WorldWideScience

Sample records for vortices magnetic

  1. A Vorticity-Magnetic Field Dynamo Instability

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    We generalize the mean field magnetic dynamo to include local evolution of the mean vorticity in addition to the mean magnetic field. The coupled equations exhibit a general mean field dynamo instability that enables the transfer of turbulent energy to the magnetic field and vorticity on larger scales. The growth of the vorticity and magnetic field both require helical turbulence which can be supplied by an underlying global rotation. The dynamo coefficients are derived including the backreac...

  2. Superexchange-Driven Magnetoelectricity in Magnetic Vortices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delaney, Kris T.; Mostovoy, Maxim; Spaldin, Nicola A.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that magnetic vortices in which spins are coupled to polar lattice distortions via superexchange exhibit an unusually large linear magnetoelectric response. We show that the periodic arrays of vortices formed by frustrated spins on kagome lattices provide a realization of this concept

  3. Vortices in Low-Dimensional Magnetic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, B. V.

    2011-05-01

    Vortices are objects that are important to describe several physical phenomena. There are many examples of such objects in nature as in a large variety of physical situations like in fluid dynamics, superconductivity, magnetism, and biology. Historically, the interest in magnetic vortex-like excitations begun in the 1960s. That interest was mainly associated with an unusual phase-transition phenomenon in two-dimensional magnetic systems. More recently, direct experimental evidence for the existence of magnetic vortex states in nano-disks was found. The interest in such model was renewed due to the possibility of the use of magnetic nano-disks as bit elements in nano-scale memory devices. The goal of this study is to review some key points for the understanding of the vortex behavior and the progress that have been done in the study of vortices in low-dimensional magnetic systems.

  4. Dynamic Assembly of Magnetic Colloidal Vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohorič, Tomaž; Kokot, Gašper; Osterman, Natan; Snezhko, Alexey; Vilfan, Andrej; Babič, Dušan; Dobnikar, Jure

    2016-04-29

    Magnetic colloids in external time-dependent fields are subject to complex induced many-body interactions governing their self-assembly into a variety of equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium structures such as chains, networks, suspended membranes, and colloidal foams. Here, we report experiments, simulations, and theory probing the dynamic assembly of superparamagnetic colloids in precessing external magnetic fields. Within a range of field frequencies, we observe dynamic large-scale structures such as ordered phases composed of precessing chains, ribbons, and rotating fluidic vortices. We show that the structure formation is inherently coupled to the buildup of torque, which originates from internal relaxation of induced dipoles and from transient correlations among the particles as a result of short-lived chain formation. We discuss in detail the physical properties of the vortex phase and demonstrate its potential in particle-coating applications.

  5. Intrinsic nonadiabatic topological torque in magnetic skyrmions and vortices

    KAUST Repository

    Akosa, Collins Ashu

    2017-03-01

    We propose that topological spin currents flowing in topologically nontrivial magnetic textures, such as magnetic skyrmions and vortices, produce an intrinsic nonadiabatic torque of the form Tt∼[(∂xm×∂ym)·m]∂ym. We show that this torque, which is absent in one-dimensional domain walls and/or nontopological textures, is responsible for the enhanced nonadiabaticity parameter observed in magnetic vortices compared to one-dimensional textures. The impact of this torque on the motion of magnetic skyrmions is expected to be crucial, especially to determine their robustness against defects and pinning centers.

  6. Cosmological Perturbations: Vorticity, Isocurvature and Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Christopherson, Adam J

    2014-01-01

    In this paper I review some recent, interlinked, work undertaken using cosmological perturbation theory -- a powerful technique for modelling inhomogeneities in the Universe. The common theme which underpins these pieces of work is the presence of non-adiabatic pressure, or entropy, perturbations. After a brief introduction covering the standard techniques of describing inhomogeneities in both Newtonian and relativistic cosmology, I discuss the generation of vorticity. As in classical fluid mechanics, vorticity is not present in linearized perturbation theory (unless included as an initial condition). Allowing for entropy perturbations, and working to second order in perturbation theory, I show that vorticity is generated, even in the absence of vector perturbations, by purely scalar perturbations, the source term being quadratic in the gradients of first order energy density and isocurvature, or non-adiabatic pressure perturbations. This generalizes Crocco's theorem to a cosmological setting. I then introduc...

  7. Vorticity production and survival in viscous and magnetized cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Dosopoulou, F; Tsagas, C G; Brandenburg, A

    2011-01-01

    We study the role of viscosity and the effects of a magnetic field on a rotating, self-gravitating fluid, using Newtonian theory and adopting the ideal magnetohydrodynamic approximation. Our results confirm that viscosity can generate vorticity in inhomogeneous environments, while the magnetic tension can produce vorticity even in the absence of fluid pressure and density gradients. Linearizing our equations around an Einstein-de Sitter cosmology, we find that viscosity adds to the diluting effect of the universal expansion. Typically, however, the dissipative viscous effects are confined to relatively small scales. We also identify the characteristic length bellow which the viscous dissipation is strong and beyond which viscosity is essentially negligible. In contrast, magnetism seems to favor cosmic rotation. The magnetic presence is found to slow down the standard decay-rate of linear vortices, thus leading to universes with more residual rotation than generally anticipated.

  8. Experimental results on chiral magnetic and vortical effects

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Various novel transport phenomena in chiral systems result from the interplay of quantum anomalies with magnetic field and vorticity in high-energy heavy-ion collisions, and could survive the expansion of the fireball and be detected in experiments. Among them are the chiral magnetic effect, the chiral vortical effect and the chiral magnetic wave, the experimental searches for which have aroused extensive interest. The goal of this review is to describe the current status of experimental studies at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL and the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, and to outline the future work in experiment needed to eliminate the existing uncertainties in the interpretation of the data.

  9. Propagation of magnetic vortices using nanocontacts as tunable attractors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfrini, M.; Kim, Joo-Von; Petit-Watelot, S.; van Roy, W.; Lagae, L.; Chappert, C.; Devolder, T.

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic vortices in thin films are in-plane spiral spin configurations with a core in which the magnetization twists out of the film plane. Vortices result from the competition between atomic-scale exchange forces and long-range dipolar interactions. They are often the ground state of magnetic dots, and have applications in medicine, microwave generation and information storage. The compact nature of the vortex core, which is 10-20 nm wide, makes it a suitable probe of magnetism at the nanoscale. However, thus far the positioning of a vortex has been possible only in confined structures, which prevents its transport over large distances. Here we show that vortices can be propagated in an unconstrained system that comprises electrical nanocontacts (NCs). The NCs are used as tunable vortex attractors in a manner that resembles the propelling of space craft with gravitational slingshots. By passing current from the NCs to a ferromagnetic film, circulating magnetic fields are generated, which nucleate the vortex and create a potential well for it. The current becomes spin polarized in the film, and thereby drives the vortex into gyration through spin-transfer torques. The vortex can be guided from one NC to another by tuning attractive strengths of the NCs. We anticipate that NC networks may be used as multiterminal sources of vortices and spin waves (as well as heat, spin and charge flows) to sense the fundamental interactions between physical objects and fluxes of the next-generation spintronic devices.

  10. Hamiltonian vortices and reconnection in a magnetized plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuvshinov, B. N.; Lakhin, V. P.; Pegoraro, F.; Schep, T. J.

    1998-01-01

    Hamiltonian vortices and reconnection in magnetized plasmas are investigated analytically and numerically using a two-fluid model. The equations are written in the Lagrangian form of three fields that are advected with different velocities. This system can be considered as a generalization and exten

  11. Magnetorheological effect in the magnetic field oriented along the vorticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzhir, P., E-mail: pavel.kuzhir@unice.fr; Magnet, C.; Fezai, H.; Meunier, A.; Bossis, G. [Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, CNRS UMR7336, University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, 28 Avenue Joseph Vallot, 06100 Nice (France); Rodríguez-Arco, L.; López-López, M. T. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Granada, Campus de Fuentenueva, 18071 Granada (Spain); Zubarev, A. [Department of Mathematical Physics, Ural Federal University, 51 Prospekt Lenina, 620083 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we have studied the magnetorheological (MR) fluid rheology in the magnetic field parallel to the fluid vorticity. Experimentally, the MR fluid flow was realized in the Couette coaxial cylinder geometry with the magnetic field parallel to the symmetry axis. The rheological measurements were compared to those obtained in the cone-plate geometry with the magnetic field perpendicular to the lower rheometer plate. Experiments revealed a quasi-Bingham behavior in both geometries with the stress level being just a few dozens of percent smaller in the Couette cylindrical geometry at the same internal magnetic field. The unexpectedly high MR response in the magnetic field parallel to the fluid vorticity is explained by stochastic fluctuations of positions and orientations of the particle aggregates. These fluctuations are induced by magnetic interactions between them. Once misaligned from the vorticity direction, the aggregates generate a high stress independent of the shear rate, and thus assimilated to the suspension apparent (dynamic) yield stress. Quantitatively, the fluctuations of the aggregate orientation are modeled as a rotary diffusion process with a diffusion constant proportional to the mean square interaction torque. The model gives a satisfactory agreement with the experimental field dependency of the apparent yield stress and confirms the nearly quadratic concentration dependency σ{sub Y}∝Φ{sup 2.2}, revealed in experiments. The practical interest of this study lies in the development of MR smart devices with the magnetic field nonperpendicular to the channel walls.

  12. Experimental Results on Chiral Magnetic and Vortical Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Various novel transport phenomena in chiral systems result from the interplay of quantum anomalies with magnetic field and vorticity in high-energy heavy-ion collisions and could survive the expansion of the fireball and be detected in experiments. Among them are the chiral magnetic effect, the chiral vortical effect, and the chiral magnetic wave, the experimental searches for which have aroused extensive interest. The goal of this review is to describe the current status of experimental studies at Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider at BNL and the Large Hadron Collider at CERN and to outline the future work in experiment needed to eliminate the existing uncertainties in the interpretation of the data.

  13. Magnetic vortices in gauge/gravity duality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strydom, Migael

    2014-07-18

    We study strongly-coupled phenomena using gauge/gravity duality, with a particular focus on vortex solutions produced by magnetic field and time-dependent problems in holographic models. The main result is the discovery of a counter-intuitive effect where a strong non-abelian magnetic field induces the formation of a triangular vortex lattice ground state in a simple holographic model. Gauge/gravity duality is a powerful theoretical tool that has been used to study strongly-coupled systems ranging from the quark-gluon plasma produced at particle colliders to condensed matter theories. The most important idea is that of duality: a strongly coupled quantum field theory can be studied by investigating the properties of a particular gravity background described by Einstein's equations. One gravity background we study in this dissertation is AdS-Schwarzschild with an SU(2) gauge field. We switch on the gauge field component that gives the field theory an external magnetic field. When the magnetic field is above a critical value, we find that the system is unstable, indicating a superconducting phase transition. We find the instability in two ways. Firstly, we do a quasinormal mode analysis, studying fluctuations about the background. Secondly, we rewrite the equations in Schroedinger form and numerically find that, as the magnetic field is increased, the potential deepens until it is capable of supporting a bound state. Next we show that the resulting superconducting ground state is a triangular vortex lattice. This is done by performing a perturbative expansion in a small parameter proportional to the condensate size. After solving the equations to third order, we use the holographic dictionary to calculate the total energy of different lattice solutions and identify the minimum energy state. In addition, we show that the result holds in an AdS-hard wall model as well, which is dual to a confining theory. Next we extend the simple gravity model to include a

  14. Ricci magnetic geodesic motion of vortices and lumps

    CERN Document Server

    Alqahtani, L S

    2014-01-01

    Ricci magnetic geodesic (RMG) motion in a k\\"ahler manifold is the analogue of geodesic motion in the presence of a magnetic field proportional to the ricci form. It has been conjectured to model low-energy dynamics of vortex solitons in the presence of a Chern-Simons term, the k\\"ahler manifold in question being the $n$-vortex moduli space. This paper presents a detailed study of RMG motion in soliton moduli spaces, focusing on the cases of hyperbolic vortices and spherical $\\mathbb{C}P^1$ lumps. It is shown that RMG flow localizes on fixed point sets of groups of holomorphic isometries, but that the flow on such submanifolds does not, in general, coincide with their intrinsic RMG flow. For planar vortices, it is shown that RMG flow differs from an earlier reduced dynamics proposed by Kim and Lee, and that the latter flow is ill-defined on the vortex coincidence set. An explicit formula for the metric on the whole moduli space of hyperbolic two-vortices is computed (extending an old result of Strachan's), an...

  15. On the evaluation of vorticity using cardiovascular magnetic resonance velocity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, J; Larose, E; Pibarot, P; Kadem, L

    2013-12-01

    Vorticity and vortical structures play a fundamental role affecting the evaluation of energetic aspects (mainly left ventricle work) of cardiovascular function. Vorticity can be derived from cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging velocity measurements. However, several numerical schemes can be used to evaluate the vorticity field. The main objective of this work is to assess different numerical schemes used to evaluate the vorticity field derived from CMR velocity measurements. We compared the vorticity field obtained using direct differentiation schemes (eight-point circulation and Chapra) and derivate differentiation schemes (Richardson 4* and compact Richardson 4*) from a theoretical velocity field and in vivo CMR velocity measurements. In all cases, the effect of artificial spatial resolution up-sampling and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) on vorticity computation was evaluated. Theoretical and in vivo results showed that the eight-point circulation method underestimated vorticity. Up-sampling evaluation showed that the artificial improvement of spatial resolution had no effect on mean absolute vorticity estimation but it affected SNR for all methods. The Richardson 4* method and its compact version were the most accurate and stable methods for vorticity magnitude evaluation. Vorticity field determination using the eight-point circulation method, the most common method used in CMR, has reduced accuracy compared to other vorticity schemes. Richardson 4* and its compact version showed stable SNR using both theoretical and in vivo data.

  16. Effect of strain on the evolution of magnetic multi-vortices in ferromagnetic nano-platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Zhang, Jianwei; Shimada, Takahiro; Kitamura, Takayuki

    2013-06-05

    The effect of external strain on the evolution of magnetic multi-vortices in nanoscale ferromagnetic platelets is investigated by a phase field model that explicitly includes the coupling between the magnetization and deformation. Phase field simulations show that a compressive strain makes the magnetic vortex-antivortex pair stable in rectangular ferromagnetic platelets, which is unstable in the absence of an external magnetic field and strain. The magnetic clockwise (CW) and counterclockwise (CCW) vortex pairs disappear in ferromagnetic platelets under an external magnetic field through the annihilation of the vortex and antivortex, or through expulsion when external strain is absent. In the presence of tensile strain, the expulsion of CW and CCW vortices is suppressed in ferromagnetic platelets. However, external strain has less effect on the annihilation of CW and CCW vortices. For ferromagnetic platelets with triple vortices, both tensile strain and a magnetic field induce the annihilation and expulsion of vortices. The effect of strain on the evolution of magnetic vortices suggests a new way to control them by strain engineering.

  17. Thermal chiral vortical and magnetic waves: new excitation modes in chiral fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2016-01-01

    In certain circumstances, chiral (parity-violating) medium can be described hydrodynamically as a chiral fluid with microscopic quantum anomalies. Possible examples of such systems include strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma, liquid helium 3He-A, neutron stars and the Early Universe. We study first-order hydrodynamics of a chiral fluid on a vortex background and in a external magnetic field. We show that there are two previously undiscovered modes describing heat waves propagating along the vortex and magnetic field. We call them the Thermal Chiral Vortical Wave and Thermal Chiral Magnetic Wave. We also identify known gapless excitations of density, the chiral vortical and chiral magnetic waves. We demonstrate that the velocity of the chiral vortical wave is zero, when the full hydrodynamic framework is applied, and hence the excitation reduces to a charge diffusion mode or is completely absent. We also correct the dispersion relation for the chiral magnetic wave.

  18. Magnetic flux inversion in Charged BPS vortices in a Lorentz-violating Maxwell-Higgs framework

    CERN Document Server

    Cantanhede, C M; Ferreira, M M; da Hora, E

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate by first the existence of electrically charged BPS vortices in a Maxwell-Higgs model supplemented with a parity-odd Lorentz-violating (LV) structure belonging to the CPT-even gauge sector of the standard model extension and a fourth order potential (in the absence of the Chern-Simons term). The modified first order BPS equations provide charged vortex configurations endowed with some interesting features: localized and controllable spatial thickness, integer flux quantization, electric field inversion and magnetic flux reversion. This model could possibly be applied on condensed matter systems which support charged vortices carrying localized and integer quantized magnetic flux, endowed with flipping of the magnetic flux.

  19. Vortices and magnetic bags in Abelian models with extended scalar sectors and some of their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Forgács, Péter

    2016-01-01

    A detailed study of vortices is presented in Ginzburg-Landau (or Abelian Higgs) models with two complex scalars (order parameters) assuming a general U(1)$\\times$U(1) symmetric potential. Particular emphasis is given to the case, when only one of the scalars obtains a vacuum expectation value (VEV). It is found that for a significantly large domain in parameter space vortices with a scalar field condensate in their core (condensate core, CC) coexist with Abrikosov-Nielsen-Olesen (ANO) vortices. Importantly CC vortices are stable and have lower energy than the ANO ones. Magnetic bags or giant vortices of the order of 1000 flux quanta are favoured to form for the range of parameters ("strong couplings") appearing for the superconducting state of liquid metallic hydrogen (LMH). Furthermore, it is argued that finite energy/unit length 1VEV vortices are smoothly connected to fractional flux 2VEV ones. Stable, finite energy CC-type vortices are also exhibited in the case when one of the scalar fields is neutral.

  20. Vortices and magnetic bags in Abelian models with extended scalar sectors and some of their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgács, Péter; Lukács, Árpád

    2016-12-01

    A detailed study of vortices is presented in Ginzburg-Landau (or Abelian Higgs) models with two complex scalars (order parameters) assuming a general U (1 )×U (1 ) symmetric potential. Particular emphasis is given to the case in which only one of the scalars obtains a vacuum expectation value (VEV). It is found that for a significantly large domain in parameter space vortices with a scalar field condensate in their core [condensate core (CC)] coexist with Abrikosov-Nielsen-Olesen (ANO) vortices. Importantly, CC vortices are stable and have lower energy than the ANO ones. Magnetic bags or giant vortices of the order of 1000 flux quanta are favored to form for the range of parameters ("strong couplings") appearing for the superconducting state of liquid metallic hydrogen (LMH). Furthermore, it is argued that finite energy/unit length 1VEV vortices are smoothly connected to fractional flux 2VEV ones. Stable, finite energy CC-type vortices are also exhibited in the case when one of the scalar fields is neutral.

  1. Magnetic structures and Z_2 vortices in a non-Abelian gauge model

    CERN Document Server

    Cabra, Daniel; Schaposnik, Fidel A

    2015-01-01

    The magnetic order of the triangular lattice with antiferromagnetic interactions is described by an SO(3) field and allows for the presence of Z2 magnetic vortices as defects. In this work we show how these Z2 vortices can be fitted into a local SU(2) gauge theory. We propose simple Ansatzes for vortex configurations and calculate their energies using well-known results of the Abelian gauge model. We comment on how Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions could be derived from a non-Abelian gauge theory and speculate on their effect on non trivial configurations.

  2. Magnetic monopoles and vortices in the standard model of electroweak interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Achúcarro, A

    2000-01-01

    These lectures start with an elementary introduction to the subject of magnetic monopoles which should be accesible from any physics background. In the Weinberg-Salam model of electroweak interactions, magnetic monopoles appear at the ends of a type of non-topological vortices called electroweak strings. These will also be discussed, as well as recent simulations of their formation during a phase transition which indicate that, in the (unphysical) range of parameters in which the strings are classically stable, they can form with a density comparable to topological vortices.

  3. Vortical Structures and Turbulent Bursts Behind Magnetic Obstacles in Transitional Flow Regimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenjeres, S.; Ten Cate, S.; Voesenek, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    The present paper reports on numerical investigations of vortical structures in transient flow regimes generated by the local action of the Lorentz force on an electrically conductive fluid. The locally imposed non-uniform magnetic field generates similar effects as observed for flows over submerged

  4. Fast and controllable switching the circulation and polarity of magnetic vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Y.; Feng, Z.; Miao, B. F.; Cao, R. X.; Sun, L.; You, B.; Wu, D.; Zhang, W.; Jiang, Z. S.; Cheng, R.; Ding, H. F.

    2014-12-01

    We report a method to switch both the circulation and polarity of magnetic vortices in a controlled manner within a nanosecond utilizing micromagnetic simulations. The controllable switching is achieved with the combination of two different types of magnetic field pulses on submicron permalloy disks with heptagonal shape. When a magnetic field pulse of ~100 mT is applied along one of the edge directions of the heptagon, the circulation of the vortex can be manipulated according to the pulse direction. When a pair of pulses with a few tens of mT in magnitude and relative delay of about 100 ps is applied in orthogonal directions, the polarity can be further controlled without influencing the circulation. The different magnitude of switching fields allows for the combination of both types of pulses in the control of both the circulation and polarity of magnetic vortices. The switching mechanism and the controlling parameters for disks with diameters of 500 and 700 nm are discussed.

  5. Magnetic Properties of Quantized Vortices in Neutron $^3P_2$ Superfluids in Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Masuda, Kota

    2015-01-01

    We discuss quantized vortices in neutron $^3P_2$ superfluids, which are believed to realize in high density neutron matter such as neutron stars. By using the Ginzburg-Landau free energy for $^3P_2$ superfluids, we determine the ground state in the absence and presence of the external magnetic field, and numerically construct $^3P_2$ quantized vortices in the absence and presence of the external magnetic field along the vortex axis (poloidal) or angular direction (toroidal). We find in certain situations the spontaneous magnetization of the vortex core, whose typical magnitude is about $10^{7-8}$ Gauss, but the net magnetic field in a neutron star is negligible because of the ratio of the vortex core size $\\sim 10$fm and the intervortex distance $\\sim 10^{-6}$m in a vortex lattice.

  6. Relationships between Fluid Vorticity, Kinetic Helicity, and Magnetic Field on Small-scales (Quiet-Network) on the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeetha, C. R.; Rajaguru, S. P.

    2016-06-01

    We derive horizontal fluid motions on the solar surface over large areas covering the quiet-Sun magnetic network from local correlation tracking of convective granules imaged in continuum intensity and Doppler velocity by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. From these we calculate the horizontal divergence, the vertical component of vorticity, and the kinetic helicity of fluid motions. We study the correlations between fluid divergence and vorticity, and between vorticity (kinetic helicity) and the magnetic field. We find that the vorticity (kinetic helicity) around small-scale fields exhibits a hemispherical pattern (in sign) similar to that followed by the magnetic helicity of large-scale active regions (containing sunspots). We identify this pattern to be a result of the Coriolis force acting on supergranular-scale flows (both the outflows and inflows), consistent with earlier studies using local helioseismology. Furthermore, we show that the magnetic fields cause transfer of vorticity from supergranular inflow regions to outflow regions, and that they tend to suppress the vortical motions around them when magnetic flux densities exceed about 300 G (from HMI). We also show that such an action of the magnetic fields leads to marked changes in the correlations between fluid divergence and vorticity. These results are speculated to be of importance to local dynamo action (if present) and to the dynamical evolution of magnetic helicity at the small-scale.

  7. Global hyperon polarization at local thermodynamic equilibrium with vorticity, magnetic field and feed-down

    CERN Document Server

    Becattini, F; Lisa, M; Upsal, I; Voloshin, S

    2016-01-01

    The system created in ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions is known to behave as an almost ideal liquid. In non-central collisions, due to the large orbital momentum, such a system might be the fluid with the highest vorticity ever created under laboratory conditions. Particles emerging from such a highly vorticous fluid are expected to be globally polarized with their spins on average pointing along the system angular momentum. Vorticity-induced polarization is the same for particles and antiparticles, but the intense magnetic field generated in these collisions may lead to the splitting in polarization. In this paper we outline the thermal approach to the calculation of the global polarization phenomenon for particles with spin and we discuss the details of the experimental study of this phenomenon, estimating the effect of feed-down. A general formula is derived for the polarization transfer in two-body decays and, particularly, for strong and electromagnetic decays. We find that accounting for such effect...

  8. Dynamics of magnetic nano-flake vortices in Newtonian fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazazzadeh, Nasim; Mohseni, Seyed Majid; Khavasi, Amin; Zibaii, Mohammad Ismail; Movahed, S. M. S.; Jafari, G. R.

    2016-12-01

    We study the rotational motion of nano-flake ferromagnetic disks suspended in a Newtonian fluid, as a potential material owing the vortex-like magnetic configuration. Using analytical expressions for hydrodynamic, magnetic and Brownian torques, the stochastic angular momentum equation is determined in the dilute limit conditions under applied magnetic field. Results are compared against experimental ones and excellent agreement is observed. We also estimate the uncertainty in the orientation of the disks due to the Brownian torque when an external magnetic field aligns them. Interestingly, this uncertainty is roughly proportional to the ratio of thermal energy of fluid to the magnetic energy stored in the disks. Our approach can be implemented in many practical applications including biotechnology and multi-functional fluidics.

  9. Magnus force and the inertial properties of magnetic vortices in weak ferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvezdin, A. K.; Zvezdin, K. A.

    2010-08-01

    The Magnus force (gyroscopic force) acting on magnetic vortices (Bloch lines) within domain boundaries in weak ferromagnets is discussed. A general formula is derived for the Magnus force in weak ferromagnets. The Magnus force is found to be nonzero for most types of domain boundaries and is determined by the average sublattice magnetization and the constants for the Dzyaloshinsky interaction and the exchange interaction between sublattices. Generalized expressions are obtained for the effective Lagrange and Rayleigh functions in weak ferromagnets taking their vortex structure into account. The question of the vortex mass, which has been found to be on the order of m*˜10-14g/cm in YFeO3, is discussed. The dynamic flexure of domain boundaries when moving vortices are present is analyzed. A formula is derived for the magnetic field dependence of the velocity of a vortex in a motionless domain boundary.

  10. Magnetic flux inversion in charged BPS vortices in a Lorentz-violating Maxwell-Higgs framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casana, R., E-mail: rodolfo.casana@gmail.com [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Maranhao, 65085-580, Sao Luis, Maranhao (Brazil); Ferreira, M.M. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Maranhao, 65085-580, Sao Luis, Maranhao (Brazil); Hora, E. da [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Maranhao, 65085-580, Sao Luis, Maranhao (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, 58051-900, Joao Pessoa, Paraiba (Brazil); Miller, C. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Maranhao, 65085-580, Sao Luis, Maranhao (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica Teorica, UNESP - Universidade Estadual Paulista, R. Dr. Bento T. Ferraz 271 - Bl. II, 01140-070, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-12-05

    We demonstrate for the first time the existence of electrically charged BPS vortices in a Maxwell-Higgs model supplemented with a parity-odd Lorentz-violating (LV) structure belonging to the CPT-even gauge sector of the standard model extension and a fourth order potential (in the absence of the Chern-Simons term). The modified first order BPS equations provide charged vortex configurations endowed with some interesting features: localized and controllable spatial thickness, integer flux quantization, electric field inversion and localized magnetic flux reversion. This model could possibly be applied on condensed matter systems which support charged vortices carrying integer quantized magnetic flux, endowed with localized flipping of the magnetic flux.

  11. Magnetic flux inversion in charged BPS vortices in a Lorentz-violating Maxwell-Higgs framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casana, R.; Ferreira, M. M.; da Hora, E.; Miller, C.

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate for the first time the existence of electrically charged BPS vortices in a Maxwell-Higgs model supplemented with a parity-odd Lorentz-violating (LV) structure belonging to the CPT-even gauge sector of the standard model extension and a fourth order potential (in the absence of the Chern-Simons term). The modified first order BPS equations provide charged vortex configurations endowed with some interesting features: localized and controllable spatial thickness, integer flux quantization, electric field inversion and localized magnetic flux reversion. This model could possibly be applied on condensed matter systems which support charged vortices carrying integer quantized magnetic flux, endowed with localized flipping of the magnetic flux.

  12. Chiral heat wave and mixing of magnetic, vortical and heat waves in chiral media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernodub, M.N. [CNRS, Laboratoire de Mathématiques et Physique Théorique,Université de Tours, 37200 (France); Soft Matter Physics Laboratory, Far Eastern Federal University,Sukhanova 8, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent,Krijgslaan 281, S9, Gent (Belgium)

    2016-01-18

    We show that a hot rotating fluid of relativistic chiral fermions possesses a new gapless collective mode associated with coherent propagation of energy density and chiral density waves along the axis of rotation. This mode, which we call the Chiral Heat Wave, emerges due to a mixed gauge-gravitational anomaly. At finite density the Chiral Heat Wave couples to the Chiral Vortical Wave while in the presence of an external magnetic field it mixes with the Chiral Magnetic Wave. The coupling of the Chiral Magnetic and Chiral Vortical Waves is also demonstrated. We find that the coupled waves — which are coherent fluctuations of the vector, axial and energy currents — have generally different velocities compared to the velocities of the individual waves.

  13. Dynamics of magnetic nano-flake vortices in Newtonian fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazazzadeh, Nasim, E-mail: n.bazazzadeh@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, Tehran 19839 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohseni, Seyed Majid, E-mail: m-mohseni@sbu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, Tehran 19839 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khavasi, Amin, E-mail: khavasi@sharif.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 11555-4363 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zibaii, Mohammad Ismail, E-mail: mizibaye@gmail.com [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, Tehran 19839 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Movahed, S.M.S., E-mail: m_movahed@sbu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, Tehran 19839 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jafari, G.R., E-mail: gjafari@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, Tehran 19839 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-01

    We study the rotational motion of nano-flake ferromagnetic disks suspended in a Newtonian fluid, as a potential material owing the vortex-like magnetic configuration. Using analytical expressions for hydrodynamic, magnetic and Brownian torques, the stochastic angular momentum equation is determined in the dilute limit conditions under applied magnetic field. Results are compared against experimental ones and excellent agreement is observed. We also estimate the uncertainty in the orientation of the disks due to the Brownian torque when an external magnetic field aligns them. Interestingly, this uncertainty is roughly proportional to the ratio of thermal energy of fluid to the magnetic energy stored in the disks. Our approach can be implemented in many practical applications including biotechnology and multi-functional fluidics. - Highlights: • The rotational motion of magnetic-vortex microdiscs in a Newtonian fluid is studied. • Results are compared against experimental ones and excellent agreement is observed. • The uncertainty in the orientation of the microdiscs is analytically derived.

  14. Relationships between fluid vorticity, kinetic helicity and magnetic field at the small-scale (quiet-network) on the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Sangeetha, C R

    2016-01-01

    We derive horizontal fluid motions on the solar surface over large areas covering the quiet-Sun magnetic network from local correlation tracking of convective granules imaged in continuum intensity and Doppler velocity by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). From these we calculate horizontal divergence, vertical component of vorticity, and kinetic helicity of fluid motions. We study the correlations between fluid divergence and vorticity, and that between vorticity (kinetic helicity) and magnetic field. We find that the vorticity (kinetic helicity) around small-scale fields exhibits a hemispherical pattern (in sign) similar to that followed by the magnetic helicity of large-scale active regions (containing sunspots). We identify this pattern to be a result of the Coriolis force acting on supergranular-scale flows (both the outflows and inflows), and is consistent with earlier studies using local helioseismology. Further, we show that the magnetic fields cau...

  15. Thermal chiral vortical and magnetic waves: New excitation modes in chiral fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran, E-mail: tigran@caltech.edu [Department of Physics, University of Illinois, 845 W Taylor Street, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Dr, M/S 298, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Murchikova, Elena [TAPIR, California Institute of Technology, MC 350-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2017-06-15

    In certain circumstances, chiral (parity-violating) medium can be described hydrodynamically as a chiral fluid with microscopic quantum anomalies. Possible examples of such systems include strongly coupled quark–gluon plasma, liquid helium {sup 3}He-A, neutron stars and the Early Universe. We study first-order hydrodynamics of a chiral fluid on a vortex background and in an external magnetic field. We show that there are two previously undiscovered modes describing heat waves propagating along the vortex and magnetic field. We call them the Thermal Chiral Vortical Wave and Thermal Chiral Magnetic Wave. We also identify known gapless excitations of density (chiral vortical and chiral magnetic waves) and transverse velocity (chiral Alfvén wave). We demonstrate that the velocity of the chiral vortical wave is zero, when the full hydrodynamic framework is applied, and hence the wave is absent and the excitation reduces to the charge diffusion mode. We also comment on the frame-dependent contributions to the obtained propagation velocities.

  16. Combined effect of horizontal magnetic field and vorticity on Rayleigh Taylor instability

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    In this research, the height, curvature and velocity of the bubble tip in Rayleigh-Taylor instability at arbitrary Atwood number with horizontal magnetic field are investigated. To support the earlier simulation and experimental results, the vorticity generation inside the bubble is introduced. It is found that, in early nonlinear stage, the temporal evolution of the bubble tip parameters depend essentially on the strength and initial perturbation of the magnetic field, although the asymptotic nature coincides with the non magnetic case. The model proposed here agrees with the previous linear, nonlinear and simulation observations.

  17. Extracting, Tracking, and Visualizing Magnetic Flux Vortices in 3D Complex-Valued Superconductor Simulation Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hanqi; Phillips, Carolyn L; Peterka, Tom; Karpeyev, Dmitry; Glatz, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method for the vortex extraction and tracking of superconducting magnetic flux vortices for both structured and unstructured mesh data. In the Ginzburg-Landau theory, magnetic flux vortices are well-defined features in a complex-valued order parameter field, and their dynamics determine electromagnetic properties in type-II superconductors. Our method represents each vortex line (a 1D curve embedded in 3D space) as a connected graph extracted from the discretized field in both space and time. For a time-varying discrete dataset, our vortex extraction and tracking method is as accurate as the data discretization. We then apply 3D visualization and 2D event diagrams to the extraction and tracking results to help scientists understand vortex dynamics and macroscale superconductor behavior in greater detail than previously possible.

  18. Fast and controllable switching the circulation and polarity of magnetic vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Y.; Feng, Z.; Miao, B.F.; Cao, R.X.; Sun, L.; You, B.; Wu, D.; Zhang, W.; Jiang, Z.S. [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road., Nanjing 210093 (China); Cheng, R. [Department of Physics, Indiana University–Purdue University—Indianapolis, 402N Blackford St. Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Ding, H.F., E-mail: hfding@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road., Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2014-12-15

    We report a method to switch both the circulation and polarity of magnetic vortices in a controlled manner within a nanosecond utilizing micromagnetic simulations. The controllable switching is achieved with the combination of two different types of magnetic field pulses on submicron permalloy disks with heptagonal shape. When a magnetic field pulse of ∼100 mT is applied along one of the edge directions of the heptagon, the circulation of the vortex can be manipulated according to the pulse direction. When a pair of pulses with a few tens of mT in magnitude and relative delay of about 100 ps is applied in orthogonal directions, the polarity can be further controlled without influencing the circulation. The different magnitude of switching fields allows for the combination of both types of pulses in the control of both the circulation and polarity of magnetic vortices. The switching mechanism and the controlling parameters for disks with diameters of 500 and 700 nm are discussed. - Highlights: • We demonstrate a method to switch the circulation and polarity of magnetic vortex. • The switching is fast (<1 ns) and controllable (independent of its prior state). • The switching is achieved by the combination of two different field pulses. • The circulation is switched by a strong single pulse according to its direction. • The polarity is further switched controllably by a pair of small orthogonal pulses.

  19. Chiral fermion dynamics in 2d magnetic vortices: Manifestation of momentum-spin-locking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pötz, W.; Hammer, René

    2016-11-01

    The electronic surface-states of a topological insulator in the presence of an in-plane magnetization vortex M (ϕ)=M (cos(Φ+νϕ), sin(Φ+νϕ)) are investigated theoretically. For a general angle of magnetization Φ∈[0 ,2 π) and topological charge ν = 1, the modifications to the zero-mass single Dirac cone dispersion are treated exactly and the spectrum of bound eigenstates which forms in the energy window ±M cos(Φ) is derived. The space-time resolved dynamics of Dirac fermions in the presence of such vortices is studied numerically using a single-cone (2 + 1)D finite-difference scheme. In the continuous spectral region, Φ-dependent scattering of Dirac fermions at the vortex is observed. Depending on the type of vortex ( Φ, ν) and the impact parameter, the propagation direction of the Dirac fermion is changed: the magnetization of the vortex exerts a torque onto the fermion spin which, by momentum-spin locking associated with the helical Dirac states, results in an in-plane rotation of the propagation direction of the scattered Dirac fermion. In head-on collisions of a Gaussian wave-packet with ν = 1 vortices a Φ-dependent lensing effect is seen in our simulations. Depending on the direction of incidence, the vortex Φ=-π/2 , ν = 2 is identified as a coherent particle-beam splitter or "condenser" in head-on collisions.

  20. Optical vortices discern attosecond time delay in electron emission from magnetic sublevels

    CERN Document Server

    Wätzel, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Photoionization from energetically distinct electronic states may have a relative time delay of tens of attoseconds. Here we demonstrate that pulses of optical vortices allow measuring such attoseconds delays from magnetic sublevels, even from a spherically symmetric target. The di?erence in the time delay is substantial and exhibits a strong angular dependence. Furthermore, we find an atomic scale variation in the time delays depending on the target orbital position in the laser spot. The findings o?er thus a qualitatively new way for a spatio-temporal sensing of the magnetic states from which the photoelectrons originate, with a spatial resolution way below the di?raction limit of the vortex beam. Our conclusions follow from analytical considerations based on symmetry, complemented and confirmed with full numerical simulations of the quantum dynamics.

  1. Scanning Hall Probe Microscopy of Magnetic Vortices inVery Underdoped yttrium-barium-copper-oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guikema, Janice Wynn; /SLAC, SSRL

    2005-12-02

    Since their discovery by Bednorz and Mueller (1986), high-temperature cuprate superconductors have been the subject of intense experimental research and theoretical work. Despite this large-scale effort, agreement on the mechanism of high-T{sub c} has not been reached. Many theories make their strongest predictions for underdoped superconductors with very low superfluid density n{sub s}/m*. For this dissertation I implemented a scanning Hall probe microscope and used it to study magnetic vortices in newly available single crystals of very underdoped YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} (Liang et al. 1998, 2002). These studies have disproved a promising theory of spin-charge separation, measured the apparent vortex size (an upper bound on the penetration depth {lambda}{sub ab}), and revealed an intriguing phenomenon of ''split'' vortices. Scanning Hall probe microscopy is a non-invasive and direct method for magnetic field imaging. It is one of the few techniques capable of submicron spatial resolution coupled with sub-{Phi}{sub 0} (flux quantum) sensitivity, and it operates over a wide temperature range. Chapter 2 introduces the variable temperature scanning microscope and discusses the scanning Hall probe set-up and scanner characterizations. Chapter 3 details my fabrication of submicron GaAs/AlGaAs Hall probes and discusses noise studies for a range of probe sizes, which suggest that sub-100 nm probes could be made without compromising flux sensitivity. The subsequent chapters detail scanning Hall probe (and SQUID) microscopy studies of very underdoped YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} crystals with T{sub c} {le} 15 K. Chapter 4 describes two experimental tests for visons, essential excitations of a spin-charge separation theory proposed by Senthil and Fisher (2000, 2001b). We searched for predicted hc/e vortices (Wynn et al. 2001) and a vortex memory effect (Bonn et al. 2001) with null results, placing upper bounds on the vison energy inconsistent with

  2. Effects of in-plane magnetic field on the transport of 2D electron vortices in non-uniform plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Justin; Richardson, Andrew; Schumer, Joseph; Pulsed Power Team

    2015-11-01

    The formation of electron vortices in current-carrying plasmas is observed in 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of the plasma-opening switch. In the presence of a background density gradient in Cartesian systems, vortices drift in the direction found by crossing the magnetic field with the background density gradient as a result of the Hall effect. However, most of the 2D simulations where electron vortices are seen and studied only allow for in-plane currents and thus only an out-of-plane magnetic field. Here we present results of numerical simulations of 2D, seeded electron vortices in an inhomogeneous background using the generalized 2D electron-magneto-hydrodynamic model that additionally allows for in-plane components of the magnetic field. By seeding vortices with a varying axial component of the velocity field, so that the vortex becomes a corkscrew, it is found that a pitch angle of around 20 degrees is sufficient to completely prevent the vortex from propagating due to the Hall effect for typical plasma parameters. This work is supported by the NRL Base Program.

  3. The dynamics of magnetic vortices in type II superconductors with pinning sites studied by the time dependent Ginzburg–Landau model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Peter; Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Ögren, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of magnetic vortices in type II superconductors with normal state pinning sites using the Ginzburg–Landau equations. Simulation results demonstrate hopping of vortices between pinning sites, influenced by external magnetic fields and external currents. The system...

  4. Compact Vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Bazeia, D; Marques, M A; Menezes, R; Zafalan, I

    2016-01-01

    We study a family of Maxwell-Higgs models, described by the inclusion of a function of the scalar field that represent generalized magnetic permeability. We search for vortex configurations which obey first-order differential equations that solve the equations of motion. We first deal with the asymptotic behavior of the field configurations, and then implement a numerical study of the solutions, the energy density and the magnetic field. We work with the generalized permeability having distinct profiles, giving rise to new models, and we investigate how the vortices behave, compared with the solutions of the corresponding standard models. In particular, we show how to build compact vortices, that is, vortex solutions with the energy density and magnetic field vanishing outside a compact region of the plane.

  5. Compact vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazeia, D.; Losano, L.; Marques, M.A.; Zafalan, I. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento de Fisica, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Menezes, R. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento de Ciencias Exatas, Rio Tinto, PB (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Departamento de Fisica, Campina Grande, PB (Brazil)

    2017-02-15

    We study a family of Maxwell-Higgs models, described by the inclusion of a function of the scalar field that represent generalized magnetic permeability. We search for vortex configurations which obey first-order differential equations that solve the equations of motion. We first deal with the asymptotic behavior of the field configurations, and then implement a numerical study of the solutions, the energy density and the magnetic field. We work with the generalized permeability having distinct profiles, giving rise to new models, and we investigate how the vortices behave, compared with the solutions of the corresponding standard models. In particular, we show how to build compact vortices, that is, vortex solutions with the energy density and magnetic field vanishing outside a compact region of the plane. (orig.)

  6. Magnetic moment of single vortices in YBCO nano-superconducting particle: Eilenberger approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharchuk, I.; Sharafeev, A.; Belova, P.; Safonchik, M.; Traito, K. B.; Lähderanta, E.

    2013-12-01

    Temperature dependence of single vortex magnetic moment in nanosize superconducting particles is investigated in the framework of quasiclassical Eilenberger approach. Such nanoparticles can be used for preparation of high-quality superconducting thin films with high critical current density. In contrast to bulk materials where the vortex magnetic moment is totally determined by flux quantum, in nano-sized specimens (with characteristic size, D, much less than effective penetration depth, λeff) the quantization rule is violated and magnetic moment is proportional to D2/λ2eff(T). Due to strong repulsion between vortices in nanoparticles only a single vortex can be trapped in them. Because of small size of particles the screening current of the vortex is located near the vortex core where the current is quite high and comparable to depairing currents. Therefore, the superconducting electron density, ns, depends on the current value and the distance from the vortex core. This effect is especially important for superconductors having gap nodes, such as YBCO. The current dependence of ns in nanoparticles is analogous to the Volovik effect in flux-line lattice in bulk samples. The magnitude of the effect can be obtained by comparing the temperature dependence of magnetic moment in the vortex and in the Meissner states. In the last case the value of screening current is small and superconducting response to the external field is determined by London penetration depth. Because of importance of nonlinear and nonlocal effects, the quantum mechanical Eilenberger approach is applied for description of the vortex in nanoparticles. The flattening of 1/λ2eff(T) dependence has been found. A comparison of the theoretical results with experimental magnetization data in Meissner and mixed states of YBCO nanopowders has been done. The presence of nonlinear and nonlocal effects in vortex current distribution is clearly visible. The obtained results are important for the description

  7. Rotating shallow water modeling of planetary,astrophysical and plasma vortical structures (plasma transport across a magnetic field,model of the jupiter's GRS, prediction of existence of giant vortices in spiral galaxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Nezlin

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Three kinds of results have been described in this paper. Firstly, an experimental study of the Rossby vortex meridional drift on the rotating shallow water has been carried out. Owing to the stringent physical analogy between the Rossby vortices and drift vortices in the magnetized plasma, the results obtained have allowed one to make a conclusion that the transport rate of the plasma, trapped by the drift vortices, across the magnetic field is equivalent to the “gyro-Bohm” diffusion coefficient. Secondly, a model of big vortices of the type of the Great Red Spot of Jupiter, dominating in the atmospheres of the outer planets, has been produced. Thirdly, the rotating shallow water modeling has been carried out of the hydrodynamical generation mechanism of spiral structures in galaxies. Trailing spiral waves of various azimuthal modes, generated by a shear flow between fast rotating “nucleus” and slow rotating periphery, were produced. The spirals are similar to those existing in the real galaxies. The hydrodynamical concept of the spiral structure formation in galaxies has been substantiated. Strong anticyclonic vortices between the spiral arms of the structures under study have been discovered for the first time. The existence of analogous vortices in real galaxies has been predicted. (This prediction has been reliably confirmed recently in special astronomical observations, carried out on the basis of the mentioned laboratory modeling and the prediction made – see the paper by A. Fridman et al. (Astrophysics and Space Science, 1997, 252, 115.

  8. Vortical flows

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jie-Zhi; Zhou, Ming-De

    2015-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive and intensive book for graduate students in fluid dynamics as well as scientists, engineers and applied mathematicians. Offering a systematic introduction to the physical theory of vortical flows at graduate level, it considers the theory of vortical flows as a branch of fluid dynamics focusing on shearing process in fluid motion, measured by vorticity. It studies vortical flows according to their natural evolution stages,from being generated to dissipated. As preparation, the first three chapters of the book provide background knowledge for entering vortical flows. The rest of the book deals with vortices and vortical flows, following their natural evolution stages. Of various vortices the primary form is layer-like vortices or shear layers, and secondary but stronger form is axial vortices mainly formed by the rolling up of shear layers.  Problems are given at the end of each chapter and Appendix, some for helping understanding the basic theories, and some involving specific ap...

  9. Magnetic phase diagram of Josephson vortices in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O2+

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Hirata

    2006-01-01

    We show experimental results on magnetic phases of Josephson vortices (JVs) in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O2+, obtained from the JV flow-resistance measurements. Periodic oscillations in the flow-resistance enable us to assign the phase of the long-range 3D ordered state, which was confirmed by the beating effect. We have made preliminary experiments on the doping effect to the JV magnetic phase. The doping effect is rejected not only in the lower boundary of 3D ordered phase, but also in the upper boundary. Above the upper boundary, the flow-resistance shows different behaviours, which may be related to the strength of the interlayer coupling of the JVs along the c-axis, and to the creation/annihilation of pancake vortex/anti-vortex pairs, thermally and magnetically.

  10. BPS vortices in the Abelian Maxwell-Carroll-Field-Jackiw-Higgs model with fractional magnetic fl ux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casana, Rodolfo; Lazar, Guillermo [Universidade Federal do Maranhao, Sao Luis (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Full text: In the last years investigations of field theories involving the spontaneous breaking of Lorentz symmetry have been studied in framework of Standard Model Extension. In this context we study the existence of Abrikosov - Nielsen - Olesen - like BPS vortices. Specifically, we analyze Maxwell-Higgs model supplemented by Lorentz violating (LV) terms in both sectors. The LV term in the Higgs sector is CPT-even whereas the gauge sector includes the Carroll-Field-Jackiw term which is CPT-odd. An important consequence due to LV term introduced in the Higgs sector is the fractionalization of the magnetic flux. Among other effects, LV coefficients rule the amplitude and spatial extension of the topological defect. Under appropriated coordinate rescaling and field redefinition BPS equations are similar to the ones of Maxwell - Chern - Simons - Higgs (MCSH) model. The difference appears in Gauss's law which contains a parameter dependent only in Higgs's LV coefficients. The Carroll-Field-Jackiw parameter couples the magnetic and electric sectors such as happens in models containing the Chern-Simons term, hence the BPS vortices are electrically charged. We emphasize that Lorentz-violating theories are somewhat equivalent to generalized Maxwell-Higgs models -in the context of effective field theories which could describe vortex configurations in continuous dielectric media. (author)

  11. Non-stochastic switching and emergence of magnetic vortices in artificial quasicrystal spin ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, V. S.; Farmer, B.; Smith, N.; Teipel, E.; Woods, J.; Sklenar, J.; Ketterson, J. B.; Hastings, J. T.; De Long, L. E.

    2014-08-01

    Previous studies of artificial spin ice have been largely restricted to periodic dot lattices. Ferromagnetic switching of segments in an applied magnetic field is stochastic in periodic spin ice systems, which makes emergent phenomena, such as the formation of vortex loops, hard to control or predict. We fabricated finite, aperiodic Penrose P2 tilings as antidot lattices with fivefold rotational symmetry in permalloy thin films. Measurements of the field dependence of the static magnetization reveal reproducible knee anomalies whose number and form are temperature dependent, which suggests they mark cooperative rearrangements of the tiling magnetic texture. Our micromagnetic simulations of the P2 tiling are in good agreement with experimental magnetization data and exhibit non-stochastic magnetic switching of segments in applied field, and vortex loops that are stable over an extended field interval during magnetic reversal.

  12. Non-stochastic switching and emergence of magnetic vortices in artificial quasicrystal spin ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, V.S., E-mail: vinayak.bhat@uky.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0055 (United States); Farmer, B.; Smith, N.; Teipel, E.; Woods, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0055 (United States); Sklenar, J.; Ketterson, J.B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208-3112 (United States); Hastings, J.T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0055 (United States); De Long, L.E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0055 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • We studied magnetic reversal in a fivefold rotational symmetric artificial quasicrystal spin ice. • Our experiments and simulations suggest the presence of non-stochastic switching in the quasicrystal. • Simulations reveal a strong connection between FM reversal and formation of vortex loops in the quasicrystal. • Our study shows that the magnetic reversal in the artificial quasicrystal is a collective phenomenon. - Abstract: Previous studies of artificial spin ice have been largely restricted to periodic dot lattices. Ferromagnetic switching of segments in an applied magnetic field is stochastic in periodic spin ice systems, which makes emergent phenomena, such as the formation of vortex loops, hard to control or predict. We fabricated finite, aperiodic Penrose P2 tilings as antidot lattices with fivefold rotational symmetry in permalloy thin films. Measurements of the field dependence of the static magnetization reveal reproducible knee anomalies whose number and form are temperature dependent, which suggests they mark cooperative rearrangements of the tiling magnetic texture. Our micromagnetic simulations of the P2 tiling are in good agreement with experimental magnetization data and exhibit non-stochastic magnetic switching of segments in applied field, and vortex loops that are stable over an extended field interval during magnetic reversal.

  13. Vorticity from irrotationally forced flow

    CERN Document Server

    Del Sordo, Fabio

    2010-01-01

    In the interstellar medium the turbulence is believed to be forced mostly through supernova explosions. In a first approximation these flows can be written as a gradient of a potential being thus devoid of vorticity. There are several mechanisms that could lead to vorticity generation, like viscosity and baroclinic terms, rotation, shear and magnetic fields, but it is not clear how effective they are, neither is it clear whether the vorticity is essential in determining the turbulent diffusion acting in the ISM. Here we present a study of the role of rotation, shear and baroclinicity in the generation of vorticity in the ISM.

  14. Hodographic vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moro, Antonio, E-mail: a.moro@lboro.ac.u [School of Mathematics, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-17

    Vortices are screw phase dislocations associated with helicoidal wave-fronts. In nonlinear optics, vortices arise as singular solutions to the phase-intensity equations of geometric optics. They exist for a general class of nonlinear response functions. In this sense, vortices possess a universal character. Analysis of geometric optics equations on the hodograph plane leads to deformed vortex type solutions that are sensitive to the form of the nonlinearity. The case of a Kerr type nonlinear response is discussed as a specific example.

  15. Single crystalline cylindrical nanowires – toward dense 3D arrays of magnetic vortices

    KAUST Repository

    Ivanov, Yurii P.

    2016-03-31

    Magnetic vortex-based media have recently been proposed for several applications of nanotechnology; however, because lithography is typically used for their preparation, their low-cost, large-scale fabrication is a challenge. One solution may be to use arrays of densely packed cobalt nanowires that have been efficiently fabricated by electrodeposition. In this work, we present this type of nanoscale magnetic structures that can hold multiple stable magnetic vortex domains at remanence with different chiralities. The stable vortex state is observed in arrays of monocrystalline cobalt nanowires with diameters as small as 45 nm and lengths longer than 200 nm with vanishing magnetic cross talk between closely packed neighboring wires in the array. Lorentz microscopy, electron holography and magnetic force microscopy, supported by micromagnetic simulations, show that the structure of the vortex state can be adjusted by varying the aspect ratio of the nanowires. The data we present here introduce a route toward the concept of 3-dimensional vortex-based magnetic memories.

  16. Resistivity Measurements on Bulk Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ: Contribution of Vortices at Low Magnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarina de la Cruz

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of high-temperature superconductors in the presence of an external magnetic field is of particular interest in light of its technological application and commercialization. In this paper, we performed resistivity measurements on bulk superconducting pellets of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ in the presence of external magnetic fields below 0.5T. The broadening of the transition region below Tc in the resistivity plots, was attributed to the residual resistance imparted by flux flow in the sample. From I-V measurements at 50 K at fields below 0.6T, the contribution of vortices was quantitatively measured as a flux flow resistivity which range from 0.1231 to 1.700 (m(-mm for applied magnetic fields from 0.04T to 0.6T. The increase in the flux flow resistivity with increasing applied field was due to the increase in the number of vortices moving in steady state motion brought about by the interaction of the vortices with the transport current.

  17. Vorticity, Shocks and Magnetic Fields in Subsonic, ICM-like Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Porter, David H; Ryu, Dongsu

    2015-01-01

    We analyze high resolution simulations of compressible, MHD turbulence with properties resembling conditions in galaxy clusters. The flow is driven to turbulence Mach number $\\mathcal{M}_t \\sim 1/2$ in an isothermal medium with an initially very weak, uniform seed magnetic field ($\\beta = P_g/P_B = 10^6$). Since cluster turbulence is likely to result from a mix of sheared (solenoidal) and compressive forcing processes, we examine the distinct turbulence properties for both cases. In one set of simulations velocity forcing is entirely solenoidal ($\

  18. Vortices and nanostructured superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book provides expert coverage of modern and novel aspects of the study of vortex matter, dynamics, and pinning in nanostructured and multi-component superconductors. Vortex matter in superconducting materials is a field of enormous beauty and intellectual challenge, which began with the theoretical prediction of vortices by A. Abrikosov (Nobel Laureate). Vortices, vortex dynamics, and pinning are key features in many of today’s human endeavors: from the huge superconducting accelerating magnets and detectors at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, which opened new windows of knowledge on the universe, to the tiny superconducting transceivers using Rapid Single Flux Quanta, which have opened a revolutionary means of communication. In recent years, two new features have added to the intrinsic beauty and complexity of the subject: nanostructured/nanoengineered superconductors, and the discovery of a range of new materials showing multi-component (multi-gap) superconductivity. In this book, leading researche...

