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Sample records for voluntary isometric muscle

  1. Effects of vibratory stimulations on maximal voluntary isometric contraction from delayed onset muscle soreness.

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    Koh, Hyung-Woo; Cho, Sung-Hyoun; Kim, Cheol-Yong; Cho, Byung-Jun; Kim, Jin-Woo; Bo, Kak Hwang

    2013-09-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of vibratory stimulation on maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) from delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). [Subjects] Sixty healthy adults participated in this study. The exclusion criteria were orthopedic or neurologic disease. [Methods] The researchers induced DOMS in the musculus extensor carpi radialis longus of each participant. Subjects in the control group received no treatment. The ultrasound group received ultrasound treatment (intensity, 1.0 W/cm(2;) frequency 1 MHz; time, 10 minutes). The vibration group received vibration stimulation (frequency, 20 MHz; time, 10 minutes). Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) was recorded at baseline, immediately after exercise, and 24, 48, and 72 hours after exercise. [Results] MVIC measurements showed statistically significant differences in the vibration group compared with the control group. [Conclusion] Vibratory stimulation had a positive effect on recovery of muscle function from DOMS.

  2. Repeatability of maximal voluntary force and of surface EMG variables during voluntary isometric contraction of quadriceps muscles in healthy subjects.

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    Rainoldi, A; Bullock-Saxton, J E; Cavarretta, F; Hogan, N

    2001-12-01

    The repeatability of initial values and rate of change of EMG signal mean spectral frequency (MNF), average rectified values (ARV), muscle fiber conduction velocity (CV) and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) was investigated in the vastus medialis obliquus (VMO) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles of both legs of nine healthy male subjects during voluntary, isometric contractions sustained for 50 s at 50% MVC. The values of MVC were recorded for both legs three times on each day and for three subsequent days, while the EMG signals have been recorded twice a day for three subsequent days. The degree of repeatability was investigated using the Fisher test based upon the ANalysis Of VAriance (ANOVA), the Standard Error of the Mean (SEM) and the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC). Data collected showed a high level of repeatability of MVC measurement (normalized SEM from 1.1% to 6.4% of the mean). MNF and ARV initial values also showed a high level of repeatability (ICC>70% for all muscles and legs except right VMO). At 50% MVC level no relevant pattern of fatigue was observed for the VMO and VL muscles, suggesting that other portions of the quadriceps might have contributed to the generated effort. These observations seem to suggest that in the investigation of muscles belonging to a multi-muscular group at submaximal level, the more selective electrically elicited contractions should be preferred to voluntary contractions.

  3. Twitch potentiation induced by stimulated and voluntary isometric contractions at various torque levels in human knee extensor muscles.

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    Miyamoto, Naokazu; Yanai, Toshimasa; Kawakami, Yasuo

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the extent of twitch potentiation (TP) after stimulated or voluntary contractions at identical intensities for the human knee extensor muscles. Isometric knee extensions of 10 s were performed at 20%, 40%, and 60% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque level, through percutaneous electrical stimulation of the quadriceps at 80 Hz or voluntary contraction. Twitch responses were evoked by stimulating the femoral nerve percutaneously with supramaximal intensity. The extent of TP after the stimulated contraction was greater than that after the voluntary contraction at the 20% MVC torque level, whereas a stimulated contraction induced a smaller extent of TP than did a voluntary contraction at contraction intensities higher than 40% MVC. We suggest that this contraction intensity dependence of differences in TP after stimulated and voluntary isometric conditioning contractions is responsible for differences in the recruitment pattern of motor units during the conditioning contractions.

  4. Time to Maximal Voluntary Isometric Contraction (MVC) for Five Different Muscle Groups in College Adults.

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    Morris, A. F.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    College men and women were studied to ascertain the force-time components of a rapid voluntary muscle contraction for five muscle groups. Researchers found that the time required for full contraction differs: (1) in men and women; and (2) among the five muscle groups. (Authors/PP)

  5. Specific modulation of corticospinal and spinal excitabilities during maximal voluntary isometric, shortening and lengthening contractions in synergist muscles.

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    Duclay, Julien; Pasquet, Benjamin; Martin, Alain; Duchateau, Jacques

    2011-06-01

    This study was designed to investigate the cortical and spinal mechanisms involved in the modulations of neural activation during lengthening compared with isometric and shortening maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs). Two muscles susceptible to different neural adjustments at the spinal level, the soleus (SOL) and medial gastrocnemius (MG), were compared. Twelve healthy males participated in at least two experimental sessions designed to assess corticospinal and spinal excitabilities. We compared the modulation of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in response to transcranial magnetic stimulation and Hoffmann reflexes (H-reflexes) during isometric and anisometric MVCs. The H-reflex and MEP responses, recorded during lengthening and shortening MVCs, were compared with those obtained during isometric MVCs. The results indicate that the maximal amplitude of both MEP and H-reflex in the SOL were smaller (P shortening MVCs but similar (P > 0.05) in MG for all three muscle contraction types. The silent period that follows maximal MEPs was reduced (P muscle. Collectively, the current results indicate that the relative contribution of both cortical and spinal mechanisms to the modulation of neural activation differs during lengthening MVCs and between two synergist muscles. The comparison of SOL and MG responses further suggests that the specific modulation of the corticospinal excitability during lengthening MVCs depends mainly on pre- and postsynaptic inhibitory mechanisms acting at the spinal level.

  6. Optimal Combinations of Isometric Normalization Tests for the Production of Maximum Voluntary Activation of the Shoulder Muscles.

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    Dal Maso, Fabien; Marion, Patrick; Begon, Mickaël

    2016-09-01

    To identify the smallest combinations of maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) tests that produce near-maximum voluntary activation (MVA) for a large proportion of participants for the shoulder girdle muscles. Cross-sectional study. Research center. Healthy participants (N=38). Not applicable. The electromyography of 12 shoulder muscles was recorded while participants performed 15 MVIC tests. The smallest combinations of MVIC tests that met our acceptance criterion (ie, produce 90% of MVA for 90% of participants) were identified. Optimal combinations were identified for each of the 12 muscles individually and for the 12 muscles simultaneously. Electromyographic activation levels of the 95th highest percentile obtained with our optimal combinations and with the Four Normalization Tests previously recommended were compared using paired t tests. Between 2 and 6 MVIC tests were required for each of the 12 muscles, and 12 MVIC tests were required for the 12 muscles to meet the acceptance criterion. These optimal combinations produced electromyographic activation levels of the 95th highest percentile comprised between 97% and 100% of MVA. These electromyographic activation levels were significantly higher than the electromyographic activation levels obtained with the Four Normalization Tests. Although the number of MVIC tests to normalize 12 shoulder muscles was increased compared with previous recommendations, the proposed method ensures that near-MVA (>90%) was obtained for a large proportion of participants (>90%). Moreover, because electromyographic activation levels of the 95th highest percentile were at least 97% of MVA, the identified combinations could reduce the interparticipant variability. The proposed combinations could help to improve electromyographic normalization and therefore reduce the misinterpretations regarding shoulder muscle activation levels. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  7. EMG, bite force, and elongation of the masseter muscle under isometric voluntary contractions and variations of vertical dimension.

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    Manns, A; Miralles, R; Palazzi, C

    1979-12-01

    The relation EMG activity, bite force, and muscular elongation was studied in eight subjects with complete natural dentition during isometric contractions of the masseter muscle, measured from 7 mm to almost maximum jaw opening. EMG was registered with superficial electrodes and bite force with a gnathodynamometer. In series 1, recordings of EMG activity maintaining bite force constant (10 and 20 kg) show that EMG is high when the bite opening is 7 mm, decreases from 15 to 20 mm, and then increases again as jaw opening approaches maximum opening. In series 2, recordings of bite force maintaining EMG constant show that bite force increases up to a certain range of jaw opening (around 15 to 20 mm) and then decreases as we approach maximum jaw opening. Results show that there is for each experimental subject a physiologically optimum muscular elongation of major efficiency where the masseter develops highest muscular force with least EMG activity.

  8. Electrically evoked and voluntary maximal isometric tension in relation to dynamic muscle performance in elderly male subjects, aged 69 years.

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    Davies, C T; White, M J; Young, K

    1983-01-01

    The dynamic performance and electrically evoked mechanical properties of elderly triceps surae muscle have been investigated in 9 men, aged 69 yr. Dynamic performance consisted of cycling on a force bicycle and a vertical jump off two feet from a force platform. The results showed that the time to peak tension (TPT) and half relaxation time (1/2 RT) were significantly greater (p less than 0.001) by 30 ms and 22 ms and the supramaximal twitch (Pt) and tetanic (20 Hz-P020) tensions and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) were less by 45 N (-33%), 708 N (-49%), and 899 N (-43%) in the elderly compared with young male control subjects. On the force platform, the height jumped (Ht), maximal force exerted (P), take-off velocity (VT), net impulse (NI) and peak power output (W) were less by 18.6 cm, 173 N, 0.9 ms-1, 52 Ns and 1120 w respectively. Similar differences of power, force and velocity were observed on the force bicycle. The reduction of W in the elderly was associated with the contractile characteristics of the leg muscle. The loss of contractile speed and capacity to to generate force in old people was reflected in their inability to develop power during the performance of a maximal vertical jump and cycling.

  9. SUPERNORMAL MUSCLE-FIBER CONDUCTION-VELOCITY DURING INTERMITTENT ISOMETRIC-EXERCISE IN HUMAN MUSCLE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERHOEVEN, JH; LANGE, F

    1994-01-01

    Muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) and surface electromyographic parameters were studied in the brachial biceps muscle of healthy males during voluntary intermittent isometric contractions at 50% of maximum force. Recovery in the following 15 min was then observed. The measurements were perform

  10. Handgrip Maximal Voluntary Isometric Contraction Does Not Correlate with Thenar Motor Unit Number Estimation

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    Arun Aggarwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In slowly progressive conditions, such as motor neurone disease (MND, 50–80% of motor units may be lost before weakness becomes clinically apparent. Despite this, maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC has been reported as a clinically useful, reliable, and reproducible measure for monitoring disease progression in MND. We performed a study on a group of asymptomatic subjects that showed a lack of correlation between isometric grip strength and thenar MUNE. Motor unit number estimation (MUNE estimates the number of functioning lower motor neurones innervating a muscle or a group of muscles. We used the statistical electrophysiological technique of MUNE to estimate the number of motor units in thenar group of muscles in 69 subjects: 19 asymptomatic Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD 1 mutation carriers, 34 family controls, and 16 population controls. The Jamar hand dynamometer was used to measure isometric grip strength. This study suggests that MUNE is more sensitive for monitoring disease progression than maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC, as MUNE correlates with the number of functional motor neurones. This supports the observation that patients with substantial chronic denervation can maintain normal muscle twitch tension until 50–80% of motor units are lost and weakness is detectable.

  11. Optimal Control of Isometric Muscle Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Rockenfeller

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We use an indirect optimal control approach to calculate the optimal neural stimulation needed to obtain measured isometric muscle forces. The neural stimulation of the nerve system is hereby considered to be a control function (input of the system ’muscle’ that solely determines the muscle force (output. We use a well-established muscle model and experimental data of isometric contractions. The model consists of coupled activation and contraction dynamics described by ordinary differential equations. To validate our results, we perform a comparison with commercial optimal control software.

  12. Ischemic Preconditioning Enhances Muscle Endurance during Sustained Isometric Exercise.

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    Tanaka, D; Suga, T; Tanaka, T; Kido, K; Honjo, T; Fujita, S; Hamaoka, T; Isaka, T

    2016-07-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) enhances whole-body exercise endurance. However, it is poorly understood whether the beneficial effects originate from systemic (e. g., cardiovascular system) or peripheral (e. g., skeletal muscle) adaptations. The present study examined the effects of IPC on local muscle endurance during fatiguing isometric exercise. 12 male subjects performed sustained isometric unilateral knee-extension exercise at 20% of maximal voluntary contraction until failure. Prior to the exercise, subjects completed IPC or control (CON) treatments. During exercise trial, electromyography activity and near-infrared spectroscopy-derived deoxygenation in skeletal muscle were continuously recorded. Endurance time to task failure was significantly longer in IPC than in CON (mean±SE; 233±9 vs. 198±9 s, PIPC and CON. In contrast, deoxygenation dynamics in the quadriceps vastus lateralis muscle was significantly faster in IPC than in CON (27.1±3.4 vs. 35.0±3.6 s, PIPC can enhance muscular endurance during fatiguing isometric exercise. Moreover, IPC accelerated muscle deoxygenation dynamics during the exercise. Therefore, we suggest that the origin of beneficial effects of IPC on exercise performance may be the enhanced mitochondrial metabolism in skeletal muscle.

  13. Plyometric training improves voluntary activation and strength during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions.

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    Behrens, Martin; Mau-Moeller, Anett; Mueller, Karoline; Heise, Sandra; Gube, Martin; Beuster, Nico; Herlyn, Philipp K E; Fischer, Dagmar-C; Bruhn, Sven

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated effects of plyometric training (6 weeks, 3 sessions/week) on maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) strength and neural activation of the knee extensors during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions. Twenty-seven participants were randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. Maximum voluntary torques (MVT) during the different types of contraction were measured at 110° knee flexion (180°=full extension). The interpolated twitch technique was applied at the same knee joint angle during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions to measure voluntary activation. In addition, normalized root mean square of the EMG signal at MVT was calculated. The twitch torque signal induced by electrical nerve stimulation at rest was used to evaluate training-related changes at the muscle level. In addition, jump height in countermovement jump was measured. After training, MVT increased by 20Nm (95% CI: 5-36Nm, P=0.012), 24Nm (95% CI: 9-40Nm, P=0.004) and 27Nm (95% CI: 7-48Nm, P=0.013) for isometric, concentric and eccentric MVCs compared to controls, respectively. The strength enhancements were associated with increases in voluntary activation during isometric, concentric and eccentric MVCs by 7.8% (95% CI: 1.8-13.9%, P=0.013), 7.0% (95% CI: 0.4-13.5%, P=0.039) and 8.6% (95% CI: 3.0-14.2%, P=0.005), respectively. Changes in the twitch torque signal of the resting muscle, induced by supramaximal electrical stimulation of the femoral nerve, were not observed, indicating no alterations at the muscle level, whereas jump height was increased. Given the fact that the training exercises consisted of eccentric muscle actions followed by concentric contractions, it is in particular relevant that the plyometric training increased MVC strength and neural activation of the quadriceps muscle regardless of the contraction mode. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Physiological response to submaximal isometric contractions of the paravertebral muscles

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    Jensen, B. R.; Jorgensen, K.; Hargens, A. R.; Nielsen, P. K.; Nicolaisen, T.

    1999-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Brief (30-second) isometric trunk extensions at 5%, 20%, 40%, 60%, and 80% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and 3 minutes of prolonged trunk extension (20% MVC) in erect position were studied in nine healthy male subjects. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the intercorrelation between intramuscular pressure and tissue oxygenation of the paravertebral muscles during submaximal isometric contractions and further, to evaluate paravertebral electromyogram and intramuscular pressure as indicators of force development. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Local physiologic responses to muscle contraction are incompletely understood. METHODS: Relative oxygenation was monitored with noninvasive near-infrared spectroscopy, intramuscular pressure was measured with a transducer-tipped catheter, and surface electromyogram was monitored at three recording sites. RESULTS: The root mean square amplitudes of the paravertebral electromyogram (L4, left and right; T12, right) and intramuscular pressure measured in the lumbar multifidus muscle at L4 increased with greater force development in a curvilinear manner. A significant decrease in the oxygenation of the lumbar paravertebral muscle in response to muscle contraction was found at an initial contraction level of 20% MVC. This corresponded to a paravertebral intramuscular pressure of 30-40 mm Hg. However, during prolonged trunk extension, no further decrease in tissue oxygenation was found compared with the tissue oxygenation level at the end of the brief contractions, indicating that homeostatic adjustments (mean blood pressure and heart rate) over time were sufficient to maintain paravertebral muscle oxygen levels. CONCLUSION: At a threshold intramuscular pressure of 30-40 mm Hg during muscle contraction, oxygenation in the paravertebral muscles is significantly reduced. The effect of further increase in intramuscular pressure on tissue oxygenation over time may be compensated for by an increase in blood pressure and heart

  15. Activation of selected shoulder muscles during unilateral wall and bench press tasks under submaximal isometric effort.

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    Tucci, Helga T; Ciol, Marcia A; de Araújo, Rodrigo C; de Andrade, Rodrigo; Martins, Jaqueline; McQuade, Kevin J; Oliveira, Anamaria S

    2011-07-01

    Controlled laboratory study. To assess the activation of 7 shoulder muscles under 2 closed kinetic chain (CKC) tasks for the upper extremity using submaximal isometric effort, thus providing relative quantification of muscular isometric effort for these muscles across the CKC exercises, which may be applied to rehabilitation protocols for individuals with shoulder weakness. CKC exercises favor joint congruence, reduce shear load, and promote joint dynamic stability. Additionally, knowledge about glenohumeral and periscapular muscle activity elicited during CKC exercises may help clinicians to design protocols for shoulder rehabilitation. Using surface electromyography, activation level was measured across 7 shoulder muscles in 20 healthy males, during the performance of a submaximal isometric wall press and bench press. Signals were normalized to the maximal voluntary isometric contraction, and, using paired t tests, data were analyzed between the exercises for each muscle. Compared to the wall press, the bench press elicited higher activity for most muscles, except for the upper trapezius. Levels of activity were usually low but were above 20% maximal voluntary isometric contraction for the serratus anterior on both tasks, and for the long head triceps brachii on the bench press. Both the bench press and wall press, as performed in this study, led to relatively low EMG activation levels for the muscles measured and may be considered for use in the early phases of rehabilitation.

  16. Isokinetic and isometric muscle strength combined with transcutaneous electrical muscle stimulation in primary fibromyalgia syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Wildschiødtz, Gordon; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B

    1991-01-01

    Twenty women with primary fibromyalgia syndrome and 20 age matched healthy women were investigated. The subjects performed maximum voluntary isokinetic contractions of the right quadriceps in an isokinetic dynamometer. Maximum voluntary isometric contractions of the right quadriceps were performe...

  17. Differential contributions of ankle plantarflexors during submaximal isometric muscle action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masood, Tahir; Bojsen-Møller, Jens; Kalliokoski, Kari K

    2014-01-01

    healthy volunteers (27.3±4.2yrs). A tracer ([(18)F]-FDG) was injected during the exercise and PET scanning was done immediately afterwards. The examined muscles included soleus (Sol), medial gastrocnemius (MG), lateral gastrocnemius (LG), and flexor hallucis longus (FHL). It was found that isometric...... maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force, muscle glucose uptake (GU) rate, and SEMG of various plantarflexors were comparable bilaterally. In terms of %EMG MVC, FHL and MG displayed the highest activity (∼34%), while LG (∼21%) had the lowest activity. Cumulative SEMG from all parts of the triceps surae...... (TS) muscle accounted for ∼70% of the combined EMG signal of all four plantarflexors. As for GU, the highest quantity was observed in MG (2.4±0.8μmol*100g(-1)*min(-1)), whereas FHL (1.8±0.6μmol*100g(-1)*min(-1)) had the lowest uptake. Cumulative GU of TS constituted nearly 80% of the combined GU...

  18. An examination of cross-talk among surface mechanomyographic signals from the superficial quadriceps femoris muscles during isometric muscle actions.

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    Beck, Travis W; DeFreitas, Jason M; Stock, Matt S

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine cross-talk among the mechanomyographic (MMG) signals from the superficial quadriceps femoris muscles during submaximal to maximal isometric muscle actions of the leg extensors. Eleven healthy men (age=20.1+/-1.1yr, mean+/-SD) volunteered to randomly perform isometric muscle actions in 10% increments from 10% to 90% of the maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). During each muscle action, MMG signals were detected from the vastus lateralis, rectus femoris, and vastus medialis with three separate accelerometers. Cross-correlation was used to quantify cross-talk among the vastus lateralis, rectus femoris, and vastus medialis during each muscle action. The results showed cross-correlation coefficients that ranged from R(x,y)=.124-.714, but generally speaking, the coefficients were between .1 and .3. In addition, there were no consistent differences among the cross-talk levels for the three muscles, and the cross-correlation coefficients generally did not increase with isometric torque. Thus, MMG can be used to examine muscle function from each of the superficial quadriceps femoris muscles during isometric muscle actions.

  19. Simultaneous Knee Extensor Muscle Action Induces an Increase in Voluntary Force Generation of Plantar Flexor Muscles.

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    Suzuki, Takahito; Shioda, Kohei; Kinugasa, Ryuta; Fukashiro, Senshi

    2017-02-01

    Suzuki, T, Shioda, K, Kinugasa, R, and Fukashiro, S. Simultaneous knee extensor muscle action induces an increase in voluntary force generation of plantar flexor muscles. J Strength Cond Res 31(2): 365-371, 2017-Maximum activation of the plantar flexor muscles is required for various sporting activities that involve simultaneous plantar flexion and knee extension. During a multi-joint movement, activation of the plantar flexor muscles is affected by the activity of the knee extensor muscles. We hypothesized that coactivation of the plantar flexor muscles and knee extensor muscles would result in a higher plantar flexion torque. To test this hypothesis, 8 male volunteers performed maximum voluntary isometric action of the plantar flexor muscles with and without isometric action of the knee extensor muscles. Surface electromyographic data were collected from 8 muscles of the right lower limb. Voluntary activation of the triceps surae muscles, evaluated using the interpolated twitch technique, significantly increased by 6.4 percentage points with intentional knee extensor action (p = 0.0491). This finding is in line with a significant increase in the average rectified value of the electromyographic activity of the vastus lateralis, fibularis longus, and soleus muscles (p = 0.013, 0.010, and 0.045, respectively). The resultant plantar flexion torque also significantly increased by 11.5% of the predetermined maximum (p = 0.031). These results suggest that higher plantar flexor activation coupled with knee extensor activation facilitates force generation during a multi-joint task.

  20. Maximal force, voluntary activation and muscle soreness after eccentric damage to human elbow flexor muscles

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    Prasartwuth, O; Taylor, JL; Gandevia, SC

    2005-01-01

    Muscle damage reduces voluntary force after eccentric exercise but impaired neural drive to the muscle may also contribute. To determine whether the delayed-onset muscle soreness, which develops ∼1 day after exercise, reduces voluntary activation and to identify the possible site for any reduction, voluntary activation of elbow flexor muscles was examined with both motor cortex and motor nerve stimulation. We measured maximal voluntary isometric torque (MVC), twitch torque, muscle soreness and voluntary activation in eight subjects before, immediately after, 2 h after, 1, 2, 4 and 8 days after eccentric exercise. Motor nerve stimulation and motor cortex stimulation were used to derive twitch torques and measures of voluntary activation. Eccentric exercise immediately reduced the MVC by 38 ± 3% (mean ±s.d., n = 8). The resting twitch produced by motor nerve stimulation fell by 82 ± 6%, and the estimated resting twitch by cortical stimulation fell by 47 ± 15%. While voluntary torque recovered after 8 days, both measures of the resting twitch remained depressed. Muscle tenderness occurred 1–2 days after exercise, and pain during contractions on days 1–4, but changes in voluntary activation did not follow this time course. Voluntary activation assessed with nerve stimulation fell 19 ± 6% immediately after exercise but was not different from control values after 2 days. Voluntary activation assessed by motor cortex stimulation was unchanged by eccentric exercise. During MVCs, absolute increments in torque evoked by nerve and cortical stimulation behaved differently. Those to cortical stimulation decreased whereas those to nerve stimulation tended to increase. These findings suggest that reduced voluntary activation contributes to the early force loss after eccentric exercise, but that it is not due to muscle soreness. The impairment of voluntary activation to nerve stimulation but not motor cortical stimulation suggests that the activation deficit lies in the

  1. Post-exercise depression following submaximal and maximal isometric voluntary contraction.

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    Cunningham, David A; Janini, Daniel; Wyant, Alexandria; Bonnett, Corin; Varnerin, Nicole; Sankarasubramanian, Vishwanath; Potter-Baker, Kelsey A; Roelle, Sarah; Wang, Xiaofeng; Siemionow, Vlodek; Yue, Guang H; Plow, Ela B

    2016-06-21

    It is well known that corticomotor excitability is altered during the post-exercise depression following fatigue within the primary motor cortex (M1). However, it is currently unknown whether corticomotor reorganization following muscle fatigue differs between magnitudes of force and whether corticomotor reorganization occurs measured with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Fifteen young healthy adults (age 23.8±1.4, 8 females) participated in a within-subjects, repeated measures design study, where they underwent three testing sessions separated by one-week each. Subjects performed separate sessions of each: low-force isometric contraction (30% maximal voluntary contraction [MVC]), high-force isometric contraction (95% MVC) of the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle until self-perceived exhaustion, as well as one session of a 30-min rest as a control. We examined changes in corticomotor map area, excitability and location of the FDI representation in and around M1 using TMS. The main finding was that following low-force, but not high-force fatigue (HFF) corticomotor map area and excitability reduced [by 3cm(2) (t(14)=-2.94, p=0.01) and 56% respectively t(14)=-4.01, p<0.001)]. Additionally, the region of corticomotor excitability shifted posteriorly (6.4±2.5mm) (t(14)=-6.33, p=.019). Corticomotor output became less excitable particularly in regions adjoining M1. Overall, post-exercise depression is present in low-force, but not for HFF. Further, low-force fatigue (LFF) results in a posterior shift in corticomotor output. These changes may be indicative of increased sensory feedback from the somatosensory cortex during the recovery phase of fatigue.

  2. System identification of the mechanomyogram from single motor units during voluntary isometric contraction.

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    Uchiyama, Takanori; Hashimoto, Erika

    2011-09-01

    A mechanomyogram (MMG) from single motor units of the anconeus muscle in voluntary isometric contraction was recorded from seven subjects using a spike-triggered averaging technique. The MMG system, in which the input was an ideal impulse and the output was the MMG detected with an acceleration sensor, was identified as the fifth-order model by the subspace-based state-space model identification method. The transfer function of the MMG system was factorized to the second- and the first-order models. The second-order model was compared to the standard form of the second-order model, and its resonance frequency was calculated. The resonance frequencies of the second-order models were 166 ± 61 and 93 ± 27 Hz, which were within the range of the values estimated from mechanical impedance in the literature. The equivalent mechanical model of the MMG system of the single motor unit was proposed on the basis of the fifth-order model. The model might be useful to evaluate the visco-elastic properties of the anconeus muscle.

  3. Methodology to Customize Maximal Isometric Forces for Hill-Type Muscle Models.

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    Dal Maso, Fabien; Begon, Mickaël; Raison, Maxime

    2017-02-01

    One approach to increasing the confidence of muscle force estimation via musculoskeletal models is to minimize the root mean square error (RMSE) between joint torques estimated from electromyographic-driven musculoskeletal models and those computed using inverse dynamics. We propose a method that reduces RMSE by selecting subsets of combinations of maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) trials that minimize RMSE. Twelve participants performed 3 elbow MVIC in flexion and in extension. An upper-limb electromyographic-driven musculoskeletal model was created to optimize maximum muscle stress and estimate the maximal isometric force of the biceps brachii, brachialis, brachioradialis, and triceps brachii. Maximal isometric forces were computed from all possible combinations of flexion-extension trials. The combinations producing the smallest RMSE significantly reduced the normalized RMSE to 7.4% compared with the combination containing all trials (9.0%). Maximal isometric forces ranged between 114-806 N, 64-409 N, 236-1511 N, and 556-3434 N for the brachii, brachialis, brachioradialis, and triceps brachii, respectively. These large variations suggest that customization is required to reduce the difference between models and actual participants' maximal isometric force. While the smallest previously reported RMSE was 10.3%, the proposed method reduced the RMSE to 7.4%, which may increase the confidence of muscle force estimation.

  4. Force depression following muscle shortening in sub-maximal voluntary contractions of human adductor pollicis.

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    Rousanoglou, Elissavet N; Oskouei, Ali E; Herzog, Walter

    2007-01-01

    Mechanical properties of skeletal muscles are often studied for controlled, electrically induced, maximal, or supra-maximal contractions. However, many mechanical properties, such as the force-length relationship and force enhancement following active muscle stretching, are quite different for maximal and sub-maximal, or electrically induced and voluntary contractions. Force depression, the loss of force observed following active muscle shortening, has been observed and is well documented for electrically induced and maximal voluntary contractions. Since sub-maximal voluntary contractions are arguably the most important for everyday movement analysis and for biomechanical models of skeletal muscle function, it is important to study force depression properties under these conditions. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine force depression following sub-maximal, voluntary contractions. Sets of isometric reference and isometric-shortening-isometric test contractions at 30% of maximal voluntary effort were performed with the adductor pollicis muscle. All reference and test contractions were executed by controlling force or activation using a feedback system. Test contractions included adductor pollicis shortening over 10 degrees, 20 degrees, and 30 degrees of thumb adduction. Force depression was assessed by comparing the steady-state isometric forces (activation control) or average electromyograms (EMGs) (force control) following active muscle shortening with those obtained in the corresponding isometric reference contractions. Force was decreased by 20% and average EMG was increased by 18% in the shortening test contractions compared to the isometric reference contractions. Furthermore, force depression was increased with increasing shortening amplitudes, and the relative magnitudes of force depression were similar to those found in electrically stimulated and maximal contractions. We conclude from these results that force depression occurs in sub

  5. Influences of Fascicle Length During Isometric Training on Improvement of Muscle Strength.

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    Tanaka, Hiroki; Ikezoe, Tome; Umehara, Jun; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Umegaki, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Takuya; Nishishita, Satoru; Fujita, Kosuke; Araki, Kojiro; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2016-11-01

    Tanaka, H, Ikezoe, T, Umehara, J, Nakamura, M, Umegaki, H, Kobayashi, T, Nishishita, S, Fujita, K, Araki, K, and Ichihashi, N. Influences of fascicle length during isometric training on improvement of muscle strength. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3249-3255, 2016-This study investigated whether low-intensity isometric training would elicit a greater improvement in maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) at the same fascicle length, rather than the joint angle, adopted during training. Sixteen healthy women (21.8 ± 1.5 years) were randomly divided into an intervention group and a control group. Before (Pre) and after (Post) training, isometric plantarflexion MVCs were measured every 10° through the range of ankle joint position from 20° dorsiflexion to 30° plantarflexion (i.e., 6 ankle angles). Medial gastrocnemius fascicle length was also measured at each position, using B-mode ultrasound under 3 conditions of muscle activation: at rest, 30%MVC at respective angles, and MVC. Plantarflexion resistance training at an angle of 20° plantarflexion was performed 3 days a week for 4 weeks at 30%MVC using 3 sets of twenty 3-second isometric contractions. Maximum voluntary contraction in the intervention group increased at 0 and 10° plantarflexion (0°; Pre: 81.2 ± 26.5 N·m, Post: 105.0 ± 21.6 N·m, 10°; Pre: 63.0 ± 23.6 N·m, Post: 81.3 ± 20.3 N·m), which was not the angle used in training (20°). However, the fascicle length adopted in training at 20° plantarflexion and 30%MVC was similar to the value at 0 or 10° plantarflexion at MVC. Low-intensity isometric training at a shortened muscle length may be effective for improving MVC at a lengthened muscle length because of specificity of the fascicle length than the joint angle.

  6. An additional phase in PCr use during sustained isometric exercise at 30% MVC in the tibialis anterior muscle.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtman, C.J.; Heerschap, A.; Zwarts, M.J.; Stegeman, D.F.

    2002-01-01

    The occurrence of an abrupt acceleration in phosphocreatine hydrolysis in the tibial anterior muscle during the last part of a sustained isometric exercise at 30% maximal voluntary contraction until fatigue is demonstrated in seven out of eight healthy subjects by applying in vivo 31P NMR spectrosco

  7. Decreasing systolic blood pressure with isometric muscle training: a CAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Espinoza Salinas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases such as coronary heart disease or heart failure. One of the interventions for the management of this disorder is isometric muscle training on upper and lower limbs. PURPOSE To prove the validity and applicability of results regarding the effectiveness of isometric training in hypertensive subjects. We also attempt to answer the following question: what is the effectiveness of isometric muscle training on the decrease of systolic blood pressure in hypertensive patients? METHODS Critical appraisal of the systematic review and meta-analysis “Isometric exercise training for blood pressure management”. RESULTS Isometric training reduces systolic blood pressure in normotensive and medicated hypertensive subjects, with a standardized mean difference of 6.77 mm Hg (95% confidence interval: 7.93-5.62. CONCLUSION It is reasonable to recommend isometric muscle training with the aim of lowering systolic blood pressure, considering the impact of the results of the articles analyzed and the applicability of this type of training.

  8. Forearm muscle oxygenation decreases with low levels of voluntary contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, G.; Kahan, N. J.; Hargens, A. R.; Rempel, D. M.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of our investigation was to determine if the near infrared spectroscopy technique was sensitive to changes in tissue oxygenation at low levels of isometric contraction in the extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle. Nine subjects were seated with the right arm abducted to 45 degrees, elbow flexed to 85 degrees, forearm pronated 45 degrees, and wrist and forearm supported on an armrest throughout the protocol. Altered tissue oxygenation was measured noninvasively with near infrared spectroscopy. The near infrared spectroscopy probe was placed over the extensor carpi radialis brevis of the subject's right forearm and secured with an elastic wrap. After 1 minute of baseline measurements taken with the muscle relaxed, four different loads were applied just proximal to the metacarpophalangeal joint such that the subjects isometrically contracted the extensor carpi radialis brevis at 5, 10, 15, and 50% of the maximum voluntary contraction for 1 minute each. A 3-minute recovery period followed each level of contraction. At the end of the protocol, with the probe still in place, a value for ischemic tissue oxygenation was obtained for each subject. This value was considered the physiological zero and hence 0% tissue oxygenation. Mean tissue oxygenation (+/-SE) decreased from resting baseline (100% tissue oxygenation) to 89 +/- 4, 81 +/- 8, 78 +/- 8, and 47 +/- 8% at 5, 10, 15, and 50% of the maximum voluntary contraction, respectively. Tissue oxygenation levels at 10, 15, and 50% of the maximum voluntary contraction were significantly lower (p muscle contraction and that near infrared spectroscopy is a sensitive technique for detecting deoxygenation noninvasively at low levels of forearm muscle contraction. Our findings have important implications in occupational medicine because oxygen depletion induced by low levels of muscle contraction may be directly linked to muscle fatigue.

  9. ANODAL TRANSCRANIAL DIRECT CURRENT STIMULATION (TDCS) INCREASES ISOMETRIC STRENGTH OF SHOULDER ROTATORS MUSCLES IN HANDBALL PLAYERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazime, Fuad Ahmad; da Cunha, Ronaldo Alves; Soliaman, Renato Rozenblit; Romancini, Ana Clara Bezerra; Pochini, Alberto de Castro; Ejnisman, Benno; Baptista, Abrahão Fontes

    2017-06-01

    Weakness of the rotator cuff muscles can lead to imbalances in the strength of shoulder external and internal rotators, change the biomechanics of the glenohumeral joint and predispose an athlete to injury. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique that has demonstrated promising results in a variety of health conditions. However few studies addressed its potential approach in the realm of athletics. The purpose of this study was to investigate if transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) technique increases the isometric muscle strength of shoulder external and internal rotators in handball athletes. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Eight female handball players aged between 17 and 21 years (Mean=19.65; SD=2.55) with 7.1 ± 4.8 years of experience in training, participating in regional and national competitions were recruited. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of shoulder external and internal rotator muscles was evaluated during and after 30 and 60 minutes post one session of anodal and sham current (2mA; 0.057mA/cm(2)) with a one-week interval between stimulations. Compared to baseline, MVIC of shoulder external and internal rotators significantly increased after real but not sham tDCS. Between-group differences were observed for external and internal rotator muscles. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction of external rotation increased significantly during tDCS, and 30 and 60 minutes post-tDCS for real tDCS compared to that for sham tDCS. For internal rotation MVIC increased significantly during and 60 minutes post-tDCS. The results indicate that transcranial direct current stimulation temporarily increases maximal isometric contractions of the internal and external rotators of the shoulder in handball players. 2.

  10. Bed rest attenuates sympathetic and pressor responses to isometric exercise in antigravity leg muscles in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Atsunori; Michikami, Daisaku; Shiozawa, Tomoki; Iwase, Satoshi; Hayano, Junichiro; Kawada, Toru; Sunagawa, Kenji; Mano, Tadaaki

    2004-05-01

    Although spaceflight and bed rest are known to cause muscular atrophy in the antigravity muscles of the legs, the changes in sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to exercises using the atrophied muscles remain unknown. We hypothesized that bed rest would augment sympathetic responses to isometric exercise using antigravity leg muscles in humans. Ten healthy male volunteers were subjected to 14-day 6 degrees head-down bed rest. Before and after bed rest, they performed isometric exercises using leg (plantar flexion) and forearm (handgrip) muscles, followed by 2-min postexercise muscle ischemia (PEMI) that continues to stimulate the muscle metaboreflex. These exercises were sustained to fatigue. We measured muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in the contralateral resting leg by microneurography. In both pre- and post-bed-rest exercise tests, exercise intensities were set at 30 and 70% of the maximum voluntary force measured before bed rest. Bed rest attenuated the increase in MSNA in response to fatiguing plantar flexion by approximately 70% at both exercise intensities (both P antigravity leg muscles.

  11. Comparison of maximum voluntary isometric contraction of the biceps on various posture and respiration conditions for normalization of electromyography data

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sang-Yeol; Jo, Marg-Eun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Maximum voluntary isometric contraction can increase the reliability of electromyography data by controlling respiration; however, many studies that use normalization of electromyography data fail to account for this. This study aims to check changes in maximum voluntary isometric contraction based on changes in posture and respiration conditions. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-two healthy volunteers were included in this study. Using 22 healthy subjects, MVIC of the biceps brachii m...

  12. Forearm muscle oxygenation during sustained isometric contractions in rock climbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kodejška

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bouldering and lead climbing are divergent disciplines of the sport of rock climbing. Bouldering moves are short and powerful, whilst sport climbing is longer and require a greater degree of endurance. Aim. The aim of this study was to compare forearm muscle oxygenation during sustained isometric contraction between lead climbers (LC and boulderers (BO. Methods. Eight BO and twelve LC completed maximal finger flexor strength test and sustained contractions to exhaustion at 60% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC. Differences between BO and LC in maximal strength, time to exhaustion, force time integral (FTI, and tissue oxygenation (SmO2 were assessed by t-test for independent samples. Results. LC showed significantly lower level of average tissue oxygenation (BO 38.9% SmO2, s = 7.4; LC 28.7% SmO2, s = 7.1 and maximal tissue deoxygenation (BO 25.6% SmO2, s = 8.2; LC 13.5% SmO2, s = 8.5. LC demonstrated significantly lower finger flexor strength (519 N, s = 72 than BO (621 N, s = 142. LC sustained a longer time of contraction (not significantly (BO 52.2 s, s = 11.5; LC 60.6 s, s = 13 and achieved a similar value of FTI (BO 17421 Ns, s = 4291; LO 17476 Ns, s = 5036 in the endurance test. Conclusions. The results showed lower deoxygenation during sustained contraction in BO than LC despite similar FTI, indicating different local metabolic pathways in both groups.

  13. Voluntary activation of the trapezius muscle in cases with neck/shoulder pain compared to healthy controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Katrine Tholstrup; Larsen, Camilla Marie; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    2017-01-01

    Subjects reporting neck/shoulder pain have been shown to generate less force during maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVC) of the shoulder muscles compared to healthy controls. This has been suggested to be caused by a pain-related decrease in voluntary activation (VA) rather than lack of...

  14. Dystonic neck muscles show a shift in relative autospectral power during isometric contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bruijn, E; Nijmeijer, S W R; Forbes, P A; Koelman, J H T M; Van Der Helm, F C T; Tijssen, M A J; Happee, R

    2017-07-17

    To identify effects of a deviant motor drive in the autospectral power of dystonic muscles during voluntary contraction in cervical dystonia patients. Submaximal (20%) isometric head-neck tasks were performed with the head fixed, measuring surface EMG of the sternocleidomastoid, splenius capitis and semispinalis capitis in CD patients and controls. Autospectral power of muscle activity, and head forces was analyzed using cumulative distribution functions (CDF). A downward shift between the theta/low alpha-band (3-10Hz) and the high alpha/beta-band (10-30Hz) was detected using the CDF10, defined as the cumulative power from 3 to 10Hz relative to power from 3 to 30Hz. CDF10 was increased in dystonic muscles compared to controls and patient muscles unaffected by dystonia, due to a 3-10Hz power increase and a 10-30Hz decrease. CDF10 also increased in patient head forces. Submaximal isometric contractions with the head fixed provided a well-defined test condition minimizing effects of reflexive feedback and tremor. We associate shifts in autospectral power with prokinetic sensorimotor control. Analysis of autospectral power in isometric tasks with the head fixed is a promising approach in research and diagnostics of cervical dystonia. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Fatigability and recovery of arm muscles with advanced age for dynamic and isometric contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Tejin; Schlinder-Delap, Bonnie; Hunter, Sandra K

    2013-02-01

    This study determined whether age-related mechanisms can increase fatigue of arm muscles during maximal velocity dynamic contractions, as it occurs in the lower limb. We compared elbow flexor fatigue of young (n=10, 20.8±2.7 years) and old men (n=16, 73.8±6.1 years) during and in recovery from a dynamic and an isometric postural fatiguing task. Each task was maintained until failure while supporting a load equivalent to 20% of maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) torque. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to assess supraspinal fatigue (superimposed twitch, SIT) and muscle relaxation. Time to failure was longer for the old men than for the young men for the isometric task (9.5±3.1 vs. 17.2±7.0 min, P=0.01) but similar for the dynamic task (6.3±2.4 min vs. 6.0±2.0 min, P=0.73). Initial peak rate of relaxation was slower for the old men than for the young men, and was associated with a longer time to failure for both tasks (PMuscular mechanisms and greater relative muscle activity (EMG activity) explain the greater fatigue during the dynamic task for the old men compared with the young men in the elbow flexor muscles. Recovery of MVC torque however relies more on the recovery of supraspinal fatigue among the old men than among the young men.

  16. Firing rate modulation of human motor units in different muscles during isometric contraction with various forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, K; Narusawa, M

    1996-05-06

    To examine the factors affecting the control of human motor units, rate coding strategies of the motor units were investigated in upper limb and intrinsic hand muscles during voluntary isometric contraction of steady force levels up to 80% of maximal voluntary contraction. Numerous spike trains from single motor units were recorded from the m. first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and the m. biceps brachii (BB) of eight human subjects by means of tungsten micro-electrodes, and the mean firing rate (MFR) was calculated for each subject and inter-individual comparisons made. The MFRs of the FDI were larger than that of the BB at the higher force level, and substantial differences were not found between these muscles at the lower force level. The slope of the linear regression line of MFRs vs. exerted forces for the FDI was more than twice that for the BB. Therefore, isometric force control of the FDI depends more on the rate coding strategy. The difference in rate coding between the FDI and BB motor units may be determined by factors other than muscle fiber composition, because both muscles are known to possess a similar composition of fiber types. Possible mechanisms underlying these characteristics of rate coding strategy are considered in this report.

  17. A linear description of shortening induced changes in isometric length-force characteristics of rat muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, K.; Grootenboer, H.J.; Koopman, H.F.J.M.; Huijing, P.A.

