WorldWideScience

Sample records for vortex mode turbulence

  1. On the Resilience of Scalar and Vector Vortex Modes in Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Mitchell A; Lavery, Martin P J; Versfeld, Daniel J; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Free-space optical communication with spatial modes of light has become topical due to the possibility of dramatically increasing communication bandwidth via Mode Division Multiplexing (MDM). While both scalar and vector vortex modes have been used as transmission bases, it has been suggested that the latter is more robust in turbulence. Using orbital angular momentum as an example, we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the crosstalk due to turbulence is the same in the scalar and vector basis sets of such modes. This work brings new insights about the behaviour of vector and scalar modes in turbulence, but more importantly it demonstrates that when considering optimal modes for MDM, the choice should not necessarily be based on their vectorial nature.

  2. OAM mode of the Hankel-Bessel vortex beam in weak to strong turbulent link of marine-atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Zhang, Yixin

    2017-04-01

    We study the turbulent effects of maritime atmosphere on the propagation of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes of a vortex beam. Based on the modified Rytov approximation, we model the effective marine-atmospheric spectrum and the normalized energy weight of the vortex modes of Hankel-Bessel beams in a paraxial marine turbulent channel. Our results show that the intensity of the signal vortex modes of Hankel-Bessel beams in a non-turbulence channel increases with increasing the quantum number of the OAM of vortex modes from one to higher. We can utilize OAM eigenstates of the Hankel-Bessel vortex beam to increase the channel capacity in optical communication of the remote link. The normalized energy weight of signal OAM modes increases and that of crosstalk OAM modes decreases from the worst to the best turbulent maritime climate. The normalized energy weight of signal OAM modes reduces with the increasing of the turbulent outer scale from 0.1 \\text{m} to 0.5 \\text{m} and the receiving diameter, but it increases with increasing the turbulent outer scale when the outer scale is greater than 0.5 \\text{m} . The effects of the inner scale on the normalized energy weight of OAM modes can be ignored. We can mitigate the effects of turbulence by the choice of the longer wavelength and smaller receiver aperture.

  3. Aircraft Wake Vortex Deformation in Turbulent Atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Hennemann, Ingo; Holzaepfel, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Large-scale distortion of aircraft wake vortices appears to play a crucial role for aircraft safety during approach and landing. Vortex distortion is investigated based on large eddy simulations of wake vortex evolution in a turbulent atmosphere. A vortex identification method is developed that can be adapted to the vortex scales of interest. Based on the identified vortex center tracks, a statistics of vortex curvature radii is established. This statistics constitutes the basis for understan...

  4. Competing stability modes in vortex structure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Stephen; Gostelow, J. Paul; Rona, Aldo; McMullan, W. Andrew

    2015-11-01

    Nose cones and turbine blades have rotating components and represent very practical geometries for which the behavior of vortex structures is not completely understood. These two different physical cases demonstrate a common theme of competition between mode and vortex types. The literature concerning boundary-layer transition over rotating cones presents clear evidence of an alternative instability mode leading to counter-rotating vortex pairs, consistent with a centrifugal instability. This is in contrast to co-rotating vortices present over rotating disks that arise from crossflow effects. It is demonstrated analytically that this mode competes with the crossflow mode and is dominant only over slender cones. Predictions are aligned with experimental measurements over slender cones. Concurrent experimental work on the flow over swept cylinders shows that organized fine-scale streamwise vorticity occurs more frequently on convex surfaces than is appreciated. The conventional view of purely two-dimensional laminar boundary layers following blunt leading edges is not realistic and such boundary layers need to be treated three-dimensionally, particularly when sweep is present. The vortical structures are counter-rotating for normal cylinders and co-rotating under high sweep conditions. Crossflow instabilities may have a major role to play in the transition process but the streamline curvature mode is still present, and seemingly unchanged, when the boundary layer becomes turbulent.

  5. Model of strong stationary vortex turbulence in space plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Aburjania

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the macroscopic consequences of nonlinear solitary vortex structures in magnetized space plasmas by developing theoretical model of plasma turbulence. Strongly localized vortex patterns contain trapped particles and, propagating in a medium, excite substantial density fluctuations and thus, intensify the energy, heat and mass transport processes, i.e., such vortices can form strong vortex turbulence. Turbulence is represented as an ensemble of strongly localized (and therefore weakly interacting vortices. Vortices with various amplitudes are randomly distributed in space (due to collisions. For their description, a statistical approach is applied. It is supposed that a stationary turbulent state is formed by balancing competing effects: spontaneous development of vortices due to nonlinear twisting of the perturbations' fronts, cascading of perturbations into short scales (direct spectral cascade and collisional or collisionless damping of the perturbations in the short-wave domain. In the inertial range, direct spectral cascade occurs through merging structures via collisions. It is shown that in the magneto-active plasmas, strong turbulence is generally anisotropic Turbulent modes mainly develop in the direction perpendicular to the local magnetic field. It is found that it is the compressibility of the local medium which primarily determines the character of the turbulent spectra: the strong vortex turbulence forms a power spectrum in wave number space. For example, a new spectrum of turbulent fluctuations in k−8/3 is derived which agrees with available experimental data. Within the framework of the developed model particle diffusion processes are also investigated. It is found that the interaction of structures with each other and particles causes anomalous diffusion in the medium. The effective coefficient of diffusion has a square root dependence on the stationary level of noise.

  6. Coherent Vortex Evolution in Drift Wave Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, R.; Terry, P. W.

    1998-11-01

    Localized structures in turbulence are subject to loss of coherence by mixing. Phase space structures, such as drift-hole, (P. W. Terry, P. H. Diamond, T. S. Hahm, Phys. Fluids B) 2 9 2048 (1990) possess a self-electric field, which if sufficiently large maintains particle trapping against the tidal deformations of ambient turbulence. We show here that intense vortices in fluid drift wave turbulence avoid mixing by suppressing ambient turbulence with the strong flow shear of the vortex edge. Analysis of turbulence evolution in the vortex edge recovers Rapid Distortion Theory (G. K. Batchelor and I. Proudman, Q. J. Mech. Appl. Math.) 7 83 (1954) as the short time limit and the shear suppression scaling theory (H. Biglari, P. H. Diamond and P. W. Terry, Phys. Fluids B) 2 1 (1990) as the long time limit. Shear suppression leads to an amplitude condition for coherence and delineates the Gaussian core from the non Gaussian tail of the probability distribution function. The amplitude condition of shear suppression is compared with the trapping condition for phase space holes. The possibility of nonlinear vortex growth will be examined by considering electron dynamics in the vortex evolution.

  7. Holographic Vortex Pair Annihilation in Superfluid Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Yiqiang; Tian, Yu; Zhang, Hongbao

    2014-01-01

    We make a first principles investigation of the dynamical evolution of vortex number in a two-dimensional (2D) turbulent superfluid by holography through numerically solving its highly non-trivial gravity dual. With the randomly placed vortices and antivortices prepared as initial states, we find that the temporal evolution of the vortex number can be well fit statistically by two-body decay due to the vortex pair annihilation featured relaxation process remarkably from a very early time on. In particular, subtracted by the universal offset, the power law fit indicates that our holographic turbulent superfluid exhibits an apparently different decay pattern from the superfluid recently experimented in highly oblate Bose-Einstein condensates.

  8. Experimental Investigation of wing-tip vortex evolution in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sean; Ghimire, Hari

    2016-11-01

    Towing tank experiments were conducted to examine the evolution of a wing-tip vortex in grid-generated turbulence. Measurements using particle image velocimetry (PIV) were conducted of the velocity field generated by towing a semi-span symmetric wing oriented at 8 degree angle of attack. Turbulence of different kinetic energy and length scales was produced by simultaneously towing grids of different mesh sizes upstream of the wing. Results showed that wing-tip vortex wandering increased with the increase in turbulence kinetic energy, ultimately leading to spontaneous collapse of the vortex. During this process, a measurable diffusion of overall vortex circulation was observed, with the rate of diffusion leading to the collapse of the vortex dependent on the turbulence intensity. Interestingly, the radius of the vortex core remained largely unchanged during the diffusion process, Evidence suggests that the breakdown of vortex was enhanced by entrainment of fluid inside vortex core due to vortex stripping in presence of turbulence.

  9. Axisymmetric Vortex Simulations with Various Turbulence Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Howard Fiedler

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The CFD code FLUENTTM has been applied to a vortex within an updraft above a frictional lower boundary. The sensitivity of vortex intensity and structure to the choice of turbulent model is explored. A high Reynolds number of 108 is employed to make the investigation relevant to the atmospheric vortex known as a tornado. The simulations are axisymmetric and are integrated forward in time to equilibrium.  In a variety of turbulence models tested, the Reynolds Stress Model allows for the greatest intensification of the vortex, with the azimuthal wind speed near the surface being 2.4 times the speed of the updraft, consistent with the destructive nature of tornadoes.  The Standard k-e Model, which is simpler than the Reynolds Stress Model but still more detailed than what is commonly available in numerical weather prediction models, produces an azimuthal wind speed near the surface of at most 0.6 times the updraft speed.        

  10. Vortex Simulation of Turbulent Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-19

    TURBULENT COMBUSTION (AFOSR Grant No. 89-0491) Principal Investigator: Ahmed F. Ghoniem Department of Mechanical Engineering Massachusetts Institute of...Heavy Industries, Nagoya, Japan.(talk and discussion). 17. 1990, Mazda Motor Co., Yokohama, Japan, (talk and discussion). 18. 1990, American Math Society...VORTICITY LAYERS UNDER NON-SYMMETRIC CONDITIONS Omar M. Kniot and Ahmed F. Ghoniem Department of Mechanical Engineering Massachusetts Institute of

  11. Turbulent Flow Measurement in Vortex Settling Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Chapokpour

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of an experimental study on the three-dimensional turbulent flow field in vortex settling basin. An ADV (Acoustic Doppler Velocity Meter were used to catch 3D velocitycomponents inside the basin. Detailed measurements of time-averaged velocity components, turbulent intensity components and turbulent kinetic energy were determined at different radial sections of chamber. Also the normalized time averaged absolute velocity of 3D components in contour type exhibition were conducted and it was found that the absolute velocity generally is influenced by u component of flow. It trends from high magnitude in basin center to the constant magnitude in basin side wall. The normalized turbulent intensity ofthree components was investigated individually. It was found that intensity of 3D components in vicinity of central air core is higher than other regions, decreasing by moving towards basin sidewall except for the sections that influenced directly by entrance flow jet and sidewall exiting overflow. The results of turbulence kinetic energy also had the same interpretation like turbulence intensity and affected by the same boundary conditions which cover turbulence intensity of 3 velocity components overly.

  12. The large-scale pulsation effect in a vortex-type turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paukov, Iu. N.; Poroshin, Iu. V.

    1989-06-01

    A physical analogy between the amplification mechanism of vortex disturbances in the atmosphere and the occurrence of self-oscillations in a confined vortex-type turbulent flow is established. The increment of vortex instability in a centrifugal atomizer is determined, and used to calculate the characteristic time of evolution of this instability (about 0.001 sec). It is shown that the pulsational operating mode of a vortex chamber with a nozzle can be viewed as a series of individual amplifying acts with respect to single vortices.

  13. Mean intensity of vortex Bessel beams propagating in turbulent atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, Igor P

    2014-05-20

    Transformation of vortex Bessel beams during propagation in turbulent atmosphere is theoretically analyzed. Deforming influence of the random inhomogeneity of the turbulent medium on propagation of diffraction-free beams leads to disappearance of their invariant properties. In the given research, features of evolution of the spatial structure of distribution of mean intensity of vortex Bessel beams in turbulent atmosphere are analyzed. A quantitative criterion of possibility of carrying over of a dark central domain by vortex Bessel beams in a turbulent atmosphere is derived. The analysis of the behavior of several physical parameters of mean-level optical radiation shows that the shape stability of a vortex Bessel beam increases with the topological charge of this beam during its propagation in a turbulent atmosphere.

  14. A mathematical consideration of vortex thinning in 2D turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Yoneda, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    In two dimensional turbulence, vortex thinning process is one of the attractive mechanism to explain inverse energy cascade in terms of vortex dynamics. By direct numerical simulation to the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations with small-scale forcing and large-scale damping, Xiao-Wan-Chen-Eyink (2009) found an evidence that inverse energy cascade may proceed with the vortex thinning mechanism. The aim of this paper is to analyze the vortex-thinning mechanism mathematically (using the incompressible Euler equations), and give a mathematical evidence that large-scale vorticity gains energy from small-scale vorticity due to the vortex-thinning process.

  15. On the Vortex Dynamics in Fractal Fourier Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Lanotte, Alessandra S; Biferale, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Incompressible, homogeneous and isotropic turbulence is studied by solving the Navier-Stokes equations on a reduced set of Fourier modes, belonging to a fractal set of dimension $D$. By tuning the fractal dimension parameter, we study the dynamical effects of Fourier decimation on the vortex stretching mechanism and on the statistics of the velocity and the velocity gradient tensor. In particular, we show that as we move from $D=3$ to $D \\sim 2.8$, the statistics gradually turns into a purely Gaussian one. This result suggests that even a mild fractal mode reduction strongly depletes the stretching properties of the non-linear term of the Navier-Stokes equations and suppresses anomalous fluctuations.

  16. Vortex diffusion and vortex-line hysteresis in radial quantum turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saluto, L., E-mail: lidia.saluto@unipa.it [DEIM, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Jou, D., E-mail: david.jou@uab.es [Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Mongiovi, M.S., E-mail: m.stella.mongiovi@unipa.it [DEIM, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

    2014-05-01

    We study the influence of vortex diffusion on the evolution of inhomogeneous quantized vortex tangles. A simple hydrodynamical model to describe inhomogeneous counterflow superfluid turbulence is used. As an illustration, we obtain solutions for these effects in radial counterflow of helium II between two concentric cylinders at different temperatures. The vortex diffusion from the inner hotter cylinder to the outer colder cylinder increases the vortex length density everywhere as compared with the non-diffusive situation. The possibility of hysteresis in the vortex line density under cyclical variations of the heat flow is explored.

  17. Vortex beam generation based on a fiber array combining and propagation through a turbulent atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, V. P.; Dudorov, V. V.; Kolosov, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    We suggest a technique for generation of optical vortex beams with a variable orbital angular momentum based on a fiber laser array. The technique uses the phase control of each single subbeam. Requirements for the number of subbeams and the spatial arrangement for the vortex beam generation are determined. The propagation dynamics of a vortex beam synthesized is compared with that of a continuous Laguerre-Gaussian beam in free space and in a turbulent atmosphere. Spectral properties of a beam synthesized, which is represented as a superposition of different azimuth modes, are determined during its free-space propagation. It is shown that energy and statistical parameters coincide for synthesized and continuous vortex beams when propagating through a turbulent medium. Probability density functions of the beam intensity fluctuations are well approximated to a gamma distribution in the cases where the scintillation index is lower than unity independently of the beam type and observation point position relative to the propagation axis.

  18. Vortex statistics for turbulence in a container with rigid boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clercx, H.J.H.; Nielsen, A.H.

    2000-01-01

    The evolution of vortex statistics for decaying two-dimensional turbulence in a square container with rigid no-slip walls is compared with a few available experimental results and with the scaling theory of two-dimensional turbulent decay as proposed by Carnevale et al. Power-law exponents...

  19. Experimental Studies on Turbulence Kinetic Energy in Confined Vortex Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.Yan; G.H.Vatistas; 等

    2000-01-01

    Turbulence kinetic energies in confined vortex flows have been studied.The studies were based on the experiments performed in a vortex chamber,In the experiments,a Laser Doppler Anemometry(LDA) was used to perform flow measurements inside the vortex chamber,which provided the data for the kinetic energy analysis.The studies concentrated on the influences of the contraction ratio and the inlet air flow rate on the kinetic energy,and analyzed the characteristics of the kinetic energy in the confined vortex flows,including the distributions of the tangential component,radial component and total turbulence kinetic energy,In the paper,both the experimental techniques and the experimental results were presented.Based on a similarity analyis and the experimental data,an empirical scaling formula was proposed so that the tangential component of the turbulence kinetic energy was dependent only on the parameter of the contraction ratio.

  20. Flow in a circular expansion pipe flow: effect of a vortex perturbation on localised turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvam, Kamal; Peixinho, Jorge; Willis, Ashley P.

    2016-12-01

    We report the results of three-dimensional direct numerical simulations for incompressible viscous fluid in a circular pipe flow with a sudden expansion. At the inlet, a parabolic velocity profile is applied together with a finite amplitude perturbation in the form of a vortex with its axis parallel to the axis of the pipe. At sufficiently high Reynolds numbers the recirculation region breaks into a turbulent patch that changes position axially, depending on the strength of the perturbation. This vortex perturbation is believed to produce a less abrupt transition than in previous studies, which applied a tilt perturbation, as the localised turbulence is observed via the formation of a wavy structure at a low order azimuthal mode, which resembles an optimally amplified perturbation. For large vortex amplitude, the localised turbulence remains at a constant axial position. It is further investigated using proper orthogonal decomposition, which indicates that the centre region close to the expansion is highly energetic.

  1. Normal modes and mode transformation of pure electron vortex beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirunavukkarasu, G.; Mousley, M.; Babiker, M.; Yuan, J.

    2017-02-01

    Electron vortex beams constitute the first class of matter vortex beams which are currently routinely produced in the laboratory. Here, we briefly review the progress of this nascent field and put forward a natural quantum basis set which we show is suitable for the description of electron vortex beams. The normal modes are truncated Bessel beams (TBBs) defined in the aperture plane or the Fourier transform of the transverse structure of the TBBs (FT-TBBs) in the focal plane of a lens with the said aperture. As these modes are eigenfunctions of the axial orbital angular momentum operator, they can provide a complete description of the two-dimensional transverse distribution of the wave function of any electron vortex beam in such a system, in analogy with the prominent role Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beams played in the description of optical vortex beams. The characteristics of the normal modes of TBBs and FT-TBBs are described, including the quantized orbital angular momentum (in terms of the winding number l) and the radial index p>0. We present the experimental realization of such beams using computer-generated holograms. The mode analysis can be carried out using astigmatic transformation optics, demonstrating close analogy with the astigmatic mode transformation between LG and Hermite-Gaussian beams. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  2. Vortex Tubes in Turbulence Velocity Fields at High Reynolds Numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Mouri, H

    2008-01-01

    The elementary structures of turbulence, i.e., vortex tubes, are studied using velocity data obtained in laboratory experiments for boundary layers and duct flows at microscale Reynolds numbers 332-1934. While past experimental studies focused on intense vortex tubes, the present study focuses on all vortex tubes with various intensities. We obtain the mean velocity profile. The radius scales with the Kolmogorov length. The circulation velocity scales with the Kolmogorov velocity, in contrast to the case of intense vortex tubes alone where the circulation velocity scales with the rms velocity fluctuation. Since these scaling laws are independent of the configuration for turbulence production, they appear to be universal at high Reynolds numbers.

  3. IUTAM Symposium on Hamiltonian Dynamics, Vortex Structures, Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Borisov, Alexey V; Mamaev, Ivan S; Sokolovskiy, Mikhail A; IUTAM BOOKSERIES : Volume 6

    2008-01-01

    This work brings together previously unpublished notes contributed by participants of the IUTAM Symposium on Hamiltonian Dynamics, Vortex Structures, Turbulence (Moscow, 25-30 August 2006). The study of vortex motion is of great interest to fluid and gas dynamics: since all real flows are vortical in nature, applications of the vortex theory are extremely diverse, many of them (e.g. aircraft dynamics, atmospheric and ocean phenomena) being especially important. The last few decades have shown that serious possibilities for progress in the research of real turbulent vortex motions are essentially related to the combined use of mathematical methods, computer simulation and laboratory experiments. These approaches have led to a series of interesting results which allow us to study these processes from new perspectives. Based on this principle, the papers collected in this proceedings volume present new results on theoretical and applied aspects of the processes of formation and evolution of various flows, wave a...

  4. Vortex shedding effects in grid-generated turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melina, G.; Bruce, P. J. K.; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2016-08-01

    The flow on the centerline of grid-generated turbulence is characterized via hot-wire anemometry for three grids with different geometry: a regular grid (RG60), a fractal grid (FSG17), and a single-square grid (SSG). Due to a higher value of the thickness t0 of its bars, SSG produces greater values of turbulence intensity Tu than FSG17, despite SSG having a smaller blockage ratio. However, the higher Tu for SSG is mainly due to a more pronounced vortex shedding contribution. The effects of vortex shedding suppression along the streamwise direction x are studied by testing a three-dimensional configuration, formed by SSG and a set of four splitter plates detached from the grid (SSG+SP). When vortex shedding is damped, the centerline location of the peak of turbulence intensity xpeak moves downstream and Tu considerably decreases in the production region. For FSG17 the vortex shedding is less intense and it disappears more quickly, in terms of x /xpeak , when compared to all the other configurations. When vortex shedding is attenuated, the integral length scale Lu grows more slowly in the streamwise direction, this being verified both for FSG17 and for SSG+SP. In the production region, there is a correlation between the vortex shedding energy and the skewness and the flatness of the velocity fluctuations. When vortex shedding is not significant, the skewness is highly negative and the flatness is much larger than 3. On the opposite side, when vortex shedding is prominent, the non-Gaussian behavior of the velocity fluctuations becomes masked.

  5. Flow in a Circular Expansion Pipe Flow: Effect of a Vortex Perturbation on Localized Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Selvam, Kamal; Willis, Ashley P

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of three-dimensional direct numerical simulations for incompressible viscous fluid in a circular pipe flow with a sudden expansion. At the inlet, a parabolic velocity profile is applied together with a finite amplitude perturbation in the form of a vortex with its axis parallel to the axis of the pipe. At sufficiently high Reynolds numbers the recirculation region breaks into a turbulent patch that changes position axially depending on the strength of the perturbation. This vortex perturbation is believed to produce a less abrupt transition than in previous studies with a tilt perturbation, as the localized turbulence is observed via the formation of a wavy structure at a low order azimuthal mode, which resembles an optimally amplified perturbation. For higher amplitude, the localized turbulence remains at a constant axial position. It is further investigated using proper orthogonal decomposition, which indicates that the centre region close to the expansion is highly energetic.

  6. Influence of Wake-Vortex Turbulence on the Flight Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borivoj Galović

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available With the growing air traffic intensity, at some ai1ports weare more often faced with the fact that aircraft land or take offone after another. Since evety aircraft leaves a turbulent vortexbehind, which acts unexpectedly and is destabilising for theaircraft flying into it, the flight safety in such repeated landingsand takeoffs becomes questionable. Determining the minimumsafety time interval between the repeated operations becomesimperative and a limiting factor for some airports withhigh air traffic intensity. Unlike militaty flying, where crew istrained to fly in a group, in civil air traffic the crew is nottrained for such flying and on top of it mostly operate on largeaircraft, which produce very strong turbulent vortex. Additionalsophisticated equipment in new modem aircraft improvesnavigation, communication and steering of the aircraft, butdoes not insure it from flying into an invisible turbulent vortex.This paper discusses the vortex generation, its nature and fa ctorsthat influence its intensity and duration. The paper alsodeals with a model of calculating the probability of flying intoa turbulent vortex regarding time intetval of repeated opera tions,and influence of sophisticated equipment installed, onthe stability and flight safety of an aircraft. Conclusion underlinesthe need to standardise the minimum safety time intervalseparation between the repeated operations, with the aim ofimproving flight safety.

  7. Optical Rogue Waves in Vortex Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, Christopher J; Oppo, Gian-Luca

    2015-01-01

    We present a spatio-temporal mechanism for producing 2D optical rogue waves in the presence of a turbulent state with creation, interaction and annihilation of optical vortices. Spatially periodic structures with bound phase lose stability to phase unbound turbulent states in complex Ginzburg- Landau and Swift-Hohenberg models with external driving. When the pumping is high and the external driving is low, synchronized oscillations are unstable and lead to spatio-temporal turbulence with high excursions in amplitude. Nonlinear amplification leads to rogue waves close to turbulent optical vortices, where the amplitude tends to zero, and to probability distribution functions with long tails typical of extreme optical events.

  8. Numerical simulation of the characteristics of turbulent Taylor vortex flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xiantao; PAN Jiazhen; CHEN Liqing; SHI Yan; CHEN Wenmei; CHU Liangyin

    2007-01-01

    Turbulent Taylor vortex flow,which is contained between a rotating inner cylinder and a coaxial fixed outer cylinder with fixed ends,is simulated by applying the development in Reynolds stress equations mold (RSM) of the micro-perturbation.This resulted from the truncation error between the numerical solution and exact solution of the Reynolds stress equations.Based on the numerical simulation results of the turbulent Taylor vortex flow,its characteristics such as the fluctuation of the flow field,the precipitous drop of azimuthal velocity,the jet flow of radial velocity,the periodicity of axial velocity,the wave periodicity of pressure distribution,the polarization of shear stress on the walls,and the turbulence intensity in the jet region,are discussed.Comparing the pilot results measured by previous methods,the relative error of the characteristics predicted by simulation is less than 30%.

  9. Transition to turbulence, intermittence, and vortex fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bershadskii, A.G.

    1985-09-01

    A model is developed which describes the fluctuation coalescence of vortices at moderately high Reynolds numbers. The model is found to be in good agreement with experimental data on (1) flow intermittence in a boundary layer, a round jet, and a plane wake; (2) the effect of a magnetic field on the formation of a turbulent energy spectrum behind a grid and on turbulent fluctuations and friction in ducts; (3) formation of a turbulent energy spectrum in a boundary layer and in ducts. 12 references.

  10. RESEARCH ON TURBULENT FLOW WITHIN THE VORTEX PUMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hong-xun

    2004-01-01

    Based on the standard k-ε turbulence model and the RANS equations, the finite volume method and the SIMPLE algorithm were adopted to carry out the three-dimensional viscous numerical simulation of the internal flow within a vortex pump in double reference frames. According to the results of numerical simulation, the internal flow in the vortex pump was analyzed, and the calculated results of blade surface pressure of the impeller were compared with experimental results. The maximum relative error is 6.6% between calculated value and experimental value of the pump head under operation conditions.

  11. Dynamic evolution of coherent vortex dipole in atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhong; Zeng, Jun

    2017-01-01

    The analytical expression for the cross-spectral density function of Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beams with coherent vortex dipole (CVD) propagating through atmospheric turbulence is derived, which enables us to study the evolution process of CVD propagating through atmospheric turbulence, where the influences of the beams parameters and atmospheric turbulence parameters on the ratio of critical off-axis distance to the waist width are stressed. It shows that the evolution process of the CVD depends on the off-axis distance. The larger the off-axis distance is, the more the number of CVD is. When the off-axis distance is zero, the position of coherent vortices with positive and negative topological charge of CVD propagating through atmospheric turbulence is always symmetry. When the off-axis distance is big enough, compared with the situation at source plane, the orientation of the positive coherent vortex of inherent CVD and negative coherent vortex of that rotates 180° in the far field. The larger the structure constant and the waist width are, as well as the smaller the spatial correlation length and the inner scale are, the smaller the ratio ac/w0 is. Besides, the ratio ac/w0 will no longer change when the spatial correlation length or the inner scale increases to a certain value, whereas the outer scale has no effect on the ratio.

  12. Direct Numerical Simulation of Twin Swirling Flow Jets: Effect of Vortex-Vortex Interaction on Turbulence Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenkai Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A direct numerical simulation (DNS was carried out to study twin swirling jets which are issued from two parallel nozzles at a Reynolds number of Re = 5000 and three swirl levels of S = 0.68, 1.08, and 1.42, respectively. The basic structures of vortex-vortex interaction and temporal evolution are illustrated. The characteristics of axial variation of turbulent fluctuation velocities, in both the near and far field, in comparison to a single swirling jet, are shown to explore the effects of vortex-vortex interaction on turbulence modifications. Moreover, the second order turbulent fluctuations are also shown, by which the modification of turbulence associated with the coherent or correlated turbulent fluctuation and turbulent kinetic energy transport characteristics are clearly indicated. It is found that the twin swirling flow has a fairly strong localized vortex-vortex interaction between a pair of inversely rotated vortices. The location and strength of interaction depend on swirl level greatly. The modification of vortex takes place by transforming large-scale vortices into complex small ones, whereas the modulation of turbulent kinetic energy is continuously augmented by strong vortex modification.

  13. Vortex statistics in turbulent rotating convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunnen, R.P.J.; Clercx, H.J.H.; Geurts, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    The vortices emerging in rotating turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in water at Rayleigh number Ra=6.0×108 are investigated using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry and by direct numerical simulation. The so-called Q criterion is used to detect the vortices from velocity fields. This criter

  14. Properties of vortex beams formed by an array of fibre lasers and their propagation in a turbulent atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, V. P.; Dudorov, V. V.; Kolosov, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    Using a numerical simulation, we investigate the possibility of synthesising vortex laser beams with a variable orbital angular momentum by a hexagonal array of fibre lasers under a phase control of individual subapertures of the array. We report the requirements to the parameters of the device generating a vortex beam (number and size of subapertures, as well as their mutual arrangement). The propagation dynamics of synthesised vortex beams is compared with that of conventional Laguerre-Gaussian beams in free space and in a turbulent atmosphere. The spectral properties of the synthesised beam, represented as a superposition of different azimuthal modes, are determined during its propagation in free space. The energy and statistical parameters of the synthesised and Laguerre-Gaussian vortex beams are shown to coincide with increasing propagation distance in a turbulent medium.

  15. TURBULENCE,VORTEX AND EXTERNAL EXPLOSION INDUCED BY VENTING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜孝海; 范宝春; 叶经方

    2004-01-01

    The process of explosion venting to air in a cylindrical vent vessel connected to a duct, filling with a stoichiometric methane-oxygen gas mixture, was simulated numerically by using a colocated grid SIMPLE scheme based on k-epsilon turbulent model and Eddydissipation combustion model. The characteristics of the combustible cloud, flame and pressure distribution in the external flow field during venting were analyzed in terms of the predicted results. The results show that the external explosion is generated due to violent turbulent combustion in the high pressure region within the external combustible cloud ignited by a jet flame. And the turbulence and vortex in the external flow field were also discussed in detail. After the jet flame penetrating into the external combustible cloud, the turbulent intensity is greater in the regions with greater average kinetic energy gradient, rather than in the flame front; and the vortex in the external flow field is generated primarily due to the baroclinic effect, which is greater in the regions where the pressure and density gradients are nearly perpendicular.

  16. Evaluation of travelling vortex speed by means of vortex tracking and dynamic mode decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyhlík, Tomáš

    2016-06-01

    The article deals with the analysis of unsteady periodic flow field related to synthetic jet creation. The analyses are based on the data obtained using ANSYS Fluent solver. Numerical results are validated by hot wire anemometry data measured along the jet centerline. The speed of travelling vortex ring is evaluated by using vortex tracking method and by using dynamic mode decomposition method. Vortex identification is based on residual vorticity which allows identifying regions in the flow field where fluid particles perform the rotational motion. The regime of the synthetic jet with Re = 329 and S = 19.7 is chosen. Both the vortex tracking and the dynamic mode decomposition based vortex speed evaluation indicate an increase in the vortex speed close to the orifice and then decrease with maximum reaching almost one and half of orifice centerline velocity. The article contains extended version the article presented at the conference AEaNMiFMaE 2016.

  17. Gap vortex streets and turbulence in time-dependent streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Dan; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2016-11-01

    Gap vortex streets form in axial flows in highly eccentric annular channels, tightly packed rod bundles and other channels having narrow gap regions flanked by wider ones. The characteristics of these vortices and the flow and turbulence distributions in some of these channels have in the past documented for steady streams; in particular, the vortex generation frequency was found to be proportional to the bulk Reynolds number. The present study extends these findings to both accelerating and decelerating air flows in a large-scale rod bundle, configured as a wind tunnel with a by-pass branch equipped with a controlled movable flap just downstream of the blower. Time-dependent statistical properties in a gap and a subchannel centre were determined by phase-averaging velocity measurements collected with hot-wire anemometers and the time history of the phase-averaged vortex street frequency was determined with the use of a wavelet transform. Contrary to expectations, the results show that deviations of the vortex frequency and other flow characteristics from the corresponding values in steady flows at the same bulk Reynolds number were significant during acceleration and much less so during deceleration. Supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the Canadian Nuclear Laboratories.

  18. Spectral large-eddy simulations and vortex dynamics in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Lesieur, M

    1999-01-01

    We present a point of view of large-eddy simulations (LES) in Fourier space, where the eddy coefficients are expressed thanks to a two- point spectral closure of isotropic turbulence, the EDQNM theory. Returning to real space, this leads to models of the structure- function family (plain, selective or filtered). These models are applied with success to predict the statistical distributions and coherent-vortex dynamics for a wide variety of turbulent flows. In three-dimensional decaying isotropic turbulence, we confirm the existence of a k/sup 4/ infrared backscatter in the kinetic-energy spectrum, and predict a new k/sup 2/ law for the pressure spectrum in this range. In the mixing layer (temporal or spatial), we show how to manipulate the topology of Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices, from quasi two- dimensionality to helical pairing. The latter vortex organization is found in a backward-facing step just behind the step, and yields big staggered Lambda -vortices which are carried away downstream. In a developed turb...

  19. Hub vortex instability within wind turbine wakes: Effects of wind turbulence, loading conditions, and blade aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Ryan; Viola, Francesco; Camarri, Simone; Gallaire, Francois; Iungo, Giacomo Valerio

    2016-11-01

    vortex instability, and it can also affect the azimuthal wave number of the most unstable mode. Finally, higher Reynolds stresses and turbulent eddy viscosity decrease both growth rate and azimuthal wave number of the most unstable mode.

  20. Aeroelastic large eddy simulations using vortex methods: unfrozen turbulent and sheared inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branlard, Emmanuel Simon Pierre; Papadakis, G.; Gaunaa, Mac

    2015-01-01

    Vortex particles methods are applied to the aeroelastic simulation of a wind turbine in sheared and turbulent inflow. The possibility to perform large-eddy simulations of turbulence with the effect of the shear vorticity is demonstrated for the first time in vortex methods simulations. Most vorte...

  1. Inhomogeneous vortex tangles in counterflow superfluid turbulence: flow in convergent channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saluto Lidia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the evolution equation for the average vortex length per unit volume L of superfluid turbulence in inhomogeneous flows. Inhomogeneities in line density L andincounterflowvelocity V may contribute to vortex diffusion, vortex formation and vortex destruction. We explore two different families of contributions: those arising from asecondorder expansionofthe Vinenequationitself, andthose whichare notrelated to the original Vinen equation but must be stated by adding to it second-order terms obtained from dimensional analysis or other physical arguments.

  2. Impact of a wind turbine on turbulence: Un-freezing turbulence by means of a simple vortex particle approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branlard, Emmanuel Simon Pierre; Mercier, P.; Machefaux, Ewan;

    2016-01-01

    by a bound vorticity lifting line while the turbine wake vorticity and the turbulence vorticity are projected onto vortex particles. In the present work the rotor blades are stiff leaving aero-elastic interactions for future work. Inflow turbulence is generated with the model of Mann and converted to vortex......A vortex particle representation of turbulent fields is devised in order to address the following questions: Does a wind turbine affect the statistics of the incoming turbulence? Should this imply a change in the way turbulence boxes are used in wind turbine aero-elastic simulations......? Is it acceptable to neglect the influence of the wake and the wind turbine on the turbulent inflow? Is there evidence to justify the extra cost of a method capable of including these effects correctly? To this end, a unified vorticity representation of the flow is used: the wind turbine model is represented...

  3. Large Eddy Simulation of Aircraft Wake Vortices in a Homogeneous Atmospheric Turbulence: Vortex Decay and Descent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jongil; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Arya, S. Pal; Proctor, Fred H.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of ambient turbulence on decay and descent of aircraft wake vortices are studied using a validated, three-dimensional: large-eddy simulation model. Numerical simulations are performed in order to isolate the effect of ambient turbulence on the wake vortex decay rate within a neutrally-stratified atmosphere. Simulations are conducted for a range of turbulence intensities, by injecting wake vortex pairs into an approximately homogeneous and isotropic turbulence field. The decay rate of the vortex circulation increases clearly with increasing ambient turbulence level, which is consistent with field observations. Based on the results from the numerical simulations, simple decay models are proposed as functions of dimensionless ambient turbulence intensity (eta) and dimensionless time (T) for the circulation averaged over a range of radial distances. With good agreement with the numerical results, a Gaussian type of vortex decay model is proposed for weak turbulence: while an exponential type of Tortex decay model can be applied for strong turbulence. A relationship for the vortex descent based on above vortex decay model is also proposed. Although the proposed models are based on simulations assuming neutral stratification, the model predictions are compared to Lidar vortex measurements observed during stable, neutral, and unstable atmospheric conditions. In the neutral and unstable atmosphere, the model predictions appear to be in reasonable agreement with the observational data, while in the stably-stratified atmosphere, they largely underestimate the observed circulation decay with consistent overestimation of the observed vortex descent. The underestimation of vortex decay during stably-stratified conditions suggests that stratification has an important influence on vortex decay when ambient levels of turbulence are weak.

  4. VISIOMETRICS OF 2D SHOCK-PLANAR S/F/S CURTAIN INTERACTIONS: VORTEX DOUBLE LAYERS, VORTEX PROJECTILES AND DECAYING STRATIFIED TURBULENCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Vortex double layers (VDLs) and vortex projectiles (VPs) are the essential coherent structures which emerge in the shock excited (s/f/s) planar-parallel "curtain" simulations of a 2D shock tube with PPM. These opposite signed layers, formed by shock induced baroclinic deposition of vorticity, "ind" and are strongly affected by secondary reflected shocks and vortex interactions. In our visiometric mode of working, we quantify several of these processes and introduce time epochs to discuss the emerging phenomena and normalizations to scale (collapse) the data at M= 1. 5 and 2. 0. This versatile configuration,easily obtained in the laboratory, allows us to study the formation, evolution and reacceleration of VPs and stratified turbulence and mixing.``

  5. Discrimination of orbital angular momentum modes of the terahertz vortex beam using a diffractive mode transformer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changming; Wei, Xuli; Niu, Liting; Wang, Kejia; Yang, Zhengang; Liu, Jinsong

    2016-06-13

    We present an efficient method to discriminate orbital angular momentum (OAM) of the terahertz (THz) vortex beam using a diffractive mode transformer. The mode transformer performs a log-polar coordinate transformation of the input THz vortex beam, which consists of two 3D-printed diffractive elements. A following lens separates each transformed OAM mode to a different lateral position in its focal plane. This method enables a simultaneous measurement over multiple OAM modes of the THz vortex beam. We experimentally demonstrate the measurement of seven individual OAM modes and two multiplexed OAM modes, which is in good agreement with simulations.

  6. Symmetry plane model for turbulent flows with vortex generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Gilles L.; Russell, David A.

    1991-01-01

    An approximate procedure is proposed for predicting the performance of counterrotating vortex-generator installations in incompressible flow. An inviscid calculation that includes the motion of the vortices is used to obtain crossflow velocities at the boundary-layer edge as a function of initial position, spacing, and strength of the vortices, and local values of the spanwise gradient are then folded into an integral turbulent-boundary layer procedure applied in the plane of symmetry. Special attention is paid to the consistency of the approximations and equations used. The two-dimensional aerodynamics of vortex generator installations on a NACA 0016 airfoil at angle-of-attack are estimated in this manner, and the results compared with experiments carried out with a 30-cm chord wing mounted in a 2.4 x 3.6-m cross-section wind tunnel and tested at chord Reynolds numbers of 0.7 and 1.4 x 10 to the 6th. Agreement in the separation location is found for these complex flows for a range of conditions.

  7. Self-recovery effect of orbital angular momentum mode of circular beam in weak non-Kolmogorov turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Liu, Yi-Dong; Wang, Jiandong; Liu, Pusheng; Yang, Yuanjie

    2016-09-01

    It is generally true that the orbital angular momentum (OAM) mode persistently degenerate when a vortex beam propagates in the atmospheric turbulence. Here, however, we unveil an interesting self-recovery effect of OAM mode of the circular beam (CiB) in weak non-Kolmogorov turbulence. We show that the CiB displays the self-focusing effect and has clear focus in the weak non-Kolmogorov turbulence if we choose proper complex parameters, and the detection probability of the original OAM mode reaches the maximum at the focus. Our study proposes a method to alleviate the turbulent effects on OAM-based communication.

  8. Mean flow development of a longitudinal vortex embedded in an attached, three-dimensional, turbulent boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shizawa, T. [Science Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Eaton, J.K. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1990-12-31

    The interaction of a longitudinal vortex with a pressure-driven, three dimensional turbulent boundary layer was investigated experimentally. The vortex was attenuated much more rapidly in the three dimensional layer than in a two-dimensional boundary layer. The persistence for the vortex-induced perturbation was strongly dependent on the sign of the vortex.

  9. Vortex line density in counterflowing He II with laminar and turbulent normal fluid velocity profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Baggaley, A W

    2013-01-01

    Superfluid helium is an intimate mixture of a viscous normal fluid, with continuous vorticity, and an inviscid superfluid, where vorticity is constrained to thin, stable topological defects. One mechanism to generate turbulence in this system is through the application of a heat flux, so called thermal counterflow. Of particular interest is how turbulence in the superfluid responds to both a laminar and turbulent normal fluid in the presence of walls. We model superfluid vortex lines as reconnecting space curves with fixed circulation, and consider both laminar (Poiseuille) and turbulent normal fluid flows in a channel configuration. Using high resolution numerical simulations we show that turbulence in the normal fluid sustains a notably higher vortex line density than a laminar flow with the same mean flow rate. We exam Vinen's relation, $\\sqrt{L}=\\gamma v_{ns}$, between the steady state vortex line density $L$ and the counterflow velocity $v_{ns}$. Our results support the hypothesis that transition to turb...

  10. Fermion zero modes in a $Z_2$ vortex background

    CERN Document Server

    Lozano, Gustavo; Schaposnik, Fidel A

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study the zero energy solutions of the Dirac equation in the background of a $Z_2$ vortex of a non-Abelian gauge model with three charged scalar fields. We determine the number of the fermionic zero modes giving their explicit form for two specific Ansatze.

  11. Large-eddy simulations and vortex structures of turbulent jets in crossflow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Using the method of large-eddy simulation, the 3-dimensional turbulent jets in crossflow with stream-wise and transverse arrangements of nozzle are simulated, emphasizing on the dynamical process of generation and evolution of vortex structures in these flows. The results show that the basic vortex structures in literatures, such as the counter-rotating vortex pair, leading-edge vortices, lee-side vortices, hanging vortices, kidney vortices and anti-kidney vortices, are not independent physical substances, but local structures of the basic vortex structure of turbulent jets in crossflow-the 3-D stretching vortex rings originating from the orifice of the nozzle, which is discovered in this study. Therefore, the most important large-scale structures of turbulent jets in crossflow are unified to the 3-D vortex rings which stretch and twist in stream-wise and swing in transverse directions. We also found that the shedding frequencies of vortex rings are much lower than the one corresponding to the appearance of leading-edge and lee-side vortices in the turbulent jets.

  12. Large-eddy simulations and vortex structures of turbulent jets in crossflow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Hui; WU ChuiJie

    2007-01-01

    Using the method of large-eddy simulation,the 3-dimensional turbulent jets in crossflow with stream-wise and transverse arrangements of nozzle are simulated,emphasizing on the dynamical process of generation and evolution of vortex structures in these flows.The results show that the basic vortex structures in literatures,such as the counter-rotating vortex pair,leading-edge vortices,lee-side vortices,hanging vortices,kidney vortices and anti-kidney vortices,are not independent physical substances,but local structures of the basic vortex structure of turbulent jets in crossflow-the 3-D stretching vortex rings originating from the orifice of the nozzle,which is discovered in this study.Therefore,the most important large-scale structures of turbulent jets in crossflow are unified to the 3-D vortex rings which stretch and twist in stream-wise and swing in transverse directions.We also found that the shedding frequencies of vortex rings are much lower than the one corresponding to the appearance of leading-edge and lee-side vortices in the turbulent jets.

  13. Integral momenta of vortex Bessel-Gaussian beams in turbulent atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, Igor P

    2016-04-20

    The orbital angular momentum of vortex Bessel-Gaussian beams propagating in turbulent atmosphere is studied theoretically. The field of an optical beam is determined through the solution of the paraxial wave equation for a randomly inhomogeneous medium with fluctuations of the refraction index of the turbulent atmosphere. Peculiarities in the behavior of the total power of the vortex Bessel-Gaussian beam at the receiver (or transmitter) are examined. The dependence of the total power of the vortex Bessel-Gaussian beam on optical beam parameters, namely, the transverse wave number of optical radiation, amplitude factor radius, and, especially, topological charge of the optical beam, is analyzed in detail. It turns out that the mean value of the orbital angular momentum of the vortex Bessel-Gaussian beam remains constant during propagation in the turbulent atmosphere. It is shown that the variance of fluctuations of the orbital angular momentum of the vortex Bessel-Gaussian beam propagating in turbulent atmosphere calculated with the "mean-intensity" approximation is equal to zero identically. Thus, it is possible to declare confidently that the variance of fluctuations of the orbital angular momentum of the vortex Bessel-Gaussian beam in turbulent atmosphere is not very large.

  14. Numerical Study of Wake Vortex Behavior in Turbulent Domains with Ambient Stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzer, George F.; Proctor, Fred H.

    2000-01-01

    A three-dimensional large eddy simulation model is used to investigate the sensitivity of ambient stratification with turbulence on the behavior of aircraft wake vortices. Modeled ambient turbulence levels range from very weak to moderate, and stratification levels range from strongly stable to unstable. The results of profound significance from this study are: 1) very little sensitivity between vortex linking time and the level of stratification, 2) the mean vortex separation remained nearly constant regardless of stratification and turbulence (at least prior to linking), 3) the wake vortices did not rise regardless of the level of stratification, and 4) for very strong stratification, the vortex stopped descending and quickly dissipated even before vortex linking could occur. These results are supported by experimental data and are contrary to conclusions from other numerical studies that assume laminar flow and/or relatively-low Reynolds numbers.

  15. Mode selective control of drift wave turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, C.; Klinger, T.; Block, D.;

    2001-01-01

    Experiments on spatiotemporal open-loop synchronization of drift wave turbulence in a magnetized cylindrical plasma are reported. The synchronization effect is modeled by a rotating current profile with prescribed mode structure. Numerical simulations of an extended Hasegawa-Wakatani model show g...

  16. The effect of vortex merging and non-merging on the transfer of modal turbulent kinetic energy content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ground, Cody; Vergine, Fabrizio; Maddalena, Luca

    2016-08-01

    A defining feature of the turbulent free shear layer is that its growth is hindered by compressibility effects, thus limiting its potential to sufficiently mix the injected fuel and surrounding airstream at the supersonic Mach numbers intrinsic to the combustor of air-breathing hypersonic vehicles. The introduction of streamwise vorticity is often proposed in an attempt to counteract these undesired effects. This fact makes the strategy of introducing multiple streamwise vortices and imposing upon them certain modes of mutual interaction in order to potentially enhance mixing an intriguing concept. However, many underlying fundamental characteristics of the flowfields in the presence such interactions are not yet well understood; therefore, the fundamental physics of these flowfields should be independently investigated before the explicit mixing performance is characterized. In this work, experimental measurements are taken with the stereoscopic particle image velocimetry technique on two specifically targeted modes of vortex interaction—the merging and non-merging of two corotating vortices. The fluctuating velocity fields are analyzed utilizing the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) in order to identify the content, organization, and distribution of the modal turbulent kinetic energy content of the fluctuating velocity eigenmodes. The effects of the two modes of vortex interaction are revealed by the POD analysis which shows distinct differences in the modal features of the two cases. When comparing the low-order eigenmodes of the two cases, the size of the structures contained within the first ten modes is seen to increase as the flow progresses downstream for the merging case, whereas the opposite is true for the non-merging case. Additionally, the relative modal energy contribution of the first ten eigenmodes increases as the vortices evolve downstream for the merging case, whereas in the non-merging case the relative modal energy contribution decreases

  17. Response of Acartia tonsa to Burgers' Vortex: Deconstructing Turbulence-Copepod Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, D. L.; Webster, D. R.; Yen, J.

    2014-11-01

    In situ studies suggest that in many oceanic regimes, turbulence affects the vertical position of copepods primarily by changing their behavior, and only secondarily by altering their physical position. We test the hypothesis that fine-scale turbulence alters copepod behavior, presenting as alterations in directed movement and changes in swimming kinematics. To this end, we create two Burgers' vortices, specifying the rotation rate and axial strain rate to correspond to turbulent vortices with size scale equaling the inverse wavenumber of the median viscous dissipation rate (i.e. r = 8.1 η) for typical turbulent conditions in the coastal or near surface region (i.e., mean turbulent dissipation rates of 0.009 and 0.096 cm2/s3) . The vortex flow is quantified via tomo-PIV. Behavioral assays of Acartia tonsa are conducted, generating 3D trajectories for analysis of swimming kinematics and response to hydrodynamic cues. A. tonsa did not significantly respond to the vortex corresponding to dissipation rate of 0.009 cm2/s3, but drastically altered their swimming behavior in the presence of the 0.096 cm2/s3 vortex, including increased relative swim speed, angle of alignment with the vortex axis, net-to-gross displacement ratio, and escape acceleration, along with decreased turn frequency (relative to stagnant control conditions). Further, A. tonsa escape location is preferentially in the core of the stronger vortex, indicating that the hydrodynamic cue triggering the distinctive escape behavior is vorticity.

  18. The turbulent decay of trailing vortex pairs in stably stratified environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzaepfel, F.; Gerz, T.; Baumann, R.

    2000-03-01

    The decay of trailing vortex pairs in thermally stably stratified environments is investigated by means of large eddy simulations. Results of in-situ measurements in the wakes of different aircraft are used to find appropriate intitializations for the simulation of wake turbulence in the quiescent atmosphere. Furthermore, cases with weak atmospheric turbulence are investigated. It is shown that the early development of the vortices is not affected by turbulence and develops almost identically as in 2D simulations. In a quiescent atmosphere the subsequent vortex decay is controlled by the interaction of short-wave disturbances, owing to the aircraft induced turbulence, and baroclinic vorticity, owing to stable stratification. As a consequence, vertical vorticity streaks between the vortices are induced which are substantially intensified by vortex stretching and finally lead to rapid turbulent wake-vortex decay. When in addition also atmospheric turbulence is present, the long-wave instability is dominantly promoted. For very strong stratification (Fr < 1) it is observed that wake vortices may rebound but lose most of their strength before reaching the flight level. Finally, the simulation results are compared to the predictive capabilities of Greene's approximate model. (orig.)

  19. Electromagnetic Transport From Microtearing Mode Turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guttenfelder, W; Kaye, S M; Nevins, W M; Wang, E; Bell, R E; Hammett, G W; LeBlanc, B P; Mikkelsen, D R

    2011-03-23

    This Letter presents non-linear gyrokinetic simulations of microtearing mode turbulence. The simulations include collisional and electromagnetic effects and use experimental parameters from a high beta discharge in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The predicted electron thermal transport is comparable to that given by experimental analysis, and it is dominated by the electromagnetic contribution of electrons free streaming along the resulting stochastic magnetic field line trajectories. Experimental values of flow shear can significantly reduce the predicted transport.

  20. Numerical simulation of quasi-streamwise hairpin-like vortex generation in turbulent boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Nan; LU Li-peng; DUAN Zhen-zhen; YUAN Xiang-jiang

    2008-01-01

    A mechanism for generation of near wall quasi-streamwise hairpin-like vortex (QHV) and secondary quasi-streamwise vortices (SQV) is presented. The conceptual model of resonant triad in the theory of hydrodynamic instability and direct numerical simulation of a turbulent boundary layer were applied to reveal the formation of QHV and SQV. The generation procedures and the characteristics of the vortex structures are obtained, which share some similarities with previous numerical simulations. The research using resonant triad conceptual model and numerical simulation provides a possibility for investigating and controling the vortex structures, which play a dominant role in the evolution of coherent structures in the near-wall region.

  1. Visualization and computation of hovering mode vortex dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freymuth, Peter; Gustafson, Karl E.; Leben, Robert

    Results from experimental and numerical simulations of the unsteady hovering flight of small birds or insects are presented in extensive photographs and computer graphics and discussed in detail. In the flow-visualization experiments, an airfoil in combined pitching and plunging motion is used to generate a thrusting jet in still air, producing in addition a vortex street with rotation opposite to that of a Karman street. The numerical studies are based on an extension of the robust multigrid method of Gustafson and Leben (1986 and 1988) to hovering-mode vortex dynamics. The derivation of the governing equations is outlined, and it is shown that the numerical and experimental results are in good qualitative agreement.

  2. Momentum Transport and Stable Modes in Kelvin-Helmholtz Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, A E; Zweibel, E G

    2016-01-01

    The Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability, which arises in astrophysical and fusion systems where turbulent momentum transport is important, has an unstable and a stable mode at the same scales. We show that in KH turbulence, as in other types of turbulence, the stable mode affects transport, nonlinearly removing energy from the inertial-range cascade to small scales. We quantify energy transfer to stable modes and its associated impact on turbulent amplitudes and transport, demonstrating that stable modes regulate transfer in KH systems. A quasilinear momentum transport calculation is performed to quantify the reduction in momentum transport due to stable modes.

  3. Transient evolution of the global mode in turbulent swirling jets: experiments and modal stability analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Rukes, Lothar; Paschereit, Oliver; Oberleithner, Kilian

    2016-01-01

    Modal linear stability analysis has proven very successful in the analysis of coherent structures of turbulent flows. Formally, it describes the evolution of a disturbance in the limit of infinite time. In this work we apply modal linear stability analysis to a turbulent swirling jet undergoing a control parameter transient. The flow undergoes a transition from a non-vortex breakdown state to a state with a strong recirculation bubble and the associated global mode. High-speed Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements are the basis for a local linear stability analysis of the temporarily evolving base flow. This analysis reveals that the onset of the global mode is strongly linked to the formation of the internal stagnation point. Several transition scenarios are discussed and the ability of a frequency selection criterion to predict the wavemaker location, frequency and growth rate of the global mode are evaluated. We find excellent agreement between the linear global mode frequency and the experimental ...

  4. Vortex beam characterization in terms of Hypergeometric- Gaussian modes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sephton, Bereneice C

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Sephton_18560_2016.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 580 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Sephton_18560_2016.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Frontiers... in Optics: The 100th OSA Annual Meeting and Exhibit/Laser Science XXXII , 17-21 October 2016, Rochester Riverside Convention Center, Rochester, New York United States Vortex beam characterization in terms of Hypergeometric- Gaussian modes Sephton...

  5. Phase spectral evidence for vortex structures in turbulent mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, M. R.

    1987-07-01

    A slab schlieren beam system is shown to give rise to signals which have a quadrature phase relationship to near field microphone signals when vortex structures are present in the flow. The effect is confirmed by signal recovery observations for the transient step induced by a shock tube behind the nozzle settling chamber. Close to the nozzle, the phase spectra noted for a natural unexcited jet show the presence of vortex-like structures in the flow, while further away from the nozzle the phase spectra show phase delays which increase at low Strouhal number. Phase spectral observations at a greater distance from the nozzle show that the constraint of a protruding centerbody, shock tube, or spark excitation gives rise to sets of discrete components in the flow which appear to preserve their vortex ring-like character.

  6. Wave modes of collective vortex gyration in dipolar-coupled-dot-array magnonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dong-Soo; Vogel, Andreas; Jung, Hyunsung; Lee, Ki-Suk; Weigand, Markus; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Fischer, Peter; Meier, Guido; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2013-07-01

    Lattice vibration modes are collective excitations in periodic arrays of atoms or molecules. These modes determine novel transport properties in solid crystals. Analogously, in periodical arrangements of magnetic vortex-state disks, collective vortex motions have been predicted. Here, we experimentally observe wave modes of collective vortex gyration in one-dimensional (1D) periodic arrays of magnetic disks using time-resolved scanning transmission x-ray microscopy. The observed modes are interpreted based on micromagnetic simulation and numerical calculation of coupled Thiele equations. Dispersion of the modes is found to be strongly affected by both vortex polarization and chirality ordering, as revealed by the explicit analytical form of 1D infinite arrays. A thorough understanding thereof is fundamental both for lattice vibrations and vortex dynamics, which we demonstrate for 1D magnonic crystals. Such magnetic disk arrays with vortex-state ordering, referred to as magnetic metastructure, offer potential implementation into information processing devices.

  7. WAVE-VORTEX MODE COUPLING IN ASTROPHYSICAL ACCRETION DISKS UNDER COMBINED RADIAL AND VERTICAL STRATIFICATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salhi, A. [Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, 1060 Tunis (Tunisia); Lehner, T. [LUTH, UMR 8102 CNRS, Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, 5 place de Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France); Godeferd, F.; Cambon, C. [Laboratoire de Mecanique des Fluides et d' Acoustique, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, Universite de Lyon, UMR 5509, CNRS, INSA, UCB, F-69134 Ecully Cedex (France)

    2013-07-10

    We examine accretion disk flow under combined radial and vertical stratification utilizing a local Cartesian (or ''shearing box'') approximation. We investigate both axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric disturbances with the Boussinesq approximation. Under axisymmetric disturbances, a new dispersion relation is derived. It reduces to the Solberg-Hoieland criterion in the case without vertical stratification. It shows that, asymptotically, stable radial and vertical stratification cannot induce any linear instability; Keplerian flow is accordingly stable. Previous investigations strongly suggest that the so-called bypass concept of turbulence (i.e., that fine-tuned disturbances of any inviscid smooth shear flow can reach arbitrarily large transient growth) can also be applied to Keplerian disks. We present an analysis of this process for three-dimensional plane-wave disturbances comoving with the shear flow of a general rotating shear flow under combined stable radial and vertical rotation. We demonstrate that large transient growth occurs for K{sub 2}/k{sub 1} >> 1 and k{sub 3} = 0 or k{sub 1} {approx} k{sub 3}, where k{sub 1}, K{sub 2}, and k{sub 3} are the azimuthal, radial, and vertical components of the initial wave vector, respectively. By using a generalized ''wave-vortex'' decomposition of the disturbance, we show that the large transient energy growth in a Keplerian disk is mainly generated by the transient dynamics of the vortex mode. The analysis of the power spectrum of total (kinetic+potential) energy in the azimuthal or vertical directions shows that the contribution coming from the vortex mode is dominant at large scales, while the contribution coming from the wave mode is important at small scales. These findings may be confirmed by appropriate numerical simulations in the high Reynolds number regime.

  8. Experimental study of the turbulent field behind a perforated vortex generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habchi, C.; Lemenand, T.; Della Valle, D.; Al Shaer, A.; Peerhossaini, H.

    2015-07-01

    The influence of the wake vortex arising behind a perforated tab on the mixing process in heat exchangers and chemical reactors is analyzed. The preliminary step of this study, i.e., investigation of the turbulent field generated by a single perforated tab, is presented here. For this aim, laser Doppler velocimetry measurements are conducted downstream from a perforated trapezoidal vortex generator placed in a wind tunnel. It is shown that two shear layers are generated by the tab. The first shear layer is located at the upper edge of the tab, and the other is ejected from the perforation edges. These shear layers are characterized by high turbulent kinetic energy levels, which are profitable for meso-mixing enhancement. Finally, a spectral study shows that the turbulent macro-scale is nearly the same for typical locations in the shear layers shed from the tab and perforation edges.

