WorldWideScience

Sample records for vpp program evaluation

  1. FY08 VPP Program Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dossett, Sharon D.

    2008-01-01

    The Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) is a recognized third-party certification of worker safety and health program excellence, based on industry best practices that focus on management leadership and employee involvement, as well as other safety and health program elements. This Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) VPP Program Evaluation is the FY-2008 report of the PNNL VPP Steering Committee regarding the status of VPP at PNNL. It is an update of the previous annual report dated January, 2007 and was completed in January 2008. An annual evaluation of the status of VPP is required of all sites that participate in the DOE-VPP. This report provides a detailed summary of the PNNL VPP Steering Committee’s evaluation of program performance and documents both strengths and improvement opportunities related to the various aspects of the VPP model.

  2. FY-2007 PNNL Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) Program Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Patrick A.; Fisher, Julie A.; Goheen, Steven C.; Isern, Nancy G.; Madson, Vernon J.; Meicenheimer, Russell L.; Pugh, Ray; Schneirla, Keri A.; Shockey, Loretta L.; Tinker, Mike R.

    2008-08-15

    This document reports the results of the FY-2007 PNNL VPP Program Evaluation, which is a self-assessment of the operational and programmatic performance of the Laboratory related to worker safety and health. The report was compiled by a team of worker representatives and safety professionals who evaluated the Laboratory's worker safety and health programs on the basis of DOE-VPP criteria. The principle elements of DOE's VPP program are: Management Leadership, Employee Involvement, Worksite Analysis, Hazard Prevention and Control, and Safety and Health Training.

  3. PNNL FY2005 DOE Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) Program Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Patrick A.; Madson, Vernon J.; Isern, Nancy G.; Haney, Janice M.; Fisher, Julie A.; Goheen, Steven C.; Gulley, Susan E.; Reck, John J.; Collins, Drue A.; Tinker, Mike R.; Walker, Landon A.; Wynn, Clifford L.

    2005-01-31

    This document reports the results of the FY 2005 PNNL VPP Program Evaluation, which is a self-assessment of the operational and programmatic performance of the Laboratory related to worker safety and health. The report was compiled by a team of worker representatives and safety professionals who evaluated the Laboratory's worker safety and health programs on the basis of DOE-VPP criteria. The principle elements of DOE's VPP program are: Management Leadership, Employee Involvement, Worksite Analysis, Hazard Prevention and Control, and Safety and Health Training.

  4. Changing Safety Culture, One Step at a Time: The Value of the DOE-VPP Program at PNNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Patrick A.; Isern, Nancy G.

    2005-02-01

    The primary value of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) is the ongoing partnership between management and staff committed to change Laboratory safety culture one step at a time. VPP enables PNNL's safety and health program to transcend a top-down, by-the-book approach to safety, and it also raises grassroots safety consciousness by promoting a commitment to safety and health 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. PNNL VPP is a dynamic, evolving program that fosters innovative approaches to continuous improvement in safety and health performance at the Laboratory.

  5. Evaluation of the Geotech SMART24BH 20Vpp/5Vpp data acquisition system with active fortezza crypto card data signing and authentication.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rembold, Randy Kai; Hart, Darren M.

    2009-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has tested and evaluated Geotech SMART24BH borehole data acquisition system with active Fortezza crypto card data signing and authentication. The test results included in this report were in response to static and tonal-dynamic input signals. Most test methodologies used were based on IEEE Standards 1057 for Digitizing Waveform Recorders and 1241 for Analog to Digital Converters; others were designed by Sandia specifically for infrasound application evaluation and for supplementary criteria not addressed in the IEEE standards. The objective of this work was to evaluate the overall technical performance of two Geotech SMART24BH digitizers with a Fortezza PCMCIA crypto card actively implementing the signing of data packets. The results of this evaluation were compared to relevant specifications provided within manufacturer's documentation notes. The tests performed were chosen to demonstrate different performance aspects of the digitizer under test. The performance aspects tested include determining noise floor, least significant bit (LSB), dynamic range, cross-talk, relative channel-to-channel timing, time-tag accuracy/statistics/drift, analog bandwidth.

  6. Calculation of VPP basing on functional analyzing method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    VPP can be used to deter mine the maxi mumvelocities of a sailboard at various sailing-routes,byestablishing the forces and moments balance-equa-tions on the sail and board in accordance with theprinciple of the maxi mal drive-force.Selectingroute is the most i mportant issue in upwind-sailing,and VPP calculations could provide the basis for de-ter mining the opti mal routes.VPP calculation of the sailboard perfor mance isa complex and difficult research task,and there arefew projects in this research-field...

  7. Performance of MC2 and the ECMWF IFS Forecast Model on the Fujitsu VPP700 and NEC SX-4M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Desgagné

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The NEC SX-4M cluster and Fujitsu VPP700 supercomputers are both based on custom vector processors using low-power CMOS technology. Their basic architectures and programming models are however somewhat different. A multi-node SX-4M cluster contains up to 32 processors per shared memory node, with a maximum of 16 nodes connected via the proprietary NEC IXS fibre channel crossbar network. A hybrid combination of inter-node MPI message-passing with intra-node tasking or threads is possible. The Fujitsu VPP700 is a fully distributed-memory vector machine with a crossbar interconnect which also supports MPI. The parallel performance of the MC2 model for high-resolution mesoscale forecasting over large domains and of the IFS RAPS 4.0 benchmark are presented for several different machine configurations. These include an SX-4/32, an SX-4/32M cluster and up to 100 PE's of the VPP700. Our results indicate that performance degradation for both models on a single SX-4 node is primarily due to memory contention within the internal crossbar switch. Multinode SX-4 performance is slightly better than single node. Longer vector lengths and SDRAM memory on the VPP700 result in lower per processor execution rates. Both models achieve close to ideal scaling on the VPP700.

  8. Calculation of VPP basing on functional analyzing method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bai Kaixiang; Wang Dexun; Han Jiurui

    2007-01-01

    The establishment and realization of the VPP calucation's model for the functional analytic theory are discussed in this paper. Functional analyzing method is a theoretical model of the VPP calculation which can eliminate the influence of the sail and board's size skillfully, so it can be regarded as a brief standard of the sailboard's VPP results. As a brief watery dynamical model, resistance on board can be regarded as a direct proportion to the square of the boat-velocity. The boat-velocities at the state of six wind-velocities (3 m/s-8 m/s) with angles of 25°-180° are obtained by calculating, which provides an important gist of the sailing-route's selection in upwind-sailing.

  9. Wackenhut Services, Incorporated: Report from the DOE Voluntary Protection Program onsite review, August 10--14, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    This report summarizes the Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP) Review Team`s findings from the five-day onsite evaluation of Wackenhut Services, Inc. (WSI) at Savannah River Site (SRS), conducted August 10-14, 1998. The site was evaluated against the program requirements contained in US Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program, Part 1: Program Elements to determine its success in implementing the five DOE-VPP tenets. The Team determined that WSI has met in varying degrees, all the tenets of the DOE-VPP. In every case, WSI programs and procedures exceed the level or degree necessary for compliance with existing standards, DOE Orders, and guidelines. In addition, WSI has systematically integrated their occupational safety and health (OSH) program into management and work practices at all levels. WSI`s efforts toward implementing the five major DOE-VPP tenets are summarized.

  10. Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program - Part IV: Onsite review handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    Onsite Review Handbook contains criteria to be used in evaluating the management systems required for initial or continued participation in the Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP), verifying and calculating rates of injury experience, the Onsite Review report format, and sample questions to be used during onsite interviews. This document should be used in conjunction with the first three DOE-VPP manuals (Part I: Program Elements, Part II: Procedures Manual, and Part III: Application Guidelines). This document is intended to assist Onsite Review team members and DOE contractors in evaluating safety and health programs, and to serve as guidance for DOE-VPP participants in performing their required annual evaluation. Requests for additional information or any questions may be addressed to a DOE-VPP Coordinator in the Office of Occupational Safety and Health Policy. The term contractor used throughout this document refers to an applicant to, or a participant in, the DOE-VPP. The term subcontractor refers to any organization that is contracted by the applicant or participant to do work at the site under review. The DOE-VPP Onsite Review Criteria contained in Appendix A provide guidance for evaluating a site`s implementation of the program requirements given in Part I: Program Elements. The program requirements are in bold italicized type, followed by guidance for ensuring implementation. Part I should be consulted for a complete description of the program requirements. These criteria should be used by team members whenever possible, but are not intended to be all inclusive. Determination of adequate implementation of the DOE-VPP requirements is at the team members` discretion. Guidance for calculating recordable injury and lost workday incidence rates is contained in Appendix B. The OSHA injury/illness records review and the associated calculations should be performed by Onsite Review Team members during the pre-onsite planning visit.

  11. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project: Report from the DOE voluntary protection program onsite review, November 17--21, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-28

    This report summarizes the Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP) Review Team`s findings from the five-day onsite evaluation of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP), conducted November 17--21, 1997. The site was evaluated against the program requirements contained in ``US Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program, Part 1: Program Elements`` to determine its success in implementing the five tenets of DOE-VPP. DOE-VPP consists of three programs, with names and functions similar to those in OSHA`s VPP. These programs are STAR, MERIT, and DEMONSTRATION. The STAR program is the core of DOE-VPP. The program is aimed at truly outstanding protectors of employee safety and health. The MERIT program is a steppingstone for contractors and subcontractors that have good safety and health programs but need time and DOE guidance to achieve STAR status. The DEMONSTRATION program is rarely used; it allows DOE to recognize achievements in unusual situations about which DOE needs to learn more before determining approval requirements for the STAR status.

  12. [PIC Program Evaluation Forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, N. J.

    These 4 questionnaires are designed to elicit teacher and parent evaluations of the Prescriptive Instruction Center (PIC) program. Included are Teacher Evaluation of Program Effectiveness (14 items), M & M Evaluation of Program Implementation (methods and materials specialists; 11 items), Teacher Evaluation of Program Effectiveness--Case Study…

  13. Program Evaluation Particularly Responsive Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stake, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the author talks about some recent developments in the methodology of program evaluation and about what he calls "responsive evaluation." He discusses two models for program evaluation, namely (1) informal study or self-study; and (2) the pretest/posttest model. Then, he describes an approach that he has been working on, which will…

  14. Gifted Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumeister, Kristie Speirs; Burney, Virginia Hays

    2012-01-01

    Faced with significant budget challenges, many districts cannot afford to hire an outside consultant to conduct a formal evaluation of their gifted programs. As an interim solution, districts may wish to conduct their own in-house program evaluation. "Gifted Program Evaluation: A Handbook for Administrators and Coordinators" is designed to assist…

  15. Language Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Language program evaluation is a pragmatic mode of inquiry that illuminates the complex nature of language-related interventions of various kinds, the factors that foster or constrain them, and the consequences that ensue. Program evaluation enables a variety of evidence-based decisions and actions, from designing programs and implementing…

  16. College Outcomes Evaluation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollander, T. Edward

    Guidelines and implementation options for a program to evaluate the outcomes of collegiate education in New Jersey are discussed. A good program must seek to: (1) maintain public confidence; (2) nuture institutional autonomy and individual diversity; and (3) stimulate educational excellence. College outcomes that the program should cover are:…

  17. Evaluating Afterschool Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Priscilla M.

    2014-01-01

    Well-implemented afterschool programs can promote a range of positive learning and developmental outcomes. However, not all research and evaluation studies have shown the benefits of participation, in part because programs and their evaluation were out of sync. This chapter provides practical guidance on how to foster that alignment between…

  18. Introducing Program Evaluation Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca GÂRBOAN

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Programs and project evaluation models can be extremely useful in project planning and management. The aim is to set the right questions as soon as possible in order to see in time and deal with the unwanted program effects, as well as to encourage the positive elements of the project impact. In short, different evaluation models are used in order to minimize losses and maximize the benefits of the interventions upon small or large social groups. This article introduces some of the most recently used evaluation models.

  19. Financial Education Program Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Burk

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study illustrates the process of program evaluation using a logic model. Guided by the Transtheoretical Model of Change and a logic model, this study evaluated the effectiveness of a Retirement and Savings Seminar by measuring participant (n = 54 satisfaction, financial knowledge, financial confidence, and financial behavior change compared to a similar group of 134 non-participants. Participants were very satisfied with the seminar. Their financial knowledge and confidence scores significantly increased from pretest to posttest. Financial knowledge and confidence scores improved more than the comparison group while controlling for group differences in age, income, and pretest scores. Two months later, participants were more likely than the comparison group to have adopted positive financial behaviors as measured by the Financial Preparedness for Retirement Scale. Financial educators can use this study as a model for planning, conducting, and evaluating their programs.

  20. Westinghouse Savannah River Company: Report from the DOE Voluntary Protection Program onsite reviews, February 24--March 7, 1997, and June 15--19, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    This report summarizes the Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP) Initial and Update Review Teams` findings from the onsite evaluations of the Westinghouse Savannah River Site (SRS), conducted February 24--March 7, 1997, and June 15-19, 1998. The site was evaluated against the program requirements contained in US Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program, Part 1: Program Elements to determine its success in implementing the five tenets of DOE-VPP. The Initial Review Team concluded that WSRC met or surpassed all DOE-VPP requirements, with the exception of 12 minor findings and 5 recommendations. WSRC was asked to resolve the findings within 90 days. During a follow-up visit in January 1996, representatives of the Team verified that all 90-day actions were completed. The Update Team detected though that the program did not demonstrate thorough and meaningful employee involvement. The ability to attain and sustain VPP-level performance on employee involvement is a significant challenge. Large companies with multiple layers of management and geographically disperse personnel have particular difficulty.

  1. Program Theory Evaluation: Logic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brousselle, Astrid; Champagne, Francois

    2011-01-01

    Program theory evaluation, which has grown in use over the past 10 years, assesses whether a program is designed in such a way that it can achieve its intended outcomes. This article describes a particular type of program theory evaluation--logic analysis--that allows us to test the plausibility of a program's theory using scientific knowledge.…

  2. Measuring Success: Evaluating Educational Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Yael

    2010-01-01

    This paper reveals a new evaluation model, which enables educational program and project managers to evaluate their programs with a simple and easy to understand approach. The "index of success model" is comprised of five parameters that enable to focus on and evaluate both the implementation and results of an educational program. The integration…

  3. Vectorization, parallelization and porting of nuclear codes on the VPP500 system (vectorization). Progress report fiscal 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Toshiyuki; Kawai, Wataru [Fujitsu Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Kawasaki, Nobuo [and others

    1997-12-01

    Several computer codes in the nuclear field have been vectorized, parallelized and transported on the FUJITSU VPP500 system at Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. These results are reported in 3 parts, i.e., the vectorization part, the parallelization part and the porting part. In this report, we describe the vectorization. In this vectorization part, the vectorization of two and three dimensional discrete ordinates simulation code DORT-TORT, gas dynamics analysis code FLOWGR and relativistic Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck simulation code RBUU are described. In the parallelization part, the parallelization of 2-Dimensional relativistic electromagnetic particle code EM2D, Cylindrical Direct Numerical Simulation code CYLDNS and molecular dynamics code for simulating radiation damages in diamond crystals DGR are described. And then, in the porting part, the porting of reactor safety analysis code RELAP5/MOD3.2 and RELAP5/MOD3.2.1.2, nuclear data processing system NJOY and 2-D multigroup discrete ordinate transport code TWOTRAN-II are described. And also, a survey for the porting of command-driven interactive data analysis plotting program IPLOT are described. (author)

  4. Vectorization, parallelization and porting of nuclear codes on the VPP500 system (porting). Progress report fiscal 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Toshiyuki [Fujitsu Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Kawasaki, Nobuo; Tanabe, Hidenobu [and others

    1998-01-01

    Several computer codes in the nuclear field have been vectorized, parallelized and transported on the FUJITSU VPP500 system at Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. These results are reported in 3 parts, i.e., the vectorization part, the parallelization part and the porting part. In this report, we describe the porting. In this porting part, the porting of reactor safety analysis code RELAP5/MOD3.2 and RELAP5/MOD3.2.1.2, nuclear data processing system NJOY and 2-D multigroup discrete ordinate transport code TWOTRAN-II are described. And also, a survey for the porting of command-driven interactive data analysis plotting program IPLOT are described. In the parallelization part, the parallelization of 2-Dimensional relativistic electromagnetic particle code EM2D, Cylindrical Direct Numerical Simulation code CYLDNS and molecular dynamics code for simulating radiation damages in diamond crystals DGR are described. And then, in the vectorization part, the vectorization of two and three dimensional discrete ordinates simulation code DORT-TORT, gas dynamics analysis code FLOWGR and relativistic Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck simulation code RBUU are described. (author)

  5. Vectorization, parallelization and porting of nuclear codes on the VPP500 system (parallelization). Progress report fiscal 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Hideo; Kawai, Wataru; Nemoto, Toshiyuki [Fujitsu Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1997-12-01

    Several computer codes in the nuclear field have been vectorized, parallelized and transported on the FUJITSU VPP500 system at Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. These results are reported in 3 parts, i.e., the vectorization part, the parallelization part and the porting part. In this report, we describe the parallelization. In this parallelization part, the parallelization of 2-Dimensional relativistic electromagnetic particle code EM2D, Cylindrical Direct Numerical Simulation code CYLDNS and molecular dynamics code for simulating radiation damages in diamond crystals DGR are described. In the vectorization part, the vectorization of two and three dimensional discrete ordinates simulation code DORT-TORT, gas dynamics analysis code FLOWGR and relativistic Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck simulation code RBUU are described. And then, in the porting part, the porting of reactor safety analysis code RELAP5/MOD3.2 and RELAP5/MOD3.2.1.2, nuclear data processing system NJOY and 2-D multigroup discrete ordinate transport code TWOTRAN-II are described. And also, a survey for the porting of command-driven interactive data analysis plotting program IPLOT are described. (author)

  6. Program evaluation and case study

    OpenAIRE

    Kushner, S

    2009-01-01

    This entry looks at the convergence of case study methodology and program evaluation. An early insight of some educational evaluation theorists was of the convergence of case study and program evaluation – the fusion of method with purpose. Program evaluation and case study came to be mutually-bracketed. In the educational evaluation field 'Responsive', 'Democratic', 'Illuminative' methodologies were developed in parallel with case study methods - the same authors contributing freely to both ...

  7. Program Evaluation: Accelerating Retained Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juneau, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this program evaluation was to evaluate the first year of an acceleration program that allowed students who were retained a grade level for not performing on academic level in early elementary school an opportunity to rejoin their age appropriate class. The primary focus of the evaluation was to evaluate the effectiveness of an…

  8. Measuring the Effects of Virtual Pair Programming in an Introductory Programming Java Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharis, N. Z.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of virtual pair programming (VPP) on student performance and satisfaction in an introductory Java course. Students used online tools that integrated desktop sharing and real-time communication, and the metrics examined showed that VPP is an acceptable alternative to individual programming experience.…

  9. Measuring the Effects of Virtual Pair Programming in an Introductory Programming Java Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharis, N. Z.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of virtual pair programming (VPP) on student performance and satisfaction in an introductory Java course. Students used online tools that integrated desktop sharing and real-time communication, and the metrics examined showed that VPP is an acceptable alternative to individual programming experience.…

  10. Improving Learning of Programming Through E-Learning by Using Asynchronous Virtual Pair Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sufian IDRIS

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The problem of learning programming subjects, especially through distance learning and E-Learning, has been widely reported in literatures. Many attempts have been made to solve these problems. This has led to many new approaches in the techniques of learning of programming. One of the approaches that have been proposed is the use of virtual pair programming (VPP. Most of the studies about VPP in distance learning or e-learning environment focus on the use of the synchronous mode of collaboration between learners. Not much research have been done about asynchronous VPP. This paper describes how we have implemented VPP and a research that has been carried out to study the effectiveness of asynchronous VPP for learning of programming. In particular, this research study the effectiveness of asynchronous VPP in the learning of object-oriented programming among students at Open University Malaysia (OUM. The result of the research has shown that most of the learners have given positive feedback, indicating that they are happy with the use of asynchronous VPP. At the same time, learners did recommend some extra features that could be added in making asynchronous VPP more enjoyable.

  11. Evaluation of Public School Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, Gordon

    This article outlines the procedures followed in program evaluation in Pittsburgh public schools. A program design is obtained by asking the field staff a series of specific questions. As the staff interact, problems about the program are resolved. The consensus achieved is the basis for standardization of activities in the field. The next step in…

  12. Guidance for training program evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    An increased concern about the training of nuclear reactor operators resulted from the incident at TMI-2 in 1979. Purpose of this guide is to provide a general framework for the systematic evaluation of training programs for DOE Category-A reactors. The primary goal of such evaluations is to promote continuing quality improvements in the selection, training and qualification programs.

  13. Vacuolar H+-translocating inorganic pyrophosphatase (Vpp1) marks partial aleurone cell fate in cereal endosperm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, Jean-Pierre; Rogowsky, Peter M

    2004-10-01

    Cereal endosperm is a model system for cell fate determination in plants. In wild-type plants the outermost endosperm cells adopt aleurone cell fate, while all underlying cells display starchy endosperm cell fate. Mutant analysis showed that cell fate is determined by position rather than lineage. To further characterise the precise cell fate of the outermost cells, we performed a differential screen and isolated the novel marker gene Vpp1 . It encodes a vacuolar H+-translocating inorganic pyrophosphatase (V-PPase) and is mainly expressed in kernels, leaves and tassels. In kernels, its expression is restricted to the aleurone layer with the maximum of expression shifting from the adaxial to the abaxial side during early stages. Together with three other marker genes Vpp1 was then used to analyse the cell fate of the outermost cells in Dap3 , Dap7 , cr4 and dek1 mutants, all of which have aberrant aleurone layers. In the Dap3 and Dap7 mutants the Vpp1 and Ltp2 markers but not the A1 and Zein markers were expressed in patches without aleurone indicating that the outermost cells had some but not all features of aleurone cells and did not simply adopt starchy endosperm cell fate. A similar result was obtained in the cr4 mutant, although Ltp2 expression was less generalised. In other Dap7 patches characterised by multiple aleurone-like cell layers the expression of Vpp1 and Ltp2 confirmed the aleurone cell fate of the cells in the additional cell layers. The analysis of dek1 mutants confirmed the starchy endosperm cell fate of the majority but not all outermost cells. Based on these data we propose a model suggesting a stepwise commitment to aleurone cell fate. Sequential steps are marked by the expression of Vpp1 , the expression of Ltp2 , the acquisition of a regular shape and thick walls and finally pigmentation coupled with A1 expression.

  14. Econometric Model Evaluation: Implications for Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridge, Richard S.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The problem associated with evaluating an econometric model using values outside those used in the model estimation is illustrated in the evaluations of a residential load management program during each of two successive years. Analysis reveals that attention must be paid to this problem. (Author/TJH)

  15. Deception in Program Evaluation Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-31

    guard for its possibility and take proactive steps to reduce the possibility of deceit. These range from the use of open and transparent feedback to... portfolio .” 14 In such a situation, where an evaluator will ultimately try to determine the effects and influences of a program on the outcome or... feedback to ensuring the independence of assessors to red cells identifying possible vulnerabilities. As long as the stakes in a program

  16. A Monolithically Integrated Silicon Modulator with a 10Gb/s 5Vpp or 5.6Vpp Driver in 0.25µm SiGe:C BiCMOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard eGoll

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents as a novelty a fully monolithically integrated 10Gb/s silicon modulator consisting of an electrical driver plus optical phase modulator in 0.25µm SiGe:C BiCMOS technology on one chip, where instead of a SOI CMOS process (only MOS transistors a SiGe BiCMOS process (MOS transistors and fast SiGe bipolar transistors is implemented. The fastest bipolar transistors in the BiCMOS product line used have a transit frequency of 120GHz and a collector-emitter breakdown voltage of 2.2V (IHP SG25H3. The main focus of this paper will be given to the electronic drivers, where two driver variants are implemented in the test chips. Circuit descriptions and simulations, which treat the influences of noise and bond wires, are presented. Measurements at separate test chips for the drivers show that the integrated driver variant one has a low power consumption in the range of 0.66W to 0.68W but a high gain of S21=37dB. From the large signal point of view this driver delivers an inverted as well as a non-inverted output data signal between 0V and 2.5V (5Vpp differential. Driver variant one is supplied with 2.5V and with 3.5V. Bit-error-ratio (BER measurements resulted in a BER better than 10E-12 for voltage differences of the input data stream down to 50mVpp. Driver variant two, which is an adapted version of driver variant one, is supplied with 2.5V and 4.2V, consumes 0.83W to 0.87W, delivers a differential data signal with 5.6Vpp at the output and has a gain of S21=40dB. The chip of the fully integrated modulator occupies an area of 12.3mm^2 due to the photonic components. Measurements with a 240mVpp electrical input data stream and for an optical input wavelength of 1540nm resulted in an extinction ratio of 3.3dB for 1mm long RF phase shifters in each modulator arm driven by driver variant one and a DC tuning voltage of 1.2V. The extinction ratio was 8.4dB at a DC tuning voltage of 7V for a device with 2mm long RF phase shifters and driver

  17. Evaluation of Programs: Reading Carol H. Weiss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msila, Vuyisile; Setlhako, Angeline

    2013-01-01

    Carol Weiss did much to enhance the role of evaluation in her writings. Her work shows evaluators what affects their roles as they evaluate programs. Furthermore, her theory of change spells out the complexities involved in program evaluation. There are various processes involved in the evaluation of programs. The paper looks at some of the…

  18. Feedback Improvement in Automatic Program Evaluation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skupas, Bronius

    2010-01-01

    Automatic program evaluation is a way to assess source program files. These techniques are used in learning management environments, programming exams and contest systems. However, use of automated program evaluation encounters problems: some evaluations are not clear for the students and the system messages do not show reasons for lost points.…

  19. 42 CFR 491.11 - Program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Program evaluation. 491.11 Section 491.11 Public... Certification; and FQHCs Conditions for Coverage § 491.11 Program evaluation. (a) The clinic or center carries out, or arranges for, an annual evaluation of its total program. (b) The evaluation includes review...

  20. Planning Evaluation through the Program Life Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheirer, Mary Ann; Mark, Melvin M.; Brooks, Ariana; Grob, George F.; Chapel, Thomas J.; Geisz, Mary; McKaughan, Molly; Leviton, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Linking evaluation methods to the several phases of a program's life cycle can provide evaluation planners and funders with guidance about what types of evaluation are most appropriate over the trajectory of social and educational programs and other interventions. If methods are matched to the needs of program phases, evaluation can and should…

  1. ENergy and Power Evaluation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    In the late 1970s, national and international attention began to focus on energy issues. Efforts were initiated to design and test analytical tools that could be used to assist energy planners in evaluating energy systems, particularly in developing countries. In 1984, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) commissioned Argonne National Laboratory`s Decision and Information Sciences Division (DIS) to incorporate a set of analytical tools into a personal computer-based package for distribution in developing countries. The package developed by DIS staff, the ENergy and Power Evaluation Program (ENPEP), covers the range of issues that energy planners must face: economic development, energy demand projections, supply-and-demand balancing, energy system expansion, and environmental impact analysis. Following the original DOE-supported development effort, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), with the assistance from the US Department of State (DOS) and the US Department of Energy (DOE), provided ENPEP training, distribution, and technical support to many countries. ENPEP is now in use in over 60 countries and is an international standard for energy planning tools. More than 500 energy experts have been trained in the use of the entire ENPEP package or some of its modules during the international training courses organized by the IAEA in collaboration with Argonne`s Decision and Information Sciences (DIS) Division and the Division of Educational Programs (DEP). This report contains the ENPEP program which can be download from the internet. Described in this report is the description of ENPEP Program, news, forums, online support and contacts.

  2. Monitoring and evaluating your program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillsman, E. [Washington State Dept. of Transportation, Olympia, WA (United States); Aumell, J. [SAFCO, Remond, WA (United States); Mickley, K.; Schuster, M. [Costco, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2002-07-01

    Washington State Legislation requires monitoring and evaluation of commute trips to worksites for large employers in urban areas. Monitoring makes it possible to collect data and detect changes in travel and parking patterns. In the case of trip reduction, the objective is to create change, particularly for single occupancy vehicle (SOV) use to control traffic and improve local and regional air quality. This presentation described the benefits of monitoring and evaluating incentive programs to ensure that objectives are kept on track. Case studies were presented which demonstrated how a variety of companies have used monitoring to obtain data on traffic counting in peak hours, and to observe how many employees make use of car pooling,mass transit systems, or cycle and walk to work.

  3. PME Guidelines for Program Development/Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dock, Stephen

    In a Program Development and Evaluation model, guidelines are presented for program directors at Delaware County Community College. Based on the premise that the process of developing programs is essentially that of evaluating programs, the model includes the following steps for both processes: (1) involve the appropriate publics; (2) identify…

  4. 5 CFR 9701.107 - Program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program evaluation. 9701.107 Section 9701... RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM General Provisions § 9701.107 Program evaluation. (a) DHS will establish... the design and results of program evaluations. (b) Involvement of employee representatives under...

  5. Gifted Education Program Evaluation: A National Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traxler, Mary Ann

    1987-01-01

    The survey of 192 gifted programs during 1982-83 found that at least half of the programs were not evaluated throughout the year and most individuals doing evaluation were not trained evaluators. Findings also indicated that teacher observation and creative products were the most common measures of student evaluation. (Author/DB)

  6. Right timing in formative program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jori; Freeman, Melissa; Roulston, Kathy

    2014-08-01

    Since many educational researchers and program developers have limited knowledge of formative evaluation, formative data may be underutilized during the development and implementation of an educational program. The purpose of this article is to explain how participatory, responsive, educative, and qualitative approaches to formative evaluation can facilitate a partnership between evaluators and educational researchers and program managers to generate data useful to inform program implementation and improvement. This partnership is critical, we argue, because it enables an awareness of when to take appropriate action to ensure successful educational programs or "kairos". To illustrate, we use examples from our own evaluation work to highlight how formative evaluation may facilitate opportune moments to (1) define the substance and purpose of a program, (2) develop understanding and awareness of the cultural interpretations of program participants, and (3) show the relevance of stakeholder experiences to program goals.

  7. 7 CFR 22.307 - Program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program evaluation. 22.307 Section 22.307 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture RURAL DEVELOPMENT COORDINATION Roles and Responsibilities of State Governments § 22.307 Program evaluation. The Department of Agriculture is responsible for continuous program...

  8. A 180-Vpp Integrated Linear Amplifier for Ultrasonic Imaging Applications in a High-Voltage CMOS SOI Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kexu; Gao, Zheng; Gui, Ping; Wang, Rui; Oguzman, Ismail; Xu, Xiaochen; Vasanth, Karthik; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K Kirk

    2015-02-01

    This brief presents a monolithically integrated fully differential linear HV amplifier as the driver of an ultrasonic transducer. The linear amplifier is capable of transmitting HV arbitrary signals with a very low harmonic distortion, which is suitable for tissue harmonic imaging and other ultrasonic modes for enhanced imaging quality. The amplifier is designed and implemented using the 0.7-μm CMOS silicon-on-insulator process with 120-V devices. The amplifier, when driving a load of 300 pF in parallel with 100 Ω, is capable of transmitting a sine-wave signal with a frequency of up to 4.4 MHz, a maximum signal swing of 180 Vpp, and a second-order harmonic distortion (HD2) of -56 dBc but only dissipating an average power of 62 mW with a 0.1% duty cycle.

  9. Energy-efficient buildings program evaluations. Volume 2: Evaluation summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, A.D.; Mayi, D.; Edgemon, S.D.

    1997-04-01

    This document presents summaries of code and utility building program evaluations reviewed as the basis for the information presented in Energy-Efficient Buildings Program Evaluations, Volume 1: Findings and Recommendations, DOE/EE/OBT-11569, Vol. 1. The main purpose of this volume is to summarize information from prior evaluations of similar programs that may be useful background for designing and conducting an evaluation of the BSGP. Another purpose is to summarize an extensive set of relevant evaluations and provide a resource for program designers, mangers, and evaluators.

  10. Differential program evaluation model in child protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalayants, Marina

    2012-01-01

    Increasingly attention has been focused to the degree to which social programs have effectively and efficiently delivered services. Using the differential program evaluation model by Tripodi, Fellin, and Epstein (1978) and by Bielawski and Epstein (1984), this paper described the application of this model to evaluating a multidisciplinary clinical consultation practice in child protection. This paper discussed the uses of the model by demonstrating them through the four stages of program initiation, contact, implementation, and stabilization. This organizational case study made a contribution to the model by introducing essential and interrelated elements of a "practical evaluation" methodology in evaluating social programs, such as a participatory evaluation approach; learning, empowerment and sustainability; and a flexible individualized approach to evaluation. The study results demonstrated that by applying the program development model, child-protective administrators and practitioners were able to evaluate the existing practices and recognize areas for program improvement.

  11. Educators Exchange: A Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, William B.

    The Educators Exchange Program (EEP) was established under a training and educational exchange agreement reached by California's San Diego Community College District (SDCCD) and the republic of Mexico. In the program, the District provided a 4-week technological training program to faculty at Centros de Capacitacion Tecnologica Industrial…

  12. A Programmed Introduction to PERT (Program Evaluation and Review Technique).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1967

    PERT--Program Evaluation and Review Technique--is introduced in this programed text to enable the reader to work at his own pace to gain a mastery of the basic rules of PERT and their application. Some of the operations the reader will be able to perform upon completion of the program include: applying PERT techniques to projects of any type or…

  13. Program Evaluation: Two Management-Oriented Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Kenneth Ray

    2010-01-01

    Two Management-Oriented Samples details two examples of the management-oriented approach to program evaluation. Kenneth Alford, a doctorate candidate at the University of the Cumberlands, details two separate program evaluations conducted in his school district and seeks to compare and contrast the two evaluations based upon the characteristics of…

  14. 5 CFR 9901.107 - Program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program evaluation. 9901.107 Section 9901.107 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT AND LABOR RELATIONS... PERSONNEL SYSTEM (NSPS) General Provisions § 9901.107 Program evaluation. The Secretary will evaluate...

  15. Evaluation of Remedial Programs at UC Davis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunziker, Celeste M.

    Efforts at the University of California, Davis, (UC Davis) to develop standard evaluation models for remedial programs are described, and three UC Davis evaluation studies are considered. A standard evaluation model entails a formal orientation, a singular values perspective, and a primary audience of program funders and oversight agencies. The…

  16. A Program Evaluation Tool for Dual Enrollment Transition Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigal, Meg; Dwyre, Amy; Emmett, Joyce; Emmett, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the development and use of a program evaluation tool designed to support self-assessment of college-based dual enrollment transition programs serving students with intellectual disabilities between the ages of 18-21 in college settings. The authors describe the need for such an evaluation tool, outline the areas addressed by…

  17. Solar energy program evaluation: an introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    deLeon, P.

    1979-09-01

    The Program Evaluation Methodology provides an overview of the practice and methodology of program evaluation and defines more precisely the evaluation techniques and methodologies that would be most appropriate to government organizations which are actively involved in the research, development, and commercialization of solar energy systems. Formal evaluation cannot be treated as a single methodological approach for assessing a program. There are four basic types of evaluation designs - the pre-experimental design; the quasi-experimental design based on time series; the quasi-experimental design based on comparison groups; and the true experimental design. This report is organized to first introduce the role and issues of evaluation. This is to provide a set of issues to organize the subsequent sections detailing the national solar energy programs. Then, these two themes are integrated by examining the evaluation strategies and methodologies tailored to fit the particular needs of the various individual solar energy programs. (MCW)

  18. Using portfolio evaluation for program outcome assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kear, Mavra E; Bear, Mary

    2007-03-01

    Portfolio evaluation is an efficient and effective strategy to objectively demonstrate the accomplishment of program objectives using students' perceptions of their academic experiences. A portfolio evaluation tool was developed to quantitatively measure students' perceptions of their achievement of the nursing program's goals and objectives. Data were collected from a convenience sample of 26 portfolio evaluations. Reliability testing showed the tool has high interrater reliability, with Cohen's Kappa >0.80 for most items. Individual achievement of program goals and objectives ranged from 53.6% to 100%. These data will be used in the next formative evaluation of the curriculum to revise program objectives and correspondneing course objectives and assignments.ty

  19. Evaluating OO example programs for CS1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Börstler, Jürgen; Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Bennedsen, Jens

    2008-01-01

    that might affect the teaching and learning of object-oriented programming. Furthermore, we present an evaluation instrument for example programs and report on initial experiences of its application to a selection of examples from popular introductory programming textbooks.......Example programs play an important role in learning to program. They work as templates, guidelines, and inspiration for learners when developing their own programs. It is therefore important to provide learners with high quality examples. In this paper, we discuss properties of example programs...

  20. Philadelphia's Parkway Program: An Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wofford, Joan; Ross, Joanne

    The Parkway Program is the prototype school-without-walls created by the School District of Philadelphia in 1967. The program presently consists of four units of approximately 200 students (chosen by lottery from throughout the city), ten teachers, ten to 12 interns, and a Unit Head and administrative assistant housed in four separate non-school…

  1. Involving Program Constituencies in the Evaluation Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshler, David

    1984-01-01

    Two case studies provide examples of citizen and program participant involvement in program evaluation. The Reflective Appraisal of Programs at Cornell Cooperative Extension involves volunteer interviewers of participants; the Lancaster County (Pennsylvania) Office of Mental Health/Mental Retardation is reviewed by a volunteer citizens' committee.…

  2. New Teacher Induction: A Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, J. Warren

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative program evaluation was to examine the impact a two-year new teacher induction program had on teachers' feelings of support, satisfaction, and self-efficacy. The program purports that higher feelings of support, satisfaction, and self-efficacy in teachers will lead to lower teacher attrition. In turn, research shows…

  3. Miramar College Program Evaluation: Criminal Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Bruce; Brumley, Leslie

    Qualitative and quantitative data are presented in this evaluation of the curricular, personnel, and financial status of Miramar College's program in criminal justice. The report first outlines the information gathered in an interview with the program chairperson, conducted to determine program objectives and goals and how they were determined,…

  4. Miramar College Program Evaluation: Aviation Maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Bruce; Brumley, Leslie

    Qualitative and quantitative data are presented in this evaluation of the curricular, personnel, and financial status of Miramar College's program in aviation maintenance. The report first provides the results of an interview with the program chairperson, which sought information on program objectives and goals and their determination, the extent…

  5. Miramar College Program Evaluation: Fire Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Bruce; Brumley, Leslie

    Qualitative and quantitative data are presented in this evaluation of the curricular, personnel, and financial status of Miramar College's program in fire sciences. The report first provides the results of an interview with the program chairperson, which sought information on program objectives and goals and their determination, the extent to…

  6. Evaluating the BK 21 Program. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Somi; Popper, Steven W.; Goldman, Charles A.; Evans, David K.; Grammich, Clifford A.

    2008-01-01

    The Brain Korea 21 program (BK21), an effort to improve Korean universities and research, has attracted a great deal of attention in Korea, producing the need to understand how well the program is meeting its goals. RAND developed a logic model for identifying program goals and dynamics, suggested quantitative and qualitative evaluation methods,…

  7. Evaluating Vocational Programs: A Three Dimensional Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Sharaf N.; Nejad, Mahmoud

    The traditional methods of assessing the academic programs in the liberal arts are inappropriate for evaluating vocational and technical programs. In traditional academic disciplines, assessment of instruction is conducted in two fashions: student evaluation at the end of a course and institutional assessment of its goals and mission. Because of…

  8. Evaluation of a Bullying Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallford, Abby; Borntrager, Cameo; Davis, Joanne L.

    2006-01-01

    In order to address the federal "No Child Left Behind Act", the state of Oklahoma required that all public schools address the problem of bullying. Although numerous anti-bullying programs exist, few have been evaluated to determine their effectiveness. The present study evaluated the effectiveness of one such program,…

  9. Critical Issues in Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Richard F.

    1984-01-01

    Five issues that emerge in most evaluation processes and that have direct consequences for use of results are identified: the dilemma of multiple purposes, the value of criteria, overscheduling, the linkage between evaluation and decision-making, and evaluating process effectiveness. (Author/MLW)

  10. Practical strategies for nursing education program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewallen, Lynne Porter

    2015-01-01

    Self-evaluation is required for institutions of higher learning and the nursing programs within them. The literature provides information on evaluation models and instruments, and descriptions of how specific nursing education programs are evaluated. However, there are few discussions in the nursing education literature of the practical aspects of nursing education program evaluation: how to get started, how to keep track of data, who to involve in data collection, and how to manage challenging criteria. This article discusses the importance of program evaluation in the academic setting and provides information on practical ways to organize the evaluation process and aggregate data, and strategies for gathering data from students, graduates, alumni, and employers of graduates.

  11. Aspect-oriented programming evaluated

    CERN Document Server

    Kleinschmager, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Hauptbeschreibung Aspect-oriented-programming is a relatively new technique that has evolved on top of the already well-established approach of object-oriented programming. When it is used correctly, it promises to remove many redundant parts of a code that appear repeatedly in an application, essentially untangling the original code. Thus, it can lead to a cleaner, more separated software design, to greater modularity and maintainability. Time-savings in software engineering can also be huge cost-savings, and anything that increases software quality is a welcome sight in an industr

  12. Discount method for programming language evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurtev, Svetomir; Christensen, Tommy Aagaard; Thomsen, Bent

    2016-01-01

    internal language design evaluation methods and large scale surveys and quantitative evaluation methods. The method is designed to be applicable even before a compiler or IDE is developed for a new language. To test the method, a usability evaluation experiment was carried out on the Quorum programming......This paper presents work in progress on developing a Discount Method for Programming Language Evaluation inspired by the Discount Usability Evaluation method (Benyon 2010) and the Instant Data Analysis method (Kjeldskov et al. 2004). The method is intended to bridge the gap between small scale...