    1996-01-01

    Active muscle shortening reduces the isometric force potential of muscle. This observation indicates that the isometric length-force characteristics are altered during muscle shortening. Post-shortening decrease in isometric force depends on starting length, shortening amplitude and shortening veloc

  18. Inhibitory interneuron circuits at cortical and spinal levels are associated with individual differences in corticomuscular coherence during isometric voluntary contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuya, Ryosuke; Ushiyama, Junichi; Ushiba, Junichi

    2017-01-01

    Corticomuscular coherence (CMC) is an oscillatory synchronization of 15–35 Hz (β-band) between electroencephalogram (EEG) of the sensorimotor cortex and electromyogram of contracting muscles. Although we reported that the magnitude of CMC varies among individuals, the physiological mechanisms underlying this variation are still unclear. Here, we aimed to investigate the associations between CMC and intracortical inhibition (ICI) in the primary motor cortex (M1)/recurrent inhibition (RI) in the spinal cord, which probably affect oscillatory neural activities. Firstly, we quantified ICI from changes in motor-evoked potentials induced by paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation in M1 during tonic isometric voluntary contraction of the first dorsal interosseous. ICI showed a significant, negative correlation with the strength of EEG β-oscillation, but not with the magnitude of CMC across individuals. Next, we quantified RI from changes in H-reflexes induced by paired-pulse electrical nerve stimulation to the posterior tibial nerve during isometric contraction of the soleus muscle. We observed a significant, positive correlation between RI and peak CMC across individuals. These results suggest that the local inhibitory interneuron networks in cortical and spinal levels are associated with the oscillatory activity in corticospinal loop. PMID:28290507

  19. Isometric hip muscle strength in posttraumatic below-knee amputees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jandrić Slavica

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Traumas and war injuries, next to chronic occlusive artery disease and diabetes mellitus-derived complications, are the most frequent cause of the lower limbs amputation. They affect mostly younger population that need a higher level of activities as compared with the elderly. Medical rehabilitation is very significant for the muscle performance improvement in this population providing their social reintegration. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of below-knee amputation on the hip isometric muscle strength and effect of rehabilitation on improvement of hip muscle strength in below-knee amputees, secondary to war wounding. Methods. Forty below-knee amputees (after war wounding, average age 35.6±10.6 years, that were included in primary rehabilitation program with prosthetics, were examined. Objective parameters were used to evaluate therapeutical effects. Isometric muscle strength of hip flexors, extensors, abductors and adductors was measured by dynamometer and expressed in Newton (N at admission, control and discharge for each patient. Average length of the treatment was 51 ± 34.1 days. Results. For isometric hip flexors (t = - 1.99346, p < 0.05, extensors (t = -4.629073, p < 0.001, abductors (t = -4.9408, p < 0.001 and adductors (t = -2.00228, p < 0.05, muscle strength was significantly less on the amputated than on nonamputated side. The highest differences in muscle strength between amputated and nonamputated limbs were noted for hip abductors (26.6% and extensors (23.3%. There was significant improvement of mean values of strength for all examined hip muscles after rehabilitation and prosthetics for both legs in comparison to beginning of the therapy. The hip abductor on the amputated side was for 19.4% weaker after rehabilitation in comparison to the nonamputated limb. Conclusion. Decreases of isometric muscle strength in all examined hip muscles were observed, more in the amputated limb. Rehabilitation

  20. Localized Electrical Impedance Myography of the Biceps Brachii Muscle during Different Levels of Isometric Contraction and Fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Le; Shin, Henry; Li, Xiaoyan; Li, Sheng; Zhou, Ping

    2016-04-22

    This study assessed changes in electrical impedance myography (EIM) at different levels of isometric muscle contraction as well as during exhaustive exercise at 60% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) until task failure. The EIM was performed on the biceps brachii muscle of 19 healthy subjects. The results showed that there was a significant difference between the muscle resistance (R) measured during the isometric contraction and when the muscle was completely relaxed. Post hoc analysis shows that the resistance increased at higher contractions (both 60% MVC and MVC), however, there were no significant changes in muscle reactance (X) during the isometric contractions. The resistance also changed during different stages of the fatigue task and there were significant decreases from the beginning of the contraction to task failure as well as between task failure and post fatigue rest. Although our results demonstrated an increase in resistance during isometric contraction, the changes were within 10% of the baseline value. These changes might be related to the modest alterations in muscle architecture during a contraction. The decrease in resistance seen with muscle fatigue may be explained by an accumulation of metabolites in the muscle tissue.

  1. Localized Electrical Impedance Myography of the Biceps Brachii Muscle during Different Levels of Isometric Contraction and Fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed changes in electrical impedance myography (EIM at different levels of isometric muscle contraction as well as during exhaustive exercise at 60% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC until task failure. The EIM was performed on the biceps brachii muscle of 19 healthy subjects. The results showed that there was a significant difference between the muscle resistance (R measured during the isometric contraction and when the muscle was completely relaxed. Post hoc analysis shows that the resistance increased at higher contractions (both 60% MVC and MVC, however, there were no significant changes in muscle reactance (X during the isometric contractions. The resistance also changed during different stages of the fatigue task and there were significant decreases from the beginning of the contraction to task failure as well as between task failure and post fatigue rest. Although our results demonstrated an increase in resistance during isometric contraction, the changes were within 10% of the baseline value. These changes might be related to the modest alterations in muscle architecture during a contraction. The decrease in resistance seen with muscle fatigue may be explained by an accumulation of metabolites in the muscle tissue.

  2. Mechanomyographic amplitude and mean power frequency responses during isometric ramp vs. step muscle actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Eric D; Beck, Travis W; Herda, Trent J; Hartman, Michael J; Stout, Jeffrey R; Housh, Terry J; Cramer, Joel T

    2008-03-15

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the mechanomyographic amplitude (MMG(RMS)) and mean power frequency (MMG(MPF)) vs. torque relationships during isometric ramp and step muscle actions for the vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) muscles. Nineteen subjects (mean+/-S.D. age=24+/-4 years) performed 2 isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) before and after 2 or 3 isometric ramp muscle actions from (5-95% MVC) to 9 submaximal step muscle actions (15, 25, 35, 45, 55, 65, 75, 85, and 95% MVC). MMG signals were recorded from the VL and RF muscles, and MMG(RMS) and MMG(MPF) values were computed for each corresponding percentage of the MVC. Absolute and normalized MMG(RMS) and MMG(MPF) vs. torque relationships were analyzed and interpreted on a subject-by-subject and composite pattern basis using polynomial regression and repeated measures ANOVAs. For MMG(RMS) and MMG(MPF), only 16-53% and 11-26% of the individual responses were consistent with the composite polynomial models, respectively. In addition, the normalized composite MMG(RMS) values were greater for the RF than the VL from 35 to 85% MVC. Only 47% of the MMG(RMS) and 5% of the MMG(MPF) individual patterns of responses were the same for the ramp and step muscle actions, and differences were also observed for the composite MMG(RMS) and MMG(MPF) patterns between the ramp and step muscle actions. Overall, these findings indicated that the torque-related patterns of responses for MMG(RMS) and MMG(MPF) were different among subjects (i.e., inter-individual variability) and were muscle- (VL vs. RF) and mode-specific (ramp vs. step).

  3. A linear description of shortening induced changes in isometric length-force characteristics of rat muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Meijer, K; Grootenboer, H.J.; Koopman, H.F.J.M.; Huijing, P.A.

    1996-01-01

    Active muscle shortening reduces the isometric force potential of muscle. This observation indicates that the isometric length-force characteristics are altered during muscle shortening. Post-shortening decrease in isometric force depends on starting length, shortening amplitude and shortening velocity. In the present study, post-shortening decrease in isometric force was determined after isokinetic contractions with various shortening amplitudes initiated from different lengths of rat medial...

  4. The effects of isometric contraction of shoulder muscles on cervical multifidus muscle dimensions in healthy office workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnama, Leila; Rezasoltani, Asghar; Khalkhali Zavieh, Minoo; Noori Kochi, Farhang; Akbarzadeh Baghban, Alireza

    2014-07-01

    It is argued that cervical multifidus muscles (CMM) are responsible for providing neck stability. However, whether they are actually activated during the tasks performed by the upper extremities to the neck is still unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effects of isometric contraction of shoulder muscles on the dimensions of CMM. Twenty three healthy males voluntarily participated in this study. Ultrasonography imaging of CMM was conducted at rest and at 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of maximal voluntary contraction of shoulder muscles in 6 directions of shoulder movements. Anterior-posterior dimension (APD), lateral dimension (LD), shape ratio and multiplied linear dimension (MLD) of cervical multifidus were measured. The APD of CMM was increased while LD and shape ratio were decreased by shoulder muscles contraction (P < 0.01).

  5. Muscle oxygenation of superficial and deep regions in knee extensor and plantar flexor muscles during repeated isometric contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, K

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in muscle oxygenation of knee extensor and plantar flexor muscles during repeated muscle contractions under the same condition. In addition, we compared changes in muscle oxygenation between superficial and deep regions of both muscles. Eleven healthy males participated in this study. During repeated knee extensions and plantar flexions (50 repetitions at 50% of the isometric maximum voluntary contraction for 3 s with 3 s relaxations), blood volume and oxygen saturation (StO₂) of the vastus lateralis and medial gastrocnemius muscles (superficial and deep region of each muscle) were measured using near infrared spectroscopy. The decrement of StO₂at the end of exercises was greater in plantar flexor muscle than in knee extensor muscle (Pmuscles, the decrement of StO₂at the end of exercises was greater in the deep region than in the superficial one (both Pmuscle and deep regions of each muscle were higher than that of knee extensor muscle and superficial regions of each muscle.

  6. Motor unit properties from three synergistic muscles during ramp isometric elbow extensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, B; Dalton, B H; Power, G A; Rice, C L

    2013-12-01

    Many tasks require synergistic activation of muscles that possess different architectural, mechanical, and neural control properties. However, investigations of the motor unit (MU) mechanisms which modulate force are mostly restricted to individual muscles and low forces. To explore the pattern of MU recruitment and discharge behavior among three elbow extensors (lateral and long heads of the triceps brachii, and anconeus) during ramp isometric contractions, recruitment thresholds of 77 MUs in five young men were determined and corresponding MU discharge rates were tracked in 1-s epochs over forces ranging from 0 to 75 % of maximal voluntary isometric force (MVC). Across all forces, MUs in the lateral head discharged at higher rates than those in the anconeus (p MVC), recruitment thresholds were lower in the anconeus than in both heads of the triceps brachii consistent with the expected twitch contractile and fiber type differences among these muscles. These findings illustrate the importance of considering synergistic relations among muscles used for a coordinated task, and the sensitivity of synergies to muscle architectural, mechanical, and possibly specific synaptic input factors.

  7. Muscle activation and blood flow do not explain the muscle length-dependent variation in quadriceps isometric endurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooistra, R D; de Ruiter, C J; de Haan, A

    2005-03-01

    We investigated the role of central activation in muscle length-dependent endurance. Central activation ratio (CAR) and rectified surface electromyogram (EMG) were studied during fatigue of isometric contractions of the knee extensors at 30 and 90 degrees knee angles (full extension = 0 degree). Subjects (n = 8) were tested on a custom-built ergometer. Maximal voluntary isometric knee extension with supramaximal superimposed burst stimulation (three 100-mus pulses; 300 Hz) was performed to assess CAR and maximal torque capacity (MTC). Surface EMG signals were obtained from vastus lateralis and rectus femoris muscles. At each angle, intermittent (15 s on 6 s off) isometric exercise at 50% MTC with superimposed stimulation was performed to exhaustion. During the fatigue task, a sphygmomanometer cuff around the upper thigh ensured full occlusion (400 mmHg) of the blood supply to the knee extensors. At least 2 days separated fatigue tests. MTC was not different between knee angles (30 degrees : 229.6 +/- 39.3 N.m vs. 90 degrees: 215.7 +/- 13.2 N.m). Endurance times, however, were significantly longer (P muscle length-related differences in metabolic cost.

  8. Impaired neuromuscular function during isometric, shortening, and lengthening contractions after exercise-induced damage to elbow flexor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Tanya S; Tucker, Kylie J; Rogasch, Nigel C; Semmler, John G

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of exercise-induced damage of the elbow flexor muscles on steady motor performance during isometric, shortening, and lengthening contractions. Ten healthy individuals (age 22+/-4 yr) performed four tasks with the elbow flexor muscles: a maximum voluntary contraction, a one repetition maximum (1 RM), an isometric task at three joint angles (short, intermediate, and long muscle lengths), and a constant-load task during slow (approximately 7 degrees/s) shortening and lengthening contractions. Task performance was quantified as the fluctuations in wrist acceleration (steadiness), and electromyography was obtained from the biceps and triceps brachii muscles at loads of 10, 20, and 40% of 1 RM. Tasks were performed before, immediately after, and 24 h after eccentric exercise that resulted in indicators of muscle damage. Maximum voluntary contraction force and 1-RM load declined by approximately 45% immediately after exercise and remained lower at 24 h ( approximately 30% decrease). Eccentric exercise resulted in reduced steadiness and increased biceps and triceps brachii electromyography for all tasks. For the isometric task, steadiness was impaired at the short compared with the long muscle length immediately after exercise (Pshortening compared with the lengthening contractions after exercise (P=0.01), and steadiness remained impaired for shortening contractions 24 h later (P=0.01). These findings suggest that there are profound effects for the performance of these types of fine motor tasks when recovering from a bout of eccentric exercise.

  9. Relations Between Lower Body Isometric Muscle Force Characteristics and Start Performance in Elite Male Sprint Swimmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Beretić

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was twofold. The first aim was to examine the influence of absolute and relative lower body muscle force on kinematic component which determine the start performance. The second aim was to create multiregressional model which could use as a tool for swimming coaches with the purpose to start performance control and improvement. Twenty seven high-level trained male competitive swimmers all members of the Serbian National Youth and Senior Swimming Team (Age = 21.1 ± 4.3 yrs., Height = 1. 89 ± 0.10 m, Weight = 81.6 ± 8.4 kg, 50m freestyle - long course = 24.36 ± 0.86 s performed two trials of standing leg extensors isometric muscle force testing and three swimming start trials corresponding to 10m distance. The average start time significantly correlated with variables of leg extensors maximum voluntary force (Fmax, r = -0.559, p = 0.002, leg extensors relative muscle voluntary force (Frel, r = -0.727, p < 0.001, leg extensors specific rate of force development (RFD50%, r = -0.338, p = 0.047 and leg extensors relative value of specific rate of force development (RFD50%rel, r = -0.402, p = 0.040. Regression equation for t10m prediction was defined by following variables: maximum voluntary isometric force of leg extensors muscles at absolute and relative level (Fmax and Frel, as well as a specific rate of force development of the same muscle groups (RFD50% and RFD50%rel at absolute and relative level too with 74.4% of explained variance. Contractile abilities indicators of the leg extensors muscles included consideration: Fmax, RFD50%, Frel and RFD50%rel showed significant correlation with swimming start times on 10m. Additionally, the results suggest that swimmers, who possess greater isometric maximum force and specific rate of force development at absolute and relative levels, tend to be able to swim faster on initial 10m swim start perforamnce.

  10. Illusion caused by vibration of muscle spindles reveals an involvement of muscle spindle inputs in regulating isometric contraction of masseter muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukiboshi, Taisuke; Sato, Hajime; Tanaka, Yuto; Saito, Mitsuru; Toyoda, Hiroki; Morimoto, Toshifumi; Türker, Kemal Sitki; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Kang, Youngnam

    2012-11-01

    Spindle Ia afferents may be differentially involved in voluntary isometric contraction, depending on the pattern of synaptic connections in spindle reflex pathways. We investigated how isometric contraction of masseter muscles is regulated through the activity of their muscle spindles that contain the largest number of intrafusal fibers among skeletal muscle spindles by examining the effects of vibration of muscle spindles on the voluntary isometric contraction. Subjects were instructed to hold the jaw at resting position by counteracting ramp loads applied on lower molar teeth. In response to the increasing-ramp load, the root mean square (RMS) of masseter EMG activity almost linearly increased under no vibration, while displaying a steep linear increase followed by a slower increase under vibration. The regression line of the relationship between the load and RMS was significantly steeper under vibration than under no vibration, suggesting that the subjects overestimated the ramp load and excessively counteracted it as reflected in the emergence of bite pressure. In response to the decreasing-ramp load applied following the increasing one, the RMS hardly decreased under vibration unlike under no vibration, leading to a generation of bite pressure even after the offset of the negative-ramp load until the vibration was ceased. Thus the subjects overestimated the increasing rate of the load while underestimating the decreasing rate of the load, due to the vibration-induced illusion of jaw opening. These observations suggest that spindle Ia/II inputs play crucial roles both in estimating the load and in controlling the isometric contraction of masseter muscles in the jaw-closed position.

  11. Muscle fatigue-induced enhancement of corticomuscular coherence following sustained submaximal isometric contraction of the tibialis anterior muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushiyama, Junichi; Katsu, Masanori; Masakado, Yoshihisa; Kimura, Akio; Liu, Meigen; Ushiba, Junichi

    2011-05-01

    Oscillatory activity of the sensorimotor cortex shows coherence with muscle activity within the 15- to 35-Hz frequency band (β-band) during weak to moderate sustained isometric contraction. We aimed to examine the acute changes in this corticomuscular coupling due to muscle fatigue and its effect on the steadiness of the exerted force. We quantified the coherence between the electroencephalogram (EEG) recorded over the sensorimotor cortex and the rectified surface electromyogram (EMG) of the tibialis anterior muscle as well as the coefficient of variance of the dorsiflexion force (Force(CV)) and sum of the auto-power spectral density function of the force within the β-band (Force(β-PSD)) during 30% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) for 60 s before (prefatiguing task) and after (postfatiguing task) muscle fatigue induced by sustained isometric contraction at 50% of MVC until exhaustion in seven healthy male subjects. The magnitude of the EEG-EMG coherence increased in the postfatiguing task in six of seven subjects. The maximal peak of EEG-EMG coherence stayed within the β-band in both pre- and postfatiguing tasks. Interestingly, two subjects, who had no significant EEG-EMG coherence in the prefatiguing task, showed significant coherence in the postfatiguing task. Additionally, Force(CV) and Force(β-PSD) significantly increased after muscle fatigue. These data suggest that when muscle fatigue develops, the central nervous system enhances oscillatory muscular activity in the β-band stronger coupled with the sensorimotor cortex activity accomplishing the sustained isometric contraction at lower performance levels.

  12. Blood flow and muscle oxygenation during low, moderate, and maximal sustained isometric contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Chris J; Allen, Matti D; Olympico, Eric; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Rice, Charles L

    2015-09-01

    A reduction of blood flow to active muscle will precipitate fatigue, and sustained isometric contractions produce intramuscular and compartmental pressures that can limit flow. The present study explored how blood flow and muscle oxygenation respond to isometric contractions at low, moderate, and maximal intensities. Over two visits, 10 males (26 ± 2 yr; means ± SD) performed 1-min dorsiflexion contractions at 30, 60, and 100% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque. Doppler ultrasound of the anterior tibial artery was used to record arterial diameter and mean blood velocity and to calculate absolute blood flow. The tissue oxygenation index (TOI) of tibialis anterior was acquired with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). There was a progressive increase in blood flow at 30% MVC (peak of 289 ± 139% resting value), no change from rest until an increase in the final 10 s of exercise at 60% MVC (peak of 197 ± 102% rest), and an initial decrease (59 ± 30% resting value) followed by a progressive increase at 100% MVC (peak of 355 ± 133% rest). Blood flow was greater at 30 and 100% than 60% MVC during the last 30 s of exercise. TOI was ∼63% at rest and, within 30 s of exercise, reached steady-state values of ∼42%, ∼22%, and ∼22% for 30, 60, and 100% MVC, respectively. Even maximal contraction of the dorsiflexors is unable to cause more than a transient decrease of flow in the anterior tibial artery. Unlike dynamic or intermittent isometric exercise, our results indicate blood flow is not linearly graded with intensity or directly coupled with oxygenation during sustained isometric contractions.

  13. β-alanine supplementation improves isometric endurance of the knee extensor muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sale Craig

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We examined the effect of four weeks of β-alanine supplementation on isometric endurance of the knee extensors at 45% maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC. Methods Thirteen males (age 23 ± 6 y; height 1.80 ± 0.05 m; body mass 81.0 ± 10.5 kg, matched for pre-supplementation isometric endurance, were allocated to either a placebo (n = 6 or β-alanine (n = 7; 6.4 g·d-1 over 4 weeks supplementation group. Participants completed an isometric knee extension test (IKET to fatigue, at an intensity of 45% MVIC, before and after supplementation. In addition, two habituation tests were completed in the week prior to the pre-supplementation test and a further practice test was completed in the week prior to the post-supplementation test. MVIC force, IKET hold-time, and impulse generated were recorded. Results IKET hold-time increased by 9.7 ± 9.4 s (13.2% and impulse by 3.7 ± 1.3 kN·s-1 (13.9% following β-alanine supplementation. These changes were significantly greater than those in the placebo group (IKET: t(11 = 2.9, p ≤0.05; impulse: t(11 = 3.1, p ≤ 0.05. There were no significant changes in MVIC force in either group. Conclusion Four weeks of β-alanine supplementation at 6.4 g·d-1 improved endurance capacity of the knee extensors at 45% MVIC, which most likely results from improved pH regulation within the muscle cell as a result of elevated muscle carnosine levels.

  14. Reduced complexity of force and muscle activity during low level isometric contractions of the ankle in diabetic individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suda, E. Y.; Madeleine, Pascal; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto;

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study evaluated the structure and amount of variability of surface electromyography (sEMG) patterns and ankle force data during low-level isometric contractions in diabetic subjects with different degrees of neuropathy. METHODS: We assessed 10 control subjects and 38 diabetic...... patients, classified as absent, mild, moderate, or severe neuropathy, by a fuzzy system based on clinical variables. Multichannel sEMG (64-electrode matrix) of tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius medialis muscles were acquired during isometric contractions at 10%, 20%, and 30% of the maximum voluntary...... during low-level isometric contractions, reducing the system's capacity to adapt to challenging mechanical demands. The observed patterns of neuromuscular complexity were not associated with disease severity, with the majority of alterations recorded in moderate subject....

  15. Acute effect of different stretching methods on isometric muscle strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Vasconcellos de Lima Costa e Silva

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the acute effect of static stretching methods (SS and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF on the static muscle strength (SMS. Eleven young male subjects with strength training experience, performed 3 tests with a 48h interval between them, randomly selected, where each one subject carried out all procedures: a hand grip without stretching; b hand grip preceded by static stretching of wrist flexors muscles; c hand grip preceded by PNF stretching of wrist flexors muscles. The Shapiro-Wilk test verified the normality of data, and a one-way ANOVA with repeated measures, followed by Tukey’s post hoc test, evaluated the differences between the groups. The significance was set at p 0.05. In conclusion, both stretching methods had caused negative effects on isometric strength, reducing its levels.

  16. Excitability changes in primary motor cortex just prior to voluntary muscle relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tomotaka; Sugawara, Kenichi; Takagi, Mineko; Higashi, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    We postulated that primary motor cortex (M1) activity does not just decrease immediately prior to voluntary muscle relaxation; rather, it is dynamic and acts as an active cortical process. Thus we investigated the detailed time course of M1 excitability changes during muscle relaxation. Ten healthy participants performed a simple reaction time task. After the go signal, they rapidly terminated isometric abduction of the right index finger from a constant muscle force output of 20% of their maximal voluntary contraction force and performed voluntary muscle relaxation. Transcranial magnetic stimulation pulses were randomly delivered before and after the go signal, and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded from the right first dorsal interosseous muscle. We selected the time course relative to an appropriate reference point, the onset of voluntary relaxation, to detect excitability changes in M1. MEP amplitude from 80 to 60 ms before the estimated electromyographic offset was significantly greater than that in other intervals. Dynamic excitability changes in M1 just prior to quick voluntary muscle relaxation indicate that cortical control of muscle relaxation is established through active processing and not by simple cessation of activity. The cortical mechanisms underlying muscle relaxation need to be reconsidered in light of such dynamics. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Time course of central and peripheral alterations after isometric neuromuscular electrical stimulation-induced muscle damage.

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    Alexandre Fouré

    Full Text Available Isometric contractions induced by neuromuscular electrostimulation (NMES have been shown to result in a prolonged force decrease but the time course of the potential central and peripheral factors have never been investigated. This study examined the specific time course of central and peripheral factors after isometric NMES-induced muscle damage. Twenty-five young healthy men were subjected to an NMES exercise consisting of 40 contractions for both legs. Changes in maximal voluntary contraction force of the knee extensors (MVC, peak evoked force during double stimulations at 10 Hz (Db(10 and 100 Hz (Db(100, its ratio (10:100, voluntary activation, muscle soreness and plasma creatine kinase activity were assessed before, immediately after and throughout four days after NMES session. Changes in knee extensors volume and T2 relaxation time were also assessed at two (D2 and four (D4 days post-exercise. MVC decreased by 29% immediately after NMES session and was still 19% lower than the baseline value at D4. The decrease in Db(10 was higher than in Db(100 immediately and one day post-exercise resulting in a decrease (-12% in the 10:100 ratio. On the contrary, voluntary activation significantly decreased at D2 (-5% and was still depressed at D4 (-5%. Muscle soreness and plasma creatine kinase activity increased after NMES and peaked at D2 and D4, respectively. T2 was also increased at D2 (6% and D4 (9%. Additionally, changes in MVC and peripheral factors (e.g., Db(100 were correlated on the full recovery period, while a significant correlation was found between changes in MVC and VA only from D2 to D4. The decrease in MVC recorded immediately after the NMES session was mainly due to peripheral changes while both central and peripheral contributions were involved in the prolonged force reduction. Interestingly, the chronological events differ from what has been reported so far for voluntary exercise-induced muscle damage.

  18. Behaviour of the human gastrocnemius muscle architecture during submaximal isometric fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mademli, Lida; Arampatzis, Adamantios

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the human gastrocnemius medialis (GM) fascicle length and pennation angle alter during a sustained submaximal isometric plantar flexion. Fourteen male subjects performed maximal voluntary plantar flexions (MVC) on a dynamometer before and after a fatiguing task. This task consisted of a sustained submaximal isometric fatiguing contraction (40% MVC) until failure to hold the defined moment. Ultrasonography was used to visualise the muscle belly of the GM. Leg kinematics were recorded (120 Hz) to calculate the joint moment using inverse dynamics. The exerted moments and the EMG signals from GM and lateralis, soleus and tibialis anterior were measured at 1,080 Hz. The root mean square (RMS) of the EMG signal of the three triceps surae muscles increased significantly (P < or = 0.05) between 17% and 28% with fatigue. Further, the fascicle length of the GM significantly decreased from 47.1 +/- 8.0 mm at the beginning to 41.8 +/- 6.7 mm at the end of fatigue and the pennation angle increased from 23.5 +/- 4.1 degrees to 26.3 +/- 2.2 degrees (P < or = 0.05). The changes in fascicle length and pennation angle of the GM during the contraction can influence the force potential of the muscle due to the force-length relationship and the force transmission to the tendon. This provides evidence on that an additional mechanical mechanism, namely tendon creep, can contribute to the increase in the EMG activity of the GM during submaximal isometric sustained contractions.

  19. Influence of Isometric Exercise Training on Quadriceps Muscle Architecture and Strength in Obese Subjects with Knee Osteoarthritis

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    Waleed S Mahmoud

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Obese individuals have reduced quadriceps muscle strength relative to body mass that may increase the rate of progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of isometric exercise training on quadriceps muscle architecture and strength in obese subjects with knee osteoarthritis. Methods: Fortyfour obese male subjects aged 40–65 years diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis were randomly assigned into group A (n=32 and group B (n=12. Group A subjects performed a 12-week isometric exercise program. Group B subjects did not participate in any exercise program and maintained their ordinary activities for the same period. Both groups received the same conventional physical therapy program including hot packs and therapeutic ultrasonic. Muscle thickness, pennation angles and fascicle length of the vastus lateralis (VL muscle of the affected knee were measured at rest by B-mode ultrasonography. Maximal voluntary isometric knee extension torque (MVIC of the affected knee was measured using an isokinetic dynamometer. Knee pain and function were evaluated using visual analogue pain scale (VAS and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC. All variables were evaluated before and the end of the intervention period for both groups. Results: at the end of the program, group A subjects showed significant improvements compared with group B subjects regarding MVIC and muscle architecture parameters (p<0.05. Also, there was significant improvement in post-test VAS and WOMAC scores in group A subjects compared to group B subjects (p<0.05. Conclusion: A 12-week quadriceps isometric training program improves knee pain and quadriceps muscle strength and architecture in obese subjects with knee OA. These results indicate that isometric training should be regarded as a proper exercise intervention for obese patients with knee OA.

  20. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity during cold stress and isometric exercise in healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaney, Jody L; Stanhewicz, Anna E; Kenney, W Larry; Alexander, Lacy M

    2014-09-15

    Cardiovascular mortality increases in cold weather in older adults, and physical activity may impart even greater cardiovascular risk than cold exposure alone. Human aging is associated with exaggerated pressor responses to whole body cooling; however, the sympathetic response to cold stress alone and in combination with isometric exercise is unknown. We hypothesized that cold stress would 1) increase muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and 2) augment the MSNA response to isometric handgrip in older adults. Whole body cooling (water-perfused suit) was conducted in 11 young (23 ± 1 yr) and 12 healthy older adults (60 ± 2 yr). Blood pressure (BP; Finometer) and MSNA (microneurography) were measured throughout cooling and during isometric handgrip at 30% maximal voluntary contraction performed at a mean skin temperature (Tsk) of 34 and 30.5°C. MSNA was greater in older adults at Tsk = 34.0°C and throughout cooling (P 0.05) or older adults (Δ12 ± 1 Tsk 34°C vs. Δ8 ± 1 Tsk 30.5°C bursts/min; Δ18 ± 3 Tsk 34°C vs. Δ17 ± 2 Tsk 30.5°C mmHg; both P > 0.05). In summary, MSNA increased during cold stress in older, but not young, adults. Furthermore, concomitant cold stress did not alter the sympathetic responses to isometric exercise in either age group, suggesting preserved sympathetic responsiveness during exercise in the cold in healthy aging. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Effects of experimental muscle pain on force variability during task-related and three directional isometric force task

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mista, Christian Ariel; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    injected into the biceps brachii muscle. The coefficient of variation (CV) was used to analyze the variability on the task-related force direction. The total excursion of the center of pressure (CoP) was used to quantify the variability on the tangential force directions. Complexity of the force......Experimentally muscle pain induces changes in the distribution of muscle activity and affects the muscle coordination. The force steadiness is impaired during muscle pain in the task-related force direction as well as in the tangential directions. In addition, pain lead to a mismatch between......-dimensional force task during acute muscle pain. Twelve right-handed healthy volunteers participated in the experiment. Three-dimensional force signals were acquired during isometric elbow flexion at 5%, 15%, and 30% of the maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). The force components were represented by a circle...

  2. Structural features of cross-bridges in isometrically contracting skeletal muscle.

    OpenAIRE

    Kraft, Theresia; Mattei, Thomas; Radocaj, Ante; Piep, Birgit; Nocula, Christoph; Furch, Markus; Brenner, Bernhard

    2002-01-01

    Two-dimensional x-ray diffraction was used to investigate structural features of cross-bridges that generate force in isometrically contracting skeletal muscle. Diffraction patterns were recorded from arrays of single, chemically skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers during isometric force generation, under relaxation, and in rigor. In isometric contraction, a rather prominent intensification of the actin layer lines at 5.9 and 5.1 nm and of the first actin layer line at 37 nm was found compared...

  3. Two maximal isometric contractions attenuate the magnitude of eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Lian; Nosaka, Kazunori; Pearce, Alan J; Chen, Trevor C

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated whether maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVC-ISO) would attenuate the magnitude of eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage. Young untrained men were placed into one of the two experimental groups or one control group (n = 13 per group). Subjects in the experimental groups performed either two or 10 MVC-ISO of the elbow flexors at a long muscle length (20° flexion) 2 days prior to 30 maximal isokinetic eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors. Subjects in the control group performed the eccentric contractions without MVC-ISO. No significant changes in maximal voluntary concentric contraction peak torque, peak torque angle, range of motion, upper arm circumference, plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity and myoglobin concentration, muscle soreness, and ultrasound echo intensity were evident after MVC-ISO. Changes in the variables following eccentric contractions were smaller (P MVC-ISO group (e.g., peak torque loss at 5 days after exercise, 23% ± 3%; peak CK activity, 1964 ± 452 IU·L(-1); peak muscle soreness, 46 ± 4 mm) or the 10 MVC-ISO group (13% ± 3%, 877 ± 198 IU·L(-1), 30 ± 4 mm) compared with the control (34% ± 4%, 6192 ± 1747 IU·L(-1), 66 ± 5 mm). The 10 MVC-ISO group showed smaller (P MVC-ISO group. Therefore, two MVC-ISO conferred potent protective effects against muscle damage, whereas greater protective effect was induced by 10 MVC-ISO, which can be used as a strategy to minimize muscle damage.

  4. Sub-sarcolemmal swelling of sarcoplasmic reticulum after isometric contractions in rat semimembranosus lateralis muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, M.E.T.; Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.; Friden, J.

    1999-01-01

    The decline in isometric force, swelling of sarcoplasmic reticulum and loss of desmin was measured in semimembranosus lateralis muscle of male Wistar rats immediately after a short series of brief (500 ms) maximal isometric contractions. For the active muscle, the series ended below (protocol A) and

  5. Screen time viewing behaviors and isometric trunk muscle strength in youth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Anders; Ried-Larsen, Mathias; Froberg, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the association of screen time viewing behavior with isometric trunk muscle strength in youth.......The objective of this study was to examine the association of screen time viewing behavior with isometric trunk muscle strength in youth....

  6. Regular physical exercise improves cardiac autonomic and muscle vasodilatory responses to isometric exercise in healthy elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarmento AO

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Adriana de Oliveira Sarmento,1–3 Amilton da Cruz Santos,1,4 Ivani Credidio Trombetta,2,5 Marciano Moacir Dantas,1 Ana Cristina Oliveira Marques,1,4 Leone Severino do Nascimento,1,4 Bruno Teixeira Barbosa,1,2 Marcelo Rodrigues Dos Santos,2 Maria do Amparo Andrade,3 Anna Myrna Jaguaribe-Lima,3,6 Maria do Socorro Brasileiro-Santos1,3,4 1Laboratory of Physical Training Studies Applied to Health, Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Paraiba, João Pessoa, Brazil; 2Unit of Cardiovascular Rehabilitation and Exercise Physiology – Heart Institute (InCor/HC-FMUSP, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 3Graduate Program in Physiotherapy, Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil; 4Associate Graduate Program in Physical Education UPE/UFPB, João Pessoa, Brazil; 5Graduate Program in Medicine, Universidade Nove de Julho (UNINOVE, São Paulo, Brazil; 6Department of Morphology and Animal Physiology, Federal Rural University of Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil Abstract: The objective of this study was to evaluate cardiac autonomic control and muscle vasodilation response during isometric exercise in sedentary and physically active older adults. Twenty healthy participants, 10 sedentary and 10 physically active older adults, were evaluated and paired by gender, age, and body mass index. Sympathetic and parasympathetic cardiac activity (spectral and symbolic heart rate analysis and muscle blood flow (venous occlusion plethysmography were measured for 10 minutes at rest (baseline and during 3 minutes of isometric handgrip exercise at 30% of the maximum voluntary contraction (sympathetic excitatory maneuver. Variables were analyzed at baseline and during 3 minutes of isometric exercise. Cardiac autonomic parameters were analyzed by Wilcoxon and Mann–Whitney tests. Muscle vasodilatory response was analyzed by repeated-measures analysis of variance followed by Tukey’s post hoc test. Sedentary older adults had higher cardiac

  7. Axial disposition of myosin heads in isometrically contracting muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juanhuix, J; Bordas, J; Campmany, J; Svensson, A; Bassford, M L; Narayanan, T

    2001-03-01

    Meridional x-ray diffraction diagrams, recorded with high angular resolution, from muscles contracting at the plateau of isometric tension show that the myosin diffraction orders are clusters of peaks. These clusters are due to pronounced interference effects between the myosin diffracting units on either side of the M-line. A theoretical analysis based on the polarity of the myosin (and actin) filaments shows that it is possible to extract phase information from which the axial disposition of the myosin heads can be determined. The results show that each head in a crown pair has a distinct structural disposition. It appears that only one of the heads in the pair stereospecifically interacts with the thin filament at any one time.

  8. Relation between muscle and brain activity during isometric contractions of the first dorsal interosseus muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duinen, Hiske; Renken, Remco; Maurits, Natasha M.; Zijdewind, Inge

    2008-01-01

    We studied the relationship between muscle activity (electromyography, EMG), force, and brain activity during isometric contractions of the index finger, on a group and individual level. Ten subjects contracted their right or left index finger at 5, 15, 30, 50, and 70% of their maximal force. Subjec

  9. ABSENCE OF GENDER DIFFERENCES IN THE FATIGABILITY OF THE FOREARM MUSCLES DURING INTERMITTENT ISOMETRIC HANDGRIP EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquin U. Gonzales

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have reported women to have a greater resistance to fatigue than men during sustained handgrip exercise, however, observed gender differences in fatigue has been shown to be a function of contraction type. The purpose of the present study was to determine if gender differences exist in forearm muscle fatigue during intermittent handgrip contractions. Women [n = 11, 23.5 ± 1.5 (SE yr] and men (n = 11, 24.1 ± 1.5 yr performed intermittent isometric handgrip contractions at a target force of 50% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC for 5 s followed by 5 s rest until task failure. Rate of fatigue was calculated from MVCs taken every 2 min during exercise, and recovery of muscle strength was measured in 5 min increments until 45 min post-task failure. Forearm muscle strength was less for women than men (W: 341.5 ± 11.9 N; M: 480.2 ± 28.0 N; p < 0.05. No gender difference was present in time to task failure (W: 793.3 ± 92.5 s; M: 684.8 ± 76.3 s or in the decrease in muscle force generating capacity at task failure (W: -47.6 ± 1.0%; M: -49.9 ± 1.3%. Rate of muscle fatigue was found to be similar between women and men (W: -3.6 ± 0.5 %·min-1; M: -4.3 ± 0.6 %·min-1 and no gender difference was found in the recovery of muscle strength following task failure. In summary, no gender difference was found in the fatigability of the forearm muscles during intermittent submaximal handgrip contractions, independent of muscle strength

  10. Reflex changes in muscle spindle discharge during a voluntary contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniss, A M; Gandevia, S C; Burke, D

    1988-03-01

    1. This study was undertaken to determine whether low-threshold cutaneous and muscle afferents from mechanoreceptors in the foot reflexly affect fusimotor neurons innervating the plantar and dorsiflexors of the ankle during voluntary contractions. 2. Recordings were made from 29 identified muscle spindle afferents innervating triceps surae and the pretibial flexors. Trains of electrical stimuli (5 stimuli, 300 impulses per second) were delivered to the sural nerve at the ankle (intensity: 2-4 times sensory threshold) and to the posterior tibial nerve at the ankle (intensity: 1.5-3 times motor threshold for the small muscles of the foot). The stimuli were delivered while the subject maintained an isometric voluntary contraction of the receptor-bearing muscle, sufficient to accelerate the discharge of each spindle ending. This ensured that the fusimotor neurons directed to the ending were active and influencing the spindle discharge. The effects of these stimuli on muscle spindle discharge were assessed using raster displays, frequencygrams, poststimulus time histograms (PSTHs) and cumulative sums ("CUSUMs") of the PSTHs. Reflex effects onto alpha-motoneurons were determined from poststimulus changes in the averaged rectified electromyogram (EMG). Reflex effects of these stimuli onto single-motor units were assessed in separate experiments using PSTHs and CUSUMs. 3. Electrical stimulation of the sural or posterior tibial nerves at nonnoxious levels had no significant effect on the discharge of the 14 spindle endings in the pretibial flexor muscles. The electrical stimuli also produced no significant change in discharge of 11 of 15 spindle endings in triceps surae. With the remaining four endings in triceps surae, the overall change in discharge appeared to be an increase for two endings (at latencies of 60 and 68 ms) and a decrease for two endings (at latencies of 110 and 150 ms). The difference in the incidence of the responses of spindle endings in tibialis

  11. Synergists activation pattern of the quadriceps muscle differs when performing sustained isometric contractions with different EMG biofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Place, Nicolas; Matkowski, Boris; Martin, Alain; Lepers, Romuald

    2006-10-01

    The aims of the present study were to examine (1) endurance time and (2) activation pattern of vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM) and rectus femoris (RF) muscles during fatiguing isometric knee extensions performed with different EMG biofeedbacks. Thirteen men (27 +/- 5 year) volunteered to participate in three experimental sessions. Each session involved a submaximal isometric contraction held until failure at an EMG level corresponding to 40% maximal voluntary contraction torque (MVC), with visual EMG biofeedback provided for either (1) RF muscle (RF task), (2) VL and VM muscles (Vasti task) or (3) the sum of the VL, VM and RF muscles (Quadriceps task). EMG activity of VL, VM and RF muscles was recorded during each of the three tasks and further analyzed. Time to task failures and MVC loss (P 0.05) between the three sessions (182 s and approximately 28%, respectively) (P > 0.05). Moreover, the magnitude of central and peripheral fatigue was not different at failure of the three tasks. Activation pattern was similar for knee extensors at the beginning of each task (P > 0.05). However, RF EMG activity decreased (P pattern for the bi-articular RF muscle compared to the mono-articular vasti muscles during fatigue.

  12. A comparison of two gluteus maximus EMG maximum voluntary isometric contraction positions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bret Contreras

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. The purpose of this study was to compare the peak electromyography (EMG of the most commonly-used position in the literature, the prone bent-leg (90° hip extension against manual resistance applied to the distal thigh (PRONE, to a novel position, the standing glute squeeze (SQUEEZE.Methods. Surface EMG electrodes were placed on the upper and lower gluteus maximus of thirteen recreationally active females (age = 28.9 years; height = 164 cm; body mass = 58.2 kg, before three maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC trials for each position were obtained in a randomized, counterbalanced fashion.Results. No statistically significant (p < 0.05 differences were observed between PRONE (upper: 91.94%; lower: 94.52% and SQUEEZE (upper: 92.04%; lower: 85.12% for both the upper and lower gluteus maximus. Neither the PRONE nor SQUEEZE was more effective between all subjects.Conclusions. In agreement with other studies, no single testing position is ideal for every participant. Therefore, it is recommended that investigators employ multiple MVIC positions, when possible, to ensure accuracy. Future research should investigate a variety of gluteus maximus MVIC positions in heterogeneous samples.

  13. A comparison of two gluteus maximus EMG maximum voluntary isometric contraction positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Bret; Vigotsky, Andrew D; Schoenfeld, Brad J; Beardsley, Chris; Cronin, John

    2015-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to compare the peak electromyography (EMG) of the most commonly-used position in the literature, the prone bent-leg (90°) hip extension against manual resistance applied to the distal thigh (PRONE), to a novel position, the standing glute squeeze (SQUEEZE). Methods. Surface EMG electrodes were placed on the upper and lower gluteus maximus of thirteen recreationally active females (age = 28.9 years; height = 164 cm; body mass = 58.2 kg), before three maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) trials for each position were obtained in a randomized, counterbalanced fashion. Results. No statistically significant (p < 0.05) differences were observed between PRONE (upper: 91.94%; lower: 94.52%) and SQUEEZE (upper: 92.04%; lower: 85.12%) for both the upper and lower gluteus maximus. Neither the PRONE nor SQUEEZE was more effective between all subjects. Conclusions. In agreement with other studies, no single testing position is ideal for every participant. Therefore, it is recommended that investigators employ multiple MVIC positions, when possible, to ensure accuracy. Future research should investigate a variety of gluteus maximus MVIC positions in heterogeneous samples.

  14. Mechanical compression during repeated sustained isometric muscle contractions and hyperemic recovery in healthy young males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osada, Takuya; Mortensen, Stefan P; Rådegran, Göran

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An elevated intramuscular pressure during a single forearm isometric muscle contraction may restrict muscle hyperemia. However, during repeated isometric exercise, it is unclear to what extent mechanical compression and muscle vasodilatation contribute to the magnitude and time course...... of beat-to-beat limb hemodynamics, due to alterations in leg vascular conductance (LVC). METHODS: In eight healthy male subjects, the time course of both beat-to-beat leg blood flow (LBF) and LVC in the femoral artery was determined between repeated 10-s isometric thigh muscle contractions and 10-s muscle...... (%). RESULTS: The exercise protocol was performed completely by all subjects (≤50 % MVC), seven subjects (≤70 % MVC), and two subjects (≤90 % MVC). During a 10-s isometric muscle contraction, the time course in both beat-to-beat LBF and LVC displayed a fitting curve with an exponential increase (P 

  15. Co-Activity during Maximum Voluntary Contraction: A Study of Four Lower-Extremity Muscles in Children with and without Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedroff, Kristina; Knutson, Loretta M.; Soderberg, Gary L.

    2008-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether children with cerebral palsy (CP) showed more co-activity than comparison children in non-prime mover muscles with regard to the prime mover during maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of four lower-extremity muscles. Fourteen children with spastic diplegic CP (10 males, four females; age…

  16. [Effect of thyroidectomy on energetics of isometric muscle contraction in white rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soboliev, V I; Moskalets', T V

    2007-01-01

    The effect of thyroidactomia on parameters of energetics of isometric contractions of front shin--bone muscle of white rats is studied in in situ experiments. It is shown that experimental atiriosis lengthen considerably the latent period of muscle contractions (+95%) considerably reduce (in 5.5 times) the speed of it contraction in first phase of contraction act and also considerably increase the time (+37%), which necessery for developing maximum strength of contraction. Thyroidactomia with general negative influence on ergothropic characteristics of isometric muscle contraction decrease considerably the expenditure of thermal energy on maximum strength of contraction unit (-17%) or on middle isometric tension unit (-9.3%).

  17. Functional connectivity between core and shoulder muscles increases during isometric endurance contractions in judo competitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawczyński, Adam; Samani, Afshin; Mroczek, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    regions during sustained isometric contraction. Methods: Twelve healthy, right-handed judo competitors participated in the study. The SEMG signals from the dominant trapezius (upper, middle and lower part), deltoideus anterior, serratus anterior, and pectoralis major muscles were recorded during isometric...