  9. Compressible Turbulent Flow Numerical Simulations of Tip Vortex Cavitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khatami, F.; Weide, van der E.T.A.; Hoeijmakers, H.W.M.

    2015-01-01

    For an elliptic Arndt’s hydrofoil numerical simulations of vortex cavitation are presented. An equilibrium cavitation model is employed. This single-fluid model assumes local thermodynamic and mechanical equilibrium in the mixture region of the flow, is employed. Furthermore, for characterizing the

  10. Wigner distribution function and kurtosis parameter of vortex beams propagating through turbulent atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suo, Qiangbo; Han, Yiping; Cui, Zhiwei

    2017-09-01

    Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel integral, the analytical expressions for the Wigner distribution function (WDF) and kurtosis parameter of partially coherent flat-topped vortex (PCFTV) beams propagating through atmospheric turbulence and free space are derived. The WDF and kurtosis parameter of PCFTV beams through turbulent atmosphere are discussed with numerical examples. The numerical results show that the beam quality depends on the structure constants, the inner scale turbulence, the outer scale turbulence, the spatial correlation length, the wave length and the beam order. PCFTV beams are less affected by turbulence than partially flat-topped coherent (PCFT) beams under the same conditions, and will be useful in free-space optical communications.

  11. Identification and tracking of hairpin vortex auto-generation in turbulent wall-bounded flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yangzi; Green, Melissa

    2016-11-01

    Hairpin vortices have been widely accepted as component structures of turbulent boundary layers. Their properties (size, vorticity, energy) and dynamic phenomena (origin, growth, breakdown) have been shown to correlate to the complex, multi-scaled turbulent motions observed in both experiments and simulations. As established in the literature, the passage of a hairpin vortex creates a wall-normal ejection of fluid, which encounters the high-speed freestream resulting in near-wall shear and increased drag. A previously generated simulation of an isolated hairpin vortex is used to study the auto-generation of a secondary vortex structure. Eulerian methods such as the Q criterion and Γ2 function, as well as Lagrangian methods are used to visualize the three-dimensional hairpin vortices and the auto-generation process. The circulation development and wall-normal location of both primary and secondary hairpin heads are studied to determine if there is a correlation between the strength and height of the primary hairpin vortex with the secondary hairpin vortex auto-generation.

  12. Generation of femtosecond optical vortex beams in all-fiber mode-locked fiber laser using mode selective coupler

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Teng; Shi, Fan; Pang, Fufei; Huang, Sujuan; Wang, Tingyun; Zeng, Xianglong

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrated a high-order optical vortex pulsed laser based on a mode selective all-fiber fused coupler composed of a single-mode fiber (SMF) and a few-mode fiber (FMF). The fused SMF-FMF coupler inserted in the cavity not only acts as mode converter from LP01 mode to LP11 or LP21 modes with a broadband width over 100 nm, but also directly delivers femtosecond vortex pulses out of the mode locked cavity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the generation of high-order pulse vortex beams in mode-locked fiber laser. The generated 140 femtosecond vortex beam has a spectral width of 67 nm centered at 1544 nm.

  13. Development of a turbulence model for the modeling of a vortex flow; Developpement d`un modele de turbulence pour modeliser un ecoulement vortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, B.; Duhamel, Ph.; Cordonnier, A. [FCB Centre de Recherches, 59 - Lille (France); Florent, P. [LAMIH/LMFE, 59 - Valenciennes (France)

    1997-12-31

    The cyclones used in cement industry generally have a diameter of 4 to 6 m. However, tests on cyclones bigger than 4 m can hardly be performed and thus, it is important to study the influence of the size of the apparatus on the development of the generated vortex. A study of the structure and characteristics of the suspension inside a cyclone has been carried out. The results of the characterization of two cyclones (400 and 800 mm diameter) running without load are presented first in order to study the vortex behaviour. In parallel with this experimental study, a numerical study has been carried out and a calculation code called CYCLOP has been developed. The code, the equations of the gas flow inside the cyclone and the modifications given to the turbulent model are presented. (J.S.) 4 refs.

  14. Vortex Clusters and Their Time Evolution in High- Reynolds-Number Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Takashi; Uno, Atsuya; Morishita, Koji; Yokokawa, Mitsuo; Kaneda, Yukio

    2016-11-01

    Time series data (with a time interval of 4τη) obtained by high-resolution direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of forced incompressible turbulence in a periodic box, with a maximum of 122883 grid points and Taylor micro-scale Reynolds numbers Rλ up to 2300, are used to study the vortex dynamics in high Reynolds number (Re) turbulent flows. Here τη is the Kolmogorov time scale. A visualization method to handle such large-scale data was developed for this study. In the high Re turbulence generated by the DNS, we observed the dynamics of tube-like vortex clusters of various sizes, which are constructed by strong micro vortices. For example, we observed the generation of the tube-like clusters of various sizes and the processes of their merging and breakdown. We also observed layer-like vortex clusters of the order of the integral length scale forming shear layers in the high Re turbulence. This research used computational resources of the K computer and other computers of the HPCI system provided by the AICS and the ITC of Nagoya University through the HPCI System Research Project (Project ID:hp150174, hp160102).

  15. Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Flames using Vortex Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-05

    0 elemen, *’s isert-: h3.- cntrSu:g’*. , upt tti=J 1 51’ an:e n eltoe- aorc log t,. the coert .. of -s dj.;te for to e toree eiements. A b; ") r Dy...0.0 , opened to form a rectilinear vortex, the waves * 2 4 a ii will like a corkscrew spinning at frequency ). The sense of rotations of the waves Is

  16. Exploring vortex structures in orbital-angular-momentum beams generated from planar geometric modes with a mode converter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, J C; Liang, H C; Lu, T H; Huang, K F; Chen, Y F

    2016-10-03

    It is theoretically demonstrated that the planar geometric mode with a π/2 mode converter, so called the circularly geometric mode, can be solved from the inhomogeneous Helmholtz equation by considering the pump distribution on the lasing mode. Theoretical analysis clearly reveal that the vortex structures of circularly geometric modes are determined by the minimum order of transverse lasing modes, the total number of transverse lasing modes and the degenerate condition in the cavity. Moreover, we experimentally manifest that the circularly geometric mode can be generated from the selective pumped solid-state laser with an external π/2 mode converter. To explore the vortex structures of the generated geometric modes, the interference patterns are performed by an experimental apparatus consisting of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The good agreement between experimental observations and numerical calculations confirms the analysis of vortex structures is reliable.

  17. Influence of vortex dynamics and atmospheric turbulence on the early evolution of a contrail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Paugam

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This study describes three-dimensional numerical simulations of the evolution of an aircraft contrail during the first 30 min following the emission of exhausts. The wake is modeled as a vortex pair descending in a stratified atmosphere where turbulent fluctuations are sustained in the late dissipation regime. The focus of the study is laid on the interactions between vortex dynamics, atmospheric turbulence and contrail microphysics, and their role in determining the growth and the distribution of ice crystals. The atmospheric turbulence is synthesized using a methodology developed to force anisotropic turbulent fluctuations. The results show the feasibility of three-dimensional simulations of the early development of a contrail in supersaturated conditions before its transition into a contrail-cirrus. %(when radiative heating and sedimentation are no more negligible. It is shown that in case of strongly supersaturated and shear-free atmosphere the optical depth is maintained as the contrail spreads by turbulent diffusion in the late dissipation regime.

  18. Far-Field Turbulent Vortex-Wake/Exhaust Plume Interaction for Subsonic and HSCT Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Adam, Ihab; Wong, Tin-Chee

    1996-01-01

    Computational study of the far-field turbulent vortex-wake/exhaust plume interaction for subsonic and high speed civil transport (HSCT) airplanes is carried out. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (NS) equations are solved using the implicit, upwind, Roe-flux-differencing, finite-volume scheme. The two-equation shear stress transport model of Menter is implemented with the NS solver for turbulent-flow calculation. For the far-field study, the computations of vortex-wake interaction with the exhaust plume of a single engine of a Boeing 727 wing in a holding condition and two engines of an HSCT in a cruise condition are carried out using overlapping zonal method for several miles downstream. These results are obtained using the computer code FTNS3D. The results of the subsonic flow of this code are compared with those of a parabolized NS solver known as the UNIWAKE code.

  19. Simulation of turbulent flow and temperature separation in a uni-flow vortex tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Promvonge, P.

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The vortex tube is a mechanical device operating as a refrigerating machine without refrigerants, by separating a compressed gas stream into two streams; the cold air stream at the tube core while the hot airstream near the tube wall. Such a separation of the flow into regions of low and high total temperature is referred to as the temperature separation effect. In this paper, simulation of the turbulent compressible flowand temperature separation in a uni-flow vortex tube with the turbulence model and the algebraic Reynolds stress model (ASM is described. Steady, compressible and two-dimensional flows are assumed through outthe calculation. It has been found that the predicted results of velocity, pressure, and temperature fields are generally in good agreement with available experiment data. Moreover, it can be indicated that the highest temperature separation occurs near the inlet nozzle while the lowest temperature separation is found at the downstream near the control valve.

  20. Intrinsic rotation drive by collisionless trapped electron mode turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lu; Diamond, P H

    2016-01-01

    Both the parallel residual stress and parallel turbulent acceleration driven by electrostatic collisionsless trapped electron mode (CTEM) turbulence are calculated analytically using gyrokinetic theory. Quasilinear results show that the parallel residual stress contributes an outward flux of co-current rotation for normal magnetic shear and turbulence intensity profile increasing outward. This may induce intrinsic counter-current rotation or flattening of the co-current rotation profile. The parallel turbulent acceleration driven by CTEM turbulence vanishes, due to the absence of a phase shift between density fluctuation and ion pressure fluctuation. This is different from the case of ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence, for which the turbulent acceleration can provide co-current drive for normal magnetic shear and turbulence intensity profile increasing outward. Its order of magnitude is predicted to be the same as that of the divergence of the residual stress [Lu Wang and P.H. Diamond, Phys. Rev. Lett...

  1. The effect of the Taylor-Grtler vortex on Reynolds stress transport in the rotating turbulent channel flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We investigates the effect of Taylor-Grtler vortex on the Reynolds stress transport in the rotating turbulent channel flow by direct numerical simulation. The Taylor-Grtler vortex is detected by longitudinal average of velocity fluctuation in the channel and defined as TG fluctuation. It has been found that turbulent diffusion is significant in the Reynolds stress transportation at the suction side of rotating turbulent channel in contrast with the turbulent channel flow without rotation and Taylor-Grtler vortex plays an important role in the turbulent diffusion in Reynolds stress transport. The paper focuses on the low and moderate rotation number, but the effect of the rotation number on the Reynolds stress transport is also reported.

  2. Model for vortex turbulence with discontinuities in the solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. P. Verkhoglyadova

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A model of vortex with embedded discontinuities in plasma flow is developed in the framework of ideal MHD in a low b plasma. Vortex structures are considered as a result of 2-D evolution of nonlinear shear Alfvén waves in the heliosphere. Physical properties of the solutions and vector fields are analyzed and the observational aspects of the model are discussed. The ratio of normal components to the discontinuity Br /Vr can be close to -2. The alignment between velocity and magnetic field vectors takes place. Spacecraft crossing such vortices will typically observe a pair of discontinuities, but with dissimilar properties. Occurrence rate for different discontinuity types is estimated and agrees with observations in high-speed solar wind stream. Discontinuity crossing provides a backward rotation of magnetic field vector and can be observed as part of a backward arc. The Ulysses magnetometer data obtained in the fast solar wind are compared with the results of theoretical modelling.

  3. Steady-state vortex-line density in turbulent He II counterflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermeier, R. M.; Cromar, M. W.; Donnelly, R. J.; Kittel, P.

    1978-01-01

    We have measured the steady-state vortex-line density in turbulent counterflow using a second-sound-burst technique as a local probe. Contrary to the Vinen theory and previous assumptions, we find substantial line-density inhomogeneity and strong departures from the predicted heat-current dependence. Anomalous behavior of the line density at higher heat currents provides evidence for a new secondary flow state.

  4. Evolutions of hairpin vortexes over a superhydrophobic surface in turbulent boundary layer flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingxian; Tian, Haiping; Yao, Zhaohui; Hao, Pengfei; Jiang, Nan

    2016-09-01

    Turbulent flows over a superhydrophobic surface and a smooth surface have been measured and studied by particle image velocimetry technology at Reθ = 990. The Reynolds shear stress distributions over the two surfaces are significantly different. Specifically, for the superhydrophobic surface, the Reynolds shear stress is suppressed in the near-wall region (y/δ curve. Evolutions of hairpin vortexes are analyzed to interpret differences in the Reynolds shear stress, based on some comparisons in the low-speed streaks and Q2/Q4 (ejection/sweep) events. The results show that, in the near wall region, the turbulent coherent structures (low-speed streaks and hairpin vortex) over the superhydrophobic surface are more stable and flat, due to the suppression in the strength and the lifting effect of the hairpin vortex. In the outer region, the superhydrophobic surface lifts the hairpin vortex away from the wall with a value of 0.14δ in our experiment, which makes the Q4 events occur further from the wall and contribute less to skin friction.

  5. Mode Selection in Flame-Vortex driven Combustion Instabilities

    KAUST Repository

    Speth, Ray

    2011-01-04

    In this paper, we investigate flame-vortex interaction in a lean premixed, laboratory scale, backward-facing step combustor. Two series of tests were conducted, using propane/hydrogen mixtures and carbon monoxide/hydrogen mixtures as fuels, respectively. Pressure measurements and high speed particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) were employed to generate pressure response curves as well as the images of the velocity field and the flame brush. We demonstrate that the step combustor exhibits several operating modes depending on the inlet conditions and fuel composition, characterized by the amplitude and frequency of pressure oscillations along with distinct dynamic flame shapes. We propose a model in which the combustor\\'s selection of the acoustic mode is governed by a combustion-related time delay inversely proportional to the flame speed. Our model predicts the transition between distinct operating modes. We introduce non-dimensional parameters characterizing the flame speed and stretch rate, and develop a relationship between these quantities at the operating conditions corresponding to each mode transition. Based on this relationship, we show that numerically-calculated density-weighted strained flame speed can be used to collapse the combustion dynamics data over the full range of conditions (inlet temperature, fuel composition, and equivalence ratio). Finally, we validate our strain flame based model by measuring the strain rate using the flame image and the velocity field from the PIV measurement. Our results show that the measured strain rates lie in the same range as the critical values at the transitions among distinct modes as those predicted by our model.

  6. The collective mode and turbulent viscosity in accretion discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fridman, A.M.; Boyarchuk, A.A.; Bisikalo, D.V.; Kuznetsov, O.A.; Khoruzhii, O.V.; Torgashin, Yu.M.; Kilpio, A.A

    2003-10-20

    The existence of a spiral-vortex structure is revealed by a numerical simulation of the dynamics of an accretion disc in close binary stars. This structure is not related to the tidal influence of a companion star. It is a density wave containing a one-armed spiral and an anticyclonic vortex. The formation of the structure is caused by a hydrodynamical instability. The latter results in a disc turbulence with a turbulent viscosity coefficient {nu}{approx_equal}0.035 {omega}h{sup 2} (h is a semithickness of the disc). This value is in accordance with both the value of a numerical viscosity in presented calculations and the results of observations. The period of the density wave rotation is in agreement with the typical periods of light curve variations observed in cataclysmic binary stars.

  7. Kinetics of a network of vortex loops in He II and a theory of superfluid turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemirovskii, Sergey K.

    2008-06-01

    A theory is developed to describe the superfluid turbulence on the base of kinetics of the merging and splitting vortex loops. Because of very frequent reconnections the vortex loops (as a whole) do not live long enough to perform any essential evolution due to the deterministic motion. On the contrary, they rapidly merge and split, and these random recombination processes prevail over other slower dynamic processes. To develop quantitative description we take the vortex loops to have a Brownian structure with the only degree of freedom, which is the length l of the loop. We perform investigation on the base of the Boltzmann type “kinetic equation” for the distribution function n(l) of number of loops with length l . This equation describes a slow change of the density of loops (in space of their lengths l ) due to the deterministic equation of motion and due to fast random change because of the frequent reconnections. By use of the special ansatz in the “collision” integral, we have found the exact power-like solution n(l)∝l-5/2 of “kinetic equation” in the stationary case. This solution is not (thermodynamically) equilibrium, but on the contrary, it describes the state with two mutual fluxes of the length (or energy) in space of sizes of the vortex loops. The term “flux” means just redistribution of length (or energy) among the loops of different sizes due to reconnections. Analyzing this solution we drew several results on the structure and dynamics of the vortex tangle in the turbulent superfluid helium. In particular, we obtained that the mean radius of the curvature is of the order of interline space. We also evaluated the full rate of the reconnection events. Assuming, further, that the processes of random collisions are the fastest ones, we studied the evolution of full length of vortex loops per unit volume—the so-called vortex line density L(t) . It is shown this evolution to obey the famous Vinen equation. The properties of the Vinen

  8. Formation Flight: Modes of Interaction of a Streamwise Vortex with a Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Chris; Bross, Matthew; Rockwell, Donald

    2014-11-01

    Aircraft flying together in an echelon or V formation experience aerodynamic advantages. Impingement of the tip vortex of the leader (upstream) wing on the follower wing can yield an increase of lift to drag ratio. This enhancement is known to be sensitive to the location of vortex impingement on the follower wing. Particle image velocimetry is employed to determine patterns of velocity and vorticity in successive crossflow planes, which characterize the streamwise evolution of the vortex structure along the chord of the follower wing and into its wake. Different modes of vortex-follower wing interaction are created by varying the spanwise location of the leader wing. These modes are defined by differences in the development of, and interaction between, the incident tip vortex from the leader wing and the tip vortex along the follower wing. Modes of development/interaction of the tip vortices include bifurcation, attenuation, and mutual induction. The bifurcation and attenuation modes decrease the strength of the follower tip vortex. In contrast, the mutual induction mode increases the strength of the follower tip vortex.

  9. HYSTERESIS BETWEEN DISTINCT MODES OF TURBULENT DYNAMOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Brandenburg, Axel [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Kitchatinov, Leonid L., E-mail: bbkarak@nordita.org [Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics, P.O. Box 291, Irkutsk 664033 (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-20

    Nonlinear mean-field models of the solar dynamo show long-term variability, which may be relevant to different states of activity inferred from long-term radiocarbon data. This paper is aimed at probing the dynamo hysteresis predicted by the recent mean-field models of Kitchatinov and Olemskoy with direct numerical simulations. We perform three-dimensional (3D) simulations of large-scale dynamos in a shearing box with helically forced turbulence. As an initial condition, we either take a weak random magnetic field or we start from a snapshot of an earlier simulation. Two quasi-stable states are found to coexist in a certain range of parameters close to the onset of the large-scale dynamo. The simulations converge to one of these states depending on the initial conditions. When either the fractional helicity or the magnetic Prandtl number is increased between successive runs above the critical value for onset of the dynamo, the field strength jumps to a finite value. However, when the fractional helicity or the magnetic Prandtl number is then decreased again, the field strength stays at a similar value (strong field branch) even below the original onset. We also observe intermittent decaying phases away from the strong field branch close to the point where large-scale dynamo action is just possible. The dynamo hysteresis seen previously in mean-field models is thus reproduced by 3D simulations. Its possible relation to distinct modes of solar activity such as grand minima is discussed.

  10. Comparison of different turbulence models in predicting the temperature separation in a Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, T.; Bandyopdhyay, S.S. [Cryogenic Engineering Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Sinhamahapatra, K.P. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2010-06-15

    An axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is used to compare the influence of different Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) based turbulence models in predicting the temperature separation in a Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube. The standard {kappa}-{epsilon}, RNG {kappa}-{epsilon}, standard {kappa}-{omega} and SST {kappa}-{omega} turbulence models are used in this study. The performance curves (hot and cold outlet temperatures versus hot outlet mass fraction) obtained by using these turbulence models are compared with the experimental results. The objective is to select an appropriate turbulence model for the simulation of the flow phenomena in a vortex tube with optimum computational expense. The performance analysis shows that among all the turbulence models investigated in this study, temperature separation predicted by the standard {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model is closer to the experimental results. (author)

  11. Kármán vortex and turbulent wake generation by wind park piles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grashorn, Sebastian; Stanev, Emil V.

    2016-12-01

    Observational evidence of turbulent wakes behind wind parks' piles motivated a series of numerical experiments, aiming to identify the dynamic regimes associated with wakes' generation in tidal basins. We demonstrate that the obstacles such as piles of wind parks give rise to vortices similar to the known Kármán vortices which affect substantially the turbulent kinetic energy. The latter can be considered as the agent enhancing sediment remobilization from the ocean bottom, thus making wakes well visible in satellite data. The temporal and spatial variability of studied processes is analyzed under stationary and nonstationary conditions. The dependence of a vortex generation and evolution upon the environmental conditions is also studied, which demonstrates a large variety of appearances of turbulent wakes. The comparison between simulations using a suspended sediment model and satellite images demonstrated that the model is capable to realistically simulate sediment wakes observed in remote sensing data.

  12. Measurements of turbulence in a microscale multi-inlet vortex nanoprecipitation reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yanxiang; Chungyin Cheng, Janine; Fox, Rodney O.; Olsen, Michael G.

    2013-07-01

    The microscale multi-inlet vortex reactor (MIVR) is designed for use in Flash NanoPrecipitation (FNP), a promising technique for producing nanoparticles within small particle size distribution. Fluid mixing is crucial in the FNP process, and due to mixing’s strong dependence upon fluid kinematics, investigating velocity and turbulence within the reactor is crucial to optimizing reactor design. To this end, microscopic particle image velocimetry has been used to investigate flow within the MIVR. Three Reynolds numbers are studied, namely, Rej = 53, 93 and 240. At Rej = 53, the flow is laminar and steady. Due to the strong viscous effects at this Reynolds number, distinct flow patterns are observed at different distances from the reactor top and bottom walls. The viscous effects also retard the tangential motions within the reactor, resulting in a weaker vortex than appears at the higher Reynolds numbers. As the Reynolds number is increased to 93, the flow becomes more homogeneous over the depth of the reactor due to weaker viscous effects, yet the flow is still steady. The diminishing effects of viscosity also result in a stronger vortex. At the highest Reynolds number investigated, the flow is turbulent. Turbulent statistics including tangential and radial velocity fluctuations and Reynolds shear stresses are analyzed for this case in addition to the mean velocity field. The tangential motions of the flow are strongest at Rej = 240. Both the tangential and radial velocity fluctuations increase as the flow spirals toward the center of the reactor. The magnitudes of the tangential and radial velocity fluctuations are similar, suggesting that the turbulence is locally isotropic.

  13. Energy Spectra of Vortex Distributions in Two-Dimensional Quantum Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashton S. Bradley

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We theoretically explore key concepts of two-dimensional turbulence in a homogeneous compressible superfluid described by a dissipative two-dimensional Gross-Pitaeveskii equation. Such a fluid supports quantized vortices that have a size characterized by the healing length ξ. We show that, for the divergence-free portion of the superfluid velocity field, the kinetic-energy spectrum over wave number k may be decomposed into an ultraviolet regime (k≫ξ^{-1} having a universal k^{-3} scaling arising from the vortex core structure, and an infrared regime (k≪ξ^{-1} with a spectrum that arises purely from the configuration of the vortices. The Novikov power-law distribution of intervortex distances with exponent -1/3 for vortices of the same sign of circulation leads to an infrared kinetic-energy spectrum with a Kolmogorov k^{-5/3} power law, which is consistent with the existence of an inertial range. The presence of these k^{-3} and k^{-5/3} power laws, together with the constraint of continuity at the smallest configurational scale k≈ξ^{-1}, allows us to derive a new analytical expression for the Kolmogorov constant that we test against a numerical simulation of a forced homogeneous, compressible, two-dimensional superfluid. The numerical simulation corroborates our analysis of the spectral features of the kinetic-energy distribution, once we introduce the concept of a clustered fraction consisting of the fraction of vortices that have the same sign of circulation as their nearest neighboring vortices. Our analysis presents a new approach to understanding two-dimensional quantum turbulence and interpreting similarities and differences with classical two-dimensional turbulence, and suggests new methods to characterize vortex turbulence in two-dimensional quantum fluids via vortex position and circulation measurements.

  14. Optical-domain Compensation for Coupling between Optical Fiber Conjugate Vortex Modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyubopytov, Vladimir S.; Tatarczak, Anna; Lu, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate for the first time optical-domain compensation for coupling between conjugate vortex modes in optical fibers. We introduce a novel method for reconstructing the complex propagation matrix of the optical fiber with straightforward implementation....

  15. Local topological charge analysis of electromagnetic vortex beam based on empirical mode decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Hui, Xiaonan; Zhang, Weite; Jin, Xiaofeng; Chi, Hao; Zhang, Xianmin

    2015-01-01

    The topological charge of an electromagnetic vortex beam depends on its wavefront helicity. For mixed vortex beams composed of several different coaxial vortices, the topological charge spectrum can be obtained by Fourier transform. However, the vortex beam is generally divergent and imperfect. It makes it significant to investigate the local topological charges, especially in radio frequency regime. Fourier transform based methods are restrained by the uncertainty principle and cannot achieve high angular resolution and mode resolution simultaneously. In this letter, an analysis method for local topological charges of vortex beams is presented based on the empirical mode decomposition (EMD). From EMD, the intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) can be obtained to construct the bases of the electromagnetic wave, and each local topological charge can be respectively defined. With this method the local value achieves both high resolution of azimuth angle and topological charge, meanwhile the amplitudes of each OAM mode...

  16. Analysis of Optical Fiber Complex Propagation Matrix on the Basis of Vortex Modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyubopytov, Vladimir S.; Tatarczak, Anna; Lu, Xiaofeng;

    2016-01-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel method for reconstruction of the complex propagation matrix of optical fibers supporting propagation of multiple vortex modes. This method is based on the azimuthal decomposition approach and allows the complex matrix elements to be determined...... by direct calculations. We apply the proposed method to demonstrate the feasibility of optical compensation for coupling between vortex modes in optical fiber....

  17. Three dimensional dynamic mode decomposition of premixed turbulent jet flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenga, Temistocle; Macart, Jonathan; Mueller, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Analysis of turbulent combustion DNS data largely focuses on statistical analyses. However, turbulent combustion is highly unsteady and dynamic. In this work, Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) will be explored as a tool for dynamic analysis of turbulent combustion DNS data, specifically a series of low Mach number spatially-evolving turbulent planar premixed hydrogen/air jet flames. DMD decomposes data into coherent modes with corresponding growth rates and oscillatory frequencies. The method identifies structures unbiased by energy so is particularly well suited to exploring dynamic processes at scales smaller than the largest, energy-containing scales of the flow and that may not be co-located in space and time. The focus of this work will be on both the physical insights that can potentially be derived from DMD modes and the computational issues associated with applying DMD to large three-dimensional DNS datasets.

  18. Large-eddy simulation of contrail evolution in the vortex phase and its interaction with atmospheric turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Picot

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the evolution of contrails in the vortex and dissipation regimes is studied by means of fully three-dimensional large-eddy simulation (LES coupled to a Lagrangian particle tracking method to treat the ice phase. In this paper, fine-scale atmospheric turbulence is generated and sustained by means of a stochastic forcing that mimics the properties of stably stratified turbulent flows as those occurring in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The initial flow field is composed of the turbulent background flow and a wake flow obtained from separate LES of the jet regime. Atmospheric turbulence is the main driver of the wake instability and the structure of the resulting wake is sensitive to the intensity of the perturbations, primarily in the vertical direction. A stronger turbulence accelerates the onset of the instability, which results in shorter contrail descent and more effective mixing in the interior of the plume. However, the self-induced turbulence that is produced in the wake after the vortex breakup dominates over background turbulence until the end of the vortex regime and controls the mixing with ambient air. This results in mean microphysical characteristics such as ice mass and optical depth that are slightly affected by the intensity of atmospheric turbulence. However, the background humidity and temperature have a first-order effect on the survival of ice crystals and particle size distribution, which is in line with recent studies.

  19. A Experimental Study of Viscous Vortex Rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziedzic, Mauricio

    Motivated by the role played by vortex rings in the process of turbulent mixing, the work is focused on the problem of stability and viscous decay of a single vortex ring. A new classification is proposed for vortex rings which is based on extensive hot-wire measurements of velocity in the ring core and wake and flow visualization. Vortex rings can be classified as laminar, wavy, turbulence-producing, and turbulent. Prediction of vortex ring type is shown to be possible based on the vortex ring Reynolds number. Linear growth rates of ring diameter with time are observed for all types of vortex rings, with different growth rates occurring for laminar and turbulent vortex rings. Data on the viscous decay of vortex rings are used to provide experimental confirmation of the accuracy of Saffman's equation for the velocity of propagation of a vortex ring. Experimental data indicate that instability of the vortex ring strongly depends on the mode of generation and can be delayed by properly adjusting the generation parameters. A systematic review of the literature on vortex-ring interactions is presented in the form of an appendix, which helps identify areas in which further research may be fruitful.

  20. Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bailly, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the major problems of turbulence and turbulent processes, including  physical phenomena, their modeling and their simulation. After a general introduction in Chapter 1 illustrating many aspects dealing with turbulent flows, averaged equations and kinetic energy budgets are provided in Chapter 2. The concept of turbulent viscosity as a closure of the Reynolds stress is also introduced. Wall-bounded flows are presented in Chapter 3, and aspects specific to boundary layers and channel or pipe flows are also pointed out. Free shear flows, namely free jets and wakes, are considered in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 deals with vortex dynamics. Homogeneous turbulence, isotropy, and dynamics of isotropic turbulence are presented in Chapters 6 and 7. Turbulence is then described both in the physical space and in the wave number space. Time dependent numerical simulations are presented in Chapter 8, where an introduction to large eddy simulation is offered. The last three chapters of the book summarize remarka...

  1. Numerical simulations and measurements of a droplet size distribution in a turbulent vortex street

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Schmeyer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A turbulent vortex street in an air flow interacting with a disperse droplet population is investigated in a wind tunnel. Non-intrusive measurement techniques are used to obtain data for the air velocity and the droplet velocity. The process is modeled with a population balance system consisting of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and a population balance equation for the droplet size distribution. Numerical simulations are performed that rely on a variational multiscale method for turbulent flows, a direct discretization of the differential operator of the population balance equation, and a modern technique for the evaluation of the coalescence integrals. After having calibrated two unknown model parameters, a very good agreement of the experimental and numerical results can be observed.

  2. Helical mode interactions and spectral transfer processes in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Linkmann, Moritz F; McKay, Mairi E; Jäger, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Spectral transfer processes in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are investigated analytically by decomposition of the velocity and magnetic fields in Fourier space into helical modes. Steady solutions of the dynamical system which governs the evolution of the helical modes are determined, and a stability analysis of these solutions is carried out. The interpretation of the analysis is that unstable solutions lead to energy transfer between the interacting modes while stable solutions do not. From this, a dependence of possible interscale energy and helicity transfers on the helicities of the interacting modes is derived. As expected from the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in 3D MHD turbulence, mode interactions with like helicities lead to transfer of energy and magnetic helicity to smaller wavenumbers. However, some interactions of modes with unlike helicities also contribute to an inverse energy transfer. As such, an inverse energy cascade for nonhelical magnetic fields is shown to be possible. Fu...

  3. Quantum magnetic flux lines, BPS vortex zero modes, and one-loop string tension shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Izquierdo, A.; Mateos Guilarte, J.; de la Torre Mayado, M.

    2016-08-01

    Spectral heat kernel/zeta function regularization procedures are employed in this paper to control the divergences arising from vacuum fluctuations of Bogomolnyi-Prasad-Sommerfield vortices in the Abelian Higgs model. Zero modes of vortex fluctuations are the source of difficulties appearing when the standard Gilkey-de Witt expansion is the tool used in the calculations of one-loop shifts of vortex masses and string tensions. A modified GdW expansion is developed to diminish the impact of the infrared divergences due to the vortex zero modes of fluctuation. With this new technique at our disposal we compute the one-loop vortex mass shifts in the planar AHM and the quantum corrections to the string tension of the magnetic flux tubes living in three dimensions. In both cases it is observed that weak repulsive forces surge between these classically noninteracting topological defects caused by vacuum quantum fluctuations.

  4. Multi-Field/-Scale Interaction of Neoclassical Tearing Modes with Turbulence and Impact on Plasma Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardoczi, Laszlo

    with Edge Localized Modes was observed. Simultaneous increase in turbulence level at the O-point was also observed and the data suggests that this temporal increase of turbulence level at the O-point accelerates NTM recovery after the ELM-crash. This is facilitated via the fast turbulent cross-field transport that leads to a rapid restoration of the flat profile (and bootstrap current perturbation) at the O-point. Finally, a series of low torque H-mode experiments were carried out to measure the perturbed ion temperature and toroidal flow profiles via CER across slowly rotating islands. Comparison of the observed flow perturbation to the gyrokinetic simulations suggests that large islands develop a vortex like plasma flow circulating around the O-point.

  5. Numerical study of asymmetrical modes in a vortex ring impacting a conical surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trejo Gutierrez, Jose Antonio; Lopez Sanchez, Erick Javier; Hernandez Zapata, Sergio; Ruiz Chavarria, Gerardo

    2016-11-01

    In this work we investigate the impact of an annular vortex on a conical surface when their symmetry axes are parallel but they do not coincide. For this purpose we solve the Navier-Stokes and continuity equations in cylindrical coordinates. We use a finite difference scheme for r and z coordinates whereas for the angular coordinate we use a Fourier spectral method. We study the development of asymmetrical modes when the vortex approaches the inner surface of the cone. The presence of the vortex ring induces the formation of a boundary layer which detaches and leads to the formation of a secondary vortex of opposite sign which moves away the cone. This secondary vortex also exhibits asymmetrical modes, which are attenuated as it moves. We present some results as the trajectories of the primary and the secondary vortices, their circulations as a function of time, the development of asymmetrical modes and the dependence of these properties on the Reynolds number and the distance between both symmetry axes. Finally we made a comparison of primary and secondary vortices with a free vortex. Authors acknowledge DGAPA-UNAM by support under project IN115315 "Ondas y estructuras coherentes en dinamica de fluidos".

  6. Role of stable modes in zonal flow regulated ITG turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makwana, Kirit; Terry, Paul; Hatch, David; Pueschel, M. J.

    2012-10-01

    Stable modes are studied in zonal flow regulated ITG turbulence using the gyrokinetic code GENE. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) modes are employed to investigate the eigenmode space of the distribution function. Both the unstable and stable POD modes show strong nonlinear energy transfer via three wave interactions that include zonal modes. The zonal mode itself absorbs a small fraction of the energy injected by the unstable mode. The remaining energy is deposited in the stable modes of non-zonal wavenumbers that are involved in the three wave coupling. These stable modes lie mostly within the wavenumber range of the instability. This indicates that zonal flows mediate energy transfer from unstable to stable modes, leading to saturation. The amplitude attenuation rate (AAR) of POD modes shows an equipartition across a large range of stable modes. This rate is balanced by three wave correlations of the POD modes and their time dependent amplitudes. These correlations are large if they involve zonal modes and they also show an equipartition for higher mode numbers. A similar analysis using linear eigenmodes also shows rough equipartition among the linear modes. Thus, AAR provides a handle to collectively describe the multitude of stable modes in a gyrokinetic simulation.

  7. Turbulent velocity and concentration measurements in a macro-scale multi-inlet vortex nanoprecipitation reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenping; Fox, Rodney; Hill, James; Olsen, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Flash Nanoprecipitation (FNP) is a technique to produce monodisperse functional nanoparticles. Microscale multi-inlet vortex reactors (MIVR) have been effectively applied to FNP due to their ability to provide rapid mixing and flexibility of inlet flow conditions. A scaled-up MIVR could potentially generate large quantities of functional nanoparticles, giving FNP wider applicability in industry. In the presented research, the turbulent velocity field inside a scaled-up, macroscale MIVR is measured by particle image velocimetry (PIV). Within the reactor, velocity is measured using both two-dimensional and stereoscopic PIV at two Reynolds numbers (3500 and 8750) based on the flow at each inlet. Data have been collected at numerous locations in the inlet channels, the reaction chamber, and the reactor outlet. Mean velocity and Reynolds stresses have been obtained based on 5000 instantaneous velocity realizations at each measurement location. The turbulent mixing process has also been investigated with passive scalar planar laser-induced fluorescence and simultaneous PIV/PLIF. Velocity and concentration results are compared to results from previous experiments in a microscale MIVR. Scaled profiles of turbulent quantities are similar to those previously found in the microscale MIVR.

  8. An accelerated stochastic vortex structure method for particle collision and agglomeration in homogeneous turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizaji, Farzad F.; Marshall, Jeffrey S.

    2016-11-01

    Modeling the response of interacting particles, droplets, or bubbles to subgrid-scale fluctuations in turbulent flows is a long-standing challenge in multiphase flow simulations using the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes approach. The problem also arises for large-eddy simulation for sufficiently small values of the Kolmogorov-scale particle Stokes number. This paper expands on a recently proposed stochastic vortex structure (SVS) method for modeling of turbulence fluctuations for colliding or otherwise interacting particles. An accelerated version of the SVS method was developed using the fast multipole expansion and local Taylor expansion approach, which reduces computation speed by two orders of magnitude compared to the original SVS method. Detailed comparisons are presented showing close agreement of the energy spectrum and probability density functions of various fields between the SVS computational model, direct numerical simulation (DNS) results, and various theoretical and experimental results found in the literature. Results of the SVS method for particle collision rate and related measures of particle interaction exhibit excellent agreement with DNS predictions for homogeneous turbulent flows. The SVS method was also used with adhesive particles to simulate formation of particle agglomerates with different values of the particle Stokes and adhesion numbers, and various measures of the agglomerate structure are compared to the DNS results.

  9. Particle transport in density gradient driven TE mode turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Skyman, Andreas; Strand, P I

    2011-01-01

    The turbulent transport of main ion and trace impurities in a tokamak device in the presence of steep electron density gradients has been studied. The parameters are chosen for trapped electron (TE) mode turbulence, driven primarily by steep electron density gradients relevant to H-mode physics, but with a transition to temperature gradient driven turbulence as the density gradient flattens. Results obtained through non-linear (NL) and quasilinear (QL) gyrokinetic simulations using the GENE code are compared with results obtained from a fluid model. Main ion and impurity transport is studied by examining the balance of convective and diffusive transport, as quantified by the density gradient corresponding to zero particle flux (peaking factor). Scalings are obtained for the impurity peaking with the background electron density gradient and the impurity charge number. It is shown that the impurity peaking factor is weakly dependent on impurity charge and significantly smaller than the driving electron density ...

  10. Faraday Rotation for Electron Beams Composed of Vortex Modes

    CERN Document Server

    Greenshields, Colin; Franke-Arnold, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Propagating vortex states, which carry orbital angular momentum (OAM), are well known in optics and have recently been demonstrated for electrons. While many analogies exist between photonic and electron vortex states, electron vortices in addition possess an orbital magnetic moment. We show here that propagation of electrons in a superposition of OAM states through a longitudinal magnetic field produces an analogue to optical Faraday rotation. In the optical domain, Faraday rotation is observed for polarisation, but not for superpositions of OAM states. The rotation we predict arises from the additional phase accumulated by the electron as it propagates in the presence of an external magnetic field. We propose an experiment in which this rotation can be measured directly in a transmission electron microscope, and discuss its relation to the well known classical image rotation associated with the Lorentz force.

  11. Free turbulent shear layer in a point vortex gas as a problem in nonequilibrium statistical mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanarayanan, Saikishan; Narasimha, Roddam; Dass, N. D. Hari

    2014-01-01

    This paper attempts to unravel any relations that may exist between turbulent shear flows and statistical mechanics through a detailed numerical investigation in the simplest case where both can be well defined. The flow considered for the purpose is the two-dimensional (2D) temporal free shear layer with a velocity difference ΔU across it, statistically homogeneous in the streamwise direction (x) and evolving from a plane vortex sheet in the direction normal to it (y) in a periodic-in-x domain L ×±∞. Extensive computer simulations of the flow are carried out through appropriate initial-value problems for a "vortex gas" comprising N point vortices of the same strength (γ =LΔU/N) and sign. Such a vortex gas is known to provide weak solutions of the Euler equation. More than ten different initial-condition classes are investigated using simulations involving up to 32000 vortices, with ensemble averages evaluated over up to 103 realizations and integration over 104L/ΔU. The temporal evolution of such a system is found to exhibit three distinct regimes. In Regime I the evolution is strongly influenced by the initial condition, sometimes lasting a significant fraction of L /ΔU. Regime III is a long-time domain-dependent evolution towards a statistically stationary state, via "violent" and "slow" relaxations [P.-H. Chavanis, Physica A 391, 3657 (2012), 10.1016/j.physa.2012.02.014], over flow time scales of order 102 and 104L/ΔU, respectively (for N =400). The final state involves a single structure that stochastically samples the domain, possibly constituting a "relative equilibrium." The vortex distribution within the structure follows a nonisotropic truncated form of the Lundgren-Pointin (L-P) equilibrium distribution (with negatively high temperatures; L-P parameter λ close to -1). The central finding is that, in the intermediate Regime II, the spreading rate of the layer is universal over the wide range of cases considered here. The value (in terms of

  12. Free turbulent shear layer in a point vortex gas as a problem in nonequilibrium statistical mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanarayanan, Saikishan; Narasimha, Roddam; Hari Dass, N D

    2014-01-01

    This paper attempts to unravel any relations that may exist between turbulent shear flows and statistical mechanics through a detailed numerical investigation in the simplest case where both can be well defined. The flow considered for the purpose is the two-dimensional (2D) temporal free shear layer with a velocity difference ΔU across it, statistically homogeneous in the streamwise direction (x) and evolving from a plane vortex sheet in the direction normal to it (y) in a periodic-in-x domain L×±∞. Extensive computer simulations of the flow are carried out through appropriate initial-value problems for a "vortex gas" comprising N point vortices of the same strength (γ=LΔU/N) and sign. Such a vortex gas is known to provide weak solutions of the Euler equation. More than ten different initial-condition classes are investigated using simulations involving up to 32000 vortices, with ensemble averages evaluated over up to 103 realizations and integration over 104L/ΔU. The temporal evolution of such a system is found to exhibit three distinct regimes. In Regime I the evolution is strongly influenced by the initial condition, sometimes lasting a significant fraction of L/ΔU. Regime III is a long-time domain-dependent evolution towards a statistically stationary state, via "violent" and "slow" relaxations [ P.-H. Chavanis Physica A 391 3657 (2012)], over flow time scales of order 102 and 104L/ΔU, respectively (for N=400). The final state involves a single structure that stochastically samples the domain, possibly constituting a "relative equilibrium." The vortex distribution within the structure follows a nonisotropic truncated form of the Lundgren-Pointin (L-P) equilibrium distribution (with negatively high temperatures; L-P parameter λ close to -1). The central finding is that, in the intermediate Regime II, the spreading rate of the layer is universal over the wide range of cases considered here. The value (in terms of momentum thickness) is 0.0166±0

  13. Scintillation reduction for combined Gaussian-vortex beam propagating through turbulent atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, Gennady P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gorshkov, V. N. [NATL' TECH. UNIV. OF UA; Torous, S. V. [NATL' TECH. UNIV. OF UA

    2010-12-14

    We numerically examine the spatial evolution of the structure of coherent and partially coherent laser beams (PCBs), including the optical vortices, propagating in turbulent atmospheres, The influence of beam fragmentation and wandering relative to the axis of propagation (z-axis) on the value of the scintillation index (SI) of the signal at the detector is analyzed. A method for significantly reducing the SI, by averaging the signal at the detector over a set of PCBs, is described, This novel method is to generate the PCBs by combining two laser beams - Gaussian and vortex beams, with different frequencies (the difference between these two frequencies being significantly smaller than the frequencies themselves). In this case, the SI is effectively suppressed without any high-frequency modulators.

  14. Scintillation reduction for combined Gaussian-vortex beam propagating through turbulent atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, G P; Torous, S V

    2011-01-01

    We numerically examine the spatial evolution of the structure of coherent and partially coherent laser beams (PCBs), including the optical vortices, propagating in turbulent atmospheres. The influence of beam fragmentation and wandering relative to the axis of propagation (z-axis) on the value of the scintillation index (SI) of the signal at the detector is analyzed. A method for significantly reducing the SI, by averaging the signal at the detector over a set of PCBs, is described. This novel method is to generate the PCBs by combining two laser beams - Gaussian and vortex beams, with different frequencies (the difference between these two frequencies being significantly smaller than the frequencies themselves). In this case, the SI is effectively suppressed without any high-frequency modulators.

  15. LES Study on the Mechanism of Vortex Rings behind Supersonic MVG with Turbulent Inflow

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Yonghua; Lu, Ping; Liu, Chaoqun

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the interaction between vortex rings behind MVG and the oblique shocks in the MVG controlled ramp flow at M=2.5 and Req=5760. Implicit large eddy simulation (ILES) method is used by solving the unfiltered form of the Navier-Stokes equations with the 5th order Bandwidth-optimized WENO scheme. The fully developed inflow is given by a series of turbulent profiles obtained from previous DNS simulation. It shows that the ring structure does not break down and keeps its topology after penetrating the strong shock wave and the oblique shocks is influenced a lot by the induced flow field from rings. The bump of the 3D shock wave surface is discovered and its mechanism is explained.

  16. Scintillation reduction for combined Gaussian-vortex beam propagating through turbulent atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, Gennady P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gorshkov, V. N. [NATL' TECH. UNIV. OF UA; Torous, S. V. [NATL' TECH. UNIV. OF UA

    2010-12-14

    We numerically examine the spatial evolution of the structure of coherent and partially coherent laser beams (PCBs), including the optical vortices, propagating in turbulent atmospheres, The influence of beam fragmentation and wandering relative to the axis of propagation (z-axis) on the value of the scintillation index (SI) of the signal at the detector is analyzed. A method for significantly reducing the SI, by averaging the signal at the detector over a set of PCBs, is described, This novel method is to generate the PCBs by combining two laser beams - Gaussian and vortex beams, with different frequencies (the difference between these two frequencies being significantly smaller than the frequencies themselves). In this case, the SI is effectively suppressed without any high-frequency modulators.

  17. Gyrokinetic δ particle simulation of trapped electron mode driven turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Jianying

    2007-11-01

    Turbulent transport driven by collisionless trapped electron modes (CTEM) is systematically studied using gyrokinetic delta-f particle-in-cell simulation. Scaling with local plasma parameters, including density gradient, electron temperature gradient, magnetic shear, temperature ratio and aspect ratio, is investigated. Simulation results are compared with previous simulations and theoretical predictions. Nonlinearly the transport level increases with increasing magnetic shear. We explain the nonlinear magnetic shear scaling by differences in the radial correlation lengths caused by toroidal coupling. The turbulence is more radially elongated at higher magnetic shear compared with low magnetic shear. We show that the suppression effect of zonal flow on CTEM transport depends on both the electron temperature gradient and the electron to ion temperature ratio. This helps explain the previous contradictory conclusions on the importance of zonal flows in different parameter regimes.ootnotetextT. Dannert, F. Jenko, Phys. Plasmas 12, 072309 (2005); D. Ernst, et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2637 (2004). Zonal flow suppression is consistent with the rate of EXB shearing from the ambient turbulence as well as the radial broadening of the spectra. Strong geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) are generated along with zonal flows and the frequency of the GAMs agrees well with kinetic theory.ootnotetextT. Watari, et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 062504 (2006). We further explore the nonlinear saturation mechanism when the zonal flows are not important. We find that when only a single toroidal mode (and its conjugate) is kept, reasonable nonlinear saturation is obtained. Investigating a range of n, modes with larger mode number n saturate at a higher level relative to lower n modes, indicating a turbulent inverse cascade process.

  18. On quantum magnetic flux lines, BPS vortex zero modes, and one-loop string tension shifts

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso-Izquierdo, A; Mayado, M de la Torre

    2016-01-01

    Spectral heat kernel/zeta function regularization procedures are employed in this paper to control the divergences arising from vacuum fluctuations of Bogomolnyi-Prasad-Sommerfield vortices in the Abelian Higgs model. Zero modes of vortex fluctuations are the source of difficulties appearing when the standard Gilkey-de Witt expansion is performed. A modified GdW expansion is developed to diminish the impact of the infrared divergences due to the vortex zero modes. With this new technique at our disposal we compute the one-loop vortex mass shift in the planar AHM and the quantum corrections to the string tension of the magnetic flux tubes living in three dimensions. In both cases it is observed that weak repulsive forces surge between these classically non interacting topological defects caused by vacuum quantum fluctuations.

  19. Numerical investigation of flat-topped vortex hollow beams and Bessel beams propagating in a turbulent atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yalin; Ma, Donglin; Yuan, Xiuhua; Zhou, Zeyu

    2016-11-10

    In this paper, the aperture averaged scintillation, mean signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and average bit error rate (BER) for both flat-topped vortex hollow beams and Bessel beams propagating in a turbulent atmosphere are evaluated. Investigations are also made illustrating the variation of aperture averaged scintillation, mean SNR, and average BER against the beam type, propagation distance, and size of the receiver aperture. Compared with the flat-topped vortex hollow beams, the Bessel beams have a smaller aperture averaged scintillation, higher mean SNR, and lower average BER when the receiver aperture is relatively small under the same conditions.

  20. Rotrix `vortex breakdown` burner turbulence-stabilized combustion of heating oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofbauer, P. [Viessmann Manufacturing Co., Inc., Ontario (Canada)

    1995-04-01

    For the past two years, the Viessmann MatriX radiant burner has been setting the standard for low emission combustion of gas. Now, with the RotriX burner, Viessmann has succeeded in drastically reducing nitrogenoxide emissions in the combustoin of oil. After a successful test period, the RotriX burner is now being introduced to the market. The RotriX oil burner consequently takes into account the mechanisms in the creation of harmful emissions in the combustion of heating oil No. 2, and guarantees stable combustion under any operating conditions. The burner has the following features: heating oil is combusted only after complete vaporization and mixing with combustion air and recirculated flue gases; the flame is not stabilized with a turbulator disk, but a strong turbulating current is created by means of the Vortex Breakdown phenomenon, which develops a very stable flame under any operating conditions; and high internal flue gas recirculation rates lower the flame temperature to the point where thermal NO formation is reduced to the same low level as in the combustion of gas. The new burner has extremely low emissions of NOx < 60 mg/kWh, and CO < 5 mg/kWh at a CO{sub 2} concentraiton of 14%.

  1. High power picosecond vortex laser based on a large-mode-area fiber amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yuichi; Okida, Masahito; Miyamoto, Katsuhiko; Omatsu, Takashige

    2009-08-03

    We present the production of picosecond vortex pulses from a stressed large-mode-area fiber amplifier for the first time. 8.5 W picosecond output with a peak power of approximately 12.5 kW was obtained at a pump power of 29 W. 2009 Optical Society of America.

  2. Vortex rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhmetov, D.G. [Lavrentiev Institute of Hydrodynamics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2009-07-01

    This book presents a comprehensive coverage of the wide field of vortex rings. The book presents the results of systematic experimental investigations, theoretical foundation, as well as the practical applications of vortex rings, such as the extinction of fires at gushing gas and oil wells. All the basic properties of vortex rings as well as their hydrodynamic structures are presented. Special attention is paid to the formation and motion of turbulent vortex rings. (orig.)

  3. MULTI-MODE OF VORTEX-INDUCED VIBRATION OF A FLEXIBLE CIRCULAR CYLINDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Fang-fang; DENG Jian; ZHENG Yao

    2011-01-01

    The vortex-induced vibration of a flexible circular cylinder is investigated at a constant Reynolds number of 1 000.The finite-volume method on moving meshes is applied for the fluid flow,and the Euler-Bemoulli beam theory is used to model the dynamic response of a flexible cylinder.The relationship between the reduced velocity and the amplitude response agrees well with the experimental results.Moreover,five different vibrating modes appear in the simulation.From the comparisons of their vortex structures,the strength of the wake flow is related to the exciting vibrating mode and different vortex patterns arise for different vibrating modes.Only 2P pattern appears in the first vibrating mode while 2S-2P patterns occur in the other vibrating modes if monitoring at different sections along the length of the cylinder.The vibration of the flexible cylinder can also greatly alter the three-dimensionality in the wake,which needs further studies in our future work,especially in the transition region for the Reynolds number from 170 to 300.

  4. Accelerated inhomogeneous (e.g. Richtmyer-Meshkov) flows: A-dot at intermediate times, vortex-accelerated vortex deposition and turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabusky, Norman; Peng, Gaozhu; Zhang, Shuang

    2004-11-01

    We review our recent contributions [1,2,3,4] in the light of their omission in recent publications [5,6,7,8]. Included is the VAVD process ( also called: secondary baroclinic circulation generation) which yields more positive and negative circulation through intermediate times than the original shock-accelerated vortex deposition (SAVD). VAVD is due to the acceleration provided by the rolled up vortex from SAVD and more important, the strongly increased density gradients of the multiphase front, also caused by the roll-up process . In addition we quantify : the effect of the initial thickness of the interfacial transition layer; the approach to constant a-dot at intermediate-to-late times; the ubiquity of vortex projectiles and transition to turbulence. Refs: 1.Zabusky, N.J., Kotelnikov, A.D., Gulak, Y. & Peng, G. Amplitude growth rate of a Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable two-dimensional interface to intermediate times. J. Fluid Mechanics, 475, p. 147-162,2003. 2.N. J. Zabusky, S. Gupta and Y. Gulak. Localization and spreading of contact discontinuity layers in simulations of compressible dissipationless flows. J. Comput. Phys. 188 (2) (2003) 347-363, 2003. 3.G. Peng, N. J. Zabusky & S. Zhang. Vortex-accelerated secondary baroclinic vorticity deposition and late intermediate time dynamics of a two-dimensional RM interface. Phys. Fluids 15 (12), 3730-3744, 2003. 4. S. Zhang, N. J. Zabusky, G. Peng & S. Gupta. Shock Gaseous Cylinder Interactions: Dynamically validated initial conditions provide excellent agreement between experiments and Navier-Stokes simulations to late-intermediate time. Phys.Fluids 16(5), 1203-1216, 2004. 5.P. Vorobieff , N.-G. Mohamed, C. Tomkins, C. Goodenough, M. Marr-Lyon, and R. F. Benjamin Scaling evolution in shock-induced transition to turbulence PHYS REV. E 68, 065301.2003. 6.C. Matsuoka, K. Nishihara and Y. Fukuda,. Nonlinear evolution of an interface in the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. PHYS. REV. E 67, 036301 2003!& erratum 7.K. Nishihara

  5. Impurity transport in trapped electron mode driven turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Mollén, A; Moradi, S; Fülöp, T

    2013-01-01

    Collisionless trapped electron mode turbulence is studied by gyrokinetic simulations with the GYRO code. Its impact on radial transport of high-Z trace impurities close to the core is thoroughly investigated, including the situation when a poloidally varying equilibrium electrostatic potential is present, and the dependence of the zero-flux impurity density gradient (peaking factor) on local plasma parameters is presented. Parameters such as ion-to-electron temperature ratio, electron temperature gradient and main species density gradient mainly affect the impurity peaking through their impact on mode characteristics. The poloidal asymmetry, the safety factor and magnetic shear have the strongest effect on impurity peaking, and it is shown that under certain scenarios where trapped electron modes are dominant, core accumulation of high-Z impurities can be avoided.

  6. DNS Study of the Turbulent Taylor-Vortex Flow on a Ribbed Inner Cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Tsukahara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbulent Taylor-vortex flows over regularly spaced square ribs mounted on a rotating inner cylinder surface were investigated using direct numerical simulations (DNSs for a Reynolds number of 3200 (based on the inner-wall velocity and the gap width between two cylinders in an apparatus with an inner-to-outer radius ratio of 0.617, while varying the streamwise interval of the ribs. We examined the flow and pressure fields around each rib, focusing on the recirculation zone, the frictional drag coefficient, and the pressure (form drag. Our results for the Taylor-Couette flows were compared to DNS for plane Poiseuille flows over ribbed surfaces performed by Leonardi et al. (2003. We determined the qualitative consistency between them with respect to the roughness effect, which depends significantly on the rib interval, but the rate of increase in the flow resistance was remarkably dampened by roughness in the present flows. Taylor vortices remaining over roughened cylinder surfaces were found to induce quick pressure recovery behind each rib, leading to less pressure drag and an enhanced backflow in the recirculation zone.

  7. LES of shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction affected by microramp vortex generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Laurent; Grebert, Arnaud; Jamme, Stéphane; Bodart, Julien; Aerodynamics, Energetics; Propulsion Dep. Team

    2016-11-01

    At large Mach numbers, the interaction of an oblique shock wave with a turbulent boundary layer (SWTBLI) developing over a flat plate gives rise to a separation bubble known to exhibit low-frequency streamwise oscillations around StL = 0 . 03 (a Strouhal number based on the separated region length). Because these oscillations yield wall pressure or load fluctuations, efforts are made to reduce their amplitude. We perform large eddy simulations to reproduce the experiments by Wang etal (2012) where a rake of microramp vortex generators (MVGs) were inserted upstream the SWTBLI with consequences yet to be fully understood. There is no consensus on the flow structure downstream MVGs and this is first clarified in the case of MVGs protruding by 0 . 47 δ in a TBL at Mach number M = 2 . 7 and Reynolds number Reθ = 3600 . Large-scale vortices intermittently shed downstream the MVGs are characterized by a streamwise period close to twice the TBL thickness and a frequency f 0 . 5Ue / δ , two orders of magnitude higher than the one of the uncontrolled SWTBLI. We then characterize the interaction between the unsteady wake of the MVGs with the SWTBLI resulting in the reduction of the interaction length and the high-frequency modulation of the shock feet motions.

  8. Radio-over-Fiber Transmission Using Vortex Modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatarczak, Anna; Lu, Xiaofeng; Rommel, Simon

    2015-01-01

    This paper demonstrates experimentally the distribution of radio-over-fiber (RoF) signals using orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light over standard OM4 multimode fiber (MMF) at 850 nm wavelength. Five independent OAM modes are used to convey RoF signals in the microwave regime showing robust...... performance and therefore opening new prospects for enhancing the capacity of MMF based RoF Links....

  9. Measuring mode indices of a partially coherent vortex beam with Hanbury Brown and Twiss type experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ruifeng; Wang, Feiran; Chen, Dongxu; Wang, Yunlong; Zhou, Yu; Gao, Hong; Zhang, Pei, E-mail: zhangpei@mail.ustc.edu.cn; Li, Fuli [Key Laboratory of Quantum Information and Quantum Optoelectronic Devices, Shaanxi Province, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2016-02-01

    It is known that the cross-correlation function (CCF) of a partially coherent vortex (PCV) beam shows a robust link with the radial and azimuthal mode indices. However, the previous proposals are difficult to measure the CCF in practical systems, especially in the case of astronomical objects. In this letter, we demonstrate experimentally that the Hanbury Brown and Twiss effect can be used to measure the mode indices of the original vortex beam and investigate the relationship between the spatial coherent width and the characterization of CCF of the PCV beam. The technique we exploit is quite efficient and robust, and it may be useful in the field of free space communication and astronomy which are related to the photon's orbital angular momentum.

