased in scratch assay, because the activation of NLRP3 induced apoptosis by the p53-Bax mitochondrial pathway in the smoke-induced response. These results demonstrate the importance of the NLRP3 inflammasome in mediating BS- and CS-induced HBE cell damage and proapoptosis.

  6. Binding of thyroglobulin (Tg) to the low-density lipoprotein receptor-associated protein (RAP) during the biosynthetic pathway prevents premature Tg interactions with sortilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botta, R; Lisi, S; Rotondo Dottore, G; Vitti, P; Marinò, M

    2017-04-05

    Sortilin, a Vps10p family member, is expressed by thyroid epithelial cells (TEC), where it binds to internalized thyroglobulin (Tg) molecules. Premature binding of Tg to sortilin during biosynthesis may cause intracellular retention of Tg. Such a premature interaction may be prevented by one or more inhibitor/s. Because both sortilin and Tg bind to the low-density lipoprotein receptor-associated protein (RAP), we investigated whether RAP serves such a function. Immunofluorescence staining for sortilin, Tg, and RAP was performed in FRTL-5 cells. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments were performed in extracts from FRTL-5 or COS-7 cells, the former co-transfected with Tg and/or RAP and/or sortilin, or in thyroid extracts from RAP KO mice. Tg and sortilin did not co-localize in FRTL-5 cells following inhibition of protein synthesis, suggesting that newly synthesized, endogenous sortilin and Tg do not interact, in confirmation of which an anti-sortilin antibody did not co-precipitate Tg in FRTL-5 cells. In contrast, Tg co-localized with RAP in FRTL-5 cells. Co-immunoprecipitation of Tg with an anti-sortilin antibody in COS-7 cells transfected with sortilin and Tg was abolished when cells were co-transfected with RAP, indicating that RAP prevents binding of Tg to sortilin during biosynthesis, in confirmation of which an anti-sortilin antibody co-precipitated Tg in thyroid extracts from RAP KO mice to a greater extent than in thyroid extracts from WT mice. Tg does not bind prematurely to sortilin because of its interaction with RAP during protein biosynthesis. These findings add new information to the knowledge of thyroid physiology.

  7. Alpha-helical destabilization of the Bcl-2-BH4-domain peptide abolishes its ability to inhibit the IP3 receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Monaco

    Full Text Available The anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein is the founding member and namesake of the Bcl-2-protein family. It has recently been demonstrated that Bcl-2, apart from its anti-apoptotic role at mitochondrial membranes, can also directly interact with the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R, the primary Ca(2+-release channel in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Bcl-2 can thereby reduce pro-apoptotic IP3R-mediated Ca(2+ release from the ER. Moreover, the Bcl-2 homology domain 4 (Bcl-2-BH4 has been identified as essential and sufficient for this IP3R-mediated anti-apoptotic activity. In the present study, we investigated whether the reported inhibitory effect of a Bcl-2-BH4 peptide on the IP 3R1 was related to the distinctive α-helical conformation of the BH4 domain peptide. We therefore designed a peptide with two glycine "hinges" replacing residues I14 and V15, of the wild-type Bcl-2-BH4 domain (Bcl-2-BH4-IV/GG. By comparing the structural and functional properties of the Bcl-2-BH4-IV/GG peptide with its native counterpart, we found that the variant contained reduced α-helicity, neither bound nor inhibited the IP 3R1 channel, and in turn lost its anti-apoptotic effect. Similar results were obtained with other substitutions in Bcl-2-BH4 that destabilized the α-helix with concomitant loss of IP3R inhibition. These results provide new insights for the further development of Bcl-2-BH4-derived peptides as specific inhibitors of the IP3R with significant pharmacological implications.