  18. Voluntary activation level and muscle fiber recruitment of human quadriceps during lengthening contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltman, J G M; Sargeant, A J; van Mechelen, W; de Haan, A

    2004-08-01

    Voluntary activation levels during lengthening, isometric, and shortening contractions (angular velocity 60 degrees/s) were investigated by using electrical stimulation of the femoral nerve (triplet, 300 Hz) superimposed on maximal efforts. Recruitment of fiber populations was investigated by using the phosphocreatine-to-creatine ratio (PCr/Cr) of single characterized muscle fibers obtained from needle biopsies at rest and immediately after a series of 10 lengthening, isometric, and shortening contractions (1 s on/1 s off). Maximal voluntary torque was significantly higher during lengthening (270 +/- 55 N.m) compared with shortening contractions (199 +/- 47 N.m, P < 0.05) but was not different from isometric contractions (252 +/- 47 N.m). Isometric torque was higher than torque during shortening (P < 0.05). Voluntary activation level during maximal attempted lengthening contractions (79 +/- 8%) was significantly lower compared with isometric (93 +/- 5%) and shortening contractions (92 +/- 3%, P < 0.05). Mean PCr/Cr values of all fibers from all subjects at rest were 2.5 +/- 0.6, 2.0 +/- 0.7, and 2.0 +/- 0.7, respectively, for type I, IIa, and IIax fibers. After 10 contractions, the mean PCr/Cr values for grouped fiber populations (regardless of fiber type) were all significantly different from rest (1.3 +/- 0.2, 0.7 +/- 0.3, and 0.8 +/- 0.6 for lengthening, isometric, and shortening contractions, respectively; P < 0.05). The cumulative distributions of individual fiber populations after either contraction mode were significantly different from rest (P < 0.05). Curves after lengthening contractions were less shifted compared with curves from isometric and shortening contractions (P < 0.05), with a smaller shift for the type IIax compared with type I fibers in the lengthening contractions. The results indicate a reduced voluntary drive during lengthening contractions. PCr/Cr values of single fibers indicated a hierarchical order of recruitment of all fiber

  19. Time-dependent cortical activation in voluntary muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qi; Wang, Xiaofeng; Fang, Yin; Siemionow, Vlodek; Yao, Wanxiang; Yue, Guang H

    2011-01-01

    This study was to characterize dynamic source strength changes estimated from high-density scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) at different phases of a submaximal voluntary muscle contraction. Eight healthy volunteers performed isometric handgrip contractions of the right arm at 20% maximal intensity. Signals of the handgrip force, electromyography (EMG) from the finger flexor and extensor muscles and 64-channel EEG were acquired simultaneously. Sources of the EEG were analyzed at 19 time points across preparation, execution and sustaining phases of the handgrip. A 3-layer boundary element model (BEM) based on the MNI (Montréal Neurological Institute) brain MRI was used to overlay the sources. A distributed current density model, LORETA L1 norm method was applied to the data that had been processed by independent component analysis (ICA). Statistical analysis based on a mixed-effects polynomial regression model showed a significant and consistent time-dependent non-linear source strength change pattern in different phases of the handgrip. The source strength increased at the preparation phase, peaked at the force onset time and decreased in the sustaining phase. There was no significant difference in the changing pattern of the source strength among Brodmann's areas 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6. These results show, for the first time, a high time resolution increasing-and-decreasing pattern of activation among the sensorimotor regions with the highest activity occurs at the muscle activity onset. The similarity in the source strength time courses among the cortical centers examined suggests a synchronized parallel function in controlling the motor activity.

  20. Comparison of EMG activity on abdominal muscles during plank exercise with unilateral and bilateral additional isometric hip adduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Yong; Kang, Min-Hyeok; Kim, Eui-Ryong; Jung, In-Gui; Seo, Eun-Young; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of additional isometric hip adduction during the plank exercise on the abdominal muscles. Twenty healthy young men participated in this study. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to monitor the activity of the bilateral rectus abdominis (RA), the internal oblique (IO), and the external oblique (EO) muscles. The participants performed three types of plank exercise; the standard plank exercise, the plank exercise with bilateral isometric hip adduction, and the plank exercise with unilateral isometric hip adduction. All abdominal muscle activity was significantly increased during the plank exercise combined with the bilateral and unilateral isometric hip adduction compared with the standard plank exercise (pmuscle activity was significantly increased during the unilateral isometric hip adduction compared with the bilateral isometric hip adduction (pabdominal muscle activity. In particular, the unilateral isometric hip adduction is a more beneficial exercise than the bilateral isometric hip adduction.

  1. Differences in cervical multifidus muscle thickness during isometric contraction of shoulder muscles: a comparison between patients with chronic neck pain and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnama, Leila; Rezasoltani, Asghar; Zavieh, Minoo Khalkhali; NooriKochi, Farhang; Baghban, Alireza Akbarzadeh

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to (1) measure the thickness of cervical multifidus muscle (CMM) in different maximal voluntary contraction percentages of isometric contraction of shoulder muscles, (2) evaluate the differences of the CMM thickness in different directions of the shoulder movement, and (3) compare the changes in the CMM thickness of participants with neck pain and also of healthy individuals. Twenty healthy men (age, 27.45 ± 4.37 years; height, 177 ± 4.66 cm; weight, 72.85 ± 6.46 kg) and 20 men with chronic mechanical neck pain (age, 28.90 ± 5.53 years; height, 176 ± 5.98 cm; weight, 73.15 ± 7.82 kg) participated in the study. Both the right and left CMM thicknesses were measured using an ultrasound device while participants performed isometric contraction of shoulder muscles in 6 movement directions. In both groups, an increment of CMM thickness followed as the increase of isometric force (P muscle thickness of healthy participants was substantially more than the chronic mechanical neck pain participants (P = .03). Although no significant difference of CMM thickness was seen among the effects of the 6 force directions (P > .05), there was a significant difference of activity noted between the left and right sides (P = .047). The results of the present study indicate that isometric contraction of shoulder muscles caused an increase in the CMM thickness regardless of force direction. This increase was seen in both groups of healthy participants and patients with neck pain. However, less thickness changes were observed in participants with neck pain, which may be interpreted as reduced CMM activity in such people. Copyright © 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Diurnal and day-to-day variation of isometric muscle strength in myasthenia gravis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinge, Lotte; Jakobsen, Johannes; Pedersen, Asger Roer

    2016-01-01

    medical treatment and in 10 control subjects. To determine diurnal and day-to-day variation, muscle strength was measured 4 times during day 1 and once at day 2. RESULTS: Knee extension strength decreased during the day in both patients and controls. Neither diurnal nor day-to-day variation of muscle...... strength was higher in patients compared with controls. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with mild to moderate MG did not have increased variation of isometric muscle strength during the day or from day-to-day compared with controls. This suggests that isometric muscle performance can be determined with high......INTRODUCTION: In patients with myasthenia gravis (MG), muscle strength is expected to decrease gradually during the day due to physical activities. METHODS: Isometric muscle strength at the shoulder, knee, and ankle was determined in 10 MG patients (MGFA class II-IV) who were receiving usual...

  3. Impairment of voluntary control of finger motion following stroke: role of inappropriate muscle coactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamper, D G; Rymer, W Z

    2001-05-01

    Subjects with chronic hemiplegia following stroke attempted to perform voluntary isometric, isokinetic, and free contractions of the extensor muscles of the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints. We recorded torque, metacarpophalangeal joint angle and velocity, and electromyographic (EMG) activity of the extrinsic extensors and flexors and the first dorsal interosseous (FDI). We found that voluntary MCP joint extension in hemiparetic subjects was greatly impaired in comparison with control subjects: only two of the 11 stroke subjects were able to generate even 0.21 N-m of isometric extension torque, only two could produce positive finger extension with no load, and none could develop an isokinetic concentric extension. Deficits seemed to result from a combination of coactivation of the finger flexor and extensor muscles and decreased voluntary excitation of the extensors, as normalized flexor and FDI EMG activity were greater for stroke than for control subjects (P < 0.001), but normalized extensor activity was reduced (P < 0.001). Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  4. Feasibility of an Isometric Maximal Voluntary Contraction Test in Hematological Cancer Patients during Thrombocytopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Zimmer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Resistance training is rarely offered to hemato-oncological patients in the daily clinical routine due to its potential harmful impact on the cardiovascular system and the long periods of thrombocytopenia experienced by these patients. Therefore, it is important to determine a valid assessment to define and control resistance training. In this study, the feasibility of a maximal voluntary contraction (MVC test was investigated in hemato-oncological patients. This inexpensive assessment may be a practicable alternative to the one repetition maximum test which is currently described as the gold standard. Methods. 29 hemato-oncological patients with platelet counts between 30000/μL and 70000/μL were recruited for this pilot study. Complications like petechial bleedings, muscle convulsion, and pain were assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory before and 48 hours after the MVC test, which was performed unidirectionally for the quadriceps muscle. Results. We did not detect any statistically significant test-related exacerbations or pain development. Discussion. MVC testing seems to be a feasible method to control a resistance training program in hemato-oncological patients. Further studies need to extend their methods and, for example, compare the MVC test with the one repetition maximum test.

  5. Mechanomyographic responses during voluntary ramp contractions of the human first dorsal interosseous muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akataki, Kumi; Mita, Katsumi; Watakabe, Makoto; Itoh, Kunihiko

    2003-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the mechanomyogram (MMG) and force relationship of the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle as well as the biceps brachii (BB) muscle during voluntary isometric ramp contractions, and to elucidate the MMG responses resulting from the intrinsic motor unit (MU) activation strategy of FDI muscle with reference to the MMG of BB muscle. The subjects were asked to exert ramp contractions of FDI and BB muscle from 5% to 70% of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) at a constant rate of 10% MVC/s. In FDI muscle, the root-mean-squared amplitude (RMS) of the MMG decreased slowly with force up to 21%, and then a progressive increase was followed by a relatively rapid decrease beyond 41% MVC. The RMS/%MVC relationship in BB muscle consisted of an initial slow increase followed by a rapid increase from 23% MVC and a progressive decrease beyond 61% MVC. With respect to the mean power frequency (MPF), FDI muscle demonstrated no obvious inflection point in the MPF/%MVC relationship compared with that in BB muscle. Namely, the MPF of FDI muscle increased linearly through the force levels exerted. In contrast to FDI muscle, the MPF/%MVC relationship in BB muscle was decomposed into four specific regions: (1) a relative rapidly increase (62% MVC). The different MMG responses between FDI and BB muscles are considered to reflect the fact that the MU activation strategy varies among different muscles in relation to their morphology and histochemical type. Namely, the rate coding of the MUs plays a more prominent role in force production in relatively small FDI muscle than does MU recruitment compared with their respective roles in the relatively large BB muscle.

  6. Change in the ipsilateral motor cortex excitability is independent from a muscle contraction phase during unilateral repetitive isometric contractions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazumasa Uehara

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the difference in a muscle contraction phase dependence between ipsilateral (ipsi- and contralateral (contra-primary motor cortex (M1 excitability during repetitive isometric contractions of unilateral index finger abduction using a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS technique. Ten healthy right-handed subjects participated in this study. We instructed them to perform repetitive isometric contractions of the left index finger abduction following auditory cues at 1 Hz. The force outputs were set at 10, 30, and 50% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC. Motor evoked potentials (MEP were obtained from the right and left first dorsal interosseous muscles (FDI. To examine the muscle contraction phase dependence, TMS of ipsi-M1 or contra-M1 was triggered at eight different intervals (0, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 300, or 500 ms after electromyogram (EMG onset when each interval had reached the setup triggering level. Furthermore, to demonstrate the relationships between the integrated EMG (iEMG in the active left FDI and the ipsi-M1 excitability, we assessed the correlation between the iEMG in the left FDI for the 100 ms preceding TMS onset and the MEP amplitude in the resting/active FDI for each force output condition. Although contra-M1 excitability was significantly changed after the EMG onset that depends on the muscle contraction phase, the modulation of ipsi-M1 excitability did not differ in response to any muscle contraction phase at the 10% of MVC condition. Also, we found that contra-M1 excitability was significantly correlated with iEMG in all force output conditions, but ipsi-M1 excitability was not at force output levels of below 30% of MVC. Consequently, the modulation of ipsi-M1 excitability was independent from the contraction phase of unilateral repetitive isometric contractions at least low force output.

  7. Cross-talk in mechanomyographic signals from the forearm muscles during sub-maximal to maximal isometric grip force.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Anamul Islam

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This study aimed: i to examine the relationship between the magnitude of cross-talk in mechanomyographic (MMG signals generated by the extensor digitorum (ED, extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU, and flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU muscles with the sub-maximal to maximal isometric grip force, and with the anthropometric parameters of the forearm, and ii to quantify the distribution of the cross-talk in the MMG signal to determine if it appears due to the signal component of intramuscular pressure waves produced by the muscle fibers geometrical changes or due to the limb tremor. METHODS: Twenty, right-handed healthy men (mean ± SD: age  = 26.7±3.83 y; height  = 174.47±6.3 cm; mass  = 72.79±14.36 kg performed isometric muscle actions in 20% increment from 20% to 100% of the maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC. During each muscle action, MMG signals generated by each muscle were detected using three separate accelerometers. The peak cross-correlations were used to quantify the cross-talk between two muscles. RESULTS: The magnitude of cross-talk in the MMG signals among the muscle groups ranged from, R2(x, y = 2.45-62.28%. Linear regression analysis showed that the magnitude of cross-talk increased linearly (r2 = 0.857-0.90 with the levels of grip force for all the muscle groups. The amount of cross-talk showed weak positive and negative correlations (r2 = 0.016-0.216 with the circumference and length of the forearm respectively, between the muscles at 100% MVIC. The cross-talk values significantly differed among the MMG signals due to: limb tremor (MMGTF, slow firing motor unit fibers (MMGSF and fast firing motor unit fibers (MMGFF between the muscles at 100% MVIC (p<0.05, η2 = 0.47-0.80. SIGNIFICANCE: The results of this study may be used to improve our understanding of the mechanics of the forearm muscles during different levels of the grip force.

  8. Muscular activity and torque of the foot dorsiflexor muscles during decremental isometric test: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Muñoz, Maria; González-Sánchez, Manuel; Martín-Martín, Jaime; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio I

    2017-06-01

    To analyse the torque variation level that could be explained by the muscle activation (EMG) amplitude of the three major foot dorsiflexor muscles (tibialis anterior (TA), extensor digitorum longus (EDL), extensor hallucis longus (EHL)) during isometric foot dorsiflexion at different intensities. In a cross-sectional study, forty-one subjects performed foot dorsiflexion at 100%, 75%, 50% and 25% of maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) with the hip and knee flexed 90° and the ankle in neutral position (90° between leg and foot). Three foot dorsiflexions were performed for each intensity. Outcome variables were: maximum (100% MVC) and relative torque (75%, 50%, 25% MVC), maximum and relative EMG amplitude. A linear regression analysis was calculated for each intensity of the isometric foot dorsiflexion. The degree of torque variation (dependent variable) from the independent variables explain (EMG amplitude of the three major foot dorsiflexor muscles) the increases when the foot dorsiflexion intensity is increased, with values of R(2) that range from 0.194 (during 25% MVC) to 0.753 (during 100% MVC). The reliability of the outcome variables was excellent. The EMG amplitude of the three main foot dorsiflexors exhibited more variance in the dependent variable (torque) when foot dorsiflexion intensity increases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Metabolically assessed muscle fibre recruitment in brief isometric contractions at different intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltman, J G M; de Haan, A; Haan, H; Gerrits, H L; van Mechelen, W; Sargeant, A J

    2004-08-01

    This study investigated the recruitment of type I, IIA and IIAX fibres after seven isometric contractions at 40, 70 and 100% maximal voluntary knee extension torque (MVC, 1 s on/1 s off). Biopsies of the vastus lateralis muscle were collected from seven subjects at rest and immediately post-exercise. Fibre fragments were dissected from the freeze-dried samples and characterized as type I, IIA and IIAX using mATPase staining. Phosphocreatine (PCr) and creatine (Cr) content were measured in the remaining part of characterized fibres. A decline in the ratio of PCr to Cr (PCr/Cr) was used as an indication of activation. The mean peak torques were, respectively, 39 (2), 72 (2) and 87 (6)% MVC. Cumulative distributions of type I and IIA fibres were significantly shifted to lower PCr/Cr ratios at all intensities (Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, P<0.05). The cumulative distribution of type IIAX fibres showed a significant leftward shift only at 87% MVC ( P<0.05). A hierarchical order of fibre activation with increasing intensity of exercise was found, with some indication of rate coding for type I and IIA fibres. Evidence for activation of type IIAX fibres was only found at 87% MVC.

  10. Less indication of muscle damage in the second than initial electrical muscle stimulation bout consisting of isometric contractions of the knee extensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldayel, Abdulaziz; Jubeau, Marc; McGuigan, Michael R; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2010-03-01

    This study compared the first and second exercise bouts consisting of electrically evoked isometric contractions for muscle damage profile. Nine healthy men (31 +/- 4 years) had two electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) bouts separated by 2 weeks. The knee extensors of one leg were stimulated by biphasic rectangular pulses (75 Hz, 400 mus, on-off ratio 5-15 s) at the knee joint angle of 100 degrees (0 degrees , full extension) to induce 40 isometric contractions, while the current amplitude was increased to maintain maximal force generation. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) torque of the knee extensors at 100 degrees , muscle soreness, pressure pain threshold and plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity were used as indirect markers of muscle damage, and measured before and 1, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h after EMS bout, and the changes over time were compared between bouts. The torque produced during exercise was approximately 30% of MVC, and no significant difference between bouts was evident for the changes in peak and average torque over 40 contractions. MVC decreased significantly (P < 0.05) by 26% immediately and 1 h after both bouts, but the recovery was significantly (P < 0.05) faster after the second bout (100% at 96 h) compared with the first bout (81% at 96 h). Development of muscle soreness and tenderness, and increases in plasma CK activity were significantly (P < 0.05) smaller after the second than the first bout. These results show that changes in muscle damage markers were attenuated in the second EMS bout compared with the initial EMS bout.

  11. Motor unit firing behaviour of soleus muscle in isometric and dynamic contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallio, Jouni; Søgaard, Karen; Avela, Janne

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the detailed control of human locomotion and balance can be improved, when individual motor units can be isolated and their firing rates followed in natural movement of large, fuctionally important muscles. For this reason the present study investigated the motor unit discharge rate...... (MUDR) in isometric and dynamic contractions of the soleus muscle....

  12. The effect of shortening history on isometric and dynamic muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, John; Elmer, Steven J; Martin, James C

    2010-03-03

    Despite numerous reports on isometric force depression, few reports have quantified force depression during active muscle shortening (dynamic force depression). The purpose of this investigation was to determine the influence of shortening history on isometric force following active shortening, force during isokinetic shortening, and velocity during isotonic shortening. The soleus muscles of four cats were subjected to a series of isokinetic contractions at three shortening velocities and isotonic contractions under three loads. Muscle excursions initiated from three different muscle lengths but terminated at a constant length. Isometric force produced subsequent to active shortening, and force or shortening velocity produced at a specific muscle length during shortening, were compared across all three conditions. Results indicated that shortening history altered isometric force by up to 5%, force during isokinetic shortening up to 30% and shortening velocity during isotonic contractions by up to 63%. Furthermore, there was a load by excursion interaction during isotonic contractions such that excursion had the most influence on shortening velocity when the loads were the greatest. There was not a velocity by excursion interaction during isokinetic contractions. Isokinetic and isotonic power-velocity relationships displayed a downward shift in power as excursions increased. Thus, to discuss force depression based on differences in isometric force subsequent to active shortening may underestimate its importance during dynamic contractions. The presence of dynamic force depression should be realized in sport performance, motor control modeling and when controlling paralyzed limbs through artificial stimulation.

  13. Energy cost of isometric force production after active shortening in skinned muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joumaa, V; Fitzowich, A; Herzog, W

    2017-02-23

    The steady state isometric force after active shortening of a skeletal muscle is lower than the purely isometric force at the corresponding length. This property of skeletal muscle is known as force depression. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the energy cost of force production at the steady state after active shortening was reduced compared to the energy cost of force production for a purely isometric contraction performed at the corresponding length (same length, same activation). Experiments were performed in skinned fibres isolated from rabbit psoas muscle. Skinned fibres were actively shortened from an average sarcomere length of 3.0 µm to an average sarcomere length of 2.4 µm. Purely isometric reference contractions were performed at an average sarcomere length of 2.4 µm. Simultaneously with the force measurements, the ATP cost was measured during the last 30 seconds of isometric contractions using an enzyme-coupled assay. Stiffness was calculated during a quick stretch-release cycle of 0.2% fibre length performed once the steady state had been reached after active shortening and during the purely isometric reference contractions. Force and stiffness following active shortening were decreased by 10.0±1.8% and 11.0±2.2%, respectively compared to the isometric reference contractions. Similarly, ATPase activity per second (not normalized to the force) showed a decrease of 15.6±3.0% in the force depressed state compared to the purely isometric reference state. However, ATPase activity per second per unit of force was similar for the isometric contractions following active shortening (28.7±2.4 mM/mN.s.mm(3)) and the corresponding purely isometric reference contraction (30.9±2.8 mM/mN.s.mm(3)). Furthermore, the reduction in absolute ATPase activity per second was significantly correlated with force depression and stiffness depression. These results are in accordance with the idea that force depression following active shortening is

  14. The role of agonist and antagonist muscles in explaining isometric knee extension torque variation with hip joint angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bampouras, Theodoros M; Reeves, Neil D; Baltzopoulos, Vasilios; Maganaris, Constantinos N

    2017-08-12

    The biarticular rectus femoris (RF), operating on the ascending limb of the force-length curve, produces more force at longer lengths. However, experimental studies consistently report higher knee extension torque when supine (longer RF length) compared to seated (shorter RF length). Incomplete activation in the supine position has been proposed as the reason for this discrepancy, but differences in antagonistic co-activation could also be responsible due to altered hamstrings length. We examined the role of agonist and antagonist muscles in explaining the isometric knee extension torque variation with changes in hip joint angle. Maximum voluntary isometric knee extension torque (joint MVC) was recorded in seated and supine positions from nine healthy males (30.2 ± 7.7 years). Antagonistic torque was estimated using EMG and added to the respective joint MVC (corrected MVC). Submaximal tetanic stimulation quadriceps torque was also recorded. Joint MVC was not different between supine (245 ± 71.8 Nm) and seated (241 ± 69.8 Nm) positions and neither was corrected MVC (257 ± 77.7 and 267 ± 87.0 Nm, respectively). Antagonistic torque was higher when seated (26 ± 20.4 Nm) than when supine (12 ± 7.4 Nm). Tetanic torque was higher when supine (111 ± 31.9 Nm) than when seated (99 ± 27.5 Nm). Antagonistic co-activation differences between hip positions do not account for the reduced MVC in the supine position. Rather, reduced voluntary knee extensor muscle activation in that position is the major reason for the lower MVC torque when RF is lengthened (hip extended). These findings can assist standardising muscle function assessment and improving musculoskeletal modelling applications.

  15. Three-dimensional geometrical changes of the human tibialis anterior muscle and its central aponeurosis measured with three-dimensional ultrasound during isometric contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiteri, Brent J; Cresswell, Andrew G; Lichtwark, Glen A

    2016-01-01

    Background. Muscles not only shorten during contraction to perform mechanical work, but they also bulge radially because of the isovolumetric constraint on muscle fibres. Muscle bulging may have important implications for muscle performance, however quantifying three-dimensional (3D) muscle shape changes in human muscle is problematic because of difficulties with sustaining contractions for the duration of an in vivo scan. Although two-dimensional ultrasound imaging is useful for measuring local muscle deformations, assumptions must be made about global muscle shape changes, which could lead to errors in fully understanding the mechanical behaviour of muscle and its surrounding connective tissues, such as aponeurosis. Therefore, the aims of this investigation were (a) to determine the intra-session reliability of a novel 3D ultrasound (3DUS) imaging method for measuring in vivo human muscle and aponeurosis deformations and (b) to examine how contraction intensity influences in vivo human muscle and aponeurosis strains during isometric contractions. Methods. Participants (n = 12) were seated in a reclined position with their left knee extended and ankle at 90° and performed isometric dorsiflexion contractions up to 50% of maximal voluntary contraction. 3DUS scans of the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle belly were performed during the contractions and at rest to assess muscle volume, muscle length, muscle cross-sectional area, muscle thickness and width, fascicle length and pennation angle, and central aponeurosis width and length. The 3DUS scan involved synchronous B-mode ultrasound imaging and 3D motion capture of the position and orientation of the ultrasound transducer, while successive cross-sectional slices were captured by sweeping the transducer along the muscle. Results. 3DUS was shown to be highly reliable across measures of muscle volume, muscle length, fascicle length and central aponeurosis length (ICC ≥ 0.98, CV contraction conditions and progressively

  16. Intrinsic muscle strength and voluntary activation of both lower limbs and functional performance after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstman, Astrid M; Beltman, Marijke J; Gerrits, Karin H; Koppe, Peter; Janssen, Thomas W; Elich, Peter; de Haan, Arnold

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the nature of muscle weakness in both legs after stroke compared with able-bodied control individuals and to examine whether there is a relationship between the degree of muscle weakness and coactivation of knee extensors and flexors as well as voluntary activation capacity of knee extensors of both paretic and non-paretic legs and indices of functional performance. Maximal voluntary isometric torques of knee extensors (MVCe) and flexors (MVCf) were determined in 14 patients (bilaterally) and 12 able-bodied controls. Simultaneous measurements were made of torque and surface EMG from agonist and antagonist muscles. Coactivation was calculated. Supramaximal triplets were evoked with electrical stimulation to estimate maximal torque capacity and degree of voluntary activation of knee extensors. MVCs, activation and coactivation parameters were correlated to scores of seven functional performance tests. MVCe, MVCf and voluntary activation were lower in paretic lower limb (PL) compared with both non-paretic lower limb (NL) and control. Besides, all these parameters of NL were also lower than control. Electrically evoked torque capacity of knee extensors of PL was about 60% of both NL and control, which were not significantly different from each other. Strong significant correlations between strength, as well as voluntary activation, and functional performance were found. Coactivation did not correlate well with functional performance. Thus, whereas for NL activation failure can explain weakness, for PL both activation failure and reduced intrinsic torque capacity are responsible for the severe weakness. Activation capacity and muscle strength correlated strongly to functional performance, while coactivation did not.

  17. Changes in voluntary quadriceps activation predict changes in muscle strength and gait biomechanics following knee joint effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrosimone, Brian; Lepley, Adam S; Murray, Amanda M; Thomas, Abbey C; Bahhur, Nael O; Schwartz, Todd A

    2014-09-01

    It has been hypothesized that arthrogenic muscle inhibition is responsible for altering physical function following knee injury. The association between the onset of arthrogenic muscle inhibition, measured using voluntary quadriceps activation, and changes in muscle strength and gait biomechanics are unknown. Outcomes were collected before and following a 60 ml experimental knee effusion in eighteen healthy participants. Voluntary quadriceps activation was the predictor variable, while the criterion variable included, maximal voluntary isometric strength, peak knee flexion angle, peak internal knee extension moment, and peak vertical ground reaction forces during the first half of stance phase upon stair descent. Percent change scores (Δ) were imputed into linear regression equations to determine associations between predictor and criterion variables. The variance in Δ voluntary quadriceps activation significantly predicted 87% the variance in the Δ strength (R(2)=0.87, Pknee flexion angle, Δ voluntary quadriceps activation predicted an additional 29% (Δ R(2)=0.29, P=0.007) of the variance in the Δ knee extension moment (R(2)=0.54, P=0.003, Δ knee extension moment=-10.79+0.74Δ knee flexion angle+1.64Δ voluntary quadriceps activation) following knee effusion. Immediate quadriceps activation deficits following joint effusion result in immediate alterations in muscle strength, knee extensor moment and vertical ground reaction force during gait. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Protective effect by maximal isometric contractions against maximal eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage of the knee extensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Kuo-Wei; Tseng, Wei-Chin; Lin, Ming-Ju; Chen, Hsin-Lian; Nosaka, Kazunori; Chen, Trevor C

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) performed before maximal eccentric contractions (MaxEC) would attenuate muscle damage of the knee extensors. Untrained men were placed to an experimental group that performed 6 sets of 10 MVIC at 90° knee flexion 2 weeks before 6 sets of 10 MaxEC or a control group that performed MaxEC only (n = 13/group). Changes in muscle damage markers were assessed before to 5 days after each exercise. Small but significant changes in maximal voluntary concentric contraction torque, range of motion (ROM) and plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity were evident at immediately to 2 days post-MVIC (p < 0.05), but other variables (e.g. thigh girth, myoglobin concentration, B-mode echo intensity) did not change significantly. Changes in all variables after MaxEC were smaller (p < 0.05) by 45% (soreness)-67% (CK) for the experimental than the control group. These results suggest that MVIC conferred potent protective effect against MaxEC-induced muscle damage.

  19. Functional connectivity between core and shoulder muscles increases during isometric endurance contractions in judo competitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawczyński, Adam; Samani, Afshin; Mroczek, Dariusz; Chmura, Paweł; Błach, Wiesław; Migasiewicz, Juliusz; Klich, Sebastian; Chmura, Jan; Madeleine, Pascal

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the surface electromyogram (SEMG) changes within and between muscles of the torso and shoulder region during static endurance contraction in elite judokas. We hypothesized an increased functional connectivity of muscles from the shoulder and torso regions during sustained isometric contraction. Twelve healthy, right-handed judo competitors participated in the study. The SEMG signals from the dominant trapezius (upper, middle and lower part), deltoideus anterior, serratus anterior, and pectoralis major muscles were recorded during isometric endurance contraction consisting of bilateral arm abduction at 90°. The normalized mutual information (NMI) was computed between muscle pairs as an index indicating functional connectivity. The NMIs increased significantly during endurance test for 10 of the 15 muscle pairs (P shoulder muscles during an endurance contraction in elite judokas.

  20. Investigation of Cervical Fleksor and Extensor Muscle Activation During Isometric Neck Extension Applied by Therraband

    Science.gov (United States)

    Önal, Sercan; Can, Filiz; Yakut, Yavuz; Baltacı, Gül

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Therrabands are commonly used for resistive exercises, streching and stabilization exercises and also isometric exercises. However, principles of practice of therrabands are mostly focused on exercise variety. Likewise it is only given point to exercise variety during therrabands’ usage at cervical region. Nevertheless, for effective usage of therrabands and for proper assessment of effectiveness response, it is necessary to know the amount of resistance being given or muscle activation response against the resistance given. The aim of this study was to compare activations of cervical flexor and extensor muscles during isometric extension exercise against the resistance of therraband in healthy individuals. Methods: 14 healthy subjects (8 female,6 male)aged between 19-32 have been included in the study. Subjects with neck problems, systemic diseases, history of trauma or operation were excluded. Neck isometric exercises with therraband was 2 sets with 2 minutes’ intervals and EMG records have been taken during exercises. After preparation of the skin, surface electrodes placed on the motor points of sternocleidomastoideus(SCM) and erector spinae(ES) muscles. After taking the average of 3 measures, the first 10 seconds of muscular activations were recorded. The average of integrated EMG(iEMG) values of each records was used for statistical data. Independent T test and Mann Whitney U test were used for the analysis of findings. Results: There was no significant difference between the right ES and left ES’s mean iEMG during isometric neck extension against therraband (p=0.06). Although there was no difference between right SCM and right ES muscles action potentials(t=-0.895; p=0.379), there was a significant difference between left SCM and left ES muscles’ action potentials (z= -2.435; p=0.01). When all the right and left SCM and ES muscle activations were compared, a significant difference was detected in favour of ES muscles ( t= -2.133; p= 0

  1. Reactive oxygen species generation is not different during isometric and lengthening contractions of mouse muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloboda, Darcée D; Brooks, Susan V

    2013-10-01

    Skeletal muscles can be injured by lengthening contractions, when the muscles are stretched while activated. Lengthening contractions produce structural damage that leads to the degeneration and regeneration of damaged muscle fibers by mechanisms that have not been fully elucidated. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated at the time of injury may initiate degenerative or regenerative processes. In the present study we hypothesized that lengthening contractions that damage the muscle would generate more ROS than isometric contractions that do not cause damage. To test our hypothesis, we subjected muscles of mice to lengthening contractions or isometric contractions and simultaneously monitored intracellular ROS generation with the fluorescent indicator 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein (CM-DCFH), which is oxidized by ROS to form the fluorescent product CM-DCF. We found that CM-DCF fluorescence was not different during or shortly after lengthening contractions compared with isometric controls, regardless of the amount of stretch and damage that occurred during the lengthening contractions. The only exception was that after severe stretches, the increase in CM-DCF fluorescence was impaired. We conclude that lengthening contractions that damage the muscle do not generate more ROS than isometric contractions that do not cause damage. The implication is that ROS generated at the time of injury are not the initiating signals for subsequent degenerative or regenerative processes.

  2. Muscular force production during non-isometric contractions: Towards numerical muscle modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Kosterina, Natalia

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of the study was to investigate skeletal muscle force production during isometric contractions, active muscle stretches and shortenings. The motivation behind this work is to improve the dominant model of muscle contraction force generation based on the theories of Hill. The effect of force modification was observed after concentric and eccentric contractions and also stretch-shortening cycles. It has been shown that this force modification is not related to lengthening/sho...

  3. Relationships between skinfold thickness and electromyographic and mechanomyographic amplitude recorded during voluntary and non-voluntary muscle actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Michael A; Herda, Trent J; Vardiman, John P; Gallagher, Phillip M; Fry, Andrew C

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine possible correlations between skinfold thicknesses and the a terms from the log-transformed electromyographic (EMGRMS) and mechanomyographic amplitude (MMGRMS)-force relationships, EMG M-Waves, and MMG gross lateral movements (GLM). Forty healthy subjects performed a 6-s isometric ramp contraction from 5% to 85% of their maximal voluntary contraction with EMG and MMG sensors placed on the vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF). A single electrical stimulus was applied to the femoral nerve to record the EMG M-waves and MMG GLMs. Skinfold thickness was assessed at the site of each electrode. Pearson's product correlation coefficients were calculated comparing skinfold thicknesses with the a terms from the log-transformed EMGRMS-and MMGRMS-force relationships, EMG M-waves, and MMG GLMs. There were no significant cor1relations (p>0.05) between the a terms and skinfold thicknesses for the RF and VL from the EMGRMS and MMGRMS-force relationships. However, there were significant correlations (pskinfold thicknesses and the EMG M-waves and MMG GLMs for the RF (r=-0.521, -0.376) and VL (r=-0.479, -0.484). Relationships were only present between skinfold thickness and the amplitudes of the EMG and MMG signals during the non-voluntary muscle actions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of experimental muscle pain on force variability during task-related and three directional isometric force task

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mista, Christian Ariel; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    -dimensional force task during acute muscle pain. Twelve right-handed healthy volunteers participated in the experiment. Three-dimensional force signals were acquired during isometric elbow flexion at 5%, 15%, and 30% of the maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). The force components were represented by a circle...... the sense of effort and motor output during contractions. However, little is known about the pain effects on the force components when task-related or three-dimensional force matching task are required. The aim of this study was to quantify changes in the force variability during task-related and three...... on a computer screen, and a moving square was used for the visual target. Subjects were asked to match the main direction of the contraction during the task-related (1D) or all the force components during the three-dimensional (3D) force matching tasks. Isotonic and hypertonic saline injections were randomly...

  5. Assessing voluntary muscle activation with the twitch interpolation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shield, Anthony; Zhou, Shi

    2004-01-01

    The twitch interpolation technique is commonly employed to assess the completeness of skeletal muscle activation during voluntary contractions. Early applications of twitch interpolation suggested that healthy human subjects could fully activate most of the skeletal muscles to which the technique had been applied. More recently, however, highly sensitive twitch interpolation has revealed that even healthy adults routinely fail to fully activate a number of skeletal muscles despite apparently maximal effort. Unfortunately, some disagreement exists as to how the results of twitch interpolation should be employed to quantify voluntary activation. The negative linear relationship between evoked twitch force and voluntary force that has been observed by some researchers implies that voluntary activation can be quantified by scaling a single interpolated twitch to a control twitch evoked in relaxed muscle. Observations of non-linear evoked-voluntary force relationships have lead to the suggestion that the single interpolated twitch ratio can not accurately estimate voluntary activation. Instead, it has been proposed that muscle activation is better determined by extrapolating the relationship between evoked and voluntary force to provide an estimate of true maximum force. However, criticism of the single interpolated twitch ratio typically fails to take into account the reasons for the non-linearity of the evoked-voluntary force relationship. When these reasons are examined, it appears that most are even more challenging to the validity of extrapolation than they are to the linear equation. Furthermore, several factors that contribute to the observed non-linearity can be minimised or even eliminated with appropriate experimental technique. The detection of small activation deficits requires high resolution measurement of force and careful consideration of numerous experimental details such as the site of stimulation, stimulation intensity and the number of interpolated

  6. Electromyographic analysis of the infraspinatus and scapular stabilizing muscles during isometric shoulder external rotation at various shoulder elevation angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uga, Daisuke; Endo, Yasuhiro; Nakazawa, Rie; Sakamoto, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify activation of the infraspinatus and scapular stabilizing muscles during shoulder external rotation at various shoulder elevation angles. [Subjects] Twenty subjects participated in this study and all measurements were performed on the right shoulder. [Methods] Isometric shoulder external rotation strength and surface electromyographic data were measured with the shoulder at 0°, 45°, 90°, and 135° elevation in the scapular plane. The electromyographic data were collected from the infraspinatus, upper trapezius, middle trapezius, lower trapezius, and serratus anterior muscles. These measurements were compared across the various shoulder elevation angles. [Results] The strength measurements did not differ significantly by angulation. The infraspinatus activity was 92%, 75%, 68%, and 57% of the maximum voluntary contraction, which significantly decreased as shoulder elevation increased. The serratus anterior activity was 24%, 48%, 53%, and 62% of the maximum voluntary contraction, which significantly increased as shoulder elevation increased. [Conclusion] Shoulder external rotation torque was maintained regardless of shoulder elevation angle. The shoulder approximated to the zero position as the shoulder elevation increased so that infraspinatus activity decreased and the scapular posterior tilting by the serratus anterior might generate shoulder external rotation torque. PMID:26957748

  7. Gravitational effects on human cardiovascular responses to isometric muscle contractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonde-Petersen, Flemmig; Suzuki, Yoji; Sadamoto, Tomoko

    Isometric exercise induces profound cardiovascular adaptations increasing mean arterial pressure and heart rate. We investigated effects of simulated +Gz and -Gz respectively on the central and peripheral cardiovascular system. Sustained handgrip exercise was performed at 40% of maximum for 2 minutes in five subjects. This maneuver increased mean arterial pressure by 40-45 mm Hg both during head out water immersion which simulates weightlessness, as well as bedrest during -25, 0, and +25 degrees tilt from the horizontal. Lower body negative pressure (-60 mm Hg for 10 min) attenuated the response to handgrip exercise to 30 mm Hg. It also increased the heart rate minimally by about 20 beats per minute while the water immersion, as well as head up, head down and horizontal bedrest showed increments of about 50 beats per min. It was concluded that the response to isometric contraction is mediated through the high pressure baroreceptors, because similar responses were seen during stresses producing a wide variation in central venous pressure. During lower body negative pressure the increased sympathetic nervous activity itself increased resting heart rate and mean arterial pressure. The responses to static exercise were, therefore, weaker.

  8. Characteristics of fast voluntary and electrically evoked isometric knee extensions during 56 days of bed rest with and without exercise countermeasure.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, E.R.; Gerrits, K.H.; Rittweger, J.; Felsenberg, D.; Stegeman, D.F.; Haan, A. de

    2008-01-01

    The contractile characteristics of fast voluntary and electrically evoked unilateral isometric knee extensions were followed in 16 healthy men during 56 days of horizontal bed rest and assessed at bed rest days 4, 7, 10, 17, 24, 38 and 56. Subjects were randomized to either an inactive control group

  9. Electromyographic, cerebral and muscle hemodynamic responses during intermittent, isometric contractions of the biceps brachii at three submaximal intensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yagesh eBhambhani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the electromyographic, cerebral and muscle hemodynamic responses during intermittent isometric contractions of biceps brachii at 20%, 40% and 60% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC. Eleven volunteers completed two minutes of intermittent isometric contractions (12/min at an elbow angle of 90° interspersed with three minutes rest between intensities in systematic order. Surface electromyography (EMG was recorded from the right biceps brachii and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS was used to simultaneously measure left prefrontal and right biceps brachii oxyhemoglobin (HbO2, deoxyhemoglobin (HHb and total hemoglobin (Hbtot. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound was used to measure middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAv bilaterally. Finger photoplethysmography was used to record beat-to-beat blood pressure and heart rate. EMG increased with force output from 20% to 60% MVC (P0.05. MCAv increased from rest to exercise but was not different among intensities (P>0.05. Force output correlated with the root mean square EMG and changes in muscle HbO2 (P0.05 at all three intensities. Force output declined by 8% from the 1st to the 24th contraction only at 60% MVC and was accompanied by systematic increases in RMS, cerebral HbO2 and Hbtot with a levelling off in muscle HbO2 and Hbtot. These changes were independent of alterations in mean arterial pressure. Since cerebral blood flow and oxygenation were elevated at 60% MVC, we attribute the development of fatigue to reduced muscle oxygen availability rather than impaired central n

  10. Reliability of ultrasound thickness measurement of the abdominal muscles during clinical isometric endurance tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ShahAli, Shabnam; Arab, Amir Massoud; Talebian, Saeed; Ebrahimi, Esmaeil; Bahmani, Andia; Karimi, Noureddin; Nabavi, Hoda

    2015-07-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the intra-examiner reliability of ultrasound (US) thickness measurement of abdominal muscles activity when supine lying and during two isometric endurance tests in subjects with and without Low back pain (LBP). A total of 19 women (9 with LBP, 10 without LBP) participated in the study. Within-day reliability of the US thickness measurements at supine lying and the two isometric endurance tests were assessed in all subjects. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to assess the relative reliability of thickness measurement. The standard error of measurement (SEM), minimal detectable change (MDC) and the coefficient of variation (CV) were used to evaluate the absolute reliability. Results indicated high ICC scores (0.73-0.99) and also small SEM and MDC scores for within-day reliability assessment. The Bland-Altman plots of agreement in US measurement of the abdominal muscles during the two isometric endurance tests demonstrated that 95% of the observations fall between the limits of agreement for test and retest measurements. Together the results indicate high intra-tester reliability for the US measurement of the thickness of abdominal muscles in all the positions tested. According to the study's findings, US imaging can be used as a reliable method for assessment of abdominal muscles activity in supine lying and the two isometric endurance tests employed, in participants with and without LBP.

  11. Isometric muscle strength and mobility capacity in children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dallmeijer, Annet J.; Rameckers, Eugene A.; Houdijk, Han; de Groot, Sonja; Scholtes, Vanessa A.; Becher, Jules G.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the relationship between isometric leg muscle strength and mobility capacity in children with cerebral palsy (CP) compared to typically developing (TD) peers. Method: Participants were 62 children with CP (6-13 years), able to walk with (n=10) or without (n=52) walking aids,

  12. Effects of trunk stability on isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement while sitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Masahiro; Gomi, Masahiro; Katoh, Munenori

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of trunk stability on isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement while sitting by performing simultaneous measurements with a handheld dynamometer (HHD) and an isokinetic dynamometer (IKD) in the same seated condition. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 30 healthy volunteers. Isometric knee extension muscle strength was simultaneously measured with a HHD and an IKD by using an IKD-specific chair. The measurement was performed twice. Measurement instrument variables and the number of measurements were examined by using the analysis of variance and correlation tests. [Results] The measurement instrument variables and the number of measurements were not significantly different. The correlation coefficients between the HHD and IKD measurements were ≥0.96. [Conclusion] Isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement using the HHD in the sitting position resulted in a lower value than that using the IKD, presumably because of the effect of trunk stability on the measurement. In the same seated posture with trunk stability, no significant difference in measurement values was observed between the HHD and IKD. The present findings suggest that trunk stability while seated during isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement influenced the HHD measurement.