  10. Measuring mode indices of a partially coherent vortex beam with HBT type experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ruifeng; Chen, Dongxu; Wang, Yunlong; Zhou, Yu; Gao, Hong; Zhang, Pei; Li, Fuli

    2016-01-01

    It is known that the cross-correlation function (CCF) of a partially coherent vortex (PCV) beam shows a robust link with the radial and azimuthal mode indices. However, the previous proposals are difficult to measure the CCF in practical system, especially in the case of astronomical objects. In this letter, we demonstrate experimentally that the Hanbury Brown and Twiss effect can be used to measure the mode indices of the original vortex beam and investigate the relationship between the spatial coherent width and the characterization of CCF of a PCV beam. The technique we exploit is quite efficient and robust, and it may be useful in the field of free space communication and astronomy which are related to the photon's orbital angular momentum.

  11. Numerical investigation of the influence of elevated turbulence levels on the cooling effectiveness of an anti-vortex hole geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repko, Timothy William

    A novel film cooling hole geometry for use in gas turbine engines has been investigated numerically by solving the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations in a commercial CFD code (STAR-CCM+) with varying turbulence intensity and length scale using the k-o SST turbulence model. Both steady and unsteady results were considered in order to investigate the effects of freestream turbulence intensity and length scale on this novel anti-vortex hole (AVH) concept. The AVH geometry utilizes two side holes, one on each side of the main hole, to attempt to mitigate the vorticity from the jet from the main hole. The AVH concept has been shown by past research to provide a substantial improvement over conventional film cooling hole designs. Past research has been limited to low turbulence intensity and small length scales that are not representative of the turbulent flow exiting the combustor. Three turbulence intensities (Tu = 5, 10 and 20%) and three length scales normalized by the main cooling hole diameter (Λ x/dm = 1, 3, 6) were considered in this study for a total of nine turbulence conditions. The highest intensity, largest length scale turbulence case (Tu = 20, Λx/dm = 6) is considered most representative of engine conditions and was shown to have the best cooling performance. Results show that the turbulence in the hot gases exiting the combustor can aid in the film cooling for the AVH geometry at high blowing ratios (BR = 2.0), where the blowing ratio is essentially the ratio of the jet-to-mainstream mass flux ratios. Length scale was shown to have an insignificant effect on the cooling performance at low turbulence intensity and a moderate effect at higher turbulence intensities. The adiabatic film cooling effectiveness was shown to increase as the turbulence intensity was elevated. The convective heat transfer coefficient was also shown to increase at the turbulence intensity was elevated. An increase in the heat transfer coefficient is a deleterious effect and

  12. Origin of hot Super-Earths and the vortex-assisted mode of planet formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyra, Wladimir

    In spite of steady advances, planet formation remains, by and large, a mystery. Although a relatively consistent theory has been developed in the past two decades, its application to the observed distribution of exoplanets has not fared too well. If the statistics of discovered exoplanets suggest that planets form efficiently, there are still fundamental unsolved problems, such as excessive inward drift of grains in protoplanetary disks during planet formation. State-of-the-art theories invoke dust traps to overcome this problem, and recent high-resolution observations of protoplanetary disks show a highcontrast crescent-shaped emission on one side of the star, originating from millimetersized grains. The favored hypothesis borrows from the planet formation literature by suggesting that this asymmetry is the result of dust trapping in giant anticyclonic vortices. This idea, however, is not without problems. Vortices have been extensively studied, and some of their understood properties conflict with them being the culprit of the observed asymmetries. Understanding these conflicts will provide constraints for the theory and advance our interpretation of the observations. In this proposal, we aim to show that vortex trapping is a viable mechanism for planet formation. This is possible because 1) large-scale vortices are expected at turbulent/quiescent transitions in the disk 2) vortices are expected in the laminar zones 3) vortices should be excellent traps for grains and thus planet formation sites; 4) grain drift from outer radii brings more planet building blocks to the vortex; and 5) The turbulent/laminar zone boundary is also a migration stopping point. We propose a set of hydrodynamical simulations including embedded solid particles to decisively demonstrate the efficiency of vortex-assisted planet formation.

  13. Dual-polarization and dual-mode orbital angular momentum radio vortex beam generated by using reflective metasurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shixing; Li, Long; Shi, Guangming

    2016-08-01

    A metasurface, which is composed of printed cross-dipole elements with different arm lengths, is designed, fabricated, and experimentally demonstrated to generate orbital angular momentum (OAM) vortex waves of dual polarizations and dual modes in the radio frequency domain simultaneously. The prototype of a practical metasurface is fabricated and measured to validate the results of theoretical analysis and design at 5.8 GHz. Numerical and experimental results verify that vortex waves with dual OAM modes and dual polarizations can be flexibly generated by using a reflective metasurface. The proposed method paves a way to generate diverse OAM vortex waves for radio frequency and microwave wireless communication applications.

  14. An experimental and analytical study of the stability of counter-rotating vortex pairs with applications for aircraft wake turbulence control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babie, Brian Matthew

    Aircraft trailing vortex wakes are commonly referred to as `wake turbulence' and may pose a flight safety hazard to other aircraft that may encounter the wake. This hazard is of critical interest during the take-off and landing stages of flight, where aircraft are in the closest proximity to one another. During these flight stages, it is common for transport aircraft to be in a high-lift, or flaps down, configuration. In an effort to study these wakes a generic four-vortex wake is generated experimentally, such that the results are independent of a specific wing loading condition. Three principle objectives served to focus the research project that is presented in this dissertation. The first two objectives were to develop an improved understanding of the wake configurations that were conducive to large instability growth rates and to subsequently use quantitative methods to identify the instability modes that dominate the far-field wake dynamic. With a clear understanding of the physics of an unstable aircraft wake, the third objective of the research project was to use this newly attained information to recommend methods for a reliable wake control strategy. A compilation of flow visualization results shows a design space of counter-rotating wake configurations, defined by the circulation and span ratios, where rapidly amplifying instabilities are consistently seen to exist. This design space is also seen to encompass rigidly-translating wake systems. A combination of quantitative flow visualization estimates, hot-wire anemometry and an analytical stability analysis was successful in identifying two forms of bending wave instability, namely the long and short-wavelength modes. Having identified two bending instability modes in the experimental wake, it was possible to suggest a strategy by which these modes could be exploited for the control of aircraft wakes.

  15. Turbulent vortex-flow and dynamic pressure oscillations in regenerative blowers; Turbulente Wirbelstroemung und dynamische Druckschwankungen in Seitenkanalmaschinen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surek, D. [Fachbereich Maschinenbau, Fachhochschule Merseburg (Germany)

    1997-05-01

    Regenerative blowers with high pressure coefficients have high dissipation losses in the side channel and on the breaker. These losses can be in the same magnitude as the polytropic specific head. The cause of the high specific dissipation energy is the turbulent vortex flow in the side channel, which is released by the high numbers of blades and restrict the polytropic efficiency by {eta}=0.46 to 0.50. The enforced turbulent vortex-flow is the reason for the high head coefficients of regenerative blowers. In the side channel, pressure pulsations occur with pressure amplitudes of high frequency up to 40 kHz. These dynamic pressure oscillations are the result of the turbulent vortex-flow. They are indicated from the edge of the impeller blades and the impeller flow in the side channel. For instance, for one rotation of the impeller t=0.02 s and the time between two blades t=0.35 ms. The analysis of the dynamic pressure shows a distribution of the amplitudes over a wide area up to 10 kHz and higher. The dominant amplitudes are the amplitude of blade rotation frequency. The forced turbulent vortex-flow causes a high turbulent vortex-viscosity in the flow and releases a pulse-flow transportation in the side channel. This is the reason for the energy transfer and the increase of the specific dissipation energy in the side channel. With knowledge of the specific pulse-flow transportation of the turbulent vortex-flow the connection to the total transmitted enthalpy can be explained. (orig.) [Deutsch] In Seitenkanalmaschinen mit den grossen Druckzahlen treten hohe Dissipationsverluste im Seitenkanal und im Unterbrecher auf, die von der gleichen Groessenordnung sein koennen wie die polytrope spezifische Nutzarbeit. Die Ursache fuer den grossen spezifischen Dissipationsenergieanteil ist in der turbulenten Wirbelstroemung im Seitenkanal zu suchen, die von den Laufradschaufeln hoher Zahl ausgeloest wird und den Wirkungsgrad der Maschinen auf Werte von {eta}=0,46... 0

  16. Observation of dual-mode, Kelvin-Helmholtz instability vortex merger in a compressible flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, W. C.; Malamud, G.; Shimony, A.; Di Stefano, C. A.; Trantham, M. R.; Klein, S. R.; Shvarts, D.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.

    2017-05-01

    We report the first observations of Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices evolving from well-characterized, dual-mode initial conditions in a steady, supersonic flow. The results provide the first measurements of the instability's vortex merger rate and supplement data on the inhibition of the instability's growth rate in a compressible flow. These experimental data were obtained by sustaining a shockwave over a foam-plastic interface with a precision-machined seed perturbation. This technique produced a strong shear layer between two plasmas at high-energy-density conditions. The system was diagnosed using x-ray radiography and was well-reproduced using hydrodynamic simulations. Experimental measurements imply that we observed the anticipated vortex merger rate and growth inhibition for supersonic shear flow.

  17. Evolution of a Network of Vortex Loops in the Turbulent Superfluid Helium; Derivation of the Vinen Equation

    OpenAIRE

    Nemirovskii, Sergey K.

    2006-01-01

    The evolution a network of vortex loops due to the fusion and breakdown in the turbulent superfluid helium is studied. We perform investigation on the base of the "rate equation" for the distribution function $n(l)$ of number of loops in space of their length $l$. There are two mechanisms for change of quantity $n(l)$. Firstly, the function changes due to deterministic process of mutual friction, when the length grows or decreases depending on orientation. Secondly, the change of $n(l)$ occur...

  18. Investigation of Turbulent Tip Leakage Vortex in an Axial Water Jet Pump with Large Eddy Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hah, Chunill; Katz, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Detailed steady and unsteady numerical studies were performed to investigate tip clearance flow in an axial water jet pump. The primary objective is to understand physics of unsteady tip clearance flow, unsteady tip leakage vortex, and cavitation inception in an axial water jet pump. Steady pressure field and resulting steady tip leakage vortex from a steady flow analysis do not seem to explain measured cavitation inception correctly. The measured flow field near the tip is unsteady and measured cavitation inception is highly transient. Flow visualization with cavitation bubbles shows that the leakage vortex is oscillating significantly and many intermittent vortex ropes are present between the suction side of the blade and the tip leakage core vortex. Although the flow field is highly transient, the overall flow structure is stable and a characteristic frequency seems to exist. To capture relevant flow physics as much as possible, a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) calculation and a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) were applied for the current investigation. The present study reveals that several vortices from the tip leakage vortex system cross the tip gap of the adjacent blade periodically. Sudden changes in local pressure field inside tip gap due to these vortices create vortex ropes. The instantaneous pressure filed inside the tip gap is drastically different from that of the steady flow simulation. Unsteady flow simulation which can calculate unsteady vortex motion is necessary to calculate cavitation inception accurately even at design flow condition in such a water jet pump.

  19. High-performance sailboat hydrofoil optimization using vortex lattice methods, and the effects of free-stream turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghello, Gianluca; Beyhaghi, Pooriya; Bewley, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    The identification of an optimized hydrofoil shape depends on an accurate characterization of both its geometry and the incoming, turbulent, free-stream flow. We analyze this dependence using the computationally inexpensive vortex lattice model implemented in AVL, coupled with the recently developed global, derivative-free optimization algorithm implemented in Δ - DOGS . Particular attention will be given to the effect of the free-stream turbulence level - as modeled by a change in the viscous drag coefficients - on the optimized values of the parameters describing the three dimensional shape of the foil. Because the simplicity of AVL, when contrasted with more complex and computationally expensive LES or RANS models, may cast doubts on its usefulness, its validity and limitations will be discussed by comparison with water tank measurement, and again taking into account the effect of the uncertainty in the free-stream characterization.

  20. Shed Vortex Structure and Phase-Averaged Velocity Statistics in Symmetric/Asymmetric Turbulent Flat Plate Wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Man Mohan

    2017-01-01

    The near wake of a flat plate is investigated via direct numerical simulations (DNS). Many earlier experimental investigations have used thin plates with sharp trailing edges and turbulent boundary layers to create the wake. This results in large theta divided by D (sub TE) values (theta is the boundary layer momentum thickness towards the end of the plate and D (sub TE) is the trailing edge thickness). In the present study the emphasis is on relatively thick plates with circular trailing edges (CTE) resulting in theta divided by D values less than one (D is the plate thickness and the diameter of the CTE), and vigorous vortex shedding. The Reynolds numbers based on the plate length and D are 1.255 x 10 (sup 6) and 10,000, respectively. Two cases are computed; one with turbulent boundary layers on both the upper and lower surfaces of the plate (statistically the same, symmetric wake, Case TT) and, a second with turbulent and laminar boundary layers on the upper and lower surfaces, respectively (asymmetric case, Case TL). The data and understanding obtained is of considerable engineering interest, particularly in turbomachinery where the pressure side of an airfoil can remain laminar or transitional because of a favorable pressure gradient and the suction side is turbulent. Shed-vortex structure and phase-averaged velocity statistics obtained in the two cases are compared here. The upper negative shed vortices in Case TL (turbulent separating boundary layer) are weaker than the lower positive ones (laminar separating boundary layer) at inception (a factor 1.27 weaker in terms of peak phase-averaged spanwise vorticity at first appearance of a peak). The upper vortices weaken rapidly as they travel downstream. A second feature of interest in Case TL is a considerable increase in the peak phase-averaged, streamwise normal intensity (random component) with increasing streamwise distance (x divided by D) that occurs nears the positive vortex cores. This behavior is

  1. Fast electrical switching of orbital angular momentum modes using ultra-compact integrated vortex emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strain, Michael J; Cai, Xinlun; Wang, Jianwei; Zhu, Jiangbo; Phillips, David B; Chen, Lifeng; Lopez-Garcia, Martin; O'Brien, Jeremy L; Thompson, Mark G; Sorel, Marc; Yu, Siyuan

    2014-09-17

    The ability to rapidly switch between orbital angular momentum modes of light has important implications for future classical and quantum systems. In general, orbital angular momentum beams are generated using free-space bulk optical components where the fastest reconfiguration of such systems is around a millisecond using spatial light modulators. In this work, an extremely compact optical vortex emitter is demonstrated with the ability to actively tune between different orbital angular momentum modes. The emitter is tuned using a single electrically contacted thermo-optical control, maintaining device simplicity and micron scale footprint. On-off keying and orbital angular momentum mode switching are achieved at rates of 10 μs and 20 μs respectively.

  2. Analytical solution for multi-singular vortex Gaussian beams: the mathematical theory of scattering modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, A.; García-March, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel procedure for solving the Schrödinger equation, which in optics is the paraxial wave equation, with an initial multisingular vortex Gaussian beam. This initial condition has a number of singularities in a plane transversal to propagation embedded in a Gaussian beam. We use scattering modes, which are solutions to the paraxial wave equation that can be combined straightforwardly to express the initial condition and therefore allow the problem to be solved. To construct the scattering modes one needs to obtain a particular set of polynomials, which play an analogous role to Laguerre polynomials for Laguerre-Gaussian modes. We demonstrate here the recurrence relations needed to determine these polynomials. To stress the utility and strength of the method we solve first the problem of an initial Gaussian beam with two positive singularities and a negative one embedded in it. We show that the solution permits one to obtain analytical expressions. These can used to obtain mathematical expressions for meaningful quantities, such as the distance at which the positive and negative singularities merge, closing the loop of a vortex line. Furthermore, we present an example of the calculation of an specific discrete-Gauss state, which is the solution of the diffraction of a Laguerre-Gauss state showing definite angular momentum (that is, a highly charged vortex) by a thin diffractive element showing certain discrete symmetry. We show that this problem is therefore solved in a much simpler way than by using the previous procedure based on the integral Fresnel diffraction method.

  3. Turbulence trigger for neoclassical tearing modes in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Sanae-I [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Itoh, Kimitaka [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Yagi, Masatoshi [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan)

    2004-01-01

    A stochastic trigger by micro-turbulence for neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) is studied. NTMs induce topological change of magnetic structure and have a subcritical nature. It is found that the NTM can be excited regardless of the presence of seed islands. The transition rate of the NTM, its probability density function and its statistically averaged amplitude are obtained. The boundary in the phase diagram is determined as the statistical long time average of the transition conditions. The NTM can be excited by crossing this boundary even in the absence of other global instabilities. The boundary is expressed in terms of the poloidal beta value. Its dependence on the ratio between the ion banana width and radius of the rational surface, rho{sub b}/r{sub s}, is found to vary in the range rho{sub b}/r{sub s}-({rho}{sub b}/r{sub s}){sup 2}, depending on the linear stability of the tearing mode.

  4. Diagnostics of BubbleMode Vortex Breakdown in Swirling Flow in a Large-Aspect-Ratio Cylinder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulikov, D. V.; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming; Naumov, Igor

    2014-01-01

    We report for the first time on the possible formation of regions with counterflow (bubble-mode vortex breakdown or explosion) at the center of strongly swirling flow generated by a rotating endwall in a large-aspect-ratio cylindrical cavity filled with a liquid medium. Previously, the possibility...... of bubble-mode breakdown was studied in detail for cylindrical cavities of moderate aspect ratio (length to radius ratios up to H/R ∼ 3.5), while flows in large-aspect-ratio cylinders were only associated with regimes of self-organized helical vortex multiplets. In the present study, a regime...... with nonstationary bubble-mode vortex breakdown has been observed in a cylindrical cavity with H/R = 4.5....

  5. Vortex zero modes, large flux limit and Ambjørn-Nielsen-Olesen magnetic instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognesi, Stefano; Chatterjee, Chandrasekhar; Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Konishi, Kenichi

    2014-10-01

    In the large flux limit vortices become flux tubes with almost constant magnetic field in the interior region. This occurs in the case of non-Abelian vortices as well, and the study of such configurations allows us to reveal a close relationship between vortex zero modes and the gyromagnetic instabilities of vector bosons in a strong background magnetic field discovered by Nielsen, Olesen and Ambjørn. The BPS vortices are exactly at the onset of this instability, and the dimension of their moduli space is precisely reproduced in this way. We present a unifying picture in which, through the study of the linear spectrum of scalars, fermions and W bosons in the magnetic field background, the expected number of translational, orientational, fermionic as well as semilocal zero modes is correctly reproduced in all cases.

  6. Vortex Zero Modes, Large Flux Limit and Ambj{\\o}rn-Nielsen-Olesen Magnetic Instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Bolognesi, Stefano; Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Konishi, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    In the large flux limit vortices become flux tubes with almost constant magnetic field in the interior region. This occurs in the case of non-Abelian vortices as well, and the study of such configurations allows us to reveal a close relationship between vortex zero modes and the gyromagnetic instabilities of vector bosons in a strong background magnetic field discovered by Nielsen, Olesen and Ambj{\\o}rn. The BPS vortices are exactly at the onset of this instability, and the dimension of their moduli space is precisely reproduced in this way. We present a unifying picture in which, through the study of the linear spectrum of scalars, fermions and W bosons in the magnetic field background, the expected number of translational, orientational, fermionic as well as semilocal zero modes is correctly reproduced in all cases.

  7. Zero modes of the generalized fermion-vortex system in a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chi-Ken; Seradjeh, Babak

    2014-06-01

    We show that Dirac fermions moving in two spatial dimensions with a generalized dispersion E ˜pN, subject to an external magnetic field and coupled to a complex scalar field carrying a vortex defect with winding number Q acquire N |Q| zero modes. This is the same as in the absence of the magnetic field. Our proof is based on selection rules in the Landau level basis that dictate the existence and the number of the zero modes. We show that the result is insensitive to the choice of geometry and is naturally extended to general field profiles, where we also derive a generalization of the Aharonov-Casher theorem. Experimental consequences of our results are briefly discussed.

  8. Majorana Zero Mode Detected with Spin Selective Andreev Reflection in the Vortex of a Topological Superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hao-Hua; Zhang, Kai-Wen; Hu, Lun-Hui; Li, Chuang; Wang, Guan-Yong; Ma, Hai-Yang; Xu, Zhu-An; Gao, Chun-Lei; Guan, Dan-Dan; Li, Yao-Yi; Liu, Canhua; Qian, Dong; Zhou, Yi; Fu, Liang; Li, Shao-Chun; Zhang, Fu-Chun; Jia, Jin-Feng

    2016-06-24

    Recently, theory has predicted a Majorana zero mode (MZM) to induce spin selective Andreev reflection (SSAR), a novel magnetic property which can be used to detect the MZM. Here, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy or spectroscopy has been applied to probe SSAR of MZMs in a topological superconductor of the Bi_{2}Te_{3}/NbSe_{2} heterostructure. The zero-bias peak of the tunneling differential conductance at the vortex center is observed substantially higher when the tip polarization and the external magnetic field are parallel rather than antiparallel to each other. This spin dependent tunneling effect provides direct evidence of MZM and reveals its magnetic property in addition to the zero energy modes. Our work will stimulate MZM research on these novel physical properties and, hence, is a step towards experimental study of their statistics and application in quantum computing.

  9. Majorana Zero Mode Detected with Spin Selective Andreev Reflection in the Vortex of a Topological Superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hao-Hua; Zhang, Kai-Wen; Hu, Lun-Hui; Li, Chuang; Wang, Guan-Yong; Ma, Hai-Yang; Xu, Zhu-An; Gao, Chun-Lei; Guan, Dan-Dan; Li, Yao-Yi; Liu, Canhua; Qian, Dong; Zhou, Yi; Fu, Liang; Li, Shao-Chun; Zhang, Fu-Chun; Jia, Jin-Feng

    2016-06-01

    Recently, theory has predicted a Majorana zero mode (MZM) to induce spin selective Andreev reflection (SSAR), a novel magnetic property which can be used to detect the MZM. Here, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy or spectroscopy has been applied to probe SSAR of MZMs in a topological superconductor of the Bi2 Te3 /NbSe2 heterostructure. The zero-bias peak of the tunneling differential conductance at the vortex center is observed substantially higher when the tip polarization and the external magnetic field are parallel rather than antiparallel to each other. This spin dependent tunneling effect provides direct evidence of MZM and reveals its magnetic property in addition to the zero energy modes. Our work will stimulate MZM research on these novel physical properties and, hence, is a step towards experimental study of their statistics and application in quantum computing.

  10. Interaction of a turbulent-jet noise source with transverse modes in a rectangular duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Succi, G. P.; Baumeister, K. J.; Ingard, K. U.

    1978-01-01

    A turbulent jet was used to excite transverse acoustic modes in a rectangular duct. The pressure spectrum showed asymmetric singularities (pressure spikes) at the resonant frequencies of the duct modes. This validates previously published theoretical results. These pressure spikes occurred over a range of jet velocities, orientations, and inlet turbulence levels. At the frequency of the spike, the measured transverse pressure shape matched the resonant mode shape.

  11. Impact of Energetic-Particle-Driven Geodesic Acoustic Modes on Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzoso, D.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.; Dumont, R.; Strugarek, A.; Abiteboul, J.; Cartier-Michaud, T.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Grandgirard, V.; Latu, G.; Passeron, C.; Thomine, O.

    2013-03-01

    The impact on turbulent transport of geodesic acoustic modes excited by energetic particles is evidenced for the first time in flux-driven 5D gyrokinetic simulations using the Gysela code. Energetic geodesic acoustic modes (EGAMs) are excited in a regime with a transport barrier in the outer radial region. The interaction between EGAMs and turbulence is such that turbulent transport can be enhanced in the presence of EGAMs, with the subsequent destruction of the transport barrier. This scenario could be particularly critical in those plasmas, such as burning plasmas, exhibiting a rich population of suprathermal particles capable of exciting energetic modes.

  12. Decay rates of magnetic modes below the threshold of a turbulent dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herault, J; Pétrélis, F; Fauve, S

    2014-04-01

    We measure the decay rates of magnetic field modes in a turbulent flow of liquid sodium below the dynamo threshold. We observe that turbulent fluctuations induce energy transfers between modes with different symmetries (dipolar and quadrupolar). Using symmetry properties, we show how to measure the decay rate of each mode without being restricted to the one with the smallest damping rate. We observe that the respective values of the decay rates of these modes depend on the shape of the propellers driving the flow. Dynamical regimes, including field reversals, are observed only when the modes are both nearly marginal. This is in line with a recently proposed model.

  13. Coarse mode aerosol measurement using a Low Turbulence Inlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, J.; Bart, M.; Trembath, J.; McQuaid, J. B.; Brooks, B. J.; Osborne, S.

    2012-04-01

    The Sahara desert is a major natural source of global mineral dust emissions (Forster et al., 2007) through the mobilisation and lifting of dust particles into the atmosphere from dust storms. A significant fraction of this dust is in the aerosol coarse mode (Weinzierl et al., 2009). It is highlighted of the difficulty in making accurate and reliable measurements from an aircraft platform, particularly that of coarse mode aerosol (Wendisch et al., 2004). To achieve the measurement of a representative aerosol sample an aerosol inlet, on an aircraft, is required for the delivery of the sample to the instruments making the measurements. Inlet design can modify aerosol size distribution through either underestimating due to aerosol losses or overestimation due to enhancements. The Low Turbulence Inlet (LTI) was designed to improve inlet efficiency. This is achieved by reducing turbulence flow within the tip of the inlet, reducing impaction of particles to the walls of the inlet (Wilson et al., 2004). The LTI further maintains isokinetic sampling flow (free stream velocity, U0 and sampling velocity, U are equal to 1). Dust aerosol over the Sahara desert provides an excellent environment to test and quantify the capabilities of the LTI on the FAAM BAe 146, whilst enabling in-situ dust measurement. The LTI was operated during the Fennec field campaign in June 2011 with 11 flights during the campaign over Mauritania and Mali. We are using the LTI to provide critical information on the sampling characteristics of the inlet used by nearly all aerosol instruments inside the aircraft (AMS, Nephelometer, PSAP, and CCN). Inlet experiments were performed with identical Optical Particle Counters (OPC) connected to the rosemount and LTI with size distribution for each inlet measured and Rosemount enhancements determined. Rosemount inlet enhancements were determined to be 2 to 4 times for particles up to 2.5 µm. A key parameter in aerosol measurement is size distribution, in which

  14. Spatially evolving vortex-gas turbulent free shear layers: Part 2. Coherent structure dynamics in vorticity and concentration fields

    CERN Document Server

    Suryanarayanan, Saikishan

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the mechanisms of coherent structure interactions in spatially evolving turbulent free shear layers at different values of the velocity ratio parameter {\\lambda}=$(U_1-U_2)/(U_1+U_2)$, where $U_1$ and $U_2 (\\leq U_1)$ are the free stream velocities on either side of the layer. The study employs the point-vortex (or vortex-gas) model presented in part I (arXiv:1509.00603) which predicts spreading rates that are in the close neighborhood of results from most high Reynolds number experiments and 3D simulations. The present (2D) simulations show that the well-known steep-growth merger events among neighboring structures of nearly equal size (Brown & Roshko 1974) account for more than 70% of the overall growth at {\\lambda}< 0.63. However the relative contribution of such 'hard merger' events decreases gradually with increasing {\\lambda}, and accounts for only 27% of the total growth at the single-stream limit ({\\lambda} = 1). It is shown that the rest of the contribution to layer growth ...

  15. Numerical modeling of turbulent swirling flow in a multi-inlet vortex nanoprecipitation reactor using dynamic DDES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, James C.; Liu, Zhenping; Fox, Rodney O.; Passalacqua, Alberto; Olsen, Michael G.

    2015-11-01

    The multi-inlet vortex reactor (MIVR) has been developed to provide a platform for rapid mixing in the application of flash nanoprecipitation (FNP) for manufacturing functional nanoparticles. Unfortunately, commonly used RANS methods are unable to accurately model this complex swirling flow. Large eddy simulations have also been problematic, as expensive fine grids to accurately model the flow are required. These dilemmas led to the strategy of applying a Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation (DDES) method to the vortex reactor. In the current work, the turbulent swirling flow inside a scaled-up MIVR has been investigated by using a dynamic DDES model. In the DDES model, the eddy viscosity has a form similar to the Smagorinsky sub-grid viscosity in LES and allows the implementation of a dynamic procedure to determine its coefficient. The complex recirculating back flow near the reactor center has been successfully captured by using this dynamic DDES model. Moreover, the simulation results are found to agree with experimental data for mean velocity and Reynolds stresses.

  16. Photonic simulation of topological superconductor edge state and zero-energy mode at a vortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wei; Chen, Liang; Ji, Xia; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Photonic simulations of quantum Hall edge states and topological insulators have inspired considerable interest in recent years. Interestingly, there are theoretical predictions for another type of topological states in topological superconductors, but debates over their experimental observations still remain. Here we investigate the photonic analogue of the p(x) + ip(y) model of topological superconductor. Two essential characteristics of topological superconductor, particle-hole symmetry and p(x) + ip(y) pairing potentials, are well emulated in photonic systems. Its topological features are presented by chiral edge state and zero-energy mode at a vortex. This work may fertilize the study of photonic topological states, and open up the possibility for emulating wave behaviors in superconductors.

  17. Vortex and LG01-mode Nd:YAG laser involving a circular Dammann grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yun; Han, Xiahui; Li, Guiyun; Liu, Jinyu; Xia, Kegui; Li, Jianlang

    2016-05-01

    By introducing a circular Dammann grating (CDG) into the pump unit, we demonstrated an end-pumped Nd:YAG laser that emitted a vortex and first-order LG mode with high laser efficiency and high power. In our scheme, the CDG was used to reshape the pumping light into an annular profile, and the adaptation of it was realized easily by inserting it into the pump unit of a conventional end-pumped solid-state laser; the laser cavity was simple, compact, and consisted of only a laser crystal and an output coupler. The beam power of this laser reached 1.86 W at an absorbed pump power of 6.38 W with a slope efficiency of 34.5%.

  18. Free-space to few-mode-fiber coupling under atmospheric turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Donghao; Li, Yan; Chen, Erhu; Li, Beibei; Kong, Deming; Li, Wei; Wu, Jian

    2016-08-01

    High speed free space optical communication (FSOC) has taken advantages of components developed for fiber-optic communication systems. Recently, with the rapid development of few-mode-fiber based fiber communication systems, few-mode-fiber components might further promote their applications in FSOC system. The coupling efficiency between free space optical beam and few-mode fibers under atmospheric turbulence effect are investigated in this paper. Both simulation and experimental results show that, compared with single-mode fiber, the coupling efficiencies for a 2-mode fiber and a 4-mode fiber are improved by ~4 dB and ~7 dB respectively in the presence of medium moderate and strong turbulence. Compared with single-mode fiber, the relative standard deviation of received power is restrained by 51% and 66% respectively with a 4-mode and 2-mode fiber.

  19. Identifying coherent structures and vortex clusters in Taylor-Couette turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spandan, Vamsi; Ostilla-Monico, Rodolfo; Lohse, Detlef; Verzicco, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The nature of the underlying structures in Taylor-Couette (TC) flow, the flow between two co-axial and independently rotating cylinders is investigated by two methods. First, the quadrant analysis technique for identifying structures with intense radial-azimuthal stresses (also referred to as ‘Q’s) of Lozano-Durán et al., (J. Fluid Mech. 694, 100-130) is used to identify the main structures responsible for the transport of angular velocity. Second, the vortex clusters are identified based on the analysis by del Álamo et al., (J. Fluid. Mech., 561, 329-358). In order to test these criteria, two different radius ratios η = ri/ro are considered, where ri and ro are the radii of inner and outer cylinder, respectively: (i) η = 0.5 and (ii) η = 0.909, which correspond to high and low curvature geometries, respectively and have different underlying structures. The Taylor rolls, i.e. the large-scale coherent structures, are effectively captured as ‘Q’s for the low curvature setup and it is observed that curvature plays a dominant role in influencing the size and volumes of these ‘Q’s. On the other hand, the vortex clusters are smaller in size when compared to the ‘Q’ structures. These vortex clusters are found to be taller in the case of η = 0.909, while the distribution of the lengths of these clusters is almost homogenous for both radius ratios.

  20. Fermion zero modes in the vortex background of a Chern-Simons-Higgs theory with a hidden sector

    CERN Document Server

    Lozano, Gustavo; Schaposnik, Fidel A

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study a $2+1$ dimensional system in which fermions are coupled to the self-dual topological vortex in $U(1) \\times U(1)$ Chern-Simons theory, where both $U(1)$ gauge symmetries are spontaneously broken. We consider two Abelian Higgs scalars with visible and hidden sectors coupled to a fermionic field through three interaction Lagrangians, where one of them violates the fermion number. Using a fine tuning procedure, we could obtain the number of the fermionic zero modes which is equal to the absolute value of the sum of the vortex numbers in the visible and hidden sectors.

  1. Scaling and interaction of self-similar modes in models of high Reynolds number wall turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A. S.; Moarref, R.; McKeon, B. J.

    2017-03-01

    Previous work has established the usefulness of the resolvent operator that maps the terms nonlinear in the turbulent fluctuations to the fluctuations themselves. Further work has described the self-similarity of the resolvent arising from that of the mean velocity profile. The orthogonal modes provided by the resolvent analysis describe the wall-normal coherence of the motions and inherit that self-similarity. In this contribution, we present the implications of this similarity for the nonlinear interaction between modes with different scales and wall-normal locations. By considering the nonlinear interactions between modes, it is shown that much of the turbulence scaling behaviour in the logarithmic region can be determined from a single arbitrarily chosen reference plane. Thus, the geometric scaling of the modes is impressed upon the nonlinear interaction between modes. Implications of these observations on the self-sustaining mechanisms of wall turbulence, modelling and simulation are outlined.

  2. Three-dimensional vortex organization in a high-Reynolds-number supersonic turbulent boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, G.E.; Adrian, R.J.; Van Oudheusden, B.W.; Scarano, F.

    2010-01-01

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry was used to quantitatively visualize the three-dimensional coherent structures in a supersonic (Mach 2) turbulent boundary layer in the region between y/δ = 0.15 and 0.89. The Reynolds number based on momentum thickness Reθ = 34000. The instantaneous velocity f

  3. Regulation of electron temperature gradient turbulence by zonal flows driven by trapped electron modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asahi, Y., E-mail: y.asahi@nr.titech.ac.jp; Tsutsui, H.; Tsuji-Iio, S. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Ishizawa, A.; Watanabe, T.-H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2014-05-15

    Turbulent transport caused by electron temperature gradient (ETG) modes was investigated by means of gyrokinetic simulations. It was found that the ETG turbulence can be regulated by meso-scale zonal flows driven by trapped electron modes (TEMs), which are excited with much smaller growth rates than those of ETG modes. The zonal flows of which radial wavelengths are in between the ion and the electron banana widths are not shielded by trapped ions nor electrons, and hence they are effectively driven by the TEMs. It was also shown that an E × B shearing rate of the TEM-driven zonal flows is larger than or comparable to the growth rates of long-wavelength ETG modes and TEMs, which make a main contribution to the turbulent transport before excitation of the zonal flows.

  4. Melting of a nonequilibrium vortex crystal in a fluid film with polymers : elastic versus fluid turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    We perform a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the forced, incompressible two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equation coupled with the FENE-P equations for the polymer-conformation tensor. The forcing is such that, without polymers and at low Reynolds numbers $Re$, the film attains a steady state that is a square lattice of vortices and anti-vortices. We find that, as we increase the Weissenberg number ${\\mathcal Wi}$, this lattice undergoes a series of nonequilibrium phase transitions, first to spatially distorted, but temporally steady, crystals and then to a sequence of crystals that oscillate in time, periodically, at low ${\\mathcal Wi}$, and quasiperiodically, for slightly larger ${\\mathcal Wi}$. Finally, the system becomes disordered and displays spatiotemporal chaos and elastic turbulence. We then obtain the nonequilibrium phase diagram for this system, in the ${\\mathcal Wi} - Re$ plane, and show that (a) the boundary between the crystalline and turbulent phases has a complicated, fractal-type character ...

  5. Pattern Selection, Wave Formation, Turbulence and Vortex Breakdown in Spiral Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    problems in rotating plane Couette - Poiseuille flow " (joint work with George H. Knightly), Contemporary Math., 108 (1990), to appear. The following...continuum of periodic waves in rotating plane Couette flow , and an analytic description of a mechanism to generate the turbulent-like flows observed in...during the period of the report: (1) "Waves in rotating plane Couette flow " (joint work with George H. Knightly, University of Massachusetts), Geometry

  6. Experimental Investigation on Turbulent Convection in Solar Air Heater Channel Fitted with Delta Winglet Vortex Generator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sompol Skullong; Pongjet Promvonge

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents an experimental study on the heat transfer and flow friction characteristics in a solar air heater channel fitted with delta-winglet type vortex generators (DWs). The experiments are conducted by vary-ing the airflow rate for Reynolds number in the range of 5000 to 24000 in the test section with a uniform heat-flux applied on the upper channel wall. Firstly, the DW pairs are mounted only at the entrance of the lower wall of the test channel (called DW-E) to create multiple vortex flows at the entry. The effect of two transverse pitches (RP=Pt/H=1 and 2) at three attack angles (α=30°, 45° and 60°) of the DW-E with its relative height, b/H=0.5 (half height of channel) is examined. Secondly, the 30° DWs with three different relative heights (b/H=0.3, 0.4 and 0.5) are placed on the upper wall only (absorber plate, called DW-A) of the test channel. The experimental result reveals that in the first case, the 60° DW-E at RP=1 provides the highest heat transfer and friction factor while the 30° DW-E at RP=1 performs overall better than the others. In the second case, the 30° DW-A at b/H=0.5 yields the highest heat transfer and friction factor but the best thermal performance is found at b/H=0.4.

  7. Ground state, collective mode, phase soliton and vortex in multiband superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shi-Zeng

    2014-12-10

    This article reviews theoretical and experimental work on the novel physics in multiband superconductors. Multiband superconductors are characterized by multiple superconducting energy gaps in different bands with interaction between Cooper pairs in these bands. The discovery of prominent multiband superconductors MgB2 and later iron-based superconductors, has triggered enormous interest in multiband superconductors. The most recently discovered superconductors exhibit multiband features. The multiband superconductors possess novel properties that are not shared with their single-band counterpart. Examples include: the time-reversal symmetry broken state in multiband superconductors with frustrated interband couplings; the collective oscillation of number of Cooper pairs between different bands, known as the Leggett mode; and the phase soliton and fractional vortex, which are the main focus of this review. This review presents a survey of a wide range of theoretical exploratory and experimental investigations of novel physics in multiband superconductors. A vast amount of information derived from these studies is shown to highlight unusual and unique properties of multiband superconductors and to reveal the challenges and opportunities in the research on the multiband superconductivity.

  8. Encoding information using Laguerre Gaussian modes over free space turbulence media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichili, Abderrahmen; Salem, Amine Ben; Dudley, Angela; Zghal, Mourad; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an efficient information transmission technique using Laguerre Gaussian (LG) modes. This technique is based on multiplexing and demultiplexing multiple LG modes with different azimuthal and radial components. At the reception, the initially sent modes encoding the information are extracted with high fidelity using a complete decomposition allowing to identify a particular mode from a set of modes within a unique iteration. Importantly, we investigate the effects of the atmospheric turbulence on the proposed communication system. We believe that the proposed technique is promising for high-bit-rate spatial division multiplexing in optical fiber and free space communication systems.

  9. Imaging magnetisation dynamics in nano-contact spin-torque vortex oscillators exhibiting gyrotropic mode splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keatley, Paul Steven; Redjai Sani, Sohrab; Hrkac, Gino; Majid Mohseni, Seyed; Dürrenfeld, Philipp; Åkerman, Johan; Hicken, Robert James

    2017-04-01

    Nano-contact spin-torque vortex oscillators (STVOs) are anticipated to find application as nanoscale sources of microwave emission in future technological applications. Presently the output power and phase stability of individual STVOs are not competitive with existing oscillator technologies. Synchronisation of multiple nano-contact STVOs via magnetisation dynamics has been proposed to enhance the microwave emission. The control of device-to-device variations, such as mode splitting of the microwave emission, is essential if multiple STVOs are to be successfully synchronised. In this work a combination of electrical measurements and time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy (TRSKM) was used to demonstrate how mode splitting in the microwave emission of STVOs was related to the magnetisation dynamics that are generated. The free-running STVO response to a DC current only was used to identify devices and bias magnetic field configurations for which single and multiple modes of microwave emission were observed. Stroboscopic Kerr images were acquired by injecting a small amplitude RF current to phase lock the free-running STVO response. The images showed that the magnetisation dynamics of a multimode device with moderate splitting could be controlled by the injected RF current so that they exhibit similar spatial character to that of a single mode. Significant splitting was found to result from a complicated equilibrium magnetic state that was observed in Kerr images as irregular spatial characteristics of the magnetisation dynamics. Such dynamics were observed far from the nano-contact and so their presence cannot be detected in electrical measurements. This work demonstrates that TRSKM is a powerful tool for the direct observation of the magnetisation dynamics generated by STVOs that exhibit complicated microwave emission. Characterisation of such dynamics outside the nano-contact perimeter permits a deeper insight into the requirements for optimal phase-locking of

  10. Retrieving clear-air turbulence information from regular commercial aircraft using Mode-S and ADS-B broadcast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Kopeć

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Navigational information broadcast by commercial aircraft in the form of Mode-S and ADS-B messages can be considered a new and valid source of upper air turbulence measurements. A set of three processing methods is proposed and analysed using a quality record of turbulence encounters made by a research aircraft. The proposed methods are based on processing the vertical acceleration or the background wind into the eddy dissipation rate. All the necessary parameters are conveyed in the Mode-S/ADS-B messages. The comparison of the results of application of the processing against a reference eddy dissipation rate obtained using on-board accelerometer indicate a significant potential of those methods. The advantages and limitation of the presented approaches are discussed.

  11. Turbulence-induced melting of a nonequilibrium vortex crystal in a forced thin fluid film

    CERN Document Server

    Perlekar, Prasad

    2009-01-01

    To develop an understanding of recent experiments on the turbulence-induced melting of a periodic array of vortices in a thin fluid film, we perform a direct numerical simulation of the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations forced such that, at low Reynolds numbers, the steady state of the film is a square lattice of vortices. We find that, as we increase the Reynolds number, this lattice undergoes a series of nonequilibrium phase transitions, first to a crystal with a different reciprocal lattice and then to a sequence of crystals that oscillate in time. Initially the temporal oscillations are periodic; this periodic behaviour becomes more and more complicated, with increasing Reynolds number, until the film enters a spatially disordered nonequilibrium statistical steady that is turbulent. We study this sequence of transitions by using fluid-dynamics measures, such as the Okubo-Weiss parameter that distinguishes between vortical and extensional regions in the flow, ideas from nonlinear dynamics, e.g., \\Poi...

  12. Zombie Vortex Instability. II. Thresholds to Trigger Instability and the Properties of Zombie Turbulence in the Dead Zones of Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Philip S.; Pei, Suyang; Jiang, Chung-Hsiang; Barranco, Joseph A.

    2016-12-01

    In Zombie Vortex Instability (ZVI), perturbations excite critical layers in stratified, rotating shear flow (as in protoplanetary disks (PPDs)), causing them to generate vortex layers, which roll up into anticyclonic zombie vortices and cyclonic vortex sheets. The process is self-sustaining as zombie vortices perturb new critical layers, spawning a next generation of zombie vortices. Here, we focus on two issues: the minimum threshold of perturbations that trigger self-sustaining vortex generation, and the properties of the late-time zombie turbulence on large and small scales. The critical parameter that determines whether ZVI is triggered is the magnitude of the vorticity on the small scales (and not velocity); the minimum Rossby number needed for instability is {{Ro}}{crit}˜ 0.2 for β \\equiv N/{{Ω }}=2, where N is the Brunt-Väisälä frequency. While the threshold is set by vorticity, it is useful to infer a criterion on the Mach number; for Kolmogorov noise, the critical Mach number scales with Reynolds number: {{Ma}}{crit}˜ {{Ro}}{crit}{{Re}}-1/2. In PPDs, this is {{Ma}}{crit}˜ {10}-6. On large scales, zombie turbulence is characterized by anticyclones and cyclonic sheets with typical Rossby number ˜0.3. The spacing of the cyclonic sheets and anticyclones appears to have a “memory” of the spacing of the critical layers. On small scales, zombie turbulence has no memory of the initial conditions and has a Kolmogorov-like energy spectrum. While our earlier work was in the limit of uniform stratification, we have demonstrated that ZVI works for non-uniform Brunt-Väisälä frequency profiles that may be found in PPDs.

  13. The slow-mode nature of compressible wave power in solar wind turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Howes, G G; Klein, K G; Chen, C H K; Salem, C S; TenBarge, J M

    2011-01-01

    We use a large, statistical set of measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 AU, and supporting synthetic spacecraft data based on kinetic plasma theory, to show that the compressible component of inertial range solar wind turbulence is primarily in the kinetic slow mode. The zero-lag cross correlation C(delta n, delta B_parallel) between proton density fluctuations delta n and the field-aligned (compressible) component of the magnetic field delta B_parallel is negative and close to -1. The typical dependence of C(delta n,delta B_parallel) on the ion plasma beta_i is consistent with a spectrum of compressible wave energy that is almost entirely in the kinetic slow mode. This has important implications for both the nature of the density fluctuation spectrum and for the cascade of kinetic turbulence to short wavelengths, favoring evolution to the kinetic Alfven wave mode rather than the (fast) whistler mode.

  14. Zombie Vortex Instability. II. Thresholds to Trigger Instability and the Properties of Zombie Turbulence in the Dead Zones of Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Marcus, Philip S; Jiang, Chung-Hsiang; Barranco, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    In Zombie Vortex Instability (ZVI), perturbations excite critical layers in stratified, rotating shear flow (as in protoplanetary disks), causing them to generate vortex layers, which roll-up into anticyclonic zombie vortices and cyclonic vortex sheets. The process is self-sustaining as zombie vortices perturb new critical layers, spawning a next generation of zombie vortices. Here, we focus on two issues: the minimum threshold of perturbations that trigger self-sustaining vortex generation, and the properties of the late-time zombie turbulence on large and small scales. The critical parameter that determines whether ZVI is triggered is the magnitude of the vorticity on the small scales (and not velocity), the minimum Rossby number needed for instability is $Ro_{crit}\\sim0.2$ for $\\beta\\equiv N/\\Omega = 2$, where $N$ is the Brunt-V\\"ais\\"al\\"a frequency. While the threshold is set by vorticity, it is useful to infer a criterion on the Mach number, for Kolmogorov noise, the critical Mach number scales with Rey...

  15. Vortex gyroscope imaging of planar superfluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powis, A T; Sammut, S J; Simula, T P

    2014-10-17

    We propose a robust imaging technique that makes it possible to distinguish vortices from antivortices in quasi-two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensates from a single image of the density of the atoms. Tilting the planar condensate prior to standard absorption imaging excites a generalized gyroscopic mode of the condensate, revealing the sign and location of each vortex. This technique is anticipated to enable experimental measurement of the incompressible kinetic energy spectrum of the condensate and the observation of a negative-temperature phase transition of the vortex gas, driven by two-dimensional superfluid turbulence.

  16. Experimental Test Results of the Energy Efficient Transport (EET) Flap-Edge Vortex Model in the Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Harry L., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents the results of a test conducted in the Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel to measure the flow field properties of a flap-edge vortex. The model was the EET (Energy Efficient Transport) Flap-Edge Vortex Model, which consists of a main element and a part-span, single-slotted trailing-edge flap. The model surface was instrumented with several chordwise and spanwise rows of pressure taps on each element. The off-body flow field velocities were to be measured in several planes perpendicular to the flap edge with a laser velocimetry system capable of measuring all three components in coincidence. However, due to seeding difficulties, the preliminary laser data did not have sufficient accuracy to be suitable for presentation; therefore, this report presents only the tabulated and plotted surface pressure data. In addition, the report contains a detail description of the model which can be used to generate accurate CFD grid structures.

  17. Using Empirical Mode Decomposition to Filter Out Non-turbulent Contributions to Air-Sea Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Luís Gustavo N.; Miller, Scott D.; Acevedo, Otávio C.

    2017-04-01

    A methodology based on Empirical mode decomposition (EMD) was used to filter out non-turbulent motions from measurements of atmospheric turbulence over the sea, aimed at reducing their contribution to eddy-covariance (EC) estimates of turbulent fluxes. The proposed methodology has two main objectives: (1) to provide more robust estimates of the fluxes of momentum, heat and CO_2; and (2) to reduce the number of flux intervals rejected due to non-stationarity criteria when using traditional EC data processing techniques. The method was applied to measurements from a 28-day cruise (HALOCAST 2010) in the Eastern Pacific region. Empirical mode decomposition was applied to 4-h long time series data and used to determine the cospectral gap time scale, T_{gap}. Intrinsic modes of oscillation with characteristic periods longer than the gap scale due to non-turbulent motions were assumed and filtered out. Turbulent fluxes were then calculated for sub-intervals of length T_{gap} from the filtered 4-h time series. In the HALOCAST data, the gap scale was successfully identified in 89% of the 4-h periods and had a mean of 37 s. The EMD approach resulted in the rejection of 11% of the flux intervals, which was much less than the 68% rejected when using standard filtering methods based on data non-stationarity. For momentum and sensible heat fluxes, the averaged difference in flux magnitude between the traditional and EMD approaches was small (3 and 1%, respectively). For the CO_2 flux, the magnitude of EMD flux estimates was on average 16% less than fluxes estimated from linear detrended 10-min time series. These results provide evidence that the EMD method can be used to reduce the effects of non-turbulent correlations from flux estimates.

  18. Mode S and ADS-B as a Source of Clear-Air Turbulence Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeć, Jacek; Kwiatkowski, Kamil; de Haan, Siebren; Malinowski, Szymon

    2016-04-01

    Clear-Air Turbulence (CAT) beside being the most common cause for commercial aircraft incidents in the cruise phase is a complex physical phenomenon. CAT is an effect of various underlying physical mechanisms such as different kinds of hydrodynamic instabilities or large scale forcing. In order to properly understand and correctly forecast it one needs a significant amount of observation data. Up to date the best available observations are the in-situ EDR (from eddy dissipation rate - a measure of turbulence intensity). Those observations are reported every ~1 min of flight (roughly every 15 km). Yet their availability is limited by the willingness of the airlines to cooperate in adjusting on-board software. However there is a class of data that can be accessed more freely. In this communication we present and discuss a feasibility analysis of the three methods of processing Mode S/ADS-B messages into viable turbulence measurements. The Mode S/ADS-B messages are unrestricted navigational data broadcast by most of the commercial aircraft. The unique characteristic of this data is a very high temporal resolution. This allows to employ processing which results in obtaining turbulence information characterized by spatial resolution comparable with the best available data sources. Moreover due to using Mode-S/ASS-B data, the number of aircraft that are providing observations increases significantly. The methods are either using simple positioning information available in the ADS-B or high-resolution wind information from the Mode S. The paper is largely based on the results of the methods application to the data originating from DELICAT flight campaign that took place in 2013. The flight campaign was conducted using NLR operated Cessna Citation II. The reference Mode-S/ADS-B data partly overlapping with the research flights were supplied by the KNMI. Analysis shows very significant potential of the Mode-S wind based methods. J. M. Kopeć, K. Kwiatkowski, S. de Haan, and

  19. Equilibrium disks, MRI mode excitation, and steady state turbulence in global accretion disk simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Parkin, E R

    2012-01-01

    Global three dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of turbulent accretion disks are presented which start from fully equilibrium initial conditions in which the magnetic forces are accounted for and the induction equation is satisfied. The local linear theory of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) is used as a predictor of the growth of magnetic field perturbations in the global simulations. The linear growth estimates and global simulations diverge when non-linear motions - perhaps triggered by the onset of turbulence - upset the velocity perturbations used to excite the MRI. The saturated state is found to be independent of the initially excited MRI mode, showing that once the disk has expelled the initially net flux field and settled into quasi-periodic oscillations in the toroidal magnetic flux, the dynamo cycle regulates the global saturation stress level. Furthermore, time-averaged measures of converged turbulence, such as the ratio of magnetic energies, are found to be in agreement with...

  20. Drift Wave versus Interchange Turbulence in Tokamak Geometry Linear versus Nonlinear Mode Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, B D

    2002-01-01

    The competition between drift wave and interchange physics in general E-cross-B drift turbulence is studied with computations in three dimensional tokamak flux tube geometry. For a given set of background scales, the parameter space can be covered by the plasma beta and drift wave collisionality. At large enough plasma beta the turbulence breaks out into ideal ballooning modes and saturates only by depleting the free energy in the background pressure gradient. At high collisionality it finds a more gradual transition to resistive ballooning. At moderate beta and collisionality it retains drift wave character, qualitatively identical to simple two dimensional slab models. The underlying cause is the nonlinear vorticity advection through which the self sustained drift wave turbulence supersedes the linear instabilities, scattering them apart before they can grow, imposing its own physical character on the dynamics. This vorticity advection catalyses the gradient drive, while saturation occurs solely through tur...

  1. Turbulent Statistics From Time-Resolved PIV Measurements of a Jet Using Empirical Mode Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Milo D.

    2013-01-01

    Empirical mode decomposition is an adaptive signal processing method that when applied to a broadband signal, such as that generated by turbulence, acts as a set of band-pass filters. This process was applied to data from time-resolved, particle image velocimetry measurements of subsonic jets prior to computing the second-order, two-point, space-time correlations from which turbulent phase velocities and length and time scales could be determined. The application of this method to large sets of simultaneous time histories is new. In this initial study, the results are relevant to acoustic analogy source models for jet noise prediction. The high frequency portion of the results could provide the turbulent values for subgrid scale models for noise that is missed in large-eddy simulations. The results are also used to infer that the cross-correlations between different components of the decomposed signals at two points in space, neglected in this initial study, are important.

  2. Insights into the growth rate of spatially evolving plane turbulent free-shear layers from 2D vortex-gas simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanarayanan, Saikishan; Narasimha, Roddam

    2017-02-01

    Although the free-shear or mixing layer has been a subject of extensive research over nearly a century, there are certain fundamental issues that remain controversial. These include the influence of initial and downstream conditions on the flow, the effect of velocity ratio across the layer, and the nature of any possible coupling between small scale dynamics and the large scale evolution of layer thickness. In the spirit of the temporal vortex-gas simulations of Suryanarayanan et al. ["Free turbulent shear layer in a point vortex gas as a problem in nonequilibrium statistical mechanics," Phys. Rev. E 89, 013009 (2014)], we revisit the simple 2D inviscid vortex-gas model with extensive computations and detailed analysis, in order to gain insights into some of the above issues. Simulations of the spatially evolving vortex-gas shear layer are carried out at different velocity ratios using a computational model based on the work of Basu et al. ["Vortex sheet simulation of a plane canonical mixing layer," Comput. Fluids 21, 1-30 (1992) and "Modelling plane mixing layers using vortex points and sheets," Appl. Math. Modell. 19, 66-75 (1995)], but with a crucial improvement that ensures conservation of global circulation. The simulations show that the conditions imposed at the origin of the free shear layer and at the exit to the computational domain can affect flow evolution in their respective downstream and upstream neighbourhoods, the latter being particularly strong in the single stream limit. In between these neighbourhoods at the ends is a regime of universal self-preserving growth rate given by a universal function of velocity ratio. The computed growth rates are generally located within the scatter of experimental data on plane mixing layers and closely agree with recent high Reynolds number experiments and 3D large eddy simulation studies. These findings support the view that observed free-shear layer growth can be largely explained by the 2D vortex dynamics of

  3. Experimental demonstration of single-mode fiber coupling over relatively strong turbulence with adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mo; Liu, Chao; Xian, Hao

    2015-10-10

    High-speed free-space optical communication systems using fiber-optic components can greatly improve the stability of the system and simplify the structure. However, propagation through atmospheric turbulence degrades the spatial coherence of the signal beam and limits the single-mode fiber (SMF) coupling efficiency. In this paper, we analyze the influence of the atmospheric turbulence on the SMF coupling efficiency over various turbulences. The results show that the SMF coupling efficiency drops from 81% without phase distortion to 10% when phase root mean square value equals 0.3λ. The simulations of SMF coupling with adaptive optics (AO) indicate that it is inevitable to compensate the high-order aberrations for SMF coupling over relatively strong turbulence. The SMF coupling efficiency experiments, using an AO system with a 137-element deformable mirror and a Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor, obtain average coupling efficiency increasing from 1.3% in open loop to 46.1% in closed loop under a relatively strong turbulence, D/r0=15.1.

  4. Gyrokinetic studies of trapped electron mode turbulence in the Helically Symmetric eXperiment stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faber, B. J. [HSX Plasma Lab, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Pueschel, M. J.; Terry, P. W. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Proll, J. H. E. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Max-Planck/Princeton Research Center for Plasma Physics, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Xanthopoulos, P. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Hegna, C. C. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Weir, G. M.; Likin, K. M.; Talmadge, J. N. [HSX Plasma Lab, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Gyrokinetic simulations of plasma microturbulence in the Helically Symmetric eXperiment are presented. Using plasma profiles relevant to experimental operation, four dominant drift wave regimes are observed in the ion wavenumber range, which are identified as different flavors of density-gradient-driven trapped electron modes. For the most part, the heat transport exhibits properties associated with turbulence driven by these types of modes. Additionally, long-wavelength, radially localized, nonlinearly excited coherent structures near the resonant central flux surface, not predicted by linear simulations, can further enhance flux levels. Integrated heat fluxes are compatible with experimental observations in the corresponding density gradient range. Despite low shearing rates, zonal flows are observed to regulate turbulence but can be overwhelmed at higher density gradients by the long-wavelength coherent structures.

  5. Wave turbulence in integrable systems: nonlinear propagation of incoherent optical waves in single-mode fibers

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    International audience; We study theoretically, numerically and experimentally the nonlinear propagation of partially incoherent optical waves in single mode optical fibers. We revisit the traditional treatment of the wave turbulence theory to provide a statistical kinetic description of the integrable scalar NLS equation. In spite of the formal reversibility and of the integrability of the NLS equation, the weakly nonlinear dynamics reveals the existence of an irreversible evolution toward a...

  6. Sadovskii vortex in strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freilich, Daniel; Llewellyn Smith, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    A Sadovskii vortex is a patch of fluid with uniform vorticity surrounded by a vortex sheet. Using a boundary element type method, we investigate the steady states of this flow in an incompressible, inviscid straining flow. Outside the vortex, the fluid is irrotational. In the limiting case where the entire circulation is due to the vortex patch, this is a patch vortex (Moore & Saffman, Aircraft wake turbulence and its detection 1971). In the other limiting case, where all the circulation is due to the vortex sheet, this is a hollow vortex (Llewellyn Smith and Crowdy, J. Fluid Mech. 691, 2012). This flow has two governing nondimensional parameters, relating the strengths of the straining field, vortex sheet, and patch vorticity. We study the relationship between these two parameters, and examine the shape of the resulting vortices. We also work towards a bifurcation diagram of the steady states of the Sadovskii vortex in an attempt to understand the connection between vortex sheet and vortex patch desingularizations of the point vortex. Support from NSF-CMMI-0970113.

  7. Effects of underwater turbulence on laser beam propagation and coupling into single-mode optical fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Frank; Lasher, Mark

    2010-06-01

    We characterize and compare the effects of turbulence on underwater laser propagation with theory. Measurements of the coupling efficiency of the focused beam into a single-mode fiber are reported. A simple tip-tilt control system, based on the position of the image centroid in the focal plane, was shown to maintain good coupling efficiency for a beam radius equal to the transverse coherence length, r(0). These results are relevant to high bandwidth communication technology that requires good spatial mode quality.