  13. Programming software for usability evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, T.L.; Allen, H.W.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the work completed for a portion of the User Interface Testbed for Technology Packaging (UseIT) project. The authors present software methods for programming systems to record and view interactions with a graphical user interface. A brief description of the human factors design process is presented. The software methods exploit features available in the X Window System and the operating system for Windows{trademark} 95 and Windows{trademark} NT{reg_sign}.

  14. A Program Evaluation of Intersession Tutoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandang Kosasih Ananda

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study examined one program which was in place in a multi-track year-round elementary school, a tutoring program delivered during the students' intersession. Through interviews, surveys, and analysis of grades recorded on report cards, the program was evaluated to determine whether goals for the program were met. Survey data revealed that students, parents, and teachers all felt overwhelmingly that the program was effective at meeting stated program goals. Report card data did not show a statistically significant increase in grades after students attended the program, but many intervening variables were not controlled for. Additional convenience factors, such as transportation, cost, and timing contributed to the program benefits

  15. A Dutch Achievement Testing Program for Guidance and Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnstra, Johan M.

    1984-01-01

    The Eindtoets Basisonderwijs (final primary school test) is a Dutch national achievement test taken annually by 90,000 pupils. This article overviews the Dutch educational system and describes this testing program, emphasizing test equating methods. Evaluation findings from 1980 and resulting changes in test content and evaluation reports are also…

  16. Lessons learned from IRIS EPO program evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, J.; Hubenthal, M.

    2012-12-01

    Evaluating the overall impact of EPO programs that include activities ranging from formal education through broad public outreach, is a complex issue. The impact of education activities targeted at narrowly defined audiences is generally easier to quantify than the national impact of outreach activities conducted by a relatively small program. For educational activities, our approach has been to leverage the best-practices identified through research and to continuously assess the individual elements internally with the intention of making improvements based on the data generated and the existing research. By constructing our elements on the best practices identified by the research community we feel that internal formative evaluation is a valid means to determine if an activity is effective, particularly when the results are compared to similar programs. For example, effective practices of professional development are well documented in the literature. As a result, this allows us to shape our programs and our evaluations to monitor elements that have been identified as key by the educational research community. Further, such actions allow us to avoid allocating significant resources with the intention of pinning down direct causal relationships between our programs and consumers, when similar interventions (conducted by others) have already shown such relationships. Ongoing review by an EPO advisory committee also provides regular oversight of program impact. While we find internal and external formative evaluation extremely useful in shaping the program and documenting its impact, we also recognize the value of a summative evaluation process. For example, an external summative evaluation of the IRIS EPO program was conducted in 2009, followed by an external panel review, as part of the regular review of IRIS programs. We found that the most valuable part of the external evaluation was our preparation, including clarifying the goals of each of the elements of the

  17. Measuring Externalities in Program Evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, Wendy

    2005-01-01

    Impact evaluations of development programmes usually focus on a comparison of participants with a control group. However, if the programme generates externalities for non-participants such an approach will capture only part of the programme's impact. Based on a unique large-scale quantitative survey

  18. Evaluating Pain Education Programs: An Integrated Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Dubrowski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of educational programs and assessment of learning are essential to maintain high-standard health science education, which includes pain education. Current models of program evaluations applied to the education of the health professions, such as the Kirkpatrick model, are mainly outcome based. More recently, efforts have been made to examine other process-based models such as the Context Input Process Product model. The present article proposes an approach that integrates both outcome- and process-based models with models of clinical performance assessment to provide a deeper understanding of a program function. Because assessment instruments are a critical part of program evaluation, it is suggested that standardization and rigour should be used in their selection, development and adaptation. The present article suggests an alternative to currently used models in pain education evaluation.

  19. Evaluation of Kentucky's Extended School Services Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Merrill L.; Cowley, Kimberly S.; Schumacher, Debbie; Hauser, Brenda

    The Extended School Services (ESS) program was established in 1990 as part of the Kentucky Education Reform Act. The program extends the school day, week, or year for students at risk of academic failure, providing them with additional instructional time to help them meet academic goals. An evaluation of ESS in 2001 utilized statewide surveys and…

  20. Evaluation of the Job Retraining Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulf, Douglas; And Others

    Iowa's Job Retraining Program was evaluated through a review of operations, surveys/interviews with community college staff, and survey responses from 43% of the business participants. Resulting recommendations were as follows: (1) retaining the program in the Department of Economic Development rather than transferring it to the state's 15…

  1. Early Fives Program Evaluation: Farmington Public Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peper, H. Robert

    An evaluation of the Early Fives program of the Farmington (Michigan) Public Schools is reported. This extra-year program began in the 1980-81 school year. By the 1982-83 school year, tuition was no longer charged, and a systematic screening effort was implemented. Each Early Fives classroom contains a maximum of 15 children with a certified…

  2. Evaluating and Selecting Sport Management Undergraduate Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuneen, Jacquelyn; Sidwell, M. Joy

    1998-01-01

    States that the accelerated growth of sport management undergraduate programs that began in the 1980s has continued into the current decade. There are currently 180 sport management major programs in American colleges and universities. Describes the sports management approval process and suggests useful strategies to evaluate sport management…

  3. 1994 Ergonomics Program Quality Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longbotham, L.; Miller, D.P.

    1995-06-01

    A telephone survey was conducted to evaluate the quality of service provided to the primary customers of the Corporate Ergonomics Group (CEG). One hundred clients who received services between October 1993 and June 1994 were asked questions on their expectations, implementation of ergonomic recommendations, follow-ups, time required, productivity improvements, symptom alleviation, and satisfaction. Suggestions on how processes could be improved were also solicited. In general, recommendations are being implemented, worksite evaluations are going smoothly, and customers are satisfied with the process. The CEG was pleased to learn that half of the people who implemented recommendations experienced improvements in productivity, and four out of five symptomatic customers experienced partial or complete relief. Through analysis of the data and by studying clients` suggestions for process improvement, the CEG has developed a strategy for changing and improving current procedures and practices. These plans can be found in the last section of this report.

  4. The human dimension of program evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vine, E.L.

    1993-05-01

    Social science issues play an important role in the evaluation of demand-side management (DSM) programs. In the very early years of DSM program evaluation in the United States, there was a fair amount of social science research applied to the behavioral aspects of energy efficiency. Since the mid-1980s, however, there has been a heavy emphasis on impact evaluation, technical measurement, and engineering methodologies. Although some have articulated the need to integrate behavioral research into energy evaluation, most emphasis has tended to center on the technical/engineering aspects. Increasingly, however, the realization is growing that it is necessary to integrate important behavioral variables into impact evaluation techniques. In addition, it is being further recognized that behavioral research questions are central to a number of critical evaluation issues: e.g., design of samples for evaluation studies, net energy savings, self-selection bias, free riders and free drivers, persistence of energy savings, process evaluation, and market impact evaluation. Finally, it is increasingly being realized that the utilization of evaluation results relies heavily on behavioral factors. Social science researchers should be poised to expect a greatly expanded role of behavioral research in evaluation. As new techniques are developed and perfected, as the results of impact evaluations become more abundant, and as the gap between technical energy savings potential and realized savings becomes more visible, research regarding the ``human dimension`` of program evaluation will be crucial. This paper provides an overview of the human dimension of program evaluation and focuses on key evaluation issues in demand-side management which will require the use of social science research for addressing these issues.

  5. Industrial Assessment Center Program Impact Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, M.A.

    2000-01-26

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy's Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) Program. The purpose of this program is to conduct energy, waste, and productivity assessments for small to medium-sized industrial firms. Assessments are conducted by 30 university-based industrial assessment centers. The purpose of this project was to evaluate energy and cost savings attributable to the assessments, the trained alumni, and the Websites sponsored by this program. How IAC assessments, alumni, and Web-based information may influence industrial energy efficiency decision making was also studied. It is concluded that appreciable energy and cost savings may be attributed to the IAC Program and that the IAC Program has resulted in more active and improved energy-efficiency decision making by industrial firms.

  6. Second Language Proficiency Assessment and Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, David

    A discussion of the role of second language proficiency assessment in the evaluation of language programs argues that for four reasons, the use of proficiency is inappropriate as a central element in evaluation. The reasons are: (1) the construct of proficiency has not been operationalized in a way that enables it to be used usefully; (2)…

  7. Organizational Structures that Support Internal Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambur, Michael T.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter explores how the structure of large complex organizations such as Cooperative Extension affects their ability to support internal evaluation of their programs and activities. Following a literature review of organizational structure and its relation to internal evaluation capacity, the chapter presents the results of interviews with…

  8. Evaluation of Training Programs for Rural Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indira, A.

    2008-01-01

    An Evaluation of the "Impact Assessment of the Training Programs" of a National Level Training Institution in India was conducted using the Kirkpatrick Method (KP Method). The studied Institution takes up research, provides training, offers consultancy and initiates action in the rural sector of India. The evaluation study used a…

  9. Handbook of evaluation of utility DSM programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirst, E.; Reed, J. [eds.; Bronfman, B.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Hicks, E.; Hirst, E.; Hoffman, M.; Keating, K.; Michaels, H.; Nadel, S.; Peters, J.; Reed, J.; Saxonis, W.; Schoen, A.; Violette, D.

    1991-12-01

    Program evaluation has become a central issue in the world of utility integrated resource planning. The DSM programs that utilities were operating to meet federal requirements or to improve customer relations are now becoming big business. DSM is being considered an important resource in a utility`s portfolio of options. In the last five years, the amount of money that utilities have invested in DSM has grown exponentially in most regulatory jurisdictions. Market analysts are now talking about DSM being a $30 billion industry by the end of the decade. If the large volume of DSM-program investments was not enough to highlight the importance of evaluation, then the introduction of regulatory incentives has really focused the spotlight. This handbook was developed through a process that involved many of those people who represent the diverse constituencies of DSM-program evaluation. We have come to recognize the many technical disciplines that must be employed to evaluate DSM programs. An analysis might start out based on the principles of utility load research to find out what happened, but a combination of engineering and statistical methods must be used to ``triangulate`` an estimate of what would have happened without the program. The difference, of course, is that elusive but prized result of evaluation: what happened as the direct result of the DSM program. Technical performance of DSM measures is not the sole determinant of the answer, either. We also recognize the importance of such behavioral attributes of DSM as persistence and free ridership. Finally, DSM evaluation is meaningless without attention to planning an approach, communicating results to relevant decision-makers, and focusing as much on the process as the impacts of the program. These topics are all covered in this handbook.

  10. Super Efficient Refrigerator Program (SERP) evaluation. Volume 1: Process evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandahl, L.J.; Ledbetter, M.R.; Chin, R.I.; Lewis, K.S.; Norling, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted this study for the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Super Efficient Refrigerator Program (SERP) Evaluation. This report documents the SERP formation and implementation process, and identifies preliminary program administration and implementation issues. The findings are based primarily on interviews with those familiar with the program, such as utilities, appliance manufacturers, and SERP administrators. These interviews occurred primarily between March and April 1995, when SERP was in the early stages of program implementation. A forthcoming report will estimate the preliminary impacts of SERP within the industry and marketplace. Both studies were funded by DOE at the request of SERP Inc., which sought a third-party evaluation of its program.

  11. The Houston Community College Eligible Legalized Alien Program. Evaluation Program. Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Don F.; Cuellar, Sylvia

    The Houston Community College (Texas) program (TOTAL ACCESS) designed in response to the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, is described and evaluated. The program offers classes to eligible aliens (97% Hispanic Americans from Mexico, El Salvador, and Guatemala) wishing to pursue the educational program required for legalization. Program…

  12. ZATPAC: a model consortium evaluates teen programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Kathryn; Murphy, Dana; Parsons, Chris

    2009-09-01

    How do we advance the environmental literacy of young people, support the next generation of environmental stewards and increase the diversity of the leadership of zoos and aquariums? We believe it is through ongoing evaluation of zoo and aquarium teen programming and have founded a consortium to pursue those goals. The Zoo and Aquarium Teen Program Assessment Consortium (ZATPAC) is an initiative by six of the nation's leading zoos and aquariums to strengthen institutional evaluation capacity, model a collaborative approach toward assessing the impact of youth programs, and bring additional rigor to evaluation efforts within the field of informal science education. Since its beginning in 2004, ZATPAC has researched, developed, pilot-tested and implemented a pre-post program survey instrument designed to assess teens' knowledge of environmental issues, skills and abilities to take conservation actions, self-efficacy in environmental actions, and engagement in environmentally responsible behaviors. Findings from this survey indicate that teens who join zoo/aquarium programs are already actively engaged in many conservation behaviors. After participating in the programs, teens showed a statistically significant increase in their reported knowledge of conservation and environmental issues and their abilities to research, explain, and find resources to take action on conservation issues of personal concern. Teens also showed statistically significant increases pre-program to post-program for various conservation behaviors, including "I talk with my family and/or friends about things they can do to help the animals or the environment," "I save water...," "I save energy...," "When I am shopping I look for recycled products," and "I help with projects that restore wildlife habitat."

  13. EVALUATIVE RESEARCH PARADIGMS IN EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS

    OpenAIRE

    Flores Barboza, José; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos

    2014-01-01

    The article focuses on the confrontation /comparison? between the naturalistic and the experimental paradigms to evaluate educational programs. It examines the theoretical framework of each paradigm and the proposed methodology to pursue an evaluation. Finally, the article addresses the possibility of a reconciliation between both paradigms. El artículo trata de la confrontación entre los paradigmas naturalista y experimental para la evaluación de programas educacionales. Examina los argum...

  14. Naturalistic Evaluation of Programs. Parents' Voice in Parent Education Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ştefan COJOCARU

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The study presents some practical means for carrying out a naturalistic evaluation, a process that has resulted, for instance, in the identification of the profile of the parent educator as defined by the parents attending parent education classes as part of the program “How to become better parents”, implemented by Holt Romania with the support of UNICEF Country Office. Exploring parents’ voices is an advantage in naturalistic evaluation when trying to identify some essential aspects of the program. Based on the grounded theory strategy, this study explores the participants’ subjective representations, being a useful source of information for future development of similar programs. The profile of the parent educator as defined by the parents has several significant characteristics: the educator’s ability to reduce power asymmetry and increase responsiveness, the importance of the educator’s personal traits of character, the role of social and spatial proximity, the importance of the parent educator in personalizing the relationship with institutions etc. The results highlight the ways in which parent educator’s characteristics can significantly contribute to increasing the attendance of such programs.

  15. Self-Assessment, Program Evaluation, and Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiali, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Never before in the history of the teaching profession has there been such a need for comprehensive evaluation of all teacher preparation programs, most especially professional development schools (PDSs). This need is driven not only by the pressures of the age of accountability, but also by the need for the PDS movement to act ethically and…

  16. Program Evaluation in Cost Benefit Terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, C. Kenneth

    This paper advances a model, called the expected opportunity loss model, for curriculum evaluation. This decision-making technique utilizes subjective data by ranking courses according to their expected contributions to the primary objective of the total program. The model also utilizes objective data in the form of component costs, and differs…

  17. Principle and Program of Evaluating Diffuse Seismicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Xiangdong

    2001-01-01

    Concept and origin of the term "the diffuse seismicity" are illustrated. Some different viewpoints regarding the diffuse seismicity and the influence characteristics on determining seismic design basis of engineering from the seismicity are analyzed. Principle and program for evaluating diffuse seismicity are studied and discussed base on over contents.

  18. An Evaluation of the NAMI Basics Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brister, Teri; Cavaleri, Mary A.; Olin, S. Serene; Shen, Sa; Burns, Barbara J.; Hoagwood, Kimberly E.

    2012-01-01

    This brief report describes results from an evaluation of NAMI Basics, a peer-delivered family education program for family caregivers of children and adolescents with mental illness. Over six classes, family members are given information (e.g. education about mental illness and treatments), skills training (e.g. family communication skills) and…

  19. Teaching Program Evaluation on Interactive Television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Keith; Steinhauser, Jim; Newman, Isadore

    This paper describes a five-session course entitled "Program Evaluation," which was taught via interactive television in the summer of 2002 to 68 doctoral and master's students in 5 of 6 locations throughout New Mexico. Students received a 4-hour lecture and then participated in off-line activities directed by the instructor. Problems in distance…

  20. Behavioral patterns of environmental performance evaluation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wanxin; Mauerhofer, Volker

    2016-11-01

    During the past decades numerous environmental performance evaluation programs have been developed and implemented on different geographic scales. This paper develops a taxonomy of environmental management behavioral patterns in order to provide a practical comparison tool for environmental performance evaluation programs. Ten such programs purposively selected are mapped against the identified four behavioral patterns in the form of diagnosis, negotiation, learning, and socialization and learning. Overall, we found that schemes which serve to diagnose environmental abnormalities are mainly externally imposed and have been developed as a result of technical debates concerning data sources, methodology and ranking criteria. Learning oriented scheme is featured by processes through which free exchange of ideas, mutual and adaptive learning can occur. Scheme developed by higher authority for influencing behaviors of lower levels of government has been adopted by the evaluated to signal their excellent environmental performance. The socializing and learning classified evaluation schemes have incorporated dialogue, participation, and capacity building in program design. In conclusion we consider the 'fitness for purpose' of the various schemes, the merits of our analytical model and the future possibilities of fostering capacity building in the realm of wicked environmental challenges.

  1. Integrating Program Theory and Systems-Based Procedures in Program Evaluation: A Dynamic Approach to Evaluate Educational Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammatikopoulos, Vasilis

    2012-01-01

    The current study attempts to integrate parts of program theory and systems-based procedures in educational program evaluation. The educational program that was implemented, called the "Early Steps" project, proposed that physical education can contribute to various educational goals apart from the usual motor skills improvement. Basic…

  2. Integrating Program Theory and Systems-Based Procedures in Program Evaluation: A Dynamic Approach to Evaluate Educational Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammatikopoulos, Vasilis

    2012-01-01

    The current study attempts to integrate parts of program theory and systems-based procedures in educational program evaluation. The educational program that was implemented, called the "Early Steps" project, proposed that physical education can contribute to various educational goals apart from the usual motor skills improvement. Basic…

  3. Integrating Program Theory and Systems-Based Procedures in Program Evaluation: A Dynamic Approach to Evaluate Educational Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammatikopoulos, Vasilis

    2012-01-01

    The current study attempts to integrate parts of program theory and systems-based procedures in educational program evaluation. The educational program that was implemented, called the "Early Steps" project, proposed that physical education can contribute to various educational goals apart from the usual motor skills improvement. Basic elements of…

  4. Evaluating Alternative High Schools: Program Evaluation in Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, Drew Samuel Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Alternative high schools serve some of the most vulnerable students and their programs present a significant challenge to evaluate. Determining the impact of an alternative high school that serves mostly at-risk students presented a significant research problem. Few studies exist that dig deeper into the characteristics and strategies of…

  5. Economic value evaluation in disease management programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnezi, Racheli; Reicher, Sima; Shani, Mordechai

    2008-05-01

    Chronic disease management has been a rapidly growing entity in the 21st century as a strategy for managing chronic illnesses in large populations. However, experience has shown that disease management programs have not been able to demonstrate their financial value. The objectives of disease management programs are to create quality benchmarks, such as principles and guidelines, and to establish a uniform set of metrics and a standardized methodology for evaluating them. In order to illuminate the essence of disease management and its components, as well as the complexity and the problematic nature of performing economic calculations of their profitability and value, we collected data from several reports that dealt with the economic intervention of disease management programs. The disease management economic evaluation is composed of a series of steps, including the following major categories: data/information technology, information generation, assessment/recommendations, actionable customer plans, and program assessment/reassessment. We demonstrate the elements necessary for economic analysis. Disease management is one of the most innovative tools in the managed care environment and is still in the process of being defined. Therefore, objectives should include the creation of quality measures, such as principles and guidelines, and the establishment of a uniform set of metrics and a standardized methodology for evaluating them.

  6. Targeted Mentoring: Evaluation of a Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Carolyn A; Harold, Rena D; Ahmedani, Brian K; Cramer, Elizabeth P

    2009-01-01

    Targeted mentoring refers to mentoring aimed at a particular population. This article presents the evaluation of a mentoring program for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) persons in social work education. Forty-three mentors and protégés responded to a survey regarding their program experiences. The results highlight the need for targeted mentoring, although some disparities of experience for mentors and protégés in this program are apparent. In general, mentors felt positive about participating, giving back to the LGBT community, and were more satisfied with their experiences than were the protégés, who were looking for more specific types of instrumental and psychosocial support.

  7. Milk-derived tripeptides IPP (Ile-Pro-Pro and VPP (Val-Pro-Pro promote adipocyte differentiation and inhibit inflammation in 3T3-F442A cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhadeep Chakrabarti

    Full Text Available Milk derived tripeptides IPP (Ile-Pro-Pro and VPP (Val-Pro-Pro have shown promise as anti-hypertensive agents due to their inhibitory effects on angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE. Due to the key inter-related roles of hypertension, chronic inflammation and insulin resistance in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome, there is growing interest in investigating established anti-hypertensive agents for their effects on insulin sensitivity and inflammation. In this study, we examined the effects of IPP and VPP on 3T3-F442A murine pre-adipocytes, a widely used model for studying metabolic diseases. We found that both IPP and VPP induced beneficial adipogenic differentiation as manifested by intracellular lipid accumulation, upregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ and secretion of the protective lipid hormone adiponectin by these cells. The observed effects were similar to those induced by insulin, suggesting potential benefits in the presence of insulin resistance. IPP and VPP also inhibited cytokine induced pro-inflammatory changes such as reduction in adipokine levels and activation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB pathway. Taken together, our findings suggest that IPP and VPP exert insulin-mimetic adipogenic effects and prevent inflammatory changes in adipocytes, which may offer protection against metabolic disease.

  8. The Evaluation Of A Diversity Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christa Fouche

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on the evaluation of a programme that was designed and developed in an attempt to address the reasons why diversity programmes fail. A large company in the banking sector initiated the development of the product and keynote personnel from this company evaluated the content. The content was found to adhere to Best Practice requirements. OpsommingDie artikel evalueer die inhoud van ’n diversiteits-program wat ontwerp en ontwikkel is ten einde die redes waarom diversiteits-opleiding faal, aan te spreek.’n Groot maatskappy in die banksektor het die ontwikkeling geinisieer en ’n aantal senior personeellede is genader om die inhoud te evalueer. Daar is bevind dat die inhoud aan wêreldklas standaarde voldoen.

  9. Evaluation metrics of educational programs for teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Gwendolyn D.

    1995-01-01

    A system for evaluating the teacher programs and services in the Education Services Branch was developed. The primary stakeholder was interested in determining the worth or usefulness of these services to educators. Therefore, two instruments were developed to collect the data. One questionnaire was administered. Data was collected, analyzed and reported. The other questionnaire was pilot tested and will be administered to teachers during the school year.

  10. A Qualitative Program Evaluation of a Structured Leadership Mentoring Program at a Large Aerospace Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teller, Romney P.

    2011-01-01

    The researcher utilized a qualitative approach to conduct a program evaluation of the organization where he is employed. The study intended to serve as a program evaluation for the structured in-house mentoring program at a large aerospace corporation (A-Corp). This program evaluation clarified areas in which the current mentoring program is…

  11. SIMS analysis: Development and evaluation program summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groenewold, G.S.; Appelhans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

    1996-11-01

    This report provides an overview of the ``SIMS Analysis: Development and Evaluation Program``, which was executed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory from mid-FY-92 to the end of FY-96. It should be noted that prior to FY-1994 the name of the program was ``In-Situ SIMS Analysis``. This report will not go into exhaustive detail regarding program accomplishments, because this information is contained in annual reports which are referenced herein. In summary, the program resulted in the design and construction of an ion trap secondary ion mass spectrometer (IT-SIMS), which is capable of the rapid analysis of environmental samples for adsorbed surface contaminants. This instrument achieves efficient secondary ion desorption by use of a molecular, massive ReO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} primary ion particle. The instrument manages surface charge buildup using a self-discharging principle, which is compatible with the pulsed nature of the ion trap. The instrument can achieve high selectivity and sensitivity using its selective ion storage and MS/MS capability. The instrument was used for detection of tri-n-butyl phosphate, salt cake (tank cake) characterization, and toxic metal speciation studies (specifically mercury). Technology transfer was also an important component of this program. The approach that was taken toward technology transfer was that of component transfer. This resulted in transfer of data acquisition and instrument control software in FY-94, and ongoing efforts to transfer primary ion gun and detector technology to other manufacturers.

  12. Gifted Education and National Standards: A K-5 Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwell-Braun, Debra A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a program evaluation of a K-5 Gifted Education Program. Program evaluation addressed how well the gifted education program studied met the National Association of Gifted Children standards. In addition, this study included stakeholder perceptions of the current gifted education program K-5. This program…

  13. 78 FR 20924 - Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research eSubmitter Pilot Evaluation Program for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-08

    ... Pilot Evaluation Program for Investigational New Drug Applications AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration...) applications to participate in a pilot evaluation program for CBER's eSubmitter Program (eSubmitter). CBER's e... FDA. II. eSubmitter Pilot Evaluation Program Expectations The eSubmitter pilot evaluation program...

  14. 7 CFR 3402.24 - Evaluation of program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Evaluation of program. 3402.24 Section 3402.24... GRADUATE AND POSTGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP GRANTS PROGRAM Supplementary Information § 3402.24 Evaluation of program. Grantees should be aware that HEP may, as a part of its own program evaluation activities,...

  15. 78 FR 19725 - Merchant Mariner Medical Evaluation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Merchant Mariner Medical Evaluation Program AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice... mariner medical evaluation program. Section 718 of the Coast Guard Authorization Act of 2012 directed the...'s merchant mariner medical evaluation program and alternatives to the program. Congress...

  16. AAAS Communicating Science Program: Reflections on Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braha, J.

    2015-12-01

    The AAAS Center for Public Engagement (Center) with science builds capacity for scientists to engage public audiences by fostering collaboration among natural or physical scientists, communication researchers, and public engagement practitioners. The recently launched Leshner Leadership Institute empowers cohorts of mid-career scientists to lead public engagement by supporting their networks of scientists, researchers, and practitioners. The Center works closely with social scientists whose research addresses science communication and public engagement with science to ensure that the Communicating Science training program builds on empirical evidence to inform best practices. Researchers ( Besley, Dudo, & Storkdieck 2015) have helped Center staff and an external evaluator develop pan instrument that measures progress towards goals that are suggested by the researcher, including internal efficacy (increasing scientists' communication skills and confidence in their ability to engage with the public) and external efficacy (scientists' confidence in engagement methods). Evaluation results from one year of the Communicating Science program suggest that the model of training yields positive results that support scientists in the area that should lead to greater engagement. This talk will explore the model for training, which provides a context for strategic communication, as well as the practical factors, such as time, access to public engagement practitioners, and technical skill, that seems to contribute to increased willingness to engage with public audiences. The evaluation program results suggest willingness by training participants to engage directly or to take preliminary steps towards engagement. In the evaluation results, 38% of trained scientists reported time as a barrier to engagement; 35% reported concern that engagement would distract from their work as a barrier. AAAS works to improve practitioner-researcher-scientist networks to overcome such barriers.

  17. Evaluation of NASA's Mars Public Engagement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viotti, M.; Bowman, C.

    2014-12-01

    From 2009-2014, NASA's Mars Public Engagement (MPE) Program developed and implemented project-level logic models and associated impacts and indicators tables using the NSF's "Framework for Evaluating Impacts of Informal Science Education Projects" (Friedman, 2008) as a key guiding document. This Framework was selected given the national-expert-level evaluation committee who synthesized evaluation in a way that allows project-to-project comparisons in key areas of measurable change, while also allowing variation for appropriate project-specific measures and outcomes. These logic models, revisited and refined annually, provide guidance for all measures developed, tested, and implemented with MPE projects, including the Mars Student Imaging Project (MSIP), the Imagine Mars Project, and Mars Educator Professional Development. Project questionnaires were developed, tested, refined, retested, and finalized following standard procedures outlined in Converse & Presser (1986), Dillman, Smyth, & Christian (2009), Krosnick & Presser (2010), and Presser, et al. (2004). Interview questions were drafted, reviewed by project staff, and revised following established interview question development guidelines (e.g., Kvale, 1996; Maxwell, 2005; Maykut & Morehouse, 1994; Strauss & Corbin, 1998). For MSIP final projects, a rubric guided by Lantz (2004) was developed to evaluate systematically the quality and completeness of the final projects. We will discuss our instruments as well as the important issue of nonresponse error, which is relevant to a wide range of NASA programs because most data is collected from customers who are voluntary participants, as opposed to grantees who must report as a condition of their grant. NASA programs that consider data and report results from voluntary samples must be cautious about claims or decisions based on those data. We will discuss the ways in which we consider and address this challenge.

  18. 7 CFR 3406.29 - Evaluation of program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Evaluation of program. 3406.29 Section 3406.29... Supplementary Information § 3406.29 Evaluation of program. Grantees should be aware that CSREES may, as a part of its own program evaluation activities, carry out in-depth evaluations of assisted activities....

  19. 7 CFR 3405.22 - Evaluation of program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Evaluation of program. 3405.22 Section 3405.22... Supplementary Information § 3405.22 Evaluation of program. Grantees should be aware that CSREES may, as a part of its own program evaluation activities, carry out in-depth evaluations of assisted activities....

  20. Program Instrumentation: A Technique for Evaluating Educational Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Bryan P.

    1990-01-01

    Discussion of educational software evaluation highlights an evaluation based on program instrumentation of a medical school simulation program. Evaluation strategies are discussed; evaluation techniques, including interviews, questionnaires, and observation are described; and implications of the results of the program instrumentation for the…

  1. An assessment program to evaluate academic effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burroughs, M.M. (Colorado Tech, Colorado Springs (United States))

    1993-01-01

    In a report to the Association for the Study of Higher Education-Educational Resources Information Center, Chaffee and Sheer note that [open quotes]A number of recent national higher education conferences have focused on the public criticism and discontent against colleges and universities.[close quotes] The causes of this criticism and discontent stem from a number of different sources, but one recurring theme is the effectiveness of the academic process. This paper describes the use of an assessment program directed at evaluating academic effectiveness at a small private college. At many educational institutions, academic effectiveness is often assessed using such metrics as research, publication, accreditation, funding, and reputation. Too often, those who stand the most to benefit from academic effectiveness, the student customers, are never invited to play a central and meaningful part in the educational assessment process. At Colorado Tech, the administration and faculty have adopted an assessment program that includes student customer input on this important dimension.

  2. Clean Technology Evaluation & Workforce Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patricia Glaza

    2012-12-01

    The overall objective of the Clean Technology Evaluation portion of the award was to design a process to speed up the identification of new clean energy technologies and match organizations to testing and early adoption partners. The project was successful in identifying new technologies targeted to utilities and utility technology integrators, in developing a process to review and rank the new technologies, and in facilitating new partnerships for technology testing and adoption. The purpose of the Workforce Development portion of the award was to create an education outreach program for middle & high-school students focused on clean technology science and engineering. While originally targeting San Diego, California and Cambridge, Massachusetts, the scope of the program was expanded to include a major clean technology speaking series and expo as part of the USA Science & Engineering Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

  3. An Evaluation of State Energy Program Accomplishments: 2002 Program Year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweitzer, M.

    2005-07-13

    cost savings and emissions reductions associated with SEP activities performed by the states during the 2002 program year, based on primary data provided by the states themselves. This is the second systematic evaluation of SEP accomplishments performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for DOE. A report documenting the findings of the first study was published in January 2003 (Schweitzer et.al., 2003).

  4. Fatigue Sensor Evaluation Program Laboratory Test Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-10-01

    Evaluation Program - laboratory Test Report, " by John Y. Kaufman, Design Engineer, and it was prepared for publication by Sue Bardsley, Technical Aid ...fatigue sensor as an aid to this purpose. The laboratory test effort was based on collection of data from six types of tests and thirty-three...34 ’: « •IIIS ......... li : « rtrtintr : •* M» c f M i H ::::::;:• ;:« ...j . .... ..:. •f’ ::.::::: ^::|:::: n» VH ft;; ** ViH ! * 1 - •• •-•• ; i

  5. Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program, 1991 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deal, D.E.; Abitz, R.J.; Myers, J.; Martin, M.L.; Milligan, D.J.; Sobocinski, R.W.; Lipponer, P.P.J. [International Technology Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Belski, D.S. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Div.

    1993-09-01

    The data presented in this report are the result of Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program (BSEP) activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan (WIPP) during 1991. These BSEP activities document and investigate the origins, hydraulic characteristics, extent, and composition of brine occurrences in the Permian Salado Formation and seepage of that brine into the excavations at the WIPP. When excavations began at the WIPP in 1982, small brine seepages (weeps) were observed on the walls. Brine studies began as part of the Site Validation Program and were formalized as a program in its own right in 1985. During nine years of observations (1982--1991), evidence has mounted that the amount of brine seeping into the WIPP excavations is limited, local, and only a small fraction of that required to produce hydrogen gas by corroding the metal in the waste drums and waste inventory. The data through 1990 is discussed in detail and summarized by Deal and others (1991). The data presented in this report describes progress made during the calendar year 1991 and focuses on four major areas: (1) quantification of the amount of brine seeping across vertical surfaces in the WIPP excavations (brine ``weeps); (2) monitoring of brine inflow, e.g., measuring brines recovered from holes drilled downward from the underground drifts (downholes), upward from the underground drifts (upholes), and from subhorizontal holes; (3) further characterization of brine geochemistry; and (4) preliminary quantification of the amount of brine that might be released by squeezing the underconsolidated clays present in the Salado Formation.

  6. 40 CFR 51.353 - Network type and program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Network type and program evaluation. 51... Requirements § 51.353 Network type and program evaluation. Basic and enhanced I/M programs can be centralized... of vehicle registration and driver's licenses, or tax and fee collections. (b) (c) Program...

  7. Implementing Comprehensive Guidance Program Evaluation Support: Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Michael S.; Hubert, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Article shares ideas learned from the challenges of implementing a program evaluation infrastructure for a comprehensive developmental, guidance, and counseling program (CDGC). The benefits of continuous program evaluation for staff and students were evident in this urban school district. Developing support for sustainable program evaluation…

  8. Nondestructive Evaluation Program: Progress in 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avioli, M.J. Jr.; Dau, G.J.; Edmonds, J.; Gehl, S.; Liu, S.N.; Stein, J.; Viswanathan, R.; Welty, C.S.

    1988-06-01

    The increasing cost of equipment for power generating plants and the potential increases in productivity and safety available through rapidly developing Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) technology led EPRI to initiate a Nondsetructive Evaluation Program in 1974. To date, the major focus has been on light water reactor inspection problems; however, increased application to other systems is now under way. This report presents a comprehensive review of the EPRI effort in the NDE area. Most of the report consists of contractor-supplied progress reports on each current project. An organization from several viewpoints is presented, e.g., in-service inspection operators, RandD personnel, and utility representatives. As the ninth in a planned series of annual progress reports of EPRI-funded NDE activities, this report also serves as the proceedings of the Eighth Annual EPRI NDE Information Meeting held in Palo Alto, California, on November 17-18, 1987. It summarizes significant progress made since the previous EPRI Special Report NP-4902-SR was issued in July 1987. Section 1 contains information about the program organization, and the sections that follow contain contractor-supplied progress reports on each current project. The progress reports are grouped by plant components/emdash/pipe, pressure vessel, steam generator and boiler tubes, and turbine. In addition, Part 6 is devoted to discussions of technology transfer. The individual reports have been cataloged separately.

  9. Evaluation of the Health Rocks! Program: The Association of Youth Engagement with Program Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This evaluation research examined the relationship between program process and program outcome, specifically, youth engagement in the national 4-H Council Health Rocks! program and their program outcomes.  Based on program evaluation surveys completed after the program by participants, youths’ engagement in the program was associated with their gains in knowledge and skills about substance use, and personal assets related to avoiding risks.  When youth participants find a program interesting, are actively engaged in the program, and find the program staff friendly, they benefit more from the program.  Findings underscore the importance of engaging curriculum and friendly staff to the success of extension or afterschool youth programs. The evaluation method may offer an example of balancing rigor of evaluation design and feasibility of implementing an evaluation.

  10. 40 CFR 145.12 - Requirements for compliance evaluation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for compliance evaluation programs. (a) State programs shall have procedures for receipt, evaluation... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for compliance evaluation programs. 145.12 Section 145.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  11. 42 CFR 485.729 - Condition of participation: Program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Program evaluation. 485... participation: Program evaluation. The organization has procedures that provide for a systematic evaluation of its total program to ensure appropriate utilization of services and to determine whether...

  12. 40 CFR 123.26 - Requirements for compliance evaluation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... evaluation programs. (a) State programs shall have procedures for receipt, evaluation, retention and... an enforcement proceeding or in court. (e) State NPDES compliance evaluation programs shall have... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for compliance...

  13. An Introduction to Course and/or Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohrabi, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Program and/or course evaluation is, in fact, one of the essential aspects of any curriculum. It is a kind of quality control in which various aspects of an instructional program are explored. Program evaluation is an attempt in which different elements of a given curriculum are scrutinized in depth. To this end, an evaluator makes every effort to…

  14. Program Evaluation Interest and Skills of School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astramovich, Randall L.

    2017-01-01

    School counselors participated in a study examining their program evaluation interest and skills. Findings suggest that school counselors understand the importance of program evaluation, yet they may lack the skills and confidence to successfully engage in program evaluation activities. Professional development training may be an important method…

  15. National Evaluation of the Weatherization Assistance Program: Preliminary Evaluation Plan for Program Year 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ternes, Mark P [ORNL; Schweitzer, Martin [ORNL; Tonn, Bruce Edward [ORNL; Schmoyer, Richard L [ORNL; Eisenberg, Joel Fred [ORNL

    2007-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Weatherization Assistance Program was created by Congress in 1976 under Title IV of the Energy Conservation and Production Act. The purpose and scope of the Program as currently stated in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 10CFR 440.1 is 'to increase the energy efficiency of dwellings owned or occupied by low-income persons, reduce their total residential expenditures, and improve their health and safety, especially low-income persons who are particularly vulnerable such as the elderly, persons with disabilities, families with children, high residential energy users, and households with high energy burden' (Code of Federal Regulations, 2005). DOE sponsored a comprehensive evaluation of the Program in the early 1990's to provide policy makers and program implementers with up-to-date and reliable information they needed for effective decision making and cost-effective operations. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) managed the five part study which was based primarily on data from Program Year (PY) 1989 and supplemented by data from 1991-92 (Brown, Berry, and Kinney, 1994). In more recent years, ORNL has conducted four metaevaluations of the Program's energy savings using studies conducted by individual states between the years 1990-1996 (Berry, 1997), 1996-1998 (Schweitzer and Berry, 1999), 1993-2002 (Berry and Schweitzer, 2003), and 1993-2005 (Schweitzer, 2005). DOE announced through its Weatherization Program Notice 05-1 (DOE, 2004) that it would undertake a new national evaluation of the Program because the Program that was evaluated comprehensively in the early 1990's is vastly different from the Program of today. The Program has incorporated new funding sources, management principles, audit procedures, and energy-efficiency measures in response to findings and recommendations resulting from the 1989 National Evaluation, the Weatherization Plus strategic planning process, and other

  16. Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program, 1990 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deal, D.E.; Abitz, R.J.; Myers, J.; Case, J.B.; Martin, M.L.; Roggenthen, W.M. [International Technology Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Belski, D.S. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Div.

    1991-08-01

    The data presented in this report are the result of Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program (BSEP) activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during 1990. When excavations began in 1982, small brine seepages (weeps) were observed on the walls. These brine occurrences were initially described as part of the Site Validation Program. Brine studies were formalized in 1985. The BSEP activities document and investigate the origins, hydraulic characteristics, extent, and composition of brine occurrences in the Permian Salado Formation and seepage of that brine into the excavations at the WIPP. The brine chemistry is important because it assists in understanding the origin of the brine and because it may affect possible chemical reactions in the buried waste after sealing the repository. The volume of brine and the hydrologic system that drives the brine seepage also need to be understood to assess the long-term performance of the repository. After more than eight years of observations (1982--1990), no credible evidence exists to indicate that enough naturally occurring brine will seep into the WIPP excavations to be of practical concern. The detailed observations and analyses summarized herein and in previous BSEP reports confirm the evidence apparent during casual visits to the underground workings -- that the excavations are remarkably dry.

  17. Program evaluation: Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership (WRAP) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, Bonnie B.; Lundien, Barbara; Kaufman, Jeffrey; Kreczko, Adam; Ferrey, Steven; Morgan, Stephen

    1991-12-01

    The Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership,'' or WRAP program, is a fuel-blind conservation program designed to assist Northeast Utilities' low-income customers to use energy safely and efficiently. Innovative with respect to its collaborative approach and its focus on utilizing and strengthening the existing low-income weatherization service delivery network, the WRAP program offers an interesting model to other utilities which traditionally have relied on for-profit energy service contractors and highly centralized program implementation structures. This report presents appendices with surveys, participant list, and computers program to examine and predict potential energy savings.