  8. The role of individual domains and the significance of shedding of ATP6AP2/(prorenin receptor in vacuolar H(+-ATPase biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichiro Kinouchi

    Full Text Available The ATPase 6 accessory protein 2 (ATP6AP2/(prorenin receptor (PRR is essential for the biogenesis of active vacuolar H(+-ATPase (V-ATPase. Genetic deletion of ATP6AP2/PRR causes V-ATPase dysfunction and compromises vesicular acidification. Here, we characterized the domains of ATP6AP2/PRR involved in active V-ATPase biogenesis. Three forms of ATP6AP2/PRR were found intracellularly: full-length protein and the N- and C-terminal fragments of furin cleavage products, with the N-terminal fragment secreted extracellularly. Genetic deletion of ATP6AP2/PRR did not affect the protein stability of V-ATPase subunits. The extracellular domain (ECD and transmembrane domain (TM of ATP6AP2/PRR were indispensable for the biogenesis of active V-ATPase. A deletion mutant of ATP6AP2/PRR, which lacks exon 4-encoded amino acids inside the ECD (Δ4M and causes X-linked mental retardation Hedera type (MRXSH and X-linked parkinsonism with spasticity (XPDS in humans, was defective as a V-ATPase-associated protein. Prorenin had no effect on the biogenesis of active V-ATPase. The cleavage of ATP6AP2/PRR by furin seemed also dispensable for the biogenesis of active V-ATPase. We conclude that the N-terminal ECD of ATP6AP2/PRR, which is also involved in binding to prorenin or renin, is required for the biogenesis of active V-ATPase. The V-ATPase assembly occurs prior to its delivery to the trans-Golgi network and hence shedding of ATP6AP2/PRR would not affect the biogenesis of active V-ATPase.

  9. The role of individual domains and the significance of shedding of ATP6AP2/(pro)renin receptor in vacuolar H(+)-ATPase biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinouchi, Kenichiro; Ichihara, Atsuhiro; Sano, Motoaki; Sun-Wada, Ge-Hong; Wada, Yoh; Ochi, Hiroki; Fukuda, Toru; Bokuda, Kanako; Kurosawa, Hideaki; Yoshida, Naohiro; Takeda, Shu; Fukuda, Keiichi; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The ATPase 6 accessory protein 2 (ATP6AP2)/(pro)renin receptor (PRR) is essential for the biogenesis of active vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase). Genetic deletion of ATP6AP2/PRR causes V-ATPase dysfunction and compromises vesicular acidification. Here, we characterized the domains of ATP6AP2/PRR involved in active V-ATPase biogenesis. Three forms of ATP6AP2/PRR were found intracellularly: full-length protein and the N- and C-terminal fragments of furin cleavage products, with the N-terminal fragment secreted extracellularly. Genetic deletion of ATP6AP2/PRR did not affect the protein stability of V-ATPase subunits. The extracellular domain (ECD) and transmembrane domain (TM) of ATP6AP2/PRR were indispensable for the biogenesis of active V-ATPase. A deletion mutant of ATP6AP2/PRR, which lacks exon 4-encoded amino acids inside the ECD (Δ4M) and causes X-linked mental retardation Hedera type (MRXSH) and X-linked parkinsonism with spasticity (XPDS) in humans, was defective as a V-ATPase-associated protein. Prorenin had no effect on the biogenesis of active V-ATPase. The cleavage of ATP6AP2/PRR by furin seemed also dispensable for the biogenesis of active V-ATPase. We conclude that the N-terminal ECD of ATP6AP2/PRR, which is also involved in binding to prorenin or renin, is required for the biogenesis of active V-ATPase. The V-ATPase assembly occurs prior to its delivery to the trans-Golgi network and hence shedding of ATP6AP2/PRR would not affect the biogenesis of active V-ATPase.

  10. The regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) domain of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 5 (GRK5) regulates plasma membrane localization and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hua; Jiang, Xiaoshan; Shen, Ke; Fischer, Christopher C; Wedegaertner, Philip B