  13. Neck Muscle EMG-Force Relationship and Its Reliability During Isometric Contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Martire, Riccardo; Gladh, Kristofer; Westman, Anton; Äng, Björn O

    2017-12-01

    Susceptible to injury, the neck is subject to scientific investigations, frequently aiming to elucidate possible injury mechanisms via surface electromyography (EMG) by indirectly estimating cervical loads. Accurate estimation requires that the EMG-force relationship is known and that its measurement error is quantified. Hence, this study examined the relationship between EMG and isometric force amplitude of the anterior neck (AN), the upper posterior neck (UPN), and the lower posterior neck (LPN) and then assessed the relationships' test-retest reliability across force-percentiles within and between days. EMG and force data were sampled from 18 participants conducting randomly ordered muscle contractions at 5-90% of maximal voluntary force during three trials over 2 days. EMG-force relationships were modeled with general linear mixed-effects regression. Overall fitted lines' between-trial discrepancies were evaluated. Finally, the reliability of participants' fitted regression lines was quantified by an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and the standard error of measurement (SEM). A rectilinear model had the best fit for AN while positively oriented quadratic models had the best fit for UPN and LPN, with mean adjusted conditional coefficients of determination and root mean square errors of 0.97-0.98 and 4-5%, respectively. Overall EMG-force relationships displayed a maximum 6% between-trial discrepancy and over 20% of maximal force, and mean ICC was above 0.79 within day and 0.27-0.61 between days across areas. Corresponding SEM was below 12% both within and between days across areas, excluding UPN between days, for which SEM was higher. EMG-force relationships were elucidated for three neck areas, and provided models allow inferences to be drawn from EMG to force on a group level. Reliability of EMG-force relationship models was higher within than between days, but typically acceptable for all but the lowest contraction intensities, and enables adjustment

  14. Impact of Isometric Contraction of Anterior Cervical Muscles on Cervical Lordosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorchuk, Curtis A; McCoy, Matthew; Lightstone, Douglas F; Bak, David A; Moser, Jacque; Kubricht, Brett; Packer, John; Walton, Dustin; Binongo, Jose

    2016-09-01

    This study investigates the impact of isometric contraction of anterior cervical muscles on cervical lordosis. 29 volunteers were randomly assigned to an anterior head translation (n=15) or anterior head flexion (n=14) group. Resting neutral lateral cervical x-rays were compared to x-rays of sustained isometric contraction of the anterior cervical muscles producing anterior head translation or anterior head flexion. Paired sample t-tests indicate no significant difference between pre and post anterior head translation or anterior head flexion. Analysis of variance suggests that gender and peak force were not associated with change in cervical lordosis. Chamberlain's to atlas plane line angle difference was significantly associated with cervical lordosis difference during anterior head translation (p=0.01). This study shows no evidence that hypertonicity, as seen in muscle spasms, of the muscles responsible for anterior head translation and anterior head flexion have a significant impact on cervical lordosis.

  15. Does the Length of Elbow Flexors and Visual Feedback Have Effect on Accuracy of Isometric Muscle Contraction in Men after Stroke?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilma Juodzbaliene

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the effect of different muscle length and visual feedback information (VFI on accuracy of isometric contraction of elbow flexors in men after an ischemic stroke (IS. Materials and Methods. Maximum voluntary muscle contraction force (MVMCF and accurate determinate muscle force (20% of MVMCF developed during an isometric contraction of elbow flexors in 90° and 60° of elbow flexion were measured by an isokinetic dynamometer in healthy subjects (MH, n=20 and subjects after an IS during their postrehabilitation period (MS, n=20. Results. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the isometric contraction of the elbow flexors absolute errors were calculated. The absolute errors provided information about the difference between determinate and achieved muscle force. Conclusions. There is a tendency that greater absolute errors generating determinate force are made by MH and MS subjects in case of a greater elbow flexors length despite presence of VFI. Absolute errors also increase in both groups in case of a greater elbow flexors length without VFI. MS subjects make greater absolute errors generating determinate force without VFI in comparison with MH in shorter elbow flexors length.

  16. Isometric fatigue patterns in time and time-frequency domains of triceps surae muscle in different knee positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Glauber Ribeiro; de Oliveira, Liliam Fernandes; Nadal, Jurandir

    2011-08-01

    The occurrence of fatigue in triceps surae (TS) muscles during sustained plantar flexion contraction is investigated by means of the RMS electromyogram (EMG) and the instantaneous median frequency (IMF) of the short time Fourier transform (STFT). Six male subjects realized a 40% maximal plantar flexion isometric voluntary contraction until fatigue in two knee positions. Electrodes were positioned on gastrocnemius medialis, gastrocnemius lateralis and soleus muscles. The torque (TO) and EMG signals were synchronized. The RMS and the median of the IMF values were obtained, respectively, for each 250 ms and 1s windows of signal. Each signal was segmented into 10 epochs, from which the mean values of IMF, RMS and TO were obtained and submitted to linear regressions to determine parameter trends. Friedman test with the Dunn's post hoc were used to test for differences among muscles activation for each knee position and among slopes of regression curves, as well as to observe changes in TS RMS values over time. The results indicate different activation strategies with the knee extended (KE) in contrast to knee flexed (KF). With the KE, the gastrocnemii showed typical fatigue behavior with significant (p<0.05) IMF reductions and RMS increases over time, while soleus showed concomitant RMS and IMF increases (p<0.05) suggesting an increased soleus contribution to the torque production. With KF, the gastrocnemii were under activated, increasing the role of soleus. Thus, time-frequency analysis represented an important tool for TS muscular fatigue evaluation, allowing differentiates the role of soleus muscle.

  17. Structural features of cross-bridges in isometrically contracting skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Theresia; Mattei, Thomas; Radocaj, Ante; Piep, Birgit; Nocula, Christoph; Furch, Markus; Brenner, Bernhard

    2002-05-01

    Two-dimensional x-ray diffraction was used to investigate structural features of cross-bridges that generate force in isometrically contracting skeletal muscle. Diffraction patterns were recorded from arrays of single, chemically skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers during isometric force generation, under relaxation, and in rigor. In isometric contraction, a rather prominent intensification of the actin layer lines at 5.9 and 5.1 nm and of the first actin layer line at 37 nm was found compared with those under relaxing conditions. Surprisingly, during isometric contraction, the intensity profile of the 5.9-nm actin layer line was shifted toward the meridian, but the resulting intensity profile was different from that observed in rigor. We particularly addressed the question whether the differences seen between rigor and active contraction might be due to a rigor-like configuration of both myosin heads in the absence of nucleotide (rigor), whereas during active contraction only one head of each myosin molecule is in a rigor-like configuration and the second head is weakly bound. To investigate this question, we created different mixtures of weak binding myosin heads and rigor-like actomyosin complexes by titrating MgATPgammaS at saturating [Ca2+] into arrays of single muscle fibers. The resulting diffraction patterns were different in several respects from patterns recorded under isometric contraction, particularly in the intensity distribution along the 5.9-nm actin layer line. This result indicates that cross-bridges present during isometric force generation are not simply a mixture of weakly bound and single-headed rigor-like complexes but are rather distinctly different from the rigor-like cross-bridge. Experiments with myosin-S1 and truncated S1 (motor domain) support the idea that for a force generating cross-bridge, disorder due to elastic distortion might involve a larger part of the myosin head than for a nucleotide free, rigor cross-bridge.

  18. Isometric and eccentric force generation assessment of skeletal muscles isolated from murine models of muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorwood, Catherine; Liu, Min; Tian, Zuozhen; Barton, Elisabeth R

    2013-01-31

    Critical to the evaluation of potential therapeutics for muscular disease are sensitive and reproducible physiological assessments of muscle function. Because many pre-clinical trials rely on mouse models for these diseases, isolated muscle function has become one of the standards for Go/NoGo decisions in moving drug candidates forward into patients. We will demonstrate the preparation of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and diaphragm muscles for functional testing, which are the predominant muscles utilized for these studies. The EDL muscle geometry is ideal for isolated muscle preparations, with two easily accessible tendons, and a small size that can be supported by superfusion in a bath. The diaphragm exhibits profound progressive pathology in dystrophic animals, and can serve as a platform for evaluating many potential therapies countering fibrosis, and promoting myofiber stability. Protocols for routine testing, including isometric and eccentric contractions, will be shown. Isometric force provides assessment of strength, and eccentric contractions help to evaluate sarcolemma stability, which is disrupted in many types of muscular dystrophies. Comparisons of the expected results between muscles from wildtype and dystrophic muscles will also be provided. These measures can complement morphological and biochemical measurements of tissue homeostasis, as well as whole animal assessments of muscle function.

  19. LONG-LASTING SUPERNORMAL CONDUCTION-VELOCITY AFTER SUSTAINED MAXIMAL ISOMETRIC CONTRACTION IN HUMAN MUSCLE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERHOEVEN, JH; VANWEERDEN, TW; ZWARTS, MJ

    1993-01-01

    Local muscle fatigue (1 min maximal voluntary contraction) and recovery were studied by means of surface and invasive EMG on elbow flexors to record the changes in muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV), median power frequency (MPF), integrated EMG (IEMG), and force. The main finding was a long-las

  20. LONG-LASTING SUPERNORMAL CONDUCTION-VELOCITY AFTER SUSTAINED MAXIMAL ISOMETRIC CONTRACTION IN HUMAN MUSCLE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERHOEVEN, JH; VANWEERDEN, TW; ZWARTS, MJ

    1993-01-01

    Local muscle fatigue (1 min maximal voluntary contraction) and recovery were studied by means of surface and invasive EMG on elbow flexors to record the changes in muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV), median power frequency (MPF), integrated EMG (IEMG), and force. The main finding was a long-las

  1. A comparison of customized strategies to manage muscle fatigue in isometric artificially elicited muscle contractions for incomplete SCI subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    del-Ama Antonio J.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle fatigue due to functional electrical stimulation still prevents its widespread use as a gait rehabilitation tool for spinal cord injured subjects. Although there is an active research towards optimization of pulse parameters to delay muscle fatigue, changes in stimulated muscle's performance during repeated contractions due to fatigue have not been yet determined. In this work, a study conducted in two phases with a sample of incomplete spinal cord injured patients is presented. In the first phase, a fatigue protocol based on submaximal isometric contractions allowed to obtain an objective criterion for estimation of fatigue of knee muscles from initial changes in muscle performance. The criterion is incorporated in the fatigue protocol in the second phase of the study, to compare two novel customized fatigue management strategies. Results showed that knee flexor muscles develop less force and lower fatigue than extensor muscles. Muscle fatigue management strategies based on customized modulations of stimulation frequency are valid to delay muscle fatigue.

  2. The Dynamics of Voluntary Force Production in Afferented Muscle Influence Involuntary Tremor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Laine

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Voluntary control of force is always marked by some degree of error and unsteadiness. Both neural and mechanical factors contribute to these fluctuations, but how they interact to produce them is poorly understood. In this study, we identify and characterize a previously undescribed neuromechanical interaction where the dynamics of voluntary force production suffice to generate involuntary tremor. Specifically, participants were asked to produce isometric force with the index finger and use visual feedback to track a sinusoidal target spanning 5 to 9 % of each individual’s maximal voluntary force level. Force fluctuations and EMG activity over the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS muscle were recorded and their frequency content was analyzed as a function target phase. Force variability in either the 1 to 5 or 6 to 15 Hz frequency ranges tended to be largest at the peaks and valleys of the target sinusoid. In those same periods, FDS EMG activity was synchronized with force fluctuations. We then constructed a physiologically-realistic computer simulation in which a muscle-tendon complex was set inside of a feedback-driven control loop. Surprisingly, the model sufficed to produce phase-dependent modulation of tremor similar to that observed in humans. Further, the gain of afferent feedback from muscle spindles was critical for appropriately amplifying and shaping this tremor. We suggest that the experimentally-induced tremor may represent the response of a viscoelastic muscle-tendon system to dynamic drive, and therefore does not fall into known categories of tremor generation, such as tremorogenic descending drive, stretch-reflex loop oscillations, motor unit behavior, or mechanical resonance. Our findings motivate future efforts to understand tremor from a perspective that considers neuromechanical coupling within the context of closed-loop control. The strategy of combining experimental recordings with physiologically-sound simulations will

  3. Motor unit firing behaviour of soleus muscle in isometric and dynamic contractions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouni Kallio

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Understanding the detailed control of human locomotion and balance can be improved, when individual motor units can be isolated and their firing rates followed in natural movement of large, fuctionally important muscles. For this reason the present study investigated the motor unit discharge rate (MUDR in isometric and dynamic contractions of the soleus muscle. METHODS: Eleven males performed isometric (10-100% MVC and dynamic (10-40% MVC plantar flexions. Intramuscular EMG was measured from Soleus with bipolar wire-electrodes and decomposed with custom built "Daisy" software. RESULTS: The Soleus MUDR was significantly higher in concentric compared to isometric or eccentric contractions at all submaximal force levels (P<0.05. In isometric contractions MUDR increased up to 100% MVC. CONCLUSION: Motor unit discharge properties of a large plantarflexor can be measured in dynamic and maximal contractions. For a given torque output, MUDR is dependent upon contraction type, as set by the major mechanical differences between concentric and eccentric actions.

  4. Functional imaging of muscle oxygenation and oxygen consumption in the knee extensor muscles during isometric contractions by spatially resolved near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kek, Khai Jun; Miyakawa, Takahiro; Kudo, Nobuki; Yamamoto, Katsuyuki

    2007-02-01

    In this study, we showed that exercise type- and intensity-dependent regional differences in muscle oxygenation and oxygen consumption rate (Vo II) of the knee extensor muscles could be imaged in real time with a multi-channel spatially resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (SR-NIRS) imaging device. Healthy subjects performed isometric knee extension exercise for 30 s (without- or with-leg-press action) at different exercise intensities [10%, 40% and 70% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC)]. "Separation-type" probes were attached to the skin over the major knee extensor muscles: vastus lateralis (VL), rectus femoris (RF) and vastus medialis (VM). Placement of the probes enabled simultaneously measurement of 12 sites over a skin area of about 30 cm2 (temporal resolution = 0.25 s). Local Vo II of each muscle, resting Vo II (Vo II, rest) and recovery Vo II (Vo II, rec ), were determined with arterial occlusion before the start and after the end of contraction, respectively. There was no significant difference between the values of Vo II rest, in the muscles. However, during knee extension exercise without-leg-press action, Vo II rec, value of the RF was significantly greater than the values of the VL and VM at all exercise intensities. In contrast, during exercise with-leg-press action, Vo II rec, values of the RF and VM were greater than those of the VL, especially during exercise at 40% and 70% MVC. In summary, the regional differences in muscle oxygenation and Vo II of the knee extensor muscles, probably due to the differences in relative contributions of muscles to exercise and in muscle architecture, were imaged using SR-NIRS.

  5. Validity and reliability of isometric, isokinetic and isoinertial modalities for the assessment of quadriceps muscle strength in patients with total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lienhard, K; Lauermann, S P; Schneider, D; Item-Glatthorn, J F; Casartelli, N C; Maffiuletti, N A

    2013-12-01

    Reliability of isometric, isokinetic and isoinertial modalities for quadriceps strength evaluation, and the relation between quadriceps strength and physical function was investigated in 29 total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients, with an average age of 63 years. Isometric maximal voluntary contraction torque, isokinetic peak torque, and isoinertial one-repetition maximum load of the involved and uninvolved quadriceps were evaluated as well as objective (walking parameters) and subjective physical function (WOMAC). Reliability was good and comparable for the isometric, isokinetic, and isoinertial strength outcomes on both sides (intraclass correlation coefficient range: 0.947-0.966; standard error of measurement range: 5.1-9.3%). Involved quadriceps strength was significantly correlated to walking speed (r range: 0.641-0.710), step length (r range: 0.685-0.820) and WOMAC function (r range: 0.575-0.663), independent from the modality (P torque (P > 0.05). In conclusion, isometric, isokinetic, and isoinertial modalities ensure valid and reliable assessment of quadriceps muscle strength in TKA patients.

  6. Maximum isometric knee flexor and extensor muscle contractions: normal patterns of torque versus time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, M P; Baldwin, J M; Gardner, G M; Sepic, S B; Downs, W J

    1977-06-01

    Isometric torque of the knee flexor and extensor muscles were recorded for 5 seconds at three knee joint positions. The subjects included healthy men in age groups from 20 to 35 and 45 to 65 years of age. The amplitudes and duration of peak torque and the time to peak torque were measured for each contraction. Peak torque was usually maintaned less than 0.1 second and never longer than 0.9 second. At each of the three angles, the mean extensor muscle torque was higher than the mean flexor muscle torque in both age groups, and the mean torque for both muscle group was higher among the younger than among the older man. The highest average torque was recorded at the knee angle of 60 degrees for the extensor muscles and 45 degrees for the flexor muscles, but this was not always a stereotyped response either for a given individual or among individuals.

  7. Acute effect of different stretching methods on isometric muscle strength

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel Vasconcellos de Lima Costa e Silva; Anderson Luiz Bezerra da Silveira; Fabrízio Di Masi; Cláudio Melibeu Bentes; Maria do Socorro Cirilo de Sousa; Jefferson da Silva Novaes

    2014-01-01

    http://dx.doi.org/10.4025/actascihealthsci.v36i1.15581 This study investigated the acute effect of static stretching methods (SS) and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) on the static muscle strength (SMS). Eleven young male subjects with strength training experience, performed 3 tests with a 48h interval between them, randomly selected, where each one subject carried out all procedures: a) hand grip without stretching; b) hand grip preceded by static stretching of wrist flexor...

  8. Isometric hip muscle strength in posttraumatic below-knee amputees

    OpenAIRE

    Jandrić Slavica

    2007-01-01

    Background/Aim. Traumas and war injuries, next to chronic occlusive artery disease and diabetes mellitus-derived complications, are the most frequent cause of the lower limbs amputation. They affect mostly younger population that need a higher level of activities as compared with the elderly. Medical rehabilitation is very significant for the muscle performance improvement in this population providing their social reintegration. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of below-kne...

  9. Image Based Calculation of Perfusion and Oxyhemoglobin Saturation in Skeletal Muscle during Submaximal Isometric Contractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Christopher P.; Cook, Ryan N.; Chance, Marti A.; Copenhaver, Elizabeth A.; Damon, Bruce M.

    2015-01-01

    The relative oxygen saturation of hemoglobin (%HbO2) and the rate of perfusion (θ̇) are important physiological quantities, particularly in organs such as skeletal muscle in which oxygen delivery and use are tightly coupled. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the image-based calculation of %HbO2 and quantification of perfusion in skeletal muscle during isometric contractions. This was accomplished by establishing an empirical relationship between the rate of RF-reversible dephasing (R2′) and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)-observed oxyhemoglobin saturation (%HbO2) under conditions of arterial occlusion and constant blood volume. A calibration curve was generated and used to calculate %HbO2 from R2′ changes measured during contraction. Twelve young healthy subjects underwent 300 seconds of arterial occlusion and performed isometric contractions of the dorsiflexors at 30% of maximal contraction for 120s. Muscle perfusion was quantified during contraction by arterial spin labeling and measures of muscle T1. Comparisons between the %HbO2 values predicted from R2′ and that measured by NIRS revealed no differences between methods (p = 0.760). Muscle perfusion reached a value of 34.7 mL 100g−1 min−1 during contraction. These measurements hold future promise in measuring muscle oxygen consumption in healthy and diseased skeletal muscle. PMID:20806379

  10. Depression of corticomotor excitability after muscle fatigue induced by electrical stimulation and voluntary contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi eKotan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we examined the effect of muscle fatigue induced by tetanic electrical stimulation (ES and submaximal isometric contraction on corticomotor excitability. Experiments were performed in a cross-over design. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs were elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation. Corticomotor excitability was recorded before and after thumb opposition muscle fatigue tasks, in which 10% of the maximal tension intensity was induced by tetanic ES or voluntary contraction (VC. The participants were 10 healthy individuals who performed each task for 10 min. Surface electrodes placed over the abductor pollicis brevis (APB muscle recorded MEPs. F- and M-waves were elicited from APB by supramaximal ES of the median nerve. After the ES1-and VC tasks, MEP amplitudes were significantly lower than before the task. However, F-and M-wave amplitudes remained unchanged. These findings suggest that corticospinal excitability is reduced by muscle fatigue as a result of intracortical inhibitory mechanisms. Our results also suggest that corticomotor excitability is reduced by muscle fatigue caused by both VC and tetanic ES.

  11. Modulation in voluntary neural drive in relation to muscle soreness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringard, A.; Puchaux, K.; Noakes, T. D.; Perrey, S.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether (1) spinal modulation would change after non-exhausting eccentric exercise of the plantar flexor muscles that produced muscle soreness and (2) central modulation of the motor command would be linked to the development of muscle soreness. Ten healthy subjects volunteered to perform a single bout of backward downhill walking exercise (duration 30 min, velocity 1 ms−1, negative grade −25%, load 12% of body weight). Neuromuscular test sessions [H-reflex, M-wave, maximal voluntary torque (MVT)] were performed before, immediately after, as well as 1–3 days after the exercise bout. Immediately after exercise there was a −15% decrease in MVT of the plantar flexors partly attributable to an alteration in contractile properties (−23% in electrically evoked mechanical twitch). However, MVT failed to recover before the third day whereas the contractile properties had significantly recovered within the first day. This delayed recovery of MVT was likely related to a decrement in voluntary muscle drive. The decrease in voluntary activation occurred in the absence of any variation in spinal modulation estimated from the H-reflex. Our findings suggest the development of a supraspinal modulation perhaps linked to the presence of muscle soreness. PMID:17978834

  12. Sustained maximal voluntary contraction produces independent changes in human motor axons and the muscle they innervate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Milder

    Full Text Available The repetitive discharges required to produce a sustained muscle contraction results in activity-dependent hyperpolarization of the motor axons and a reduction in the force-generating capacity of the muscle. We investigated the relationship between these changes in the adductor pollicis muscle and the motor axons of its ulnar nerve supply, and the reproducibility of these changes. Ten subjects performed a 1-min maximal voluntary contraction. Activity-dependent changes in axonal excitability were measured using threshold tracking with electrical stimulation at the wrist; changes in the muscle were assessed as evoked and voluntary electromyography (EMG and isometric force. Separate components of axonal excitability and muscle properties were tested at 5 min intervals after the sustained contraction in 5 separate sessions. The current threshold required to produce the target muscle action potential increased immediately after the contraction by 14.8% (p<0.05, reflecting decreased axonal excitability secondary to hyperpolarization. This was not correlated with the decline in amplitude of muscle force or evoked EMG. A late reversal in threshold current after the initial recovery from hyperpolarization peaked at -5.9% at ∼35 min (p<0.05. This pattern was mirrored by other indices of axonal excitability revealing a previously unreported depolarization of motor axons in the late recovery period. Measures of axonal excitability were relatively stable at rest but less so after sustained activity. The coefficient of variation (CoV for threshold current increase was higher after activity (CoV 0.54, p<0.05 whereas changes in voluntary (CoV 0.12 and evoked twitch (CoV 0.15 force were relatively stable. These results demonstrate that activity-dependent changes in motor axon excitability are unlikely to contribute to concomitant changes in the muscle after sustained activity in healthy people. The variability in axonal excitability after sustained activity

  13. Clinical significance of isometric bite force versus electrical activity in temporal and masseter muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, Merete; Michler, L; Han, K

    1989-01-01

    Bite force and activity in temporal and masseter muscles during biting and chewing were recorded in 19 control subjects and 23 subjects with symptoms and signs of functional disorders of the craniomandibular system. The entire group comprised 13 men and 29 women, 14-63 yr of age. Maximal unilater...... of mandibular elevator strength as a whole, but inadequate to disclose asymmetric conditions. During isometric contraction, relative strength of electromyographic activity fairly accurately imaged the output of mechanical activity....

  14. Efeitos na medida do ângulo Q com a contração isométrica voluntária máxima do músculo quadricipital Efectos en la medida del ángulo Q con la contracción isométrica voluntária máxima del musculo cuadricipital Effects in the Q angle measurement with maximal voluntary isometric contraction of the quadriceps muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C.G. Belchior

    2006-02-01

    examination situations, having the quadriceps relaxed and in a maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC through radiographic measurement, aiming to contribute to the assessment and treatment of patients with patelofemoral disorder (PFD. Through the standard radiological method twenty 21 years old mean women (40 knees were assessed. All individuals were positioned supine using a U-podalic stabilizer, having their lower limbs relaxed, using a plumb film on the anterior tuberosity of the tibia. For the statistical analysis, the averages for the asymptomatic and symptomatic groups in a relaxed and MVIC status, as well as the Student's t-test with p < 0.05 significance level were used. The mean values to the Q angle compared to the asymptomatic group were 17.15º on relaxation, and 14.5º on MVIC, while the asymptomatic group presented 21.45º, and 15.8º, respectively. The results in the equality analysis between the symptomatic and asymptomatic groups on the relaxed status attained a p = 0.004, and to the maximal voluntary isometric contraction, p = 0.29. Considering the data attained in the present study, it can be verified that in a relaxing status, there is a difference between the value of the Q angle among symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals, being found a higher value in the FPD bearers, while in a maximal isometric contraction of the quadriceps muscle no statistical difference was found in the present study, with a reduction in the angle in both groups.

  15. Quantifying thigh muscle co-activation during isometric knee extension contractions: within- and between-session reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsavelis, Dimitrios; Threlkeld, A Joseph

    2014-08-01

    Muscle co-activation around the knee is important during ambulation and balance. The wide range of methodological approaches for the quantification of co-activation index (CI) makes comparisons across studies and populations difficult. The present study determined within- and between-session reliability of different methodological approaches for the quantification of the CI of the knee extensor and flexor muscles during maximum voluntary isometric contractions (MVICs). Eight healthy volunteers participated in two repeated testing sessions. A series of knee extension MVICs of the dominant leg with concomitant torque and electromyographic (EMG) recordings were captured. CI was calculated utilizing different analytical approaches. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) showed that within-session measures displayed higher reliability (ICC>0.861) and lower variability (Coefficient of variation; CV24.2%). A selection of a 500ms or larger window of RMS EMG activity around the PT delivered more reliable and less variable results than other approaches. Our findings suggest that the CI can provide a reliable measure for comparisons among conditions and is best utilized for within-session experimental designs.

  16. Differences in activation patterns in elbow flexor muscles during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, K; Kawakami, Y; Fukunaga, T; Yano, H; Miyashita, M

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the relative activation of the synergistic muscles during three different types of muscle contraction, the electromyograms (EMG) of two elbow flexor muscles, the biceps brachii (BB) and the brachioradialis (BR), have been compared. To accomplish this eight healthy human subjects performed the following elbow flexions against the same load--concentric, eccentric and isometric contractions. The isometric contractions were performed at three elbow angles: 10, 45 and 90 degrees (0 degree equal to full extension). The EMG were recorded by bipolar surface electrodes, and the relative activation between the two muscles was evaluated as the quotient of mean EMG activities (BR/BB). For the isotonic elbow flexions, BR/BB were calculated at three angle divisions: 0-30 degrees, 30-60 degrees and 60-90 degrees. Results indicated that the relative activation of the BR during the concentric contractions was higher than that of the eccentric contraction, particularly at the extended elbow angles, i.e. the BR/BB of the concentric contractions for the elbow joint angles ranging from 0-30 degrees and 30-60 degrees were significantly greater (P contractions. During the isometric and eccentric contractions, the BR/BB at the flexed joint angles tended to be greater than those at the extended angles. In contrast, there were no angle-dependent BR/BB variations during the concentric elbow flexions. Further, changing patterns in the EMG power spectra due to the type of contraction were different between BB and BR. These results indicated that the activation pattern in the two elbow flexor muscles varied with the muscle contraction pattern.

  17. Muscle force generation and force control of finger movements in children with spastic hemiplegia during isometric tasks.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.; Rameckers, E.A.A.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2005-01-01

    Force control ability was investigated in 10 males and 10 females, between 5 and 15 years old with spastic hemiplegia (mild and moderate hand dysfunction), and an aged-matched control group (eight males, 12 females). An isometric force production task at five different levels of maximum voluntary co

  18. Behavior of human gastrocnemius muscle fascicles during ramped submaximal isometric contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héroux, Martin E; Stubbs, Peter W; Herbert, Robert D

    2016-09-01

    Precise estimates of muscle architecture are necessary to understand and model muscle mechanics. The primary aim of this study was to estimate continuous changes in fascicle length and pennation angle in human gastrocnemius muscles during ramped plantar flexor contractions at two ankle angles. The secondary aim was to determine whether these changes differ between proximal and distal fascicles. Fifteen healthy subjects performed ramped contractions (0-25% MVC) as ultrasound images were recorded from the medial (MG, eight sites) and lateral (LG, six sites) gastrocnemius muscle with the ankle at 90° and 120° (larger angles correspond to shorter muscle lengths). In all subjects, fascicles progressively shortened with increasing torque. MG fascicles shortened 5.8 mm (11.1%) at 90° and 4.5 mm (12.1%) at 120°, whereas LG muscle fascicles shortened 5.1 mm (8.8%) at both ankle angles. MG pennation angle increased 1.4° at 90° and 4.9° at 120°, and LG pennation angle decreased 0.3° at 90° and increased 2.6° at 120°. Muscle architecture changes were similar in proximal and distal fascicles at both ankle angles. This is the first study to describe continuous changes in fascicle length and pennation angle in the human gastrocnemius muscle during ramped isometric contractions. Very similar changes occurred in proximal and distal muscle regions. These findings are relevant to studies modeling active muscle mechanics.

  19. Muscle Activation Differs between Three Different Knee Joint-Angle Positions during a Maximal Isometric Back Squat Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Marchetti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare muscle activation of the lower limb muscles when performing a maximal isometric back squat exercise over three different positions. Fifteen young, healthy, resistance-trained men performed an isometric back squat at three knee joint angles (20°, 90°, and 140° in a randomized, counterbalanced fashion. Surface electromyography was used to measure muscle activation of the vastus lateralis (VL, vastus medialis (VM, rectus femoris (RF, biceps femoris (BF, semitendinosus (ST, and gluteus maximus (GM. In general, muscle activity was the highest at 90° for the three quadriceps muscles, yet differences in muscle activation between knee angles were muscle specific. Activity of the GM was significantly greater at 20° and 90° compared to 140°. The BF and ST displayed similar activation at all joint angles. In conclusion, knee position alters muscles activation of the quadriceps and gluteus maximus muscles. An isometric back squat at 90° generates the highest overall muscle activation, yet an isometric back squat at 140° generates the lowest overall muscle activation of the VL and GM only.

  20. Ultrasonographic analysis of dorsal neck muscles thickness changes induced by isometric contraction of shoulder muscles: A comparison between patients with chronic neck pain and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Noureddin; Rezasoltani, Asghar; Rahnama, Leila; Noori-Kochi, Farhang; Jaberzadeh, Shapour

    2016-04-01

    Altered pattern of muscle activity is commonly seen with chronic neck pain (CNP). However, limited investigations have been done on dorsal neck muscles' activity pattern while performing upper limb tasks in patients with CNP. To investigate dorsal neck muscles' thickness changes during isometric contraction of shoulder muscles. Case-control study. This study investigated dorsal neck muscles' thickness changes during isometric contraction of shoulder muscles in 20 healthy participants (mean age 27 ± 4.37) and 17 patients with CNP (mean age 29 ± 5.50). Effects of isometric force of shoulder muscles on dorsal neck muscles' thickness changes were also evaluated. Significant muscle × group interaction was observed for the dorsal neck muscles thickness changes (p = 0.008) indicating different pattern of muscle activity in terms of changes in muscle thickness of two groups. Significant main effects of direction was observed (P = 0.003), with the abduction had the greatest impact on changing the dorsal neck muscles thickness. patients with CNP showed altered pattern of muscle thickness changes in comparison to healthy participants. Isometric abduction of shoulder muscles induced the greatest changes of dorsal neck muscles thickness among other force directions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Combined isometric, concentric, and eccentric resistance exercise prevents unloading-induced muscle atrophy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, G R; Haddad, F; Bodell, P W; Tran, P D; Baldwin, K M

    2007-11-01

    Previously, we reported that an isometric resistance training program that was effective in stimulating muscle hypertrophy in ambulatory rats could not completely prevent muscle atrophy during unloading (Haddad F, Adams GR, Bodell PW, Baldwin KM. J Appl Physiol 100: 433-441, 2006). These results indicated that preventing muscle atrophy does not appear to be simply a function of providing an anabolic stimulus. The present study was undertaken to determine if resistance training, with increased volume (3-s contractions) and incorporating both static and dynamic components, would be effective in preventing unloading-induced muscle atrophy. Rats were exposed to 5 days of muscle unloading via tail suspension. During that time one leg received electrically stimulated resistance exercise (RE) that included an isometric, concentric, and eccentric phase. The results of this study indicate that this combined-mode RE provided an anabolic stimulus sufficient to maintain the mass and myofibril content of the trained but not the contralateral medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle. Relative to the contralateral MG, the RE stimulus increased the amount of total RNA (indicative of translational capacity) as well as the mRNA for several anabolic/myogenic markers such as insulin-like growth factor-I, myogenin, myoferlin, and procollagen III-alpha-1 and decreased that of myostatin, a negative regulator of muscle size. The combined-mode RE protocol also increased the activity of anabolic signaling intermediates such as p70S6 kinase. These results indicate that a combination of static- and dynamic-mode RE of sufficient volume provides an effective stimulus to stimulate anabolic/myogenic mechanisms to counter the initial stages of unloading-induced muscle atrophy.

  2. Prophylactic tolperisone for post-exercise muscle soreness causes reduced isometric force--a double-blind randomized crossover control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Prem; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Madeleine, Pascal; Svensson, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The role of tolperisone hydrochloride, a centrally acting muscle relaxant in relieving painful muscle spasm is recently being discussed. The present study hypothesizes that the prophylactic use of tolperisone hydrochloride may effectively relieve post-exercise muscle soreness, based on the spasm theory of exercise pain. Twenty male volunteers, aged 25.2 +/- 0.82 years (mean +/- SEM) participated in 10 sessions in which they received oral treatment with placebo or the centrally acting muscle relaxant tolperisone hydrochloride (150 mg) three times daily for 8 days, in randomized crossover double-blind design. Time course assessments were made for pressure pain threshold, Likert's pain score (0-5), pain areas, range of abduction, isometric force, and electromyography (EMG) root mean square (RMS) during maximum voluntary isometric force on day 1 and 6, immediately after an eccentric exercise of first dorsal interosseous muscle, and 24 and 48 h after the exercise. Treatment with placebo or tolperisone hydrochloride was initiated immediately after the assessments on the first day baseline assessments. On the sixth day baseline investigations were repeated and then the subjects performed six bouts of standardized intense eccentric exercise of first dorsal interosseous muscle for provocation of post-exercise muscle soreness (PEMS). Perceived intensity of warmth, tiredness, soreness and pain during the exercise bouts were recorded on a 10 cm visual analogue pain scale. VAS scores and pressure pain thresholds did not differ between tolperisone and placebo treatment. All VAS scores increased during the exercise bouts 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 as compared to bout 1. Increased pain scores and pain areas were reported immediately after, 24 and 48 h after exercise. Pressure pain thresholds were reduced at 24 and 48 h after the exercise in the exercised hand. Range of abduction of the index finger was reduced immediately after the exercise and was still reduced at 24 h as compared to the

  3. The origin of activity in the biceps brachii muscle during voluntary contractions of the contralateral elbow flexor muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijdewind, Inge; Butler, Jane E.; Gandevia, Simon C.; Taylor, Janet L.

    2006-01-01

    During strong voluntary contractions, activity is not restricted to the target muscles. Other muscles, including contralateral muscles, often contract. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to analyse the origin of these unintended contralateral contractions (termed "associated" contractio

  4. The origin of activity in the biceps brachii muscle during voluntary contractions of the contralateral elbow flexor muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijdewind, Inge; Butler, Jane E.; Gandevia, Simon C.; Taylor, Janet L.

    2006-01-01

    During strong voluntary contractions, activity is not restricted to the target muscles. Other muscles, including contralateral muscles, often contract. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to analyse the origin of these unintended contralateral contractions (termed "associated"

  5. In-Vivo Measurement of Muscle Tension: Dynamic Properties of the MC Sensor during Isometric Muscle Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srđan Đorđević

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is the largest tissue structure in our body and plays an essential role for producing motion through integrated action with bones, tendons, ligaments and joints, for stabilizing body position, for generation of heat through cell respiration and for blood glucose disposal. A key function of skeletal muscle is force generation. Non-invasive and selective measurement of muscle contraction force in the field and in clinical settings has always been challenging. The aim of our work has been to develop a sensor that can overcome these difficulties and therefore enable measurement of muscle force during different contraction conditions. In this study, we tested the mechanical properties of a “Muscle Contraction” (MC sensor during isometric muscle contraction in different length/tension conditions. The MC sensor is attached so that it indents the skin overlying a muscle group and detects varying degrees of tension during muscular contraction. We compared MC sensor readings over the biceps brachii (BB muscle to dynamometric measurements of force of elbow flexion, together with recordings of surface EMG signal of BB during isometric contractions at 15° and 90° of elbow flexion. Statistical correlation between MC signal and force was very high at 15° (r = 0.976 and 90° (r = 0.966 across the complete time domain. Normalized SD or σN = σ/max(FMC was used as a measure of linearity of MC signal and elbow flexion force in dynamic conditions. The average was 8.24% for an elbow angle of 90° and 10.01% for an elbow of angle 15°, which indicates high linearity and good dynamic properties of MC sensor signal when compared to elbow flexion force. The next step of testing MC sensor potential will be to measure tension of muscle-tendon complex in conditions when length and tension change simultaneously during human motion.

  6. Effect of combined variation of force amplitude and rate of force development on the modulation characteristics of muscle activation during rapid isometric aiming force production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Hoon; Stelmach, George E

    2006-01-01

    Studies of rapid target-directed limb movements have suggested that various control schemes can be defined by the modulation pattern of the muscle activity. The present study was aimed to address the question regarding the extent to which a simultaneous control of force amplitude, and rate of force development influences the modulation characteristics of muscle activation associated with producing rapid isometric aiming forces at the elbow joint. The subjects were instructed to produce rapid isometric force pulses to three different force amplitudes (15, 35, and 55% of their maximal voluntary contractions) under systematically varied force-rate conditions ranging from a fast and accurate force-rate to the fastest force-rate possible. The results showed that larger force amplitudes were achieved by increasing the rate of force development (d F/d t) while the time to peak force remained relatively constant. The magnitude of the electromyographic (EMG) burst systematically increased as a function of force amplitude at all force-rate conditions. The primary finding was that the characteristic of the EMG burst duration associated with different force amplitudes showed a significant difference among force-rate conditions. Under a fast and accurate force-rate condition, the duration of the agonist burst increased linearly with force amplitude. A gradual transition into a fixed duration of the agonist burst then was observed over the remaining three force-rate requirements. With increasingly faster force-rates, there were no changes in the agonist burst duration over three force amplitudes. These results indicate that the combined variations in force amplitude and force-rate examined relative to the most rapid force-rate influence the control patterns for the muscle activation during the fast isometric force production. Changes in the EMG modulation patterns observed are likely due to the constraints imposed by muscle contractile properties.

  7. The effect of temperature on eccentric contraction-induced isometric force loss in isolated perfused rat medial gastrocnemius muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasaghi Gharamaleki B

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: The typical features of eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage are delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS and prolonged loss of muscle strength. It has been shown that passive warmth is effective in reducing muscle injury. Due to the interaction of different systems in vivo, we used isolated perfused medial gastrocnemius skeletal muscle to study the direct effect of temperature on the eccentric contraction-induced force loss. "nMethods: After femoral artery cannulation of a rat, the left medial gastrocnemius muscle was separated and then the entire lower limb was transferred into a prewarmed (35oC chamber. With the chamber temperature at 31, 35 and 39oC before and during eccentric contraction. Isometric force loss was measured after 15 eccentric contractions (N=7-9. "nResults: Maximum contraction force reduction has been used as an index for eccentric contraction-induced force loss. In this study eccentric contraction caused a significant reduction in maximum isometric tension (p<0.01, but no significant difference was seen in isometric force loss at 31oC and 39oC compared with that at 35oC. "nConclusions: Our results suggest that temperature changes before or during eccentric contractions have no effect on eccentric contraction-induced force loss. "nKeywords: Isolated perfused muscle, skeletal muscle, eccentric contractions, isometric force, gastrocnemius muscle, temperature.

  8. An additional phase in PCr use during sustained isometric exercise at 30% MVC in the tibialis anterior muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houtman, C J; Heerschap, A; Zwarts, M J; Stegeman, D F

    2002-06-01

    The occurrence of an abrupt acceleration in phosphocreatine hydrolysis in the tibial anterior muscle during the last part of a sustained isometric exercise at 30% maximal voluntary contraction until fatigue is demonstrated in seven out of eight healthy subjects by applying in vivo 31P NMR spectroscopy at 1.5 T field strength. This additional third phase in PCr hydrolysis, is preceded by a common biphasic pattern (first fast then slow) in PCr use. The NMR spectra, as localized by a surface coil and improved by proton irradiation, were collected at a time resolution of 16 s. Mean rates of PCr hydrolysis during exercise were -0.44 +/- 0.19% s(-1), -0.07 +/- 0.04% s(-1), and -0.29 +/- 0.10% s(-1) for the three successive phases. The increased rate of PCr hydrolysis, and also the loss of fine force control evident in the force records are consistent with increased involvement of large, fast-fatiguable units later in the contraction.

  9. Relation between equatorial x-ray intensities and isometric twitch forces in frog skeletal muscle

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    Tanaka, Hidehiro; Tameyasu, Tsukasa; Sugi, Haruo (Teikyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1983-01-01

    The sartorius muscle of bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) was mounted vertically in an experimental chamber. The muscle was continuously perfused with Ringer solution, and stimulated with single 2 msec supramaximal current pulses. The equatorial X-ray diffraction pattern (specimen to detector distance, 40 cm) during isometric twitches was recorded with a linear position-sensitive proportional counter, and the data were registered in a computer memory system. With an increase of temperature from 5 to 22/sup 0/C, the magnitude of peak twitch force was reduced by about 50% with a marked decrease in the duration of mechanical response, while the minimum value of Isub(1.0)/Isub(1.1) attained during a twitch increased by more than twofold. On the other hand, the equatorial reflection from resting and fully tetanized muscles showed no appreciable dependence on temperature, though the steady tetanic force P/sub 0/ increased by about 10% with an increase in temperature from 5 to 25/sup 0/C. The intensity ratio is not a linear function of isometric force developed.

  10. sEMG Feature Analysis on Forearm Muscle Fatigue During Isometric Contractions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    明东; 王欣; 徐瑞; 邱爽; 赵欣; 綦宏志; 周鹏; 张力新; 万柏坤

    2014-01-01

    In order to detect and assess the muscle fatigue state with the surface electromyography (sEMG) character-istic parameters, this paper carried out a series of isometric contraction experiments to induce the fatigue on the fore-arm muscles from four subjects, and recorded the sEMG signals of the flexor carpi ulnaris. sEMG's median frequency (MDF) and mean frequency (MF) were extracted by short term Fourier transform (STFT), and the root mean square (RMS) of wavelet coefficients in the frequency band of 5-45 Hz was obtained by continuous wavelet transform (CWT). The results demonstrate that both MDF and MF show downward trends within 1 min;however, RMS shows an upward trend within the same time. The three parameters are closely correlated with absolute values of mean corre-lation coefficients greater than 0.8. It is suggested that the three parameters above can be used as reliable indicators to evaluate the level of muscle fatigue during isometric contractions.

  11. Acute effects of different stretching durations on passive torque, mobility, and isometric muscle force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Shingo; Suzuki, Shigeyuki; Iwata, Masahiro; Banno, Yasuhiro; Asai, Yuji; Tsuchida, Wakako; Inoue, Takayuki

    2013-12-01

    Static stretching is widely applied in various disciplines. However, the acute effects of different durations of stretching are unclear. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the acute effects of different stretching durations on muscle function and flexibility, and provide an insight into the optimal duration of static stretching. This randomized crossover trial included 24 healthy students (17 men and 7 women) who stretched their right hamstrings for durations of 20, 60, 180, and 300 seconds in a random order. The following outcomes were assessed using an isokinetic dynamometer as markers of lower-limb function and flexibility: static passive torque (SPT), dynamic passive torque (DPT), stiffness, straight leg raise (SLR), and isometric muscle force. Static passive torque was significantly decreased after all stretching durations (p stretching compared with that after 20-second stretching, and stiffness decreased significantly after 180- and 300-second stretching (p stretching (p stretching durations (p stretching than after 20-second stretching and higher after 300-second stretching than after 60-second stretching (p stretching durations (p stretching is associated with a decrease in SPT but an increase in SLR. Over 180 seconds of stretching was required to decrease DPT and stiffness, but isometric muscle force decreased regardless of the stretching duration. In conclusion, these results indicate that longer durations of stretching are needed to provide better flexibility.