  19. Primordial vorticity and gradient expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannini, Massimo; Rezaei, Zahra

    2012-02-01

    The evolution equations of the vorticities of the electrons, ions and photons in a pre-decoupling plasma are derived, in a fully inhomogeneous geometry, by combining the general relativistic gradient expansion and the drift approximation within the Adler-Misner-Deser decomposition. The vorticity transfer between the different species is discussed in this novel framework and a set of general conservation laws, connecting the vorticities of the three-component plasma with the magnetic field intensity, is derived. After demonstrating that a source of large-scale vorticity resides in the spatial gradients of the geometry and of the electromagnetic sources, the total vorticity is estimated to lowest order in the spatial gradients and by enforcing the validity of the momentum constraint. By acknowledging the current bounds on the tensor to scalar ratio in the (minimal) tensor extension of the ΛCDM paradigm, the maximal comoving magnetic field induced by the total vorticity turns out to be, at most, of the order of 10-37 G over the typical comoving scales ranging between 1 and 10 Mpc. While the obtained results seem to be irrelevant for seeding a reasonable galactic dynamo action, they demonstrate how the proposed fully inhomogeneous treatment can be used for the systematic scrutiny of pre-decoupling plasmas beyond the conventional perturbative expansions.

  20. Primordial vorticity and gradient expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    The evolution equations of the vorticities of the electrons, ions and photons in a pre-decoupling plasma are derived, in a fully inhomogeneous geometry, by combining the general relativistic gradient expansion and the drift approximation within the Adler-Misner-Deser decomposition. The vorticity transfer between the different species is discussed in this novel framework and a set of general conservation laws, connecting the vorticities of the three-component plasma with the magnetic field intensity, is derived. After demonstrating that a source of large-scale vorticity resides in the spatial gradients of the geometry and of the electromagnetic sources, the total vorticity is estimated to lowest order in the spatial gradients and by enforcing the validity of the momentum constraint. By acknowledging the current bounds on the tensor to scalar ratio in the (minimal) tensor extension of the $\\Lambda$CDM paradigm the maximal comoving magnetic field induced by the total vorticity turns out to be, at most, of the or...

  1. Charged BPS vortices and reversal of the magnetic flux in a Maxwell-Higgs type model without the Chern-Simons term

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantanhede, Carlisson M. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica (IFT/UNESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Casana, Rodolfo; Ferreira Junior, Manoel M. [Universidade Federal do Maranhao (UFMA), MA (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Hora, Eduardo da [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), PB (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Since the seminal works by Abrikosov [1] and Nielsen-Olesen [2] showing the existence of uncharged vortex, such nonperturbative solutions have been a theoretical issue of enduring interest. Already, the electrically charged vortices are obtained only in abelian models endowed with the Chern-Simons term [3,4]. This remains valid even in the context of highly nonlinear models, such as the Born-Infield electrodynamics. In this work, we demonstrated the existence of electrically charged BPS vortices in a Maxwell-Higgs model without the Chern- Simons term but endowed with a CPT-even and parity-odd Lorentz-violating (LV) structure. The LV term belonging to the CPT-even electrodynamics of the Standard Model Extension [5] plays a similar role that of the Chern-Simons term, mixing the electric and magnetic sectors. Besides the LV coefficients provide a very rich set of vortex configurations exhibiting electric's field inversion also are responsible by controlling the characteristic length of the vortex and by the flipping of the magnetic flux. [1] A. Abrikosov, Sov. Phys. JETP 32, 1442 (1957). [2] H. Nielsen, P. Olesen, Nucl. Phys. B 61, 45 (1973). [3] R. Jackiw and E. J. Weinberg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 2234 (1990). [4] C.K. Lee, K.M. Lee, H. Min, Phys. Lett. B 252, 79 (1990) [5] D. Colladay and V. A. Kostelecky, Phys. Rev. D 55, 6760 (1997); Phys. Rev. D 58, 116002 (1998). (author)

  2. 4D-flow cardiac magnetic resonance-derived vorticity is sensitive marker of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in patients with mild-to-moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Michal; Humphries, Stephen; Stenmark, Kurt R; Kheyfets, Vitaly O; Buckner, J Kern; Hunter, Kendall S; Fenster, Brett E

    2017-04-27

    To investigate the possibility that vorticity assessed by four-dimensional flow cardiac magnetic resonance (4D-Flow CMR) in the left ventricle of patients with mild-to-moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a potential marker of early LV diastolic dysfunction (LVDD) and more sensitive than standard echocardiography, and whether changes in vorticity are associated with quantitative computed tomography (CT) and clinical markers of COPD, and right ventricular (RV) echocardiographic markers indicative of ventricular interdependency. Sixteen COPD patients with presumptive LVDD and 10 controls underwent same-day 4D-Flow CMR and Doppler echocardiography to quantify early and late diastolic vorticity as well as standard evaluation for LVDD. Furthermore, all patients underwent detailed CT analysis for COPD markers including percent emphysema and air trapping. The 4D-Flow CMR derived diastolic vorticity measures were correlated with CT measures, standard clinical and CMR markers, and echocardiographic diastolic RV metrics. Early diastolic vorticity was significantly reduced in COPD patients (P < 0.0001) with normal left ventricular (LV) mass, geometry, systolic function, and no or mild signs of Doppler LVDD when compared with controls. Vorticity significantly differentiated COPD patients without echocardiographic signs of LVDD (n = 11) from controls (P < 0.0001), and from COPD patients with stage I LVDD (n = 5) (P < 0.0180). Vorticity markers significantly correlated with CT computed measures, CMR-derived RV ejection fraction, echocardiographic RV diastolic metrics, and 6-minute walk test. 4D-Flow CMR derived diastolic vorticity is reduced in patients with mild-to-moderate COPD and no or mild signs of LVDD, implying early perturbations in the LV flow domain preceding more obvious mechanical changes (i.e. stiffening and dilation). Furthermore, reduced LV vorticity appears to be driven by COPD induced changes in lung tissue and parallel RV

  3. Controlled Manipulation of Individual Vortices in a Superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straver, E.W.J.

    2010-04-05

    We report controlled local manipulation of single vortices by low temperature magnetic force microscope (MFM) in a thin film of superconducting Nb. We are able to position the vortices in arbitrary configurations and to measure the distribution of local depinning forces. This technique opens up new possibilities for the characterization and use of vortices in superconductors.

  4. Vortical versus skyrmionic states in mesoscopic p -wave superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Becerra, V.; Sardella, E.; Peeters, F. M.; Milošević, M. V.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the superconducting states that arise as a consequence of mesoscopic confinement and a multicomponent order parameter in the Ginzburg-Landau model for p -wave superconductivity. Conventional vortices, but also half-quantum vortices and skyrmions, are found as the applied magnetic field and the anisotropy parameters of the Fermi surface are varied. The solutions are well differentiated by a topological charge that for skyrmions is given by the Hopf invariant and for vortices by the circulation of the superconducting velocity. We revealed several unique states combining vortices and skyrmions, their possible reconfiguration with varied magnetic field, as well as temporal and field-induced transitions between vortical and skyrmionic states.

  5. Defining Coherent Vortices Objectively from the Vorticity

    CERN Document Server

    Haller, George; Farazmand, Mohammad; Huhn, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Rotationally coherent Lagrangian vortices are formed by tubes of deforming fluid elements that complete equal bulk material rotation relative to the mean rotation of the deforming fluid volume. We show that initial positions of such tubes coincide with tubular level surfaces of the Lagrangian-Averaged Vorticity Deviation (LAVD), the trajectory integral of the normed difference of the vorticity from its spatial mean. LAVD-based vortices are objective, i.e., remain unchanged under time-dependent rotations and translations of the coordinate frame. In the limit of vanishing Rossby numbers in geostrophic flows, cyclonic LAVD vortex centers are precisely the observed attractors for light particles. A similar result holds for heavy particles in anticyclonic LAVD vortices. We also establish a relationship between rotationally coherent Lagrangian vortices and their instantaneous Eulerian counterparts. The latter are formed by tubular surfaces of equal material rotation rate, objectively measured by the Instantaneous V...

  6. Nonquasineutral electron vortices in nonuniform plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angus, J. R.; Richardson, A. S.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Schumer, J. W. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, District of Columbia 20375 (United States); Ottinger, P. F. [Engility Corporation, Chantilly, Virginia 20151 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Electron vortices are observed in the numerical simulation of current carrying plasmas on fast time scales where the ion motion can be ignored. In plasmas with nonuniform density n, vortices drift in the B × ∇n direction with a speed that is on the order of the Hall speed. This provides a mechanism for magnetic field penetration into a plasma. Here, we consider strong vortices with rotation speeds V{sub ϕ} close to the speed of light c where the vortex size δ is on the order of the magnetic Debye length λ{sub B}=|B|/4πen and the vortex is thus nonquasineutral. Drifting vortices are typically studied using the electron magnetohydrodynamic model (EMHD), which ignores the displacement current and assumes quasineutrality. However, these assumptions are not strictly valid for drifting vortices when δ ≈ λ{sub B}. In this paper, 2D electron vortices in nonuniform plasmas are studied for the first time using a fully electromagnetic, collisionless fluid code. Relatively large amplitude oscillations with periods that correspond to high frequency extraordinary modes are observed in the average drift speed. The drift speed W is calculated by averaging the electron velocity field over the vorticity. Interestingly, the time-averaged W from these simulations matches very well with W from the much simpler EMHD simulations even for strong vortices with order unity charge density separation.

  7. Potential vorticity formulation of compressible magnetohydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arter, Wayne

    2013-01-04

    Compressible ideal magnetohydrodynamics is formulated in terms of the time evolution of potential vorticity and magnetic flux per unit mass using a compact Lie bracket notation. It is demonstrated that this simplifies analytic solution in at least one very important situation relevant to magnetic fusion experiments. Potentially important implications for analytic and numerical modelling of both laboratory and astrophysical plasmas are also discussed.

  8. Vortices and vortex lattices in quantum ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A. M.; Marchant, N. G.; O’Dell, D. H. J.; Parker, N. G.

    2017-03-01

    The experimental realization of quantum-degenerate Bose gases made of atoms with sizeable magnetic dipole moments has created a new type of fluid, known as a quantum ferrofluid, which combines the extraordinary properties of superfluidity and ferrofluidity. A hallmark of superfluids is that they are constrained to rotate through vortices with quantized circulation. In quantum ferrofluids the long-range dipolar interactions add new ingredients by inducing magnetostriction and instabilities, and also affect the structural properties of vortices and vortex lattices. Here we give a review of the theory of vortices in dipolar Bose–Einstein condensates, exploring the interplay of magnetism with vorticity and contrasting this with the established behaviour in non-dipolar condensates. We cover single vortex solutions, including structure, energy and stability, vortex pairs, including interactions and dynamics, and also vortex lattices. Our discussion is founded on the mean-field theory provided by the dipolar Gross–Pitaevskii equation, ranging from analytic treatments based on the Thomas–Fermi (hydrodynamic) and variational approaches to full numerical simulations. Routes for generating vortices in dipolar condensates are discussed, with particular attention paid to rotating condensates, where surface instabilities drive the nucleation of vortices, and lead to the emergence of rich and varied vortex lattice structures. We also present an outlook, including potential extensions to degenerate Fermi gases, quantum Hall physics, toroidal systems and the Berezinskii–Kosterlitz–Thouless transition.

  9. Direct observation of rectified motion of vortices by Lorentz microscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yoshihiko Togawa; Ken Harada; Tetsuya Akashi; Hiroto Kasai; Tsuyoshi Matsuda; Atsutaka maeda; Akira Tonomura

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the vortex dynamics for the `ratchet' operation in a niobium superconductor via a direct imaging of Lorentz microscopy. We directly observe one-directional selective motion of field-gradient-driven vortices along fabricated channels. This results from the rectification of vortices in a spatially asymmetric potential under the oscillating magnetic field in a temporally symmetric manner. Based on the observation of the individual motion of vortices, we clarify the elementary process involved in this rectification.

  10. Fractional Vortices and Lumps

    CERN Document Server

    Eto, Minoru; Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Konishi, Kenichi; Nagashima, Takayuki; Nitta, Muneto; Ohashi, Keisuke; Vinci, Walter

    2009-01-01

    We study what might be called fractional vortices, vortex configurations with the minimum winding from the viewpoint of their topological stability, but which are characterized by various notable substructures in the transverse energy distribution. The fractional vortices occur in diverse Abelian or non-Abelian generalizations of the Higgs model. The global and local features characterizing these are studied, and we identify the two crucial ingredients for their occurrence - the vacuum degeneracy leading to non-trivial vacuum moduli M, and the BPS nature of the vortices. Fractional vortices are further classified into two kinds. The first type of such vortices appear when M has orbifold Z_n singularities; the second type occurs in systems in which the vacuum moduli space M possesses either a deformed geometry or some singularity. These general features are illustrated with several concrete models.

  11. Large-scale Alfvén vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishchenko, O. G., E-mail: onish@ifz.ru [Institute of Physics of the Earth, 10 B. Gruzinskaya, 123242 Moscow, Russian Federation and Space Research Institute, 84/32 Profsouznaya str., 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Pokhotelov, O. A., E-mail: pokh@ifz.ru [Institute of Physics of the Earth, 10 B. Gruzinskaya, 123242 Moscow (Russian Federation); Horton, W., E-mail: wendell.horton@gmail.com [Institute for Fusion Studies and Applied Research Laboratory, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78713 (United States); Scullion, E., E-mail: scullie@tcd.ie [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Fedun, V., E-mail: v.fedun@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S13JD (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    The new type of large-scale vortex structures of dispersionless Alfvén waves in collisionless plasma is investigated. It is shown that Alfvén waves can propagate in the form of Alfvén vortices of finite characteristic radius and characterised by magnetic flux ropes carrying orbital angular momentum. The structure of the toroidal and radial velocity, fluid and magnetic field vorticity, the longitudinal electric current in the plane orthogonal to the external magnetic field are discussed.

  12. Gyrofluid potential vorticity equation and turbulent equipartion states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Naulin, Volker;

    2015-01-01

    An equation governing potential vorticity in a magnetized plasmas is derived. The equation is analogous to Ertel's theorem. In the long wave-length limit the potential vorticity equals the ratio of the gyro-frequency plus the E × B- and diamagnetic polarization densities to the particle density...

  13. Vortices and vortex lattices in quantum ferrofluids

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, A M; O'Dell, D H J; Parker, N G

    2016-01-01

    The achievement of quantum-degenerate Bose gases composed of atoms with sizeable magnetic dipole moments has realized quantum ferrofluids, a form of fluid which combines the extraordinary properties of superfluidity and ferrofluidity. A hallmark of superfluids is that they are constrained to circulate through vortices with quantized circulation. These excitations underpin a variety of rich phenomena, including vortex lattices, quantum turbulence, the Berenzinksii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition and Kibble-Zurek defect formation. Here we provide a comprehensive review of the theory of vortices and vortex lattices in quantum ferrofluids created from dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates, exploring the interplay of magnetism with vorticity and contrasting this with the established behaviour in non-dipolar condensates. Our discussion is based on the mean-field theory provided by the dipolar Gross-Pitaevskii equation, from analytic treatments based on the Thomas-Fermi and variational approaches to full numerical simula...

  14. On n-quantum vortices in superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Marchenko, V I

    2002-01-01

    The conditions of the n-quantum vortices observation in the superconductors are discussed. It is established in the course of calculating the coefficient by the |psi| sup 6 (psi - the order parameter) in the Ginzburg-Landau theory for the BCS standard model that the sign of this coefficient is negative. This favours the possibility of observing the n-quantum vortices in the superconductors, wherein the vortex lattice with gravitation is formed. The existence of gravitation is manifested in the magnetization finite jump in the H sub 0 = H sub c sub sup 1 field. When by the temperature change the superconductor behavior changes in such a way, that its magnetization in the H sub 0 = H sub c field reduces to the zero, than the observation of the n-quantum vortices near this transition is possible

  15. Vortices as degenerate metrics

    CERN Document Server

    Baptista, J M

    2012-01-01

    We note that the Bogomolny equation for abelian vortices is precisely the condition for invariance of the Hermitian-Einstein equation under a degenerate conformal transformation. This leads to a natural interpretation of vortices as degenerate hermitian metrics that satisfy a certain curvature equation. Using this viewpoint, we rephrase standard results about vortices and make some new observations. We note the existence of a conceptually simple, non-linear rule for superposing vortex solutions, and we describe the natural behaviour of the L^2-metric on the moduli space upon certain restrictions.

  16. Vortices and Vortical Structures in Internal Aerodynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RudolfDvorak

    1997-01-01

    The paper aims at summarizing the author's recent phenomenological study of the origin,development and identification of vortical structures in internal aerodynamics.A connection between evolution of these structures and flow separation in closed curved channels is also discussed.It has been shown that in real fluids the individual vortex cores very sonn lose their identity and merge into a new dissipative structure,the properties of which still have to be defined.

  17. Gyrofluid potential vorticity equation and turbulent equipartion states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Naulin, Volker

    2015-01-01

    An equation governing potential vorticity in a magnetized plasmas is derived. The equation is analogous to Ertel's theorem. In the long wave-length limit the potential vorticity equals the ratio of the gyro-frequency plus the E × B- and diamagnetic polarization densities to the particle density....... The equation is relevant for transport barriers in magnetically confined plasmas because particle density, ion temperature and the radial electric field are mutually coupled through the potential vorticity. The potential vorticity equation is derived from an energy conserving, four-field, electrostatic, full......-F gyrofluid model. It is shown that the gyrofluid model possesses two exact Lagrangian invariants. In systems where mixing uniformly distribute the Lagrangian invariants we derive the corresponding turbulent equipartion states. It is shown that the system is driven towards constant potential vorticity. Given...

  18. Inward propagating chemical waves in Taylor vortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Barnaby W; Novak, Jan; Wilson, Mark C T; Britton, Melanie M; Taylor, Annette F

    2010-04-01

    Advection-reaction-diffusion (ARD) waves in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction in steady Taylor-Couette vortices have been visualized using magnetic-resonance imaging and simulated using an adapted Oregonator model. We show how propagating wave behavior depends on the ratio of advective, chemical and diffusive time scales. In simulations, inward propagating spiral flamelets are observed at high Damköhler number (Da). At low Da, the reaction distributes itself over several vortices and then propagates inwards as contracting ring pulses--also observed experimentally.

  19. On Ginzburg-Landau Vortices of Superconducting Thin Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Jin DING; Qiang DU

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the vortex structure of the superconducting thin films placed in a magnetic field. We show that the global minimizer of the functional modelling the superconducting thin films has a bounded number of vortices when the applied magnetic field hex < Hc1 + K log |log ε|where Hc1 is the lower critical field of the film obtained by Ding and Du in SIAM J. Math. Anal.,2002. The locations of the vortices are also given.

  20. Vortices and Jacobian varieties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manton, Nicholas S.; M. Romão, Nuno

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the geometry of the moduli space of N-vortices on line bundles over a closed Riemann surface of genus g > 1, in the little explored situation where 1 = 1, the vortex metric typically degenerates as the dissolving limit is approached, the degeneration occurring precisely...

  1. Theory of Concentrated Vortices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alekseenko, Sergey; Kuibin, Pavel; Okulov, Valery

    This book presents comprehensive and authoritative coverage of the wide field of concentrated vortices observed in nature and technique. The methods for research of their kinematics and dynamics are considered. Special attention is paid to the flows with helical symmetry. The authors have describ...

  2. Vitality of optical vortices

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Optical vortices are always created or annihilated in pairs with opposite topological charges. However, the presence of such a vortex dipole does not directly indicate whether they are associated with a creation or an annihilation event. Here we...

  3. Moist Potential Vorticity and Up-Sliding Slantwise Vorticity Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUI Xiao-Peng; GAO Shou-Ting; WU Guo-Xiong

    2003-01-01

    By using the moist potential vorticity equation derived from complete atmospheric equations including the effect of mass forcing, the theory of up-sliding slantwise vorticity development (USVD) is proposed based on the theory of slantwise vorticity development. When an air parcel slides up along a slantwise isentropic surface, its vertical component of relative vorticity is developed. Based on the theory of USVD, a complete vertical vorticity equation is expected with mass forcing, which explicitly includes the effect of both internal forcings and external forcings.

  4. Statistical mechanics of vortices from field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Kajantie, Keijo; Neuhaus, T; Rajantie, A; Rummukainen, K

    1999-01-01

    We study with lattice Monte Carlo simulations the interactions and macroscopic behaviour of a large number of vortices in the 3-dimensional U(1) gauge+Higgs field theory, in an external magnetic field. We determine non-perturbatively the (attractive or repelling) interaction energy between two or more vortices, as well as the critical field strength H_c, the thermodynamical discontinuities, and the surface tension related to the boundary between the Meissner phase and the Coulomb phase in the type I region. We also investigate the emergence of vortex lattice and vortex liquid phases in the type II region. For the type I region the results obtained are in qualitative agreement with mean field theory, except for small values of H_c, while in the type II region there are significant discrepancies. These findings are relevant for superconductors and some models of cosmic strings, as well as for the electroweak phase transition in a magnetic field.

  5. The Finiteness of Moffatt vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Kalita, Jiten C; Panda, Swapnendu; Unal, Aynur

    2016-01-01

    Till date, the sequence of vortices present in the solid corners of internal viscous incompressible flows, widely known as Moffatt vortices was thought to be infinite. In this paper, we propose two topological equivalence classes of Moffatt vortices in terms of orientation-preserving homeomorphism as well as critical point theory. We further quantify the centers of vortices as fixed points through Brower fixed point theorem and define boundary of a vortex as circle cell. With the aid of these new developments and some existing theorems in topology, we provide six proofs establishing that the sequence of Moffatt vortices cannot be infinite; in fact it is at most finite.

  6. Onset of Vortices in Thin Superconducting Strips and Wires

    CERN Document Server

    Aranson, I S; Shapiro, B Y

    1994-01-01

    Spontaneous nucleation and the consequent penetration of vortices into thin superconducting films and wires, subjected to a magnetic field, can be considered as a nonlinear stage of primary instability of the current-carrying superconducting state. The development of the instability leads to the formation of a chain of vortices in strips and helicoidal vortex lines in wires. The boundary of instability was obtained analytically. The nonlinear stage was investigated by simulations of the time-dependent generalized Ginzburg-Landau equation.

  7. Vorticity in analogue gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Cropp, Bethan; Turcati, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    In the analogue gravity framework, the acoustic disturbances in a moving fluid can be described by an equation of motion identical to a relativistic scalar massless field propagating in a curved spacetime. This description is possible only when the fluid under consideration is barotropic, inviscid and irrotational. In this case, the propagation of the perturbations is governed by an acoustic metric which depends algebrically on the local speed of sound, density and the background flow velocity, the latter assumed to be vorticity free. In this work we provide an straightforward extension in order to go beyond the irrotational constraint. Using a charged --- relativistic and non-relativistic --- Bose--Einstein condensate as a physical system, we show that in the low momentum limit and performing the eikonal approximation we can derive a d'Alembertian equation of motion for the charged phonons where the emergent acoustic metric depends on a flow velocity in the presence of vorticity.

  8. Vorticity in analog gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropp, Bethan; Liberati, Stefano; Turcati, Rodrigo

    2016-06-01

    In the analog gravity framework, the acoustic disturbances in a moving fluid can be described by an equation of motion identical to a relativistic scalar massless field propagating in curved space-time. This description is possible only when the fluid under consideration is barotropic, inviscid, and irrotational. In this case, the propagation of the perturbations is governed by an acoustic metric that depends algebrically on the local speed of sound, density, and the background flow velocity, the latter assumed to be vorticity-free. In this work we provide a straightforward extension in order to go beyond the irrotational constraint. Using a charged—relativistic and nonrelativistic—Bose-Einstein condensate as a physical system, we show that in the low-momentum limit and performing the eikonal approximation we can derive a d’Alembertian equation of motion for the charged phonons where the emergent acoustic metric depends on flow velocity in the presence of vorticity.

  9. Vorticity in holographic fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Caldarelli, Marco M; Petkou, Anastasios C; Petropoulos, P Marios; Pozzoli, Valentina; Siampos, Konstadinos

    2012-01-01

    In view of the recent interest in reproducing holographically various properties of conformal fluids, we review the issue of vorticity in the context of AdS/CFT. Three-dimensional fluids with vorticity require four-dimensional bulk geometries with either angular momentum or nut charge, whose boundary geometries fall into the Papapetrou--Randers class. The boundary fluids emerge in stationary non-dissipative kinematic configurations, which can be cyclonic or vortex flows, evolving in compact or non-compact supports. A rich network of Einstein's solutions arises, naturally connected with three-dimensional Bianchi spaces. We use Fefferman--Graham expansion to handle holographic data from the bulk and discuss the alternative for reversing the process and reconstruct the exact bulk geometries.

  10. Puffed Noncommutative Nonabelian Vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Bouatta, N; MacCaferri, C; Bouatta, Nazim; Evslin, Jarah; Maccaferri, Carlo

    2007-01-01

    We present new solutions of noncommutative gauge theories in which coincident unstable vortices expand into unstable circular shells. As the theories are noncommutative, the naive definition of the locations of the vortices and shells is gauge-dependent, and so we define and calculate the profiles of these solutions using the gauge-invariant noncommutative Wilson lines introduced by Gross and Nekrasov. We find that charge 2 vortex solutions are characterized by two positions and a single nonnegative real number, which we demonstrate is the radius of the shell. We find that the radius is identically zero in all 2-dimensional solutions. If one considers solutions that depend on an additional commutative direction, then there are time-dependent solutions in which the radius oscillates, resembling a braneworld description of a cyclic universe. There are also smooth BIon-like space-dependent solutions in which the shell expands to infinity, describing a vortex ending on a domain wall.

  11. Vortices and Jacobian varieties

    CERN Document Server

    Manton, Nicholas S

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the geometry of the moduli space of N-vortices on line bundles over a closed Riemann surface of genus g > 1, in the little explored situation where 1 = 1, the vortex metric typically degenerates as the dissolving limit is approached, the degeneration occurring precisely on the critical locus of the Abel-Jacobi map at degree N. We describe consequences of this phenomenon from the point of view of multivortex dynamics.

  12. Vortices around Dragonfly Wings

    OpenAIRE

    Kweon, Jihoon; Choi, Haecheon

    2009-01-01

    Dragonfly beats its wings independently, resulting in its superior maneuverability. Depending on the magnitude of phase difference between the fore- and hind-wings of dragonfly, the vortical structures and their interaction with wings become significantly changed, and so does the aerodynamic performance. In this study, we consider hovering flights of modelled dragonfly with three different phase differences (phi=-90, 90, 180 degrees). The three-dimensional wing shape is based on that of Aesch...

  13. Vorticity is a marker of right ventricular diastolic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenster, Brett E; Browning, James; Schroeder, Joyce D; Schafer, Michal; Podgorski, Chris A; Smyser, Jamie; Silveira, Lori J; Buckner, J Kern; Hertzberg, Jean R

    2015-09-15

    Right ventricular diastolic dysfunction (RVDD) is an important prognostic indicator in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). RV vortex rings have been observed in healthy subjects, but their significance in RVDD is unknown. Vorticity, the local spinning motion of an element of fluid, may be a sensitive measure of RV vortex dynamics. Using four-dimensional (4D) flow cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR), we investigated the relationship between right heart vorticity with echocardiographic indexes of RVDD. Thirteen (13) PAH subjects and 10 controls underwent same-day 4D flow CMR and echocardiography. RV diastolic function was assessed using trans-tricuspid valve (TV) early (E) and late (A) velocities, E/A ratio, and e' and a' tissue Doppler velocities. RV and right atrial (RA) integrated mean vorticity was calculated for E and A-wave filling periods using 4D datasets. Compared with controls, A-wave vorticity was significantly increased in RVDD subjects in both the RV [2343 (1,559-3,295) vs. 492 (267-2,649) 1/s, P = 0.028] and RA [30 (27-44) vs. 9 (5-27) 1/s, P = 0.005]. RA E vorticity was significantly decreased [13 (7-22) vs. 28 (15-31) 1/s, P = 0.038] in RVDD. E-wave vorticity correlated TV e', E-,and TV E/A (P < 0.05), and A-wave vorticity associated with both TV A and E/A (P < 0.02). RVDD is associated with alterations in E- and A-wave vorticity, and vorticity correlates with multiple echocardiographic markers of RVDD. Vorticity may be a robust noninvasive research tool for the investigation of RV fluid and tissue mechanical interactions in PAH. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Analogue Magnetism: An Ansatz

    CERN Document Server

    Osano, Bob

    2016-01-01

    We present an ansatz for the relationship between magnetic flux density and fluid vorticity evolution equations. We also suggest that the magnetic flux density evolution equations be compared to the evolution equation for an effective vorticity ($\\omega_{eff}$), which bears a power law relation to the ordinary vorticity.

  15. Numerical and Experimental Study of Electromagnetically Driven Vortical Flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenjeres, S.; Verdoold, J.; Tummers, M.J.; Hanjalic, K.; Kleijn, C.R.

    2009-01-01

    The paper reports on numerical and experimental investigations of electromagnetically driven vortical flows of an electrically conductive fluid in a generic setup. Two different configurations of permanent magnets are considered: a 3-magnet configuration in which the resulting Lorentz force is focus

  16. Interaction of plasma vortices with resonant particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jovanovic, D.; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    1990-01-01

    Kinetic effects associated with the electron motion along magnetic field lines in low‐beta plasmas are studied. Using the gyrokinetic description of electrons, a kinetic analog of the reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations is derived, and it is shown that in the strongly nonlinear regime they poss......Kinetic effects associated with the electron motion along magnetic field lines in low‐beta plasmas are studied. Using the gyrokinetic description of electrons, a kinetic analog of the reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations is derived, and it is shown that in the strongly nonlinear regime...... particles. The evolution equations indicate the possibility of excitation of plasma vortices by electron beams....

  17. General vorticity conservation

    CERN Document Server

    Gümral, H

    1998-01-01

    The motion of an incompressible fluid in Lagrangian coordinates involves infinitely many symmetries generated by the left Lie algebra of group of volume preserving diffeomorphisms of the three dimensional domain occupied by the fluid. Utilizing a 1+3-dimensional Hamiltonian setting an explicit realization of this symmetry algebra and the related Lagrangian and Eulerian conservation laws are constructed recursively. Their Lie algebraic structures are inherited from the same construction. The laws of general vorticity and helicity conservations are formulated globally in terms of invariant differential forms of the velocity field.

  18. Holographic Fluids with Vorticity and Analogue Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Leigh, Robert G; Petropoulos, P Marios

    2012-01-01

    We study holographic three-dimensional fluids with vorticity in local equilibrium and discuss their relevance to analogue gravity systems. The Fefferman-Graham expansion leads to the fluid's description in terms of a comoving and rotating Papapetrou-Randers frame. A suitable Lorentz transformation brings the fluid to the non-inertial Zermelo frame, which clarifies its interpretation as moving media for light/sound propagation. We apply our general results to the Lorentzian Kerr-AdS_4 and Taub-NUT-AdS_4 geometries that describe fluids in cyclonic and vortex flows respectively. In the latter case we associate the appearance of closed timelike curves to analogue optical horizons. In addition, we derive the classical rotational Hall viscosity of three-dimensional fluids with vorticity. Our formula remarkably resembles the corresponding result in magnetized plasmas.

  19. Vortices and Vermas

    CERN Document Server

    Bullimore, Mathew; Gaiotto, Davide; Hilburn, Justin; Kim, Hee-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    In three-dimensional gauge theories, monopole operators create and destroy vortices. We explore this idea in the context of 3d N=4 gauge theories in the presence of an Omega-background. In this case, monopole operators generate a non-commutative algebra that quantizes the Coulomb-branch chiral ring. The monopole operators act naturally on a Hilbert space, which is realized concretely as the equivariant cohomology of a moduli space of vortices. The action furnishes the space with the structure of a Verma module for the Coulomb-branch algebra. This leads to a new mathematical definition of the Coulomb-branch algebra itself, related to that of Braverman-Finkelberg-Nakajima. By introducing additional boundary conditions, we find a construction of vortex partition functions of 2d N=(2,2) theories as overlaps of coherent states (Whittaker vectors) for Coulomb-branch algebras, generalizing work of Braverman-Feigin-Finkelberg-Rybnikov on a finite version of the AGT correspondence. In the case of 3d linear quiver gaug...

  20. Vortices revealed: Swimming faster

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Houwelingen, Josje; van de Water, Willem; Kunnen, Rudie; van Heijst, Gertjan; Clercx, Herman

    2016-11-01

    Understanding and optimizing the propulsion in human swimming requires insight into the hydrodynamics of the flow around the swimmer. Experiments and simulations addressing the hydrodynamics of swimming have been conducted in studies before, including the visualization of the flow using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The main objective in this study is to develop a system to visualize the flow around a swimmer in practice inspired by this technique. The setup is placed in a regular swimming pool. The use of tracer particles and lasers to illuminate the particles is not allowed. Therefore, we choose to work with air bubbles with a diameter of 4 mm, illuminated by ambient light. Homogeneous bubble curtains are produced by tubes implemented in the bottom of the pool. The bubble motion is captured by six cameras placed in underwater casings. A first test with the setup has been conducted by pulling a cylinder through the bubbles and performing a PIV analysis. The vorticity plots of the resulting data show the expected vortex street behind the cylinder. The shedding frequency of the vortices resembles the expected frequency. Thus, it is possible to identify and follow the coherent structures. We will discuss these results and the first flow measurements around swimmers.

  1. Ginzburg-Landau vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Bethuel, Fabrice; Helein, Frederic

    2017-01-01

    This book is concerned with the study in two dimensions of stationary solutions of uɛ of a complex valued Ginzburg-Landau equation involving a small parameter ɛ. Such problems are related to questions occurring in physics, e.g., phase transition phenomena in superconductors and superfluids. The parameter ɛ has a dimension of a length which is usually small.  Thus, it is of great interest to study the asymptotics as ɛ tends to zero. One of the main results asserts that the limit u-star of minimizers uɛ exists. Moreover, u-star is smooth except at a finite number of points called defects or vortices in physics. The number of these defects is exactly the Brouwer degree – or winding number – of the boundary condition. Each singularity has degree one – or as physicists would say, vortices are quantized. The singularities have infinite energy, but after removing the core energy we are lead to a concept of finite renormalized energy.  The location of the singularities is completely determined by minimiz...

  2. Abrikosov Gluon Vortices in Color Superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrer, Efrain J

    2010-01-01

    In this talk I will discuss how the in-medium magnetic field can influence the gluon dynamics in a three-flavor color superconductor. It will be shown how at field strengths comparable to the charged gluon Meissner mass a new phase can be realized, giving rise to Abrikosov's vortices of charged gluons. In that phase, the inhomogeneous gluon condensate anti-screens the magnetic field due to the anomalous magnetic moment of these spin-1 particles. This paramagnetic effect can be of interest for astrophysics, since due to the gluon vortex antiscreening mechanism, compact stars with color superconducting cores could have larger magnetic fields than neutron stars made up entirely of nuclear matter. I will also discuss a second gluon condensation phenomenon connected to the Meissner instability attained at moderate densities by two-flavor color superconductors. In this situation, an inhomogeneous condensate of charged gluons emerges to remove the chromomagnetic instability created by the pairing mismatch, and as a ...

  3. Is the Chiral Vortical Effect Vanishing in Heavy Ion Collisions?

    CERN Document Server

    Landsteiner, Karl; Pena-Benitez, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    We study the frequency dependence of all the chiral vortical and magnetic conductivities for a relativistic chiral gas of free fermions and for a strongly coupled CFT with holographic dual in four dimensions. Both systems present gauge and gravitational anomalies and we compute their contribution to the conductivities. The chiral vortical conductivities and the chiral magnetic conductivity in the energy current show an unexpected frequency dependence in the form of a delta centered at zero frequency. We argue that this makes the CVE practically unobservable in heavy ion collisions. In the appendix we discuss why the CME seems to vanish in the consistent current for a particular implementation of the axial chemical potential.

  4. Abelian Vortices with Singularities

    CERN Document Server

    Baptista, J M

    2012-01-01

    Let L --> X be a complex line bundle over a compact connected Riemann surface. We consider the abelian vortex equations on L when the metric on the surface has finitely many point degeneracies or conical singularities and the line bundle has parabolic structure. These conditions appear naturally in the study of vortex configurations with constraints, or configurations invariant under the action of a finite group. We first show that the moduli space of singular vortex solutions is the same as in the regular case. Then we compute the total volume and total scalar curvature of the moduli space singular vortex solutions. These numbers differ from the case of regular vortices by a very natural term. Finally we exhibit explicit non-trivial vortex solutions over the thrice punctured hyperbolic sphere.

  5. Vortices in a Bose-Einstein Condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haljan, Paul C.

    2004-05-01

    Since the advent of Bose-Einstein condensation in the dilute alkalis, there has been considerable interest in observing effects in atomic condensates akin to the hallmark effects associated with superfluidity and superconductivity. In particular, the study of quantized vortices and vortex lattices represents an important connection between the traditional ``super" systems such as liquid Helium and this new atomic system. This thesis explores some of the first vortex experiments in a condensate of magnetically trapped Rubidium-87. Single vortex lines and rings are created using a wavefunction engineering technique, which is an ideal starting point to study the dynamical behavior of vortices within the condensate. An entirely different approach of ``intrinsic nucleation" has been developed to create rapidly rotating condensates with large amounts of vorticity. A novel variation of forced evaporation is used to simultaneously cool and spin up an ultracold gas. In this way, condensates can be formed that are rotating in excess of 95% of the centrifugal limit and contain large, extraordinarily regular lattices of well over 100 vortices. Direct detection of the vortex cores makes it possible to study the microscopic structure of the vortex arrangements both at equilibrium and under dynamical conditions where severe applied stresses distort the lattice far from its equilibrium configuration. In conclusion, the techniques developed in this work have helped to open up a new area of rotating condensate physics and, in the future, may lead to regimes of extreme rotation and quantum Hall physics. This work was performed at the University of Colorado, Boulder, under the supervision of Prof. Eric A. Cornell.

  6. Comparison between ionospheric convection vortices and the associated equivalent currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, J.; Benkevitch, L.; Sofko, G. J.; Koustov, A. V.

    2004-12-01

    The equivalent current pattern derived from CANOPUS, NRCAN/GSC and MACCS magnetometers has been compared with the ionospheric convection pattern observed by SuperDARN HF radars. The discrepancies between the equivalent convection (EQC) and the SuperDARN-observed convection (SDC) patterns are explained in terms of the effect of day-night photoionization conductance gradient and the coupling between field-aligned currents (FACs) and ionospheric conductances. In particular, the agreement between the EQC and SDC patterns is usually worse for a counterclockwise convection vortex than for a clockwise cell, but a consistent pattern of discrepancy for counterclockwise convection vortices has been found. We suggest that the discrepancies are due to a downward FAC-conductance coupling process. Since the counterclockwise vortices and clockwise vortices occur predominantly in the dawn and dusk sectors, respectively, in accordance with the usual 2-cell global convection pattern, the asymmetry between the EQC and SDC patterns for counterclockwise vortices and clockwise vortices would naturally lead to a dawn-dusk asymmetry as well. This is revealed by a global statistical study of the deviation of direction between the magnetic equivalent convection and the SuperDARN convection in different time sectors and latitudes. In the dawn sector, the statistical results reveal that, at lower latitudes, the EQC direction deviation is slightly counterclockwise with respect to the SDC direction, whereas the deviation is significantly clockwise at high latitudes. These deviations are consistent with the discrepancy pattern for counterclockwise convection vortices, as found in the individual vortex event studies.

  7. Brief Analysis of Vorticity in Soil Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Nader, José Jorge

    2014-01-01

    This note discusses basic properties of vorticity in groundwater flow theory. An evolution equation for the vorticity vector is derived to demonstrate that, when present, vorticity decreases very rapidly. In addition, it is shown how vorticity affects, though very little, the hydraulic head directional variation in the vicinity of a point.

  8. Fresnel Lens with Embedded Vortices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Vyas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vortices of different charges are embedded in a wavefront that has quadratic phase variation, and the intensity distribution near the focal plane is studied. This method may be useful in realizing complicated beam profiles. We have experimentally demonstrated the generation of vortex arrays having integer as well as fractional topological charges that produce different intensity profiles at the focal plane. The phase variation realized on a spatial light modulator (SLM acts as a Fresnel lens with embedded vortices.

  9. Nontopological self-dual Maxwell-Higgs vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Bazeia, D; Ferreira, M M; da Hora, E

    2015-01-01

    We study the existence of self-dual nontopological vortices in generalized Maxwell-Higgs models recently introduced in Ref. \\cite{gv}. Our investigation is explicitly illustrated by choosing a sixth-order self-interaction potential, which is the simplest one allowing the existence of nontopological structures. We specify some Maxwell-Higgs models yielding BPS nontopological vortices having energy proportional to the magnetic flux, $\\Phi_{B}$, and whose profiles are numerically achieved. Particularly, we investigate the way the new solutions approach the boundary values, from which we verify their nontopological behavior. Finally, we depict the profiles numerically found, highlighting the main features they present.

  10. Hamiltonian dynamics of several rigid bodies interacting with point vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Weissmann, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a Hamiltonian description for the dynamics of several rigid bodies interacting with point vortices in an inviscid, incompressible fluid. We adopt the idea of Vankerschaver et al. (2009) to derive the Hamiltonian formulation via symplectic reduction of a canonical Hamiltonian system on a principle fibre bundle. On the reduced phase space we determine the magnetic symplectic form directly, without resorting to the machinery of mechanical connections on principle fibre bundles. We derive the equations of motion for the general case, and also for the special Lie-Poisson case of a single rigid body and zero total vorticity. Finally we give a partly degenerate Lagrangian formulation for the system.

  11. Vortices in superconducting bulk, films and SQUIDs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ernst Helmut Brandt

    2006-01-01

    The properties of the ideal periodic vortex lattice in bulk superconductors and in films of any thickness can be calculated from Ginzburg-Landau theory by an iteration method using Fourier series. The London theory yields general analytic expressions for the magnetic field and energy of arbitrary arrangements of straight or curved vortex lines. The elasticity of the vortex lattice is highly nonlocal. The magnetic response of superconductors of realistic shapes like thin and thick strips and disks or thin rectangular plates or films, containing pinned vortices, can be computed within continuum theory by solving an integral equation. A useful example is a thin square with a central hole and a radial slit, used as superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID).

  12. Characteristics and controllability of vortices in ferromagnetics, ferroelectrics, and multiferroics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yue; Chen, W. J.

    2017-08-01

    Topological defects in condensed matter are attracting e significant attention due to their important role in phase transition and their fascinating characteristics. Among the various types of matter, ferroics which possess a switchable physical characteristic and form domain structure are ideal systems to form topological defects. In particular, a special class of topological defects—vortices—have been found to commonly exist in ferroics. They often manifest themselves as singular regions where domains merge in large systems, or stabilize as novel order states instead of forming domain structures in small enough systems. Understanding the characteristics and controllability of vortices in ferroics can provide us with deeper insight into the phase transition of condensed matter and also exciting opportunities in designing novel functional devices such as nano-memories, sensors, and transducers based on topological defects. In this review, we summarize the recent experimental and theoretical progress in ferroic vortices, with emphasis on those spin/dipole vortices formed in nanoscale ferromagnetics and ferroelectrics, and those structural domain vortices formed in multiferroic hexagonal manganites. We begin with an overview of this field. The fundamental concepts of ferroic vortices, followed by the theoretical simulation and experimental methods to explore ferroic vortices, are then introduced. The various characteristics of vortices (e.g. formation mechanisms, static/dynamic features, and electronic properties) and their controllability (e.g. by size, geometry, external thermal, electrical, magnetic, or mechanical fields) in ferromagnetics, ferroelectrics, and multiferroics are discussed in detail in individual sections. Finally, we conclude this review with an outlook on this rapidly developing field.

  13. MHD Flow Visualization of Magnetopause and Polar Cusps Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Vega, Y. M.; Kessel, R. L.; Shao, X.; Boller, R. A.

    2007-01-01

    Detailed analysis of Wind, Geotail, and Cluster data shows how magnetopause boundary and polar cusps vortices associated with high speed streams can be a carrier of energy flux to the Earth's magnetosphere. For our analysis time interval, March 29 . - April 5 2002, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) is primarily northward and MHD simulations of vortices along the flanks within nine hours of the time interval suggest that a Kelvin Helmholtz (KH) instability is likely present. Vortices were classified by solar wind input provided by the Wind satellite located 70-80 RE upstream from Earth. We present statistics for a total of 304 vortices found near the ecliptic plane on the magnetopause flanks, 273 with northward IMF and 31 with southward IMF. The vortices generated under northward IMF were more driven into the dawnside than into the duskside, being substantially more ordered on the duskside. Most of the vortices were large in scale, up to 10 RE, and with a rotation axis closely aligned with the Z(sub GSE) direction. They rotated preferentially clockwise on the dawnside, and. counter-clockwise on the duskside. Those generated under southward IMF were less ordered, fewer in number, and also smaller in diameter. Significant vortex activity occurred on the nightside region of the magnetosphere for these southward cases in contrast to the northward IMF cases on which most of the activity was driven onto the magnetopause flanks. Magnetopause crossings seen by the Geotail spacecraft for the time interval were analyzed and compared with the MHD simulation to validate our results. Vortices over the polar cusps are also being analyzed and the simulation results will be compared to the multi-point measurements of the four Cluster satellites.

  14. Filamentation with nonlinear Bessel vortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jukna, V; Milián, C; Xie, C; Itina, T; Dudley, J; Courvoisier, F; Couairon, A

    2014-10-20

    We present a new type of ring-shaped filaments featured by stationary nonlinear high-order Bessel solutions to the laser beam propagation equation. Two different regimes are identified by direct numerical simulations of the nonlinear propagation of axicon focused Gaussian beams carrying helicity in a Kerr medium with multiphoton absorption: the stable nonlinear propagation regime corresponds to a slow beam reshaping into one of the stationary nonlinear high-order Bessel solutions, called nonlinear Bessel vortices. The region of existence of nonlinear Bessel vortices is found semi-analytically. The influence of the Kerr nonlinearity and nonlinear losses on the beam shape is presented. Direct numerical simulations highlight the role of attractors played by nonlinear Bessel vortices in the stable propagation regime. Large input powers or small cone angles lead to the unstable propagation regime where nonlinear Bessel vortices break up into an helical multiple filament pattern or a more irregular structure. Nonlinear Bessel vortices are shown to be sufficiently intense to generate a ring-shaped filamentary ionized channel in the medium which is foreseen as opening the way to novel applications in laser material processing of transparent dielectrics.

  15. Dynamics of fractional vortices in long Josephson junctions; Dynamik fraktionaler Flusswirbel in langen Josephsonkontakten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaber, Tobias

    2007-07-01

    In this thesis static and dynamic properties of fractional vortices in long Josephson junctions are investigated. Fractional vortices are circulating supercurrents similar to the well-known Josephson fluxons. Yet, they show the distinguishing property of carrying only a fraction of the magnetic flux quantum. Fractional vortices are interesting non-linear objects. They spontaneously appear and are pinned at the phase discontinuity points of so called 0-{kappa} junctions but can be bend or flipped by external forces like bias currents or magnetic fields. 0-{kappa} junctions and fractional vortices are generalizations of the well-known 0-{pi} junctions and semifluxons, where not only phase jumps of pi but arbitrary values denoted by kappa are considered. By using so-called artificial 0-{kappa} junctions that are based on standard Nb-AlO{sub x}-Nb technology the classical dynamics of fractional vortices has been investigated experimentally for the very first time. Here, half-integer zero field steps could be observed. These voltage steps on the junction's current-voltage characteristics correspond to the periodic flipping/hopping of fractional vortices. In addition, the oscillatory eigenmodes of fractional vortices were investigated. In contrast to fluxons fractional vortices have an oscillatory eigenmode with a frequency within the plasma gap. Using resonance spectroscopy the dependence of the eigenmode frequency on the flux carried by the vortex and an applied bias current was determined. (orig.)

  16. Superconducting vortices in semilocal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgács, Péter; Reuillon, Sébastien; Volkov, Mikhail S

    2006-02-01

    It is shown that the SU(2) semilocal model--the Abelian Higgs model with two complex scalars--admits a new class of stationary, straight string solutions carrying a persistent current and having finite energy per unit length. In the plane orthogonal to their direction they correspond to a nontrivial deformation of the embedded Abrikosov-Nielsen-Olesen (ANO) vortices by the current flowing through them. The new solutions bifurcate with the ANO vortices in the limit of vanishing current. They can be either static or stationary. In the stationary case, the relative phase of the two scalars rotates at constant velocity, giving rise to an electric field and angular momentum, while the energy remains finite. The new static vortex solutions have lower energy than the ANO vortices and could be of considerable importance in various physical systems (from condensed matter to cosmic strings).

  17. Reconstruction of Propagating Kelvin-Helmholtz Vortices at Mercury's Magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Torbjoern; Boardsen, Scott A.; Slavin, James A.; Blomberg, Lars G.; Cumnock, Judy A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje

    2011-01-01

    A series of quasi-periodic magnetopause crossings were recorded by the MESSENGER spacecraft during its third flyby of Mercury on 29 September 2009, likely caused by a train of propagating Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) vortices. We here revisit the observations to study the internal structure of the waves. Exploiting MESSENGER s rapid traversal of the magnetopause, we show that the observations permit a reconstruction of the structure of a rolled-up KH vortex directly from the spacecraft s magnetic field measurements. The derived geometry is consistent with all large-scale fluctuations in the magnetic field data, establishes the non-linear nature of the waves, and shows their vortex-like structure. In several of the wave passages, a reduction in magnetic field strength is observed in the middle of the wave, which is characteristic of rolled-up vortices and is related to the increase in magnetic pressure required to balance the centrifugal force on the plasma in the outer regions of a vortex, previously reported in computer simulations. As the KH wave starts to roll up, the reconstructed geometry suggests that the vortices develop two gradual transition regions in the magnetic field, possibly related to the mixing of magnetosheath and magnetospheric plasma, situated at the leading edges from the perspectives of both the magnetosphere and the magnetosheath.

  18. General aspects of optical vortices

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available . Stef Roux CSIR National Laser Centre PO Box 395, Pretoria 0001, South Africa CSIR National Laser Centre – p.1/32 Contents . Definition of an optical vortex . Topological charge and vortex morphology . How to detect a vortex — interferometry . How... to generate optical vortices CSIR National Laser Centre – p.2/32 Persistent dark spots Optical vortices CSIR National Laser Centre – p.3/32 Speckle field Amplitude Phase CSIR National Laser Centre – p.4/32 Singular phase function CSIR National Laser Centre – p...

  19. Spatially resolved vertical vorticity in solar supergranulation using helioseismology and local correlation tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Langfellner, J; Birch, A C

    2015-01-01

    Flow vorticity is a fundamental property of turbulent convection in rotating systems. Solar supergranules exhibit a preferred sense of rotation, which depends on the hemisphere. This is due to the Coriolis force acting on the diverging horizontal flows. We aim to spatially resolve the vertical flow vorticity of the average supergranule at different latitudes, both for outflow and inflow regions. To measure the vertical vorticity, we use two independent techniques: time-distance helioseismology (TD) and local correlation tracking of granules in intensity images (LCT) using data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Both maps are corrected for center-to-limb systematic errors. We find that 8-h TD and LCT maps of vertical vorticity are highly correlated at large spatial scales. Associated with the average supergranule outflow, we find tangential (vortical) flows that reach about 10 m/s in the clockwise direction at 40{\\deg} latitude. In average inflow regio...

  20. Subwavelength vortical plasmonic lattice solitons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fangwei; Mihalache, Dumitru; Hu, Bambi; Panoiu, Nicolae C

    2011-04-01

    We present a theoretical study of vortical plasmonic lattice solitons, which form in two-dimensional arrays of metallic nanowires embedded into nonlinear media with both focusing and defocusing Kerr nonlinearities. Their existence, stability, and subwavelength spatial confinement are investigated in detail.

  1. Topological Vortices in Superfluid Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGJun-Ping; DUANYi-Shi

    2005-01-01

    We study the topological structure of the vortex system in a superfluid film. Explicit expressions for the vortex density and velocity field as functions of the superfluid order parameter are derived. The evolution of vortices is also studied from the topological properties of the superfluid order parameter field.

  2. Magnetic vortices in gauge/gravity duality

    OpenAIRE

    Strydom, Migael

    2014-01-01

    Wir untersuchen stark gekoppelte Phänomene unter Verwendung der Dualität zwischen Eich- und Gravitationstheorien. Dabei liegt ein besonderer Fokus einerseits auf Vortex Lösungen, die von einem magnetischem Feld verursacht werden, und andererseits auf zeitabhängigen Problemen in holographischen Modellen. Das wichtigste Ergebnis ist die Entdeckung eines unerwarteten Effektes in einem einfachen holografischen Modell: ein starkes nicht abelsches magnetisches Feld verursach...

  3. Energy Density of Vortices in the Schroedinger Picture

    CERN Document Server

    Laenge, J D; Reinhardt, H

    2003-01-01

    The one-loop energy density of an infinitely thin static magnetic vortex in SU(2) Yang-Mills theory is evaluated using the Schroedinger picture. Both the gluonic fluctuations as well as the quarks in the vortex background are included. The energy density of the magnetic vortex is discussed as a function of the magnetic flux. The center vortices correspond to local minima in the effective potential. These minima are degenerated with the perturbative vacuum if the fermions are ignored. Inclusion of fermions lifts this degeneracy, raising the vortex energy above the energy of the perturbative vacuum.

  4. Evidence for the movement of macro-vortices on high critical temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán, Guillermo Briones; Quelle, Iria; Gonzalez-Jorge, Higinio; Romani, Luis; Domarco, Gerardo

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a procedure for inserting currents in rings and their respective vortices was developed. The current circulating around the ring was determined by measuring the magnetic field in its axis. Current and vortices were separated by eliminating the current using a resistor placed in the section through which the whole current circulates. The vortices undergo a Lorentz force traveling over the superconducting net and it dissipate energy. This movement is interrupted by the obstacles found on their way (pinning) and can be seen on the decaying curves especially toward the end of the experiment when the forces get weaker due to the decreasing vortices. This movement of vortices was evidenced by resorting to a long time, during which the vortices have come to a stop. The vortices amount was manipulated by means of the injection of anti-vortices that allowed us to eliminate part of them. This allowed us to observe the decrease in travel speed and the dissipation of energy.

  5. Charge redistribution from anomalous magneto-vorticity coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Hattori, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    We investigate novel transport phenomena in a chiral fluid originated from an interplay between a vorticity and strong magnetic field, which induces a redistribution of vector charges in the system and an axial current along the magnetic field. The corresponding transport coefficients are obtained from an energy-shift argument for the chiral fermions in the lowest Landau level (LLL) due to a spin-vorticity coupling and also from diagrammatic computations on the basis of the linear response theory. Based on consistent results from the both methods, we observe that the transport coefficients are proportional to the anomaly coefficient and are independence of temperature and chemical potential. We therefore speculate that these transport phenomena are connected to quantum anomaly.