  18. 24 CFR 266.115 - Program monitoring and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Program monitoring and evaluation... Housing Finance Agency Requirements § 266.115 Program monitoring and evaluation. (a) HFA certifications... and evaluation. Monitoring and evaluation activities will focus on compliance with...

  19. Data Collection Methods for Evaluating Museum Programs and Exhibitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Amy Crack; Cohn, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Museums often evaluate various aspects of their audiences' experiences, be it what they learn from a program or how they react to an exhibition. Each museum program or exhibition has its own set of goals, which can drive what an evaluator studies and how an evaluation evolves. When designing an evaluation, data collection methods are purposefully…

  20. A Program Evaluation of the Lincoln School District Teacher Collaboration Time (TCT) Staff Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitterman, Sheila

    2010-01-01

    Many investigators have documented the need for valid and credible program evaluation research of teacher professional development programs. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to conduct a comprehensive program evaluation of the Lincoln School District's Teacher Collaboration Time (TCT) staff development program. The study questions…

  1. Evaluation Methodology for Education Programs with Diffuse Goals: Applications to Extension Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Richard J.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses applications of evaluation methodology for educational programs to extension evaluation. Reviews alternative evaluation designs, makes specific suggestions for interpreting past evaluation studies, and presents ideas for future extension evaluation. (CS)

  2. Evaluation of Mexico's Universal Vaccination Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-04-01

    This article summarizes findings from an evaluation of Mexico's Universal Vaccination Program during 1990-97, the progress achieved, the lessons learned, and objectives under decentralization. The evaluation assessed the cold chain and logistics systems, and the feasibility of vaccine production within Gerencia General de Biologicos y Reactivos. In 1996, 97% of children aged 1-4 years completed the full immunization schedule. Over the past 7 years, the incidence of preventable diseases declined. There were no poliomyelitis cases in the prior 7 years, no diphtheria cases in the prior 6 years, and a gradual decline in morbidity due to measles in the prior 5 years. Several government sectors are giving high priority to vaccination activities. Sufficient resources have been allocated for immunization. The government is planning on adding new vaccines that would benefit the adult population and/or prevent congenital defects. There is close coordination within institutions of the National Health System and with other public health organizations, such as PAHO and UNICEF. It is recommended that the central government perform high quality epidemiological surveillance and improve rapid analysis capacity, especially at the local and regional levels. Improvement is needed in the reporting capacity at the local level, to feed recent data to the central level in a timely fashion, and to use analysis to improve operations. Epidemiological training is needed at the operations level, as is private sector involvement at all levels. Underreporting of morbidity occurs. Regionalization must be monitored to ensure maximizing of resources.

  3. Program and Evaluation Planning Light: Planning in the Real World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justus J. RANDOLPH

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Although there are many high-quality models for program and evaluation planning, these models are often too intensive to be used in situations when time and resources are scarce. Additionally, there is little added value in using an elaborate and expensive program and evaluation planning procedure when programs are small or are planned to be short-lived. To meet the need for simplified models for program and evaluation planning, we describe a model that includes only what we consider to be the most essential outcomes-based program and evaluation planning steps: (a how to create a logic model that shows how the program is causally expected to lead to outcomes, (b how to use the logic model to identify the goals and objectives that the program is responsible for; (c how to formulate measures, baselines, and targets from the goals and objectives; and (d how to construct program activities that align with program targets.

  4. Lazy evaluation of FP programs: A data-flow approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Y.H. [International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY (United States). Thomas J. Watson Research Center; Gaudiot, J.L. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Computer Research Inst.

    1988-12-31

    This paper presents a lazy evaluation system for the list-based functional language, Backus` FP in data-driven environment. A superset language of FP, called DFP (Demand-driven FP), is introduced. FP eager programs are transformed into DFP lazy programs which contain the notions of demands. The data-driven execution of DFP programs has the same effects of lazy evaluation. DFP lazy programs have the property of always evaluating a sufficient and necessary result. The infinite sequence generator is used to demonstrate the eager-lazy program transformation and the execution of the lazy programs.

  5. Flight program language requirements. Volume 2: Requirements and evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The efforts and results are summarized for a study to establish requirements for a flight programming language for future onboard computer applications. Several different languages were available as potential candidates for future NASA flight programming efforts. The study centered around an evaluation of the four most pertinent existing aerospace languages. Evaluation criteria were established, and selected kernels from the current Saturn 5 and Skylab flight programs were used as benchmark problems for sample coding. An independent review of the language specifications incorporated anticipated future programming requirements into the evaluation. A set of detailed language requirements was synthesized from these activities. The details of program language requirements and of the language evaluations are described.

  6. Best practices in evaluating worksite health promotion programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmeier, Jessica; Terry, Paul E; Cipriotti, Aldo; Burtaine, Jeffrey E

    2010-01-01

    Program evaluation is generally recognized as a "best practice" activity for worksite health promotion programs. The importance of "best practice" worksite health promotion programming is increasing with the stakes anticipated by health care reform. Volvo's health promotion activities are used as an example of "best practice" programming with a particular focus on creating a dashboard of evaluation metrics that can meet the accountability needs of senior management. The role of a comprehensive evaluation framework using nine components is explored along with reasonable expectations for program outcomes. Finally, stakeholder utility from the evaluation approach is explored.

  7. 5 CFR 339.205 - Medical evaluation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Medical evaluation programs. 339.205... QUALIFICATION DETERMINATIONS Physical and Medical Qualifications § 339.205 Medical evaluation programs. Agencies may establish periodic examination or immunization programs by written policies or directives...

  8. 40 CFR 501.16 - Requirements for compliance evaluation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... § 501.16 Requirements for compliance evaluation programs. State sludge management programs shall have... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for compliance evaluation programs. 501.16 Section 501.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...

  9. 40 CFR 233.40 - Requirements for compliance evaluation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... DUMPING 404 STATE PROGRAM REGULATIONS Compliance Evaluation and Enforcement § 233.40 Requirements for compliance evaluation programs. (a) In order to abate violations of the permit program, the State shall... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for compliance...

  10. Teach Louisiana Consortium: A Fifth Year Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Broussard, Michelle; Stringer, Angelle

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a fifth year program evaluation of a private provider program for teacher certification in Louisiana. The study sought to evaluate the success of the Teach Louisiana Consortium program in terms of teacher placement, teacher retention, administrative satisfaction, teacher attitudes, and teacher pedagogical knowledge. Initial…

  11. Evaluation of a Community-Based Aging Intervention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hui-Chuan; Wang, Chun-Hou; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chang, Ming-Chen; Wang, Jean

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the outcome and process of a community-based aging intervention program for the elderly in Taiwan. The program included education on nutrition and dietary behavior and on physical activities. Outcome and process evaluations were conducted. The program may have had some effects on decreasing some dietary behavioral problems and…

  12. Evaluating Academic Technical Communication Programs: New Stakeholders, Diverse Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Paul V.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses three challenges (dealing with program diversity, accommodating conflicting emphases, and precipitating positive change) in evaluating academic technical communication programs. Outlines an approach to program evaluation that redefines the stakeholders to include a wide range of partners in both workplace and academy, and that uses a…

  13. Effective Practices for Evaluating Education and Public Outreach Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, S.

    2013-12-01

    Stephanie Baird Wilkerson, PhD Carol Haden EdD Magnolia Consulting,LLC Education and public outreach (EPO) program developers and providers seeking insights regarding effective practices for evaluating EPO activities programs benefit from understanding why evaluation is critical to the success of EPO activities and programs, what data collection methods are appropriate, and how to effectively communicate and report findings. Based on our extensive experience evaluating EPO programs, we will share lessons learned and examples of how these practices play out in actual evaluation studies. EPO program developers, providers, and evaluators must consider several factors that influence which evaluation designs and data collection methods will be most appropriate, given the nature of EPO programs. Effective evaluation practices of EPO programs take into account a program's phase of development, duration, and budget as well as a program's intended outcomes. EPO programs that are just beginning development will have different evaluation needs and priorities than will well-established programs. Effective evaluation practices consider the 'life' of a program with an evaluation design that supports a program's growth through various phases including development, revision and refinement, and completion. It would be premature and inappropriate to expect the attainment of longer-term outcomes of activities during program development phases or early stages of implementation. During program development, EPO providers should clearly define program outcomes that are feasible and appropriate given a program's scope and expected reach. In many respects, this directly relates to the amount of time, or duration, intended audiences participate in EPO programs. As program duration increases so does the likelihood that the program can achieve longer-term outcomes. When choosing which outcomes are reasonable to impact and measure, program duration should be considered. Effective evaluation

  14. Aplicação de métodos de calibração multivariada para a determinação simultânea de riboflavina (VB2, tiamina (VB1, piridoxina (VB6 e nicotinamida (VPP UV spectrophotrometry and chemometrics methods for simultaneous determinations of riboflavin (VB2, thiamine (VB1, pyridoxine (VB6 and nicotinamide (VPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosângela C. Barthus

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the artificial neural networks (ANN and partial least squares (PLS regression were applied to UV spectral data for quantitative determination of thiamin hydrochloride (VB1, riboflavin phosphate (VB2, pyridoxine hydrochloride (VB6 and nicotinamide (VPP in pharmaceutical samples. For calibration purposes, commercial samples in 0.2 mol L-1 acetate buffer (pH 4.0 were employed as standards. The concentration ranges used in the calibration step were: 0.1 - 7.5 mg L-1 for VB1, 0.1 - 3.0 mg L-1 for VB2, 0.1 - 3.0 mg L-1 for VB6 and 0.4 - 30.0 mg L-1 for VPP. From the results it is possible to verify that both methods can be successfully applied for these determinations. The similar error values were obtained by using neural network or PLS methods. The proposed methodology is simple, rapid and can be easily used in quality control laboratories.

  15. A Technology for Program Documentation and Evaluation: A Pilot Meta-Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Peter J.

    Meta evaluation, or the evaluation of evaluations, was applied to a technology for program documentation and evaluation used in a mainstreaming project. The technology consisted of four phases: (1) planning for decision-making; (2) documenting actual program outcomes; (3) implementing decisions; and (4) instituting program renewal. This pilot meta…

  16. Program evaluation: Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership (WRAP) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    The Connecticut low income weatherization program was developed in response to a 1987 rate docket order from the Connecticut Department of Public Utility Control (DPUC) to Connecticut Light Power Co., an operating subsidiary of Northeast Utilities (NU). (Throughout this report, NU is referred to as the operator of the program.) This program, known as the Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership, or WRAP, was configured utilizing input from a collaborative group of interested parties to the docket. It was agreed that this program would be put forth by the electric utility, but would not ignore oil and gas savings (thus, it was to be fuel- blind''). The allocated cost of conservation services for each fuel source, however, should be cost effective. It was to be offered to those utility customers at or below 200 percent of the federal poverty levels, and provide a wide array of energy saving measures directed toward heating, water heating and lighting. It was felt by the collaborative group that this program would raise the level of expenditures per participant for weatherization services provided by the state, and by linking to and revising the auditing process for weatherization, would lower the audit unit cost. The program plans ranged from the offering of low-cost heating, water heating and infiltration measures, increased insulation levels, carpentry and plumbing services, to furnace or burner replacement. The program was configured to allow for very comprehensive weatherization and heating system servicing.

  17. An Evaluation of a College Reading Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, A. J.

    A college reading improvement program (CRIP) at the University of South Florida was examined to determine if it was of benefit to the participating students. Sixty-five freshmen took part in the 15-week program which used individually planned programs and different methods and materials. Pretesting had shown these 65 students to be significantly…

  18. Evaluation of Quality in Social Care: Aplus Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutrenit, Jean-Marc

    2005-01-01

    France is not advanced regarding evaluation in social work, despite a law established in January 2002 making evaluation a legal obligation every 5 years. This article presents a software program to help social services evaluate on both individual and group levels. Automatic dashboard results of the program with special emphasis on the main…

  19. Review of evaluations of utility home-energy-audit programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, L.; Soderstrom, J.; Hirst, E.; Newman, B.; Weaver, R.

    1981-03-01

    Evaluation efforts of utilities with active home energy audit programs are reviewed to suggest methodologies, issues, and data that can contribute to the development of a comprehensive Residential Conservation Service evaluation plan. On the basis mainly of written reports received from the utilities, findings about customer response to programs are summarized. The topics discussed include: correlates of program penetration rates; use of financing; attitudes toward programs; actions taken; characteristics of participants; and energy savings due to programs. Particular attention is given to three studies (Tennessee Valley Authority, Seattle City Light, and Pacific Gas and Electric) that analyze fuel consumption records as part of the evaluation.

  20. Independent Panel Evaluation of Dry Sludge PISA Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F.F.

    1999-10-20

    Dr. Kirk Yeager and Mr. Marvin Banks from Energetic Material Research and Technology Center (EMRTC) evaluated the Savannah River Site (SRS) efforts in the Dry Sludge program. They evaluated four program areas: energetic material formation, stability, initiation, and propagation. The panel evaluation included a site visit (July 13, 1999 and July 14, 1999) as well as a review of various reports and presentations by researchers involved in the program.

  1. The Independent Psychodiagnostic Clinic: Maintaining Accountability through Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoff, Howard M.

    1982-01-01

    Describes an evaluation model for the independent psychodiagnostic clinic and outlines an evaluation tool used at the Psychoeducational Teaching Laboratory in Syracuse, New York. Evaluation components include formative and summative product and process evaluations. Suggests program evaluation be part of contract negotiations and individually…

  2. Evaluating Prior Learning Assessment Programs: A Suggested Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan L. Travers and Marnie T. Evans

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades, American institutions have been expected to include systematic program reviews to meet accrediting standards, either by independent or governmental review agencies. Program evaluation is critical for several reasons: it provides systematic ways to assess what needs improvement or what needs changing and it provides ways to validate practices, whether to internal or external audiences (Mishra, 2007. Most program evaluative models are focused on academic programs, which don’t fit the uniqueness of prior learning assessment programs. This paper proposes an evaluative framework for prior learning assessment programs, which takes into account the type of work within prior learning assessment programs and uses program portfolios, similar to how students are asked to document their work.

  3. Evaluating Youth Development Programs: Progress and Promise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Jodie L.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2016-01-01

    Advances in theories of adolescent development and positive youth development have greatly increased our understanding of how programs and practices with adolescents can impede or enhance their development. In this article the authors reflect on the progress in research on youth development programs in the last two decades, since possibly the…

  4. Evaluating the Effectiveness of School Instrumental Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtz, Glenn

    2001-01-01

    Describes the analysis of "Strengths and Weaknesses and Opportunities and Threats" (SWOT). Discusses the study, "Gemeinhardt 4," that used the SWOT analysis to determine 13 different types of music programs. Addresses how music teachers can utilize this information. Includes other sections such as, "Possible Solution to Music Program Threats."…

  5. Human Services Program Evaluation: "How to Improve Your Accountability and Program Effectiveness"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Thomas; Sorensen, James

    2015-01-01

    The term "outcome evaluation" has become one of the most popular terms among human service providers and those whose job it is to evaluate the impact of human service programs. In the public sector alone, there are over a hundred instruments in use to evaluate the impact of state human service programs. Most states, many providers, and…

  6. Program Theory and Quality Matter: Changing the Course of Extension Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Mary E.; Cater, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    As internal evaluators for the 4-H program in two states, we simultaneously yet independently began to change the way we approached our evaluation practices, turning from evaluation capacity building (ECB) efforts that prepared educators to define and measure program outcomes to strategies that engage educators in defining and measuring program…

  7. A Discrepancy-Based Methodology for Nuclear Training Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantor, Jeffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    A three-phase comprehensive process for commercial nuclear power training program evaluation is presented. The discrepancy-based methodology was developed after the Three Mile Island nuclear reactor accident. It facilitates analysis of program components to identify discrepancies among program specifications, actual outcomes, and industry…

  8. Program Evaluation of Math Factual Operations for Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Deficiencies in mathematics standardized test scores prompted school district policymakers to consider implementing a program designed to increase students' basic multiplication fact skills. This study was an evaluation of the Math Factual Operations for Understanding program. The program, marketed with a martial arts theme, was intended to…

  9. Program Evaluation: Relationships as Key to Student Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malti, Tina; Schwartz, Sarah E. O.; Liu, Cindy H.; Noam, Gil G.

    2008-01-01

    Evaluation is an important program component of RALLY and helps to document the gains that stem from this program. This article describes the quality of RALLY implementation and selected student outcomes of an exemplary RALLY program at an urban middle school. The findings showed effects on students' resiliency as well as academic success, as…

  10. Evaluation Report, Brookville EEE Program, ESEA Title I, Summer, 1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Don L.

    Contained in this report is an evaluation of the ESEA Title I Environmental-Ecological Education Program for educationally disadvantaged students operated by the Brookville Area School District, Pennsylvania. The program is a modification of a previously operated ESEA Title III Rural Youth Enrichment Program. Conducted during the summer of 1970,…

  11. Support for Career Development in Youth: Program Models and Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekinda, Megan A.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines four influential programs--Citizen Schools, After School Matters, career academies, and Job Corps--to demonstrate the diversity of approaches to career programming for youth. It compares the specific program models and draws from the evaluation literature to discuss strengths and weaknesses of each. The article highlights…

  12. Outcomes and lessons learned from evaluating TRICARE's disease management programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall, Timothy M; Askarinam Wagner, Rachel C; Zhang, Yiduo; Yang, Wenya; Arday, David R; Gantt, Cynthia J

    2010-06-01

    To share outcomes and lessons learned from an evaluation of disease management (DM) programs for asthma, congestive heart failure (CHF), and diabetes for TRICARE patients. Multiyear evaluation of participants in voluntary, opt-out DM programs. Patient-centered programs, administered by 3 regional contractors, provide phone-based consultations with a care manager, educational materials, and newsletters. The study sample consisted of 23,793 asthma, 4092 CHF, and 29,604 diabetes patients with at least 6 months' tenure in the program. Medical claims were analyzed to quantify program effect on healthcare utilization, medical costs, and clinical outcomes. Multivariate regression analysis with an historical control group was used to predict patient outcomes in the absence of DM. The difference between actual and predicted DM patient outcomes was attributed to the program. A patient survey collected data on program satisfaction and perceived usefulness of program information and services. Modest improvements in patient outcomes included reduced inpatient days and medical costs, and (with few exceptions) increased percentages of patients receiving appropriate medications and tests. Annual per patient reductions in medical costs were $453, $371, and $783 for asthma, CHF, and diabetes program participants, respectively. The estimated return on investment was $1.26 per $1.00 spent on DM services. Findings suggest that the DM programs more than pay for themselves, in addition to improving patient health and quality of life. Lessons learned in program design, implementation, effectiveness, and evaluation may benefit employers contemplating DM, DM providers, and evaluators of DM programs.

  13. Management Education Program Evaluation: An Empirical Study in Mainland China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sou, Gryphon; Zhou, Pinqiu

    2007-01-01

    Background: With the accession of the PRC to the WTO, Chinese education market is open to the educational service providers of the foreign countries. They are keen to offer MBA Degree programs to the Career Managers in the Mainland. Aims: This research studies program evaluation and so forth the quality assessment of a MBA degree program in the…

  14. Taiwan Teacher Preparation Program Evaluation: Some Critical Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tze-Chang

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the influences and changes of recent Taiwan teacher preparation program evaluation (TTPPE) as one of the national evaluation projects conducted by the Higher Education Evaluation and Accreditation Council of Taiwan. The main concerns are what kind of ideology is transformed through the policy by means of evaluation, and what…

  15. GLOBE in the Czech Republic: A Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cincera, Jan; Maskova, Veronika

    2011-01-01

    The article presents results of the evaluation of the GLOBE program (Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment) in the Czech Republic. The evaluation explores the implementation of the program in schools and its impact on research skills. Four hundred and sixty six pupils, aged 13, from 28 different schools participated in the…

  16. Program Evaluation: Where Instruction and School Business Meet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, Steven V.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about program evaluation, a strategy commonly used by instructional leaders that can help school business officials improve their budget process. As districts struggle to develop budgets in these challenging economic times, school business officials might consider turning to program evaluation for help. Program…

  17. E-Basics: Online Basic Training in Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silliman, Ben

    2016-01-01

    E-Basics is an online training in program evaluation concepts and skills designed for youth development professionals, especially those working in nonformal science education. Ten hours of online training in seven modules is designed to prepare participants for mentoring and applied practice, mastery, and/or team leadership in program evaluation.…

  18. 7 CFR 295.4 - Program evaluation status reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program evaluation status reports. 295.4 Section 295.4... projects concerning evaluation of FNS food assistance programs. A copy of the current status report on... AGRICULTURE GENERAL REGULATIONS AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION AND RECORDS TO THE PUBLIC § 295.4...

  19. Evaluation Methodologies for Estimating the Likelihood of Program Implementation Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Roger; Decker, Phillip J.; Kirkman, Dorothy M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite our best efforts as evaluators, program implementation failures abound. A wide variety of valuable methodologies have been adopted to explain and evaluate the "why" of these failures. Yet, typically these methodologies have been employed concurrently (e.g., project monitoring) or to the post-hoc assessment of program activities.…

  20. Summative Evaluation of the Foreign Credential Recognition Program. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, 2010

    2010-01-01

    A summative evaluation of the Foreign Credential Recognition Program (FCRP) funded by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) was conducted during the spring, summer and fall of 2008. The main objective of the evaluation was to measure the relevance, impacts, and cost-effectiveness of the program. Given the timing of the evaluation…

  1. Creating a Minnesota Statewide SNAP-Ed Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Abby; Barno, Trina Adler; Sherman, Shelley; Lovett, Kathleen; Hurtado, G. Ali

    2013-01-01

    Systematic evaluation is an essential tool for understanding program effectiveness. This article describes the pilot test of a statewide evaluation tool for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education (SNAP-Ed). A computer algorithm helped Community Nutrition Educators (CNEs) build surveys specific to their varied educational settings…

  2. School Volunteer Program. A Two-Year Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomew Consolidated School Corp., Columbus, IN.

    This report evaluates a volunteer program established in the Bartholomew Consolidated School Corporation in Columbus, Indiana. Areas identified for evaluation were (1) the fulfillment or achievement of program objectives; (2) measurable differences in volunteers' attitudes toward the schooling process and parenting skills, as well as their…

  3. Self Evaluation Manual for Wisconsin Secondary Vocational Programs. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Dorothy; Klitzke, Elizabeth

    This manual provides the procedures and instrumentation through which vocational education program personnel may critically assess the value and effectiveness of their program. The first section addresses preparing for the self-evaluation, including commitment, committees, and timetable. Conducting the self-evaluation is the focus of the next…

  4. Healing by Creating: Patient Evaluations of Art-Making Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiney, Sue P.; Darr-Hope, Heidi; Meriwether, Marian P.; Adams, Swann Arp

    2017-01-01

    The benefits of using art in health care, especially with cancer patients, have been described anecdotally. However, few manuscripts include a conceptual framework to describe the evaluation of patient programs. This paper describes patients' evaluation of a healing arts program developed within a hospital for cancer patients that used art-making,…

  5. The Homestart Program Evaluation Report, l985-86.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Jennifer S.; Panofsky, Carolyn

    The evaluation of the Albuquerque Public Schools' 1985-86 Homestart Program, funded by Chapter 1 of the Evaluation Consolidation Improvement Act, employed surveys and interviews to address the impact of the programs on the home environment and on the child's experience in school. Data were gathered from Chapter 1 Cognitive Language Development…

  6. Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE) Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Each day, between 12 to 13 U.S. workers die as a result of a traumatic injury on the job. Investigations conducted through the FACE program allow the identification...

  7. Evaluation of Slum Upgrading Programs: Literature Review and Methodological Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    José Brakarz; Laura Jaitman

    2013-01-01

    This technical note analyzes the methodologies used to evaluate neighborhood upgrading programs, describes their results, and suggests approaches for future evaluations. Local and central governments are increasingly utilizing slum or neighborhood upgrading programs to deal with the multiple problems of urban poverty. These programs employ a methodology of integral interventions, combining of both infrastructure works and social services targeted to specific neighborhoods. Due to this variety...

  8. Motivation for Evaluation: A roadmap for Improving Program Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, J. J.; Bohon, W.; Bravo, T. K.; Dorr, P. M.; Hubenthal, M.; Johnson, J. A.; Sumy, D. F.; Welti, R.; Davis, H. B.

    2016-12-01

    Over the past year, the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) Education and Public Outreach (EPO) program has undertaken a new effort to increase the rigor with which it evaluates its programs and products. More specifically we sought to make evaluation an integral part of our EPO staff's work, enable staff to demonstrate why we do the activities we do, enhance the impact or our products and programs, and empower staff to be able to make evidence-based claims. The challenges we faced included a modest budget, finding an applicable approach to both new and legacy programs ranging from formal and informal education to public outreach, and implementing the process without overwhelming staff. The Collaborative Impact Analysis Method (IAM; Davis and Scalice, 2015) was selected as it allowed us to combine the EPO staff's knowledge of programs, audiences and content with the expertise of an outside evaluation expert, through consultations and a qualitative rubric assessing the initial state of each product/program's evaluation. Staff then developed action plans to make incremental improvements to the evaluation of programs over time. We have found that this approach promotes the development of staff knowledge and skills regarding evaluation, provides a common language among staff, increases enthusiasm to collect and share data, encourages discussions of evaluative approaches when planning new activities, and improves each program's ability to capture the intended and unintended effects on the behaviors, attitudes, skills, interests, and/or knowledge of users/participants. We will share the initial IAM Scores for products and programs in the EPO portfolio, along with examples of the action plans for several key products and programs, and the impact that implementing those actions plans has had on our evaluations. Davis, H. & Scalice, D. (2015). Evaluate the Impact of your Education and Outreach Program Using the Quantitative Collaborative Impact Analysis

  9. Positive youth development programs for adolescents with greater psychosocial needs: evaluation based on program implementers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L; Ng, Catalina S M; Law, Moon Y M

    2017-02-01

    As program implementers' views are seldom included in program evaluation and there are few related studies in different Chinese communities, this study examined the perceptions of the program implementers who implemented the Tier 2 Program of the P.A.T.H.S. Program in Hong Kong. The Tier 2 Program was designed to promote the development of adolescents with greater psychosocial needs. In the community-based P.A.T.H.S. Project, 400 program implementers completed a subjective outcome evaluation form (Form D) for program implementers. Consistent with the previous findings, program implementers generally held positive views towards the program, implementers, and program effectiveness and their views towards these three domains did not differ across grades. In line with the hypotheses, perceived program quality and perceived implementer quality predicted program effectiveness. The present findings provided an alternative perspective showing that the Tier 2 Program was well received by the program implementers and they regarded the program to be beneficial to the program participants.

  10. Support for career development in youth: program models and evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekinda, Megan A

    2012-01-01

    This article examines four influential programs-Citizen Schools, After School Matters, career academies, and Job Corps-to demonstrate the diversity of approaches to career programming for youth. It compares the specific program models and draws from the evaluation literature to discuss strengths and weaknesses of each. The article highlights three key lessons derived from the models that have implications for career development initiatives more generally: (1) career programming can and should be designed for youth across a broad age range, (2) career programming does not have to come at the expense of academic training or preparation for college, and (3) program effectiveness depends on intentional design and high-quality implementation.

  11. A framework for evaluation of technology transfer programs. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    The objective of this volume is to describe a framework with which DOE can develop a program specific methodology to evaluate it`s technology transfer efforts. This approach could also be applied to an integrated private sector technology transfer organization. Several benefits will be realized from the application of this work. While the immediate effect will be to assist program managers in evaluating and improving program performance, the ultimate benefits will accrue to the producing industry, the states, and the nation in the form of sustained or increased domestic oil production. This benefit depends also, of course, on the effectiveness of the technology being transferred. The managers of the Technology Transfer program, and the larger federal oil and gas R&D programs, will be provided with a means to design and assess the effectiveness of program efforts as they are developed, tested and performed. The framework allows deficiencies in critical aspects of the program to be quickly identified, allowing for timely corrections and improvements. The actual process of developing the evaluation also gives the staff of the Oil R&D Program or Technology Transfer subprogram the opportunity to become oriented to the overall program goals. The structure and focus imposed by the evaluation paradigm will guide program staff in selecting activities which are consistent with achieving the goals of the overall R&D program.

  12. Evolutionary Evaluation: implications for evaluators, researchers, practitioners, funders and the evidence-based program mandate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Jennifer Brown; Hargraves, Monica; Trochim, William M

    2014-08-01

    Evolutionary theory, developmental systems theory, and evolutionary epistemology provide deep theoretical foundations for understanding programs, their development over time, and the role of evaluation. This paper relates core concepts from these powerful bodies of theory to program evaluation. Evolutionary Evaluation is operationalized in terms of program and evaluation evolutionary phases, which are in turn aligned with multiple types of validity. The model of Evolutionary Evaluation incorporates Chen's conceptualization of bottom-up versus top-down program development. The resulting framework has important implications for many program management and evaluation issues. The paper illustrates how an Evolutionary Evaluation perspective can illuminate important controversies in evaluation using the example of the appropriate role of randomized controlled trials that encourages a rethinking of "evidence-based programs". From an Evolutionary Evaluation perspective, prevailing interpretations of rigor and mandates for evidence-based programs pose significant challenges to program evolution. This perspective also illuminates the consequences of misalignment between program and evaluation phases; the importance of supporting both researcher-derived and practitioner-derived programs; and the need for variation and evolutionary phase diversity within portfolios of programs.

  13. Planning and Evaluating ICT in Education Programs Using the Four Dimensions of Sustainability: A Program Evaluation from Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouezevara, Sarah; Mekhael, Sabry William; Darcy, Niamh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the findings from a program evaluation of an ICT in education project within the USAID-funded Girls Improved Learning Outcomes (GILO) program. The evaluation uses a framework of four dimensions of ICT sustainability to examine the appropriateness of the design and implementation of the project, which provided simple, relevant…

  14. A Program Evaluation Model: Using Bloom's Taxonomy to Identify Outcome Indicators in Outcomes-Based Program Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Rita C.

    2011-01-01

    Outcomes-based program evaluation is a systematic approach to identifying outcome indicators and measuring results against those indicators. One dimension of program evaluation is assessing the level of learner acquisition to determine if learning objectives were achieved as intended. The purpose of the proposed model is to use Bloom's Taxonomy to…

  15. Beowawe Geothermal Area evaluation program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iovenitti, J. L

    1981-03-01

    Several exploration programs were conducted at the Beowawe Geothermal Prospect, Lander and Eureka County, Nevada. Part I, consisting of a shallow temperature hole program, a mercury soil sampling survey, and a self-potential survey were conducted in order to select the optimum site for an exploratory well. Part II consisted of drilling a 5927-foot exploratory well, running geophysical logs, conducting a drill stem test (2937-3208 feet), and a short-term (3-day) flow test (1655-2188 feet). All basic data collected is summarized.

  16. Evaluating programs that address ideological issues: ethical and practical considerations for practitioners and evaluators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Lisa D; Fagen, Michael C; Neiger, Brad L

    2014-03-01

    There are important practical and ethical considerations for organizations in conducting their own, or commissioning external, evaluations and for both practitioners and evaluators, when assessing programs built on strongly held ideological or philosophical approaches. Assessing whether programs "work" has strong political, financial, and/or moral implications, particularly when expending public dollars, and may challenge objectivity about a particular program or approach. Using a case study of the evaluation of a school-based abstinence-until-marriage program, this article discusses the challenges, lessons learned, and ethical responsibilities regarding decisions about evaluation, specifically associated with ideologically driven programs. Organizations should consider various stakeholders and views associated with their program to help identify potential pitfalls in evaluation. Once identified, the program or agency needs to carefully consider its answers to two key questions: Do they want the answer and are they willing to modify the program? Having decided to evaluate, the choice of evaluator is critical to assuring that ethical principles are maintained and potential skepticism or criticism of findings can be addressed appropriately. The relationship between program and evaluator, including agreements about ownership and eventual publication and/or promotion of data, should be addressed at the outset. Programs and organizations should consider, at the outset, their ethical responsibility when findings are not expected or desired. Ultimately, agencies, organizations, and programs have an ethical responsibility to use their data to provide health promotion programs, whether ideologically founded or not, that appropriately and effectively address the problems they seek to solve.

  17. Evaluation of Emergency Medicine Community Educational Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia, Estevan Adan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Out-of-hospital emergencies occur frequently, and laypersons are often the first to respond to these events. As an outreach to our local communities, we developed “Basic Emergency Interventions Everyone Should Know,” a three-hour program addressing cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillator use, heart attack and stroke recognition and intervention, choking and bleeding interventions and infant and child safety. Each session lasted 45 minutes and was facilitated by volunteers from the emergency department staff. A self-administered 13-item questionnaire was completed by each participant before and after the program. A total of 183 participants completed the training and questionnaires. Average score pre-training was nine while the average score post-training was 12 out of a possible 13 (P< .0001. At the conclusion of the program 97% of participants felt the training was very valuable and 100% would recommend the program to other members of their community. [West J Emerg Med. 2010;11(5:416-418.

  18. Evaluation Study of VTAE Wood Technics Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin State Board of Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education, Madison.

    A survey of former students of the Wisconsin Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education (VTAE) wood technics programs and employers in woodworking industries was conducted during spring of 1985. General objectives were to determine job classifications, types of businesses, and relative importance of tasks or duties in various woodworking-related…

  19. Evaluation of a Soft Skills Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charoensap-Kelly, Piyawan; Broussard, Lauren; Lindsly, Mallory; Troy, Megan

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of a soft skills employee training program. We examined willingness to learn and delivery methods (face-to-face vs. online) and their associations with the training outcomes in terms of learning and behavioral change. Results showed that neither participants' willingness to learn nor delivery…

  20. Hypertension and Diabetes Mellitus Program evaluation on user's view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Juliana Veiga Mottin; Mantovani, Maria de Fátima; Kalinke, Luciana Puchalski; Ulbrich, Elis Martins

    2015-01-01

    to evaluate the program proposed by the Reorganization Care Plan for Hypertension and Diabetes Mellitus on user's view, and describe aspects of the trajectory of the participants correlating with the program's evaluation. evaluative study with a qualitative approach conducted in health units with the Family Health Strategy, in a city of the metropolitan region of Curitiba, in the period from September to March, 2012. A total of 30 adults with hypertension and/or Diabetes mellitus were interviewed. Data were analyzed through content analysis. Four categories were identified: Disease diagnosis; Reasons for the program need; Knowledge of the program, and program evaluation. there was the recognition of the orientations, and the monitoring of activities developed, with emphasis in cost reduction for users.

  1. An Evaluation of Knowledge Transfer from Microworld Programming to Conventional Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinogalos, Stelios

    2012-01-01

    Programming microworlds are being used for introducing students to programming for many years. Although many professors and school teachers report positive results from using programming microwords, these results are usually based on anecdotal evidence rather than rigorous empirical evaluation. A question that has not been answered yet with…

  2. An Evaluation of Knowledge Transfer from Microworld Programming to Conventional Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinogalos, Stelios

    2012-01-01

    Programming microworlds are being used for introducing students to programming for many years. Although many professors and school teachers report positive results from using programming microwords, these results are usually based on anecdotal evidence rather than rigorous empirical evaluation. A question that has not been answered yet with…

  3. Evaluation Framework for NASA's Educational Outreach Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Rick; Booker, Angela; Linde, Charlotte; Preston, Connie

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the proposed work is to develop an evaluation framework for NASA's educational outreach efforts. We focus on public (rather than technical or scientific) dissemination efforts, specifically on Internet-based outreach sites for children.The outcome of this work is to propose both methods and criteria for evaluation, which would enable NASA to do a more analytic evaluation of its outreach efforts. The proposed framework is based on IRL's ethnographic and video-based observational methods, which allow us to analyze how these sites are actually used.

  4. Focus Group Evaluation from the Perspective of Program Implementers: Findings Based on the Secondary 2 Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. L. Shek

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nine focus groups comprising 23 program implementers recruited from nine schools were conducted to evaluate the Tier 1 Program (Secondary 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes. Qualitative findings showed that a majority of the program implementers regarded the program as beneficial to the program participants in different psychosocial domains. The program implementers also described the program positively and positive metaphors were used to represent the program. In conjunction with the previous research findings, the present study provides further support for the effectiveness of the Tier 1 Program of Project P.A.T.H.S. in promoting holistic development among Chinese adolescents in Hong Kong.

  5. Evaluation Designs for the Improving Teaching Competencies Program Dissemination Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, Diane L.; And Others

    Evaluation designs are presented for these work components of the Improving Teaching Competencies Program (ITCP): (1) developing, implementing, and evaluating a strategy for disseminating selected ITCP instructional systems in Individually Guided Education (IGE) schools; (2) developing, implementing, and evaluating a strategy for disseminating…

  6. Evaluation Capacity in K-12 School Counseling Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Michael S.

    2002-01-01

    Presents results of a literature review, organized the Milstein and Cotton evaluation capacity (B. Milstein and D. Cotton, 2000) framework, detailing and analyzing the contextual factors and system features that impact the evaluation capacity of school counseling programs. Discusses implications for evaluation in other settings. (SLD)

  7. A Context-Adaptive Model for Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Brian K.

    1990-01-01

    Presents an adaptable, context-sensitive model for ESL/EFL program evaluation, consisting of seven steps that guide an evaluator through consideration of relevant issues, information, and design elements. Examples from an evaluation of the Reading for Science and Technology Project at the University of Guadalajara, Mexico are given. (31…

  8. Examining Evaluation System of an English Language Program in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si-hong, Li

    2007-01-01

    In the field of EFL, effective language evaluation is receiving more and more attention. However, in many Chinese EFL situations, the evaluation of language development is still considered to be product-oriented. It is the purpose of this article to examine an evaluation system of an English language program offered by a university in Yunnan…

  9. Toward Useful Program Evaluation in College Foreign Language Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, John M., Ed.; Davis, John McE., Ed.; Sinicrope, Castle, Ed.; Watanabe, Yukiko, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This volume reports on innovative, useful evaluation work conducted within U.S. college foreign language programs. An introductory chapter scopes out the territory, reporting key findings from research into the concerns, impetuses, and uses for evaluation that FL educators identify. Seven chapters then highlight examples of evaluations conducted…

  10. Creating an Information Literacy Badges Program in Blackboard: A Formative Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunon, Johanna; Ramirez, Laura Lucio; Ryckman, Brian; Campbell, Loy; Mlinar, Courtney

    2015-01-01

    A formative program evaluation using Stufflebeam's (2010) Context, Input, Process, Product (CIPP) model was conducted to assess the use of digital badges for tracking basic library instructional skills across academic programs at Nova Southeastern University. Based on the evaluation of pilot library modules and Blackboard Learn's badges…

  11. Creating an Information Literacy Badges Program in Blackboard: A Formative Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunon, Johanna; Ramirez, Laura Lucio; Ryckman, Brian; Campbell, Loy; Mlinar, Courtney

    2015-01-01

    A formative program evaluation using Stufflebeam's (2010) Context, Input, Process, Product (CIPP) model was conducted to assess the use of digital badges for tracking basic library instructional skills across academic programs at Nova Southeastern University. Based on the evaluation of pilot library modules and Blackboard Learn's badges…

  12. How To Use Qualitative Methods in Evaluation. CSE Program Evaluation Kit, Volume 4. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Michael Quinn

    The "CSE Program Evaluation Kit" is a series of nine books intended to assist people conducting program evaluations. This volume, the fourth in the kit, explains the basic assumptions underlying qualitative procedures, suggests evaluation situations where qualitative designs are useful, and provides guidelines for designing qualitative…

  13. Program Evaluation: The Board Game--An Interactive Learning Tool for Evaluators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febey, Karen; Coyne, Molly

    2007-01-01

    The field of program evaluation lacks interactive teaching tools. To address this pedagogical issue, the authors developed a collaborative learning technique called Program Evaluation: The Board Game. The authors present the game and its development in this practitioner-oriented article. The evaluation board game is an adaptable teaching tool…

  14. Self-Evaluation Manual. Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction Secondary Vocational Program Evaluation Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitzke, Elizabeth; And Others

    The purpose of this self-evaluation manual is to provide the procedures and instrumentation through which vocational education program personnel may evaluate or re-evaluate the value and effectiveness of their program. The manual is based upon statewide goals and objectives of vocational education as determined in 1983 by the project advisory…

  15. Evaluations of organizational effectiveness in mental health programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheid, T L; Greenley, J R

    1997-12-01

    We present a conceptual framework derived from organizational theory for understanding the evaluation of the effectiveness of mental health services. We postulate that organizations are deemed "successful" by their constituents when they conform to institutional demands and expectations that are both internally and externally generated. We empirically assess institutional conformity by examining evaluations of effectiveness by 269 mental health providers in 29 different mental health programs. Specialist programs responded to institutional demands by targeting services to those considered most in need: clients with severe mental illnesses. The formal structure and program philosophy of these programs clearly reflected this emphasis; consequently, levels of goal incongruence were low and evaluations of effectiveness were high. Generalist programs continued to provide care to diverse client groups, had more professionals, offered traditional services (such as psychotherapy), and exhibited higher levels of goal incongruence; these factors resulted in lower evaluations of effectiveness. This research is important because it demonstrates that organizational processes of institutional conformity (program objectives meet the demands of external constituents) and goal congruence (program objectives meet with expectations of internal constituents) are critical to positive evaluations of effectiveness. With the current institutional demand for effective, efficient services, it is critical that researchers have a conceptual framework for analyzing those factors which influence evaluations of effectiveness.