  12. Surface electromyogram analysis of the direction of isometric torque generation by the first dorsal interosseous muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ping; Suresh, Nina L.; Zev Rymer, William

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether a novel technique using high density surface electromyogram (EMG) recordings can be used to detect the directional dependence of muscle activity in a multifunctional muscle, the first dorsal interosseous (FDI). We used surface EMG recordings with a two-dimensional electrode array to search for inhomogeneous FDI activation patterns with changing torque direction at the metacarpophalangeal joint, the locus of action of the FDI muscle. The interference EMG distribution across the whole FDI muscle was recorded during isometric contraction at the same force magnitude in five different directions in the index finger abduction-flexion plane. The electrode array EMG activity was characterized by contour plots, interpolating the EMG amplitude between electrode sites. Across all subjects the amplitude of the flexion EMG was consistently lower than that of the abduction EMG at the given force. Pattern recognition methods were used to discriminate the isometric muscle contraction tasks with a linear discriminant analysis classifier, based on the extraction of two different feature sets of the surface EMG signal: the time domain (TD) feature set and a combination of autoregressive coefficients and the root mean square amplitude (AR+RMS) as a feature set. We found that high accuracies were obtained in the classification of different directions of the FDI muscle isometric contraction. With a monopolar electrode configuration, the average overall classification accuracy from nine subjects was 94.1 ± 2.3% for the TD feature set and 95.8 ± 1.5% for the AR+RMS feature set. Spatial filtering of the signal with bipolar electrode configuration improved the average overall classification accuracy to 96.7 ± 2.7% for the TD feature set and 98.1 ± 1.6% for the AR+RMS feature set. The distinct EMG contour plots and the high classification accuracies obtained from this study confirm distinct interference EMG pattern distributions as a

  13. Cortical and spinal excitability during and after lengthening contractions of the human plantar flexor muscles performed with maximal voluntary effort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Hahn

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate the sites of potential specific modulations in the neural control of lengthening and subsequent isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs versus purely isometric MVCs of the plantar flexor muscles, when there is enhanced torque during and following stretch. Ankle joint torque during maximum voluntary plantar flexion was measured by a dynamometer when subjects (n = 10 lay prone on a bench with the right ankle tightly strapped to a foot-plate. Neural control was analysed by comparing soleus motor responses to electrical nerve stimulation (M-wave, V-wave, electrical stimulation of the cervicomedullary junction (CMEP and transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex (MEP. Enhanced torque of 17 ± 8% and 9 ± 8% was found during and 2.5-3 s after lengthening MVCs, respectively. Cortical and spinal responsiveness was similar to that in isometric conditions during the lengthening MVCs, as shown by unchanged MEPs, CMEPs and V-waves, suggesting that the major voluntary motor pathways are not subject to substantial inhibition. Following the lengthening MVCs, enhanced torque was accompanied by larger MEPs (p ≤ 0.05 and a trend to greater V-waves (p ≤ 0.1. In combination with stable CMEPs, increased MEPs suggest an increase in cortical excitability, and enlarged V-waves indicate greater motoneuronal output or increased stretch reflex excitability. The new results illustrate that neuromotor pathways are altered after lengthening MVCs suggesting that the underlying mechanisms of the enhanced torque are not purely mechanical in nature.

  14. Local Muscle Metabolic Demand Induced by Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation and Voluntary Contractions at Different Force Levels: A NIRS Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthalib, Makii; Kerr, Graham; Nosaka, Kazunori; Perrey, Stephane

    2016-06-13

    Functional Muscle metabolic demand during contractions evoked by neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has been consistently documented to be greater than voluntary contractions (VOL) at the same force level (10-50% maximal voluntary contraction-MVC). However, we have shown using a near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technique that local muscle metabolic demand is similar between NMES and VOL performed at MVC levels, thus controversy exists. This study therefore compared biceps brachii muscle metabolic demand (tissue oxygenation index-TOI and total hemoglobin volume-tHb) during a 10s isometric contraction of the elbow flexors between NMES (stimulation frequency of 30Hz and current level to evoke 30% MVC) and VOL at 30% MVC (VOL-30%MVC) and MVC (VOL-MVC) level in 8 healthy men (23-33-y). Greater changes in TOI and tHb induced by NMES than VOL-30%MVC confirm previous studies of a greater local metabolic demand for NMES than VOL at the same force level. The same TOI and tHb changes for NMES and VOL-MVC suggest that local muscle metabolic demand and intramuscular pressure were similar between conditions. In conclusion, these findings indicate that NMES induce a similar local muscle metabolic demand as that of maximal VOL.

  15. Fatigue-related firing of distal muscle nociceptors reduces voluntary activation of proximal muscles of the same limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, David S; McNeil, Chris J; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2014-02-15

    With fatiguing exercise, firing of group III/IV muscle afferents reduces voluntary activation and force of the exercised muscles. These afferents can also act across agonist/antagonist pairs, reducing voluntary activation and force in nonfatigued muscles. We hypothesized that maintained firing of group III/IV muscle afferents after a fatiguing adductor pollicis (AP) contraction would decrease voluntary activation and force of AP and ipsilateral elbow flexors. In two experiments (n = 10) we examined voluntary activation of AP and elbow flexors by measuring changes in superimposed twitches evoked by ulnar nerve stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex, respectively. Inflation of a sphygmomanometer cuff after a 2-min AP maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) blocked circulation of the hand for 2 min and maintained firing of group III/IV muscle afferents. After a 2-min AP MVC, maximal AP voluntary activation was lower with than without ischemia (56.2 ± 17.7% vs. 76.3 ± 14.6%; mean ± SD; P muscle afferents from the hand decreased voluntary drive and force of AP. Moreover, this effect decreased voluntary drive and torque of proximal unfatigued muscles, the elbow flexors. Fatigue-sensitive group III/IV muscle nociceptors act to limit voluntary drive not only to fatigued muscles but also to unfatigued muscles within the same limb.

  16. ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC ACTIVITY OF THE VASTUS MEDIALIS OBLIQUE AND VASTUS LATERALIS DURING MAXIMUM VOLUNTARY ISOMETRICS IN DIFFERENT WEIGHT BEARING POSITIONS OF THE FOOT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreekar Kumar Reddy.R

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patellofemoral pain syndrome is a very common disorder. 90% of the general population has some degree of pathologic changes of the patellofemoral joint. Knowledge regarding the cause and prevention of patellofemoral pain syndrome is essential. Therefore the purpose of this study is intended to know whether different foot positions alter Vastus Medialis Oblique and Vastus Lateralis that leads to dysfunctions of knee joint. Method: 30 subjects are included in study and investigated foot in different foot positions are in neutral, pronated and supinated foot positions and performed maximum voluntary isometric contractions are recorded with electromyography. Results: EMG amplitudes (microvolts of VL and VMO at three different weight bearing positions of foot during maximum voluntary contraction analysis by using one-way Analysis of Variance. Mean amplitudes of foot positions in pronation shown significant difference while comparing with neutral and supination. Conclusion: The VMO and VL activity shows significant difference in the pronated foot weight bearing position compared to the neutral and supinated foot. Performing the maximum voluntary isometric contractions of VMO and VL with pronated foot elicited significantly higher EMG activity compared to Neutral or supinated weight bearing positions of foot. The results of this study also suggested that for patellofemoral pain which is caused by pronated foot can be treat with by using the soft foot orthoses

  17. Inspiratory muscle training lowers the oxygen cost of voluntary hyperpnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Louise A; Tecklenburg-Lund, Sandra L; Chapman, Robert F; Stager, Joel M; Wilhite, Daniel P; Mickleborough, Timothy D

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if inspiratory muscle training (IMT) alters the oxygen cost of breathing (Vo(2RM)) during voluntary hyperpnea. Sixteen male cyclists completed 6 wk of IMT using an inspiratory load of 50% (IMT) or 15% placebo (CON) of maximal inspiratory pressure (Pi(max)). Prior to training, a maximal incremental cycle ergometer test was performed to determine Vo(2) and ventilation (V(E)) at multiple workloads. Pre- and post-training, subjects performed three separate 4-min bouts of voluntary eucapnic hyperpnea (mimic), matching V(E) that occurred at 50, 75, and 100% of Vo(2 max). Pi(max) was significantly increased (P muscles following a period of IMT may facilitate increased O(2) availability to the active muscles during exercise. These data suggest that IMT may reduce the O(2) cost of ventilation during exercise, providing an insight into mechanism(s) underpinning the reported improvements in whole body endurance performance; however, this awaits further investigation.

  18. On simulating sustained isometric muscle fatigue: a phenomenological model considering different fiber metabolisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasa, J; Sierra, M; Muñoz, M J; Soteras, F; Osta, R; Calvo, B; Miana-Mena, F J

    2014-11-01

    The present study shows a new computational FEM technique to simulate the evolution of the mechanical response of 3D muscle models subjected to fatigue. In an attempt to obtain very realistic models, parameters needed to adjust the mathematical formulation were obtained from in vivo experimental tests. The fatigue contractile properties of three different rat muscles (Tibialis Anterior, Extensor Digitorium Longus and Soleus) subjected to sustained maximal isometric contraction were determined. Experiments were conducted on three groups [Formula: see text] of male Wistar rats [Formula: see text] using a protocol previously developed by the authors for short tetanic contractions. The muscles were subjected to an electrical stimulus to achieve tetanic contraction during 10 s. The parameters obtained for each muscle were incorporated into a finite strain formulation for simulating active and passive behavior of muscles with different fiber metabolisms. The results show the potential of the model to predict muscle fatigue under high-frequency stimulation and the 3D distribution of mechanical variables such as stresses and strains.

  19. Calcium transients in skeletal muscle fibres under isometric conditions and during and after a quick stretch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, P

    1991-12-01

    The transient change in the sarcoplasmic concentration of Ca2+ was measured in intact fibres isolated from the anterior tibial muscle of the frog Litoria moorei. The fibres had been injected with the calcium-sensitive dye arsenazo III and the change of the calcium concentration was calculated from the changes in light absorbance at 570, 600 and 720 nm wavelengths. Absorbance and force were measured under three different conditions: (1) during a normal isometric twitch, (2) when a quick ramp-and-hold stretch had been applied to the fibre during onset of the contraction, and (3) when the fibre was allowed to contract isometrically at a length corresponding to the final length of the stretch. A method was devised to neutralize most of the movement artefacts encountered in such measurements. While the quick stretch caused substantial increase in the level and the duration of the contractile force such as originally described in whole muscle by A. V. Hill, the calcium transients appeared basically unaffected. It thus seems that the mechanism behind the phenomenon of the force enhancement lies at a step in the excitation-contraction coupling subsequent to the calcium release. From the present results, however, it is not clear whether the phenomenon is caused by an increase in the level of activation of the calcium-dependent regulatory system, or whether it is to be found in the acto-myosin interaction itself. The latter alternative would be consistent with the stiffness measurements published earlier.

  20. Power output, isometric strength and steadiness in the leg muscles of pre- and postmenopausal women; the effects of hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carville, Serena F; Rutherford, Olga M; Newham, Di J

    2006-02-01

    There are conflicting reports of the effects of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on strength preservation in postmenopausal women, while any effect on power output has received little attention. Decreased steadiness of force generation has been reported in older muscles and may be related to the hormonal changes associated with the menopause, but the effect of HRT has not been investigated. We have studied the effect of HRT on strength, power output and isometric force steadiness in healthy women. Sixteen young (aged 27.4 +/- 1.4 years, mean +/- SEM) and 29 postmenopausal women were studied. Fifteen of the latter were taking HRT (68.1 +/- 1.4 years, HRT+) and 14 (70.5 +/- 1.5 years, HRT-) had never done so. During isometric quadriceps contractions the force steadiness (coefficient of variation of force) was measured at 10, 25, 50 and 100% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). The average power generated by an explosive leg extension was recorded. The HRT- group generated less power (110.2 +/- 7.2 W) than both the HRT+ (136.5 +/- 10.9 W, P = 0.027) and young (136.2 +/- 5.8 W, P = 0.027) subjects. Power output was similar in the HRT+ and younger subjects. The HRT- subjects were weaker than the younger ones (241.3 +/- 14.0 N vs. 297.6 +/- 13 N, P = 0.006). The strength of the HRT+ group (255.5 +/- 14 N) was not significantly different to the other two groups. There was no difference in steadiness between the three groups at any of the force levels. HRT appears to maintain power output to a greater extent than isometric strength in postmenopausal women. There was no evidence for an effect of either age or HRT on isometric steadiness in the quadriceps.

  1. LONG-TERM ASSESSMENT OF ECCENTRIC, ISOMETRIC, CONCENTRIC MUSCLE STRENGTH AND FUNCTIONAL CAPACITY AFTER SEVERELY BURNED ADULT

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    Anwar Abdelgayed Ebid

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Severe burn leads to marked and prolonged skeletal muscle catabolism and weakness. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the long term effect of severe burn injury on eccentric, concentric, isometric muscle torque, average power, lean body mass, six minute walk and 8-foot walk. Design: Eccentric, isometric and concentric muscle torque and average power were assessed at 24 months in burned adult with 40%-50% total body surface area (TBSA at 150 o/s by using isokinetic dynamometry, Total lean body mass (TLBM and lower limb mass (LLM measurements were assessed for both groups using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Functional capacity was assessed using six minute walk test (6MWT and 8-Feet walk test. Lean body mass (LBM was determined via dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Nonburned adult was assessed similarly, and served as controls. Results: severely burned adult (n=35, relative to nonburned adult (n=42 had significantly lower peak torque of eccentric, isometric, concentric muscle strength, average power and functional capacity. The most affected type of muscle strength after burn was concentric, isometric then eccentric. Conclusions: Our results serve as an objective data for assessing the three modes of muscle strength and functional capacity in severely burned adult population.

  2. Removal of visual feedback alters muscle activity and reduces force variability during constant isometric contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baweja, Harsimran S; Patel, Bhavini K; Martinkewiz, Julie D; Vu, Julie; Christou, Evangelos A

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare force accuracy, force variability and muscle activity during constant isometric contractions at different force levels with and without visual feedback and at different feedback gains. In experiment 1, subjects were instructed to accurately match the target force at 2, 15, 30, 50, and 70% of their maximal isometric force with abduction of the index finger and maintain their force even in the absence of visual feedback. Each trial lasted 22 s and visual feedback was removed from 8-12 to 16-20 s. Each subject performed 6 trials at each target force, half with visual gain of 51.2 pixels/N and the rest with a visual gain of 12.8 pixels/N. Force error was calculated as the root mean square error of the force trace from the target line. Force variability was quantified as the standard deviation and coefficient of variation (CVF) of the force trace. The EMG activity of the agonist (first dorsal interosseus; FDI) was measured with bipolar surface electrodes placed distal to the innervation zone. Independent of visual gain and force level, subjects exhibited lower force error with the visual feedback condition (2.53 +/- 2.95 vs. 2.71 +/- 2.97 N; P feedback was removed (CVF: 4.06 +/- 3.11 vs. 4.47 +/- 3.14, P feedback condition and this difference increased especially at higher force levels (70%: 370 +/- 149 vs. 350 +/- 143 microV, P feedback. Subjects performed constant isometric contractions with the abduction of the index finger at an absolute force of 2 N, with two distinct feedback gains of 15 and 3,000 pixels/N. In agreement with the findings of experiment 1, subjects exhibited lower force error in the presence of visual feedback especially when the feedback gain was high (0.057 +/- 0.03 vs. 0.095 +/- 0.05 N). However, force variability was not affected by the vastly distinct feedback gains at this force, which supported and extended the findings from experiment 1. Our findings demonstrate that although removal of visual

  3. Sweating responses to isometric hand-grip exercise and forearm muscle metaboreflex in prepubertal children and elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Tatsuro; Kai, Seiko; Nakajima, Michi; Ichinose-Kuwahara, Tomoko; Gerrett, Nicola; Kondo, Narihiko; Inoue, Yoshimitsu

    2017-02-01

    What is the central question of this study? Non-thermal factors (e.g. muscle metaboreflex) contribute to the sweating response during exercise. Although it is well recognized that the sweating responses caused by core temperature elevation in prepubertal children and the elderly are attenuated compared with young adults, it is unknown whether non-thermal sweating is also attenuated in these populations. What is the main finding and its importance? The non-thermal sweating response during isometric hand-grip exercise and isolated muscle metaboreflex were attenuated in prepubertal children compared with young adults in a non-uniform manner over the body, but only during the muscle metaboreflex in the elderly. This may explain the maturation- and ageing-related decline of sweating during exercise. The purpose of the present study was to investigate sweating responses to isometric hand-grip (IH) exercise and muscle metaboreflex in prepubertal children and the elderly. In hot conditions (ambient temperature, 35°C; relative humidity, 45%), 13 healthy young adults, 10 prepubertal children and 10 elderly subjects (aged 20.4 ± 1.2, 11.4 ± 0.5 and 63.5 ± 3.1 years, respectively) repeated a three hand-grip exercise protocol that consisted of 1 min IH exercise at 15, 30 or 45% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) followed by 2 min postexercise forearm occlusion. Local sweat rates (SRs) on the forehead, chest, forearm, thigh and palm were continuously measured (ventilated capsule method). The forehead SR in prepubertal children during IH exercise at 45% MVC was significantly lower than that of young adults (0.26 ± 0.22 and 0.08 ± 0.15 mg cm(-2)  min(-1) for young adults and children, respectively; P elderly at any exercise intensities. The SR on the chest (0.22 ± 0.22 and -0.01 ± 0.05 mg cm(-2)  min(-1) for young adults and children, respectively), forearm (0.14 ± 0.12 and 0.03 ± 0.04 mg cm(-2)  min(-1) ) and thigh (0.13 ± 0.10 and 0

  4. Synchronous monitoring of muscle dynamics and muscle force for maximum isometric tetanus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakir Hossain, M.; Grill, Wolfgang

    2010-03-01

    Skeletal muscle is a classic example of a biological soft matter . At both macro and microscopic levels, skeletal muscle is exquisitely oriented for force generation and movement. In addition to the dynamics of contracting and relaxing muscle which can be monitored with ultrasound, variations in the muscle force are also expected to be monitored. To observe such force and sideways expansion variations synchronously for the skeletal muscle a novel detection scheme has been developed. As already introduced for the detection of sideways expansion variations of the muscle, ultrasonic transducers are mounted sideways on opposing positions of the monitored muscle. To detect variations of the muscle force, angle of pull of the monitored muscle has been restricted by the mechanical pull of the sonic force sensor. Under this condition, any variation in the time-of-flight (TOF) of the transmitted ultrasonic signals can be introduced by the variation of the path length between the transducers. The observed variations of the TOF are compared to the signals obtained by ultrasound monitoring for the muscle dynamics. The general behavior of the muscle dynamics and muscle force shows almost an identical concept. Since muscle force also relates the psychological boosting-up effects, the influence of boosting-up on muscle force and muscle dynamics can also be quantified form this study. Length-tension or force-length and force-velocity relationship can also be derived quantitatively with such monitoring.

  5. Electron Tomography of Cryofixed, Isometrically Contracting Insect Flight Muscle Reveals Novel Actin-Myosin Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Shenping; Liu, Jun; Reedy, Mary C.; Tregear, Richard T.; Winkler, Hanspeter; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Lucaveche, Carmen; Goldman, Yale E.; Reedy, Michael K.; Taylor, Kenneth A. (UPENN); (Duke); (MRCLMB); (FSU); (Jikei-Med)

    2010-10-22

    Isometric muscle contraction, where force is generated without muscle shortening, is a molecular traffic jam in which the number of actin-attached motors is maximized and all states of motor action are trapped with consequently high heterogeneity. This heterogeneity is a major limitation to deciphering myosin conformational changes in situ. We used multivariate data analysis to group repeat segments in electron tomograms of isometrically contracting insect flight muscle, mechanically monitored, rapidly frozen, freeze substituted, and thin sectioned. Improved resolution reveals the helical arrangement of F-actin subunits in the thin filament enabling an atomic model to be built into the thin filament density independent of the myosin. Actin-myosin attachments can now be assigned as weak or strong by their motor domain orientation relative to actin. Myosin attachments were quantified everywhere along the thin filament including troponin. Strong binding myosin attachments are found on only four F-actin subunits, the 'target zone', situated exactly midway between successive troponin complexes. They show an axial lever arm range of 77{sup o}/12.9 nm. The lever arm azimuthal range of strong binding attachments has a highly skewed, 127{sup o} range compared with X-ray crystallographic structures. Two types of weak actin attachments are described. One type, found exclusively in the target zone, appears to represent pre-working-stroke intermediates. The other, which contacts tropomyosin rather than actin, is positioned M-ward of the target zone, i.e. the position toward which thin filaments slide during shortening. We present a model for the weak to strong transition in the myosin ATPase cycle that incorporates azimuthal movements of the motor domain on actin. Stress/strain in the S2 domain may explain azimuthal lever arm changes in the strong binding attachments. The results support previous conclusions that the weak attachments preceding force generation are

  6. Electron tomography of cryofixed, isometrically contracting insect flight muscle reveals novel actin-myosin interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenping Wu

    Full Text Available Isometric muscle contraction, where force is generated without muscle shortening, is a molecular traffic jam in which the number of actin-attached motors is maximized and all states of motor action are trapped with consequently high heterogeneity. This heterogeneity is a major limitation to deciphering myosin conformational changes in situ.We used multivariate data analysis to group repeat segments in electron tomograms of isometrically contracting insect flight muscle, mechanically monitored, rapidly frozen, freeze substituted, and thin sectioned. Improved resolution reveals the helical arrangement of F-actin subunits in the thin filament enabling an atomic model to be built into the thin filament density independent of the myosin. Actin-myosin attachments can now be assigned as weak or strong by their motor domain orientation relative to actin. Myosin attachments were quantified everywhere along the thin filament including troponin. Strong binding myosin attachments are found on only four F-actin subunits, the "target zone", situated exactly midway between successive troponin complexes. They show an axial lever arm range of 77°/12.9 nm. The lever arm azimuthal range of strong binding attachments has a highly skewed, 127° range compared with X-ray crystallographic structures. Two types of weak actin attachments are described. One type, found exclusively in the target zone, appears to represent pre-working-stroke intermediates. The other, which contacts tropomyosin rather than actin, is positioned M-ward of the target zone, i.e. the position toward which thin filaments slide during shortening.We present a model for the weak to strong transition in the myosin ATPase cycle that incorporates azimuthal movements of the motor domain on actin. Stress/strain in the S2 domain may explain azimuthal lever arm changes in the strong binding attachments. The results support previous conclusions that the weak attachments preceding force generation are very

  7. An EEG-based study of discrete isometric and isotonic human lower limb muscle contractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwin Joseph T

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electroencephalography (EEG combined with independent component analysis enables functional neuroimaging in dynamic environments including during human locomotion. This type of functional neuroimaging could be a powerful tool for neurological rehabilitation. It could enable clinicians to monitor changes in motor control related cortical dynamics associated with a therapeutic intervention, and it could facilitate noninvasive electrocortical control of devices for assisting limb movement to stimulate activity dependent plasticity. Understanding the relationship between electrocortical dynamics and muscle activity will be helpful for incorporating EEG-based functional neuroimaging into clinical practice. The goal of this study was to use independent component analysis of high-density EEG to test whether we could relate electrocortical dynamics to lower limb muscle activation in a constrained motor task. A secondary goal was to assess the trial-by-trial consistency of the electrocortical dynamics by decoding the type of muscle action. Methods We recorded 264-channel EEG while 8 neurologically intact subjects performed isometric and isotonic, knee and ankle exercises at two different effort levels. Adaptive mixture independent component analysis (AMICA parsed EEG into models of underlying source signals. We generated spectrograms for all electrocortical source signals and used a naïve Bayesian classifier to decode exercise type from trial-by-trial time-frequency data. Results AMICA captured different electrocortical source distributions for ankle and knee tasks. The fit of single-trial EEG to these models distinguished knee from ankle tasks with 80% accuracy. Electrocortical spectral modulations in the supplementary motor area were significantly different for isometric and isotonic tasks (p  Conclusions Independent component analysis of EEG reveals unique spatial and spectro-temporal electrocortical properties for different

  8. Cortico-muscular synchronization by proprioceptive afferents from the tongue muscles during isometric tongue protrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maezawa, Hitoshi; Mima, Tatsuya; Yazawa, Shogo; Matsuhashi, Masao; Shiraishi, Hideaki; Funahashi, Makoto

    2016-03-01

    Tongue movements contribute to oral functions including swallowing, vocalizing, and breathing. Fine tongue movements are regulated through efferent and afferent connections between the cortex and tongue. It has been demonstrated that cortico-muscular coherence (CMC) is reflected at two frequency bands during isometric tongue protrusions: the beta (β) band at 15-35Hz and the low-frequency band at 2-10Hz. The CMC at the β band (β-CMC) reflects motor commands from the primary motor cortex (M1) to the tongue muscles through hypoglossal motoneuron pools. However, the generator mechanism of the CMC at the low-frequency band (low-CMC) remains unknown. Here, we evaluated the mechanism of low-CMC during isometric tongue protrusion using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Somatosensory evoked fields (SEFs) were also recorded following electrical tongue stimulation. Significant low-CMC and β-CMC were observed over both hemispheres for each side of the tongue. Time-domain analysis showed that the MEG signal followed the electromyography signal for low-CMC, which was contrary to the finding that the MEG signal preceded the electromyography signal for β-CMC. The mean conduction time from the tongue to the cortex was not significantly different between the low-CMC (mean, 80.9ms) and SEFs (mean, 71.1ms). The cortical sources of low-CMC were located significantly posterior (mean, 10.1mm) to the sources of β-CMC in M1, but were in the same area as tongue SEFs in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1). These results reveal that the low-CMC may be driven by proprioceptive afferents from the tongue muscles to S1, and that the oscillatory interaction was derived from each side of the tongue to both hemispheres. Oscillatory proprioceptive feedback from the tongue muscles may aid in the coordination of sophisticated tongue movements in humans.

  9. Real-time muscle state estimation from EMG signals during isometric contractions using Kalman filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menegaldo, Luciano L

    2017-08-01

    State-space control of myoelectric devices and real-time visualization of muscle forces in virtual rehabilitation require measuring or estimating muscle dynamic states: neuromuscular activation, tendon force and muscle length. This paper investigates whether regular (KF) and extended Kalman filters (eKF), derived directly from Hill-type muscle mechanics equations, can be used as real-time muscle state estimators for isometric contractions using raw electromyography signals (EMG) as the only available measurement. The estimators' amplitude error, computational cost, filtering lags and smoothness are compared with usual EMG-driven analysis, performed offline, by integrating the nonlinear Hill-type muscle model differential equations (offline simulations-OS). EMG activity of the three triceps surae components (soleus, gastrocnemius medialis and gastrocnemius lateralis), in three torque levels, was collected for ten subjects. The actualization interval (AI) between two updates of the KF and eKF was also varied. The results show that computational costs are significantly reduced (70x for KF and 17[Formula: see text] for eKF). The filtering lags presented sharp linear relationships with the AI (0-300 ms), depending on the state and activation level. Under maximum excitation, amplitude errors varied in the range 10-24% for activation, 5-8% for tendon force and 1.4-1.8% for muscle length, reducing linearly with the excitation level. Smoothness, measured by the ratio between the average standard variations of KF/eKF and OS estimations, was greatly reduced for activation but converged exponentially to 1 for the other states by increasing AI. Compared to regular KF, extended KF does not seem to improve estimation accuracy significantly. Depending on the particular application requirements, the most appropriate KF actualization interval can be selected.

  10. Attenuation of eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage conferred by maximal isometric contractions: a mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Coelho Rabello Lima

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Although beneficial in determined contexts, eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD might be unwanted during training regimens, competitions and daily activities. There are a vast number of studies investigating strategies to attenuate EIMD response after damaging exercise bouts. Many of them consist of performing exercises that induce EIMD, consuming supplements or using equipment that are not accessible for most people. It appears that performing maximal isometric contractions (ISOs 2-4 days prior to damaging bouts promotes significant attenuation of EIMD symptoms that are not related to muscle function. It has been shown that the volume of ISOs, muscle length in which they are performed, and interval between them and the damaging bout influence the magnitude of this protection. Additionally, it appears that this protection is not long-lived, lasting no longer than 4 days. Although no particular mechanisms for these adaptations were identified, professionals should consider applying this non-damaging stimulus before submitting their patients to unaccustomed exercised. However, it seems not to be the best option for athletes or relatively trained individuals. Future studies should focus on establishing if ISOs protect other populations (i.e., trained individuals or muscle groups (i.e., knee extensors against EIMD, as well as investigate different mechanisms for ISO-induced protection.

  11. Acute effects of the different intensity of static stretching on flexibility and isometric muscle force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataura, Satoshi; Suzuki, Shigeyuki; Matsuo, Shingo; Hatano, Genki; Iwata, Masahiro; Yokoi, Kazuaki; Tsuchida, Wakako; Banno, Yasuhiro; Asai, Yuji

    2016-11-29

    In various fields, static stretching is commonly performed to improve flexibility, whereas the acute effects of different stretch intensities are unclear. Therefore, we investigated the acute effects of different stretch intensities on flexibility and muscle force. Eighteen healthy participants (nine men, nine women) performed 180-s static stretches of the right hamstrings at 80%, 100%, and 120% of maximum tolerable intensity without stretching pain, in random order. The following outcomes were assessed as markers of lower limb function and flexibility: static passive torque (SPT), range of motion (ROM), passive joint (muscle-tendon) stiffness, passive torque at onset of pain (PT), and isometric muscle force. SPT was significantly decreased after all stretching intensities (p stretching at 100% and 120% intensity, ROM and PT were significantly increased after stretching (p stretching at 100% and 120% than at 80%, and passive stiffness was significantly lower after 120% than after 80% (p stretching and the relative change for SPT (p stretching at greater intensity is more effective for increasing ROM and decreasing passive muscle-tendon stiffness.

  12. Trunk strength and lumbar paraspinal muscle activity during isometric exercise in chronic low-back pain patients and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassisi, J E; Robinson, M E; O'Conner, P; MacMillan, M

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe trunk strength and lumbar paraspinal muscle activity across five angles of flexion during isometric exercise and rest in chronic low-back pain patients and control subjects. High muscle tension as measured by surface integrated electromyography is predicted by a muscle spasm model, and low muscle tension is predicted by a muscle deficiency model. Prior lumbar surgery had no affect on peak torque or maximum surface integrated electromyography data. Both groups produced greater torque and less surface integrated electromyography in more flexed positions. Chronic low-back pain patients exhibited lower peak torque and lower maximum surface integrated electromyography bilaterally during isometric extension effort across all angles. A muscle deficiency model of chronic low back pain was supported by these data and a muscle spasm model was not supported. Discriminant analyses indicated that monitoring maximum surface integrated electromyography of lumbar muscles during isometric effort facilitates classification of chronic low-back pain patients. Future directions are discussed in terms of applying psychophysiologic methods to pain rehabilitation.

  13. Isokinetic and Isometric Muscle Strength in a Healthy Population – with Special Reference to Age and Gender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danneskiold-Samsøe, B; Bartels, E M; Bülow, P M

    2009-01-01

    was subgrouped according to age and gender. Isometric and isokinetic muscle strength was measured in each subject across the main joints in the body. A statistical model was developed that encompassed the three main muscle groups: upper limbs, trunk and lower limbs. Results: Muscle strength in healthy men...... decreases in a linear fashion from the age of 25 years down to between 54% and 89% at the age of 75 years, and seems not highly dependent on any other parameter than age. For women, the muscle strength is dependent on weight and is only related to age from around 40 years of age. The decrease in muscle...

  14. Isometric and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with fibrositis syndrome. New characteristics for a difficult definable category of patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B

    1987-01-01

    A common complaint among patients with fibrositis syndrome is exhaustion and fatique. It was therefore felt desirable to evaluate the muscle strength of these patients compared with normal subjects. Maximum isometric and isokinetic strength of knee extension was measured in 15 patients and 15...... healthy matched subjects, using an isokinetic dynamometer (Cybex II). Maximum isometric strength at various knee extension angles (90 degrees, 60 degrees and 30 degrees degrees) was significantly (p less than 0.001) lower in the fibrositis group than in controls, a reduction of approximately 58......-66%. Maximum isokinetic strength at various knee extension velocities (30-240 degrees per second) was also significantly (p less than 0.01) lower in the fibrositis group than in controls, the reduction being approximately 41-51%. In conclusion, isometric and isokinetic muscle strength is found to be lower...

  15. Fatigue-related firing of muscle nociceptors reduces voluntary activation of ipsilateral but not contralateral lower limb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, David S; Fitzpatrick, Siobhan C; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2015-02-15

    During fatiguing upper limb exercise, maintained firing of group III/IV muscle afferents can limit voluntary drive to muscles within the same limb. It is not known if this effect occurs in the lower limb. We investigated the effects of group III/IV muscle afferent firing from fatigued ipsilateral and contralateral extensor muscles and ipsilateral flexor muscles of the knee on voluntary activation of the knee extensors. In three experiments, we examined voluntary activation of the knee extensors by measuring changes in superimposed twitches evoked by femoral nerve stimulation. Subjects attended on 2 days for each experiment. On one day a sphygmomanometer cuff occluded blood flow of the fatigued muscles to maintain firing of group III/IV muscle afferents. After a 2-min extensor contraction (experiment 1; n = 9), mean voluntary activation was lower with than without maintained ischemia (47 ± 19% vs. 87 ± 8%, respectively; P contraction (MVC) (experiment 2; n = 8), mean voluntary activation was also lower with than without ischemia (59 ± 21% vs. 79 ± 9%; P muscle afferents reduces voluntary activation of the fatigued muscle and nonfatigued antagonist muscles in the same leg. However, group III/IV muscle afferents from the fatigued left leg had no effect on the unfatigued right leg. This suggests that any "crossover" of central fatigue in the lower limbs is not mediated by group III/IV muscle afferents.

  16. Improved identification of dystonic cervical muscles via abnormal muscle activity during isometric contractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Bruijn, E.; Nijmeijer, S. W. R.; Forbes, P. A.; Koelman, J. H. T. M.; van der Helm, F. C. T.; Tijssen, M. A. J.; Happee, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The preferred treatment for cervical dystonia (CD) is injection of botulinum toxin in the dystonic muscles. Unfortunately, in the absence of reliable diagnostic methods it can be difficult to discriminate dystonic muscles from healthy muscles acting in compensation. We investigated if dy

  17. Improved identification of dystonic cervical muscles via abnormal muscle activity during isometric contractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Bruijn, E; Nijmeijer, S W R; Forbes, P A; Koelman, J H T M; van der Helm, F C T; Tijssen, M A J; Happee, R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The preferred treatment for cervical dystonia (CD) is injection of botulinum toxin in the dystonic muscles. Unfortunately, in the absence of reliable diagnostic methods it can be difficult to discriminate dystonic muscles from healthy muscles acting in compensation. We investigated if dy

  18. The Combined Effect of Electrical Stimulation and High-Load Isometric Contraction on Protein Degradation Pathways in Muscle Atrophy Induced by Hindlimb Unloading

    OpenAIRE

    Naoto Fujita; Shinichiro Murakami; Hidemi Fujino

    2011-01-01

    High-load isometric exercise is considered an effective countermeasure against muscle atrophy, but therapeutic electrical stimulation for muscle atrophy is often performed without loading. In the present study, we investigated the combined effectiveness of electrical stimulation and high-load isometric contraction in preventing muscle atrophy induced by hindlimb unloading. Electrical stimulation without loading resulted in slight attenuation of muscle atrophy. Moreover, combining electrical s...

  19. Isometric abdominal wall muscle strength assessment in individuals with incisional hernia: a prospective reliability study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K. K.; Kjær, Michael; Jorgensen, L. N.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the reliability of measurements obtained by the Good Strength dynamometer, determining isometric abdominal wall and back muscle strength in patients with ventral incisional hernia (VIH) and healthy volunteers with an intact abdominal wall. Methods Ten patients with VIH and ten...... healthy volunteers with an intact abdominal wall were each examined twice with a 1 week interval. Examination included the assessment of truncal flexion and extension as measured with the Good Strength dynamometer, the completion of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) and the self......-assessment of truncal strength on a visual analogue scale (SATS). The test–retest reliability of truncal flexion and extension was assessed by interclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and Bland and Altman graphs. Finally, correlations between truncal strength, and IPAQ and SATS were examined. Results Truncal flexion...

  20. Tension and heat production during isometric contractions and shortening in the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, S H

    1978-09-01

    1. Tension and heat production were measured during phasic isometric contractions and isovelocity shortening in the anterior byssus retractor muscle (ABRM) of Mytilus edulis at 20 degrees C. 2. Isometric tension at lo was 550 +/- 40 mN/mm2 (S.D. for 173 observations in nine muscles), while the isometric maintenance heat rate was 1.0 +/- 0.2 mW/g wet wt. (S.D. for seventy-eight observations in eight muscles). 3. Isometric tension and heat production were measured as functions of muscle length over a range of 0.79--1.14 lo and were found to bear a linear relation to each other. 4. The force-velocity relation was determined in isovelocity releases imposed during tetanic stimulation and was found to fit the Hill equation with parameters alpha/Po = 0.07 +/- 0.01 and b/lo = 0.016 +/- 0.0007 sec-1 (S.E. from non-linear least-squares regression of the pooled data from seven experiments). 5. Heat production measured in the same experiments showed that shortening heat is produced with a shortening heat coefficient alpha/Po of 0.15. Shortening heat does not appear to be force-dependent, and separate experiments confirmed that it is a linear function of the amount of shortening.

  1. Short-interval intracortical inhibition is not affected by varying visual feedback in an isometric task in biceps brachii muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo eRantalainen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI of the primary motor cortex (M1 appears to play a significant role in skill acquisition. Consequently, it is of interest to find out which factors cause modulation of SICI. Purpose: To establish if visual feedback and force requirements influence SICI. Methods: SICI was assessed from 10 healthy adults (5 males and 5 females aged between 21 and 35 years in three submaximal isometric elbow flexion torque levels (5%, 20% and 40% of maximal voluntary contraction [MVC] and with two tasks differing in terms of visual feedback. Single-pulse and paired-pulse motor evoked potentials (MEPs, supramaximal M-wave and background surface electromyogram (sEMG were recorded from the biceps brachii muscle. Results: Repeated measures MANOVA was used for statistical analyses. Background sEMG did not differ between tasks (F = 0.4, P = 0.68 nor was task × torque level interaction observed (F = 1.2, P = 0.32, whereas background sEMG increased with increasing torque levels (P = 0.001. SICI did not differ between tasks (F = 0.9, P = 0.43 and no task × torque level interaction was observed (F = 2.3, P = 0.08. However, less SICI was observed at 40% MVC compared to the 5% and 20% MVC torque levels (P = 0.01 to 0.001. Conclusion: SICI was not altered by performing the same task with differing visual feedback. However, SICI decreased with increasing submaximal torque providing further evidence that SICI is one mechanism of modulating cortical excitability and plays a role in force gradation.

  2. Haemodynamic changes in human masseter and temporalis muscles induced by different levels of isometric contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y J; Kuboki, T; Tsukiyama, Y; Koyano, K; Clark, G T

    1999-08-01

    This study evaluated the influence of low contraction forces on intramuscular haemodynamics in human masseter and temporalis using near-infrared tissue spectroscopy. This method allowed the intramuscular haemoglobin (Hb) to be assessed dynamically before, during and after a 5, 15, 25 and 100% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Twenty volunteers, 10 males and 10 females, without pain or dysfunction in the masticatory system were included in this study. Data were recorded for 30 s before, 30 s during and 5 min after the four sustained contraction tasks. The results showed that all four levels of voluntary contraction produced a clear haemodynamic response (during and after contraction) in both muscles. For analytical purposes, the maximum Hb achieved after 100% MVC was set equal to 1.00. In the masseter the mean peak Hb during the 5, 15, 25 and 100% MVC was 0.49, 0.92, 1.30 and 1.73 while after the contractions it was 0.50, 0.65, 0.78 and 1.00, respectively. In the temporalis the peak Hb during the contractions was 0.23, 0.36, 0.48 and 0.66 and after the contractions 0.32, 0.45, 0.56 and 1.00, respectively. Repeated-measures analysis of variance revealed a significant main effect for the different contraction levels both in the masseter (during contraction, p = 0.001; after contraction, parchitecture between the two muscles contributes to these differences in blood flow.

  3. Effects of Contract-Relax, Static Stretching, and Isometric Contractions on Muscle-Tendon Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Anthony D; Husbands-Beasley, Jade; Blazevich, Anthony J

    2015-10-01

    Loading characteristics of stretching techniques likely influence the specific mechanisms responsible for acute increases in range of motion (ROM). Therefore, the effects of a version of contract-relax (CR) proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching, static stretching (SS), and maximal isometric contraction (Iso) interventions were studied in 17 healthy human volunteers. Passive ankle moment was recorded on an isokinetic dynamometer, with EMG recording from the triceps surae, simultaneous real-time motion analysis, and ultrasound-imaging-recorded gastrocnemius medialis muscle and Achilles tendon elongation. Subjects then performed each intervention randomly on separate days before reassessment. Significant increases in dorsiflexion ROM (2.5°-5.3°; P stretching (P stretching and Iso (17.7%-22.1%; P 0.05), whereas significant reductions in muscle stiffness occurred after CR stretching and SS (16.0%-20.5%; P 0.05). Increases in peak passive moment (stretch tolerance) occurred after Iso (6.8%; P stretching (10.6%; P = 0.08), and SS (5.2%; P = 0.08); no difference in changes between conditions was found (P > 0.05). Significant correlations (rs = 0.69-0.82; P stretching suggest a broader adaptive response that likely explains its superior efficacy in acutely increasing ROM. Although mechanical changes appear tissue-specific between interventions, similar increases in stretch tolerance after all interventions are strongly correlated with changes in ROM.

  4. Evidence of skeletal muscle damage following electrically stimulated isometric muscle contractions in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackey, Abigail; Bojsen-Moller, Jens; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    It is unknown whether muscle damage at the level of the sarcomere can be induced without lengthening contractions. To investigate this, we designed a study where seven young, healthy men underwent 30 min of repeated electrical stimulated contraction of m. gastrocnemius medialis, with the ankle an...

  5. Electromyographic analysis of the infraspinatus and scapular stabilizing muscles during isometric shoulder external rotation at various shoulder elevation angles

    OpenAIRE

    Uga, Daisuke; Endo, Yasuhiro; Nakazawa, Rie; Sakamoto, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify activation of the infraspinatus and scapular stabilizing muscles during shoulder external rotation at various shoulder elevation angles. [Subjects] Twenty subjects participated in this study and all measurements were performed on the right shoulder. [Methods] Isometric shoulder external rotation strength and surface electromyographic data were measured with the shoulder at 0°, 45°, 90°, and 135° elevation in the scapular plane. The electromyographic data ...

  6. Electromyographic analysis of the infraspinatus and scapular stabilizing muscles during isometric shoulder external rotation at various shoulder elevation angles

    OpenAIRE

    Uga, Daisuke; Endo, Yasuhiro; Nakazawa, Rie; Sakamoto, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify activation of the infraspinatus and scapular stabilizing muscles during shoulder external rotation at various shoulder elevation angles. [Subjects] Twenty subjects participated in this study and all measurements were performed on the right shoulder. [Methods] Isometric shoulder external rotation strength and surface electromyographic data were measured with the shoulder at 0°, 45°, 90°, and 135° elevation in the scapular plane. The electromyographic data ...

  7. Changes in sarcomere length during isometric tension development in frog skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleworth, D R; Edman, K A

    1972-12-01

    1. Changes in sarcomere length during isometric contraction of isolated semitendinosus muscle fibres from the frog were studied using laser diffraction techniques. Movements of the first-order diffraction line relative to the zero-order reference were recorded from a screen on continuously moving film. Sarcomere length changes of 50 A could be resolved in this way.2. Following a latent period of approximately 12 msec after the stimulus of a single skeletal muscle fibre at 1-2 degrees C, there appeared to be a simultaneous onset of tension development and sarcomere shortening. Provided that the fibre was uniformly excited along its length, different regions shortened together by approximately the same amount. The extent of the shortening was a function of the total compliance of the tendons and tension measuring device.3. During the plateau of a smooth tetanus no fluctuations of first-order line width or zero- to first-order line spacing were detectable at any point examined along the preparation. This finding provides evidence that, in a functionally intact fibre, no synchronous oscillations of the sarcomeres, at least no length changes exceeding 50 A, occur during a fused tetanus. Furthermore, the fact that the first-order line did not increase in width as the preparation went from rest to full activity indicates that contraction proceeds without appreciable change in distribution of sarcomere lengths.4. The sarcomere movements during relaxation differed along the length of the fibre. As the tension declined smoothly, sarcomeres in some parts of the fibre underwent further shortening, while the end sarcomeres near the tendons and in one or two regions in the middle segment of the fibre were further extended. These data indicate that the duration of the mechanical activity differs in different regions along the length of the fibre. The pattern of relaxation, i.e. the behaviour of the sarcomeres in different fibre segments, is unique to any particular fibre.

  8. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation with the Maximum Voluntary Muscle Contraction Facilitates Motor Neuron Excitability and Muscle Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuo Touge

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Three trials of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS during the maximum voluntary muscle contraction (MVC were repeated at 15-minute intervals for 1 hour to examine the effects on motor evoked potentials (MEPs in the digital muscles and pinching muscle force before and after 4 high-intensity TMSs (test 1 condition or sham TMS (test 2 condition with MVC. Under the placebo condition, real TMS with MVC was administered only before and 1 hour after the sham TMS with MVC. Magnetic stimulation at the foramen magnum level (FMS with MVC was performed by the same protocol as that for the test 2 condition. As a result, MEP sizes in the digital muscles significantly increased after TMS with MVC under test conditions compared with the placebo conditions (P<0.05. Pinching muscle force was significantly larger 45 minutes and 1 hour after TMS with MVC under the test conditions than under the placebo condition (P<0.05. FMS significantly decreased MEP amplitudes 60 minutes after the sham TMS with MVC (P<0.005. The present results suggest that intermittently repeated TMS with MVC facilitates motor neuron excitabilities and muscle force. However, further studies are needed to confirm the effects of TMS with MVC and its mechanism.