  8. Radial vortex core oscillations in Bose-Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhelst, N.; Ichmoukhamedov, T.; Tempere, J.

    2017-07-01

    Dilute ultracold quantum gases form an ideal and highly tunable system in which superfluidity can be studied. Recently quantum turbulence in Bose-Einstein condensates was reported [PRL 103, 045310 (2009)], opening up a new experimental system that can be used to study quantum turbulence. A novel feature of this system is that vortex cores now have a finite size. This means that the vortices are no longer one dimensional features in the condensate, but that the radial behaviour and excitations might also play an important role in the study of quantum turbulence in Bose-Einstein condensates. In this paper we investigate these radial modes using a simplified variational model for the vortex core. This study results in the frequencies of the radial modes, which can be compared with the frequencies of the thoroughly studied Kelvin modes. From this comparison we find that the lowest (l = 0) radial mode has a frequency in the same order of magnitude as the Kelvin modes. However the radial modes still have a larger energy than the Kelvin modes, meaning that the Kelvin modes will still constitute the preferred channel for energy decay in quantum turbulence.

  9. Mode signature and stability for a Hamiltonian model of electron temperature gradient turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Tassi, Emanuele

    2010-01-01

    Stability properties and mode signature for equilibria of a model of electron temperature gradient (ETG) driven turbulence are investigated by Hamiltonian techniques. After deriving the infinite families of Casimir invariants, associated with the noncanonical Poisson bracket of the model, a sufficient condition for stability is obtained by means of the Energy-Casimir method. Mode signature is then investigated for linear motions about homogeneous equilibria. Depending on the sign of the equilibrium "translated" pressure gradient, stable equilibria can either be energy stable, i.e.\\ possess definite linearized perturbation energy (Hamiltonian), or spectrally stable with the existence of negative energy modes (NEMs). The ETG instability is then shown to arise through a Kre\\u{\\i}n-type bifurcation, due to the merging of a positive and a negative energy mode, corresponding to two modified drift waves admitted by the system. The Hamiltonian of the linearized system is then explicitly transformed into normal form, ...

  10. Reconnection of superfluid vortex bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamri, Sultan Z; Youd, Anthony J; Barenghi, Carlo F

    2008-11-21

    Using the vortex filament model and the Gross-Pitaevskii nonlinear Schroedinger equation, we show that bundles of quantized vortex lines in He II are structurally robust and can reconnect with each other maintaining their identity. We discuss vortex stretching in superfluid turbulence and show that, during the bundle reconnection process, kelvin waves of large amplitude are generated, in agreement with the finding that helicity is produced by nearly singular vortex interactions in classical Euler flows.

  11. Role of density gradient driven trapped electron mode turbulence in the H-mode inner core with electron heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, D. R.; Burrell, K. H.; Guttenfelder, W.; Rhodes, T. L.; Dimits, A. M.; Bravenec, R.; Grierson, B. A.; Holland, C.; Lohr, J.; Marinoni, A.; McKee, G. R.; Petty, C. C.; Rost, J. C.; Schmitz, L.; Wang, G.; Zemedkun, S.; Zeng, L.

    2016-05-01

    A series of DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] low torque quiescent H-mode experiments show that density gradient driven trapped electron mode (DGTEM) turbulence dominates the inner core of H-mode plasmas during strong electron cyclotron heating (ECH). Adding 3.4 MW ECH doubles Te/Ti from 0.5 to 1.0, which halves the linear DGTEM critical density gradient, locally reducing density peaking, while transport in all channels displays extreme stiffness in the density gradient. This suggests that fusion α-heating may degrade inner core confinement in H-mode plasmas with moderate density peaking and low collisionality, with equal electron and ion temperatures, key conditions expected in burning plasmas. Gyrokinetic simulations using GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] (and GENE [Jenko et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 1904 (2000)]) closely match not only particle, energy, and momentum fluxes but also density fluctuation spectra from Doppler backscattering (DBS), with and without ECH. Inner core DBS density fluctuations display discrete frequencies with adjacent toroidal mode numbers, which we identify as DGTEMs. GS2 [Dorland et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 5579 (2000)] predictions show the DGTEM can be suppressed, to avoid degradation with electron heating, by broadening the current density profile to attain q0>qmin>1 .

  12. Probability density of the orbital angular momentum mode of Hankel-Bessel beams in an atmospheric turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yu; Liu, Xiaojun; Gao, Jie; Zhang, Yixin; Zhao, Fengsheng

    2014-04-07

    We develop a novel model of the probability density of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes for Hankel-Bessel beams in paraxial turbulence channel based on the Rytov approximation. The results show that there are multi-peaks of the mode probability density along the radial direction. The peak position of the mode probability density moves to beam center with the increasing of non-Kolmogorov turbulence-parameters and the generalized refractive-index structure parameters and with the decreasing of OAM quantum number, propagation distance and wavelength of the beams. Additionally, larger OAM quantum number and smaller non-Kolmogorov turbulence-parameter can be selected in order to obtain larger mode probability density. The probability density of the OAM mode crosstalk is increasing with the decreasing of the quantum number deviation and the wavelength. Because of the focusing properties of Hankel-Bessel beams in turbulence channel, compared with the Laguerre-Gaussian beams, Hankel-Bessel beams are a good light source for weakening turbulence spreading of the beams and mitigating the effects of turbulence on the probability density of the OAM mode.

  13. Vortex knots in tangled quantum eigenfunctions

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Alexander J

    2016-01-01

    Tangles of string typically become knotted, from macroscopic twine down to long-chain macromolecules such as DNA. Here we demonstrate that knotting also occurs in quantum wavefunctions, where the tangled filaments are vortices (nodal lines/phase singularities). The probability that a vortex loop is knotted is found to increase with its length, and a wide gamut of knots from standard tabulations occur. The results follow from computer simulations of random superpositions of degenerate eigenstates of three simple quantum systems: a cube with periodic boundaries, the isotropic 3-dimensional harmonic oscillator and the 3-sphere. In the latter two cases, vortex knots occur frequently, even in random eigenfunctions at relatively low energy, and are constrained by the spatial symmetries of the modes. The results suggest that knotted vortex structures are generic in complex 3-dimensional wave systems, establishing a topological commonality between wave chaos, polymers and turbulent Bose-Einstein condensates.

  14. Numerical Experiments with a Turbulent Single-Mode Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cloutman, L.D.

    2000-04-01

    Direct numerical simulation is a powerful tool for studying turbulent flows. Unfortunately, it is also computationally expensive and often beyond the reach of the largest, fastest computers. Consequently, a variety of turbulence models have been devised to allow tractable and affordable simulations of averaged flow fields. Unfortunately, these present a variety of practical difficulties, including the incorporation of varying degrees of empiricism and phenomenology, which leads to a lack of universality. This unsatisfactory state of affairs has led to the speculation that one can avoid the expense and bother of using a turbulence model by relying on the grid and numerical diffusion of the computational fluid dynamics algorithm to introduce a spectral cutoff on the flow field and to provide dissipation at the grid scale, thereby mimicking two main effects of a large eddy simulation model. This paper shows numerical examples of a single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability in which this procedure produces questionable results. We then show a dramatic improvement when two simple subgrid-scale models are employed. This study also illustrates the extreme sensitivity to initial conditions that is a common feature of turbulent flows.

  15. Influence of thermal inhibitor position and temperature on vortex-shedding-driven pressure oscillations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Wanxing; Li Shipeng; Zhang Qiao; Li Junwei; Ye Qingqing; Wang Ningfei

    2013-01-01

    Vortex-acoustic coupling is one of the most important potential sources of combustion instability in solid rocket motors (SRMs).Based on the Von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics (VKI) experimental motor,the influence of the thermal inhibitor position and temperature on vortex-shedding-driven pressure oscillations is numerically studied via the large eddy simulation (LES)method.The simulation results demonstrate that vortex shedding is a periodic process and its accurate frequency can be numerically obtained.Acoustic modes could be easily excited by vortex shedding.The vortex shedding frequency and second acoustic frequency dominate the pressure oscillation characteristics in the chamber.Thermal inhibitor position and gas temperature have little effect on vortex shedding frequency,but have great impact on pressure oscillation amplitude.Pressure amplitude is much higher when the thermal inhibitor locates at the acoustic velocity anti-nodes.The farther the thermal inhibitor is to the nozzle head,the more vortex energy would be dissipated by the turbulence.Therefore,the vortex shedding amplitude at the second acoustic velocity antinode near 3/4L (L is chamber length) is larger than those of others.Besides,the natural acoustic frequencies increase with the gas temperature.As the vortex shedding frequency departs from the natural acoustic frequency,the vortex-acoustic feedback loop is decoupled.Consequently,both the vortex shedding and acoustic amplitudes decrease rapidly.

  16. Forecasting turbulent modes with nonparametric diffusion models: Learning from noisy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Tyrus; Harlim, John

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we apply a recently developed nonparametric modeling approach, the "diffusion forecast", to predict the time-evolution of Fourier modes of turbulent dynamical systems. While the diffusion forecasting method assumes the availability of a noise-free training data set observing the full state space of the dynamics, in real applications we often have only partial observations which are corrupted by noise. To alleviate these practical issues, following the theory of embedology, the diffusion model is built using the delay-embedding coordinates of the data. We show that this delay embedding biases the geometry of the data in a way which extracts the most stable component of the dynamics and reduces the influence of independent additive observation noise. The resulting diffusion forecast model approximates the semigroup solutions of the generator of the underlying dynamics in the limit of large data and when the observation noise vanishes. As in any standard forecasting problem, the forecasting skill depends crucially on the accuracy of the initial conditions. We introduce a novel Bayesian method for filtering the discrete-time noisy observations which works with the diffusion forecast to determine the forecast initial densities. Numerically, we compare this nonparametric approach with standard stochastic parametric models on a wide-range of well-studied turbulent modes, including the Lorenz-96 model in weakly chaotic to fully turbulent regimes and the barotropic modes of a quasi-geostrophic model with baroclinic instabilities. We show that when the only available data is the low-dimensional set of noisy modes that are being modeled, the diffusion forecast is indeed competitive to the perfect model.

  17. Turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z. Lin; R.E. Waltz

    2007-01-01

    @@ Turbulent transport driven by plasma pressure gradients [Tangl978] is one of the most important scientific challenges in burning plasma experiments since the balance between turbulent transport and the self-heating by the fusion products (a-particles) determines the performance of a fusion reactor like ITER.

  18. Streamwise Vortex Interaction with a Horseshoe Vortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Piotr Doerffer; Pawel Flaszynski; Franco Magagnato

    2003-01-01

    Flow control in turbomachinery is very difficult because of the complexity of its fully 3-D flow structure. The authors propose to introduce streamwise vortices into the control of internal flows. A simple configuration of vortices was investigated in order to better understand the flow control methods by means of streamwise vortices.The research presented here concerns streamwise vortex interaction with a horseshoe vortex. The effects of such an interaction are significantly dependent on the relative location of the streamwise vortex in respect to the leading edge of the profile. The streamwise vortex is induced by an air jet. The horseshoe vortex is generated by the leading edge of a symmetric profile. Such a configuration gives possibility to investigate the interaction of these two vortices alone. The presented analysis is based on numerical simulations by means of N-S compressible solver with a two-equation turbulence model.

  19. Scaling and interaction of self-similar modes in models of high-Reynolds number wall turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, A S; McKeon, B J

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has established the usefulness of the resolvent operator that maps the terms nonlinear in the turbulent fluctuations to the fluctuations themselves. Further work has described the self-similarity of the resolvent arising from that of the mean velocity profile. The orthogonal modes provided by the resolvent analysis describe the wall-normal coherence of the motions and inherit that self-similarity. In this contribution, we present the implications of this similarity for the nonlinear interaction between modes with different scales and wall-normal locations. By considering the nonlinear interactions between modes, it is shown that much of the turbulence scaling behaviour in the logarithmic region can be determined from a single arbitrarily chosen reference plane. Thus, the geometric scaling of the modes is impressed upon the nonlinear interaction between modes. Implications of these observations on the self-sustaining mechanisms of wall turbulence, modelling and simulation are outlined.

  20. Pulsed coherent fiber lidar transceiver for aircraft in-flight turbulence and wake-vortex hazard detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbulut, M.; Hwang, J.; Kimpel, F.; Gupta, S.; Verdun, H.

    2011-06-01

    We report on the development of a fiber-optic pulsed coherent lidar transceiver for wind-velocity and aircraft wake-vortex hazard detection. The all-fiber 1.5μm transmitter provides up to 560 μJ energy at 25 kHz with 800 ns pulse width (pump limited). Performance simulations indicate wake-vortex hazard signature detection up to ~2.5km range with a receiver sensitivity of ~2 fW (SNR=6), suited for an aircraft landing scenario. Furthermore, the transceiver is implemented using high-speed FPGA based control and digital-signal-processing, enabling its use as a flexible pulse-format multi-function in-flight lidar sensor. We present the latest laboratory results and preliminary testing of this pulsed coherent lidar transceiver, along with the lidar performance simulation of wake-vortex eddy models.

  1. 100 kHz thousand-frame burst-mode planar imaging in turbulent flames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, James B; Venkateswaran, Prabhakar; Miller, Joseph D; Slipchenko, Mikhail N; Gord, James R; Roy, Sukesh; Meyer, Terrence R

    2014-02-15

    High-repetition-rate, burst-mode lasers can achieve higher energies per pulse compared with continuously pulsed systems, but the relatively few number of laser pulses in each burst has limited the temporal dynamic range of measurements in unsteady flames. A fivefold increase in the range of timescales that can be resolved by burst-mode laser-based imaging systems is reported in this work by extending a hybrid diode- and flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG-based amplifier system to nearly 1000 pulses at 100 kHz during a 10 ms burst. This enables an unprecedented burst-mode temporal dynamic range to capture turbulent fluctuations from 0.1 to 50 kHz in flames of practical interest. High pulse intensity enables efficient conversion to the ultraviolet for planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of nascent formaldehyde and other potential flame radicals.

  2. Multi-field/-scale interactions of turbulence with neoclassical tearing mode magnetic islands in the DIII-D tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardóczi, L.; Rhodes, T. L.; Bañón Navarro, A.; Sung, C.; Carter, T. A.; La Haye, R. J.; McKee, G. R.; Petty, C. C.; Chrystal, C.; Jenko, F.

    2017-05-01

    We present the first localized measurements of long and intermediate wavelength turbulent density fluctuations ( n ˜ ) and long wavelength turbulent electron temperature fluctuations ( T˜ e ) modified by m /n =2 /1 Neoclassical Tearing Mode (NTM) islands (m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers, respectively). These long and intermediate wavelengths correspond to the expected Ion Temperature Gradient and Trapped Electron Mode scales, respectively. Two regimes have been observed when tracking n ˜ during NTM evolution: (1) small islands are characterized by a steep Te radial profile and turbulence levels comparable to those of the background; (2) large islands have a flat Te profile and reduced turbulence level at the O-point. Radially outside the large island, the Te profile is steeper and the turbulence level increased compared to the no or small island case. Reduced turbulence at the O-point compared to the X-point leads to a 15% modulation of n˜ 2 across the island that is nearly in phase with the Te modulation. Qualitative comparisons to the GENE non-linear gyrokinetic code are promising with GENE replicating the observed scaling of turbulence modification with island size. These results are significant as they allow the validation of gyrokinetic simulations modeling the interaction of these multi-scale phenomena.

  3. Coupled mode theory approach to depolarization associated with propagation in turbulent media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosignani, B.; di Porto, P.; Clifford, Steven F.

    1988-06-01

    Marcuse's (1974) coupled-mode theory is invoked in the present consideration of the problem of light depolarization in a turbulent atmosphere, in order to allow the evaluation of the depolarization ratio for a plane wave and comparison of its expression with that obtained in the frame of two distinct approaches predicting different behaviors. It is found that both approaches yield the same result when calculated to the same order in both of the relevant smallness parameters, thereby resolving a long-standing controversy.

  4. Operational condition of direct single-mode-fiber coupled FSO terminal under strong atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimoto, Yoshinori

    2011-03-01

    This paper discusses the operational condition for direct single-mode-fiber-coupling FSO terminals under the various adverse weather conditions, such as strong atmospheric turbulences and rain falls. A good correlation between the scintillation index of the intensities of beacon receiving power and the signal fading depth has been observed, which allows us to predict the signal link quality based on the beacon scintillation index provided by the classical scintillation theory and concludes that the scintillation index for the beacon beam should be less than 0.1. This paper also reports the effect of performance enhancements provided by the new adaptive controller for the stable and robust terminal operation.

  5. Turbulent effects of strong irradiance fluctuations on the orbital angular momentum mode of fractional Bessel Gauss beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie; Zhang, Yixin; Dan, Weiyi; Hu, Zhengda

    2015-06-29

    The turbulent effects of strong irradiance fluctuations on the probability densities and the normalized powers of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes are modeled for fractional Bessel Gauss beams in paraxial turbulence channel. We find that the probability density of signal OAM modes is a function of position deviation from the beam center, and the farther away from the beam center the detection position is, the smaller the probability density is. For fractional OAM quantum numbers, the average probability densities of signal/crosstalk modes oscillate along the beam radius except the half-integer. When the beam waist of source decreases or the irradiance fluctuation increases, the average probability density of the signal OAM mode drops. The peak of the average probability density of crosstalk modes shifts to outward of the beam center as beam waist gets larger. In the nearby region of beam center, the larger the quantum number deviation of OAM, the smaller the beam waist and the turbulence fluctuations are, the lower average probability densities of crosstalk OAM modes are. Especially, the increase of turbulence fluctuations can make the crosstalk stronger and more concentrated. Lower irradiance fluctuation can give rise to higher the normalized powers of the signal OAM modes, which is opposite to the crosstalk normalized powers.

  6. Investigation of wall-bounded turbulent flow using Dynamic mode decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, Yoshinori; Duke, Daniel; Atkinson, Callum; Soria, Julio, E-mail: yoshinori.mizuno@monash.edu [Laboratory for Turbulence Research in Aerospace and Combustion, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Monash University (Australia)

    2011-12-22

    Dynamics mode decomposition (DMD) which is a method to construct a linear mapping describing the dynamics of a given time-series of any quantities is applied to the analysis of a turbulent channel flow. The flow fields are generated by direct numerical simulations for the friction Reynolds number Re{sub {tau}} = 190. The time-series of the flow fields in a short time-interval in the order of the wall-unit time-scale and in a small spatial domain that encloses a single near-wall structure are used as the inputs to DMD. In some datasets, linearly growing modes that seem to contribute to the well-known self-sustained cycle of the flow structures near the wall are detected.

  7. Exchange-mediated, nonlinear, out-of-plane magnetic field dependence of the ferromagnetic vortex gyrotropic mode frequency driven by core deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Jasper P.; Fangohr, Hans; Kostylev, Mikhail; Metaxas, Peter J.

    2016-12-01

    We have performed micromagnetic simulations of low-amplitude gyrotropic dynamics of magnetic vortices in the presence of spatially uniform out-of-plane magnetic fields. For disks having small lateral dimensions, we observe a frequency drop-off when approaching the disk's out-of-plane saturation field. This nonlinear frequency response is shown to be associated with a vortex core deformation driven by nonuniform demagnetizing fields that act on the shifted core. The deformation results in an increase in the average out-of-plane magnetization of the displaced vortex state (contrasting the effect of gyrofield-driven deformation at low field), which causes the exchange contribution to the vortex stiffness to switch from positive to negative. This generates an enhanced reduction of the core stiffness at high field, leading to a nonlinear field dependence of the gyrotropic mode frequency.

  8. Suppression of AGN-Driven G-Mode Turbulence by Magnetic Fields in a Magnetohydrodynamic Model of the Intracluster Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambic, Christopher J.; Morsony, Brian J.; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the role of AGN feedback in turbulent heating of galaxy clusters. X-ray measurements of the Perseus Cluster intracluster medium (ICM) by the Hitomi Mission found a velocity dispersion measure of σ ˜ 164 km/s, indicating a large-scale turbulent energy of approximately 4% of the thermal energy. If this energy is transferred to small scales via a turbulent cascade and dissipated as heat, radiative cooling can be offset and the cluster can remain in the observed thermal equilibrium. Using 3D ideal MHD simulations and a plane-parallel model of the ICM, we analyze the production of turbulence by g-modes generated by the supersonic expansion and buoyant rise of AGN-driven bubbles. Previous work has shown that this process is inefficient, with less than 1% of the injected energy ending up in turbulence. Hydrodynamic instabilities shred the bubbles apart before they can excite sufficiently strong g-modes. We examine the role of a large-scale magnetic field which is able to drape around these rising bubbles, preserving them from instabilities. We show that a helical magnetic field geometry is able to better preserve bubbles, driving stronger g-modes; however, the production of turbulence is still inefficient. Magnetic tension acts to stabilize g-modes, preventing the nonlinear transition to turbulence. In addition, the magnetic tension force acts along the field lines to suppress the formation of small-scale vortices. These two effects halt the turbulent cascade. Our work shows that ideal MHD is an insufficient description for the cluster feedback process, and we discuss future work such as the inclusion of anisotropic viscosity as a means of simulating high β plasma kinetic effects. In addition, other mechanisms of heating the ICM plasma such as sound waves or cosmic rays may be responsible to account for observed feedback in galaxy clusters.

  9. Mode analysis of fluctuations in two-species Bose-Einstein condensates of atomic gases with a vortex for a component. Characteristic features of compressive and sliding motions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doi, Kensuke; Natsume, Yuhei [Chiba Univ., Graduate School of Science and Technology, Chiba (Japan)

    2003-04-01

    Characteristic features of fluctuations of Bose-Einstein condensations for systems of two-components in gas phases of alkali-metal atoms trapped by spherical harmonic potentials are discussed on the basis of numerical calculations. We concentrate our attention on the phases in which the spherical state {psi}{sub 1} without vortex is surrounded by {psi}{sub 2} with a vortex for the unit circulation q=1. These states are expressed by Gross-Pitaevskii equation, where a vortex-core is along the z-axis. We investigate properties of collective excitations by the linear analysis for bosonic excitations described as Bogoliubov equations. The behavior of each mode is discussed in relation with the role of interspecies repulsion in addition to that of intraspecies one. We point out the role of the new compressive mode which has two nodes on z-axis, in addition to that of the core mode without a node which have been previously discussed in the single-component system. Furthermore, we would like to emphasize that sliding modes show the branching features into in- and out-of-phase motions with increasing interspecies interaction. The dependence of those branchings on interspecies repulsion is explained by spatial shapes of relevant modes. (author)

  10. Dead time effects in turbulence spectra measured by burst-mode LDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velte, Clara; Buchhave, Preben; George, William

    2014-11-01

    Dead time effects in laser Doppler measurements have not so far been considered a major problem. We show how dead time occurs in burst-mode laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) when using a so-called burst-mode LDA processor and describe their effects on the measured power spectra. We show how dead time effects may be caused by more than one seed particle being present in the measurement volume at the same time and explain analytically how dead time causes a reduction in the power in the spectrum at low frequencies and an oscillation in the spectrum at the high frequency end. We also present a realistic model for the data sampled from a processor with dead time and use this model to generate turbulence velocity data in a computer. Finally we compare the spectrum computed from realistic values of dead time and sample rate in the computer generated data and compare this spectrum to a measured spectrum in a free turbulent jet with similar parameters. The excellent agreement between the features of these spectra show that our model and explanation of the dead time effect is a valid one.

  11. The implicit contribution of slab modes to the perpendicular diffusion coefficient of particles interacting with two-component turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Shalchi, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We explore the transport of energetic particles in two-component turbulence in which the stochastic magnetic field is assumed to be a superposition of slab and two-dimensional modes. It is known that in magnetostatic slab turbulence, the motion of particles across the mean magnetic field is subdiffusive. If a two-dimensional component is added, diffusion is recovered. It was also shown before that in two-component turbulence, the slab modes do not explicitly contribute to the perpendicular diffusion coefficient. In the current paper the implicit contribution of slab modes is explored and it is shown that this contribution leads to a reduction of the perpendicular diffusion coefficient. This effect improves the agreement between simulations and analytical theory. Furthermore, the obtained results are relevant for investigations of diffusive shock acceleration.

  12. Large field SPIV with separated sheets in a spanwise plane of a turbulent boundary layer with vortex generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foucaut, J.M.; Coudert, S.; Braud, C.

    2012-01-01

    The Stereoscopic PIV is nowadays a well established measurement technique for turbulent flows. However, the accuracy and the spatial resolution are still highly questionable in presence of complex flow with both strong gradients and out of plane motions. To give guidelines for both setup and meas......The Stereoscopic PIV is nowadays a well established measurement technique for turbulent flows. However, the accuracy and the spatial resolution are still highly questionable in presence of complex flow with both strong gradients and out of plane motions. To give guidelines for both setup...

  13. Turbulent precipitation of uranium oxalate in a vortex reactor - experimental study and modelling; Precipitation turbulente d'oxalate d'uranium en reacteur vortex - etude experimentale et modelisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer de Gelicourt, Y

    2004-03-15

    Industrial oxalic precipitation processed in an un-baffled magnetically stirred tank, the Vortex Reactor, has been studied with uranium simulating plutonium. Modelling precipitation requires a mixing model for the continuous liquid phase and the solution of population balance for the dispersed solid phase. Being chemical reaction influenced by the degree of mixing at molecular scale, that commercial CFD code does not resolve, a sub-grid scale model has been introduced: the finite mode probability density functions, and coupled with a model for the liquid energy spectrum. Evolution of the dispersed phase has been resolved by the quadrature method of moments, first used here with experimental nucleation and growth kinetics, and an aggregation kernel based on local shear rate. The promising abilities of this local approach, without any fitting constant, are strengthened by the similarity between experimental results and simulations. (author)

  14. Inertial modes and their transition to turbulence in a differentially rotating spherical gap flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Michael; Harlander, Uwe; Andrés Triana, Santiago; Egbers, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    dominant mode (l,m,ˆω) = (3,2,˜ 0.71) is increasing with increasing |Ro| until a critical Rossby number Rocrit. Accompanying with this is an increase of the zonal mean flow outside the tangent cylinder, leading to enhanced angular momentum transport. At the particular Rocrit, the wave mode, and the entire flow, breaks up into smaller-scale turbulence [6], together with a strong increase of the zonal mean flow inside the tangent cylinder. We found that the critical Rossby number scales approximately with E1/5. References [1] Aldridge, K. D.; Lumb, L. I. (1987): Inertial waves identified in the Earth's fluid outer core. Nature 325 (6103), S. 421-423. DOI: 10.1038/325421a0. [2] Greenspan, H. P. (1968): The theory of rotating fluids. London: Cambridge U.P. (Cambridge monographs on mechanics and applied mathematics). [3] Kelley, D. H.; Triana, S. A.; Zimmerman, D. S.; Lathrop, D. P. (2010): Selection of inertial modes in spherical Couette flow. Phys. Rev. E 81 (2), 26311. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.81.026311. [4] Rieutord, M.; Triana, S. A.; Zimmerman, D. S.; Lathrop, D. P. (2012): Excitation of inertial modes in an experimental spherical Couette flow. Phys. Rev. E 86 (2), 026304. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.86.026304. [5] Hoff, M., Harlander, U., Egbers, C. (2016): Experimental survey of linear and nonlinear inertial waves and wave instabilities in a spherical shell. J. Fluid Mech., (in print) [6] Kerswell, R. R. (1999): Secondary instabilities in rapidly rotating fluids: inertial wave breakdown. Journal of Fluid Mechanics 382, S. 283-306. DOI: 10.1017/S0022112098003954.

  15. Drag-Reducing Agent for Aqueous Liquid Flowing in Turbulent Mode through Pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab Y. Shnain

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, mucilage was extracted from Malabar spinach and tested for drag-reducing properties in aqueous liquids flowing through pipelines. Friction produced by liquids flowing in turbulent mode through pipelines increase power consumption. Drag-reducing agents (DRA such as polymers, suspended solids and surfactants are used to reduce power losses. There is a demand for natural, biodegradable DRA and mucilage is emerging as an attractive alternative to conventional DRAs. Literature review revealed that very little research has been done on the drag-reducing properties of this mucilage and there is an opportunity to explore the potential applications of mucilage from Malabar spinach. An experimental piping rig was used to study the DR properties of the mucilage on water under the effect of varying pipe dimensions and mucilage concentrations. It is shown that these additives can dramatically reduce friction drag provided that the flow is occurring under turbulent conditions. Experimental results also show that DR increases when the mucilage concentration increases.

  16. Self-sustained turbulence and H-mode confinement in toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Sanae-I.; Yagi, Masatoshi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan); Fukuyama, Atsushi [Okayama Univ. (Japan). School of Engineering

    1996-10-01

    The method of self-sustained turbulence is applied to the tokamak plasma, incorporating the effect of an inhomogeneous radial electric field. The transport coefficient is derived, making a bridge between L- and H-phase plasmas. It is possible to construct a unified transport model of the L- and H-mode phases. The anomalous transport coefficients are obtained in a unified and explicit form in terms of profile parameters such as the plasma pressure gradient, the magnetic shear, the shear and curvature of the radial electric field. Strong reductions of the thermal conductivity, {chi}, the electron and ion viscosities, {mu}{sub e}, and {mu}, and the turbulent level in the H-phase plasma are explained. Furthermore, an additional stability window due to E`{sub r} is discovered in the higher pressure-gradient regime. The anomalous ion viscosity determines {Delta}, the typical scale length or E{sub r}. Self-consistent solutions of {Delta} and {mu} are discussed. (author).

  17. Comparison of BES measurements of ion-scale turbulence with direct, gyrokinetic simulations of MAST L-mode plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Field, A R; Ghim, Y-c; Hill, P; McMillan, B; Roach, C M; Saarelma, S; Schekochihin, A A; Zoletnik, S

    2013-01-01

    Observations of ion-scale (k_y*rho_i <= 1) density turbulence of relative amplitude dn_e/n_e <= 0.2% are available on the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) using a 2D (8 radial x 4 poloidal channel) imaging Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) diagnostic. Spatial and temporal characteristics of this turbulence, i.e., amplitudes, correlation times, radial and perpendicular correlation lengths and apparent phase velocities of the density contours, are determined by means of correlation analysis. For a low-density, L-mode discharge with strong equilibrium flow shear exhibiting an internal transport barrier (ITB) in the ion channel, the observed turbulence characteristics are compared with synthetic density turbulence data generated from global, non-linear, gyro-kinetic simulations using the particle-in-cell (PIC) code NEMORB. This validation exercise highlights the need to include increasingly sophisticated physics, e.g., kinetic treatment of trapped electrons, equilibrium flow shear and collisions, to reprodu...

  18. On the evolution of irradiated turbulent clouds: a comparative study between modes of triggered star formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anathpindika, S.; Bhatt, H. C.

    2012-12-01

    Gas within molecular clouds (MCs) is turbulent and unevenly distributed. Interstellar shocks such as those driven by strong fluxes of ionizing radiation (IR) profoundly affect MCs. While small dense MCs exposed to a strong flux of IR have been shown to implode due to radiation-driven shocks, a phenomenon called radiation-driven implosion, larger MCs, however, are likely to survive this flux, which, in fact, may produce new star-forming sites within these clouds. Here we examine this hypothesis using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics algorithm coupled with a ray-tracing scheme that calculates the position of the ionization front at each time-step. We present results from simulations performed for three choices of IR flux spanning the range of fluxes emitted by a typical B-type star to a cluster of OB-type stars. The extent of photoablation, of course, depends on the strength of the incident flux and a strong flux of IR severely ablates an MC. Consequently, the first star formation sites appear in the dense shocked layer along the edges of the irradiated cloud. Radiation-induced turbulence readily generates dense filamentary structure within the photoablated cloud although several new star-forming sites also appear in some of the densest regions at the junctions of these filaments. Prevalent physical conditions within an MC play a crucial role in determining the mode, i.e. filamentary as compared to isolated pockets, of star formation, the time-scale on which stars form and the distribution of stellar masses. The probability distribution functions derived for irradiated clouds in this study are intriguing due to their resemblance with those presented in a recent census of irradiated MCs. Furthermore, irrespective of the nature of turbulence, the protostellar mass functions(MFs) derived in this study follow a power-law distribution. When turbulence within the cloud is driven by a relatively strong flux of IR such as that emitted by a massive O-type star or a cluster

  19. An amplitude-frequency study of turbulent scaling intermittency using Empirical Mode Decomposition and Hilbert Spectral Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Y X; Lu, Z M; Liu, Y L

    2014-01-01

    Hilbert-Huang transform is a method that has been introduced recently to decompose nonlinear, nonstationary time series into a sum of different modes, each one having a characteristic frequency. Here we show the first successful application of this approach to homogeneous turbulence time series. We associate each mode to dissipation, inertial range and integral scales. We then generalize this approach in order to characterize the scaling intermittency of turbulence in the inertial range, in an amplitude-frequency space. The new method is first validated using fractional Brownian motion simulations. We then obtain a 2D amplitude-frequency representation of the pdf of turbulent fluctuations with a scaling trend, and we show how multifractal exponents can be retrieved using this approach. We also find that the log-Poisson distribution fits the velocity amplitude pdf better than the lognormal distribution.

  20. Magnetic Draping as a Possible Solution to Turbulent Heating of the ICM in Kinetic Mode AGN Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambic, Christopher John; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Morsony, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Recent x-ray measurements of the Perseus Cluster intracluster medium (ICM) by the Hitomi Mission found a velocity dispersion measure of σ ˜ 150 km/s, indicating a large-scale turbulent energy of approximately 4% of the thermal energy. If this energy is transferred to small scales via a turbulent cascade and dissipated as heat, radiative cooling can be offset and the cluster can remain in its observed thermal equilibrium. We investigate the role of AGN feedback in turbulent heating of galaxy clusters. Specifically, we analyze the production of turbulence by g-modes generated by the supersonic expansion and buoyant rise of AGN-driven bubbles. Previous work has shown that this process is inefficient, with less that 1% of the injected energy ending up in turbulence. This inefficiency is primarily due to the fact that the bubbles are shredded apart by hydrodynamic instabilies before they can excite sufficiently strong g-modes. Using a plane-parallel model of the ICM and 3D ideal MHD simulations, we examine the role of a large-scale magnetic field which is able to drape around these rising bubbles, preserving them from hydrodynamic instabilities. We present results for a magnetic field perpendicular to our gravitational field as well as for a helical field geometry. We find that, while magnetic draping is able to better preserve AGN-driven bubbles and excite stronger g-modes, the production of turbulence is still inefficient. This fact is likely due to the magnetic tension force preventing the production of vortices in the ICM plasma. Our work shows that ideal MHD is an insufficient description for the cluster feedback process, and we discuss future work such as the inclusion of anisotropic viscosity as a means of simulating high β plasma kinetic effects.

  1. Dependence of the L- to H-mode Power Threshold on Toroidal Rotation and the Link to Edge Turbulence Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKee, G; Gohil, P; Schlossberg, D; Boedo, J; Burrell, K; deGrassie, J; Groebner, R; Makowski, M; Moyer, R; Petty, C; Rhodes, T; Schmitz, L; Shafer, M; Solomon, W; Umansky, M; Wang, G; White, A; Xu, X

    2008-10-13

    The injected power required to induce a transition from L-mode to H-mode plasmas is found to depend strongly on the injected neutral beam torque and consequent plasma toroidal rotation. Edge turbulence and flows, measured near the outboard midplane of the plasma (0.85 < r/a < 1.0) on DIII-D with the high-sensitivity 2D beam emission spectroscopy (BES) system, likewise vary with rotation and suggest a causative connection. The L-H power threshold in plasmas with the ion {del}B drift away from the X-point decreases from 4-6 MW with co-current beam injection, to 2-3 MW with near zero net injected torque, and to <2 MW with counter injection. Plasmas with the ion {del}B drift towards the X-point exhibit a qualitatively similar though less pronounced power threshold dependence on rotation. 2D edge turbulence measurements with BES show an increasing poloidal flow shear as the L-H transition is approached in all conditions. At low rotation, the poloidal flow of turbulent eddies near the edge reverses prior to the L-H transition, generating a significant poloidal flow shear that exceeds the measured turbulence decorrelation rate. This increased poloidal turbulence velocity shear may facilitate the L-H transition. No such reversal is observed in high rotation plasmas. The poloidal turbulence velocity spectrum exhibits a transition from a Geodesic Acoustic Mode zonal flow to a higher-power, lower frequency, zero-mean-frequency zonal flow as rotation varies from co-current to balanced during a torque scan at constant injected neutral beam power, perhaps also facilitating the L-H transition. This reduced power threshold at lower toroidal rotation may benefit inherently low-rotation plasmas such as ITER.

  2. Interplay between turbulence, neoclassical and zonal flows during the transition from low to high confinement mode at ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavedon, M.; Pütterich, T.; Viezzer, E.; Birkenmeier, G.; Happel, T.; Laggner, F. M.; Manz, P.; Ryter, F.; Stroth, U.; The ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2017-01-01

    The spatio-temporal interplay between turbulence, mean and zonal flows has been investigated at the L-H and H-L transitions in the edge region of the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. Close to both transitions, an intermediate phase (I-phase) characterized by ‘limit cycle like oscillations’ (LCOs) is observed in which periodic bursts of turbulence correlate with \\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} flow reduction and relaxation of gradients. During the I-phase, the \\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} velocity is dominated by the mean flows indicating that turbulence driven flows are small. Periodic dithers between L-mode and the phases with LCOs are also observed just before the H-mode onset where the edge density and temperature profile gradients evolve on similar timescale as the flows. Thus connection between mean and \\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} flows holds during the all evolution from L-mode to H-mode demonstrating the fundamental role of the neoclassical flows in the L-H transition physics.

  3. 大气湍流中部分相干聚焦涡旋光束的传输特性%Propagation Properties of Focused Partially Coherent Vortex Beams in Turbulent Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仓吉; 张逸新

    2009-01-01

    The propagation properties of focused partially coherent Gauss-Schell model vortex beams in the turbulent atmosphere were investigated based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle and the quadratic approximation of phase structure function. Optical intensity expression on the focal plane was obtained. By use of the expression, the intensity distribution of such kind of beam on the focal plane in the turbulent atmosphere was studied. The results show that in the turbulent atmosphere, the singularity of the vortex beam lows down with the propagation distance increasing. The maintenance of singularity is better for the vortex beams with larger topological charge and longer spatially coherent length. When the focal length and turbulent strength are fixed, the topological charge and coherent length of the source can be adjusted to control the behavior of intensity distribution on the focal plane and size of the focal spot. Vortex beams with larger topological charge can be resistant to the turbulent effects on the intensity distribution on the focal plane to some extent.%基于广义惠更斯-菲涅耳原理和相位结构函数的平方近似,研究了部分相干高斯-谢尔模型涡旋光束被聚焦后在大气湍流中的传输特性,得到了焦平面上光强解析表达式.利用该表达式,详细研究了该类光束在大气湍流中传输焦平面上的光强分布特性.结果表明:在大气湍流中,随着传输距离的增加,涡旋光束的奇异性逐渐降低.对于拓扑荷大的以及空间相干长度较长的涡旋光束,光束奇异性的保持相对要好.在一定的焦距长度和湍流大气条件下,我们可以通过调整光源的拓扑荷和相干长度控制焦面光强分布和焦斑大小.另外,有一定拓扑荷的涡旋光束可以在一定程度上降低大气湍流对传输光束焦面光强分布的影响.

  4. The role of turbulence-flow interactions in L- to H-mode transition dynamics: recent progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, L.

    2017-02-01

    Recent experimental and simulation work has substantially advanced the understanding of L-mode plasma edge turbulence and plasma flows and their mutual interaction across the L-H transition. Flow acceleration and E   ×   B shear flow amplification via the turbulent Reynolds stress have been directly observed in multiple devices, using multi-tip probe arrays, Doppler backscattering, beam emission spectroscopy, and gas puff imaging diagnostics. L-H transitions characterized by limit-cycle oscillations (LCO) allow probing of the trigger dynamics and the synergy of turbulence-driven and pressure-gradient-driven flows with high spatio-temporal resolution. L-mode turbulent structures exhibit characteristic changes in topology (tilting) and temporal and radial correlation preceding the L-H transition. Long-range toroidal flow correlations increase preceding edge-transport-barrier formation. The energy transfer from the turbulence spectrum to large-scale axisymmetric flows has been quantified in L-LCO and fast L-H transitions in several devices. After formation of a transient barrier, the increasing ion pressure gradient (via the E   ×   B flow shear associated with diamagnetic flow) sustains fluctuation suppression and secures the transition to H-mode. Heuristic models of the L-H trigger dynamics have progressed from 0D predator-prey models to 1D extended models, including neoclassical ion flow-damping and pressure-gradient evolution. Initial results from 2D and 3D reduced fluid models have been obtained for high-collisionality regimes.

  5. Magnetic Draping as a Possible Solution to Turbulent Heating of the ICM in Kinetic Mode AGN Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambic, Christopher; Reynolds, Christopher; Morsony, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Recent x-ray measurements of the Perseus Cluster intracluster medium (ICM) by the Hitomi Mission found a velocity dispersion measure of σ 150 km/s, indicating a large-scale turbulent energy of approximately 4 % of the thermal energy. If this energy is transferred to small scales via a turbulent cascade and dissipated as heat, radiative cooling can be offset and the cluster can remain in its observed thermal equilibrium. We investigate the role of AGN feedback, specifically the production of turbulence by g-modes generated by the supersonic expansion and buoyant rise of AGN-driven bubbles, in a plane-parallel model of the ICM using 3D ideal MHD simulations. We present results for a magnetic field perpendicular to the gravitational field as well as a helical field. We find that, while magnetic draping is able to better preserve AGN-driven bubbles and excite stronger g-modes, the production of turbulence is still inefficient. This fact is likely due to the magnetic tension force preventing the production of vortices in the ICM plasma. Our work shows that ideal MHD is an insufficient description for the cluster feedback process and we discuss future work such as the inclusion of anisotropic viscosity as a means of simulating high β plasma kinetic effects. NSF grant AST1333514

  6. Analysis of time-resolved PIV measurements of a confined turbulent jet using POD and Koopman modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semeraro, Onofrio; Lundell, Fredrik [KTH Mechanics, Linne Flow Centre, Stockholm (Sweden); Bellani, Gabriele [KTH Mechanics, Linne Flow Centre, Stockholm (Sweden); University of California, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-11-15

    We present a comparative analysis of proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) computed from experimental data of a turbulent, quasi 2-D, confined jet with co-flow (Re = 11,500, co-flow ratio inner-to-outer flow {approx}2:1). The experimental data come from high-speed 2-D particle image velocimetry. The flow is fully turbulent, and it contains geometry-dependent large-scale coherent structures; thus, it provides an interesting benchmark case for the comparison between POD and DMD. In this work, we address issues related to snapshot selections (1), convergence (2) and the physical interpretation (3) of both POD and DMD modes. We found that the convergence of POD modes follows the criteria of statistical convergence of the autocovariance matrix. For the computation of DMD modes, we suggest a methodology based on two criteria: the analysis of the residuals to optimize the sampling parameters of the snapshots, and a time-shifting procedure that allows us to identify the spurious modes and retain the modes that consistently appear in the spectrum. These modes are found to be the ones with nearly null growth rate. We then present the selected modes, and we discuss the way POD and DMD rank them. POD analysis reveals that the most energetic spatial structures are related to the large-scale oscillation of the inner jet (flapping); from the temporal analysis emerges that these modes are associated with a low-frequency peak at St = 0.02. At this frequency, DMD identifies a similar mode, where oblique structures from the walls appear together with the flapping mode. The second most energetic group of modes identified is associated with shear-layer oscillations, and to a recirculation zone near the inner jet. Temporal analysis of these modes shows that the flapping of the inner jet might be sustained by the recirculation. In the DMD, the shear-layer modes are separated from the recirculation modes. These have large amplitudes in the DMD. In

  7. Segmented Vortex Telescope and its Tolerance to Diffraction Effects and Primary Aberrations

    CERN Document Server

    Treviño, Juan P; Chávez-Cerda, Sabino

    2013-01-01

    We propose the segmented Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT/GTM),as the largest spatial light modulator capable of producing vortex beams of integer topological charge. This observing mode could be applied for direct exoplanet searches in the millimeter or submillimeter regimes. We studied the stability of the vortex structure against aberrations and diffraction effects inherent to the size and segmented nature of the collector mirror. In the presence of low order aberrations the focal distribution of the system remains stable. Our results show that these effects depend on the topological charge of the vortex and the relative orientation of the aberration with respect to the antenna axis. Coma and defocus show no large effects in the image at the focal plane, nevertheless the system is very sensitive to astigmatism. Heat turbulence, simulated by random aberrations, shows that the system behaves in a similar way as astigmatism dissociating the vortices. We propose the Segmented Vortex Telescope as a novel approac...

  8. Self-regulation of turbulence in low rotation DIII-D QH-mode with an oscillating transport barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barada, Kshitish; Rhodes, T. L.; Burrell, K. H.; Zeng, L.; Chen, Xi

    2016-10-01

    We present observations of turbulence and flow shear limit cycle oscillations (LCOs) in wide pedestal QH-mode DIII-D tokamak plasmas that are consistent with turbulence self-regulation. In this low input torque regime, both edge harmonic oscillations (EHOs) and ELMs are absent. LCOs of ExB velocity shear and ñ present predator-prey like behavior in these fully developed QH-mode plasmas. During these limit cycle oscillations, the ExB poloidal flows possess a long-range toroidal correlation consistent with turbulence generated zonal flow activity. Further, these limit cycle oscillations are observed in a broad range of edge parameters including ne, Te, floor Langmuir probe ion saturation current, and radial electric field Er. TRANSP calculations of transport indicate little change between the EHO and LCO wide pedestal phases. These observations are consistent with LCO driven transport that may play a role in maintaining the profiles below ELM threshold in the EHO-free steady state wide pedestal QH-mode regime. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FG02-08ER54984 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  9. The strange physics of low frequency mirror mode turbulence in the high temperature plasma of the magnetosheath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Treumann

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Mirror mode turbulence is the lowest frequency perpendicular magnetic excitation in magnetized plasma proposed already about half a century ago by Rudakov and Sagdeev (1958 and Chandrasekhar et al. (1958 from fluid theory. Its experimental verification required a relatively long time. It was early recognized that mirror modes for being excited require a transverse pressure (or temperature anisotropy. In principle mirror modes are some version of slow mode waves. Fluid theory, however, does not give a correct physical picture of the mirror mode. The linear infinitesimally small amplitude physics is described correctly only by including the full kinetic theory and is modified by existing spatial gradients of the plasma parameters which attribute a small finite frequency to the mode. In addition, the mode is propagating only very slowly in plasma such that convective transport is the main cause of flow in it. As the lowest frequency mode it can be expected that mirror modes serve as one of the dominant energy inputs into plasma. This is however true only when the mode grows to large amplitude leaving the linear stage. At such low frequencies, on the other hand, quasilinear theory does not apply as a valid saturation mechanism. Probably the dominant processes are related to the generation of gradients in the plasma which serve as the cause of drift modes thus transferring energy to shorter wavelength propagating waves of higher nonzero frequency. This kind of theory has not yet been developed as it has not yet been understood why mirror modes in spite of their slow growth rate usually are of very large amplitudes indeed of the order of |B/B0|2~O(1. It is thus highly reasonable to assume that mirror modes are instrumental for the development of stationary turbulence in high temperature plasma. Moreover, since the magnetic field in mirror turbulence forms extended though slightly oblique magnetic bottles, low parallel energy particles can be trapped

  10. The role of coherent vorticity in turbulent transport in resistive drift-wave turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bos, Wouter J T; Benkadda, Sadruddin; Farge, Marie; Schneider, Kai; 10.1063/1.2956640

    2011-01-01

    The coherent vortex extraction method, a wavelet technique for extracting coherent vortices out of turbulent flows, is applied to simulations of resistive drift-wave turbulence in magnetized plasma (Hasegawa-Wakatani system). The aim is to retain only the essential degrees of freedom, responsible for the transport. It is shown that the radial density flux is carried by these coherent modes. In the quasi-hydrodynamic regime, coherent vortices exhibit depletion of the polarization-drift nonlinearity and vorticity strongly dominates strain, in contrast to the quasiadiabatic regime.

  11. Spatiotemporal analysis of turbulent jets enabled by 100-kHz, 100-ms burst-mode particle image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joseph D.; Jiang, Naibo; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Mance, Jason G.; Meyer, Terrence R.; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R.

    2016-12-01

    100-kHz particle image velocimetry (PIV) is demonstrated using a double-pulsed, burst-mode laser with a burst duration up to 100 ms. This enables up to 10,000 time-sequential vector fields for capturing a temporal dynamic range spanning over three orders of magnitude in high-speed turbulent flows. Pulse doublets with inter-pulse spacing of 2 µs and repetition rate of 100 kHz are generated using a fiber-based oscillator and amplified through an all-diode-pumped, burst-mode amplifier. A physics-based model of pulse doublet amplification in the burst-mode amplifier is developed and used to accurately predict oscillator pulse width and pulse intensity inputs required to generate equal-energy pulse doublets at 532 nm for velocity measurements. The effect of PIV particle response and high-speed-detector limitations on the spatial and temporal resolution are estimated in subsonic turbulent jets. An effective spatial resolution of 266-275 µm and temporal resolution of 10 µs are estimated from the 8 × 8 pixel correlation window and inter-doublet time spacing, respectively. This spatiotemporal resolution is sufficient for quantitative assessment of integral time and length scales in highly turbulent jets with Reynolds numbers in the range 15,000-50,000. The temporal dynamic range of the burst-mode PIV measurement is 1200, limited by the 85-ms high-energy portion of the burst and 30-kHz high-frequency noise limit.

  12. Encoding information using Laguerre Gaussian modes over free space turbulence media

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Trichili, A

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available of the atmospheric turbulence on the proposed communication system. We believe that the proposed technique is promising for high-bit-rate spatial division multiplexing in optical fiber and free space communication systems....

  13. Operational optical turbulence forecast for the service mode of top-class ground based telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masciadri, Elena; Lascaux, Franck; Turchi, Alessio; Fini, Luca

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution we present the most relevant results obtained in the context of a feasibility study (MOSE) undertaken for ESO. The principal aim of the project was to quantify the performances of an atmospherical non-hydrostatical mesoscale model (Astro-Meso-NH code) in forecasting all the main atmospherical parameters relevant for the ground-based astronomical observations and the optical turbulence (CN2 and associated integrated astroclimatic parameters) above Cerro Paranal (site of the VLT) and Cerro Armazones (site of the E-ELT). A detailed analysis on the score of success of the predictive capacities of the system have been carried out for all the astroclimatic as well as for the atmospherical parameters. Considering the excellent results that we obtained, this study proved the opportunity to implement on these two sites an automatic system to be run nightly in an operational configuration to support the scheduling of scientific programs as well as of astronomical facilities (particularly those supported by AO systems) of the VLT and the E-ELT. At the end of 2016 a new project for the implementation of a demonstrator of an operational system to be run on the two ESO's sites will start. The fact that the system can be run simultaneously on the two sites is an ancillary appealing feature of the system. Our team is also responsible for the implementation of a similar automatic system at Mt.Graham, site of the LBT (ALTA Project). Our system/method will permit therefore to make a step ahead in the framework of the Service Mode for new generation telescopes. Among the most exciting achieved results we cite the fact that we proved to be able to forecast CN2 profiles with a vertical resolution as high as 150 m. Such a feature is particularly crucial for all WFAO systems that require such detailed information on the OT vertical stratification on the whole 20 km above the ground. This important achievement tells us that all the WFAO systems can rely on automatic

  14. Vulcanized Vortex

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Inyong

    2008-01-01

    We investigate vortex configurations with the "vulcanization" term introduced for renormalization of $\\phi_\\star^4$ theory in canonical $\\theta$-deformed noncommutativity. In the small-$\\theta$ limit, we perform numerical calculations and find that nontopological vortex solutions exist as well as Q-ball type solutions, but topological vortex solutions are not admitted.

  15. An assessment of turbulence models for linear hydrodynamic stability analysis of strongly swirling jets

    CERN Document Server

    Rukes, Lothar; Oberleithner, Kilian

    2016-01-01

    Linear stability analysis has proven to be a useful tool in the analysis of dominant coherent structures, such as the von K\\'{a}rm\\'{a}n vortex street and the global spiral mode associated with the vortex breakdown of swirling jets. In recent years, linear stability analysis has been applied successfully to turbulent time-mean flows, instead of laminar base-flows, \\textcolor{black}{which requires turbulent models that account for the interaction of the turbulent field with the coherent structures. To retain the stability equations of laminar flows, the Boussinesq approximation with a spatially nonuniform but isotropic eddy viscosity is typically employed. In this work we assess the applicability of this concept to turbulent strongly swirling jets, a class of flows that is particularly unsuited for isotropic eddy viscosity models. Indeed we find that unsteady RANS simulations only match with experiments with a Reynolds stress model that accounts for an anisotropic eddy viscosity. However, linear stability anal...

  16. Impact of resonant magnetic perturbations on nonlinearly driven modes in drift-wave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leconte, M. [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, NFRI (Korea, Republic of); Diamond, P. H. [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, NFRI (Korea, Republic of); CMTFO and CASS, UCSD, California 92093 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    In this work, we study the effects of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) on turbulence, flows, and confinement in the framework of resistive drift wave turbulence. We extend the Hasegawa-Wakatani model to include RMP fields. The effect of the RMPs is to induce a linear coupling between the zonal electric field and the zonal density gradient, which drives the system to a state of electron radial force balance for large ({delta}B{sub r}/B{sub 0}). Both the vorticity flux (Reynolds stress) and particle flux are modulated. We derive an extended predator prey model which couples zonal potential and density dynamics to the evolution of turbulence intensity. This model has both turbulence drive and RMP amplitude as control parameters and predicts a novel type of transport bifurcation in the presence of RMPs. We find states that are similar to the ZF-dominated state of the standard predator-prey model, but for which the power threshold is now a function of the RMP strength. For small RMP amplitude, the energy of zonal flows decreases and the turbulence energy increases with ({delta}B{sub r}/B{sub 0}), corresponding to a damping of zonal flows.

  17. Transmission of Vortex Beams Nested Gaussian Beams in Turbulent Atmosphere%涡旋光束嵌套高斯光束在湍流大气中的传输

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵艮春; 庄其仁; 陈唐荣; 戴文海

    2013-01-01

    研究大气湍流波像差中的散焦和像散两种低阶像差对聚焦涡旋光束嵌套高斯光束焦面光强的影响,并用数值模拟的方法分析接收焦面平均光强分布随光束聚焦距离、拓扑荷数、湍流强度等参数的变化特性.结果表明:随着传输距离和大气折射率结构常数的增大,复合光束焦面光强峰值降低,光斑半径增大,光斑漂移现象明显,而接收焦面内的光强分布仍保持其高斯分布规律.说明涡旋光束和高斯光束经大气湍流后具有相同的强度起伏,有利于接收端的相干检测.%The paper investigates the effects of two low-order aberrations, i. e. atmospheric turbulence defocusing aberration and astigmatism, on the focal plane intensity of vortex beams nested Gaussian beam. The variation of the focal plane intensity with atmospheric turbulence intensity, transmission distance and the topological charge are analyzed by the numerical simulation methed. The results show that: as the transmission distance and the atmospheric refractive index structure constant increasing, the composite beam focal plane intensity peak reduced, facula radius increased, and the laser spot drift phenomenon is obvious, but the intensity distribution in the receiving focal plane still maintains its Gauss distribution law. It demonstrate that the vortex beam and Gauss beam have the same intensity fluctuation when they passing through atmospheric turbulence, therefore it is helpful to the coherent detection of the receiving end.

  18. Zonal flow generation and its nonlinear dynamics in trapped electron mode turbulence of flat density tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Z. B.; Hahm, T. S.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate zonal flow (ZF) generation in ion temperature gradient driven trapped-electron-mode (ITG-driven TEM) turbulence via modulational instability analysis. We show that the acceleration of a seed ZF is a consequence of the competition of negative radiation pressure (NRP, acting as a driving force) and positive radiation pressure (PRP, acting as a retarding force) of the ITG-driven TEM turbulence. A critical dimensionless ion temperature logarithmic gradient (R/{{L}{{T\\text{i}},\\text{c}}} ) normalized to the major radius is obtained by balancing the NRP- and PRP effects. For \\frac{R}{{{L}{{T\\text{i}}}}}text{i}},\\text{c}}}} , the NRP effect is dominant and the seed ZF is accelerated. Otherwise, the PRP effect is dominant and the seed ZF is decelerated. In addition, a new nonlinear evolution mechanism of the ZF is also proposed. It is shown that the turbulence energy intensity spectrum gets steepened in k-space due to the ZF shearing, which in turn induces nonlinear growth of the ZF.

  19. Optical Vortex Solitons in Parametric Wave Mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, T J; Buryak, A V; Sammut, R A; Alexander, Tristram J.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Buryak, Alexander V.; Sammut, Rowland A.

    2000-01-01

    We analyze two-component spatial optical vortex solitons supported by degenerate three- or four-wave mixing in a nonlinear bulk medium. We study two distinct cases of such solitons, namely, parametric vortex solitons due to phase-matched second-harmonic generation in a optical medium with competing quadratic and cubic nonlinear response, and vortex solitons in the presence of third-harmonic generation in a cubic medium. We find, analytically and numerically, the structure of two-component vortex solitons, and also investigate modulational instability of their plane-wave background. In particular, we predict and analyze in detail novel types of vortex solitons, a `halo-vortex', consisting of a two-component vortex core surrounded by a bright ring of its harmonic field, and a `ring-vortex' soliton which is a vortex in a harmonic field that guides a bright localized ring-like mode of a fundamental frequency field.

  20. Dynamical systems analysis of fluid transport in time-periodic vortex ring flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, Karim; Leonard, Anthony; Ferziger, Joel H.

    2006-04-01

    It is known that the stable and unstable manifolds of dynamical systems theory provide a powerful tool for understanding Lagrangian aspects of time-periodic flows. In this work we consider two time-periodic vortex ring flows. The first is a vortex ring with an elliptical core. The manifolds provide information about entrainment and detrainment of irrotational fluid into and out of the volume transported with the ring. The likeness of the manifolds with features observed in flow visualization experiments of turbulent vortex rings suggests that a similar process might be at play. However, what precise modes of unsteadiness are responsible for stirring in a turbulent vortex ring is left as an open question. The second situation is that of two leapfrogging rings. The unstable manifold shows striking agreement with even the fine features of smoke visualization photographs, suggesting that fluid elements in the vicinity of the manifold are drawn out along it and begin to reveal its structure. We suggest that interpretations of these photographs that argue for complex vorticity dynamics ought to be reconsidered. Recently, theoretical and computational tools have been developed to locate structures analogous to stable and unstable manifolds in aperiodic, or finite-time systems. The usefulness of these analogs is demonstrated, using vortex ring flows as an example, in the paper by Shadden, Dabiri, and Marsden [Phys. Fluids 18, 047105 (2006)].