  16. Evaluating a physician leadership development program - a mixed methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throgmorton, Cheryl; Mitchell, Trey; Morley, Tom; Snyder, Marijo

    2016-05-16

    Purpose - With the extent of change in healthcare today, organizations need strong physician leaders. To compensate for the lack of physician leadership education, many organizations are sending physicians to external leadership programs or developing in-house leadership programs targeted specifically to physicians. The purpose of this paper is to outline the evaluation strategy and outcomes of the inaugural year of a Physician Leadership Academy (PLA) developed and implemented at a Michigan-based regional healthcare system. Design/methodology/approach - The authors applied the theoretical framework of Kirkpatrick's four levels of evaluation and used surveys, observations, activity tracking, and interviews to evaluate the program outcomes. The authors applied grounded theory techniques to the interview data. Findings - The program met targeted outcomes across all four levels of evaluation. Interview themes focused on the significance of increasing self-awareness, building relationships, applying new skills, and building confidence. Research limitations/implications - While only one example, this study illustrates the importance of developing the evaluation strategy as part of the program design. Qualitative research methods, often lacking from learning evaluation design, uncover rich themes of impact. The study supports how a PLA program can enhance physician learning, engagement, and relationship building throughout and after the program. Physician leaders' partnership with organization development and learning professionals yield results with impact to individuals, groups, and the organization. Originality/value - Few studies provide an in-depth review of evaluation methods and outcomes of physician leadership development programs. Healthcare organizations seeking to develop similar in-house programs may benefit applying the evaluation strategy outlined in this study.

  17. Final program evaluation methods and results of a National Lymphedema Management Program in Togo, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziperstein, Josh; Dorkenoo, Monique; Datagni, Michel; Drexler, Naomi; Murphy, Monica; Sodahlon, Yao; Mathieu, Els

    2014-06-01

    In order to eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (LF) as a public health problem, the World Health Assembly recommends an approach which includes interruption of transmission of infection and the alleviation of morbidity. In 2000, the Togolese National Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (PNELF) started the annual mass drug administrations and in 2007, the program added a morbidity component for the management of lymphedema. This manuscript describes the methods of an evaluation aimed at assessing the strengths and weaknesses of the Togolese National Lymphedema Morbidity Program. The evaluation was conducted through in-depth interviews with stakeholders at each programmatic level. Interviews focused on message dissemination, health provider training, patient self-care practices, social dynamics, and program impact. The evaluation demonstrated that the program strengths include the standardization and in-depth training of health staff, dissemination of the program's treatment message, a positive change in the community's perception of lymphedema, and successful patient recruitment and training in care techniques. The lessons learned from this evaluation helped to improve Togo's program, but may also provide guidance and strategies for other countries desiring to develop a morbidity program. The methods of program evaluation described in this paper can serve as a model for monitoring components of other decentralized national health programs in low resource settings.

  18. Earth orbital teleoperator visual system evaluation program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, N. L., Jr.; Kirkpatrick, M., III; Frederick, P. N.; Malone, T. B.

    1975-01-01

    Empirical tests of range estimation accuracy and resolution, via television, under monoptic and steroptic viewing conditions are discussed. Test data are used to derive man machine interface requirements and make design decisions for an orbital remote manipulator system. Remote manipulator system visual tasks are given and the effects of system parameters of these tasks are evaluated.

  19. Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge Biological Program Evaluation 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a written evaluation of the biological program at Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge conducted in July, 1992 by a regional management team. It outlines...

  20. Evaluation of biochars by temperature programmed oxidation/mass spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biochar from the thermochemical conversion of biomass was evaluated by Temperature Programmed Oxidation (TPO) coupled with mass spectroscopy. This technique can be used to assess the oxidative reactivity of carbonaceous solids where higher temperature reactivity indicates greater structural order. ...

  1. The Nursing Leadership Institute program evaluation: a critique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Havaei F

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Farinaz Havaei, Maura MacPhee School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada Abstract: A theory-driven program evaluation was conducted for a nursing leadership program, as a collaborative project between university faculty, the nurses' union, the provincial Ministry of Health, and its chief nursing officers. A collaborative logic model process was used to engage stakeholders, and mixed methods approaches were used to answer evaluation questions. Despite demonstrated, successful outcomes, the leadership program was not supported with continued funding. This paper examines what happened during the evaluation process: What factors failed to sustain this program? Keywords: leadership development, theory-driven evaluation, mixed methods, collaborative logic modeling

  2. A Utilization-Focused Program Evaluation of Lead for Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetta, Orsolina A.

    2012-01-01

    Students should have exposure to social justice education (SJE) through the content-based curriculum or through cocurricular learning opportunities. This program evaluation study used qualitative data collection and analysis procedures to determine how to best improve the cocurricular SJE program, Lead for Diversity (LFD), which is used in high…

  3. Understanding Evaluation Training in Schools and Programs of Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro, Leslie A.; Christie, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    This study provides an understanding of how the coursework required for attaining a Masters of Public Health (MPH) degree in epidemiology or health education from accredited schools or programs of public health prepares students to evaluate programs or interventions. Study data were generated using a content analysis of required coursework…

  4. Program Evaluation and Research Designs. NBER Working Paper No. 16016

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiNardo, John; Lee, David S.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter provides a selective review of some contemporary approaches to program evaluation. One motivation for our review is the recent emergence and increasing use of a particular kind of "program" in applied microeconomic research, the so-called Regression Discontinuity (RD) Design of Thistlethwaite and Campbell (1960). We organize our…

  5. Automated Writing Evaluation Program's Effect on Student Writing Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Lester Donnie

    2011-01-01

    In an ex post facto causal-comparative research design, this study investigated the effectiveness of Automated Writing Evaluation (AWE) programs on raising the student writing achievement. Tennessee Comprehensive Assessment Program (TCAP) writing achievement scores from the 2010 administration were utilized for this study. The independent variable…

  6. Situated Research Design and Methodological Choices in Formative Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supovitz, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Design-based implementation research offers the opportunity to rethink the relationships between intervention, research, and situation to better attune research and evaluation to the program development process. Using a heuristic called the intervention development curve, I describe the rough trajectory that programs typically follow as they…

  7. Evaluating a Psychology Graduate Student Peer Mentoring Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Christina; Mullins, Morell E.

    2012-01-01

    Research on mentoring outcomes and characteristics of various types of mentoring programs in different settings is limited. The present study sampled 39 graduate students at a small Midwestern university to evaluate peer mentoring in a graduate school setting. Mentoring function and outcome relationships as well as program characteristics were…

  8. Evaluation of Educational Television Programs for Distance Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Nasreen

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of educational television programs in distance learning system. Using the procedure of survey method, this study finds out the worth of educational television programs. Its results are based on the responses of the learners of distance teaching system. The views of students were collected by…

  9. Situated Research Design and Methodological Choices in Formative Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supovitz, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Design-based implementation research offers the opportunity to rethink the relationships between intervention, research, and situation to better attune research and evaluation to the program development process. Using a heuristic called the intervention development curve, I describe the rough trajectory that programs typically follow as they…

  10. Small College Teacher Preparation Program Evaluations: A Multiple Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saynes, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    The methods of evaluating teacher preparation programs are becoming increasingly more reliant on student test data. These test data driven formats, however, are not appropriate for small colleges. Small colleges are currently left off the Tennessee Report Card on the Effectiveness of Teacher Training Programs because the colleges did not produce…

  11. CIVITAS: An International Civic Education Exchange Program. Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello, Beverly

    This evaluation report documents the CIVITAS program's progress toward its five stated goals: (1) acquaint educators from Eastern and Central Europe with exemplary curricular and teacher training programs in civic education developed in the United States; (2) assist educators from Eastern and Central Europe in adapting and implementing effective…

  12. Evaluating Nutrition Education Programming by Using a Dietary Screener

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Jennifer; Litchfield, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Short dietary assessment instruments known as screeners have potential for use in evaluating nutrition education programming because detecting change in dietary intake can demonstrate movement toward program goals. Using screeners results in objective dietary intake data but involves less administrative time, training, and cost than other…

  13. Evaluation Report of the West Virginia Right to Read Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berty, Ernst

    Results of a recently conducted evaluation of a pioneer reading program in West Virginia during the 1973-1974 school year are included in this document. Emphasis in this federally funded program was placed on an individualized, diagnostic-prescriptive approach to reading instruction. Contents consist of an introduction; sections discussing the…

  14. Independent Evaluators of Federal Programs: Approaches, Devices, and Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    international organizations, and federal, state, and local governments in the United States. 3 See discussion in Eleanor Chelimsky, “The Coming Transformations...in Evaluation,” in Eleanor Chelimsky and William R. Shardish, eds., Evaluation for the 21st Century: A Handbook (Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 1997), pp...Cook, and Laura C. Leviton, Foundations of Program Evaluation: Theories of Practice (Newbury Park , CA: Sage, 1991), p. 22. For more on evaluation and

  15. Developing a dancer wellness program employing developmental evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Terry eClark; Arun eGupta; Chester eHo

    2014-01-01

    Wellness programs are being increasingly employed with performing artists. Given their aim of reducing injuries, injury tracking is commonly employed as an outcome measure. Evaluating the development and process of a wellness program can also enhance its effectiveness. Developmental evaluation offers one methodological framework within which to conduct such investigations. This paper reports on a two year process involving feedback from professional ballet dancers, management and artistic sta...

  16. Personal Benefits of a Health Evaluation and Enhancement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzelmann, F.; Durbeck, D. C.

    1970-01-01

    A study was made of the benefits reported by participants in a health evaluation and enhancement program dealing with physical activity. Program benefits were identified and defined in regard to three major areas: program effects on work; program effects on health; and program effects on habits and behavior. A strong positive and consistent relationship was found between reported benefits in each of these areas and measures of improvement in cardiovascular functioning based on treadmill performance. Significant differences in these measures of improvement were also found between participants who reported program benefits and those persons who did not. These findings provide a meaningful profile of the pattern of benefits generated by this kind of health program.

  17. Evaluation of an intergenerational program for pregnant and parenting adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roye, C F; Balk, S J

    1996-01-01

    Poor life outcomes for teenage mothers Young mothers (N = 65) several years after the birth of their first child. Half had mothers (called grandmothers) who attended the Teenage Mothers-Grandmothers program. A long-term evaluation study of the effects of the Teenage Mothers-Grandmothers Program on outcomes for the teens. Instruments used: demographic questionnaire, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, the Arizona Social Support Inventory Schedule, and an open-ended questionnaire. Teens whose mothers participated in the program were significantly less likely to drop out of school and had significantly better self-esteem. Including the mothers of pregnant and parenting adolescents in programs can be beneficial.

  18. Measuring infrastructure: A key step in program evaluation and planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Carol L; Glasgow, LaShawn; Lavinghouze, S Rene; Rieker, Patricia P; Fulmer, Erika; McAleer, Kelly; Rogers, Todd

    2016-06-01

    State tobacco prevention and control programs (TCPs) require a fully functioning infrastructure to respond effectively to the Surgeon General's call for accelerating the national reduction in tobacco use. The literature describes common elements of infrastructure; however, a lack of valid and reliable measures has made it difficult for program planners to monitor relevant infrastructure indicators and address observed deficiencies, or for evaluators to determine the association among infrastructure, program efforts, and program outcomes. The Component Model of Infrastructure (CMI) is a comprehensive, evidence-based framework that facilitates TCP program planning efforts to develop and maintain their infrastructure. Measures of CMI components were needed to evaluate the model's utility and predictive capability for assessing infrastructure. This paper describes the development of CMI measures and results of a pilot test with nine state TCP managers. Pilot test findings indicate that the tool has good face validity and is clear and easy to follow. The CMI tool yields data that can enhance public health efforts in a funding-constrained environment and provides insight into program sustainability. Ultimately, the CMI measurement tool could facilitate better evaluation and program planning across public health programs.

  19. The Program Evaluator's Role in Cross-Project Pollination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasgur, Bruce J.

    An expanded duties role of the multiple-program evaluator as an integral part of the ongoing decision-making process in all projects served is defended. Assumptions discussed included that need for projects with related objectives to pool resources and avoid duplication of effort and the evaluator's unique ability to provide an objective…

  20. The Efficacy of Stuttering Measurement Training: Evaluating Two Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, Lauren A.; Stavros, Candace; Ebrahimian, Mineh; Wang, Yuedong; Ingham, Roger J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Two stuttering measurement training programs currently used for training clinicians were evaluated for their efficacy in improving the accuracy of total stuttering event counting. Method: Four groups, each with 12 randomly allocated participants, completed a pretest-posttest design training study. They were evaluated by their counts of…

  1. Meeting the Pepsi Challenge: Preparing Evaluation Programs for Scholastic Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Mona S.

    This document provides guidelines for preparing evaluation programs for scholastic improvement. The philosophy underlying assessment and accountability is discussed, with specific reference to the positive and negative aspects of assessment. The design of a curriculum evaluation model is presented, including goal identification, data gathering,…

  2. Evaluation of Training Programs in Russian Manufacturing Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucherov, Dmitry; Manokhina, Daria

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine the features of training evaluation process in Russian manufacturing companies. On the basis of three assumptions regarding the differences in group of employees involved in training, duration and costs of a training program, the authors tried to find out the peculiarities of training evaluation tools and levels…

  3. Designing and Using Program Evaluation as a Tool for Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Margaret E.

    2010-01-01

    The Auburn University Educational Leadership Team and its K-12 practitioner and community partners collaboratively developed a comprehensive, on-going evaluation plan to assess a newly implemented field-based graduate program. The purpose of the present manuscript was to describe the evaluation guidelines and plans. The leadership team and…

  4. Using Youth Participatory Evaluation to Improve a Bullying Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Adrienne M.; Sollie, Donna L.; Silva, Kelcie

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a youth participatory evaluation of a bullying prevention curriculum before the curriculum was implemented in communities. We partnered with youths from a young women leaders' program to reduce the number of lessons in an existing curriculum and determine which activities were likely to have the greatest impact. To evaluate the…

  5. The Efficacy of Stuttering Measurement Training: Evaluating Two Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, Lauren A.; Stavros, Candace; Ebrahimian, Mineh; Wang, Yuedong; Ingham, Roger J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Two stuttering measurement training programs currently used for training clinicians were evaluated for their efficacy in improving the accuracy of total stuttering event counting. Method: Four groups, each with 12 randomly allocated participants, completed a pretest-posttest design training study. They were evaluated by their counts of…

  6. Evaluation of Training Programs in Russian Manufacturing Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucherov, Dmitry; Manokhina, Daria

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine the features of training evaluation process in Russian manufacturing companies. On the basis of three assumptions regarding the differences in group of employees involved in training, duration and costs of a training program, the authors tried to find out the peculiarities of training evaluation tools and levels…

  7. Evaluation of a breast and colon cancer survivorship program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollum, Kennon H; Wood, Felecia G; Auriemma, Kimberly

    2014-04-01

    This article describes a cancer survivorship program that addressed quality of life (QOL) changes related to chemotherapy. The program focused on adult breast and colon cancer survivors at a community oncology practice in the southeastern United States, and consisted of an educational visit designed to identify and address QOL changes that occurred as a result of chemotherapy. The QOL of Cancer Survivors (QOL-CS) survey administered before and after the visit analyzed QOL metrics, which were combined with program evaluation data to assess physical, psychosocial, social, and spiritual well-being changes that may have occurred as a result of program participation. Differences in QOL-CS scores did not represent statistically significant changes in QOL for program participants. However, program evaluation responses identified perceived changes in QOL as a result of participating in cancer treatment and a subsequent cancer survivorship program, which demonstrated clinical significance for program participants. Physical, psychosocial, social, and spiritual well-being measures were affected by program participation. Improvement in distress related to the initial cancer diagnosis and family distress were the most significant reported changes, and male gender and advanced age were associated with improved psychosocial well-being.

  8. Through the Looking Glass: What Happens When an Evaluator's Program Is Evaluated and Degrees of Strangeness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Alan G.; Baillie, Lynne E.

    1997-01-01

    Two articles present differing points of view on the evaluation of the development of a teacher education program. "Through the Looking Glass..." describes what happens when an evaluator becomes the evaluation client, and "Degrees of Strangeness" reports on the evaluator's findings and opinions. (SLD)

  9. Evaluation des Programmes d'Informatique (Evaluation of Computer Science Programs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisan, Claude

    In March 1994, Quebec's Commission on the Evaluation of Collegiate Teaching initiated an evaluation of computer science programs in province colleges. This report describes the evaluation process and presents results. The first section describes the following four stages of the evaluation: the formation of a consulting committee and evaluation…

  10. Evaluating Youth Sexual Health Peer Education Programs: "Challenges and Suggestions for Effective Evaluation Practices"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworsky, Denise; Larkin, June; Sriranganathan, Gobika; Clout, Jerri; Janssen, Jesse; Campbell, Lisa; Flicker, Sarah; Stadnicki, Dan; Erlich, Leah; Flynn, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Although peer sexual health education is a common form of sexual health promotion for youth, systematic reviews of these programs are relatively rare. In this study we interviewed youth peer educators to inquire about their experience of program evaluation and their perception of what is needed to develop effective evaluation practices. Data were…

  11. Effectiveness and Evaluation of Crime Prevention Programs in Minas Gerais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Beato

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This essay analyzes previous studies evaluating the effectiveness of the crime prevention policies adopted by the Government of Minas Gerais (Brazil. In this work, greater emphasis is placed on studies evaluating outcomes than on studies dealing with the process of setting up and implementing programs and projects. In order to allow a more systematic discussion, the Maryland Scale, which categorizes research and evaluations according to the methodological strengths and weaknesses in five levels, is employed. Subsequently, the authors draw a parallel between Brazil and other settings. Finally, this essay lays out the implications of this discussion regarding the prevention programs

  12. Evaluation for program decision making: a case study of the Oportunidades program in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, Lynnette M; Steta, Concepción; Rivera, Juan; Valle, Adolfo Martinez; Grados, Rogelio; Uriega, Sara; López, Victor Hugo

    2011-11-01

    Although evaluation is now an integral part of the design and implementation of public programs in many countries, there is growing recognition that the utilization of evaluation results for improving implementation and decision making, particularly in developing countries, is limited. The objective of this paper is to describe the process by which the external impact evaluation has been used to increase the potential of Oportunidades to improve nutritional outcomes of the beneficiary population through modifications to its design and operation. We will summarize a series of studies that have guided this process and focus on key aspects that have facilitated the utilization of evaluation results for decision making in the program. Implementation of research to document the impact of programs and the publication of such findings in peer reviewed journals, although vital for improving our evidence base and for the advancement of researchers within the current academic system, is not enough to ensure that the program itself will benefit from the evaluation. The use of evaluation results as a basis for modifications to the design and implementation of the nutrition component of Oportunidades was favored by open dialogue among all sectors involved in the program and the evaluation team and a long-term commitment on the part of all those involved. We think that the lessons learnt from this process are relevant for other programs, even where resources may be limited.

  13. Utilization-focused evaluation of a STEM enrichment program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Sally

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact and utilization of a STEM enrichment program (hereafter referred to as The Program). The Program consisted of two parts. First an educator resource center provided free educational materials throughout The Program’s home state. The second part of The Program was a network of education specialists who provided professional development for teachers, modeled lessons with students, and provided presentations for the general public. The problem addressed by this study was a lack of knowledge regarding the impact of The Program. The Program’s director requested a utilization-focused program evaluation to answer thirteen questions. Questions covered Program impact for five areas: overall impact on teachers, overall impact on students, overall impact of materials, overall impact of Program personnel, and overall impact on STEM education. A mixed-methods case study was designed to gather data. Quantitative data included Program archival data regarding the number of contacts and a survey distributed to teachers who had used The Program’s services on at least one occasion. Qualitative data included written comments gathered from the teacher surveys, seven teacher focus groups, and four Program personnel interviews. Data found an overall positive Program impact in all five areas. Both quantitative and qualitative data showed favorable perceptions by teachers and Program personnel. It is not known if data from this case study can be generalized to other STEM enrichment programs. Future research might include a study to determine if The Program’s model could be used to generate new STEM enrichment programs.

  14. The Energy-Related Inventions Program: Evaluation challenges and solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes results of evaluation of the Energy-Related Inventions Program (ERIP), focusing on the methodological challenges faced by the evaluators and solutions implemented. Operated jointly by US DOE and NIST, ERIP is one of the longest running commercialization assistance programs in US. The evaluation suggest that ERIP is a cost-effective federal investment. By the end of 1994, 24% of ERIP technologies had entered the market, producing total cumulative sales of $961 million (1994 dollars). With $124 million in program appropriations 1975-94, ERIP has an 8:1 return. At least 757 job-years were directly supported by ERIP technologies in 1994, and 6, 646 job-years of employment have been created over the past decade. The sales and employment supported by ERIP technologies are associated with $4.4 million in 1994 federal tax returns. Many issues must be addressed to fairly appraise public investments in technology commercialization programs, such as the need to track the program participants for extended periods, complexities in accounting for spinoff technologies, determining the validity of program evaluations, and dealing with performance data that are dominated by a small number of highly successful technologies.

  15. Issues Surrounding the Evaluation of Teacher Internship Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, D.

    2006-12-01

    Georgia Intern-Fellowships for Teachers (GIFT) is a collaborative effort designed to enhance mathematics and science experiences of Georgia teachers and their students through summer research internships for teachers. By offering business, industry, public science institute and research summer fellowships to teachers, GIFT provides educators with first-hand exposure to the skills and knowledge necessary for the preparation of our future workforce. Since 1991, GIFT has placed middle and high school math, science and technology teachers in over 1100 positions throughout the state. In these fellowships, teachers are involved in cutting edge scientific and engineering research, data analysis, curriculum development and real-world inquiry and problem solving, and create Action Plans to assist them in translating the experience into changed classroom practice. Since 2004, an increasing number of high school students have worked with their teachers in research laboratories. The GIFT program has an advisory board composed of university researchers, business and education leaders. The board members work in various subcommittees assisting the program with areas such as sponsor recruitment, evaluation and long term planning. The evaluation subcommittee has been actively involved in providing direction regarding the evaluation of the GIFT program's impact on teachers and their students. The program recently conducted a survey of its former participants. This presentation will discuss the results of the survey and the challenges associated with program evaluation of teacher internship programs.

  16. Evaluation of the Capillary Blood Glucose Self-monitoring Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augusto, Mariana Cristina; Nitsche, Maria José Trevizani; Parada, Cristina Maria Garcia de Lima; Zanetti, Maria Lúcia; Carvalhaes, Maria Antonieta de Barros Leite

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the structure, process and results of the Capillary Blood Glucose Self-monitoring Program in a Brazilian city. METHOD: epidemiological, cross-sectional study. The methodological framework of Donabedian was used to construct indicators of structure, process and outcome. A random sample (n = 288) of users enrolled and 96 health professionals who worked in the program was studied. Two questionnaires were used that were constructed for this study, one for professionals and one for users, both containing data for the evaluation of structure, process and outcome. Anthropometric measures and laboratory results were collected by consulting the patients' health records. The analysis involved descriptive statistics. RESULTS: most of the professionals were not qualified to work in the program and were not knowledgeable about the set of criteria for patient registration. None of the patients received complete and correct orientations about the program and the percentage with skills to perform conducts autonomously was 10%. As regards the result indicators, 86.4% of the patients and 81.3% of the professionals evaluated the program positively. CONCLUSION: the evaluation indicators designed revealed that one of the main objectives of the program, self-care skills, has not been achieved. PMID:25493676

  17. Evaluation of the Capillary Blood Glucose Self-monitoring Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Cristina Augusto

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the structure, process and results of the Capillary Blood Glucose Self-monitoring Program in a Brazilian city.METHOD: epidemiological, cross-sectional study. The methodological framework of Donabedian was used to construct indicators of structure, process and outcome. A random sample (n = 288 of users enrolled and 96 health professionals who worked in the program was studied. Two questionnaires were used that were constructed for this study, one for professionals and one for users, both containing data for the evaluation of structure, process and outcome. Anthropometric measures and laboratory results were collected by consulting the patients' health records. The analysis involved descriptive statistics.RESULTS: most of the professionals were not qualified to work in the program and were not knowledgeable about the set of criteria for patient registration. None of the patients received complete and correct orientations about the program and the percentage with skills to perform conducts autonomously was 10%. As regards the result indicators, 86.4% of the patients and 81.3% of the professionals evaluated the program positively.CONCLUSION: the evaluation indicators designed revealed that one of the main objectives of the program, self-care skills, has not been achieved.

  18. Phase III Program Study Report. Evaluation of the Child and Family Resource Program (CFRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lynell; and Others

    Fourth in a series of Child and Family Resource Program (CFRP) evaluation reports, this document is devoted to the program study component, designed to illustrate CFRP operations across the country and to establish a descriptive context for statistical and analytic findings. Chapter 1 describes the process of building a network of linkages with…

  19. An Evaluation of the 4-H "Health Rocks" Program: Implications for Program Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Self, Carlton; Morgan, A. Christian; Fuhrman, Nicholas E.; Navarro, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The National 4-H Council developed the Health Rocks substance abuse educational program to prevent youth from engaging in risky behaviors. The program was presented in 2010 to more than 8,000 middle school youth in Georgia. A post-then-pre evaluation was conducted with youth who completed 10 hours of instruction to determine if changes in youth…

  20. Developing a dancer wellness program employing developmental evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry eClark

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Wellness programs are being increasingly employed with performing artists. Given their aim of reducing injuries, injury tracking is commonly employed as an outcome measure. Evaluating the development and process of a wellness program can also enhance its effectiveness. Developmental evaluation offers one methodological framework within which to conduct such investigations. This paper reports on a two year process involving feedback from professional ballet dancers, management and artistic staff, and healthcare providers at a ballet company in order to develop a dancer screening and wellness program. Following a consultation phase, an initial program comprised of an expanded medical team and annual injury prevention screen was proposed. Alongside implementation with 30 professional ballet dancers, formal and informal feedback was sought from stakeholders and members across all levels of the ballet company to facilitate ongoing development, evaluation, and revision of the wellness program. The use of a process informed by developmental evaluation helped identify strengths and limitations within the screening process. The collective expertise of the assessors was used to modify the components and process of the screen to strive for ecological appropriateness. The process also fostered buy-in from all involved. Participant feedback helped refine the medical team available to the dancers and influenced the treatment and referral pathways via which dancers are able to access each member of the medical team. Furthermore, reflective discussions with artistic and management staff brought to light potential interactions between repertoire programming, fitness, and injury patterns. This prompted a reconsideration of how artists are trained and supported. Evaluation methods that focus on experiences and insight gained during program development stand to result in more efficient screening programs and health promotion models and, ultimately, healthier

  1. Knowledge, compliance, and satisfaction: an evaluation of the SIMPLE program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Sárate, Sacha; González-Cordero, Myriam L; Gutiérrez-Collazo, Luz M; Ríos-Motta, Ruth

    2009-11-01

    Evaluate the increase in medication use knowledge, participants' compliance, and satisfaction with the pharmacist through the SIMPLE program (Sepa [Know] Información correcta sobre [Correct information about] Medicinas [Medicines], Pregunte [Ask], Lea la etiqueta [Read the label], y Evite problemas [and Avoid problems]). Quasi-experimental type using a convenience sample. Community pharmacies in Puerto Rico. 60 years of age or older in need of education for appropriate use of medications, using three or more medications for chronic diseases, were functional, and signed an informed consent and privacy agreement. A total of 316 elderly were enrolled. Complete documentation for the six encounters was obtained for 250 participants. The program was implemented through six encounters between pharmacists and participants in community pharmacies. Medication use knowledge and participants' compliance were measured by analyzing the baseline data and follow-up encounters. Participants' satisfaction with the pharmacist was evaluated using the Satisfaction With Pharmacist (SWiP) scale. Medication use knowledge, participant's compliance, and satisfaction with the pharmacist. Compliance improved from 55.2% before the program to 90.0% after the program. Knowledge of medication use improved from 36.8% before the program to 94.4% after the program. There was an increase in the "very much" response for all items in the SWiP scale. An increase in knowledge and compliance with medication therapy by the participants was observed after participation in the program. Participant-pharmacist relationship was reaffirmed and enhanced after participation in the program.

  2. Evaluation of the State Energy Conservation Program from program initiation to September 1978. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heller, James N.; Grossmann, John R.; Shochet, Susan; Bresler, Joel; Duggan, Noreene

    1980-03-01

    The State Energy Conservation Program was established in 1975 to promote energy conservation and to help states develop and implement their own conservation programs. Base (5) and supplemental (3) programs required states to implement programs including: mandatory thermal-efficiency standards and insulation requirements for new and renovated buildings; mandatory lighting efficiency standards for public buildings; mandatory standards and policies affecting the procurement practices of the state and its political subdivisions; program measures to promote the availability and use of carpools, vanpools, and public transportation; a traffic law or regulation which permits a right turn-on-red; and procedures to carry out a continuing public education effort to increase awareness of energy conservation; procedures which promote effective coordination among local, state, and Federal energy conservation programs; and procedures for carrying out energy audits on buildings and industrial plants. All 50 states and Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, and the District of Columbia participated in the program. The total 1980 energy savings projected by the states is about 5.9 quadrillion Btu's or about 7% of the DOE projected 1980 baseline consumption of just under 83 quads. The detailed summary is presented on the following: information the SECP evaluation; DOE response to the SECP; DOE's role in the program management process; the effectiveness of the states in managing the SECP; the status of program measure implementation; innovative state energy conservation programs; and the evaluation methodology.

  3. Statistical Analysis of Demographic and Temporal Differences in LANL's 2014 Voluntary Protection Program Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Adam Christopher [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Booth, Steven Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-20

    Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) surveys were conducted in 2013 and 2014 to assess the degree to which workers at Los Alamos National Laboratory feel that their safety is valued by their management and peers. The goal of this analysis is to determine whether the difference between the VPP survey scores in 2013 and 2014 is significant, and to present the data in a way such that it can help identify either positive changes or potential opportunities for improvement. Data for several questions intended to identify the demographic groups of the respondent are included in both the 2013 and 2014 VPP survey results. These can be used to identify any significant differences among groups of employees as well as to identify any temporal trends in these cohorts.

  4. Process evaluation: Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership (WRAP Program). [Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-01

    The ``Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership,`` or WRAP program, is a fuel-blind conservation program designed to assist Northeast Utilities` low-income customers to use energy safely and efficiently. Innovative with respect to its collaborative approach and its focus on utilizing and strengthening the existing low-income weatherization service delivery network, and WRAP program offers an interesting model to other utilities which traditionally have relied on for-profit energy service contractors and highly centralized program implementation structures. This report presents the findings of a process evaluation and WRAP customer survey conducted by the Technical Development Corporation (TDC). TDC`s work is one part of a multi-part evaluation project being conducted under the management of ICF Resources, Inc.

  5. Process evaluation: Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership (WRAP Program)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-01

    The Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership,'' or WRAP program, is a fuel-blind conservation program designed to assist Northeast Utilities' low-income customers to use energy safely and efficiently. Innovative with respect to its collaborative approach and its focus on utilizing and strengthening the existing low-income weatherization service delivery network, and WRAP program offers an interesting model to other utilities which traditionally have relied on for-profit energy service contractors and highly centralized program implementation structures. This report presents the findings of a process evaluation and WRAP customer survey conducted by the Technical Development Corporation (TDC). TDC's work is one part of a multi-part evaluation project being conducted under the management of ICF Resources, Inc.

  6. Ethical review of health promotion program evaluation proposals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, Wilfreda E; Vollman, Ardene Robinson; Burgess, Michael M

    2003-01-01

    Some policies state that program evaluation falls within the domain of administrative research that does not require review by an ethics review board. We propose that some health promotion program evaluations include at least one element of research and can be distinguished from quality assurance. Although American and Canadian evaluation societies provide important guidelines and standards for evaluation practitioners, processes for accountability to the public are provided by research ethics boards. The field of health promotion is, by its nature, replete with challenges to existing research ethics boards. Given the dearth of published literature on the ethics of health promotion evaluation or practice, the field could benefit from the open debate that reviews of proposals would encourage.

  7. Towards Bridging the Gap Programming Language and Partial Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Meur, Anne-Francoise; Lawall, Julia Laetitia; Consel, Charles

    2002-01-01

    to guide the choice of both the code to specialize and the invariants to exploit during the specialization process. To ease the use of partial evaluation, the syntax of this language is similar to the declaration syntax of the target language of the partial evaluator. To provide feedback to the programmer......, declarations are checked throughout the analyses performed by partial evaluation. The language has been successfully used by a signal-processing expert in the design of a specializable Forward Error Correction component.......Partial evaluation is a program-transformation technique that automatically specializes a program with respect to user-supplied invariants. Despite successful applications in areas such as graphics, operating systems, and software engineering, partial evaluators have yet to achieve widespread use...

  8. General test plan redundant sensor strapdown IMU evaluation program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwell, T.; Irwin, H. A.; Miyatake, Y.; Wedekind, D. E.

    1971-01-01

    The general test plan for a redundant sensor strapdown inertial measuring unit evaluation program is presented. The inertial unit contains six gyros and three orthogonal accelerometers. The software incorporates failure detection and correction logic and a land vehicle navigation program. The principal objective of the test is a demonstration of the practicability, reliability, and performance of the inertial measuring unit with failure detection and correction in operational environments.

  9. 75 FR 64397 - Value Pricing Pilot Program Participation, Fiscal Years 2010 and 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-19

    ..., consensus building and marketing, modeling, and technology assessments. 2. Implementation Costs--Allowable... used in many other sectors of the economy to respond to peak-use demands. For example, airlines, hotels... are received. The Federal share payable under the VPP program is up to 80 percent of the cost of the...

  10. Evaluation of the Advanced Subsonic Technology Program Noise Reduction Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Robert A.; Rawls, John W., Jr.; Russell, James W.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents a detailed evaluation of the aircraft noise reduction technology concepts developed during the course of the NASA/FAA Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Noise Reduction Program. In 1992, NASA and the FAA initiated a cosponsored, multi-year program with the U.S. aircraft industry focused on achieving significant advances in aircraft noise reduction. The program achieved success through a systematic development and validation of noise reduction technology. Using the NASA Aircraft Noise Prediction Program, the noise reduction benefit of the technologies that reached a NASA technology readiness level of 5 or 6 were applied to each of four classes of aircraft which included a large four engine aircraft, a large twin engine aircraft, a small twin engine aircraft and a business jet. Total aircraft noise reductions resulting from the implementation of the appropriate technologies for each class of aircraft are presented and compared to the AST program goals.

  11. The NASA-USPHS Health Evaluation and Enhancement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbeck, D. C.; Heinzelmann, F.; Moxley, R. T., III; Schacther, J.; Payne, G. H.; Limoncelli, D. D.; Fox, S. M., III; Arnoldi, L. B.

    1972-01-01

    An exercise program was initiated to assess the feasibility of an on the job health evaluation and enhancement program, as well as to identify the factors which influenced volunteering, adherence, and effectiveness of the program. The program was utilized by 237 of the 998 eligible Federal employees, with a mean attendance of 1.3 days per week. Those who volunteered perceived a need for increased physical activity, felt they had sufficient time to participate, and derived subjective as well as objective benefits. Significant improvements were found in heart rate response to the standard exercise test, body weight, skinfold measurements, and triglycerides. A consistent relationship was found between subjectively reported effects of the program on work, health habits, and behavior, and improvement in cardiovascular function, based on treadmill performance. Numerous personal and programmatic factors influencing volunteering and participation were identified.

  12. Moving Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Programs Forward: Improving Program Evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Arlene; McCloskey, Lois

    1990-01-01

    Thirteen evaluations of programs to prevent child abuse and neglect are reviewed. The evaluations were characterized by careful attention to methodologic detail but lacked definitions of abuse or neglect. Important topics are omitted, such as the consequences and costs of medical neglect. (Author/JDD)

  13. 1972-73 Program Evaluation of the Right to Read Program of Hardin, Montana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin School District, MT.

    This paper presents an evaluation of the Hardin, Montana, School District's Right to Read program. Short descriptions of the results of the evaluation are presented for the areas of paragraph meaning, word meaning, interest/attitude, basic approach, instructional technique, student grouping, availability and skill of reading teachers, nonclassroom…

  14. Evaluation of Teacher Induction Practices in a US University English Language Program: Towards Useful Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, WeiWei

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on a formative and internal evaluation of teacher induction practices for newly hired teachers in a US university ESL program. By adopting a utilization-focused approach, evaluators produced a design that was articulated to the information needs of the evaluation users. The ensuing findings were then used to develop and…

  15. NATIONAL EVALUATION OF THE WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE PROGRAM DURING THE ARRA PERIOD: PROGRAM YEARS 2009-2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonn, Bruce Edward [ORNL; Rose, Erin M [ORNL; Schmoyer, Richard L [ORNL; Eisenberg, Joel Fred [ORNL; Ternes, Mark P [ORNL; Schweitzer, Martin [ORNL; Hendrick, Timothy P [ORNL

    2012-08-01

    This report describes the third major evaluation of the Program, encompassing program years 2009 to 2011. In this report, this period of time is referred to as the ARRA Period. This is a special period of time for the Program because the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 has allocated $5 billion of funding for the Program. In normal program years, WAP s annual appropriation is in the range of $200-250 million, supporting the weatherization of approximately 100,000 homes. With the addition of ARRA funding during these program years, the expectation is that weatherization activity will exceed 300,000 homes per year. In addition to saving energy and reducing low-income energy bills, expanded WAP funding is expected to stimulate the economy by providing new jobs in the weatherization field and allowing low-income households to spend more money on goods and services by spending less on energy.

  16. ADEA/AAL Institute for Allied Health Educators: Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Overman, Pamela R; Grzesikowski, Tami; Tucker-Lively, Felicia; Weinstein, George; Haden, N Karl

    2015-05-01

    Revised accreditation standards for dental and dental hygiene education programs have increased emphasis on faculty development that can improve teaching and learning, foster curricular change including use of teaching and learning technologies, and enhance retention and satisfaction of faculty. The American Dental Education Association (ADEA) and Academy for Academic Leadership (AAL) established the Institute for Allied Health Educators (IAHE) in 2007 to address faculty development needs for allied dental and allied health educators. In 2009, it was transitioned to an online program, which resulted in increased enrollment and diversity of participants. After seven years, a comprehensive program evaluation was warranted. The authors developed an online questionnaire based on Kirkpatrick's four-level model of training evaluation; for this study, levels one (satisfaction), two (knowledge and skill acquisition), and three (behavior change) were examined. Of the 400 program participants invited to take part in the study, a 38% response rate was achieved, with the majority indicating full-time faculty status. Nearly all (95-97%) of the respondents agreed or strongly agreed the program contributed to their teaching effectiveness, and 88-96% agreed or strongly agreed it enhanced their knowledge of educational concepts and strategies. In addition, 83% agreed or strongly agreed the program helped them develop new skills and confidence with technology, with 69% agreeing or strongly agreeing that it helped them incorporate technology into their own educational setting. Nearly 90% were highly positive or positive in their overall assessment of the program; 95% indicated they would recommend it to a colleague; and 80% agreed or strongly agreed they had discussed what they learned with faculty colleagues at their home institutions who had not attended the program. Positive findings from this evaluation provide evidence that the IAHE has been able to meet its goals.

  17. An evaluation of Nova Scotia's alcohol ignition interlock program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanlaar, Ward G M; Mainegra Hing, Marisela; Robertson, Robyn D

    2017-03-01

    Alcohol ignition interlock programs for offenders aim to reduce recidivism among convicted drink drivers. This study presents an evaluation of Nova Scotia's interlock program implemented in 2008 in order to assess its effectiveness to reduce impaired driving and to help identify areas for improvement. Data used include conviction and crash records of individual participants; provincial monthly counts of alcohol-related charges, convictions and fatal and serious crashes; and interlock logged events. Methods used include descriptive statistics, survival analysis, time series and logistic regression analysis. With respect to specific deterrence (i.e., preventing recidivism) there was a 90% reduction in recidivism among voluntary participants since participation in the interlock program and a 79% reduction after these participants exited from the program. With respect to general deterrence (i.e., referring to a preventative effect on the entire population of drivers in Nova Scotia) there were temporary decreases in the numbers of alcohol-related charges (13.32%) and convictions (9.93%) and a small significant decrease in the number of fatal and serious injury alcohol-related crashes, following the implementation of the program. The evidence suggests the interlock program was better at preventing harm due to alcohol-impaired driving than the alternative of not using the interlock program. Recommendations were formulated supporting the continuation of the interlock program in Nova Scotia.