    2014-07-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate activated GPCRs at the plasma membrane (PM). Here GRK5/GRK4 chimeras and point mutations in GRK5 identify a short sequence within the regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) domain in GRK5 that is critical for GRK5 PM localization. This region of the RGS domain of GRK5 coincides with a region of GRK6 and GRK1 shown to form a hydrophobic dimeric interface (HDI) in crystal structures. Coimmunoprecipitation (coIP) and acceptor photobleaching fluorescence resonance energy transfer assays show that expressed GRK5 self-associates in cells, whereas GRK5-M165E/F166E (GRK5-EE), containing hydrophilic mutations in the HDI region of the RGS domain, displays greatly decreased coIP interactions. Both forcing dimerization of GRK5-EE, via fusion to leucine zipper motifs, and appending an extra C-terminal membrane-binding region to GRK5-EE (GRK5-EE-CT) recover PM localization. In addition, GRK5-EE displays a decreased ability to inhibit PAR1-induced calcium release compared with GRK5 wild type (wt). In contrast, PM-localized GRK5-EE-CaaX (appending a C-terminal prenylation and polybasic motif from K-ras) or GRK5-EE-CT shows comparable ability to GRK5 wt to inhibit PAR1-induced calcium release. The results suggest a novel model in which GRK5 dimerization is important for its plasma membrane localization and function. © 2014 Xu, Jiang, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  11. Collagen I induces discoidin domain receptor (DDR) 1 expression through DDR2 and a JAK2-ERK1/2-mediated mechanism in primary human lung fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Pedro A; Jarai, Gabor

    2011-04-15

    Discoidin domain receptors (DDRs) DDR1 and DDR2 are receptor tyrosine kinases with the unique ability among receptor tyrosine kinases to respond to collagen. Several signaling molecules have been implicated in DDR signaling, including Shp-2, Src, and MAPK pathways, but a detailed understanding of these pathways and their transcriptional targets is still lacking. Similarly, the regulation of the expression of DDRs is poorly characterized with only a few inflammatory mediators, such as lipopolysaccharide and interleukin-1β identified as playing a role in DDR1 expression. DDRs have been reported to induce the expression of various genes including matrix metalloproteinases and bone morphogenetic proteins, but the regulatory mechanisms underlying DDR-induced gene expression remain to be determined. The aim of the present work was to elucidate the molecular mechanisms implicated in the expression of DDRs and to identify DDR-induced signaling pathways and target genes. Our data show that collagen I induces the expression of DDR1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner in primary human lung fibroblasts. Furthermore, activation of DDR2, JAK2, and ERK1/2 MAPK signaling pathways was essential for collagen I-induced DDR1 and matrix metalloproteinase 10 expression. Finally, inhibition of the ERK1/2 pathway abrogated DDR1 expression by blocking the recruitment of the transcription factor polyoma enhancer A-binding protein 3 to the DDR1 promoter. Our data provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of collagen I-induced DDR1 expression and demonstrate an important role for ERK1/2 activation and the recruitment of polyoma enhancer-A binding protein 3 to the DDR1 promoter.

  12. Substitution within erythropoietin receptor gene D1 domain associated with litter size in Beijing Black pig, Sus scrofa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Longchao; Wang, Ligang; Li, Yong; Li, Wen; Yan, Hua; Liu, Xin; Zhao, Kebin; Wang, Lixian

    2011-10-01

    Studies of uterine capacity and litter size in swine have suggested that erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) plays an important role in fetal survival through maturation of red blood cells. In this study, we screened the porcine EPOR gene for mutations and identified three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): two missense mutations and one synonymous mutation. We then genotyped 272 Beijing Black sows, Sus scrofa, and compared this data with litter sizes from a total of 1523 parities among the sows. The G allele of the nonsynonymous SNP, EPOR c.434A>G, was associated with greater litter size at both first parity (P G could be a useful genetic marker to improve litter size in swine.

  13. Coalescence of B cell receptor and invariant chain MHC II in a raft-like membrane domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Julian T; Lindner, Robert

    2014-11-01

    The BCR binds antigen for processing and subsequent presentation on MHC II molecules. Polyvalent antigen induces BCR clustering and targeting to endocytic processing compartments, which are also accessed by Ii-MHC II. Here, we report that clustered BCR is able to team up with Ii-MHC II already at the plasma membrane of mouse B-lymphocytes. Colocalization of BCR and Ii-MHC II on the cell surface required clustering of both types of molecules. The clustering of only one type did not trigger the recruitment of the other. Ii-bound MIF (a ligand of Ii) also colocalized with clustered BCR upon oligomerization of MIF on the surface of the B cell. Abundant surface molecules, such as B220 or TfnR, did not cocluster with the BCR. Some membrane raft-associated molecules, such as peptide-loaded MHC II, coclustered with the BCR, whereas others, such as GM1, did not. The formation of a BCR- and Ii-MHC II-containing membrane domain by antibody-mediated clustering was independent of F-actin and led to the coendocytosis of its constituents. With a rapid Brij 98 extraction method, it was possible to capture this membrane domain biochemically as a DRM. Ii and clustered BCR were present on the same DRM, as shown by immunoisolation. The coalescence of BCR and Ii-MHC II increased tyrosine phosphorylation, indicative of enhanced BCR signaling. Our work suggests a novel role for MIF and Ii-MHC II in BCR-mediated antigen processing.