  6. The role of coherent vorticity in turbulent transport in resistive drift-wave turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bos, Wouter J T; Benkadda, Sadruddin; Farge, Marie; Schneider, Kai; 10.1063/1.2956640

    2011-01-01

    The coherent vortex extraction method, a wavelet technique for extracting coherent vortices out of turbulent flows, is applied to simulations of resistive drift-wave turbulence in magnetized plasma (Hasegawa-Wakatani system). The aim is to retain only the essential degrees of freedom, responsible for the transport. It is shown that the radial density flux is carried by these coherent modes. In the quasi-hydrodynamic regime, coherent vortices exhibit depletion of the polarization-drift nonlinearity and vorticity strongly dominates strain, in contrast to the quasiadiabatic regime.

  7. Vorticity production through rotation, shear and baroclinicity

    CERN Document Server

    Del Sordo, Fabio

    2010-01-01

    In the absence of rotation and shear, and under the assumption of constant temperature or specific entropy, purely potential forcing by localized expansion waves is known to produce irrotational flows that have no vorticity. Here we study the production of vorticity under idealized conditions when there is rotation, shear, or baroclinicity, to address the problem of vorticity generation in the interstellar medium in a systematic fashion. We use three-dimensional periodic box numerical simulations to investigate the various effects in isolation. We find that for slow rotation, vorticity production in an isothermal gas is small in the sense that the ratio of the root-mean-square values of vorticity and velocity is small compared with the wavenumber of the energy carrying motions. For Coriolis numbers above a certain level, vorticity production saturates at a value where the aforementioned ratio becomes comparable with the wavenumber of the energy carrying motions. Shear also raises the vorticity production, but...

  8. Vortical flow past a sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattner, Trent; Chong, Min; Joubert, Peter

    2000-11-01

    Vortical flow past a sphere in a constant diameter pipe was studied experimentally in a guide vane apparatus similar to those used in fundamental experimental studies of vortex breakdown. The initial effect of swirl was to shorten the downstream separation bubble. For a small range of the swirl intensity, an almost stagnant upstream separation bubble formed. As the swirl intensity was increased, the bubble became unstable and an unsteady spiral formed. At high swirl intensity there was a mean recirculation region which penetrated far upstream while the flow on the downstream hemisphere was attached. Measurements of the velocity field were obtained using laser Doppler velocimetry. Analysis of these results suggests that the onset of upstream separation is associated with the formation of a negative azimuthal vorticity component which slows the axial flow near the axis of symmetry. This is consistent with inviscid distortion of the vortex filaments in the diverging flow approaching the sphere.

  9. Numerical Simulation of Protoplanetary Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-12-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Center for Turbulence Research 81 Annual Research Briefs 2003 Numerical simulation of protoplanetary vortices By H. Lin, J.A. Barranco t AND P.S...planetesimals and planets. In earlier works ( Barranco & Marcus 2000; Barranco et al. 2000; Lin et al. 2000) we have briefly described the possible physical...transport. In particular, Barranco et al. (2000) provided a general mathe- matical framework that is suitable for the asymptotic regime of the disk

  10. Vortical structures in a flume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurka, R.; Liberzon, A.; Hetsroni, G.

    2006-03-01

    We report the results of statistical spatial characterization of coherent structures in turbulent boundary layer in a flume. The characterization approach is based on the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) of vorticity, elucidating large-scale coherent patterns in a turbulent boundary layer. The method was successfully applied to the two- and three-dimensional experimental data extracted from particle image velocimetry (PIV), and multi-plane stereoscopic PIV (XPIV) respectively, and the three-dimensional data from direct numerical simulation (DNS) in a channel flow. The large-scale structure was obtained by using linear combination of POD eigenmodes of vorticity. POD allows for methodological analysis of the properties of the educed structure in the different measurement planes (orthogonal in the case of 2D PIV and parallel in the case of XPIV) and in the different cross-sections of the DNS data. Based on the statistical approach we suggest a conceptual model of large-scale coherent structures in a turbulent boundary layer flow that incorporates the experimental and the numerical results. The proposed conceptual model is a spiral vortical structure attached to the wall and expanding in both the spanwise and the wall-normal directions. Its shape resembles a funnel structure and a `double-cone eddy' concept. The relationship of the model to the structures in the near wall region is presented.

  11. The fate of pancake vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutyrin, G. G.; Radko, T.

    2017-03-01

    Nonlinear evolution of pancake-like vortices in a uniformly rotating and stratified fluid is studied using a 3D Boussinesq numerical model at large Rossby numbers. After the initial stage of viscous decay, the simulations reveal exponential growth of toroidal circulation cells (aka Taylor vortices) at the peripheral annulus with a negative Rayleigh discriminant. At the nonlinear stage, these thin cells redistribute the angular momentum and density differently at the levels of radial outflow and inflow. Resulting layering, with a vertical stacking of sharp variations in velocity and density, enhances small-scale mixing and energy decay. Characteristic detectable stretching patterns are produced in the density field. The circulation patterns, induced by centrifugal instability, tend to homogenize the angular momentum in the vicinity of the unstable region. We demonstrate that the peak intensity of the cells and the vortex energy decay are dramatically reduced by the earth's rotation due to conservation of total absolute angular momentum. The results have important implications for better understanding the fate of pancake vortices and physical mechanisms of energy transfer in stratified fluids.

  12. Vortices and domain walls: 'Wormholes' in unconventional superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bessarab, P F [St. Petersburg State University, Universitetskaya nab. 7/9, 199164 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Radievsky, A V, E-mail: van_der_paul@yahoo.co.u [Immanuel Kant State University of Russia, Nevskogo str. 14, 236016 Kaliningrad (Russian Federation)

    2010-01-15

    In the framework of the 2D and 3D time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau model we study superconductors with multicomponent order parameter (d-pairing). We argue that topological defects inside the sample do affect its thermodynamic properties such as hysteresis loop, susceptibility, etc. Along with earlier known topological defects such as Abrikosov vortices, domain walls (DWs) which separate different magnetic phases and even vortices inside the DW, we found an interesting combination of DWs and vortices. Namely we show that equivalent magnetic phases may be linked together with a vortex going through the other magnetic phase. This configuration may correspond to a stable state even in a zero external magnetic field. We also mention that this configuration is topologically similar to the 'wormholes' in the quantum gravity.

  13. Static vortices in long Josephson junctions of exponentially varying width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semerdjieva, E. G.; Boyadjiev, T. L.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2004-06-01

    A numerical simulation is carried out for static vortices in a long Josephson junction with an exponentially varying width. At specified values of the parameters the corresponding boundary-value problem admits more than one solution. Each solution (distribution of the magnetic flux in the junction) is associated to a Sturm-Liouville problem, the smallest eigenvalue of which can be used, in a first approximation, to assess the stability of the vortex against relatively small spatiotemporal perturbations. The change in width of the junction leads to a renormalization of the magnetic flux in comparison with the case of a linear one-dimensional model. The influence of the model parameters on the stability of the states of the magnetic flux is investigated in detail, particularly that of the shape parameter. The critical curve of the junction is constructed from pieces of the critical curves for the different magnetic flux distributions having the highest critical currents for the given magnetic field.

  14. Spins in the vortices of a high-temperature superconductor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lake, B.; Aeppli, G.; Clausen, K.N.

    2001-01-01

    Neutron scattering is used to characterize the magnetism of the vortices for the optimally doped high-temperature superconductor La2-xSrxCuO4 (x = 0.163) in an applied magnetic field. As temperature is reduced, Low-frequency spin fluctuations first disappear with the loss of vortex mobility......, but then reappear. We find that the vortex state can be regarded as an inhomogeneous mixture of a superconducting spin fluid and a material containing a nearly ordered antiferromagnet. These experiments show that as for many other properties of cuprate superconductors, the important underlying microscopic forces...

  15. Vortical sources of aerodynamic force and moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J. Z.; Wu, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that the aerodynamic force and moment can be expressed in terms of vorticity distribution (and entropy variation for compressible flow) on near wake plane, or in terms of boundary vorticity flux on the body surface. Thus the vortical sources of lift and drag are clearly identified, which is the real physical basis of optimal aerodynamic design. Moreover, these sources are highly compact, hence allowing one to concentrate on key local regions of the configuration, which have dominating effect to the lift and drag. A detail knowledge of the vortical low requires measuring or calculating the vorticity and dilatation field, which is however still a challenging task. Nevertheless, this type of formulation has some unique advantages; and how to set up a well-posed problem, in particular how to establish vorticity-dilatation boundary conditions, is addressed.

  16. Vorticity production through rotation, shear and baroclinicity

    OpenAIRE

    Del Sordo, Fabio; Brandenburg, Axel

    2010-01-01

    In the absence of rotation and shear, and under the assumption of constant temperature or specific entropy, purely potential forcing by localized expansion waves is known to produce irrotational flows that have no vorticity. Here we study the production of vorticity under idealized conditions when there is rotation, shear, or baroclinicity, to address the problem of vorticity generation in the interstellar medium in a systematic fashion. We use three-dimensional periodic box numerical simulat...

  17. "Explosively growing" vortices of unstably stratified atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishchenko, O. G.; Horton, W.; Pokhotelov, O. A.; Fedun, V.

    2016-10-01

    A new type of "explosively growing" vortex structure is investigated theoretically in the framework of ideal fluid hydrodynamics. It is shown that vortex structures may arise in convectively unstable atmospheric layers containing background vorticity. From an exact analytical vortex solution the vertical vorticity structure and toroidal speed are derived and analyzed. The assumption that vorticity is constant with height leads to a solution that grows explosively when the flow is inviscid. The results shown are in agreement with observations and laboratory experiments

  18. Vitality of optical vortices (Presentation)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Roux3_2014.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 3018 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Roux3_2014.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Title Vitality of optical vortices F Stef... Roux Presented at Complex Light and Optical Force VIII SPIE Photonics West 2014 Moscone Center, San Francisco, California USA 5 February 2014 CSIR National Laser Centre, Pretoria, South Africa – p. 1/11 Speckle Amplitude Phase – p. 2/11 Vortex...

  19. Separation vortices and pattern formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Bohr, Tomas; Schnipper, Teis

    2010-01-01

    In this paper examples are given of the importance of flow separation for fluid patterns at moderate Reynolds numbers—both in the stationary and in the time-dependent domain. In the case of circular hydraulic jumps, it has been shown recently that it is possible to generalise the Prandtl–Kármán–P...... results for the vortex patterns behind a flapping foil in a flowing soap film, which shows the interaction and competition between the vortices shed from the round leading edge (like the von Kármán vortex street) and those created at the sharp trailing edge....

  20. Making sound vortices by metasurfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Liping; Qiu, Chunyin, E-mail: cyqiu@whu.edu.cn; Lu, Jiuyang; Tang, Kun; Ke, Manzhu; Peng, Shasha [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Jia, Han [State Key Laboratory of Acoustics and Key Laboratory of Noise and Vibration Research, Institute of Acoustics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Liu, Zhengyou [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Institute for Advanced Studies, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Based on the Huygens-Fresnel principle, a metasurface structure is designed to generate a sound vortex beam in airborne environment. The metasurface is constructed by a thin planar plate perforated with a circular array of deep subwavelength resonators with desired phase and amplitude responses. The metasurface approach in making sound vortices is validated well by full-wave simulations and experimental measurements. Potential applications of such artificial spiral beams can be anticipated, as exemplified experimentally by the torque effect exerting on an absorbing disk.

  1. Making sound vortices by metasurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Ye, Liping; Lu, Jiuyang; Tang, Kun; Jia, Han; Ke, Manzhu; Peng, Shasha; Liu, Zhengyou

    2016-01-01

    Based on the Huygens-Fresnel principle, a metasurface structure is designed to generate a sound vortex beam in airborne environment. The metasurface is constructed by a thin planar plate perforated with a circular array of deep subwavelength resonators with desired phase and amplitude responses. The metasurface approach in making sound vortices is validated well by full-wave simulations and experimental measurements. Potential applications of such artificial spiral beams can be anticipated, as exemplified experimentally by the torque effect exerting on an absorbing disk.

  2. Nontopological self-dual Maxwell-Higgs vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazeia, D.; Casana, R.; Ferreira, M. M., Jr.; da Hora, E.

    2015-01-01

    We study the existence of self-dual nontopological vortices in generalized Maxwell-Higgs models recently introduced in Bazeia D. et al., Eur. Phys. J. C, 71 (2001) 1833. Our investigation is explicitly illustrated by choosing a sixth-order self-interaction potential, which is the simplest one allowing the existence of nontopological structures. We specify some Maxwell-Higgs models yielding BPS nontopological vortices having energy proportional to the magnetic flux, Φ B , and whose profiles are numerically achieved. Particularly, we investigate the way the new solutions approach the boundary values, from which we verify their nontopological behavior. Finally, we depict the numerically found profiles, highlighting the main features they present.

  3. Comparison Between Vortices Created and Evolving During Fixed and Dynamic Solar Wind Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Vega, Yaireska M.; Kessel, R. L.; Sibeck, David Gary; Kalb, V. L.; Boller, R. A.; Rastaetter, L.

    2013-01-01

    We employ Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to examine the creation and evolution of plasma vortices within the Earth's magnetosphere for steady solar wind plasma conditions. Very few vortices form during intervals of such solar wind conditions. Those that do remain in fixed positions for long periods (often hours) and exhibit rotation axes that point primarily in the x or y direction, parallel (or antiparallel) to the local magnetospheric magnetic field direction. Occasionally, the orientation of the axes rotates from the x direction to another direction. We compare our results with simulations previously done for unsteady solar wind conditions. By contrast, these vortices that form during intervals of varying solar wind conditions exhibit durations ranging from seconds (in the case of those with axes in the x or y direction) to minutes (in the case of those with axes in the z direction) and convect antisunward. The local-time dependent sense of rotation seen in these previously reported vortices suggests an interpretation in terms of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. For steady conditions, the biggest vortices developed on the dayside (about 6R(E) in diameter), had their rotation axes aligned with the y direction and had the longest periods of duration. We attribute these vortices to the flows set up by reconnection on the high latitude magnetopause during intervals of northward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) orientation. This is the first time that vortices due to high-latitude reconnection have been visualized. The model also successfully predicts the principal characteristics of previously reported plasma vortices within the magnetosphere, namely their dimension, flow velocities, and durations.

  4. Comparison between vortices created and evolving during fixed and dynamic solar wind conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collado-Vega, Y.M.; Sibeck, D.G.; Rastaetter, L. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Space Weather Lab.; Kessel, R.L. [NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC (United States). Heliophysics Div.; Kalb, V.L. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Terrestrial Information Systems Lab.; Boller, R.A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Science Data Systems Branch

    2013-10-01

    We employ Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to examine the creation and evolution of plasma vortices within the Earth's magnetosphere for steady solar wind plasma conditions. Very few vortices form during intervals of such solar wind conditions. Those that do remain in fixed positions for long periods (often hours) and exhibit rotation axes that point primarily in the x or y direction, parallel (or antiparallel) to the local magnetospheric magnetic field direction. Occasionally, the orientation of the axes rotates from the x direction to another direction. We compare our results with simulations previously done for unsteady solar wind conditions. By contrast, these vortices that form during intervals of varying solar wind conditions exhibit durations ranging from seconds (in the case of those with axes in the x or y direction) to minutes (in the case of those with axes in the z direction) and convect antisunward. The local-time dependent sense of rotation seen in these previously reported vortices suggests an interpretation in terms of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. For steady conditions, the biggest vortices developed on the dayside (about 6 R{sub E} in diameter), had their rotation axes aligned with the y direction and had the longest periods of duration. We attribute these vortices to the flows set up by reconnection on the high-latitude magnetopause during intervals of northward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) orientation. This is the first time that vortices due to high-latitude reconnection have been visualized. The model also successfully predicts the principal characteristics of previously reported plasma vortices within the magnetosphere, namely their dimension, flow velocities, and durations. (orig.)

  5. Ginzburg-Landau vortices driven by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurzke, Matthias; Melcher, Christof; Moser, Roger; Spirn, Daniel

    2009-06-15

    A simplified model for the energy of the magnetization of a thin ferromagnetic film gives rise to a version of the theory of Ginzburg-Landau vortices for sphere-valued maps. In particular we have the development of vortices as a certain parameter tends to 0. The dynamics of the magnetization is ruled by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, which combines characteristic properties of a nonlinear Schroedinger equation and a gradient flow. This paper studies the motion of the vortex centers under this evolution equation. (orig.)

  6. On generating counter-rotating streamwise vortices

    KAUST Repository

    Winoto, S H

    2015-09-23

    Counter-rotating streamwise vortices are known to enhance the heat transfer rate from a surface and also to improve the aerodynamic performance of an aerofoil. In this paper, some methods to generate such counter-rotating vortices using different methods or physical conditions will be briefly considered and discussed.

  7. Theory of concentrated vortices an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Alekseenko, S V; Okulov, V L

    2007-01-01

    Vortex motion is one of the basic states of a flowing continuum. Intere- ingly, in many cases vorticity is space-localized, generating concentrated vortices. Vortex filaments having extremely diverse dynamics are the most characteristic examples of such vortices. Notable examples, in particular, include such phenomena as self-inducted motion, various instabilities, wave generation, and vortex breakdown. These effects are typically ma- fested as a spiral (or helical) configuration of a vortex axis. Many publications in the field of hydrodynamics are focused on vortex motion and vortex effects. Only a few books are devoted entirely to v- tices, and even fewer to concentrated vortices. This work aims to highlight the key problems of vortex formation and behavior. The experimental - servations of the authors, the impressive visualizations of concentrated vortices (including helical and spiral) and pictures of vortex breakdown primarily motivated the authors to begin this work. Later, the approach based on the hel...

  8. Artificial ice using superconducting vortices (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trastoy Quintela, Juan; Malnou, Maxime; Ulysse, Christian; Bernard, Rozenn; Bergeal, Nicolas; Faini, Giancarlo; Lesueur, Jerome; Briatico, Javier; Villegas, Javier E.

    2016-10-01

    We use magnetic flux quanta (superconducting vortices) on artificial energy landscapes (pinning arrays) to create a new type of artificial ice. This vortex ice shows unusual temperature effects that offer new possibilities in the study of ice systems. We have investigated the matching of the flux lattice to pinning arrays that present geometrical frustration. The pinning arrays are fabricated on YBCO films using masked O+ ion irradiation. The details of the magneto-resistance imply that the flux lattice organizes into a vortex ice. The absence of history-dependent effects suggests that the vortex ice is highly ordered. Due to the technique used for the artificial energy landscape fabrication, we have the ability to change the pinning array geometry using temperature as a control knob. In particular we can switch the geometrical frustration on and off, which opens the door to performing a new type of annealing absent in other artificial ice systems. * Work supported by the French ANR "MASTHER", and the Fundación Barrié (Galicia, Spain)

  9. Spatio-temporal optical vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Jhajj, N; Rosenthal, E W; Zahedpour, S; Wahlstrand, J K; Milchberg, H M

    2016-01-01

    We present the first experimental, theoretical, and numerical evidence of spatio-temporal optical vortices (STOVs). Quantized STOVs are a fundamental element of the nonlinear collapse and subsequent propagation of short optical pulses in material media. A STOV consists of a ring-shaped null in the electromagnetic field about which the phase is spiral, forming a dynamic torus which is concentric with and tracks the propagating pulse. Depending on the sign of the material dispersion, the local electromagnetic energy flow is saddle or spiral about the STOV. STOVs are born and evolve conserving topological charge; they can be simultaneously created in pairs with opposite windings, or generated from a point null. Our results, here obtained for optical pulse collapse and filamentation in air, are generalizable to a broad class of nonlinearly propagating waves.

  10. Separation vortices and pattern formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Bohr, Tomas; Schnipper, Teis

    2010-01-01

    In this paper examples are given of the importance of flow separation for fluid patterns at moderate Reynolds numbers—both in the stationary and in the time-dependent domain. In the case of circular hydraulic jumps, it has been shown recently that it is possible to generalise the Prandtl–Kármán–P...... results for the vortex patterns behind a flapping foil in a flowing soap film, which shows the interaction and competition between the vortices shed from the round leading edge (like the von Kármán vortex street) and those created at the sharp trailing edge.......-time evolution of the sand ripple pattern, which has the surprising features that it breaks the local sand conservation and has long-range interaction, features that can be underpinned by experiments. Very similar vortex dynamics takes place around oscillating structures such as wings and fins. Here, we present...

  11. Breathers on Quantized Superfluid Vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Salman, Hayder

    2013-01-01

    We consider the propagation of breathers along a quantised superfluid vortex. Using the correspondence between the local induction approximation (LIA) and the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation, we identify a set of initial conditions corresponding to breather solutions of vortex motion governed by the LIA. These initial conditions, which give rise to a long-wavelength modulational instability, result in the emergence of large amplitude perturbations that are localised in both space and time. The emergent structures on the vortex filament are analogous to loop solitons. Although the breather solutions we study are exact solutions of the LIA equations, we demonstrate through full numerical simulations that their key emergent attributes carry over to vortex dynamics governed by the Biot-Savart law and to quantized vortices described by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. The breather excitations can lead to self-reconnections, a mechanism that can play an important role within the cross-over range of scales in superfl...

  12. Electroweak Vortices and Gauge Equivalence

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDowell, Samuel W.; Törnkvist, Ola

    Vortex configurations in the electroweak gauge theory are investigated. Two gauge-inequivalent solutions of the field equations, the Z and W vortices, have previously been found. They correspond to embeddings of the Abelian Nielsen-Olesen vortex solution into a U(1) subgroup of SU(2)×U(1). It is shown here that any electroweak vortex solution can be mapped into a solution of the same energy with a vanishing upper component of the Higgs field. The correspondence is a gauge equivalence for all vortex solutions except those for which the winding numbers of the upper and lower Higgs components add to zero. This class of solutions, which includes the W vortex, corresponds to a singular solution in the one-component gauge. The results, combined with numerical investigations, provide an argument against the existence of other vortex solutions in the gauge-Higgs sector of the Standard Model.

  13. Nonabelian Superconductors: Vortices and Confinement in ${\\cal N}=2$ SQCD

    CERN Document Server

    Auzzi, R; Evslin, J; Konishi, K; Yung, A; Auzzi, Roberto; Bolognesi, Stefano; Evslin, Jarah; Konishi, Kenichi; Yung, Alexei

    2003-01-01

    We study nonabelian vortices (flux tubes) in SU(N) gauge theories, which are responsible for the confinement of (nonabelian) magnetic monopoles. In particular a detailed analysis is given of ${\\cal N}=2$ SQCD with gauge group SU(3) deformed by a small adjoint chiral multiplet mass. Tuning the bare quark masses (which we take to be large) to a common value $m$, we consider a particular vacuum of this theory in which an SU(2) subgroup of the gauge group remains unbroken. We consider $5 \\ge N_f \\ge 4$ flavors so that the SU(2) sub-sector remains non asymptotically free: the vortices carrying nonabelian fluxes may be reliably studied in a semi-classical regime. We show that the vortices indeed acquire exact zero modes which generate global rotations of the flux in an $SU(2)_{C+F}$ group. We study an effective world-sheet theory of these orientational zero modes which reduces to an ${\\cal N}=2$ O(3) sigma model in (1+1) dimensions. Mirror symmetry then teaches us that the dual SU(2) group is not dynamically broken...

  14. Extreme-Ultraviolet Vortices from a Free-Electron Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Primož Rebernik Ribič

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Extreme-ultraviolet vortices may be exploited to steer the magnetic properties of nanoparticles, increase the resolution in microscopy, and gain insight into local symmetry and chirality of a material; they might even be used to increase the bandwidth in long-distance space communications. However, in contrast to the generation of vortex beams in the infrared and visible spectral regions, production of intense, extreme-ultraviolet and x-ray optical vortices still remains a challenge. Here, we present an in-situ and an ex-situ technique for generating intense, femtosecond, coherent optical vortices at a free-electron laser in the extreme ultraviolet. The first method takes advantage of nonlinear harmonic generation in a helical undulator, producing vortex beams at the second harmonic without the need for additional optical elements, while the latter one relies on the use of a spiral zone plate to generate a focused, micron-size optical vortex with a peak intensity approaching 10^{14}  W/cm^{2}, paving the way to nonlinear optical experiments with vortex beams at short wavelengths.

  15. Generation and Growth of Single Hairpin Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji-Haidari, Ahmad

    The behavior of selectively generated single hairpin vortices are examined within a laminar boundary layer environment over a range of Reynolds numbers, the hairpin vortices are experimentally generated by means of controlled fluid injection from a streamwise slot. Flow visualization using both dye and hydrogen bubble wire is employed in conjunction with hot film anemometry to investigate the growth characteristics and evolution of these single hairpin vortices. Qualitatively, it is established that hairpin vortices form by local destabilization at the interface between the low-speed fluid introduced through the slot and the higher speed boundary layer flow. Kinematical considerations of the hairpin vortex are established. It is observed that a hairpin vortex generally displays visualization and velocity signatures characteristic of those observed for a turbulent boundary layer. Hydrogen-bubble wire visualization results specifically indicate that hairpin vortices generate two purely turbulent-like flow patterns. The first is a low-speed streak pattern developing immediately adjacent to the surface due to surface interaction by the counter -rotating legs of the hairpin vortex; the second pattern is a turbulent pocket-like pattern farther removed from the surface. It is determined from the visualization data that hairpin vortices manifest the necessary flow characteristics which give rise to the regenerative and sustained process required for maintenance of turbulence. The regeneration and the growth process takes place through the formation of similar hairpin-like vortices by one of two means. The first is an inviscid lateral propagation of the initial disturbance which gives rise to outboard (subsidiary), vortices which cause the lateral spreading of the structure. A more complicated and eruptive process occurs by means of viscous-inviscid interactions which give rise to trailing vortices (secondary), which cause the streamwise elongation of the disturbance. A

  16. Transition from slow Abrikosov to fast moving Josephson vortices in iron pnictide superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Philip J W; Balicas, Luis; Geshkenbein, Vadim; Blatter, Gianni; Karpinski, Janusz; Zhigadlo, Nikolai D; Batlogg, Bertram

    2013-02-01

    Iron pnictides are layered high T(c) superconductors with moderate material anisotropy and thus Abrikosov vortices are expected in the mixed state. Yet, we have discovered a distinct change in the nature of the vortices from Abrikosov-like to Josephson-like in the pnictide superconductor SmFeAs(O,F) with T(c)~48-50 K on cooling below a temperature T*~41-42 K, despite its moderate electronic anisotropy γ~4-6. This transition is hallmarked by a sharp drop in the critical current and accordingly a jump in the flux-flow voltage in a magnetic field precisely aligned along the FeAs layers, indicative of highly mobile vortices. T* coincides well with the temperature where the coherence length ξ(c) perpendicular to the layers matches half of the FeAs-layer spacing. For fields slightly out-of-plane (> 0.1°- 0.15°) the vortices are completely immobilized as well-pinned Abrikosov segments are introduced when the vortex crosses the FeAs layers. We interpret these findings as a transition from well-pinned, slow moving Abrikosov vortices at high temperatures to weakly pinned, fast flowing Josephson vortices at low temperatures. This vortex dynamics could become technologically relevant as superconducting applications will always operate deep in the Josephson regime.

  17. 4D Flow Assessment of Vorticity in Right Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R. Browning

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Diastolic dysfunction, a leading cause of heart failure in the US, is a complex pathology which manifests morphological and hemodynamic changes in the heart and circulatory system. Recent advances in time-resolved phase-contrast cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (4D Flow have allowed for characterization of blood flow in the right ventricle (RV and right atrium (RA, including calculation of vorticity and qualitative visual assessment of coherent flow patterns. We hypothesize that right ventricular diastolic dysfunction (RVDD is associated with changes in vorticity and right heart blood flow. This paper presents background on RVDD, and 4D Flow tools and techniques used for quantitative and qualitative analysis of cardiac flows in the normal and disease states. In this study, 20 patients with RVDD and 14 controls underwent cardiac 4D Flow and echocardiography. A method for determining the time-step for peak early diastole using 4D Flow data is described. Spatially integrated early diastolic vorticity was extracted from the RV, RA, and combined RV/RA regions of each subject using a range of vorticity thresholding and scaling methods. Statistically significant differences in vorticity were found in the RA and combined RA/RV in RVDD subjects compared to controls when vorticity vectors were both thresholded and scaled by cardiac index.

  18. Vorticity in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Wei-Tian

    2016-01-01

    We study the event-by-event generation of flow vorticity in RHIC Au + Au collisions and LHC Pb + Pb collisions by using the HIJING model. Different definitions of the vorticity field and velocity field are considered. A variety of properties of the vorticity are explored, including the impact parameter dependence, the collision energy dependence, the spatial distribution, the event-by-event fluctuation of the magnitude and azimuthal direction, and the time evolution. In addition, the spatial distribution of the flow helicity is also studied.

  19. Vorticity in heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei-Tian; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-06-01

    We study the event-by-event generation of flow vorticity in the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Au +Au collisions and CERN Large Hadron Collider Pb +Pb collisions by using the hijing model. Different definitions of the vorticity field and velocity field are considered. A variety of properties of the vorticity are explored, including the impact parameter dependence, the collision energy dependence, the spatial distribution, the event-by-event fluctuation of the magnitude and azimuthal direction, and the time evolution. In addition, the spatial distribution of the flow helicity is also studied.

  20. Correlations between Abelian monopoles and center vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini Nejad, Seyed Mohsen; Deldar, Sedigheh

    2017-04-01

    We study the correlations between center vortices and Abelian monopoles for SU(3) gauge group. Combining fractional fluxes of monopoles, center vortex fluxes are constructed in the thick center vortex model. Calculating the potentials induced by fractional fluxes constructing the center vortex flux in a thick center vortex-like model and comparing with the potential induced by center vortices, we observe an attraction between fractional fluxes of monopoles constructing the center vortex flux. We conclude that the center vortex flux is stable, as expected. In addition, we show that adding a contribution of the monopole-antimonopole pairs in the potentials induced by center vortices ruins the Casimir scaling at intermediate regime.

  1. Regional eddy vorticity transport and the equilibrium vorticity budgets of a numerical model ocean circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, D. E.; Holland, W. R.

    1981-01-01

    A mean vorticity budget analysis is presented of Holland's (1978) numerical ocean general circulation experiment. The stable budgets are compared with classical circulation theory to emphasize the ways in which the mesoscale motions of the model alter (or leave unaltered) classical vorticity balances. The basinwide meridional transports of vorticity by the mean flow and by the mesoscale flow in the mean are evaluated to establish the role(s) of the mesoscale in the larger scale equilibrium vorticity transports. The vorticity equation for this model fluid system is presented and the budget analysis method is described. Vorticity budgets over the selected regions and on a larger scale are given, and a summary of budget results is provided along with remarks about the utility of this type of analysis.

  2. Regional eddy vorticity transport and the equilibrium vorticity budgets of a numerical model ocean circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, D. E.; Holland, W. R.

    1981-01-01

    A mean vorticity budget analysis is presented of Holland's (1978) numerical ocean general circulation experiment. The stable budgets are compared with classical circulation theory to emphasize the ways in which the mesoscale motions of the model alter (or leave unaltered) classical vorticity balances. The basinwide meridional transports of vorticity by the mean flow and by the mesoscale flow in the mean are evaluated to establish the role(s) of the mesoscale in the larger scale equilibrium vorticity transports. The vorticity equation for this model fluid system is presented and the budget analysis method is described. Vorticity budgets over the selected regions and on a larger scale are given, and a summary of budget results is provided along with remarks about the utility of this type of analysis.

  3. Vortices in Bose-Einstein condensates: A review of the experimental results

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Srinivasan

    2006-01-01

    Rotating dilute Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) of alkali atoms offer a testing ground for theories of vortices in weakly interacting superfluids. In a rotating superfluid, quantised vortices, with a vorticity h/m, form above a critical velocity. Such vortices have been generated in BEC of alkali atoms by different techniques such as (a) wave function engineering of a two-component BEC, (b) decay of solitons, (c) rotation of a thermal cloud before cooling it below the condensation temperature, (d) stirring with an `optical' spoon, (e) rotating a deformation in the anisotropic trap in which the condensate is trapped and (f ) by creating Berry phase by adiabatically reversing the axial magnetic field. Since the core of a vortex is a fraction of a micrometer in diameter, it cannot be directly imaged optically. The condensate with vortices is allowed to ballistically expand till the size increases by one order before the vortices are imaged. Surface wave spectroscopy and the change in aspect ratio of a rotating cloud are the other techniques used. Studies have been made on the creation and dynamics of single vortex and on systems with more than a hundred vortices. Results have been obtained on vortex nucleation, stability of vortex structures, nature of the vortex lattice and defects in such a lattice. Important results are: (a) evidence exists that vortex nucleation takes place by a surface mode instability; but this is not the only mechanism; (b) the vortex lattice is perfectly triangular right up to the edge; (c) in the initial stages of rotation of the cloud a tangled web of vortices is seen; it takes a few hundred milliseconds before the vortices arrange themselves in a lattice; this time appears to be independent of temperature; (d) the decay of vortices appears to arise from the transfer of energy to the rotating thermal component and is dependent on temperature; (e) defects in the lattices such as dislocations and grain boundaries are seen; (f) transverse

  4. Topological BPS vortices in a Maxwell-Higgs model with a CPT-odd and Lorentz-violating nonminimal coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Casana, Rodolfo; Mota, Alexsandro Lucena

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the existence of topological self-dual vortices in a nonminimal CPT-odd and Lorentz-violating Maxwell-Higgs model. The Lorentz-violating nonminimal interaction is introduced via a modification of the usual covariant derivative coupling the Higgs and the gauge sectors. The self-dual solutions behave similarly to the Abrikosov-Nielsen-Olesen vortices, are electrically neutral and their total energy is proportional to the quantized magnetic flux.

  5. BPS Maxwell-Chern-Simons-like vortices in a Lorentz-violating framework

    CERN Document Server

    Casana, R; Da Hora, E; Neves, A B F

    2013-01-01

    We have analyzed Maxwell-Chern-Simons-Higgs BPS vortices in a Lorentz-violating CPT-odd context. The Lorentz violation induces profiles with a conical behavior at the origin. For some combination of the coefficients for Lorentz violation there always exists a sufficiently large winding number for which the magnetic field flips its sign.

  6. BPS Maxwell-Chern Vortices in a Lorentz-Violating Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casana, R.; Ferreira, M. M.; Hora, E. Da; Neves, A. B. F.

    2014-01-01

    We have analyzed Maxwell-Chern-Simons-Higgs BPS vortices in a Lorentz-violating CPT-odd context. The Lorentz violation induces profiles with a conical behavior at the origin. For some combination of the coefficients for Lorentz violation there always exists a sufficiently large winding number for which the magnetic field flips its sign.

  7. ANALYTICAL SOLUTION OF NONLINEAR BAROTROPIC VORTICITY EQUATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yue-peng; SHI Wei-hui

    2008-01-01

    The stability of nonlinear barotropic vorticity equation was proved. The necessary and sufficient conditions for the initial value problem to be well-posed were presented. Under the conditions of well-posedness, the corresponding analytical solution was also gained.

  8. Vortices in simulations of solar surface convection

    CERN Document Server

    Moll, R; Schüssler, M

    2011-01-01

    We report on the occurrence of small-scale vortices in simulations of the convective solar surface. Using an eigenanalysis of the velocity gradient tensor, we find the subset of high vorticity regions in which the plasma is swirling. The swirling regions form an unsteady, tangled network of filaments in the turbulent downflow lanes. Near-surface vertical vortices are underdense and cause a local depression of the optical surface. They are potentially observable as bright points in the dark intergranular lanes. Vortex features typically exist for a few minutes, during which they are moved and twisted by the motion of the ambient plasma. The bigger vortices found in the simulations are possibly, but not necessarily, related to observations of granular-scale spiraling pathlines in "cork animations" or feature tracking.

  9. Refutation of stability proofs for dipole vortices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nycander, J.

    1992-01-01

    Five stability proofs for dipole vortices (modons) that have been presented by various authors are examined. It is shown that they are all incorrect, and that westward-propagating dipoles are in fact unstable, in contradiction to some of the proofs.......Five stability proofs for dipole vortices (modons) that have been presented by various authors are examined. It is shown that they are all incorrect, and that westward-propagating dipoles are in fact unstable, in contradiction to some of the proofs....

  10. Chaotic vortical flows and their manifestations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baznat, M.; Gudima, K.; Sorin, A.; Teryaev, O.

    2016-11-01

    We study vorticity and hydrodynamic helicity in semi-peripheral heavy-ion collisions using the kinetic model of Quark-Gluon Strings. The angular momentum, which is a source of P-odd observables, is preserved with a good accuracy. We observe formation of the specific toroidal structures of the vorticity field. Their existence, accompanied by the strange chemical potential, is mirrored in the polarization of hyperons of the percent order.

  11. Generation and propagation of optical vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozas, David

    Optical vortices are singularities in phase fronts of laser beams. They are characterized by a dark core whose size (relative to the size of the background beam) may dramatically affect their behavior upon propagation. Previously, only large-core vortices have been extensively studied. The object of the research presented in this dissertation was to explore ways of generating small-core optical vortices (also called optical vortex filaments ), and to examine their propagation using analytical, numerical and experimental methods. Computer-generated holography enabled us to create arbitrary distributions of optical vortex filaments for experimental exploration. Hydrodynamic analogies were used to develop an heuristic model which described the dependence of vortex motion on other vortices and the background beam, both qualitatively and quantitatively. We predicted that pair of optical vortex filaments will rotate with angular rates inversely proportional to their separation distance (just like vortices in a fluid). We also reported the first experimental observation of this novel fluid-like effect. It was found, however, that upon propagation in linear media, the fluid-like rotation was not sustained owing to the overlap of diffracting vortex cores. Further numerical studies and experiments showed that rotation angle may be enhanced in nonlinear self-defocusing media. The results presented in this thesis offer us a better understanding of dynamics of propagating vortices which may result in applications in optical switching, optical data storage, manipulation of micro-particles and optical limiting for eye protection.

  12. Maxwell-Chern-Simons vortices in a CPT-odd Lorentz-violating Higgs Electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Casana, R; da Hora, E; Neves, A B F

    2014-01-01

    We have studied BPS vortices in a CPT-odd and Lorentz-violating Maxwell-Chern-Simons-Higgs (MCSH) electrodynamics attained from the dimensional reduction of the Carroll-Field-Jackiw-Higgs model. The Lorentz-violating parameter induces a pronounced behavior at origin (for the magnetic/electric fields and energy density) which is absent in the MCSH vortices. For some combination of the Lorentz-violating coefficients there always exist a sufficiently large winding number $n_{0}$ such that for all $% |n|\\geq |n_{0}|$ the magnetic field flips its signal, yielding two well defined regions with opposite magnetic flux. However, the total magnetic flux remains quantized and proportional to the winding number.

  13. Maxwell-Chern-Simons vortices in a CPT-odd Lorentz-violating Higgs electrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casana, R.; Ferreira, M.M.; Hora, E. da; Neves, A.B.F. [Universidade Federal do Maranhao, Departamento de Fisica, Sao Luis, Maranhao (Brazil)

    2014-09-15

    We study BPS vortices in a CPT-odd and Lorentz-violating Maxwell-Chern-Simons-Higgs (MCSH) electrodynamics attained from the dimensional reduction of the Carroll-Field-Jackiw-Higgs model. The Lorentz-violating parameter induces a pronounced behavior at origin (for the magnetic/electric fields and energy density) which is absent in the MCSH vortices. For some combination of the Lorentz-violating coefficients there always exists a sufficiently large winding number n{sub 0} such that for all vertical stroke n vertical stroke ≥ vertical stroke n{sub 0} vertical stroke the magnetic field flips sign, yielding two well-defined regions with opposite magnetic flux. However, the total magnetic flux remains quantized and proportional to the winding number. (orig.)

  14. Maxwell-Chern-Simons vortices in a CPT-odd Lorentz-violating Higgs electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casana, R.; Ferreira, M. M.; da Hora, E.; Neves, A. B. F.

    2014-09-01

    We have studied BPS vortices in a CPT-odd and Lorentz-violating Maxwell-Chern-Simons-Higgs (MCSH) electrodynamics attained from the dimensional reduction of the Carroll-Field-Jackiw-Higgs model. The Lorentz-violating parameter induces a pronounced behavior at origin (for the magnetic/electric fields and energy density) which is absent in the MCSH vortices. For some combination of the Lorentz-violating coefficients there always exist a sufficiently large winding number $n_{0}$ such that for all $% |n|\\geq |n_{0}|$ the magnetic field flips its signal, yielding two well defined regions with opposite magnetic flux. However, the total magnetic flux remains quantized and proportional to the winding number.

  15. Self-Dual Vortices in Abelian Higgs Models with Dielectric Function on the Noncommutative Plane

    CERN Document Server

    Fuertes, W García

    2014-01-01

    We show that Abelian Higgs Models with dielectric function defined on the noncommutative plane enjoy self-dual vorticial solutions. By choosing a particular form of the dielectric function, we provide a family of solutions whose Higgs and magnetic fields interpolate between the profiles of the noncommutative Nielsen-Olesen and Chern-Simons vortices. This is done both for the usual $U(1)$ model and for the $SU(2)\\times U(1)$ semilocal model with a doublet of complex scalar fields. The variety of known noncommutative self-dual vortices which display a regular behaviour when the noncommutativity parameter tends to zero results in this way considerably enlarged.

  16. Stability of helical tip vortices in a rotor far wake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okulov, Valery; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2007-01-01

    , corresponding to Rankine, Gaussian and Scully vortices, at radial extents ranging from the core radius of a tip vortex to several rotor radii. The analysis shows that the stability of tip vortices largely depends on the radial extent of the hub vorticity as well as on the type of vorticity distribution. As part......As a means of analysing the stability of the wake behind a multi-bladed rotor the stability of a multiplicity of helical vortices embedded in an assigned flow field is addressed. In the model the tip vortices in the far wake are approximated by infinitely long helical vortices with constant pitch...... and radius. The work is a further development of a model developed in Okulov (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 521, p. 319) in which the linear stability of N equally azimuthally spaced helical vortices was considered. In the present work the analysis is extended to include an assigned vorticity field due to root...

  17. Global reconnection topology as inferred from plasma observations inside Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Bavassano Cattaneo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available During a long lasting period of northward interplanetary magnetic field and high solar wind speed (above 700 km/s, the Cluster spacecraft go across a number of very large rolled-up Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH vortices at the dusk magnetopause, close to the terminator. The peculiarity of the present event is a particular sequence of ions and electrons distribution functions observed repeatedly inside each vortex. In particular, whenever Cluster crosses the current layer inside the vortices, multiple field-aligned ion populations appear, suggesting the occurrence of reconnection. In addition, the ion data display a clear velocity filter effect both at the leading and at the trailing edge of each vortex. This effect is not present in the simultaneous electron data. Unlike other KH studies reported in the literature in which reconnection occurs within the vortices, in the present event the observations are not compatible with local reconnection, but are accounted for by lobe reconnection occurring along an extended X-line at the terminator in the Southern Hemisphere. The reconnected field lines "sink" across the magnetopause and then convect tailward-duskward where they become embedded in the vortices. Another observational evidence is the detected presence of solar wind plasma on the magnetospheric side of the vortices, which confirms unambiguously the occurrence of mass transport across the magnetopause already reported in the literature. The proposed reconnection scenario accounts for all the observational aspects, regarding both the transport process and the kinetic signatures.

  18. Viscous tilting and production of vorticity in homogeneous turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzner, M.; Guala, M.; Lüthi, B.; Liberzon, A.; Nikitin, N.; Kinzelbach, W.; Tsinober, A.

    2010-06-01

    Viscous depletion of vorticity is an essential and well known property of turbulent flows, balancing, in the mean, the net vorticity production associated with the vortex stretching mechanism. In this letter, we, however, demonstrate that viscous effects are not restricted to a mere destruction process, but play a more complex role in vorticity dynamics that is as important as vortex stretching. Based on the results from three dimensional particle tracking velocimetry experiments and direct numerical simulation of homogeneous and quasi-isotropic turbulence, we show that the viscous term in the vorticity equation can also locally induce production of vorticity and changes of the orientation of the vorticity vector (viscous tilting).

  19. Use of acoustic vortices in acoustic levitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic fields are known to exert forces on the surfaces of objects. These forces are noticeable if the sound pressure is sufficiently high. Two phenomena where acoustic forces are relevant are: i) acoustic levitation, where strong standing waves can hold small objects at certain positions......, counterbalancing their weight, and ii) acoustic vortices, spinning sound fields that can impinge angular momentum and cause rotation of objects. In this contribution, both force-creating sound fields are studied by means of numerical simulations. The Boundary Element Method is employed to this end. The simulation...... of acoustical vortices uses an efficient numerical implementation based on the superposition of two orthogonal sound fields with a delay of 90° between them. It is shown that acoustic levitation and the use of acoustic vortices can be combined to manipulate objects in an efficient and controlled manner without...

  20. Stability of periodic arrays of vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Dauxois, T; Tuckerman, L S; Dauxois, Thierry; Fauve, Stephan; Tuckerman, Laurette

    1995-01-01

    The stability of periodic arrays of Mallier-Maslowe or Kelvin-Stuart vortices is discussed. We derive with the energy-Casimir stability method the nonlinear stability of this solution in the inviscid case as a function of the solution parameters and of the domain size. We exhibit the maximum size of the domain for which the vortex street is stable. By adapting a numerical time-stepping code, we calculate the linear stability of the Mallier-Maslowe solution in the presence of viscosity and compensating forcing. Finally, the results are discussed and compared to a recent experiment in fluids performed by Tabeling et al.~[Europhysics Letters {\\bf 3}, 459 (1987)]. Electromagnetically driven counter-rotating vortices are unstable above a critical electric current, and give way to co-rotating vortices. The importance of the friction at the bottom of the experimental apparatus is also discussed.

  1. Martian polar vortices: Comparison of reanalyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, D. W.; Toigo, A. D.; Guzewich, S. D.; Greybush, S. J.; Wilson, R. J.; Montabone, L.

    2016-09-01

    The structure and evolution of the Martian polar vortices is examined using two recently available reanalysis systems: version 1.0 of the Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation (MACDA) and a preliminary version of the Ensemble Mars Atmosphere Reanalysis System (EMARS). There is quantitative agreement between the reanalyses in the lower atmosphere, where Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data are assimilated, but there are differences at higher altitudes reflecting differences in the free-running general circulation model simulations used in the two reanalyses. The reanalyses show similar potential vorticity (PV) structure of the vortices: There is near-uniform small PV equatorward of the core of the westerly jet, steep meridional PV gradients on the polar side of the jet core, and a maximum of PV located off of the pole. In maps of 30 sol mean PV, there is a near-continuous elliptical ring of high PV with roughly constant shape and longitudinal orientation from fall to spring. However, the shape and orientation of the vortex varies on daily time scales, and there is not a continuous ring of PV but rather a series of smaller scale coherent regions of high PV. The PV structure of the Martian polar vortices is, as has been reported before, very different from that of Earth's stratospheric polar vortices, but there are similarities with Earth's tropospheric vortices which also occur at the edge of the Hadley Cell, and have near-uniform small PV equatorward of the jet, and a large increase of PV poleward of the jet due to increased stratification.

  2. Up-Sliding Slantwise Vorticity Development and the Complete Vorticity Equation with Mass Forcing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔晓鹏; 高守亭; 吴国雄

    2003-01-01

    The moist potential vorticity (MPV) equation is derived from complete atmospheric equations includingthe effect of mass forcing, with which the theory of Up-sliding Slantwise Vorticity Development (USVD)is proposed based on the theory of Slantwise Vorticity Development (SVD). When an air parcel slides upalong a slantwise isentropic surface, its vertical component of relative vorticity will develop, and the steeperthe isentropic surface is, the more violent the development will be. From the definition of MPV and theMPV equation produced here in, a complete vorticity equation is then put forward with mass forcing, whichexplicitly includes the effects of both internal forcings, such as variations of stability, baroclinicity, andvertical shear of horizontal wind, and external forcings, such as diabatic heating, friction, and mass forcing.When isentropic surfaces are flat, the complete vorticity equation matches its traditional counterpart. Thephysical interpretations of some of the items which are included in the complete vorticity equation butnot in the traditional one are studied with a simplified model of the Changjiang-Huaihe Meiyu front. A60-h simulation is then performed to reproduce a torrential rain event in the Changjiang-Huaihe regionand the output of the model is studied qualitatively based on the theory of USVD. The result shows thatthe conditions of the theory of USVD are easily satisfied immediately in front of mesoscale rainstorms inthe downwind direction, that is, the theory of USVD is important to the development and movement ofthese kinds of systems.

  3. Vorticity Confinement Applied to Turbulent Wing Tip Vortices for Wake-Integral Drag Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Kristopher; Povitsky, Alex

    2013-11-01

    In the current study the vorticity confinement (VC) approach was applied to tip vortices shed by edges of stationary wings in order to predict induced drag by far-field integration in Trefftz plane. The VC parameter was evaluated first by application to convection of vortices in 2-D uniform flow and then to tip vortices shed in 3-D simulation of finite-aspect ratio rectangular wing in subsonic flight. Dependence of VC parameter on the flight Mach number and the angle of attack was evaluated. The aerodynamic drag results with application of VC to prevent numerical diffusion are much closer to analytic lifting line theory compared to integration over surface of wing while the viscous profile drag is more accurately evaluated by surface integration. To apply VC to viscous and turbulent flows, it is shown that VC does not affect the physical rate of dissipation of vortices in viscous/turbulent flows at time scales corresponding to convection of vortices from the wing to Trefftz plane of integration. To account for turbulent effects on tip vortices, VC was applied in combination with Spalart-Allmaras, k- ɛ, and six Reynolds stresses models of turbulence. The results are compared to experiments to validate the physical dissipation of tip vortex. This research was supported by The Dayton Area Graduate Studies Institute (DAGSI) and US Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) grants in 2009-2013, US Army Research Office (ARO) in 2012-2013 and ASEE/AFRL summer faculty grant.

  4. Slow light vortices in periodic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sukhorukov, Andrey A.; Ha, Sangwoo; Desyatnikov, Anton S.

    2009-01-01

    We reveal that the reduction of the group velocity of light in periodic waveguides is generically associated with the presence of vortex energy flows. We show that the energy flows are gradually frozen for slow-light at the Brillouin zone edge, whereas vortices persist for slow-light states havin...... non-vanishing phase velocity inside the Brillouin zone. We also demonstrate that presence of vortices can be linked to the absence of slow-light at the zone edge, and present calculations illustrating these general results....

  5. Slow-light vortices in periodic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sukhorukov, Andrey A.; Ha, Sangwoo; Desyatnikov, Anton S.

    2009-01-01

    We reveal that the reduction of the group velocity of light in periodic waveguides is generically associated with the presence of vortex energy flows. We show that the energy flows are gradually frozen for slow-light at the Brillouin zone edge, whereas vortices persist for slow-light states havin...... non-vanishing phase velocity inside the Brillouin zone. We also demonstrate that presence of vortices can be linked to the absence of slow-light at the zone edge, and present calculations illustrating these general results....

  6. Use of acoustic vortices in acoustic levitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic fields are known to exert forces on the surfaces of objects. These forces are noticeable if the sound pressure is sufficiently high. Two phenomena where acoustic forces are relevant are: i) acoustic levitation, where strong standing waves can hold small objects at certain positions...... of acoustical vortices uses an efficient numerical implementation based on the superposition of two orthogonal sound fields with a delay of 90° between them. It is shown that acoustic levitation and the use of acoustic vortices can be combined to manipulate objects in an efficient and controlled manner without...

  7. Dust Devils and Convective Vortices on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordonez-Etxeberria, I.; Hueso, R.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2017-03-01

    Dust devils are low pressure convective vortices able to lift dust from the surface of a planet. They are a common feature on Mars and they can also be found on desertic locations on Earth. On Mars they are considered an important part of the atmospheric dust cycle. Dust in Mars is an essential ingredient of the atmosphere where it affects the radiative balance of the planet. Here we review observations of these dusty vortices from orbit, from in situ measurements on the surface of Mars and some of the models developed to simulate them.

  8. Horizontal Roll Vortices and Crown Fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Donald A.

    1982-06-01

    Observational evidence from nine crown fires suggests that horizontal roll vortices are a major mechanism in crown-fire spread. Post-burn aerial photography indicates that unburned tree-crown streets are common with crown fire. Investigation of the understory of these crown streets after two fires showed uncharred tree trunks along a center line. This evidence supports a hypothesis of vortex action causing strong downward motion of air along the streets. Additionally, photographs of two ongoing crown fires show apparent horizontal roll vortices. Discussion also includes laboratory and numerical studies in fluid dynamics that may apply to crown fires.

  9. Tracking Surface Cyclones with Moist Potential Vorticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuohao CAO; Da-Lin ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    Surface cyclone tracks are investigated in the context of moist potential vorticity (MPV). A prognostic equation of surface absolute vorticity is derived which provides a basis for using negative MPV (NMPV) in the troposphere as an alternative approach to track surface cyclones. An observed case study of explosive lee cyclogenesis is performed to test the effectiveness of the MPV approach. It is shown that when a surface cyclone signal is absent due to the blocking of the Rocky Mountains, the surface cyclone can be well identified by tracing the peak NMPV.

  10. Metastable States of Josepshon Vortices: Thermal Processes and Quantum Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallraff, A.; Kemp, A.; Koval, Yu.; Ustinov, A. V.; Fistul, M. V.

    2001-03-01

    We experimentally study the dynamics of a single Josephson vortex in a tilted periodic potential. In the presence of a bias current applied uniformly to a long Josephson junction, metastable vortex-states are induced by the interaction of the vortex with an artificially formed inhomogeneity in the junction, or by shaping the junction subject to a small external magnetic field [1]. At high temperatures, we observe the thermal escape of the vortex out of the metastable state. As temperature and damping is reduced, the macroscopic quantum properties of Josephson vortices, such as energy level quantization and quantum tunneling, are expected to manifest themselves [2,3]. We report on our current experimental work to observe these effects. Our interest in this macroscopic quantum system is related to the possibility of using quantum states of Josephson vortices for performing quantum computation. We have suggested that a vortex trapped in a double-well potential in a narrow long junction can be used as a scalable and well-controllable qubit [1]. [1] A. Wallraff et al. , J. Low Temp. Phys. J. Low Temp. Phys. 188, 543 (2000). [2] T. Kato and M. Imada, J. Phys. Soc. Japan 65, 2963 (1996). [3] A. Shnirman, E. Ben-Jacob, and B. Malomed, Phys. Rev. B 56, 14677 (1997).

  11. Experimental Observations of Ion Phase-Space Vortices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans; Armstrong, R. J.; Trulsen, J.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental observations of ion phase-space vortices are reported. The ion phase-space vortices form in the region of heated ions behind electrostatic ion acoustic shocks. The results are in qualitative agreement with numerical and analytic studies....

  12. Cyclones and attractive streaming generated by acoustical vortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaud, Antoine; Baudoin, Michael; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Bou Matar, Olivier

    2014-07-01

    Acoustical and optical vortices have attracted great interest due to their ability to capture and manipulate particles with the use of radiation pressure. Here we show that acoustical vortices can also induce axial vortical flow reminiscent of cyclones, whose topology can be controlled by adjusting the properties of the acoustical beam. In confined geometry, the phase singularity enables generating "attractive streaming" with the flow directed toward the transducer. This opens perspectives for contactless vortical flow control.