  9. Isometric abdominal wall muscle strength assessment in individuals with incisional hernia: a prospective reliability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, K K; Kjaer, M; Jorgensen, L N

    2016-12-01

    To determine the reliability of measurements obtained by the Good Strength dynamometer, determining isometric abdominal wall and back muscle strength in patients with ventral incisional hernia (VIH) and healthy volunteers with an intact abdominal wall. Ten patients with VIH and ten healthy volunteers with an intact abdominal wall were each examined twice with a 1 week interval. Examination included the assessment of truncal flexion and extension as measured with the Good Strength dynamometer, the completion of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) and the self-assessment of truncal strength on a visual analogue scale (SATS). The test-retest reliability of truncal flexion and extension was assessed by interclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and Bland and Altman graphs. Finally, correlations between truncal strength, and IPAQ and SATS were examined. Truncal flexion and extension showed excellent test-retest reliability for both patients with VIH (ICC 0.91 and 0.99) and healthy controls (ICC 0.97 and 0.96). Bland and Altman plots showed that no systematic bias was present for neither truncal flexion nor extension when assessing reliability. For patients with VIH, no significant correlations between objective measures of truncal strength and IPAQ or SATS were found. For healthy controls, both truncal flexion (τ 0.58, p = 0.025) and extension (τ 0.58, p = 0.025) correlated significantly with SATS, while no other significant correlation between truncal strength measures and IPAQ was found. The Good Strength dynamometer provided a reliable, low-cost measure of truncal flexion and extension in patients with VIH.

  10. Transcranial magnetic stimulation with the maximum voluntary muscle contraction facilitates motor neuron excitability and muscle force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touge, Tetsuo; Urai, Yoshiteru; Ikeda, Kazuyo; Kume, Kodai; Deguchi, Kazushi

    2012-01-01

    Three trials of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) during the maximum voluntary muscle contraction (MVC) were repeated at 15-minute intervals for 1 hour to examine the effects on motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the digital muscles and pinching muscle force before and after 4 high-intensity TMSs (test 1 condition) or sham TMS (test 2 condition) with MVC. Under the placebo condition, real TMS with MVC was administered only before and 1 hour after the sham TMS with MVC. Magnetic stimulation at the foramen magnum level (FMS) with MVC was performed by the same protocol as that for the test 2 condition. As a result, MEP sizes in the digital muscles significantly increased after TMS with MVC under test conditions compared with the placebo conditions (P MVC under the test conditions than under the placebo condition (P MVC (P MVC facilitates motor neuron excitabilities and muscle force. However, further studies are needed to confirm the effects of TMS with MVC and its mechanism.

  11. Relationship between Isometric Strength of Six Lower Limb Muscle Groups and Motor Skills among Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckinx, F; Croisier, J L; Reginster, J Y; Petermans, J; Goffart, E; Bruyère, O

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to assess the correlation between isometric muscle strength of the lower limb and motor skills. This is a cross sectional study performed among volunteer nursing home residents included in the SENIOR (Sample of Elderly Nursing home Individuals: an Observational Research) cohort. The present analysis focused on isometric muscle strength of 6 lower limb muscle groups (i.e. knee extensors, knee flexors, hip abductors, hip extensors, ankle flexors and ankle extensors), assessed using a validated hand-held dynamometer (i.e. the MicroFET2 device), and motor skills evaluated using the Tinetti test, the Timed Up and Go test, the Short Physical Performance Battery test (SPPB) and the walking speed. The relationship between all these parameters was tested by means of a multiple correlation, adjusted on age, sex and body mass index. 450 nursing home residents (69.8% of women) with a mean age of 83.1±9.4 years were included in this study. Our results showed a significant inverse correlation between lower limb muscle strength and the time required to perform the TUG test or gait speed, except for ankle flexors and ankle extensors. The relationship between the Tinetti test or the SPPB score, and lower limb muscle strength was significant, except for ankle flexors and ankle extensors. In conclusion, a positive association between lower limb muscle strength of the four main muscle groups and motor skills of the elderly nursing residents was found in this research. Therefore, special attention should be given to these muscle groups during rehabilitation programs.

  12. Electromyographic Responses during Elbow Movement at Two Angles with Voluntary Contraction: Influences of Muscle Activity on Upper Arm Biceps Brachii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nizam Uddin Ahamed

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of Electromyography (EMG signals generated by individuals is part of human musculoskeletal system research and signals are always influenced by the electrode placement in the muscle. This characteristic is also obvious at Biceps Brachii (BB muscles during the movement of elbow at different angles. The purpose of this study was to monitor and determine the BB muscle function in 3 conditions: (i electrodes were placed at 3 locations on the BB, (ii elbow was fixed at the two angles (90° and 150° and (iii isometric contractions were performed to record EMG data. EMG data were obtained from six healthy subjects (n = 6, mean±SD age = 24.4±3.1 years, body mass = 68±6.3 kg, height = 164±4.1 cm, BMI = 21.2±2.3, right arm dominated. A Bluetooth-enabled laptop, wireless EMG sensors, digital dynamometer and angle meter were used for data recording. EMG data were calculated and analyzed by average value, standard deviation, Root Mean Square (RMS and highest peak of the signal during maximum voluntary contraction. All the dependent variables were calculated using repeated measures Analysis of Variance (ANOVA. The results from the research showed that (i according to the calculation of average RMS and the maximum peaks of EMG signals, there was a significant difference between 2 angles (p = 0.047, i.e., p<0.05, but no interaction at the same angles when overall average EMG and standard deviation value are considered and (ii majority of the outcomes showed that EMG activity is higher in the order of middle, upper and lower BB muscle. It is therefore important that electrical signals generated upon different electrode placements and angles on the BB muscle are used for biceps rehabilitation and other physiological measurements on upper arm.

  13. The endothermic ATP hydrolysis and crossbridge attachment steps drive the increase of force with temperature in isometric and shortening muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offer, Gerald; Ranatunga, K W

    2015-04-15

    The isometric tetanic tension of skeletal muscle increases with temperature because attached crossbridge states bearing a relatively low force convert to those bearing a higher force. It was previously proposed that the tension-generating step(s) in the crossbridge cycle was highly endothermic and was therefore itself directly targeted by changes in temperature. However, this did not explain why a rapid rise in temperature (a temperature jump) caused a much slower rate of rise of tension than a rapid length step. This led to suggestions that the step targeted by a temperature rise is not the tension-generating step but is an extra step in the attached pathway of the crossbridge cycle, perhaps located on a parallel pathway. This enigma has been a major obstacle to a full understanding of the operation of the crossbridge cycle. We have now used a previously developed mechano-kinetic model of the crossbridge cycle in frog muscle to simulate the temperature dependence of isometric tension and shortening velocity. We allowed all five steps in the cycle to be temperature-sensitive. Models with different starting combinations of enthalpy changes and activation enthalpies for the five steps were refined by downhill simplex runs and scored by their ability to fit experimental data on the temperature dependence of isometric tension and the relationship between force and shortening velocity in frog muscle. We conclude that the first tension-generating step may be weakly endothermic and that the rise of tension with temperature is largely driven by the preceding two strongly endothermic steps of ATP hydrolysis and attachment of M.ADP.Pi to actin. The refined model gave a reasonable fit to the available experimental data and after a temperature jump the overall rate of tension rise was much slower than after a length step as observed experimentally. The findings aid our understanding of the crossbridge cycle by showing that it may not be necessary to include an additional

  14. Motor unit activity during isometric and concentric-eccentric contractions of the human first dorsal interosseus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J N; Fuglevand, A J; Walsh, M L; Bigland-Ritchie, B

    1995-08-01

    1. Motor unit activity was recorded with intramuscular fine wire electrodes during isometric, concentric, and eccentric activity in the human first dorsal interosseus muscle. Twenty-one units from 11 subjects were sampled. 2. During isotonic cycles of shortening and lengthening, 18 of 21 units were recruited during the concentric phase, increased their discharge rates as the concentric movement progressed, then decreased their discharge rate during the eccentric phase, and were derecruited. 3. A different pattern of recruitment was observed in recordings from three units. These units were recruited during the eccentric phase, at a time when other units were decreasing their discharge rate or being derecruited. In two of the units selectively recruited during the eccentric phase, it was possible to determine their isometric thresholds, which were higher than those of units exhibiting the more common pattern of recruitment. 4. For two of the three units exhibiting selective recruitment during eccentric contraction, the unit was recorded simultaneously with different pairs of recording wires separated by 5-10 mm. Each discharge of these units was detected by both electrodes, making it unlikely that movement artifact was responsible for the initiation or cessation of discharge. 5. The recruitment patterns observed suggest that changes in the type or distribution of synaptic inputs to motoneurons during movement can, in some instances, override pre- and postsynaptic factors that shape recruitment order in isometric conditions.

  15. Use of diffuse optical spectroscopy to monitor muscle and brain oxygenation dynamics during isometric and isokinetic exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Goutham; Cotter, Joshua; Reuland, Warren; Warren, Robert V.; Mirzaei Zarandi, Soroush M.; Cerussi, Albert E.; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Galassetti, Pietro

    2013-03-01

    The use of near-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy (TRS-20, Hamamatsu Corporation) in two resistance type exercise applications in human subjects is described. First, using isometric flexion of the biceps, we compared the magnitude and relevance of tissue hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation (stO2) changes when assuming constant scattering versus continuous measurement of reduced scattering coefficients at three wavelengths. It was found that the assumption of constant scattering resulted in significant errors in hemoglobin concentration assessment during sustained isometric contractions. Secondly, we tested the effect of blood flow restriction (BFR) on oxygenation in a muscle (vastus medialis oblique, VMO) and in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of the brain. The BFR training technique resulted in considerably more fatigability in subjects, and correlated with reduced muscle stO2 between sets of exertion. Additionally, exercise with BFR resulted in greater PFC deoxygenation than a condition with equivalent work performance but no BFR. These experiments demonstrate novel applications for diffuse optical spectroscopy in strength testing and targeted muscle rehabilitation.

  16. Changes in conformation of myosin heads during the development of isometric contraction and rapid shortening in single frog muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazzesi, G; Reconditi, M; Dobbie, I; Linari, M; Boesecke, P; Diat, O; Irving, M; Lombardi, V

    1999-01-15

    1. Two-dimensional X-ray diffraction patterns were recorded at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility from central segments of intact single muscle fibres of Rana temporaria with 5 ms time resolution during the development of isometric contraction. Shortening at ca 0.8 times the maximum velocity was also imposed at the isometric tetanus plateau. 2. The first myosin-based layer line (ML1) and the second myosin-based meridional reflection (M2), which are both strong in resting muscle, were completely abolished at the plateau of the isometric tetanus. The third myosin-based meridional reflection (M3), arising from the axial repeat of the myosin heads along the filaments, remained intense but its spacing changed from 14.34 to 14.56 nm. The intensity change of the M3 reflection, IM3, could be explained as the sum of two components, I14.34 and I14.56, arising from myosin head conformations characteristic of rest and isometric contraction, respectively. 3. The amplitudes (A) of the X-ray reflections, which are proportional to the fraction of myosin heads in each conformation, changed with half-times that were similar to that of isometric force development, which was 33.5 +/- 2. 0 ms (mean +/- s.d., 224 tetani from three fibres, 4 C), measured from the end of the latent period. We conclude that the myosin head conformation changes synchronously with force development, at least within the 5 ms time resolution of these measurements. 4. The changes in the X-ray reflections during rapid shortening have two temporal components. The rapid decrease in intensity of the 14.56 nm reflection at the start of shortening is likely to be due to tilting of myosin heads attached to actin. The slower changes in the other reflections were consistent with a return to the resting conformation of the myosin heads that was about 60 % complete after shortening of 70 nm per half-sarcomere.

  17. Isokinetic and isometric muscle function of the knee extensors and flexors during simulated soccer activity: effect of exercise and dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ajmol; Williams, Clyde

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of dehydration during soccer-type intermittent exercise on isokinetic and isometric muscle function. Eight soccer players performed two 90-min high-intensity intermittent shuttle-running trials without (NF) or with (FL) fluid ingestion (5 ml · kg(-1) before and 2 ml · kg(-1) every 15 min). Isokinetic and isometric strength and muscular power of knee flexors and knee extensors were measured pre-exercise, at half-time and post-exercise using isokinetic dynamometry. Sprint performance was monitored throughout the simulated-soccer exercise. Isokinetic knee strength was reduced at faster (3.13 rad · s(-1); P = 0.009) but not slower (1.05 rad · s(-1); P = 0.063) contraction speeds with exercise; however, there was no difference between FL and NF. Peak isometric strength of the knee extensors (P = 0.002) but not the knee flexors (P = 0.065) was significantly reduced with exercise with no difference between FL and NF. Average muscular power was reduced over time at both 1.05 rad · s(-1) (P = 0.01) and 3.14 rad · s(-1) (P = 0.033) but was not different between FL and NF. Mean 15-m sprint time increased with duration of exercise (P = 0.005) but was not different between FL and NF. In summary, fluid ingestion during 90 min of soccer-type exercise was unable to offset the reduction in isokinetic and isometric strength and muscular power of the knee extensors and flexors.

  18. Voluntary exercise prevents cisplatin-induced muscle wasting during chemotherapy in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernille Hojman

    Full Text Available Loss of muscle mass related to anti-cancer therapy is a major concern in cancer patients, being associated with important clinical endpoints including survival, treatment toxicity and patient-related outcomes. We investigated effects of voluntary exercise during cisplatin treatment on body weight, food intake as well as muscle mass, strength and signalling. Mice were treated weekly with 4 mg/kg cisplatin or saline for 6 weeks, and randomized to voluntary wheel running or not. Cisplatin treatment induced loss of body weight (29.8%, P < 0.001, lean body mass (20.6%, P = 0.001, as well as anorexia, impaired muscle strength (22.5% decrease, P < 0.001 and decreased glucose tolerance. In addition, cisplatin impaired Akt-signalling, induced genes related to protein degradation and inflammation, and reduced muscle glycogen content. Voluntary wheel running during treatment attenuated body weight loss by 50% (P < 0.001, maintained lean body mass (P < 0.001 and muscle strength (P < 0.001, reversed anorexia and impairments in Akt and protein degradation signalling. Cisplatin-induced muscular inflammation was not prevented by voluntary wheel running, nor was glucose tolerance improved. Exercise training may preserve muscle mass in cancer patients receiving cisplatin treatment, potentially improving physical capacity, quality of life and overall survival.

  19. ISOMETRIC GLUTEUS MEDIUS MUSCLE TORQUE AND FRONTAL PLANE PELVIC MOTION DURING RUNNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evie N. Burnet

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between isometric GM torque and the degree of frontal plane pelvic drop during running. Twenty-one healthy, recreational runners (9 males, 12 females who ran 8.05 km or more per week were obtained from a sample of convenience. GM maximal isometric torque was collected prior to the run. Subjects then ran on a treadmill for 30 minutes while bilateral three-dimensional pelvic kinematic data were collected for 10 seconds at each 2 minute increment. Left side pelvic drop showed a slight increase (effect size = 0.61; while, the right side pelvic drop remained stable (effect size = 0.18. Pearson's Correlations showed no relationship between GM isometric torque and frontal plane pelvic drop for any of the data collection periods during the 30-minute run. These results suggest that isometric GM torque was a poor predictor of frontal plane pelvic drop. One should question whether a dynamic rather than static measure of GM strength would be more appropriate. Future research is needed to identify dynamic strength measures that would better predict biomechanical components of running gait

  20. Effects of Isometric Hand-Grip Muscle Contraction on Young Adults' Free Recall and Recognition Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomporowski, Phillip D.; Albrecht, Chelesa; Pendleton, Daniel M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if physical arousal produced by isometric hand-dynamometer contraction performed during word-list learning affects young adults' free recall or recognition memory. Method: Twenty-four young adults (12 female; M[subscript age] = 22 years) were presented with 4 20-item word lists. Moderate arousal…

  1. Anisotropy of human muscle via non invasive impedance measurements. Frequency dependence of the impedance changes during isometric contractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashuri, Hektor

    In this thesis we present non invasive muscle impedance measurements using rotatable probes extending the work done by Aaron et al. (1997) by measuring not only the real part of the impedance but the imaginary part as well. The results reveal orientations of underlying muscle fibers via minima in resistance and reactance versus angle curves, suggesting this method as potentially useful for studying muscle properties in clinical and physiological research. Calculations of the current distribution for a slab of material with anisotropic conductivity show that the current distribution depends strongly on the separation of two current electrodes and as well as on its conducting anisotropy. Forearm muscle impedance measurements at 50 kHz done by Shiffman et al. (2003) had shown that both resistance (R) and reactance (X) increase during isometric contraction. We have extended these measurements in the 3 to 100 kHz range and we found that resistance (R) and reactance (X) both increase and their changes increased or decreased at frequency dependent rates. Analysis based on circuit models of changes in R and X during the short contraction pulses showed that the extra cellular fluid resistance increased by 3.9 +/- 1.4 %, while the capacitance increased by 5.6 +/- 2 %. For long contraction pulses at very low frequencies: (1) there was practically no change in R during contraction, which implies that these changes are due to cellular membrane or intracellular effects with the extra cellular water component not participating, and (2) in post contraction stage there were no morphological changes which means that drifts in R can only be due to physiological changes. Following Shiffman et al. (2003) we measured impedance changes of R and X during a triangular shaped pulse of force generated via isometric forearm muscle contraction at 50 kHz. We measured these changes in 3-100 kHz frequency range for a stair case pulse of forces and the results showed that they are frequency

  2. Assessing the accuracy of subject-specific, muscle-model parameters determined by optimizing to match isometric strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSmitt, Holly J; Domire, Zachary J

    2016-12-01

    Biomechanical models are sensitive to the choice of model parameters. Therefore, determination of accurate subject specific model parameters is important. One approach to generate these parameters is to optimize the values such that the model output will match experimentally measured strength curves. This approach is attractive as it is inexpensive and should provide an excellent match to experimentally measured strength. However, given the problem of muscle redundancy, it is not clear that this approach generates accurate individual muscle forces. The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate this approach using simulated data to enable a direct comparison. It is hypothesized that the optimization approach will be able to recreate accurate muscle model parameters when information from measurable parameters is given. A model of isometric knee extension was developed to simulate a strength curve across a range of knee angles. In order to realistically recreate experimentally measured strength, random noise was added to the modeled strength. Parameters were solved for using a genetic search algorithm. When noise was added to the measurements the strength curve was reasonably recreated. However, the individual muscle model parameters and force curves were far less accurate. Based upon this examination, it is clear that very different sets of model parameters can recreate similar strength curves. Therefore, experimental variation in strength measurements has a significant influence on the results. Given the difficulty in accurately recreating individual muscle parameters, it may be more appropriate to perform simulations with lumped actuators representing similar muscles.

  3. Current distribution in skeletal muscle activated by functional electrical stimulation: image-series formulation and isometric recruitment curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livshitz, L M; Einziger, P D; Mizrahi, J

    2000-01-01

    The present work develops an analytical model that allows one to estimate the current distribution within the whole muscle and the resulting isometric recruitment curve (IRC). The quasistatic current distribution, expressed as an image series, i.e., a collection of properly weighted and shifted point-source responses, outlines an extension for more than three layers of the classical image theory in conductive plane-stratified media. Evaluation of the current distribution via the image series expansions requires substantially less computational time than the standard integral representation. The expansions use a unique recursive representation for Green's function, that is a generic characteristic of the stratification. This approach permits one to verify which of the tissue electrical properties are responsible for the current density distribution within the muscle, and how significant their combinations are. In addition, the model permits one to study the effect of different electrode placement on the shape and the magnitude of the potential distribution. A simple IRC model was used for parameter estimation and model verification by comparison with experimentally obtained isometric recruitment curves. Sensitivity of the model to different parameters such as conductivity of the tissues and activation threshold was verified. The resulting model demonstrated characteristic features that were similar to those of experimentally obtained data. The model also quantitatively confirmed the differences existing between surface (transcutaneous) and implanted (percutaneous) electrode stimulation.

  4. Oxygenation and EMG in the proximal and distal vastus lateralis during submaximal isometric knee extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crenshaw, Albert G.; Bronee, Lars; Krag, Ida

    2010-01-01

    /or (2) fatigue development. Nine males performed 2-min sustained isometric knee extensions at 15% and 30% maximum voluntary contraction during which oxygenation and EMG were recorded simultaneously from proximal and distal locations of the vastus lateralis muscle. Near infrared spectroscopy variables...

  5. Effects of voluntary wheel running on satellite cells in the rat plantaris muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Atsushi Kojima; Mitsutoshi Kurosaka; Yuji Ogura; Hisashi Naito; Shizuo Katamoto; Katsumasa Goto

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of voluntary wheel running on satellite cells in the rat plantaris muscle. Seventeen 5-week-old male Wistar rats were assigned to a control (n = 5) or training (n = 12) group. Each rat in the training group ran voluntarily in a running-wheel cage for 8 weeks. After the training period, the animals were anesthetized, and the plantaris muscles were removed, weighed, and analyzed immunohistochemically and biochemically. Although there were no significant diffe...

  6. Modulation in voluntary neural drive in relation to muscle soreness

    OpenAIRE

    Racinais, S.; Bringard, A.; Puchaux, K.; Noakes, T D; Perrey, S.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether (1) spinal modulation would change after non-exhausting eccentric exercise of the plantar flexor muscles that produced muscle soreness and (2) central modulation of the motor command would be linked to the development of muscle soreness. Ten healthy subjects volunteered to perform a single bout of backward downhill walking exercise (duration 30 min, velocity 1 ms−1, negative grade −25%, load 12% of body weight). Neuromuscular test sessions [H-r...

  7. Voluntary exercise prevents cisplatin-induced muscle wasting during chemotherapy in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille; Fjelbye, Jonas; Zerahn, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Loss of muscle mass related to anti-cancer therapy is a major concern in cancer patients, being associated with important clinical endpoints including survival, treatment toxicity and patient-related outcomes. We investigated effects of voluntary exercise during cisplatin treatment on body weight...

  8. Neuromuscular control of scapula muscles during a voluntary task in subjects with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, C M; Søgaard, Karen; Chreiteh, S S

    2013-01-01

    Imbalance of neuromuscular activity in the scapula stabilizers in subjects with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome (SIS) is described in restricted tasks and specific populations. Our aim was to compare the scapular muscle activity during a voluntary movement task in a general population with and w...

  9. An isometric muscle force estimation framework based on a high-density surface EMG array and an NMF algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chengjun; Chen, Xiang; Cao, Shuai; Qiu, Bensheng; Zhang, Xu

    2017-08-01

    Objective. To realize accurate muscle force estimation, a novel framework is proposed in this paper which can extract the input of the prediction model from the appropriate activation area of the skeletal muscle. Approach. Surface electromyographic (sEMG) signals from the biceps brachii muscle during isometric elbow flexion were collected with a high-density (HD) electrode grid (128 channels) and the external force at three contraction levels was measured at the wrist synchronously. The sEMG envelope matrix was factorized into a matrix of basis vectors with each column representing an activation pattern and a matrix of time-varying coefficients by a nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) algorithm. The activation pattern with the highest activation intensity, which was defined as the sum of the absolute values of the time-varying coefficient curve, was considered as the major activation pattern, and its channels with high weighting factors were selected to extract the input activation signal of a force estimation model based on the polynomial fitting technique. Main results. Compared with conventional methods using the whole channels of the grid, the proposed method could significantly improve the quality of force estimation and reduce the electrode number. Significance. The proposed method provides a way to find proper electrode placement for force estimation, which can be further employed in muscle heterogeneity analysis, myoelectric prostheses and the control of exoskeleton devices.

  10. Predictability of in vivo changes in pennation angle of human tibialis anterior muscle from rest to maximum isometric dorsiflexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maganaris, C N; Baltzopoulos, V

    1999-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the predictability of in vivo, ultrasound-based changes in human tibialis anterior (TA) pennation angle from rest to maximum isometric dorsiflexion (MVC) using a planimetric model assuming constant thickness between aponeuroses and straight muscle fibres. Sagittal sonographs of TA were taken in six males at ankle angles of -15 degrees (dorsiflexion direction), 0 degrees (neutral position), + 15 (plantarflexion direction) and + 30 degrees both at rest and during dorsiflexor MVC trials performed on an isokinetic dynamometer. At all four ankle angles scans were taken from the TA proximal, central and distal regions. TA architecture did not differ (P > 0.05) neither between its two unipennate parts nor along the scanned regions over its length at a given ankle angle and state of contraction. Comparing MVC with rest at any given ankle angle, pennation angle was larger (62-71%, P 0.05). The model used estimated accurately (P > 0.05) changes in TA pennation angle occurring in the transition from rest to MVC and therefore its use is encouraged for estimating the isometric TA ankle moment and force generating capacity using musculoskeletal modelling.

  11. Reliability of the Q Force; a mobile instrument for measuring isometric quadriceps muscle strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, K W; Regterschot, G R H; Krijnen, W P; Slager, G E C; van der Schans, C P; Zijlstra, W

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The ability to generate muscle strength is a pre-requisite for all human movement. Decreased quadriceps muscle strength is frequently observed in older adults and is associated with a decreased performance and activity limitations. To quantify the quadriceps muscle strength and to monito

  12. Reliability of the Q Force; a mobile instrument for measuring isometric quadriceps muscle strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, K.W.; Regterschot, G.R.H.; Krijnen, W.P.; Slager, G.E.C.; Schans, C.P. van der; Zijlstra, W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The ability to generate muscle strength is a pre-requisite for all human movement. Decreased quadriceps muscle strength is frequently observed in older adults and is associated with a decreased performance and activity limitations. To quantify the quadriceps muscle strength and to monito

  13. Longitudinal, lateral and transverse axes of forearm muscles influence the crosstalk in the mechanomyographic signals during isometric wrist postures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Anamul Islam

    Full Text Available In mechanomyography (MMG, crosstalk refers to the contamination of the signal from the muscle of interest by the signal from another muscle or muscle group that is in close proximity.The aim of the present study was two-fold: i to quantify the level of crosstalk in the mechanomyographic (MMG signals from the longitudinal (Lo, lateral (La and transverse (Tr axes of the extensor digitorum (ED, extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU and flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU muscles during isometric wrist flexion (WF and extension (WE, radial (RD and ulnar (UD deviations; and ii to analyze whether the three-directional MMG signals influence the level of crosstalk between the muscle groups during these wrist postures.Twenty, healthy right-handed men (mean ± SD: age = 26.7±3.83 y; height = 174.47±6.3 cm; mass = 72.79±14.36 kg participated in this study. During each wrist posture, the MMG signals propagated through the axes of the muscles were detected using three separate tri-axial accelerometers. The x-axis, y-axis, and z-axis of the sensor were placed in the Lo, La, and Tr directions with respect to muscle fibers. The peak cross-correlations were used to quantify the proportion of crosstalk between the different muscle groups.The average level of crosstalk in the MMG signals generated by the muscle groups ranged from: 34.28-69.69% for the Lo axis, 27.32-52.55% for the La axis and 11.38-25.55% for the Tr axis for all participants and their wrist postures. The Tr axes between the muscle groups showed significantly smaller crosstalk values for all wrist postures [F (2, 38 = 14-63, p<0.05, η2 = 0.416-0.769].The results may be applied in the field of human movement research, especially for the examination of muscle mechanics during various types of the wrist postures.

  14. [The activity of muscles of the shoulder girdle and shoulder during the constant isometric efforts of the wrist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereshchaka, I V; Lehedza, O V; Dornovs'kyĭ, M; Horkovenko, A V; Khorievin, V I

    2014-01-01

    Electromyogramms (EMG) of eight muscles of the arm were analyzed in 11 healthy men aged 25-40 years during equal magnitude isometric efforts created by wrist. Subjects had to track cursor that moved around on the screen at a constant speed (16 degrees/s) in a horizontal plane. Thus, the subject slowly changed the direction of generation of efforts, while its amplitude remained constant. It was established that during creation of the static efforts equal in all directions, the extensors activity was mainly in the areas of extension of shoulder and elbow joints, whereas the flexor activity was observed in all directions with maximum, which corresponded to the arm bending. It is assumed that muscular activity is organized on the principle of the synergies that are clearly related to the task and beyond it can not exist.

  15. Temporal muscle activation assessment by ultrasound imaging during flexor withdrawal reflex and voluntary contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Gomez-Tames; Shuto, Nakamura; Jose, Gonzalez; Wenwei, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Activating flexor reflexes by electrical stimulation has been used as a mechanism to initiate the swing phase or to enhance it for spinal cord injured patients. However, it is necessary to know their contraction dynamics in order to artificially induce them at the right moment of a walking cycle. This requires understanding the temporal activation pattern of both surface and deep muscles simultaneously. This study aimed at developing a system to measure and analyze the temporal activation of both surface and deep muscles during voluntary contraction and flexor reflexes (also called withdrawal reflexes) using ultrasound imaging. A set of experiments were done to verify the validity of the system, while exploring the temporal pattern of muscle activation during flexor reflexes. As a result, we were able to quantify the surface and deep muscle activity by measuring the muscle thickness, pennation angle and long-axis displacement, from the ultrasound images.

  16. Descending pain modulation and its interaction with peripheral sensitization following sustained isometric muscle contraction in fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ge, Hong-You; Nie, HongLing; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    facilitation and that the effect of descending pain modulation be dependent on peripheral muscle pain sensitivity. METHODS: Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were measured from 13 points bilaterally in the upper trapezius muscle and from the mid-point bilaterally in the tibialis anterior before-, immediately......) than healthy control groups (286.2±24.1s) (P0.05). Following the contraction, PPTs were increased significantly and heterogeneously in the upper trapezius over time, but not, in the tibialis anterior muscle in healthy controls. However, PPT were significantly decreased over time in the tibialis...

  17. Quantitative genomics of voluntary exercise in mice: transcriptional analysis and mapping of expression QTL in muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Scott A; Nehrenberg, Derrick L.; Hua, Kunjie; Garland, Theodore; Pomp, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Motivation and ability both underlie voluntary exercise, each with a potentially unique genetic architecture. Muscle structure and function are one of many morphological and physiological systems acting to simultaneously determine exercise ability. We generated a large (n = 815) advanced intercross line of mice (G4) derived from a line selectively bred for increased wheel running (high runner) and the C57BL/6J inbred strain. We previously mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL) contributing to v...

  18. Using Maximal Isometric Force to Determine the Optimal Load for Measuring Dynamic Muscle Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiering, Barry A.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Bentley, Jason R.; Nash, Roxanne E.; Sinka, Joseph; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2009-01-01

    Maximal power output occurs when subjects perform ballistic exercises using loads of 30-50% of one-repetition maximum (1-RM). However, performing 1-RM testing prior to power measurement requires considerable time, especially when testing involves multiple exercises. Maximal isometric force (MIF), which requires substantially less time to measure than 1-RM, might be an acceptable alternative for determining the optimal load for power testing. PURPOSE: To determine the optimal load based on MIF for maximizing dynamic power output during leg press and bench press exercises. METHODS: Twenty healthy volunteers (12 men and 8 women; mean +/- SD age: 31+/-6 y; body mass: 72 +/- 15 kg) performed isometric leg press and bench press movements, during which MIF was measured using force plates. Subsequently, subjects performed ballistic leg press and bench press exercises using loads corresponding to 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, and 60% of MIF presented in randomized order. Maximal instantaneous power was calculated during the ballistic exercise tests using force plates and position transducers. Repeated-measures ANOVA and Fisher LSD post hoc tests were used to determine the load(s) that elicited maximal power output. RESULTS: For the leg press power test, six subjects were unable to be tested at 20% and 30% MIF because these loads were less than the lightest possible load (i.e., the weight of the unloaded leg press sled assembly [31.4 kg]). For the bench press power test, five subjects were unable to be tested at 20% MIF because these loads were less than the weight of the unloaded aluminum bar (i.e., 11.4 kg). Therefore, these loads were excluded from analysis. A trend (p = 0.07) for a main effect of load existed for the leg press exercise, indicating that the 40% MIF load tended to elicit greater power output than the 60% MIF load (effect size = 0.38). A significant (p . 0.05) main effect of load existed for the bench press exercise; post hoc analysis indicated that the effect of

  19. System identification of evoked mechanomyogram from abductor pollicis brevis muscle in isometric contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Takanori; Sakai, Hiroaki

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to verify the applicability of a sixth-order model to the mechanomyogram (MMG) system of the parallel-fibered muscle, which was identified from the MMG of the pennation muscle. The median nerve was stimulated, and an MMG and torque of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle were measured. The MMGs were detected with either a capacitor microphone or an acceleration sensor. The transfer functions between stimulation and the MMG and between stimulation and torque were identified by the singular value decomposition method. The torque and the MMG, which were detected with a capacitor microphone, DMMG, were approximated with a second- and a third-order model, respectively. The natural frequency of the torque, reflecting longitudinal mechanical characteristics, did not show a significant difference from that of the DMMG. The MMG detected with an acceleration sensor was approximated with a fourth-order model. The natural frequencies of the AMMG reflecting the muscle and subcutaneous tissue in the transverse direction were obtained. Both DMMG and AMMG have to be measured to investigate the model of the MMG system for parallel-fibered muscle. The MMG system of parallel-fibered muscle was also modeled with a sixth-order model.

  20. Activation of rectus capitis posterior major muscles during voluntary retraction of the head in asymptomatic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Richard C; Rowan, Jacob J; Bai, Peng; Pierce, Steven J; Shafer-Crane, Gail A; Prokop, Lawrence L

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess levels of electromyographic activity measured from rectus capitis posterior major (RCPM) muscles of asymptomatic subjects as their heads moved from a self-defined neutral position to a retracted position. A 2 × 2 within-subjects factorial research design was used. Disposable, intramuscular electrodes were used to collect electromyographic data from asymptomatic subjects between the ages of 20 and 40 years old. Data analysis was performed using mixed effects β regression models. Activation of RCPM muscles was found to significantly increase (P < .0001) as the head moved from a self-defined neutral position to a retracted position. Rectus capitis posterior major muscle activation levels, measured as a function of head position, have not been previously reported. The findings from this study showed that RCPM muscle activation significantly increases during voluntary retraction of the head. Copyright © 2014 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A regression model predicting isometric shoulder muscle activities from arm postures and shoulder joint moments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xu; McGorry, Raymond W; Lin, Jia-Hua

    2014-06-01

    Tissue overloading is a major contributor to shoulder musculoskeletal injuries. Previous studies attempted to use regression-based methods to predict muscle activities from shoulder kinematics and shoulder kinetics. While a regression-based method can address co-contraction of the antagonist muscles as opposed to the optimization method, most of these regression models were based on limited shoulder postures. The purpose of this study was to develop a set of regression equations to predict the 10th percentile, the median, and the 90th percentile of normalized electromyography (nEMG) activities from shoulder postures and net shoulder moments. Forty participants generated various 3-D shoulder moments at 96 static postures. The nEMG of 16 shoulder muscles was measured and the 3-D net shoulder moment was calculated using a static biomechanical model. A stepwise regression was used to derive the regression equations. The results indicated the measured range of the 3-D shoulder moment in this study was similar to those observed during work requiring light physical capacity. The r(2) of all the regression equations ranged between 0.228 and 0.818. For the median of the nEMG, the average r(2) among all 16 muscles was 0.645, and the five muscles with the greatest r(2) were the three deltoids, supraspinatus, and infraspinatus. The results can be used by practitioners to estimate the range of the shoulder muscle activities given a specific arm posture and net shoulder moment. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Increased Skeletal Muscle GLUT4 Expression in Obese Mice After Voluntary Wheel Running Exercise Is Posttranscriptional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurley, Jami M; Griesel, Beth A; Olson, Ann Louise

    2016-10-01

    Exercise promotes glucose clearance by increasing skeletal muscle GLUT4-mediated glucose uptake. Importantly, exercise upregulates muscle GLUT4 expression in an insulin-independent manner under conditions of insulin resistance, such as with type 2 diabetes. However, the insulin-independent mechanism responsible for rescued muscle GLUT4 expression is poorly understood. We used voluntary wheel running (VWR) in mice to test the prevailing hypothesis that insulin-independent upregulation of skeletal muscle GLUT4 protein expression with exercise is through increased Glut4 transcription. We demonstrate that 4 weeks of VWR exercise in obese mice rescued high-fat diet-induced decreased muscle GLUT4 protein and improved both fasting plasma insulin and hepatic triacylglyceride levels, but did not rescue muscle Glut4 mRNA. Persistent reduction in Glut4 mRNA suggests that a posttranscriptional mechanism regulated insulin-independent muscle GLUT4 protein expression in response to exercise in lean and obese mice. Reduction of GLUT4 protein in sedentary animals upon treatment with rapamycin revealed mTORC1-dependent GLUT4 regulation. However, no difference in GLUT4 protein expression was observed in VWR-exercised mice treated with either rapamycin or Torin 1, indicating that exercise-dependent regulation on GLUT4 was mTOR independent. The findings provide new insight into the mechanisms responsible for exercise-dependent regulation of GLUT4 in muscle.

  3. Motor imagery of voluntary muscle relaxation induces temporal reduction of corticospinal excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kouki; Watanabe, Jun; Muraoka, Tetsuro; Kanosue, Kazuyuki

    2015-03-01

    Voluntary muscle relaxation is an "active process" requiring cortical activation. However, cortical activation during motor imagery of muscle relaxation has not been well understood. The purpose of this study was to clarify time-dependent changes in corticospinal excitability during the imagery of muscle relaxation. Ten participants imagined volitional muscle relaxation from an imagined pinching with their right index finger and thumb in response to an auditory cue. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was applied at the left primary motor area of the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle at different time intervals after the auditory cue. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded from the right hand and forearm muscles. The MEP amplitudes of the FDI and the synergist temporally decreased after the auditory cue as compared with those present in the resting condition. Our finding indicates that motor imagery of muscle relaxation induces a temporal reduction of the corticospinal excitability related to the targeted muscle. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of explosive type strength training on isometric force- and relaxation-time, electromyographic and muscle fibre characteristics of leg extensor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häkkinen, K; Komi, P V; Alén, M

    1985-12-01

    To investigate the influence of explosive type strength training on isometric force- and relaxation-time and on electromyographic and muscle fibre characteristics of human skeletal muscle, 10 male subjects went through progressive training which included primarily jumping exercises without extra load and with light extra weights three times a week for 24 weeks. Specific training-induced changes in force-time curve were observed and demonstrated by great (P less than 0.05-0.01) improvements in in parameters of fast force production and by a minor (P less than 0.05) increase in maximal force. The continuous increases in fast force production during the entire training were accompanied by and correlated with the increases (P less than 0.05) in average IEMG-time curve and with the increase (P less than 0.05) in the FT:ST muscle fibre area ratio. The percentage of FT fibres of the muscle correlated (P less than 0.05) with the improvement of average force-time curve during the training. The increase in maximal force was accompanied by significant (P less than 0.05) increases in maximum IEMGs of the trained muscles. However, the hypertrophic changes, as judged from the anthropometric and muscle fibre area data, were only slight during the training. It can be concluded that in training for fast force production considerable neural and selective muscular adaptations may occur to explain the improvement in performance, but that genetic factors may determine the ultimate potential of the trainability of this aspect of the neuromuscular performance.

  5. The effect of heating and cooling on time course of voluntary and electrically induced muscle force variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazaitis, Marius; Skurvydas, Albertas; Vadopalas, Kazys; Daniusevičiūtė, Laura; Senikienė, Zibuoklė

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of heating and cooling on time course of voluntary and electrically induced muscle force variation. Ten volunteers performed 50 maximal voluntary and electrically induced contractions of the knee extensors at an angle of 120 degrees under the control conditions and after passive lower body heating and cooling in the control, heating, and cooling experiments. Peak torque, torque variation, and half-relaxation time were assessed during the exercise. Passive lower body heating increased muscle and core temperatures, while cooling lowered muscle temperature, but did not affect core temperature. We observed significantly lower muscle fatigue during voluntary contraction compared with electrically induced contractions. Body heating (opposite to cooling) increased involuntarily induced muscle force, but caused greater electrically induced muscle fatigue. In the middle of the exercise, the coefficient of correlation for electrically induced muscle torque decreased significantly as compared with the beginning of the exercise, while during maximal voluntary contractions, this relation for torque remained significant until the end of the exercise. It was shown that time course of voluntary contraction was more stable than in electrically induced contractions.

  6. INFLUENCE OF STRENGTH TRAINING PROGRAM ON ISOMETRIC MUSCLE STRENGTH IN YOUNG ATHLETES

    OpenAIRE

    Dragan Radovanovic; Aleksandar Ignjatovic; Ratko Stankovic

    2007-01-01

    Strength training, or resistance training, is a form of physical conditioning used to increase the ability to resist force. Since muscular strength is required for success in many sports, it is logical to assume that stronger and more powerful young athletes will achieve better results. The aim of the study was to examine the effects of strength training on young athletes. An eight-week strength training program for developing muscle strength was performed in this study. Training protocol was...

  7. Effect of toe extension on EMG of triceps surae muscles during isometric dorsiflexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqi, Ariba; Arjunan, Sridhar P; Kumar, Dinesh

    2016-12-01

    The protocol for estimating force of contraction by triceps surae (TS) muscles requires the immobilization of the ankle during dorsiflexion and plantar flexion. However, large variability in the results has been observed. To identify the cause of this variability, experiments were conducted where ankle dorsiflexion force and electromyogram (EMG) of the TS were recorded under two conditions: (i) toes were strapped and (ii) toes were unstrapped, with all other conditions such as immobilization of the ankle remaining unchanged. The root mean square (RMS) of the EMG and the force were analyzed and one-tail Student's t-test was performed for significance between the two conditions. The RMS of the EMG from TS muscles was found to be significantly higher (~55%) during dorsiflexion with toes unstrapped compared with when the toes were strapped. The torque corresponding to dorsiflexion was also higher with toes unstrapped. Our study has shown that it is important to strap the toes when measuring the torque at the ankle and EMG of the TS muscles.

  8. Effects of augmented trunk stabilization with external compression support on shoulder and scapular muscle activity and maximum strength during isometric shoulder abduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyun-jeong; Kim, Suhn-yeop; Oh, Duck-won

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of augmented trunk stabilization with external compression support (ECS) on the electromyography (EMG) activity of shoulder and scapular muscles and shoulder abductor strength during isometric shoulder abduction. Twenty-six women volunteered for the study. Surface EMG was used to monitor the activity of the upper trapezius (UT), lower trapezius (LT), serratus anterior (SA), and middle deltoid (MD), and shoulder abductor strength was measured using a dynamometer during three experimental conditions: (1) no external support (condition-1), (2) pelvic support (condition-2), and (3) pelvic and thoracic supports (condition-3) in an active therapeutic movement device. EMG activities were significantly lower for UT and higher for MD during condition 3 than during condition 1 (p Shoulder abductor strength was significantly higher during condition 3 than during condition 1 (p muscle effort of the UT during isometric shoulder abduction and increasing shoulder abductor strength. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Isometric muscle training of the spine musculature in patients with spinal bony metastases under radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rief Harald

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Osseous metastatic involvement of the spinal column affects many patients with a primary tumour disease of all entities. The consequences are pain both at rest and under exertion, impairments in going about day-to-day activities, diminished performance, the risk of pathological fractures, and neurological deficits. Palliative percutaneous radiotherapy is one of the therapeutical options available in this connection. The aim of this explorative study is to investigate the feasibility of muscle-training exercises and to evaluate the progression- and fracture-free survival time and the improvement of bone density, as well as to assess other clinical parameters such as pain, quality of life, and fatigue as secondary endpoints. Methods/Design This study is a prospective, randomized, monocentre, controlled explorative intervention study in the parallel-group design to determine the multidimensional effects of a course of exercises at first under physiotherapeutic instruction and subsequently performed by the patients independently for strengthening the paravertebral muscles of patients with metastases of the vertebral column parallel to their percutaneous radiotherapy. On the days of radiation treatment the patients in the control group shall be given physical treatment in the form of respiratory therapy and the so-called "hot roll". The patients will be randomized into one of the two groups: differentiated muscle training or physiotherapy with thirty patients in each group. Discussion The aim of the study is to evaluate the feasibility of the training programme described here. Progression-free and fracture-free survival, improved response to radiotherapy by means of bone density, and clinical parameters such as pain, quality of life, and fatigue constitute secondary study objectives. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01409720

  10. Changes in Systolic Blood Pressure during Isometric Contractions of Different Size Muscle Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-05-01

    flexion), fine motor control is required to produce index finger adduction as an isolated i contraction (37,38). with this in mind , one should...efficacy of drugs used for treating I hypertension. Clinicians, using biofeedback techniques, could teach individuals hcw to relax certain muscles. i...I APP ~NDhX E CLLIBRATION CF FO~C~ £~EASIJBING TR&NSDUC~B5 I I ii I I H. I I’ I.. I 106 The calibration for each ’t0" ring force transducer I was

  11. The Effects of a Self-Adapted, Jaw Repositioning Mouthpiece and Jaw Clenching on Muscle Activity during Vertical Jump and Isometric Clean Pull Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Allen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a self-adapted, jaw repositioning mouthpiece and jaw clenching on muscle activity during the countermovement vertical jump (CMVJ and isometric mid-thigh clean pull (MTCP. Methods:  Thirty-six healthy, recreationally trained males (n=36; age, 23 ± 2.8 years; height, 178.54 ± 9.0 cm; body mass, 83.09 ± 7.8 kg completed maximal CMVJ and MTCP assessments under six experimental conditions:  jaw repositioning mouthpiece plus clenching (MP+C, jaw repositioning mouthpiece with jaw relaxed (MP, traditional mouthguard plus clenching (MG+C, traditional mouthguard with jaw relaxed (MG, no mouthpiece plus clenching (NoMP+C and no mouthpiece with jaw relaxed (NoMP while muscle activity of the dominant leg medial gastrocnemius (G, medial hamstring (H, vastus medialis (VMO, and erector spinae (ES was recorded. Results:  Repeated measures ANOVA revealed no changes in MTCP muscle activation for any mouthpiece or clench condition. Jaw clenching, regardless of mouthpiece condition, significantly improved prime mover muscle activation during CMVJ (p .05. Conclusion:  These findings support jaw clenching as a viable technique to elicit concurrent activation potentiation (CAP of prime mover muscle activity during dynamic but not isometric physical activity. Keywords: jaw repositioning mouthpiece, jaw clenching, concurrent activation potentiation, muscle activation

  12. Maximal intermittent contractions of the first dorsal interosseous inhibits voluntary activation of the contralateral homologous muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Justin J; Feldman, Matthew R; Simmonds, Michael J

    2016-09-07

    The aim of this study was to investigate how maximal intermittent contractions for a hand muscle influence cortical and reflex activity, as well as the ability to voluntarily activate, the homologous muscle in the opposite limb. Twelve healthy subjects (age: 24 ± 3 years, all right hand dominant) performed maximal contractions of the dominant limb first dorsal interosseous (FDI), and activity of the contralateral FDI was examined in a series of experiments. Index finger abduction force, FDI EMG, motor evoked potentials and heteronomous reflexes were obtained from the contralateral limb during brief non-fatiguing contractions. The same measures, as well as the ability to voluntarily activate the contralateral FDI, were then assessed in an extended intermittent contraction protocol that elicited fatigue. Brief contractions under non-fatigued conditions increased index finger abduction force, FDI EMG, and motor evoked potential amplitude of the contralateral limb. However, when intermittent maximal contractions were continued until fatigue, there was an inability to produce maximal force with the contralateral limb (~30%) which was coupled to a decrease in the level of voluntary activation (~20%). These declines were present without changes in reflex activity, and regardless of whether cortical or motor point stimulation was used to assess voluntary activation. It is concluded that performing maximal intermittent contractions with a single limb causes an inability of the CNS to maximally drive the homologous muscle of the contralateral limb. This was, in part, mediated by mechanisms that involve the motor cortex ipsilateral to the contracting limb.