  1. Proper orthogonal decomposition analysis of vortex shedding behind a rotating circular cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dol Sharul Sham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbulence studies were made in the wake of a rotating circular cylinder in a uniform free stream with the objective of describing the patterns of the vortex shedding up to suppression of the periodic vortex street at high velocity ratios, λ. The results obtained in the present study establish that shedding of Kármán vortices in a rotating circular cylinder-generated wake is modified by rotation of the cylinder. Alternate vortex shedding is highly visible when λ < 2.0 although the strength of the separated shear layers differ due to the rotation of the cylinder. The spectral density in the wakes indicate significant changes at λ = 2.0. The results indicate that the rotation of the cylinder causes significant disruption in the structure of the flow. Alternate vortex shedding is weak, distorted and close to being suppressed at λ = 2.0. It is clear that flow asymmetries will weaken vortex shedding, and when the asymmetries are significant enough, total suppression of a periodic street occurs. Particular attention was paid to the decomposition of the flow using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD. By analyzing this decomposition with the help of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV data, it was found that large scales contribute to the coherent motion. Vorticity structures in the modes become increasingly irregular with downstream distance, suggesting turbulent interactions are occurring at the more downstream locations, especially when the cylinder rotates.

  2. Prime modes of fluid circulation in large-aspect-ratio turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdoold, J.; Tummers, M.J.; Hanjalić, K.

    2009-01-01

    Based on a detailed experimental investigation in an aspect-ratio-4 rectangular cell in the range 3.7×107≤Ra≤3.7×109, we present evidence of possible scenarios of the long-term dynamics of large-scale circulations (LSC) in bounded large-aspect-ratio turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection. Karhunen-Loè

  3. The non-linear evolution of the tearing mode in electromagnetic turbulence using gyrokinetic simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Hornsby, William A; Buchholz, Rico; Grosshauser, Stefan; Weikl, Arne; Zarzoso, David; Casson, Francis J; Poli, Emanuele; Peeters, Artur G

    2015-01-01

    The non-linear evolution of a magnetic island is studied using the Vlasov gyro-kinetic code GKW. The interaction of electromagnetic turbulence with a self-consistently growing magnetic island, generated by a tearing unstable $\\Delta' > 0$ current profile, is considered. The turbulence is able to seed the magnetic island and bypass the linear growth phase by generating structures that are approximately an ion gyro-radius in width. The non-linear evolution of the island width and its rotation frequency, after this seeding phase, is found to be modified and is dependent on the value of the plasma beta and equilibrium pressure gradients. At low values of beta the island evolves largely independent of the turbulence, while at higher values the interaction has a dramatic effect on island growth, causing the island to grow exponentially at the growth rate of its linear phase, even though the island is larger than linear theory validity. The turbulence forces the island to rotate in the ion-diamagnetic direction as o...

  4. Vortex bursting and tracer transport of a counter-rotating vortex pair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misaka, T.; Holzäpfel, F.; Hennemann, I.; Gerz, T.; Manhart, M.; Schwertfirm, F.

    2012-02-01

    Large-eddy simulations of a coherent counter-rotating vortex pair in different environments are performed. The environmental background is characterized by varying turbulence intensities and stable temperature stratifications. Turbulent exchange processes between the vortices, the vortex oval, and the environment, as well as the material redistribution processes along the vortex tubes are investigated employing passive tracers that are superimposed to the initial vortex flow field. It is revealed that the vortex bursting phenomenon, known from photos of aircraft contrails or smoke visualization, is caused by collisions of secondary vortical structures traveling along the vortex tube which expel material from the vortex but do not result in a sudden decay of circulation or an abrupt change of vortex core structure. In neutrally stratified and weakly turbulent conditions, vortex reconnection triggers traveling helical vorticity structures which is followed by their collision. A long-lived vortex ring links once again establishing stable double rings. Key phenomena observed in the simulations are supported by photographs of contrails. The vertical and lateral extents of the detrained passive tracer strongly depend on environmental conditions where the sensitivity of detrainment rates on initial tracer distributions appears to be low.

  5. Turbulence at the transition to the high density H-mode in Wendelstein 7-AS plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basse, N.P.; Zoletnik, S.; Baumel, S.

    2003-01-01

    Recently a new improved confinement regime was found in the Wendelstein 7-AS (W7-AS) stellarator (Renner H. et al 1989 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 31 1579). The discovery of this high density high confinement mode (HDH-mode) was facilitated by the installation of divertor modules. In this paper...... of the fluctuation level associated with the transition from NC- to HDH-mode. Correlation calculations on a 20 mus timescale between magnetic and density fluctuations lead to the result that the fluctuations are correlated in NC- but not in HDH-mode. Finally, a comparative analysis between the enhanced D-alpha H...

  6. Topology of Vortex-Wing Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Chris; Rockwell, Donald

    2016-11-01

    Aircraft flying together in an echelon or V formation experience aerodynamic advantages. Impingement of the tip vortex from the leader (upstream) wing on the follower wing can yield an increase of lift to drag ratio. This enhancement is known to depend on the location of vortex impingement on the follower wing. Particle image velocimetry is employed to determine streamline topology in successive crossflow planes, which characterize the streamwise evolution of the vortex structure along the chord of the follower wing and into its wake. Different modes of vortex-follower wing interaction are created by varying both the spanwise and vertical locations of the leader wing. These modes are defined by differences in the number and locations of critical points of the flow topology, and involve bifurcation, attenuation, and mutual induction. The bifurcation and attenuation modes decrease the strength of the tip vortex from the follower wing. In contrast, the mutual induction mode increases the strength of the follower tip vortex. AFOSR.

  7. A study on the optimization of the angle of curvature for a Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube, using both experimental and full Reynolds stress turbulence numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiee, Seyed Ehsan; Ayenehpour, Sabah; Sadeghiazad, M. M.

    2016-02-01

    The working tube is a main part of vortex tube which the compressed fluid is injected into this part tangentially. An appropriate design of working tube geometry leads to better efficiency and performance of vortex tube. In the experimental investigation, the parameters are focused on the working tube angle, inlet pressure and number of nozzles. The effect of the working tube angle is investigated in the range of θ = 0-120°. The experimental tests show that we have an optimum model between θ = 0 and θ = 20°. The most objective of this investigation is the demonstration of the successful use of CFD in order to develop a design tool that can be utilized with confidence over a range of operating conditions and geometries, thereby providing a powerful tool that can be used to optimize vortex tube design as well as assess its utility in the field of new applications and industries. A computational fluid dynamics model was employed to predict the performances of the air flow inside the vortex tube. The numerical investigation was done by full 3D steady state CFD-simulation using FLUENT6.3.26. This model utilizes the Reynolds stress model to solve the flow equations. Experiments were also conducted to validate results obtained for the numerical simulation. First purpose of numerical study in this case was validation with experimental data to confirm these results and the second was the optimization of experimental model to achieve the highest efficiency.

  8. Fossil turbulence and fossil turbulence waves can be dangerous

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, Carl H

    2012-01-01

    Turbulence is defined as an eddy-like state of fluid motion where the inertial-vortex forces of the eddies are larger than any other forces that tend to damp the eddies out. By this definition, turbulence always cascades from small scales where vorticity is created to larger scales where turbulence fossilizes. Fossil turbulence is any perturbation in a hydrophysical field produced by turbulence that persists after the fluid is no longer turbulent at the scale of the perturbation. Fossil turbulence patterns and fossil turbulence waves preserve and propagate energy and information about previous turbulence. Ignorance of fossil turbulence properties can be dangerous. Examples include the Osama bin Laden helicopter crash and the Air France 447 Airbus crash, both unfairly blamed on the pilots. Observations support the proposed definitions, and suggest even direct numerical simulations of turbulence require caution.

  9. Effect of Vortex Circulation on Injectant from a Single Film-Cooling Hole and a Row of Film-Cooling Holes in a Turbulent Boundary Layer. Part 1. Injection Beneath the Vortex Downwash

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-01

    distribution is unlimited ~ PERFORMING ORGAN IZATION REPORT NUMBER(S) 5 MONITORING ORGANIZ ATION REPORT NUMBER(S) )a NAM E OF PERF ORMING ORGANIZATION 6b...California, March, 1987. Ort1::, A., "The Thermal Behavoir of Film Cooled Turbulent Boundary Layers as Affected by Long1tudinal Vort1ces", M.E

  10. Impact of resonant magnetic perturbations on zonal modes, drift-wave turbulence and the L-H transition threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leconte, M.; Diamond, P. H.; Xu, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We study the effects of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) on turbulence, flows and confinement in the framework of resistive drift-wave turbulence. This work was motivated, in parts, by experiments reported at the IAEA 2010 conference (Xu et al 2011 Nucl. Fusion 51 062030) which showed a decrease of long-range correlations during the application of RMPs. We derive and apply a zero-dimensional predator-prey model coupling the drift-wave-zonal-mode system (Leconte and Diamond 2012 Phys. Plasmas 19 055903) to the evolution of mean quantities. This model has both density-gradient drive and RMP amplitude as control parameters and predicts a novel type of transport bifurcation in the presence of RMPs. This model allows a description of the full L-H transition evolution with RMPs, including the mean sheared flow evolution. The key results are the following: (i) the L-I and I-H power thresholds both increase with RMP amplitude |\\tilde b_x| , the relative increase of the L-I threshold scales as \\Delta P_LI \\propto |\\tilde b_x|^2 \

  11. Impact of Resonant Magnetic Perturbations on Zonal Modes, Drift-Wave Turbulence and the L-H Transition Threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Leconte, M; Xu, Y

    2013-01-01

    We study the effects of Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) on turbulence, flows and confinement in the framework of resistive drift-wave turbulence. This work was motivated, in parts, by experiments reported at the IAEA 2010 conference [Y. Xu {\\it et al}, Nucl. Fusion \\textbf{51}, 062030] which showed a decrease of long-range correlations during the application of RMPs. We derive and apply a zero-dimensional predator-prey model coupling the Drift-Wave Zonal Mode system [M. Leconte and P.H. Diamond, Phys. Plasmas \\textbf{19}, 055903] to the evolution of mean quantities. This model has both density gradient drive and RMP amplitude as control parameters and predicts a novel type of transport bifurcation in the presence of RMPs. This model allows a description of the full L-H transition evolution with RMPs, including the mean sheared flow evolution. The key results are: i) The L-I and I-H power thresholds \\emph{both} increase with RMP amplitude $|\\bx|$, the relative increase of the L-I threshold scales as $\\D...

  12. Migration by soaring or flapping: numerical atmospheric simulations reveal that turbulence kinetic energy dictates bee-eater flight mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapir, Nir; Horvitz, Nir; Wikelski, Martin; Avissar, Roni; Mahrer, Yitzhak; Nathan, Ran

    2011-01-01

    Aerial migrants commonly face atmospheric dynamics that may affect their movement and behaviour. Specifically, bird flight mode has been suggested to depend on convective updraught availability and tailwind assistance. However, this has not been tested thus far since both bird tracks and meteorological conditions are difficult to measure in detail throughout extended migratory flyways. Here, we applied, to our knowledge, the first comprehensive numerical atmospheric simulations by mean of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) to study how meteorological processes affect the flight behaviour of migrating birds. We followed European bee-eaters (Merops apiaster) over southern Israel using radio telemetry and contrasted bird flight mode (flapping, soaring–gliding or mixed flight) against explanatory meteorological variables estimated by RAMS simulations at a spatial grid resolution of 250 × 250 m2. We found that temperature and especially turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) determine bee-eater flight mode, whereas, unexpectedly, no effect of tailwind assistance was found. TKE during soaring–gliding was significantly higher and distinct from TKE during flapping. We propose that applying detailed atmospheric simulations over extended migratory flyways can elucidate the highly dynamic behaviour of air-borne organisms, help predict the abundance and distribution of migrating birds, and aid in mitigating hazardous implications of bird migration. PMID:21471116

  13. Migration by soaring or flapping: numerical atmospheric simulations reveal that turbulence kinetic energy dictates bee-eater flight mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapir, Nir; Horvitz, Nir; Wikelski, Martin; Avissar, Roni; Mahrer, Yitzhak; Nathan, Ran

    2011-11-22

    Aerial migrants commonly face atmospheric dynamics that may affect their movement and behaviour. Specifically, bird flight mode has been suggested to depend on convective updraught availability and tailwind assistance. However, this has not been tested thus far since both bird tracks and meteorological conditions are difficult to measure in detail throughout extended migratory flyways. Here, we applied, to our knowledge, the first comprehensive numerical atmospheric simulations by mean of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) to study how meteorological processes affect the flight behaviour of migrating birds. We followed European bee-eaters (Merops apiaster) over southern Israel using radio telemetry and contrasted bird flight mode (flapping, soaring-gliding or mixed flight) against explanatory meteorological variables estimated by RAMS simulations at a spatial grid resolution of 250 × 250 m(2). We found that temperature and especially turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) determine bee-eater flight mode, whereas, unexpectedly, no effect of tailwind assistance was found. TKE during soaring-gliding was significantly higher and distinct from TKE during flapping. We propose that applying detailed atmospheric simulations over extended migratory flyways can elucidate the highly dynamic behaviour of air-borne organisms, help predict the abundance and distribution of migrating birds, and aid in mitigating hazardous implications of bird migration.

  14. Wall mode instability driven transition to turbulence in a soft microchannel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Sagar; v, Kumaran

    Transition to turbulence has been triggered due to structure fluid interaction at Reynolds number (Re) much lower than hard wall transition Re, in a soft walled micro channel of dimensions 40mm*1.5mm*0.16mm. Mixing index analysis indicates high degree of mixing accompanied by lower pressure drop as the channel deforms. Flow after transition velocity statistics has been extensively studied using Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) along streamwise-wallnormal direction. The reduced plots of streamwise mean velocity are shown with the absence of viscous sublayer and presence of logarithmic layer with von Karman constants different from rigid wall channel. The one-point cross correlation between velocity fluctuations is non-zero at the soft surface which is in contrast to flow in hard walled channel. This indicates that the additional fluid stress exerted on the soft surface by the fluid velocity fluctuations result in net energy transfer due to shear work done at the interface. The structure fluid interface acts as a source of energy for the mean turbulent kinetic energy which is typically zero at the interface for hard walled channel. We also detect the onset of wall-oscillations primarily tangential to the surface at the transition Re. Department of Science and Technology (DST), Govt. of India.

  15. 湍流边界层流向-展向平面中发卡涡的涡迹特征%Hairpin vortex signature in the streamwise-spanwise plane in a turbulent boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘璐璐; 张军; 翟树成; 张国平

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of detailed flow structure of a turbulent boundary layer is of great significance for establishing the link among the detailed flow structure characteristics, flow noise and wall friction, which can help lay the foundation for deeper research of the drag and noise reduction mechanism. PIV (particle image velocimetry) technique is applied in this paper to study the hairpin vortex signatures in the streamwise-spanwise plane in turbulent boundary layer flow on a flat plate. The experiment successfully identifies low-speed streaks from PIV instantaneous velocity field and the distributions of spanwise spacing of low-speed streaks along with wall-normal distance and Reynolds number are obtained through statistical analysis in the logarithmic layer. Meanwhile, the counter-rotating vortices surrounding the long low-speed streaks in the streamwise-spanwise plane are extracted through vortex identification criterion, which reveals the relationship between hairpin packets and long low-speed streaks. Besides, this paper performs a research about the distribution of spanwise spacing of hairpin vortex legs, considering various wall-normal distances and the effect of Reynolds numbers.%研究湍流边界层精细流动结构特征,有助于建立流动结构特征与壁面摩阻、流噪声之间的关联,从而为湍流边界层减阻降噪机理的深层次研究奠定基础。该文应用PIV(粒子图像测速)技术,对平板湍流边界层中发卡涡在流向-展向平面的涡迹特征进行研究。利用PIV瞬时速度场,捕捉到明显的低速条带,通过统计分析获得对数层范围低速条带间距随壁面法向距离的变化以及雷诺数的影响规律。同时,通过涡识别准则,提取在流向-展向平面内长低速条带两侧的反向漩涡带,揭示了发卡涡包与长低速条带的内在关系。此外,还研究了流向-展向平面发卡涡涡腿间距随壁面法向距离的变化规律以及雷诺数的影响。

  16. Numerical Study of Mechanism of U-shaped Vortex Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Ping; Liu, Chaoqun

    2014-01-01

    This paper illustrates the mechanism of U-shaped vortex formation which is found both by experiment and DNS. The main goal of this paper is to explain how the U-shaped vortex is formed and further develops. According to the results obtained by our direct numerical simulation with high order accuracy, the U-shaped vortex is part of the coherent vortex structure and is actually the tertiary streamwise vortices induced by the secondary vortices. The new finding is quite different from existing theories which describe that the U-shaped vortex is newly formed as the head of young turbulence spot and finally break down to small pieces. In addition, we find that the U-shaped vortex has the same vorticity sign as the original {\\lambda}-shaped vortex tube legs and serves as a second neck to supply vorticity to the ringlike vortex when the original vortex tube is stretched and multiple rings are generated.

  17. Comparative study of partially coherent vortex beam propagations through atmospheric turbulence along a uplJnk path and a downlink path%部分相干涡旋光束通过大气湍流上行和下行传输的比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晋红; 吕百达

    2011-01-01

    基于广义惠更斯一菲涅耳原理,以高斯-谢尔模型(GSM)涡旋光束作为典型的部分相干涡旋光束,推导出GSM涡旋光束通过大气湍流斜程传输的平均光强、均方根束宽和交叉谱密度函数的解析表达式,并用以研究了大气湍流中上行和下行对GSM涡旋光束传输和对相干涡旋的影响.结果表明,在相同条件下,GSM涡旋光束下行传输受大气湍流的影响要小于上行传输,下行传输时相干涡旋拓扑电荷守恒距离要长于上行传输.对所得结果做了物理解释.%Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle, the propagations of a partially coherent vortex beam through atmospheric turbulence along an uplink path and a downlink path are studied, where the Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) vortex beam is taken as a typical example of partially coherent vortex beam. The analytical expressions for the average intensity, rms width and cross-spectral density function of GSM vortex beam propagating through atmospheric turbulence along a slant path are derived and used to study the influence of atmospheric turbulence along an uplink path and a downlink path on GSM vortex beam propagation and on coherence vortex. It is shown that under the same conditions the influence of atmospheric turbulence along a downlink path on GSM vortex beam propagation is smaller than that along a uplink path, and the conservation distance of the topological charge of GSM vortex beam along a downlink path is longer than that along a uplink path. The results are explained in physics.

  18. Into turbulent air: size-dependent effects of von Kármán vortex streets on hummingbird flight kinematics and energetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Jimenez, Victor M; Sapir, Nir; Wolf, Marta; Variano, Evan A; Dudley, Robert

    2014-05-22

    Animal fliers frequently move through a variety of perturbed flows during their daily aerial routines. However, the extent to which these perturbations influence flight control and energetic expenditure is essentially unknown. Here, we evaluate the kinematic and metabolic consequences of flight within variably sized vortex shedding flows using five Anna's hummingbirds feeding from an artificial flower in steady control flow and within vortex wakes produced behind vertical cylinders. Tests were conducted at three horizontal airspeeds (3, 6 and 9 m s(-1)) and using three different wake-generating cylinders (with diameters equal to 38, 77 and 173% of birds' wing length). Only minimal effects on wing and body kinematics were demonstrated for flight behind the smallest cylinder, whereas flight behind the medium-sized cylinder resulted in significant increases in the variances of wingbeat frequency, and variances of body orientation, especially at higher airspeeds. Metabolic rate was, however, unchanged relative to that of unperturbed flight. Hummingbirds flying within the vortex street behind the largest cylinder exhibited highest increases in variances of wingbeat frequency, and of body roll, pitch and yaw amplitudes at all measured airspeeds. Impressively, metabolic rate under this last condition increased by up to 25% compared with control flights. Cylinder wakes sufficiently large to interact with both wings can thus strongly affect stability in flight, eliciting compensatory kinematic changes with a consequent increase in flight metabolic costs. Our findings suggest that vortical flows frequently encountered by aerial taxa in diverse environments may impose substantial energetic costs.

  19. Gyrokinetic studies of core turbulence features in ASDEX Upgrade H-mode plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, A. Bañón, E-mail: banon@physics.ucla.edu; Told, D. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrase 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Happel, T.; Görler, T.; Abiteboul, J.; Bustos, A.; Doerk, H. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrase 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Jenko, F. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrase 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Max-Planck/Princeton Center for Plasma Physics (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Gyrokinetic validation studies are crucial for developing confidence in the model incorporated in numerical simulations and thus improving their predictive capabilities. As one step in this direction, we simulate an ASDEX Upgrade discharge with the GENE code, and analyze various fluctuating quantities and compare them to experimental measurements. The approach taken is the following. First, linear simulations are performed in order to determine the turbulence regime. Second, the heat fluxes in nonlinear simulations are matched to experimental fluxes by varying the logarithmic ion temperature gradient within the expected experimental error bars. Finally, the dependence of various quantities with respect to the ion temperature gradient is analyzed in detail. It is found that density and temperature fluctuations can vary significantly with small changes in this parameter, thus making comparisons with experiments very sensitive to uncertainties in the experimental profiles. However, cross-phases are more robust, indicating that they are better observables for comparisons between gyrokinetic simulations and experimental measurements.

  20. Low- and high-mode separation of short wavelength turbulence in dithering Wendelstein 7-AS plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basse, N.P.; Zoletnik, S.; Saffman, M.;

    2002-01-01

    In this article measurements of small scale electron density fluctuations in dithering high confinement (H)-mode plasmas obtained by collective scattering of infrared light are presented. A scan of the fluctuation wavenumber was made in a series of similar discharges in the Wendelstein 7-AS (W7-AS...

  1. Operational optical turbulence forecast for the Service Mode of top-class ground based telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Masciadri, E; Turchi, A; Fini, L

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution we present the most relevant results obtained in the context of a feasibility study (MOSE) undertaken for ESO. The principal aim of the project was to quantify the performances of a mesoscale model (Astro-Meso-NH code) in forecasting all the main atmospherical parameters relevant for the ground-based astronomical observations and the optical turbulence (CN2 and associated integrated astroclimatic parameters) above Cerro Paranal (site of the VLT) and Cerro Armazones (site of the E-ELT). A detailed analysis on the score of success of the predictive capacities of the system have been carried out for all the astroclimatic as well as for the atmospherical parameters. Considering the excellent results that we obtained, this study proved the opportunity to implement on these two sites an automatic system to be run nightly in an operational configuration to support the scheduling of scientific programs as well as of astronomical facilities (particularly those supported by AO systems) of the VLT a...

  2. Dynamic mode decomposition of turbulent cavity flows for self-sustained oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seena, Abu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, KAIST, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Hyung Jin, E-mail: hjsung@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, KAIST, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DMD modes were extracted from two cavity flow data set at Re{sub D} = 12,000 and 3000. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At Re{sub D} = 3000, frequencies of boundary layer and shear layer structures coincides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Boundary layer structures exceed in size with shear layer structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At Re{sub D} = 12,000, structure showed coherence leading to self-sustained oscillations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrodynamic resonance occurs if coherence exists in wavenumber and frequency. - Abstract: Self-sustained oscillations in a cavity arise due to the unsteady separation of boundary layers at the leading edge. The dynamic mode decomposition method was employed to analyze the self-sustained oscillations. Two cavity flow data sets, with or without self-sustained oscillations and possessing thin or thick incoming boundary layers (Re{sub D} = 12,000 and 3000), were analyzed. The ratios between the cavity depth and the momentum thickness (D/{theta}) were 40 and 4.5, respectively, and the cavity aspect ratio was L/D = 2. The dynamic modes extracted from the thick boundary layer indicated that the upcoming boundary layer structures and the shear layer structures along the cavity lip line coexisted with coincident frequency space but with different wavenumber space, whereas structures with a thin boundary layer showed complete coherence among the modes to produce self-sustained oscillations. This result suggests that the hydrodynamic resonances that gave rise to the self-sustained oscillations occurred if the upcoming boundary layer structures and the shear layer structures coincided, not only in frequencies, but also in wavenumbers. The influences of the cavity dimensions and incoming momentum thickness on the self-sustained oscillations were examined.

  3. The linear stability of swirling vortex rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargan-Shingles, C.; Rudman, M.; Ryan, K.

    2016-11-01

    The stability of vortex rings with an azimuthal component of velocity is investigated numerically for various combinations of ring wavenumber and swirl magnitude. The vortex rings are equilibrated from an initially Gaussian distribution of azimuthal vorticity and azimuthal velocity, at a circulation-based Reynolds number of 10 000, to a state in which the vortex core is qualitatively identical to that of the piston generated vortex rings. The instability modes of these rings can be characterised as Kelvin instability modes, analogous to instability modes observed for Gaussian and Batchelor vortex pairs. The shape of an amplified mode typically depends only on the azimuthal wavenumber at the centre of the vortex core and the magnitude of the corresponding velocity component. The wavenumber of a particular sinuous instability varies with radius from the vortex ring centre for rings of finite aspect ratio. Thicker rings spread the amplification over a wider range of wavenumbers for a particular resonant mode pair, while the growth rate and the azimuthal wavenumber corresponding to the peak growth both vary as a function of the wavenumber variation. Normalisation of the wavenumber and the growth rate by a measure of the wavenumber variation allows a coherent description of stability modes to be proposed, across the parameter space. These results provide a framework for predicting the development of resonant Kelvin instabilities on vortex rings with an induced component of swirling velocity.

  4. A flux-matched gyrokinetic analysis of DIII-D L-mode turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görler, T.; White, A. E.; Told, D.; Jenko, F.; Holland, C.; Rhodes, T. L.

    2014-12-01

    Previous nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of specific DIII-D L-mode cases have been found to significantly underpredict the ion heat transport and associated density and temperature fluctuation levels by up to almost one of order of magnitude in the outer-core domain, i.e., roughly in the last third of the minor radius. Since then, this so-called shortfall issue has been subject to various speculations on possible reasons and furthermore motivation for a number of dedicated comparisons for L-mode plasmas in comparable machines. However, only a rather limited number of simulations and gyrokinetic codes has been applied to the original scenario, thus calling for further dedicated investigations in order to broaden the scientific basis. The present work contributes along these lines by employing another well-established gyrokinetic code in a numerically and physically comprehensive manner. Contrary to the previous studies, only a mild underprediction is observed at the outer radial positions which can furthermore be overcome by varying the ion temperature gradient within the error bars associated with the experimental measurement. The significance and reliability of these simulations are demonstrated by benchmarks, numerical convergence tests, and furthermore by extensive validation studies. The latter involve cross-phase and cross-power spectra analyses of various fluctuating quantities and confirm a high degree of realism. The code discrepancies come as a surprise since the involved software packages had been benchmarked repeatedly and very successfully in the past. Further collaborative effort in identifying the underlying difference is hence required.

  5. Wake Vortex Structure Characteristics of a Flexible Oscillating Fin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-dong Wang; Pei Chen; Xiao-qing Zhang

    2008-01-01

    We compute the wake of a two-dimensional and three-dimensional flexible fin in an unsteady flow field with heaving and pitching motions using FLUENT. Deflexion mode is used for a non-uniform cantilever beam with non-uniformly distributed load. The effect of chordwise deflexion length on the characteristics of propulsion is discussed for two-dimensional flexible fin.The thrust coefficient decreases, propulsive efficiency increases and the intensity of turbulence attenuates gradually as the deflexion length increases. For a three-dimensional flexible fin, the intensity of the vortex in the plane of symmetry is higher than that in the plane at 3/4 span length of the caudal fro. But the propulsive performance achieved is not what we expected with the given deflexion mode.

  6. Vortex methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chorin, A.J. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Mathematics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-06-01

    Vortex methods originated from the observation that in incompressible inviscid flow vorticity (or, more accurately, circulation) is a conserved quantity, as can be readily deduced from the absence of tangential stresses. Thus, if the vorticity is known at time t=0, one can find the flow at a later time by simply following the vorticity. In this narrow context, a vortex method is a numerical method that follows vorticity. The author restricts himself in these lectures to a special class of numerical vortex methods, those that are based on a Lagrangian transport of vorticity in hydrodynamics by smoothed particles (blobs) and those whose analysis contributes to the understanding of blob methods. Blob methods started in the 1930`s.

  7. The first turbulent combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, C H

    2005-01-01

    The first turbulent combustion arises in a hot big bang cosmological model Gibson (2004) where nonlinear exothermic turbulence permitted by quantum mechanics, general relativity, multidimensional superstring theory, and fluid mechanics cascades from Planck to strong force freeze out scales with gravity balancing turbulent inertial-vortex forces. Interactions between Planck scale spinning and non-spinning black holes produce high Reynolds number turbulence and temperature mixing with huge Reynolds stresses driving the rapid inflation of space. Kolmogorovian turbulent temperature patterns are fossilized as strong-force exponential inflation stretches them beyond the scale of causal connection ct where c is light speed and t is time. Fossil temperature turbulence patterns seed nucleosynthesis, and then hydro-gravitational structure formation in the plasma epoch, Gibson (1996, 2000). Evidence about formation mechanisms is preserved by cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies. CMB spectra indicate hydr...

  8. Planck-Kerr Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, C H

    2003-01-01

    A quantum gravitational instability is identified at Planck scales between non-spinning extreme Schwarzschild black holes and spinning extreme Kerr black holes, which produces a turbulent Planck particle gas. Planck inertial vortex forces balance gravitational forces as the Planck turbulence cascades to larger scales and the universe expands and cools. Turbulent mixing of temperature fluctuations and viscous dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy provide irreversibilities necessary to sustain the process to the strong force freeze out temperature where inflation begins. Turbulent temperature fluctuations are fossilized when they are stretched by inflation beyond the horizon scale of causal connection. As the horizon of the expanding universe grows, the fluctuations seed patterns of nucleosynthesis, and these seed the formation of structure in the plasma epoch. Fossil big bang turbulence is supported by extended self similarity coefficients computed for cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies tha...

  9. Dynamic Evolution Equations for Isolated Smoke Vortexes in Rational Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Smoke circle vortexes are a typical dynamic phenomenon in nature. The similar circle vortexes phenomenon appears in hurricane, turbulence, and many others. A semi-empirical method is constructed to get some intrinsic understanding about such circle vortex structures. Firstly, the geometrical motion equations for smoke circle is formulated based on empirical observations. Based on them, the mechanic dynamic motion equations are established. Finally, the general dynamic evolution equations for ...

  10. Numerical Studies of Quantum Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubota, Makoto; Fujimoto, Kazuya; Yui, Satoshi

    2017-09-01

    We review numerical studies of quantum turbulence. Quantum turbulence is currently one of the most important problems in low temperature physics and is actively studied for superfluid helium and atomic Bose-Einstein condensates. A key aspect of quantum turbulence is the dynamics of condensates and quantized vortices. The dynamics of quantized vortices in superfluid helium are described by the vortex filament model, while the dynamics of condensates are described by the Gross-Pitaevskii model. Both of these models are nonlinear, and the quantum turbulent states of interest are far from equilibrium. Hence, numerical studies have been indispensable for studying quantum turbulence. In fact, numerical studies have contributed to revealing the various problems of quantum turbulence. This article reviews the recent developments in numerical studies of quantum turbulence. We start with the motivation and the basics of quantum turbulence and invite readers to the frontier of this research. Though there are many important topics in the quantum turbulence of superfluid helium, this article focuses on inhomogeneous quantum turbulence in a channel, which has been motivated by recent visualization experiments. Atomic Bose-Einstein condensates are a modern issue in quantum turbulence, and this article reviews a variety of topics in the quantum turbulence of condensates, e.g., two-dimensional quantum turbulence, weak wave turbulence, turbulence in a spinor condensate, some of which have not been addressed in superfluid helium and paves the novel way for quantum turbulence researches. Finally, we discuss open problems.

  11. Discrete vortex method simulations of the aerodynamic admittance in bridge aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Johannes Tophøj; Hejlesen, Mads Mølholm; Larsen, Allan;

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel method for the simulation of the aerodynamic admittance in bluff body aerodynamics. The method introduces a model for describing oncoming turbulence in two-dimensional discrete vortex method simulations by seeding the upstream flow with vortex particles. The turbulence...

  12. Cascade of kinetic energy in three-dimensional compressible turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianchun; Yang, Yantao; Shi, Yipeng; Xiao, Zuoli; He, X T; Chen, Shiyi

    2013-05-24

    The conservative cascade of kinetic energy is established using both Fourier analysis and a new exact physical-space flux relation in a simulated compressible turbulence. The subgrid scale (SGS) kinetic energy flux of the compressive mode is found to be significantly larger than that of the solenoidal mode in the inertial range, which is the main physical origin for the occurrence of Kolmogorov's -5/3 scaling of the energy spectrum in compressible turbulence. The perfect antiparallel alignment between the large-scale strain and the SGS stress leads to highly efficient kinetic energy transfer in shock regions, which is a distinctive feature of shock structures in comparison with vortex structures. The rescaled probability distribution functions of SGS kinetic energy flux collapse in the inertial range, indicating a statistical self-similarity of kinetic energy cascades.

  13. On hydrodynamic shear turbulence in Keplerian disks via transient growth to bypass transition

    CERN Document Server

    Chagelishvili, G D; Tevzadze, A G; Lominadze, J G

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of hydrodynamic shear turbulence in non-magnetized Keplerian disks. We wish to draw attention to a route to hydrodynamic turbulence which seems to be little known by the astrophysical community, but which has been intensively discussed among fluid dynamicists during the past decade. In this so-called `bypass' concept for the onset of turbulence, perturbations undergo a transient growth, and they may reach an amplitude that is sufficiently large to allow positive feedback through nonlinear interactions. This transient growth is linear in nature, and thus it differs in principle from the well-known nonlinear instability. We describe the type of perturbations that according to this process are the most likely to lead to turbulence, namely non-axisymmetric vortex mode perturbations in the two dimensional limit. We show that the apparently inhibiting action of the Coriolis force on the dynamics of such vortical perturbations is substantially diminished due to the pressure perturba...

  14. Vortex Laser based on III-V semiconductor metasurface: direct generation of coherent Laguerre-Gauss modes carrying controlled orbital angular momentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghilani, Mohamed S; Myara, Mikhael; Sellahi, Mohamed; Legratiet, Luc; Sagnes, Isabelle; Beaudoin, Grégoire; Lalanne, Philippe; Garnache, Arnaud

    2016-12-05

    The generation of a coherent state, supporting a large photon number, with controlled orbital-angular-momentum L = ħl (of charge l per photon) presents both fundamental and technological challenges: we demonstrate a surface-emitting laser, based on III-V semiconductor technology with an integrated metasurface, generating vortex-like coherent state in the Laguerre-Gauss basis. We use a first order phase perturbation to lift orbital degeneracy of wavefunctions, by introducing a weak anisotropy called here "orbital birefringence", based on a dielectric metasurface. The azimuthal symmetry breakdown and non-linear laser dynamics create "orbital gain dichroism" allowing selecting vortex handedness. This coherent photonic device was characterized and studied, experimentally and theoretically. It exhibits a low divergence (50 dB vortex purity), and single frequency operation in a stable low noise regime (0.1% rms). Such high performance laser opens the path to widespread new photonic applications.

  15. Direct numerical simulations of vortex rings at ReΓ = 7500

    OpenAIRE

    Bergdorf, Michael; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Leonard, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    We present direct numerical simulations of the turbulent decay of vortex rings with ReΓ = 7500. We analyse the vortex dynamics during the nonlinear stage of the instability along with the structure of the vortex wake during the turbulent stage. These simulations enable the quantification of vorticity dynamics and their correlation with structures from dye visualization and the observations of circulation decay that have been reported in related experimental works. Movies are available with th...

  16. Brownian vortexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bo; Lin, Jiayi; Darby, Ellis; Grosberg, Alexander Y.; Grier, David G.

    2009-07-01

    Mechanical equilibrium at zero temperature does not necessarily imply thermodynamic equilibrium at finite temperature for a particle confined by a static but nonconservative force field. Instead, the diffusing particle can enter into a steady state characterized by toroidal circulation in the probability flux, which we call a Brownian vortex. The circulatory bias in the particle’s thermally driven trajectory is not simply a deterministic response to the solenoidal component of the force but rather reflects interplay between advection and diffusion in which thermal fluctuations extract work from the nonconservative force field. As an example of this previously unrecognized class of stochastic heat engines, we consider a colloidal sphere diffusing in a conventional optical tweezer. We demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that nonconservative optical forces bias the particle’s fluctuations into toroidal vortexes whose circulation can reverse direction with temperature or laser power.

  17. Vortex transmutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Albert; Zacarés, Mario; García-March, Miguel-Angel; Monsoriu, Juan A; de Córdoba, Pedro Fernández

    2005-09-16

    Using group theory arguments and numerical simulations, we demonstrate the possibility of changing the vorticity or topological charge of an individual vortex by means of the action of a system possessing a discrete rotational symmetry of finite order. We establish on theoretical grounds a "transmutation pass" determining the conditions for this phenomenon to occur and numerically analyze it in the context of two-dimensional optical lattices. An analogous approach is applicable to the problems of Bose-Einstein condensates in periodic potentials.

  18. Instability of vortex pair leapfrogging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tophøj, Laust; Aref, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    pairs fly off to infinity, and a "walkabout" mode, where the vortices depart from leapfrogging but still remain within a finite distance of one another. We show numerically that this transition is more gradual, a result that we relate to earlier investigations of chaotic scattering of vortex pairs [L...

  19. Multi-field/-scale interactions of turbulence with neoclassical tearing modes and impact on plasma confinement in the DIII-D tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardoczi, L.

    2016-10-01

    We present the first localized measurements of ITG scale temperature and density fluctuations and TEM scale density fluctuations modified by an m=2, n=1 magnetic island. These islands are formed by a Neoclassical Tearing Mode (NTM) deep in the core plasma at the q=2 surface. NTMs are important as they often degrade confinement and lead to disruption. This is the first experimental confirmation of a long-standing theory prediction of decreased local small-scale turbulence levels across large-scale magnetic islands. Our measurements capture a mean reduction of turbulence inside (and enhancement just outside) the island region during island evolution. Additionally, in the island saturated state, the fluctuations at the O-point are observed to be reduced compared to the X-point. These measurements allow the determination of the turbulence length scale at the island separatrix that is predicted to affect NTM stability. A novel, non-perturbative measurement technique finds reduced cross-field electron thermal diffusivity (by 1-2 orders of magnitude) at the O-point, consistent with the local turbulence reduction. Initial comparisons to the GENE non-linear gyrokinetic code are promising with GENE predicting the observed turbulence reduction inside the island and increase just outside the island and replicating the observed scaling with island size. These results allow the validation of gyrokinetic simulations modeling the interaction of multi-scale phenomena as well as have potential implications for improved NTM control. Supported by USDOE under DE-FG02-08ER54984, DE-FG02-08ER54999 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  20. What is turbulence, what is fossil turbulence, and which ways do they cascade?

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, Carl H

    2012-01-01

    Turbulence is defined as an eddy-like state of fluid motion where the inertial-vortex forces of the eddies are larger than any other forces that tend to damp the eddies out. By this definition, turbulence always cascades from small scales (where the vorticity is created) to larger scales (where other forces dominate and the turbulence fossilizes). Fossil turbulence is any perturbation in a hydrophysical field produced by turbulence that persists after the fluid is no longer turbulent at the scale of the perturbation. Fossil turbulence patterns and fossil turbulence waves preserve and propagate information about previous turbulence to larger and smaller length scales. Big bang fossil turbulence patterns are identified in anisotropies of temperature detected by space telescopes in the cosmic microwave background. Direct numerical simulations of stratified shear flows and wakes show that turbulence and fossil turbulence interactions are recognizable and persistent.

  1. Mechanism of instabilities in turbulent combustion leading to flashback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, J. O.; Vaneveld, L.; Ghoniem, A. F.; Daily, J. W.; Oppenheim, A. K.; Korschelt, D.; Hubbard, G. L.

    1981-01-01

    High-speed schlieren cinematography, combined with synchronized pressure transducer records, was used to investigate the mechanism of combustion instabilities leading to flashback. The combustion chamber had an oblong rectangular cross-section to model the essential features of planar flow, and was provided with a rearward facing step acting as a flameholder. As the rich limit was approached, three instability modes were observed: (1) humming - a significant increase in the amplitude of the vortex pattern; (2) buzzing - a large-scale oscillation of the flame; and (3) chucking - a cyclic reformation of the flame, which results in flashback. The mechanism of these phenomena is ascribed to the action of vortices in the recirculation zone and their interactions with the trailing vortex pattern of the turbulent mixing layer behind the step.

  2. Dynamic Evolution Equations for Isolated Smoke Vortexes in Rational Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Jianhua, Xiao

    2011-01-01

    Smoke circle vortexes are a typical dynamic phenomenon in nature. The similar circle vortexes phenomenon appears in hurricane, turbulence, and many others. A semi-empirical method is constructed to get some intrinsic understanding about such circle vortex structures. Firstly, the geometrical motion equations for smoke circle is formulated based on empirical observations. Based on them, the mechanic dynamic motion equations are established. Finally, the general dynamic evolution equations for smoke vortex are formulated. They are dynamic evolution equations for exact stress field and dynamic evolution equations for average stress field. For industrial application and experimental data processing, their corresponding approximation equations for viscous fluid are given. Some simple discussions are made.

  3. Alteration of helical vortex core without change in flow topology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velte, Clara Marika; Okulov, Valery; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver

    2011-01-01

    The abrupt expansion of the slender vortex core with changes in flow topology is commonly known as vortex breakdown. We present new experimental observations of an alteration of the helical vortex core in wall bounded turbulent flow with abrupt growth in core size, but without change in flow...... topology. The helical symmetry as such is preserved, although the characteristic parameters of helical symmetry of the vortex core transfer from a smooth linear variation to a different trend under the influence of a non-uniform pressure gradient, causing an increase in helical pitch without changing its...

  4. Equilibrium energy spectrum of point vortex motion with remarks on ensemble choice and ergodicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esler, J. G.

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics and statistical mechanics of N chaotically evolving point vortices in the doubly periodic domain are revisited. The selection of the correct microcanonical ensemble for the system is first investigated. The numerical results of Weiss and McWilliams [Phys. Fluids A 3, 835 (1991), 10.1063/1.858014], who argued that the point vortex system with N =6 is nonergodic because of an apparent discrepancy between ensemble averages and dynamical time averages, are shown to be due to an incorrect ensemble definition. When the correct microcanonical ensemble is sampled, accounting for the vortex momentum constraint, time averages obtained from direct numerical simulation agree with ensemble averages within the sampling error of each calculation, i.e., there is no numerical evidence for nonergodicity. Further, in the N →∞ limit it is shown that the vortex momentum no longer constrains the long-time dynamics and therefore that the correct microcanonical ensemble for statistical mechanics is that associated with the entire constant energy hypersurface in phase space. Next, a recently developed technique is used to generate an explicit formula for the density of states function for the system, including for arbitrary distributions of vortex circulations. Exact formulas for the equilibrium energy spectrum, and for the probability density function of the energy in each Fourier mode, are then obtained. Results are compared with a series of direct numerical simulations with N =50 and excellent agreement is found, confirming the relevance of the results for interpretation of quantum and classical two-dimensional turbulence.

  5. The mechanism of vortex switching in magnetic nanodots under circular magnetic field. II. The dynamics of spin plaquette with vortex

    CERN Document Server

    Kovalev, A S

    2003-01-01

    A plaquette spin system in a vortex configuration is considered analytically and numerically to treat theoretically the vortex switching in magnetic nanodots due to the action of external circular magnetic field. The initial (linear) stage of the switching is analyzed. The analytical results obtained confirm the numerical data on the plaquette dynamics. Both the numerical analysis and the analytical consideration of the initial activation stage show the importance of taking into account the system azimuthal modes. At the frequencies of these modes the most rapid amplification of the vortex energy and the total out-of-plane magnetization occurs. The growth of the modes amplitudes gives rise to a parametrical activation of the low-frequency symmetric mode, and in turn causes the vortex switching. The results obtained provide a qualitative explanation of the numerical data on vortex switching in large-sized magnetic systems and may be used in experiments on guided effect on vortex polarization in magnetic nanodo...

  6. Statistical model of the efficiency for spatial light coupling into a single-mode fiber in the presence of atmospheric turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Ma, Lie; Yang, Qingbo; Ran, Qiwen

    2015-11-01

    The average efficiency of spatial light coupling into a single-mode optical fiber is widely used but cannot estimate the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and bit error rate (BER) in free-space optical communication. We provide a statistical model for coupling efficiency and derive the exact expression of the probability density function (PDF). The simulation results confirm that the model is reasonable in the condition of different turbulence intensities and wavefront compensation terms, which is also consistent with our outdoor experiment. We also estimate the average SNR and BER using the PDF. The model is quite useful in a satellite-to-ground laser communication downlink.

  7. Coupling between temporal and spatial chaos of vortex state in superconductors with periodical pinning arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, H.T. [Department of Information Management, Cheng Shiu University, Kaoshuing, Taiwan (China); Cheng, C.H. [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education of China), Superconductivity R and D Center (SRDC), Mail Stop 165, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Ke, C.; Pan, M. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wale, Sydney, 2052 NSW (Australia); Zhao, Y., E-mail: yzhao@swjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education of China), Superconductivity R and D Center (SRDC), Mail Stop 165, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wale, Sydney, 2052 NSW (Australia)

    2011-11-15

    Mean field approach is a good way of dealing with chaos of vortex motion in a background of many vortices. The vortex motion under the damping mode is a kind of self-organized motion. The spatial chaos can dominate the chaotic behavior of the system. Vortex motion in the background of many vortices is investigated by a mean field approach. Effects of the vortex-vortex coupling, the driving frequency, and the vortex viscosity on the vortex motion have been studied to reveal the interaction between the spatial and temporal chaos. It is found that the mean-field approach is a good approximation to describe the vortex motion in one dimensional vortex system. The vortex motion under the damping mode is a kind of self-organized motion. The spatial chaos can dominate the chaotic behavior of the system.

  8. Exploring transverse pattern formation in a dual-polarization self-mode-locked monolithic Yb: KGW laser and generating a 25-GHz sub-picosecond vortex beam via gain competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, M T; Liang, H C; Su, K W; Chen, Y F

    2016-04-18

    Formation of transverse modes in a dual-polarization self-mode-locked monolithic Yb: KGW laser under high-power pumping is thoroughly explored. It is experimentally observed that the polarization-resolved transverse patterns are considerably affected by the pump location in the transverse plane of the gain medium. In contrast, the longitudinal self-mode-locking is nearly undisturbed by the pump position, even under the high-power pumping. Under central pumping, a vortex beam of the Laguerre-Gaussian LGp,l mode with p = 1 and l = 1 can be efficiently generated through the process of the gain competition with a sub-picosecond pulse train at 25.3 GHz and the output power can be up to 1.45 W at a pump power of 10.0 W. Under off-center pumping, the symmetry breaking causes the transverse patterns to be dominated by the high-order Hermite-Gaussian modes. Numerical analyses are further performed to manifest the symmetry breaking induced by the off-center pumping.

  9. Vortex Laser at Exceptional Point

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xing-Yuan; Li, Ying; Li, Bo; Ma, Ren-Min

    2016-01-01

    The optical vortices carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) are commonly generated by modulating the available conventional light beam. This article shows that a micro-laser operates at the exceptional point (EP) of the non-Hermitian quantum system can directly emit vortex laser with well-defined OAM at will. Two gratings (the refractive index modulation and along azimuthal direction and the grating protruding from the micro-ring cavity) modulate the eigenmode of a micro-ring cavity to be a vortex laser mode. The phase-matching condition ensures that we can tune the OAM of the vortex beam to be arbitrary orders by changing the grating protruding from the micro-ring cavity while the system is kept at EP. The results are obtained by analytical analysis and confirmed by 3D full wave simulations.

  10. 部分相干双曲正弦-Gauss涡旋光束叠加形成的合成相干涡旋在非Kolmogorov大气湍流中的动态演化%Dynamic evolution of composite coherence vortices by superimpositions of partially coherent hyperbolic-sine-Gaussian vortex beams in non-Kolmogorov atmospheric turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何雪梅; 吕百达

    2012-01-01

    一些实验表明,实际大气会偏离理想Kolmogorov模型.本文基于广义Huygens-Fresnel原理和Toselli等提出的非Kolmogorov湍流模型,推导出部分相干双曲正弦-Gauss(HSG)涡旋光束通过非Kolmogorov大气湍流的解析传输公式,并用以对两束部分相干HSG涡旋光束相干叠加和非相干叠加形成的合成相干涡旋在非Kolmogorov大气湍流中的动态演化进行了研究.结果表明,合成光束平均光强的演化过程与非Kolmogorov湍流的广义指数α,源平面上叠加涡旋光束拓扑电荷的符号,以及叠加方式有关.合成相干涡旋在非Kolmogorov大气湍流中传输时会出现移动、产生和湮灭.广义指数α,拓扑电荷符号,以及叠加方式都会影响其演化行为.最后,将本文所得结果与相关文献做了比较.%Some experiments show that the practical atmosphere deviates from ideal Kolmogorov model. In this paper, based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle and the non-Kolmogorov turbulence model proposed by Toselli et al., the analytical expression for the propagation of partially coherent hyperbolic-sine-Gaussian vortex beams through non-Kolmogorov atmospheric turbulence is derived and used to study the dynamic evolutions of composite coherence vortices formed by coherent and incoherent superpositions of two partially coherent hyperbolic-sine-Gaussian vortex beams in non-Kolmogorov atmospheric turbulence. It is shown that the evolution process of the average intensity of the superimposed beam depends on the general exponent c~ of the non-Kolmogorov turbulence, the sign of the topological charge of the superimposed vortex beam in the source plane, and superposition scheme. The motion, the creation and the annihilation of composite coherence vortices may take place upon propagation through non-Kolmogorov turbulence, and the general exponent a, sign of the topological charge and superposition scheme affect the evolution behavior. Finally, the results are

  11. Wake Vortex Transport and Decay in Ground Effect: Vortex Linking with the Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Hamilton, David W.; Han, Jongil

    2000-01-01

    Numerical simulations are carried out with a three-dimensional Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) model to explore the sensitivity of vortex decay and transport in ground effect (IGE). The vortex decay rates are found to be strongly enhanced following maximum descent into ground effect. The nondimensional decay rate is found to be insensitive to the initial values of circulation, height, and vortex separation. The information gained from these simulations is used to construct a simple decay relationship. This relationship compares well with observed data from an IGE case study. Similarly, a relationship for lateral drift due to ground effect is constructed from the LES data. In the second part of this paper, vortex linking with the ground is investigated. Our numerical simulations of wake vortices for IGE show that a vortex may link with its image beneath the ground, if the intensity of the ambient turbulence is moderate to high. This linking with the ground (which is observed in real cases)gives the appearance of a vortex tube that bends to become vertically oriented and which terminates at the ground. From the simulations conducted, the linking time for vortices in the free atmosphere; i.e., a function of ambient turbulence intensity.

  12. Turbulence and Fossil Turbulence in Oceans and Lakes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pak-Tao Leung; Carl H. Gibson

    2004-01-01

    Turbulence is defined as an eddy-like state of fluid motion where the inertial-vortex forces of the eddies are larger than any of the other forces that tend to damp the eddies out. Energy cascades of irrotational flows from large scales to small are non-turbulent, even if they supply energy to turbulence. Turbulent flows are rotational and cascade from small scales to large, with feedback. Viscous forces limit the smallest turbulent eddy size to the Kolmogorov scale. In stratified fluids, buoyancy forces limit large vertical overturns to the Ozmidov scale and convert the largest turbulent eddies into a unique class of saturated, non-propagating, internal waves, termed fossil-vorticity-turbulence. These waves have the same energy but different properties and spectral forms than the original turbulence patch. The Gibson (1980, 1986) theory of fossil turbulence applies universal similarity theories of turbulence and turbulent mixing to the vertical evolution of an isolated patch of turbulence in a stratified fluid as its growth is constrained and fossilized by buoyancy forces. Quantitative hydrodynamic-phase-diagrams (HPDs) from the theory are used to classify microstructure patches according to their hydrodynamic states. When analyzed in HPD space, previously published oceanic datasets showed their dominant microstructure patches are fossilized at large scales in all layers. Laboratory and field measurements suggested phytoplankton species with different swimming abilities adjust their growth strategies by pattern recognition of turbulence-fossil-turbulence dissipation and persistence times that predict survival-relevant surface layer sea changes. New data collected near a Honolulu waste-water outfall showed the small-to-large evolution of oceanic turbulence microstructure from active to fossil states, and revealed the ability of fossil-density-turbulence patches to absorb, and vertically radiate, internal wave energy, information, and enhanced turbulent

  13. Optical vortex discrimination with a transmission volume hologram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruneisen, Mark T [Air Force Research Laboratory, Directed Energy Directorate, Kirtland AFB, NM 87117 (United States); Dymale, Raymond C; Stoltenberg, Kurt E [Boeing Company, PO Box 5670, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Steinhoff, Nicholas [Optical Sciences Company, 1341 S Sunkist St., Anaheim, CA 92806 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Transmissive volume holograms are considered as mode-selective optical elements for the de-multiplexing and detecting of optical vortex modes according to the topological charge or mode number. Diffraction of vortex modes by a fundamental mode hologram is modeled using a physical optics model that treats the volume hologram as an angle-dependent transfer function. Diffracted irradiance profiles and diffraction efficiencies are calculated numerically as a function of the incident mode number. The results of the model are compared with experimental results obtained with volume holograms of fundamental and higher-order vortex modes. When considered as a function of detuning between the incident and recorded mode numbers, the measured diffraction efficiencies are found to be invariant with respect to the recorded mode number, provided that the order difference remains unchanged, and in close agreement with the predictions of the model. Measurements are made with a 1.3 mm thick permanent photo-thermo-refractive glass hologram and a 9 mm thick re-writable photorefractive lithium niobate hologram. A liquid-crystal spatial light modulator generates the vortex modes used to record and read the holograms. The results indicate that a simple volume hologram can discriminate between vortex modes; however, adjacent mode discrimination with low crosstalk would require a very thick hologram. Furthermore, broadening of the vortex angular spectrum, due to diffraction at a finite aperture, can adversely affect diffraction efficiencies.

  14. Organised structures in wall turbulence as deduced from stability theory-based methods

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Sen; S V Veeravalli; P W Carpenter; G Joshi; P S Josan

    2007-02-01

    In earlier work, we have explored the relevance of hydrodynamic stability theory to fully developed turbulent wall flows. Using an extended Orr-Summerfeld Equation, based on an anisotropic eddy-viscosity model, it was shown that there exists a wide range of unstable wave numbers (wall modes), which mimic some of the key features of turbulent wall flows. Here we present experimental confirmation for the same. There is good qualitative and quantitative agreement between theory and experiment. Once the dominant coherent structure is obtained from stability theory, control of turbulence would be the next logical step. As shown, the use of a compliant wall shows considerable promise. We also present some theoretical work for bypass transition (Klebanoff/K-modes), wherein the receptivity of a laminar boundary layer to a vortex sheet in the freestream has been studied. Further, it is shown that triadic interaction between K-modes, 2D TS waves and 3D TS waves can lead to rapid algebraic growth. A similar mechanism seems to carry over to inner wall structures in wall turbulence and perhaps this is the “root cause” for sustenance of turbulence.

  15. Constructive modelling of structural turbulence: computational experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belotserkovskii, O M; Oparin, A M; Troshkin, O V [Institute for Computer Aided Design, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vtoraya Brestskaya st., 19/18, Moscow, 123056 (Russian Federation); Chechetkin, V M [Keldysh Institute for Applied Mathematics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miusskaya sq., 4, Moscow, 125047 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: o.bel@icad.org.ru, E-mail: a.oparin@icad.org.ru, E-mail: troshkin@icad.org.ru, E-mail: chech@gin@keldysh.ru

    2008-12-15

    Constructively, the analysis of the phenomenon of turbulence must and can be performed through direct numerical simulations of mechanics supposed to be inherent to secondary flows. This one reveals itself through such instances as large vortices, structural instabilities, vortex cascades and principal modes discussed in this paper. Like fragments of a puzzle, they speak of a motion ordered with its own nuts and bolts, however chaotic it appears at first sight. This opens an opportunity for a multi-oriented approach of which a prime ideology seems to be a rational combination of grid, spectral and statistical methods. An attempt is made to bring together the above instances and produce an alternative point of view on the phenomenon in question when based on the main laws of conservation.

  16. Boundary Layers in Laminar Vortex Flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Glenn Leslie

    A detailed experimental study of the flow in an intense, laminar, axisymmetric vortex has been conducted in the Purdue Tornado Vortex Simulator. The complicated nature of the flow in the boundary layer of laboratory vortices and presumably on that encountered in full-scale tornadoes has been examined. After completing a number of modifications to the existing facility to improve the quality of the flow in the simulator, hot-film anemometry was employed for making velocity-component and turbulence-intensity measurements of both the free-stream and boundary layer portions of the flow. The measurements represent the first experimental boundary layer investigation of a well-defined vortex flow to appear in the literature. These results were compared with recent theoretical work by Burggraf, Stewartson and Belcher (1971) and with an exact similarity solution for line-sink boundary layers developed by the author. A comparison is also made with the numerical simulation of Wilson (1981) in which the boundary conditions were matched to those of the present experimental investigation. Expressions for the vortex core radius, the maximum tangential velocity and the maximum pressure drop are given in terms of dimensionless modeling parameters. References. Burggraf, O. R., K. Stewartson and R. Belcher, Boundary layer. induced by a potential vortex. Phys. Fluids 14, 1821-1833 (1971). Wilson, T., M. S. thesis, Vortex Boundary Layer Dynamics, Univ. Calif. Davis (1981).

  17. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E. [eds.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  18. 不同湍流模型在轴流泵叶顶泄漏涡模拟中的应用与验证%Application and experiment of different turbulence models for simulating tip leakage vortex in axial flow pump

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张德胜; 吴苏青; 施卫东; 潘大志; 姚捷; 张光建

    2013-01-01

      为寻求一种经济、适合的湍流模型模拟轴流泵叶顶泄漏涡的结构和运动特性,该文基于ANSYS CFX软件平台,优化了六面体网格拓扑结构,比较了标准k-ε湍流模型(standard k-ε)、重正化群k-ε湍流模型(renormalization group k-ε,RNG),标准k-ω湍流模型(standard k-ω)和SST k-ω湍流模型(shear stress transport)等4种湍流模型在轴流泵叶顶泄漏涡模拟中的计算精度和叶顶泄漏涡流场特征。数值模拟和试验结果表明,在最优工况下,SST k-ω湍流模型预测外特性曲线与试验曲线吻合较好,扬程误差为4.688%,较其他3种湍流模型准确;4种湍流模型计算的叶顶泄漏涡流线、叶顶区压力场和轴面速度场分布规律相似,但RNG k-ε和SST k-ω湍流模型计算的涡卷吸较强,涡带的旋涡强度相对较大。基于旋涡强度提出了一种对叶顶泄漏涡的涡心进行识别的方法,并与高速摄影拍摄的涡带结果进行了对比,在设计流量工况和大流量工况下,发现SST k-ω湍流模型计算的叶顶泄漏涡运动轨迹与试验结果吻合度较好,验证了SST k-ω湍流模型在轴流泵叶顶泄漏涡模拟具有较好的适用性。%  In order to explore a turbulence model to simulate the structure and the kinetic characteristic of the tip leakage vortex suitably, the study was conducted based on the ANSYS CFX soft and high-speed imaging experiment. The topology structure of the simulation domain was optimized with 20 layers in a blade tip region that got more flow information in the tip area. As a result, simulation requirements are met, while reducing the calculation time. The flow field characteristic, especially the tip leakage vortex simulated by four kinds of turbulence models, which are standard k-ε, renormalization group k-ε, standard k-ω, and shear stress transport k-ω, was compared and analyzed. The simulation and the experiment results

  19. Edge energy transport barrier and turbulence in the I-mode regime on Alcator C-Moda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, A. E.; Whyte, D. G.; Churchill, R. M.; Cziegler, I.; Dominguez, A.; Golfinopoulos, T.; Hughes, J. W.; Rice, J. E.; Bespamyatnov, I.; Greenwald, M. J.; Howard, N.; Lipschultz, B.; Marmar, E. S.; Reinke, M. L.; Rowan, W. L.; Terry, J. L.