  18. Overview of Evaluation Methods for R&D Programs. A Directory of Evaluation Methods Relevant to Technology Development Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruegg, Rosalie [TIA Consulting, Inc., Emeral Isle, NC (United States); Jordan, Gretchen B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2007-03-01

    This document provides guidance for evaluators who conduct impact assessments to determine the “realized” economic benefits and costs, energy, environmental benefits, and other impacts of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s (EERE) R&D programs. The focus of this Guide is on realized outcomes or impacts of R&D programs actually experienced by American citizens, industry, and others.

  19. Alberta: evaluation of nursing retention and recruitment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, Arlene; Graham, Carol; Smith, Jennifer; Aitken, Julia; Odell, Jill

    2012-03-01

    Retention and recruitment strategies are essential to address nursing workforce supply and ensure the viability of healthcare delivery in Canada. Knowledge transfer between experienced nurses and those new to the profession is also a focus for concern. The Multi-Employer/United Nurses of Alberta Joint Committee attempted to address these issues by introducing a number of retention and recruitment (R&R) initiatives for nurses in Alberta: in total, seven different programs that were introduced to some 24,000 nurses and employers across the province of Alberta in 2001 (the Transitional Graduate Nurse Recruitment Program) and 2007 (the remaining six R&R programs). Approximately 1,600 nurses participated in the seven programs between 2001 and 2009. Of the seven strategies, one supported entry into the workplace, two were pre-retirement strategies and four involved flexible work options. This project entailed a retrospective evaluation of the seven programs and differed from the other Research to Action (RTA) projects because it was solely concerned with evaluation of pre-existing initiatives. All seven programs were launched without a formal evaluation component, and the tracking of local uptake varied throughout the province. The union and various employers faced challenges in implementing these strategies in a timely fashion, as most were designed at the bargaining table during negotiations. As a result, systems, policy and procedural changes had to be developed to support their implementation after they became available.Participants in the programs indicated improvements over time in several areas, including higher levels of satisfaction with work–life balance, hours worked and their current practice and profession. The evaluation found that participation led to perceived improvements in nurses' confidence, greater control over their work environment, decreased stress levels, increased energy and morale and perceived improved ability to provide high-quality care

  20. Evaluation of a continuous quality improvement program in anticoagulant therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantin, Ariane; Lahaie, Alexandre; Odobasic, Bojan; Tremblay, Marie-Philip; Wazzan, Dana; Caron, Stéphanie; Leblanc, Caroline; Martineau, Josée; Lalonde, Lyne

    2016-01-01

    Background: The ACO Program (Programme ACO), a continuous quality improvement program (CQIP) in anticoagulation therapy, was offered in community pharmacies as a pilot project. Objective: To evaluate the participants’ appreciation for the various activities of the program. Methods: Participants had access to training activities, including an audit with feedback, online training activities (OTA), clinical tools and support from facilitators. Cognitive behavioural learning determinants were evaluated before and 5 months after the beginning of the program. Participants’ satisfaction and perception were documented via online questionnaires and a semistructured interview. Results: Of the 52 pharmacists in the ACO Program, 47 participated in this evaluation. Seventy-seven percent of the participants completed at least 1 OTA and 6% published on the forum. The feeling of personal effectiveness rose from 8.01 (7.67-8.35) to 8.62 (8.24-8.99). The audit and feedback, as well as the high-quality OTA and their lecturers, were the most appreciated elements. Discussion: There was a high OTA participation rate. The facilitators seemed to play a key role in the CQIP. The low level of participation in the forum reflects the known phenomenon of social loafing. Technical difficulties affecting the platform and data collection for the audit with feedback constituted limitations. Conclusion: The CQIP in anticoagulation therapy is appreciated by community pharmacists and is associated with an improved feeling of personal effectiveness. PMID:27829859

  1. Development and evaluation of a pharmacogenomics educational program for pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formea, Christine M; Nicholson, Wayne T; McCullough, Kristen B; Berg, Kevin D; Berg, Melody L; Cunningham, Julie L; Merten, Julianna A; Ou, Narith N; Stollings, Joanna L

    2013-02-12

    Objectives. To evaluate hospital and outpatient pharmacists' pharmacogenomics knowledge before and 2 months after participating in a targeted, case-based pharmacogenomics continuing education program.Design. As part of a continuing education program accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), pharmacists were provided with a fundamental pharmacogenomics education program.Evaluation. An 11-question, multiple-choice, electronic survey instrument was distributed to 272 eligible pharmacists at a single campus of a large, academic healthcare system. Pharmacists improved their pharmacogenomics test scores by 0.7 questions (pretest average 46%; posttest average 53%, p=0.0003).Conclusions. Although pharmacists demonstrated improvement, overall retention of educational goals and objectives was marginal. These results suggest that the complex topic of pharmacogenomics requires a large educational effort in order to increase pharmacists' knowledge and comfort level with this emerging therapeutic opportunity.

  2. [Preventing school violence: an evaluation of an intervention program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Carla Silva

    2011-06-01

    School violence (bullying), is currently considered a growing public health issue across the globe. It is essential to intervene in order to improve the quality of life of children/adolescents at school. Therefore, it should be a research priority to include the issue in the agenda of nurses. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of an anti-violence program implemented with 307 secondary level students in a school in Lisbon. The evaluation before and after the program was performed using a questionnaire that was elaborated and validated for this study. We found that before the intervention, there was a high level of bullying (50% victims and 35% aggressors), and that the aggressions also included teachers (7%) and other school workers (9%). The program consisted of building awareness/preparation in teachers and parents and practicing social competencies among the students. After the intervention significant results were observed in the global reduction of school violence.

  3. Advanced gas cooled nuclear reactor materials evaluation and development program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    Results of work performed from January 1, 1977 through March 31, 1977 on the Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program are presented. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Process Heat and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (impure Helium), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in this report includes progress to date on alloy selection for VHTR Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) applications and for DCHT applications. The present status on the simulated reactor helium loop design and on designs for the testing and analysis facilities and equipment is discussed.

  4. Program Evaluation in the Arts. An Annotated Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildemuth, Barbara M., Comp.; Eichinger, Debra S., Comp.

    This 56-item annotated bibliography gives teachers and administrators access to information on the evaluation of school fine arts programs. Based upon a computer search of the Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) data base, it cites project reports, journal articles, and dissertations published from 1963 to 1976. Citations of elementary…

  5. Counselor Competence, Performance Assessment, and Program Evaluation: Using Psychometric Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Kevin A.; Bloom, Margaret L.; Tassara, Marcel H.; Caperton, William

    2014-01-01

    Psychometric instruments have been underutilized by counselor educators in performance assessment and program evaluation efforts. As such, we conducted a review of the literature that revealed 41 instruments fit for such efforts. We described and critiqued these instruments along four dimensions--"Target Domain," "Format,"…

  6. Residential Environmental Education Center Program Evaluation: An Ongoing Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Nicholas; Buskist, Connie; Herron, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Residential environmental education centers (REECs) have been criticized for their lack of quality program evaluation. However, the last national study done on the practices of REECs was Chenery and Hammerman's (1985) research. This article presents the results of a national survey of directors of REECs (n = 114) that gives insight into the…

  7. Counselor Competence, Performance Assessment, and Program Evaluation: Using Psychometric Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Kevin A.; Bloom, Margaret L.; Tassara, Marcel H.; Caperton, William

    2014-01-01

    Psychometric instruments have been underutilized by counselor educators in performance assessment and program evaluation efforts. As such, we conducted a review of the literature that revealed 41 instruments fit for such efforts. We described and critiqued these instruments along four dimensions--"Target Domain," "Format,"…

  8. What Can Mixed Methods Designs Offer Professional Development Program Evaluators?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Victoria; Nevin, Ann

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the authors describe the benefits and pitfalls of mixed methods designs. They argue that mixed methods designs may be preferred when evaluating professional development programs for p-K-12 education given the new call for accountability in making data-driven decisions. They summarize and critique the studies in terms of limitations…

  9. Detailed Test Plan Redundant Sensor Strapdown IMU Evaluation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwell, T.; Miyatake, Y.; Wedekind, D. E.

    1971-01-01

    The test plan for a redundant sensor strapdown inertial measuring unit evaluation program is presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) test philosophy and limitations, (2) test sequence, (3) equipment specifications, (4) general operating procedures, (5) calibration procedures, (6) alignment test phase, and (7) navigation test phase. The data and analysis requirements are analyzed.

  10. Media Literacy Education Program Evaluators: What's the Job Description, Again?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DaCosta, Kneia Octavia

    2012-01-01

    School program evaluation researchers face a set of overlapping questions concerning our roles in the field: For the sake of "the data" and in quest of "the truth," am I a shrewd researcher before all else? For the sake of community-building and establishing respectful, reciprocal relationships with my school partners, am I first a gracious school…

  11. Program Evaluation: An Empirical Study of Individualized Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinhardt, Gaea

    The results of three years of evaluative investigation of the University of Pittsburgh Learning Research and Development Center's program of individualized education are described. The study was conducted in seven Follow Through sites and three Pittsburgh area schools. Standardized tests were used as input and outcome measures; questionnaires and…

  12. Evaluation of a Nutrition Education Program for Family Practice Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, David S.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A nutrition education program at the University of South Alabama Medical Center that was based on the "co-counseling model" as described by Moore and Larsen is described. Patients with one of three problem areas were selected for evaluation: hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and pregnancy. (MLW)

  13. Implementing and Evaluating the National Healthy School Program in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicklander, Molly K.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to trace development of the National Healthy School Program (NHSP) from a global concept to implementation at the local school level in England with a view toward clarifying and, more importantly, determining if implementation is proceeding as planned, as evidenced by the presence of process evaluation. The NHSP is…

  14. Evaluating Adult Literacy Programs at the Community Provider Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benseman, John; Sutton, Alison

    1999-01-01

    Details the design and implementation of a rolling review process for community-based adult literacy programs. Describes four steps: documentation to become "review ready," collection of feedback from participants and key informants, site visit by reviewers, and use of the evaluation report as a planning tool. (SK)

  15. Consumer Evaluation of Educational Programs: Using Questionnaires Completed by Alumni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, H. L.; Hewson, M.; Weiker, G.

    This paper describes a method used to evaluate 48 medical residency programs at one institution. It presents the background rationale, logistics, and results obtained by surveying alumni, in the context of their current practice, for relevant data on the value of their training experience. Surveys were sent for 3 years to all alumni of Cleveland…

  16. Increasing Team Skills: An Evaluation of Program Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen-Webb, Marilyn-Lu

    1985-01-01

    A six-hour developmental program was evaluated using alternate forms of the highly validated Personal Skills Map. The differences in participants' scores showed increases in self-esteem, comfort, and management skills (p is less than .00), while aggression (p=.05) and deference (p is less than .00) decreased. (Author/CT)

  17. Evaluation of the Individualized Study Program: Early Warning System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunziker, Celeste M.

    The Early Warning System (EWS) of the Individualized Study Program (ISP) at the University of California, Davis, was evaluated. Disadvantaged students who have not met the university's entrance requirements are tracked by the EWS during their first year in order to identify academic problems and provide advising and support. Findings include: EWS…

  18. Pattern Matching, Validity, and Conceptualization in Program Evaluation,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trochim, Wilham M. K.

    1985-01-01

    Two quasiexperimental designs--nonequivalent dependent variable and reversed treatment designs--illustrate pattern matching logic as a basis for evaluation, examining college health services. Three pattern matches are significant: (1) program pattern match indicates implementation; (2) measurement match assesses test validity; and (3) effect…

  19. National Weatherization Assistance Program Evaluation: Assessment of Refrigerator Energy Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonn, Bruce Edward [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Goeltz, Rick [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report assesses the energy consumption characteristics and performance of refrigerators that were monintored as a component of the Indoor Air Quality Study that itself was a component of the retrospective evaluation of the Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program.

  20. Evaluation of a Spiritually Based Child Maltreatment Prevention Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Louisa K.; Rigazio-DiGilio, Sandra A.

    2013-01-01

    The authors empirically evaluated a spiritually based 1-day child maltreatment training program. Pretest, posttest, and follow-up results indicated that participants' recognition of hypothetical maltreatment did not increase after training. Furthermore, although participants decreased their use of items known to dissuade decisions to report, they…

  1. Learning Under the Tree : Evaluating Skillful Parenting Program in West Kenya ICS Full Evaluation Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Esch, R.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371571502; de Haan, M.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074405624

    2016-01-01

    Summary The central purpose of this evaluation is to determine if and how the Skillful Parenting Program (SPP) effects the parenting of its participants. In addition, it aims to determine how the parenting program was adapted to the West Kenyan setting, and how the specific content and processes of

  2. A Meta-Evaluation of a Generic Skills Approach to Evaluating Academic Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Gary W.

    The Academic Program Evaluation Paradigm (APEP) is a five-stage process for participating institutions and their faculties to structure inquiry into their academic programs and develop concrete procedures to effect institutional changes. APEP was developed and implemented by 10 member institutions of the American Association of State Colleges and…

  3. An outcome evaluation of the 'Skipper' designated driver program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, A; Watson, B

    2014-05-01

    The general aim of designated driver programs is to reduce the level of drink driving by encouraging potential drink drivers to travel with a driver who has abstained from (or at least limited) consuming alcohol. Designated driver programs appear to be quite widespread around the world, however a limited number have been subject to rigorous evaluation. This paper reports results from an outcome evaluation of a designated driver program called 'Skipper', which was trialled in a provincial city in Queensland, Australia. The outcome evaluation included surveys three weeks prior to (baseline), four months following (1st follow-up), and 16 months following (2nd follow-up) the commencement of the trial in both the 'intervention area' (baseline, n=202; 1st follow-up, n=211; 2nd follow-up, n=200) and a 'comparison area'(baseline, n=203; 1st follow-up, n=199; 2nd follow-up, n=201); and a comparison of random breath testing and crash data before and after the trial. The survey results indicate that awareness of the program in the intervention area was quite high four months following its introduction and that this was maintained at 16 months. The results also suggest that the 'Skipper' program and the related publicity had positive impacts on behaviour with an increase in the proportion of people participating in designated driver as a passenger. It is less clear, however, whether the 'Skipper' program impacted on other behaviours of interest, such as drink driving or involvement in alcohol-related crashes. Suggestions for further research and program improvement are discussed as well as limitations of the research.

  4. Evaluation of Pre-Departure English Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Saukah

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The program evaluation reported in this article covers three batches of participants, from 1996 through 1997, sponsored by the Directorate General of Higher Education projects to prepare faculty members of teacher training institutions for overseas studies. The result outcomes could be achieved when the initial English competence requirred for participating in the program was at least at the Pre-Advanced level. The criterion validity of the TOEFL-Equivalent test developed by the program was assured, and the test could, therefore, be used as a good predictor of the International TOEFL. Other recommendations are also given for the improvement of the planning and implementation of the program in the future

  5. An evaluation of a suicide bereavement peer support program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Constance A; Schiff, Jeannette Waegemakers; Chugh, Urmil; Rawlinson, Dixie; Hides, Elizabeth; Leith, Judy

    2010-01-01

    Peer support, a cornerstone in recovery programs for mental illness and addiction, has not been widely applied to service programs for survivors of suicide. In 2004-2006 Canadian Mental Health Association Suicide Services in Calgary, Alberta, introduced the Peer Support Program for adults, an adjunct to conventional individual and group intervention. This article reports on a mixed-methods evaluation of the Peer Support Program. Hogan's Grief Response Checklist and the qualitative data tracked positive outcomes for both the peer supporters and the clients. This study challenges the unspoken assumption that survivors of suicide, due to their vulnerability, require the services of highly skilled professionals and would not be in a position to offer unsupervised support to peers. Rather it supports an intervention protocol that consists of peer supporters and professionals working collaboratively to offer cost-effective, client-centered services.

  6. A Review of Economic Evaluations of Tobacco Control Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer W. Kahende

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Each year, an estimated 443,000 people die of smoking-related diseases in the United States. Cigarette smoking results in more than $193 billion in medical costs and productivity losses annually.In an effort to reduce this burden, many states, the federal government, and several national organizations fund tobacco control programs and policies. For this report we reviewed existing literature on economic evaluations of tobacco control interventions. We found that smoking cessation therapies, including nicotine replacement therapy (NRT and self-help are most commonly studied. There are far fewer studies on other important interventions, such as price and tax increases, media campaigns, smoke free air laws and workplace smoking interventions, quitlines, youth access enforcement, school-based programs, and community-based programs. Although there are obvious gaps in the literature, the existing studies show in almost every case that tobacco control programs and policies are either cost-saving or highly cost-effective.

  7. SME Support Programs in Europe: Granting and Evaluation criterion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Madrid Guijarro

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyze the situation of the support programs to SME in Europe. We identify the main support programs to this kind of firms and analyze the general criterion used to grant and evaluate these programs by the different agencies using a phone survey. Our sample is formed by 44 agencies included in EURADA which represent a coverage of 33,3%. The result show that the support program that will be increased in a higher number of agencies is the one related to "innovation and technological development", and the one that will be decreased in a higher number of agencies is the one related to "reestructuration of declining firms".

  8. USABILITY EVALUATION OF A CONTROL AND PROGRAMMING ENVIRONMENT FOR PROGRAMMING EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maísa S. dos S. Lopes

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an assessment of usability of Control and Programming Environment (CPE of a remote mobile robot. The CPE is an educational environment focused on computer programming education that integrates a program development online tool with a remote lab. To evaluate system usability, empirical test was conducted with computer science students in order to identify the views of users on the system and get directions on how to improve the quality of interface use. The study used questionnaire and observation of the evaluator. The degree of users’ satisfaction was measured by using a quantitative approach that establishes the average ranking for each question of the questionnaire. The results indicate that the system is simple, easy to use and suited to programming practices, however needed changes to make it more intuitive and efficient. The realization test of usability, even with a small sample user, is important to provide feedback on the system's user experience and help identify problems.

  9. Development of object oriented program `SONSHO` for strength evaluation. Manual of Version 4.0 program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosogai, Hiromi [Joyo Industries Co. Ltd., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Kasahara, Naoto

    1998-07-01

    Object Oriented Program `SONSHO` predicts creep fatigue damage factors based on Elevated Temperature Structural Design Guide for `Monju` and other various procedures from stress classification data obtained from structural analysis results. From view point of program implementation, it is required that external programs interface and frequent revise from update of material and creep fatigue evaluation methods. Object oriented approach was continuously introduced to improve these aspects of the program. Version 4.0 has the following new functions. (1) Material strength library was implemented as an independent program module based on Microsoft Active X control and 32bitDLL technologies, which can be accessed by general Windows programs. (2) Self instruction system `Wizard` enables manual less operation. (3) Microsoft common object model (COM) was adopted for program interface, and this program can communicate with Excel sheet data on memory. Sonsho Ver.4.0 can work on Windows 95 or Windows NT4.0. Microsoft Visual Basic 5.0 (Enterprose Edition) and Microsoft FORTRAN Power Station 4.0 were adopted for program. (author)

  10. The Joint Committee on Standards for Educational Evaluation's "The Program Evaluation Standards: How to Assess Evaluations of Educational Programs" [Book Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Joe B.; Patton, Michael Quinn

    1994-01-01

    Two reviews consider the program-evaluation standards of the Joint Committee on Standards for Educational Evaluations. This edition makes the complexity, risks, and power of evaluation clear through descriptive writing and case illustrations. The organization and content of the standards document are described. (SLD)

  11. Objective Evaluation in an Online Geographic Information System Certificate Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott L. WALKER

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective Evaluation in an Online Geographic Information System Certificate Program Asst. Professor. Dr. Scott L. WALKER Texas State University-San Marcos San Marcos, Texas, USA ABSTRACT Departmental decisions regarding distance education programs can be subject to subjective decision-making processes influenced by external factors such as strong faculty opinions or pressure to increase student enrolment. This paper outlines an evaluation of a departmental distance-education program. The evaluation utilized several methods that strived to inject objectivity in evaluation and subsequent decision-making. A rapid multi-modal approach included evaluation methods of (1 considering the online psychosocial learning environment, (2 content analyses comparing the online version of classes to face-to-face versions, (3 cost comparisons in online vs. face-to-face classes, (4 student outcomes, (5 student retention, and (6 benchmarking. These approaches offer opportunities for departmental administrators and decision-making committees to make judgments informed by facts rather than being influenced by the emotions, beliefs, or opinions of organizational dynamics.

  12. Evaluation of medical education virtual program: P3 model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RITA REZAEE

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In e-learning, people get involved in a process and create the content (product and make it available for virtual learners. The present study was carried out in order to evaluate the first virtual master program in medical education at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences according to P3 Model. Methods: This is an evaluation research study with post single group design used to determine how effective this program was. All students 60 who participated more than one year in this virtual program and 21 experts including teachers and directors participated in this evaluation project. Based on the P3 e-learning model, an evaluation tool with 5-point Likert rating scale was designed and applied to collect the descriptive data. Results: Students reported storyboard and course design as the most desirable element of learning environment (2.30±0.76, but they declared technical support as the less desirable part (1.17±1.23. Conclusion: Presence of such framework in this regard and using it within the format of appropriate tools for evaluation of e-learning in universities and higher education institutes, which present e-learning curricula in the country, may contribute to implementation of the present and future e-learning curricula efficiently and guarantee its implementation in an appropriate way.

  13. Evaluation of Medical Education virtual Program: P3 model

    Science.gov (United States)

    REZAEE, RITA; SHOKRPOUR, NASRIN; BOROUMAND, MARYAM

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In e-learning, people get involved in a process and create the content (product) and make it available for virtual learners. The present study was carried out in order to evaluate the first virtual master program in medical education at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences according to P3 Model. Methods: This is an evaluation research study with post single group design used to determine how effective this program was. All students 60 who participated more than one year in this virtual program and 21 experts including teachers and directors participated in this evaluation project. Based on the P3 e-learning model, an evaluation tool with 5-point Likert rating scale was designed and applied to collect the descriptive data. Results: Students reported storyboard and course design as the most desirable element of learning environment (2.30±0.76), but they declared technical support as the less desirable part (1.17±1.23). Conclusion: Presence of such framework in this regard and using it within the format of appropriate tools for evaluation of e-learning in universities and higher education institutes, which present e-learning curricula in the country, may contribute to implementation of the present and future e-learning curricula efficiently and guarantee its implementation in an appropriate way. PMID:27795971

  14. Gompertz - A program for evaluation and comparison of survival curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemera, P; Doubal, S

    2000-07-01

    Principles, properties and use of a program for evaluation of survival curves are described. Parameters of Gompertzian mortality curves are computed from survival data of two populations by help of nonlinear regression. The differences in parameters of both curves are evaluated statistically. This method evaluates effectively even survival data of very small populations. The results are presented in numeric, verbal and graphic forms. Finally, reading of the results is offered to distinguish changes corresponding to altered aging rate from changes caused by influences not affecting the basic mechanism of aging. Program GOMPERTZ in the form of Microsoft Excel workbook equipped with Visual Basic procedures is offered free through e-mail (klemera@faf.cuni.cz).

  15. EPO Program and Product Evaluation Throughout the Development Lifecycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, C.; Butcher, G. J.

    2013-12-01

    Evaluation of successful education and public outreach (EPO) programs and products is becoming increasingly important for the continued development of such efforts. This presentation will detail the tools and techniques used to evaluate two EPO efforts- 1) NASA's REEL Science Communications Contest and Video Production Workshop, and 2) the 'Sensors, Circuits, and Satellites' product. A primary challenge with evaluating any EPO product geared towards children and students is the limitation on collecting information from minors. With regards to the REEL Science Contest, over 120 students participated in producing and entering 48 contest entries but because of the Office of Budget and Management (OBM) regulations that restrict collecting feedback from more than nine individuals, we were only able to collect evaluation data from a small subset of this group. The five winning students who participated in the final workshop took part in the evaluation. The benefit of a small group size is that it allowed for more in-depth one-on-one interviews with each student. The feedback collected from this evaluation offered valuable insight into what worked well along with areas of improvement for futures contests and workshops. The REEL Science video contest had another evaluation opportunity since NASA scientists, communications experts, and producers also participated in the program and worked directly with the students. A survey was administered for this audience in an effort to gauge the perceived value and success of the program from the perspective of the originating institution. We found that if a program is well received, the program is more likely to receive future support. Additionally, this component of the program evaluation provided useful feedback and lessons learned to help optimize the role of the internal audience for similar programs in the future. Implementing formative evaluation is key to developing a successful EPO product development. Collecting data at key

  16. The Economic Evaluation of Lighting Energy-saving Modification Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Xing-zheng

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Many lighting energy-saving modification programs have the embarrassment of uneconomical. This papertakes into account economic evaluation to solve the problem. According to illuminative equipments price, lifespan and power consumption, the optimal program will be found under the limited investment. Firstly, the benefit ratio will be used to evaluate on the equipments modification necessity, and get the modification sequence. If the biggest benefit ratio is in different equipment simultaneously, the better one will be selected in terms of relative investment recovery period. The relative remaining time is innovatively introduced into economic evaluation for determining the equipments modification locations. Then the system operation flowchart is to prove that the scheme is workable.

  17. An economic evaluation of public programs for internationalization: the case of the Diagnostic Program in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansino, José M; Lopez-Melendo, Jaime; Pablo-Romero, María del P; Sánchez-Braza, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    This paper evaluates the Diagnostic Program in Spain which is a publicly funded program to promote internationalization of companies located in Andalusia (south of Spain). The methodology used is the propensity score-matching. The treatment group consists of companies which participated in the Program until 2008. The control group has companies which planned to participate in the Program but had not done so up to that date. The response variable measures the ratio of export to total sales for each company. Four covariates have been taken into account: activity, location, sales and number of employees. The analysis leads to the conclusion that the companies that participated in the Program improved their ratio of exports to total sales by about 10 percentage points.

  18. The evaluation of a digital information literacy program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Sieberhagen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The article reports on the evaluation of a digital information literacy program (DILP to determine the program’s effectiveness in enhancing students’ digital information literacy skills. The DILP was originally designed and developed for the South African student, as member of Generation Y, but was adapted after identifying the demographics and characteristics of Generation Z.  This information was incorporated in the existing DILP, therefore making the DILP applicable to and useful for both Generations Y and Z. New learning technologies were identified and incorporated in the DILP to enhance students’ learning experience. An analysis of reported research indicated that there is a lack in the evaluation of programs to determine their effectiveness in enhancing the digital information literacy skills of students by using an outcomes assessment instrument. The development of an outcomes assessment instrument, which is based on internationally benchmarked information literacy competency standards and their outcomes, are presented. Evidence is provided of the effectiveness of the program in order to prove its worth as an instructional program.  Recommendations are made on how digital information literacy programs may be improved to be more effective in enhancing students’ digital information literacy skills

  19. [Effectiveness evaluation of the drug dependency outpatient program "STEM"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Ayumi; Satou, Yoshitaka; Matsumoto, Toshihiko

    2016-02-01

    A cognitive behavioral therapy program entitled "STEM" was implemented with 42 drug dependent outpatients at Okayama Psychiatric Medical Center. Characteristics of 1 group who completed the program were examined, with the effectiveness of the program evaluated through monitoring longitudinal changes over a period of 8.5 months. Results showed that the percentage of patients who completed the program was 52.4% (22 out of 42 people), those who completed had a longer educational history than the dropouts, a high proportion of those who completed held some form of employment and that their motivation to recover was high. Evaluation results of the program effectiveness showed significant improvement in short-term drug self-efficacy, with a tendency for later improvement in feelings and emotions also observed. While a certain level of effectiveness was proven, approximately half the group dropped out; so it is necessary to consider alternative options at an early stage for participants with a high risk of dropout, such as strengthening individual support based on their specific characteristics.

  20. Evaluating disease management program effectiveness: an introduction to survival analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Ariel; Adams, John L; Roberts, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    Currently, the most widely used method in the disease management industry for evaluating program effectiveness is the "total population approach." This model is a pretest-posttest design, with the most basic limitation being that without a control group, there may be sources of bias and/or competing extraneous confounding factors that offer plausible rationale explaining the change from baseline. Survival analysis allows for the inclusion of data from censored cases, those subjects who either "survived" the program without experiencing the event (e.g., achievement of target clinical levels, hospitalization) or left the program prematurely, due to disenrollement from the health plan or program, or were lost to follow-up. Additionally, independent variables may be included in the model to help explain the variability in the outcome measure. In order to maximize the potential of this statistical method, validity of the model and research design must be assured. This paper reviews survival analysis as an alternative, and more appropriate, approach to evaluating DM program effectiveness than the current total population approach.

  1. Evaluation informs coalition programming for environmental tobacco smoke reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Mary E; Mueller, Keith J; Harrop, Dianne

    2003-01-01

    The objective for this formative evaluation was to establish baseline data for informing a community coalition's strategic planning in environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) risk reduction. The coalition had chosen 3 targeted settings for ETS risk reduction: restaurants, childcare facilities, and government buildings. The evaluation methodology involved telephone interviews (restaurants, n = 805; governmental buildings, n = 258) and mailed surveys (childcare facilities, n = 1,142). Data on county residents and businesses were used for comparison purposes and were analyzed from the Nebraska Social Climate Survey (2001; n = 558). Evaluation baseline findings showed that licensed childcare facilities were more ETS knowledgeable, less ETS tolerant, and more smoke-free than restaurants. Residents were more bothered by ETS than what restaurant proprietors perceived. The majority of governmental buildings were not smoke-free. Conclusions were that community health nurse evaluators can provide coalitions with formative evaluative data to inform strategic planning and increase the likelihood of effective program interventions for community impact on ETS.

  2. Energy extension service pilot program evaluation report: the first year. Volume I: evaluation summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-09-01

    The evaluation report of the Energy Extension Service in the 10 pilot states - Alabama, Connecticut, Michigan, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Wyoming, Washington, Wisconsin - contains 8 chapters. Chapter II describes the methodology and Chapter III summarizes the findings. Chapters IV, V, and VI trace the progression from program operations through client impact to energy savings. Chapter VII analyzes the factors that might contribute to making some programs work more effectively than others. The service delivery programs are divided into 3 categories according to the target audience served: residential homeowners and renters, small businesses, and public institutions. Chapter VIII discusses the implications for the National EES Program. (MCW)

  3. Vectorization, parallelization and implementation of nuclear codes =MVP/GMVP, QMDRELP, EQMD, HSABC, CURBAL, STREAM V3.1, TOSCA, EDDYCAL, RELAP5/MOD2/C36-05, RELAP5/MOD3= on the VPP500 computer system. Progress report 1995 fiscal year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Hideo; Fujita, Toyozo [Fujitsu Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Kawai, Wataru; Harada, Hiroo; Gorai, Kazuo; Yamasaki, Kazuhiko; Shoji, Makoto; Fujii, Minoru

    1996-06-01

    At Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering, time consuming eight nuclear codes suggested by users have been vectorized, parallelized on the VPP500 computer system. In addition, two nuclear codes used on the VP2600 computer system were implemented on the VPP500 computer system. Neutron and photon transport calculation code MVP/GMVP and relativistic quantum molecular dynamics code QMDRELP have been parallelized. Extended quantum molecular dynamics code EQMD and adiabatic base calculation code HSABC have been parallelized and vectorized. Ballooning turbulence simulation code CURBAL, 3-D non-stationary compressible fluid dynamics code STREAM V3.1, operating plasma analysis code TOSCA and eddy current analysis code EDDYCAL have been vectorized. Reactor safety analysis code RELAP5/MOD2/C36-05 and RELAP5/MOD3 were implemented on the VPP500 computer system. (author)

  4. Optimizing the post-graduate institutional program evaluation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lypson, Monica L; Prince, Mark E P; Kasten, Steven J; Osborne, Nicholas H; Cohan, Richard H; Kowalenko, Terry; Dougherty, Paul J; Reynolds, R Kevin; Spires, M Catherine; Kozlow, Jeffrey H; Gitlin, Scott D

    2016-02-17

    Reviewing program educational efforts is an important component of postgraduate medical education program accreditation. The post-graduate review process has evolved over time to include centralized oversight based on accreditation standards. The institutional review process and the impact on participating faculty are topics not well described in the literature. We conducted multiple Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycles to identify and implement areas for change to improve productivity in our institutional program review committee. We also conducted one focus group and six in-person interviews with 18 committee members to explore their perspectives on the committee's evolution. One author (MLL) reviewed the transcripts and performed the initial thematic coding with a PhD level research associate and identified and categorized themes. These themes were confirmed by all participating committee members upon review of a detailed summary. Emergent themes were triangulated with the University of Michigan Medical School's Admissions Executive Committee (AEC). We present an overview of adopted new practices to the educational program evaluation process at the University of Michigan Health System that includes standardization of meetings, inclusion of resident members, development of area content experts, solicitation of committed committee members, transition from paper to electronic committee materials, and focus on continuous improvement. Faculty and resident committee members identified multiple improvement areas including the ability to provide high quality reviews of training programs, personal and professional development, and improved feedback from program trainees. A standing committee that utilizes the expertise of a group of committed faculty members and which includes formal resident membership has significant advantages over ad hoc or other organizational structures for program evaluation committees.

  5. Evaluation of Enova's heating programs; Evaluering av Enovas varmeprogrammer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, Ingeborg; Grorud, Christian; Heldal, Nicolai; Trong, Maj Dang

    2006-07-01

    An evaluation of Enova's heating program is presented. The central point was to evaluate to which degree Enova's heating program had resulted in increased supply of renewable energy for heating purposes to the Norwegian energy system. Main results are presented in part 1, chapter 1 to 5, while the facts and analyses behind the evaluation are presented in part 2, chapter I to VII. The main conclusion is that the program seen as one has had triggering effect on the market. The program has thus provided results in the form of increased supply of heating energy. Because of the project limitations and the lack of systematically documented baselines in the procedures, there are insecurities connected to the exact data registered. This makes quantification of the results difficult (ml)

  6. Evaluating an interdisciplinary undergraduate training program in health promotion research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Shalini; Harvey, Richard H; Stokols, Daniel; Pine, Kathleen H; Fuqua, Juliana; Shokair, Said M; Whiteley, John M

    2009-04-01

    The University of California at Irvine Interdisciplinary Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (ID-SURE) program had three objectives: (1) designing an interdisciplinary health promotion training curriculum for undergraduate research fellows; (2) developing measures for evaluating and assessing program-related educational processes and products; and (3) comparing these educational process and product measures between groups of students who did or did not receive the training. A total of 101 students participated in the ID-SURE program during 2005, 2006, and 2007. A longitudinal research design was employed whereby students' interdisciplinary attitudes and behaviors were assessed at the beginning and end of the training program. The interdisciplinary and intellectual qualities of students' academic and research products were assessed at the conclusion of the training activities. In addition, ID-SURE participants' interdisciplinary attitudes, behaviors, and research products were compared to those of 70 participants in another fellowship program that did not have an interdisciplinary training component. Exposing undergraduate research fellows to the interdisciplinary curriculum led to increased participation in, and positive attitudes about, interdisciplinary classroom and laboratory activities. Products, such as the integrative and interdisciplinary quality of student research projects, showed no differences when compared to those of undergraduates who were not exposed to the interdisciplinary curriculum. However, undergraduates exposed to the training engaged in more interdisciplinary behaviors at the end of the program than students who were not trained in interdisciplinary research techniques. The findings from this study offer evidence for the efficacy of the ID-SURE program for training undergraduate students in transdisciplinary concepts, methods, and skills that are needed for effective scientific collaboration. Additionally, this study makes two important

  7. Clemson University Science Master's Program in Sustainable and Resilient Infrastructure: A program evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sell, Elizabeth Eberhart

    The Clemson University Science Master's Program (SMP) in Sustainable and Resilient Infrastructure is a program which aims to link engineering, materials, construction, environment, architecture, business, and public policy to produce graduates with unique holistic perspective and expertise to immediately contribute to the workforce in the area of sustainable and resilient infrastructure. A program evaluation of the SMP has been performed to study the effectiveness of the SMP and identify areas where the goals and vision of the SMP are achieved and areas where improvements can be made. This was completed by analysis of trends within survey responses, review of Master's thesis reports, and review of courses taken. It was found that the SMP has facilitated new interdisciplinary research collaborations of faculty in different concentration areas within the Glenn Department of Civil Engineering, as well as collaboration with faculty in other departments. It is recommended that a course which provides instruction in all eight competency areas be required for all SMP students to provide a comprehensive overview and ensure all students are exposed to concepts of all competency areas. While all stakeholders are satisfied with the program and believe it has been successful thus far, efforts do need to be made as the program moves forward to address and improve some items that have been mentioned as needing improvement. The concerns about concentration courses, internship planning, and advising should be addressed. This evaluation provides benefits to prospective students, current SMP participants, and outside program supporters. The goal of this evaluation is to provide support that the SMP is an effective and worthwhile program for participating students, while attempting to identify any necessary program improvements and provide recommendations for achieving these improvements. This goal has been accomplished.

  8. Evaluating the SOS suicide prevention program: a replication and extension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glanovsky Jaime

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suicide is a leading cause of death for children and youth in the United States. Although school based programs have been the principal vehicle for youth suicide prevention efforts for over two decades, few have been systematically evaluated. This study examined the effectiveness of the Signs of Suicide (SOS prevention program in reducing suicidal behavior. Methods 4133 students in 9 high schools in Columbus, Georgia, western Massachusetts, and Hartford, Connecticut were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups during the 2001–02 and 2002–03 school years. Self-administered questionnaires were completed by students in both groups approximately 3 months after program implementation. Results Significantly lower rates of suicide attempts and greater knowledge and more adaptive attitudes about depression and suicide were observed among students in the intervention group. Students' race/ethnicity, grade, and gender did not alter the impact of the intervention on any of the outcomes assessed in this analysis. Conclusion This study has confirmed preliminary analysis of Year 1 data with a larger and more racially and socio-economically diverse sample. SOS continues to be the only universal school-based suicide prevention program to demonstrate significant effects of self-reported suicide attempts in a study utilizing a randomized experimental design. Moreover, the beneficial effects of SOS were observed among high school-aged youth from diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds, highlighting the program's utility as a universal prevention program. Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT000387855.

  9. Dissemination of Technology to Evaluate Healthy Food Incentive Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Darcy A; Hunt, Alan R; Merritt, Katie; Shon, En-Jung; Pike, Stephanie N

    2017-03-01

    Federal policy supports increased implementation of monetary incentive interventions for chronic disease prevention among low-income populations. This study describes how a Prevention Research Center, working with a dissemination partner, developed and distributed technology to support nationwide implementation and evaluation of healthy food incentive programming focused on Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program recipients. FM Tracks, an iOS-based application and website, was developed to standardize evaluation methods for healthy food incentive program implementation at direct-to-consumer markets. This evaluation examined diffusion and adoption of the technology over 9 months (July 2015-March 2016). Data were analyzed in 2016. FM Tracks was disseminated to 273 markets affiliated with 37 regional networks in 18 states and Washington, DC. All markets adopted the sales transaction data collection feature, with nearly all recording at least one Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (99.3%) and healthy food incentive (97.1%) transaction. A total of 43,493 sales transactions were recorded. By the ninth month of technology dissemination, markets were entering individual sales transactions using the application (34.5%) and website (29.9%) and aggregated transactions via website (35.6%) at similar rates. Use of optional evaluation features like recording a customer ID with individual transactions increased successively with a low of 22.2% during the first month to a high of 69.2% in the ninth month. Systematic and widely used evaluation technology creates possibilities for pragmatic research embedded within ongoing, real-world implementation of food access interventions. Technology dissemination requires supportive technical assistance and continuous refinement that can be advanced through academic-practitioner partnerships. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to isoleucine-proline-proline (IPP) and valine-proline-proline (VPP) and maintenance of normal blood pressure (ID 661, 1831, 1832, 2891, further assessment) pursuant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following a request from the European Commission, pursuant to Article 13.1 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies was asked to provide a scientific opinion on a health claim related to isoleucine-proline-proline (IPP) and valine-proline-proline (VPP......) and maintenance of normal blood pressure. The food constituent that is the subject of the claim, the tripeptides isoleucine-proline-proline (IPP) and valine-proline-proline (VPP), is sufficiently characterised. The claimed effect, maintenance of normal blood pressure, is a beneficial physiological effect...

  11. The value of student portfolios to evaluate undergraduate nursing programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlowicz, K A

    2000-01-01

    A growing trend in nursing education is the use of student portfolios for program evaluation. Incorporating portfolio analysis into a school's evaluation plan requires that faculty consider how the benefits and limitations of the portfolio development process impact the entire curriculum. The primary benefit of portfolio evaluation is that it permits the correlation of competencies attained by graduates with curricular outcomes. However, portfolio development also promotes increased student responsibility for learning, enhances faculty-student interaction, and facilitates changes in curriculum and instruction. The principal limitations of portfolio evaluation are the lack of research-based evidence that demonstrates the validity and reliability of portfolio analysis, time required to create a portfolio, and documentation storage.

  12. Evaluating the quality and effectiveness of hazardous waste training programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolpa, R.L.; Haffenden, R.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Weaver, M.A. [Headquarters Air Force Materiel Command, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH (United States)

    1996-05-01

    An installation`s compliance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste regulations is strongly dependent on the knowledge, skill, and behavior of all individuals involved in the generation and management of hazardous waste. Recognizing this, Headquarters Air Force Materiel Command (HQ/AFMC) determined that an in-depth evaluation of hazardous waste training programs at each AFMC installation was an appropriate element in assessing the overall effectiveness of installation hazardous waste management programs in preventing noncompliant conditions. Consequently, pursuant to its authority under Air Force Instruction (AFI) 32-7042, Solid and Hazardous Waste Compliance (May 12, 1994) to support and maintain hazardous waste training, HQ/AFMC directed Argonne National Laboratory to undertake the Hazardous Waste Training Initiative. This paper summarizes the methodology employed in performing the evaluation and presents the initiative`s salient conclusions.