  13. Brain Functional Connectivity is Different during VoluntaryConcentric and Eccentric Muscle Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan X Yao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies report greater activation in the cortical motor network in controlling eccentric contraction (EC than concentric contraction (CC of human skeletal muscles despite lower activation level of the muscle associated with EC. It is unknown, however, whether the strength of functional coupling between the primary motor cortex (M1 and other involved areas in the brain differs as voluntary movements are controlled by a network of regions in the primary, secondary and association cortices. Examining fMRI-based functional connectivity (FC offers an opportunity to measure strength of such coupling. To address the question, we examined functional MRI (fMRI data acquired during EC and CC (20 contractions each with similar movement distance and speed of the right first dorsal interosseous (FDI muscle in 11 young (20-32 years and healthy individuals and estimated FC between the M1 and a number of cortical regions in the motor control network. The major findings from the behavioral and fMRI-based FC analysis were that (1 no significant differences were seen in movement distance, speed and stability between the EC and CC; (2 significantly stronger mean FC was found for CC than EC. Our finding provides novel insights for a better understanding of the control mechanisms underlying voluntary movements produced by EC and CC. The finding is potentially helpful for guiding the development of targeted sport training and/or therapeutic programs for performance enhancement and injury prevention.

  14. Voluntary muscle activation improves with power training and is associated with changes in gait speed in mobility-limited older adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Lars G; Strotmeyer, Elsa S; Skjødt, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Incomplete voluntary muscle activation may contribute to impaired muscle mechanical function and physical function in older adults. Exercise interventions have been shown to increase voluntary muscle activation, although the evidence is sparse for mobility-limited older adults, particularly in as...

  15. Research and application of isometric muscle force testing%等长肌力测试的研究与应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋奇永; 徐秀林

    2011-01-01

    背景:等长肌力测试是目前肌力测定方法中较为实用的一种测试手段,当某些关节保持一定的位置时,肌肉通过等长收缩,完成等长肌力测试.目的:综述等长肌力测试技术的研究进展及应用,并对此测试技术的未来发展进行讨论.方法:由第一作者检索ScienceDirect数据库,HighWire Press数据库,中国期刊全文数据库及万方数据库中发表于2000/2010有关肌力测试和等长肌力测试的实验研究及临床应用文献.英文检索词为"muscle force,muscle force testing,isometric contraction,isometric muscle force testing",中文检索词为"肌力、肌力测试、等长收缩、等长肌力测试".同一领域文献则选择近期发表及发表在权威杂志的文章.结果及结论:共检索到76篇文章,按纳入和排除标准对文献进行筛选,保留32篇文章进行综述.等长肌力测试并不能全面的反应人体肌力的情况,再加上由于其测试技术的不成熟性,使其应用受到了限制.等速肌力测试和等张肌力测试也是测试肌力的主要方法,它们各有优势,但也各有不足;而等张肌力测试系统无法测定与角度有关的参数.同时,表面肌电信号对评估肌力也有不错的效果.因此,将等长肌力测试与等速、等张测试系统及表面肌电信号结合或许会有更好的测试效果.%BACKGROUND: lsometric muscle force testing is a very practical method to measure the contractive strength of muscle or muscle group of subjects' active movements. It is done by isometric contraction with the joints maintaining in a certain position.OBJECTIVE: To summarize the research and application concerning technologies of isometric muscle force testing and to discuss the main testing technologies of outlook.METHODS: Literatures about muscle force testing, isometric muscle force testing and clinical application were searched from ScienceDirect database, HighWire Press database, Chinese Journal Full-text database

  16. Reliability of maximal voluntary isometric contraction testing in a multicenter study of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Syntex/Synergen Neuroscience Joint Venture rhCNTF ALS Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoagland, R J; Mendoza, M; Armon, C; Barohn, R J; Bryan, W W; Goodpasture, J C; Miller, R G; Parry, G J; Petajan, J H; Ross, M A

    1997-06-01

    Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) is becoming widely used for monitoring disease progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We evaluated the variability of MVIC in a large multicenter (29 sites) drug trial in ALS. Intra- and interrater variability were assessed twice during the 19-month study. Intrarater reliability increased from the first to the second test, approaching the reliability reported for a single experienced clinical evaluator, but interrater reliability did not. Multiple clinical evaluators in a single site increased the variability of MVIC measurements. Rigorous quality assurance standards and monitoring of clinical evaluators should be incorporated into the design of multicenter studies using MVIC, since low variability is necessary to detect a modest treatment effect.

  17. Voluntary activation of human knee extensors measured using transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodall, S; Romer, L M; Ross, E Z

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the applicability and reliability of a transcranial magnetic stimulation twitch interpolation technique for measuring voluntary activation of a lower limb muscle group. Cortical voluntary activation of the knee extensors was determined in nine healthy men on two separate visits by measuring superimposed twitch torques evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation during isometric knee extensions of varying intensity. Superimposed twitch amplitude decreased linearly with increasing voluntary torque between 50 and 100% of mean maximal torque, allowing estimation of resting twitch amplitude and subsequent calculation of voluntary activation. There were no systematic differences for maximal voluntary activation within day (mean +/- s.d. 90.9 +/- 6.2 versus 90.7 +/- 5.9%; P = 0.98) or between days (90.8 +/- 6.0 versus 91.2 +/- 5.7%; P = 0.92). Systematic bias and random error components of the 95% limits of agreement were 0.23 and 9.3% within day versus 0.38 and 7.5% between days. Voluntary activation was also determined immediately after a 2 min maximal voluntary isometric contraction; in four of these subjects, voluntary activation was determined 30 min after the sustained contraction. Immediately after the sustained isometric contraction, maximal voluntary activation was reduced from 91.2 +/- 5.7 to 74.2 +/- 12.0% (P knee extensors.

  18. Comparison of isometric contractile properties of the tongue muscles in three species of frogs, Litoria caerulea, Dyscophus guinetti, and Bufo marinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, S E; Nishikawa, K C

    1999-11-01

    Previous studies show that anurans feed in at least three different ways. Basal frogs have a broad tongue that shortens during protraction and emerges only a short distance from the mouth. Some frogs have long, narrow tongues that elongate dramatically due primarily to inertia from mouth opening, which is transferred to the tongue. A few species have a hydrostatic mechanism that produces tongue elongation during protraction. This functional diversity occurs among frogs that share the same two pairs of tongue muscles. Our study compares the isometric contractile properties of these tongue muscles among three frog species that represent each feeding mechanism. Nerves to the paired protractors and retractors were stimulated electrically in each species to record the force properties, contraction speeds, and fatigabilites of these muscles. Few differences were found in the isometric contractile properties of tongue muscles, and the greatest differences were found in the retractors, not the protractors. We propose that the unique arrangement of the tongue muscles in frogs results in a retractor that may also be coactivated with the protractor in order to produce normal tongue protraction. Inertial effects from body, head, and jaw movements, along with clear differences that we found in passive resistance of the tongues to elongation, may explain much of the behavioral variation in tongue use among species. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Quantitative genomics of voluntary exercise in mice: transcriptional analysis and mapping of expression QTL in muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Scott A; Nehrenberg, Derrick L; Hua, Kunjie; Garland, Theodore; Pomp, Daniel

    2014-08-15

    Motivation and ability both underlie voluntary exercise, each with a potentially unique genetic architecture. Muscle structure and function are one of many morphological and physiological systems acting to simultaneously determine exercise ability. We generated a large (n = 815) advanced intercross line of mice (G4) derived from a line selectively bred for increased wheel running (high runner) and the C57BL/6J inbred strain. We previously mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL) contributing to voluntary exercise, body composition, and changes in body composition as a result of exercise. Using brain tissue in a subset of the G4 (n = 244), we have also previously reported expression QTL (eQTL) colocalizing with the QTL for the higher-level phenotypes. Here, we examined the transcriptional landscape of hind limb muscle tissue via global mRNA expression profiles. Correlations revealed an ∼1,168% increase in significant relationships between muscle transcript expression levels and the same exercise and body composition phenotypes examined previously in the brain. The exercise trait most often significantly correlated with gene expression in the brain was running duration while in the muscle it was maximum running speed. This difference may indicate that time spent engaging in exercise behavior may be more influenced by central (neurobiological) mechanisms, while intensity of exercise may be largely controlled by peripheral mechanisms. Additionally, we used subsets of cis-acting eQTL, colocalizing with QTL, to identify candidate genes based on both positional and functional evidence. We discuss three plausible candidate genes (Insig2, Prcp, Sparc) and their potential regulatory role.

  20. Training-related changes in the EMG-moment relationship during isometric contractions: Further evidence of improved control of muscle activation in strength-trained men?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarantini, David; Bru, Bertrand

    2015-08-01

    The possibility of using electromyography (EMG) to track muscle activity has raised the question of its relationship with the effort exerted by the muscles around the joints. However, the EMG-moment relationship is yet to be fully defined, and increasing knowledge of this topic could contribute to research in motor control and to the development of EMG-based algorithms and devices. With regards the training-related adaptations at the peripheral and central level, the present study investigated the effect of strength training on EMG-moment relationship. Our aim was to clarify its nature and gain further understanding of how morphological and neural factors may affect its form. The EMG-moment relationship was determined during knee flexion and extension isometric contractions performed by strength-trained male athletes and untrained male participants. The results showed that strength training induced linearity of the EMG-moment relationship concomitantly with enhanced maximum force production capacity and decreased co-activation of knee agonist-antagonist muscle pair. These results clarified discordant results regarding the linear or curved nature of the EMG-moment in isometric conditions and suggested that the remarkable linearity of the EMG-moment found in trained participants could indicate improved control of muscle activation.

  1. Between-subject variance in the magnitude of corticomuscular coherence during tonic isometric contraction of the tibialis anterior muscle in healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushiyama, Junichi; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Masakado, Yoshihisa; Hase, Kimitaka; Kimura, Akio; Liu, Meigen; Ushiba, Junichi

    2011-09-01

    Oscillatory activity of the sensorimotor cortex has been reported to show coherence with muscle activity in the 15- to 35-Hz frequency band (β-band) during weak to moderate intensity of isometric contraction. The present study examined the variance of the magnitude of the corticomuscular coherence across a large number of subjects. We quantified the coherence between EEG over the sensorimotor cortex and rectified electromyogram (EMG) from the tibialis anterior muscle during tonic isometric contraction at 30% of maximal effort in 100 healthy young individuals. We estimated the maximal peak of EEG-EMG coherence (Cohmax) and the ratio of the sum of the autopower spectral density function within the β-band to that of all frequency ranges for both EEG (EEGβ-PSD) and EMG (EMGβ-PSD) signals. The frequency histogram of Cohmax across all subjects showed a broad bell-shaped continuous distribution (range, 0.048-0.816). When the coherence was thresholded at the estimated significance level of P < 0.05 (0.114), 46 out of 100 subjects showed significant EEG-EMG coherence. Cohmax occurred within the β-band in the majority of subjects who showed significant EEG-EMG coherence (n = 43). Furthermore, Cohmax showed significant positive correlations with both EEGβ-PSD (r = 0.575, P < 0.001) and EMGβ-PSD (r = 0.606, P < 0.001). These data suggest that even during simple tonic isometric contraction, the strength of oscillatory coupling between the sensorimotor cortex and spinal motoneurons varies among individuals and is a contributory factor determining muscle activation patterns such as the degree of grouped discharge in muscle activity within the β-band for each subject.

  2. Is there a reliable and invariant set of muscle synergy during isometric biaxial trunk exertion in the sagittal and transverse planes by healthy subjects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedaghat-Nejad, Ehsan; Mousavi, Seyed Javad; Hadizadeh, Maliheh; Narimani, Roya; Khalaf, Kinda; Campbell-Kyureghyan, Naira; Parnianpour, Mohamad

    2015-09-18

    It has been suggested that the central nervous system simplifies muscle control through basic units, called synergies. In this study, we have developed a novel target-matching protocol and used non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) technique to extract trunk muscle synergies and corresponding torque synergies. Isometric torque data at the L5/S1 level and electromyographic patterns of twelve abdominal and back muscles from twelve healthy participants (five females) were simultaneously recorded. Each participant performed a total number of 24 isometric target-matching tasks using 12 different angular directions and 2 levels of uniaxial and biaxial exertions. Within- and between-subject similarities were assessed by considering both the data of different pairs of participants, where the activation coefficients of one participant were used in the NMF analysis of another participant, and the Pearson's correlation coefficients (R) between muscle synergy vectors. The results showed that, for a healthy person, a set of four muscles (overall variance accounted for (VAF) of 97.9 ± 0.53%) and four corresponding torque synergies (overall VAF of 92.2 ± 3.03%) could efficiently decompose the sagittal and transverse torque planes into their main directions. Furthermore, the correlation coefficients were 0.77 ± 0.12, 0.86 ± 0.08, 0.78 ± 0.12, and 0.93 ± 0.04, for all synergies, reflecting the consistency of muscle synergies across participants. Overall, our results suggest that by taking advantage of muscle synergies we could potentially overcome the redundancy inherent to control strategies of the trunk neuromuscular system. In future studies, the synergies identified in patients with low back pain could be compared with those extracted from healthy participants towards various clinical and rehabilitation applications.

  3. Neuromuscular fatigue following isometric contractions with similar torque time integral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozand, V; Cattagni, T; Theurel, J; Martin, A; Lepers, R

    2015-01-01

    Torque time integral (TTI) is the combination of intensity and duration of a contraction. The aim of this study was to compare neuromuscular alterations following different isometric sub-maximal contractions of the knee extensor muscles but with similar TTI. Sixteen participants performed 3 sustained contractions at different intensities (25%, 50%, and 75% of Maximal Voluntary Contraction (MVC) torque) with different durations (68.5±33.4 s, 35.1±16.8 s and 24.8±12.9 s, respectively) but similar TTI value. MVC torque, maximal voluntary activation level (VAL), M-wave characteristics and potentiated doublet amplitude were assessed before and immediately after the sustained contractions. EMG activity of the vastus lateralis (VL) and -rectus femoris (RF) muscles was recorded during the sustained contractions. MVC torque reduction was similar in the 3 conditions after the exercise (-23.4±2.7%). VAL decreased significantly in a similar extent (-3.1±1.3%) after the 3 sustained contractions. Potentiated doublet amplitude was similarly reduced in the 3 conditions (-19.7±1.5%), but VL and RF M-wave amplitudes remained unchanged. EMG activity of VL and RF muscles increased in the same extent during the 3 contractions (VL: 54.5±40.4%; RF: 53.1±48.7%). These results suggest that central and peripheral alterations accounting for muscle fatigue are similar following isometric contractions with similar TTI. TTI should be considered in the exploration of muscle fatigue during sustained isometric contractions.

  4. Neuromuscular performance of maximal voluntary explosive concentric contractions is influenced by angular acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, D; Bakenecker, P; Zinke, F

    2016-12-28

    Torque production during maximal voluntary explosive contractions is considered to be a functionally more relevant neuromuscular measure than steady-state torque, but little is known about accelerated concentric contractions. This study investigated torque, muscle activity, and fascicle behavior during isometric and fast concentric contractions of quadriceps femoris. Ten participants performed maximal voluntary explosive isometric, isovelocity, and additional concentric knee extensions at angular accelerations ranging from 700 to 4000° s(-2) that resulted in an angular velocity of 300° s(-1) at 40° knee flexion. Concentric torque at 40° knee flexion was corrected for inertia, and the corresponding isometric torque was matched to the time when the target knee angle of 40° was reached during concentric contractions. Electromyography of quadriceps femoris and hamstrings and ultrasound of vastus lateralis were measured to determine muscle activity, fascicle length, and fascicle velocity (FV). The faster the acceleration, the more torque was produced during concentric contractions at 40° knee flexion, which was accompanied by a reduction in FV. In comparison with isometric conditions, concentric quadriceps muscle activity was increased and torque during accelerations ≥3000° s(-2) equaled the time-matched isometric torque. Our results provide novel evidence that acceleration influences torque production during maximal voluntary explosive concentric contractions. This is suggested to be due to series elasticity and reduced force depression.

  5. The effect of local skin cooling before a sustained, submaximal isometric contraction on fatigue and isometric quadriceps femoris performance: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenauer, Erich; Cescon, Corrado; Deliens, Tom; Clarys, Peter; Clijsen, Ron

    2017-04-01

    The central- and peripheral mechanisms by which heat strain limits physical performance are not fully elucidated. Nevertheless, pre-cooling is often used in an attempt to improve subsequent performance. This study compared the effects of pre-cooling vs. a pre-thermoneutral application on central- and peripheral fatigue during 60% of isometric maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) of the right quadriceps femoris muscle. Furthermore, the effects between a pre-cooling and a pre-thermoneutral application on isometric MVC of the right quadriceps femoris muscle and subjective ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were investigated. In this randomized controlled trial, 18 healthy adults voluntarily participated. The participants received either a cold (experimental) application (+8°C) or a thermoneutral (control) application (+32°C) for 20min on their right thigh (one cuff). After the application, central (fractal dimension - FD) and peripheral (muscle fiber conduction velocity - CV) fatigue was estimated using sEMG parameters during 60% of isometric MVC. Surface EMG signals were detected from the vastus medialis and lateralis using bidimensional arrays. Immediately after the submaximal contraction, isometric MVC and RPE were assessed. Participants receiving the cold application were able to maintain a 60% isometric MVC significantly longer when compared to the thermoneutral group (mean time: 78 vs. 46s; p=0.04). The thermoneutral application had no significant impact on central fatigue (p>0.05) compared to the cold application (p=0.03). However, signs of peripheral fatigue were significantly higher in the cold group compared to the thermoneutral group (p=0.008). Pre-cooling had no effect on isometric MVC of the right quadriceps muscle and ratings of perceived exertion. Pre-cooling attenuated central fatigue and led to significantly longer submaximal contraction times compared to the pre-thermoneutral application. These findings support the use of pre-cooling procedures

  6. Effect of motor imagery and voluntary muscle contraction on the F wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Motohiko; Kimura, Jun; Walker, D David; Taniguchi, Shinichirou; Ichikawa, Hiroo; Fujisawa, Reiko; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Abe, Tatsuya; Yamada, Thoru; Kayamori, Ryoji; Mizutani, Tomohiko

    2010-08-01

    We tested the validity of instructing patients to minimally contract the muscle to facilitate F-wave recording in clinical practice. In 12 healthy subjects, F waves were recorded from the first dorsal interosseous muscle at rest, during motor imagery, and at up to 30% of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). F-wave persistence increased significantly from 32.5 +/- 11.9% (mean +/- SD) at rest to 58.3 +/- 15.2% during motor imagery and 90.0 +/- 8.7% during 3% MVC. It then remained the same during stepwise changes to and from 30% MVC before decreasing significantly from 80.8 +/- 18.5% during 3% MVC to 48.7 +/- 23.8% during motor imagery and 27.0 +/- 16.0% at rest. The trial average of F-wave amplitude showed a similar pattern of facilitation. Motor imagery enhances F-wave persistence and amplitude, which further increase with a slight muscle contraction and show no additional change with a stronger effort.

  7. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation versus volitional isometric strength training in children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackhouse, Scott K; Binder-Macleod, Stuart A; Stackhouse, Carrie A; McCarthy, James J; Prosser, Laura A; Lee, Samuel C K

    2007-01-01

    To date, no reports have investigated neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) to increase muscle force production of children with cerebral palsy (CP) using high-force contractions and low repetitions. The aims of this study were to determine if isometric NMES or volitional training in children with CP could increase muscle strength and walking speed and to examine the mechanisms that may contribute to increased force production. Eleven children with spastic diplegia were assigned to an NMES training group or to a volitional training group. Participants in the NMES group had electrodes implanted percutaneously to activate the quadriceps femoris and triceps surae muscles. The volitional group trained with maximal effort contractions. Both groups performed a 12-week isometric strength-training program. Maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) force, voluntary muscle activation, quadriceps and triceps surae cross-sectional area (CSA), and walking speed were measured pre- and post-strength training. The NMES-trained group had greater increases in normalized force production for both the quadriceps femoris and triceps surae. Similarly, only the NMES group showed an increase in walking speed after training. Changes in voluntary muscle activation explained approximately 67% and 37% of the changes seen in the MVIC of the NMES and volitional groups, respectively. Quadriceps femoris maximum CSA increased significantly for the NMES group only. This study was the first to quantitatively show strength gains with the use of NMES in children with CP. These results support the need for future experimental studies that will examine the clinical effectiveness of NMES strength training.

  8. Mapping of spatial and temporal heterogeneity of plantar flexor muscle activity during isometric contraction: correlation of velocity-encoded MRI with EMG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csapo, Robert; Malis, Vadim; Sinha, Usha; Sinha, Shantanu

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between contraction-associated muscle kinematics as measured by velocity-encoded phase-contrast (VE-PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and activity recorded via electromyography (EMG), and to construct a detailed three-dimensional (3-D) map of the contractile behavior of the triceps surae complex from the MRI data. Ten axial-plane VE-PC MRI slices of the triceps surae and EMG data were acquired during submaximal isometric contractions in 10 subjects. MRI images were analyzed to yield the degree of contraction-associated muscle displacement on a voxel-by-voxel basis and determine the heterogeneity of muscle movement within and between slices. Correlational analyses were performed to determine the agreement between EMG data and displacements. Pearson's coefficients demonstrated good agreement (0.84 muscle revealed significant heterogeneity in displacement values both in-plane and along the cranio-caudal axis, with highest values in the mid-muscle regions. By contrast, no significant differences between muscle regions were found in the soleus muscle. Substantial differences among displacements were also observed within slices, with those in static areas being only 17-39% (maximum) of those in the most mobile muscle regions. The good agreement between EMG data and displacements suggests that VE-PC MRI may be used as a noninvasive, high-resolution technique for quantifying and modeling muscle activity over the entire 3-D volume of muscle groups. Application to the triceps surae complex revealed substantial heterogeneity of contraction-associated muscle motion both within slices and between different cranio-caudal positions.

  9. In vivo forces generated by finger flexor muscles do not depend on the rate of fingertip loading during an isometric task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kursa, Katarzyna; Diao, Edward; Lattanza, Lisa; Rempel, David

    2005-11-01

    Risk factors for activity-related tendon disorders of the hand include applied force, duration, and rate of loading. Understanding the relationship between external loading conditions and internal tendon forces can elucidate their role in injury and rehabilitation. The goal of this investigation is to determine whether the rate of force applied at the fingertip affects in vivo forces in the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendon and the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) tendon during an isometric task. Tendon forces, recorded with buckle force transducers, and fingertip forces were simultaneously measured during open carpal tunnel surgery as subjects (N=15) increased their fingertip force from 0 to 15N in 1, 3, and 10s. The rates of 1.5, 5, and 15N/s did not significantly affect FDP or FDS tendon to fingertip force ratios. For the same applied fingertip force, the FDP tendon generated more force than the FDS. The mean FDP to fingertip ratio was 2.4+/-0.7 while the FDS to tip ratio averaged 1.5+/-1.0 (pfinger muscles in order to stabilize the finger and control joint torques at the force rates studied. Therefore, for this task, no additional increase in muscle force was observed at higher rates. These findings suggest that for high precision, isometric pinch maneuvers under static finger conditions, tendon forces are independent of loading rate.

  10. Motor unit firing rates and synchronisation affect the fractal dimension of simulated surface electromyogram during isometric/isotonic contraction of vastus lateralis muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesin, Luca; Dardanello, Davide; Rainoldi, Alberto; Boccia, Gennaro

    2016-12-01

    During fatiguing contractions, many adjustments in motor units behaviour occur: decrease in muscle fibre conduction velocity; increase in motor units synchronisation; modulation of motor units firing rate; increase in variability of motor units inter-spike interval. We simulated the influence of all these adjustments on synthetic EMG signals in isometric/isotonic conditions. The fractal dimension of the EMG signal was found mainly influenced by motor units firing behaviour, being affected by both firing rate and synchronisation level, and least affected by muscle fibre conduction velocity. None of the calculated EMG indices was able to discriminate between firing rate and motor units synchronisation. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sensory modulation of voluntary and TMS-induced activation in hand muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofler, Markus; Valls-Solé, Josep; Fuhr, Peter; Schindler, Christian; Zaccaria, Barbara R; Saltuari, Leopold

    2008-07-01

    Nociceptive suppression of tonic voluntary electromyographic (EMG) activity in human hand muscles (cutaneous silent period, CSP) is in its functional organization consistent with a spinal protective reflex. Motoneuronal excitability and its modulation may also be investigated by conditioned motor evoked potentials (MEPs). To date, effects of exteroceptive stimuli on tonic EMG and on MEPs have been compared mainly using innocuous stimuli, while noxious stimuli have not been studied in great detail. In ten subjects, we recorded CSPs induced in volitionally activated flexor pollicis brevis muscle (FPB) by noxious digit II (D2) stimulation, and in first dorsal interosseous muscle (FDI) following noxious D2 and digit V (D5) stimulation. Then, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to evoke MEPs in the same hand muscles at rest--conditioned by equal noxious D2 or D5 stimulation and individually delayed--so that the MEPs occurred at times corresponding to immediately before, during, and immediately after the CSP in each subject. Immediately before the CSP, there was no significant difference between nociceptive MEP modulation and tonic EMG modulation in any muscle-finger-combination. In the middle of the CSP, noxious finger stimulation exerted suppression of TMS-induced MEPs in all the three muscle-finger-combinations, but less so as compared to corresponding tonic EMG levels. After the CSP, MEPs remained suppressed when corresponding tonic EMG levels were significantly enhanced. Notably, MEPs were also suppressed in cases when occurring at times corresponding to the excitatory long-loop reflex. Incomplete MEP suppression during the CSP may allow for an "emergency grip" even during noxious stimulation. MEP suppression outlasting the CSP is compatible with a "passive" re-synchronization of volitionally activated motor units rather than an "active" reflex involving recruitment of corticospinal motoneurons. The differences in tonic EMG and MEP modulation favors an

  12. Comparison of sympathetic nerve responses to neck and forearm isometric exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, S. L. Jr; Ray, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Although the autonomic and cardiovascular responses to arm and leg exercise have been studied, the sympathetic adjustments to exercise of the neck have not. The purpose of the present study was twofold: 1) to determine sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to isometric contractions of the neck extensors and 2) to compare sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to isometric exercise of the neck and forearm. METHODS: Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate were measured in nine healthy subjects while performing isometric neck extension (INE) and isometric handgrip (IHG) in the prone position. After a 3-min baseline period, subjects performed three intensities of INE for 2.5 min each: 1) unloaded (supporting head alone), 2) 10% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and 3) 30% MVC, then subjects performed two intensities (10% and 30% MVC) of IHG for 2.5 min. RESULTS: Supporting the head by itself did not significantly change any of the variables. During [NE, MAP significantly increased by 10 +/- 2 and 31 +/- 4 mm Hg and MSNA increased by 67 +/- 46 and 168 +/- 36 units/30 s for 10% and 30% MVC, respectively. IHG and INE evoked similar responses at 10% MVC, but IHG elicited higher peak MAP and MSNA at 30% MVC (37 +/- 7 mm Hg (P muscle fiber type composition, muscle mass, and/or muscle architecture of the neck and forearm are responsible for these differences in peak responses.

  13. Muscle damage induced by electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosaka, Kazunori; Aldayel, Abdulaziz; Jubeau, Marc; Chen, Trevor C

    2011-10-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) induces muscle damage that is characterised by histological alterations of muscle fibres and connective tissue, increases in circulating creatine kinase (CK) activity, decreases in muscle strength and development of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Muscle damage is induced not only by eccentric contractions with ES but also by isometric contractions evoked by ES. Muscle damage profile following 40 isometric contractions of the knee extensors is similar between pulsed current (75 Hz, 400 μs) and alternating current (2.5 kHz delivered at 75 Hz, 400 μs) ES for similar force output. When comparing maximal voluntary and ES-evoked (75 Hz, 200 μs) 50 isometric contractions of the elbow flexors, ES results in greater decreases in maximal voluntary contraction strength, increases in plasma CK activity and DOMS. It appears that the magnitude of muscle damage induced by ES-evoked isometric contractions is comparable to that induced by maximal voluntary eccentric contractions, although the volume of affected muscles in ES is not as large as that of eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage. It seems likely that the muscle damage in ES is associated with high mechanical stress on the activated muscle fibres due to the specificity of motor unit recruitment (i.e., non-selective, synchronous and spatially fixed manner). The magnitude of muscle damage induced by ES is significantly reduced when the second ES bout is performed 2-4 weeks later. It is possible to attenuate the magnitude of muscle damage by "pre-conditioning" muscles, so that muscle damage should not limit the use of ES in training and rehabilitation.

  14. Effects of 8 wk of voluntary unloaded wheel running on K+ tolerance and excitability of soleus muscles in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broch-Lips, Martin; de Paoli, Frank; Pedersen, Thomas Holm; Overgaard, Kristian; Nielsen, Ole Bækgaard

    2011-07-01

    During intense exercise, efflux of K(+) from working muscles increases extracellular K(+) ([K(+)](o)) to levels that can compromise muscle excitability and hence cause fatigue. In this context, the reduction in the exercise-induced elevation of [K(+)](o) observed after training in humans is suggested to contribute to the increased performance after training. Although a similar effect could be obtained by an increase in the tolerance of muscle to elevated [K(+)](o), this possibility has not been investigated. To examine this, isolated soleus muscles from sedentary (sedentary) rats and from rats that had voluntarily covered 13.1 ± 0.7 km/day in an unloaded running wheel for 8 wk (active) were compared. In muscles from active rats, the loss of force induced by exposure to an elevated [K(+)](o) of 9 mM was 42% lower than in muscles from sedentary rats (P fibers (P fiber action potentials (AP), and higher Na(+)/K(+) pump content. When stimulated intermittently at 6.5 mM K(+), muscles from active rats displayed better endurance than muscles from sedentary rats, whereas no difference was found when the muscles were stimulated continuously at 30 or 120 Hz. We conclude that voluntary running increases muscle excitability, leading to improved tolerance to elevated [K(+)](o).

  15. An examination of the frequency-specific behavior of the mechanomyographic amplitude versus isometric torque relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, T W

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the patterns of responses for mechanomyographic (MMG) amplitude versus isometric torque in different frequency bands for the vastus lateralis (VL), rectus femoris (RF), and vastus medialis (VM) muscles. Eleven men (mean +/- SD age = 20.1 +/- 1.1 yrs) performed submaximal to maximal isometric step muscle actions of the dominant leg extensors from 10% to 100% of the maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). During each muscle action, three separate surface mechanomyographic (MMG) signals were detected from the VL, RF and VM. Each MMG signal was decomposed into 9 different frequency bands (5-15, 15-25, 25-35, 35-45, 45-55, 55-65, 65-75, 75-85, and 85-95 Hz), and the root-mean-square amplitude of the signal in each frequency band was calculated. The results showed that for the VL and RF muscles, MMG amplitude plateaued from 80-100% MVC in the 15-25 and 25-35 Hz frequency bands. For the VM, however, the plateau in MMG amplitude from 80-100% MVC occurred in the 5-15 and 15-25 Hz bands. These findings indicated that there were both muscle- and frequency-specific discrepancies in the MMG amplitude versus isometric torque relationship that could be due to differences in muscle architecture and/or fiber type composition.

  16. A COMPARISON OF TOPICAL MENTHOL TO ICE ON PAIN, EVOKED TETANIC AND VOLUNTARY FORCE DURING DELAYED ONSET MUSCLE SORENESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johar, Pramod; Grover, Varun; Topp, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Background: Pain can adversely affect muscle functioning by inhibiting muscle contractions. Delayed onset muscle soreness was used as a tool to ascertain whether a topical menthol-based analgesic or ice was more effective at reducing pain and permitting greater muscular voluntary and evoked force. Methods: Sixteen subjects were randomized to receive either a topical gel containing 3.5% menthol or topical application of ice to the non-dominant elbow flexors two days following the performance of an exercise designed to induce muscle soreness. Two days later, DOMS discomfort was treated with a menthol based analgesic or ice. Maximum voluntary contractions and evoked tetanic contractions of the non-dominant elbow flexors were measured at baseline prior to inducing muscle soreness (T1), two days following inducing DOMS after 20 (T2), 25 (T3) and 35 (T4) minutes of either menthol gel or ice therapy. Pain perception using a 10-point visual analog scale was also measured at these four data collection points. Treatment analysis included a 2 way repeated measures ANOVA (2 × 4). Results: Delayed onset muscle soreness decreased (p = 0.04) voluntary force 17.1% at T2 with no treatment effect. Tetanic force was 116.9% higher (p<0.05) with the topical analgesic than ice. Pain perception at T2 was significantly (p=0.02) less with the topical analgesic versus ice. Conclusions: Compared to ice, the topical menthol-based analgesic decreased perceived discomfort to a greater extent and permitted greater tetanic forces to be produced. Level of Evidence: Level 2b PMID:22666646

  17. Changes in muscle contractile characteristics and jump height following 24 days of unilateral lower limb suspension.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horstman, A.M.; Ruiter, C.J. de; Duijnhoven, N.T.L. van; Hopman, M.T.E.; Haan, A. de

    2012-01-01

    We measured changes in maximal voluntary and electrically evoked torque and rate of torque development because of limb unloading. We investigated whether these changes during single joint isometric muscle contractions were related to changes in jump performance involving dynamic muscle contractions

  18. Comparison of sympathetic nerve responses to neck and forearm isometric exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, S. L. Jr; Ray, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Although the autonomic and cardiovascular responses to arm and leg exercise have been studied, the sympathetic adjustments to exercise of the neck have not. The purpose of the present study was twofold: 1) to determine sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to isometric contractions of the neck extensors and 2) to compare sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to isometric exercise of the neck and forearm. METHODS: Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate were measured in nine healthy subjects while performing isometric neck extension (INE) and isometric handgrip (IHG) in the prone position. After a 3-min baseline period, subjects performed three intensities of INE for 2.5 min each: 1) unloaded (supporting head alone), 2) 10% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and 3) 30% MVC, then subjects performed two intensities (10% and 30% MVC) of IHG for 2.5 min. RESULTS: Supporting the head by itself did not significantly change any of the variables. During [NE, MAP significantly increased by 10 +/- 2 and 31 +/- 4 mm Hg and MSNA increased by 67 +/- 46 and 168 +/- 36 units/30 s for 10% and 30% MVC, respectively. IHG and INE evoked similar responses at 10% MVC, but IHG elicited higher peak MAP and MSNA at 30% MVC (37 +/- 7 mm Hg (P type composition, muscle mass, and/or muscle architecture of the neck and forearm are responsible for these differences in peak responses.

  19. Differences between measured and resultant joint moments during isometric contractions at the ankle joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arampatzis, Adamantios; Morey-Klapsing, Gaspar; Karamanidis, Kiros; DeMonte, Gianpiero; Stafilidis, Savvas; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine two hypotheses: (a) during voluntary and electrically induced isometric contractions the moments measured at the dynamometer are different from the resultant moments in the same plane around the ankle joint and (b) at a given resultant moment during electrically induced isometric contractions the ankle angle while loading is different from the ankle angle while unloading. Twenty-seven long distance runners participated in the study. All subjects performed isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) and contractions induced by electrostimulation at four different ankle-knee angle combinations on a Biodex-dynamometer. The kinematics of the leg were recorded using the vicon 624 system with eight cameras operating at 120 Hz. The main findings were: (a) the resultant moment at the ankle joint and the moment measured by the Biodex-dynamometer during isometric contractions are different, (b) during a plantar flexion effort the ankle angle changes significantly, whereas the knee angle shows only small and in most cases not significant changes, and (c) at identical resultant ankle joint moments the ankle angles are different between the loading and the unloading phases. The observed differences may lead to erroneous conclusions concerning the following: (a) diagnostic of muscle architecture, (b) estimation of the moment-ankle angle relationship and (c) estimation of the strain and hysteresis of tendons and aponeuroses.

  20. Strength Training to Contraction Failure Increases Voluntary Activation of the Quadriceps Muscle Shortly After Total Knee Arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Elin Karin; Jakobsen, Thomas Linding; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle during one set of knee extensions performed until contraction failure in patients shortly after total knee arthroplasty. DESIGN: This was a cross-sectional study of 24 patients with total knee...... arthroplasty. One set of knee extensions was performed until contraction failure, using a predetermined 10 repetition maximum loading. In the operated leg, electromyographic (EMG) activity of the lateral and medial vastus, semitendinosus, and biceps femoris muscles was recorded during the set. Muscle activity...... (%EMGmax) and median power frequency of the EMG power spectrum were calculated for each repetition decile (10%-100% contraction failure). RESULTS: Muscle activity increased significantly over contractions from a mean of 90.0 and 93.6 %EMGmax (lateral vastus and medial vastus, respectively) at 10...

  1. The effect of parameters of equilibrium-based 3-D biomechanical models on extracted muscle synergies during isometric lumbar exertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandari, A H; Sedaghat-Nejad, E; Rashedi, E; Sedighi, A; Arjmand, N; Parnianpour, M

    2016-04-11

    A hallmark of more advanced models is their higher details of trunk muscles represented by a larger number of muscles. The question is if in reality we control these muscles individually as independent agents or we control groups of them called "synergy". To address this, we employed a 3-D biomechanical model of the spine with 18 trunk muscles that satisfied equilibrium conditions at L4/5, with different cost functions. The solutions of several 2-D and 3-D tasks were arranged in a data matrix and the synergies were computed by using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) algorithms. Variance accounted for (VAF) was used to evaluate the number of synergies that emerged by the analysis, which were used to reconstruct the original muscle activations. It was showed that four and six muscle synergies were adequate to reconstruct the input data of 2-D and 3-D torque space analysis. The synergies were different by choosing alternative cost functions as expected. The constraints affected the extracted muscle synergies, particularly muscles that participated in more than one functional tasks were influenced substantially. The compositions of extracted muscle synergies were in agreement with experimental studies on healthy participants. The following computational methods show that the synergies can reduce the complexity of load distributions and allow reduced dimensional space to be used in clinical settings.

  2. Effectiveness of adding voluntary pelvic floor muscle contraction to a Pilates exercise program: an assessor-masked randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torelli, Luiza; de Jarmy Di Bella, Zsuzsanna Ilona Katalin; Rodrigues, Claudinei Alves; Stüpp, Liliana; Girão, Manoel João Batista Castello; Sartori, Marair Gracio Ferreira

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of adding voluntary pelvic floor muscle contraction (PFMC) to a Pilates exercise program in sedentary nulliparous women. Fifty-seven healthy nulliparous and physically inactive women were randomized to a Pilates exercise program (PEP) with or without PFMC. Forty-eight women concluded this study (24 participants for each group). Each woman was evaluated before and after the PEP, by a physiotherapist and an urogynecologist (UG). Neither of the professionals was revealed to them. This physiotherapist measured their pelvic floor muscle strength by using both a perineometer (Peritron) and vaginal palpation (Oxford Scale). The UG, who performed 3D perineal ultrasound examinations, collected their data and evaluated the results for pubovisceral muscle thickness and the levator hiatus area (LA). Both professionals were blinded to the group allocation. The protocol for both groups consisted of 24 bi-weekly 1-h individual sessions of Pilates exercises, developed by another physiotherapist who specializes in PFM rehabilitation and the Pilates technique. The PEP+ PFMC group showed significantly greater strength improvements than the PEP group when comparing the Oxford scale, vaginal pressure and pubovisceral muscle thickness during contraction measurements at baseline and post-treatment. Our findings suggest that adding a voluntary PFMC to a Pilates exercise program is more effective than Pilates alone in improving PFM strength in sedentary nulliparous women.

  3. Feedforward consequences of isometric contractions: effort and ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Billy L; Smith, Janette L; Martin, Peter G; McBain, Rachel A; Taylor, Janet L; Butler, Jane E

    2016-08-01

    The onset of voluntary muscle contractions causes rapid increases in ventilation and is accompanied by a sensation of effort. Both the ventilatory response and perception of effort are proportional to contraction intensity, but these behaviors have been generalized from contractions of a single muscle group. Our aim was to determine how these relationships are affected by simultaneous contractions of multiple muscle groups. We examined the ventilatory response and perceived effort of contraction during separate and simultaneous isometric contractions of the contralateral elbow flexors and of an ipsilateral elbow flexor and knee extensor. Subjects made 10-sec contractions at 25, 50, and 100% of maximum during normocapnia and hypercapnia. For simultaneous contractions, both muscle groups were activated at the same intensities. Ventilation was measured continuously and subjects rated the effort required to produce each contraction. As expected, ventilation and perceived effort increased proportionally with contraction intensity during individual contractions. However, during simultaneous contractions, neither ventilation nor effort reflected the combined muscle output. Rather, the ventilatory response was similar to when contractions were performed separately, and effort ratings showed a small but significant increase for simultaneous contractions. Hypercapnia at rest doubled baseline ventilation, but did not affect the difference in perceived effort between separate and simultaneous contractions. The ventilatory response and the sense of effort at the onset of muscle activity are not related to the total output of the motor pathways, or the working muscles, but arise from cortical regions upstream from the motor cortex.

  4. Influence of oxidative stress, diaphragm fatigue, and inspiratory muscle training on the plasma cytokine response to maximum sustainable voluntary ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Dean E; Johnson, Michael A; McPhilimey, Martin J; Williams, Neil C; Gonzalez, Javier T; Barnett, Yvonne A; Sharpe, Graham R

    2014-04-15

    The influence of oxidative stress, diaphragm fatigue, and inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on the cytokine response to maximum sustainable voluntary ventilation (MSVV) is unknown. Twelve healthy males were divided equally into an IMT or placebo (PLA) group, and before and after a 6-wk intervention they undertook, on separate days, 1 h of (1) passive rest and (2) MSVV, whereby participants undertook volitional hyperpnea at rest that mimicked the breathing and respiratory muscle recruitment patterns commensurate with heavy cycling exercise. Plasma cytokines remained unchanged during passive rest. There was a main effect of time (P ventilation and increases in plasma IL-6 concentration. In conclusion, increases in plasma IL-1β and IL-6 concentrations during MSVV were not due to diaphragm fatigue or DNA damage in PBMC. Increases in plasma IL-6 concentration during MSVV are attenuated following IMT, and the plasma IL-6 response is dependent upon the level of respiratory muscle work and minute ventilation.