  13. Vorticity, Gyroscopic precession, and Spin-Curvature Force

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Wei Chieh; Lee, Si Chen

    2012-01-01

    In investigating the relation between vorticity and gyroscopic precession, we calculate the vorticity vector in Godel, Kerr, Lewis, Schwarzschild, Minkowski metric and find out the vorticity vector of the specific observers is the angular velocity of gyroscopic precession. Furthermore, considering space-time torsion will flip the vorticity and spin-curvature force to opposite sign. This result is very similar to the behavior of positive and negative helicity of quantum spin in Stern-Gerlach f...

  14. Cyclones and attractive streaming generated by acoustical vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Riaud, Antoine; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Matar, Olivier Bou

    2014-01-01

    Acoustical and optical vortices have attracted large interest due to their ability in capturing and manipulating particles with the use of the radiation pressure. Here we show that acoustical vortices can also induce axial vortical flow reminiscent of cyclones whose topology can be controlled by adjusting the properties of the acoustical beam. In confined geometry, the phase singularity enables generating attractive streaming with a flow directed toward the transducer. This opens perspectives for contact-less vortical flow control.

  15. Confinement and fat-center-vortices model

    CERN Document Server

    Deldar, S

    2004-01-01

    In this paper I review shortly potentials obtained for SU(2), SU(3) and SU(4) static sources from fat-center-vortices model. Results confirm the confinement of quarks in all three gauge groups. Proportionality of string tensions with flux tube counting is better than Casimir scaling especially for SU(4).

  16. Equilibration of centrifugally unstable vortices: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carnevale, G.F.; Kloosterziel, R.C.; Orlandi, P.

    2016-01-01

    In three-dimensional flow, a vortex can become turbulent and be destroyed through a variety of instabilities. In rotating flow, however, the result of the breakup of a vortex is usually a state comprising several vortices with their axes aligned along the ambient rotation direction. This article is

  17. Long Term Changes in the Polar Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braathen, Geir O.

    2016-04-01

    As the amount of halogens in the stratosphere is slowly declining and the ozone layer slowly recovers it is of interest to see how the meteorological conditions in the vortex develop over the long term since such changes might alter the foreseen ozone recovery. In conjunction with the publication of the WMO Antarctic and Arctic Ozone Bulletins, WMO has acquired the ERA Interim global reanalysis data set for several meteorological parameters. This data set goes from 1979 - present. These long time series of data can be used for several useful studies of the long term development of the polar vortices. Several "environmental indicators" for vortex change have been calculated, and a climatology, as well as trends, for these parameters will be presented. These indicators can act as yardsticks and will be useful for understanding past and future changes in the polar vortices and how these changes affect polar ozone depletion. Examples of indicators are: vortex mean temperature, vortex minimum temperature, vortex mean PV, vortex "importance" (PV*area), vortex break-up time, mean and maximum wind speed. Data for both the north and south polar vortices have been analysed at several isentropic levels from 350 to 850 K. A possible link between changes in PV and sudden stratospheric warmings will be investigated, and the results presented. The unusual meteorological conditions of the 2015 south polar vortex and the 2010/11 and 2015/16 north polar vortices will be compared to other recent years.

  18. Vorticity dynamics in an intracranial aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Trung; Borazjani, Iman; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2008-11-01

    Direct Numerical Simulation is carried out to investigate the vortex dynamics of physiologic pulsatile flow in an intracranial aneurysm. The numerical solver is based on the CURVIB (curvilinear grid/immersed boundary method) approach developed by Ge and Sotiropoulos, J. Comp. Physics, 225 (2007) and is applied to simulate the blood flow in a grid with 8 million grid nodes. The aneurysm geometry is extracted from MRI images from common carotid artery (CCA) of a rabbit (courtesy Dr.Kallmes, Mayo Clinic). The simulation reveals the formation of a strong vortex ring at the proximal end during accelerated flow phase. The vortical structure advances toward the aneurysm dome forming a distinct inclined circular ring that connects with the proximal wall via two long streamwise vortical structures. During the reverse flow phase, the back flow results to the formation of another ring at the distal end that advances in the opposite direction toward the proximal end and interacts with the vortical structures that were created during the accelerated phase. The basic vortex formation mechanism is similar to that observed by Webster and Longmire (1998) for pulsed flow through inclined nozzles. The similarities between the two flows will be discussed and the vorticity dynamics of an aneurysm and inclined nozzle flows will be analyzed.This work was supported in part by the University of Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  19. RENORMALIZED ENERGY WITH VORTICES PINNING EFFECT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ding Shijin

    2000-01-01

    This paper is a continuation of the previous paper in the Journal of Partial Differential Equations [1]. We derive in this paper the renormalized energy to further determine the locations of vortices in some case for the variational problem related to the superconducting thin films having variable thickness.

  20. Prometheus Induced Vorticity In Saturns F Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Sutton, Phil J

    2016-01-01

    Saturns rings are known to show remarkable real time variability in their structure. Many of which can be associated to interactions with nearby moons and moonlets. Possibly the most interesting and dynamic place in the rings, probably in the whole Solar System, is the F ring. A highly disrupted ring with large asymmetries both radially and azimuthally. Numerically non zero components to the curl of the velocity vector field (vorticity) in the perturbed area of the F ring post encounter are witnessed, significantly above the background vorticity. Within the perturbed area rich distributions of local rotations is seen located in and around the channel edges. The gravitational scattering of ring particles during the encounter causes a significant elevated curl of the vector field above the background F ring vorticity for the first 1-3 orbital periods post encounter. After 3 orbital periods vorticity reverts quite quickly to near background levels. This new found dynamical vortex life of the ring will be of grea...

  1. Motion of three vortices near collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leoncini, X.; Kuznetsov, L.; Zaslavsky, G. M.

    2000-08-01

    A system of three point vortices in an unbounded plane has a special family of self-similarly contracting or expanding solutions: during the motion, the vortex triangle remains similar to the original one, while its area decreases (grows) at a constant rate. A contracting configuration brings three vortices to a single point in a finite time; this phenomenon known as vortex collapse is of principal importance for many-vortex systems. Dynamics of close-to-collapse vortex configurations depends on the way the collapse conditions are violated. Using an effective potential representation, a detailed quantitative analysis of all the different types of near-collapse dynamics is performed when two of the vortices are identical. We discuss time and length scales, emerging in the problem, and their behavior as the initial vortex triangle is approaching an exact collapse configuration. Different types of critical behaviors, such as logarithmic or power-law divergences are exhibited, which emphasize the importance of the way the collapse is approached. Period asymptotics for all singular cases are presented as functions of the initial vortice's configurations. Special features of passive particle mixing by near-collapse flows are illustrated numerically.

  2. Bilinear Relative Equilibria of Identical Point Vortices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aref, H.; Beelen, Peter; Brøns, Morten

    2012-01-01

    -axis and n on the x-axis. We define generating polynomials q(z) and p(z), respectively, for each set of vortices. A second-order, linear ODE for p(z) given q(z) is derived. Several results relating the general solution of the ODE to relative equilibrium configurations are established. Our strongest result......A new class of bilinear relative equilibria of identical point vortices in which the vortices are constrained to be on two perpendicular lines, conveniently taken to be the x- and y-axes of a Cartesian coordinate system, is introduced and studied. In the general problem we have m vortices on the y......, obtained using Sturm’s comparison theorem, is that if p(z) satisfies the ODE for a given q(z) with its imaginary zeros symmetric relative to the x-axis, then it must have at least n−m+2 simple, real zeros. For m=2 this provides a complete characterization of all zeros, and we study this case in some detail...

  3. Prometheus Induced Vorticity in Saturn's F Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Phil J.; Kusmartsev, Feo V.

    2016-11-01

    Saturn's rings are known to show remarkable real time variability in their structure. Many of which can be associated to interactions with nearby moons and moonlets. Possibly the most interesting and dynamic place in the rings, probably in the whole Solar System, is the F ring. A highly disrupted ring with large asymmetries both radially and azimuthally. Numerically non-zero components to the curl of the velocity vector field (vorticity) in the perturbed area of the F ring post encounter are witnessed, significantly above the background vorticity. Within the perturbed area rich distributions of local rotations is seen located in and around the channel edges. The gravitational scattering of ring particles during the encounter causes a significant elevated curl of the vector field above the background F ring vorticity for the first 1-3 orbital periods post encounter. After 3 orbital periods vorticity reverts quite quickly to near background levels. This new found dynamical vortex life of the ring will be of great interest to planet and planetesimals in proto-planetary disks where vortices and turbulence are suspected of having a significant role in their formation and migrations. Additionally, it is found that the immediate channel edges created by the close passage of Prometheus actually show high radial dispersions in the order 20-50 cm/s, up to a maximum of 1 m/s. This is much greater than the value required by Toomre for a disk to be unstable to the growth of axisymmetric oscillations. However, an area a few hundred km away from the edge shows a more promising location for the growth of coherent objects.

  4. Prometheus Induced Vorticity in Saturn's F Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Phil J.; Kusmartsev, Feo V.

    2016-09-01

    Saturn's rings are known to show remarkable real time variability in their structure. Many of which can be associated to interactions with nearby moons and moonlets. Possibly the most interesting and dynamic place in the rings, probably in the whole Solar System, is the F ring. A highly disrupted ring with large asymmetries both radially and azimuthally. Numerically non-zero components to the curl of the velocity vector field (vorticity) in the perturbed area of the F ring post encounter are witnessed, significantly above the background vorticity. Within the perturbed area rich distributions of local rotations is seen located in and around the channel edges. The gravitational scattering of ring particles during the encounter causes a significant elevated curl of the vector field above the background F ring vorticity for the first 1-3 orbital periods post encounter. After 3 orbital periods vorticity reverts quite quickly to near background levels. This new found dynamical vortex life of the ring will be of great interest to planet and planetesimals in proto-planetary disks where vortices and turbulence are suspected of having a significant role in their formation and migrations. Additionally, it is found that the immediate channel edges created by the close passage of Prometheus actually show high radial dispersions in the order ~20-50 cm/s, up to a maximum of 1 m/s. This is much greater than the value required by Toomre for a disk to be unstable to the growth of axisymmetric oscillations. However, an area a few hundred km away from the edge shows a more promising location for the growth of coherent objects.

  5. An eddy closure for potential vorticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringler, Todd D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The Gent-McWilliams (GM) parameterization is extended to include a direct influence in the momentum equation. The extension is carried out in two stages; an analysis of the inviscid system is followed by an analysis of the viscous system. In the inviscid analysis the momentum equation is modified such that potential vorticity is conserved along particle trajectories following a transport velocity that includes the Bolus velocity in a manner exactly analogous to the continuity and tracer equations. In addition (and in contrast to traditional GM closures), the new formulation of the inviscid momentum equation results in a conservative exchange between potential and kinetic forms of energy. The inviscid form of the eddy closure conserves total energy to within an error proportional to the time derivative of the Bolus velocity. The hypothesis that the viscous term in the momentum equation should give rise to potential vorticity being diffused along isopycnals in a manner analogous to other tracers is examined in detail. While the form of the momentum closure that follows from a strict adherence to this hypothesis is not immediately interpretable within the constructs of traditional momentum closures, three approximations to this hypothesis results in a form of dissipation that is consistent with traditional Laplacian diffusion. The first two approximations are that relative vorticity, not potential vorticity, is diffused along isopyncals and that the flow is in approximate geostrophic balance. An additional approximation to the Jacobian term is required when the dissipation coefficient varies in space. More importantly, the critique of this hypothesis results in the conclusion that the viscosity parameter in the momentum equation should be identical to the tradition GM closure parameter {Kappa}. Overall, we deem the viscous form of the eddy closure for potential vorticity as a viable closure for use in ocean circulation models.

  6. Finite size effect on spread of resonance frequencies in arrays of coupled vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, Andreas; Drews, André; Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter; Meier, Guido

    2011-01-25

    Dynamical properties of magnetic vortices in arrays of magnetostatically coupled ferromagnetic disks are studied by means of a broadband ferromagnetic-resonance (FMR) setup. Magnetic force microscopy and magnetic transmission soft X-ray microscopy are used to image the core polarizations and the chiralities which are both found to be randomly distributed. The resonance frequency of vortex-core motion strongly depends on the magnetostatic coupling between the disks. The parameter describing the relative broadening of the absorption peak observed in the FMR transmission spectra for a given normalized center-to-center distance between the elements is shown to depend on the size of the array.

  7. Two species of vortices in massive gauged non-linear sigma models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso-Izquierdo, A. [Departamento de Matemática Aplicada, Universidad de Salamanca,Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias y Ambientales, Av. Filiberto Villalobos 119, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain); Fuertes, W. García [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Oviedo, Facultad de Ciencias, Calle Calvo Sotelo s/n, E-33007 Oviedo (Spain); Guilarte, J. Mateos [Departamento de Física Fundamental, Universidad de Salamanca, Facultad de Ciencias, Plaza de la Merced, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain)

    2015-02-23

    Non-linear sigma models with scalar fields taking values on ℂℙ{sup n} complex manifolds are addressed. In the simplest n=1 case, where the target manifold is the S{sup 2} sphere, we describe the scalar fields by means of stereographic maps. In this case when the U(1) symmetry is gauged and Maxwell and mass terms are allowed, the model accommodates stable self-dual vortices of two kinds with different energies per unit length and where the Higgs field winds at the cores around the two opposite poles of the sphere. Allowing for dielectric functions in the magnetic field, similar and richer self-dual vortices of different species in the south and north charts can be found by slightly modifying the potential. Two different situations are envisaged: either the vacuum orbit lies on a parallel in the sphere, or one pole and the same parallel form the vacuum orbit. Besides the self-dual vortices of two species, there exist BPS domain walls in the second case. Replacing the Maxwell contribution of the gauge field to the action by the second Chern-Simons secondary class, only possible in (2+1)-dimensional Minkowski space-time, new BPS topological defects of two species appear. Namely, both BPS vortices and domain ribbons in the south and the north charts exist because the vacuum orbit consits of the two poles and one parallel. Formulation of the gauged ℂℙ{sup 2} model in a reference chart shows a self-dual structure such that BPS semi-local vortices exist. The transition functions to the second or third charts break the U(1)×SU(2) semi-local symmetry, but there is still room for standard self-dual vortices of the second species. The same structures encompassing N complex scalar fields are easily generalized to gauged ℂℙ{sup N} models.

  8. Non-Abelian Vortices with an Aharonov-Bohm Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Evslin, Jarah; Nitta, Muneto; Ohashi, Keisuke; Vinci, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The interplay of gauge dynamics and flavor symmetries often leads to remarkably subtle phenomena in the presence of soliton configurations. Non-Abelian vortices -- vortex solutions with continuous internal orientational moduli -- provide an example. Here we study the effect of weakly gauging a U(1)_R subgroup of the flavor symmetry on such BPS vortex solutions. Our prototypical setting consists of an SU(2) x U(1) gauge theory with N_f=2 sets of fundamental scalars that break the gauge symmetry to an "electromagnetic" U(1). The weak U(1)_R gauging converts the well-known CP1 orientation modulus |B| of the non-Abelian vortex into a parameter characterizing the strength of the magnetic field that is responsible for the Aharonov-Bohm effect. As the phase of B remains a genuine zero mode while the electromagnetic gauge symmetry is Higgsed in the interior of the vortex, these solutions are superconducting strings.

  9. Topological vortices in generalized Born-Infeld-Higgs electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Casana, R; Rubiera-Garcia, D; Santos, C dos

    2015-01-01

    A consistent BPS formalism to study the existence of topological axially symmetric vortices in generalized versions of the Born-Infeld-Higgs electrodynamics is implemented. Such a generalization modifies the field dynamics via introduction of three non-negative functions depending only in the Higgs field, namely, $G(|\\phi|)$, $w(|\\phi|) $ and $V(|\\phi|)$. A set of first-order differential equations is attained when these functions satisfy a constraint related to the Ampere law. Such a constraint allows to minimize the system energy in such way that it becomes proportional to the magnetic flux. Our results provides an enhancement of topological vortex solutions in Born-Infeld-Higgs electrodynamics. Finally, we analyze a set of models such that a generalized version of Maxwell-Higgs electrodynamics is recovered in a certain limit of the theory.

  10. Topological vortices in generalized Born-Infeld-Higgs electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casana, R.; Hora, E. da; Rubiera-Garcia, D.; Santos, C. dos

    2015-08-01

    A consistent BPS formalism to study the existence of topological axially symmetric vortices in generalized versions of the Born-Infeld-Higgs electrodynamics is implemented. Such a generalization modifies the field dynamics via the introduction of three nonnegative functions depending only in the Higgs field, namely, , , and . A set of first-order differential equations is attained when these functions satisfy a constraint related to the Ampère law. Such a constraint allows one to minimize the system's energy in such way that it becomes proportional to the magnetic flux. Our results provides an enhancement of the role of topological vortex solutions in Born-Infeld-Higgs electrodynamics. Finally, we analyze a set of models entailing the recovery of a generalized version of Maxwell-Higgs electrodynamics in a certain limit of the theory.

  11. Topological vortices in generalized Born-Infeld-Higgs electrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casana, R. [Universidade Federal do Maranhao, Departamento de Fisica, Sao Luis, Maranhao (Brazil); Hora, E. da [Universidade Federal do Maranhao, Departamento de Fisica, Sao Luis, Maranhao (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Maranhao, Coordenadoria Interdisciplinar de Ciencia e Tecnologia, Sao Luis, Maranhao (Brazil); Rubiera-Garcia, D. [Fudan University, Department of Physics, Center for Field Theory and Particle Physics, Shanghai (China); Santos, C. dos [Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Centro de Fisica e Departamento de Fisica e Astronomia, Porto (Portugal)

    2015-08-15

    A consistent BPS formalism to study the existence of topological axially symmetric vortices in generalized versions of the Born-Infeld-Higgs electrodynamics is implemented. Such a generalization modifies the field dynamics via the introduction of three nonnegative functions depending only in the Higgs field, namely,G(vertical stroke φ vertical stroke), w(vertical stroke φ vertical stroke), and V (vertical stroke φ vertical stroke). A set of first-order differential equations is attained when these functions satisfy a constraint related to the Ampere law. Such a constraint allows one to minimize the system's energy in such way that it becomes proportional to the magnetic flux. Our results provides an enhancement of the role of topological vortex solutions in Born-Infeld-Higgs electrodynamics. Finally, we analyze a set of models entailing the recovery of a generalized version of Maxwell-Higgs electrodynamics in a certain limit of the theory. (orig.)

  12. Spin Magnetohydrodynamics. Energy density and vorticity evolution in electron-ion quantum plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Trukhanova, Mariya Iv

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we explain a magneto quantum hydrodynamics (MQHD) method for the study of the quantum evolution of a system of spinning fermions in an external electromagnetic field. The fundamental equations of microscopic quantum hydrodynamics (the momentum balance equation, the energy evolution equation and the magnetic moment density equation) were derived from the many-particle microscopic Schredinger equation with a Spin-spin and Coulomb modified Hamiltonian. It has been showed that in the absence of external electromagnetic field the system of particles are subject to the usual quantum force (Bohm potential) and spin-dependent addition (Spin stress). Using the developed approach, an extended vorticity evolution equation for the quantum spinning plasma has been derived. The effects of the new spin forces and Spin-spin interaction contributions on the motion of fermions, the evolution of the magnetic moment density, the energy dynamics and vorticity generation have been predicted. The explicated MQHD appr...

  13. Viscous tilting and production of vorticity in homogeneous turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Holzner, M; Lüthi, B; Liberzon, A; Nikitin, N; Kinzelbach, W; Tsinober, A

    2010-01-01

    Viscous depletion of vorticity is an essential and well known property of turbulent flows, balancing, in the mean, the net vorticity production associated with the vortex stretching mechanism. In this letter we however demonstrate that viscous effects are not restricted to a mere destruction process, but play a more complex role in vorticity dynamics that is as important as vortex stretching. Based on results from particle tracking experiments (3D-PTV) and direct numerical simulation (DNS) of homogeneous and quasi isotropic turbulence, we show that the viscous term in the vorticity equation can also locally induce production of vorticity and changes of its orientation (viscous tilting).

  14. Magnetic vortex racetrack memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Liwei D.; Jin, Yongmei M.

    2017-02-01

    We report a new type of racetrack memory based on current-controlled movement of magnetic vortices in magnetic nanowires with rectangular cross-section and weak perpendicular anisotropy. Data are stored through the core polarity of vortices and each vortex carries a data bit. Besides high density, non-volatility, fast data access, and low power as offered by domain wall racetrack memory, magnetic vortex racetrack memory has additional advantages of no need for constrictions to define data bits, changeable information density, adjustable current magnitude for data propagation, and versatile means of ultrafast vortex core switching. By using micromagnetic simulations, current-controlled motion of magnetic vortices in cobalt nanowire is demonstrated for racetrack memory applications.

  15. Pinning of superconducting vortices in MoGe/Au Thin nano-squares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrier-Garcia, Lise; Timmermans, Matias; Van de Vondel, Joris; Moshchalkov, Victor V.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we report a scanning tunneling spectroscopy study of vortex patterns in mesoscopic superconducting squares and explore the impact of defects and corrugations inherently present in nanofabricated structures. We find that a hillock at the edge can function as an attractive or repulsive pinning center for vortices deforming the, theoretically predicted, symmetry-induced vortex configurations. In addition, we exploit the inherently present imperfections, creating metastable states, to visualize the dynamics of vortex penetration during magnetic field sweeps.

  16. Instability of isolated hollow vortices with zero circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiejima, Toshihiko

    2016-04-01

    Inviscid linear stability analysis and numerical simulations are used to investigate how temporal disturbances evolve in double-annular hollow vortices with an opposite-signed vorticity (the total circulation is zero). Two extrema exist in the vorticity profile and constitute a factor of instability. The dispersion relation is expressed as a simple cubic equation. The results show that the instabilities of vortices are strongly enhanced by the hollow effect of the annular vorticity. In addition, the growth rate of the dominant modes significantly increases with decreasing negative-vorticity thickness. During the initial stage, the dominant unstable modes obtained from simulations are consistent with those obtained from the linear analysis. In nonlinear developments, the flow field stretches out in one direction depending on the motion of the plural vortex pair formed by rolling up the positive and negative vorticities. Once such structures in the vortex are generated, the vortex immediately breaks down and does not become metastable.

  17. Three-dimensional quantification of vorticity and helicity from 3D cine PC-MRI using finite-element interpolations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, Julio; Urbina, Jesús; Valverde, Israel; Mura, Joaquín; Tejos, Cristián; Irarrazaval, Pablo; Andia, Marcelo E; Hurtado, Daniel E; Uribe, Sergio

    2017-03-31

    We propose a 3D finite-element method for the quantification of vorticity and helicity density from 3D cine phase-contrast (PC) MRI. By using a 3D finite-element method, we seamlessly estimate velocity gradients in 3D. The robustness and convergence were analyzed using a combined Poiseuille and Lamb-Ossen equation. A computational fluid dynamics simulation was used to compared our method with others available in the literature. Additionally, we computed 3D maps for different 3D cine PC-MRI data sets: phantom without and with coarctation (18 healthy volunteers and 3 patients). We found a good agreement between our method and both the analytical solution of the combined Poiseuille and Lamb-Ossen. The computational fluid dynamics results showed that our method outperforms current approaches to estimate vorticity and helicity values. In the in silico model, we observed that for a tetrahedral element of 2 mm of characteristic length, we underestimated the vorticity in less than 5% with respect to the analytical solution. In patients, we found higher values of helicity density in comparison to healthy volunteers, associated with vortices in the lumen of the vessels. We proposed a novel method that provides entire 3D vorticity and helicity density maps, avoiding the used of reformatted 2D planes from 3D cine PC-MRI. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  18. Solitonic vortices in Bose-Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylutki, M.; Donadello, S.; Serafini, S.; Pitaevskii, L. P.; Dalfovo, F.; Lamporesi, G.; Ferrari, G.

    2015-04-01

    We analyse, theoretically and experimentally, the nature of solitonic vortices (SV) in an elongated Bose-Einstein condensate. In the experiment, such defects are created via the Kibble-Zurek mechanism, when the temperature of a gas of sodium atoms is quenched across the BEC transition, and are imaged after a free expansion of the condensate. By using the Gross-Pitaevskii equation, we calculate the in-trap density and phase distributions characterizing a SV in the crossover from an elongated quasi-1D to a bulk 3D regime. The simulations show that the free expansion strongly amplifies the key features of a SV and produces a remarkable twist of the solitonic plane due to the quantized vorticity associated with the defect. Good agreement is found between simulations and experiments.

  19. Mimicking graphene with polaritonic spin vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulevich, Dmitry R.; Yudin, Dmitry

    2017-09-01

    Exploring the properties of strongly correlated systems through quantum simulation with photons, cold atoms, or polaritons represents an active area of research. In fact, the latter sheds light on the behavior of complex systems that are difficult to address in the laboratory or to tackle numerically. In this study, we discuss an analog of graphene formed by exciton-polariton spin vortices arranged into a hexagonal lattice. We show how graphene-type dispersion at different energy scales arises for several types of exciton-polariton spin vortices. In contrast to previous studies of exciton polaritons in artificial lattices, the use of exciton-polariton spin vortex modes offers a richer playground for quantum simulations. In particular, we demonstrate that the sign of the nearest-neighbor coupling strength can be inverted.

  20. Quantum tunneling of vortices in the Tl2CaBa2Cu2O8 superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada, J.; Chudnovsky, E. M.; García, A.

    1993-05-01

    Magnetic-relaxation measurements of a Tl-based high-Tc superconductor show temperature-independent flux creep below 6 K. The effect is analyzed in terms of the overdamped quantum diffusion of two-dimensional vortices. Good agreement between theory and experiment is found.

  1. The Vorticity of Solar Photospheric Flows on the Scale of Granulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pevtsov, A A

    2016-01-01

    We employ time sequences of images observed with a G-band filter (4305{\\AA}) by the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on board of Hinode spacecraft at different latitude along solar central me-ridian to study vorticity of granular flows in quiet Sun areas during deep minimum of solar activity. Using a feature correlation tracking (FCT) technique, we calculate the vorticity of granular-scale flows. Assuming the known pattern of vertical flows (upward in granules and downward in inter-granular lanes), we infer the sign of kinetic helicity of these flows. We show that the kinetic helicity of granular flows and intergranular vortices exhibits a weak hemispheric preference, which is in agreement with the action of the Coriolis force. This slight hemispheric sign asymmetry, however, is not statistically significant given large scatter in the average vorticity. The sign of the current he-licity density of network magnetic fields computed using full disk vector magnetograms from the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigati...

  2. Cusp currents from ionospheric vorticity generated by gasdynamic and merging flow fields at the magnetopause

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mie, Y. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Crooker, N.U.; Siscoe, G.L. [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Cusp currents that arise from ionospheric vorticity generated by the combined merging outflow and gasdynamic flow fields at the magnetopause are quantified and compared with those calculated from vorticity generated by mapping the solar wind electric field into a limited cusp region of the polar cap, as proposed in the synthesis view of Banks. The results are essentially identical for strong interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B{sub Y}, thus demonstrating equivalence between mechanical and electrical descriptions of reconnection-driven convection. For southward IMF, however, the mechanical description yields weak cusp currents with dawn-dusk bipolarity, as deduced from early observations by Iijima and Potemra, whereas the electrical description yields none. The bipolar currents arise from the diverging pattern of gasdynamic flow. The currents become unipolar as B{sub Y} increases and the asymmetry of the merging outflow dominates. Additional cusp currents in both models arise at kinks in the flow contours (additional ionospheric vorticity) around the border of the cusp region, owing to limiting the area of mapping from the magnetopause. The border currents form a bipolar pair that rotates around the circumference of the cusp as the IMF rotates in clock angle. They dominate the currents arising from vorticity within the cusp. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Analytic Modeling of Severe Vortical Storms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-08

    AD---AO86 919 TR DEFENSE AND SPACE SYSTEMS GROUP REDONDO BEACH CA -ETC F/6 4/2 ANALYTIC MODELING OF SEVERE VORTICAL, STDRMS.CW),7JUL G0 F FENDELL ...and Space Systems Group One Space 1ark ___Redondo Beach, California 90278 Francis E. Fendell , Principal Investigator for Artic and Earth Sciences... Fendell , principal investigator, and Phillip Feldman, numerical analyst, of TRW Defense and Space Systems Group, and George Carrier of Harvard University

  4. Vorticity, Stokes' Theorem and the Gauss's Theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2004-12-01

    Vorticity is a property of the flow of any fluid and moving fluids acquire properties that allow an engineer to describe that particular flow in greater detail. It is important to recognize that mere motion alone does not guarantee that the air or any fluid has vorticity. Vorticity is one of four important quantities that define the kinematic properties of any fluid flow. The Navier-Stokes equations are the foundation of fluid mechanics, and Stokes' theorem is used in nearly every branch of mechanics as well as electromagnetics. Stokes' Theorem also plays a vital role in many secondary theorems such as those pertaining to vorticity and circulation. However, the divergence theorem is a mathematical statement of the physical fact that, in the absence of the creation or destruction of matter, the density within a region of space can change only by having it flow into, or away from the region through its boundary. This is also known as Gauss's Theorem. It should also be noted that there are many useful extensions of Gauss's Theorem, including the extension to include surfaces of discontinuity in V. Mathematically expressed, Stokes' theorem can be expressed by considering a surface S having a bounding curve C. Here, V is any sufficiently smooth vector field defined on the surface and its bounding curve C. Integral (Surface) [(DEL X V)] . dS = Integral (Contour) [V . dx] In this paper, the author outlines and stresses the importance of studying and teaching these mathematical techniques while developing a course in Hydrology and Fluid Mechanics. References Arfken, G. "Gauss's Theorem." 1.11 in Mathematical Methods for Physicists, 3rd ed. Orlando, FL: Academic Press, pp. 57-61, 1985. Morse, P. M. and Feshbach, H. "Gauss's Theorem." In Methods of Theoretical Physics, Part I. New York: McGraw-Hill, pp. 37-38, 1953. Eric W. Weisstein. "Divergence Theorem." From MathWorld--A Wolfram Web Resource. http://mathworld.wolfram.com/DivergenceTheorem.html

  5. Motion of Three Vortices near Collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Leoncini, X; Zaslavsky, G M

    2000-01-01

    A system of three point vortices in an unbounded plane has a special family of self-similarly contracting or expanding solutions: during the motion, vortex triangle remains similar to the original one, while its area decreases (grows) at a constant rate. A contracting configuration brings three vortices to a single point in a finite time; this phenomenon is known as vortex collapse and is of principal importance for many-vortex systems. The self-similar motion (contracting or expanding) is not generic, it arises when vortex strengths and initial positions satisfy two special collapse conditions. Dynamics of close-to-collapse vortex configurations depends on the way the collapse conditions are violated. We show, that when two of the vortices are identical, it is possible to reduce a three-vortex system to a problem of motion of a particle in an effective potential, defined by initial conditions. Using the effective potential representation, a detailed quantitative analysis of different types of near-collapse d...

  6. Instability in the magnetic field penetration in type II superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Isaías G. de, E-mail: isaias@ufrrj.br

    2015-07-17

    Under the view of the time-dependent Ginzburg–Landau theory we have investigated the penetration of the magnetic field in the type II superconductors. We show that the single vortices, situated along the borderline, between the normal region channel and the superconducting region, can escape to regions still empty of vortices. We show that the origin of this process is the repulsive nature of vortex–vortex interaction, in addition to the non-homogeneous distribution of the vortices along the normal region channel. Using London theory we explain the extra gain of kinetic energy by the vortices situated along this borderline. - Highlights: • TDGL is used to study the magnetic field penetration in type II superconductors. • Instability process is found during the magnetic field penetration. • Vortices along the front of the normal region escape to superconducting region. • We explain the extra-gain of kinetic energy by vortices along the borderline.

  7. Field theoretical model of multilayered Josephson junction and dynamics of Josephson vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Toshiaki; Iida, Hideaki; Nitta, Muneto

    2016-09-01

    Multilayered Josephson junctions are modeled in the context of a field theory, and dynamics of Josephson vortices trapped inside insulators are studied. Starting from a theory consisting of complex and real scalar fields coupled to a U(1) gauge field which admit parallel N -1 domain-wall solutions, Josephson couplings are introduced weakly between the complex scalar fields. The N -1 domain walls behave as insulators separating N superconductors, where one of the complex scalar fields has a gap. We construct the effective Lagrangian on the domain walls, which reduces to a coupled sine-Gordon model for well-separated walls and contains more interactions for walls at short distance. We then construct sine-Gordon solitons emerging in an effective theory in which we identify Josephson vortices carrying singly quantized magnetic fluxes. When two neighboring superconductors tend to have the same phase, the ground state does not change with the positions of domain walls (the width of superconductors). On the other hand, when two neighboring superconductors tend to have π -phase differences, the ground state has a phase transition depending on the positions of domain walls; when the two walls are close to each other (one superconductor is thin), frustration occurs because of the coupling between the two superconductors besides the thin superconductor. Focusing on the case of three superconductors separated by two insulators, we find for the former case that the interaction between two Josephson vortices on different insulators changes its nature, i.e., attractive or repulsive, depending on the positions of the domain walls. In the latter case, there emerges fractional Josephson vortices when two degenerate ground states appear due to spontaneous charge-symmetry breaking, and the number of the Josephson vortices varies with the position of the domain walls. Our predictions should be verified in multilayered Josephson junctions.

  8. Study on direct measurement method of vorticity from particle images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RUAN Xiaodong; FU Xin; YANG Huayong

    2007-01-01

    To overcome the shortcomings of conventional methods for vorticity measurement,a new direct measurement of vorticity (DMV) method extracting vorticity from particle images was proposed.Based on the theory of fluid flow,two matched particle patterns were extracted from particle images in the DMV method.The pattern vorticity was determined from the average angular displacement of rotation between the two matched particle patterns.The method was applied on standard particle images,and was compared with the second and third order central finite difference methods.Results show that the accuracy of DMV method is independent of the spatial resolution of the sampling,and the uncertainty errors in the velocity measurement are not propagated into the vorticity.The method is applicable for measuring vorticity of a stronger rotational flow.The time interval of image sampling should be shortened to increase the measurement ranges for higher shearing distortion flows.

  9. A Measure of Flow Vorticity with Helical Beams of Light

    CERN Document Server

    Rosales-Guzmán, Aniceto Belmonte Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    Vorticity describes the spinning motion of a fluid, i.e., the tendency to rotate, at every point in a flow. The interest in performing accurate and localized measurements of vorticity reflects the fact that many of the quantities that characterize the dynamics of fluids are intimately bound together in the vorticity field, being an efficient descriptor of the velocity statistics in many flow regimes. It describes the coherent structures and vortex interactions that are at the leading edge of laminar, transitional, and turbulent flows in nature. The measurement of vorticity is of paramount importance in many research fields as diverse as biology microfluidics, complex motions in the oceanic and atmospheric boundary layers, and wake turbulence on fluid aerodynamics. However, the precise measurement of flow vorticity is difficult. Here we put forward an optical sensing technique to obtain a direct measurement of vorticity in fluids using Laguerre-Gauss (LG) beams, optical beams which show an azimuthal phase vari...

  10. Strong swirl approximation and intensive vortices in the atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Klimenko, A Y

    2014-01-01

    This work investigates intensive vortices, which are characterised by the existence of a converging radial flow that significantly intensifies the flow rotation. Evolution and amplification of the vorticity present in the flow play important roles in the formation of the vortex. When rotation in the flow becomes sufficiently strong - and this implies validity of the strong swirl approximation developed by Einstein and Li (1951), Lewellen (1962), Turner (1966) and Lundgren (1985) - the analysis of Klimenko (2001a-c) and of the present work determine that further amplification of vorticity is moderated by interactions of vorticity and velocity. This imposes physical constraints on the flow resulting in the so-called compensating regime, where the radial distribution of the axial vorticity is characterised by the 4/3 and 3/2 power laws. This asymptotic treatment of a strong swirl is based on vorticity equations and involves higher order terms. This treatment incorporates multiscale analysis indicating downstream...

  11. Fluid-magnetic helicity in axisymmetric stationary relativistic magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, G.

    2017-10-01

    The present work is intended to gain a fruitful insight into the understanding of the formations of magneto-vortex configurations and their role in the physical processes of mutual exchange of energies associated with fluid's motion and the magnetic fields in an axisymmetric stationary hydromagnetic system subject to strong gravitational field (e.g., neutron star/magnetar). It is found that the vorticity flux vector field associated with vorticity 2-form is a linear combination of fluid's vorticity vector and of magnetic vorticity vector. The vorticity flux vector obeys Helmholtz's flux conservation. The energy equation associated with the vorticity flux vector field is deduced. It is shown that the mechanical rotation of vorticity flux surfaces contributes to the formation of vorticity flux vector field. The dynamo action for the generation of toroidal components of vorticity flux vector field is described in the presence of meridional circulations. It is shown that the stretching of twisting magnetic lines due to differential rotation leads to the breakdown of gravitational isorotation in the absence of meridional circulations. An explicit expression consists of rotation of vorticity flux surface, energy and angular momentum per baryon for the fluid-magnetic helicity current vector is obtained. The conservation of fluid-magnetic helicity is demonstrated. It is found that the fluid-magnetic helicity displays the energy spectrum arising due to the interaction between the mechanical rotation of vorticity flux surfaces and the fluid's motion obeying Euler's equations. The dissipation of a linear combination of modified fluid helicity and magnetic twist is shown to occur due to coupled effect of frame dragging and meridional circulation. It is found that the growing twist of magnetic lines causes the dissipation of modified fluid helicity in the absence of meridional circulations.

  12. Baroclinic Vortices in Rotating Stratified Shearing Flows: Cyclones, Anticyclones, and Zombie Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, Pedram

    Large coherent vortices are abundant in geophysical and astrophysical flows. They play significant roles in the Earth's oceans and atmosphere, the atmosphere of gas giants, such as Jupiter, and the protoplanetary disks around forming stars. These vortices are essentially three-dimensional (3D) and baroclinic, and their dynamics are strongly influenced by the rotation and density stratification of their environments. This work focuses on improving our understanding of the physics of 3D baroclinic vortices in rotating and continuously stratified flows using 3D spectral simulations of the Boussinesq equations, as well as simplified mathematical models. The first chapter discusses the big picture and summarizes the results of this work. In Chapter 2, we derive a relationship for the aspect ratio (i.e., vertical half-thickness over horizontal length scale) of steady and slowly-evolving baroclinic vortices in rotating stratified fluids. We show that the aspect ratio is a function of the Brunt-Vaisala frequencies within the vortex and outside the vortex, the Coriolis parameter, and the Rossby number of the vortex. This equation is basically the gradient-wind equation integrated over the vortex, and is significantly different from the previously proposed scaling laws that find the aspect ratio to be only a function of the properties of the background flow, and independent of the dynamics of the vortex. Our relation is valid for cyclones and anticyclones in either the cyclostrophic or geostrophic regimes; it works with vortices in Boussinesq fluids or ideal gases, and non-uniform background density gradient. The relation for the aspect ratio has many consequences for quasi-equilibrium vortices in rotating stratified flows. For example, cyclones must have interiors more stratified than the background flow (i.e., super-stratified), and weak anticyclones must have interiors less stratified than the background (i.e., sub-stratified). In addition, this equation is useful to

  13. Thick vortices in SU(2) lattice gauge theory

    OpenAIRE

    Cheluvaraja, Srinath

    2004-01-01

    Three dimensional SU(2) lattice gauge theory is studied after eliminating thin monopoles and the smallest thick monopoles. Kinematically this constraint allows the formation of thick vortex loops which produce Z(2) fluctuations at longer length scales. The thick vortex loops are identified in a three dimensional simulation. A condensate of thick vortices persists even after the thin vortices have all disappeared. The thick vortices decouple at a slightly lower temperature (higher beta) than t...

  14. SIMULATION OF AIRCRAFT CONDENSATION TRAILS AND WAKE VORTICES INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. O. Aubakirov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A technique of calculation of aircraft condensation trails (contrails and wake vortices interaction is described. The technique is based on a suitable for real-time applications mathematical model of far wake utilizes the method of discrete vortices. The technique is supplemented by account of the influence of axial velocities in the vortex nucleus on contrail and wake vortex location. Results of calculations of contrails and wake vortices interaction for Il-76 and B-747 aircraft are presented.

  15. Analysis of the Caudal Vortices Evolvement around Flapping Foil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhi-dong; Zhang Xiao-qing; Su Yu-min; Xu Yu-ru

    2005-01-01

    The viscous flow field around two-dimensional flapping (heaving and pitching) foils was numerically computed. The structural characteristics of caudal vortices were investigated and the contour curves at different phase angles were obtained.The relationships between the structural characteristics of the vortices and the force acting on the foil and between the widths of the caudal vortex street and of the caudal flow field were analyzed. A method to determine the shedding frequency of the vortices was proposed.

  16. A global MHD simulation study of the vortices at the magnetosphere boundary under the southward IMF condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, K.; Ogino, T.; Lee, D.; Walker, R. J.; Kim, K.

    2013-12-01

    One of the significant problems in magnetospheric physics concerns the nature and properties of the processes which occur at the magnetopause boundary; in particular how energy, momentum, and plasma the magnetosphere receives from the solar wind. Basic processes are magnetic reconnection [Dungey, 1961] and viscouslike interaction, such as Kelvin-Helmholtz instability [Dungey 1955, Miura, 1984] and pressure-pulse driven [Sibeck et al. 1989]. In generally, magnetic reconnection occurs efficiently when the IMF is southward and the rate is largest where the magnetosheath magnetic field is antiparallel to the geomagnetic field. [Sonnerup, 1974; Crooker, 1979; Luhmann et al., 1984; Park et al., 2006, 2009]. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is driven by the velocity shear at the boundary, which occur frequently when the IMF is northward. Also variation of the magnetic field and the plasma properties is reported to be quasi-periodic with 2-3min [Otto and Fairfield, 2000] and period of vortex train with 3 to 4 minutes by global MHD simulation [Ogino, 2011]. The pressure-pulse is driven by the solar wind. And the observations of the magnetospheric magnetic field response show quasi-periodic with a period of 8 minutes [Sibeck et al., 1989; Kivelson and Chen, 1995]. There have been few studies of the vortices in the magnetospheric boundary under southward IMF condition. However it is not easy to find the generation mechanism and characteristic for vortices in complicated 3-dimensional space. Thus we have performed global MHD simulation for the steady solar wind and southward IMF conditions. From the simulation results, we find that the vortex occurs at R= 11.7Re (IMF Bz = -2 nT) and R= 10.2Re (IMF Bz = -10 nT) in the dayside magnetopause boundary. Also the vortex rotates counterclockwise in duskside magnetopause (clockwise in dawnside) and propagates tailward. Across the vortex, magnetic field and plasma properties clearly show quasi-periodic fluctuations with a period of 8

  17. Effect of streamwise vortices on Tollmien-Schlichting waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    The method of multiple scales is used to determine a first-order uniform expansion for the effect of counter-rotating steady streamwise vortices in growing boundary layers on oblique Tollmien-Schlichting waves. The results show that such vortices have a strong tendency to amplify oblique Tollmien-Schlichting waves having a spanwise wavelength that is twice the wavelength of the vortices. An analytical expression is derived for the growth rates of these waves. These exponential growth rates increase linearly with increasing amplitudes of the vortices. Numerical results are presented. They suggest that this mechanism may dominate the instability.

  18. Vorticity, gyroscopic precession, and spin-curvature force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wei Chieh; Lee, Si Chen

    2013-02-01

    In investigating the relationship between vorticity and gyroscopic precession, we calculate the vorticity vector in Godel, Kerr, Lewis, Schwarzschild, and Minkowski metrics and find that the vorticity vector of the specific observers is the angular velocity of the gyroscopic precession. Furthermore, when space-time torsion is included, the vorticity and spin-curvature force change sign. This result is very similar to the behavior of the positive and negative helicities of quantum spin in the Stern-Gerlach force. It implies that the inclusion of torsion will lead to an analogous property of quantum spin even in classical treatment.

  19. Vorticity, Gyroscopic precession, and Spin-Curvature Force

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Wei Chieh

    2012-01-01

    In investigating the relation between vorticity and gyroscopic precession, we calculate the vorticity vector in Godel, Kerr, Lewis, Schwarzschild, Minkowski metric and find out the vorticity vector of the specific observers is the angular velocity of gyroscopic precession. Furthermore, considering space-time torsion will flip the vorticity and spin-curvature force to opposite sign. This result is very similar to the behavior of positive and negative helicity of quantum spin in Stern-Gerlach force. It implies that the inclusion of torsion will lead to analogous property of quantum spin even in classical treatment.

  20. On relation between scalar interfaces and vorticity in inviscid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, O. N.; Patwardhan, Saurabh

    2013-11-01

    A great variety of applications like pollutant mixing in the atmosphere, mixing of reactants in combustion highlight the importance of passive scalar dynamics in fluid flows. The other dynamically important variable in the study of fluid flow is the vorticity. Vorticity though, unlike a passive scalar, does affect the fluid motion. The dynamics of scalar (linear) and vorticity (non-linear) are governed by the equations which inherently have different characteristics. This paper addresses the question of the faithfulness of representation of vorticity by scalar marker and the motivation for this comes from the experiment of Head and Bandyopadhyay (1981) which showed the existence of coherent vortices by using smoke flow visualization in a turbulent boundary layer. We will show analytically in regions where the molecular diffusion effects are negligible, the vorticity and scalar gradients are orthogonal to each other. The iso- surface of scalar follows the vorticity in an inviscid situation. Also, we will demonstrate that in the case of unsteady burgers vortex and vortex shedding behind a finite circular cylinder, the scalar gradient is orthogonal to vorticity and inner product of vorticity and scalar gradients is zero in regions away from the wall.

  1. Dynamics of circular arrangements of vorticity in two dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Swaminathan, Rohith V; Perlekar, Prasad; Govindarajan, Rama

    2015-01-01

    The merger of two like-signed vortices is a well-studied problem, but in a turbulent flow, we may often have more than two like-signed vortices interacting. We study the merger of three or more identical co-rotating vortices initially arranged on the vertices of a regular polygon. At low to moderate Reynolds numbers, we find an additional stage in the merger process, absent in the merger of two vortices, where an annular vortical structure is formed and is long-lived. Vortex merger is slowed down significantly due to this. Such annular vortices are known at far higher Reynolds numbers in studies of tropical cyclones, which have been noticed to break down into individual vortices. In the pre-annular stage, vortical structures in a viscous flow tilt and realign in a manner similar to the inviscid case, but the pronounced filaments visible in the latter are practically absent in the former. Five or fewer vortices initially elongate radially, and then reorient their long axis closer to the azimuthal direction so ...

  2. Vortices in Ionization Collisions by Positron Impact

    CERN Document Server

    Navarrete, F; Fiol, J; Barrachina, R O

    2013-01-01

    The presence of vortices in the ionisation of hydrogen atoms by positrons at intermediate impact energies is investigated. The present findings show that a previously reported minima in the fully-differential cross section is the signature of a vortex in the continuum positron-electron-proton system. The behaviour of the real and imaginary parts of the complex-valued transition matrix is studied in order to determine and characterize the vortex in momentum space. The obtained information is translated to fully-differential ionisation cross sections, feasible of being measured with currently available techniques.

  3. Internal waves and vortices in satellite images

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Some recent papers proposed the use of the satellite images of Google Earth in teaching physics, in particular to see some behaviours of waves. Reflection, refraction, diffraction and interference are easy to be found in these satellite maps. Besides Google Earth, other sites exist, such as Earth Observatory or Earth Snapshot, suitable for illustrating the large-scale phenomena in atmosphere and oceans In this paper, we will see some examples for teaching surface and internal sea waves, and internal waves and the K\\'arm\\'an vortices in the atmosphere. Aim of this proposal is attracting the interest of students of engineering schools to the physics of waves.

  4. A splitting-free vorticity redistribution method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhart, M.; Obi, S.

    2017-02-01

    We present a splitting-free variant of the vorticity redistribution method. Spatial consistency and stability when combined with a time-stepping scheme are proven. We propose a new strategy preventing excessive growth in the number of particles while retaining the order of consistency. The novel concept of small neighbourhoods significantly reduces the method's computational cost. In numerical experiments the method showed second order convergence, one order higher than predicted by the analysis. Compared to the fast multipole code used in the velocity computation, the method is about three times faster.

  5. Field theoretical model of multi-layered Josephson junction and dynamics of Josephson vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Fujimori, Toshiaki; Nitta, Muneto

    2016-01-01

    Multi-layered Josephson junctions are modeled in the context of a field theory, and dynamics of Josephson vortices trapped inside insulators are studied. Starting from a theory consisting of complex and real scalar fields coupled to a U(1) gauge field which admit parallel $N-1$ domain-wall solutions, Josephson couplings are introduced weakly between the complex scalar fields. The $N-1$ domain walls behave as insulators separating $N$ superconductors. We construct the effective Lagrangian on the domain walls, which reduces to a coupled sine-Gordon model for well-separated walls and contains more interactions for walls at short distance. We then construct sine-Gordon solitons emerging in the effective theory that we identify Josephson vortices carrying singly quantized magnetic fluxes. When two neighboring superconductors tend to have the same phase, the ground state does not change with the positions of domain walls. On the other hand, when two neighboring superconductors tend to have the $\\pi$ phase differenc...

  6. Two-dimensional Hybrid Simulations of Kinetic Plasma Turbulence: Current and Vorticity vs Proton Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Franci, Luca; Matteini, Lorenzo; Verdini, Andrea; Landi, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Proton temperature anisotropies between the directions parallel and perpendicular to the mean magnetic field are usually observed in the solar wind plasma. Here, we employ a high-resolution hybrid particle-in-cell simulation in order to investigate the relation between spatial properties of the proton temperature and the peaks in the current density and in the flow vorticity. Our results indicate that, although regions where the proton temperature is enhanced and temperature anisotropies are larger correspond approximately to regions where many thin current sheets form, no firm quantitative evidence supports the idea of a direct causality between the two phenomena. On the other hand, quite a clear correlation between the behavior of the proton temperature and the out-of-plane vorticity is obtained.

  7. Vortices in stratified protoplanetary disks : from baroclinic instability to vortex layers

    CERN Document Server

    Richard, S; Dizes, S Le

    2016-01-01

    Large scale vortices could play a key role in the evolution of protoplanetary disks, particularly in the dead-zone where no turbulence associated with magnetic field is expected. Their possible formation by the subcritical baroclinic instability is a complex issue due to the vertical structure of the disk and to the elliptical instability.} {In two-dimensional disks the baroclinic instability is studied as a function of the thermal transfer efficiency. In three-dimensional disks we explore the importance of radial and vertical stratification on the processes of vortex formation and amplification.} {Numerical simulations are performed using a fully compressible hydrodynamical code based on a second order finite volume method. We assume a perfect gas law in inviscid disk models in which heat transfer is due to either relaxation or diffusion.} {In 2D, the baroclinic instability with thermal relaxation leads to the formation of large-scale vortices, which are unstable with respect to the elliptic instability. In ...

  8. Dynamics of Quantized Vortices Before Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andryushchenko, V. A.; Kondaurova, L. P.; Nemirovskii, S. K.

    2016-12-01

    The main goal of this paper is to investigate numerically the dynamics of quantized vortex loops, just before the reconnection at finite temperature, when mutual friction essentially changes the evolution of lines. Modeling is performed on the base of vortex filament method using the full Biot-Savart equation. It was discovered that the initial position of vortices and the temperature strongly affect the dependence on time of the minimum distance δ (t) between tips of two vortex loops. In particular, in some cases, the shrinking and collapse of vortex loops due to mutual friction occur earlier than the reconnection, thereby canceling the latter. However, this relationship takes a universal square-root form δ ( t) =√{( κ /2π ) ( t_{*}-t) } at distances smaller than the distances, satisfying the Schwarz reconnection criterion, when the nonlocal contribution to the Biot-Savart equation becomes about equal to the local contribution. In the "universal" stage, the nearest parts of vortices form a pyramid-like structure with angles which neither depend on the initial configuration nor on temperature.

  9. Motion Equation of Vorticity for Newton Fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Jianhua, X

    2005-01-01

    The vorticity plays an important role in aerodynamics and rotational flow. Usually, they are studied with modified Navier-Stokes equation. This research will deduce the motion equation of vorticity from Navier-Stokes equation. To this propose, the velocity gradient field is decomposed as the stack of non-rotation field and pure-rotation field. By introducing the Chen S+R decomposition, the rotational flow is redefined. For elastic fluid, the research shows that for Newton fluid, the local average rotation always produces an additional pressure on the rotation plane. This item is deterministic rather than stochastic (as Reynolds stress) or adjustable. For non-elastic fluid, such as air, the research shows that the rotation will produce an additional stress along the rotation axis direction, that is on the normal direction of rotation plane. This result can be used to explain the lift force connected with vortex. The main purpose of this research is to supply a solvable mathematical model for the calculation of...

  10. Quantum vortices and trajectories in particle diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Delis, N; Contopoulos, G

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the phenomenon of the diffraction of charged particles by thin material targets using the method of the de Broglie-Bohm quantum trajectories. The particle wave function can be modeled as a sum of two terms $\\psi=\\psi_{ingoing}+\\psi_{outgoing}$. A thin separator exists between the domains of prevalence of the ingoing and outgoing wavefunction terms. The structure of the quantum-mechanical currents in the neighborhood of the separator implies the formation of an array of \\emph{quantum vortices}. The flow structure around each vortex displays a characteristic pattern called `nodal point - X point complex'. The X point gives rise to stable and unstable manifolds. We find the scaling laws characterizing a nodal point-X point complex by a local perturbation theory around the nodal point. We then analyze the dynamical role of vortices in the emergence of the diffraction pattern. In particular, we demonstrate the abrupt deflections, along the direction of the unstable manifold, of the quantum trajector...

  11. Downstream Evolution of Longitudinal Embedded Vortices with Helical Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velte, Clara Marika; Okulov, Valery; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver

    2009-01-01

    In the present work the downstream development of device induced vortices with helical symmetry embedded in wall bounded flow on a bump is studied with the aid of Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV). The downstream evolution of characteristic parameters of helical vortices is studied...

  12. Decay or collapse: Aircraft wake vortices in grid turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, M.; Elsenaar, A.; Heijst, van G.J.F.; Kuczaj, A.K.; Geurts, B.J.

    2006-01-01

    Trailing vortices are naturally shed by airplanes and they typically evolve into a counter-rotating vortex pair. Downstream of the aircraft, these vortices can persist for a very long time and extend for several kilometers. This poses a potential hazard to following aircraft, particularly during tak

  13. A phase analysis of vorticity vectors associated with tropical convection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Xiao-Peng

    2008-01-01

    Three new vorticity vectors have been proposed by Gao et al to study the two-dimensional tropical convection. In the present paper, phase relations between surface rain rate and the vorticity vectors are analysed with the calculations of lag correlation coefficients based on hourly zonally-averaged mass-integrated cloud-resolving simulation data. The cloud-resolving model is integrated with the vertical velocity, zonal wind, horizontal thermal and moisture advections, and sea surface temperature observed and derived from tropical ocean global atmosphere - coupled ocean atmosphere response experiment (TOGA-COARE) for 10 days. Maximum local increase of the vertical component of the convective vorticity vector leads maximum surface rain rate by 2 hours mainly due to the interaction between vorticity and zonal gradient of ice heating. While maximum local increase of the vertical component of the moist vorticity vector leads maximum surface rain rate by 2 hours mainly because of the interaction between zonal specific humidity gradient and zonal buoyancy gradient. And the maximum local decrease of the zonal component of the dynamic vorticity vector leads maximum surface rain rate by 2 hours mainly due to the interactions between vorticity and vertical pressure gradient as well as vorticity and buoyancy.