  13. Evaluation of a compassion fatigue resiliency program for oncology nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Patricia; Deshields, Teresa; Berger, Julia Allen; Clarke, Marty; Olsen, Sarah; Chen, Ling

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate a resiliency program designed to educate oncology nurses about compassion fatigue. Descriptive pilot study. A National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center in the midwestern United States. 13 oncology nurses employed in an outpatient infusion center. Nurses attended a five-week program involving five 90-minute sessions on compassion fatigue resiliency. A pre- and post-test design, using repeated measures, was conducted over six months. Scores on the Professional Quality of Life (ProQOL) IV, Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey, Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R), and the Nursing Job Satisfaction Scale. Long-term benefits were realized from the program. Secondary traumatization scores on the ProQOL IV declined immediately after the program, remained down at three months, and then dropped again at six months, with a statistically significant mean difference compared with baseline. The average IES-R total scores improved significantly overall and for each of the three postintervention time points. Participants evaluated the program positively with respect to their ability to apply and benefit from resiliency techniques. This is the first reported study to show benefits gained from a compassion fatigue intervention program. Participants received useful strategies for managing stress at work and home. Compassion fatigue is a prevalent condition among healthcare providers. Development of resiliency to compassion fatigue may improve decision making, clarity of communication, and patient and nurse satisfaction. Self-regulation offers an approach to reduce stress during a perceived threat. Working by intention reduces reactivity in the workplace and makes communication more intentional and, therefore, effective.

  14. Evaluating program effects on institutional delivery in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuestion, Michael J; Velasquez, Anibal

    2006-07-01

    We evaluate the joint effects of two targeted Peruvian health programs on a mother's choice of whether to deliver in a public emergency obstetric care (EmOC) facility. The national maternal and child health insurance, or SMI Program, provided delivery care coverage to Peru's poorest households beginning in 1998. During 1996-2002, Proyecto 2000 sought to improve the quality of EmOC and increase utilization of public EmOC facilities in the districts reporting the highest maternal and neonatal mortality levels. Our data come from the Proyecto 2000 endline evaluation, which sampled 5335 mothers living in the catchment areas of 29 treatment and 29 matched control EmOC facilities. Using propensity scoring and two quality of care indices, we find significantly higher quality of care in Proyecto 2000 treatment facilities. Using variance components logistic models, we find a mother enrolled in the SMI Program was more likely to have delivered her last child in a public EmOC, controlling for household constraints. Residence in a Proyecto 2000 treatment area did not significantly affect the choice. A cross-level interaction term was insignificant, indicating the two program effects were independent.

  15. Impact evaluation for the Manufactured Housing Acquisition Program: Technical appendix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, A.D.; Taylor, Z.T.; Schrock, D.W.; Kavanaugh, D.C.; Chin, R.I.

    1995-10-01

    This document supplements the Manufactured Housing Acquisition Program (MAP) impact evaluation report, Lee et al. (1995). MAP is a voluntary energy-efficiency program for HUD-code manufactured homes conducted in the Pacific Northwest beginning in April 1992. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) prepared this and the impact evaluation reports for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville). Lee et al. (1995) presents the objectives, methodology, and findings of the program evaluation. This report presents more details about specific aspects of the analysis. The authors used a three-tier approach to analyze the energy consumption of MAP and baseline homes. Chapter 2 discusses Tier 1, the billing data and simplified regression analysis. Chapter 3 presents the details of the Tier 2 analysis, the PRInceton Scorekeeping Method (PRISM). Chapter 4 presents details of the primary analysis technique that they used, a comprehensive regression analysis. Chapter 5 and 6 review two other studies of energy savings associated with MAP. Chapter 5 discusses the simulation model analysis conducted by Ecotope, Inc. Chapter 6 reviews the analysis by Regional Economic Research conducted for three Pacific Northwest investor-owned utilities. The final chapter, Chapter 7, presents details of the Bonneville levelized cost methodology used to estimate the cost of energy savings associated with MAP. Results are presented and discussed in many cases for the three different climate zones found in the Pacific Northwest. 18 refs., 29 tabs.

  16. Threshold evaluation data revision and computer program enhancement. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-02-27

    The Threshold Evaluation System was developed to assist the Division of Buildings and Community Systems of the Department of Energy in performing preliminary evaluation of projects being considered for funding. In addition, the evaluation has been applied to on-going projects, because information obtained through RD and D may alter the expected benefits and costs of a project, making it necessary to reevaluate project funding. The system evaluates each project according to its expected energy savings and costs. A number of public and private sector criteria are calculated, upon which comparisons between projects may be based. A summary of the methodology is given in Appendix B. The purpose of this task is to upgrade both the quality of the data used for input to the system and the usefulness and efficiency of the computer program used to perform the analysis. The modifications required to produce a better, more consistent set of data are described in Section 2. Program changes that have had a significant impact on the methodology are discussed in Section 3, while those that affected only the computer code are presented as a system flow diagram and program listing in Appendix C. These improvements in the project evaluation methodology and data will provide BCS with a more efficient and comprehensive management tool. The direction of future work will be toward integrating this system with a large scale (at ORNL) so that information used by both systems may be stored in a common data base. A discussion of this, and other unresolved problems is given in Section 4.

  17. Physical protection evaluation methodology program development and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Janghoon; Yoo, Hosik [Korea Institute of Nuclear Non-proliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    It is essential to develop a reliable physical protection evaluation methodology for applying physical protection concept to the design stage. The methodology can be used to assess weak points and improve performance not only for the design stage but also for nuclear facilities in operation. Analyzing physical protection property of nuclear facilities is not a trivial work since there are many interconnected factors affecting overall performance. Therefore several international projects have been organized to develop a systematic physical protection evaluation methodology. INPRO (The International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles) and GIF PRPP (Generation IV International Forum Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection) methodology are among the most well-known evaluation methodologies. INPRO adopts a checklist type of questionnaire and has a strong point in analyzing overall characteristic of facilities in a qualitative way. COMPRE program has been developed to help general users apply COMPRE methodology to nuclear facilities. In this work, COMPRE program development and a case study of the hypothetical nuclear facility are presented. The development of COMPRE program and a case study for hypothetic facility is presented in this work. The case study shows that COMPRE PP methodology can be a useful tool to assess the overall physical protection performance of nuclear facilities. To obtain meaningful results from COMPRE PP methodology, detailed information and comprehensive analysis are required. Especially, it is not trivial to calculate reliable values for PPSE (Physical Protection System Effectiveness) and C (Consequence), while it is relatively straightforward to evaluate LI (Legislative and Institutional framework), MC (Material Control) and HR (Human Resources). To obtain a reliable PPSE value, comprehensive information about physical protection system, vital area analysis and realistic threat scenario assessment are required. Like

  18. 75 FR 26283 - Proposed Collection, Submission for OMB Review, Museums for America Grant Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-11

    ... Program Evaluation AGENCY: Institute of Museum and Library Services, The National Foundation on the Arts... for America Grant Program Evaluation. The 60-day Notice for ``Museums for America Grant Program... Grant Program Evaluation. OMB Number: To be determined. Agency Number: 3137. Frequency: One...

  19. A Program Evaluation Process to Meet the Needs of English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellante, Donna; Donne, Vicki

    2013-01-01

    The process of program evaluation was utilized to evaluate the education program, provide information to make decisions on its ability to comply with mandates from the state education department, and develop or improve the program to meet the goals of the new initiative to meet the needs of English language learners. The program evaluation process…

  20. National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program: the Hydrogeochemical Stream Sediment Reconnaissance Program at LLNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, G.H.

    1980-08-01

    From early 1975 to mid 1979, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) participated in the Hydrogeochemical Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR), part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). The Laboratory was initially responsible for collecting, analyzing, and evaluating sediment and water samples from approximately 200,000 sites in seven western states. Eventually, however, the NURE program redefined its sampling priorities, objectives, schedules, and budgets, with the increasingly obvious result that LLNL objectives and methodologies were not compatible with those of the NURE program office, and the LLNL geochemical studies were not relevant to the program goal. The LLNL portion of the HSSR program was consequently terminated, and all work was suspended by June 1979. Of the 38,000 sites sampled, 30,000 were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analyses (INAA), delayed neutron counting (DNC), optical emission spectroscopy (OES), and automated chloride-sulfate analyses (SC). Data from about 13,000 sites have been formally reported. From each site, analyses were published of about 30 of the 60 elements observed. Uranium mineralization has been identified at several places which were previously not recognized as potential uranium source areas, and a number of other geochemical anomalies were discovered.

  1. Early Evaluation Findings From a Federally Funded Training Program: The Public Health Associate Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobelson, Robyn K; Young, Andrea C; Wigington, Corinne J; Duncan, Heather

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) created the Public Health Associate Program (PHAP) to establish a continuous source of public health professionals who can deliver frontline services at the federal, state, tribal, local, and territorial levels. The article describes preliminary evaluation findings for PHAP. The evaluation's primary purposes are to assess the quality and effectiveness of PHAP, determine its value and impact, and provide information to continuously improve the program. Because the evaluation is both formative and summative and focuses on aggregate outputs and outcomes of PHAP, the methodology is complex and builds over time as different cohorts cycle into and out of the program. Results presented are outcomes of various Web-based surveys and reporting systems. Four PHAP cohorts, consisting of 579 individuals, participated in 1 or more of the evaluation activities described in this article. The majority of participants report satisfaction with their PHAP experiences, and 74% of recent graduates indicate they are continuing their careers or education in public health immediately after program completion. Seventy-eight percent of recent PHAP graduates who accept a job in public health are employed by the federal government. One year post-PHAP, 74% of alumni report that PHAP has been influential in their careers. CDC's investment in PHAP has increased the capacity and capabilities of the public health workforce. Results presented are early indicators of program quality, effectiveness, and impact. Today's public health workers are asked to do more with less, in the face of a dynamic array of complex public health challenges. PHAP offers public health agencies assistance in tackling these losses and challenges.

  2. Implementing and evaluating a program to facilitate chronic disease prevention and screening in primary care: a mixed methods program evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Manca, Donna Patricia; Aubrey-Bassler, Kris; Kandola, Kami; Aguilar, Carolina; Campbell-Scherer, Denise; Sopcak, Nicolette; O’Brien, Mary Ann; Meaney, Christopher; Faria, Vee; Baxter, Julia; Moineddin, Rahim; Salvalaggio, Ginetta; Green, Lee; Cave, Andrew; Grunfeld, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Background The objectives of this paper are to describe the planned implementation and evaluation of the Building on Existing Tools to Improve Chronic Disease Prevention and Screening in Primary Care (BETTER 2) program which originated from the BETTER trial. The pragmatic trial, informed by the Chronic Care Model, demonstrated the effectiveness of an approach to Chronic Disease Prevention and Screening (CDPS) involving the use of a new role, the prevention practitioner. The desired goals of t...

  3. Evaluation of spacecraft technology programs (effects on communication satellite business ventures), volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenburg, J. S.; Kaplan, M.; Fishman, J.; Hopkins, C.

    1985-01-01

    The computational procedures used in the evaluation of spacecraft technology programs that impact upon commercial communication satellite operations are discussed. Computer programs and data bases are described.

  4. Evaluation of the hypertension disease management program in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Younmi; Lee, Kunsei; Shin, Eunyoung; Kim, Hyeongsu; June, Kyung Ja

    2010-07-01

    This study evaluated how the Hypertension Disease Management Program (HDMP) affects patient's blood pressure, knowledge, health behaviors, and use of medical services. Evaluation was performed by 2 measures, which were before and after comparison within the management group (n = 210) and comparison between the management group and control group (n = 1050) in 2005. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure of management group significantly decreased from 137.5 and 86.0 mm Hg to 131.2 and 83.8 mm Hg (P management techniques significantly increased after HDMP. However, there was no significant difference in the use of medical service between the disease management group and the control group. This study showed that the HDMP improved lifestyle and reduced blood pressure on the disease management group, but changed neither medical costs nor use of medical services. Long-term evaluation should be performed to determine if the HDMP reduce medical costs and use of medical services.

  5. Evaluating the Maturity of Cybersecurity Programs for Building Control Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glantz, Clifford S.; Somasundaram, Sriram; Mylrea, Michael E.; Underhill, Ronald M.; Nicholls, Andrew K.

    2016-08-29

    The cyber-physical security threat to buildings is complex, non-linear, and rapidly evolving as operational and information technologies converge and connect buildings to cyberspace. Cyberattacks on buildings can exploit smart building controls and breach corporate networks, causing financial and reputational damage. This may result in the loss of sensitive building information or the disruption of, or damage to, the systems necessary for the safe and efficient operation of buildings. For the buildings and facility infrastructure, there is a need for a robust national cybersecurity strategy for buildings, guidance on the selection and implementation of appropriate cybersecurity controls for buildings, an approach to evaluate the maturity and adequacy of the cybersecurity programs. To provide an approach for evaluating the maturity of the cybersecurity programs for building control systems, the US Department of Energy’s widely used Cybersecurity Capability and Maturity Model (C2M2) has been adapted into a building control systems version. The revised model, the Buildings-C2M2 (B-C2M2) provides maturity level indicators for cybersecurity programmatic domains. A “B-C2M2 Lite” version allows facility managers and building control system engineers, or information technology personnel to perform rapid self-assessments of their cybersecurity program. Both tools have been pilot tested on several facilities. This paper outlines the concept of a maturity model, describes the B-C2M2 tools, presents results and observations from the pilot assessments, and lays out plans for future work.

  6. 25 CFR 36.50 - Standard XVII-School program evaluation and needs assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Standard XVII-School program evaluation and needs... SITUATIONS Evaluation of Educational Standards § 36.50 Standard XVII—School program evaluation and needs... of this evaluation will be to determine the effects and quality of school programs and to improve...

  7. 7 CFR 634.50 - Program and project monitoring and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program and project monitoring and evaluation. 634.50... Evaluation § 634.50 Program and project monitoring and evaluation. (a) Comprehensive USDA/EPA joint water... and for general RCWP program management. (2) Monitoring, evaluation, and analysis is a joint...

  8. Multimethod Strategy for Assessing Program Fidelity: The National Evaluation of the Revised G.R.E.A.T. Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbensen, Finn-Aage; Matsuda, Kristy N.; Taylor, Terrance J.; Peterson, Dana

    2011-01-01

    This study reports the results of the process evaluation component of the Process and Outcome Evaluation of the Gang Resistance Education and Training (G.R.E.A.T.) program. The process evaluation consisted of multiple methods to assess program fidelity: (a) observations of G.R.E.A.T. Officer Trainings (G.O.T); (b) surveys and interviews of…

  9. Economic evaluation of a comprehensive teenage pregnancy prevention program: pilot program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Marjorie S; Ross, Joseph S; Bilodeau, Roseanne; Richter, Rosemary S; Palley, Jane E; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2009-12-01

    Previous research has suggested that comprehensive teenage pregnancy prevention programs that address sexual education and life skills development and provide academic support are effective in reducing births among enrolled teenagers. However, there have been limited data on the costs and cost effectiveness of such programs. The study used a community-based participatory research approach to develop estimates of the cost-benefit of the Pathways/Senderos Center, a comprehensive neighborhood-based program to prevent unintended pregnancies and promote positive development for adolescents. Using data from 1997-2003, an in-time intervention analysis was conducted to determine program cost-benefit while teenagers were enrolled; an extrapolation analysis was then used to estimate accrued economic benefits and cost-benefit up to age 30 years. The program operating costs totaled $3,228,152.59 and reduced the teenage childbearing rate from 94.10 to 40.00 per 1000 teenage girls, averting $52,297.84 in total societal costs, with an economic benefit to society from program participation of $2,673,153.11. Therefore, total costs to society exceeded economic benefits by $559,677.05, or $1599.08 per adolescent per year. In an extrapolation analysis, benefits to society exceed costs by $10,474.77 per adolescent per year by age 30 years on average, with social benefits outweighing total social costs by age 20.1 years. This comprehensive teenage pregnancy prevention program is estimated to provide societal economic benefits once participants are young adults, suggesting the need to expand beyond pilot demonstrations and evaluate the long-range cost effectiveness of similarly comprehensive programs when they are implemented more widely in high-risk neighborhoods.

  10. Monitoring and evaluation of green public procurement programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adell, Aure [Ecoinstitut, Barcelona (Spain); Schaefer, Bettina [Ecoinstitut, Barcelona (Spain); Ravi, Kavita [US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Corry, Jenny [Collaborative Labeling and Appliance Standards Program (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Effective procurement policies can help governments save considerable amounts of money while also reducing energy consumption. Additionally, private sector companies which purchase large numbers of energy-consuming devices can benefit from procurement policies that minimize life-cycle energy costs. Both public and private procurement programs offer opportunities to generate market-transforming demand for energy efficient appliances and lighting fixtures. In recent years, several governments have implemented policies to procure energy efficient products and services. When deploying these policies, efforts have focused on developing resources for implementation (guidelines, energy efficiency specifications for tenders, life cycle costing tools, training, etc.) rather than defining monitoring systems to track progress against the set objectives. Implementation resources are necessary to make effective policies; however, developing Monitoring and Evaluation (M and E) mechanisms are critical to ensure that the policies are effective. The purpose of this article is to provide policy makers and procurement officials with a preliminary map of existing approaches and key components to monitor Energy Efficient Procurement (EEP) programs in order to contribute to the improvement of their own systems. Case studies are used throughout the paper to illustrate promising approaches to improve the M and E of EEP programs, from the definition of the system or data collection to complementary instruments to improve both the monitoring response and program results.

  11. Evaluation of selected outcomes of an accelerated nursing degree program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellet, Louiselle L; MacIntosh, Judy; Gibson, Cheryl H; Jefferson, Steven

    2008-02-01

    Accelerated or condensed programs in nursing have gained popularity over the last 10 years in Canada. They are designed to accommodate the learning needs of a special pool of learners with prior university education. These learners have expectations, abilities, and skills different from students in basic baccalaureate programs and so require instruction to suit their background. While accelerated programs have proliferated, there is little published evidence as to the actual number in Canada or on their effectiveness in preparing beginning practitioners who can meet the demands of the workplace. In this paper, the authors discuss selected outcomes of a pilot project wherein an accelerated option was examined as a feasible avenue for the education of Canadian professional nurses. Evaluation during and following the project was an integral component to contribute to an evidence base for nursing education decisions. Data were collected from two student cohorts and multiple stakeholders including faculty, employers, and nurse co-workers. Data were elicited on many variables but only four are addressed here. These are: scores on the national licensure examination, competency-to-practice rankings, student and employer perceptions of preparedness for practice, and manageability of students' stress levels during the program. The paper focuses on the findings pertaining to each variable and the lessons learned.

  12. An Evaluation System for the Online Training Programs in Meteorology and Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Zhi, Xiefei

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies the current evaluation system for the online training program in meteorology and hydrology. CIPP model that includes context evaluation, input evaluation, process evaluation and product evaluation differs from Kirkpatrick model including reactions evaluation, learning evaluation, transfer evaluation and results evaluation in…

  13. Evaluator and Program Manager Perceptions of Evaluation Capacity and Evaluation Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro, Leslie A.; Christie, Christina A.

    2017-01-01

    The evaluation community has demonstrated an increased emphasis and interest in evaluation capacity building in recent years. A need currently exists to better understand how to measure evaluation capacity and its potential outcomes. In this study, we distributed an online questionnaire to managers and evaluation points of contact working in…

  14. Meta-Evaluation: Experiences in an Accelerated Graduate Nurse Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardisson, Michelle; Smallheer, Benjamin; Moore, Ginny; Christenbery, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Most schools of nursing are engaged in some form of program evaluation and recognize the potential benefits in using program evaluation outcomes to influence continuous improvement in program quality. A number of factors exist that may negatively influence program evaluation quality and adversely affect the ability to make sound decisions based on program evaluation outcomes. The potential limitations that threaten program evaluation quality underscore the importance of evaluating the evaluation process itself, also known as meta-evaluation. However, there is an absence of discussion in the nursing literature of the importance of program meta-evaluation. This article seeks to address this gap in the nursing literature and illuminate the need for more schools of nursing to engage in the meta-evaluation process. By introducing 1 model of program meta-evaluation and describing our own endeavors in the program meta-evaluation process, we hope to inspire other schools of nursing to consider using a systematic and formalized process to evaluate their own program evaluation processes to ensure that data obtained from program evaluation are of optimal quality to influence sound, data-driven decisions to promote continued quality and excellence in nursing education programs.

  15. Kennedy space center cardiovascular disease risk reduction program evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine S Calderon

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Kristine S Calderon1, Charles Smallwood1, David A Tipton21Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health Services, Comprehensive Health Services, Inc., Kennedy Space Center, Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA; 2Aerospace Medicine and Occupational Health Branch, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Kennedy Space Center, FL, USAAbstract: This program evaluation examined the Kennedy Space Center (KSC Cardiovascular Disease (CVD Risk Reduction Program which aims to identify CVD risk factors and reduce these risk factors through health education phone counseling. High risk participants (those having two or more elevated lipid values are identified from monthly voluntary CVD screenings and counseled. Phone counseling consists of reviewing lab values with the participant, discussing dietary fat intake frequency using an intake questionnaire, and promoting the increase in exercise frequency. The participants are followed-up at two-months and five-months for relevant metrics including blood pressure, weight, body mass index (BMI, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL and low density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, dietary fat intake, and exercise frequency. Data for three years of the KSC CVD Program included 366 participants, average age of 49 years, 75% male, and 25% female. For those with complete two and five month follow-up data, significant baseline to two-month follow-up comparisons included decreases in systolic blood pressure (p = 0.03; diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.002; total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and dietary fat intake (all three at p < 0.0001 as well as a significant increase in exercise frequency (p = 0.04. Significant baseline to five-month follow-up comparisons included decreases in triglycerides (p = 0.05; and total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and dietary intake (all three at p < 0.0001. These program evaluation results indicate that providing brief phone health education counseling and information

  16. The Lassen Astrobiology Intern Program - Concept, Implementation and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Marais, D. J.; Dueck, S. L.; Davis, H. B.; Parenteau, M. N.; Kubo, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    The program goal was to provide a hands-on astrobiology learning experience to high school students by introducing astrobiology and providing opportunities to conduct field and lab research with NASA scientists. The program sought to increase interest in interdisciplinary science, technology, engineering, math and related careers. Lassen Volcanic National Park (LVNP), Red Bluff High School and the Ames Team of the NASA Astrobiology Institute led the program. LVNP was selected because it shares aspects of volcanism with Mars and it hosts thermal springs with microbial mat communities. Students documented volcanic deposits, springs and microbial mats. They analyzed waters and sampled rocks, water and microorganisms. They cultured microorganisms and studied chemical reactions between rocks and simulated spring waters. Each student prepared a report to present data and discuss relationships between volcanic rocks and gases, spring waters and microbial mats. At a "graduation" event the students presented their findings to the Red Bluff community. They visited Ames Research Center to tour the facilities and learn about science and technology careers. To evaluate program impact, surveys were given to students after lectures, labs, fieldwork and discussions with Ames scientists. Students' work was scored using rubrics (labs, progress reports, final report, presentation). Students took pre/post tests on core astrobiology concepts. Parents, teachers, rangers, Ames staff and students completed end-of-year surveys on program impact. Several outcomes were documented. Students had a unique and highly valued learning experience with NASA scientists. They understood what scientists do through authentic scientific work, and what scientists are like as individuals. Students became knowledgeable about astrobiology and how it can be pursued in the lab and in the field. The students' interest increased markedly in astrobiology, interdisciplinary studies and science generally.

  17. Evaluating Active U: an internet-mediated physical activity program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodrich David E

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Engaging in regular physical activity can be challenging, particularly during the winter months. To promote physical activity at the University of Michigan during the winter months, an eight-week Internet-mediated program (Active U was developed providing participants with an online physical activity log, goal setting, motivational emails, and optional team participation and competition. Methods This study is a program evaluation of Active U. Approximately 47,000 faculty, staff, and graduate students were invited to participate in the online Active U intervention in the winter of 2007. Participants were assigned a physical activity goal and were asked to record each physical activity episode into the activity log for eight weeks. Statistics for program reach, effectiveness, adoption, and implementation were calculated using the Re-Aim framework. Multilevel regression analyses were used to assess the decline in rates of data entry and goal attainment during the program, to assess the likelihood of joining a team by demographic characteristics, to test the association between various predictors and the number of weeks an individual met his or her goal, and to analyze server load. Results Overall, 7,483 individuals registered with the Active U website (≈16% of eligible, and 79% participated in the program by logging valid data at least once. Staff members, older participants, and those with a BMI P Conclusion Internet-mediated physical activity interventions that focus on physical activity logging and goal setting while incorporating team competition may help a significant percentage of the target population maintain their physical activity during the winter months.

  18. Evaluating Vocational Educators' Training Programs: A Kirkpatrick-Inspired Evaluation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravicchio, Fabrizio; Trentin, Guglielmo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the article is to describe the assessment model adopted by the SCINTILLA Project, a project in Italy aimed at the online vocational training of young, seriously-disabled subjects and their subsequent work inclusion in smart-work mode. It will thus describe the model worked out for evaluation of the training program conceived for the…

  19. Nuclear thermal rocket nozzle testing and evaluation program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidian, Kenneth O.; Kacynski, Kenneth J.

    1993-01-01

    Performance characteristics of the Nuclear Thermal Rocket can be enhanced through the use of unconventional nozzles as part of the propulsion system. The Nuclear Thermal Rocket nozzle testing and evaluation program being conducted at the NASA Lewis is outlined and the advantages of a plug nozzle are described. A facility description, experimental designs and schematics are given. Results of pretest performance analyses show that high nozzle performance can be attained despite substantial nozzle length reduction through the use of plug nozzles as compared to a convergent-divergent nozzle. Pretest measurement uncertainty analyses indicate that specific impulse values are expected to be within + or - 1.17 pct.

  20. Evaluating a Graduate Professional Development Program for Informal Science Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Jeremy Paul

    This study is an examination and evaluation of the outcomes of a series of courses that I helped build to create a graduate certificate. Specifically, I wanted to evaluate whether or not the online iteration of the Informal Science Institutions Environmental Education Graduate Certificate Program truly provided the long term professional development needed to enhance the skills of the formal and informal educators participating so that they could contribute meaningfully to the improvement of science literacy in their respective communities. My role as an internal evaluator provided an extraordinary opportunity to know the intent of the learning opportunities and why they were constructed in a particular fashion. Through the combination of my skills, personal experiences both within the certificate's predecessor and as an educator, I was uniquely qualified to explore the outcomes of this program and evaluate its effectiveness in providing a long-term professional development for participants. After conducting a literature review that emphasized a need for greater scientific literacy in communities across America, it was evident that the formal education enterprise needs the support of informal educators working on the ground in myriad different settings in ways that provide science as both content and process, learning science facts and doing real science. Through a bridging of informal science educators with formal teachers, it was thought each could learn the culture of the other, making each more fluent in accessing community resources to help make these educators more collaborative and able to bridge the classroom with the outside world. This bridge promotes ongoing, lifelong learning, which in turn can help the national goal of greater scientific literacy. This study provided insight into the thinking involved in the learners' growth as they converted theory presented in course materials into practice. Through an iterative process of reviewing the course

  1. Evaluation of a Positive Youth Development Program for Adolescents with Greater Psychosocial Needs: Integrated Views of Program Implementers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. L. Shek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available To help adolescents with greater psychosocial needs, the Tier 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes was designed and implemented by school social workers and teachers. Based on subjective outcome evaluation data collected from the program participants (n = 2,542 in 49 schools, program implementers were invited to write down five conclusions based on an integration of the evaluation findings. With reference to 245 conclusions included in the 49 evaluation reports, secondary data analyses showed that most of the conclusions concerning perceptions of the Tier 2 Program, instructors, and program effectiveness were positive. In addition, difficulties encountered and recommendations for program improvement were highlighted. In conjunction with previous evaluation findings, the present study suggests that the Tier 2 Program was well received and was perceived to be beneficial to the development of adolescents with greater psychosocial needs.

  2. Evaluation of a positive youth development program for adolescents with greater psychosocial needs: integrated views of program implementers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L; Ma, Cecilia M S; Sun, Rachel C F

    2010-10-01

    To help adolescents with greater psychosocial needs, the Tier 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes) was designed and implemented by school social workers and teachers. Based on subjective outcome evaluation data collected from the program participants (n = 2,542) in 49 schools, program implementers were invited to write down five conclusions based on an integration of the evaluation findings. With reference to 245 conclusions included in the 49 evaluation reports, secondary data analyses showed that most of the conclusions concerning perceptions of the Tier 2 Program, instructors, and program effectiveness were positive. In addition, difficulties encountered and recommendations for program improvement were highlighted. In conjunction with previous evaluation findings, the present study suggests that the Tier 2 Program was well received and was perceived to be beneficial to the development of adolescents with greater psychosocial needs.

  3. 76 FR 37371 - Agency Information Collection: Comment Request for National Gap Analysis Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-27

    ... (ICR) for a new collection of information: National Gap Analysis Program Evaluation. This notice....S. Geological Survey Agency Information Collection: Comment Request for National Gap Analysis Program Evaluation AGENCY: United States Geological Survey (USGS), Interior. ACTION: Notice of a...

  4. 76 FR 14376 - Evaluation of State Coastal Management Programs and National Estuarine Research Reserves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... Reserve and the Georgia Coastal Management Program. The National Estuarine Research Reserve evaluation... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Evaluation of State Coastal Management Programs and National Estuarine Research Reserves AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Office...

  5. Better Crunching: Recommendations for Multivariate Data Analysis Approaches for Program Impact Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Marc T.

    2016-01-01

    Extension program evaluations often present opportunities to analyze data in multiple ways. This article suggests that program evaluations can involve more sophisticated data analysis approaches than are often used. On the basis of a hypothetical program scenario and corresponding data set, two approaches to testing for evidence of program impact…

  6. Using Program Theory-Driven Evaluation Science to Crack the Da Vinci Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Stewart I.

    2005-01-01

    Program theory-driven evaluation science uses substantive knowledge, as opposed to method proclivities, to guide program evaluations. It aspires to update, clarify, simplify, and make more accessible the evolving theory of evaluation practice commonly referred to as theory-driven or theory-based evaluation. The evaluator in this chapter provides a…

  7. Thermionic Technology Program: A, Insulator test and evaluation: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobson, J.C.; Witt, T.

    1987-11-30

    The Thermionic Technology Program (TTP) consisted of two major efforts, evaluation of insulators and evaluation of thermionic converters. This report details the work performed on the insulator phase of the program. Efforts were made to better understand the mechanisms involved in the electrochemistry of insulators at elevated temperatures by modelling the ionic transport through the various layers of the insulator package. Although rigorous analytic solutions could not be obtained owing to a lack of detailed data, a simplified model indicated that alumina should not fail by depletion of aluminum for thousands of years, whereas calculations for yttria revealed a far more rapid depletion of oxygen and consequently earlier failure. Methods for microscopic and electrical testing of cylindrical insulator samples were developed, and an improved test oven design was initiated. Testing of alumina/niobium cermet samples revealed rapid failure contrary to the theoretical predictions for alumina. Large discrepancies in the initial conduction activation energy among the various samples suggested that different mechanisms could have controlled the conduction and hence the failure in different samples, although all had undergone nominally identical processing. The short lifetimes reveal how rapidly ambient conditions in thermionic power conversion can degrade the performance of insulating oxides. It was concluded that minor dopants could have been responsible for the early breakdowns. Thus, high purity materials with precise quality control will be necessary for trilayer package development. 35 refs., 28 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Evaluation of the school supplementary feeding program in peninsular malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Md Arop, M; Abdullah, A; Abdulrahman, S; Mohdjani, M

    2000-03-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the implementation of the School Supplement Feeding Program (SSFP) among primary school in terms of financial management and budget disbursement, food preparation, selection of menus and nutrient content of food served. A total of 129 schools comprising 77 national type, 31 Chinese and 21 Tamil vernacular schools in four different regions (northern, eastern, central and southern) of Peninsular Malaysia were selected for this study. The results of this cross-sectional study showed a need to improve the budget disbursement to schools. Most of the schools followed the guidelines provided by the Ministry of Education for selection of eligible children. The quality of food prepared by contracted (local community members) and voluntary (teachers) operators. The use of 10 recommended menus provided for a 2-week cycle by most of the schools has shown increased acceptance and less monotonous feeling towards the food among the children. Nutrient content of food served increased relatively with an increase in budget from RM0.45 to RM0.80 per child. Parents surveyed indicated that the program should continue as this will keep children from low income families from being hungry during school hours. A continued process of monitoring and evaluation is necessary to improve its implementation.

  9. Object-oriented fault tree evaluation program for quantitative analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson-Hine, F. A.; Koen, B. V.

    1988-01-01

    Object-oriented programming can be combined with fault free techniques to give a significantly improved environment for evaluating the safety and reliability of large complex systems for space missions. Deep knowledge about system components and interactions, available from reliability studies and other sources, can be described using objects that make up a knowledge base. This knowledge base can be interrogated throughout the design process, during system testing, and during operation, and can be easily modified to reflect design changes in order to maintain a consistent information source. An object-oriented environment for reliability assessment has been developed on a Texas Instrument (TI) Explorer LISP workstation. The program, which directly evaluates system fault trees, utilizes the object-oriented extension to LISP called Flavors that is available on the Explorer. The object representation of a fault tree facilitates the storage and retrieval of information associated with each event in the tree, including tree structural information and intermediate results obtained during the tree reduction process. Reliability data associated with each basic event are stored in the fault tree objects. The object-oriented environment on the Explorer also includes a graphical tree editor which was modified to display and edit the fault trees.

  10. Evaluation of a College Freshman Diversity Research Program

    CERN Document Server

    Garner, Sarah; Schmidt, Sarah J; Wisniewski, John P; Agol, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Since 2005, the Pre-Major in Astronomy Program (Pre-MAP) at the University of Washington (UW) Department of Astronomy has made a concentrated effort to recruit and retain underrepresented undergraduates in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). This paper evaluates Pre-MAP in the context of the larger UW student population using data compiled by the University's student database. We evaluate the Pre-MAP program in terms of our goals of recruiting a more diverse population than the University and in terms of a higher fraction of students successfully completing degrees. We find that Pre-MAP serves a higher percentage of underrepresented minorities and equal percentages of women compared to entering freshmen classes at UW. Additionally, Pre-MAP has a higher percentage of degree completion with higher average GPA's and similar time to completion when compared to UW as a whole and other STEM majors, particularly with students that place into lower-level math courses (such as basic algebra or pre...

  11. Evaluating and operationalizing an environmental auditing program: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Laura; Bruce, Natalie; Suh, Kathryn N; Roth, Virginia

    2014-07-01

    Environmental auditing is an important tool to ensure consistent and effective cleaning. Our pilot study compared an alcohol-based fluorescent marking product and an adenosine-5'-triphosphate bioluminescence product for use in an environmental auditing program to determine which product was more practical and acceptable to users. Both products were tested on 15 preselected high touch objects in randomly selected patient rooms, following regular daily cleaning. A room was considered a "pass" if ≥80% of surfaces were adequately cleaned as defined by manufacturers' guidelines. A qualitative survey assessed user preference and operational considerations. Using fluorescent marking, 9 of 37 patient rooms evaluated (24%) were considered a "pass" after daily cleaning. Using adenosine-5'-triphosphate bioluminescence, 21 of 37 patient rooms passed (57%). There was great variability in results between different high touch objects. Eighty percent of users preferred the alcohol-based fluorescent marking product because it provided an effective visual aid to coach staff on proper cleaning techniques and allowed simple and consistent application. Environmental auditing using translucent, alcohol-based fluorescent marking best met the requirements of our organization. Our results reinforce the importance of involving a multidisciplinary team in evaluating and operationalizing an environmental auditing program. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluating the High School Lunar Research Projects Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaner, A. J.; Shipp, S. S.; Allen, J.; Kring, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Center for Lunar Science and Exploration (CLSE), a collaboration between the Lunar and Planetary Institute and NASA's Johnson Space Center, is one of seven member teams of the NASA Lunar Science Institute (NLSI). In addition to research and exploration activities, the CLSE team is deeply invested in education and outreach. In support of NASA's and NLSI's objective to train the next generation of scientists, CLSE's High School Lunar Research Projects program is a conduit through which high school students can actively participate in lunar science and learn about pathways into scientific careers. The objectives of the program are to enhance 1) student views of the nature of science; 2) student attitudes toward science and science careers; and 3) student knowledge of lunar science. In its first three years, approximately 140 students and 28 teachers from across the United States have participated in the program. Before beginning their research, students undertake Moon 101, a guided-inquiry activity designed to familiarize them with lunar science and exploration. Following Moon 101, and guided by a lunar scientist mentor, teams choose a research topic, ask their own research question, and design their own research approach to direct their investigation. At the conclusion of their research, teams present their results to a panel of lunar scientists. This panel selects four posters to be presented at the annual Lunar Science Forum held at NASA Ames. The top scoring team travels to the forum to present their research. Three instruments have been developed or modified to evaluate the extent to which the High School Lunar Research Projects meets its objectives. These three instruments measure changes in student views of the nature of science, attitudes towards science and science careers, and knowledge of lunar science. Exit surveys for teachers, students, and mentors were also developed to elicit general feedback about the program and its impact. The nature of science

  13. Interfacing theories of program with theories of evaluation for advancing evaluation practice: Reductionism, systems thinking, and pragmatic synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huey T

    2016-12-01

    Theories of program and theories of evaluation form the foundation of program evaluation theories. Theories of program reflect assumptions on how to conceptualize an intervention program for evaluation purposes, while theories of evaluation reflect assumptions on how to design useful evaluation. These two types of theories are related, but often discussed separately. This paper attempts to use three theoretical perspectives (reductionism, systems thinking, and pragmatic synthesis) to interface them and discuss the implications for evaluation practice. Reductionism proposes that an intervention program can be broken into crucial components for rigorous analyses; systems thinking view an intervention program as dynamic and complex, requiring a holistic examination. In spite of their contributions, reductionism and systems thinking represent the extreme ends of a theoretical spectrum; many real-world programs, however, may fall in the middle. Pragmatic synthesis is being developed to serve these moderate- complexity programs. These three theoretical perspectives have their own strengths and challenges. Knowledge on these three perspectives and their evaluation implications can provide a better guide for designing fruitful evaluations, improving the quality of evaluation practice, informing potential areas for developing cutting-edge evaluation approaches, and contributing to advancing program evaluation toward a mature applied science.

  14. Evaluating environmental education, citizen science, and stewardship through naturalist programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merenlender, Adina M; Crall, Alycia W; Drill, Sabrina; Prysby, Michelle; Ballard, Heidi

    2016-12-01

    Amateur naturalists have played an important role in the study and conservation of nature since the 17th century. Today, naturalist groups make important contributions to bridge the gap between conservation science and practice around the world. We examined data from 2 regional naturalist programs to understand participant motivations, barriers, and perspectives as well as the actions they take to advance science, stewardship, and community engagement. These programs provide certification-based natural history and conservation science training for adults that is followed by volunteer service in citizen science, education, and stewardship. Studies in California and Virginia include quantitative and qualitative evaluation data collected through pre- and postcourse surveys, interviews, and long-term tracking of volunteer hours. Motivations of participants focused on learning about the local environment and plants and animals, connecting with nature, becoming certified, and spending time with people who have similar interests. Over half the participants surveyed were over 50 years old, two-thirds were women, and a majority reported household incomes of over $50,000 (60% in California, 85% in Virginia), and citizen science. The primary barrier was lack of time due to the need to work and focus on career advancement. Survey data revealed that participants' ecological knowledge, scientific skills, and belief in their ability to address environmental issues increased after training. Documented conservation actions taken by the participants include invasive plant management, habitat restoration, and cleanups of natural areas and streams. Long-term data from Virginia on volunteer hours dedicated to environmental citizen science show an increase from 14% in 2007 to 32% in 2014. In general, participants in the naturalist programs we examined increased their content knowledge about ecosystems, had greater confidence in conserving them, and continued to engage as citizen

  15. Tools for Formative Evaluation: Gathering the Information Necessary for Program Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaratne, K. S. U.

    2016-01-01

    New Extension educators experience a steep learning curve when attempting to develop effective Extension programs. Formative evaluation is helpful to new, and experienced, Extension educators in determining the changes necessary for making programs more effective. Formative evaluation is an essential part of program evaluation. However, its use…

  16. 78 FR 53150 - Advisory Committee on the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-28

    ... Advisory Committee on the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program Evaluation; Notice of... Visiting Program Evaluation (MIECHVE). Authority: Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program Evaluation. Date and Time: September 12,...