    2011-05-01

    We report extended studies of the I-mode regime [Whyte et al., Nucl. Fusion 50, 105005 (2010)] obtained in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak [Marmar et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 51(3), 3261 (2007)]. This regime, usually accessed with unfavorable ion B × ∇B drift, features an edge thermal transport barrier without a strong particle transport barrier. Steady I-modes have now been obtained with favorable B × ∇B drift, by using specific plasma shapes, as well as with unfavorable drift over a wider range of shapes and plasma parameters. With favorable drift, power thresholds are close to the standard scaling for L-H transitions, while with unfavorable drift they are ˜ 1.5-3 times higher, increasing with Ip. Global energy confinement in both drift configurations is comparable to H-mode scalings, while density profiles and impurity confinement are close to those in L-mode. Transport analysis of the edge region shows a decrease in edge χeff, by typically a factor of 3, between L- and I-mode. The decrease correlates with a drop in mid-frequency fluctuations (f ˜ 50-150 kHz) observed on both density and magnetics diagnostics. Edge fluctuations at higher frequencies often increase above L-mode levels, peaking at f ˜ 250 kHz. This weakly coherent mode is clearest and has narrowest width (Δf/f ˜ 0.45) at low q95 and high Tped, up to 1 keV. The Er well in I-mode is intermediate between L- and H-mode and is dominated by the diamagnetic contribution in the impurity radial force balance, without the Vpol shear typical of H-modes.

  20. Wake-vortex decay in external turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuczaj, Arkadiusz K.; Armenio, V.; Fröhlich, J.; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    2010-01-01

    Wake vortices that form behind a moving aircraft represent 11 safety COil cern for other aircraft.s that follow. These tornado-like wake structures may persist for several minutes, extending for many kilometers across the sky. This safety issue is particularly important close to major airports where

  1. Wake-vortex decay in external turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Bernard J.; Kuczaj, Arkadiusz K.; Armenio, V.; Fröhlich, J.; Geurts, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    Wake vortices that form behind a moving aircraft represent 11 safety COil cern for other aircraft.s that follow. These tornado-like wake structures may persist for several minutes, extending for many kilometers across the sky. This safety issue is particularly important close to major airports where

  2. Fractional vortex Hilbert's Hotel

    CERN Document Server

    Gbur, Greg

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate how the unusual mathematics of transfinite numbers, in particular a nearly perfect realization of Hilbert's famous hotel paradox, manifests in the propagation of light through fractional vortex plates. It is shown how a fractional vortex plate can be used, in principle, to create any number of "open rooms," i.e. topological charges, simultaneously. Fractional vortex plates are therefore demonstrated to create a singularity of topological charge, in which the vortex state is completely undefined and in fact arbitrary.

  3. U-shaped Vortex Structures in Large Scale Cloud Cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yantao; Peng, Xiaoxing; Xu, Lianghao; Hong, Fangwen

    2015-12-01

    The control of cloud cavitation, especially large scale cloud cavitation(LSCC), is always a hot issue in the field of cavitation research. However, there has been little knowledge on the evolution of cloud cavitation since it is associated with turbulence and vortex flow. In this article, the structure of cloud cavitation shed by sheet cavitation around different hydrofoils and a wedge were observed in detail with high speed camera (HSC). It was found that the U-shaped vortex structures always existed in the development process of LSCC. The results indicated that LSCC evolution was related to this kind of vortex structures, and it may be a universal character for LSCC. Then vortex strength of U-shaped vortex structures in a cycle was analyzed with numerical results.

  4. Vortices and turbulence (The 23rd Lanchester Memorial Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, G. M.

    1983-12-01

    A comprehensive discussion is presented concerning the phenomena characteristically treated in vortex and turbulence theory, as well as the degree of success achieved by various computation and visualization methods and theoretical models developed for vortex flow behavior prediction. Note is taken of the pioneering research conducted by F. W. Lanchester in 1893-1907, and attention is given to vortex tip and edge generation by rectangular and delta wings, the cool core effect of the Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube, the modeling of shear flows by means of vortex array methods, the classification and modelling of turbulent flows (together with a taxonomy of their calculation methods), and NASA ILLIAC IV computations of two-dimensional channel flow. Also noted are recent results concerning the boundary layer coherent structure of a flat plate at zero pressure gradient, including the regeneration structure and flow distortion and breakdown of a turbulent boundary layer.

  5. Modeling nucleation and coagulation modes in the formation of particulate matter inside a turbulent exhaust plume of a diesel engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hee; Gautam, Mridul; Gera, Dinesh

    2002-05-01

    This paper presents the results from a study that is aimed at predicting the nucleation, coagulation, and dynamics of particulate matter (PM) emissions from on-road heavy-duty diesel vehicles. The PM concentration is predicted from the composition of fuel, and operating and ambient conditions. A numerical algorithm for simultaneously solving the coagulation, condensation, and nucleation equations is developed. The effect of relative humidity on the nucleation rate and the nucleus size is also discussed. In addition, the effect of the ambient air dilution on PM size distribution is numerically predicted for a diesel-powered truck operating in a controlled environment at NASA Langley wind-tunnel facility. The particle size distribution and concentration are measured at four different locations in a turbulent plume from the diesel exhaust in the tunnel, and an excellent agreement between the measured and predicted PM concentration values at these locations inside the tunnel is observed.

  6. The effects on a core collapse of changes in the number and size of turbulent modes of velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arreaga-García, G.

    2017-10-01

    We consider 28 particle-based simulations aimed at comparing the gravitational collapse of a spherically symmetric, uniform gas core in which two extreme types of turbulent spectra of velocity have been initially induced, so that ∇·vec{v}=0 (14 simulations) and ∇×vec{v}=0 (14 simulations). For all the simulations, the ratios of the kinetic energy and thermal energy to the gravitational energy were fixed at β=0.21 and α=0.24, respectively. Most of the simulations finish by forming a single protostar, except for two simulations that form a binary system of protostars. In order to quantify the differences (or similarities) between the two types of simulations, we calculate some integral properties of the resulting protostars, such as the mass Mf and the ratios αf and βf.

  7. Quantum vortex dynamics in two-dimensional neutral superfluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, C. -C J.; Duine, R.A.; MacDonald, A.H.

    2010-01-01

    We derive an effective action for the vortex-position degree of freedom in a superfluid by integrating out condensate phase- and density-fluctuation environmental modes. When the quantum dynamics of environmental fluctuations is neglected, we confirm the occurrence of the vortex Magnus force and

  8. The experimental study of interaction between shock wave and turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO YuXin; YI ShiHe; HE Lin; CHENG ZhongYu; TIAN LiFeng

    2007-01-01

    The interaction between shock wave and turbulence has been studied in supersonic turbulent mix layer wind tunnel. The interaction between oblique shock wave and turbulent boundary layer and the influence of large vortex in mix layer on oblique shock wave have been observed by NPLS technique. From NPLS image, not only complex flow structure is observed but also time-dependent supersonic flow visualization is realized. The mechanism of interaction between shock wave and turbulence is discussed based on high quality NPLS image.

  9. Vortex mechanism in hydrocyclones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐继润; 刘正宁; 邢军; 李新跃; 黄慧; 徐海燕; 罗茜

    2001-01-01

    On the basis of analyzing the vortex characteristics, a new mechanism of the vortex formation in hydrocyclones is developed. The main concept of the mechanism is that the vortex flow in a hydrocyclone is resulted from the overlapping of container rotation and hole leakage. The model is then used to explain the compound distribution of free vortex and forced vortex, predict the similarity of tangential velocity at different input pressures, and make count of the principle of small hydrocyclone with lower cut-size than large one. Meanwhile a new possible approach to a large hydro-cyclone with lower cut-size by minimizing or eliminating the air core is discussed briefly.

  10. Analysis of pressure perturbation sources on a generic space launcher after-body in supersonic flow using zonal turbulence modeling and dynamic mode decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statnikov, Vladimir; Sayadi, Taraneh; Meinke, Matthias; Schmid, Peter; Schröder, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    A sparsity promoting dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) combined with a classical data-based statistical analysis is applied to the turbulent wake of a generic axisymmetric configuration of an Ariane 5-like launcher at Ma∞ = 6.0 computed via a zonal Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes/large-eddy simulation (RANS/LES) method. The objective of this work is to gain a better understanding of the wake flow dynamics of the generic launcher by clarification and visualization of initially unknown pressure perturbation sources on its after-body in coherent flow patterns. The investigated wake topology is characterized by a subsonic cavity region around the cylindrical nozzle extension which is formed due to the displacement effect of the afterexpanding jet plume emanating from the rocket nozzle (Mae = 2.52, pe/p∞ = 100) and the shear layer shedding from the main body. The cavity region contains two toroidal counter-rotating large-scale vortices which extensively interact with the turbulent shear layer, jet plume, and rocket walls, leading to the shear layer instability process to be amplified. The induced velocity fluctuations in the wake and the ultimately resulting pressure perturbations on the after-body feature three global characteristic frequency ranges, depending on the streamwise position inside the cavity. The most dominant peaks are detected at SrD r3 = 0.85 ± 0.075 near the nozzle exit, while the lower frequency peaks, in the range of SrD r2 = 0.55 ± 0.05 and SrD r1 = 0.25 ± 0.05, are found to be dominant closer to the rocket's base. A sparse promoting DMD algorithm is applied to the time-resolved velocity field to clarify the origin of the detected peaks. This analysis extracts three low-frequency spatial modes at SrD = 0.27, 0.56, and 0.85. From the three-dimensional shape of the DMD modes and the reconstructed modulation of the mean flow in time, it is deduced that the detected most dominant peaks of SrD r3 ≈ 0.85 are caused by the radial flapping motion of

  11. Role of thermal friction in relaxation of turbulent Bose-Einstein condensates

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Joon Hyun; Shin, Y

    2016-01-01

    In recent experiments, the relaxation dynamics of highly oblate, turbulent Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) was investigated by measuring the vortex decay rates in various sample conditions [Phys. Rev. A $\\bf 90$, 063627 (2014)] and, separately, the thermal friction coefficient $\\alpha$ for vortex motion was measured from the long-time evolution of a corotating vortex pair in a BEC [Phys. Rev. A $\\bf 92$, 051601(R) (2015)]. We present a comparative analysis of the experimental results, and find that the vortex decay rate $\\Gamma$ is almost linearly proportional to $\\alpha$. We perform numerical simulations of the time evolution of a turbulent BEC using a point-vortex model equipped with longitudinal friction and vortex-antivortex pair annihilation, and observe that the linear dependence of $\\Gamma$ on $\\alpha$ is quantitatively accounted for in the dissipative point-vortex model. The numerical simulations reveal that thermal friction in the experiment was too strong to allow for the emergence of a vortex-clus...

  12. Collisions of Vortex Filament Pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banica, Valeria; Faou, Erwan; Miot, Evelyne

    2014-12-01

    We consider the problem of collisions of vortex filaments for a model introduced by Klein et al. (J Fluid Mech 288:201-248, 1995) and Zakharov (Sov Phys Usp 31(7):672-674, 1988, Lect. Notes Phys 536:369-385, 1999) to describe the interaction of almost parallel vortex filaments in three-dimensional fluids. Since the results of Crow (AIAA J 8:2172-2179, 1970) examples of collisions are searched as perturbations of antiparallel translating pairs of filaments, with initial perturbations related to the unstable mode of the linearized problem; most results are numerical calculations. In this article, we first consider a related model for the evolution of pairs of filaments, and we display another type of initial perturbation leading to collision in finite time. Moreover, we give numerical evidence that it also leads to collision through the initial model. We finally study the self-similar solutions of the model.

  13. Divergence of optical vortex beams

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, Salla Gangi; Prabhakar, Shashi; Anwar, Ali; Banerji, J; Singh, R P

    2015-01-01

    We show, both theoretically and experimentally, that the propagation of optical vortices in free space can be analysed by using the width ($w(z)$) of the host Gaussian beam and the inner and outer radii of the vortex beam at the source plane ($z=0$) as defined in \\textit{Optics Letters \\textbf{39,} 4364-4367 (2014)}. We also studied the divergence of vortex beams, considered as the rate of change of inner or outer radius with the propagation distance, and found that it varies with the order in the same way as that of the inner and outer radii at zero propagation distance. These results may be useful in designing optical fibers for orbital angular momentum modes that play a crucial role in quantum communication.

  14. Turbulence and fossil turbulence lead to life in the universe

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, Carl H

    2012-01-01

    Turbulence is defined as an eddy-like state of fluid motion where the inertial-vortex forces of the eddies are larger than all the other forces that tend to damp the eddies out. Fossil turbulence is a perturbation produced by turbulence that persists after the fluid ceases to be turbulent at the scale of the perturbation. Because vorticity is produced at small scales, turbulence must cascade from small scales to large, providing a consistent physical basis for Kolmogorovian universal similarity laws. Oceanic and astrophysical mixing and diffusion are dominated by fossil turbulence and fossil turbulent waves. Observations from space telescopes show turbulence and vorticity existed in the beginning of the universe and that their fossils persist. Fossils of big bang turbulence include spin and the dark matter of galaxies: clumps of ~ 10^12 frozen hydrogen planets that make globular star clusters as seen by infrared and microwave space telescopes. When the planets were hot gas, they hosted the formation of life i...

  15. Depicting Vortex Stretching and Vortex Relaxing Mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    符松; 李启兵; 王明皓

    2003-01-01

    Different from many existing studies on the paranetrization of vortices, we investigate the effectiveness of two new parameters for identifying the vortex stretching and vortex relaxing mechanisms. These parameters are invariants and identify three-dimensional flow structures only, i.e. they diminish in two-dimensional flows. This is also unlike the existing vortex identification approaches which deliver information in two-dimensional flows. The present proposals have been successfully applied to identify the stretching and relaxing vortices in compressible mixing layers and natural convection flows.

  16. Holographic thermal relaxation in superfluid turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Yiqiang [School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100049 (China); Niu, Chao [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100049 (China); Tian, Yu [School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics,Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100190 (China); Zhang, Hongbao [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University,Beijing 100875 (China); Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel and The International Solvay Institutes,Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-12-02

    Holographic duality provides a first-principles approach to investigate real time processes in quantum many-body systems, in particular at finite temperature and far-from-equilibrium. We use this approach to study the dynamical evolution of vortex number in a two-dimensional (2D) turbulent superfluid through numerically solving its gravity dual. We find that the temporal evolution of the vortex number can be well fit statistically by two-body decay due to the vortex pair annihilation featured relaxation process, thus confirm the previous suspicion based on the experimental data for turbulent superfluid in highly oblate Bose-Einstein condensates. Furthermore, the decay rate near the critical temperature is in good agreement with the recently developed effective theory of 2D superfluid turbulence.

  17. Tomographic PIV measurements of a regenerating hairpin vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatino, D. R.; Rossmann, T.

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional formation and regeneration of a hairpin vortex in a laminar boundary layer is studied in a free-surface water channel. The vortex is generated by fluid injection through a narrow slot into a laminar boundary layer (Re_{δ ^*} = 485) and recorded with tomographic particle image velocimetry. The swirling strength based on the λ _2 criterion shows that the hairpin initially forms at the upstream edge of the elongated ring vortex produced by the injection. The elongated ring vortex decays while the hairpin vortex strengthens. Because the hairpin vortex is of sufficient strength, it forms a kink in the legs as a result of inviscid induction. A bridging structure forms between the legs initially upstream of the kink. As this structure dissipates, another bridging structure forms downstream of the kink and closes the vortex loop between the legs. This pinches off the original hairpin head such that two distinct vortices result. The formation of the secondary hairpin head does not appear to be preceded by a reduction in the spanwise gap between the legs or significant change in height above the wall as has been seen when exposed to a mean turbulent profile. Instead, the formation is preceded by the stretching of the hairpin legs downstream of the kink, exposes the ejected fluid between the legs to boundary layer flow producing conditions similar to those that formed the initial hairpin vortex.

  18. Anisotropic Characteristics of Turbulence Dissipation in Swirling Flow: A Direct Numerical Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingtuan Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the anisotropic characteristics of turbulent energy dissipation rate in a rotating jet flow via direct numerical simulation. The turbulent energy dissipation tensor, including its eigenvalues in the swirling flows with different rotating velocities, is analyzed to investigate the anisotropic characteristics of turbulence and dissipation. In addition, the probability density function of the eigenvalues of turbulence dissipation tensor is presented. The isotropic subrange of PDF always exists in swirling flows relevant to small-scale vortex structure. Thus, with remarkable large-scale vortex breakdown, the isotropic subrange of PDF is reduced in strongly swirling flows, and anisotropic energy dissipation is proven to exist in the core region of the vortex breakdown. More specifically, strong anisotropic turbulence dissipation occurs concentratively in the vortex breakdown region, whereas nearly isotropic turbulence dissipation occurs dispersively in the peripheral region of the strong swirling flows.

  19. A vortex filament tracking method for the Gross-Pitaevskii model of a superfluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villois, Alberto; Krstulovic, Giorgio; Proment, Davide; Salman, Hayder

    2016-10-01

    We present an accurate and robust numerical method to track quantised vortex lines in a superfluid described by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. By utilising the pseudo-vorticity field of the associated complex scalar order parameter of the superfluid, we are able to track the topological defects of the superfluid and reconstruct the vortex lines which correspond to zeros of the field. Throughout, we assume our field is periodic to allow us to make extensive use of the Fourier representation of the field and its derivatives in order to retain spectral accuracy. We present several case studies to test the precision of the method which include the evaluation of the curvature and torsion of a torus vortex knot, and the measurement of the Kelvin wave spectrum of a vortex line and a vortex ring. The method we present makes no a priori assumptions on the geometry of the vortices and is therefore applicable to a wide range of systems such as a superfluid in a turbulent state that is characterised by many vortex rings coexisting with sound waves. This allows us to track the positions of the vortex filaments in a dense turbulent vortex tangle and extract statistical information about the distribution of the size of the vortex rings and the inter-vortex separations. In principle, the method can be extended to track similar topological defects arising in other physical systems.

  20. Low-frequency variability of Western Boundary Currents in the turbulent ocean: intrinsic modes and atmospheric forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sérazin, Guillaume; Penduff, Thierry; Terray, Laurent; Grégorio, Sandy; Barnier, Bernard; Molines, Jean-Marc

    2015-04-01

    Ocean-atmosphere heat fluxes are particularly strong in Western Boundary Current (WBC) regions where SST front variations influence basin-scale climate variability. Observed low-frequency fluctuations in latitude and strength of these oceanic jets are classically thought to be essentially atmospherically-driven by wind stress curl variability via the oceanic Rossby wave adjustment. Yet academic eddy-resolving process-oriented models with double-gyre configurations have revealed that an idealized WBC may exhibit low-frequency intrinsic fluctuations without low-frequency external forcing (e.g. Berloff et al., 2007, Dijkstra and Ghil, 2005, etc). Experiments with eddying Ocean General Circulation Models (OGCMs) have also shown that the amount of low-frequency Sea Level Anomaly (SLA) variability is largely intrinsic in WBCs (Penduff et al. 2011; Sérazin et al 2014) and that the frontal-scale (<10°) pattern of the Kuroshio Extension (KE) variability is similar to intrinsic modes (Taguchi et al. 2010). Based on a pair of atmospherically-forced 1/12° OGCM experiments that simulate with accuracy either the intrinsic variability (seasonally-forced) or the observed total variability (forced with the full range of atmospheric timescales), Empirical Orthogonal Function analysis is performed on zonally-averaged SLA fields of four main WBCs (e.g. Gulf Stream, Kuroshio Extension, Agulhas Current and East Australian Current). The first two modes of the KE and GS exhibit a similar spatial structure that is shaped by oceanic intrinsic processes. The frequency content is however different between the intrinsic and total Principal Components, the former containing a wide range of timescales similar to a red noise and the latter being more autocorrelated at interannual-to-decadal timescales. These modes are compared with those obtained from the 20 years of altimetry observation and relationships with low-frequency westward propagative features in the respective oceanic basin are

  1. Turbulence and mixing in the early universe

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, C H

    2001-01-01

    The role of turbulence and turbulent mixing in the formation and evolution of the early universe is examined. A new quantum-gravitational-dynamics model suggests that the mechanism of the hot big bang is functionally equivalent to the mechanism of turbulence, where an inertial-vortex force at Planck scales matches the Planck gravitational force and drives the formation of space-time-energy and the formation of more Planck particles, more spinning Planck-Kerr particles, and a big bang turbulence cascade to larger scales before cooling to the strong force freeze out temperature. Temperature fluctuations between the Planck temperature and strong force temperature are mixed by turbulence to give a Corrsin-Obukhov spectral form. Inflation fossilizes the turbulent temperature fluctuations by stretching them beyond the horizon scale of causal connection ct, where c is light speed and t is time. Fossil temperature turbulence fluctuations seed anisotropies in the nucleosynthesis of light elements, causing density fluc...

  2. NUMERICAL STUDY OF FLOW IN CONICAL DIFFUSER WITH VORTEX GENERATOR JETS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiaomin; NISHI Michihiro

    2007-01-01

    To develop vortex generator jet (VGJ) method for flow control, the turbulence flow in a 14°conical diffuser with and without vortex generator jets are simulated by solving Navier-Stokes equations with κ-ε turbulence model. The diffuser performance, based on different velocity ratio (ratio of the jet speed to the mainstream velocity), is investigated and compared with the experimental study. On the basis of the flow characteristics using computation fluid dynamics (CFD) method observed in the conical diffuser and the downstream development of the longitudinal vortices, attempt is made to correlate the pressure recovery coefficient with the behavior of vortices produced by vortex generator jets.

  3. Turbulence on a Fractal Fourier set

    CERN Document Server

    Lanotte, Alessandra Sabina; Biferale, Luca; Malapaka, Shiva Kumar; Toschi, Federico

    2015-01-01

    The dynamical effects of mode reduction in Fourier space for three dimensional turbulent flows is studied. We present fully resolved numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations with Fourier modes constrained to live on a fractal set of dimension D. The robustness of the energy cascade and vortex stretching mechanisms are tested at changing D, from the standard three dimensional case to a strongly decimated case for D = 2.5, where only about $3\\%$ of the Fourier modes interact. While the direct energy cascade persist, deviations from the Kolmogorov scaling are observed in the kinetic energy spectra. A model in terms of a correction with a linear dependency on the co-dimension of the fractal set, $E(k)\\sim k^{- 5/3 + 3 -D }$, explains the results. At small scales, the intermittent behaviour due to the vorticity production is strongly modified by the fractal decimation, leading to an almost Gaussian statistics already at D ~ 2.98. These effects are connected to a genuine modification in the triad-to-tri...

  4. Quadrature Uncertainty and Information Entropy of Quantum Elliptical Vortex States

    OpenAIRE

    Banerji, Anindya; Panigrahi, Prasanta. K.; Singh, Ravindra Pratap; Chowdhury, Saurav; Bandyopadhyay, Abir

    2012-01-01

    We study the quadrature uncertainty of the quantum elliptical vortex state using the associated Wigner function. Deviations from the minimum uncertainty states were observed due to the absence of the Gaussian nature. In our study of the entropy, we noticed that with increasing vorticity, entropy increases for both the modes. We further observed that, there exists an optimum value of ellipticity which gives rise to maximum entanglement of the two modes of the quantum elliptical vortex states. ...

  5. Electron vortex magnetic holes: A nonlinear coherent plasma structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haynes, C.T.; Burgess, D.; Camporeale, E.; Sundberg, T.

    2015-01-01

    We report the properties of a novel type of sub-proton scale magnetic hole found in two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying turbulence with a guide field. The simulations were performed with a realistic value for ion to electron mass ratio. These structures, electron vortex magnetic

  6. Numerical Prediction of Tip Vortex Cavitation for Marine Propellers in Non-uniform Wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhi-Feng; Zhou, Fang; Li, Dan

    2017-07-01

    Tip vortex cavitation is the first type of cavitation to take place around most marine propellers. But the numerical prediction of tip vortex cavitation is one of the challenges for propeller wake because of turbulence dissipation during the numerical simulation. Several parameters of computational mesh and numerical algorithm are tested by mean of the predicted length of tip vortex cavtiation to validate a developed method. The predicted length of tip vortex cavtiation is on the increase about 0.4 propeller diameters using the developed numerical method. The predicted length of tip vortex cavtiation by RNG k - ɛ model is about 3 times of that by SST k - ω model. Therefore, based on the validation of the present approach, the cavitating flows generated by two rotating propellers under a non-uniform inflow are calculated further. The distributions of axial velocity, total pressure and vapor volume fraction in the transversal planes across tip vortex region are shown to be useful in analyzing the feature of the cavitating flow. The strongest kernel of tip vortex cavitation is not at the position most close to blade tip but slightly far away from the region. During the growth of tip vortex cavitation extension, it appears short and thick, and then it becomes long and thin. The pressure fluctuations at the positions inside tip vortex region also validates the conclusion. A key finding of the study is that the grids constructed especially for tip vortex flows by using separated computational domain is capable of decreasing the turbulence dissipation and correctly capturing the feature of propeller tip vortex cavitation under uniform and non-uniform inflows. The turbulence model and advanced grids is important to predict tip vortex cavitation.

  7. Numerical Simulation of the vortex shedding from two side-by-side square cylinders in gas-liquid two-phase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y. L.; Deng, D.

    2010-03-01

    Considering the turbulence deduced by shearing stress and air bubble, and based on two-fluid model, gas-liquid two-phase flow around two square cylinders in side-by-side arrangement in vertical tube with different void fraction different spacing ratio is numerically simulated by using the finite volume method in this paper. It is found that the gap flow with the spacing ratio smaller than 2.0 is not only biased to one side, resulting in the formation of a narrower wake behind one cylinder and a wider wake behind the other, but also not-biased to neither of them; vortex shedding from the two cylinders with the spacing ratio larger than or equal to 2.0 is synchronized. But when the spacing ratio is equal to 2.0, In-phase mode is the predominant mode while anti-phase mode predominates when the spacing ratio is 2.5, 3.0, 5.0. In bias pattern, the cylinder with wide wake has smaller resistance, the cylinder with narrow wake has larger resistance, and the cylinders with middle wake have equality resistance. Meanwhile the spacing ratio has tremendous influence on pulsating lift, amplitude spectrum and so on. The volume of void fraction in the incident flow influence the vortex production, falling off & development heavily. When the volume of void fraction increases to 0.12, the stable vortex street does not produce.

  8. Numerical investigation of cavitation-vortex interaction in a mixed-flow water jet pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Renfang; Lou, Xianwu [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Ji, Bin [Wuhan University, Hubei (China); Zhai, Zhihong; Zhou, Jiajian [Marine Design and Research Institute of China, Shanghai (China)

    2015-09-15

    Turbulent cavitating flows in a mixed-flow waterjet pump were numerically investigated using the k-w SST turbulence model and the mass transfer cavitation model based on the Rayleigh-Plesset equation to provide a comprehensive understanding of the cavitation-vortex interaction mechanism. The predicted hydraulic performance, as well as the cavitation performance, exhibits a reasonable agreement with the experimental results. The vorticity distributions under three operation conditions were illustrated together. Based on the illustration, cavitation development enhances vorticity production and flow unsteadiness in a mixed-flow waterjet pump. Vortices are basically located at the cavity interface, particularly at the downstream interface, during cavitation. Further analyses using the relative vorticity transport equation in cavitating turbulent flows indicate that vortex dilation and baroclinic torque exhibit a steep jump as cavitation occurs. In addition, vortex stretching contributes mainly to large-scale vortex generation.

  9. Effect of the conical-shape on the performance of vortex tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guen, M.; Natkaniec, C.; Kammeyer, J.; Seume, J. R.; Adjlout, L.; Imine, O.

    2013-04-01

    The present study focuses on the effect of conical shape in the cold side of the Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube which is shown to have a considerable influence on the system performance. A vortex tube is a simple circular tube with no moving parts which is capable to divide a high pressure flow into two relatively lower pressure flows with temperatures higher and lower than the incoming flow. A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic model is used to analyse the mechanisms of flow inside a vortex tube. The SST turbulence model is used to predict the turbulent flow behaviour inside the vortex tube. The geometry of a vortex tube with circumferential inlet slots as well as axial cold and hot outlet is considered. Performance curves temperature separation versus cold outlet mass fraction are calculated for a given inlet mass flow rate and varying outlet mass flow rates.

  10. Delta-singular vortex dynamics on a rotating sphere and stability of coupled atmospheric centers of action

    CERN Document Server

    Mokhov, I I; Chefranov, A G

    2010-01-01

    Existence of a stationary mode for a Hamiltonian dynamic system of two point vortexes with different signs on different latitudes of a uniform rotating sphere complying with observed data is stated. It is shown that such mode realization is possible only in the case when the more intensive cyclonic vortex has greater latitude than that of the anticyclonic vortex. A criterion of exponential instability of the stationary vortex mode taken into account impact of the polar vortexes is obtained. Compliance of the theory to observed data and reanalysis for coupled quasi-stationary systems of cyclonic and anticyclonic atmosphere action centers above oceans in the Northern Hemisphere is considered.

  11. Structure and modeling of turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novikov, E.A. [Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The {open_quotes}vortex strings{close_quotes} scale l{sub s} {approximately} LRe{sup -3/10} (L-external scale, Re - Reynolds number) is suggested as a grid scale for the large-eddy simulation. Various aspects of the structure of turbulence and subgrid modeling are described in terms of conditional averaging, Markov processes with dependent increments and infinitely divisible distributions. The major request from the energy, naval, aerospace and environmental engineering communities to the theory of turbulence is to reduce the enormous number of degrees of freedom in turbulent flows to a level manageable by computer simulations. The vast majority of these degrees of freedom is in the small-scale motion. The study of the structure of turbulence provides a basis for subgrid-scale (SGS) models, which are necessary for the large-eddy simulations (LES).

  12. Stereo particle image velocimetry applied to a vortex pipe flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zherui; Hugo, Ronald J.

    2006-03-01

    Stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV) has been employed to study a vortex generated via tangential injection of water in a 2.25 inch (57 mm) diameter pipe for Reynolds numbers ranging from 1,118 to 63,367. Methods of decreasing pipe-induced optical distortion and the PIV calibration technique are addressed. The mean velocity field analyses have shown spatial similarity and revealed four distinct flow regions starting from the central axis of rotation to the pipe wall in the vortex flows. Turbulence statistical data and vortex core location data suggest that velocity fluctuations are due to the axis of the in-line vortex distorting in the shape of a spiral.

  13. Oscillations of a Turbulent Jet Incident Upon an Edge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.C. Lin; D. Rockwell

    2000-09-19

    For the case of a jet originating from a fully turbulent channel flow and impinging upon a sharp edge, the possible onset and nature of coherent oscillations has remained unexplored. In this investigation, high-image-density particle image velocimetry and surface pressure measurements are employed to determine the instantaneous, whole-field characteristics of the turbulent jet-edge interaction in relation to the loading of the edge. It is demonstrated that even in absence of acoustic resonant or fluid-elastic effects, highly coherent, self-sustained oscillations rapidly emerge above the turbulent background. Two clearly identifiable modes of instability are evident. These modes involve large-scale vortices that are phase-locked to the gross undulations of the jet and its interaction with the edge, and small-scale vortices, which are not phase-locked. Time-resolved imaging of instantaneous vorticity and velocity reveals the form, orientation, and strength of the large-scale concentrations of vorticity approaching the edge in relation to rapid agglomeration of small-scale vorticity concentrations. Such vorticity field-edge interactions exhibit rich complexity, relative to the simplified pattern of vortex-edge interaction traditionally employed for the quasi-laminar edgetone. Furthermore, these interactions yield highly nonlinear surface pressure signatures. The origin of this nonlinearity, involving coexistence of multiple frequency components, is interpreted in terms of large- and small-scale vortices embedded in distributed vorticity layers at the edge. Eruption of the surface boundary layer on the edge due to passage of the large-scale vortex does not occur; rather apparent secondary vorticity concentrations are simply due to distension of the oppositely-signed vorticity layer at the tip of the edge. The ensemble-averaged turbulent statistics of the jet quickly take on an identity that is distinct from the statistics of the turbulent boundary layer in the channel

  14. Cut-and-connect of two antiparallel vortex tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melander, Mogens V.; Hussain, Fazle

    1988-01-01

    Motivated by an early conjecture that vortex cut-and-connect plays a key role in mixing and production of turbulence, helicity and aerodynamic noise, the cross-linking of two antiparallel viscous vortex tubes via direct numerical simulation is studied. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved by a dealiased pseudo-spectral method with 64 cubed grid points in a periodic domain for initial Reynolds numbers Re up to 1000. The vortex tubes are given an initial sinusoidal perturbation to induce a collision and keep the two tubes pressed against each other as annihilation continues. Cross-sectional and wire plots of various properties depict three stages of evolution: (1) Inviscid induction causing vortex cores to first approach and form a contact zone with a dipole cross-section, and then to flatten and stretch; (2) Vorticity annihilation in the contact zone accompanied by bridging between the two vortices at both ends of the contact zone due to a collection of cross-linked vortex lines, now orthogonal to the initial vortex tubes. The direction of dipole advection in the contact zone reverses; and (3) Threading of the remnants of the original vortices in between the bridges as they pull apart. The crucial stage 2 is shown to be a simple consequence of vorticity annihilation in the contact zone, link-up of the un-annihilated parts of vortex lines, and stretching and advection by the vortex tube swirl of the cross-linked lines, which accumulate at stagnation points in front of the annihilating vortex dipole. It is claimed that bridging is the essence of any vorticity cross-linking and that annihilation is sustained by stretching of the dipole by the bridges. Vortex reconnection details are found to be insensitive to asymmetry. Modeling of the reconnection process is briefly examined. The 3D spatial details of scalar transport (at unity Schmidt number), enstrophy production, dissipation and helicity are also examined.

  15. Flow regimes in a trapped vortex cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasagna, D.; Iuso, G.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents results of an experimental investigation on the flow in a trapped vortex cell, embedded into a flat plate, and interacting with a zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer. The objective of the work is to describe the flow features and elucidate some of the governing physical mechanisms, in the light of recent investigations on flow separation control using vortex cells. Hot-wire velocity measurements of the shear layer bounding the cell and of the boundary layers upstream and downstream are reported, together with spectral and correlation analyses of wall-pressure fluctuation measurements. Smoke flow visualisations provide qualitative insight into some relevant features of the internal flow, namely a large-scale flow unsteadiness and possible mechanisms driving the rotation of the vortex core. Results are presented for two very different regimes: a low-Reynolds-number case where the incoming boundary layer is laminar and its momentum thickness is small compared to the cell opening, and a moderately high-Reynolds-number case, where the incoming boundary layer is turbulent and the ratio between the momentum thickness and the opening length is significantly larger than in the first case. Implications of the present findings to flow control applications of trapped vortex cells are also discussed.

  16. Vortex ring breakdown induced by topographic forcing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiser, J; Kiger, K T, E-mail: kkiger@umd.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20910 (United States)

    2011-12-22

    Detailed measurements of the vortex breakdown within a strongly forced impinging jet are presented, with the goal of studying the effects of a small topographic disturbance on the breakdown and turbulence structure. This work is related to an ongoing effort to understand the dynamics of sediment suspension within a landing rotorcraft where a mobile boundary is subject to rapid erosion and deposition. The current work compares the results of a uniform surface to that of a small radial fence placed upstream of the vortex impingement location. The result is a dramatic increase in the coherence of the three-dimensional looping exhibited by the secondary vortex, leading to a more organized and strongly perturbed mean flow. Specifically, a triple decomposition of the velocity fluctuations indicates a very intense periodic stress in the vicinity of the impingement site, followed by a significant decay. Conversely, the random component of the fluctuating stresses gradually increases to modest levels as the coherent contributions decrease, eventually becoming greater than the coherent stress. The fence produces a bifurcation in the flow through the perturbation of the secondary vortex, which in turn creates a high-and low-speed streak on either side of the fence. The subsequent dynamics leads to increased fluctuating stress in the high-speed region, and a dramatically lower stress in the low-speed region, favoring preferential erosion on either side of the topographic disturbance.

  17. Intra-cavity vortex beam generation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, Darryl

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available ? per photon, and may be found as beams expressed in several basis functions, including Laguerre-Gaussian (LGpl) beams1, Bessel-Gaussian beams3 and Airy beams4 to name but a few. LG0l are otherwise known as vortex beams and LG0l beams are routinely... are represented by ?petals? and we show that through a full modal decomposition, the ?petal? fields are a superposition of two LG0l modes. Keywords: Vortex beams, SLM, Laguerre-Gaussian beams, Porro-prism resonator, Petals. 1. INTRODUCTION It is well...

  18. Instability of a two-step Rankine vortex in a reduced gravity QG model

    OpenAIRE

    Perrot, Xavier; Carton, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the stability of a steplike Rankine vortex in a one-active-layer, reduced gravity, quasi-geostrophic model. After calculating the linear stability with a normal mode analysis, the singular modes are determined as a function of the vortex shape to investigate short-time stability. Finally we determine the position of the critical layer and show its influence when it lies inside the vortex.

  19. Instability of a two-step Rankine vortex in a reduced gravity QG model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrot, Xavier [Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, Ecole Normale Supérieure, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75005 Paris (France); Carton, Xavier, E-mail: xperrot@lmd.ens.fr, E-mail: xcarton@univ-brest.fr [Laboratoire de Physique des Océans, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, 6 avenue Le Gorgeu, F-29200 Brest (France)

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the stability of a steplike Rankine vortex in a one-active-layer, reduced gravity, quasi-geostrophic model. After calculating the linear stability with a normal mode analysis, the singular modes are determined as a function of the vortex shape to investigate short-time stability. Finally we determine the position of the critical layer and show its influence when it lies inside the vortex. (papers)

  20. Cryptanalysis of Vortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aumasson, Jean-Philippe; Dunkelman, Orr; Mendel, Florian;

    2009-01-01

    Vortex is a hash function that was first presented at ISC'2008, then submitted to the NIST SHA-3 competition after some modifications. This paper describes several attacks on both versions of Vortex, including collisions, second preimages, preimages, and distinguishers. Our attacks exploit flaws ...

  1. Aerodynamically shaped vortex generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Velte, Clara Marika; Øye, Stig;

    2016-01-01

    An aerodynamically shaped vortex generator has been proposed, manufactured and tested in a wind tunnel. The effect on the overall performance when applied on a thick airfoil is an increased lift to drag ratio compared with standard vortex generators. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  2. Vortex beam based more stable annular laser guide star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ruiyao; Cui, Wenda; Li, Lei; Sun, Quan; He, Yulong; Wang, Hongyan; Ning, Yu; Xu, Xiaojun

    2016-11-01

    We present an annular laser guide star (LGS) concept for large ground-based telescopes in this paper. The more stable annular LGS is generated by turbulence-resisted vortex beam. In the uplink, a vortex beam tends to wander more slightly than a Gaussian beam does in atmospheric turbulence. This may enable an annular LGS to wander more slightly than a traditional Gaussian beam generated LGS does, which would ease the burden of uplink tip-tilt mirror and benefit a dynamical closed-loop adaptive optics system. We conducted numerical simulation to validate the feasibility of this concept. And we have gotten 31% reduced variance of spot wandering of annular LGS. Besides, we set up a spatial light modulator based laser guide star simulator for beam propagation in turbulent atmosphere to experimentally test the annular LGS concept. Preliminary experimental results are given. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time this concept is formulated.

  3. Dynamic Mode Decomposition of Jet in Channel Crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhao; Laurence, Dominique

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, the authors present a comparative analysis of Koopman modes computed from snap-shots of direct numerical simulations of a jet in channel crossflow (channel flow Re number = 3333, jet-to-crossflow velocity ratio = 1/6). The flow is complex due to interactions between the jet and the cross-flow, and contains geometry-dependent large-scale coherent structures; thus, the Koopman mode analysis provides a powerful tool for studying the spatial and spectral information of the flow. The Koopman modes are approximated by the DMD modes restricted to Krylov subspace, and the Koopman modes isolate structures associated with single frequency only. In this work, we address issues related to the physical interpretation of the DMD modes. The results show that the computed Koopman modes identify the relevant frequencies and the corresponding three-dimensional flow structures automatically. We present the selected DMD modes, which show big differences in the spatial structures and frequency. The shear layer vortices are separated from the horseshoe vortex. These modes have large amplitudes among all modes obtained. Acknowledging the IT Services at The University of Manchester, the use of ARCHER HPC allocated via UK EPSRC Turbulence Consortium (EPSRC Grant EP/L000261/1), the use of BlueGene/Q supercomputer sponsored by EDF R&D centre Chatou and Cedric Flageul.

  4. Vortex cutting in superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatz, A.; Vlasko-Vlasov, V. K.; Kwok, W. K.; Crabtree, G. W.

    2016-08-01

    Vortex cutting and reconnection is an intriguing and still-unsolved problem central to many areas of classical and quantum physics, including hydrodynamics, astrophysics, and superconductivity. Here, we describe a comprehensive investigation of the crossing of magnetic vortices in superconductors using time dependent Ginsburg-Landau modeling. Within a macroscopic volume, we simulate initial magnetization of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor followed by subsequent remagnetization with perpendicular magnetic fields, creating the crossing of the initial and newly generated vortices. The time resolved evolution of vortex lines as they approach each other, contort, locally conjoin, and detach, elucidates the fine details of the vortex-crossing scenario under practical situations with many interacting vortices in the presence of weak pinning. Our simulations also reveal left-handed helical vortex instabilities that accompany the remagnetization process and participate in the vortex crossing events.

  5. Vortices and vortex lattices in quantum ferrofluids

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, A M; O'Dell, D H J; Parker, N G

    2016-01-01

    The achievement of quantum-degenerate Bose gases composed of atoms with sizeable magnetic dipole moments has realized quantum ferrofluids, a form of fluid which combines the extraordinary properties of superfluidity and ferrofluidity. A hallmark of superfluids is that they are constrained to circulate through vortices with quantized circulation. These excitations underpin a variety of rich phenomena, including vortex lattices, quantum turbulence, the Berenzinksii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition and Kibble-Zurek defect formation. Here we provide a comprehensive review of the theory of vortices and vortex lattices in quantum ferrofluids created from dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates, exploring the interplay of magnetism with vorticity and contrasting this with the established behaviour in non-dipolar condensates. Our discussion is based on the mean-field theory provided by the dipolar Gross-Pitaevskii equation, from analytic treatments based on the Thomas-Fermi and variational approaches to full numerical simula...

  6. Discrete vortex method simulations of aerodynamic admittance in bridge aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Johannes Tophøj; Hejlesen, Mads Mølholm; Larsen, Allan

    , and to determine aerodynamic forces and the corresponding flutter limit. A simulation of the three-dimensional bridge responseto turbulent wind is carried out by quasi steady theory by modelling the bridge girder as a line like structure [2], applying the aerodynamic load coefficients found from the current version...... of DVMFLOW in a strip wise fashion. Neglecting the aerodynamic admittance, i.e. the correlation of the instantaneous lift force to the turbulent fluctuations in the vertical velocities, leads to higher response to high frequency atmospheric turbulence than would be obtained from wind tunnel tests....... In the present work we have extended the laminar oncoming flow in DVMFLOW to a turbulent one, modelled by seeding the upstream flow with vortex particles synthesized from prescribed atmospheric turbulence velocity spectra [3] . The discrete spectrum is sampled from the continuous spectrum subject to a lower cutoff...

  7. Fractally Fourier decimated homogeneous turbulent shear flow in noninteger dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathali, Mani; Khoei, Saber

    2017-02-01

    Time evolution of the fully resolved incompressible homogeneous turbulent shear flow in noninteger Fourier dimensions is numerically investigated. The Fourier dimension of the flow field is extended from the integer value 3 to the noninteger values by projecting the Navier-Stokes equation on the fractal set of the active Fourier modes with dimensions 2.7 ≤d ≤3.0 . The results of this study revealed that the dynamics of both large and small scale structures are nontrivially influenced by changing the Fourier dimension d . While both turbulent production and dissipation are significantly hampered as d decreases, the evolution of their ratio is almost independent of the Fourier dimension. The mechanism of the energy distribution among different spatial directions is also impeded by decreasing d . Due to this deficient energy distribution, turbulent field shows a higher level of the large-scale anisotropy in lower Fourier dimensions. In addition, the persistence of the vortex stretching mechanism and the forward spectral energy transfer, which are three-dimensional turbulence characteristics, are examined at changing d , from the standard case d =3.0 to the strongly decimated flow field for d =2.7 . As the Fourier dimension decreases, these forward energy transfer mechanisms are strongly suppressed, which in turn reduces both the small-scale intermittency and the deviation from Gaussianity. Besides the energy exchange intensity, the variations of d considerably modify the relative weights of local to nonlocal triadic interactions. It is found that the contribution of the nonlocal triads to the total turbulent kinetic energy exchange increases as the Fourier dimension increases.

  8. Fractally Fourier decimated homogeneous turbulent shear flow in noninteger dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathali, Mani; Khoei, Saber

    2017-02-01

    Time evolution of the fully resolved incompressible homogeneous turbulent shear flow in noninteger Fourier dimensions is numerically investigated. The Fourier dimension of the flow field is extended from the integer value 3 to the noninteger values by projecting the Navier-Stokes equation on the fractal set of the active Fourier modes with dimensions 2.7≤d≤3.0. The results of this study revealed that the dynamics of both large and small scale structures are nontrivially influenced by changing the Fourier dimension d. While both turbulent production and dissipation are significantly hampered as d decreases, the evolution of their ratio is almost independent of the Fourier dimension. The mechanism of the energy distribution among different spatial directions is also impeded by decreasing d. Due to this deficient energy distribution, turbulent field shows a higher level of the large-scale anisotropy in lower Fourier dimensions. In addition, the persistence of the vortex stretching mechanism and the forward spectral energy transfer, which are three-dimensional turbulence characteristics, are examined at changing d, from the standard case d=3.0 to the strongly decimated flow field for d=2.7. As the Fourier dimension decreases, these forward energy transfer mechanisms are strongly suppressed, which in turn reduces both the small-scale intermittency and the deviation from Gaussianity. Besides the energy exchange intensity, the variations of d considerably modify the relative weights of local to nonlocal triadic interactions. It is found that the contribution of the nonlocal triads to the total turbulent kinetic energy exchange increases as the Fourier dimension increases.

  9. Gauge turbulence, topological defect dynamics, and condensation in Higgs models

    CERN Document Server

    Gasenzer, Thomas; Pawlowski, Jan M; Sexty, Dénes

    2013-01-01

    The real-time dynamics of topological defects and turbulent configurations of gauge fields for electric and magnetic confinement are studied numerically within a 2+1D Abelian Higgs model. It is shown that confinement is appearing in such systems equilibrating after a strong initial quench such as the overpopulation of the infrared modes. While the final equilibrium state does not support confinement, metastable vortex defect configurations appear in the gauge field which are found to be closely related to the appearance of physically observable confined electric and magnetic charges. These phenomena are seen to be intimately related to the approach of a non-thermal fixed point of the far-from-equilibrium dynamical evolution, signalled by universal scaling in the gauge-invariant correlation function of the Higgs field. Even when the parameters of the Higgs action do not support condensate formation in the vacuum, during this approach, transient Higgs condensation is observed. We discuss implications of these r...

  10. Vortex-lattice melting in a one-dimensional optical lattice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoek, M.; Stoof, H.T.C.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate quantum fluctuations of a vortex lattice in a one-dimensional optical lattice. Our method gives full access to all the modes of the vortex lattice and we discuss in particular the Bloch bands of the Tkachenko modes. Because of the small number of particles in the pancake

  11. Vortex-lattice melting in a one-dimensional optical lattice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoek, M.; Stoof, H.T.C.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate quantum fluctuations of a vortex lattice in a one-dimensional optical lattice for realistic numbers of particles and vortices. Our method gives full access to all the modes of the vortex lattice and we discuss in particular the Bloch bands of the Tkachenko modes. Because of the

  12. Numerical Study of Wake Vortex Interaction with the Ground Using the Terminal Area Simulation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Han, Jongil

    1999-01-01

    A sensitivity study for the in-ground effect on aircraft wake vortices has been conducted using a validated large eddy simulation model. The numerical results are compared with observed data and show good agreement for vortex decay and lateral vortex transport. The vortex decay rate is strongly influenced by the ground, but appears somewhat insensitive to ambient turbulence. In addition, the results show that the ground can affect the trajectory and descent-rate of a wake vortex pair at elevations up to about 3 b(sub o) (where b(sub o) is the initial vortex separation). However, the ground does not influence the average circulation of the vortices until the cores descend to within about 0.6 b(sub o), after which time the ground greatly enhances their rate of demise. Vortex rebound occurs in the simulations, but is more subtle than shown in previous numerical studies.

  13. Fundamental and vortex solitons in a two-dimensional optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, J; Yang, Jianke; Musslimani, Ziad

    2003-01-01

    Fundamental and vortex solitons in a two-dimensional optically induced waveguide array are reported. In the strong localization regime, the fundamental soliton is largely confined to one lattice site, while the vortex state comprises of four fundamental modes superimposed in a square configuration with a phase structure that is topologically equivalent to the conventional vortex. However, in the weak localization regime, both the fundamental and vortex solitons spread over many lattice sites. We further show that fundamental and vortex solitons are stable against small perturbations in the strong localization regime.

  14. An optical vortex coronagraph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, David M.

    2005-08-01

    An optical vortex may be characterized as a dark core of destructive interference in a beam of spatially coherent light. This dark core may be used as a filter to attenuate a coherent beam of light so an incoherent background signal may be detected. Applications of such a filter include: eye and sensor protection, forward-scattered light measurement, and the detection of extra-solar planets. Optical vortices may be created by passing a beam of light through a vortex diffractive optical element, which is a plate of glass etched with a spiral pattern, such that the thickness of the glass increases in the azimuthal direction. An optical vortex coronagraph may be constructed by placing a vortex diffractive optical element near the image plane of a telescope. An optical vortex coronagraph opens a dark window in the glare of a distant star so nearby terrestrial sized planets and exo-zodiacal dust may be detected. An optical vortex coronagraph may hold several advantages over other techniques presently being developed for high contrast imaging, such as lower aberration sensitivity and multi-wavelength operation. In this manuscript, I will discuss the aberration sensitivity of an optical vortex coronagraph and the key advantages it may hold over other coronagraph architectures. I will also provide numerical simulations demonstrating high contrast imaging in the presence of low-order static aberrations.

  15. Generation of topologically diverse acoustic vortex beams using a compact metamaterial aperture

    CERN Document Server

    Naify, Christina J; Martin, Theodore P; Nicholas, Michael; Guild, Matthew D; Orris, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Vortex waves, which carry orbital angular momentum, have found use in a range of fields from quantum communications to particle manipulation. Due to their widespread influence, significant attention has been paid to the methods by which vortex waves are generated. For example, active phased arrays generate diverse vortex modes at the cost of electronic complexity and power consumption. Conversely, analog apertures, such as spiral phase plates, metasurfaces, and gratings require separate apertures to generate each mode. Here we present a new class of metamaterial-based acoustic vortex generators, which are both geometrically and electronically simple, and topologically tunable. Our metamaterial approach generates vortex waves by wrapping an acoustic leaky wave antenna back upon itself. Exploiting the antennas frequency-varying refractive index, we demonstrate experimentally and analytically that this analog structure generates both integer, and non-integer vortex modes. The metamaterial design makes the apertu...

  16. Experimental study of the dynmamics of a stretched vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitjeans, Philippe; Bottausci, Frederic; Maurel, Agnes

    2001-11-01

    Numerical simulations of turbulent flows as well as real experiments indicates that a large part of vorticity in generic velocity fields is concentrated in localized regions in the form of filaments. The creation of such structures can be accounted for by the action of stretching on vorticity field, e.g. secondary instability mechanism in stretched vortex sheets. An experiment is performed in order to create a single stretched vortex that is supposed to have the same dynamics than these filaments of vorticity. The initial vorticity comes from a laminar boundary layer flow in a low velocity water channel, and the stretching is produced by succion through two holes located on the lateral walls of the channel. When the stretching is strong enough, a vortex is created that remains at its location attached to the succion holes. Recent results on the charateristics of this vortex will be presented. Instabilities of such a structure may produce the explosion of the vortex as a turbulent spot. This behaviour will be described and characterized.

  17. The NASA-Langley Wake Vortex Modelling Effort in Support of an Operational Aircraft Spacing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Fred H.

    1998-01-01

    Two numerical modelling efforts, one using a large eddy simulation model and the other a numerical weather prediction model, are underway in support of NASA's Terminal Area Productivity program. The large-eddy simulation model (LES) has a meteorological framework and permits the interaction of wake vortices with environments characterized by crosswind shear, stratification, humidity, and atmospheric turbulence. Results from the numerical simulations are being used to assist in the development of algorithms for an operational wake-vortex aircraft spacing system. A mesoscale weather forecast model is being adapted for providing operational forecast of winds, temperature, and turbulence parameters to be used in the terminal area. This paper describes the goals and modelling approach, as well as achievements obtained to date. Simulation results will be presented from the LES model for both two and three dimensions. The 2-D model is found to be generally valid for studying wake vortex transport, while the 3-D approach is necessary for realistic treatment of decay via interaction of wake vortices and atmospheric boundary layer turbulence. Meteorology is shown to have an important affect on vortex transport and decay. Presented are results showing that wake vortex transport is unaffected by uniform fog or rain, but wake vortex transport can be strongly affected by nonlinear vertical change in the ambient crosswind. Both simulation and observations show that atmospheric vortices decay from the outside with minimal expansion of the core. Vortex decay and the onset three-dimensional instabilities are found to be enhanced by the presence of ambient turbulence.

  18. Fast Josephson vortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malishevskii, A.S.; Silin, V.P.; Uryupin, S.A

    2002-12-30

    For the magnetically coupled waveguide and long Josephson junction we gave the analytic description of two separate velocity domains where the free motion of traveling vortex (2{pi}-kink) exists. The role of the mutual influence of waveguide and long Josephson junction is discussed. It is shown the possibility of the fast vortex motion with the velocity much larger than Swihart velocity of Josephson junction and close to the speed of light in the waveguide. The excitation of motion of such fast Josephson vortex is described.

  19. Large Eddy Simulation of New Vortex Generator Enhancing Heat Exchange of Solar Energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Juan; YANG Li; QI Cheng-ying

    2009-01-01

    This paper put forward a new-type vortex generator enhancing heat exchange of solar air-drier and air-heater on the gas side,and investigated the mechanism of heat transfer enhancement and drag reduction by the influence of vortex generators on the coherent structure of turbulent boundary layer.The flow and heat transfer characteristics of rectangle channel with bevel-cut half-elliptical column vortex generators were obtained using large eddy simulation (LES) and the hydromechanics software FLUENT6.3.The instantaneous proper-ties of velocity,temperature and pressure in channel were gained.The coherent structure of turbulent boundary layer flow was showed, and the characteristic of vortex induced by inclined-cut semi-ellipse vortex generator and its influence on turbulent coherent structure were analyzed.And the effect mechanism of turbulent coherent structure on flow field,pressure field and temperature field was discussed.Based on the results,the heat trans-fer coefficient and drag reduction of the new vortex generator with different pitch angles were compared.Some-times.the coherent effects of the increased wall heat transfer and the decreased skin friction do not satisfy theReynolds analogy.The turbulent coherent structure can be controlled through the geometry of the vortex gener-ator.so the heat transfer and drag reduction can also be controlled.Then we can seek suitable form of vortex generator and structure parameters.in order to achieve the enhanced heat transfer and flow of drag reduction in the solar air-heater and solar air-drier.

  20. Spiral Wave Generation in a Vortex Electric Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Xiao-Ping; CHEN Jiang-Xing; ZHAO Ye-Hua; LOU Qin; WANG Lu-Lu; SIIEN Qian

    2011-01-01

    The effect of a vortical electric field on nonlinear patterns in excitable media is studied. When an appropriate vortex electric field is applied, the system exhibits pattern transition from chemical turbulence to spiral waves, which possess the same chtality as the vortex electric field. The underlying mechanism of this is discussed. We also show the meandering behavior of a spiral under the taming of a vortex electric field. The results obtained here may contribute to control strategies of patterns on surface reaction.%The effect of a vortical electric field on nonlinear patterns in excitable media is studied.When an appropriate vortex electric field is applied,the system exhibits pattern transition from chemical turbulence to spiral waves,which possess the same chirality as the vortex electric field.The underlying mechanism of this is discussed.We also show the meandering behavior of a spiral under the taming of a vortex electric field.The results obtained here may contribute to control strategies of patterns on surface reaction.Spiral waves are one of the most common and widely studied patterns in nature.They appear in hydrodynamic systems,chemical reactions and a large variety of biological,chemical and physical systems.[1-5] Much attention has been paid to their rich nonlinear dynamics,as well as potential applications in various biological or physiological systems,since the emergence and instability of spirals usually lead to abnormal states,for example in cardiac arrythmia[6,7] and epilepsy[8].Much research has been carried out in studying pattern formations in catalytic CO oxidation on Pt(110),[9-11] because they provide practical utilization in industry.A rich variety of spatiotemporal patterns,including travelling pulses,standing waves,target patterns,spiral waves and chemical turbulence have been observed in this system.[12-16

  1. Staircase temperature profiles and plasma transport self-organisation in a minimum kinetic model of turbulence based on the trapped ion mode instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartier-Michaud, T.; Ghendrih, P.; Sarazin, Y.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Drouot, T.; Estève, D.; Garbet, X.; Grandgirard, V.; Latu, G.; Norscini, C.; Passeron, C.

    2014-11-01

    A minimum model of plasma turbulence in a kinetic framework is presented. It is based on trapped ion turbulence, gyro and bounce averaged, and implemented in the versatile and efficient code TERESA. Zonal flow - streamer interplay are readily shown to be key players that govern the confinement properties of the model. The parameter space of the model is explored with brute force numerics. A generic result is either a streamer dominated pattern with large transport, or a staircase temperature profile with very marked corrugations and quenched transport. A case with off-axis heating is found to exhibit quasiperiodic relaxation events relevant to investigate dynamical turbulence self-organisation.

  2. Numerical Study of the Instability and Flow Transition in a Vortex-Ring/Wall Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Ren

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Instability and fl w transition of a vortex ring impinging on a wall were investig ated by means of large-eddy simulation for two vortex core thicknesses corresponding to thin and thick vortex rings. Various fundamental mechanisms dictating the fl w behaviours, such as evolution of vortical structures, instability and breakdown of vortex rings, development of modal energies, and transition from laminar to turbulent state, have been studied systematically . Analysis of the enstrophy of wrapping vortices and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE in fl w fiel indicates that the formation and evolution of wrapping vortices are closely associated with the fl w transition to turbulent state. It is found that the temporal development of wrapping vortices and the growth rate of axial fl w generated around the circumference of the core region for the thin ring are faster than those for the thick ring. The azimuthal instabilities of primary and secondary vortex rings are analysed and the development of modal energies reveals the fl w transition to turbulent state. The law of energy decay follows a characteristic k 5=3 law, indicating that the vortical fl w has become turbulent. The results obtained in this study provide physical insight into the understanding of the instability mechanisms relevant to the vortical fl w evolution.