  14. Vorticity amplification near the stagnation point of landing gear wheels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltham, G.; Ekmekci, A.

    2014-04-01

    The vicinity near the forward stagnation point of landing-gear wheels has been found to support a mechanism for oncoming streams of weak vorticity to collect, grow, and amplify into discrete large-scale vortical structures that then shed with a distinct periodicity. To the authors' knowledge, such a flow phenomenon has never been reported before for landing gear wheels, which are in essence finite (three-dimensional) cylinders. To gain further insight into this phenomenon, a detailed experimental study has been undertaken employing the hydrogen bubble visualization and Particle Image Velocimetry techniques. A very thin platinum wire, similar to those used in hydrogen bubble visualization applications, was placed upstream of the wheel model to produce two streams of weak vorticity (with opposite sign) that convected toward the model. As the vorticity streams enter the stagnation region of the wheels, significant flow deceleration and vorticity stretching act to collect, grow, and amplify the incoming vorticity streams into large-scale vortical structures. Experiments were performed at a fixed Reynolds number, with a value of 32 500 when defined based on the diameter of the wheel and a value of 21 based on the diameter of the vorticity-generating upstream wire. First, to establish a baseline, the natural flow field (without the presence of an upstream wire) was characterized, where experimentally determined values for the stagnation boundary-layer thickness and the velocity profile along the stagnation streamline were both found to agree with the values provided in the literature for two-dimensional cylinders. Subsequently, the dynamics of vorticity collection, growth, amplification, and shedding were studied. The size, stand-off distance and the shedding frequency of the vortical structures forming near the stagnation region were all found to strongly depend on the impingement location of the inbound vorticity on the wheel. A simple relationship between the non

  15. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    by B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet operation was very satisfactory till the technical stop at the end of the year 2010. The field was ramped down on 5th December 2010, following the successful regeneration test of the turbine filters at full field on 3rd December 2010. This will limit in the future the quantity of magnet cycles, as it is no longer necessary to ramp down the magnet for this type of intervention. This is made possible by the use of the spare liquid Helium volume to cool the magnet while turbines 1 and 2 are stopped, leaving only the third turbine in operation. This obviously requires full availability of the operators to supervise the operation, as it is not automated. The cryogenics was stopped on 6th December 2010 and the magnet was left without cooling until 18th January 2011, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The maintenance of the vacuum pumping was done immediately after the magnet stop, when the magnet was still at very low temperature. Only the vacuum pumping of the ma...

  16. Generation of speckle vortices by Archimedes' spiral micro-holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haibin; Liu, Tingting; Chen, Jun; Sun, Ping

    2016-10-01

    Speckle plays an important role in the optical field. Optical vortices which exist in random speckle fields usually contain useful phase information. The distribution of speckle field is determined by these optical vortices. In order to study speckle vortices quantitatively, we established a micro-holes array model based on the law of Archimedes' spiral arrangement. Speckle vortices can be generated by the random diffuse reflection points (spiral micro-holes). In the experiments, the gray image of Archimedes' spiral micro-holes are displayed on the screen of liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM), and the output optical field is captured by a CCD camera. The numerical simulations and experimental results show that the model can be used to generate speckle vortices.

  17. Generation of Optical Vortices by Linear Phase Ramps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Vyas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Generation of optical vortices using linear phase ramps is experimentally demonstrated. When two regions of a wavefront have opposite phase gradients then along the line of phase discontinuity vortices can be generated. It is shown that vortices can evolve during propagation even with the unequal magnitude of tilt in the two regions of the wavefront. The number of vortices and their location depend upon the magnitude of tilt. vortex generation is experimentally realized by encoding phase mask on spatial light modulator and their presence is detected interferometrically. Numerical simulation has been performed to calculate the diffracted intensity distribution from the phase mask, and presence of vortices in the diffracted field is detected by computational techniques.

  18. Nanoscale assembly of superconducting vortices with scanning tunnelling microscope tip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jun-Yi; Gladilin, Vladimir N.; Tempere, Jacques; Xue, Cun; Devreese, Jozef T.; van de Vondel, Joris; Zhou, Youhe; Moshchalkov, Victor V.

    2016-12-01

    Vortices play a crucial role in determining the properties of superconductors as well as their applications. Therefore, characterization and manipulation of vortices, especially at the single-vortex level, is of great importance. Among many techniques to study single vortices, scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) stands out as a powerful tool, due to its ability to detect the local electronic states and high spatial resolution. However, local control of superconductivity as well as the manipulation of individual vortices with the STM tip is still lacking. Here we report a new function of the STM, namely to control the local pinning in a superconductor through the heating effect. Such effect allows us to quench the superconducting state at nanoscale, and leads to the growth of vortex clusters whose size can be controlled by the bias voltage. We also demonstrate the use of an STM tip to assemble single-quantum vortices into desired nanoscale configurations.

  19. Decay of high order optical vortices in anisotropic nonlinear optical media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mamaev, A.V.; Saffman, M.; Zozulya, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical study of the decay of high order optical vortices in media with an anisotropic nonlocal nonlinearity. Vortices with charge n decay into an aligned array of n vortices of unit charge.......We present an experimental and theoretical study of the decay of high order optical vortices in media with an anisotropic nonlocal nonlinearity. Vortices with charge n decay into an aligned array of n vortices of unit charge....

  20. Large-deviation statistics of vorticity stretching in isotropic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Perry L; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-03-01

    A key feature of three-dimensional fluid turbulence is the stretching and realignment of vorticity by the action of the strain rate. It is shown in this paper, using the cumulant-generating function, that the cumulative vorticity stretching along a Lagrangian path in isotropic turbulence obeys a large deviation principle. As a result, the relevant statistics can be described by the vorticity stretching Cramér function. This function is computed from a direct numerical simulation data set at a Taylor-scale Reynolds number of Re(λ)=433 and compared to those of the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE) for material deformation. As expected, the mean cumulative vorticity stretching is slightly less than that of the most-stretched material line (largest FTLE), due to the vorticity's preferential alignment with the second-largest eigenvalue of strain rate and the material line's preferential alignment with the largest eigenvalue. However, the vorticity stretching tends to be significantly larger than the second-largest FTLE, and the Cramér functions reveal that the statistics of vorticity stretching fluctuations are more similar to those of the largest FTLE. In an attempt to relate the vorticity stretching statistics to the vorticity magnitude probability density function in statistically stationary conditions, a model Kramers-Moyal equation is constructed using the statistics encoded in the Cramér function. The model predicts a stretched-exponential tail for the vorticity magnitude probability density function, with good agreement for the exponent but significant difference (35%) in the prefactor.

  1. Non-Abelian vortices with an Aharonov-Bohm effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evslin, Jarah [TPCSF, IHEP, Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing (China); Theoretical physics division, IHEP, Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing (China); Konishi, Kenichi [Department of Physics “Enrico Fermi”, University of Pisa,Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127, Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Pisa,Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127, Pisa (Italy); Nitta, Muneto [Department of Physics, and Research and Education Center for Natural Sciences, Keio University,4-1-1 Hiyoshi, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan); Ohashi, Keisuke [Department of Physics, Osaka City University,Osaka (Japan); Vinci, Walter [London Centre for Nanotechnology and Computer Science, University College London,17-19 Gordon Street, London, WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-16

    The interplay of gauge dynamics and flavor symmetries often leads to remarkably subtle phenomena in the presence of soliton configurations. Non-Abelian vortices — vortex solutions with continuous internal orientational moduli — provide an example. Here we study the effect of weakly gauging a U(1){sub R} subgroup of the flavor symmetry on such BPS vortex solutions. Our prototypical setting consists of an SU(2)×U(1) gauge theory with N{sub f}=2 sets of fundamental scalars that break the gauge symmetry to an “electromagnetic' U(1). The weak U(1){sub R} gauging converts the well-known CP{sup 1} orientation modulus |B| of the non-Abelian vortex into a parameter characterizing the strength of the magnetic field that is responsible for the Aharonov-Bohm effect. As the phase of B remains a genuine zero mode while the electromagnetic gauge symmetry is Higgsed in the interior of the vortex, these solutions are superconducting strings.

  2. Dipole vortices in the Great Australian Bight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cresswell, George R.; Lund-Hansen, Lars C.; Nielsen, Morten Holtegaard

    2015-01-01

    Shipboard measurements from late 2006 made by the Danish Galathea 3 Expedition and satellite sea surface temperature images revealed a chain of cool and warm mushroom' dipole vortices that mixed warm, salty, oxygen-poor waters on and near the continental shelf of the Great Australian Bight (GAB......) with cooler, fresher, oxygen-rich waters offshore. The alternating jets' flowing into the mushrooms were directed mainly northwards and southwards and differed in temperature by only 1.5 degrees C; however, the salinity difference was as much as 0.5, and therefore quite large. The GAB waters were slightly...... denser than the cooler offshore waters. The field of dipoles evolved and distorted, but appeared to drift westwards at 5km day-1 over two weeks, and one new mushroom carried GAB water southwards at 7km day(-1). Other features encountered between Cape Leeuwin and Tasmania included the Leeuwin Current...

  3. Gradient evolution for potential vorticity flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Balasuriya

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional unsteady incompressible flows in which the potential vorticity (PV plays a key role are examined in this study, through the development of the evolution equation for the PV gradient. For the case where the PV is conserved, precise statements concerning topology-conservation are presented. While establishing some intuitively well-known results (the numbers of eddies and saddles is conserved, other less obvious consequences (PV patches cannot be generated, some types of Lagrangian and Eulerian entities are equivalent are obtained. This approach enables an improvement on an integrability result for PV conserving flows (if there were no PV patches at time zero, the flow would be integrable. The evolution of the PV gradient is also determined for the nonconservative case, and a plausible experiment for estimating eddy diffusivity is suggested. The theory is applied to an analytical diffusive Rossby wave example.

  4. Analytical BPS Maxwell-Higgs vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Casana, R; da Hora, E; Santos, C dos

    2014-01-01

    We have established a prescription for the calculation of analytical vortex solutions in the context of generalized Maxwell-Higgs models whose overall dynamics is controlled by two positive functions of the scalar field. We have also determined a natural constraint between these functions and the Higgs potential allowing the existence of axially symmetric Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) solutions possessing finite energy. Furthermore, when the generalizing functions are chosen suitably, the nonstandard BPS equations can be solved exactly. We have studied some examples, comparing them with the usual Abrikosov-Nielsen-Olesen (ANO) solution. The overall conclusion is that the analytical self-dual vortices are well-behaved in all relevant sectors, strongly supporting the generalized models they belong themselves. In particular, our results mimic well-known properties of the usual (numerical) configurations, as localized energy density, while contributing to the understanding of topological solitons and their...

  5. Instantons and vortices on noncommutative toric varieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirio, Lucio S.; Landi, Giovanni; Szabo, Richard J.

    2014-09-01

    We elaborate on the quantization of toric varieties by combining techniques from toric geometry, isospectral deformations and noncommutative geometry in braided monoidal categories, and the construction of instantons thereon by combining methods from noncommutative algebraic geometry and a quantized twistor theory. We classify the real structures on a toric noncommutative deformation of the Klein quadric and use this to derive a new noncommutative four-sphere which is the unique deformation compatible with the noncommutative twistor correspondence. We extend the computation of equivariant instanton partition functions to noncommutative gauge theories with both adjoint and fundamental matter fields, finding agreement with the classical results in all instances. We construct moduli spaces of noncommutative vortices from the moduli of invariant instantons, and derive corresponding equivariant partition functions which also agree with those of the classical limit.

  6. Vorticity Fluctuations in Plane Couette Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz de Zarate, Jose; Sengers, Jan V.

    2010-11-01

    In this presentation we evaluate the flow-induced amplification of the thermal noise in plane Couette configuration. The physical origin of the noise is the random nature of molecular collisions, that contribute with a stochastic component to the stress tensor (Landau's fluctuating hydrodynamics). This intrinsic stochastic forcing is then amplified by the mode- coupling mechanisms associated to shear flow. In a linear approximation, noise amplification can be studied by solving stochastic Orr-Sommerfeld and Squire equations. We compare the efficiency of the different mechanisms, being the most important the direct coupling between Squire and Orr-Sommerfed equations. The main effect is to amplify wall-normal vorticity fluctuations with an spanwise modulation at wave number around 1.5, a configuration that resembles the streaks that have been proposed as precursors of the flow instability.

  7. How strong are the Rossby vortices?

    CERN Document Server

    Meheut, H; Lai, D

    2013-01-01

    The Rossby wave instability, associated with density bumps in differentially rotating discs, may arise in several different astrophysical contexts, such as galactic or protoplanetary discs. While the linear phase of the instability has been well studied, the nonlinear evolution and especially the saturation phase remain poorly understood. In this paper, we test the non-linear saturation mechanism analogous to that derived for wave-particle interaction in plasma physics. To this end we perform global numerical simulations of the evolution of the instability in a two-dimensional disc. We confirm the physical mechanism for the instability saturation and show that the maximum amplitude of vorticity can be estimated as twice the linear growth rate of the instability. We provide an empirical fitting formula for this growth rate for various parameters of the density bump. We also investigate the effects of the azimuthal mode number of the instability and the energy leakage in the spiral density waves. Finally, we sh...

  8. Non-Abelian Chern-Simons Vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Lozano, G S; Moreno, E F; Schaposnik, F A

    2007-01-01

    We consider the bosonic sector of a ${\\cal N} = 2$ supersymmetric Chern-Simons-Higgs theory in 2 + 1 dimensions. The gauge group is $U(1)\\times SU(N)$ and has $N_f$ flavors of fundamental matter fields. The model supports non-Abelian (axially symmetric) vortices when $N_f \\geq N$, which have internal (orientational) moduli. When $N_f > N$, the solutions acquire additional collective coordinates parameterizing their transverse size. We solve the BPS equations numerically and obtain local ($N_f = N$) and semi-local ($N_f > N$) string solutions. A $CP^{N-1}$ low-energy effective action for the orientational moduli is obtained in both cases. In the semilocal case there is an additional term in the effective action induced by the transverse size moduli. We find such term in the limit of large transverse size, where exact solutions can be obtained analytically.

  9. Vortices and hysteresis in a rotating Bose-Einstein condensate with anharmonic confinement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, A.D.; Kavoulakis, G.M.

    2004-01-01

    Vortices; Bose-Einstein condensation; phase diagrams; phase transformation Udgivelsesdato: 4 August......Vortices; Bose-Einstein condensation; phase diagrams; phase transformation Udgivelsesdato: 4 August...

  10. Computational simulations of vorticity enhanced diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vold, Erik L.

    1999-11-01

    Computer simulations are used to investigate a phenomenon of vorticity enhanced diffusion (VED), a net transport and mixing of a passive scalar across a prescribed vortex flow field driven by a background gradient in the scalar quantity. The central issue under study here is the increase in scalar flux down the gradient and across the vortex field. The numerical scheme uses cylindrical coordinates centered with the vortex flow which allows an exact advective solution and 1D or 2D diffusion using simple numerical methods. In the results, the ratio of transport across a localized vortex region in the presence of the vortex flow over that expected for diffusion alone is evaluated as a measure of VED. This ratio is seen to increase dramatically while the absolute flux across the vortex decreases slowly as the diffusion coefficient is decreased. Similar results are found and compared for varying diffusion coefficient, D, or vortex rotation time, τv, for a constant background gradient in the transported scalar vs an interface in the transported quantity, and for vortex flow fields constant in time vs flow which evolves in time from an initial state and with a Schmidt number of order unity. A simple analysis shows that for a small diffusion coefficient, the flux ratio measure of VED scales as the vortex radius over the thickness for mass diffusion in a viscous shear layer within the vortex characterized by (Dτv)1/2. The phenomenon is linear as investigated here and suggests that a significant enhancement of mixing in fluids may be a relatively simple linear process. Discussion touches on how this vorticity enhanced diffusion may be related to mixing in nonlinear turbulent flows.

  11. Dynamics of Giant Planet Polar Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueshaber, Shawn R.; Sayanagi, Kunio M.

    2016-10-01

    The polar atmospheres of the giant planets have come under increasing interest since a compact, warm-core, stable, cyclonic polar vortex was discovered at each of Saturn's poles. In addition, the south pole of Neptune appears to have a similar feature, and Uranus' north pole is exhibiting activity that could indicate the formation of a polar vortex. We investigate the formation and maintenance of these giant planet polar vortices by varying several key atmospheric dynamics parameters in a forced-dissipative, 1.5-layer shallow water model. Our simulations are run using the EPIC (Explicit Planetary Isentropic Coordinate) global circulation model, to which we have added a gamma-plane rectangular grid option appropriate for simulating polar atmospheric dynamics.In our numerical simulations, we vary the atmospheric deformation radius, planetary rotation rate, storm forcing intensity, and storm vorticity (cyclone-to-anticyclone) ratio to determine what combination of values favors the formation of a polar vortex. We find that forcing the atmosphere by injecting small-scale mass perturbations ("storms") to form either all cyclones, all anticyclones, or equal numbers of both, may all result in a cyclonic polar vortex. Additionally, we examine the role of eddy momentum convergence in the intensification and maintenance of a polar cyclone.Our simulation results are applicable to understanding all four of the solar system giant planets. In the future, we plan to expand our modeling effort with a more realistic 3D primitive equations model, also with a gamma-plane rectangular grid using EPIC. With our 3D primitive equations model, we will study how various vertical atmospheric stratification structures influence the formation and maintenance of a polar cyclone. While our shallow-water model only involves storms of a single layer, a 3D primitive equations model allows us to study how storms of finite vertical extent and at differing levels in the atmosphere may further favor

  12. Three-dimensional flow and vorticity transport in idealized airway model from laminar to turbulent regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalal, Sahar; van de Moortele, Tristan; Nemes, Andras; Eslam Panah, Azar; Coletti, Filippo

    2015-11-01

    The presence and intensity of secondary flows formed by the inhaled air during respiration has important consequences for gas exchange and particle transport in the lungs. Here we focus on the formation and persistence of such secondary flows by experimentally studying the steady inspiration in an idealized airway model. The geometry consists of a symmetric planar double bifurcation that respects the geometrical proportions of the human bronchial tree. Physiologically relevant Reynolds numbers from 100 to 5000 are investigated, ranging from laminar to turbulent regimes. The time-averaged, three-dimensional velocity fields are obtained from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), providing detailed distributions of vorticity, circulation, and secondary flow strength. Information on the velocity fluctuations are obtained by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The measurements highlight the effect of the Reynolds number on the momentum transport, flow partitioning at the bifurcations, strength and sense of rotation of the longitudinal vortices. A marked change in topology is found at a specific Reynolds number, above which the influence of the upstream flow prevails over the effect of the local geometry. Finally, turbulence and its role in the mean vorticity transport are also discussed.

  13. Open issues in confinement, for the lattice and for center vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Cornwall, John M

    2009-01-01

    Topological confinement by center vortices does not immediately explain either a minimum-area law for non-planar Wilson loops or the L\\"uscher term. I conjecture that both a minimal-area law and a L\\"uscher term arise in a confinement model of random ensembles of vortices with no propagating gluons (a polymer model), and propose their test by polymer-like lattice simulations. I also consider the role of dynamically-massive gluons propagating from one point to another on a Wilson loop, and conjecture an approximate duality between the gluon-chain model and a condensate of center vortices with nexuses (magnetic monopoles) propagating on the vortex surfaces. I explore the old fishnet model, updated to deal with propagating massive QCD gluons, and argue that it leads to a surface tension and therefore a L\\"uscher term, as expressed through an effective action of the Dirichlet form that describes tension. I propose various lattice studies of non-planar Wilson loops to investigate such issues. Finally, in a differe...

  14. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet was energised at the beginning of March 2012 at a low current to check all the MSS safety chains. Then the magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T on 6 March 2012. Unfortunately two days later an unintentional switch OFF of the power converter caused a slow dump. This was due to a misunderstanding of the CCC (CERN Control Centre) concerning the procedure to apply for the CMS converter control according to the beam-mode status at that time. Following this event, the third one since 2009, a discussion was initiated to define possible improvement, not only on software and procedures in the CCC, but also to evaluate the possibility to upgrade the CMS hardware to prevent such discharge from occurring because of incorrect procedure implementations. The magnet operation itself was smooth, and no power cuts took place. As a result, the number of magnetic cycles was reduced to the minimum, with only two full magnetic cycles from 0 T to 3.8 T. Nevertheless the magnet suffered four stops of the cryogeni...

  15. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    Operation of the magnet has gone quite smoothly during the first half of this year. The magnet has been at 4.5K for the full period since January. There was an unplanned short stop due to the CERN-wide power outage on May 28th, which caused a slow dump of the magnet. Since this occurred just before a planned technical stop of the LHC, during which access in the experimental cavern was authorized, it was decided to leave the magnet OFF until 2nd June, when magnet was ramped up again to 3.8T. The magnet system experienced a fault also resulting in a slow dump on April 14th. This was triggered by a thermostat on a filter choke in the 20kA DC power converter. The threshold of this thermostat is 65°C. However, no variation in the water-cooling flow rate or temperature was observed. Vibration may have been the root cause of the fault. All the thermostats have been checked, together with the cables, connectors and the read out card. The tightening of the inductance fixations has also been checked. More tem...

  16. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      Following the unexpected magnet stops last August due to sequences of unfortunate events on the services and cryogenics [see CMS internal report], a few more events and initiatives again disrupted the magnet operation. All the magnet parameters stayed at their nominal values during this period without any fault or alarm on the magnet control and safety systems. The magnet was stopped for the September technical stop to allow interventions in the experimental cavern on the detector services. On 1 October, to prepare the transfer of the liquid nitrogen tank on its new location, several control cables had to be removed. One cable was cut mistakenly, causing a digital input card to switch off, resulting in a cold-box (CB) stop. This tank is used for the pre-cooling of the magnet from room temperature down to 80 K, and for this reason it is controlled through the cryogenics control system. Since the connection of the CB was only allowed for a field below 2 T to avoid the risk of triggering a fast d...

  17. Coherence vortices of partially coherent beams in the far field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Pu-Sheng; Lü Bai-da

    2007-01-01

    Based on the propagation law of cross-spectral density function, studied in this paper are the coherence vortices of partially coherent, quasi-monochromatic singular beams with Gaussian envelope and Schell-model correlator in the far field, where our main attention is paid to the evolution of far-field coherence vortices into intensity vortices of fully coherent beams. The results show that, although there are usually no zeros of intensity in partially coherent beams with Gaussian envelope and Schell-model correlator, zeros of spectral degree of coherence exist. The coherence vortices of spectral degree of coherence depend on the relative coherence length, mode index and positions of pairs of points.If a point and mode index are kept fixed, the position of coherence vortices changes with the increase of the relative coherence length. For the low coherent case there is a circular phase dislocation. In the coherent limit coherence vortices become intensity vortices of fully coherent Laguerre-Gaussian beams.

  18. Vortices and quasiparticles near the superconductor-insulator transition in thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galitski, Victor M; Refael, G; Fisher, Matthew P A; Senthil, T

    2005-08-12

    We study the low temperature behavior of an amorphous superconducting film driven normal by a perpendicular magnetic-field (B). For this purpose we introduce a new two-fluid formulation consisting of fermionized field-induced vortices and electrically neutralized Bogoliubov quasiparticles (spinons) interacting via a long-ranged statistical interaction. This approach allows us to access a novel non-Fermi-liquid phase, which naturally interpolates between the low B superconductor and the high B normal metal. We discuss the properties of the resulting "vortex metal" phase.

  19. Evolution of spiral wave and pattern formation in a vortical polarized electric field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Jun; Yi Ming; Li Bing-Wei; Li Yan-Long

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the evolution of the pattern transition induced by the vortical electric field (VEF) is investigated. Firstly, a scheme is suggested to generate the VEF by changing the spatial magnetic field. Secondly, the VEF is imposed on the whole medium, and the evolutions of the spiral wave and the spatiotemporal chaos are investigated by using the numerical simulation. The result confirms that the drift and the breakup of the spiral wave and the new net-like pattern are observed when different polarized fields are imposed on the whole medium respectively. Finally, the pattern transition induced by the polarized field is discussed theoretically.

  20. On the link between martian total ozone and potential vorticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, James A.; Lewis, Stephen R.; Patel, Manish R.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that total ozone in the martian atmosphere is highly correlated with the dynamical tracer, potential vorticity, under certain conditions. The degree of correlation is investigated using a Mars global circulation model including a photochemical model. Potential vorticity is the quantity of choice to explore the dynamical nature of polar vortices because it contains information on winds and temperature in a single scalar variable. The correlation is found to display a distinct seasonal variation, with a strong positive correlation in both northern and southern winter at poleward latitudes in the northern and southern hemisphere respectively. The identified strong correlation implies variations in polar total ozone during winter are predominantly controlled by dynamical processes in these spatio-temporal regions. The weak correlation in northern and southern summer is due to the dominance of photochemical reactions resulting from extended exposure to sunlight. The total ozone/potential vorticity correlation is slightly weaker in southern winter due to topographical variations and the preference for ozone to accumulate in Hellas basin. In northern winter, total ozone can be used to track the polar vortex edge. The ozone/potential vorticity ratio is calculated for both northern and southern winter on Mars for the first time. Using the strong correlation in total ozone and potential vorticity in northern winter inside the polar vortex, it is shown that potential vorticity can be used as a proxy to deduce the distribution of total ozone where satellites cannot observe for the majority of northern winter. Where total ozone observations are available on the fringes of northern winter at poleward latitudes, the strong relationship of total ozone and potential vorticity implies that total ozone anomalies in the surf zone of the northern polar vortex can potentially be used to determine the origin of potential vorticity filaments.

  1. Heat transfer enhancement using tip and junction vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Mark Cecil

    1998-10-01

    Single-phase convective heat transfer can be enhanced by modifying the heat transfer surface to passively generate streamwise vortices. The swirling flow of the vortices modifies the temperature field, thinning the thermal boundary layer and increasing surface convection. Tip vortices generated by delta wings and junction vortices generated by hemispherical protuberances were studied in laminar flat-plate and developing channel flows. Local and average convective measurements were obtained, and the structure of the vortices was studied using quantitative flow visualization and vortex strength measurements. The pressure drop penalty associated with the heat transfer enhancement was also investigated. Tip vortices generated by delta wings enhanced local convection by as much as 300% over a flat-plate boundary layer flow. Vortex strength increased with Reynolds number based on chord length, wing aspect ratio, and wing angle of attack. As the vortices were advected downstream, they decayed because of viscous interactions. In the developing channel flow, tip vortices produced a significant local heat transfer enhancement on both sides of the channel. The largest spatially averaged heat transfer enhancement was 55%; it was accompanied by a 100% increase in the pressure drop relative to the same channel flow with no delta-wing vortex generator. Junction vortices created by hemispherical surface protuberances provided local heat transfer enhancements as large as 250%. Vortex strength increased with an increasing ratio of hemisphere radius to local boundary layer thickness on a flat plate. In the developing channel flows, heat transfer enhancements were observed on both sides of the channel. The largest spatially averaged heat transfer enhancement was 50%; it was accompanied by a 90% pressure drop penalty relative to the same channel flow with no hemispherical vortex generator. This research is important in compact heat exchanger design. Enhancing heat transfer can lead to

  2. Strong pinning of vortices by antiferromagnetic domain boundaries in CeCo(In1-x Cd x )5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, D.-J.; Pedrero, L.; Pham, L. D.; Fisk, Z.; Brando, M.

    2016-09-01

    We have studied the isothermal magnetization M(H) of CeCo({{In}}1-x Cd x )5 with x = 0.0075 and 0.01 down to 50 mK. Pronounced field-history dependent phenomena occur in the coexistence regime of the superconducting and antiferromagnetic phases. At low-fields, a phenomenological model of magnetic-flux entry well explains M(H) implying the dominance of bulk pinning effect. However, unless crystallographic quenched disorder is hysteretic, the asymmetric peak effect (ASPE) which appears at higher fields cannot be explained by the pinning of vortices due to material defects. Also, the temperature dependence of the ASPE deviates from the conventional scenario for the peak effect. Comparison of our thermodynamic phase diagrams with those from previous neutron scattering and magnetoresistance experiments indicates that the pinning of vortices takes place at the field-history dependent antiferromagnetic domain boundaries.

  3. Observation of vortex coalescence, vortex chains and crossing vortices in the anisotropic spin-triplet superconductor Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasselbach, K. [CRTBT-CNRS, BP 166X, 38042 Grenoble (France)], E-mail: klaus.hasselbach@grenoble.cnrs.fr; Dolocan, V.O. [CRTBT-CNRS, BP 166X, 38042 Grenoble (France)], E-mail: dolocan@cpfs.mpg.de; Lejay, P. [CRTBT-CNRS, BP 166X, 38042 Grenoble (France); Mailly, Dominique [LPN-CNRS, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France)

    2007-09-01

    Scanning {mu}SQUID force microscopy is used to study magnetic flux structures in single crystals of the layered spin-triplet superconductor Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4}. Images of the magnetic flux configuration above the a{sup {yields}}b{sup {yields}}-face of the cleaved crystal are acquired, mostly after field-cooling the sample. For low applied magnetic fields, individual vortices are observed, each carrying a single quantum of flux. Above 1 G, coalescence of vortices is discovered. The coalescing vortices may indicate the presence of domains of a chiral order parameter. When the applied field is tilted from the c{sup {yields}}-axis, we observe a gradual transition from vortex domains to vortex chains. The in-plane component of the applied magnetic field transforms the vortex domains to vortex chains by aligning them along the field direction.This behavior and the inter-chain distance varies in qualitative agreement with the Ginzburg-Landau theory of anisotropic 3D superconductors. The effective mass anisotropy of Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4}, {gamma} = 20, is the highest observed in three-dimensional superconductors. When the applied field is closely in-plane, the vortex form flux channels confined between the crystal-layers. Residual Abrikosov vortices are pinned preferentially on these channels. Thus the in-plane vortices are decorated by crossing Abrikosov vortices: two vortex orientations are apparent simultaneously, one along the layers and the other perpendicular to the layers.

  4. A continuous-vorticity panel method for lifting surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, A.; Mook, D. T.; Nayfeh, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    A continuous-vorticity panel method is developed and utilized to predict the steady aerodynamic loads on lifting surfaces having sharp-edge separation. Triangular panels with linearly varying vorticity are used. The velocity field generated by an individual element is obtained in closed form. An optimization scheme is constructed for finding the vorticity at the nodes of the elements. The method is not restricted by aspect ratios, angles of attack, planforms, or camber. Rectangular and delta wings are presented as numerical examples. The numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental data for incompressible flows.

  5. Migration of anticyclonic vortices in the protoplanetary disk

    CERN Document Server

    Surville, Clément

    2012-01-01

    This contribution describes the evolution of the protoplanetary disk using 2D numerical simulations. The 2D Euler equations are solved with the finite volume method. The numerical simulations are used to study the persistence and migration of anticyclonic vortices. Two cases are presented : (1) vortices produced by a Rossby wave instability, (2) a non-linear vortex model initially implemented into the disk. The migration of the vortices is due to spiral density waves excited by the vortex in the gas of the disk

  6. Interaction of Vortices with a progressive Surface Wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LinlinWANG; HuiyangMA

    1996-01-01

    Interaction of submerged vortices with a progressive surface wave is investigated by the finite-difference numerical solution of Navier-Stokes equations.The progressive wave is the surface gravity water wave in a finite depth.The initial vortex model is Oseen vortex.The numerical computations show that a special pattern of the wave surface may be observed by the interaction from the submerged vortices.The influences of Froude number,the initial geometric configuration of vortices,and the amplitude,inital phase of surface wave on the wave pattern are discussed.

  7. Kinetic study of ion-acoustic plasma vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, S. A. [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Aman-ur-Rehman, E-mail: amansadiq@gmail.com [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan); Mendonca, J. T. [IPFN, Instituto Superior Téchnico, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2014-09-15

    The kinetic theory of electron plasma waves with finite orbital angular momentum has recently been introduced by Mendonca. This model shows possibility of new kind of plasma waves and instabilities. We have extended the theory to ion-acoustic plasma vortices carrying orbital angular momentum. The dispersion equation is derived under paraxial approximation which exhibits a kind of linear vortices and their Landau damping. The numerical solutions are obtained and compared with analytical results which are in good agreement. The physical interpretation of the ion-acoustic plasma vortices and their Landau resonance conditions are given for typical case of Maxwellian plasmas.

  8. Dynamics of circular arrangements of vorticity in two dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Rohith V.; Ravichandran, S.; Perlekar, Prasad; Govindarajan, Rama

    2016-07-01

    The merger of two like-signed vortices is a well-studied problem, but in a turbulent flow, we may often have more than two like-signed vortices interacting. We study the merger of three or more identical corotating vortices initially arranged on the vertices of a regular polygon. At low to moderate Reynolds numbers, we find an additional stage in the merger process, absent in the merger of two vortices, where an annular vortical structure is formed and is long lived. Vortex merger is slowed down significantly due to this. Such annular vortices are known at far higher Reynolds numbers in studies of tropical cyclones, which have been noticed to a break down into individual vortices. In the preannular stage, vortical structures in a viscous flow are found here to tilt and realign in a manner similar to the inviscid case, but the pronounced filaments visible in the latter are practically absent in the former. Five or fewer vortices initially elongate radially, and then reorient their long axis closer to the azimuthal direction so as to form an annulus. With six or more vortices, the initial alignment is already azimuthal. Interestingly at higher Reynolds numbers, the merger of an odd number of vortices is found to proceed very differently from that of an even number. The former process is rapid and chaotic whereas the latter proceeds more slowly via pairing events. The annular vortex takes the form of a generalized Lamb-Oseen vortex (GLO), and diffuses inward until it forms a standard Lamb-Oseen vortex. For lower Reynolds number, the numerical (fully nonlinear) evolution of the GLO vortex follows exactly the analytical evolution until merger. At higher Reynolds numbers, the annulus goes through instabilities whose nonlinear stages show a pronounced difference between even and odd mode disturbances. Here again, the odd mode causes an early collapse of the annulus via decaying turbulence into a single central vortex, whereas the even mode disturbance causes a more

  9. Image simulations of kinked vortices for transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beleggia, Marco; Pozzi, G.; Tonomura, A.

    2010-01-01

    We present an improved model of kinked vortices in high-Tc superconductors suitable for the interpretation of Fresnel or holographic observations carried out with a transmission electron microscope. A kinked vortex is composed of two displaced half-vortices, perpendicular to the film plane...... observations of high-Tc superconducting films, where the Fresnel contrast associated with some vortices showed a dumbbell like appearance. Here, we show that under suitable conditions the JV segment may reveal itself in Fresnel imaging or holographic phase mapping in a transmission electron microscope....

  10. Computer simulation studies of pulsed Doppler signals from vortices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Sizhong; WANG Yuanyuan; WANG Weiqi

    2001-01-01

    A computer simulation method for pulsed Doppler signals from vortices was proposed to generate simulated vortex Doppler signals under various given circumstances. The relative waveforms, such as the maximum frequency waveform, the mean frequency waveform and the bandwidth waveform, were obtained using the short time Fourier analysis of those simulated signals. The relations were studied between several spectrum parameters obtained from these waveforms and given simulation conditions, such as the position and the size of the sample volume, the distance between two vortices, the free stream velocity and the maximum tangent velocity of the vortex. The sensitive parameters were found to detect vortices using the pulsed Doppler techniques.

  11. Quantised vortices and mutual friction in relativistic superfluids

    CERN Document Server

    Andersson, N; Vickers, J A

    2016-01-01

    We consider the detailed dynamics of an array of quantised superfluid vortices in the framework of general relativity, as required for quantitative modelling of realistic neutron star cores. Our model builds on the variational approach to relativistic (multi-) fluid dynamics, where the vorticity plays a central role. The description provides a natural extension of, and as it happens a better insight into, existing Newtonian models. In particular, we account for the mutual friction associated with scattering of a second "normal" component in the mixture off of the superfluid vortices.

  12. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet and its sub-systems were stopped at the beginning of the winter shutdown on 8th December 2011. The magnet was left without cooling during the cryogenics maintenance until 17th January 2012, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The vacuum pumping was maintained during this period. During this shutdown, the yearly maintenance was performed on the cryogenics, the vacuum pumps, the magnet control and safety systems, and the power converter and discharge lines. Several preventive actions led to the replacement of the electrovalve command coils, and the 20A DC power supplies of the magnet control system. The filters were cleaned on the demineralised water circuits. The oil of the diffusion pumps was changed. On the cryogenics, warm nitrogen at 343 K was circulated in the cold box to regenerate the filters and the heat exchangers. The coalescing filters have been replaced at the inlet of both the turbines and the lubricant trapping unit. The active cha...

  13. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet was successfully operated at the end of the year 2009 despite some technical problems on the cryogenics. The magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T at the end of November until December 16th when the shutdown started. The magnet operation met a few unexpected stops. The field was reduced to 3.5 T for about 5 hours on December 3rd due to a faulty pressure sensor on the helium compressor. The following day the CERN CCC stopped unintentionally the power converters of the LHC and the experiments, triggering a ramp down that was stopped at 2.7 T. The magnet was back at 3.8 T about 6 hours after CCC sent the CERN-wide command. Three days later, a slow dump was triggered due to a stop of the pump feeding the power converter water-cooling circuit, during an intervention on the water-cooling plant done after several disturbances on the electrical distribution network. The magnet was back at 3.8 T in the evening the same day. On December 10th a break occurred in one turbine of the cold box producing the liquid ...

  14. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

      The magnet was operated without any problem until the end of the LHC run in February 2013, apart from a CERN-wide power glitch on 10 January 2013 that affected the CMS refrigerator, causing a ramp down to 2 T in order to reconnect the coldbox. Another CERN-wide power glitch on 15 January 2013 didn’t affect the magnet subsystems, the cryoplant or the power converter. At the end of the magnet run, the reconnection of the coldbox at 2.5 T was tested. The process will be updated, in particular the parameters of some PID valve controllers. The helium flow of the current leads was reduced but only for a few seconds. The exercise will be repeated with the revised parameters to validate the automatic reconnection process of the coldbox. During LS1, the water-cooling services will be reduced and many interventions are planned on the electrical services. Therefore, the magnet cryogenics and subsystems will be stopped for several months, and the magnet cannot be kept cold. In order to avoid unc...

  15. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The CMS magnet has been running steadily and smoothly since the summer, with no detected flaw. The magnet instrumentation is entirely operational and all the parameters are at their nominal values. Three power cuts on the electrical network affected the magnet run in the past five months, with no impact on the data-taking as the accelerator was also affected at the same time. On 22nd June, a thunderstorm caused a power glitch on the service electrical network. The primary water cooling at Point 5 was stopped. Despite a quick restart of the water cooling, the inlet temperature of the demineralised water on the busbar cooling circuit increased by 5 °C, up to 23.3 °C. It was kept below the threshold of 27 °C by switching off other cooling circuits to avoid the trigger of a slow dump of the magnet. The cold box of the cryogenics also stopped. Part of the spare liquid helium volume was used to maintain the cooling of the magnet at 4.5 K. The operators of the cryogenics quickly restarted ...

  16. MAGNETS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofacker, H.B.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to nmgnets used in a calutron and more particularly to means fur clamping an assembly of magnet coils and coil spacers into tightly assembled relation in a fluid-tight vessel. The magnet comprises windings made up of an assembly of alternate pan-cake type coils and spacers disposed in a fluid-tight vessel. At one end of the tank a plurality of clamping strips are held firmly against the assembly by adjustable bolts extending through the adjacent wall. The foregoing arrangement permits taking up any looseness which may develop in the assembly of coils and spacers.

  17. Uncharged compactlike and fractional Lorentz-violating BPS vortices in the CPT-even sector of the standard model extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C.; Casana, R.; Ferreira, M. M., Jr.; da Hora, E.

    2012-09-01

    We have investigated and verified the existence of stable uncharged Bogomol’nyi-Prasad-Sommerfeld (BPS) vortices in the framework of an Abelian Maxwell-Higgs model supplemented with CPT-even and Lorentz-violating (LV) terms belonging to the gauge and Higgs sectors of the standard model extension. The analysis is performed in two situations: first, by considering the Lorentz violation only in the gauge sector, and then in both gauge and Higgs sectors. In the first case, it is observed that the model supports vortices somehow equivalent to the ones appearing in a dielectric medium. The Lorentz violation controls the radial extension (core of the solution) and the magnetic field amplitude of the Abrikosov-Nielsen-Olesen vortices, yielding compactlike defects in an alternative and simpler way than that of k-field models. At the end, we consider the Lorentz-violating terms in the gauge and Higgs sectors. It is shown that the full model also supports compactlike uncharged BPS vortices in a modified vacuum, but this time there are two LV parameters controlling the defect structure. Moreover, an interesting novelty is introduced by the LV-Higgs sector: fractional vortex solutions.

  18. Formation and stability of tri-polar vortices in stratified geostrophic flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corread, S.M.; Carton, X.J. [French Navy Oceanography Center, Brest (France)

    1999-12-01

    The formation, stationary and stability of tri-polar vortices are investigated in a two-layer quasi-geostrophic model. On the f-plane, these tripoles form from the barotropic and baroclinic instabilities of circular isolated vortices. Various horizontal and vertical potential vorticity distributions, both piecewise constant and continuous, are considered here for these circular vortices.

  19. Point Vortices: Finding Periodic Orbits and their Topological Classification

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Spencer A

    2015-01-01

    The motion of point vortices constitutes an especially simple class of solutions to Euler's equation for two dimensional, inviscid, incompressible, and irrotational fluids. In addition to their intrinsic mathematical importance, these solutions are also physically relevant. Rotating superfluid helium can support rectilinear quantized line vortices, which in certain regimes are accurately modeled by point vortices. Depending on the number of vortices, it is possible to have either regular integrable motion or chaotic motion. Thus, the point vortex model is one of the simplest and most tractable fluid models which exhibits some of the attributes of weak turbulence. The primary aim of this work is to find and classify periodic orbits, a special class of solutions to the point vortex problem. To achieve this goal, we introduce a number of algorithms: Lie transforms which ensure that the equations of motion are accurately solved; constrained optimization which reduces close return orbits to true periodic orbits; o...

  20. On the definition of a moist-air potential vorticity

    CERN Document Server

    Marquet, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    A new potential vorticity is derived by using a specific entropy formulation expressed in terms of a moist-air entropy potential temperature. The new formulation is compared with Ertel's version and with others based on virtual and equivalent potential temperatures. The new potential vorticity is subject to conservative properties ensured by the Second Law applied to the moist-air material derivatives. It is shown that the upper tropospheric and stratospheric (dry) structures are nearly the same as those obtained with Ertel's component. Moreover, new structures are observed in the low troposphere, with negative values associated with moist frontal regions. The negative values are observed in the frontal regions where slantwise convection instabilities may take place, but they are smaller than those observed with the equivalent potential vorticity. The main purpose of the article is to diagnose the behaviour of the new potential vorticity from numerical output generated by the ARPEGE NWP model, with the help o...

  1. Magnus and other forces on vortices in superfluids and superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, Michael [University of Illinois, IL (United States)

    1998-07-01

    I discuss some of the forces acting on vortices in charged superfluids, paying particular attention to the way that the Berry and Aharonov-Casher phases combine to reflect the classical magnetohydrodynamics. (Author). 28 refs.

  2. Are Superfluid Vortices in Pulsars Violating the Weak Equivalence Principle?

    CERN Document Server

    de Matos, Clovis Jacinto

    2010-01-01

    In the present paper we argue that timing irregularities in pulsars, like glitches and timing noise, could be associated with the violation of the weak equivalence principle for vortices in the superfluid core of rotating neutron stars.

  3. Stability of superfluid vortices in dense quark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Alford, Mark G; Vachaspati, Tanmay; Windisch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Superfluid vortices in the color-flavor-locked (CFL) phase of dense quark matter are known to be energetically disfavored relative to well-separated triplets of "semi-superfluid" color flux tubes. However, the short-range interaction (metastable versus unstable) has not been established. In this paper we perform numerical calculations using the effective theory of the condensate field, mapping the regions in the parameter space of coupling constants where the vortices are metastable versus unstable. For the case of zero gauge coupling we analytically identify a candidate for the unstable mode, and show that it agrees well with the results of the numerical calculations. We find that in the region of the parameter space that seems likely to correspond to real-world CFL quark matter the vortices are unstable, indicating that if such matter exists in neutron star cores it is very likely to contain semi-superfluid color flux tubes rather than superfluid vortices.

  4. Propagation dynamics of vortices in Helico-Conical optical beams

    CERN Document Server

    Bareza, Nestor

    2015-01-01

    We present the dynamics of optical vortices (OVs) that came from the propagation of helico-conical optical beam. This dynamics is investigated numerically by tracking the OVs at several distances using rigorous scalar diffraction theory. To ensure that our numerical calculations are correct, we compare the intensity profiles and their corresponding interferograms taken at different propagation distances between simulations and experiments. We observe that the peripheral isopolar vortices transport radially inward, toward the optical axis along the transverse spatial space as the beam propagates. When the beam has a central vortex, these vortices have significant induced angular rates of motion about the optical axis. These propagation dynamics of vortices influence the internal energy flow and the wave profile reconstruction of the beam, which can be important when deciding their applications.

  5. Vortical Structures in CT-based Breathing Lung Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jiwoong; Lee, Changhyun; Hoffman, Eric; Lin, Ching-Long

    2016-11-01

    The 1D-3D coupled computational fluid dynamics (CFD) lung model is applied to study vortical structures in the human airways during normal breathing cycles. During inhalation, small vortical structures form around the turbulent laryngeal jet and Taylor-Gőrtler-like vortices form near the curved walls in the supraglottal region and at airway bifurcations. On exhalation elongated vortical tubes are formed in the left main bronchus, whereas a relatively slower stream is observed in the right main bronchus. These structures result in helical motions in the trachea, producing long lasting high wall shear stress on the wall. The current study elucidates that the correct employment of image-based airway deformation and lung deflation information is crucial for capturing the physiologically consistent regional airflow structures. The pathophysiological implications of these structures in destruction of tracheal wall will be discussed.

  6. Analytical BPS Maxwell-Higgs Vortices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Casana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We have established a prescription for the calculation of analytical vortex solutions in the context of generalized Maxwell-Higgs models whose overall dynamics is controlled by two positive functions of the scalar field, namely, fϕ and wϕ. We have also determined a natural constraint between these functions and the Higgs potential Uϕ, allowing the existence of axially symmetric Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS solutions possessing finite energy. Furthermore, when the generalizing functions are chosen suitably, the nonstandard BPS equations can be solved exactly. We have studied some examples, comparing them with the usual Abrikosov-Nielsen-Olesen (ANO solution. The overall conclusion is that the analytical self-dual vortices are well-behaved in all relevant sectors, strongly supporting the consistency of the respective generalized models. In particular, our results mimic well-known properties of the usual (numerical configurations, as localized energy density, while contributing to the understanding of topological solitons and their description by means of analytical methods.

  7. Chirp-driven giant phase space vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Pallavi; Ganesh, Rajaraman

    2016-06-01

    In a collisionless, unbounded, one-dimensional plasma, modelled using periodic boundary conditions, formation of steady state phase space coherent structures or phase space vortices (PSV) is investigated. Using a high resolution one-dimensional Vlasov-Poisson solver based on piecewise-parabolic advection scheme, the formation of giant PSV is addressed numerically. For an infinitesimal external drive amplitude and wavenumber k, we demonstrate the existence of a window of chirped external drive frequency that leads to the formation of giant PSV. The linear, small amplitude, external drive, when chirped, is shown to couple effectively to the plasma and increase both streaming of "untrapped" and "trapped" particle fraction. The steady state attained after the external drive is turned off and is shown to lead to a giant PSV with multiple extrema and phase velocities, with excess density fraction, defined as the deviation from the Maxwellian background, Δ n / n 0 ≃ 20 % - 25 % . It is shown that the process depends on the chirp time duration Δt. The excess density fraction Δn/n0, which contains both trapped and untrapped particle contribution, is also seen to scale with Δt, only inhibited by the gradient of the distribution in velocity space. Both single step drive and multistep chirp processes are shown to lead to steady state giant PSV, with multiple extrema due to embedded holes and clumps, long after the external drive is turned off.

  8. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet ran smoothly in the last few months until a fast dump occurred on 9th May 2011. Fortunately, this occurred in the afternoon of the first day of the technical stop. The fast dump was due to a valve position controller that caused the sudden closure of a valve. This valve is used to regulate the helium flow on one of the two current leads, which electrically connects the coil at 4.5 K to the busbars at room temperature. With no helium flow on the lead, the voltage drop and the temperatures across the leads increase up to the defined thresholds, triggering a fast dump through the Magnet Safety System (MSS). The automatic reaction triggered by the MSS worked properly. The helium release was limited as the pressure rise was just at the limit of the safety valve opening pressure. The average temperature of the magnet reached 72 K. It took four days to recover the temperature and refill the helium volumes. The faulty valve controller was replaced by a spare one before the magnet ramp-up resumed....

  9. Large-Eddy Simulations of Dust Devils and Convective Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiga, Aymeric; Barth, Erika; Gu, Zhaolin; Hoffmann, Fabian; Ito, Junshi; Jemmett-Smith, Bradley; Klose, Martina; Nishizawa, Seiya; Raasch, Siegfried; Rafkin, Scot; Takemi, Tetsuya; Tyler, Daniel; Wei, Wei

    2016-11-01

    In this review, we address the use of numerical computations called Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) to study dust devils, and the more general class of atmospheric phenomena they belong to (convective vortices). We describe the main elements of the LES methodology. We review the properties, statistics, and variability of dust devils and convective vortices resolved by LES in both terrestrial and Martian environments. The current challenges faced by modelers using LES for dust devils are also discussed in detail.

  10. On the temperature dependence of the chiral vortical effects

    CERN Document Server

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the origins of temperature dependence of the axial vortical effect (AVE), i.e. generation of an axial current in a rotating chiral medium along the rotation axis. We show that the corresponding transport coefficient depends on the number of light weakly interacting degrees of freedom, rather than on the gravitational anomaly. We also comment on the role of low-dimensional defects in the rotating medium, and appearance of the chiral vortical effect due to them.

  11. Visualization and Quantification of Rotor Tip Vortices in Helicopter Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, David L.; Ahmad, Jasim U.; Holst, Terry L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an automated approach for effective extraction, visualization, and quantification of vortex core radii from the Navier-Stokes simulations of a UH-60A rotor in forward flight. We adopt a scaled Q-criterion to determine vortex regions and then perform vortex core profiling in these regions to calculate vortex core radii. This method provides an efficient way of visualizing and quantifying the blade tip vortices. Moreover, the vortices radii are displayed graphically in a plane.

  12. The role of vortices in animal locomotion in fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dvořák R.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to show the significance of vortices in animal locomotion in fluids on two deliberately chosen examples. The first example concerns lift generation by bird and insect wings, the second example briefly mentiones swimming and walking on water. In all the examples, the vortices generated by the moving animal impart the necessary momentum to the surrounding fluid, the reaction to which is the force moving or lifting the animal.

  13. Simulating living organisms with populations of point vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmieder, R.W.

    1995-07-01

    The author has found that time-averaged images of small populations of point vortices can exhibit motions suggestive of the behavior of individual organisms. As an example, the author shows that collections of point vortices confined in a box and subjected to heating can generate patterns that are broadly similar to interspecies defense in certain sea anemones. It is speculated that other simple dynamical systems can be found to produce similar complex organism-like behavior.

  14. Conditions for Two-Cell Structure in Severe Vortical Storms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-02-01

    SEVERE VORTICAL STORMS by G. F. Carrier, F. E. Fendell , P. S. Feldman, and S. F. Fink TRW Space and Technology Group, Redondo Beach, CA 90278 Thi...Claification Conditions for Two-Call Structure in Severe Vortical Storms (U) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Carrier. G. F. (Harvard U.): Fendell , F. E., Feldman...cell structure will occur. Very roughly, about half of all tropical storms ( Fendell 1974), and about one-quarter to one-half of meso- cyclones (Brooks

  15. Vorticity analysis in the Zagros orogen, Shiraz area, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkarinejad, Khalil; Heibati, Zahra

    2016-10-01

    Quantitative vorticity analyses in orogenic belts are essential for studying the kinematics of deformation and can be performed using a range of methods. The combination of microstructural analysis for vorticity with other methods creates a more rigorous analysis. In order to determine the degree of non-coaxiality and spatial pattern of vorticity during deformation in the Zagros Orogenic Belt, a study area containing the boundary of the Zagros Folded Belt and the Zagros Fold-and-Thrust Belt is selected. The study area is situated in the Shiraz region of E-Zagros in Iran. The kinematic vorticity analysis is carried out using 4 methods based on: (1) the degree of asymmetry of the calcite c-axis fabric, (2) the assumption that the orientation of the long axes of calcite within an oblique stylolite foliation delineates the direction of the instantaneous stretching axis, (3) the assumption that the tension gash tips determine the direction of the instantaneous stretching axis and (4) stylolite teeth determine the direction of the instantaneous stretching axis. C-axis data from calcite give a kinematic vorticity number between 0.68 and 0.83, and the orientation of the long axes of calcite grains yields a range between 0.5 and 0.84. Stylolites provide a kinematic vorticity number between 0.5 and 0.79, and tension gashes provide a kinematic vorticity number between 0.56 and 0.81. This range of vorticity numbers confirms the contributions of both simple (33-59%) and pure shear (41-67%). Twining of calcite also reveals that the last stage of deformation occurred at a temperature of 170-200 °C. Spatial analysis reveals an increase in the simple shear component from the SW of the Zagros Folded Belt to the NE of the Zagros Fold-and-Thrust Belt.

  16. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

    The magnet is fully stopped and at room temperature. The maintenance works and consolidation activities on the magnet sub-systems are progressing. To consolidate the cryogenic installation, two redundant helium compressors will be installed as ‘hot spares’, to avoid the risk of a magnet downtime in case of a major failure of a compressor unit during operation. The screw compressors, their motors, the mechanical couplings and the concrete blocks are already available and stored at P5. The metallic structure used to access the existing compressors in SH5 will be modified to allow the installation of the two redundant ones. The plan is to finish the installation and commissioning of the hot spare compressors before the summer 2014. In the meantime, a bypass on the high-pressure helium piping will be installed for the connection of a helium drier unit later during the Long Shutdown 1, keeping this installation out of the schedule critical path. A proposal is now being prepared for the con...

  17. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    MAGNET During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bough...

  18. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet worked very well at 3.8 T as expected, despite a technical issue that manifested twice in the cryogenics since June. All the other magnet sub-systems worked without flaw. The issue in the cryogenics was with the cold box: it could be observed that the cold box was getting progressively blocked, due to some residual humidity and air accumulating in the first thermal exchanger and in the adsorber at 65 K. This was later confirmed by the analysis during the regeneration phases. An increase in the temperature difference between the helium inlet and outlet across the heat exchanger and a pressure drop increase on the filter of the adsorber were observed. The consequence was a reduction of the helium flow, first compensated by the automatic opening of the regulation valves. But once they were fully opened, the flow and refrigeration power reduced as a consequence. In such a situation, the liquid helium level in the helium Dewar decreased, eventually causing a ramp down of the magnet current and a field...