  17. 34 CFR 403.191 - What are the requirements for program evaluation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the requirements for program evaluation? 403... program evaluation? (a)(1) Beginning in the 1992-1993 school year, each recipient of financial assistance... program listed in § 403.130 to support the cost of conducting the evaluation required under paragraphs...

  18. Program Evaluation of Community College Learning Assistance Centers: What Do LAC Directors Think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Doug; Blankenberger, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study seeks to determine the nature of current program evaluation practices for learning assistance centers (LACs), the practices being used for program evaluation, and whether LAC directors believe their practices are appropriate for evaluating program effectiveness. Method: We conducted a survey (n = 61) of community college LAC…

  19. 76 FR 12978 - Advisory Committee on the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-09

    ... Advisory Committee on the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program Evaluation; Notice of..., Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program Evaluation. Date and Time: March 23, 2011, 9 a.m.-3 p.m... Program Evaluation will meet for its first session on Wednesday, March 23, 2011, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m....

  20. 76 FR 12977 - Advisory Committee on the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-09

    ... Advisory Committee on the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program Evaluation AGENCY... Committee on the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program Evaluation. SUMMARY: HRSA and... and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program Evaluation (``the Committee''), pursuant to subsection...

  1. Program Evaluation of Community College Learning Assistance Centers: What Do LAC Directors Think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Doug; Blankenberger, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study seeks to determine the nature of current program evaluation practices for learning assistance centers (LACs), the practices being used for program evaluation, and whether LAC directors believe their practices are appropriate for evaluating program effectiveness. Method: We conducted a survey (n = 61) of community college LAC…

  2. Integrating Data Mining in Program Evaluation of K-12 Online Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Jui-Long; Hsu, Yu-Chang; Rice, Kerry

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated an innovative approach of program evaluation through analyses of student learning logs, demographic data, and end-of-course evaluation surveys in an online K-12 supplemental program. The results support the development of a program evaluation model for decision making on teaching and learning at the K-12 level. A case study…

  3. The Status of Program Evaluation Expectations in State School Counselor Certification Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Michael S.

    2000-01-01

    Studied state school counselor certification requirements with respect to program evaluation expectations. Responses of state certification offices show 19 states and the District of Columbia require some form of program evaluation knowledge and skills, but only Colorado and Washington require knowledge of the program evaluation standards…

  4. Does Evaluation Competence of Extension Educators Differ by Their Program Area of Responsibility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, Nav R.; Martin, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Raising evaluation capacity is not an easy task unless the evaluation competence of Extension professionals in each program area is identified. The study reported here identified whether level of knowledge and skills and needs for further training in program evaluation vary for Extension educators based on their program area. A total of 752…

  5. Breaking a Spell of Silence: The Tasmanian Evaluation of the 2006 Pride & Prejudice Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Doug

    2007-01-01

    An evaluation of the Pride & Prejudice program, which ran in three Tasmanian schools in 2006, suggests that students who completed the program had more positive attitudes towards gay men and lesbians. This finding parallels an earlier evaluation of the same anti-homophobia program undertaken in Victoria. The evaluation leads to a discussion…

  6. Evaluating Realized Impacts of DOE/EERE R&D Programs. Standard impact evaluation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruegg, Rosalie [TIA Consulting, Inc. (United States); O' Connor, Alan C. [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Loomis, Ross J. [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2014-08-01

    This document provides guidance for evaluators who conduct impact assessments of research and development (R&D) programs for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). It is also targeted at EERE program staff responsible for initiating and managing commissioned impact studies. The guide specifies how to estimate economic benefits and costs, energy saved and installed or generated, environmental impacts, energy security impacts, and knowledge impacts of R&D investments in advanced energy technologies.

  7. Energy Star Lighting Verification Program (Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conan O' Rourke; Yutao Zhou

    2006-03-01

    The Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL) is a watchdog program. It was created in response to complaints received by utility program managers about the performance of certain Energy Star lighting products being promoted within their service territories and the lack of a self-policing mechanism within the lighting industry that would ensure the reliability of these products and their compliance with ENERGY STAR specifications. To remedy these problems, PEARL purchases and tests products that are available to the consumers in the marketplace. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) tests the selected products against the corresponding Energy Star specifications. This report includes the experimental procedure and data results of Cycle Three and Cycle Four of PEARL program during the period of April 2003 to October 2003, along with the description of apparatus used, equipment calibration process, experimental methodology, and research findings from the testing. The parameter tested for Cycle three is lumen maintenance at 40% rated life, and parameters tested for Cycle Four are all parameters required in Energy Star specifications except lumen maintenance at 40% rated life.

  8. Energy Star Lighting Verification Program (Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conan O' Rourke; Yutao Zhou

    2006-03-01

    The Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL) is a watchdog program. It was created in response to complaints received by utility program managers about the performance of certain Energy Star lighting products being promoted within their service territories and the lack of a self-policing mechanism within the lighting industry that would ensure the reliability of these products and their compliance with ENERGY STAR specifications. To remedy these problems, PEARL purchases and tests products that are available to the consumers in the marketplace. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) tests the selected products against the corresponding Energy Star specifications. This report includes the experimental procedure and data results of Cycle Five and Cycle Six of PEARL program during the period of April 2004 to October 2004, along with the description of apparatus used, equipment calibration process, experimental methodology, and research findings from the testing. The parameter tested for Cycle Five is lumen maintenance at 40% rated life, and parameters tested for Cycle Six are Efficacy, CCT, CRI, Power Factor, Start Time, Warm-up Time, and Rapid Cycle Stress Test for CFLs.

  9. Energy Star Lighting Verification Program (Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conan O' Rourke; Yutao Zhou

    2006-03-01

    The Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL) is a watchdog program. It was created in response to complaints received by utility program managers about the performance of certain Energy Star lighting products being promoted within their service territories and the lack of a self-policing mechanism within the lighting industry that would ensure the reliability of these products and their compliance with ENERGY STAR specifications. To remedy these problems, PEARL purchases and tests products that are available to the consumers in the marketplace. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) tests the selected products against the corresponding Energy Star specifications. This report includes the experimental procedure and data results of Cycle Six of PEARL program during the period of October 2004 to April 2005, along with the description of apparatus used, equipment calibration process, experimental methodology, and research findings from the testing. The parameters tested for CFL models in Cycle Six are 1000-hour Lumen Maintenance, Lumen Maintenance at 40% Rated Life, and Interim Life Test, along with a series of parameters verified, such as ballast electrical parameters and Energy Star label.

  10. Energy Star Lighting Verification Program (Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conan O' Rourke; Yutao Zhou

    2006-03-01

    The Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL) is a watchdog program. It was created in response to complaints received by utility program managers about the performance of certain Energy Star lighting products being promoted within their service territories and the lack of a self-policing mechanism within the lighting industry that would ensure the reliability of these products and their compliance with ENERGY STAR specifications. To remedy these problems, PEARL purchases and tests products that are available to the consumers in the marketplace. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) tests the selected products against the corresponding Energy Star specifications. This report includes the experimental procedure and data results of Cycle 6 and Reflector CFL In-situ Testing of PEARL program during the period of April 2005 to October 2005, along with the description of apparatus used, equipment calibration process, experimental methodology, and research findings from the testing. LRC performed testing for the fixture samples in Cycle 6 against Energy Star residential fixture specifications during this period of time. LRC subcontracted the Reflector CFL In-situ Testing to Luminaire Testing Laboratories located at Allentown PA, and supervised this test.

  11. Energy Star Lighting Verification Program (Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conan O' Rourke; Yutao Zhou

    2006-05-01

    The Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL) is a watchdog program. It was created in response to complaints received by utility program managers about the performance of certain Energy Star lighting products being promoted within their service territories and the lack of a self-policing mechanism within the lighting industry that would ensure the reliability of these products and their compliance with ENERGY STAR specifications. To remedy these problems, PEARL purchases and tests products that are available to the consumers in the marketplace. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) tests the selected products against the corresponding Energy Star specifications. This report includes the experimental procedure of Cycle 7 of PEARL program during the period of October 2005 to March 2006, along with the description of apparatus used, equipment calibration process, experimental methodology, and research findings from the testing. LRC administered the purchasing of CFL samples to test in Cycle 7, performed 100-hour seasoning for most of the CFL samples received by March 2006, and performed sphere testing for some of the CFL samples at 100 hours of life (initial measurement).

  12. Energy Star Lighting Verification Program (Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conan O' Rourke; Yutao Zhou

    2006-03-01

    The Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL) is a watchdog program. It was created in response to complaints received by utility program managers about the performance of certain Energy Star lighting products being promoted within their service territories and the lack of a self-policing mechanism within the lighting industry that would ensure the reliability of these products and their compliance with ENERGY STAR specifications. To remedy these problems, PEARL purchases and tests products that are available to the consumers in the marketplace. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) tests the selected products against the corresponding Energy Star specifications. This report includes the experimental procedure and data results of Cycle Four and Cycle Five of PEARL program during the period of October 2003 to April 2004, along with the description of apparatus used, equipment calibration process, experimental methodology, and research findings from the testing. The parameter tested for Cycle Four is lumen maintenance at 40% rated life, and parameters tested for Cycle Five are all parameters required in Energy Star specifications except lumen maintenance at 40% rated life.

  13. Energy Star Lighting Verification Program (Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conan O' Rourke; Yutao Zhou

    2006-03-01

    The Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL) is a watchdog program. It was created in response to complaints received by utility program managers about the performance of certain Energy Star lighting products being promoted within their service territories and the lack of a self-policing mechanism within the lighting industry that would ensure the reliability of these products and their compliance with ENERGY STAR specifications. To remedy these problems, PEARL purchases and tests products that are available to the consumers in the marketplace. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) tests the selected products against the corresponding Energy Star specifications. This report includes the experimental procedure and data results of Cycle Three of PEARL program during the period of October 2002 to April 2003, along with the description of apparatus used, equipment calibration process, experimental methodology, and research findings from the testing. The products tested are 20 models of screw-based compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) of various types and various wattages made or marketed by 12 different manufacturers, and ten models of residential lighting fixtures from eight different manufacturers.

  14. The Effect of Formative Program Evaluation on Continuous Program Improvement: A Case Study of a Clinical Training Program in Lao PDR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyun Bae; Shin, Jwa-Seop; Lee, Seung-Hee; Kim, Do-Hwan; Hwang, Jinyoung; Kim, Eun Jung; Bouphavanh, Ketsomsouk

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of the formative program evaluation on the continuous improvement of a clinical training program for Lao health professionals. The training program was conducted 4 times consecutively for total 48 health professionals, and the formative program evaluation was carried out during the whole process. To evaluate the satisfaction and the transfer of the trainees, the questionnaire survey, the focus group interview, and the trainees' medical records were used. After the end of each batch of the program, the evaluation data were analyzed, and its results were shared with the training management committee and the trainers, who, based on the results, reached a consensus on how to improve the program. The evaluation results and the comparison of them among the four batches of the program showed that there was a continuous increase of the satisfaction and the transfer of the trainees, especially in the early period of the program. The formative program evaluation which was conducted during the whole process of the clinical training program had a positive effect on the improvement of the program, especially in the early phase, by increasing the satisfaction and transfer of the trainees.

  15. Evaluating RITES, a Statewide Math and Science Partnership Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, D. P.; Caulkins, J. L.; Burns, A. L.; de Oliveira, G.; Dooley, H.; Brand, S.; Veeger, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Rhode Island Technology-Enhanced Science project (RITES) is a NSF-MSP Program that seeks to improve science education by providing professional development to science teachers at the 5th through 12th grade levels. At it's heart, RITES is a complex, multifaceted project that is challenging to evaluate because of the nature of its goal: the development of a large, statewide partnership between higher education and K12 public school districts during a time when science education strategies and leadership are in flux. As a result, these difficulties often require flexibility and creativity regarding evaluation, study design and data collection. In addition, the research agenda of the project often overlaps with the evaluator's agenda, making collaboration and communication a crucial component of the project's success. In it's 5th year, RITES and it's evaluators have developed a large number of instruments, both qualitative and quantitative, to provide direction and feedback on the effectiveness of the project's activities. RITES personnel work closely with evaluators and researchers to obtain a measure of how RITES' 'theory-of-action' affects both student outcomes and teacher practice. Here we discuss measures of teacher and student content gains, student inquiry gains, and teacher implementation surveys. Using content questions based on AAAS and MOSART databases, teachers in the short courses and students in classrooms showed significant normalized learning gains with averages generally above 0.3. Students of RITES-trained teachers also outperformed their non-RITES peers on the inquiry-section of the NECAP test, and The results show, after controlling for race and economic status, a small but statistically significant increase in test scores for RITES students. Technology use in the classroom significantly increased for teachers who were 'expected implementers' where 'expected implementers' are those teachers who implemented RITES as the project was designed. This

  16. Evaluation of a Parent Education Program for Divorcing Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenry, Patrick C.; Clark, Kathleen A.; Stone, Glenn

    1999-01-01

    Compares participants in a parent education program [Parents' Education about Children's Emotions Program (PEACE)] mandated for divorcing parents with a similar sample of individuals who had not participated in such a program. Although the findings provide little evidence for the longer-term impact of this program, the program participants…

  17. Program evaluation as community-engaged research: Challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Reed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reflects on the challenges and opportunities that have arisen in the course of evaluative research into the impact of a number of schools’ engagement programs at Macquarie University, Sydney. It maps out how the research has been conceived and then operationalised as an engaged model of research that includes consultations and collaborations at multiple stages of the research, from conception to dissemination. The article then considers a number of the challenges that have arisen and, in the context of current understanding of best practice in community-engaged research, discusses some of the strategies that were deployed in response to these challenges. By critically examining the limitations of these responses, the article ultimately reinforces the argument that the complexities of engaged research mean that the perfectly engaged research project remains, in most cases, an impossible myth. Instead, community-engaged research should be seen as an approach to research, or an attitude to embed into practice, which ultimately requires embracing a ‘can always do better’ approach to conducting research and a commitment to collaboration and democratic practice that goes beyond the immediate context of the research project. Keywords: Evaluative research, evaluation, community-engaged research, collaboration

  18. Evaluation design and technical assistance opportunities: early findings from the Beacon Community Program evaluation teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, Alison; Kennedy, Hilary; DeCoudres, Ben; Singer Cohen, Rebecca; Sabharwal, Raj; Fairbrother, Gerry

    2012-01-01

    The Beacon Community Cooperative Agreement Program is funding 17 communities to build and strengthen their health information technology (IT) capabilities to enhance care coordination, improve patient and population health, and reduce or restrain costs. Based on the experiences and evidence generated by these communities, the program hopes to illustrate the possibilities of leveraging health IT to achieve desired goals. Doing so requires rigorous evaluation work, which is the subject of this issue brief. Based on semistructured interviews with representatives from each Beacon Community, the brief outlines various study designs, evaluation approaches, outcome measures, and data sources in use. It also identifies some common challenges, including establishing governance models, determining baseline measures, and assessing impact in a relatively constrained timeframe. Technical assistance in disseminating and publishing findings and assessing return on investments will be offered in the coming year.

  19. Development of a program logic model and evaluation plan for a participatory ergonomics intervention in construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaegers, Lisa; Dale, Ann Marie; Weaver, Nancy; Buchholz, Bryan; Welch, Laura; Evanoff, Bradley

    2014-03-01

    Intervention studies in participatory ergonomics (PE) are often difficult to interpret due to limited descriptions of program planning and evaluation. In an ongoing PE program with floor layers, we developed a logic model to describe our program plan, and process and summative evaluations designed to describe the efficacy of the program. The logic model was a useful tool for describing the program elements and subsequent modifications. The process evaluation measured how well the program was delivered as intended, and revealed the need for program modifications. The summative evaluation provided early measures of the efficacy of the program as delivered. Inadequate information on program delivery may lead to erroneous conclusions about intervention efficacy due to Type III error. A logic model guided the delivery and evaluation of our intervention and provides useful information to aid interpretation of results. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. An evaluation of a mental health program for homeless men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caton, C L; Wyatt, R J; Grunberg, J; Felix, A

    1990-03-01

    The authors report the results of a before-and-after evaluation of an on-site mental health day treatment program for homeless men. Thirty-two subjects were interviewed 6 or more months after placement from a crisis shelter to community housing in order to probe housing stability, aftercare treatment compliance, employment, rehospitalization, and criminal justice contacts. In the after phase, living on the street was virtually eliminated, use of shelters decreased sevenfold, aftercare utilization tripled, and contacts with the criminal justice system were halved. Psychiatric hospitalizations and unemployment were higher in the after phase. Findings are discussed in relation to the need to conduct controlled experiments of new psychosocial treatments for the homeless mentally ill.

  1. Employee Wellness Program in a small rural industry: employee evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Melondie; Gaskins, Susan; Shaw, Lynda

    2005-06-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine employees' perceptions of a wellness program resulting from collaboration between a small rural industry and a College of Nursing. Focus group methods were used to elicit evaluative data from 27 employees. A semi-structured interview guide of open-ended questions was used to elicit information. The employees readily identified the screenings and information they had received related to hypertension, blood sugar, and cholesterol to be helpful. Health behavior changes the employees identified based on the health promotion activities and screenings included diet changes, different food preparations, and exercise. The screenings were found to be beneficial because they helped them to understand the significance of the results and how they could alter them with health behaviors. The repeated screenings provided an opportunity for them to see how health behavior changes had affected their results.

  2. Evaluation of patients with stroke monitored by home care programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Railka de Souza Oliveira

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patient with a stroke in home treatment, investigating physical capacity, mental status and anthropometric analysis. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in Fortaleza/CE, from January to April of 2010. Sixty-one individuals monitored by a home care program of three tertiary hospitals were investigated, through interviews and the application of scales. The majority of individuals encountered were female (59%, elderly, bedridden, with a low educational level, a history of other stroke, a high degree of dependence for basic (73.8% and instrumental (80.3 % activities of daily living, and a low cognitive level (95.1%. Individuals also presented with tracheostomy, gastric feeding and urinary catheter, difficulty hearing, speaking, chewing, swallowing, and those making daily use of various medications. It was concluded that home care by nurses is an alternative for care of those individuals with a stroke.

  3. Video Use in Social Science Research and Program Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Rosenstein

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available In light of technological advances in producing, viewing and storing moving images, it is appropriate to survey the literature concerning the use of moving images in research over the past few decades. A review of the literature shows that the use of video technology for research falls into three areas: observation (including data collection and analysis, a mechanism for giving feedback, and a means for distance learning and consulting via videoconferencing. This article addresses the first two areas — observation and feedback. It begins with a survey of the use of video observation as a tool for research and documentation. A section on feedback, divided into three sections: performance, interaction and situational assessment follows. A separate section is devoted to the use of video for Program Evaluation. The article concludes with a discussion of epistemological methodological issues and the ethics involved in such a technologically advanced medium.

  4. Evaluation of patients with stroke monitored by home care programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Railka de Souza Oliveira

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patient with a stroke in home treatment, investigating physical capacity, mental status and anthropometric analysis. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in Fortaleza/CE, from January to April of 2010. Sixty-one individuals monitored by a home care program of three tertiary hospitals were investigated, through interviews and the application of scales. The majority of individuals encountered were female (59%, elderly, bedridden, with a low educational level, a history of other stroke, a high degree of dependence for basic (73.8% and instrumental (80.3 % activities of daily living, and a low cognitive level (95.1%. Individuals also presented with tracheostomy, gastric feeding and urinary catheter, difficulty hearing, speaking, chewing, swallowing, and those making daily use of various medications. It was concluded that home care by nurses is an alternative for care of those individuals with a stroke.

  5. Pilot Evaluation Study of the Life Skills Program REBOUND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Jungaberle

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the study is pilot evaluation of the life skills program REBOUND in a school context focusing on substance use, risk perception, and knowledge about psychoactive substances ( n IG + CG = 723 students in five schools and 46 classes, Mage = 14.8, range 14-18 for the total sample and in the subgroups gender, age, and school type. Main goal of the study is collecting evidence for program optimization. A controlled study was carried out with repeated measurement before and after the intervention (4-6 months. Multilevel analyses, ANCOVA, and logistic regression analyses were applied to measure the effects. Overall, significantly lower incidence rates of drunkenness (odds ratio [OR] = .55; p = .033, improved knowledge about psychoactive substances (p = .006, lower personal (p = .013 and general tobacco risk perception among users (p = .002, and lower general tobacco (p = .018 and cannabis (p = .000 risk perception in non-users were found in the total intervention group. In subgroups, significantly lower rates for the incidence of drunkenness can be shown for males (p = .008 and for younger participants (p = .004. Students at academic high school (German Gymnasium showed a decrease in 30-day prevalence for alcohol (p = .017 and cannabis (p = .014, and they improved in their knowledge about psychoactive substances (p = .000. In vocational high school classes (German Realschule, there was an increase in the relative alcohol risk perception of the students (p = .019. REBOUND contributes to a controlled use of alcohol and increases knowledge about psychoactive substances. REBOUND has various effects on the examined subgroups age, gender, and school type: Males, younger students, and students in academic high school benefitted more from the course regarding consumption-related criteria. We suggest a program optimization specific to school form and age, inclusion of a tobacco intervention, and the use of more gender-segregated interventions.

  6. Pilot evaluation of the text4baby mobile health program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans William Douglas

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mobile phone technologies for health promotion and disease prevention have evolved rapidly, but few studies have tested the efficacy of mobile health in full-fledged programs. Text4baby is an example of mobile health based on behavioral theory, and it delivers text messages to traditionally underserved pregnant women and new mothers to change their health, health care beliefs, practices, and behaviors in order to improve clinical outcomes. The purpose of this pilot evaluation study is to assess the efficacy of this text messaging campaign. Methods We conducted a randomized pilot evaluation study. All participants were pregnant women first presenting for care at the Fairfax County, Virginia Health Department. We randomized participants to enroll in text4baby and receive usual health care (intervention, or continue simply to receive usual care (control. We then conducted a 24-item survey by telephone of attitudes and behaviors related to text4baby. We surveyed participants at baseline, before text4baby was delivered to the intervention group, and at follow-up at approximately 28 weeks of baby’s gestational age. Results We completed 123 baseline interviews in English and in Spanish. Overall, the sample was predominantly of Hispanic origin (79.7% with an average age of 27.6 years. We completed 90 follow-up interviews, and achieved a 73% retention rate. We used a logistic generalized estimating equation model to evaluate intervention effects on measured outcomes. We found a significant effect of text4baby intervention exposure on increased agreement with the attitude statement “I am prepared to be a new mother” (OR = 2.73, CI = 1.04, 7.18, p = 0.042 between baseline and follow-up. For those who had attained a high school education or greater, we observed a significantly higher overall agreement to attitudes against alcohol consumption during pregnancy (OR = 2.80, CI = 1.13, 6.90, p = 0.026. We also observed a

  7. [Evaluation of our psycho-educative program by participating caregivers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, J C; Van den Berge, D; de Wouters d'Oplinter, N; Bosman, N; Fery, P

    2010-09-01

    Facing difficulties due to dementia syndromes, systemic care is necessary. Amongst therapies assessed specifically to caregivers, psychoeducative steps seem to be the strongest effective one on neuropsychiatrics symptoms. Psychoeducations tend to teach the caregivers to modify their interactions with patients via a better understanding of illnesses and patients. Our training "Pour mieux vivre avec la maladie d'Alzheimer", applied in groups of eight to twelve persons, consists in twelve sessions of two hours each. To assure the biggest possible availability, we recently incorporated the concomitant coverage of patients into artistic workshops. These sessions of art-therapy realized in parallel to our psychoeducative program will thus be estimated according to the same rigorous methodology. The critical evaluations realized by participants at the end of our program reflect the outcome of our main objective (to teach to modify interactions with the patients) while contributing to the improvement of social contacts and to the learning of calling to existing helps. These preliminary results strongly argue for the pursuit and even extension of this kind of caregiver's management.

  8. Evaluating Program about Performance of Circular Sodium Heat Pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Jae Sik; Kim, Hee Reyoung [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The superior heat transfer capability, structural simplicity, relatively inexpensive, insensitivity to the gravitational field, silence and reliability are some of its outstanding features. We study about heat transfer equation of heat pipe and program predicting performance which is considering geometrical shape of heat pipe by the related heat transfer equation of heat pipe. The operating temperature is 450 .deg. C - 950 .deg. C, working fluid is sodium, material for container is stainless steel, and type of wick is sintered metal. As a result of evaluating program about performance of circular sodium heat pipe based on MATLAB code, express correlation between radius and LHR, correlation between heat transfer length and LHR, correlation between wick and LHR, correlation between operating temperature and LHR. Generally radius values of heat pipe are proportional to LHR because of increase of mass flow which is main factor of heat flow. Heat transfer length values of heat pipe are inversely proportional to LHR and slightly inversely proportional to heat rate. Pore size is proportional to LHR. Although increase of pore size decrease capillary pressure, decrease more pressure drop in liquid phase. As a result, mass flow and heat rate are increase. But we have to do additional consideration about pore size and voidage in the aspect of safety and production technique.

  9. Evaluation to Improve a High School Summer Science Outreach Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Bakshian Chiappinelli

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the Young Scientist Program (YSP at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis (WUSM is to broaden science literacy and recruit talent for the scientific future. In particular, YSP seeks to expose underrepresented minority high school students from St. Louis public schools (SLPS to a wide variety of careers in the sciences. The centerpiece of YSP, the Summer Focus Program (SFP, is a nine-week, intensive research experience for competitively chosen rising high school seniors (Scholars. Scholars are paired with volunteer graduate student, medical student, or postdoctoral fellow mentors who are active members of the practicing scientific community and serve as guides and exemplars of scientific careers. The SFP seeks to increase the number of underrepresented minority students pursuing STEM undergraduate degrees by making the Scholars more comfortable with science and science literacy. The data presented here provide results of the objective, quick, and simple methods developed by YSP to assess the efficacy of the SFP from 2006 to 2013. We demonstrate that the SFP successfully used formative evaluation to continuously improve the various activities within the SFP over the course of several years and in turn enhance student experiences within the SFP. Additionally we show that the SFP effectively broadened confidence in science literacy among participating high school students and successfully graduated a high percentage of students who went on to pursue science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM majors at the undergraduate level.

  10. Evaluations of Structural Failure Probabilities and Candidate Inservice Inspection Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Simonen, Fredric A.

    2009-05-01

    The work described in this report applies probabilistic structural mechanics models to predict the reliability of nuclear pressure boundary components. These same models are then applied to evaluate the effectiveness of alternative programs for inservice inspection to reduce these failure probabilities. Results of the calculations support the development and implementation of risk-informed inservice inspection of piping and vessels. Studies have specifically addressed the potential benefits of ultrasonic inspections to reduce failure probabilities associated with fatigue crack growth and stress-corrosion cracking. Parametric calculations were performed with the computer code pc-PRAISE to generate an extensive set of plots to cover a wide range of pipe wall thicknesses, cyclic operating stresses, and inspection strategies. The studies have also addressed critical inputs to fracture mechanics calculations such as the parameters that characterize the number and sizes of fabrication flaws in piping welds. Other calculations quantify uncertainties associated with the inputs calculations, the uncertainties in the fracture mechanics models, and the uncertainties in the resulting calculated failure probabilities. A final set of calculations address the effects of flaw sizing errors on the effectiveness of inservice inspection programs.

  11. Evaluation of Electric Power Procurement Strategies by Stochastic Dynamic Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saisho, Yuichi; Hayashi, Taketo; Fujii, Yasumasa; Yamaji, Kenji

    In deregulated electricity markets, the role of a distribution company is to purchase electricity from the wholesale electricity market at randomly fluctuating prices and to provide it to its customers at a given fixed price. Therefore the company has to take risk stemming from the uncertainties of electricity prices and/or demand fluctuation instead of the customers. The way to avoid the risk is to make a bilateral contact with generating companies or install its own power generation facility. This entails the necessity to develop a certain method to make an optimal strategy for electric power procurement. In such a circumstance, this research has the purpose for proposing a mathematical method based on stochastic dynamic programming and additionally considering the characteristics of the start-up cost of electric power generation facility to evaluate strategies of combination of the bilateral contract and power auto-generation with its own facility for procuring electric power in deregulated electricity market. In the beginning we proposed two approaches to solve the stochastic dynamic programming, and they are a Monte Carlo simulation method and a finite difference method to derive the solution of a partial differential equation of the total procurement cost of electric power. Finally we discussed the influences of the price uncertainty on optimal strategies of power procurement.

  12. Modification and Adaptation of the Program Evaluation Standards in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyami, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    The Joint Committee on Standards for Educational Evaluation's Program Evaluation Standards is probably the most recognized and applied set of evaluation standards globally. The most recent edition of The Program Evaluation Standards includes five categories and 30 standards. The five categories are Utility, Feasibility, Propriety, Accuracy, and…

  13. Using Curriculum-Based Measurements for Program Evaluation: Expanding Roles for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tusing, Mary E.; Breikjern, Nicholle A.

    2017-01-01

    Educators increasingly need to evaluate schoolwide reform efforts; however, complex program evaluations often are not feasible in schools. Through a case example, we provide a heuristic for program evaluation that is easily replicated in schools. Criterion-referenced interpretations of schoolwide screening data were used to evaluate outcomes…

  14. Modification and Adaptation of the Program Evaluation Standards in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyami, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    The Joint Committee on Standards for Educational Evaluation's Program Evaluation Standards is probably the most recognized and applied set of evaluation standards globally. The most recent edition of The Program Evaluation Standards includes five categories and 30 standards. The five categories are Utility, Feasibility, Propriety, Accuracy,…

  15. Subjective outcome evaluation of the project P.A.T.H.S. (Secondary 2 program): views of the program participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L; Ng, Catalina S M

    2009-10-01

    A total of 196 secondary schools participated in the Secondary 2 Program of the Full Implementation Phase of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes). After completion of the Tier 1 Program, 30,731 students responded to the Subjective Outcome Evaluation Form (Form A) to assess their perceptions of the program, instructors, and perceived effectiveness of the program. Based on the consolidated reports submitted by the schools to the funding body, the research team aggregated the consolidated data to form a "reconstructed" overall profile on the perceptions of the program participants. Findings demonstrated that high proportions of the respondents had positive perceptions of the program and the instructors, and roughly four-fifths of the respondents regarded the program as beneficial to them. Correlation analyses showed that perceived program and instructor characteristics were positively associated with perceived benefits of the program.

  16. Subjective Outcome Evaluation of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Secondary 2 Program: Views of the Program Participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. L. Shek

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 196 secondary schools participated in the Secondary 2 Program of the Full Implementation Phase of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes. After completion of the Tier 1 Program, 30,731 students responded to the Subjective Outcome Evaluation Form (Form A to assess their perceptions of the program, instructors, and perceived effectiveness of the program. Based on the consolidated reports submitted by the schools to the funding body, the research team aggregated the consolidated data to form a “reconstructed” overall profile on the perceptions of the program participants. Findings demonstrated that high proportions of the respondents had positive perceptions of the program and the instructors, and roughly four-fifths of the respondents regarded the program as beneficial to them. Correlation analyses showed that perceived program and instructor characteristics were positively associated with perceived benefits of the program.

  17. Energy Star Lighting Verification Program (Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conan O' Rourke; Yutao Zhou

    2007-12-31

    The Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL) is a watchdog program. It was created in response to complaints received by utility program managers about the performance of certain Energy Star lighting products being promoted within their service territories and the lack of a self-policing mechanism within the lighting industry that would ensure the reliability of these products and their compliance with ENERGY STAR specifications. To remedy these problems, PEARL purchases and tests products that are available to the consumers in the marketplace. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) tests the selected products against the corresponding Energy Star specifications. This final report summarizes the experimental procedure and results of all cycles (Cycles 1 through 8) of PEARL program from the beginning of year 2000 to the end of 2007, along with the description of apparatus used, equipment calibration process, experimental methodology, and research findings from the testing. In each cycle of PEARL program, PEARL Board selects a list of Compact Fluorescent Lamp (CFL) and Residential Lighting Fixture (RLF) models that are Energy Star qualified. In Cycle 5, Cycle 7, and Cycle 8, no fixture models were selected. After that PEARL sponsors procure product samples for each selected model from different stores and locations in the retail market and send them to LRC for testing. LRC then receive and select the samples, and test them against Energy Star specifications. After the testing LRC analyze and report the results to PEARL Board. Totally 185 models of CFL and 52 models of RLF were tested in PEARL program. Along with the evolution of the Energy Star specifications from year 2000 to 2003, parameters that were required by Energy Star changed during the eight years of PEARL program. The testing parameters and number of samples tested in PEARL program also changed during this time. For example, in Cycle 1, three samples of each models were tested

  18. Financial evaluations of antibiotic stewardship programs - a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Willem Hendrik Dik

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThere is an increasing awareness to counteract problems due to incorrect antimicrobial use. Interventions that are implemented are often part of an Antimicrobial Stewardship Program (ASPs. Studies publishing results from these interventions are increasing, including reports on the economical effects of ASPs. This review will look at the economical sections of these studies and the methods that were used. MethodsA systematic review was performed of articles found in the PubMed and EMBASE databases published from 2000 until November 2014. Included studies found were scored for various aspects and the quality of the papers was assessed following an appropriate check list (CHEC criteria list.Results1233 studies were found, of which 149 were read completely. 99 were included in the final review. Of these studies, 57 only mentioned the costs associated with the antimicrobial medication. Others also included operational costs (n=23, costs for hospital stay (n=18 and/or other costs (n=19. 9 studies were further assessed for their quality. These studies scored between 2 and 14 out of a potential total score of 19.ConclusionsThis review gives an extensive overview of the current financial evaluation of ASPs and the quality of these economical studies. We show that there is still major potential to improve financial evaluations of ASPs. Studies do not use similar nor consistent methods or outcome measures, making it impossible draw sound conclusions and compare different studies. Finally, we make some recommendations for the future.

  19. Accident Sequence Evaluation Program: Human reliability analysis procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swain, A.D.

    1987-02-01

    This document presents a shortened version of the procedure, models, and data for human reliability analysis (HRA) which are presented in the Handbook of Human Reliability Analysis With emphasis on Nuclear Power Plant Applications (NUREG/CR-1278, August 1983). This shortened version was prepared and tried out as part of the Accident Sequence Evaluation Program (ASEP) funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and managed by Sandia National Laboratories. The intent of this new HRA procedure, called the ''ASEP HRA Procedure,'' is to enable systems analysts, with minimal support from experts in human reliability analysis, to make estimates of human error probabilities and other human performance characteristics which are sufficiently accurate for many probabilistic risk assessments. The ASEP HRA Procedure consists of a Pre-Accident Screening HRA, a Pre-Accident Nominal HRA, a Post-Accident Screening HRA, and a Post-Accident Nominal HRA. The procedure in this document includes changes made after tryout and evaluation of the procedure in four nuclear power plants by four different systems analysts and related personnel, including human reliability specialists. The changes consist of some additional explanatory material (including examples), and more detailed definitions of some of the terms. 42 refs.

  20. Genetic programming approach to evaluate complexity of texture images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciocca, Gianluigi; Corchs, Silvia; Gasparini, Francesca

    2016-11-01

    We adopt genetic programming (GP) to define a measure that can predict complexity perception of texture images. We perform psychophysical experiments on three different datasets to collect data on the perceived complexity. The subjective data are used for training, validation, and test of the proposed measure. These data are also used to evaluate several possible candidate measures of texture complexity related to both low level and high level image features. We select four of them (namely roughness, number of regions, chroma variance, and memorability) to be combined in a GP framework. This approach allows a nonlinear combination of the measures and could give hints on how the related image features interact in complexity perception. The proposed complexity measure M exhibits Pearson correlation coefficients of 0.890 on the training set, 0.728 on the validation set, and 0.724 on the test set. M outperforms each of all the single measures considered. From the statistical analysis of different GP candidate solutions, we found that the roughness measure evaluated on the gray level image is the most dominant one, followed by the memorability, the number of regions, and finally the chroma variance.

  1. [Evaluation of a teaching program of nutrition in agronomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, S; Andrade, M; Harper, L; Kain, J; Eskenazi, M E; Sánchez, F; Domínguez, J I; Valiente, S

    1985-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a set of teaching materials on food, nutrition and agriculture, adapted at the Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA), University of Chile, within the scope of a project with AID and the School of Agronomy of the Chilean Catholic University (U. C.) aimed at incorporating the teaching of human nutrition into the curriculum of Latin American agronomists. A one semester course (54 hours) was given to 22 students of the 7th semester of Agronomy and two Ecuatorian agronomists (with AID scholarships). A set of knowledge evaluation instruments was applied at the beginning and at the end of the course. A total of 83.3% of the students passed the final examination (with more than 75% of correct answers). The difference between the initial and final performance was highly significant (p less than 0.001). According to the students' and teachers' opinions, the general textbook and the teachers book contributed effectively to meet the learning objectives whereas the students handbook needed some modifications. In conclusion, the program is an important contribution to the education of agronomists in a new conception of their role in regard to improvement of the nutritional status and quality of life of the rural population. With a few minor modifications, a final version to be used in the countries of the Region, shall soon become available.

  2. Putting evaluation capacity building in context: Reflections on the Ontario Brain Institute's Evaluation Support Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jean A

    2017-05-13

    This article, in three parts, reflects on the content of the six articles included in the forum. It begins with a description of the Evaluation Support Program, emphasizing its key attributes. Next, it raises two points regarding ECB theory: (1) the need to become clearer about the concepts and terms used to describe and study this phenomenon, and (2) the potential value of social science theory to understand ECB and improve its practice. The article concludes with practical ideas for improving ECB: (1) framing it as an educative act, which assigns the evaluator the critical role of evaluation teacher/coach; and (2) the importance of never assuming that an ECB effort begins in unchartered territory, but rather that it builds on people's knowledge, skills, attitudes, and previous experiences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Program Evaluation of the Direct Instruction Reading Interventions: Reading Mastery and Corrective Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Nita M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this program evaluation was to evaluate the Direct Instruction programs, Reading Mastery and Corrective Reading, from SRA McGraw-Hill Publishing Company, which were being used as a school-wide reading intervention. These programs were implemented at a small elementary school in the Piedmont area of North Carolina beginning in the…

  4. Assessment and Evaluation of the Utah Master Naturalist Program: Implications for Targeting Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larese-Casanova, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The Utah Master Naturalist Program trains citizens who provide education, outreach, and service to promote citizen stewardship of natural resources within their communities. In 2007-2008, the Watersheds module of the program was evaluated for program success, and participant knowledge was assessed. Assessment and evaluation results indicated that…

  5. State Preschool Program Evaluations and Research: Research-to-Policy Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Many states with preschool programs, as well as other interested organizations and individuals, have undertaken research and evaluation efforts to improve their understanding of state preschool program implementation, results, and impacts. A 2004 review by Gilliam and Zigler examined state efforts to evaluate preschool programs from 1997 to 2003.…

  6. Qualitative Evaluation of Emotional Intelligence In-Service Program for Secondary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fer, Seval

    2004-01-01

    This paper is an attempt to evaluate the Emotional Intelligence (EQ) In-Service Program on the basis of experiences of 20 secondary school teachers who attended the program in a private school in Turkey. A phenomenological approach, with a focus group method was used. The first objective of this study was to evaluate EQ program on the basis of…

  7. Evaluation of the Cosmetology Program at Caldwell Community College and Technical Institute--Fall, 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipes, V. David

    In fall 1981, the cosmetology program at Caldwell Community College and Technical Institute (CCC&TI) was evaluated as part of a process to create a model for the periodic evaluation of all occupational programs at the school. In addition to collecting information for planning and program improvement, the study sought to assess the achievement of…

  8. Process Evaluation of a Workers' Health Surveillance Program for Meat Processing Workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Holland, Berry J; Brouwer, Sandra; de Boer, Michiel R; Reneman, Michiel F; Soer, Remko

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the implementation process of a workers' health surveillance (WHS) program in a Dutch meat processing company. Methods Workers from five plants were eligible to participate in the WHS program. The program consisted of four evaluative components and an intervention component. Qu

  9. Evaluating the Generality and Limits of Blind Return-Oriented Programming Attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS EVALUATING THE GENERALITY AND LIMITS OF BLIND RETURN- ORIENTED PROGRAMMING ATTACKS by Lawrence...EVALUATING THE GENERALITY AND LIMITS OF BLIND RETURN- ORIENTED PROGRAMMING ATTACKS 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Lawrence Keener 7. PERFORMING...consider a recently proposed information disclosure vulnerability called blind return- oriented programming (BROP). Under certain conditions, this

  10. Process Evaluation of a Bullying Prevention Program: A Public School-County Health Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Lynne; Hoover, John

    2008-01-01

    In this article, a process evaluation of a school-based, violence intervention program is presented. The program was modeled after bullying prevention programs described by Daniel Olweus (1993) whose components were implemented to achieve student safety goals. The process evaluation instrument used in this study was developed by a rural Midwestern…

  11. Process Evaluation of a Bullying Prevention Program: A Public School-County Health Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Lynne; Hoover, John

    2008-01-01

    In this article, a process evaluation of a school-based, violence intervention program is presented. The program was modeled after bullying prevention programs described by Daniel Olweus (1993) whose components were implemented to achieve student safety goals. The process evaluation instrument used in this study was developed by a rural Midwestern…

  12. The Math and Science Partnership Program Evaluation: Overview of the First Two Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Robert K.