  3. Capturing coherent structures and turbulent interfaces in wake flows by means of the Organised Eddy Simulation, OES and by Tomo-PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deri, E.; Ouvrard, H.; Braza, M.; Hunt, J.; Hoarau, Y.; Cazin, S.; Cid, E.; Harran, G.

    2011-12-01

    The present study aims at a physical analysis of the coherent and chaotic vortex dynamics in the near wake around a flat plate at incidence, to provide new elements in respect of the flow physics turbulence modelling for high-Reynolds number flows around bodies. This constitutes nowadays a challenge in the aeronautics design. A special attention is paid to capture the thin shear layer interfaces downstream of the separation, responsible for aeroacoustics phenomena related to noise reduction and directly linked to an accurate prediction of the aerodynamic forces. The experimental investigation is carried out by means of tomographic PIV. The interaction of the most energetic coherent structures with the random turbulence is discussed. Furthermore, the POD analysis allowed evaluation of 3D phase averaged dynamics as well as the influence of higher modes associated with the finer-scale turbulence. The numerical study by means of the Organised Eddy Simulation, OES approach ensured a reduced turbulence diffusion that allowed development of the von Karman instability and of capturing of the thin shear-layer interfaces, by using appropriate criteria based on vorticity and dissipation rate of kinetic energy. A comparison between the experiments and the simulations concerning the coherent vortex pattern is carried out.

  4. Modeling the turbulent kinetic energy equation for compressible, homogeneous turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aupoix, B.; Blaisdell, G. A.; Reynolds, William C.; Zeman, Otto

    1990-01-01

    The turbulent kinetic energy transport equation, which is the basis of turbulence models, is investigated for homogeneous, compressible turbulence using direct numerical simulations performed at CTR. It is shown that the partition between dilatational and solenoidal modes is very sensitive to initial conditions for isotropic decaying turbulence but not for sheared flows. The importance of the dilatational dissipation and of the pressure-dilatation term is evidenced from simulations and a transport equation is proposed to evaluate the pressure-dilatation term evolution. This transport equation seems to work well for sheared flows but does not account for initial condition sensitivity in isotropic decay. An improved model is proposed.

  5. Vortex dynamics in the wake of a mechanical fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruecker, Christoph [TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Lehrstuhl fuer Stroemungslehre und Stroemungsmaschinen, Freiberg (Germany); Bleckmann, Horst [Poppelsdorfer Schloss, Zoologisches Institut Bonn, Bonn (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    This study focuses on the three-dimensional flow around a mechanical fish model, which reproduces the typical undulatory body and fin motion of a carangiform swimmer. The mechanical model consists of a flexible skeleton embedded in a soft transparent silicone body, which is connected with two cams to a flapping and bending hinge generating a traveling wave motion with increasing amplitude from anterior to posterior, extending to a combined heaving and pitching motion at the fin. The model is submerged in a water tank and towed at the characteristic swimming speed for the neutral swimming mode at U/V = 1. The method of Scanning Particle Image Velocimetry was used to analyze the three-dimensional time-dependent flow field in the axial and saggital planes. The results confirm the earlier observations that the wake develops into a chain of vortex rings which travel sidewards perpendicular to the swimming direction. However, instead of one single vortex shed at each tail beat half-cycle we observed a pair of two vortex rings being shed. Each pair consists of a larger main vortex ring corresponding to the tail beat start-stop vortex, while the second vortex ring is due to the body bending motion. The existence of the second vortex reflects the role of the body in undulatory swimming. A simplified model of the fish body comparing it to a plate with a hinged flap demonstrates the link between the sequence of kinematics and vortex shedding. (orig.)

  6. Numerical method to calculate flow-induced vibration in turbulent flow. 3rd Report. Analysis of vortex-induced vibration in an array of elastically supported tubes; Ranryuba ni okeru ryutai kozotai rensei shindo kaiseki shuho no kaihatsu. 3. Kangun ni okeru uzu reiki shindo kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadaoka, N.; Umegaki, K. [Hitachi, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-01-25

    A vortex-induced vibration of an array of elastically supported tubes is simulated in two-dimension by using a flow-induced vibration analysis program, which was developed in order to evaluate flow-induced vibration in various components such as heat exchangers. From a comparison of calculated results and experimental data, the following points are observed. (1) For the calculated results in a 5 {times} 5 square array, the flow pattern surrounding the first-row tubes is markedly different from that observed in the second-row or third-row tubes. This flow pattern is the same as that obtained from the experiment. (2) All tubes begin to oscillate due to unsteady fluid force and the oscillating mode is different for each row of tubes. These oscillation patterns show the same tendency in the experiments and it is concluded that the developed method can simulate vortex-induced vibration in an array of elastically supported tubes. 19 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Perfect vortex beam: Fourier transformation of a Bessel beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaity, Pravin; Rusch, Leslie

    2015-02-15

    We derive a mathematical description of a perfect vortex beam as the Fourier transformation of a Bessel beam. Building on this development, we experimentally generate Bessel-Gauss beams of different orders and Fourier transform them to form perfect vortex beams. By controlling the radial wave vector of a Bessel-Gauss beam, we can control the ring radius of the generated beam. Our theoretical predictions match with the experimental results and also provide an explanation for previous published works. We find the perfect vortex resembles that of an orbital angular momentum (OAM) mode supported in annular profiled waveguides. Our prefect vortex beam generation method can be used to excite OAM modes in an annular core fiber.

  8. Vortex flow hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, A. M., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to quantify the hysteresis associated with various vortex flow transition points and to determine the effect of planform geometry. The transition points observed consisted of the appearance (or disappearance) of trailing edge vortex burst and the transition to (or from) flat plate or totally separated flows. Flow visualization with smoke injected into the vortices was used to identify the transitions on a series of semi-span models tested in a low speed tunnel. The planforms tested included simple deltas (55 deg to 80 deg sweep), cranked wings with varying tip panel sweep and dihedral, and a straked wing. High speed movies at 1000 frames per second were made of the vortex flow visualization in order to better understand the dynamics of vortex flow, burst and transition.

  9. Modeling gasodynamic vortex cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdyan, A. E.; Fauve, S.

    2017-08-01

    We aim at studying gasodynamic vortex cooling in an analytically solvable, thermodynamically consistent model that can explain limitations on the cooling efficiency. To this end, we study an angular plus radial flow between two (coaxial) rotating permeable cylinders. Full account is taken of compressibility, viscosity, and heat conductivity. For a weak inward radial flow the model qualitatively describes the vortex cooling effect, in terms of both temperature and the decrease of the stagnation enthalpy, seen in short uniflow vortex (Ranque) tubes. The cooling does not result from external work and its efficiency is defined as the ratio of the lowest temperature reached adiabatically (for the given pressure gradient) to the lowest temperature actually reached. We show that for the vortex cooling the efficiency is strictly smaller than 1, but in another configuration with an outward radial flow, we find that the efficiency can be larger than 1. This is related to both the geometry and the finite heat conductivity.

  10. A computational study of the topology of vortex breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spall, Robert E.; Gatski, Thomas B.

    1991-01-01

    A fully three-dimensional numerical simulation of vortex breakdown using the unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations has been performed. Solutions to four distinct types of breakdown are identified and compared with experimental results. The computed solutions include weak helical, double helix, spiral, and bubble-type breakdowns. The topological structure of the various breakdowns as well as their interrelationship are studied. The data reveal that the asymmetric modes of breakdown may be subject to additional breakdowns as the vortex core evolves in the streamwise direction. The solutions also show that the freestream axial velocity distribution has a significant effect on the position and type of vortex breakdown.

  11. Vector Lattice Vortex Solitons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian-Dong; YE Fang-Wei; DONG Liang-Wei; LI Yong-Ping

    2005-01-01

    @@ Two-dimensional vector vortex solitons in harmonic optical lattices are investigated. The stability properties of such solitons are closely connected to the lattice depth Vo. For small Vo, vector vortex solitons with the total zero-angular momentum are more stable than those with the total nonzero-angular momentum, while for large Vo, this case is inversed. If Vo is large enough, both the types of such solitons are stable.

  12. Quantum turbulence: Theoretical and numerical problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemirovskii, Sergey K.

    2013-03-01

    The term “quantum turbulence” (QT) unifies the wide class of phenomena where the chaotic set of one dimensional quantized vortex filaments (vortex tangles) appear in quantum fluids and greatly influence various physical features. Quantum turbulence displays itself differently depending on the physical situation, and ranges from quasi-classical turbulence in flowing fluids to a near equilibrium set of loops in phase transition. The statistical configurations of the vortex tangles are certainly different in, say, the cases of counterflowing helium and a rotating bulk, but in all the physical situations very similar theoretical and numerical problems arise. Furthermore, quite similar situations appear in other fields of physics, where a chaotic set of one dimensional topological defects, such as cosmic strings, or linear defects in solids, or lines of darkness in nonlinear light fields, appear in the system. There is an interpenetration of ideas and methods between these scientific topics which are far apart in other respects. The main purpose of this review is to bring together some of the most commonly discussed results on quantum turbulence, focusing on analytic and numerical studies. We set out a series of results on the general theory of quantum turbulence which aim to describe the properties of the chaotic vortex configuration, starting from vortex dynamics. In addition we insert a series of particular questions which are important both for the whole theory and for the various applications. We complete the article with a discussion of the hot topic, which is undoubtedly mainstream in this field, and which deals with the quasi-classical properties of quantum turbulence. We discuss this problem from the point of view of the theoretical results stated in the previous sections. We also included section, which is devoted to the experimental and numerical suggestions based on the discussed theoretical models.

  13. Numerical study of the properties of optical vortex array laser tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chun-Fu; Chu, Shu-Chun

    2013-11-01

    Chu et al. constructed a kind of Ince-Gaussian modes (IGM)-based vortex array laser beams consisting of p x p embedded optical vortexes from Ince-Gaussian modes, IG(e)(p,p) modes [Opt. Express 16, 19934 (2008)]. Such an IGM-based vortex array laser beams maintains its vortex array profile during both propagation and focusing, and is applicable to optical tweezers. This study uses the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) method to study the properties of the IGM-based vortex array laser tweezers while it traps dielectric particles. This study calculates the resultant force exerted on the spherical dielectric particles of different sizes situated at the IGM-based vortex array laser beam waist. Numerical results show that the number of trapping spots of a structure light (i.e. IGM-based vortex laser beam), is depended on the relation between the trapped particle size and the structure light beam size. While the trapped particle is small comparing to the beam size of the IGM-based vortex array laser beams, the IGM-based vortex array laser beams tweezers are suitable for multiple traps. Conversely, the tweezers is suitable for single traps. The results of this study is useful to the future development of the vortex array laser tweezers applications.

  14. Observation of a new turbulence-driven limit-cycle state in H-modes with lower hybrid current drive and lithium-wall conditioning in the EAST superconducting tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, H.Q.; Xu, G.S.; Guo, H.Y.;

    2012-01-01

    -frequency oscillation, termed a limit-cycle state, appears at the edge during the quiescent phase with good energy and particle confinement. Detailed measurements by edge Langmuir probes show modulation interaction and strong three-wave coupling between the low-frequency oscillations and high-frequency-broadband (80......The first high confinement H-mode plasma has been obtained in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) with about 1 MW lower hybrid current drive after wall conditioning by lithium evaporation and real-time injection of Li powder. Following the L–H transition, a small-amplitude, low....... And the measurements demonstrate that the energy gain of zonal flows is of the same order as the energy loss of turbulence. This strongly suggests the interactions between zonal flows and high-frequency turbulences at the pedestal during the limit-cycle state....

  15. Buoyant Norbury's vortex rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyth, Mark; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Salman, Hayder

    2014-11-01

    Norbury's vortices are a one-parameter family of axisymmetric vortex rings that are exact solutions to the Euler equations. Due to their relative simplicity, they are extensively used to model the behavior of real vortex rings found in experiments and in Nature. In this work, we extend the original formulation of the problem to include buoyancy effects for the case where the fluid that lies within the vortex has a different density to that of the ambient. In this modified formulation, buoyancy effects enter the problem through the baroclinic term of the vorticity equation. This permits an efficient numerical solution of the governing equation of motion in terms of a vortex contour method that tracks the evolution of the boundary of the vortex. Finally, we compare our numerical results with the theoretical analysis of the short-time evolution of a buoyant vortex. Funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness through grant DPI2011-28356-C03-02 and by the London Mathematical Society.

  16. Turbulence in the Ocean, Atmosphere, Galaxy and Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, C H

    1996-01-01

    Flows in natural bodies of fluid often become turbulent, with eddy-like motions dominated by inertial-vortex forces. Buoyancy, Coriolis, viscous, self-gravitational, electromagnetic, and other force constraints produce a complex phase space of wave-like hydrodynamic states that interact with turbulence eddies, masquerade as turbulence, and preserve information about previous hydrodynamic states as fossil turbulence. Evidence from the ocean, atmosphere, galaxy and universe are compared with universal similarity hypotheses of Kolmogorov (1941, 1962) for turbulence velocity u, and extensions to scalar fields q like temperature mixed by turbulence. Information about previous hydrodynamic states is preserved by Schwarz viscous and turbulence lengths and masses of self-gravitating condensates. Viscous-gravitational formation occurred 10^4-10^5 y after the Big Bang for supercluster, cluster, and then galaxy masses of the plasma, producing the first turbulence. Condensation after plasma neutralization of the H-4He ga...

  17. Onset of meso-scale turbulence in active nematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doostmohammadi, Amin; Shendruk, Tyler N.; Thijssen, Kristian; Yeomans, Julia M.

    2017-05-01

    Meso-scale turbulence is an innate phenomenon, distinct from inertial turbulence, that spontaneously occurs at low Reynolds number in fluidized biological systems. This spatiotemporal disordered flow radically changes nutrient and molecular transport in living fluids and can strongly affect the collective behaviour in prominent biological processes, including biofilm formation, morphogenesis and cancer invasion. Despite its crucial role in such physiological processes, understanding meso-scale turbulence and any relation to classical inertial turbulence remains obscure. Here we show how the motion of active matter along a micro-channel transitions to meso-scale turbulence through the evolution of locally disordered patches (active puffs) from an ordered vortex-lattice flow state. We demonstrate that the stationary critical exponents of this transition to meso-scale turbulence in a channel coincide with the directed percolation universality class. This finding bridges our understanding of the onset of low-Reynolds-number meso-scale turbulence and traditional scale-invariant turbulence in confinement.

  18. Influence of stable stratification on three-dimensional isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metais, O.

    The influence of a stable stratification on three-dimensional homogeneous turbulence is investigated by performing large eddy simulations with the subgrid scales procedure developed by Chollet and Lesieur for isotropic turbulence. Computational initial conditions close to those of the experiments performed by Itsweire, Helland and Van Atta allow the comparison of the experimental and numerical evolutions of density-stratified turbulent flows. Theoretical works by Riley, Metcalfe and Weisman and by Lilly suggest that low Froude number stably-stratified turbulence may be a nearly noninteracting superposition of wave and quasi-horizontal turbulent vortex motions. For our computations the stably-stratified turbulence seems to be a decaying three-dimensional turbulence pulsed by internal gravity waves. However some tendencies towards two-dimensional turbulence are observed.

  19. A simple model for turbulence intermittencies

    CERN Document Server

    Rimbert, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    Whether turbulence intermittencies shall be described by a log-Poisson, a log-stable pdf or other distributions is still debated nowadays. In this paper, a bridge between polymer physics, self-avoiding walk and random vortex stretching is established which may help in getting a new insight on this topics. Actually a very simple relationship between stability index of the stable law and the well known Flory exponent stemming from polymer physics is established. Moreover the scaling of turbulence intermittencies with Reynolds number is also obtained and the overall picture is very close to Tennekes' simple model for the fine scale structure of turbulence [Phys. Fluids, 11, 3 (1968)] : vortex tubes of Kolmogorov length width are bend by bigger vortices of Taylor length scale. This thus results in both a simple and sound model with no fitting parameter needed.

  20. A Nonlinear k-ε Turbulence Model Applicable to High Pressure Gradient and Large Curvature Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiyao Gu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the RANS turbulence models solve the Reynolds stress by linear hypothesis with isotropic model. They can not capture all kinds of vortexes in the turbomachineries. In this paper, an improved nonlinear k-ε turbulence model is proposed, which is modified from the RNG k-ε turbulence model and Wilcox's k-ω turbulence model. The Reynolds stresses are solved by nonlinear methods. The nonlinear k-ε turbulence model can calculate the near wall region without the use of wall functions. The improved nonlinear k-ε turbulence model is used to simulate the flow field in a curved rectangular duct. The results based on the improved nonlinear k-ε turbulence model agree well with the experimental results. The calculation results prove that the nonlinear k-ε turbulence model is available for high pressure gradient flows and large curvature flows, and it can be used to capture complex vortexes in a turbomachinery.

  1. Probing 2D Quantum Turbulence in Atomic Superfluid Gas using Bragg Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Seo, Sang Won; Kim, Joon Hyun; Shin, Yong-il

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of spatially resolved Bragg spectroscopy for detection of the quantum vortex circulation signs in an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). High-velocity atoms near the vortex cores are resonantly scattered from the BEC, and the vortex signs are determined from the scattered atom positions relative to the corresponding vortex cores. Using this method, we investigate decaying 2D quantum turbulence in a highly oblate BEC at temperatures of $\\sim 0.5 T_c$, where $T_c$ is the critical temperature of the trapped sample. Clustering of like-sign vortices is not observed; rather, the measured vortex configurations reveal weak pair correlations between the vortices and antivortices in the turbulent BEC. Our Bragg scattering method enables a direct experimental study of 2D quantum turbulence in BECs.

  2. Laguerre Gaussian beam multiplexing through turbulence

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Trichili, A

    2014-08-17

    Full Text Available We analyze the effect of atmospheric turbulence on the propagation of multiplexed Laguerre Gaussian modes. We present a method to multiplex Laguerre Gaussian modes using digital holograms and decompose the resulting field after encountering a...

  3. Controlling vortex motion and vortex kinetic friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nori, Franco; Savel'ev, Sergey

    2006-05-01

    We summarize some recent results of vortex motion control and vortex kinetic friction. (1) We describe a device [J.E. Villegas, S. Savel'ev, F. Nori, E.M. Gonzalez, J.V. Anguita, R. Garcìa, J.L. Vicent, Science 302 (2003) 1188] that can easily control the motion of flux quanta in a Niobium superconducting film on an array of nanoscale triangular magnets. Even though the input ac current has zero average, the resulting net motion of the vortices can be directed along either one direction, the opposite direction, or producing zero net motion. We also consider layered strongly anisotropic superconductors, with no fixed spatial asymmetry, and show [S. Savel'ev, F. Nori, Nature Materials 1 (2002) 179] how, with asymmetric drives, the ac motion of Josephson and/or pancake vortices can provide a net dc vortex current. (2) In analogy with the standard macroscopic friction, we present [A. Maeda, Y. Inoue, H. Kitano, S. Savel'ev, S. Okayasu, I. Tsukada, F. Nori , Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 (2005) 077001] a comparative study of the friction force felt by vortices in superconductors and charge density waves.

  4. Validation of vortex code viscous models using lidar wake measurements and CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branlard, Emmanuel; Machefaux, Ewan; Gaunaa, Mac;

    2014-01-01

    The newly implemented vortex code Omnivor coupled to the aero-servo-elastic tool hawc2 is described in this paper. Vortex wake improvements by the implementation of viscous effects are considered. Different viscous models are implemented and compared with each other. Turbulent flow fields...... with sheared inflow are used to compare the vortex code performance with CFD and lidar measurements. Laminar CFD computations are used to evaluate the performance of the viscous models. Consistent results between the vortex code and CFD tool are obtained up to three diameters downstream. The modelling...... of viscous boundaries appear more important than the modelling of viscosity in the wake. External turbulence and shear appear sufficient but their full potential flow modelling would be preferred....

  5. The investigation of coherent structures in the wall region of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer based on DNS database

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Through temporal mode direct numerical simulation, flow field database of a fully developed turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate with Mach number 4.5 and Reynolds number Reθ =1094 has been obtained. Commonly used detection meth- ods in experiments are applied to detecting coherent structures in the flow field, and it is found that coherent structures do exist in the wall region of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer. The detected results show that a low-speed streak is de- tected by using the Mu-level method, the rising parts of this streak are detected by using the second quadrant method, and the crossing regions from a low-speed streak to the high-speed one are detected by using the VITA method respectively. Notwithstanding that different regions are detected by different methods, they are all accompanied by quasi-stream-wise vortex structures.

  6. The investigation of coherent structures in the wall region of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer based on DNS database

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG ZhangFeng; ZHOU Heng; LUO JiSheng

    2007-01-01

    Through temporal mode direct numerical simulation, flow field database of a fully developed turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate with Mach number 4.5 and Reynolds number Reθ=1094 has been obtained. Commonly used detection methods in experiments are applied to detecting coherent structures in the flow field,and it is found that coherent structures do exist in the wall region of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer. The detected results show that a low-speed streak is detected by using the Mu-level method, the rising parts of this streak are detected by using the second quadrant method, and the crossing regions from a low-speed streak to the high-speed one are detected by using the VITA method respectively.Notwithstanding that different regions are detected by different methods, they are all accompanied by quasi-stream-wise vortex structures.

  7. Ultimate Turbulent Taylor-Couette Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Huisman, Sander G; Grossmann, Siegfried; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2011-01-01

    The flow structure of strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow with Reynolds numbers up to Re_i = 2*10^6 of the inner cylinder is experimentally examined with high-speed particle image velocimetry (PIV). The wind Reynolds numbers Re_w of the turbulent Taylor-vortex flow is found to scale as Re_w ~ Ta^(1/2), exactly as predicted for the ultimate turbulence regime, in which the boundary layers are turbulent. The dimensionless angular velocity flux has an effective scaling of Nu_{\\omega} ~ Ta^0.38, also in correspondence with turbulence in the ultimate regime. The scaling of Nu_{\\omega} is confirmed by local angular velocity flux measurements extracted from high-speed PIV measurements: though the flux shows huge fluctuations, its spatial and temporal average nicely agrees with the result from the global torque measurements.

  8. Physical Experiments to Investigate the Effects of Street Bottom Heating and Inflow Turbulence on Urban Street-Canyon Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jae-Jin KIM; Jong-Jin BAIK

    2005-01-01

    The effects of street bottom heating and inflow turbulence on urban street-canyon flow are experimentally investigated using a circulating water channel. Three experiments are carried out for a street canyon with a street aspect ratio of 1. Results from each experiment with bottom heating or inflow turbulence are compared with those without bottom heating and appreciable inflow turbulence. It is demonstrated that street bottom heating or inflow turbulence increases the intensity of the canyon vortex. A possible explanation on how street bottom heating or inflow turbulence intensifies the canyon vortex is given from a fluid dynamical viewpoint.

  9. Large-eddy simulations of contrails in a turbulent atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Picot

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the evolution of contrails in the vortex and dissipation regimes is studied by means of fully three-dimensional large-eddy simulation (LES coupled to a Lagrangian particle tracking method to treat the ice phase. This is the first paper where fine-scale atmospheric turbulence is generated and sustained by means of a stochastic forcing that mimics the properties of stably stratified turbulent flows as those occurring in the upper troposphere lower stratosphere. The initial flow-field is composed by the turbulent background flow and a wake flow obtained from separate LES of the jet regime. Atmospheric turbulence is the main driver of the wake instability and the structure of the resulting wake is sensitive to the intensity of the perturbations, primarily in the vertical direction. A stronger turbulence accelerates the onset of the instability, which results in shorter contrail decent and more effective mixing in the interior of the plume. However, the self-induced turbulence that is produced in the wake after the vortex break-up dominates over background turbulence at the end of the vortex regime and dominates the mixing with ambient air. This results in global microphysical characteristics such as ice mass and optical depth that are be slightly affected by the intensity of atmospheric turbulence. On the other hand, the background humidity and temperature have a first order effect on the survival of ice crystals and particle size distribution, which is in line with recent and ongoing studies in the literature.

  10. Contribution of velocity-vorticity correlations to the frictional drag in wall-bounded turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Min; Ahn, Junsun; Hwang, Jinyul; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2016-08-01

    The relationship between the frictional drag and the velocity-vorticity correlations in wall-bounded turbulent flows is derived from the mean vorticity equation. A formula for the skin friction coefficient is proposed and evaluated with regards to three canonical wall-bounded flows: turbulent boundary layer, turbulent channel flow, and turbulent pipe flow. The frictional drag encompasses four terms: advective vorticity transport, vortex stretching, viscous, and inhomogeneous terms. Drag-reduced channel flow with the slip condition is used to test the reliability of the formula. The advective vorticity transport and vortex stretching terms are found to dominate the contributions to the frictional drag.

  11. Vortex array laser beam generation from a Dove prism-embedded unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Shu-Chun; Yang, Chao-Shun; Otsuka, Kenju

    2008-11-24

    This paper proposes a new scheme for generating vortex laser beams from a laser. The proposed system consists of a Dove prism embedded in an unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer configuration. This configuration allows controlled construction of p x p vortex array beams from Ince-Gaussian modes, IG(e) (p,p) modes. An incident IG(e)(p,p) laser beam of variety order p can easily be generated from an end-pumped solid-state laser system with an off-axis pumping mechanism. This study simulates this type of vortex array laser beam generation, analytically derives the vortex positions of the resulting vortex array laser beams, and discusses beam propagation effects. The resulting vortex array laser beam can be applied to optical tweezers and atom traps in the form of two-dimensional arrays, or used to study the transfer of angular momentum to micro particles or atoms (Bose-Einstein condensate).

  12. Basic research in wake vortex alleviation using a variable twist wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, D. J.; Holbrook, G. T.

    1981-01-01

    The variable twist wing concept was used to investigate the relative effects of lift and turbulence distribution on the rolled up vortex wake. Several methods of reducing the vortex strength behind an aircraft were identified. These involve the redistribution of lift spanwise on the wing and drag distribution along the wing. Initial attempts to use the variable twist wing velocity data to validate the WAKE computer code have shown a strong correlation, although the vorticity levels were not exactly matched.

  13. On vortex shedding and prediction of vortex-induced vibrations of circular cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halse, Karl Henning

    1997-12-31

    In offshore installations, many crucial components can be classified as slender marine structures: risers, mooring lines, umbilicals and cables, pipelines. This thesis studies the vortex shedding phenomenon and the problem of predicting vortex-induced vibrations of such structures. As the development of hydrocarbons move to deeper waters, the importance of accurately predicting the vortex-induced response has increased and so the need for proper response prediction methods is large. This work presents an extensive review of existing research publications about vortex shedding from circular cylinders and the vortex-induced vibrations of cylinders and the different numerical approaches to modelling the fluid flow. The response predictions from different methods are found to disagree, both in response shapes and in vibration amplitudes. This work presents a prediction method that uses a fully three-dimensional structural finite element model integrated with a laminar two-dimensional Navier-Stokes solution modelling the fluid flow. This solution is used to study the flow both around a fixed cylinder and in a flexibly mounted one-degree-of-freedom system. It is found that the vortex-shedding process (in the low Reynolds number regime) is well described by the computer program, and that the vortex-induced vibration of the flexibly mounted section do reflect the typical dynamic characteristics of lock-in oscillations. However, the exact behaviour of the experimental results found in the literature was not reproduced. The response of the three-dimensional structural model is larger than the expected difference between a mode shape and a flexibly mounted section. This is due to the use of independent hydrodynamic sections along the cylinder. The predicted response is not unrealistic, and the method is considered a powerful tool. 221 refs., 138 figs., 36 tabs.

  14. Vortex Identification from Local Properties of the Vorticity Field

    CERN Document Server

    Elsas, J H

    2016-01-01

    A number of systematic procedures for the identification of coherent structures have been developed as a way to address their possible kinematical and dynamical roles in structural formulations of turbulence. It has been broadly acknowledged, however, that vortex detection algorithms, usually based on linear-algebraic properties of the velocity gradient tensor, are plagued with severe shortcomings and are also dependent on the choice of subjective threshold parameters in their implementations. In two-dimensions, a large class of standard vortex identification prescriptions turn out to be equivalent to the "swirling strength criterion", which is critically revisited in this work. We classify the instances where the $\\lambda_{ci}$-criterion blatantly fails and propose an alternative vortex detection scheme based on the local curvature properties of the vorticity graph -- the "vorticity curvature criterion" -- which improves over the results obtained with the $\\lambda_{ci}$-criterion in controlled Monte-Carlo te...

  15. Ubiquitous Solar Eruptions Driven by Magnetized Vortex Tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Kitiashvili, I N; Lele, S K; Mansour, N N; Wray, A A

    2013-01-01

    The solar surface is covered by high-speed jets transporting mass and energy into the solar corona and feeding the solar wind. The most prominent of these jets have been known as spicules. However, the mechanism initiating these eruptions events is still unknown. Using realistic numerical simulations we find that small-scale eruptions are produced by ubiquitous magnetized vortex tubes generated by the Sun's turbulent convection in subsurface layers. The swirling vortex tubes (resembling tornadoes) penetrate into the solar atmosphere, capture and stretch background magnetic field, and push surrounding material up, generating quasiperiodic shocks. Our simulations reveal a complicated high-speed flow patterns, and thermodynamic and magnetic structure in the erupting vortex tubes. We found that the eruptions are initiated in the subsurface layers and are driven by the high-pressure gradients in the subphotosphere and photosphere, and by the Lorentz force in the higher atmosphere layers.

  16. Nano magnetic vortex wall guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Y. Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A concept of nano magnetic vortex wall guide is introduced. Two architectures are proposed. The first one is properly designed superlattices while the other one is bilayer nanostrips. The concept is verified by micromagnetic simulations. Both guides can prevent the vortex core in a magnetic vortex wall from colliding with sample surface so that the information stored in the vortex core can be preserved during its transportation from one location to another one through the guides.

  17. Vortex Characterization for Engineering Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jankun-Kelly, M; Thompson, D S; Jiang, M; Shannahan, B; Machiraju, R

    2008-01-30

    Realistic engineering simulation data often have features that are not optimally resolved due to practical limitations on mesh resolution. To be useful to application engineers, vortex characterization techniques must be sufficiently robust to handle realistic data with complex vortex topologies. In this paper, we present enhancements to the vortex topology identification component of an existing vortex characterization algorithm. The modified techniques are demonstrated by application to three realistic data sets that illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of our approach.

  18. Vortex dynamics of stratospheric sudden warmings: a reanalysis data study using PV contour integral diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Robin; Thuburn, John; Kwasniok, Frank

    2015-04-01

    The dynamics of the polar vortex behind stratospheric sudden warming events is investigated in a data-based study. Potential vorticity contour integral diagnostics of mass and circulation are calculated from ERA-40 reanalysis data for the stratosphere. The edge of the vortex is easily identifiable in these diagnostics as a high gradient of potential vorticity, and the warming events are clearly visible. The amount of air stripped from the vortex as part of a preconditioning leading up to the warming events is determined using the balance equation of the mass integral. Significant persistent removal of mass from the vortex is found, with several such stripping events identifiable through the winter, especially in those during which a major sudden warming event occurred. These stripping episodes are visible in corresponding potential vorticity maps, where tongues of potential vorticity can be seen to be stripped from the vortex and mixed into the sorrounding surf zone of turbulent air.

  19. Jet vortex methods

    CERN Document Server

    Holm, Darryl D

    2015-01-01

    Vortex blob methods are typically characterized by a regularization length scale, below which the the dynamics are trivial for isolated blobs. In this article we will find that the dynamics need not be trivial if one is willing to consider distributional derivatives of Dirac delta functionals as valid vorticity distributions. More specifically, a new singular vortex theory is presented for regularised Euler fluid equations of ideal incompressible flow in the plane. We determine the conditions under which such regularised Euler fluid equations may admit vorticity singularities which are stronger than delta functions, e.g., derivatives of delta functions. We also characterise the Hamiltonian dynamics of the higher-order singular vortices. Applications to the design of numerical meth- ods similar to vortex blob methods are also discussed. Such findings shed light onto the rich dynamics which occur below the regularization length scale and enlighten our perspective on the multiscale aspects of regularized fluid m...

  20. Vortex tube optimization theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewins, Jeffery [Cambridge Univ., Magdalene Coll., Cambridge (United Kingdom); Bejan, Adrian [Duke Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Durham, NC (United States)

    1999-11-01

    The Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube splits a single high pressure stream of gas into cold and warm streams. Simple models for the vortex tube combined with regenerative precooling are given from which an optimisation can be undertaken. Two such optimisations are needed: the first shows that at any given cut or fraction of the cold stream, the best refrigerative load, allowing for the temperature lift, is nearly half the maximum loading that would result in no lift. The second optimisation shows that the optimum cut is an equal division of the vortex streams between hot and cold. Bounds are obtainable within this theory for the performance of the system for a given gas and pressure ratio. (Author)

  1. Magnetic vortex racetrack memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Liwei D.; Jin, Yongmei M.

    2017-02-01

    We report a new type of racetrack memory based on current-controlled movement of magnetic vortices in magnetic nanowires with rectangular cross-section and weak perpendicular anisotropy. Data are stored through the core polarity of vortices and each vortex carries a data bit. Besides high density, non-volatility, fast data access, and low power as offered by domain wall racetrack memory, magnetic vortex racetrack memory has additional advantages of no need for constrictions to define data bits, changeable information density, adjustable current magnitude for data propagation, and versatile means of ultrafast vortex core switching. By using micromagnetic simulations, current-controlled motion of magnetic vortices in cobalt nanowire is demonstrated for racetrack memory applications.

  2. Turbulence and diffusion fossil turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, C H

    2000-01-01

    Fossil turbulence processes are central to turbulence, turbulent mixing, and turbulent diffusion in the ocean and atmosphere, in astrophysics and cosmology, and in most other natural flows. George Gamov suggested in 1954 that galaxies might be fossils of primordial turbulence produced by the Big Bang. John Woods showed that breaking internal waves on horizontal dye sheets in the interior of the stratified ocean form highly persistent remnants of these turbulent events, which he called fossil turbulence. The dark mixing paradox of the ocean refers to undetected mixing that must exist somewhere to explain why oceanic scalar fields like temperature and salinity are so well mixed, just as the dark matter paradox of galaxies refers to undetected matter that must exist to explain why rotating galaxies don't fly apart by centrifugal forces. Both paradoxes result from sampling techniques that fail to account for the extreme intermittency of random variables involved in self-similar, nonlinear, cascades over a wide ra...

  3. Vortex solitons at the interface separating square and hexagonal lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jović Savić, Dragana, E-mail: jovic@ipb.ac.rs; Piper, Aleksandra; Žikić, Radomir; Timotijević, Dejan

    2015-06-19

    Vortex solitons at the interface separating two different photonic lattices – square and hexagonal – are demonstrated numerically. We consider the conditions for the existence of discrete vortex states at such interfaces and develop a concise picture of different scenarios of the vortex solutions behavior. Various vortices with different size and topological charges are considered, as well as various lattice interfaces. A novel type of discrete vortex surface solitons in a form of five-lobe solution is observed. Besides stable three-lobe and six-lobe discrete surface modes propagating for long distances, we observe various oscillatory vortex surface solitons, as well as dynamical instabilities of different kinds of solutions and study their angular momentum. Dynamical instabilities occur for higher values of the propagation constant, or at higher beam powers. - Highlights: • We demonstrate vortex solitons at the square–hexagonal photonic lattice interface. • A novel type of five-lobe surface vortex solitons is observed. • Different phase structures of surface solutions are studied. • Orbital angular momentum transfer of such solutions is investigated.

  4. A parabolized stability analysis of a trailing vortex wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edstrand, Adam; Schmid, Peter; Taira, Kunihiko; Cattafesta, Louis

    2016-11-01

    To aid in understanding how best to control a trailing vortex, we perform a parabolized stability analysis on a flow past a wing at a chord-based Reynolds number of 1000. At the upstream position, the wake instability branch dominates, with only a single vortex instability present in the spectrum. With downstream progression, the growth rate of the wake instability decays, but remains unstable 10 chords downstream. With the wake mode being unstable so far downstream, these results imply that the excitation of the wake instability, despite the varying base flow, will continue to see growth and potentially disrupt the trailing vortex. Conversely, the vortex instability in its formative region rapidly decays to the stable half-plane, then at 11 chords downstream becomes unstable again. We hypothesized the renewed instability growth far downstream is developing as a result of vortex instabilities, however the excitation of these instabilities proves to be challenging in the vortex far field. From these results, control near the two-dimensional wake behind the airfoil may better interfere with the trailing vortex formation; however, to determine the optimal disturbances, an adjoint analysis is required and is included in the future work of the project. ONR Grants N00014-10-1-0832 and N00014-15-1-2403.

  5. Dynamics of the vortex wakes of flying and swimming vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, J M

    1995-01-01

    The vortex wakes of flying and swimming animals provide evidence of the history of aero- and hydrodynamic force generation during the locomotor cycle. Vortex-induced momentum flux in the wake is the reaction of forces the animal imposes on its environment, which must be in equilibrium with inertial and external forces. In flying birds and bats, the flapping wings generate lift both to provide thrust and to support the weight. Distinct wingbeat and wake movement patterns can be identified as gaits. In flow visualization experiments, only two wake patterns have been identified: a vortex ring gait with inactive upstroke, and a continuous vortex gait with active upstroke. These gaits may be modelled theoretically by free vortex and lifting line theory to predict mechanical energy consumption, aerodynamic forces and muscle activity. Longer-winged birds undergo a distinct gait change with speed, but shorter-winged species use the vortex ring gait at all speeds. In swimming fish, the situation is more complex: the wake vortices form a reversed von Kármán vortex street, but little is known about the mechanism of generation of the wake, or about how it varies with speed and acceleration or with body form and swimming mode. An unresolved complicating factor is the interaction between the drag wake of the flapping fish body and the thrusting wake from the tail.

  6. Applications of URANS on predicting unsteady turbulent separated flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinglei Xu; Huiyang Ma

    2009-01-01

    Accurate prediction of unsteady separated turbu-lent flows remains one of the toughest tasks and a practi-cal challenge for turbulence modeling. In this paper, a 2D flow past a circular cylinder at Reynolds number 3,900 is numerically investigated by using the technique of unsteady RANS (URANS). Some typical linear and nonlinear eddy viscosity turbulence models (LEVM and NLEVM) and a quadratic explicit algebraic stress model (EASM) are evalu-ated. Numerical results have shown that a high-performance cubic NLEVM, such as CLS, are superior to the others in simulating turbulent separated flows with unsteady vortex shedding.

  7. Applications of URANS on predicting unsteady turbulent separated flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinglei; Ma, Huiyang

    2009-06-01

    Accurate prediction of unsteady separated turbulent flows remains one of the toughest tasks and a practical challenge for turbulence modeling. In this paper, a 2D flow past a circular cylinder at Reynolds number 3,900 is numerically investigated by using the technique of unsteady RANS (URANS). Some typical linear and nonlinear eddy viscosity turbulence models (LEVM and NLEVM) and a quadratic explicit algebraic stress model (EASM) are evaluated. Numerical results have shown that a high-performance cubic NLEVM, such as CLS, are superior to the others in simulating turbulent separated flows with unsteady vortex shedding.

  8. TURBULENT COHERENT STRUCTURES IN CHANNELS WITH SAND WAVES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Sand wave bed is one of the typical shape of complicated boundaries in hydraulics and river dynamics, and sand wave motion is the main form of the bed load motion in-rivers, thence the study of turbulent structures over sand waves is of importance both in theory and practice. In this paper turbulent coherent structures over single-and multi-sand waves were studied experimentally, the formulae for the separation length and vortex shedding period of the turbulent flow over single-sand wave were suggested, and the characteristics of turbulent coherent structures over multi-sand waves were also given.

  9. The cosmic web and microwave background fossilize the first turbulent combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Carl H.; Keeler, R. Norris

    2016-10-01

    Collisional fluid mechanics theory predicts a turbulent hot big bang at Planck conditions from large, negative, turbulence stresses below the Fortov-Kerr limit (Big bang turbulence fossilized when quarks formed, extracting the mass energy of the universe by extreme negative viscous stresses of inflation, expanding to length scales larger than the horizon scale ct. Viscous-gravitational structure formation by fragmentation was triggered at big bang fossil vorticity turbulence vortex lines during the plasma epoch, as observed by the Planck space telescope. A cosmic web of protogalaxies, protogalaxyclusters, and protogalaxysuperclusters that formed in turbulent boundary layers of the spinning voids are hereby identified as expanding turbulence fossils that falsify CDMHC cosmology.

  10. Studying the mesoscale structure of inhomogeneities within the high-latitude stratosphere during the evolution of the circumpolar vortex on the basis of aircraft measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shur, G. N.; Volkov, V. V.; Sitnikov, N. M.; Ulanovskii, A. E.; Sitnikova, V. I.

    2014-03-01

    Mesoscale inhomogeneities in the fields of wind, temperature, and ozone concentrations have been studied on the basis of aircraft measurements performed within the international EUPLEX and RECONCILE projects in the northern polar region in the presence of the circumpolar vortex. Data have been obtained on the structure of turbulence inside and outside the circumpolar vortex. The zones of enhanced turbulence have been studied. The spectrum of coherence between ozone and wind velocity are found to have high values.

  11. Gauge turbulence, topological defect dynamics, and condensation in Higgs models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasenzer, Thomas [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI, Planckstraße 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); McLerran, Larry [Physics Department, Bldg. 510A, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); RIKEN BNL Research Center, Bldg. 510A, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Physics Department, China Central Normal University, Wuhan (China); Pawlowski, Jan M.; Sexty, Dénes [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI, Planckstraße 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    The real-time dynamics of topological defects and turbulent configurations of gauge fields for electric and magnetic confinement are studied numerically within a 2+1D Abelian Higgs model. It is shown that confinement is appearing in such systems equilibrating after a strong initial quench such as the overpopulation of the infrared modes. While the final equilibrium state does not support confinement, metastable vortex defect configurations appearing in the gauge field are found to be closely related to the appearance of physically observable confined electric and magnetic charges. These phenomena are seen to be intimately related to the approach of a non-thermal fixed point of the far-from-equilibrium dynamical evolution, signaled by universal scaling in the gauge-invariant correlation function of the Higgs field. Even when the parameters of the Higgs action do not support condensate formation in the vacuum, during this approach, transient Higgs condensation is observed. We discuss implications of these results for the far-from-equilibrium dynamics of Yang–Mills fields and potential mechanisms of how confinement and condensation in non-Abelian gauge fields can be understood in terms of the dynamics of Higgs models. These suggest that there is an interesting new class of dynamics of strong coherent turbulent gauge fields with condensates.

  12. Stagnation zone formation on the axis of a closed vortex flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naumov, I. V.; Okulov, Valery; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2014-01-01

    The features of developing a counterflow zone (bubble-mode vortex breakdown or vortex explosion) at the center of an intensively swirled flow produced in a liquid-filled cylindrical container with a rotating endwall have been studied. The observation showed that the scenario of developing a bubble...

  13. Theory of vortex-lattice melting in a one-dimensional optical lattice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoek, M.; Stoof, H.T.C.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate quantum and temperature fluctuations of a vortex lattice in a one-dimensional optical lattice. We discuss in particular the Bloch bands of the Tkachenko modes and calculate the correlation function of the vortex positions along the direction of the optical lattice. Because of the

  14. Simulation of a MW rotor equipped with vortex generators using CFD and an actuator shape model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troldborg, Niels; Zahle, Frederik; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a comparison of CFD simulations of the DTU 10 MW reference wind turbine with and without vortex generators installed on the inboard part of the blades. The vortex generators are modelled by introducing body forces determined using a modified version of the so-called BAY mode...

  15. Electrical Turbulence in Three-Dimensional Heart Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfree, A. T.

    1994-11-01

    Rotors or vortex action potentials with a diameter of about 1 centimeter and a rotation period of about 0.1 second occur in normal myocardium just before transition to fibrillation, a disorderly pattern of action potential propagation. Numerical models and corresponding mathematical analysis have recently suggested candidate mechanisms, all two-dimensional, for this transition from periodic electrical activity to something resembling turbulence. However, comparably recent experiments unanimously show that rotors, and the spiral waves they radiate, remain stably periodic in two-dimensional myocardium. This seeming paradox suggests a transition mediated through disorderly dynamics of the electrical vortex in three dimensions, as a "vortex filament."

  16. Viscous tilting and production of vorticity in homogeneous turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzner, M.; Guala, M.; Lüthi, B.; Liberzon, A.; Nikitin, N.; Kinzelbach, W.; Tsinober, A.

    2010-06-01

    Viscous depletion of vorticity is an essential and well known property of turbulent flows, balancing, in the mean, the net vorticity production associated with the vortex stretching mechanism. In this letter, we, however, demonstrate that viscous effects are not restricted to a mere destruction process, but play a more complex role in vorticity dynamics that is as important as vortex stretching. Based on the results from three dimensional particle tracking velocimetry experiments and direct numerical simulation of homogeneous and quasi-isotropic turbulence, we show that the viscous term in the vorticity equation can also locally induce production of vorticity and changes of the orientation of the vorticity vector (viscous tilting).

  17. Viscous tilting and production of vorticity in homogeneous turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Holzner, M; Lüthi, B; Liberzon, A; Nikitin, N; Kinzelbach, W; Tsinober, A

    2010-01-01

    Viscous depletion of vorticity is an essential and well known property of turbulent flows, balancing, in the mean, the net vorticity production associated with the vortex stretching mechanism. In this letter we however demonstrate that viscous effects are not restricted to a mere destruction process, but play a more complex role in vorticity dynamics that is as important as vortex stretching. Based on results from particle tracking experiments (3D-PTV) and direct numerical simulation (DNS) of homogeneous and quasi isotropic turbulence, we show that the viscous term in the vorticity equation can also locally induce production of vorticity and changes of its orientation (viscous tilting).

  18. Angular dynamics of a small particle in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Candelier, F; Mehlig, B

    2016-01-01

    We compute the angular dynamics of a neutrally buoyant nearly spherical particle immersed in an unsteady fluid. We assume that the particle is small, that its translational slip velocity is negligible, and that unsteady and convective inertia are small perturbations. We derive an approximation for the torque on the particle that determines the first inertial corrections to Jeffery's equation. These corrections arise as a consequence of local vortex stretching, and can be substantial in turbulence where local vortex stretching is strong and closely linked to the irreversibility of turbulence.

  19. Stochastic Response of Energy Balanced Model for Vortex-Induced Vibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Krenk, S.

    of lightly damped structures are found on two branches, with the highest amplification branch on the low-frequency branch. The effect free wind turbulence is to destabilize the vibrations on the high amplification branch, thereby reducing the oscillation amplitude. The effect is most pronounced for very......A double oscillator model for vortex-induced oscillations of structural elements based on exact power exchange between fluid and structure, recently proposed by authors, is extended to include the effect of the turbulent component of the wind. In non-turbulent flow vortex-induced vibrations...... lightly damped structures. The character of the structural vibrations changes with increasing turbulence and damping from nearly regular harmonic oscillation to typical narrow-banded stochastic response, closely resembling observed behaviour in experiments and full-scale structures....

  20. Dynamics of Vortex Cavitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings, P.C.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes the mechanisms with which tip vortex cavitation is responsible for broadband pressure fluctuations on ship propellers. Hypotheses for these are described in detail by Bosschers (2009). Validation is provided by three main cavitation-tunnel experiments, one on a model propeller

  1. Vortex Simulation of the Bubbly Flow around a Hydrofoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomi Uchiyama

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is concerned with the two-dimensional simulation for an air-water bubbly flow around a hydrofoil. The vortex method, proposed by the authors for gas-liquid two-phase free turbulent flow in a prior paper, is applied for the simulation. The liquid vorticity field is discrerized by vortex elements, and the behavior of vortex element and the bubble motion are simultaneously computed by the Lagrangian approach. The effect of bubble motion on the liquid flow is taken into account through the change in the strength of vortex element. The bubbly flow around a hydrofoil of NACA4412 with a chord length 100 mm is simulated. The Reynolds number is 2.5×105, the bubble diameter is 1 mm, and the volumetric flow ratio of bubble to whole fluid is 0.048. It is confirmed that the simulated distributions of air volume fraction and pressure agree well with the trend of the measurement and that the effect of angle of attack on the flow is favorably analyzed. These demonstrate that the vortex method is applicable to the bubbly flow analysis around a hydrofoil.

  2. Evolution of vortex-surface fields in transitional boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yue; Zhao, Yaomin; Xiong, Shiying

    2016-11-01

    We apply the vortex-surface field (VSF), a Lagrangian-based structure-identification method, to the DNS database of transitional boundary layers. The VSFs are constructed from the vorticity fields within a sliding window at different times and locations using a recently developed boundary-constraint method. The isosurfaces of VSF, representing vortex surfaces consisting of vortex lines with different wall distances in the laminar stage, show different evolutionary geometries in transition. We observe that the vortex surfaces with significant deformation evolve from wall-parallel planar sheets through hairpin-like structures and packets into a turbulent spot with regeneration of small-scale hairpins. From quantitative analysis, we show that a small number of representative or influential vortex surfaces can contribute significantly to the increase of the drag coefficient in transition, which implies a reduced-order model based on VSF. This work has been supported in part by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11472015, 11522215 and 11521091), and the Thousand Young Talents Program of China.

  3. Passive Wake Vortex Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, J M

    2001-10-18

    The collapse of the Soviet Union and ending of the Cold War brought about many significant changes in military submarine operations. The enemies that the US Navy faces today and in the future will not likely be superpowers armed with nuclear submarines, but rather smaller, rogue nations employing cheaper diesel/electric submarines with advanced air-independent propulsion systems. Unlike Cold War submarine operations, which occurred in deep-water environments, future submarine conflicts are anticipated to occur in shallow, littoral regions that are complex and noisy. Consequently, non-acoustic signatures will become increasingly important and the submarine stealth technology designed for deep-water operations may not be effective in these environments. One such non-acoustic signature is the surface detection of a submarine's trailing vortex wake. If a submarine runs in a slightly buoyant condition, its diving planes must be inclined at a negative angle of attack to generate sufficient downforce, which keeps the submarine from rising to the surface. As a result, the diving planes produce a pair of counter-rotating trailing vortices that propagate to the water surface. In previous deep-water operations, this was not an issue since the submarines could dive deep enough so that the vortex pair became incoherent before it reached the water surface. However, in shallow, littoral environments, submarines do not have the option of diving deep and, hence, the vortex pair can rise to the surface and leave a distinct signature that might be detectable by synthetic aperture radar. Such detection would jeopardize not only the mission of the submarine, but also the lives of military personnel on board. There has been another attempt to solve this problem and reduce the intensity of trailing vortices in the wakes of military submarines. The research of Quackenbush et al. over the past few years has been directed towards an idea called ''vortex leveraging

  4. Recent results on analytical plasma turbulence theory: Realizability, intermittency, submarginal turbulence, and self-organized criticality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krommes, J.A.

    2000-01-18

    Recent results and future challenges in the systematic analytical description of plasma turbulence are described. First, the importance of statistical realizability is stressed, and the development and successes of the Realizable Markovian Closure are briefly reviewed. Next, submarginal turbulence (linearly stable but nonlinearly self-sustained fluctuations) is considered and the relevance of nonlinear instability in neutral-fluid shear flows to submarginal turbulence in magnetized plasmas is discussed. For the Hasegawa-Wakatani equations, a self-consistency loop that leads to steady-state vortex regeneration in the presence of dissipation is demonstrated and a partial unification of recent work of Drake (for plasmas) and of Waleffe (for neutral fluids) is given. Brief remarks are made on the difficulties facing a quantitatively accurate statistical description of submarginal turbulence. Finally, possible connections between intermittency, submarginal turbulence, and self-organized criticality (SOC) are considered and outstanding questions are identified.

  5. Alleviation of fuselage form drag using vortex flows: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wortman, A.

    1987-09-15

    The concept of using vortex generators to reduce the fuselage form drag of transport aircraft combines the outflow from the plane of symmetry which is induced by the rotational component of the vortex flow with the energization of the boundary layer to reduce the momentum thickness and to delay or eliminate flow separation. This idea was first advanced by the author in 1981. Under a DOE grant, the concept was validated in wind tunnel tests of approximately 1:17 scale models of fuselages of Boeing 747 and Lockheed C-5 aircraft. The search for the minimum drag involved three vortex generator configurations with three sizes of each in six locations clustered in the aft regions of the fuselages at the beginning of the tail upsweep. The local Reynolds number, which is referred to the length of boundary layer run from the nose, was approximately 10{sup 7} so that a fully developed turbulent boundary layer was present. Vortex generator planforms ranged from swept tapered, through swept straight, to swept reverse tapered wings whose semi-spans ranged from 50% to 125% of the local boundary layer thickness. Pitch angles of the vortex generators were varied by inboard actuators under the control of an external proportional digital radio controller. It was found that certain combinations of vortex generator parameters increased drag. However, with certain configurations, locations, and pitch angles of vortex generators, the highest drag reductions were 3% for the 747 and about 6% for the C-5, thus confirming the arguments that effectiveness increases with the rate of upsweep of the tail. Greatest gains in performance are therefore expected on aft loading military transports. 10 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Automatic Tip Vortex Core Profiling for Numerical Flow Simulations of Rotorcraft in Hover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, David L.; Chaderjian, Neal M.

    2010-01-01

    An automated approach is presented that extracts visual and quantitative data from vortex cores produced by Navier-Stokes simulations of rotorcraft in hover mode. This approach extracts contiguous rotor tip vortex-core trajectories, cross-flow velocity profiles, and vortex-core diameter variation with wake age (azimuth angle). This automated approach is faster and more accurate than a conventional manual approach. Moreover, this new approach allows for an efficient way to quantitatively compare vortex-core profiles from different flow simulations, e.g., grid resolution studies, and validate computed results with experimental data

  7. Shell Models of Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Plunian, Franck; Frick, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Shell models of hydrodynamic turbulence originated in the seventies. Their main aim was to describe the statistics of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in spectral space, using a simple set of ordinary differential equations. In the eighties, shell models of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence emerged based on the same principles as their hydrodynamic counter-part but also incorporating interactions between magnetic and velocity fields. In recent years, significant improvements have been made such as the inclusion of non-local interactions and appropriate definitions for helicities. Though shell models cannot account for the spatial complexity of MHD turbulence, their dynamics are not over simplified and do reflect those of real MHD turbulence including intermittency or chaotic reversals of large-scale modes. Furthermore, these models use realistic values for dimensionless parameters (high kinetic and magnetic Reynolds numbers, low or high magnetic Prandtl number) allowing extended inertial range and accu...

  8. Plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, W. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies; Hu, G. [Globalstar LP, San Jose, CA (United States)

    1998-07-01

    The origin of plasma turbulence from currents and spatial gradients in plasmas is described and shown to lead to the dominant transport mechanism in many plasma regimes. A wide variety of turbulent transport mechanism exists in plasmas. In this survey the authors summarize some of the universally observed plasma transport rates.

  9. High Turbulence

    CERN Multimedia

    EuHIT, Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    As a member of the EuHIT (European High-Performance Infrastructures in Turbulence - see here) consortium, CERN is participating in fundamental research on turbulence phenomena. To this end, the Laboratory provides European researchers with a cryogenic research infrastructure (see here), where the first tests have just been performed.

  10. The shock-vortex interaction patterns affected by vortex flow regime and vortex models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Keun-Shik; Barik, Hrushikesh; Chang, Se-Myong

    2009-08-01

    We have used a third-order essentially non-oscillatory method to obtain numerical shadowgraphs for investigation of shock-vortex interaction patterns. To search different interaction patterns, we have tested two vortex models (the composite vortex model and the Taylor vortex model) and as many as 47 parametric data sets. By shock-vortex interaction, the impinging shock is deformed to a S-shape with leading and lagging parts of the shock. The vortex flow is locally accelerated by the leading shock and locally decelerated by the lagging shock, having a severely elongated vortex core with two vertices. When the leading shock escapes the vortex, implosion effect creates a high pressure in the vertex area where the flow had been most expanded. This compressed region spreads in time with two frontal waves, an induced expansion wave and an induced compression wave. They are subsonic waves when the shock-vortex interaction is weak but become supersonic waves for strong interactions. Under a intermediate interaction, however, an induced shock wave is first developed where flow speed is supersonic but is dissipated where the incoming flow is subsonic. We have identified three different interaction patterns that depend on the vortex flow regime characterized by the shock-vortex interaction.

  11. Secondary turbulent flow in an infinte bend

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, H. Bo; Gislason, Kjartan; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    The flow in an infinite circular bend is inverstigated in both the laminar and fully turbulent flow case, by use of laminar flow solver, a k-e turbulence model, and a fully Reynolds stress turbulence model. The topic of the analysis is to investigate whether a counter-rotating secondary flow cell...... is formed near the surface at the outer bank. This cell might help to stabilise the bank and hereby be an important factor for the morphology in a meandering river. In the laminar runs stability criterion related to a Dean number was estabilshed. In the simulations with the k-e model and the Reynolds stress...... model, the influence of the curvature ratio and cross section geometry on the vortex pattern is investigated. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that an-isotropy of turbulence plays an important role for the structure of flow pattern and existence of an extra flow cell....

  12. Towards quantum turbulence in finite temperature Bose-Einstein condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, Shanquan [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University,Beijing, 100875 (China); Tian, Yu [School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing, 100049 (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of High Temperature Superconductors,Shanghai, 200444 (China); Zhang, Hongbao [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University,Beijing, 100875 (China); Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, andThe International Solvay Institutes,Pleinlaan 2, Brussels, B-1050 (Belgium)

    2016-07-19

    Motivated by the various indications that holographic superfluid is BCS like at the standard quantization but BEC like at the alternative quantization, we have implemented the alternative quantization in the dynamical holographic superfluid for the first time. With this accomplishment, we further initiate the detailed investigation of quantum turbulence in finite temperature BEC by a long time stable numerical simulation of bulk dynamics, which includes the two body decay of vortex number caused by vortex pair annihilation, the onset of superfluid turbulence signaled by Kolmogorov scaling law, and a direct energy cascade demonstrated by injecting energy to the turbulent superfluid. All of these results share the same patterns as the holographic superfluid at the standard quantization, thus suggest that these should be universal features for quantum turbulence at temperatures order of the critical temperature.

  13. Towards quantum turbulence in finite temperature Bose-Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Shanquan; Tian, Yu; Zhang, Hongbao

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by the various indications that holographic superfluid is BCS like at the standard quantization but BEC like at the alternative quantization, we have implemented the alternative quantization in the dynamical holographic superfluid for the first time. With this accomplishment, we further initiate the detailed investigation of quantum turbulence in finite temperature BEC by a long time stable numerical simulation of bulk dynamics, which includes the two body decay of vortex number caused by vortex pair annihilation, the onset of superfluid turbulence signaled by Kolmogorov scaling law, and a direct energy cascade demonstrated by injecting energy to the turbulent superfluid. All of these results share the same patterns as the holographic superfluid at the standard quantization, thus suggest that these should be universal features for quantum turbulence at temperatures order of the critical temperature.