  19. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé.

    The magnet operation restarted end of June this year. Quick routine checks of the magnet sub-systems were performed at low current before starting the ramps up to higher field. It appeared clearly that the end of the field ramp down to zero was too long to be compatible with the detector commissioning and operations plans. It was decided to perform an upgrade to keep the ramp down from 3.8T to zero within 4 hours. On July 10th, when a field of 1.5T was reached, small movements were observed in the forward region support table and it was decided to fix this problem before going to higher field. At the end of July the ramps could be resumed. On July 28th, the field was at 3.8T and the summer CRAFT exercise could start. This run in August went smoothly until a general CERN wide power cut took place on August 3rd, due to an insulation fault on the high voltage network outside point 5. It affected the magnet powering electrical circuit, as it caused the opening of the main circuit breakers, resulting in a fast du...

  20. Interaction between global-scale atmospheric vortices: Modeling with Hamiltonian dynamic system of antipodal point vortices on a rotating sphere

    CERN Document Server

    Mokhov, Igor I; Chefranov, A G

    2016-01-01

    We get point vortices dynamics equations on a rotating sphere surface directly from the hydrodynamic equations as representing their weak exact solution contrary to the conventional case of the use of a kinematic relationship between a given singular vortex field and velocity field. It is first time that the effect of a sphere rotation on the vortices interaction is accounted for in exact form. We show that only the stream function of a vortex pair of antipodal vortices (APV), and only it satisfies the original three-dimensional hydrodynamics equations on a sphere. We prove that only APV pair with two point vortices in the diameter-conjugated points of a sphere with equal by quantity but different sign circulations may be correctly considered as an elementary (stationary, not self-affecting) singular point object on a sphere. We suggest using the axis connecting the two point vortices in an APV for describing of an axis of rotation of the global vortices introduced in (Barrett, 1958) to reflect the observed g...

  1. A potential vorticity perspective on atmospheric blocking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croci Maspoli, M.; Schwierz, C.

    2003-04-01

    A persistent large-scale anomaly of the west to east flow in the midlatitudes with a weakening and meridional splitting of the jet can be specified as atmospheric blocking. Lifetimes last from several days up to weeks so that blocking can therefore significantly determine monthly circulation index values. The vertical range affected by this phenomenon covers the entire troposphere as mirrored in increased surface pressure as well as an elevated tropopause and is also felt in the lower-stratosphere. Here we seek to shed more light on the physical mechanisms related to blocking by adopting the PV (potential vorticity) perspective with a focus on tropopause-level dynamics. Processes such as Rossby-wave breaking and diabatic heating can modify the conservative behaviour of the PV and are therefore important features for the formation and maintenance of atmospheric blocking. This motivates the definition of a novel blocking index based upon the three-dimensional structure of the phenomenon. A vertically integrated measure (PV within the 500 - 150 hPa layer, VIPV) is calculated, underlining the quasi-barotropic nature of blocked atmospheric state. Benefits of the new index include: representation of the two-dimensional structure of the phenomenon, its lifecycle and geographical distribution. The investigation is conducted over the period 1979 to 2001 using ECMWF reanalysis data. Characteristics of the VIPV field are presented. The new VIPV index is compared to a standard blocking index (e.g. Tibaldi and Molteni (1989)) on a case study basis and also with respect to seasonal variability. Relations to climate modes/indices (NAO, AO) are also discussed.

  2. Quantum information processing with optical vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoury, Antonio Z. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: In this work we discuss several proposals for quantum information processing using the transverse structure of paraxial beams. Different techniques for production and manipulation of optical vortices have been employed and combined with polarization transformations in order to investigate fundamental properties of quantum entanglement as well as to propose new tools for quantum information processing. As an example, we have recently proposed and demonstrated a controlled NOT (CNOT) gate based on a Michelson interferometer in which the photon polarization is the control bit and the first order transverse mode is the target. The device is based on a single lens design for an astigmatic mode converter that transforms the transverse mode of paraxial optical beams. In analogy with Bell's inequality for two-qubit quantum states, we propose an inequality criterion for the non-separability of the spin-orbit degrees of freedom of a laser beam. A definition of separable and non-separable spin-orbit modes is used in consonance with the one presented in Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 2007. As the usual Bell's inequality can be violated for entangled two-qubit quantum states, we show both theoretically and experimentally that the proposed spin-orbit inequality criterion can be violated for non-separable modes. The inequality is discussed both in the classical and quantum domains. We propose a polarization to orbital angular momentum teleportation scheme using entangled photon pairs generated by spontaneous parametric down conversion. By making a joint detection of the polarization and angular momentum parity of a single photon, we are able to detect all the Bell-states and perform, in principle, perfect teleportation from a discrete to a continuous system using minimal resources. The proposed protocol implementation demands experimental resources that are currently available in quantum optics laboratories. (author)

  3. Complex Convective Thermal Fluxes and Vorticity Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, Jose M.; Tellez, Jackson; Sotillos, Laura; Lopez Gonzalez-Nieto, Pilar; Sanchez, Jesus M.; Furmanek, Petr; Diez, Margarita

    2015-04-01

    Local Diffusion and the topological structure of vorticity and velocity fields is measured in the transition from a homogeneous linearly stratified fluid to a cellular or layered structure by means of convective cooling and/or heating[1,2]. Patterns arise by setting up a convective flow generated by an array of Thermoelectric devices (Peltier/Seebeck cells) these are controlled by thermal PID generating a buoyant heat flux [2]. The experiments described here investigate high Prandtl number mixing using brine and fresh water in order to form density interfaces and low Prandtl number mixing with temperature gradients. The set of dimensionless parameters define conditions of numeric and small scale laboratory modeling of environmental flows. Fields of velocity, density and their gradients were computed and visualized [3,4]. When convective heating and cooling takes place the combination of internal waves and buoyant turbulence is much more complicated if the Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers are high in order to study entrainment and mixing. Using ESS and selfsimilarity structures in the velocity and vorticity fieds and intermittency [3,5] that forms in the non-homogeneous flow is related to mixing and stiring. The evolution of the mixing fronts are compared and the topological characteristics of the merging of plumes and jets in different configurations presenting detailed comparison of the evolution of RM and RT, Jets and Plumes in overall mixing. The relation between structure functions, fractal analysis and spectral analysis can be very useful to determine the evolution of scales. Experimental and numerical results on the advance of a mixing or nonmixing front occurring at a density interface due to body forces [6]and gravitational acceleration are analyzed considering the fractal and spectral structure of the fronts like in removable plate experiments for Rayleigh-Taylor flows. The evolution of the turbulent mixing layer and its complex configuration is studied

  4. Precession-driven dynamos in a full sphere and the role of large scale cyclonic vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Yufeng; Noir, Jerome; Jackson, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Precession has been proposed as an alternative power source for planetary dynamos. Previous hydrodynamic simulations suggested that precession can generate very complex flows in planetary liquid cores [Y. Lin, P. Marti, and J. Noir, "Shear-driven parametric instability in a precessing sphere," Physics of Fluids 27, 046601 (2015)]. In the present study, we numerically investigate the magnetohydrodynamics of a precessing sphere. We demonstrate precession driven dynamos in different flow regimes, from laminar to turbulent flows. In particular, we highlight the magnetic field generation by large scale cyclonic vortices, which has not been explored previously. In this regime, dynamos can be sustained at relatively low Ekman numbers and magnetic Prandtl numbers, which paves the way for planetary applications.

  5. Slowly-growing gap-opening planets trigger weaker vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Michael; Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Lin, Min-Kai

    2017-04-01

    The presence of a giant planet in a low-viscosity disc can create a gap edge in the disc's radial density profile sharp enough to excite the Rossby wave instability. This instability may evolve into dust-trapping vortices that might explain the 'banana-shaped' features in recently observed asymmetric transition discs with inner cavities. Previous hydrodynamical simulations of planet-induced vortices have neglected the time-scale of hundreds to thousands of orbits to grow a massive planet to Jupiter size. In this work, we study the effect of a giant planet's runaway growth time-scale on the lifetime and characteristics of the resulting vortex. For two different planet masses (1 and 5 Jupiter masses) and two different disc viscosities (α = 3 × 10-4 and 3 × 10-5), we compare the vortices induced by planets with several different growth time-scales between 10 and 4000 planet orbits. In general, we find that slowly-growing planets create significantly weaker vortices with lifetimes and surface densities reduced by more than 50 per cent. For the higher disc viscosity, the longest growth time-scales in our study inhibit vortex formation altogether. Additionally, slowly-growing planets produce vortices that are up to twice as elongated, with azimuthal extents well above 180° in some cases. These unique, elongated vortices likely create a distinct signature in the dust observations that differentiates them from the more concentrated vortices that correspond to planets with faster growth time-scales. Lastly, we find that the low viscosities necessary for vortex formation likely prevent planets from growing quickly enough to trigger the instability in self-consistent models.

  6. The vorticity and angular momentum budgets of Asian summer monsoon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P L S Rao; U C Mohanty; P V S Raju; M A Arain

    2004-09-01

    The study delineates the vorticity and angular momentum balances of Asian summer monsoon during the evolution and established phases. It also elucidates the differences between these balances in the National Centre for Environmental Prediction/National Centre for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis and the National Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (NCM- RWF) analysis fields. The NCEP/NCAR reanalysis for a 40 year period (1958-97) and the NCM- RWF analysis for a three year (1994-96) period are made use of for the purpose. The time mean summer monsoon circulation is bifurcated into stable mean and transient eddy components and the mean component is elucidated. The generation of vorticity due to stretching of isobars balances most of the vorticity transported out of the monsoon domain during the evolution period. However, during the established period, the transportation by the relative and planetary vorticity components exceeds the generation due to stretching. The effective balancing mechanism is provided by vorticity generation due to sub-grid scale processes. The flux convergence of omega and relative momenta over the monsoon domain is effectively balanced by pressure torque during the evolution and established phases. Nevertheless, the balance is stronger during the established period due to the increase in the strength of circulation. Both the NCMRWF and NCEP fields indicate the mean features related to vorticity and angular momentum budgets realistically. Apart from the oceanic bias (strong circulation over oceans rather than continents), the summer monsoon circulation indicated by the NCEP is feeble compared to NCMRWF. The significant terms in the large-scale budgets of vorticity and angular momentum enunciate this aspect.

  7. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The magnet subsystems resumed operation early this spring. The vacuum pumping was restarted mid March, and the cryogenic power plant was restarted on March 30th. Three and a half weeks later, the magnet was at 4.5 K. The vacuum pumping system is performing well. One of the newly installed vacuum gauges had to be replaced at the end of the cool-down phase, as the values indicated were not coherent with the other pressure measurements. The correction had to be implemented quickly to be sure no helium leak could be at the origin of this anomaly. The pressure measurements have been stable and coherent since the change. The cryogenics worked well, and the cool-down went quite smoothly, without any particular difficulty. The automated start of the turbines had to be fine-tuned to get a smooth transition, as it was observed that the cooling power delivered by the turbines was slightly higher than needed, causing the cold box to stop automatically. This had no consequence as the cold box safety system acts to keep ...

  8. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bought. Th...

  9. Control of Trapped Vorticity in an Offset Diffuser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Travis J.; Vukasinovic, Bojan; Glezer, Ari

    2015-11-01

    Vorticity concentrations trapped within in a recessed section in the moldline of an offset diffuser are manipulated using fluidic actuation to alter the flow evolution within the diffuser. Trapped vorticity is engendered by deliberate local flow separation owing to the aggressive moldline curvature. The strength and scale of the trapped vortex and its interaction with the cross flow are controlled by a spanwise array of streamwise, surface-integrated fluidic actuators that are placed just upstream of the recessed moldline. The local and global characteristics of the diffuser flow in the absence and presence of the actuation are investigated at Mach numbers up to M = 0 . 7 , using static pressure distributions, hot-wire anemometry, and particle image velocimetry. It is shown that flow distortion as measured by cross sectional variations of the total pressure distribution within the diffuser can be significantly modified by manipulation of the trapped vorticity, and is reduced (by over 50%) with increasing momentum of the actuation jets. The mitigation of flow distortion by trapped vorticity actuation is associated with manipulation of the evolution of streamwise secondary vortices within the diffuser. Supported by ONR.

  10. Vortical structures in pool fires: Observation, speculation, and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tieszen, S.R.; Nicolette, V.F.; Gritzo, L.A.; Moya, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Holen, J.K. [SINTEF/NTH, Trondheim (Norway). Div. Thermodynamics; Murray, D. [Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, CA (United States)

    1996-11-01

    While all fires are complex and involve many phenomena, this report is limited to large, turbulent liquid-hydrocarbon pool fires. Large, liquid-hydrocarbon pool fires present a risk in petrochemical storage and processing facilities and transportation systems that contain large amounts of liquid hydrocarbons. This report describes observations, speculations, and numerical simulations of vortical structures in pool fires. Vortical structures are observed in fires with length scales ranging from those that bend millimeter-thick flame zones to those that entrain air many meters from the edge of the fire to its centerline. The authors propose that baroclinic vorticity generation is primarily responsible for production of rotational motion at small scale and that amalgamation is responsible for the production of large-scale rotational structures from the myriad of small-scale structures. Numerical simulations show that vortical structures having time-mean definitions can be resolved with a Reynolds-Average Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach. However, for vortical structures without time-mean definition, RANS is inappropriate, and another technique, such as Large Eddy Simulation (LES), should be employed. 39 refs., 52 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Electron temperature gradient mode instability and stationary vortices with elliptic and circular boundary conditions in non-Maxwellian plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haque, Q. [Theoretical Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Zakir, U. [Department of Physics, University of Peshawar, Khyber Pakhtun Khwa 25000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics, University of Malakand, Khyber Pakhtun Khwa 18800 (Pakistan); Qamar, A. [Department of Physics, University of Peshawar, Khyber Pakhtun Khwa 25000 (Pakistan)

    2015-12-15

    Linear and nonlinear dynamics of electron temperature gradient mode along with parallel electron dynamics is investigated by considering hydrodynamic electrons and non-Maxwellian ions. It is noticed that the growth rate of η{sub e}-mode driven linear instability decreases by increasing the value of spectral index and increases by reducing the ion/electron temperature ratio along the magnetic field lines. The eigen mode dispersion relation is also found in the ballooning mode limit. Stationary solutions in the form of dipolar vortices are obtained for both circular and elliptic boundary conditions. It is shown that the dynamics of both circular and elliptic vortices changes with the inclusion of inhomogeneity and non-Maxwellian effects.

  12. Stationary bathtub vortices and a critical regime of liquid discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanyants, Yury A.; Yeoh, Guan H.

    A modified Lundgren model is applied for the description of stationary bathtub vortices in a viscous liquid with a free surface. Laminar liquid flow through the circular bottom orifice is considered in the horizontally unbounded domain. The liquid is assumed to be undisturbed at infinity and its depth is taken to be constant. Three different drainage regimes are studied: (i) subcritical, where whirlpool dents are less than the fluid depth; (ii) critical, where the whirlpool tips touch the outlet orifice; and (iii) supercritical, where surface vortices entrain air into the intake pipe. Particular attention is paid to critical vortices; the condition for their existence is determined and analysed. The influence of surface tension on subcritical whirlpools is investigated. Comparison of results with known experimental data is discussed.

  13. Drift and ion acoustic wave driven vortices with superthermal electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali Shan, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); National Centre For Physics (NCP), Shahdra Valley Road, QAU Campus, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Islamabad (Pakistan); Haque, Q. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); National Centre For Physics (NCP), Shahdra Valley Road, QAU Campus, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2012-08-15

    Linear and nonlinear analysis of coupled drift and acoustic mode is presented in an inhomogeneous electron-ion plasma with {kappa}-distributed electrons. A linear dispersion relation is found which shows that the phase speed of both the drift wave and the ion acoustic wave decreases in the presence of superthermal electrons. Several limiting cases are also discussed. In the nonlinear regime, stationary solutions in the form of dipolar and monopolar vortices are obtained. It is shown that the condition for the boundedness of the solution implies that the speed of drift wave driven vortices reduces with increase in superthermality effect. Ignoring density inhomogeniety, it is investigated that the lower and upper limits on the speed of the ion acoustic driven vortices spread with the inclusion of high energy electrons. The importance of results with reference to space plasmas is also pointed out.

  14. On the local stability of vortices in differentially rotating discs

    CERN Document Server

    Railton, A D

    2014-01-01

    In order to circumvent the loss of solid material through radial drift towards the central star, the trapping of dust inside persistent vortices in protoplanetary discs has often been suggested as a process that can eventually lead to planetesimal formation. Although a few special cases have been discussed, exhaustive studies of possible quasi-steady configurations available for dust-laden vortices and their stability have yet to be undertaken, thus their viability or otherwise as locations for the gravitational instability to take hold and seed planet formation is unclear. In this paper we generalise and extend the well known Kida solution to obtain a series of steady state solutions with varying vorticity and dust density distributions in their cores, in the limit of perfectly coupled dust and gas. We then present a local stability analysis of these configurations, considering perturbations localised on streamlines. Typical parametric instabilities found have growthrates of $~0.05\\Omega_P$, where $\\Omega_P$...

  15. Transverse commensurability effect for vortices on periodic pinning arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichhardt, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reichhardt, Cynthia J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Using computer simulations, we demonstrate a type of commensurability that occurs for vortices moving longitudinally through periodic pinning arrays in the presence of an additional transverse driving force. As a function of vortex density, there is a series of broad maxima in the transverse critical depinning force that do not fall at the matching fields where the number of vortices equals an integer multiple of the number of pinning sites. The commensurability effects are associated with dynamical states in which evenly spaced structures consisting of one or more moving rows of vortices form between rows of pinning sites. Remarkably, the critical transverse depinning force can be more than an order of magnitude larger than the longitudinal depinning force.

  16. Stability of model flocks in a vortical flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggaley, A. W.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the stability of self-propelled particle flocks in the Taylor-Green vortex, a steady vortical flow. We consider a model in which particles align themselves to a combination of the orientation and the acceleration of particles within a critical radius. We identify two distinct regimes: If alignment with orientation is dominant, the particles tend to be expelled from regions of high vorticity. In contrast, if anticipation is dominant, the particles accumulate in areas of large vorticity. In both regimes, the relative order of the flock is reduced. However, we show that there can be a critical balance of the two effects that stabilizes the flock in the presence of external fluid forcing. This strategy could provide a mechanism for animal flocks to remain globally ordered in the presence of fluid forcing, and it may also have applications in the design of flocking autonomous drones and artificial microswimmers.

  17. Rapid expulsion of microswimmers by a vortical flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Andrey; Aranson, Igor S

    2016-03-23

    Interactions of microswimmers with their fluid environment are exceptionally complex. Macroscopic shear flow alters swimming trajectories in a highly nontrivial way and results in dramatic reduction of viscosity and heterogeneous bacterial distributions. Here we report on experimental and theoretical studies of rapid expulsion of microswimmers, such as motile bacteria, by a vortical flow created by a rotating microparticle. We observe a formation of a macroscopic depletion area in a high-shear region, in the vicinity of a microparticle. The rapid migration of bacteria from the shear-rich area is caused by a vortical structure of the flow rather than intrinsic random fluctuations of bacteria orientations, in stark contrast to planar shear flow. Our mathematical model reveals that expulsion is a combined effect of motility and alignment by a vortical flow. Our findings offer a novel approach for manipulation of motile microorganisms and shed light on bacteria-flow interactions.

  18. Rapid expulsion of microswimmers by a vortical flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Andrey; Aranson, Igor S.

    2016-01-01

    Interactions of microswimmers with their fluid environment are exceptionally complex. Macroscopic shear flow alters swimming trajectories in a highly nontrivial way and results in dramatic reduction of viscosity and heterogeneous bacterial distributions. Here we report on experimental and theoretical studies of rapid expulsion of microswimmers, such as motile bacteria, by a vortical flow created by a rotating microparticle. We observe a formation of a macroscopic depletion area in a high-shear region, in the vicinity of a microparticle. The rapid migration of bacteria from the shear-rich area is caused by a vortical structure of the flow rather than intrinsic random fluctuations of bacteria orientations, in stark contrast to planar shear flow. Our mathematical model reveals that expulsion is a combined effect of motility and alignment by a vortical flow. Our findings offer a novel approach for manipulation of motile microorganisms and shed light on bacteria–flow interactions. PMID:27005581

  19. Inelastic scattering of xenon atoms by quantized vortices in superfluids

    CERN Document Server

    Pshenichnyuk, I A

    2016-01-01

    We study inelastic interactions of particles with quantized vortices in superfluids by using a semi-classical matter wave theory that is analogous to the Landau two-fluid equations, but allows for the vortex dynamics. The research is motivated by recent experiments on xenon doped helium nanodroplets that show clustering of the impurities along the vortex cores. We numerically simulate the dynamics of trapping and interactions of xenon atoms by quantized vortices in superfluid helium and the obtained results can be extended to scattering of other impurities by quantized vortices. Different energies and impact parameters of incident particles are considered. We show that inelastic scattering is closely linked to the generation of Kelvin waves along a quantized vortex during the interaction even if there is no capture. The capture criterion of an impurity is formulated in terms of the binding energy.

  20. Instabilities of coherent vortices in a free shear layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couet, B.

    The LARGE-SCALE structures observed in a shear layer can be described by a family of well-defined vortices. A Lagrangian vortex method is most appropriate to study the behavior of these vortices, provided an accurate initial representation can be obtained for the simulation. Using the vortex-in-cell method, a full three-dimensional numerical simulation of the steady-state vortices discovered by Stuart is presented here. The subharmonic pairing instability is examined both in its two-dimensional (vortex pairing) and its three-dimensional form (helical pairing) and the growth rates are compared with the stability results of Pierrehumbert and Widnall. Three-dimensionality is also generated in this flow by means of the broadband translative instability identified experimentally as the streamwise streak structure. Growth rates for the translative modes are also compared with the stability analysis.

  1. Technical Considerations in Magnetic Analogue Models

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Patrick W M

    2016-01-01

    The analogy between vorticity and magnetic fields has been a subject of interest to researchers for a considerable period of time, mainly because of the structural similarities between the systems of equations that govern the evolution of the two fields. We recently presented the analysis of magnetic fields and hydrodynamics vorticity fields and argued for a formal theory of analogue magnetism. This article provides in depth technical details of the relevant considerations for the simulation procedures and extends the analyses to a range of fluids.

  2. Vorticity and Capillaries at the Surface of a Jet

    CERN Document Server

    Andre, Matthieu A

    2012-01-01

    Shear layer instability at the free surface of a water jet is studied. The accompanying video shows experimental data recorded using measurement methods such as Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) and Particle Image Velocity (PIV). These results reveal the mechanisms leading to the formation of capillary waves on the surface due to the roll-up of the shear layer. These capillary waves eventually collide to each other, injecting vorticity in the bulk of the flow. Shear layer and injected vorticity interact to form a counter rotating vortex pair that moves down to the flow.

  3. Observation of Solitonic Vortices in Bose-Einstein Condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donadello, Simone; Serafini, Simone; Tylutki, Marek; Pitaevskii, Lev P.; Dalfovo, Franco; Lamporesi, Giacomo; Ferrari, Gabriele

    2014-08-01

    We observe solitonic vortices in an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) after free expansion. Clear signatures of the nature of such defects are the twisted planar density depletion around the vortex line, observed in absorption images, and the double dislocation in the interference pattern obtained through homodyne techniques. Both methods allow us to determine the sign of the quantized circulation. Experimental observations agree with numerical simulations. These solitonic vortices are the decay product of phase defects of the BEC order parameter spontaneously created after a rapid quench across the BEC transition in a cigar-shaped harmonic trap and are shown to have a very long lifetime.

  4. Toroidal vortices as a solution to the dust migration problem

    CERN Document Server

    Loren-Aguilar, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    In an earlier letter, we reported that dust settling in protoplanetary discs may lead to a dynamical dust-gas instability that produces global toroidal vortices. In this letter, we investigate the evolution of a dusty protoplanetary disc with two different dust species (1 mm and 50 cm dust grains), under the presence of the instability. We show how toroidal vortices, triggered by the interaction of mm grains with the gas, stop the radial migration of metre-sized dust, potentially offering a natural and efficient solution to the dust migration problem.

  5. Vortices in the Two-Dimensional Simple Exclusion Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodineau, T.; Derrida, B.; Lebowitz, Joel L.

    2008-06-01

    We show that the fluctuations of the partial current in two dimensional diffusive systems are dominated by vortices leading to a different scaling from the one predicted by the hydrodynamic large deviation theory. This is supported by exact computations of the variance of partial current fluctuations for the symmetric simple exclusion process on general graphs. On a two-dimensional torus, our exact expressions are compared to the results of numerical simulations. They confirm the logarithmic dependence on the system size of the fluctuations of the partial flux. The impact of the vortices on the validity of the fluctuation relation for partial currents is also discussed in an Appendix.

  6. Random organization of vortices under an anisotropic condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ienaga, K.; Dobroka, M.; Shirahata, Y.; Kawamura, Y.; Kaneko, S.; Okuma, S.

    2017-07-01

    Many colliding particles that are periodically sheared by ac drive self-organize to avoid future collisions, which is known as random organization. Recently, we have observed the random organization in the vortex system of a strip-shaped amorphous Mo x Ge1-x film, where the vortices experience periodic local shear from ac drive and the random pinning potential. In this work, we study how random organization changes in the vortex system under the tilted field, where an anisotropic vortex-vortex interaction is introduced. We find that characteristic times of random organization for the vortices driven in the tilted direction are significantly smaller than those in the untilted field.

  7. Unfolding of Vortices into Topological Stripes in a Multiferroic Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Mostovoy, M.; Han, M. G.; Horibe, Y.; Aoki, T.; Zhu, Y.; Cheong, S.-W.

    2014-06-01

    Multiferroic hexagonal RMnO3 (R =rare earths) crystals exhibit dense networks of vortex lines at which six domain walls merge. While the domain walls can be readily moved with an applied electric field, the vortex cores so far have been impossible to control. Our experiments demonstrate that shear strain induces a Magnus-type force pulling vortices and antivortices in opposite directions and unfolding them into a topological stripe domain state. We discuss the analogy between this effect and the current-driven dynamics of vortices in superconductors and superfluids.

  8. Giant vortices in the Ginzburg-Landau model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Peter

    The time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation is solved in a region of two spatial dimensions and with complex geometry using the finite element method. The geometry has a marked influence on the vortex distribution and we have observed generation of giant vortices at boundary defects.......The time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation is solved in a region of two spatial dimensions and with complex geometry using the finite element method. The geometry has a marked influence on the vortex distribution and we have observed generation of giant vortices at boundary defects....

  9. Explosion of relativistic electron vortices in laser plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Lezhnin, K V; Esirkepov, T Zh; Bulanov, S V; Gu, Y; Weber, S; Korn, G

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of high intensity laser radiation with underdense plasma may lead to the formation of electron vortices. Though being quasistationary on an electron timescales, these structures tend to expand on a proton timescale due to Coloumb repulsion of ions. Using a simple analytical model of a stationary vortex as initial condition, 2D PIC simulations are performed. A number of effects are observed such as vortex boundary field intensification, multistream instabilities at the vortex boundary, and bending of the vortex boundary with the subsequent transformation into smaller electron vortices.

  10. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance work and consolidation activities on the magnet cryogenics and its power distribution are progressing according to the schedules. The manufacturing of the two new helium compressor frame units has started. The frame units support the valves, all the sensors and the compressors with their motors. This activity is subcontracted. The final installation and the commissioning at CERN are scheduled for March–April 2014. The overhauls of existing cryogenics equipment (compressors, motors) are in progress. The reassembly of the components shall start in early 2014. The helium drier, to be installed on the high-pressure helium piping, has been ordered and will be delivered in the first trimester of 2014. The power distribution for the helium compressors in SH5 on the 3.3kV network is progressing. The 3.3kV switches, between each compressor and its hot spare compressor, are being installed, together with the power cables for the new compressors. The 3.3kV electrical switchboards in SE5 will ...

  11. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The cooling down to the nominal temperature of 4.5 K was achieved at the beginning of August, in conjunction with the completion of the installation work of the connection between the power lines and the coil current leads. The temperature gradient on the first exchanger of the cold box is now kept within the nominal range. A leak of lubricant on a gasket of the helium compressor station installed at the surface was observed and several corrective actions were necessary to bring the situation back to normal. The compressor had to be refilled with lubricant and a regeneration of the filters and adsorbers was necessary. The coil cool down was resumed successfully, and the cryogenics is running since then with all parameters being nominal. Preliminary tests of the 20kA coil power supply were done earlier at full current through the discharge lines into the dump resistors, and with the powering busbars from USC5 to UXC5 without the magnet connected. On Monday evening August 25th, at 8pm, the final commissionin...

  12. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    The first phase of the commissioning ended in August by a triggered fast dump at 3T. All parameters were nominal, and the temperature recovery down to 4.5K was carried out in two days by the cryogenics. In September, series of ramps were achieved up to 3 and finally 3.8T, while checking thoroughly the detectors in the forward region, measuring any movement of and around the HF. After the incident of the LHC accelerator on September 19th, corrective actions could be undertaken in the forward region. When all these displacements were fully characterized and repetitive, with no sign of increments in displacement at each field ramp, it was possible to start the CRAFT, Cosmic Run at Four Tesla (which was in fact at 3.8T). The magnet was ramped up to 18.16kA and the 3 week run went smoothly, with only 4 interruptions: due to the VIP visits on 21st October during the LHC inauguration day; a water leak on the cooling demineralized water circuit, about 1 l/min, that triggered a stop of the cooling pumps, and resulte...

  13. Magnetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboud, Essam; El-Masry, Nabil; Qaddah, Atef; Alqahtani, Faisal; Moufti, Mohammed R. H.

    2015-06-01

    The Rahat volcanic field represents one of the widely distributed Cenozoic volcanic fields across the western regions of the Arabian Peninsula. Its human significance stems from the fact that its northern fringes, where the historical eruption of 1256 A.D. took place, are very close to the holy city of Al-Madinah Al-Monawarah. In the present work, we analyzed aeromagnetic data from the northern part of Rahat volcanic field as well as carried out a ground gravity survey. A joint interpretation and inversion of gravity and magnetic data were used to estimate the thickness of the lava flows, delineate the subsurface structures of the study area, and estimate the depth to basement using various geophysical methods, such as Tilt Derivative, Euler Deconvolution and 2D modeling inversion. Results indicated that the thickness of the lava flows in the study area ranges between 100 m (above Sea Level) at the eastern and western boundaries of Rahat Volcanic field and getting deeper at the middle as 300-500 m. It also showed that, major structural trend is in the NW direction (Red Sea trend) with some minor trends in EW direction.

  14. Interaction of vortices with different types of pinning centers in MgB{sub 2} superconducting films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zadorosny, R; Ortiz, W A [Grupo de Supercondutividade e Magnetismo, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, 13.565-905, CP 676, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Seong, W K; Kang, W N, E-mail: rafazad@df.ufscar.b [BK21 Division and Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-01

    This contribution reports on the magnetic response of two MgB{sub 2} films with 600 nm of thickness. These films were grown using the hybrid physical chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) method under different temperatures. One of the films, grown at 580 deg. C, has a micro structure with columnar grains, a rough surface and small grain size. The other, grown at 650 deg. C, has a smooth surface and larger grains. A double transition is present in the columnar sample. The lower transition temperature is due to currents tunneling through the intergrain material and the higher one is associated with the transition of the grains to the normal state. Magnetic phase diagrams in tilted geometries, with the applied fields (AC and DC) forming angles in the range (0 deg., 90 deg.) with the plane of the film, were determined to verify the influence of the perpendicular component of the AC field on pinned vortices. Hysteresis loops of magnetization versus applied field were also measured for both samples. The columnar sample exhibits jumps in the decreasing field branch of the magnetization, indicating that vortices pinned by the columnar microstructures leave the sample in bundles.

  15. Interaction of Global-Scale Atmospheric Vortices: Modeling Based on Hamiltonian System for Antipodal Vortices on Rotating Sphere

    CERN Document Server

    Mokhov, Igor I; Chefranov, Alexander G

    2012-01-01

    It is shown for the first time that only an antipodal vortex pair (APV) is the elementary singular vortex object on the sphere compatible with the hydrodynamic equations. The exact weak solution of the absolute vorticity equation on the rotating sphere is obtained in the form of Hamiltonian dynamic system for interacting APVs. This is the first model describing interaction of Barrett vortices corresponding to atmospheric centers of action (ACA). In particular, new steady-state conditions for N=2 are obtained. These analytical conditions are used for the analysis of coupled cyclone-anticyclone ACAs over oceans in the Northern Hemisphere.

  16. 3D optical vortices generated by micro-optical elements and its novel applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BU J.; LIN J.; K. J. Moh; B. P. S. Ahluwalia; CHEN H. L.; PENG X.; NIU H. B.; YUAN X.C.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we report on recent development in the areas of optical vortices generated by micro-optical elements and applications of optical vortices, including optical manipulation, radial polarization and secure free space optical communication

  17. Electron vortices: Beams with orbital angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, S. M.; Babiker, M.; Thirunavukkarasu, G.; Yuan, J.

    2017-07-01

    The recent prediction and subsequent creation of electron vortex beams in a number of laboratories occurred after almost 20 years had elapsed since the recognition of the physical significance and potential for applications of the orbital angular momentum carried by optical vortex beams. A rapid growth in interest in electron vortex beams followed, with swift theoretical and experimental developments. Much of the rapid progress can be attributed in part to the clear similarities between electron optics and photonics arising from the functional equivalence between the Helmholtz equations governing the free-space propagation of optical beams and the time-independent Schrödinger equation governing freely propagating electron vortex beams. There are, however, key differences in the properties of the two kinds of vortex beams. This review is primarily concerned with the electron type, with specific emphasis on the distinguishing vortex features: notably the spin, electric charge, current and magnetic moment, the spatial distribution, and the associated electric and magnetic fields. The physical consequences and potential applications of such properties are pointed out and analyzed, including nanoparticle manipulation and the mechanisms of orbital angular momentum transfer in the electron vortex interaction with matter.

  18. The relativistic electro-vortical field—revisiting magneto-genesis and allied problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Swadesh M.

    2016-11-01

    Following the idea of MagnetoFluid unification [S. M. Mahajan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 035001 (2003)], a very general Electro-Vortical (EV) field is constructed to describe the dynamics of a perfect relativistic fluid. Structurally similar to the electromagnetic field Fμν , the Electro-Vortical field Mνμ unifies the macroscopic forces into a single grand force that is the weighted sum of the electromagnetic and the inertial/thermal forces. The new effective force may be viewed either as a vortico-thermal generalization of the electromagnetic force or as the electromagnetic generalization of the vortico-thermal forces that a fluid element experiences in course of its evolution. Two fundamental consequences follow from this grand unification: (1) emergences of a new helicity that is conserved for arbitrary thermodynamics and (2) the entire dynamics is formally expressible as an MHD (magnetohydrodynamics) like ideal Ohm's law in which the "electric" and "magnetic" components of the EV field replace the standard electric and magnetic fields. In the light of these more and more encompassing conserved helicities, the "scope and significance" of the classical problem of magneto-genesis (need for a seed field to get a dynamo started) is reexamined. It is shown that in models more advanced than MHD, looking for exotic seed-generation mechanisms (like the baroclinic thermodynamics) should not constitute a fundamental pursuit; the totally ideal dynamics is perfectly capable of generating and sustaining magnetic fields entirely within its own devices. For a specified thermodynamics, a variety of exact and semi exact self-consistent analytical solutions for equilibrium magnetic and flow fields are derived for a single species charged fluid. The scale lengths of the fields are determined by two natural scale lengths: the skin depth and the gradient length of the thermodynamic quantities. Generally, the skin depth, being the shorter (even much shorter) than the gradient length

  19. Slowly-growing gap-opening planets trigger weaker vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Hammer, Michael; Lin, Min-Kai

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a giant planet in a low-viscosity disc can create a gap edge in the disc's radial density profile sharp enough to excite the Rossby Wave Instability. This instability may evolve into dust-trapping vortices that might explain the "banana-shaped" features in recently observed asymmetric transition discs with inner cavities. Previous hydrodynamical simulations of planet-induced vortices have neglected the timescale of hundreds to thousands of orbits to grow a massive planet to Jupiter-size. In this work, we study the effect of a giant planet's runaway growth timescale on the lifetime and characteristics of the resulting vortex. For two different planet masses (1 and 5 Jupiter masses) and two different disc viscosities ($\\alpha$=3$\\times 10^{-4}$ and 3$\\times10^{-5}$), we compare the vortices induced by planets with several different growth timescales between 10 and 4000 planet orbits. In general, we find that slowly-growing planets create significantly weaker vortices with lifetimes and surface d...

  20. The vorticity budget of developing Typhoon Nuri (2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Raymond

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The formation of west Pacific tropical cyclone Nuri (2008 was observed over four days from easterly wave to typhoon stage by aircraft using scanning Doppler radar and dropsonde data. This typhoon intensified rapidly in a significantly sheared environment. In spite of the shear, overlapping closed circulations existed in the storm frame of reference in the boundary layer and at 5 km elevation, providing a deep region protected from environmental influences. The vorticity budget was analyzed and it was found that vorticity convergence dominated vortex tilting on the storm scale in the lower troposphere. At times vorticity convergence also greatly exceeded frictional spindown in the boundary layer. Thus, the Ekman pumping hypothesis was found to be a poor approximation in the early stages of the development of this typhoon. As Nuri developed, convective sources of boundary layer vorticity became fewer but more intense, culminating in a single nascent eyewall at the tropical storm stage. A non-developing tropical wave case was also analyzed. This system started with much weaker circulations in the boundary layer and aloft, leaving it unprotected against environmental intrusion. This may explain its failure to develop.

  1. Ionospheric travelling convection vortices observed by the Greenland magnetometer chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotsiaros, Stavros; Stolle, Claudia; Friis-Christensen, Eigil

    2013-01-01

    The Greenland magnetometer array continuously provides geomagnetic variometer data since the early eighties. With the polar cusp passing over it almost every day, the array is suitable to detect ionospheric traveling convection vortices (TCVs), which were rst detected by Friis-Christensen et al...

  2. Quantitative flow analysis of swimming dynamics with coherent Lagrangian vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, F.; van Rees, W. M.; Gazzola, M.; Rossinelli, D.; Haller, G.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2015-08-01

    Undulatory swimmers flex their bodies to displace water, and in turn, the flow feeds back into the dynamics of the swimmer. At moderate Reynolds number, the resulting flow structures are characterized by unsteady separation and alternating vortices in the wake. We use the flow field from simulations of a two-dimensional, incompressible viscous flow of an undulatory, self-propelled swimmer and detect the coherent Lagrangian vortices in the wake to dissect the driving momentum transfer mechanisms. The detected material vortex boundary encloses a Lagrangian control volume that serves to track back the vortex fluid and record its circulation and momentum history. We consider two swimming modes: the C-start escape and steady anguilliform swimming. The backward advection of the coherent Lagrangian vortices elucidates the geometry of the vorticity field and allows for monitoring the gain and decay of circulation and momentum transfer in the flow field. For steady swimming, momentum oscillations of the fish can largely be attributed to the momentum exchange with the vortex fluid. For the C-start, an additionally defined jet fluid region turns out to balance the high momentum change of the fish during the rapid start.

  3. On the Stability of Dust-Laden Protoplanetary Vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Philip

    2010-01-01

    The formation of planetesimals via gravitational instability of the dust layer in a protoplanetary disks demands that there be local patches where dust is concentrated by a factor of $\\sim$ a few $\\times 10^3$ over the background value. Vortices in protoplanetary disks may concentrate dust to these values allowing them to be the nurseries of planetesimals. The concentration of dust in the cores of vortices increases the dust-gas ratio of the core compared to the background disk, creating a "heavy vortex." In this work, we show that these vortices are subject to an instability which we have called the heavy-core instability. Using Floquet theory, we show that this instability occurs in elliptical protoplanetary vortices when the gas-dust density of the core of the vortex is heavier than the ambient gas-dust density by a few tens of percent. The heavy-core instability grows very rapidly, with a growth timescale of a few vortex rotation periods. While the nonlinear evolution of this instability remains unknown, ...

  4. Streaming vorticity flux from oscillating walls with finite amplitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J. Z.; Wu, X. H.; Wu, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    How to describe vorticity creation from a moving wall is a long standing problem. This paper discusses relevant issues at the fundamental level. First, it is shown that the concept of 'vorticity flux due to wall acceleration' can be best understood by following fluid particles on the wall rather than observing the flow at fixed spatial points. This is of crucial importance when the time-averaged flux is to be considered. The averaged flux has to be estimated in a wall-fixed frame of reference (in which there is no flux due to wall acceleration at all); or, if an inertial frame of reference is used, the generalized Lagrangian mean (GLM) also gives the same result. Then, for some simple but typical configurations, the time-averaged vorticity flux from a harmonically oscillating wall with finite amplitude is analyzed, without appealing to small perturbation. The main conclusion is that the wall oscillation will produce an additional mean vorticity flux (a fully nonlinear streaming effect), which is partially responsible for the mechanism of vortex flow control by waves. The results provide qualitative explanation for some experimentally and/or computationally observed phenomena.

  5. Self-similar motion of three point vortices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aref, Hassan

    2010-01-01

    One of the counter-intuitive results in the three-vortex problem is that the vortices can converge on and meet at a point in a finite time for certain sets of vortex circulations and for certain initial conditions. This result was already included in Groumlbli's thesis of 1877 and has since been...

  6. Restrictions on the geometry of the periodic vorticity equation

    CERN Document Server

    Escher, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    We prove that several evolution equations arising as mathematical models for fluid motion cannot be realized as metric Euler equations on the Lie group of all smooth and orientation-preserving diffeomorphisms on the circle. These include the quasi-geostrophic model equation, the axisymmetric Euler flow in higher space dimensions, and De Gregorio's vorticity model equation.

  7. The decay of wake vortices in the convective boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzaepfel, F.; Gerz, T.; Frech, M.; Doernbrack, A.

    2000-03-01

    The decay of three wake vortex pairs of B-747 aircraft in a convectively driven atmospheric boundary layer is investigated by means of large-eddy simulations (LES). This situation is considered as being hazardous as the updraft velocities of a thermal may compensate the induced descent speed of the vortex pair resulting in vortices stalled in the flight path. The LES results, however, illustrate that (i) the primary rectilinear vortices are rapidly deformed on the scale of the alternating updraft and downdraft regions; (ii) parts of the vortices stay on flight level but are quickly eroded by the enhanced turbulence of an updraft; (iii) longest living sections of the vortices are found in regions of relatively calm downdraft flow which augments their descent. Strip theory calculations are used to illustrate the temporal and spatial development of lift and rolling moments experienced by a following medium weight class B-737 aircraft. Characteristics of the respective distributions are analysed. Initially, the maximum rolling moments slightly exceed the available roll control of the B-737. After 60 seconds the probability of rolling moments exceeding 50% of the roll control, a value which is considered as a threshold for acceptable rolling moments, has decreased to 1% of its initial probability. (orig.)

  8. Generalized self-dual Chern-Simons vortices

    OpenAIRE

    Bazeia, D.(Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, João Pessoa, PB, 58051-970, Brazil); da Hora, E.; Santos, C. dos(Centro de Física e Departamento de Física e Astronomia, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto, 4169-007, Porto, Portugal); Menezes, R.(Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, 58109-970 Campina Grande, PB, Brazil)

    2010-01-01

    We search for vortices in a generalized Abelian Chern-Simons model with a nonstandard kinetic term. We illustrate our results, plotting and comparing several features of the vortex solution of the generalized model with those of the vortex solution found in the standard Chern-Simons model.

  9. Vorticity and non-coaxiality in progressive deformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Means, W.D.; Hobbs, B.E.; Lister, G.S.; Williams, P.F.

    1980-01-01

    A measure of the non-coaxiality involved in progressive deformation histories is proposed in the form of the kinematical vorticity number, Wk. This number is a measure of the relative effects of rotation of material lines (relative to the instantaneous stretching axes) and of stretching of these mat

  10. Instability of helical tip vortices in rotor wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2011-01-01

    The conditions for the appearance of instabilities in systems of helical vortices constitute an intriguing problem that still remains partly unsolved. The experimental study of Felli, Camussi & Di Felice (J. Fluid Mech., this issue, vol. 682, 2011, pp. 5-53) has shed new light on some of the basi...

  11. Ionospheric travelling convection vortices observed by the Greenland magnetometer chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotsiaros, Stavros; Stolle, Claudia; Friis-Christensen, Eigil

    2013-01-01

    The Greenland magnetometer array continuously provides geomagnetic variometer data since the early eighties. With the polar cusp passing over it almost every day, the array is suitable to detect ionospheric traveling convection vortices (TCVs), which were rst detected by Friis-Christensen et al...

  12. Quantitative flow analysis of swimming dynamics with coherent Lagrangian vortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, F; van Rees, W M; Gazzola, M; Rossinelli, D; Haller, G; Koumoutsakos, P

    2015-08-01

    Undulatory swimmers flex their bodies to displace water, and in turn, the flow feeds back into the dynamics of the swimmer. At moderate Reynolds number, the resulting flow structures are characterized by unsteady separation and alternating vortices in the wake. We use the flow field from simulations of a two-dimensional, incompressible viscous flow of an undulatory, self-propelled swimmer and detect the coherent Lagrangian vortices in the wake to dissect the driving momentum transfer mechanisms. The detected material vortex boundary encloses a Lagrangian control volume that serves to track back the vortex fluid and record its circulation and momentum history. We consider two swimming modes: the C-start escape and steady anguilliform swimming. The backward advection of the coherent Lagrangian vortices elucidates the geometry of the vorticity field and allows for monitoring the gain and decay of circulation and momentum transfer in the flow field. For steady swimming, momentum oscillations of the fish can largely be attributed to the momentum exchange with the vortex fluid. For the C-start, an additionally defined jet fluid region turns out to balance the high momentum change of the fish during the rapid start.

  13. Vortices as Nurseries for Planetesimal Formation in Protoplanetary Discs

    CERN Document Server

    Heng, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Turbulent, two-dimensional, hydrodynamic flows are characterized by the emergence of coherent, long-lived vortices without a need to invoke special initial conditions. Vortices have the ability to sequester particles, with typical radii from about 1 mm to 10 cm, that are slightly decoupled from the gas. A generic feature of discs with surface density and effective temperature profiles that are decreasing, power-law functions of radial distance is that four vortex zones exist for a fixed particle size. In particular, two of the zones form an annulus at intermediate radial distances within which small particles reside. Particle capture by vortices occurs on a dynamical time scale near and at the boundaries of this annulus. As the disc ages and the particles grow via coagulation, the size of the annulus shrinks. Older discs prefer to capture smaller particles, a phenomenon we term "vortex aging". More viscous, more dust-opaque and/or less massive discs can have vortices that age faster and trap a broader range o...

  14. Data Mining for Vortices on the Earth's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Vega, Y. M.; Kalb, V.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2016-12-01

    This research validates a method to detect and characterize vortices based on velocity from simulation data. The current algorithm involves systematically searching the 3-dimensional velocity fields to identify critical points, points where the magnitude of the velocity vector field vanishes, making these points candidates for vortex centers. We utilize the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) run on request capability to create a series of model runs initialized from the conditions observed by the Cluster mission in the Hwang et al., 2011 analysis of Kelvin Helmholtz vortices observed during southward IMF. The fast data characterization and vortex detection will permit the scientist to focus in on different magnetosphere locations for further investigation in large data sets. This not only saves time to scientist, but also diminishes the potential for missing features of interest. We also analyze further the properties of the vortices found including the velocity changes within their motion across the magnetosheath, and the potential of our tool to characterize transient features (e.g. Flux Transfer Event (FTEs)) with vortical internal structures.

  15. Tip vorticity reduction and optimization of lifting surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sparenberg, JA

    2001-01-01

    In linearized optimization theory, lifting surfaces, moving in an inviscid and incompressible fluid, shed tip vorticity of which the strength has infinite square-root singularities. Here we discuss that an optimization procedure can be coupled to constraints so that the strength of the shed vorticit

  16. Streaming vorticity flux from oscillating walls with finite amplitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J. Z.; Wu, X. H.; Wu, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    How to describe vorticity creation from a moving wall is a long standing problem. This paper discusses relevant issues at the fundamental level. First, it is shown that the concept of 'vorticity flux due to wall acceleration' can be best understood by following fluid particles on the wall rather than observing the flow at fixed spatial points. This is of crucial importance when the time-averaged flux is to be considered. The averaged flux has to be estimated in a wall-fixed frame of reference (in which there is no flux due to wall acceleration at all); or, if an inertial frame of reference is used, the generalized Lagrangian mean (GLM) also gives the same result. Then, for some simple but typical configurations, the time-averaged vorticity flux from a harmonically oscillating wall with finite amplitude is analyzed, without appealing to small perturbation. The main conclusion is that the wall oscillation will produce an additional mean vorticity flux (a fully nonlinear streaming effect), which is partially responsible for the mechanism of vortex flow control by waves. The results provide qualitative explanation for some experimentally and/or computationally observed phenomena.

  17. Low temperature magnetic force microscopy on ferromagnetic and superconducting oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirohi, Anshu; Sheet, Goutam

    2016-05-01

    We report the observation of complex ferromagnetic domain structures on thin films of SrRuO3 and superconducting vortices in high temperature superconductors through low temperature magnetic force microscopy. Here we summarize the experimental details and results of magnetic imaging at low temperatures and high magnetic fields. We discuss these data in the light of existing theoretical concepts.

  18. Elliptical flow instability in a conducting fluid triggered by an external magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajer, Konrad; Mizerski, Krzysztof

    2013-03-08

    We demonstrate that arbitrarily weak magnetic field may cause violent instability of an anticyclonic, recirculating flow with uniform mean angular velocity. This magnetohydrodynamic instability would trigger turbulence in the cores of vortices where neither centrifugal, exchange instability, nor magnetorotational instability is effective. In the accretion disk vortices this can be an important mechanism of enhanced outward transport of angular momentum.

  19. Fundamental interactions of vortical structures with boundary layers in two-dimensional flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutsias, E.A.; Lynov, Jens-Peter

    1991-01-01

    in the vorticity-stream function representation for bounded geometries. Fundamental processes connected to vorticity detachment from the boundary layers caused by the proximity of vortical structures are described. These processes include enstrophy enhancement of the main flow during bursting events, and pinning...

  20. Internal and vorticity waves in decaying stratified flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matulka, A.; Cano, D.

    2009-04-01

    Most predictive models fail when forcing at the Rossby deformation Radius is important and a large range of scales have to be taken into account. When mixing of reactants or pollutants has to be accounted, the range of scales spans from hundreds of Kilometers to the Bachelor or Kolmogorov sub milimiter scales. We present some theoretical arguments to describe the flow in terms of the three dimensional vorticity equations, using a lengthscale related to the vorticity (or enstrophy ) transport. Effect of intermittent eddies and non-homogeneity of diffusion are also key issues in the environment because both stratification and rotation body forces are important and cause anisotropy/non-homogeneity. These problems need further theoretical, numerical and observational work and one approach is to try to maximize the relevant geometrical information in order to understand and therefore predict these complex environmental dispersive flows. The importance of the study of turbulence structure and its relevance in diffusion of contaminants in environmental flows is clear when we see the effect of environmental disasters such as the Prestige oil spill or the Chernobil radioactive cloud spread in the atmosphere. A series of Experiments have been performed on a strongly stratified two layer fluid consisting of Brine in the bottom and freshwater above in a 1 square meter tank. The evolution of the vortices after the passage of a grid is video recorded and Particle tracking is applied on small pliolite particles floating at the interface. The combination of internal waves and vertical vorticity produces two separate time scales that may produce resonances. The vorticity is seen to oscilate in a complex way, where the frecuency decreases with time.

  1. Complex plasma experimental device – A test bed for studying dust vortices and other collective phenomena

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MANJIT KAUR; SAYAK BOSE; P K CHATTOPADHYAY; J GHOSH; Y C SAXENA

    2016-12-01

    A typical device for carrying out sophisticated and complex dusty plasma experiments is designed, fabricated and made operational at the Institute for Plasma Research, India. The device is named as complex plasma experimental device (CPED). The main aim of this multipurpose machine is to study the formation and behaviour of dust vortices in the absence of external magnetic field under the effect of various plasma parameters. Further, the device is equipped with advanced imaging diagnostics for studying many other interesting phenomena such as dust oscillations, three-dimensional crystalline structures, dust rotation, etc. The device is quite flexible to accommodate many innovative experiments. Detailed design of the device, its diagnostics capabilities and theadvanced image analysis techniques are presented in this paper.

  2. Scattering of dislocated wavefronts by vertical vorticity and the Aharonov-Bohm effect; 1, Shallow water

    CERN Document Server

    Coste, C; Lund, F; Coste, Christophe; Umeki, Makoto; Lund, Fernando

    1999-01-01

    When a surface wave interacts with a vertical vortex in shallow water the latter induces a dislocation in the incident wavefronts that is analogous to what happens in the Aharonov-Bohm effect for the scattering of electrons by a confined magnetic field. In addition to this global similarity between these two physical systems there is scattering. This paper reports a detailed calculation of this scattering, which is quantitatively different from the electronic case in that a surface wave penetrates the inside of a vortex while electrons do not penetrate a solenoid. This difference, together with an additional difference in the equations that govern both physical systems lead to a quite different scattering in the case of surface waves, whose main characteristic is a strong asymmetry in the scattering cross section. The assumptions and approximations under which these effects happen are carefully considered, and their applicability to the case of scattering of acoustic waves by vorticity is noted.

  3. Chirality and Z2 vortices in a Heisenberg spin model on the kagome lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenge, J.-C.; Lhuillier, C.; Messio, L.; Pierre, L.; Viot, P.

    2008-05-01

    The phase diagram of the classical J1-J2 model on the kagome lattice is investigated by using extensive Monte Carlo simulations. In a realistic range of parameters, this model has a low-temperature chiral-ordered phase without long-range spin order. We show that the critical transition marking the destruction of the chiral order is preempted by the first-order proliferation of Z2 point defects. The core energy of these vortices appears to vanish when approaching the T=0 phase boundary, where both Z2 defects and gapless magnons contribute to disordering the system at very low temperatures. This situation might be typical of a large class of frustrated magnets. Possible relevance for real materials is also discussed.

  4. Hybridized Abrikosov Flux-lines and Pancake Vortices in Two-band Superconductors with Mixed Dimensionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, K.; Eschrig, M.

    2008-03-01

    We study electronic structure and thermodynamic properties of a two-band superconductor, in which one band is ballistic and quasi-two dimensional (2D), and the other is diffusive and three dimensional (3D). We assume that superconductivity in the 3D diffusive band is ``weak'', i.e., mostly induced, as is the case in MgB2. Hybridization with the ``weak'' 3D diffusive band has significant and intriguing influence on the electronic properties of the ``strong'' 2D ballistic band. In particular, the effects of Coulomb interactions in the diffusive band and unusual Kramer-Pesch effect are examined. Furthermore, based on a circular-cell approximation within the quasiclassical theory of superconductivity, we explore the effects of magnetic field on vortex structure in such a two-band superconductor. We discuss hybridization of Abrikosov flux lines in the 3D diffusive band with pancake vortices in the 2D ballistic band.