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the Math and Science Partnership Program Evaluation (MSP-PE) during the project's first two years and provides the evaluation framework being used to assess the National Science Foundation's MSP Program. The study conveys the MSP-PE's ongoing design and implementation. To show how they reflect the nature of the MSP Program,…

  13. Energy Extension Service Pilot Program: evaluation report after two years. Volume I. Evaluation summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-04-01

    The EES pilot program was initiated in August 1977, when 10 states were selected on a competitive basis for participation. The pilot states (Alabama, Connecticut, Michigan, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming) devoted the first 6 months to start-up activities. This document is a follow-up report to the three volume Evaluation Summary of the first year of the pilot EES program published in September 1979. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the impacts and costs of the two years of the pilot program, and to check the consistency of findings over the two year period. The analysis addresses the following: (1) were the impact findings of Year I and Year II consistent, or did Year I and Year II attitudes and behavior vary. If variation existed, could it be attributed to program changes as the EES progressed from a start-up phase (Year I) to more normal service delivery (Year II); and (2) did costs of service delivery change (again reflecting start-up and normal service delivery costs). Did cost changes affect conclusions about the relative cost effectiveness of delivering services to different target audiences.

  14. 75 FR 54343 - Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research eSubmitter Pilot Evaluation Program for Blood...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-07

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) is announcing an invitation to participate in a pilot evaluation program for CBER's eSubmitter Program (eSubmitter). CBER's eSubmitter has been customized as an automated biologics license application (BLA) and BLA supplement (BLS) submission system for blood and blood components. Participation in the......

  15. Development and Evaluation of a Programmed Text in Criminal Law. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Thomas A.

    Two pieces of literature by Thomas A. Wills are contained in this document: (1) A complete programed text in law, "A Programmed Text in Criminal Law," and (2) a study comparing instruction with versus instruction without the use of programed texts, "Development and Evaluation of a Programed Text in Criminal Law." In the latter, six control and six…

  16. Two Computer Programs for Equipment Cost Estimation and Economic Evaluation of Chemical Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuri, Carlos J.; Corripio, Armando B.

    1984-01-01

    Describes two computer programs for use in process design courses: an easy-to-use equipment cost estimation program based on latest cost correlations available and an economic evaluation program which calculates two profitability indices. Comparisons between programed and hand-calculated results are included. (JM)

  17. Deformable image and dose registration evaluation using two commercial programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Tuohy

    2014-03-01

    : Tuohy R, Bosse C, Mavroidis P, Shi Z, Crownover R, Papanikolaou N, Stathakis S. Deformable image and dose registration evaluation using two commercial programs. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(2:020242. DOI: 10.14319/ijcto.0202.42

  18. Comparison of international guideline programs to evaluate and update the Dutch program for clinical guideline development in physical therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgers Jako S

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical guidelines are considered important instruments to improve quality in health care. Since 1998 the Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF produced evidence-based clinical guidelines, based on a standardized program. New developments in the field of guideline research raised the need to evaluate and update the KNGF guideline program. Purpose of this study is to compare different guideline development programs and review the KNGF guideline program for physical therapy in the Netherlands, in order to update the program. Method Six international guideline development programs were selected, and the 23 criteria of the AGREE Instrument were used to evaluate the guideline programs. Information about the programs was retrieved from published handbooks of the organizations. Also, the Dutch program for guideline development in physical therapy was evaluated using the AGREE criteria. Further comparison the six guideline programs was carried out using the following elements of the guideline development processes: Structure and organization; Preparation and initiation; Development; Validation; Dissemination and implementation; Evaluation and update. Results Compliance with the AGREE criteria of the guideline programs was high. Four programs addressed 22 AGREE criteria, and two programs addressed 20 AGREE criteria. The previous Dutch program for guideline development in physical therapy lacked in compliance with the AGREE criteria, meeting only 13 criteria. Further comparison showed that all guideline programs perform systematic literature searches to identify the available evidence. Recommendations are formulated and graded, based on evidence and other relevant factors. It is not clear how decisions in the development process are made. In particular, the process of translating evidence into practice recommendations can be improved. Conclusion As a result of international developments and consensus, the described processes

  19. Healthy start program and feto-infant morbidity outcomes: evaluation of program effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihu, Hamisu M; Mbah, Alfred K; Jeffers, Delores; Alio, Amina P; Berry, Lo

    2009-01-01

    We evaluate the impact of the Healthy Start intervention program on feto-infant morbidity within a community setting. Prospective data from 2002 to 2007 within the ongoing Federally funded Healthy Start intervention project in Central Hillsborough County were merged with corresponding birth outcomes data from the Florida Department of Health. The impact of the project on the following feto-infant morbidity indices was assessed among service recipients: low birth weight (LBW), very low birth weight (VLBW), preterm, very preterm, small for gestational age (SGA) and a composite feto-infant morbidity outcome. Program effectiveness and impact were measured using odds ratios from logistic regression models and number needed to treat (NNT). The risk for low birth weight (OR = 0.7; 95% CI = 0.5-1.0), preterm (OR = 0.7; 95% CI = 0.5-0.9) and the composite feto-infant morbidity outcome (OR = 0.8; 95% CI = 0.6-0.9) was reduced among service recipients (N = 536) as compared to non-recipients (N = 2,815). A clinically important level of risk reduction was also noted for very low birth weight (OR = 0.5; 95% CI = 0.2-1.1) and very preterm (OR = 0.6; 95% CI = 0.3-1.2) although these did not reach statistical significance. The adjusted NNT was lowest for the composite feto-infant morbidity outcome (18), preterm birth (21) and low birth weight (24), and highest for very preterm (86) and very low birth weight (74) events. In a disadvantaged community setting, the Healthy Start intervention program was found to reduce the risk for very low birth weight and preterm births by about one-third.

  20. Restructuring High School Science Curriculum: A Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Cathy Jean

    One rural Midwestern high school discovered a discrepancy among school, state, and national science skill attainment, verified by ACT scores. If students do not acquire vital science skills, they may not perform proficiently on science tests, thus impacting future college options. Inquiry based instruction and constructivism provided the basis for the theoretical framework. This study questioned associations between ACT scores, inquiry science technique usage, and ACT standard usage (Phase 1), and teachers' views on science instruction (Phase 2). This sequential explanatory mixed methods program evaluation included 469 ACT scores, surveys sent to 9 science teachers, and 8 interviews. Phase 1 used the inquiry science implementation scale survey and an ACT college readiness standards workbook to determine proportional associations between datasets. Descriptive statistics, one-sample t tests, and binomial tests were used to analyze Phase 1 data. Phase 2 interviews augmented Phase 1 data and were disassembled, reassembled, and interpreted for parallel viewpoints. Phase 1 data indicated that teachers use a slightly above average amount of inquiry and science ACT standards in the classroom; however, most science students did not test above the curriculum and there were inconsistencies in standards covered. Phase 2 data revealed teachers need time to collaborate and become skilled in inquiry methods to rectify the inconsistencies. The project was an evaluation report. This study will foster positive social change by giving the district a plan: adapt the science curriculum by integrating more ACT and inquiry standards and participate in more professional development that applies inquiry as a tool to increase science skill proficiency, thus generating locally competitive students for college and the workforce.

  1. 76 FR 2388 - National Toxicology Program (NTP); NTP Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Toxicology Program (NTP); NTP Interagency Center for the Evaluation of... Director, National Toxicology Program. BILLING CODE 4140-01-P...

  2. Three-Year Evaluation of a Large Scale Early Grade French Immersion Program: The Ottawa Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Henri; Swain, Marrill

    1975-01-01

    The school performance of pupils in grades K-2 of the French immersion program in operation in Ottawa public schools is evaluated in comparison with that of pupils in the regular English program. (Author/RM)

  3. Evaluating the Application of Program Outcomes to Study Abroad Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Patricia Joanne; Mrozek, Lawrence J.

    2016-01-01

    A search through the 2015 annual conference program of the National Collegiate Honors Council (NCHC) turned up a dozen sessions focusing on the topic of study abroad, demonstrating that a growing number of honors programs and colleges are encouraging or requiring study abroad. Many programs now offer and support honors semesters abroad or…

  4. THE DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF AN EVALUATION MODEL FOR VOCATIONAL PILOT PROGRAMS. FINAL REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    TUCKMAN, BRUCE W.

    THE OBJECTIVES OF THE PROJECT WERE (1) TO DEVELOP AN EVALUATION MODEL IN THE FORM OF A HOW-TO-DO-IT MANUAL WHICH OUTLINES PROCEDURES FOR OBTAINING IMMEDIATE INFORMATION REGARDING THE DEGREE TO WHICH A PILOT PROGRAM ACHIEVES ITS STATED FINAL OBJECTIVES, (2) TO EVALUATE THIS MODEL BY USING IT TO EVALUATE TWO ONGOING PILOT PROGRAMS, AND (3) TO…

  5. New Partnerships Require New Approaches to Participatory Program Evaluations: Planning for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHardy, Joan

    2002-01-01

    Discusses this era of transition in program evaluation, which is marked by growing cooperation between government and civil society, and suggests participatory program evaluation as an approach to lessen undue influence by any one partner and promote a positive culture of evaluation. (SLD)

  6. 29 CFR 1960.80 - Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and health programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and... EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Evaluation of Federal Occupational Safety and Health Programs § 1960.80 Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and...

  7. Redesigning and Aligning Assessment and Evaluation for a Federally Funded Math and Science Teacher Educational Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardre, Patricia L.; Slater, Janis; Nanny, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the redesign of evaluation components for a teacher professional development project funded by the National Science Foundation. It focuses on aligning evaluation instrumentation and strategies with program goals, research goals and program evaluation best practices. The study identifies weaknesses in the original (year 1)…

  8. Pebbling and Branching Programs Solving the Tree Evaluation Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Wehr, Dustin

    2010-01-01

    We study restricted computation models related to the Tree Evaluation Problem}. The TEP was introduced in earlier work as a simple candidate for the (*very*) long term goal of separating L and LogDCFL. The input to the problem is a rooted, balanced binary tree of height h, whose internal nodes are labeled with binary functions on [k] = {1,...,k} (each given simply as a list of k^2 elements of [k]), and whose leaves are labeled with elements of [k]. Each node obtains a value in [k] equal to its binary function applied to the values of its children, and the output is the value of the root. The first restricted computation model, called Fractional Pebbling, is a generalization of the black/white pebbling game on graphs, and arises in a natural way from the search for good upper bounds on the size of nondeterministic branching programs (BPs) solving the TEP - for any fixed h, if the binary tree of height h has fractional pebbling cost at most p, then there are nondeterministic BPs of size O(k^p) solving the heigh...

  9. Video streaming: implementation and evaluation in an undergraduate nursing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Paul N; Glover, Pauline

    2008-02-01

    Video streaming technology enables video content, held on the web sites, to be streamed via the web. We report the implementation and evaluation of video streaming in an undergraduate nursing program in a metropolitan university in Australia. Students (n=703) were emailed a survey with a 15% response rate. We found that 91% (n=74) of respondents stated that video streaming assisted their learning. Forty-six percent(n=50) of students had difficulty accessing video streaming (particularly at the beginning of the study period). Over a 97-day period there were 8440 "hits" to the site from 1039 different internet protocol (IP) addresses. There were 4475 video streaming sessions undertaken by users. Video streaming was used for reviewing previously attended lectures (52%, n=56), examination preparation (34%, n=37), viewing missed lectures (27%, n=29) and class preparation (9%, n=10). Our experience with the introduction of video streaming has met with general enthusiasm from both students and teaching staff. Video streaming has particular relevance for rural students.

  10. Evaluation of a Teacher Program in a French-Belgian university. The Use of Teaching Portfolios

    OpenAIRE

    Frenay, Mariane; Wouters, Pascale; Bourgeois, Etienne; Galand, Benoît

    2005-01-01

    Frenay, M., Wouters, P., Bourgeois, E., & Galand, B. (2005). Evaluation of a Teacher Program in a French-Belgian university. The Use of Teaching Portfolios. Les Cahiers de Recherche du Girsef, 46.; The objective of this paper is to analyze how teaching portfolios, when used as an integrated activity in a University teaching and learning program, could be an effective way to evaluate the impact of programs, by measuring the structure of the observed learning outcomes of this program.

  11. Program Evaluation of the English Language Proficiency Program for Foreign Students a Case Study: University of the East, Manila Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimi, Esmaeel Ali; Farsi, Mitra

    2016-01-01

    This study on evaluating an English program of studies for foreign students seeking admission to the UE Graduate School attempts to examine the prevailing conditions of foreign students in the UE Graduate School with respect to their competence and competitiveness in English proficiency. It looks into the existing English programs of studies in…

  12. 2010 Solar Program Peer Review Report: An Independent Evaluation of Program Activities for FY2009 and FY2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program

    2010-12-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program's 2010 Program Review meeting, held on May 24?27, 2010, in Washington, D.C.

  13. Tuberculosis control program in the municipal context: performance evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Tiemi; Magnabosco, Gabriela Tavares; Andrade, Rubia Laine de Paula; Brunello, Maria Eugenia Firmino; Monroe, Aline Aparecida; Ruffino-Netto, Antonio; Scatena, Lucia Marina; Villa, Tereza Cristina Scatena

    2017-03-30

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the performance of the Tuberculosis Control Program in municipalities of the State of São Paulo. This is a program evaluation research, with ecological design, which uses three non-hierarchical groups of the municipalities of the State of São Paulo according to their performance in relation to operational indicators. We have selected 195 municipalities with at least five new cases of tuberculosis notified in the Notification System of the State of São Paulo and with 20,000 inhabitants or more in 2010. The multiple correspondence analysis was used to identify the association between the groups of different performances, the epidemiological and demographic characteristics, and the characteristics of the health systems of the municipalities. The group with the worst performance showed the highest rates of abandonment (average [avg] = 10.4, standard deviation [sd] = 9.4) and the lowest rates of supervision of Directly Observed Treatment (avg = 6.1, sd = 12.9), and it was associated with low incidence of tuberculosis, high tuberculosis and HIV, small population, high coverage of the Family Health Strategy/Program of Community Health Agents, and being located on the countryside. The group with the best performance presented the highest cure rate (avg = 83.7, sd = 10.5) and the highest rate of cases in Directly Observed Treatment (avg = 83.0, sd = 12.7); the group of regular performance showed regular results for outcome (avg cure = 79.8, sd = 13.2; abandonment avg = 9.5, sd = 8.3) and supervision of the Directly Observed Treatment (avg = 42.8, sd = 18.8). Large population, low coverage of the Family Health Strategy/Program of Community Health Agents, high incidence of tuberculosis and AIDS, and being located on the coast and in metropolitan areas were associated with these groups. The findings highlight the importance of the Directly Observed Treatment in relation to the outcome for treatment and raise reflections on the

  14. Process evaluation of the Bonneville Power Administration Residential Weatherization Pilot Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerman, D.I.; Bronfman, B.H.; Tonn, B.

    1983-10-01

    An evaluation of the BPA Residential Weatherization Pilot Program is described. Data for this report were gathered at the eleven public utilities participating in the program, at the BPA area and district offices serving these utilities, and at BPA headquarters. This process evaluation of the Pilot Program documents the history of the program, outlines the implementation strategies adopted by the Pilot utilities, describes the role of the BPA area and district offices in the program, and indicates what was learned by BPA and the utilities in the period the program operated.

  15. Development and Evaluation of a Peer Support Program for Parents Facing Perinatal Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Rachel M; Roose, Rosmarie E

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this program evaluation was to understand the perspectives of peer parents and parents receiving support within a peer support program for perinatal bereavement at a midsized hospital within the midwestern United States. To document participants' perceptions of the program, a focus group was conducted with peer parents, and surveys were completed by both peer parents and parents receiving support. In this article we review our model of a peer support program for perinatal bereavement and report on parents' evaluation of the program. Recommendations through which other organizations can develop peer support programs for parents who have experienced a perinatal loss are provided.

  16. Evaluation of radiological teaching programs in the Internet; Evaluation radiologischer Lernprogramme im Internet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, J.; Schubert, S.; Voelk, M.; Scheibl, K.; Paetzel, C.; Schreyer, A.; Djavidani, B.; Feuerbach, S. [Institut fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Klinikum der Universitaet Regensburg (Germany); Strotzer, M. [Institut fuer Radiologie, Krankenhause Hohe Warte,Hohe Warte 8, 95445 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2003-01-01

    Evaluation of web based training programs,which can be contacted from the homepages of radiological departments of German universities.Material and method From june 2000 to january 2002 the 75 web based training programs of 57 providers,which can be contacted from the web pages of the radiological departments of german universities were evaluated in a prospective study.A medical student experienced in using the world wide web examined each training program three times in an interval of six months using the following criteria: availability of the web sites,target group,kind of training program,contents and structure and the technical solution. 51 of the 57 the homepages were fully available at each visit. 64 of the 75 web based training programs which could be connected from these sites were available at all three visitis.One program was only partially available at one spot check. 8 of the 75 programs were designed for physicians and medically trained personal, 23 were made for medical students and 44 addressed both target groups (partially more than once mentioned).The number of the presented cases ranged between one single and 3700. In 31 of 75 training programs links to other teaching files were found.A complete presentation of cases was presented by 48 of the 75 web sites.5 of the 75 web sites offered physiological images for comparison. In 20 training programs the pathological changes were optically marked in the x-ray images.A logical and didactical structure was found in 24 teaching files, 14 gave the possibility to check the learning results.No provider made use of the possibility to pass credits to the students or physicians acount with regard to official training programs. Multimedia techniques were used in 15 training programs.43 sites used data reduced preview images (thumbnails).The latest update of the site is mentioned in 55 of the 75 web sites. 19 of 57 providers had either no possibility of contact or did not answer to an e-mail. From the homepages

  17. Challenges and Opportunities for Evaluating Environmental Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carleton-Hug, Annelise; Hug, J. William

    2010-01-01

    Environmental education organizations can do more to either institute evaluation or improve the quality of their evaluation. In an effort to help evaluators bridge the gap between the potential for high quality evaluation systems to improve environmental education, and the low level of evaluation in actual practice, we reviewed recent…

  18. Challenges and Opportunities for Evaluating Environmental Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carleton-Hug, Annelise; Hug, J. William

    2010-01-01

    Environmental education organizations can do more to either institute evaluation or improve the quality of their evaluation. In an effort to help evaluators bridge the gap between the potential for high quality evaluation systems to improve environmental education, and the low level of evaluation in actual practice, we reviewed recent…

  19. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to isoleucyl-prolyl-proline (IPP) and valyl-prolyl-proline (VPP) and maintenance of normal blood pressure pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    studies (in 19 papers; five papers were translated by the applicant into English from the Japanese original) and one unpublished study, as well as two published and one unpublished meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) as being pertinent to the claim. Thirteen of the RCTs provided, four...... relationship has not been established between the consumption of IPP and VPP and maintenance of normal blood pressure. © European Food Safety Authority, 2011...

  20. Redesigning and aligning assessment and evaluation for a federally funded math and science teacher educational program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardré, Patricia L; Slater, Janis; Nanny, Mark

    2010-11-01

    This paper examines the redesign of evaluation components for a teacher professional development project funded by the National Science Foundation. It focuses on aligning evaluation instrumentation and strategies with program goals, research goals and program evaluation best practices. The study identifies weaknesses in the original (year 1) program evaluation design and implementation, develops strategies and tracks changes for year 2 implementation, and then reports enhancement of findings and recommendations for year 3. It includes lessons learned about assessment and evaluation over the project lifespan, with implications for research and evaluation of a range of related programs. This study functions as a classic illustration of how critical it is to observe first principles of assessment and evaluation for funded programs, the risks that arise when they are ignored, and the benefits that accrue when they are systematically observed.

  1. Jamaica National Net-Billing Pilot Program Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doris, Elizabeth [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Stout, Sherry [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Peterson, Kimberly [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-12-18

    This technical report discusses the effectiveness of the Jamaica Public Service Company Limited Net-Billing Pilot Program. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) collected and analyzed data from a wide range of stakeholders, conducted in-country research, and compared program elements to common interconnection practices to form programmatic recommendations for the Jamaica context. NREL finds that the net-billing pilot program has successfully contributed to the support of the emerging solar market in Jamaica with the interconnection of 80 systems under the program for a total of 1.38 megawatts (MW) at the time of original analysis.

  2. Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Model Program for Evaluating School Principals. Maxi-II Practicum Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Edgar Z.

    The objective of this project was to improve the Orange, California Unified School District's system for evaluating school principals through the development, implementation, and evaluation of a model program. The intended result of improved evaluation through the model was to identify those management skills which each participating principal…

  3. Return of talent programs: rationale and evaluation criteria for programs to ameliorate a 'brain drain'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keely, C B

    1986-03-01

    The term, brain drain, describes the loss of skilled professionals and the nonreturn of students from advanced study abroad. It is now used almost exclusively in reference to mobility from less developed countries to more developed countries. Controversy centers on whether needed skills are being drawn off unfairly at subsidized rates from developing to developed countries or whether excess capability is being utilized in developed countries rather than underemployed or wasted at home. Some causes of high level personnel migration include: 1) wage differentials between sending and receiving countries; 2) absence of opportunities for career development or mobility for reasons other than merit or accomplishment; 3) lack of high quality facilities, equipment, time, and other costly supports in developing countries; 4) employer's lack of knowledge of employee work and the resulting wages; and 5) political disagreement or persecution. Prospects for closing wage gaps and upgrading working conditions on a large scale in developing countries are dim. Growth of the labor force coupled with national needs that are not congruent with professions requiring costly facilities, supplies, and equipment make this a slim possibility. Increasing career mobility possibilities seems to be a more promising route to reducing brain drain. One form of preventive measure is offering study abroad which requires service at the end of the study period; a variation is to guarantee employment for university graduates or for certain sectors, such as scientists. Restructuring decisions on hiring and promotion would have a positive effect, as would developing a better evaluation of expected productivity by type of training. Successful return of talent programs will be relatively modest in terms of the number of people returning and should be thought of as a part of human capital investment. Programs that are concerned with filling positions rather than with luring talent home are more likely to be

  4. Evaluating an EPO Program in an NSF Facility: Successes and Challenges of Developing Robust Evaluation with Modest Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlevoix, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Many science and technology facilities, as well as science-focused non-profits have directorates or divisions dedicated to education, outreach, and often communications. These Education and Outreach programs typically have complex portfolios of projects and sub-programs ranging from communications and general outreach to professional training and development of key stakeholders. UNAVCO's Education and Community Engagement (ECE) Program provides outreach, education and communications services to the NSF geodetic facility. Specific areas of focus for ECE include: professional development and training, educational materials development and dissemination, community communications, and a geo-workforce development sub-program. Activities within these four areas are determined through a combination of strategic planning and resource availability. Since 2013, the ECE program has worked toward developing a robust planning and evaluation process. Annual strategic planning sessions identify the scope of work for the coming year. An annual implementation plan is developed from these sessions including specific tasks, targets and performance metrics. Quarterly review of progress and realignment of work guides the program and a formal internal evaluation of annual work progress informs the following year's scope of work. The UNAVCO ECE program has consulted with external evaluators on this process and has incorporated suggestions to improve the process after the first year. This presentation will provide an overview of the implementation plan and evaluation process. We will share with the community the successes and challenges of developing a robust evaluation plan that incorporates all program portfolio elements.

  5. A Science Lesson Plan Analysis Instrument for Formative and Summative Program Evaluation of a Teacher Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Christina L.; Martin, Sonya N.; Otieno, Tracey C.

    2008-01-01

    In evaluating the success of teacher development programs, valid and scalable measures of teaching practice are needed. We have developed and validated the Science Lesson Plan Analysis Instrument (SLPAI) for quantitative evaluation of teacher-generated multiday lesson plans. This paper presents the SLPAI as a complement to surveys and classroom…

  6. Determining the quality of competences assessment programs: A self-evaluation procedure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baartman, Liesbeth; Prins, Frans; Kirschner, Paul A.; Van der Vleuten, Cees

    2009-01-01

    Baartman, L. K. J., Prins, F. J., Kirschner, P. A., & Van der Vleuten, C. P. M. (2007). Determining the quality of Competence Assessment Programs: A self-evaluation procedure. Studies in Educational Evaluation, 33, 258-281.

  7. Determining the quality of competences assessment programs: A self-evaluation procedure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baartman, Liesbeth; Prins, Frans; Kirschner, Paul A.; Van der Vleuten, Cees

    2009-01-01

    Baartman, L. K. J., Prins, F. J., Kirschner, P. A., & Van der Vleuten, C. P. M. (2007). Determining the quality of Competence Assessment Programs: A self-evaluation procedure. Studies in Educational Evaluation, 33, 258-281.

  8. Great Ideas Revisited. Techniques for Evaluating Training Programs. Revisiting Kirkpatrick's Four-Level Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Donald

    1996-01-01

    Kirkpatrick reviews his 1959 article presenting his four-level model of evaluation. He suggests that training professionals should evaluate their programs and understanding those four levels is a good start. The text of the original article is included. (JOW)

  9. Process Evaluation of a Positive Youth Development Program in Hong Kong Based on Different Cohorts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben M. F. Law

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are only a few process evaluation studies on positive youth development programs, particularly in the Chinese context. This study aims to examine the quality of implementation of a positive youth development program (the Project P.A.T.H.S.: Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes and investigate the relationships among program adherence, process factors, implementation quality, and perceived program success. Process evaluation of 97 classroom-based teaching units was conducted in 62 schools from 2005 to 2009. Findings based on different cohorts generally showed that there were high overall program adherence and implementation quality. Program adherence and implementation process were highly correlated with quality and success of the program. Multiple regression analyses further showed that both implementation process and program adherence are significant predictors of program quality and success. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.

  10. Helping adolescents with greater psychosocial needs: evaluation of a positive youth development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L; Sun, Rachel C F

    2008-06-13

    The Tier 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes), designed and implemented primarily by school social workers, attempts to help adolescents with greater psychosocial needs. After completion of the Tier 2 Program in the Full Implementation Phase (2006/07 school year), 10,255 Secondary 1 students in 207 schools responded to the Subjective Outcome Evaluation Form (Form C) to assess their views of the program, instructors, and perceived effectiveness of the program. Results showed that high proportions of the respondents had positive perceptions of the program and the instructors, and roughly four-fifths of the respondents regarded the program as helpful to them. Pearson correlation analyses showed that perceptions of the program and instructors were significantly correlated with perceived effectiveness of the program. Participants who joined volunteer training activities generally had higher global subjective outcome evaluation scores than did participants who attended programs without volunteer training activities.

  11. An Evaluation of CHAMPS: A Classroom Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnear, Holly J.

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation was designed to examine the impact of Conversation, Help, Activity, Movement, Participation, Success (CHAMPS), a classroom management program in elementary schools in a district in North Carolina. The participants included principals and teachers who attended a 2-day training course and implemented the CHAMPS program at their…

  12. Evaluation of the College Possible Program: Results from a Randomized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a randomized trial of the College Possible program, which provides two years of college preparatory work for high school juniors and seniors in Minneapolis and St. Paul. The trial involved 238 students, including 134 who were randomly selected for admission to the program. The results indicate that the College…

  13. Evaluating Conservation Education Programs at a South American Zoo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de White, Teresa Gutierrez; Jacobson, Susan K.

    1994-01-01

    Reports a study to determine the effectiveness of conservation education strategies in use at zoological parks by comparing program formats. Fourth-grade students (n=1,015) were assigned to experimental groups and completed questionnaires. Knowledge and attitude scores of students whose teachers participated in the educational program improved…

  14. Developing and Utilizing Undergraduate Program Objectives for Developing Evaluative Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, Carroll D.

    A follow-up study of recent graduates of the College of Education at the University of New Orleans was developed to continue the organized assessment program of the College. Information gathered by the investigation is intended to provide the basis for revision of the undergraduate teacher education program and the development of effective…

  15. Evaluating Market Orientation of an Executive MBA Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubas, Khalid M.; Ghani, Waqar I.; Davis, Stanley; Strong, James T.

    1998-01-01

    A study assessed the market orientation of the executive Master's in Business Administration (MBA) program at Saint Joseph's University (Pennsylvania) in terms of 12 skills and knowledge areas that reflect effective managerial performance and the student-executives' perceptions of program strengths and weaknesses in delivering these skills.…

  16. Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Sustainable Living Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazze, Sarah; Stockard, Jean

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Masters at Home program was modeled after Extension "master" classes with the aim of increasing individuals' energy and resource saving behaviors. This article explores the impact of the program on participants' behavior, attitudes, and knowledge over several years of implementation. Data sources include survey…

  17. Evaluation of the Virtual Physiology of Exercise Laboratory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, John L.

    2009-01-01

    The Virtual Physiology of Exercise Laboratory (VPEL) program was created to simulate the test design, data collection, and analysis phases of selected exercise physiology laboratories. The VPEL program consists of four modules: (1) cardiovascular, (2) maximal O[subscript 2] consumption [Vo[subscript 2max], (3) lactate and ventilatory thresholds,…

  18. Systematic Student Input into Evaluation of an Educational Innovation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halinski, Ronald S.; Tcheng, Tse-Kia

    Under a program of educational innovation implemented by the university, some 20 percent of the faculty were engaged in activities designed to improve the quality of instruction. Financial support exceeded one-half million dollars. The purpose of this study was to determine the program's overall impact. Baseline data was gathered in March 1973,…

  19. An Evaluation of the Allen J. Ellender Fellowship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesel, Justin; Gutmann, Babette

    The Allen J. Ellender Fellowship Program provides fellowships to economically disadvantaged secondary school students, secondary school teachers and administrators, and economically disadvantaged older citizens, and recent immigrants for participation in the Close Up Foundation's week-long civics education programs in Washington, D.C. The Close Up…

  20. Evaluation of the Early Admission to First Grade Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebbeler, Kathleen; And Others

    This report presents findings from the first year of a pilot program permitting kindergarten age students to enter school at the first grade level (K-1 program for 5-year-olds). The purposes of the study were: (1) to compare the academic and social behavior of the early admissions (EA) students with that of the regular first graders; (2) to…

  1. Evaluation of a cross-cultural training program for Pakistani educators: Lessons learned and implications for program planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Rebecca; Woodland, Rebecca H

    2017-02-20

    In this paper, we share the results of a summative evaluation of PEILI, a US-based adult professional development/training program for secondary school Pakistani teachers. The evaluation was guided by the theories of cultural competence (American Psychological Association, 2003; Bamberger, 1999; Wadsworth, 2001) and established frameworks for the evaluation of professional development/training and instructional design (Bennett, 1975; Guskey, 2002; King, 2014; Kirkpatrick, 1967). The explicit and implicit stakeholder assumptions about the connections between program resources, activities, outputs, and outcomes are described. Participant knowledge and skills were measured via scores on a pre/posttest of professional knowledge, and a standards-based performance assessment rubric. In addition to measuring short-term program outcomes, we also sought to incorporate theory-driven thinking into the evaluation design. Hence, we examined participant self-efficacy and access to social capital, two evidenced-based determinants or "levers" that theoretically explain the transformative space between an intervention and its outcomes (Chen, 2012). Data about program determinants were collected and analyzed through a pre/posttest of self-efficacy and social network analysis. Key evaluation findings include participant acquisition of new instructional skills, increased self-efficacy, and the formation of a nascent professional support network. Lessons learned and implications for the design and evaluation of cross-cultural teacher professional development programs are discussed.

  2. Development of a Systemwide Predator Control Program, Section II : Northern Squawfish Management Program Evaluation, 1995 annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Franklin R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Portland, OR)

    1997-04-01

    Report on progress on evaluation of the Columbia River Northern Squawfish Management Program in 1995. The objectives in 1995 were to (1) evaluate exploitation rate and size composition of northern squawfish captured in various fisheries, and estimate reductions in predation on juvenile salmonids since implementation of the Northern Squawfish Management Program; and (2) evaluate changes through 1995 in relative abundance, consumption, size and age structure, growth, and fecundity of northern squawfish in lower Columbia and Snake River reservoirs and in the Columbia River downstream from Bonneville Dam.

  3. Exploring an Accelerated College Program for Adult Learners: A Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engleking, Charlene

    2015-01-01

    Many colleges and universities have expanded their mission to include adult learners. Programs range from scheduling traditional courses in the evening to designing new programs tailored to meet the needs of working adults. Program designers have relied on theorists such, as Mezirow (1991), Houle (1996), and Knowles, Holton, and Swanson (1998), to…

  4. Evaluating Effectiveness of Pair Programming as a Teaching Tool in Programming Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faja, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness of pair programming on student learning and satisfaction in introductory programming courses. Pair programming, used in the industry as a practice of an agile development method, can be adopted in classroom settings to encourage peer learning, increase students' social skills, and enhance student…

  5. Healthy Weigh (El camino saludable) phase 1: a retrospective critical examination of program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frable, Pamela Jean; Dart, Lyn; Bradley, Patricia J

    2006-07-01

    Healthy Weigh (El camino saludable) is an obesity prevention program for low-income, predominantly Hispanic and African American families in an urban community in Tarrant County, Texas. Healthy Weigh Phase 1 was a successful community-campus partnership that took place in summer (June-August) and fall (September-November) 2003. The program met stated objectives and extensively engaged students from several health disciplines in service learning. This article describes what we learned about the evaluation of the program by examining the phase 1 evaluation process. Family environments are important intervention settings for establishing life-long dietary practices. Available in English and Spanish, Healthy Weigh Phase 1 helped families that were at risk for overweight and obesity to adopt healthy eating, physical activity, and weight management patterns. Analysis of a program logic model and formative evaluation data identified evaluation questions that could have improved the phase 1 evaluation process. Questions were categorized according to Donabedian's structure-process-outcome framework, and potential benefits of each question were identified. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Framework for Program Evaluation in Public Health standards were used to judge the overall quality of the phase 1 evaluation process. The phase 1 evaluation process successfully assessed the program's effects and generally met evaluation standards. Our critical examination also highlighted structure and process evaluation issues with potential for strengthening future interventions, community partnerships, and program outcomes. Lessons learned influenced the phase 2 grant activities. Most importantly, we learned that involvement of program participants as full partners in program design, evaluation, and implementation is essential. Our understanding and practice of program evaluation evolved as Healthy Weigh became a true community-based participatory research endeavor.

  6. Let's get technical: Enhancing program evaluation through the use and integration of internet and mobile technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materia, Frank T; Miller, Elizabeth A; Runion, Megan C; Chesnut, Ryan P; Irvin, Jamie B; Richardson, Cameron B; Perkins, Daniel F

    2016-06-01

    Program evaluation has become increasingly important, and information on program performance often drives funding decisions. Technology use and integration can help ease the burdens associated with program evaluation by reducing the resources needed (e.g., time, money, staff) and increasing evaluation efficiency. This paper reviews how program evaluators, across disciplines, can apply internet and mobile technologies to key aspects of program evaluation, which consist of participant registration, participant tracking and retention, process evaluation (e.g., fidelity, assignment completion), and outcome evaluation (e.g., behavior change, knowledge gain). In addition, the paper focuses on the ease of use, relative cost, and fit with populations. An examination on how these tools can be integrated to enhance data collection and program evaluation is discussed. Important limitations of and considerations for technology integration, including the level of technical skill, cost needed to integrate various technologies, data management strategies, and ethical considerations, are highlighted. Lastly, a case study of technology use in an evaluation conducted by the Clearinghouse for Military Family Readiness at Penn State is presented and illustrates how technology integration can enhance program evaluation.

  7. Financial Awareness Education with Apprentices in the Australian Construction Industry: Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Plessis, Karin; Green, Emma

    2013-01-01

    A financial awareness education program was implemented with construction industry apprentices in Victoria, Australia. The program included face-to-face delivery of education around a range of financial management issues that apprentices face as they begin their apprenticeship. The paper reports on an evaluation of the program, which included…

  8. Evaluation of Achieving a College Education Plus: A Credit-Based Transition Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Gaye; Fowler, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This ex post facto study evaluated Achieving a College Education (ACE) Plus program, a credit-based transition program between a high school district and a community college. Achieving a College Education Plus is an early outreach program. It is designed to aid at-risk students in graduating from high school and making a smooth transition to…

  9. A Microcomputer Program for Evaluating Pumping Test Results for Confined Aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephen M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes an interactive, self-prompting BASIC program that can be incorporated in introductory and intermediate hydrology courses. Exlains how the program can be used to evaluate pumping test data and also to calculate transmissivity and storativity values of confined aquifers. The program is written for the IBM PC. (ML)

  10. Evaluation of a Life Skills Program for Women Inmates in Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schram, Pamela J.; Morash, Merry

    2002-01-01

    Describes and evaluates a life skills program that focuses on addressing the special needs of female inmates. Analyses of pre- and post-test scores of program participants compared emotional empathy, self-esteem, coping resources, problem solving, parenting stress, employability, and well-being. Results suggest tat the program does address some of…

  11. An Evaluation of the Influence of the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program in Missouri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Nelda M.; Gross, John G.

    The report evaluates the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) in Missouri by comparing the dietary adequacy and nutrition knowledge of 200 program families representative of urban, small town and rural areas with that of 200 similarly representative non-program families. Data were gathered by personal interviews taken in March,…

  12. Parent Involvement Program Institute: Parents as Partners with Schools. Final Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Strategic Planning/Research and Development.

    An evaluation was done of the 1992 Parent Involvement Program Institute (PIPI), a program sponsored by the Office of Parent Involvement of the New York City Board of Education and held at Pace University (New York City). The PIPI brought together parents to showcase successful program components, and to provide help and encouragement to parents…

  13. Art Enrichment: Evaluating a Collaboration between Head Start and a Graduate Art Therapy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klorer, P. Gussie; Robb, Megan

    2012-01-01

    Head Start, a U.S. federally funded program, prepares children for school through early childhood intervention in social-emotional and cognitive arenas. This article describes program evaluation survey results from the past 5 years of an 18-year collaboration between a university graduate art therapy program and 8 Head Start centers. Graduate art…

  14. Lessons from a Concurrent Evaluation of Eight Antibullying Programs Used in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flygare, Erik; Gill, Peter Edward; Johansson, Bjorn

    2013-01-01

    Sweden has a low prevalence of bullying and Swedish schools are legally obliged to have anti-bullying policies. Many commercial programs are available. A mixed methods, quasi-experimental, concurrent evaluation of 8 programs, chosen from a pool of 21 widely used anti-bullying programs, was planned. Preliminary data, based on 835 stakeholder…

  15. Process Evaluation of a Positive Youth Development Program: Project P.A.T.H.S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Ben M. F.; Shek, Daniel T. L.

    2011-01-01

    There are only a few process evaluation studies on positive youth development programs, particularly in the Chinese context. Objectives: This study aims to examine the quality of implementation of a positive youth development program (Project Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programs [P.A.T.H.S.]) and investigate the…

  16. Evaluation of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program in Nine Urban Schools: Effective Practices and next Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Sally; Washington, Ericka

    2008-01-01

    The Olweus Bullying Prevention Program (BPP) is an internationally recognized school-based bullying prevention program. This project sought to evaluate pilot implementation of the program in one urban district using fidelity of implementation, bullying incident density (BID), student surveys, and serious incident reports as process and outcome…

  17. Art Enrichment: Evaluating a Collaboration between Head Start and a Graduate Art Therapy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klorer, P. Gussie; Robb, Megan

    2012-01-01

    Head Start, a U.S. federally funded program, prepares children for school through early childhood intervention in social-emotional and cognitive arenas. This article describes program evaluation survey results from the past 5 years of an 18-year collaboration between a university graduate art therapy program and 8 Head Start centers. Graduate art…

  18. The Effect of a Physiological Evaluation Program on Coronary Heart Disease Risk Scores for Sedentary Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkenberg, Mel; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to compare the coronary heart disease (CHD) probability estimates of a group of sedentary males involved in an exercise stress test program from 1968 through 1974 with those of a comparison group of sedentary males not involved in the program. The program was designed to evaluate cardiopulmonary function and improve…

  19. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a Positive Youth Development Program for Secondary Students in Macau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew L. Luk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A well-tested comprehensive Chinese positive youth development program (Project P.A.T.H.S. developed in Hong Kong has been modified and adapted for use in Macau. This program aims to help adolescent school children develop positively and to be better prepared for their future. The present study investigated the effectiveness of the Tier 1 Program of “P.A.T.H.S.” for Secondary 2 students of two pilot schools. Since there were “repeating” and “transferring” students joining the program, the effectiveness of the program on these particular groups of participants was also examined. The subjective outcome evaluations including participants' perceptions of the program, program instructors, benefits from the program, and overall satisfaction were positive. Although the longitudinal data from the objective outcome evaluation did not show any notable improvement, the overall effect of the program was found to be positive to the new comers in the junior secondary years. The existing evaluation findings suggest that the Secondary 2 program is especially effective to those newly joining the program. In view of the paucity of youth studies in Macau, the present study can contribute to evidence-based youth work and provide baseline data for the program to be evaluated in the Secondary 3 periods in the future.

  20. An Examination of the Concept and Role of Program Monitoring and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood-Fabre, Liese

    This paper examines the concepts of program monitoring and program evaluation in the literature, and offers working definitions based on two dimensions of measurement: focus (what questions are addressed) and timing (how often the measures are taken). Focus can be on inputs to the program or outcomes from it; timing can be one-shot or continuous.…