  14. Towards Quantum Turbulence in Finite Temperature Bose-Einstein Condensates

    CERN Document Server

    Lan, Shanquan; Zhang, Hongbao

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the various indications that holographic superfluid is BCS like at the standard quantization but BEC like at the alternative quantization, we have implemented the alternative quantization in the dynamical holographic superfluid for the first time. With this accomplishment, we further initiate the detailed investigation of quantum turbulence in finite temperature BEC by a long time stable numerical simulation of bulk dynamics, which includes the two body decay of vortex number caused by vortex pair annihilation, the onset of superfluid turbulence signaled by Kolmogorov scaling law, and a direct energy cascade demonstrated by injecting energy to the turbulent superfluid. All of these results share the same patterns as the holographic superfluid at the standard quantization, thus suggest that these should be universal features for quantum turbulence at temperatures order of the critical temperature.

  15. Exact results for vortex loop operators in 3d supersymmetric theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drukker, Nadav; Okuda, Takuya; Passerini, Filippo

    2014-07-01

    Three dimensional field theories admit disorder line operators, dubbed vortex loop operators. They are defined by the path integral in the presence of prescribed singularities along the defect line. We study half-BPS vortex loop operators for = 2 supersymmetric theories on 3, its deformation and 1 × 2. We construct BPS vortex loops defined by the path integral with a fixed gauge or flavor holonomy for infinitesimal curves linking the loop. It is also possible to include a singular profile for matter fields. For vortex loops defined by holonomy, we perform supersymmetric localization by calculating the fluctuation modes, or alternatively by applying the index theory for transversally elliptic operators. We clarify how the latter method works in situations without fixed points of relevant isometries. Abelian mirror symmetry transforms Wilson and vortex loops in a specific way. In particular an ordinary Wilson loop transforms into a vortex loop for a flavor symmetry. Our localization results confirm the predictions of abelian mirror symmetry.

  16. Characterizing a burst leading-edge vortex on a rotating flat plate wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Anya R.; Medina, Albert; Spooner, Hannah; Mulleners, Karen

    2016-04-01

    Identifying, characterizing, and tracking incoherent vortices in highly separated flows is of interest for the development of new low-order models for unsteady lift prediction. The current work examines several methods to identify vortex burst and characterize a burst leading-edge vortex. Time-resolved stereoscopic PIV was performed on a rotating flat plate wing at Re = 2500. The burst process was found to occur at mid-span and is characterized by axial flow reversal, the entrainment of opposite-sign vorticity, and a rapid expansion of vortex size. A POD analysis revealed that variations in certain mode coefficients are indicative of the flow state changes characteristics of burst. During burst, the leading-edge vortex evolves to a region of inhomogeneous vorticity distributed over a large area. Several methods of defining the vortex size and circulation are evaluated and a combination of these can be used to characterize the leading-edge vortex both pre- and post-burst.

  17. Frequency response of Lamb-Oseen vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Rodríguez, F. J.; Parras, L.; del Pino, C.

    2016-12-01

    In this numerical study we present the frequency response of the Lamb-Oseen (Gaussian) vortex for two synthetic jet configurations. The first one consists of an annular axial jet that is superimposed on the Gaussian vortex. The other configuration deals with an off-axis, single-point, axial jet (SPI). We detect that the system responds to the forcing for a given axial wavenumber, k, exciting natural modes of the vortex by a resonance mechanism. We propose an explanation for the physical mechanism responsible for the maximum energy gain obtained by comparing our results with the different branches found theoretically by Fabre et al (2006 J. Fluid Mech. 551 235-74). We find high energy gains in both cases ({G}∞ ≃ {10}3 for the annular jet and {G}∞ ≃ {10}4 for the SPI jet), so these types of forcing are able to produce responses of the system strong enough to reach a non-linear state. Axisymmetric modes, with azimuthal wavenumber m = 0, produce the highest energy gain while applying an annular forcing. However, other modes, such as the helical one m = 1 and also double helix modes with m = 2, contribute in the SPI configuration. We find that the best region to be tested experimentally in both cases is the region that corresponds to the L2 branch described by Fabre and his collaborators. Furthermore, and whenever using these L2 branch frequencies, the response of the system is always axisymmetric, independently of the type of excitation. Finally, we conclude that the energy gain with the SPI jet is one order of magnitude greater than for the annular jet, so that the single-point off-axis jet is a feasible candidate to design a control device.

  18. Subcritical excitation of plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.; Yagi, M.; Fukuyama, A.

    1996-01-01

    Theory of current-diffusive interchange mode turbulence in plasmas is developed in the presence of collisional transport. Double-valued amplitude of stationary fluctuations is expressed in terms of the pressure gradient. The backward bifurcation is shown to appear near the linear stability boundary. The subcritical nature of the turbulence is explicitly illustrated. Critical pressure gradient at which the transition from collisional transport to the turbulent one is to occur is predicted. This provides a prototype of the transport theory for nonlinear-non-equilibrium systems. (author).

  19. Subcritical excitation of plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan); Itoh, Sanae; Yagi, Masatoshi; Fukuyama, Atsushi

    1996-09-01

    Theory of current-diffusive interchange mode turbulence in plasmas in the presence of collisional transport is developed. Amplitude of stationary fluctuations is expressed in terms of the double-valued function of the pressure gradient. The backward bifurcation is shown to appear near the linear stability boundary. The subcritical nature of the turbulence is explicitly illustrated. The critical pressure gradient at which the transition from collisional transport to the turbulent one is to occur is predicted. This work provides a prototype of the transport theory for nonlinear-nonequilibrium systems. (author)

  20. Quadrature Uncertainty and Information Entropy of Quantum Elliptical Vortex States

    CERN Document Server

    Banerji, Anindya; Singh, Ravindra Pratap; Chowdhury, Saurav; Bandyopadhyay, Abir

    2013-01-01

    We study the quadrature uncertainty of the quantum elliptical vortex state using the associated Wigner function. Deviations from the minimum uncertainty states were observed due to the absence of the Gaussian nature. In our study of the entropy, we noticed that with increasing vorticity, entropy increases for both the modes. We further observed that, there exists an optimum value of ellipticity which gives rise to maximum entanglement of the two modes of the quantum elliptical vortex states. A further increase in ellipticity reduces the entropy thereby resulting in a loss of information carrying capacity. We check the validity of the entropic inequality relations, namely the subaddivity and the Araki-Lieb inequality. The later was satisfied only for a very small range of the ellipticity of the vortex while the former seemed to be valid at all values.

  1. A NUMERICAL STUDY ON VORTEX RINGS WITH SWIRLHu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A finite difference scheme in cylindrical coordinates was used to study the three-dimensional (3D) motion of a vortex ring with swirl and the passage interaction between two vortex rings. For the 3D evolution of a single thin ring, the azimuthal perturbation modes grow linearly in the early stage. According to their growth rates, two bands of growing waves, which correspond to the first and the second radial mode respectively, can be observed. The result is similar to the prediction of short wave instability theory for swirl-free vortex rings. For the passage process between two rings, results show that the azimuthal velocity is in inverse proportion to radius while the azimuthal vorticity is in proportion to radius during the interaction.

  2. Interplay of waves and eddies in rotating stratified turbulence and the link with kinetic-potential energy partition

    CERN Document Server

    Marino, Raffaele; Herbert, Corentin; Pouquet, Annick

    2015-01-01

    The interplay between waves and eddies in stably stratified rotating flows is investigated by means of world-class direct numerical simulations using up to $3072^3$ grid points. Strikingly, we find that the shift from vortex to wave dominated dynamics occurs at a wavenumber $k_R$ which does not depend on Reynolds number, suggesting that partition of energy between wave and vortical modes is not sensitive to the development of turbulence at the smaller scales. We also show that $k_R$ is comparable to the wavenumber at which exchanges between kinetic and potential modes stabilize at close to equipartition, emphasizing the role of potential energy, as conjectured in the atmosphere and the oceans. Moreover, $k_R$ varies as the inverse of the Froude number as explained by the scaling prediction proposed, consistent with recent observations and modeling of the Mesosphere-Lower Thermosphere and of the ocean.

  3. Identifying Turbulent Structures through Topological Segmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bremer, Peer-Timo; Gruber, Andrea; Bennett, Janine C.; Gyulassy, Attila; Kolla, Hemanth; Chen, Jacqueline H.; Grout, Ray W.

    2016-01-01

    A new method of extracting vortical structures from a turbulent flow is proposed whereby topological segmentation of an indicator function scalar field is used to identify the regions of influence of the individual vortices. This addresses a long-standing challenge in vector field topological analysis: indicator functions commonly used produce a scalar field based on the local velocity vector field; reconstructing regions of influence for a particular structure requires selecting a threshold to define vortex extent. In practice, the same threshold is rarely meaningful throughout a given flow. By also considering the topology of the indicator field function, the characteristics of vortex strength and extent can be separated and the ambiguity in the choice of the threshold reduced. The proposed approach is able to identify several types of vortices observed in a jet in cross-flow configuration simultaneously where no single threshold value for a selection of common indicator functions appears able to identify all of these vortex types.

  4. Coherent vortical structures in two-dimensional plasma turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, H.L.; Coutsias, E.A.; Huld, T.;

    1992-01-01

    A laboratory experiment was carried out in order to study the nonlinear saturated stage of the cross-field electrostatic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a strongly magnetized plasma. The presence of large vortex-like structures in a background of wide-band turbulent fluctuations was demonstrated...... simulations. The importance of the large scale structures for the turbulent plasma transport across magnetic field lines was analyzed in detail....

  5. Role of thermal friction in relaxation of turbulent Bose-Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joon Hyun; Kwon, Woo Jin; Shin, Y.

    2016-09-01

    In recent experiments, the relaxation dynamics of highly oblate, turbulent Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) was investigated by measuring the vortex decay rates in various sample conditions [Phys. Rev. A 90, 063627 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.90.063627] and, separately, the thermal friction coefficient α for vortex motion was measured from the long-time evolution of a corotating vortex pair in a BEC [Phys. Rev. A 92, 051601(R) (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.92.051601]. We present a comparative analysis of the experimental results, and find that the vortex decay rate Γ is almost linearly proportional to α . We perform numerical simulations of the time evolution of a turbulent BEC using a point-vortex model equipped with longitudinal friction and vortex-antivortex pair annihilation, and observe that the linear dependence of Γ on α is quantitatively accounted for in the dissipative point-vortex model. The numerical simulations reveal that thermal friction in the experiment was too strong to allow for the emergence of a vortex-clustered state out of decaying turbulence.

  6. Classification of coherent vortices creation and distance of topological charge conservation in non-Kolmogorov atmospheric turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhong; Zeng, Jun; Duan, Meiling

    2015-05-04

    The analytical expressions for the cross-spectral density function of partially coherent sinh-Gaussian (ShG) vortex beams propagating through free space and non-Kolmogorov atmospheric turbulence are derived, and used to study the classification of coherent vortices creation and distance of topological charge conservation. With the increment of the general structure constant and the waist width, as well as the decrement of the general exponent, the inner scale of turbulence and spatial correlation length, the distance of topological charge conservation will decrease, whereas the outer scale of turbulence and the Sh-part parameter have no effect on the distance of topological charge conservation. According to the creation, the coherent vortices are grouped into three classes: the first is the inherent coherent vortices of the vortex beams, the second is created by the vortex beams when propagating through free space, and the third is created by the atmospheric turbulence inducing the vortex beams.

  7. Unsteady Flow Analysis of Pump Mode Small Discharge Condition for a Francis Pump-turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoran, ZHAO; Yexiang, XIAO; Jincai, XU; Wei, XU; Jianbo, SUN; Zhengwei, WANG; Yangyang, YAO

    2016-11-01

    Unsteady flow phenomena, including vortex flow at runner inlet, helical backflow in the draft tube and numerous vortexes inside the guide vanes, can occur in pump-turbines under off design conditions at pump mode and can impact normal operation of pump-turbines. All of these phenomena cause serious pressure pulsation, which is quite different from cases in normal pump mode. There is also a difference of pressure pulsation frequency and amplitude in different place through the runner. This paper builds a whole flow passage of a model pump-turbine, simulates flow characteristics in runner by CFD technology, analyses pressure pulsation in the runner and explores the origin and mechanism of pressure pulsations. The SST-CC turbulence model is adopted to perform unsteady simulations of the pump-turbine under 0.46Q BEP small discharge condition at pump mode. Unsteady flow structures are proceeded combined with hydraulic loss and pressure amplitude spectra. The results indicates that there is complicated disordered flow inside the runner under 0.46Q BEP small discharge condition at pump mode, shows the amplitude and frequency characteristic of pressure pulsations through runner flow passage.

  8. Simulations of vortex generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumoutsakos, P.

    1995-01-01

    We are interested in the study, via direct numerical simulations, of active vortex generators. Vortex generators may be used to modify the inner part of the boundary layer or to control separation thus enhancing the performance and maneuverability of aerodynamic configurations. We consider generators that consist of a surface cavity elongated in the stream direction and partially covered with a moving lid that at rest lies flush with the boundary. Streamwise vorticity is generated and ejected due to the oscillatory motion of the lid. The present simulations complement relevant experimental investigations of active vortex generators at NASA Ames and Stanford University (Saddoughi, 1994, and Jacobson and Reynolds, 1993). Jacobson and Reynolds (1993) used a piezoelectric device in water, allowing for small amplitude high frequency oscillations. They placed the lid asymmetrically on the cavity and observed a strong outward velocity at the small gap of the cavity. Saddoughi used a larger mechanically driven device in air to investigate this flow and he observed a jet emerging from the wide gap of the configuration, contrary to the findings of Jacobson and Reynolds. Our task is to simulate the flows generated by these devices and to conduct a parametric study that would help us elucidate the physical mechanisms present in the flow. Conventional computational schemes encounter difficulties when simulating flows around complex configurations undergoing arbitrary motions. Here we present a formulation that achieves this task on a purely Lagrangian frame by extending the formulation presented by Koumoutsakos, Leonard and Pepin (1994). The viscous effects are taken into account by modifying the strength of the particles, whereas fast multipole schemes employing hundreds of thousands of particles allow for high resolution simulations. The results of the present simulations would help us assess some of the effects of three-dimensionality in experiments and investigate the role

  9. Vortex Rings from Sphagnum Moss Capsules

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Emily S; Cha, Jung Ha; Strassman, Sam; Hard, Clara; Whitaker, Dwight L

    2010-01-01

    Long distance wind dispersal requires small spores with low terminal velocities, which can be held aloft by turbulent air currents until they are deposited in suitable habitats for colonization. The inherent difficulty in dispersing spores by wind is that spores easily carried by wind are also rapidly decelerated when moving through still air. Thus the height of spore release is critical in determining their range of dispersal. Vascular plants with wind dispersed spores use the height of the plant to lift spores into sufficient wind currents for dispersal, however non-vascular plants such as Sphagnum cannot grow sufficiently tall. These fluid dynamics videos show how exploding capsules of {\\em Sphagnum} moss generate vortex rings to carry spores to heights above 10 cm with an initial velocity of 16 m s$^{-1}$. In contrast spores launched ballistically at these speeds through still air would travel only 2-7 mm.

  10. Multiply Phased Traveling BPS Vortex

    CERN Document Server

    Kimm, Kyoungtae; Cho, Y M

    2016-01-01

    We present the multiply phased current carrying vortex solutions in the U(1) gauge theory coupled to an $(N+1)$-component SU(N+1) scalar multiplet in the Bogomolny limit. Our vortex solutions correspond to the static vortex dressed with traveling waves along the axis of symmetry. What is notable in our vortex solutions is that the frequencies of traveling waves in each component of the scalar field can have different values. The energy of the static vortex is proportional to the topological charge of $CP^N$ model in the BPS limit, and the multiple phase of the vortex supplies additional energy contribution which is proportional to the Noether charge associated to the remaining symmetry.

  11. Erratum to: “Vortex fermion on the lattice” [Nucl. Phys. B 636 (2002) 264 290

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Keiichi

    2008-09-01

    In Ref. [H. Neuberger, hep-lat/03030090] Neuberger studied a vortex fermion model with two continuum extra-dimensions, and pointed out that there are no k≠0 zero modes, which is in disagreement with our paper. Since this discrepancy is due to an error in our paper, we give relevant corrections. The main result of our paper that a normalizable zero mode solution appears at the core of the vortex does not change.

  12. Simulation of vortex laser beams propagation in parabolic index media based on fractional Fourier transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossoulina, O. A.; Kirilenko, M. S.; Khonina, S. N.

    2016-08-01

    We use radial Fractional Fourier transform to model vortex laser beams propagation in optical waveguides with parabolic dependence of the refractive index. To overcome calculation difficulties at distances proportional to a quarter of the period we use varied calculation step. Numerical results for vortex modes superposition propagation in a parabolic optical fiber show that the transverse beam structure can be changed significantly during the propagation. To provide stable transverse distribution input scale modes should be in accordance with fiber parameters.

  13. Vortex cores and vortex motion in superconductors with anisotropic Fermi surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvis, J. A.; Herrera, E.; Guillamón, I.; Vieira, S.; Suderow, H.

    2017-02-01

    Explaning static and dynamic properties of the vortex lattice in anisotropic superconductors requires a careful characterization of vortex cores. The vortex core contains Andreev bound states whose spatial extension depends on the anisotropy of the electronic band-structure and superconducting gap. This might have an impact on the anisotropy of the superconducting properties and on vortex dynamics. Here we briefly summarize basic concepts to understand anisotropic vortex cores and review vortex core imaging experiments. We further discuss moving vortex lattices and the influence of vortex core shape in vortex motion. We find vortex motion in highly tilted magnetic fields. We associate vortex motion to the vortex entry barrier and the screening currents at the surface. We find preferential vortex motion along the main axis of the vortex lattice. After travelling integers of the intervortex distance, we find that vortices move more slowly due to the washboard potential of the vortex lattice.

  14. Experimental Study of Tip Vortex Flow from a Periodically Pitched Airfoil Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, KBMQ; Fagan, A. F.; Mankbadi, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental investigation of a tip vortex from a NACA0012 airfoil is conducted in a low-speed wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of 4x10(exp 4). Initially, data for a stationary airfoil held at various angles-of-attack (alpha) are gathered. Detailed surveys are done for two cases: alpha=10 deg with attached flow and alpha=25 deg with massive flow separation on the upper surface. Distributions of various properties are obtained using hot-wire anemometry. Data include mean velocity, streamwise vorticity and turbulent stresses at various streamwise locations. For all cases, the vortex core is seen to involve a mean velocity deficit. The deficit apparently traces to the airfoil wake, part of which gets wrapped by the tip vortex. At small alpha, the vortex is laminar within the measurement domain. The strength of the vortex increases with increasing alpha but undergoes a sudden drop around alpha (is) greater than 16 deg. The drop in peak vorticity level is accompanied by transition and a sharp rise in turbulence within the core. Data are also acquired with the airfoil pitched sinusoidally. All oscillation cases pertain to a mean alpha=15 deg while the amplitude and frequency are varied. An example of phase-averaged data for an amplitude of +/-10 deg and a reduced frequency of k=0.2 is discussed. All results are compared with available data from the literature shedding further light on the complex dynamics of the tip vortex.

  15. Measurement of magnetic turbulence structure and nonlinear mode coupling of tearing fluctuations in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed field pinch edge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assadi, S.

    1994-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability of current-driven modes are studied in the MST reversed field pinch. Measured low frequency (f < 35 kHz) magnetic fluctuations are consistent with the global resistive tearing instabilities predicted by 3-D MHD simulations. At frequencies above 35 kHz, the magnetic fluctuations were detected to be localized and externally resonant. Discrete dynamo events, ``sawtooth oscillations,`` have been observed in the experimental RFP plasmas. This phenomenon causes the plasma to become unstable to m = 1 tearing modes. The modes that may be important in different phases of these oscillations are identified. These results then assist in nonlinear studies and also help to interpret the spectral broadening of the measured data during a discrete dynamo event. Three-wave nonlinear coupling of spectral Fourier modes is measured in the MST by applying bispectral analysis to magnetic fluctuations measured at the plasma edge at 64 toroidal locations and 16 poloidal locations, permitting observation of coupling over 8 poloidal and 32 toroidal modes. Comparison to bispectra predicted by resistive MHD computation indicates reasonably good agreement. However, during the crash phase of the sawtooth oscillation the nonlinear coupling is strongly enhanced, concomitant with a broadened k-spectrum. During the sawtooth formation the plasma is undergoing a pure diffusive process. The dynamo only occurs during the sawtooth crash. High frequency activity prior to a sawtooth crash is caused by nonlinear frequency (small-scale) mode coupling. Growth rate and coupling coefficients of toroidal mode spectra are calculated by statistical modeling. Temporal evolution of edge toroidal mode spectra has been predicted by transfer function analysis. The driving sources of electrostatic fields are different than for the magnetic fields. The characteristics of tearing modes can be altered by external field errors and addition of impurities to the plasma.

  16. Effect of air jet vortex generators on a shock wave boundary layer interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souverein, L.J.; Debiève, J.-F.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of upstream injection by means of continuous air jet vortex generators (AJVGs) on a shock wave turbulent boundary layer interaction is experimentally investigated. The baseline interaction is of the impinging type, with a flow deflection angle of 9.5degrees and a Mach number Me = 2.3. Con

  17. Effect on a shock wave boundary layer interaction of air jet vortex generators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souverein, L.J.; Debieve, J.F.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of upstream injection by means of continuous Air Jet Vortex Generators (AJVGs) on a shock wave turbulent boundary layer interaction is experimentally investigated. The baseline interaction is of the impinging type, with a flow deflection angle of 9.5◦, a Mach number Me = 2.3, and a moment

  18. Computing the flow past Vortex Generators: Comparison between RANS Simulations and Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manolesos, M.; Sørensen, Niels N.; Troldborg, Niels;

    2016-01-01

    The flow around a wind turbine airfoil equipped with Vortex Generators (VGs) is examined. Predictions from three different Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) solvers with two different turbulence models and two different VG modelling approaches are compared between them and with experimental ...

  19. 3D Droplet velocities and sizes in the Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, R.; Zeegers, J. C. H.; Kuerten, J. G. M.; Michalek, W. R.

    2012-11-01

    The Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube is a known device that is used to generate spot cooling. In this study, we experimentally investigate the behavior of small water droplets in the vortex tube by means of Phase Doppler Particle Analysis. In an experimental vortex tube, droplets were injected together with a carrier gas to form a fast rotating (up to 80.000 rpm) droplet-gas mixture. Droplet sizes, 3D velocity components, and turbulent properties were measured, showing high intensity isotropic turbulence in the core region. To investigate the cause of the high intensity turbulence, a frequency analysis was applied on the measured velocity. The frequency spectrum of the velocity is presented and indicates that wobbling of the vortex axis is the cause of the high turbulence intensity. It was expected that larger droplets have a higher radial velocity because of the larger centrifugal force. Results show, however, that small and lager droplets behave similar. This research is supported by the Dutch Technology Foundation STW, which is the applied science division of NWO, and the Technology Programme of the Ministry of Economic Affairs.

  20. Numerical Investigation of Heat Transfer Augmentation through Geometrical Optimization of Vortex Generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorji, Mofid; Mirgolbabaei, Hessam; Barari, Amin;

    2010-01-01

    In this paper a two-dimensional numerical simulation of a steady incompressible and turbulent model has been carried out to study the effects of vortex generators in a compact heat exchanger in a curvilinear coordinate system. The mesh which is applied in this study is boundary fitted and has bee...

  1. Numerical Analysis on Longitudinal Location Optimization of Vortex Generator in Compact Heat Exchangers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorji, M.; Mirgolbababei, H.; Barari, Amin

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, numerical, curvilinear and turbulent model has been used to investigate the effect of vortex generator's longitudinal displacement on heat transfer and fluid flow in different Reynolds numbers ranging from 500 to 3000. The numerical model has been validated with experimental result...

  2. Onset of meso-scale turbulence in living fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Doostmohammadi, Amin; Thijssen, Kristian; Yeomans, Julia M

    2016-01-01

    Meso-scale turbulence is an innate phenomenon, distinct from inertial turbulence, that spontaneously occurs at zero-Reynolds number in fluidized biological systems. This spatio-temporal disordered flow radically changes nutrient and molecular transport in living fluids and can strongly affect the collective behaviour in prominent biological processes, including biofilm formation, morphogenesis and cancer invasion. Despite its crucial role in such physiological processes, understanding meso-scale turbulence and any relation to classical inertial turbulence remains obscure. Here, we show how the motion of active matter along a micro-channel transitions to meso-scale turbulence through the evolution of disordered patches (active puffs) from an absorbing state of flow vortex-lattices. We demonstrate that the critical behaviour of this transition to meso-scale turbulence in a channel belongs to the directed percolation universality class. This finding bridges our understanding of the onset of zero-Reynolds number ...

  3. Numerical investigation on flow behavior and energy separation in a micro-scale vortex tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahbar Nader

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are a few experimental and numerical studies on the behaviour of micro-scale vortex tubes. The intention of this work is to investigate the energy separation phenomenon in a micro-scale vortex tube by using the computational fluid dynamic. The flow is assumed as steady, turbulent, compressible ideal gas, and the shear-stress transport sst k-w is used for modeling of turbulence phenomenon. The results show that 3-D CFD simulation is more accurate than 2-D axisymmetric one. Moreover, optimum cold-mass ratios to maximize the refrigeration-power and isentropicefficiency are evaluated. The results of static temperature, velocity magnitude and pressure distributions show that the temperature-separation in the micro-scale vortex tube is a function of kinetic-energy variation and air-expansion in the radial direction.

  4. Temperature, Pressure and Velocity measurements on the Ranque-Hilsch Vortex Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, R.; Zeegers, J. C. H.; Kuerten, J. G. M.; Michałek, W. R.

    2012-11-01

    Temperatures, pressures and velocities were measured in a Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube. Results show that the cooling power is larger than the heating power due to a heat loss to the surroundings. This heat loss became the more dominant thermodynamic process at large cold fractions (the ratio of cold mass flow over total mass flow). The velocities were obtained by means of Laser Doppler Anemometry. By this method, the three dimensional velocities of the gas and their standard deviations in the vortex tube are revealed by an non-intrusive measurement method. The turbulent fluctuations, characterized by the standard deviations, show that the turbulence is isotropic in the core region of the vortex tube.

  5. Spectro-Polarimetric Properties of Small-Scale Plasma Eruptions Driven by Magnetic Vortex Tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Kitiashvili, Irina N

    2014-01-01

    Highly turbulent nature of convection on the Sun causes strong multi-scale interaction of subsurface layers with the photosphere and chromosphere. According to realistic 3D radiative MHD numerical simulations ubiquitous small-scale vortex tubes are generated by turbulent flows below the visible surface and concentrated in the intergranular lanes. The vortex tubes can capture and amplify magnetic field, penetrate into chromospheric layers and initiate quasi-periodic flow eruptions that generates Alfv\\'enic waves, transport mass and energy into the solar atmosphere. The simulations revealed high-speed flow patterns, and complicated thermodynamic and magnetic structures in the erupting vortex tubes. The spontaneous eruptions are initiated and driven by strong pressure gradients in the near-surface layers, and accelerated by the Lorentz force in the low chromosphere. In this paper, the simulation data are used to further investigate the dynamics of the eruptions, their spectro-polarimetric characteristics for the...

  6. Evolution of a superfluid vortex filament tangle driven by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation

    CERN Document Server

    Villois, Alberto; Krstulovic, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    The development and decay of a turbulent vortex tangle driven by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation is studied. Using a recently-developed accurate and robust tracking algorithm, all quantised vortices are extracted from the fields. The Vinen's decay law for the total vortex length with a coefficient that is in quantitative agreement with the values measured in Helium II is observed. The topology of the tangle is then studied showing that linked rings may appear during the decay. The tracking also allows for determining the statistics of small-scales quantities of vortex lines, exhibiting large fluctuations of curvature and torsion. Finally, the temporal evolution of the Kelvin wave spectrum is obtained providing evidence of the development of a weak-wave turbulence cascade.

  7. Scalar Mixing In A Vortex Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, P.; Villermaux, E.; Leweke, T.

    We present experimental and theoretical results on the evolution of a scalar blob em- bedded in the velocity field of one or two vortices, a configuration relevant to geo- physical mixing in particular. We first follow the evolution of the scalar in one vortex. The scalar blob rolls up into a spiral and then diffuses rapidly, much faster than in the absence of a vortex flow. A simple model predicts that the maximal scalar concentration decreases in time as t-3 , after a mixing time which scales like Pe1 /2 /3 (where Pe = /D is the Peclet number). This hyper-diffusion process is due to the coupled presence of stretching and diffusion, and is in good quantitative agreement with the experimental results. In contrast with this temporal variation of the scalar, the model predicts that the proba- bility distribution functions (PDF) of the scalar are almost stationnary. The agreement between experimental and theoretical PDF is excellent. Finally, we report on the evolution of the PDF of a scalar during the merging of two vortices and on the comparison law of the concentration PDF's associated with each vortices, both in laminar and turbulent situations.

  8. A generalization of vortex lines

    CERN Document Server

    Fecko, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Helmholtz theorem states that, in ideal fluid, vortex lines move with the fluid. Another Helmholtz theorem adds that strength of a vortex tube is constant along the tube. The lines may be regarded as integral surfaces of an 1-dimensional integrable distribution (given by the vorticity 2-form). In general setting of theory of integral invariants, due to Poincare and Cartan, one can find $d$-dimensional integrable distribution whose integral surfaces show both properties of vortex lines: they move with (abstract) fluid and, for appropriate generalization of vortex tube, strength of the latter is constant along the tube.

  9. Cosmic Ray transport in turbulent magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Huirong

    2013-01-01

    Cosmic ray (CR) transport and acceleration is determined by the properties of magnetic turbulence. Recent advances in MHD turbulence call for revisions in the paradigm of cosmic ray transport. We use the models of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence that were tested in numerical simulation, in which turbulence is injected at large scale and cascades to to small scales. We shall address the issue of the transport of CRs, both parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. We shall demonstrate compressible fast modes are dominant cosmic ray scatterer from both quasilinear and nonlinear theories. We shall also show that the self-generated wave growth by CRs are constrained by preexisting turbulence and discuss the process in detail in the context of shock acceleration at supernova remnants and their implications. In addition, we shall dwell on the nonlinear growth of kinetic gyroresonance instability of cosmic rays induced by large scale compressible turbulence. This gyroresonance of cosmic rays on turbulence is d...

  10. Analysis of the Radar Reflectivity of Aircraft Vortex Wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, Karim; Wray, Alan; Yan, Jerry (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Radar has been proposed as a way to track wake vortices to reduce aircraft spacing and tests have revealed radar echoes from aircraft wakes in clear air. The results are always interpreted qualitatively using Tatarski's theory of weak scattering by isotropic atmospheric turbulence. The goal of the present work was to predict the value of the radar cross-section (RCS) using simpler models. This is accomplished in two steps. First, the refractive index is obtained. Since the structure of the aircraft wakes is different from atmospheric turbulence, three simple mechanisms specific to vortex wakes are considered: (1) Radial density gradient in a two-dimensional vortex, (2) three-dimensional fluctuations in the vortex cores, and (3) Adiabatic transport of the atmospheric fluid in a two-dimensional oval surrounding the pair of vortices. The index of refraction is obtained more precisely for the two-dimensional mechanisms than for the three-dimensional ones. In the second step, knowing the index of refraction, a scattering analysis is performed. Tatarski's weak scattering approximation is kept but the usual assumptions of a far-field and a uniform incident wave are dropped. Neither assumption is generally valid for a wake that is coherent across the radar beam. For analytical insight, a simpler approximation that invokes, in addition to weak scattering, the far-field and wide cylindrical beam assumptions, is also developed and compared with the more general analysis. The predicted RCS values for the oval surround the vortices (mechanism C) agree with the experiments of Bilson conducted over a wide range of frequencies. However, the predictions have a cut-off away from normal incidence which is not present in the measurements. Estimates suggest that this is due to turbulence in the baroclinic vorticity generated at the boundary of the oval. The reflectivity of a vortex itself (mechanism A) is comparable to that of the oval (mechanism C) but cuts-off at frequencies lower

  11. INTERSTELLAR TURBULENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Falceta-Gonçalves

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Interstellar Medium (ISM is a complex, multi-phase system, where the history of the stars occurs. The processes of birth and death of stars are strongly coupled to the dynamics of the ISM. The observed chaotic and diffusive motions of the gas characterize its turbulent nature. Understanding turbulence is crucial for understanding the star-formation process and the energy-mass feedback from evolved stars. Magnetic fields, threading the ISM, are also observed, making this effort even more difficult. In this work, I briefly review the main observations and the characterization of turbulence from these observable quantities. Following on, I provide a review of the physics of magnetized turbulence. Finally, I will show the main results from theoretical and numerical simulations, which can be used to reconstruct observable quantities, and compare these predictions to the observations.

  12. Wall Turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  13. Study of interaction of a pair of longitudinal vortices with a horseshoe vortex around a wing. 1st Report. Potential for passive controlling by a pair of vortex generators; Tsubasa mawari no bateikei uzu to tateuzu no kansho ni kansuru kenkyu. 1. Ittsui no uzu hasseiki ni yoru judo seigyoho no teian

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, H.; Takahashi, M. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Ikeda, K. [Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Shizawa, T.; Honami, S. [Science University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1999-12-25

    This paper presents a potential for a passive control of a horseshoe vortex at the root of the wing. NACA0024 wing is established on a turbulent boundary layer. A pair of vortex generators of halt delta wing is installed upstream of the wing. The controlled horseshoe vortex is tested qualitatively by flow visualization technique. Also, the potential for controlling is quantitatively investigated by wall static pressure and total pressure. The horseshoe vortex is remarkably controlled in Common Flow Up Configuration (CFUC) of vortex generators. The distortion of the total pressure contours is diminished by 49% and the vortex is located closer to the wing. In case of Common Flow Down Configuration (CFDC), the mass flow averaged pressure loss is decreased by 29% compared with the case without a pair of vortex generators. (author)

  14. Hybrid POD-FFT analysis of nonlinear evolving coherent structures of DNS wavepacket in laminar-turbulent transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kean Lee; Yeo, K. S.

    2017-08-01

    This paper concerns the study of direct numerical simulation data of a wavepacket in laminar turbulent transition in a Blasius boundary layer. The decomposition of this wavepacket into a set of "modes" (a basis that spans an approximate solution space) can be achieved in a wide variety of ways. Two well-known tools are the fast Fourier transform (FFT) and the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). To synergize the strengths of both methods, a hybrid POD-FFT is pioneered, using the FFT as a tool for interpreting the POD modes. The POD-FFT automatically identifies well-known fundamental, subharmonic, and Klebanoff modes in the flow, even though it is blind to the underlying physics. Moreover, the POD-FFT further separates the subharmonic content of the wavepacket into three fairly distinct parts: a positively detuned mode resembling a Lambda-vortex, a Craik-type tuned mode, and a Herbert-type positive-negative detuned mode pair, in decreasing order of energy. This distinction is less widely recognized, but it provides a possible explanation for the slightly positively detuned subharmonic mode often observed in previous experiments and simulations.

  15. GEOMETRIC TURBULENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trunev A. P.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article we have investigated the solutions of Maxwell's equations, Navier-Stokes equations and the Schrödinger associated with the solutions of Einstein's equations for empty space. It is shown that in some cases the geometric instability leading to turbulence on the mechanism of alternating viscosity, which offered by N.N. Yanenko. The mechanism of generation of matter from dark energy due to the geometric turbulence in the Big Bang has been discussed

  16. LES investigation of the transport and decay of various-strengths wake vortices in ground effect and subjected to a turbulent crosswind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricteux, L.; Duponcheel, M.; De Visscher, I.; Winckelmans, G.

    2016-06-01

    This study is concerned with the investigation of two-vortex systems (2VS) of various strengths that are released near the ground and evolve in the presence of a turbulent crosswind. We analyze the physics of the vortices interactions with the turbulent wind and with the ground during the rebound phase, and that lead to the fully developed turbulent flow and interactions. The transport and decay of the vortices are also analyzed. The turbulent wind itself is obtained by direct numerical simulation using a half channel flow. The flow is then supplemented with the 2VS, using vortices with a circulation distribution that is representative of vortices after roll-up of a near wake. The vortex strengths, Γ0, are such that ReΓ = Γ0/ν = 2.0 × 104 for the baseline; there is then a case with twice weaker vortices, and a case with twice stronger vortices. The simulations are run in wall-resolved Large Eddy Simulation (LES) mode. The baseline is in line with the wall-resolved LES study of a similar case [A. Stephan et al., "Aircraft wake-vortex decay in ground proximity - Physical mechanisms and artificial enhancement," J. Aircr. 50(4), 1250-1260 (2013)]. They highlighted the significant effect that the near-wall streaks of the wind have on the development of instabilities in the secondary vortices, and the ensuing turbulence. Our analysis complements theirs by also showing the significant effect that the wind turbulent structures, away from the ground and that are stretched by the primary vortices, also have on the destabilization of the secondary vortices. Comparisons are also made with the most recent study [F. N. Holzäpfel et al., "Wind impact on single vortices and counter-rotating vortex pairs in ground proximity," in 7th AIAA Atmospheric and Space Environments Conference, AIAA Aviation (American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 2015)], where ReΓ = 2.0 × 104 for all cases and where it is the wind intensity that is varied. Diagnostics on the vortex

  17. Evolution of an electron plasma vortex in a strain flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, J. R.

    2016-10-01

    Coherent vortex structures are ubiquitous in fluids and plasmas and are examples of self-organized structures in nonlinear dynamical systems. The fate of these structures in strain and shear flows is an important issue in many physical systems, including geophysical fluids and shear suppression of turbulence in plasmas. In two-dimensions, an inviscid, incompressible, ideal fluid can be modeled with the Euler equations, which is perhaps the simplest system that supports vortices. The Drift-Poisson equations for pure electron plasmas in a strong, uniform magnetic field are isomorphic to the Euler equations, and so electron plasmas are an excellent test bed for the study of 2D vortex dynamics. This talk will describe results from a new experiment using pure electron plasmas in a specially designed Penning-Malmberg (PM) trap to study the evolution of an initially axisymmetric 2D vortex subject to externally imposed strains. Complementary vortex-in-cell simulations are conducted to validate the 2D nature of the experimental results and to extend the parameter range of these studies. Data for vortex destruction using both instantaneously applied and time dependent strains with flat (constant vorticity) and extended radial profiles will be presented. The role of vortex self-organization will be discussed. A simple 2D model works well for flat vorticity profiles. However, extended profiles exhibit more complicated behavior, such as filamentation and stripping; and these effects and their consequences will be discussed. Work done in collaboration with N. C. Hurst, D. H. E. Dubin, and C. M. Surko.

  18. Phase transitions and connectivity in three-dimensional vortex equilibria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akao, J.H.

    1994-05-01

    The statistical mechanics of collections of closed self avoiding vortex loops on a lattice are studied. The system is related to the vortex form of the three dimensional XY model and to lattice vortex equilibrium models of turbulence. The system exhibits vortex connectivity and screening effects, and models in vorticity variables the superfluid transition. The equilibrium states of the system are simulated by a grand canonical Monte Carlo method. A set of geometric transformations for self-avoiding loops is developed. The numerical method employs histogram sampling techniques and utilizes a modification to the Metropolis flow which enhances efficiency. Results are given for a region in the temperature-chemical potential plane, where the chemical potential is related to the vortex fugacity. A line of second order transitions is identified at low temperature. The transition is shown to be a percolation threshold at which connected vortex loops of infinite size appear in the system. The nature of the transition supports the assumption that the lambda transition in bulk superfluid helium is driven by vortices. An asymptotic analysis is performed for the energy and entropy scaling of the system as functions of the system size and the lattice spacing. These estimates indicate that the infinite temperature line is a phase boundary between small scale fractal vortices and large scale smooth vortices. A suggestion is made that quantum vortices have uniform structure on the scale of the lattice spacing and lie in the positive temperature regime, while classical vortices have uniform structure on the scale of the domain and lie in the negative temperature regime.

  19. Vortex-Surface Interactions: Vortex Dynamics and Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-16

    a) Main vortex structures developing on a typical submarine hull; (b) Schematic illustrating a horseshoe vortex at a wing-body junction of a " Rood ...secondary vortices. Firstly, looking at Figure 7, showing only the secondary vortices being visualized by our technique , we see that a tongue of secondary

  20. Evolution of optical vortex distributions in stochastic vortex fields

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available dipole,? Opt. Commun. 236, 433?440 (2004). [23] Dana, I. and Freund, I., ?Vortex-lattice wave fields,? Opt. Commun. . [24] Jenkins, R., Banerji, J., and Davies, A., ?The generation of optical vortices and shape preserving vortex arrays in hollow...

  1. Simulating Wake Vortex Detection with the Sensivu Doppler Wind Lidar Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Dan; Nguyen, Chi

    2014-01-01

    In support of NASA's Atmospheric Environment Safety Technologies NRA research topic on Wake Vortex Hazard Investigation, Aerospace Innovations (AI) investigated a set of techniques for detecting wake vortex hazards from arbitrary viewing angles, including axial perspectives. This technical report describes an approach to this problem and presents results from its implementation in a virtual lidar simulator developed at AI. Threedimensional data volumes from NASA's Terminal Area Simulation System (TASS) containing strong turbulent vortices were used as the atmospheric domain for these studies, in addition to an analytical vortex model in 3-D space. By incorporating a third-party radiative transfer code (BACKSCAT 4), user-defined aerosol layers can be incorporated into atmospheric models, simulating attenuation and backscatter in different environmental conditions and altitudes. A hazard detection algorithm is described that uses a twocomponent spectral model to identify vortex signatures observable from arbitrary angles.

  2. Two Dimensional Wake Vortex Simulations in the Atmosphere: Preliminary Sensitivity Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, F. H.; Hinton, D. A.; Han, J.; Schowalter, D. G.; Lin, Y.-L.

    1998-01-01

    A numerical large-eddy simulation model is currently being used to quantify aircraft wake vortex behavior with meteorological observables. The model, having a meteorological framework, permits the interaction of wake vortices with environments characterized by crosswind shear, stratification, and humidity. The addition of grid-scale turbulence as an initial condition appeared to have little consequence. Results show that conventional nondimensionalizations work very well for vortex pairs embedded in stably stratified flows. However, this result is based on simple environments with constant Brunt-Vaisala frequency. Results presented here also show that crosswind profiles exert important and complex interactions on the trajectories of wake vortices. Nonlinear crosswind profiles tended to arrest the descent of wake vortex pairs. The member of the vortex pair with vorticity of same sign as the vertical change in the ambient along-track vorticity may be deflected upwards.

  3. Vortex oscillations around a hemisphere-cylinder body with a high fineness ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Bao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The vortex unsteadiness around a hemisphere-cylinder body at AOAs of 10 to 80 deg was studied using Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD). The Reynolds number (Re) based on the cylinder diameter of the body is 22000. The results show that vortex oscillations exist over the forebody at the whole range of AOAs. The oscillation is characterized by alternate oscillations of a forebody leeward vortex pair up and down and in-phase swings from side to side. The vortex shedding can be found at the afterbody as AOAs more than 20o, and the shedding region moves forwards gradually with AOAs increasing, and accordingly the region of vortex oscillations contracts and eventually only exists near the nose as AOAs sufficiently high. The vortex oscillation and shedding all induce fluctuating side forces along the body, but the ones from vortex oscillations are larger. The frequencies of vortex oscillations are similar to the ones of vortex shedding at the AOAs of 10o-40o with St=0.085-0.12, in which...

  4. Cylindrical sound wave generated by shock-vortex interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribner, H. S.

    1985-01-01

    The passage of a columnar vortex broadside through a shock is investigated. This has been suggested as a crude, but deterministic, model of the generation of 'shock noise' by the turbulence in supersonic jets. The vortex is decomposed by Fourier transform into plane sinusoidal shear waves disposed with radial symmetry. The plane sound waves produced by each shear wave/shock interaction are recombined in the Fourier integral. The waves possess an envelope that is essentially a growing cylindrical sound wave centered at the transmitted vortex. The pressure jump across the nominal radius R = ct attenuates with time as 1/(square root of R) and varies around the arc in an antisymmetric fashion resembling a quadrupole field. Very good agreement, except near the shock, is found with the antisymmetric component of reported interferometric measurements in a shock tube. Beyond the front r approximately equals R is a precursor of opposite sign, that decays like 1/R, generated by the 1/r potential flow around the vortex core. The present work is essentially an extension and update of an early approximate study at M = 1.25. It covers the range (R/core radius) = 10, 100, 1000, and 10,000 for M = 1.25 and (in part) for M = 1.29 and, for fixed (R/core radius) = 1000, the range M = 1.01 to infinity.

  5. Evaluation of Vortex Chamber Concepts for Liquid Rocket Engine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Huu Phuoc; Knuth, Williams; Michaels, Scott; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Rocket-based combined-cycle engines (RBBC) being considered at NASA for future generation launch vehicles feature clusters of small rocket thrusters as part of the engine components. Depending on specific RBBC concepts, these thrusters may be operated at various operating conditions including power level and/or propellant mixture ratio variations. To pursue technology developments for future launch vehicles, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is examining vortex chamber concepts for the subject cycle engine application. Past studies indicated that the vortex chamber schemes potentially have a number of advantages over conventional chamber methods. Due to the nature of the vortex flow, relatively cooler propellant streams tend to flow along the chamber wall. Hence, the thruster chamber can be operated without the need of any cooling techniques. This vortex flow also creates strong turbulence, which promotes the propellant mixing process. Consequently, the subject chamber concepts not only offer the system simplicity but they also would enhance the combustion performance. The test results showed that the chamber performance was markedly high even at a low chamber length-to- diameter ratio (L/D). This incentive can be translated to a convenience in the thrust chamber packaging.

  6. Recent developments in plasma turbulence and turbulent transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, P.W. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1997-09-22

    This report contains viewgraphs of recent developments in plasma turbulence and turbulent transport. Localized nonlinear structures occur under a variety of circumstances in turbulent, magnetically confined plasmas, arising in both kinetic and fluid descriptions, i.e., in either wave-particle or three-wave coupling interactions. These structures are non wavelike. They cannot be incorporated in the collective wave response, but interact with collective modes through their shielding by the plasma dielectric. These structures are predicted to modify turbulence-driven transport in a way that in consistent with, or in some cases are confirmed by recent experimental observations. In kinetic theory, non wavelike structures are localized perturbations of phase space density. There are two types of structures. Holes are self-trapped, while clumps have a self-potential that is too weak to resist deformation and mixing by ambient potential fluctuations. Clumps remain correlated in turbulence if their spatial extent is smaller than the correlation length of the scattering fields. In magnetic turbulence, clumps travel along stochastic magnetic fields, shielded by the plasma dielectric. A drag on the clump macro-particle is exerted by the shielding, inducing emission into the collective response. The emission in turn damps back on the particle distribution via Landau dampling. The exchange of energy between clumps and particles, as mediated by the collective mode, imposes constraints on transport. For a turbulent spectrum whose mean wavenumber along the equilibrium magnetic field is nonzero, the electron thermal flux is proportional to the ion thermal velocity. Conventional predictions (which account only for collective modes) are larger by the square root of the ion to electron mass ratio. Recent measurements are consistent with the small flux. In fluid plasma,s localized coherent structures can occur as intense vortices.

  7. Solitary vortexes in magnetohydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vainshtein, S.I.

    1985-12-01

    Stationary configurations in magnetohydrodynamics are investigated for the following two particular cases: (1) there is no motion, which corresponds to a state of magnetostatic equilibrium; and (2) the magnetic field intensity becomes zero, i.e., hydrodynamic vortexes are involved. It is shown that in certain cases the line-of-force topology must be sufficiently simple in order before a stationary or equilibrium state can be achieved. It is also shown that in the two-dimensional case, the magnetic surfaces of an equilibrium configuration represent coaxial cylindrical surfaces. 12 references.

  8. Vortex Flow Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    j . 1978. 93. Grabowski , W.J.; "Solutions of the Navier-Stokes Equations for Vortex Breakdown," NASA CR...including foreign nations. This technical report has been reviewed and is approved for publication. LAWRENCE W. ROGERS Q LOWELL C. KEEL, Major, USAF Project...or’ a w U - a LU LU U- LU C - J ’di 2 2 C LU I- 4 S Ua * - w x 2 40 20 I- 2 LU W S ~ 00 * U. 4 I- 𔃾 LU a 4 U 4 2 C C LU 4 a 4a 2 I- 4 a 3 9

  9. Robustness of a coherence vortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Cleberson R; Jesus-Silva, Alcenisio J; Fonseca, Eduardo J S

    2016-09-20

    We study, experimentally and theoretically, the behavior of a coherence vortex after its transmission through obstacles. Notably, we find that such a vortex survives and preserves its effective topological charge. Despite suffering changes on the modulus of the coherence function, these changes disappear during propagation.

  10. Vortex duality in higher dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekman, Aron Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    A dynamic vortex line traces out a world sheet in spacetime. This thesis shows that the information of all its dynamic behaviour is completely contained in the world sheet. Furthermore a mathematical framework for order–disorder phase transitions in terms of the proliferation of such vortex world sh

  11. Analysis of streamwise-oriented vortex interactions for two wings in close proximity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Caleb J.; Visbal, Miguel R.; Gordnier, Raymond E.

    2015-01-01

    This investigation addresses the impingement of the trailing vortex provided by a leader-wing upon a follower-wing operating in close proximity. Exploration of the relative spacing between the two wings reveals several distinct flow regimes occur within a small range of lateral positions of the incident vortex. These changes effectively alter the evolution of the follower-wing wake via mutual induction between the incident and trailing vortices. Several unsteady mechanisms impact the general flow field in each regime. The incident vortex for an inboard impingement rapidly decays over the wing due to transition to turbulence. A tip-aligned vortex results in a highly unsteady interaction and generates enhanced surface pressure fluctuations beneath the tip vortex. Placing the incident vortex outboard elicits mutual instability between the leader and follower-wing trailing vortices. While lift-enhancement was found to be dominated by an inviscid increase in effective angle of attack, viscous effects in the near-tip region alter the local surface force distribution and influence the rolling moment coefficient. These flow variations which occur over a small range of lateral positions could generate buffeting loads in the presence of a wandering streamwise vortex.

  12. Spiral and Taylor vortex fronts and pulses in axial through flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinter, A; Lücke, M; Hoffmann, Ch

    2003-02-01

    The influence of an axial through flow on the spatiotemporal growth behavior of different vortex structures in the Taylor-Couette system with radius ratio eta=0.5 is determined. The Navier-Stokes equations (NSE) linearized around the basic Couette-Poiseuille flow are solved numerically with a shooting method in a wide range of through flow strengths Re and different rates of co-rotating and counter-rotating cylinders for toroidally closed vortices with azimuthal wave number m=0 and for spiral vortex flow with m=+/-1. For each of these three different vortex varieties we have investigated (i) axially extended vortex structures, (ii) axially localized vortex pulses, and (iii) vortex fronts. The complex dispersion relations of the linearized NSE for vortex modes with the three different m are evaluated for real axial wave numbers for (i) and over the plane of complex axial wave numbers for (ii) and (iii). We have also determined the Ginzburg-Landau amplitude equation (GLE) approximation in order to analyze its predictions for the vortex structures (ii) and (iii). Critical bifurcation thresholds for extended vortex structures are evaluated. The boundaries between absolute and convective instability of the basic state for vortex pulses are determined with a saddle-point analysis of the dispersion relations. Fit parameters for power-law expansions of the boundaries up to Re4 are listed in two tables. Finally, the linearly selected front behavior of growing vortex structures is investigated using saddle-point analyses of the dispersion relations of NSE and GLE. For the two front intensity profiles (increasing in positive or negative axial direction) we have determined front velocities, axial growth rates, and the wave numbers and frequencies of the unfolding vortex patterns with azimuthal wave numbers m=0,+/-1, respectively.

  13. TEM turbulence optimisation in stellarators

    CERN Document Server

    Proll, J H E; Xanthopoulos, P; Lazerson, S A; Faber, B J

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of neoclassically optimised stellarators, optimising stellarators for turbulent transport is an important next step. The reduction of ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence has been achieved via shaping of the magnetic field, and the reduction of trapped-electron mode (TEM) turbulence is adressed in the present paper. Recent analytical and numerical findings suggest TEMs are stabilised when a large fraction of trapped particles experiences favourable bounce-averaged curvature. This is the case for example in Wendelstein 7-X [C.D. Beidler $\\textit{et al}$ Fusion Technology $\\bf{17}$, 148 (1990)] and other Helias-type stellarators. Using this knowledge, a proxy function was designed to estimate the TEM dynamics, allowing optimal configurations for TEM stability to be determined with the STELLOPT [D.A. Spong $\\textit{et al}$ Nucl. Fusion $\\bf{41}$, 711 (2001)] code without extensive turbulence simulations. A first proof-of-principle optimised equilibrium stemming from the TEM-dominated stella...

  14. Energy transfer in compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataille, Francoise; Zhou, YE; Bertoglio, Jean-Pierre

    1995-01-01

    This letter investigates the compressible energy transfer process. We extend a methodology developed originally for incompressible turbulence and use databases from numerical simulations of a weak compressible turbulence based on Eddy-Damped-Quasi-Normal-Markovian (EDQNM) closure. In order to analyze the compressible mode directly, the well known Helmholtz decomposition is used. While the compressible component has very little influence on the solenoidal part, we found that almost all of the compressible turbulence energy is received from its solenoidal counterpart. We focus on the most fundamental building block of the energy transfer process, the triadic interactions. This analysis leads us to conclude that, at low turbulent Mach number, the compressible energy transfer process is dominated by a local radiative transfer (absorption) in both inertial and energy containing ranges.

  15. A bursting phenomenon in a vortex-gas boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekaran, Aarthi; Narasimha, Roddam; Govindarajan, Rama

    2014-11-01

    Bursts are a central phenomenon in turbulent boundary layers as they are an integral part of turbulent energy and stress production. They have consequently been a continuing area of interest since the 1970s following the detailed investigations of Kline et al. (1967). Despite several attempts to understand their dynamics, it has been difficult to arrive at a consensus even on the scaling of the burst frequency. The present investigation simulates the outer part of a plane turbulent boundary layer using the vortex-gas model, in a first step towards understanding the role of the outer layer in boundary layer dynamics. Preliminary results indicate the formation of regions of concentrated vorticity near the wall, at a frequency that is independent of the initial vortex configuration but a function of the mean velocity profile. Further, comparisons with existing experimental data indicate a burst frequency which when scaled on outer variables, is within the range of scatter among different studies. Quadrant occupancy statistics are also related to those in conventional boundary layers. It appears as if a bursting phenomenon of some kind may be a general feature of an inviscid, wall-bounded shear flow, and does not necessitate inclusion of either viscosity or three-dimensionality.

  16. Turbulence and turbulent mixing in natural fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, Carl H

    2010-01-01

    Turbulence and turbulent mixing in natural fluids begins with big bang turbulence powered by spinning combustible combinations of Planck particles and Planck antiparticles. Particle prograde accretion on a spinning pair releases 42% of the particle rest mass energy to produce more fuel for turbulent combustion. Negative viscosity and negative turbulence stresses work against gravity, creating mass-energy and space-time from the vacuum. Turbulence mixes cooling temperatures until a quark-gluon strong-force SF freeze-out. Gluon-viscosity anti-gravity ({\\Lambda}SF) exponentially inflates the fireball to preserve big bang turbulence information at scales larger than ct as the first fossil turbulence. Cosmic microwave background CMB temperature anisotropies show big bang turbulence fossils along with fossils of weak plasma turbulence triggered (10^12 s) as plasma viscous forces permit gravitational fragmentation on supercluster to galaxy mass scales (10^13 s). Turbulent morphologies and viscous-turbulent lengths a...

  17. Generalized Local Induction Equation, Elliptic Asymptotics, and Simulating Superfluid Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Strong, Scott A

    2011-01-01

    We prove the generalized induction equation and the generalized local induction equation (GLIE), which replaces the commonly used local induction approximation (LIA) to simulate the dynamics of vortex lines and thus superfluid turbulence. We show that the LIA is, without in fact any approximation at all, a general feature of the velocity field induced by any length of a curved vortex filament. Specifically, the LIA states that the velocity field induced by a curved vortex filament is asymmetric in the binormal direction. Up to a potential term, the induced incompressible field is given by the Biot-Savart integral, where we recall that there is a direct analogy between hydrodynamics and magnetostatics. Series approximations to the Biot-Savart integrand indicate a logarithmic divergence of the local field in the binormal direction. While this is qualitatively correct, LIA lacks metrics quantifying its small parameters. Regardless, LIA is used in vortex filament methods simulating the self-induced motion of quan...

  18. Merging of aircraft vortex trails - Similarities to magnetic field merging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the phenomenological and formal similarities between the merging of aircraft vortex trails and the merging of magnetic field lines in a plasma. High-resolution photographs are shown of smoke trails from the wing tips of an airplane. These photographs show that the two vortex trails merge together downstream of the aircraft in a way similar to the merging of oppositely directed magnetic field lines in a plasma. Although there are some differences, this correspondence is apparently related to the fact that the vorticity equation in a fluid has the same mathematical form as the magnetic field equation in an MHD plasma. In both cases the merging proceeds at a rate considerably faster than would be predicted from classical estimates of the viscosity and resistivity. The enhanced merging rate in the fluid case appears to result from turbulence that increases the diffusion rate in the merging region.

  19. Optical vortex coronagraphs on ground-based telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, Charles

    2007-01-01

    The optical vortex coronagraph is potentially a remarkably effective device, at least for an ideal unobstructed telescope. Most ground-based telescopes however suffer from central obscuration and also have to operate through the aberrations of the turbulent atmosphere. This note analyzes the performance of the optical vortex in these circumstances and compares to some other designs, showing that it performs similarly in this situation. There is a large class of coronagraphs of this general type, and choosing between them in particular applications depends on details of performance at small off-axis distances and uniformity of response in the focal plane. Issues of manufacturability to the necessary tolerances are also likely to be important.

  20. Lift enhancement by trapped vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossow, Vernon J.

    1992-01-01

    The viewgraphs and discussion of lift enhancement by trapped vortex are provided. Efforts are continuously being made to find simple ways to convert wings of aircraft from an efficient cruise configuration to one that develops the high lift needed during landing and takeoff. The high-lift configurations studied here consist of conventional airfoils with a trapped vortex over the upper surface. The vortex is trapped by one or two vertical fences that serve as barriers to the oncoming stream and as reflection planes for the vortex and the sink that form a separation bubble on top of the airfoil. Since the full three-dimensional unsteady flow problem over the wing of an aircraft is so complicated that it is hard to get an understanding of the principles that govern the vortex trapping process, the analysis is restricted here to the flow field illustrated in the first slide. It is assumed that the flow field between the two end plates approximates a streamwise strip of the flow over a wing. The flow between the endplates and about the airfoil consists of a spanwise vortex located between the suction orifices in the endplates. The spanwise fence or spoiler located near the nose of the airfoil serves to form a separated flow region and a shear layer. The vorticity in the shear layer is concentrated into the vortex by withdrawal of fluid at the suction orifices. As the strength of the vortex increases with time, it eventually dominates the flow in the separated region so that a shear or vertical layer is no longer shed from the tip of the fence. At that point, the vortex strength is fixed and its location is such that all of the velocity contributions at its center sum to zero thereby making it an equilibrium point for the vortex. The results of a theoretical analysis of such an idealized flow field are described.