  14. Soluble T cell receptordomains engineered for high-affinity binding to staphylococcal or streptococcal superantigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Preeti; Wang, Ningyan; Kranz, David M

    2014-01-28

    Staphylococcus aureus and group A Streptococcus secrete a collection of toxins called superantigens (SAgs), so-called because they stimulate a large fraction of an individual's T cells. One consequence of this hyperactivity is massive cytokine release leading to severe tissue inflammation and, in some cases, systemic organ failure and death. The molecular basis of action involves the binding of the SAg to both a T cell receptor (TCR) on a T cell and a class II product of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on an antigen presenting cell. This cross-linking leads to aggregation of the TCR complex and signaling. A common feature of SAgs is that they bind with relatively low affinity to the variable region (V) of the beta chain of the TCR. Despite this low affinity binding, SAgs are very potent, as each T cell requires only a small fraction of their receptors to be bound in order to trigger cytokine release. To develop high-affinity agents that could neutralize the activity of SAgs, and facilitate the development of detection assays, soluble forms of the Vβ regions have been engineered to affinities that are up to 3 million-fold higher for the SAg. Over the past decade, six different Vβ regions against SAgs from S. aureus (SEA, SEB, SEC3, TSST-1) or S. pyogenes (SpeA and SpeC) have been engineered for high-affinity using yeast display and directed evolution. Here we review the engineering of these high-affinity Vβ proteins, structural features of the six different SAgs and the Vβ proteins, and the specific properties of the engineered Vβ regions that confer high-affinity and specificity for their SAg ligands.

  15. Soluble T Cell ReceptorDomains Engineered for High-Affinity Binding to Staphylococcal or Streptococcal Superantigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus and group A Streptococcus secrete a collection of toxins called superantigens (SAgs, so-called because they stimulate a large fraction of an individual’s T cells. One consequence of this hyperactivity is massive cytokine release leading to severe tissue inflammation and, in some cases, systemic organ failure and death. The molecular basis of action involves the binding of the SAg to both a T cell receptor (TCR on a T cell and a class II product of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC on an antigen presenting cell. This cross-linking leads to aggregation of the TCR complex and signaling. A common feature of SAgs is that they bind with relatively low affinity to the variable region (V of the beta chain of the TCR. Despite this low affinity binding, SAgs are very potent, as each T cell requires only a small fraction of their receptors to be bound in order to trigger cytokine release. To develop high-affinity agents that could neutralize the activity of SAgs, and facilitate the development of detection assays, soluble forms of the Vβ regions have been engineered to affinities that are up to 3 million-fold higher for the SAg. Over the past decade, six different Vβ regions against SAgs from S. aureus (SEA, SEB, SEC3, TSST-1 or S. pyogenes (SpeA and SpeC have been engineered for high-affinity using yeast display and directed evolution. Here we review the engineering of these high-affinity Vβ proteins, structural features of the six different SAgs and the Vβ proteins, and the specific properties of the engineered Vβ regions that confer high-affinity and specificity for their SAg ligands.

  16. Multiple pathways for vacuolar sorting of yeast proteinase A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westphal, V; Marcusson, E G; Winther, Jakob R.

    1996-01-01

    The sorting of the yeast proteases proteinase A and carboxypeptidase Y to the vacuole is a saturable, receptor-mediated process. Information sufficient for vacuolar sorting of the normally secreted protein invertase has in fusion constructs previously been found to reside in the propeptide...... of proteinase A. We found that sorting of such a hybrid protein is dependent on the vacuolar protein-sorting receptor Vps10p. This was unexpected, as strains disrupted for VPS10 sort more than 85% of the proteinase A to the vacuole. Consistent with a role for Vps10p in sorting of proteinase A, we found that 1...