  5. Velocity and Vorticity in the Right Heart from 4DMRI Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzberg, Jean; Browning, James; Fenster, Brett

    2016-11-01

    Measurements of blood flow in the human heart were made using time-resolved 3D cardiac magnetic resonance phase contrast flow imaging (4DMRI). This work focuses on blood flow in the right ventricle (RV) and right atrium (RA) in both normal subjects and patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH). Although cardiac output is unchanged early in the disease, details of the flow field differ between normals and PH patients. In particular, vorticity at peak diastole has been found to correlate with PH. The underlying physics of this difference are being explored by a qualitative visual comparison of 3D flow structures in the vena cava, RA, and RV between healthy subjects and pulmonary hypertensive patients.

  6. CMB anisotropies from primordial inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, A

    2004-01-01

    Primordial inhomogeneous magnetic fields of the right strength can leave a signature on the CMB temperature anisotropy and polarization. Potentially observable contributions to polarization B-modes are generated by vorticity and gravitational waves sourced by the magnetic anisotropic stress. We compute the corresponding CMB transfer functions in detail including the effect of neutrinos. The shear rapidly causes the neutrino anisotropic stress to cancel the stress from the magnetic field, suppressing the production of gravitational waves and vorticity on super-horizon scales after neutrino decoupling. A significant large scale signal from tensor modes can only be produced before neutrino decoupling, and the actual amplitude is somewhat uncertain. Plausible values suggest primordial nearly scale invariant fields of ~ 10^(-10)G today may be observable from their large scale tensor anisotropy. They can be distinguished from primordial gravitational waves by their non-Gaussianity. Vector mode vorticity sources B-m...

  7. Imprinting superconducting vortex footsteps in a magnetic layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisbois, Jérémy; Motta, Maycon; Avila, Jonathan I; Shaw, Gorky; Devillers, Thibaut; Dempsey, Nora M; Veerapandian, Savita K P; Colson, Pierre; Vanderheyden, Benoît; Vanderbemden, Philippe; Ortiz, Wilson A; Nguyen, Ngoc Duy; Kramer, Roman B G; Silhanek, Alejandro V

    2016-06-06

    Local polarization of a magnetic layer, a well-known method for storing information, has found its place in numerous applications such as the popular magnetic drawing board toy or the widespread credit cards and computer hard drives. Here we experimentally show that a similar principle can be applied for imprinting the trajectory of quantum units of flux (vortices), travelling in a superconducting film (Nb), into a soft magnetic layer of permalloy (Py). In full analogy with the magnetic drawing board, vortices act as tiny magnetic scribers leaving a wake of polarized magnetic media in the Py board. The mutual interaction between superconducting vortices and ferromagnetic domains has been investigated by the magneto-optical imaging technique. For thick Py layers, the stripe magnetic domain pattern guides both the smooth magnetic flux penetration as well as the abrupt vortex avalanches in the Nb film. It is however in thin Py layers without stripe domains where superconducting vortices leave the clearest imprints of locally polarized magnetic moment along their paths. In all cases, we observe that the flux is delayed at the border of the magnetic layer. Our findings open the quest for optimizing magnetic recording of superconducting vortex trajectories.

  8. A numerical method of tracing a vortical axis along local topological axis line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Katsuyuki; Hasegawa, Hideki

    2016-06-01

    A new numerical method is presented to trace or identify a vortical axis in flow, which is based on Galilean invariant flow topology. We focus on the local flow topology specified by the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the velocity gradient tensor, and extract the axis component from its flow trajectory. Eigen-vortical-axis line is defined from the eigenvector of the real eigenvalue of the velocity gradient tensor where the tensor has the conjugate complex eigenvalues. This numerical method integrates the eigen-vortical-axis line and traces a vortical axis in terms of the invariant flow topology, which enables to investigate the feature of the topology-based vortical axis.

  9. Free-space propagation of guided optical vortices excited in an annular core fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hongwei; Zhang, Entao; Zhao, Baoyin; Duan, Kailiang

    2012-07-30

    The analytical expression for the propagation of guided optical vortices through free space is derived and used to study the dynamic evolution of guided optical vortices after passing through the free space, and the dependence of guided optical vortices on the control parameters where the effect of propagation distance is stressed. It is shown that the motion, pair creation and annihilation of guided optical vortices may take place. In particular, the creation and annihilation of a pair of guided optical vortices do not take place by varying fiber length.

  10. A Climatological Investigation of the Activity of Summer Subtropical Vortices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Zhexian; DAI Kan

    2008-01-01

    By applying a new vortex detection method to the ECMWF 40-yr reanalysis (ERA40) data from 1985 to 2002, the climatology of summer vortices has been investigated in five subtropical regions, i.e., the northwestern Pacific, northeastern Pacific, northwestern Atlantic, northeastern Atlantic, and Australia-South Pacific, followed by validation with NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data. Results are as follows: (1) The spatial distributions of ERA40 vortex activities (VAC) were well consistent with those of NCEP/NCAR reanalysis (NRA) results in all regions, especially in northwestern Pacific. (2) Because of different model resolutions, both the number and intensity of vortices obtained from NRA were significantly weaker thanERA40's. (3) Vortices mainly cruised in coasts and the adjacent seas, from where to the land or the open sea vortex activities were gradually decreased. (4) There were two active centers in the northwestern Pacific:one was located in South China Sea and the other, as the largest center of the five regions, spread from the east side of the Philippines to Japan. (5) Over the northwestern Atlantic, most vortices occurred in Panama and its west-side offshore. (6) The spatial distributions of vortices were alike between the northeastern Pacific and northeastern Atlantic, both spreading from coasts to the west-side sea at 5°-20°N. (7) In the Anstralia-South Pacific, vortices were not as active as those in the other four regions, and mostly took place in the equator-side of near ocean areas. (8) Except the northwestern Pacific and northwestern Atlantic, the VAC interannual variations in the other three regions were different between ERA40 and NRA data. (9)In the northwestern Pacific and northwestern Atlantic, the VAC interannual variation could be separated to several distinct stages. (10) Since the mid 1980s, mean vortex intensity was getting increased in the northwestern Pacific, which was most significant in the subtropical areas on a global basis. In the western

  11. ASYMMETRIC VORTICES FLOW OVER SLENDER BODY AND ITS ACTIVE CONTROL AT HIGH ANGLE OF ATTACK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Xueying; WANG Yankui

    2004-01-01

    The studies of asymmetric vortices flow over slender body and its active control at high angles of attack have significant importance for both academic field and engineering area. This paper attempts to provide an update state of art to the investigations on the fields of forebody asymmetric vortices. This review emphasizes the correlation between micro-perturbation on the model nose and its response and evolution behaviors of the asymmetric vortices. The critical issues are discussed,which include the formation and evolution mechanism of asymmetric multi-vortices; main behaviors of asymmetric vortices flow including its deterministic feature and vortices flow structure; the evolution and development of asymmetric vortices under the perturbation on the model nose; forebody vortex active control especially discussed micro-perturbation active control concept and technique in more detail. However present understanding in this area is still very limited and this paper tries to identify the key unknown problems in the concluding remarks.

  12. Numerical study of the evolution of vortices in a linearly stratified fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckers, M.; Clercx, H.J.H.; Van Heijst, G.J.F. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven (Netherlands). J.M. Burgers Centre fro Fluid Dynamics; Verzicco, R. [Rome Univ. La Sapienza, Rome (Italy). Dipt. di Meccanica e Aeronautica

    1999-12-01

    This paper presents a numerical study in which the evolution of vortices in a Stafford fluid is compared to the evolution of two-dimensional vortices. The influence of the Reynolds number and the Froude number are investigated, for the evolution of axisymmetric vortices, for their azimuthal instability and for the subsequent formation of tripoles. It is found that due to radial diffusion axisymmetric vortices with various initial vorticity profiles all evolve towards the same profile. This evolution reduces the growth of azimuthal instabilities which may lead to the formation of a tripole. For vortices in a stratified fluid the effect of the ambient stratification on the evolution of the vortices is investigated. It is found that a process of vortex stretching, which becomes more pronounced for increasing Froude numbers, leads to a weaker tripole formation.

  13. Vortex Identification from Local Properties of the Vorticity Field

    CERN Document Server

    Elsas, J H

    2016-01-01

    A number of systematic procedures for the identification of coherent structures have been developed as a way to address their possible kinematical and dynamical roles in structural formulations of turbulence. It has been broadly acknowledged, however, that vortex detection algorithms, usually based on linear-algebraic properties of the velocity gradient tensor, are plagued with severe shortcomings and are also dependent on the choice of subjective threshold parameters in their implementations. In two-dimensions, a large class of standard vortex identification prescriptions turn out to be equivalent to the "swirling strength criterion", which is critically revisited in this work. We classify the instances where the $\\lambda_{ci}$-criterion blatantly fails and propose an alternative vortex detection scheme based on the local curvature properties of the vorticity graph -- the "vorticity curvature criterion" -- which improves over the results obtained with the $\\lambda_{ci}$-criterion in controlled Monte-Carlo te...

  14. On the refracted patterns produced by liquid vortices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yasser Aboelkassem; Georgios H.Vatistas

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the refracted shad-ows produced by steady and time-decaying liquid vor-tices under uniform illumination from above is givenin this article.An expression for the induced shadowintensity is derived and found to be a function of thevortex's free surface profile,i.e.,function of the staticpressure distribution.The patterns for different focus-ing depth are given and compared with previous visu-alization results from the literature.The phenomenonis examined and illustrated as a bench mark case byusing both steady and time-decaying algebraic vortexmodels.However,this study can be extended to checkthe feasibility of recovering the main flow properties byanalyzing the luminous image intensity of the refractedpatterns.The present analysis is valid only when the swirlvelocity is order of magnitude higher than the meridi-onal flow components and the vorticity is concentratedwithin the core region and of intense conditions.

  15. A study of optical vortices inside the Talbot interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Panthong, Pituk; Pattanaporkratana, Apichart; Chiangga, Surasak; Deachapunya, Sarayut

    2015-01-01

    The optical Talbot interferometer has been used to explore the topological charges of optical vortices. We recorded the self-imaging of a diffraction grating in the near-field regime with the optical vortex of several topological charges. Our twisted light was generated by a spatial light modulator (SLM). Previous studies showed that interferometric methods can determine the particular orbital angular momentum (OAM) states, but a large number of OAM eigenvalues are difficult to distinguish from the interference patterns. Here, we show that the Talbot patterns can distinguish the charges as well as the OAM of the vortices with high orders. Owing to high sensitivity and self-imaging of Talbot effect, several OAM eigenvalues can be distinguished by direct measurement. We assure the experimental results with our theory. The present results are useful for classical and quantum metrology as well as future implementations of quantum communications.

  16. Mechanism for Influence of Nose Bluntness on Asymmetric Vortices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Gang; LIANG Xin-Gang

    2004-01-01

    @@ Pressure distributions on slender bodies are measured at various roll angles; it is found that the side loads on the blunted-nose slender body are as small as one-third of that on a pointed-nose one, or even zero at some roll angles. Numerical simulation shows that different flow structures are generated on the leeside of the bodies with different noses. The results confirm that a structure of U-shaped horseshoe vortex develops on the top of the blunted nose due to the closed type of surface flow separation. The shear layer separated from the nose is entrapped into the horseshoe vortex core and forms two main vortices on the two sides of the body. The function of this structure is to hold in the two main nose vortices and to restrict the emergence of asymmetry.

  17. Supersymmetry Breaking on Gauged Non-Abelian Vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Konishi, Kenichi; Vinci, Walter

    2012-01-01

    There are a large number of systems characterized by a completely broken gauge symmetry, but with an unbroken global color-flavor diagonal symmetry, i.e., systems in the so-called color-flavor locked phase. If the gauge symmetry breaking supports vortices, the latter develop non-Abelian orientational zero-modes and become non-Abelian vortices, a subject of intense study in the last several years. In this paper we consider the effects of weakly gauging the full exact global flavor symmetry in such systems, deriving an effective description of the light excitations in the presence of a vortex. Surprising consequences are shown to follow. The fluctuations of the vortex orientational modes get diffused to bulk modes through tunneling processes. When our model is embedded in a supersymmetric theory, the vortex is still 1/2 BPS saturated, but the vortex effective action breaks supersymmetry.

  18. Interactions and excitations of non-Abelian vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alford, M.G.; Benson, K.; Coleman, S.; March-Russell, J. (Lyman Laboratory of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (USA)); Wilczek, F. (Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (USA))

    1990-04-02

    We examine bosonic zero modes of vortices formed in the gauge breaking {ital G}{r arrow}{ital H}. For non-Abelian {ital G}, zero modes are generic. Their solutions depend on global symmetry structure. Vortices render the embedding {ital H}{contained in}{ital G} space dependent, with a dynamically determined subgroup {ital {tilde H}} single valued. They Aharonov-Bohm scatter gauge bosons associated with multivalued generators. Alice strings ({ital H}=O(2), {ital {tilde H}}={ital openZ}{sub 2}) attract charges and scatter SO(2) photons,'' and a two-string system has zero modes with unlocalizable Cheshire'' charge. The resulting superconductivity has novel electrodynamics.

  19. Temporally optimized spanwise vorticity sensor measurements in turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill-Winter, C.; Klewicki, J.; Baidya, R.; Marusic, I.

    2015-12-01

    Multi-element hot-wire anemometry was used to measure spanwise vorticity fluctuations in turbulent boundary layers. Smooth wall boundary layer profiles, with very good spatial and temporal resolution, were acquired over a Kármán number range of 2000-12,700 at the Melbourne Wind Tunnel at the University of Melbourne and the University of New Hampshire's Flow Physics Facility. A custom hot-wire probe was necessary to simultaneously obtain velocity and spanwise vorticity measurements centered at a fixed point in space. A custom calibration/processing scheme was developed to utilize single-wall-parallel wires to optimize the accuracy of the measured wall-normal velocity fluctuations derived from the sensor's ×-array.

  20. Mass deformed world-sheet action of semi local vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yunguo [School of Space Science and Physics, Shandong University at Weihai,264209 Weihai (China); Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment,264209 Weihai (China)

    2014-02-10

    The mass deformed effective world-sheet theory of semi local vortices was constructed via the field theoretical method. By Euler-Lagrangian equations, the Ansatze for both the gauge field and the adjoint scalar were solved, this ensures that zero modes of vortices are minimal excitations of the system. Up to the 1/g{sup 2} order, all profiles are solved. The mass deformed effective action was obtained by integrating out the transverse plane of the vortex string. The effective theory interpolates between the local vortex and the lump. Respecting certain normalization conditions, the effective theory shows a Seiberg-like duality, which agrees with the result of the Kähler quotient construction.

  1. Are vortices in rotating superfluids breaking the Weak Equivalence Principle?

    CERN Document Server

    de Matos, Clovis Jacinto

    2009-01-01

    Due to the breaking of gauge symmetry in rotating superfluid Helium, the inertial mass of a vortex diverges with the vortex size. The vortex inertial mass is thus much higher than the classical inertial mass of the vortex core. An equal increase of the vortex gravitational mass is questioned. The possibility that the vortices in a rotating superfluid could break the weak equivalence principle in relation with a variable speed of light in the superfluid vacuum is debated. Experiments to test this possibility are investigated on the bases that superfluid Helium vortices would not fall, under the single influence of a uniform gravitational field, at the same rate as the rest of the superfluid Helium mass.

  2. Clustering of heavy particles in vortical flows: a selective review

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S RAVICHANDRAN; P DEEPU; RAMA GOVINDARAJAN

    2017-04-01

    Heavy particles in a turbulent flow tend to leave regions of high vorticity and cluster into regions of high strain. The consequences of such clustering have been studied in a variety of situations over the past few decades, and this problem has seen several review papers already. Our objectives in this paper are three-fold. (i) We introduce the reader to the basic ideas, and explain why the problem is interesting. (ii) Using an N-vortex system we present an interesting case where particles are attracted to the vicinity of vortices. A new scaling forthe critical Stokes number of attraction is obtained. (iii) We review a number of papers, which are related to cloud physics in this context.

  3. Characterization of vortical gusts produced by a heaving plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufstedler, Esteban; McKeon, Beverley J.

    2016-11-01

    To experimentally investigate the interaction between a wing and a spanwise vortical gust, a simple gust generator has been built and tested. This consists of a transversely heaving flat plate that changes direction to release a vortex, which then convects downstream to interact with a wing. Previous experiments have shown that, immediately downstream of the plate, the circulation of the generated vortex is proportional to the heaving speed of the plate. The forces that the gusts exert on a downstream wing were shown to be strongly repeatable and consistent with a passing vortex. This presentation will discuss the properties of the vortical gusts as they move downstream, and relate those properties to the important dimensionless parameters of the flow. These properties include the convection speed and circulation of the vortex, as well as the enstrophy due to the wake of the plate. This research is funded by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation through Grant GBMF#2645 to the California Institute of Technology.

  4. Stretching vortices as a basis for the theory of turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Sirota, V A

    2014-01-01

    Turbulent flows play an important role in many aspects of nature and technics from sea storms to transport of particles or chemicals. Transport of energy from large scales to small fluctuations is the essential feature of three-dimensional turbulence. What mechanism is responsible for this transport and how do the small fluctuations appear? The conventional conception implies a cascade of breaking vortices. But it faces crucial problems in explaining the mechanism of the breaking, and fails to explain the observed long-living structures in turbulent flows. We suggest a new concept based on recent analysis of stochastic Navier-Stokes equation: stretching of vortices instead of their breaking may be the main mechanism of turbulence. This conception is free of the disadvantages of the cascade paradigm; it also does not need finite-time singularities to explain the observed statistical properties of turbulent flows. Moreover, the introduction of the new conception allows immediately to get velocity scaling parame...

  5. Sunspots are in many ways similar to terrestrial vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Vatistas, Georgios H

    2011-01-01

    In this letter we identify similarities amongst sunspots and terrestrial vortices. The dark appearance of the central part of any sunspot is currently justified by an anticipated cooling effect experienced by the ionized gas. However, it cannot single-handedly reconcile the halo that surrounds the penumbra, the subsequent second dim ring that could be possibly followed by a second halo. In antithesis, light refraction due to density variations in a compressible whirl can give reason for all of these manifestations. Certain data of Wilson's depression fit better the geometric depth profile of a two-celled vortex. The last provides a hurricane equivalent manifestation for the normal and reverse Evershed effect. There is compelling evidence that alike to atmospheric vortices sunspots do also spawn meso-cyclones.

  6. Spiral density wave generation by vortices in Keplerian flows

    CERN Document Server

    Bodo, G; Murante, G; Tevzadze, A; Rossi, P; Ferrari, A

    2005-01-01

    We perform a detailed analytical and numerical study of the dynamics of perturbations (vortex/aperiodic mode, Rossby and spiral-density waves) in 2D compressible disks with a Keplerian law of rotation. We draw attention to the process of spiral-density wave generation from vortices, discussing, in particular, the initial, most peculiar stages of wave emission. We show that the linear phenomenon of wave generation by vortices in smooth (without inflection points) shear flows found by using the so-called non-modal approach, is directly applicable to the present case. After an analytical non-modal description of the physics and characteristics of the spiral-density wave generation/propagation in the local shearing-sheet model, we follow the process of wave generation by small amplitude coherent circular vortex structures, by direct global numerical simulation, describing the main features of the generated waves.

  7. The Finiteness of vortices in steady incompressible viscous fluid flow

    CERN Document Server

    Kalita, Jiten C; Panda, Swapnendu

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we provide two novel approaches to show that incompressible fluid flow in a finite domain contains at most a finite number vortices. We use a recently developed geometric theory of incompressible viscous flows along with an existing mathematical analysis concept to establish the finiteness. We also offer a second proof of finiteness by roping in the Kolmogorov's length scale criterion in conjunction with the notion of diametric disks.

  8. Helicity and topology of a small region of quantum vorticity

    CERN Document Server

    Mesgarnezhad, M; Baggaley, A W; Barenghi, C F

    2016-01-01

    We numerically study the evolution of a small turbulent region of quantised vorticity in superfluid helium, a regime which can be realised in the laboratory. We show that the turbulence achieves a fluctuating steady-state in terms of dynamics (energy), geometry (length, writhing) and topology (linking). After defining the knot spectrum, we show that, at any instant, the turbulence consists of many unknots and few large loops of great geometrical and topological complexity.

  9. Numerical evaluation of gas core length in free surface vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofano, L.; Nobili, M.; Caruso, G.

    2014-11-01

    The formation and evolution of free surface vortices represent an important topic in many hydraulic intakes, since strong whirlpools introduce swirl flow at the intake, and could cause entrainment of floating matters and gas. In particular, gas entrainment phenomena are an important safety issue for Sodium cooled Fast Reactors, because the introduction of gas bubbles within the core causes dangerous reactivity fluctuation. In this paper, a numerical evaluation of the gas core length in free surface vortices is presented, according to two different approaches. In the first one, a prediction method, developed by the Japanese researcher Sakai and his team, has been applied. This method is based on the Burgers vortex model, and it is able to estimate the gas core length of a free surface vortex starting from two parameters calculated with single-phase CFD simulations. The two parameters are the circulation and the downward velocity gradient. The other approach consists in performing a two-phase CFD simulation of a free surface vortex, in order to numerically reproduce the gas- liquid interface deformation. Mapped convergent mesh is used to reduce numerical error and a VOF (Volume Of Fluid) method was selected to track the gas-liquid interface. Two different turbulence models have been tested and analyzed. Experimental measurements of free surface vortices gas core length have been executed, using optical methods, and numerical results have been compared with experimental measurements. The computational domain and the boundary conditions of the CFD simulations were set consistently with the experimental test conditions.

  10. Hilbert Statistics of Vorticity Scaling in Two-Dimensional Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, H S; Meng, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the scaling property of the inverse energy cascade and forward enstrophy cascade of the vorticity filed $\\omega(x,y)$ in two-dimensional (2D) turbulence is analyzed. This is accomplished by applying a Hilbert-based technique, namely Hilbert-Huang Transform, to a vorticity field obtained from a $8192^2$ grid-points direct numerical simulation of the 2D turbulence with a forcing scale $k_f=100$ and an Ekman friction. The measured joint probability density function $p(C,k)$ of mode $C_i(x)$ of the vorticity $\\omega$ and instantaneous wavenumber $k(x)$ is separated by the forcing scale $k_f$ into two parts, which corresponding to the inverse energy cascade and the forward enstrophy cascade. It is found that all conditional pdf $p(C\\vert k)$ at given wavenumber $k$ has an exponential tail. In the inverse energy cascade, the shape of $p(C\\vert k)$ does collapse with each other, indicating a nonintermittent cascade. The measured scaling exponent $\\zeta_{\\omega}^I(q)$ is linear with the statistical ord...

  11. Seismometer Detection of Dust Devil Vortices by Ground Tilt

    CERN Document Server

    Lorenz, Ralph D; Murdoch, Naomi; Lognonné, Philippe; Kawamura, Taichi; Mimoun, David; Banerdt, W Bruce

    2015-01-01

    We report seismic signals on a desert playa caused by convective vortices and dust devils. The long-period (10-100s) signatures, with tilts of ~10$^{-7}$ radians, are correlated with the presence of vortices, detected with nearby sensors as sharp temporary pressure drops (0.2-1 mbar) and solar obscuration by dust. We show that the shape and amplitude of the signals, manifesting primarily as horizontal accelerations, can be modeled approximately with a simple quasi-static point-load model of the negative pressure field associated with the vortices acting on the ground as an elastic half space. We suggest the load imposed by a dust devil of diameter D and core pressure {\\Delta}Po is ~({\\pi}/2){\\Delta}PoD$^2$, or for a typical terrestrial devil of 5 m diameter and 2 mbar, about the weight of a small car. The tilt depends on the inverse square of distance, and on the elastic properties of the ground, and the large signals we observe are in part due to the relatively soft playa sediment and the shallow installatio...

  12. Jovian Vortices and Barges: HST observations 1994-1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, R.; Sanchez-Lavega, A.; Lecacheux, J.; Colas, F.; Miyazaki, I.

    2000-10-01

    We have used the HST-WFPC2 archived images of Jupiter in the period 1994-1998 to study the zonal and meridional distributions, long-term motions, lifetimes, interactions and other properties of the vortices larger than 2 degrees. The latitude range covered spans from +75 to -75 degrees. High-resolution images obtained with the 890nm, 410nm and 953nm wavelength filters allowed us to make a morphological classification based on their appearance in each filter. The vortices are anticyclones, and their long-term motions have been completed with ground-based images and are compared to the mean Jovian zonal wind profile. Significant differences are found between the vortex velocities and the mean zonal winds. Some vortices exhibited important drift changes in short period times. We analyze a possible correlation between their size and zonal wind velocity. On the other hand, the "barges" lie in the cyclone domains of the wind-profile and have been identified in several latitudes. Their latitudinal size is similar in all of them (typically 1.6 degrees) but their longitudinal size ranges from 1 to 32 degrees. We discuss the temporal evolution of some of these cyclonic regions. The Spanish team was supported by Gobierno Vasco PI 034/97. The French team was supported by the "Programme National de Planetologie." RM acknowledges a fellowship from Universidad Pais Vasco.

  13. Some exact BPS solutions for exotic vortices and monopoles

    CERN Document Server

    Ramadhan, Handhika S

    2015-01-01

    We present several analytical solutions of BPS vortices and monopoles in the generalized Abelian Maxwell-Higgs and Yang-Mills-Higgs theories, respectively. These models have recently been extensively studied and several exact solutions have already been obtained in~\\cite{Casana:2014qfa, Casana:2013lna}. In each theory, the dynamics is controlled by the additional two positive scalar-field-dependent functions, $f(|\\phi|)$ and $w(|\\phi|)$. For the case of vortices, we work in the ordinary symmetry-breaking Higgs potential, while for the case of monopoles we have the ordinary condition of the Prasad-Sommerfield limit. Our results generalize that of exact solutions found previously. We also present solutions for BPS vortices with higher winding number. These solutions suffer from the condition that $w(|\\phi|)$ has negative value at some finite range of $r$, but we argue that since it satisfies the weaker positive-value conditions then the corresponding energy density is still positive-definite and, thus, they are...

  14. Lagrangian structures in time-periodic vortical flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Kostrykin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Lagrangian trajectories of fluid particles are experimentally studied in an oscillating four-vortex velocity field. The oscillations occur due to a loss of stability of a steady flow and result in a regular reclosure of streamlines between the vortices of the same sign. The Eulerian velocity field is visualized by tracer displacements over a short time period. The obtained data on tracer motions during a number of oscillation periods show that the Lagrangian trajectories form quasi-regular structures. The destruction of these structures is determined by two characteristic time scales: the tracers are redistributed sufficiently fast between the vortices of the same sign and much more slowly transported into the vortices of opposite sign. The observed behavior of the Lagrangian trajectories is quantitatively reproduced in a new numerical experiment with two-dimensional model of the velocity field with a small number of spatial harmonics. A qualitative interpretation of phenomena observed on the basis of the theory of adiabatic chaos in the Hamiltonian systems is given. The Lagrangian trajectories are numerically simulated under varying flow parameters. It is shown that the spatial-temporal characteristics of the Lagrangian structures depend on the properties of temporal change in the streamlines topology and on the adiabatic parameter corresponding to the flow. The condition for the occurrence of traps (the regions where the Lagrangian particles reside for a long time is obtained.

  15. A study of vorticity formation in high energy nuclear collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becattini, F. [Universita di Firenze, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Sesto F.no (Firenze) (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Firenze, Sesto F.no (Firenze) (Italy); Inghirami, G. [Universita di Firenze, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Sesto F.no (Firenze) (Italy); Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS), Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Rolando, V.; Pagliara, G. [Universita di Ferrara, Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Ferrara (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); Beraudo, A.; De Pace, A.; Nardi, M. [INFN, Sezione di Torino, Turin (Italy); Del Zanna, L. [Universita di Firenze, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Sesto F.no (Firenze) (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Firenze, Sesto F.no (Firenze) (Italy); INAF, Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Florence (Italy); Chandra, V. [Indian Institute of Technology Gandhinagar, Ahmedabad, Gujrat (India)

    2015-09-15

    We present a quantitative study of vorticity formation in peripheral ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions at √(s{sub NN}) = 200 GeV by using the ECHO-QGP numerical code, implementing relativistic dissipative hydrodynamics in the causal Israel-Stewart framework in 3 + 1 dimensions with an initial Bjorken flow profile. We consider different definitions of vorticity which are relevant in relativistic hydrodynamics. After demonstrating the excellent capabilities of our code, which proves to be able to reproduce Gubser flow up to 8 fm/c, we show that, with the initial conditions needed to reproduce the measured directed flow in peripheral collisions corresponding to an average impact parameter b = 11.6 fm and with the Bjorken flow profile for a viscous Quark Gluon Plasma with η/s = 0.1 fixed, a vorticity of the order of some 10{sup -2} c/fm can develop at freeze-out. The ensuing polarization of Λ baryons does not exceed 1.4 % at midrapidity. We show that the amount of developed directed flow is sensitive to both the initial angular momentum of the plasma and its viscosity. (orig.)

  16. The impact of intraglottal vortices on vocal fold dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erath, Byron; Pirnia, Alireza; Peterson, Sean

    2016-11-01

    During voiced speech a critical pressure is produced in the lungs that separates the vocal folds and creates a passage (the glottis) for airflow. As air passes through the vocal folds the resulting aerodynamic loading, coupled with the tissue properties of the vocal folds, produces self-sustained oscillations. Throughout each cycle a complex flow field develops, characterized by a plethora of viscous flow phenomena. Air passing through the glottis creates a jet, with periodically-shed vortices developing due to flow separation and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the shear layer. These vortices have been hypothesized to be a crucial mechanism for producing vocal fold vibrations. In this study the effect of vortices on the vocal fold dynamics is investigated experimentally by passing a vortex ring over a flexible beam with the same non-dimensional mechanical properties as the vocal folds. Synchronized particle image velocimetry data are acquired in tandem with the beam dynamics. The resulting impact of the vortex ring loading on vocal fold dynamics is discussed in detail. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation Grant CBET #1511761.

  17. Sensing and exploitation of vortices for a schooling fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Amy; Maertens, Audrey; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2016-11-01

    The question of whether fish are capable of actively sensing and using individual vortices while schooling has long been debated. Prior research has shown that fish can gain a hydrodynamic benefit when swimming in the wake of another fish. However, it remains unclear if lateral line feedback is necessary, and if so, how a fish may adjust its motion to maximize its energy savings. To begin to address this, we study though numerical simulations the hydrodynamic interactions between two fish swimming in tandem, focusing on the interaction of individual vortices with the following fish. Using a potential flow model, we show that the pressure sensed by the following fish can be captured with a low number of states, which provide information that allows the fish to locate near-field vortices and phase its undulating motion accordingly. We will discuss how vortex interactions along the fish can be beneficial, the signals they induce, and which strategies a fish may use to save the most energy.

  18. Some exact BPS solutions for exotic vortices and monopoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadhan, Handhika S.

    2016-07-01

    We present several analytical solutions of BPS vortices and monopoles in the generalized Abelian Maxwell-Higgs and Yang-Mills-Higgs theories, respectively. These models have recently been extensively studied and several exact solutions have already been obtained in [1,2]. In each theory, the dynamics is controlled by the additional two positive scalar-field-dependent functions, f (| ϕ |) and w (| ϕ |). For the case of vortices, we work in the ordinary symmetry-breaking Higgs potential, while for the case of monopoles we have the ordinary condition of the Prasad-Sommerfield limit. Our results generalize the exact solutions found previously. We also present solutions for BPS vortices with higher winding number. These solutions suffer from the condition that w (| ϕ |) has negative value at some finite range of r, but we argue that since it satisfies the weaker positive-value conditions then the corresponding energy density is still positive-definite and, thus, they are acceptable BPS solutions.

  19. Dust-trapping Rossby vortices in protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Meheut, H; Varniere, P; Benz, W

    2012-01-01

    One of the most challenging steps in planet formation theory is the one leading to the formation of planetesimals of kilometre size. A promising scenario involves the existence of vortices able to concentrate a large amount of dust and grains in their centres. Up to now this scenario has been studied mostly in 2D razor thin disks. A 3D study including, simultaneously, the formation and resulting dust concentration of the vortices with vertical settling, was still missing. The Rossby wave instability self-consistently forms 3D vortices, which have the unique quality of presenting a large scale vertical velocity in their centre. Here we aim to study how this newly discovered effect can alter the dynamic evolution of the dust. We perform global 3D simulations of the RWI in a radially and vertically stratified disk using the code MPI-AMRVAC. After the growth phase of the instability, the gas and solid phases are modelled by a bi-fluid approach, where the dust is considered as a fluid without pressure. Both the dr...

  20. Models of Vortices and Spirals in White Dwarf's Accretion Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boneva, Daniela

    2010-11-01

    The main aim in the current survey is to suggest models of the development of structures, such as vortices and spirals, in accretion white dwarf's binaries. On the base of hydrodynamical analytical considerations it is applied numerical methods and simulations. It is suggested in the theoretical model the perturbation's parameters of the accretion flow, caused by the influences of the tidal wave over the flux of accretion matter around the secondary star. To examine such disturbed flow, the numerical code has involved in the calculations. The results reveal us an appearing of structure with spiral shape due to the tidal interaction in the close binaries. Our further simulations give the solution, which expresses the formation of vortical configurations in the accretion disc's zone. The evolution of vortices in areas of the flow's interaction is explored using single vortex and composite vortex models. Gas in the disc matter is considered to be compressible and non-ideal. The longevity of all these structures is different and each depends of time period of the rotation, density and velocity of the accretion matter.

  1. Measurements of leading edge vortices in a supersonic stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanovic, Ivana Milija

    An experimental investigation of the leading edge vortices from a 75° sweptback, sharp edge delta wing has been carried out in a Mach 2.49 stream. Five-hole conical probe traverses were conducted vertically and horizontally through the primary vortices at the trailing edge and at one half chord downstream station for 7° and 12° angles of attack. The main objective was to determine the Mach number and pressure distributions in the primary vortex and to present comparisons of flow properties at different survey stations. In response to the continued interest in efficient supersonic flight vehicles, particularly in the missile arena, the motivation for this research has been to provide the quantitative details of supersonic leading edge vortices, the understanding of which up to now has been largely based on flow visualizations and presumed similarity to low speed flows. As a prerequisite to the measurement campaign, the employed five-hole conical probe was numerically calibrated using a three-dimensional Thin Layer Navier-Stokes solver in order to circumvent the traditional experimental approach vastly demanding on resources. The pressure readings at the probe orifices were computed for a range of Mach numbers and pitch angles, and subsequently verified in wind tunnel tests. The calibration phase also demonstrated the profound influence of the probe bluntness on the nearby static pressure ports, its relevance to the ultimate modeling strategy and the resulting calibration charts. Flow diagnostics of the leading edge vortices included both qualitative flow visualizations, as well as quantitative measurements. Shadowgraphs provided information regarding the trajectory and relative size of the generated vortices while assuring that no probe-induced vortex breakdown occurred. Surface oil patterns revealed the general spanwise locations of leeward vortices, and confirmed topological similarity to their low speed counterparts. The probe measurements revealed substantial

  2. CONTRIBUTION OF VELOCITY VORTICES AND FAST SHOCK REFLECTION AND REFRACTION TO THE FORMATION OF EUV WAVES IN SOLAR ERUPTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongjuan; Liu, Siqing; Gong, Jiancun [Center for Space Science and Applied Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wu, Ning [School of Tourism and Geography, Yunnan Normal University, Kunming, Yunnan 650031 (China); Lin, Jun [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650011 (China)

    2015-06-01

    We numerically study the detailed evolutionary features of the wave-like disturbance and its propagation in the eruption. This work is a follow-up to Wang et al., using significantly upgraded new simulations. We focus on the contribution of the velocity vortices and the fast shock reflection and refraction in the solar corona to the formation of the EUV waves. Following the loss of equilibrium in the coronal magnetic structure, the flux rope exhibits rapid motions and invokes the fast-mode shock at the front of the rope, which then produces a type II radio burst. The expansion of the fast shock, which is associated with outward motion, takes place in various directions, and the downward expansion shows the reflection and the refraction as a result of the non-uniform background plasma. The reflected component of the fast shock propagates upward and the refracted component propagates downward. As the refracted component reaches the boundary surface, a weak echo is excited. The Moreton wave is invoked as the fast shock touches the bottom boundary, so the Moreton wave lags the type II burst. A secondary echo occurs in the area where reflection of the fast shock encounters the slow-mode shock, and the nearby magnetic field lines are further distorted because of the interaction between the secondary echo and the velocity vortices. Our results indicate that the EUV wave may arise from various processes that are revealed in the new simulations.

  3. Off-centred immobile magnetic vortex under influence of spin-transfer torque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravchuk, Volodymyr P; Sheka, Denis D; Gaididei, Yuri [Institute for Theoretical Physics, 03143 Kiev (Ukraine); Mertens, Franz G, E-mail: vkravchuk@bitp.kiev.ua [Physics Institute, University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2011-07-20

    Formation of the 'dip' structure which foregoes switching of magnetic vortex polarity is studied numerically in magnetic nanodisc. A new method based on influence of the spin-transfer torque is used. The method allows one to obtain the dip structure for immobile vortex which significantly improves studying accuracy in comparison with the case of moving vortex. Free out-of-plane vortices as well as in-plane vortices pinned on hole defects are considered. It is shown that the process of the dip formation is different for free and pinned vortices and direction of the dip does not directly depend on the vortex polarity.

  4. Magnetization dynamics of imprinted non-collinear spin textures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streubel, Robert, E-mail: r.streubel@ifw-dresden.de; Kopte, Martin; Makarov, Denys, E-mail: d.makarov@ifw-dresden.de [Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, IFW Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Fischer, Peter [Center for X-Ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Physics Department, UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, California 95064 (United States); Schmidt, Oliver G. [Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, IFW Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Material Systems for Nanoelectronics, Chemnitz University of Technology, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2015-09-14

    We study the magnetization dynamics of non-collinear spin textures realized via imprint of the magnetic vortex state in soft permalloy into magnetically hard out-of-plane magnetized Co/Pd nanopatterned heterostructures. Tuning the interlayer exchange coupling between soft- and hard-magnetic subsystems provides means to tailor the magnetic state in the Co/Pd stack from being vortex- to donut-like with different core sizes. While the imprinted vortex spin texture leads to the dynamics similar to the one observed for vortices in permalloy disks, the donut-like state causes the appearance of two gyrofrequencies characteristic of the early and later stages of the magnetization dynamics. The dynamics are described using the Thiele equation supported by the full scale micromagnetic simulations by taking into account an enlarged core size of the donut states compared to magnetic vortices.

  5. Lorentz microscopy observation of vortices in high-Tc superconductors using a 1-MV field emission transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Ken

    2013-06-01

    Lorentz microscopy has opened the door to observing a single quantized magnetic flux line (i.e. a vortex) and its dynamic behavior inside a superconductor in real time. It resulted from the efforts of Dr Akira Tonomura and his collaborators, who developed a field emission electron microscope and advanced the technologies used for visualizing vortices (e.g. a low-temperature specimen stage and a magnetic-field application system). They used a 1-MV field emission transmission electron microscope with an electron beam that can penetrate thick specimens of high-temperature superconductors (Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ and YB2C3O7-δ) to reveal the flux-line features inside materials and their interactions with defects. This memorial paper reviews the results of research in the area of vortex matter physics.

  6. Finite Element Treatment of Vortex States in 3D Cubic Superconductors in a Tilted Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lin; Cai, Chuanbing

    2017-03-01

    The time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations have been solved numerically by a finite element analysis for superconducting samples with a cubic shape in a tilted magnetic field. We obtain different vortex patterns as a function of the external magnetic field. With a magnetic field not parallel to the x- or y-axis, the vortices attempt to change their orientation accordingly. Our analysis of the corresponding changes in the magnetic response in different directions can provide information not only about vorticity but also about the three-dimensional vortex arrangement, even about the very subtle changes for the superconducting samples with a cubic shape in a tilted magnetic field.

  7. Towards laboratory detection of topological vortices in superfluid phases of QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Arpan; De, Somnath; Srivastava, Ajit M

    2016-01-01

    Topological defects arise in a variety of systems, e.g. vortices in superfluid helium to cosmic strings in the early universe. There is an indirect evidence of neutron superfluid vortices from glitches in pulsars. One also expects that topological defects may arise in various high baryon density phases of quantum chromodynamics (QCD), e.g. superfluid topological vortices in the color flavor locked (CFL) phase. We investigate the possibility of detecting these topological superfluid vortices in laboratory experiments, namely heavy-ion collisions. Using hydrodynamic simulations, we show that vortices can qualitatively affect the power spectrum of flow fluctuations. This can give unambiguous signal for superfluid transition resulting in vortices, allowing for check of defect formation theories in a relativistic quantum field theory system.

  8. Half-plane diffraction of Gaussian beams carrying two vortices of equal charges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He De; Gao Zeng-Hui; Lü Bai-Da

    2011-01-01

    This paper derives explicit expressions for the propagation of Ganssian beams carrying two vortices of equal charges m =±1 diffracted at a half-plane screen,which enables the study of the dynamic evolution of vortices in the diffraction field.It shows that there may be no vortices,a pair or several pairs of vortices of opposite charges m =+l,-1 in the diffraction field.Pair creation,annihilation and motion of vortices may appear upon propagation.The off-axis distance additionally affects the evolutionary behaviour.In the process the total topological charge is equal to zero,which is unequal to that of the vortex beam at the source plane.A comparison with the free-space propagation of two vortices of equal charges and a further extension are made.

  9. The velocity shear and vorticity across redshifts and non-linear scales

    CERN Document Server

    Libeskind, Noam I; Gottlöber, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of the large scale distribution of matter in the universe is often characterized by the density field. Here we take a complimentary approach and characterize it using the cosmic velocity field, specifically the deformation of the velocity field. The deformation tensor is decomposed into its symmetric component (known as the "shear tensor") and its anti-symmetric part (the "vorticity"). Using a high resolution cosmological simulation we examine the relative orientations of the shear and the vorticity as a function of spatial scale and redshift. The shear is found to be remarkable stable to the choice of scale, while the vorticity is found to quickly decay with increasing spatial scale or redshift. The vorticity emerges out of the linear regime randomly oriented with respect to the shear eigenvectors. Non-linear evolution drives the vorticity to lie within the plane defined by the eigenvector of the fastest collapse. Within that plane the vorticity first gets aligned with the middle eigenvector an...

  10. Sharp asymptotic estimates for vorticity solutions of the 2D Navier-Stokes equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuncheng You

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The asymptotic dynamics of high-order temporal-spatial derivatives of the two-dimensional vorticity and velocity of an incompressible, viscous fluid flow in $mathbb{R}^2$ are studied, which is equivalent to the 2D Navier-Stokes equation. It is known that for any integrable initial vorticity, the 2D vorticity solution converges to the Oseen vortex. In this paper, sharp exterior decay estimates of the temporal-spatial derivatives of the vorticity solution are established. These estimates are then used and combined with similarity and $L^p$ compactness to show the asymptotical attraction rates of temporal-spatial derivatives of generic 2D vorticity and velocity solutions by the Oseen vortices and velocity solutions respectively. The asymptotic estimates and the asymptotic attraction rates of all the derivatives obtained in this paper are independent of low or high Reynolds numbers.

  11. Duality, Quantum Vortices and Anyons in Maxwell-Chern-Simons-Higgs Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Marino, E C

    1993-01-01

    The order-disorder duality structure is exploited in order to obtain a quantum description of anyons and vortices in: a) the Maxwell theory; b) the Abelian Higgs Model; c) the Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory; d) the Maxwell-Chern-Simons-Higgs theory. A careful construction of a charge bearing order operator($\\sigma$) and a magnetic flux bearing disorder operator (vortex operator) ($\\mu$) is performed, paying attention to the necessary requirements for locality. An anyon operator is obtained as the product $\\varphi=\\sigma\\mu$. A detailed and comprehensive study of the euclidean correlation functions of $\\sigma$, $\\mu$ and $\\varphi$ is carried on in the four theories above. The exact correlation functions are obtained in cases $\\underline{a}$ and $\\underline{c}$. The large distance behavior of them is obtained in cases $\\underline{b}$ and $\\underline{d}$. The study of these correlation functions allows one to draw conclusions about the condensation of charge and magnetic flux, establishing thereby an analogy with t...

  12. Pure odd-frequency superconductivity at the cores of proximity vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alidoust, Mohammad; Zyuzin, Alexander; Halterman, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    After more than a decade, direct observation of the odd frequency triplet pairing state in superconducting hybrid structures remains elusive. We propose an experimentally feasible setup that can unambiguously reveal the zero energy peak due to proximity-induced equal spin superconducting triplet correlations. We theoretically investigate a two-dimensional Josephson junction in the diffusive regime. The nanostructure consists of a normal metal sandwiched between two ferromagnetic layers with spiral magnetization patterns. By applying an external magnetic field perpendicular to the junction plane, vortices nucleate in the normal metal. The calculated energy and spatially resolved density of states, along with the pair potential, reveal that remarkably, only triplet Cooper pairs survive in the vortex cores. These isolated odd frequency triplet correlations result in well defined zero energy peaks in the local density of states that can be identified through tunneling spectroscopy experiments. Moreover, the diffusive regime considered here rules out the possibility of Andreev bound states in the vortex core as contributors to the zero energy peaks.

  13. Conservation of Total Vorticity for a 2D Stochastic Navier Stokes Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M. Kotelenez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider point vortices whose positions satisfy a stochastic ordinary differential equation on ℝ2 perturbed by spatially correlated Brownian noise. The associated signed point measure-valued empirical process turns out to be a weak solution to a stochastic Navier-Stokes equation (SNSE with a state-dependent stochastic term. As the number of vortices tends to infinity, we obtain a smooth solution to the SNSE, and we prove the conservation of total vorticity in this continuum limit.

  14. A numerical study of the stabilitiy of helical vortices using vortex methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walther, J H [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Guenot, M [Enginering College in Industrial Systems, FR-17041, La Rochelle (France); Machefaux, E [Enginering College in Industrial Systems, FR-17041, La Rochelle (France); Rasmussen, J T [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Chatelain, P [Computational Laboratory, ETH Zurich, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Okulov, V L [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Soerensen, J N [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Bergdorf, M [Computational Laboratory, ETH Zurich, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Koumoutsakos, P [Computational Laboratory, ETH Zurich, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2007-07-15

    We present large-scale parallel direct numerical simulations using particle vortex methods of the instability of the helical vortices. We study the instability of a single helical vortex and find good agreement with inviscid theory. We outline equilibrium configurations for three double helical vortices-similar to those produced by three blade wind turbines. The simulations confirm the stability of the inviscid model, but predict a breakdown of the vortical system due to viscosity.

  15. Velocity-vorticity formulation of three-dimensional, steady, viscous, incompressible flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meir, A.J. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)

    1994-12-31

    In this work we discuss some aspects of the velocity-vorticity formulation of three-dimensional, steady, viscous, incompressible flows. We describe reasonable boundary conditions that should be imposed on the vorticity and a compatibility condition that the vorticity must satisfy. This formulation may give rise to efficient numerical algorithms for approximating solutions of the Stokes problem, which in turn yields an iterative method for approximating solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations.

  16. Parallel numerical simulations for quantized vortices in Bose-Einstein condensates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Zhao-Hui; Wang De-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    We employ the parallel computing technology to study numerically the three-dimensional structure of quantized vortices of Bose-Einstein condensates. For anisotropic cases, the bending process of vortices is described in detail by the decrease of Gross-Pitaevskii energy. A completely straight vortex and the steady and symmetrical multiple-vortex configurations are obtained. We analyse the effect of initial conditions and angular velocity on the number and shape of vortices.

  17. Buoyancy in tropical cyclones and other rapidly rotating atmospheric vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Roger K.; Montgomery, Michael T.; Zhu, Hongyan

    2005-07-01

    Motivated primarily by its application to understanding tropical-cyclone intensification and maintenance, we re-examine the concept of buoyancy in rapidly rotating vortices, distinguishing between the buoyancy of the symmetric balanced vortex or system buoyancy, and the local buoyancy associated with cloud dynamics. The conventional definition of buoyancy is contrasted with a generalized form applicable to a vortex, which has a radial as well as a vertical component. If, for the special case of axisymmetric motions, the balanced density and pressure distribution of a rapidly rotating vortex are used as the reference state, the buoyancy field then characterizes the unbalanced density perturbations, i.e. the local buoyancy. We show how to determine such a reference state without approximation. The generation of the toroidal circulation of a vortex, which is necessary for vortex amplification, is characterized in the vorticity equation by the baroclinicity vector. This vector depends, inter-alia, on the horizontal (or radial) gradient of buoyancy evaluated along isobaric surfaces. We show that for a tropical-cyclone-scale vortex, the buoyancy so calculated is significantly different from that calculated at constant height or on surfaces of constant σ ( σ = ( p - p*)/( ps - p*), where p is the actual pressure, p* some reference pressure and ps is the surface pressure). Since many tropical-cyclone models are formulated using σ-coordinates, we examine the calculation of buoyancy on σ-surfaces and derive an expression for the baroclinicity vector in σ-coordinates. The baroclinic forcing term in the azimuthal vorticity equation for an axisymmetric vortex is shown to be approximately equal to the azimuthal component of the curl of the generalized buoyancy. A scale analysis indicates that the vertical gradient of the radial component of generalized buoyancy makes a comparatively small contribution to the generation of toroidal vorticity in a tropical cyclone, but may be

  18. Polar Vortex Oscillation Viewed in an Isentropic Potential Vorticity Coordinate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The stratospheric polar vortex oscillation (PVO) in the Northern Hemisphere is examined in a semiLagrangian θ-PVLAT coordinate constructed by using daily isentropic potential vorticity maps derived from NCEP/NCAR reanalysis Ⅱ dataset covering the period from 1979 to 2003. In the semi-Lagrangian θ-PVLAT coordinate, the variability of the polar vortex is solely attributed to its intensity change because the changes in its location and shape would be naturally absent by following potential vorticity contours on isentropic surfaces. The EOF and regression analyses indicate that the PVO can be described by a pair of poleward and downward propagating modes. These two modes together account for about 82% variance of the daily potential vorticity anomalies over the entire Northern Hemisphere. The power spectral analysis reveals a dominant time scale of about 107 days in the time series of these two modes,representing a complete PVO cycle accompanied with poleward propagating heating anomalies of both positive and negative signs from the equator to the pole. The strong polar vortex corresponds to the arrival of cold anomalies over the polar circle and vice versa. Accompanied with the poleward propagation is a simultaneous downward propagation. The downward propagation time scale is about 20 days in high and low latitudes and about 30 days in mid-latitudes. The zonal wind anomalies lag the poleward and downward propagating temperature anomalies of the opposite sign by 10 days in low and high latitudes and by 20 days in mid-latitudes. The time series of the leading EOF modes also exhibit dominant time scales of 8.7, 16.9, and 33.8 months. They approximately follow a double-periodicity sequence and correspond to the 3-peak extratropical Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) signal.

  19. Distributional Enstrophy Dissipation Via the Collapse of Three Point Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoda, Takeshi; Sakajo, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    Dissipation of enstrophy in 2D incompressible flows in the zero viscous limit is considered to play a significant role in the emergence of the inertial range corresponding to the forward enstrophy cascade in the energy spectrum of 2D turbulent flows. However, since smooth solutions of the 2D incompressible Euler equations conserve the enstrophy, we need to consider non-smooth inviscid and incompressible flows so that the enstrophy dissipates. Moreover, it is physically uncertain what kind of a flow evolution gives rise to such an anomalous enstrophy dissipation. In this paper, in order to acquire an insight about the singular phenomenon mathematically as well as physically, we consider a dispersive regularization of the 2D Euler equations, known as the Euler-α equations, for the initial vorticity distributions whose support consists of three points, i.e., three α -point vortices, and take the α → 0 limit of its global solutions. We prove with mathematical rigor that, under a certain condition on their vortex strengths, the limit solution becomes a self-similar evolution collapsing to a point followed by the expansion from the collapse point to infinity for a wide range of initial configurations of point vortices. We also find that the enstrophy always dissipates in the sense of distributions at the collapse time. This indicates that the triple collapse is a mechanism for the anomalous enstrophy dissipation in non-smooth inviscid and incompressible flows. Furthermore, it is an interesting example elucidating the emergence of the irreversibility of time in a Hamiltonian dynamical system.

  20. Prescribed Velocity Gradients for Highly Viscous SPH Fluids with Vorticity Diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peer, Andreas; Teschner, Matthias

    2016-12-06

    Working with prescribed velocity gradients is a promising approach to efficiently and robustly simulate highly viscous SPH fluids. Such approaches allow to explicitly and independently process shear rate, spin, and expansion rate. This can be used to, e.g., avoid interferences between pressure and viscosity solvers. Another interesting aspect is the possibility to explicitly process the vorticity, e.g. to preserve the vorticity. In this context, this paper proposes a novel variant of the prescribed-gradient idea that handles vorticity in a physically motivated way. In contrast to a less appropriate vorticity preservation that has been used in a previous approach, vorticity is diffused. The paper illustrates the utility of the vorticity diffusion. Therefore, comparisons of the proposed vorticity diffusion with vorticity preservation and additionally with vorticity damping are presented. The paper further discusses the relation between prescribed velocity gradients and prescribed velocity Laplacians which improves the intuition behind the prescribed-gradient method for highly viscous SPH fluids. Finally, the paper discusses the relation of the proposed method to a physically correct implicit viscosity formulation.

  1. Effect of thin film on the generation of vorticity by surface waves

    CERN Document Server

    Parfenyev, V M; Lebedev, V V

    2016-01-01

    Recently a theoretical scheme explaining the vorticity generation by surface waves in liquids was developed [S. Filatov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 054501 (2016)]. Here we study how a thin (monomolecular) film presented at the surface of liquid affects the generated vorticity. We demonstrate that the vorticity becomes parametrically larger than for the case with a clean surface and now it depends on viscosity of the liquid. We also discuss the motion of particles passively advected by the generated surface flow. The results can be used in different applications: from the analysis of pollutants' diffusion on the ocean surface till the reconstruction of vorticity based on the particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements.

  2. Imaging of trapped vortices in YBCO coated conductor by scanning SQUID microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, M. [Department of EESE, Kyushu University, Hakozaki 6-10-1, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)]. E-mail: inoue@ees.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Kiss, T. [Department of EESE, Kyushu University, Hakozaki 6-10-1, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Koyanagi, S. [Department of EESE, Kyushu University, Hakozaki 6-10-1, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Imamura, K. [Department of EESE, Kyushu University, Hakozaki 6-10-1, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Takeo, M. [Department of EESE, Kyushu University, Hakozaki 6-10-1, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Iijima, Y. [Fujikura Ltd., Tokyo 135-8512 (Japan); Kakimoto, K. [Fujikura Ltd., Tokyo 135-8512 (Japan); Saitoh, T. [Fujikura Ltd., Tokyo 135-8512 (Japan); Matsuda, J. [Superconductivity Research Laboratory, Tokyo 130-0062 (Japan); Tokunaga, Y. [Superconductivity Research Laboratory, Tokyo 130-0062 (Japan); Izumi, T. [Superconductivity Research Laboratory, Tokyo 130-0062 (Japan); Shiohara, Y. [Superconductivity Research Laboratory, Tokyo 130-0062 (Japan)

    2005-10-01

    We investigated trapped vortices in Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (YBCO) coated conductor by using a scanning SQUID microscope (SSM). Several peculiar properties of the vortices were observed such as a large bundle of vortices at a certain position and a coexistence of positive- and negative-sign vortices. Comparing the SSM images with that of low temperature scanning laser microscopy (LTSLM) and SEM, we identified the relationship between local dissipation and position of current blocking defect. Furthermore, regular vortex images were also observed by the SSM in the region where higher J {sub c} has been identified by the LTSLM.