  17. Chimeric antigen receptor containing ICOS signaling domain mediates specific and efficient antitumor effect of T cells against EGFRvIII expressing glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chan-Juan; Yang, Yu-Xiu; Han, Ethan Q; Cao, Na; Wang, Yun-Fei; Wang, Yi; Zhao, Ying-Ying; Zhao, Li-Ming; Cui, Jian; Gupta, Puja; Wong, Albert J; Han, Shuang-Yin

    2013-05-09

    Adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells appears to be a promising immunotherapeutic strategy. CAR combines the specificity of antibody and cytotoxicity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes, enhancing T cells' ability to specifically target antigens and to effectively kill cancer cells. Recent efforts have been made to integrate the costimulatory signals in the CAR to improve the antitumor efficacy. Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) is an attractive therapeutic target as it frequently expresses in glioma and many other types of cancers. Our current study aimed to investigate the specific and efficient antitumor effect of T cells modified with CAR containing inducible costimulator (ICOS) signaling domain. A second generation of EGFRvIII/CAR was generated and it contained the EGFRvIII single chain variable fragment, ICOS signaling domain and CD3ζ chain. Lentiviral EGFRvIII/CAR was prepared and human CD3+ T cells were infected by lentivirus encoding EGFRvIII/CAR. The expression of EGFRvIII/CAR on CD3+ T cells was confirmed by flow cytometry and Western blot. The functions of EGFRvIII/CAR+ T cells were evaluated using in vitro and in vivo methods including cytotoxicity assay, cytokine release assay and xenograft tumor mouse model. Chimeric EGFRvIIIscFv-ICOS-CD3ζ (EGFRvIII/CAR) was constructed and lentiviral EGFRvIII/CAR were made to titer of 106 TU/ml. The transduction efficiency of lentiviral EGFRvIII/CAR on T cells reached around 70% and expression of EGFRvIII/CAR protein was verified by immunoblotting as a band of about 57 kDa. Four hour 51Cr release assays demonstrated specific and efficient cytotoxicity of EGFRvIII/CAR+ T cells against EGFRvIII expressing U87 cells. A robust increase in the IFN-γ secretion was detected in the co-culture supernatant of the EGFRvIII/CAR+ T cells and the EGFRvIII expressing U87 cells. Intravenous and intratumor injection of EGFRvIII/CAR+ T cells inhibited the in vivo growth of the EGFRv

  18. Natural Products as Chemopreventive Agents by Potential Inhibition of the Kinase Domain in ErbB Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivero-Acosta, Maria; Maldonado-Rojas, Wilson; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus

    2017-02-17

    Small molecules found in natural products provide therapeutic benefits due to their pharmacological or biological activity, which may increase or decrease the expression of human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER), a promising target in the modification of signaling cascades involved in excessive cellular growth. In this study, in silico molecular protein-ligand docking protocols were performed with AutoDock Vina in order to evaluate the interaction of 800 natural compounds (NPs) from the NatProd Collection (http://www.msdiscovery.com/natprod.html), with four human HER family members: HER1 (PDB: 2ITW), HER2 (PDB: 3PP0), HER3 (PDB: 3LMG) and HER4 (PDB: 2R4B). The best binding affinity values (kcal/mol) for docking pairs were obtained for HER1-podototarin (-10.7), HER2-hecogenin acetate (-11.2), HER3-hesperidin (-11.5) and HER4-theaflavin (-10.7). The reliability of the theoretical calculations was evaluated employing published data on HER inhibition correlated with in silico binding calculations. IC50 values followed a significant linear relationship with the theoretical binding Affinity data for HER1 (R = 0.656, p 0.05). In short, this methodology allowed the identification of several NPs as HER inhibitors, being useful in the discovery and design of more potent and selective anticancer drugs.

  19. Delineation of the endocytic pathway of substance P and its seven-transmembrane domain NK1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, E F; Garland, A M; Gamp, P D; Lovett, M; Payan, D G; Bunnett, N W

    1995-01-01

    Many of the actions of the neuropeptide substance P (SP) that are mediated by the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1-R) desensitize and resensitize, which may be associated with NK1-R endocytosis and recycling. We delineated this endocytic pathway in transfected cells by confocal microscopy using cyanine 3-SP and NK1-R antibodies. SP and the NK1-R were internalized into the same clathrin immunoreactive vesicles, and then sorted into differ