  3. Spin vortices in the Abelian-Higgs model with cholesteric vacuum structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Adam J.; Shifman, Mikhail; Tallarita, Gianni

    2015-12-01

    We continue the study of U(1) vortices with cholesteric vacuum structure. A new class of solutions is found which represent global vortices of the internal spin field. These spin vortices are characterized by a non-vanishing angular dependence at spatial infinity, or winding. We show that despite the topological Z2 behavior of SO(3) windings, the topological charge of the spin vortices is of the Z type in the cholesteric. We find these solutions numerically and discuss the properties derived from their low energy effective field theory in 1 + 1 dimensions.

  4. Spin vortices in the Abelian-Higgs model with cholesteric vacuum structure

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, Adam; Tallarita, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    We continue the study of $U(1)$ vortices with cholesteric vacuum structure. A new class of solutions is found which represent global vortices of the internal spin field. These spin vortices are characterized by a non-vanishing angular dependence at spatial infinity, or winding. We show that despite the topological $\\mathbb{Z}_2$ behavior of $SO(3)$ windings, the topological charge of the spin vortices is of the $\\mathbb{Z}$ type in the cholesteric. We find these solutions numerically and discuss the properties derived from their low energy effective field theory in $1+1$ dimensions.

  5. Contribution of velocity-vorticity correlations to the frictional drag in wall-bounded turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Min; Ahn, Junsun; Hwang, Jinyul; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2016-08-01

    The relationship between the frictional drag and the velocity-vorticity correlations in wall-bounded turbulent flows is derived from the mean vorticity equation. A formula for the skin friction coefficient is proposed and evaluated with regards to three canonical wall-bounded flows: turbulent boundary layer, turbulent channel flow, and turbulent pipe flow. The frictional drag encompasses four terms: advective vorticity transport, vortex stretching, viscous, and inhomogeneous terms. Drag-reduced channel flow with the slip condition is used to test the reliability of the formula. The advective vorticity transport and vortex stretching terms are found to dominate the contributions to the frictional drag.

  6. Fine tuned vortices in lattice SU(2) gluodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gubarev, F V; Polikarpov, M I; Syritsyn, S N; Zakharov, V I

    2003-01-01

    We report measurements of the action associated with center vortices in the lattice SU(2) pure gauge theory. In the lattice units the excess of the action on the plaquettes belonging to the vortex is approximately a constant, independent on the lattice spacing 'a'. Therefore the action of the center vortex is of order A/a^2, where 'A' is its area. Since the area A is known to scale in the physical units, the observation suggests that the suppression due to the surface action is balanced, or fine tuned to the entropy factor which is to be an exponential of A/a^2.

  7. Topological charge algebra of optical vortices in nonlinear interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanova, Alexandra A; Shutova, Mariia; Bahari, Aysan; Zhi, Miaochan; Sokolov, Alexei V

    2015-12-28

    We investigate the transfer of orbital angular momentum among multiple beams involved in a coherent Raman interaction. We use a liquid crystal light modulator to shape pump and Stokes beams into optical vortices with various integer values of topological charge, and cross them in a Raman-active crystal to produce multiple Stokes and anti-Stokes sidebands. We measure the resultant vortex charges using a tilted-lens technique. We verify that in every case the generated beams' topological charges obey a simple relationship, resulting from angular momentum conservation for created and annihilated photons, or equivalently, from phase-matching considerations for multiple interacting beams.

  8. A Probe of Primordial Gravity Waves and Vorticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamionkowski, M. [Department of Physics, Columbia University, 538 West 120th Street, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Kosowsky, A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)]|[and Department of Physics, Lyman Laboratory, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Stebbins, A. [NASA/Fermilab Astrophysics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510-0500 (United States)

    1997-03-01

    A formalism for describing an all-sky map of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background is presented. The polarization pattern on the sky can be decomposed into two geometrically distinct components. One of these components is not coupled to density inhomogeneities. A nonzero amplitude for this component of polarization can only be caused by tensor or vector metric perturbations. This allows unambiguous identification of long-wavelength gravity waves or large-scale vortical flows at the time of last scattering. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Close pairs of relative equilibria for identical point vortices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirksen, Tobias; Aref, Hassan

    2011-01-01

    Numerical solution of the classical problem of relative equilibria for identical point vortices on the unbounded plane reveals configurations that are very close to the analytically known, centered, symmetrically arranged, nested equilateral triangles. New numerical solutions of this kind are found...... also has this property, and new relative equilibria close to the nested, symmetrically arranged, regular heptagons have been found. The centered regular nonagon is also marginally stable. Again, a new family of close relative equilibria has been found. The closest relative equilibrium pairs occur...

  10. Quantized Vortices and Four-Component Superfluidity of Semiconductor Excitons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anankine, Romain; Beian, Mussie; Dang, Suzanne; Alloing, Mathieu; Cambril, Edmond; Merghem, Kamel; Carbonell, Carmen Gomez; Lemaître, Aristide; Dubin, François

    2017-03-24

    We study spatially indirect excitons of GaAs quantum wells, confined in a 10  μm electrostatic trap. Below a critical temperature of about 1 K, we detect macroscopic spatial coherence and quantized vortices in the weak photoluminescence emitted from the trap. These quantum signatures are restricted to a narrow range of density, in a dilute regime. They manifest the formation of a four-component superfluid, made by a low population of optically bright excitons coherently coupled to a dominant fraction of optically dark excitons.

  11. Sound Generation in the Interaction of Two Isentropic Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    difference in their spacial scales. Mu = −0.8, Md = 0.25, d = 2.2, rcu = 1 and rcd = 0.2. 11 X S o u n d P re ss u re -200 -100 0 100 200 -0.0004 -0.0002 0...counter-rotating vortices in the case of Mu = −0.5, Md = 0.5, d = 2.2, rcu = 1 and rcd = 0.2. References [1] Lighthill M. J. (1952). On sound generated

  12. The numerical solution of the vorticity transport equation

    CERN Document Server

    Dennis, S C R

    1973-01-01

    A method of approximating the two-dimensional vorticity transport equation in which the matrix associated with the difference equations is diagonally dominant and the truncation error is the same as that of the fully central-difference approximation, is discussed. An example from boundary layer theory is given by calculating the viscous stagnation point flow at the nose of a cylinder. Some new solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations are obtained for symmetrical flow past a flat plate of finite length. (16 refs).

  13. Nonlinear modes in the hollow-cores of liquid vortices

    KAUST Repository

    Amaouche, Mustapha

    2013-09-01

    In this paper we show that the wave patterns observed on the interfacial contours of hollow-core vortices, produced within a shallow layer of fluid contained in stationary cylinder and driven by a rotating disk at the bottom [G.H. Vatistas, H.A. Abderrahmane, M.H. Kamran Siddiqui, Experimental confirmation of Kelvin\\'s equilibria, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 (2008) 174503-174504], can be described as travelling cnoidal waves. These rotating stationary waves are obtained as solutions of a Korteweg-de Vries type equation, in accordance with the geometrical and kinematic characteristics of the observed polygonal patterns. © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Dynamical properties of vortical structures on the beta-plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sutyrin, G.G.; Hesthaven, J.S.; Lynov, Jens-Peter;

    1994-01-01

    into a rotating tripole. A critical value of the vortex intensity is found, below which the tripolar structure does not appear even in the case of an initially shielded vortex. Weak monopolar vortices are able to trap particles and provide some west-meridional fluid transport, even in the case when they decay...... with a decaying amplitude (meridional case), thereby carrying trapped particles predominantly eastward. A steady state is not reached if the dipole intensity is below a critical value which depends on the initial direction of propagation. Weak dipoles either decay and shrink owing to Rossby wave radiation...

  15. Vortices and ring dark solitons in nonlinear amplifying waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jie-Fang; Li, Lu; Mihalache, Dumitru; Malomed, Boris A

    2010-01-01

    We consider the generation and propagation of (2+1)-dimensional beams in a nonlinear waveguide with the linear gain. Simple self-similar evolution of the beams is achieved at the asymptotic stage, if the input beams represent the fundamental mode. On the contrary, if they carry vorticity or amplitude nodes (or phase slips), vortex tori and ring dark solitons (RDSs) are generated, featuring another type of the self-similar evolution, with an exponentially shrinking vortex core or notch of the RDS. Numerical and analytical considerations reveal that these self-similar structures are robust entities in amplifying waveguides, being \\emph{stable} against azimuthal perturbations.

  16. How can vorticity be produced in irrotationally forced flows?

    CERN Document Server

    Del Sordo, Fabio

    2010-01-01

    A spherical hydrodynamical expansion flow can be described as the gradient of a potential. In that case no vorticity should be produced, but several additional mechanisms can drive its production. Here we analyze the effects of baroclinicity, rotation and shear in the case of a viscous fluid. Those flows resemble what happens in the interstellar medium. In fact in this astrophysical environment supernovae explosion are the dominant flows and, in a first approximation, they can be seen as spherical. One of the main difference is that in our numerical study we examine only weakly supersonic flows, while supernovae explosions are strongly supersonic.

  17. Shock Wave Induced Separation Control by Streamwise Vortices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ryszard SZWABA

    2005-01-01

    Control of shock wave and boundary layer interaction finds still a lot of attention. Methods of this interaction control have been especially investigated in recent decade. This research was mostly concerned with flows without separation. However, in many applications shock waves induce separation often leads to strong unsteady effects. In this context it is proposed to use streamwise vortices for the interaction control. The results of experimental investigations are presented here. The very promising results were obtained, meaning that the incipient separation was postponed and the separation size was reduced for the higher Mach numbers. The decrease of the RMS of average shock wave oscillation was also achieved.

  18. First characterization of coherent optical vortices from harmonic undulator radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsing, E; Dunning, M; Hast, C; Raubenheimer, T; Xiang, Dao

    2014-09-26

    We describe the experimental generation and measurement of coherent light that carries orbital angular momentum from a relativistic electron beam radiating at the second harmonic of a helical undulator. The measured helical phase of the light is shown to be in agreement with predictions of the sign and magnitude of the phase singularity and is more than 2 orders of magnitude greater than the incoherent signal. Our setup demonstrates that such optical vortices can be produced in modern free-electron lasers in a simple afterburner arrangement for novel two-mode pump-probe experiments.

  19. Targeted mixing in an array of alternating vortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelard, R; Benzekri, T; Chandre, C; Leoncini, X; Vittot, M

    2007-10-01

    Transport and mixing properties of passive particles advected by an array of vortices are investigated. Starting from the integrable case, it is shown that a special class of perturbations allows one to preserve separatrices which act as effective transport barriers, while triggering chaotic advection. In this setting, mixing within the two dynamical barriers is enhanced while long range transport is prevented. A numerical analysis of mixing properties depending on parameter values is performed; regions for which optimal mixing is achieved are proposed. Robustness of the targeted mixing properties regarding errors in the applied perturbation are considered, as well as slip/no-slip and/or boundary conditions for the flow.

  20. A Vortical Dawn Flank Boundary Layer for Near-Radial IMF: Wind Observations on 24 October 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Gratton, F. T.; Gnavi, G.; Torbert, R. B.; Wilson, Lynn B., III

    2014-01-01

    We present an example of a boundary layer tailward of the dawn terminator which is entirely populated by rolled-up flow vortices. Observations were made by Wind on 24 October 2001 as the spacecraft moved across the region at the X plane approximately equal to -13 Earth radii. Interplanetary conditions were steady with a near-radial interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Approximately 15 vortices were observed over the 1.5 hours duration of Wind's crossing, each lasting approximately 5 min. The rolling up is inferred from the presence of a hot tenuous plasma being accelerated to speeds higher than in the adjoining magnetosheath, a circumstance which has been shown to be a reliable signature of this in single-spacecraft observations. A blob of cold dense plasma was entrained in each vortex, at whose leading edge abrupt polarity changes of field and velocity components at current sheets were regularly observed. In the frame of the average boundary layer velocity, the dense blobs were moving predominantly sunward and their scale size along the X plane was approximately 7.4 Earth radii. Inquiring into the generation mechanism of the vortices, we analyze the stability of the boundary layer to sheared flows using compressible magnetohydrodynamic Kelvin-Helmholtz theory with continuous profiles for the physical quantities. We input parameters from (i) the exact theory of magnetosheath flow under aligned solar wind field and flow vectors near the terminator and (ii) the Wind data. It is shown that the configuration is indeed Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) unstable. This is the first reported example of KH-unstable waves at the magnetopause under a radial IMF.

  1. Spontaneous Magnetization through Non-Abelian Vortex Formation in Rotating Dense Quark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Vinci, Walter; Nitta, Muneto

    2012-01-01

    When a color superconductor of high density QCD is rotating, super- fluid vortices are inevitably created along the rotation axis. In the color-flavor locked phase realized at the asymptotically large chemical potential, there appear non-Abelian vortices carrying both circulations of superfluid and color magnetic fluxes. A family of solutions has a degeneracy characterized by the Nambu-Goldtone modes CP2, associ- ated with the color-flavor locked symmetry spontaneously broken in the vicinity of the vortex. In this paper, we study electromagnetic coupling of the non-Abelian vortices and find that the degeneracy is removed with the induced effective potential. We obtain one stable vortex solu- tion and a family of metastable vortex solutions, both of which carry ordinary magnetic fluxes in addition to color magnetic fluxes. We dis- cuss quantum mechanical decay of the metastable vortices by quantum tunneling, and compare the effective potential with the other known po- tentials, the quantum mechanically induced...

  2. Non-linear vorticity upsurge in Burgers flow

    CERN Document Server

    Lam, F

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that numerical solutions of Burgers' equation can be obtained by a scale-totality algorithm for fluids of small viscosity (down to one billionth). Two sets of initial data, modelling simple shears and wall boundary layers, are chosen for our computations. Most of the solutions are carried out well into the fully turbulent regime over finely-resolved scales in space and in time. It is found that an abrupt spatio-temporal concentration in shear constitutes an essential part during the flow evolution. The vorticity surge has been instigated by the non-linearity complying with instantaneous enstrophy production while ad hoc disturbances play no role in the process. In particular, the present method predicts the precipitous vorticity re-distribution and accumulation, predominantly over localised regions of minute dimension. The growth rate depends on viscosity and is a strong function of initial data. Nevertheless, the long-time energy decay is history-independent and is inversely proportional to ti...

  3. Aerodynamic forces and vortical structures in flapping butterfly's forward flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Naoto; Senda, Kei; Iima, Makoto; Hirai, Norio

    2013-02-01

    Forward flights of a bilaterally symmetrically flapping butterfly modeled as a four-link rigid-body system consisting of a thorax, an abdomen, and left and right wings are numerically simulated. The joint motions of the butterflies are adopted from experimental observations. Three kinds of the simulations, distinguished by ways to determine the position and attitude of the thorax, are carried out: a tethered simulation, a prescribed simulation, and free-flight simulations. The upward and streamwise forces as well as the wake structures in the tethered simulation, where the thorax of the butterfly is fixed, reasonably agree with those in the corresponding tethered experiment. In the prescribed simulation, where the thoracic trajectories as well as the joint angles are given by those observed in a free-flight experiment, it is confirmed that the butterfly can produce enough forces to achieve the flapping flights. Moreover, coherent vortical structures in the wake and those on the wings are identified. The generation of the aerodynamic forces due to the vortical structures are also clarified. In the free-flight simulation, where only the joint angles are given as periodic functions of time, it is found that the free flight is longitudinally unstable because the butterfly cannot maintain the attitude in a proper range. Focusing on the abdominal mass, which largely varies owing to feeding and metabolizing, we have shown that the abdominal motion plays an important role in periodic flights. The necessity of control of the thoracic attitude for periodic flights and maneuverability is also discussed.

  4. Survival and Structure of Dusty Vortices in Protoplanetary Discs

    CERN Document Server

    Crnkovic-Rubsamen, Ivo; Stone, James M

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the impact of dust feedback on the survival and structure of vortices in protoplanetary discs using 2-D shearing box simulations with Lagrangian dust particles. We consider dust with a variety of sizes (stopping time $t_s = 10^{-2}\\Omega^{-1} - 10^{2}\\Omega^{-1}$, from fully coupled with the gas to the decoupling limit. We find that a vortex is destroyed by dust feedback when the total dust-to-gas mass ratio within the vortex is larger than 30-50%, independent of the dust size. The dust distribution can still be asymmetric in some cases after the vortex has been destroyed. With smaller amounts of dust, a vortex can survive for at least 100 orbits, and the maximum dust surface density within the vortex can be more than 100 times larger than the gas surface density, potentially facilitating planetesimal formation. On the other hand, in these stable vortices, small ($t_s \\Omega^{-1}$) dust grains concentrate differently and affect the gas dynamics in different ways. The distribution of large dus...

  5. Hamiltonian Dynamics of Several Rigid Bodies Interacting with Point Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weißmann, Steffen

    2014-04-01

    We derive the dynamics of several rigid bodies of arbitrary shape in a two-dimensional inviscid and incompressible fluid, whose vorticity is given by point vortices. We adopt the idea of Vankerschaver et al. (J. Geom. Mech. 1(2): 223-226, 2009) to derive the Hamiltonian formulation via symplectic reduction from a canonical Hamiltonian system. The reduced system is described by a noncanonical symplectic form, which has previously been derived for a single circular disk using heavy differential-geometric machinery in an infinite-dimensional setting. In contrast, our derivation makes use of the fact that the dynamics of the fluid, and thus the point vortex dynamics, is determined from first principles. Using this knowledge we can directly determine the dynamics on the reduced, finite-dimensional phase space, using only classical mechanics. Furthermore, our approach easily handles several bodies of arbitrary shape. From the Hamiltonian description we derive a Lagrangian formulation, which enables the system for variational time integrators. We briefly describe how to implement such a numerical scheme and simulate different configurations for validation.

  6. Helical vortices generated by flapping wings of bumblebees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farge, Marie; Engels, Thomas; Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Schneider, Kai; Lehmann, Fritz; Sesterhenn, Jörn

    2016-11-01

    We analyze high resolution numerical simulation data of a bumblebee with fixed body and prescribed wing motion, flying in a numerical wind tunnel, presented in. The inflow condition of the tunnel varies from unperturbed laminar to strongly turbulent. The flow generated by the flapping wings indicates the important role of the leading edge vortex (LEV), responsible for elevated lift production and which is not significantly altered by the inflow turbulence. The LEV has a conical structure due to the three-dimensional motion of the wings. This flow configuration produces strong vorticity on the sharp leading edge and the outwards velocity (from the root to the tip of the wing) in the spanwise direction. Flow visualizations show that the generated vortical structures are characterized by a strong helicity. We study the evolution of the mean helicity for each wing and analyze the impact of turbulent inflow. We thankfully acknowledge financial support from the French-German AIFIT project funded by DFG and ANR (Grant 15-CE40-0019). DK gratefully acknowledges financial support from the JSPS postdoctoral fellowship.

  7. Optical vortices as potential indicators of biophysical dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Anindya; Kirkpatrick, Sean J.

    2017-03-01

    Laser speckle patterns are granular patterns produced as a result of random interference of light waves. Optical vortices (OVs) are phase singularities in such speckle fields, characterized by zero intensity and an undefined phase. Decorrelation of the speckle fields causes these OVs to move in both time and space. In this work, a variety of parameters of these OVs have been studied. The speckle fields were simulated to undergo three distinct decorrelation behaviors- Gaussian, Lorentzian and constant decorrelations. Different decorrelation behaviors represent different dynamics. For example, Lorentzian and Gaussian decorrelations represent Brownian and ordered motions, respectively. Typical dynamical systems in biophysics are generally argued to be a combination of these. For each of the decorrelation behaviors under study, the vortex trails were tracked while varying the rate of decorrelation. Parameters such as the decorrelation length, average trail length and the deviation of the vortices as they traversed in the speckle field, were studied. Empirical studies were also performed to define the distinction between trails arising from different speckle decorrelation behaviors. The initial studies under stationary speckle fields were followed up by similar studies on shifting fields. A new idea to employ Poincaŕe plots in speckle analysis has also been introduced. Our studies indicate that tracking OVs can be a potential method to study cell and tissue dynamics.

  8. Borneo Vortices: A case study and its relation to climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braesicke, P.; Ooi, S. H.; Samah, A. A.

    2012-04-01

    Borneo vortices (BVs) develop over the South China Sea and are main drivers for the formation of deep convection and heavy rainfall in East Malaysia. We present a case study of a cold-surge-induced BV during January 2010 in which the export of potential energy lead to a strengthening of the subtropical jet. Potential vorticity (PV) and water vapour analyses confirm a significant impact of the BV on upper tropospheric composition. Dry, high PV air is found far below 100 hPa in the vicinty of the vortex. Using a PV threshold analysis of ERA-Interim data we construct a climatological composite of similar events and characterise the thermal, dynamical and composition structure of a 'typical' BV. We note the preferential formation of BVs during ENSO cold conditions and show that two effects contribute to the formation of the dry upper layer above a BV: Air is vertically transported upwards in the BV whilst precipitating and the large scale flow in which the BV is embedded advect dry, ozone rich air from the equatorial TTL over the BV. Thus the occurence frequency of BVs is important for the regional variability of upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric composition.

  9. Linear and Nonlinear Evolution of Disturbances in Supersonic Streamwise Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Wie, Yong-Sun

    1997-11-01

    Effective control of compressible streamwise vortices play a significant role in both external and internal aerodynamics. In this study, evolution of disturbances in a supersonic vortex is studied by using quasi-cylindrical linear stability analysis and parabolized stability equations (PSE)footnote M. R. Malik and C.-L. Chang, AIAA Paper 97-0758. formulation. Appropriate mean-flow profilesfootnote M. K. Smart, I. M. Kalkhoran, and J. Bentson, AIAA Paper 94-2576. suitable for stability analysis were identified and modeled successfully. Using linear stability analysis, the stability characteristics of axisymmetric vortices were mapped thoroughly. The results indicate that viscosity has very little effect while increasing Mach number significantly stabilizes the disturbance. Linear PSE analysis shows that the effect of streamwise mean flow variation is small for the case considered here. Nonlinear evolution of helical modes is also studied by using PSE. The growth of the disturbances results in the appearance of coherent large scale motion and significant mean flow distortion in the axial velocity and temperature fields. In the end, nonlinear effects tend to stabilize the vortex.

  10. Hydrodynamic Model of Desalination by "Overlimiting" Electrodialysis with Electroconvective Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Rhokyun; Pham, Van Sang; Han, Jongyoon

    2016-11-01

    In 1968, Sonin and Probstein developed a hydrodynamic theory of desalination by electrodialysis. Under a laminar flow between ion exchange membranes, linear ion concentration gradients are developed near the membranes by ion concentration polarization (ICP) in Ohmic-limiting current regimes. This linear ICP determines the relations between current, voltage, and desalting performance. Here, we revisit the hydrodynamic model with nonlinear ICP phenomenon at overlimiting currents. In this regime, electroconvective vortices on the membrane induce flat and extremely low concentration zones. Based on the previous prediction of the vortex height under shear flow, we verify that the height directly represents the amount of the removed salt because there is almost no ion in the vortices. Next, from the mass continuity of ions, the amount of the removed salts is equal to the ion flux through the membrane (i.e. current); as a result, we can develop the relations between current, voltage, and salt removal. Lastly, from these relations, power consumption and desalination cost can be calculated to find the optimal operating condition of overlimiting electrodialysis.

  11. Management of Vortices Trailing Flapped Wings via Separation Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenblatt, David

    2005-01-01

    A pilot study was conducted on a flapped semi-span model to investigate the concept and viability of near-wake vortex management via separation control. Passive control was achieved by means of a simple fairing and active control was achieved via zero mass-flux blowing slots. Vortex sheet strength, estimated by integrating surface pressure ports, was used to predict vortex characteristics by means of inviscid rollup relations. Furthermore, vortices trailing the flaps were mapped using a seven-hole probe. Separation control was found to have a marked effect on vortex location, strength, tangential velocity, axial velocity and size over a wide range of angles of attack and control conditions. In general, the vortex trends were well predicted by the inviscid rollup relations. Manipulation of the separated flow near the flap edges exerted significant control over both outboard and inboard edge vortices while producing negligible lift excursions. Dynamic separation and attachment control was found to be an effective means for dynamically perturbing the vortex from arbitrarily long wavelengths down to wavelengths less than a typical wingspan. In summary, separation control has the potential for application to time-independent or time-dependent wake alleviation schemes, where the latter can be deployed to minimize adverse effects on ride-quality and dynamic structural loading.

  12. Formation And Ingestion Of Vortices Into Jet Engines During Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Ho Wei; Jermy, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Vortices can be produced and ingested into the intake of a turbofan and turbojet aero engine during high power operation near solid surfaces. This can happen either on the runway during take-off or during engine test runs in a test cell. The vortex can throw debris into the intake or cause the compressor to stall causing significant damage to the engine and may require major overhaul. The ability to predict the onset of a vortex is therefore extremely valuable to the industry and could potentially save millions of dollars in overhaul costs. The factors that determines whether or not a vortex forms include engine thrust level, geometric factors such as the distance between the engine core and the ground and the size of the engine core, and flow conditions such as ambient vorticity and height of boundary layer. Computational fluid dynamic studies have been carried out by the authors to attempt to predict the effects that these factors have on the threshold of vortex formation. These works include the first reported studies of numerical predictions of the vortex formation threshold on both the runway or test cell scenarios and include factors that have not been previously studied either numerically or experimentally.

  13. Geometric phase mediated topological transport of sound vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shubo; Chan, C T

    2016-01-01

    When a physical system undergoes a cyclic evolution, a non-integrable phase can arise in addition to the normal dynamical phase. This phase, depending only on the geometry of the path traversed in the parameter space and hence named geometric phase, has profound impact in both classical and quantum physics, leading to exotic phenomena such as electron weak anti-localization and light spin-Hall effect. Experimental observations of the geometric phase effect in classical system are typically realized using vector waves such as light characterized by a polarization. We show here that such an effect can also be realized in scalar wave systems such as sound wave. Using a helical hollow waveguide, we show that the geometric phase effect associated with the transportation of sound vortices, i.e. sound wave carrying intrinsic orbital angular momentum, can serve as a potential mechanism to control the flow of sound vortices with different topological charges, resulting in geometric phase-based sound vortex filters.

  14. Thermoconvective vortices in a cylindrical annulus with varying inner radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaño, D; Navarro, M C; Herrero, H

    2014-12-01

    This paper shows the influence of the inner radius on the stability and intensity of vertical vortices, qualitatively similar to dust devils and cyclones, generated in a cylindrical annulus non-homogeneously heated from below. Little relation is found between the intensity of the vortex and the magnitude of the inner radius. Strong stable vortices can be found for both small and large values of the inner radius. The Rankine combined vortex structure, that characterizes the tangential velocity in dust devils, is clearly observed when small values of the inner radius and large values of the ratio between the horizontal and vertical temperature differences are considered. A contraction on the radius of maximum azimuthal velocity is observed when the vortex is intensified by thermal mechanisms. This radius becomes then nearly stationary when frictional force balances the radial inflow generated by the pressure drop in the center, despite the vortex keeps intensifying. These results connect with the behavior of the radius of the maximum tangential wind associated with a hurricane.

  15. Melt pool vorticity in deep penetration laser material welding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Kumar; S Dash; A K Tyagi; Baldev Raj

    2011-04-01

    In the present study, the vorticity of melt motion in the keyhole and weld pool has been evaluated in case of high power CO2 laser beam welding. The circulation of vorticity is obtained as a function of Reynolds number for a given keyhole volume which is linked to Mach number variation. The shear stress and thermal fluxes present in the turbulent pool are linked to diffusivity and Prandtl number variation. It was shown that below a critical value of Rayleigh number, the conduction mode of melt transfer signifying beam absorption becomes dominant. Above this value, convective heat transfer indicates melting and evaporation occurring in the weld pool during laser welding. The evaporative recoil pressure expels the liquid while surface tension and hydrostatic pressure help to retain the melt in the keyhole cavity in this high power laser beam welding. The understanding of several hydrodynamic phenomena occuring in the weld pool is valuable not only for understanding basic mechanistic aspects but also for process optimization involved in laser beam welding.

  16. Scanning Tunnelling Spectroscopy of Vortices with Normal and Superconducting tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, J. G.; Suderow, H.; Vieira, S.

    Scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/S) has proved to be a powerful tool to study superconductivity down to atomic level. Vortex lattice studies require characterizing areas of enough size to contain a large number of vortices. On the other hand, it is necessary to combine this capability with high spectroscopic and microscopic resolution. This is a fundamental aspect to measure and detect the subtle changes appearing inside and around a single vortex. We report in this chapter our approach to the use of STM/S, using normal and superconducting tips, to observe the lattice of vortices in several compounds, and the information acquired inside these fascinating entities. The combination of superconducting tips and scanning tunneling spectroscopy, (ST)2S, presents advantages for the study of superconducting samples. It allows to distinguish relevant features of the sample density of states, which manifest itself as small changes in the Josephson coupling between sample and tip condensates, and it has also shown to be very efficient in the study of the ferromagnetic-superconductor transition in the re-entrant superconductor ErRh4B4.

  17. On the Stability of Elliptical Vortices in Accretion Discs

    CERN Document Server

    Lesur, G

    2009-01-01

    (Abriged) The existence of large-scale and long-lived 2D vortices in accretion discs has been debated for more than a decade. They appear spontaneously in several 2D disc simulations and they are known to accelerate planetesimal formation through a dust trapping process. However, the issue of the stability of these structures to the imposition of 3D disturbances is still not fully understood, and it casts doubts on their long term survival. Aim: We present new results on the 3D stability of elliptical vortices embedded in accretion discs, based on a linear analysis and several non-linear simulations. Methods: We derive the linearised equations governing the 3D perturbations in the core of an elliptical vortex, and we show that they can be reduced to a Floquet problem. We solve this problem numerically in the astrophysical regime and we present several analytical limits for which the mechanism responsible for the instability can be explained. Finally, we compare the results of the linear analysis to some high ...

  18. EFT for Vortices with Dilaton-dependent Localized Flux

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, C P; Williams, M

    2015-01-01

    We study how codimension-two objects like vortices back-react gravitationally with their environment in theories (such as 4D or higher-dimensional supergravity) where the bulk is described by a dilaton-Maxwell-Einstein system. We do so both in the full theory, for which the vortex is an explicit classical `fat brane' solution, and in the effective theory of `point branes' appropriate when the vortices are much smaller than the scales of interest for their back-reaction (such as the transverse Kaluza-Klein scale). We extend the standard Nambu-Goto description to include the physics of flux-localization wherein the ambient flux of the external Maxwell field becomes partially localized to the vortex, generalizing the results of a companion paper to include dilaton-dependence for the tension and localized flux. In the effective theory, such flux-localization is described by the next-to-leading effective interaction, and the boundary conditions to which it gives rise are known to play an important role in how (and...

  19. Axisymmetrically Tropical Cyclone-like Vortices with Secondary Circulations

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Liang

    2013-01-01

    The secondary circulation of the tropical cyclone (TC) is related to its formation and intensification, thus becomes very important in the studies. The analytical solutions have both the primary and secondary circulation in a three-dimensionally nonhydrostatic and adiabatic model. We prove that there are three intrinsic radiuses for the axisymmetrically ideal incompressible flow. The first one is the radius of maximum primary circular velocity $r_m$. The second one is radius of the primary kernel $r_k>r_m$, across which the vorticity of the primary circulation changes sign and the vertical velocity changes direction. The last one is the radius of the maximum primary vorticity $r_d$, at which the vertical flow of the secondary circulation approaches its maximum, and across which the radius velocity changes sign. The first TC-like vortex solution has universal inflow or outflow. The relations between the intrinsic length scales are $r_k=\\sqrt{2}r_m$ and $r_d=2r_m$. The second one is a multi-planar solution, per...

  20. Classification of hemispheric monthly mean stratospheric potential vorticity fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Huth

    Full Text Available Monthly mean NCEP reanalysis potential vorticity fields at the 650 K isentropic level over the Northern and Southern Hemispheres between 1979 and 1997 were studied using multivariate analysis tools. Principal component analysis in the T-mode was applied to demonstrate the validity of such statistical techniques for the study of stratospheric dynamics and climatology. The method, complementarily applied to both the raw and anomaly fields, was useful in determining and classifying the characteristics of winter and summer PV fields on both hemispheres, in particular, the well-known differences in the behaviour and persistence of the polar vortices. It was possible to identify such features as sudden warming events in the Northern Hemisphere and final warming dates in both hemispheres. The stratospheric impact of other atmospheric processes, such as volcanic eruptions, also identified though the results, must be viewed at this stage as tentative. An interesting change in behaviour around 1990 was detected over both hemispheres.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; general circulation; climatology

  1. Tidal and residual flows in the western Dutch Wadden Sea III: Vorticity balances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridderinkhof, H.

    A vorticity-dynamics approach is used to examine the origin of the small-scale residual current field in the western Dutch Wadden Sea. For a representative part of the Wadden Sea, the magnitude of vorticity and of terms in the balance equation for vorticity is determined on the basis of results from a two-dimensional numerical model. The torque from bottom friction along the side walls of the tidal channels appears to be the dominating mechanism in generating tidal relative vorticity, the magnitude of which is much larger than planetary vorticity. Especially near a tidal inlet, stretching and squeezing of fluid columns is of importance in increasing/decreasing relative vorticity. Averaging over a tidal period shows, compared to the tidal equations, an increased influence of the non-linear advective and streching/squeezing terms in the tidally-averaged balance. However, although the relative influence of these strong non-linear terms increases, the influence of the weak non-linear terms originating in bottom friction cannot be ignored. The mechanism responsible for the headland eddies near a tidal inlet and the topographical eddies in the channels of the Wadden Sea is essentially the same, viz. the transfer of vorticity from a source region where this vorticity is produced by differential bottom friction, to adjacent regions. This transfer of tidal vorticity, or advection, is most effective near a transition from straight to curved isobaths where a gradient in the production of tidal vorticity occurs. This is illustrated by showing the vorticity possessed by a particular fluid column during a tidal excursion. The dominant influence of the bathymetry on the small scale residual current pattern is used for a qualitative discussion of the residual flow field in other parts of our numerical model.

  2. Rigidly connected magnetic lines: twisting and winding of magnetic lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, G.

    2017-10-01

    The dynamical process of magnetic flux variation in a fluid's stream tube is described by constructing 1+1+ (2) decomposition of the gradient of fluid's 4-velocity. The necessary and sufficient conditions are obtained for a spacelike congruence to be a congruence of rigidly connected spacelike curves. The evolution of magnetic flux in a magnetic tube is explored under the assumptions that magnetic lines are rigidly connected and the chemical potential of the fluid is constant along a magnetic tube. The interplay between magnetic and stream tubes is demonstrated. It is shown that the growth of magnetic energy in a magnetic tube cannot exceed to that of a stream tube. It is found that the proper time variation of twist of magnetic lines is caused by gravitation inside a neutron star if magnetic lines are rigidly connected and charge neutrality condition holds. Helmholtz-like magnetic vorticity flux conservation in a magnetic tube constituted by rigidly connected geodetic magnetic lines is derived under the assumption that the charge neutrality condition holds. It is shown that the winding of frozen-in poloidal magnetic field due to differential rotation requires meridional circulation in an axisymmetric stationary hydromagnetic configuration.

  3. Equilibrium magnetic states in individual hemispherical permalloy caps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streubel, Robert; Schmidt, Oliver G. [Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, IFW Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Material Systems for Nanoelectronics, Chemnitz University of Technology, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Gaididei, Yuri [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, 03143 Kiev (Ukraine); Sheka, Denis D. [Radiophysics Faculty, Taras Shevchenko National University of Kiev, 01601 Kiev (Ukraine); Makarov, Denys [Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, IFW Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Kronast, Florian [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-09-24

    The magnetization distributions in individual soft magnetic permalloy caps on non-magnetic spherical particles with sizes ranging from 50 to 800 nm are investigated. We experimentally visualize the magnetic structures at the resolution limit of the x-ray magnetic circular dichroism photoelectron emission microscopy (XMCD-PEEM). By analyzing the so-called tail contrast in XMCD-PEEM, the spatial resolution is significantly enhanced, which allowed us to explore magnetic vortices and their displacement on curved surfaces. Furthermore, cap nanostructures are modeled as extruded hemispheres to determine theoretically the phase diagram of equilibrium magnetic states. The calculated phase diagram agrees well with the experimental observations.

  4. Wavelet Analysis of the Conditional Vorticity Budget in Fully Developed Homogeneous Isotropic Turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilczek, M; Friedrich, R [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 9, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Kadoch, B [Aix-Marseille Universite and M2P2-CNRS Ecole Centrale de Marseille, 38 Rue Joliot-Curie, 13451 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Schneider, K [M2P2-CNRS and CMI, Universite de Provence, 39 Rue Joliot-Curie, 13453 Marseille Cedex 13 (France); Farge, M, E-mail: mwilczek@uni-muenster.de [LMD-CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 Rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 5 (France)

    2011-12-22

    We study the conditional balance of vortex stretching and vorticity diffusion of fully developed three-dimensional homogeneous isotropic turbulence with respect to coherent and incoherent flow contributions. This decomposition is achieved by the Coherent Vorticity Extraction based on orthogonal wavelets applied to DNS data, which yields insights into the influence of the different contributions as well as their interaction.

  5. Imparting small vorticity to a Bianchi type-VIh empty spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batakis, Nikos A.

    1981-04-01

    We present and briefly discuss a Bianchi type-VIh empty spacetime. The field equations have been solved after being linearized with respect to a parameter which imparts vorticity to the model. The limit of zero vorticity is an already known solution.

  6. Controlled Flow Distortion in an Offset Diffuser using Hybrid Trapped Vorticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, T. J.; Vukasinovic, B.; Glezer, A.

    2016-11-01

    Trapped vorticity concentration engendered by deliberate modification of the internal surface of an offset diffuser is coupled with a spanwise array of surface-integrated fluidic-oscillating jets for hybrid flow control of streamwise vorticity concentrations that dominate the base flow and give rise to flow distortions at the engine inlet. The local and global characteristics of the diffuser flow in the absence and presence of the actuation are investigated at Mach numbers up to M = 0.7, using surface oil-flow visualization and pressure distributions, and particle image velocimetry. It is shown that two sources of streamwise vorticity dominate the base flow distortion, namely, corner and a central pair of counter-rotating vortices. The present investigations demonstrate that the actuation affects the topology, strength and scale of the trapped vorticity and thereby its coupling to and interaction with the counter rotating streamwise vortices, where the central vortex pair becomes fully suppressed. As a result, the actuation significantly alters the evolution of the flow within the diffuser, and leads to significant suppression of pressure distortion at the engine inlet (by about 80%) at actuation level that is less than 0.7% of the diffuser's mass flow rate. These findings indicate the utility of hybrid trapped vorticity actuation for mitigating adverse effects of secondary vorticity concentrations formed by local separation and corner flows. Supported by ONR.

  7. Potential Vorticity Evolution in the Co-orbital Region of Embedded Protoplanets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koller, J. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    2004-04-01

    This thesis presents two-dimensional hydrodynamic disk simulations with embedded protoplanets, emphasizing the non-linear dynamics in the co-orbital region. In particular, it demonstrates how a protoplanetary disk responds to embedded low mass planets at the inviscid limit. Since the potential vorticity (PV) flow is not conserved, due to the spiral shocks and possibly boundary layer effects emanating from the planet, the PV profile develops inflection points which eventually render the flow unstable. Vortices are produced in association with the potential vorticity minima. Born in the separatrix region, these vortices experience close encounters with the planet, consequently exerting strong torques on the planet. The existence of these vortices, if confirmed, have important implications on planetary migration rates. The formation of vortices is discussed in more detail and a key parameter is found which depends solely on planet mass and sound speed. With this key parameter, one can predict the disk evolution, PV growth rates, and threshold conditions for forming vortices in the co-orbital region. An analytical estimate for the change of PV due to shocks is compared to the actual change in PV in the hydrodynamic simulations. They match well except in the inner region where vortices form. In addition, extensive resolution tests were carried out but uncertainties remain about the physics of this particular region.

  8. Formation mechanism of hairpin vortices in the wake of a truncated square cylinder in a duct

    CERN Document Server

    Dousset, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the laminar shedding of hairpin vortices in the wake of a truncated square cylinder placed in a duct, for Reynolds numbers around the critical threshold of the onset of vortex shedding. We single out the formation mechanism of the hairpin vortices by means of a detailed analysis of the flow patterns in the steady regime. We show that unlike in previous studies of similar structures, the dynamics of the hairpin vortices is entwined with that of the counter-rotating pair of streamwise vortices, which we found to be generated in the bottom part of the near wake (these are usually referred to as base vortices). In particular, once the hairpin structure is released, the base vortices attach to it, forming its legs, so these are streamwise, and not spanwise as previously observed in unconfined wakes or behind cylinders of lower aspect ratios. We also single out a trail of Omega-shaped vortices, generated between successive hairpin vortices through a mechanism that is analogous to that active in near-...

  9. Potential Vorticity Evolution in the Co-orbital Region of Embedded Protoplanets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Koller

    2004-09-01

    This thesis presents two-dimensional hydrodynamic disk simulations with embedded protoplanets, emphasizing the non-linear dynamics in the co-orbital region. In particular, it demonstrates how a protoplanetary disk responds to embedded low mass planets at the inviscid limit. Since the potential vorticity (PV) flow is not conserved, due to the spiral shocks and possibly boundary layer effects emanating from the planet, the PV profile develops inflection points which eventually render the flow unstable. Vortices are produced in association with the potential vorticity minima. Born in the separatrix region, these vortices experience close encounters with the planet, consequently exerting strong torques on the planet. The existence of these vortices, if confirmed, have important implications on planetary migration rates. The formation of vortices is discussed in more detail and a key parameter is found which depends solely on planet mass and sound speed. With this key parameter, one can predict the disk evolution, PV growth rates, and threshold conditions for forming vortices in the co-orbital region. An analytical estimate for the change of PV due to shocks is compared to the actual change in PV in the hydrodynamic simulations. They match well except in the inner region where vortices form. In addition, extensive resolution tests were carried out but uncertainties remain about the physics of this particular region.

  10. Energy and vorticity decay in Haloclines and Thermoclines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, Jose M.; Matulka, Annia M.; Peco, Cristian

    2010-05-01

    Experiments at different Reynolds numbers on the vertical and horizontal mixing structure and efficiency of mixing across a thermocline or halocline are used to investigate the decay of the turbulence [1-3]. Vertical and horizontal grids are used to mix an initialy sharp density interface (mostly made up with brine). Visualization methods are used to derive the velocity and vorticity horizontal fields and density probes allow to evaluate mixing. The vortex behavior is analyzed in detail as well as the process of energy decay and the transfer from kinetic to potential energy.By using the multi-fractal "Box counting Algorithm" [1] on the kinetic energy and vorticity fields and a suitable non dimensional Damkholer type of decay time, based on the local dissipation in the experiments that model ocean haloclines and surface ROFI, it is possible to relate certain patterns to physical processes similar to those in the ocean as in[4]. Diffusion, Spectral variations, Intermittency and higher order estimations of local mixing are presented as functions of the Richardson number and these predictions are compared with practical ocean flows and pollution situations[5]. [1] Redondo J.M. and Garzon G."Multifractal structure and intermittency in Rayleigh-Taylor Driven Fronts". Ed. S. Dalziel www.damtp.cam.ac.uk/iwpctm9/proceedings/IWPCTM9/Papers/Programme.htm. 2004. [2] Redondo, J.M. and Cantalapiedra I.R. "Mixing in Horizontally Heterogeneous Flows". Jour. Flow Turbulence and Combustion. 51. 217-222. 1993. [3] Castilla R, Redondo J.M., Gamez P.J., Babiano A. "Coherent vortices and Lagrangian Dynamics in 2D Turbulence". Non-Linear Processes in Geophysics 14. 139-151. 2007. [4] Bezerra,M.O. M. Diez, C. Medeiros, A. Rodriguez, E. Bahia., A. Sanchez-Arcilla and J.M. Redondo. "Study on the influence of waves on coastal diffusion using image analysis". Jour. Flow Turbulence and Combustion 59,.191-204. 1998. [5] Peco, C. "Mixing in the Thermocline and Halocline Ms". Thesis, ETSECCPB

  11. Diagnostic study on the relation between ozone and vorticity potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel Basset, H. [Department of Astronomy and Meteorology, Faculty of Science, Al Azhar University, Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt); Gahein, A. [Egyptian Meteorological Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    2003-04-01

    A diagnostic analysis of a Mediterranean system and the associated tropopause folding for the period 27 February to 10 March, 1987 is presented. Geopotential height, potential vorticity (PV) and relative humidity distributions were diagnosed. The analysis indicates clear correlation between the development of the cut-off low and the tropopause folding. A series of vertical cross-sections at the ends of the jet streaks demonstrated that a fold could be captured using potential vorticity and relative humidity. Q-vectors were employed to investigate vertical motion in the vicinity of the fold and showed the exact positions of descent corresponding to the fold along the entire length of the jet streak. The analysis also shows that the strong correlation between total ozone and column integrated vorticity potential holds well for all levels. As both quantities are integrals through the atmosphere, this result is consistent with, but does not prove, a high independent linear dependence between ozone and PV. More case studies are needed to assure the high linear dependence between ozone and PV. The maximum transport of ozone from the stratosphere to the troposphere is coinciding with the maximum developing system, and also with the maximum values of PV. [Spanish] Se presenta un analisis diagnostico de un Sistema mediterraneo y del pliegue de la tropopausa asociado durante el periodo del 27 de febrero al 10 de marzo de 1987. Se diagnosticaron la altitud neopotencial, el potencial de vorticidad y la distribucion de la humedad relativa. El analisis indica una correlacion clara entre el desarrollo de la baja segregada y el pliegue de la tropopausa. Una serie de cortes verticales en los extremos de las trazas del chorro demostraron que el pliegue puede ser capturado utilizando el potencial de vorticidad y la humedad relativa. Para investigar la movilidad vertical en la vecindad del pliegue se utilizaron vectores Q, y se demostraron las posiciones exactas de descenso

  12. Analysis of scalar dissipation in terms of vorticity geometry in isotropic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms promoting scalar dissipation through scalar gradient production are scrutinized in terms of vorticity alignment with respect to strain principal axes. For that purpose, a stochastic Lagrangian model for the velocity gradient tensor and the scalar gradient vector is used. The model results show that the major part of scalar dissipation occurs for stretched vorticity, namely when the vorticity vector aligns with the extensional and intermediate strain eigenvectors. More specifically, it appears that the mean scalar dissipation is well represented by the sample defined by alignment with the extensional strain, while the most intense scalar dissipation is promoted by the set of events for which vorticity aligns with the intermediate strain. This difference is explained by rather subtle mechanisms involving the statistics of both the strain intensities and the scalar gradient alignment resulting from these special alignments of vorticity. The analysis allowing for the local flow structure confirms t...

  13. Baroclinic Vorticity Production in Protoplanetary Disks; Part II: Vortex Growth and Longevity

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, M R; Julien, K; Petersen, Mark R.; Stewart, Glen R.; Julien, Keith

    2006-01-01

    The factors affecting vortex growth in convectively stable protoplanetary disks are explored using numerical simulations of a two-dimensional anelastic-gas model which includes baroclinic vorticity production and radiative cooling. The baroclinic feedback, where anomalous temperature gradients produce vorticity through the baroclinic term and vortices then reinforce these temperature gradients, is found to be an important process in the rate of growth of vortices in the disk. Factors which strengthen the baroclinic feedback include fast radiative cooling, high thermal diffusion, and large radial temperature gradients in the background temperature. When the baroclinic feedback is sufficiently strong, anticyclonic vortices form from initial random perturbations and maintain their strength for the duration of the simulation, for over 600 orbital periods. Based on both simulations and a simple vortex model, we find that the local angular momentum transport due to a single vortex may be inward or outward, dependin...

  14. Numerical and Experimental Study on Negative Buoyance Induced Vortices in N-Butane Jet Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Yuan

    2015-07-26

    Near nozzle flow field in flickering n-butane diffusion jet flames was investigated with a special focus on transient flow patterns of negative buoyance induced vortices. The flow structures were obtained through Mie scattering imaging with seed particles in a fuel stream using continuous-wave (CW) Argon-ion laser. Velocity fields were also quantified with particle mage velocimetry (PIV) system having kHz repetition rate. The results showed that the dynamic motion of negative buoyance induced vortices near the nozzle exit was coupled strongly with a flame flickering instability. Typically during the flame flickering, the negative buoyant vortices oscillated at the flickering frequency. The vortices were distorted by the flickering motion and exhibited complicated transient vortical patterns, such as tilting and stretching. Numerical simulations were also implemented based on an open source C++ package, LaminarSMOKE, for further validations.

  15. Proposed Aharonov-Casher interferometry of non-Abelian vortices in chiral p-wave superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosfeld, Eytan; Seradjeh, Babak; Vishveshwara, Smitha

    2011-03-01

    We propose a two-path vortex interferometry experiment based on the Aharonov- Casher effect for detecting the non-Abelian nature of vortices in a chiral p-wave superconductor. The effect is based on observing vortex interference patterns upon enclosing a finite charge of externally controllable magnitude within the interference path. We predict that when the interfering vortices enclose an odd number of identical vortices in their path, the interference pattern disappears only for non-Abelian vortices. When pairing involves two distinct spin species, we derive the mutual statistics between half quantum and full quantum vortices and show that, remarkably, our predictions still hold for the situation of a full quantum vortex enclosing a half quantum vortex in its path. We discuss the experimentally relevant conditions under which these effects can be observed. Work supported by ICMT at UIUC, NSERC of Canada, CAS fellowship at UIUC, and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  16. Swirling around filaments: are large-scale structure vortices spinning up dark halos?

    CERN Document Server

    Laigle, Clotilde; Codis, Sandrine; Dubois, Yohan; Borgne, Damien le; Pogosyan, Dmitri; Devriendt, Julien; Peirani, Sebastien; Prunet, Simon; Rouberol, Stephane; Slyz, Adrianne; Sousbie, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    The kinematic analysis of dark matter and hydrodynamical simulations suggests that the vorticity in large-scale structure is mostly confined to, and predominantly aligned with their filaments, with an excess of probability of 20 per cent to have the angle between vorticity and filaments direction lower than 60 degrees relative to random orientations. The cross sections of these filaments are typically partitioned into four quadrants with opposite vorticity sign, arising from multiple flows, originating from neighbouring walls. The spins of halos embedded within these filaments are consistently aligned with this vorticity for any halo mass, with a stronger alignment for the most massive structures up to an excess of probability of 165 per cent. On large scales, adiabatic/cooling hydrodynamical simulations display the same vorticity in the gas as in the dark matter. The global geometry of the flow within the cosmic web is therefore qualitatively consistent with a spin acquisition for smaller halos induced by th...

  17. Features of wavy vortices in a curved channel from experimental and numerical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligrani, P. M.; Finlay, W. H.; Fields, W. A.; Fuqua, S. J.; Subramanian, C. S.

    1992-01-01

    Results are reported from an experimental study obtaining evidence of time-dependent, wavy vortex motions associated with undulating and twisting Dean vortices in a curved channel with 40-to-1 aspect ratio, and mild curvature (radius ratio = 0.979). The results are compared with direct numerical simulations of time-dependent 3D Navier-Stokes equations using boundary conditions in the spanwise and streamwise directions. When viewed in cross section, experimental visualizations of undulating and twisting vortex flows show rocking motion and changes in the direction of the flow between vortices that are like those observed in the simulations. Experimental spectra show that undulating vortices are replaced by the higher-frequency, shorter streamwise wavelength twisting vortices at higher Reynolds numbers. When undulating vortices are present, experimental power spectra and visualizations give frequencies that are somewhat lower than the most unstable frequencies predicted by linear stability analysis.

  18. Sharp vorticity gradients in two-dimensional turbulence and the energy spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, E.A.; Naulin, Volker; Nielsen, Anders Henry;

    2010-01-01

    Formation of sharp vorticity gradients in two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic turbulence and their influence on the turbulent spectra are considered. The analog of the vortex line representation as a transformation to the curvilinear system of coordinates moving together with the di-vorticity lines...... is developed and compressibility of this mapping appears as the main reason for the formation of the sharp vorticity gradients at high Reynolds numbers. In the case of strong anisotropy the sharp vorticity gradients can generate spectra which fall off as k −3 at large k, which appear to take the same form...... as the Kraichnan spectrum for the enstrophy cascade. For turbulence with weak anisotropy the k dependence of the spectrum due to the sharp gradients coincides with the Saffman spectrum: E(k) ~ k −4. Numerical investigations of decaying turbulence reveal exponential growth of di-vorticity with a spatial distributed...

  19. Time-distance helioseismology: A new averaging scheme for measuring flow vorticity

    CERN Document Server

    Langfellner, Jan; Birch, Aaron C

    2014-01-01

    Time-distance helioseismology provides information about vector flows in the near-surface layers of the Sun by measuring wave travel times between points on the solar surface. Specific spatial averages of travel times have been proposed for distinguishing between flows in the east-west and north-south directions and measuring the horizontal divergence of the flows. No specific measurement technique has, however, been developed to measure flow vorticity. Here we propose a new measurement technique tailored to measuring the vertical component of vorticity. Fluid vorticity is a fundamental property of solar convection zone dynamics and of rotating turbulent convection in particular. The method consists of measuring the travel time of waves along a closed contour on the solar surface in order to approximate the circulation of the flow along this contour. Vertical vorticity is related to the difference between clockwise and counter-clockwise travel times. We applied the method to characterize the vortical motions ...

  20. Performance of a transverse vorticity probe in a turbulent channel flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, T.; Antonia, R.A.; Zhu, Y. [Newcastle upon Tyne Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Orlandi, P. [Dipartimento di Meccanica e Aeronautica, Universita Degli Studi di Roma ``La Sapienza``, I-00184 Rome (Italy); Esposito, P. [INSEAN - Istituto Nazionale per Studi ed Esperienze di Architettura Navale, Via di Vallerano 139, I-00128 Rome (Italy)

    1998-05-01

    The performance of a four hot-wire transverse vorticity probe is tested by comparing measurements in a fully developed turbulent channel flow with corresponding data obtained from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the same flow. In the inner region, the probe performs poorly, the rms vorticities being consistently smaller than the DNS values. In the outer region of the flow, there is reasonable agreement between measured and DNS vorticity statistics, especially after correcting the measurements for the effect of spatial resolution. In this region, the imbalance indicated by the vorticity form of the streamwise momentum equation is approximately constant. The magnitude of the imbalance can be reduced to an acceptable level of accuracy by considering sources of error which affect the velocity-vorticity correlations. (orig.) With 11 figs., 30 refs.