  5. Voluntary muscle activation improves with power training and is associated with changes in gait speed in mobility-limited older adults - A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvid, Lars G; Strotmeyer, Elsa S; Skjødt, Mathias; Magnussen, Line V; Andersen, Marianne; Caserotti, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    Incomplete voluntary muscle activation may contribute to impaired muscle mechanical function and physical function in older adults. Exercise interventions have been shown to increase voluntary muscle activation, although the evidence is sparse for mobility-limited older adults, particularly in association with physical function. This study examined the effects of 12weeks of power training on outcomes of voluntary muscle activation and gait speed in mobility-limited older adults from the Healthy Ageing Network of Competence (HANC) study. We included 37 older men and women with a usual gait speed of analysis: n=16 in the training group (TG: 12weeks of progressive high-load power training, 2 sessions per week; age: 82.3±1.3years, 56% women) and n=21 in the control group (CG: no interventions; age: 81.6±1.1years, 67% women). Knee extensor muscle thickness (ultrasonography), strength (isokinetic dynamometry), voluntary activation (interpolated twitch technique), and gait speed (2-min maximal walking test) were assessed at baseline and post-intervention. At baseline, TG and CG were comparable for all measures. Post-intervention, significant between-group changes (TG vs. CG; pgait speed (+0.12m/s), whereas the between-group change in muscle thickness was non-significant (+0.08cm). Improvements in voluntary muscle activation were associated with improvements in gait speed in TG (r=0.67, ppower training, and is associated with improved maximal gait speed. Incomplete voluntary muscle activation should be considered one of the key mechanisms influencing muscle mechanical function and gait speed in older adults.

  6. Real-time surface electromyography in Parkinson's disease patients during exercise-induced muscle fatigue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Gao; Tong Zhang; Xia Gao

    2011-01-01

    To explore the mechanisms underlying exercise-induced local muscle fatigue in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD), we used surface electromyography to record myoelectric signals from the tibialis anterior muscle during isometric contraction-induced fatigue until exhaustion. The results revealed no significant differences between patients with idiopathic PD and healthy controls in maximum voluntary contraction of the tibialis anterior muscle. The basic characteristics of surface electromyography were also similar between the two groups. The duration of isometric contraction at 50% maximum voluntary contraction was shortened in PD patients. In addition, PD patients exhibited a stronger increase in mean square amplitude, but a weaker decrease in median frequency and mean power frequency compared with healthy controls during isometric contraction. The skeletal muscles of PD patients revealed specificity of surface electromyography findings, indicating increased fatigability compared with healthy controls.

  7. Neuromuscular control of scapula muscles during a voluntary task in subjects with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome. A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, C M; Søgaard, K; Chreiteh, S S; Holtermann, A; Juul-Kristensen, B

    2013-10-01

    Imbalance of neuromuscular activity in the scapula stabilizers in subjects with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome (SIS) is described in restricted tasks and specific populations. Our aim was to compare the scapular muscle activity during a voluntary movement task in a general population with and without SIS (n=16, No-SIS=15). Surface electromyography was measured from Serratus anterior (SA) and Trapezius during bilateral arm elevation (no-load, 1kg, 3kg). Mean relative muscle activity was calculated for SA and the upper (UT) and lower part of trapezius (LWT), in addition to activation ratio and time to activity onset. In spite of a tendency to higher activity among SIS 0.10-0.30 between-group differences were not significant neither in ratio of muscle activation 0.80-0.98 nor time to activity onset 0.53-0.98. The hypothesized between-group differences in neuromuscular activity of Trapezius and Serratus was not confirmed. The tendency to a higher relative muscle activity in SIS could be due to a pain-related increase in co-activation or a decrease in maximal activation. The negative findings may display the variation in the specific muscle activation patterns depending on the criteria used to define the population of impingement patients, as well as the methodological procedure being used, and the shoulder movement investigated.

  8. Cerebellar brain inhibition in the target and surround muscles during voluntary tonic activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyakaew, Pattamon; Cho, Hyun Joo; Srivanitchapoom, Prachaya; Popa, Traian; Wu, Tianxia; Hallett, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Motor surround inhibition is the neural mechanism that selectively favours the contraction of target muscles and inhibits nearby muscles to prevent unwanted movements. This inhibition was previously reported at the onset of a movement, but not during a tonic contraction. Cerebellar brain inhibition (CBI) is reduced in active muscles during tonic activation; however, it has not been studied in the surround muscles. CBI was evaluated in the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) muscle as the target muscle, and the abductor digiti minimi, flexor carpi radialis and extensor carpi radialis muscles as surround muscles, during rest and tonic activation of the FDI muscle in 21 subjects. Cerebellar stimulation was performed under magnetic resonance imaging-guided neuronavigation targeting lobule VIII of the cerebellar hemisphere. Stimulus intensities for cerebellar stimulation were based on the resting motor cortex threshold (RMT) and adjusted for the depth difference between the cerebellar and motor cortices. We used 90-120% of the adjusted RMT as the conditioning stimulus intensity during rest. The intensity that generated the best CBI at rest in the FDI muscle was selected for use during tonic activation. During selective tonic activation of the FDI muscle, CBI was significantly reduced only for the FDI muscle, and not for the surround muscles. Unconditioned motor evoked potential sizes were increased in all muscles during FDI muscle tonic activation as compared with rest, despite background electromyography activity increasing only for the FDI muscle. Our study suggests that the cerebellum may play an important role in selective tonic finger movement by reducing its inhibition in the motor cortex only for the relevant agonist muscle.

  9. No evidence of neural adaptations following chronic unilateral isometric training of the intrinsic muscles of the hand: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manca, A; Ginatempo, F; Cabboi, M P; Mercante, B; Ortu, E; Dragone, D; De Natale, E R; Dvir, Z; Rothwell, J C; Deriu, Franca

    2016-10-01

    To test whether long-term cortical adaptations occur bilaterally following chronic unilateral training with a simple motor task. Participants (n = 34) were randomly allocated to a training or control groups. Only the former completed a 4-week maximal-intensity isometric training of the right first dorsal interosseus muscle through key pinching. Maximal strength was assessed bilaterally in four different movements progressively less similar to the training task: key, tip and tripod pinches, and handgrip. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to probe, in the left and right primary hand motor cortices, a number of standard tests of cortical excitability, including thresholds, intra-cortical inhibition and facilitation, transcallosal inhibition, and sensory-motor integration. Training increased strength in the trained hand, but only for the tasks specifically involving the trained muscle (key +8.5 %; p hand, i.e., a cross-education effect (key +6.4 %; p = 0.02; tip +4.7 %; p = 0.007). Despite these changes in strength, no significant variation was observed in any of the neurophysiological parameters describing cortico-spinal and intra-cortical excitability, inter-hemispheric inhibition, and cortical sensory-motor integration. A 4-week maximal-intensity unilateral training induced bilaterally spatial- and task-specific strength gains, which were not associated to direct or crossed cortical adaptations. The observed long-term stability of neurophysiological parameters might result from homeostatic plasticity phenomena, aimed at restoring the physiological inter-hemispheric balance of neural activity levels perturbed by the exercise. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02010398.

  10. Isometric cervical extension strength of recreational and experienced cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, K; Nichols, J; Holmes, B; Buono, M

    1995-06-01

    The effect for cyclists of the typical forward sitting position on neck strength and its possible relationship to neck pain have not been examined. The purpose of this study was to measure the peak isometric cervical extension strength (PICES) of both recreational and experienced road cyclists and to compare these values to those of noncyclists. Subjects, 45 men between the ages of 18 and 40, were tested for voluntary PICES through a 126 degrees range of motion on a MedX cervical extension machine. No significant differences were found between the three groups in PICES at any angle. When expressed relative to body weight, significant differences in PICES were found at 126 degrees between the control group and the recreational cyclist group (p cycling, rather than from muscle weakness.

  11. In vivo human gastrocnemius architecture with changing joint angle at rest and during graded isometric contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narici, M V; Binzoni, T; Hiltbrand, E; Fasel, J; Terrier, F; Cerretelli, P

    1996-10-01

    1. Human gastrocnemius medialis architecture was analysed in vivo, by ultrasonography, as a function of joint angle at rest and during voluntary isometric contractions up to the maximum force (MCV). maximum force (MVC). 2. At rest, as ankle joint angle increased from 90 to 150 deg, pennation increased from 15.8 to 27.7 deg, fibre length decreased from 57.0 to 34.0 mm and the physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) increased from 42.1 to 63.5 cm2. 3. From rest to MVC, at a fixed ankle joint angle of 110 deg, pennation angle increased from 15.5 to 33.6 deg and fibre length decreased from 50.8 to 32.9 mm, with no significant change in the distance between the aponeuroses. As a result of these changes the PCSA increased by 34.8%. 4. Measurements of pennation angle, fibre length and distance between the aponeuroses of the gastrocnemius medialis were also performed by ultrasound on a cadaver leg and found to be in good agreement with direct anatomical measurements. 5. It is concluded that human gastrocnemius medialis architecture is significantly affected both by changes of joint angle at rest and by isometric contraction intensity. The remarkable shortening observed during isometric contraction suggests that, at rest, the gastrocnemius muscle and tendon are considerably slack. The extrapolation of muscle architectural data obtained from cadavers to in vivo conditions should be made only for matching muscle lengths.

  12. Comparison of exogenous adenosine and voluntary exercise on human skeletal muscle perfusion and perfusion heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinonen, Ilkka H.A.; Kemppainen, Jukka; Kaskinoro, Kimmo;

    2010-01-01

    femoral artery infusion of adenosine (1 mg * min(-1) * litre thigh volume(-1)), which has previously been shown to induce maximal whole thigh blood flow of ~8 L/min. This response was compared to the blood flow induced by moderate-high intensity one-leg dynamic knee extension exercise. Adenosine increased...... muscle. Additionally, it remains to be determined what proportion of adenosine-induced flow elevation is specifically directed to muscle only. In the present study we measured thigh muscle capillary nutritive blood flow in nine healthy young men using positron emission tomography at rest and during...... muscle blood flow on average to 40 +/- 7 ml. min(-1) per 100g(-1) of muscle and an aggregate value of 2.3 +/- 0.6 L * min(-1) for the whole thigh musculature. Adenosine also induced a substantial change in blood flow distribution within individuals. Muscle blood flow during adenosine infusion...

  13. Muscle tissue oxygenation, pressure, electrical, and mechanical responses during dynamic and static voluntary contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsted, Pernille; Blangsted, Anne Katrine; Søgaard, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Dynamic muscle contractions have been shown to cause greater energy turnover and fatigue than static contractions performed at a corresponding force level. Therefore, we hypothesized that: (1) electro- (EMG) and mechanomyography (MMG), intramuscular pressure (IMP), and reduction in muscle oxygen...... similar in spite of major differences in the MMG and EMG responses of the muscle during contraction periods. This may relate to the surprisingly lower IMP in DYN than IST....

  14. The Effect of Sports Dance on the Elderly Lower Limb Isometric Muscle Strength Index%体育舞蹈对老年人下肢等长肌力指标的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙莉琴

    2015-01-01

    目的:研究体育舞蹈对老年男性下肢等长肌力的影响及对肌力下降的预防和康复治疗作用。方法:在问卷调查的基础上,筛选20名参与体育舞蹈健身运动2年以上的老年人为体育舞蹈组,20名无体育舞蹈和其它健身运动的老年人为对照组。结果:与老年对照组相比,老年体育舞蹈组的下肢等长肌力显著增大(P<0.01)。结论:老年人下肢等长肌力显著下降;体育舞蹈有助于改善下肢等长肌力持续收缩时间,增强等长肌力,对老年性下肢等长肌力下降具有预防和康复治疗作用。%Objective: To research the effects of sport dance on isometric muscle force of lower limb in the male elderly and the prevention and rehabilitation treatment muscle weakness. Methods: On the questionnaire, screening 20 elderly men who go into sport dance over two year as the sports dance group and the 20 elderly men whithout sport dance or other exercises as the control group. Results:Compared with the control group, lower limb isometric muscle force in the sports dance group was increased significantly (P<0.01). Conclusions: The lower limb isometric muscle force in the elderly was decreased significantly. Sports dance was contributive to improve continuing contraction time and increase isometric muscle force. Sports dance have prevention and rehabilitation action to senile lower limb isometric force weakness.

  15. Comparison of sympathetic nerve responses to neck and forearm isometric exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, S. L. Jr; Ray, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Although the autonomic and cardiovascular responses to arm and leg exercise have been studied, the sympathetic adjustments to exercise of the neck have not. The purpose of the present study was twofold: 1) to determine sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to isometric contractions of the neck extensors and 2) to compare sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to isometric exercise of the neck and forearm. METHODS: Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate were measured in nine healthy subjects while performing isometric neck extension (INE) and isometric handgrip (IHG) in the prone position. After a 3-min baseline period, subjects performed three intensities of INE for 2.5 min each: 1) unloaded (supporting head alone), 2) 10% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and 3) 30% MVC, then subjects performed two intensities (10% and 30% MVC) of IHG for 2.5 min. RESULTS: Supporting the head by itself did not significantly change any of the variables. During [NE, MAP significantly increased by 10 +/- 2 and 31 +/- 4 mm Hg and MSNA increased by 67 +/- 46 and 168 +/- 36 units/30 s for 10% and 30% MVC, respectively. IHG and INE evoked similar responses at 10% MVC, but IHG elicited higher peak MAP and MSNA at 30% MVC (37 +/- 7 mm Hg (P architecture of the neck and forearm are responsible for these differences in peak responses.

  16. Fast unilateral isometric knee extension torque development and bilateral jump height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruiter, Cornelis J; Van Leeuwen, Daniel; Heijblom, Arjan; Bobbert, Maarten F; de Haan, Arnold

    2006-10-01

    We hypothesized that the initial rate (first 40 ms) of unilateral knee extensor torque development during a maximally fast isometric contraction would depend on the subjects' ability for fast neural activation and that it would predict bilateral jumping performance. Nine males (21.8 +/- 0.9 yr, means +/- SD) performed unilateral fast isometric knee extensions (120 degrees knee angle) without countermovement on a dynamometer and bilateral squat jumps (SJ) and countermovement jumps (CMJ) starting from 90 and 120 degrees knee angles (full extension = 180 degrees ). The dynamometer contractions started either from full relaxation or from an isometric pre-tension (15% maximal isometric torque, Tmax). Torque time integral for the first 40 ms after torque onset (TTI-40, normalized to Tmax) and averaged normalized rectified knee extensor EMG for 40 ms before fast torque onset (EMG-40) were used to quantify initial torque rise and voluntary muscle activation. TTI-40 without pre-tension (range: 0.02-0.19% Tmax per second) was significantly lower than TTI-40 with pre-tension, and both were significantly (r = 0.81 and 0.80) related to EMG-40. During jumping, similar significant positive relations were found between jump height and knee extensor EMG during the first 100 ms of the rise in ground reaction force. There also were significant positive linear relations between dynamometer TTI-40 and jump height (r = 0.75 (SJ 90), 0.84 (SJ 120), 0.76 (CMJ 90), and 0.86 (CMJ 120)) but not between dynamometer Tmax and jump height (-0.16 < r < 0.02). One-legged TTI-40 to a large extent explained the variation in jump height. The ability to produce a high efferent neural drive before muscle contraction seemed to dominate performance in both the simple single-joint isometric task and the complex multijoint dynamic task.

  17. Long-term paired associative stimulation can restore voluntary control over paralyzed muscles in incomplete chronic spinal cord injury patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulga, Anastasia; Lioumis, Pantelis; Zubareva, Aleksandra; Brandstack, Nina; Kuusela, Linda; Kirveskari, Erika; Savolainen, Sarianna; Ylinen, Aarne; Mäkelä, Jyrki P

    2016-01-01

    Emerging therapeutic strategies for spinal cord injury aim at sparing or restoring at least part of the corticospinal tract at the acute stage. Hence, approaches that strengthen the weak connections that are spared or restored are crucial. Transient plastic changes in the human corticospinal tract can be induced through paired associative stimulation, a noninvasive technique in which transcranial magnetic brain stimulation is synchronized with electrical peripheral nerve stimulation. A single paired associative stimulation session can induce transient plasticity in spinal cord injury patients. It is not known whether paired associative stimulation can strengthen neuronal connections persistently and have therapeutic effects that are clinically relevant. We recruited two patients with motor-incomplete chronic (one para- and one tetraplegic) spinal cord injuries. The patients received paired associative stimulation for 20-24 weeks. The paraplegic patient, previously paralyzed below the knee level, regained plantarflexion and dorsiflexion of the ankles of both legs. The tetraplegic patient regained grasping ability. The newly acquired voluntary movements could be performed by the patients in the absence of stimulation and for at least 1 month after the last stimulation session. In this unblinded proof-of-principle demonstration in two subjects, long-term paired associative stimulation induced persistent and clinically relevant strengthening of neural connections and restored voluntary movement in previously paralyzed muscles. Further study is needed to confirm whether long-term paired associative stimulation can be used in rehabilitation after spinal cord injury by itself and, possibly, in combination with other therapeutic strategies.

  18. Interaction of poststroke voluntary effort and functional neuromuscular electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Nathaniel; Knutson, Jayme; Chae, John; Crago, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) may be able to augment functional arm and hand movement after stroke. Poststroke neuroprostheses that incorporate voluntary effort and FES to produce the desired movement must consider how forces generated by voluntary effort and FES combine, even in the same muscle, in order to provide an appropriate level of stimulation to elicit the desired assistive force. The goal of this study was to determine whether the force produced by voluntary effort and FES add together independently of effort or whether the increment in force depends on the level of voluntary effort. Isometric force matching tasks were performed under different combinations of voluntary effort and FES. Participants reached a steady level of force, and while attempting to maintain a constant effort level, FES was applied to augment the force. Results indicate that the increment in force produced by FES decreases as the level of initial voluntary effort increases. Potential mechanisms causing the change in force output are proposed, but the relative contribution of each mechanism is unknown.

  19. Standardized voluntary force measurement in a lower extremity rehabilitation robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolliger Marc

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Isometric force measurements in the lower extremity are widely used in rehabilitation of subjects with neurological movement disorders (NMD because walking ability has been shown to be related to muscle strength. Therefore muscle strength measurements can be used to monitor and control the effects of training programs. A new method to assess isometric muscle force was implemented in the driven gait orthosis (DGO Lokomat. To evaluate the capabilities of this new measurement method, inter- and intra-rater reliability were assessed. Methods Reliability was assessed in subjects with and without NMD. Subjects were tested twice on the same day by two different therapists to test inter-rater reliability and on two separate days by the same therapist to test intra-rater reliability. Results Results showed fair to good reliability for the new measurement method to assess isometric muscle force of lower extremities. In subjects without NMD, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC for inter-rater reliability ranged from 0.72 to 0.97 and intra-rater reliability from 0.71 to 0.90. In subjects with NMD, ICC ranged from 0.66 to 0.97 for inter-rater and from 0.50 to 0.96 for intra-rater reliability. Conclusion Inter- and intra- rater reliability of an assessment method for measuring maximal voluntary isometric muscle force of lower extremities was demonstrated. We suggest that this method is a valuable tool for documentation and controlling of the rehabilitation process in patients using a DGO.

  20. Impaired voluntary neuromuscular activation limits muscle power in mobility-limited older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background. Age-related alterations of neuromuscular activation may contribute to deficits in muscle power and mobility function. This study assesses whether impaired activation of the agonist quadriceps and antagonist hamstrings, including amplitude- and velocity-dependent characteristics of activa...

  1. Age and Sex Effects on the Active Stiffness of Vastus Intermedius under Isometric Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong-Zhi Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously, a novel technique was proposed to quantify the relationship between the muscle stiffness and its nonfatigue contraction intensity. The method extended the measured range of isometric contraction to 100% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC using an ultrasonic shear wave measurement setup. Yet, it has not been revealed how this relationship could be affected by factors like age or sex. To clarify these questions, vastus intermedius (VI stiffness of 40 healthy subjects was assessed under 11 step levels of isometric contraction. The subjects were divided into four groups: young males, young females, elderly males, and elderly females (n=10 for each. In a relaxed state, no significant difference was observed between the male and female subjects (p=0.156 nor between the young and elderly subjects (p=0.221. However, when performing isometric contraction, the VI stiffness of males was found to be significantly higher than that of females at the same level (p<0.001, and that of the young was higher than the elderly (p<0.001. Meanwhile, for two knee joint angles used, the stiffness measured at a 90° knee joint angle was always significantly larger than that measured at 60° (p<0.001. Recognizing the active muscle stiffness of VI contributes to body stability, and these results may provide insight into the age and sex bias in musculoskeletal studies, such as those on fall risks.

  2. A Study on the Differences of Quadriceps Femoris Activities by Knee Alignment during Isometric Contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seol; Ko, Yu-Min; Jang, Gwon-Uk; Hwang, Yoon-Tae; Park, Ji-Won

    2014-11-01

    [Purpose] This study attempted to identify how genu varum or valgum affects the electromyographic activities of the vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, and rectus femoris during knee isometric contraction. [Subjects] Fifty-two healthy young adults were enrolled in this study. They were enrolled and classified into three groups by knee alignment conditions: the genu varum, genu valgum, and control groups. [Methods] The electromyographic activity ratio of the vastus medialis to the vastus lateralis and rectus femoris were calculated using the percentage of maximum voluntary contraction. The participants contracted their quadriceps during isometric contraction at 30 and 60° of knee flexion. [Results] The genu varum group had more activity in the vastus medialis than in the vastus lateralis and rectus femoris, whereas the genu valgum group had more activity in the vastus lateralis and rectus femoris than in the vastus medialis. There was a significant difference in the muscle activity ratio between the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis by angle of knee flexion degree only in the genu valgum. There were no significant differences in any of the three groups in terms of the muscle activity ratio of the vastus medialis to the rectus femoris by angle of knee flexion. [Conclusion] The quadriceps femoris was used for different strategies according to knee alignment during isometric contraction at 30 and 60°. This study suggests that rehabilitation training programs used to strengthen the quadriceps should consider the knee alignment conditions of the target subjects.

  3. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction studies of myosin head movements in live frog sartorius muscle during isometric and isotonic contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Fernandez, M L; Bordas, J; Diakun, G; Harries, J; Lowy, J; Mant, G R; Svensson, A; Towns-Andrews, E

    1994-06-01

    Using the facilities at the Daresbury Synchrotron Radiation Source, meridional diffraction patterns of muscles at ca 8 degrees C were recorded with a time resolution of 2 or 4 ms. In isometric contractions tetanic peak tension (P0) is reached in ca 400 ms. Under such conditions, following stimulation from rest, the timing of changes in the major reflections (the 38.2 nm troponin reflection, and the 21.5 and 14.34/14.58 nm myosin reflections) can be explained in terms of four types of time courses: K1, K2, K3 and K4. The onset of K1 occurs immediately after stimulation, but that of K2, K3 and K4 is delayed by a latent period of ca 16 ms. Relative to the end of their own latent periods the half-times for K1, K2, K3 and K4 are 14-16, 16, 32 and 52 ms, respectively. In half-times, K1, K2, K3 lead tension rise by 52, 36 and 20 ms, respectively. K4 parallels the time course of tension rise. From an analysis of the data we conclude that K1 reflects thin filament activation which involves the troponin system; K2 arises from an order-disorder transition during which the register between the filaments is lost; K3 is due to the formation of an acto-myosin complex which (at P0) causes 70% or more of the heads to diffract with actin-based periodicities; and K4 is caused by a change in the axial orientation of the myosin heads (relative to thin filament axis) which is estimated to be from 65-70 degrees at rest to ca 90 degrees at P0. Isotonic contraction experiments showed that during shortening under a load of ca 0.27 P0, at least 85% of the heads (relative to those forming an acto-myosin complex at P0) diffract with actin-based periodicities, whilst their axial orientation does not change from that at rest. During shortening under a negligible load, at most 5-10% of the heads (relative to those forming an acto-myosin complex at P0) diffract with actin-based periodicities, and their axial orientation also remains the same as that at rest. This suggests that in isometric

  4. A silent period in sural muscle occurring prior to the voluntary forward inclination of the body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwase, Y; Uchida, T; Takanashi, Y; Suzuki, N; Hashimoto, M; Yamamoto, Y; Takegami, T; Koyama, H

    1981-01-20

    A silent period lasting for 300-500 msec was observed in triceps surae muscle when the subject inclined forward from the normal standing. This silent period preceded 100 msec or more the beginning of the body inclination and was terminated by an abrupt refiring in the midst of the body swing. The silence was not preceded by the increase in activity of the sural muscle itself or any other leg muscles studied. H-reflex in soleus was strongly inhibited or disappeared during the silent period, indicating that the excitability of the spinal motoneurons was greatly decreased during this period. These findings suggest that the silent period was not induced by some reflex activity in the spinal cord, but was caused by the inhibitory activity based on a central program on the spinal motoneurons.

  5. The effects of verbal encouragement and conscientiousness on maximal voluntary contraction of the triceps surae muscle in elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binboğa, Erdal; Tok, Serdar; Catikkas, Fatih; Guven, Senol; Dane, Senol

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effect of verbal encouragement on maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) level of the triceps surae muscle group. Our secondary focus was to examine whether the effect of verbal encouragement on MVC level varies as a result of conscientiousness. While the participants performed plantar flexion, MVCs of the triceps surae muscle group were measured using rectified and smoothed surface electromyography (rsEMG) during the absence and presence of verbal encouragement. Participants completed questions from the Five Factor Personality Inventory concerning conscientiousness and were divided into high- and low-conscientiousness groups according to a median split. The sample included 30 female and 53 male elite athletes. In the entire cohort, there was no significant difference in MVCs with and without verbal encouragement. When the sample was partitioned by conscientiousness scores, verbal encouragement led to a significant increase in MVC in the low-conscientiousness group, whereas verbal encouragement led to a non-significant decrease in MVC in the high-conscientiousness group. Percentage change in MVC across experimental conditions was significantly different between the groups, with a 9.72% increase during verbal encouragement of the low-conscientiousness group, and a 2.47% decrease during verbal encouragement of the high-conscientiousness group.

  6. Adaptive responses of GLUT-4 and citrate synthase in fast-twitch muscle of voluntary running rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, E. J.; Halseth, A. E.

    1995-01-01

    Glucose transporter (GLUT-4) protein, hexokinase, and citrate synthase (proteins involved in oxidative energy production from blood glucose catabolism) increase in response to chronically elevated neuromuscular activity. It is currently unclear whether these proteins increase in a coordinated manner in response to this stimulus. Therefore, voluntary wheel running (WR) was used to chronically overload the fast-twitch rat plantaris muscle and the myocardium, and the early time courses of adaptative responses of GLUT-4 protein and the activities of hexokinase and citrate synthase were characterized and compared. Plantaris hexokinase activity increased 51% after just 1 wk of WR, whereas GLUT-4 and citrate synthase were increased by 51 and 40%, respectively, only after 2 wk of WR. All three variables remained comparably elevated (+50-64%) through 4 wk of WR. Despite the overload of the myocardium with this protocol, no substantial elevations in these variables were observed. These findings are consistent with a coordinated upregulation of GLUT-4 and citrate synthase in the fast-twitch plantaris, but not in the myocardium, in response to this increased neuromuscular activity. Regulation of hexokinase in fast-twitch muscle appears to be uncoupled from regulation of GLUT-4 and citrate synthase, as increases in the former are detectable well before increases in the latter.

  7. Acute fatigue impairs neuromuscular activity of anterior cruciate ligament-agonist muscles in female team handball players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zebis, M K; Bencke, J; Andersen, L L

    2011-01-01

    In sports, like team handball, fatigue has been associated with an increased risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. While effects of fatigue on muscle function are commonly assessed during maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MVC), such measurements may not relate to the muscle...... for neuromuscular activity [electromyography (EMG)] during a sidecutting maneuver on a force plate, pre and post a simulated handball match. MVC was obtained during maximal isometric quadriceps and hamstring contraction. The simulated handball match consisted of exercises mimicking handball match activity. Whereas...... the simulated handball match induced a decrease in MVC strength for both the quadriceps and hamstring muscles (P

  8. Decreased QOL and muscle strength are persistent 1 year after intramedullary nailing of a tibial shaft fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter; Elsoe, Rasmus; Laessoe, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    was measured with the questionnaire Eq5D-5L and compared to norm data from a reference population. Recordings of pain and contralateral muscle strength (isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) for knee flexion and extension were collected at 6 weeks, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Ipsilateral MVCs...

  9. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ELECTRICAL AND VIBRATORY OUTPUT OF MUSCLE DURING VOLUNTARY CONTRACTION AND FATIGUE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZWARTS, MJ; KEIDEL, M

    1991-01-01

    Measurements were done on the biceps muscles of 6 healthy volunteers to record simultaneously the surface electromyogram (EMG) and vibromyogram (VMG) by means of a piezoelectric device (accelerometer). The VMG is generated by mechanical waves due to the contraction mechanism and often measured as so

  10. The isometric athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, J C; Stebbins, C L

    1992-05-01

    A number of normal daily and athletic activities require isometric or static exercise. Such sports as weight lifting and other high-resistance activities are used by athletes to gain strength and skeletal muscle bulk. However, static exercise also causes significant increases in blood pressure, heart rate, myocardial contractility, and cardiac output. These changes occur in response to central neural irradiation, called central command, as well as a reflex originating from statically contracting muscle. Studies have demonstrated that blood pressure appears to be the regulated variable, presumably because the increased pressure provides blood flow into muscles that have compressed their arterial inflow as a result of increases in intramuscular pressure created by contraction. Thus, static exercise is characterized by a pressure load to the heart and can be differentiated from dynamic (isotonic) exercise, which involves a volume load to the heart. Physical training with static exercise leads to concentric cardiac, particularly left ventricular, hypertrophy, whereas training with dynamic exercise leads to eccentric hypertrophy. Furthermore, the magnitude of cardiac hypertrophy is much less in athletes training with static than dynamic exercise. Neither systolic nor diastolic function is altered by the hypertrophic process associated with static exercise training. Many of the energy requirements for static exercise, particularly during more severe levels of exercise, are met by anaerobic glycolysis because the contracting muscle becomes deprived of blood flow. Training with repetitive static exercise therefore causes little increase in oxygen transport capacity, so that maximal oxygen consumption is either not or only minimally increased. Peripheral cardiovascular adaptations also can occur in response to static exercise training. Although controversial, these adaptations include modest decreases in resting blood pressure, smaller increases in blood pressure during a

  11. Intermuscular force transmission between human plantarflexor muscles in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen-Møller, Jens; Bojsen-Møller, Jens; Schwartz, Sidse;

    2010-01-01

    of the present study was to investigate if intermuscular force transmission occurs within and between human plantarflexor muscles in vivo. Seven subjects performed four types of either active contractile tasks or passive joint manipulations: passive knee extension, voluntary isometric plantarflexion, voluntary...... isometric hallux flexion, passive hallux extension, and selective percutaneous stimulation of the gastrocnemius medialis (MG). In each experiment plantar- and hallux flexion force and corresponding EMG activity were sampled. During all tasks ultrasonography was applied at proximal and distal sites to assess...... task-induced tissue displacement (which is assumed to represent loading) for the plantarflexor muscles [MG, soleus (SOL), and flexor hallucis longus (FHL)]. Selective MG stimulation and passive knee extension resulted in displacement of both the MG and SOL muscles. Minimal displacement of the triceps...

  12. Effect of repeated forearm muscle cooling on the adaptation of skeletal muscle metabolism in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Hitoshi; Nishimura, Takayuki; Wijayanto, Titis; Watanuki, Shigeki; Tochihara, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of repeated cooling of forearm muscle on adaptation in skeletal muscle metabolism. It is hypothesized that repeated decreases of muscle temperature would increase the oxygen consumption in hypothermic skeletal muscle. Sixteen healthy males participated in this study. Their right forearm muscles were locally cooled to 25 °C by cooling pads attached to the skin. This local cooling was repeated eight times on separate days for eight participants (experimental group), whereas eight controls received no cold exposure. To evaluate adaptation in skeletal muscle metabolism, a local cooling test was conducted before and after the repeated cooling period. Change in oxy-hemoglobin content in the flexor digitorum at rest and during a 25-s isometric handgrip (10% maximal voluntary construction) was measured using near-infrared spectroscopy at every 2 °C reduction in forearm muscle temperature. The arterial blood flow was occluded for 15 s by upper arm cuff inflation at rest and during the isometric handgrip. The oxygen consumption in the flexor digitorum muscle was evaluated by a slope of the oxy-hemoglobin change during the arterial occlusion. In the experimental group, resting oxygen consumption in skeletal muscle did not show any difference between pre- and post-intervention, whereas muscle oxygen consumption during the isometric handgrip was significantly higher in post-intervention than in pre-test from thermoneutral baseline to 31 °C muscle temperature (P < 0.05). This result indicated that repeated local muscle cooling might facilitate oxidative metabolism in the skeletal muscle. In summary, skeletal muscle metabolism during submaximal isometric handgrip was facilitated after repeated local muscle cooling.

  13. Effect of repeated forearm muscle cooling on the adaptation of skeletal muscle metabolism in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Hitoshi; Nishimura, Takayuki; Wijayanto, Titis; Watanuki, Shigeki; Tochihara, Yutaka

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of repeated cooling of forearm muscle on adaptation in skeletal muscle metabolism. It is hypothesized that repeated decreases of muscle temperature would increase the oxygen consumption in hypothermic skeletal muscle. Sixteen healthy males participated in this study. Their right forearm muscles were locally cooled to 25 °C by cooling pads attached to the skin. This local cooling was repeated eight times on separate days for eight participants (experimental group), whereas eight controls received no cold exposure. To evaluate adaptation in skeletal muscle metabolism, a local cooling test was conducted before and after the repeated cooling period. Change in oxy-hemoglobin content in the flexor digitorum at rest and during a 25-s isometric handgrip (10% maximal voluntary construction) was measured using near-infrared spectroscopy at every 2 °C reduction in forearm muscle temperature. The arterial blood flow was occluded for 15 s by upper arm cuff inflation at rest and during the isometric handgrip. The oxygen consumption in the flexor digitorum muscle was evaluated by a slope of the oxy-hemoglobin change during the arterial occlusion. In the experimental group, resting oxygen consumption in skeletal muscle did not show any difference between pre- and post-intervention, whereas muscle oxygen consumption during the isometric handgrip was significantly higher in post-intervention than in pre-test from thermoneutral baseline to 31 °C muscle temperature ( P muscle cooling might facilitate oxidative metabolism in the skeletal muscle. In summary, skeletal muscle metabolism during submaximal isometric handgrip was facilitated after repeated local muscle cooling.

  14. Metabolic adaptations of skeletal muscle to voluntary wheel running exercise in hypertensive heart failure rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, R L; Kullman, E L; Waters, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    The Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rat mimics the human progression of hypertension from hypertrophy to heart failure. However, it is unknown whether SHHF animals can exercise at sufficient levels to observe beneficial biochemical adaptations in skeletal muscle. Thirty-seven female...... SHHF and Wistar-Furth (WF) rats were randomized to sedentary (SHHFsed and WFsed) and exercise groups (SHHFex and WFex). The exercise groups had access to running wheels from 6-22 months of age. Hindlimb muscles were obtained for metabolic measures that included mitochondrial enzyme function...... and expression, and glycogen utilization. The SHHFex rats ran a greater distance and duration as compared to the WFex rats (Pmuscle citrate synthase and beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase enzyme activity was not altered in the SHHFex group...

  15. Myofibrillar proteolysis in response to voluntary or electrically stimulated muscle contractions in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M; Trappe, T; Crameri, R M;

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge about the effects of exercise on myofibrillar protein breakdown in human subjects is limited. Our purpose was to measure the changes in the degradation of myofibrillar proteins in response to different ways of eliciting muscle contractions using the local interstitial 3-methyl-histidine......Knowledge about the effects of exercise on myofibrillar protein breakdown in human subjects is limited. Our purpose was to measure the changes in the degradation of myofibrillar proteins in response to different ways of eliciting muscle contractions using the local interstitial 3-methyl....... Only after ES did the histochemical stainings show significant disruption of cytoskeletal proteins. Furthermore, intracellular disruption and destroyed Z-lines were markedly more pronounced in ES vs VOL. In conclusion, the local level of interstitial 3-MH in the skeletal muscle was significantly...... enhanced after ES compared with VOL immediately after exercise, while the level of 3-MH did not change in the post-exercise period after VOL. These results indicate that the local myofibrillar breakdown is accelerated after ES associated with severe myofiber damage....

  16. Voluntary activation of ankle muscles is accompanied by subcortical facilitation of their antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertsen, Svend Sparre; Zuur, Abraham T.; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2010-01-01

    Flexion and extension movements are organized reciprocally, so that extensor motoneurones in the spinal cord are inhibited when flexor muscles are active and vice versa. During and just prior to dorsiflexion of the ankle, soleus motoneurones are thus inhibited as evidenced by a depression...... MEPs were also facilitated (although to a lesser extent) at a similar time in relation to the onset of dorsiflexion. TA MEPs were facilitated 50 ms prior to onset of dorsiflexion and neither depressed nor facilitated prior to plantar flexion. No difference was found between the facilitation...

  17. Reflexes in the shoulder muscles elicited from the human coracoacromial ligament

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Louise Pyndt; Nørregaard, Jesper; Krogsgaard, Michael

    2004-01-01

    into the CAL in seven normal shoulders. Electric activity was recorded from eight shoulder muscles by surface and intramuscular electrodes. During isometric contractions, electrical stimulation was applied to the CAL at two different stimulus intensities, a weak stimulus (stim-1) and a stronger stimulus (stim......-2). In both experiments, electrical stimulation of the CAL elicited a general inhibition in the voluntary activated shoulder muscles. In study I the average latencies (mean+/-SE) of the muscular inhibition were 66+/-4 ms (stim-1) and 62+/-4 ms (stim-2) during isometric flexion and 73+/-3 ms (stim-1...

  18. [Motor unit activities of human masseter muscle during sustained voluntary contractions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, T

    1990-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the motor unit activities of the human masseter muscle during sustained the bite force at a constant level. The electrical activities recorded with surface and inserted electrodes were studied, with the following results. 1. The masseter muscle had the changes of activities in two phases as a contraction progressed. 2. In the first phase, surface EMG activities decreased and discharge frequency of motor units also decreased. 3. In the second phase, surface EMG activities increased and discharge frequency of motor units also increased. 4. In the first phase, it was suggested that the bite force was maintained by an increase in the twitch tension produced by a motor unit and that there were no recruitment of additional motor units. 5. In the second phase, it was indicated that the bite force was maintained by the recruitment of new motor units and an increase in the discharge frequency of motor units to compensate a loss of force resulted from the contractile element fatigue.

  19. 表面肌电信号指标评价低负荷等长收缩诱发屈肘肌疲劳的敏感性和稳定性分析%Sensitivity and Stability of sEMG in Evaluating Muscle Fatigue Caused by Isometric Contractions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王乐军; 陆爱云; 范年春; 郑樊慧; 董菲; 张磊

    2013-01-01

    目的:分析表面肌电(sEMG)信号指标评定低负荷等长收缩诱发运动性肌肉疲劳的敏感性和稳定性,为疲劳评价提供参考.方法:以15名男性青年志愿者为研究对象,先测试受试者屈肘关节最大自主收缩力矩(Maximal Voluntary Contration,MVC),令受试者右臂腕部拉住可在肘关节处产生20%MVC的重物,记录右侧肱桡肌和肱二头肌sEMG,至不能坚持负荷时结束实验.计算时域指标均方根振幅(RMS),基于傅里叶变换计算中值频率(MF)和平均功率频率(MPF),基于小波包分析计算中值频率(MDF)和平均功率频率(MNF),基于非线性分析计算Lempel-Ziv复杂度C(n).评定上述指标在低负荷等长收缩诱发屈肘肌疲劳方面的敏感性和稳定性.结果:肱二头肌与肱桡肌sEMG的RMS随负荷实验持续时间延长表现出逐渐增加的趋势,而MF、MPF、MDF、MNF、C(n)则表现出逐渐减小的趋势.MF、MPF、MDF、MNF、C(n)与负荷运动持续时间之间具有显著负相关,RMS与负荷运动持续时间之间具有显著的正相关.肱二头肌与肱桡肌RMS反映疲劳的敏感性和稳定性优于其他指标.结论:由于低负荷收缩诱发疲劳引起募集运动单位数量增加等因素作用,RMS表现出较显著的增加趋势,是评定由低负荷等长收缩诱发屈肘肌疲劳的较好指标.%Objective The sensitivity and stability of sEMG during muscle fatigue induced by isometric contraction was evaluated. Methods Fifteen young man participated in this experiment. The isomeric contraction of elbow flexion was performed with the load of 20% individual maximal voluntary contraction. At the same time, sEMG signals were collected from biceps brachi (BB) and brachioradialis (BR), then root mean square (RMS),Fourier transformation-based medium frequency (MF) and mean power frequency (MPF) .wavelet packet transformation-based medium frequency (MDF) and mean power frequency (MNF), and nonlinear Lempel-Ziv complexity (Cn) were

  20. Physiological alterations of maximal voluntary quadriceps activation by changes of knee joint angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, R; Awiszus, F

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of different angles of the knee joint on voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle, estimating the ability of a subject to activate a muscle maximally by means of voluntary contraction. Isometric torque measurement was performed on 6 healthy subjects in 5 degrees intervals between 30 degrees and 90 degrees of knee joint flexion. Superimposed twitches at maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and at a level of 60% and 40% of the MVC were applied and the voluntary activation estimated. At between 30 degrees and 75 degrees of knee flexion, the maximal extension torque increased at an average rate of 2.67 +/- 0.6 Nm/degree, followed by a decline with further flexion. However, throughout the joint-angle range tested, voluntary activation increased on average by 0.37%/degree with a maximum at 90 degrees of flexion. Due to the influence of joint position it is not possible to generalize results obtained at the knee joint angle of 90 degrees of flexion, which is usually used for the quadriceps twitch-interpolation technique. Consequently, it is useful to investigate voluntary activation deficits in knee joint disorders at a range of knee joint angles that includes, in particular, the more extended joint angles used frequently during daily activity.

  1. Isometric knee extensor fatigue following a Wingate test: peripheral and central mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-del-Olmo, M; Rodriguez, F A; Marquez, G; Iglesias, X; Marina, M; Benitez, A; Vallejo, L; Acero, R M

    2013-02-01

    Central and peripheral fatigue have been explored during and after running or cycling exercises. However, the fatigue mechanisms associated with a short maximal cycling exercise (30 s Wingate test) have not been investigated. In this study, 10 volunteer subjects performed several isometric voluntary contractions using the leg muscle extensors before and after two bouts of cycling at 25% of maximal power output and two bouts of Wingate tests. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electrical motor nerve stimulation (NM) were applied at rest and during the voluntary contractions. Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), voluntary activation (VA), twitch amplitude evoked by electrical nerve stimulation, M wave and motor potential evoked by TMS (MEP) were recorded. MVC, VA and twitch amplitude evoked at rest by NM decreased significantly after the first and second Wingate tests, indicating central and peripheral fatigue. MVC and VA, but not the twitch amplitude evoked by NM, recovered before the second Wingate test. These results suggest that the Wingate test results in a decrease in MVC associated with peripheral and central fatigue. While the peripheral fatigue is associated with an intramuscular impairment, the central fatigue seems to be the main reason for the Wingate test-induced impairment of MVC.

  2. Motor imagery muscle contraction strength influences spinal motor neuron excitability and cardiac sympathetic nerve activity

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in spinal motor neuron excitability and autonomic nervous system activity during motor imagery of isometric thenar muscle activity at 10% and 50% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). [Methods] The F-waves and low frequency/high frequency (LF/HF) ratio were recorded at rest, during motor imagery, and post-trial. For motor imagery trials, subjects were instructed to imagine thenar muscle activity at 10% and 50% MVC while holding the...

  3. Alleviation of Motor Impairments in Patients with Cerebral Palsy: Acute Effects of Whole-body Vibration on Stretch Reflex Response, Voluntary Muscle Activation and Mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Krause

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionIndividuals suffering from cerebral palsy (CP often have involuntary, reflex-evoked muscle activity resulting in spastic hyperreflexia. Whole-body vibration (WBV has been demonstrated to reduce reflex activity in healthy subjects, but evidence in CP patients is still limited. Therefore, this study aimed to establish the acute neuromuscular and kinematic effects of WBV in subjects with spastic CP.Methods44 children with spastic CP were tested on neuromuscular activation and kinematics before and immediately after a 1-min bout of WBV (16–25 Hz, 1.5–3 mm. Assessment included (1 recordings of stretch reflex (SR activity of the triceps surae, (2 electromyography (EMG measurements of maximal voluntary muscle activation of lower limb muscles, and (3 neuromuscular activation during active range of motion (aROM. We recorded EMG of m. soleus (SOL, m. gastrocnemius medialis (GM, m. tibialis anterior, m. vastus medialis, m. rectus femoris, and m. biceps femoris. Angular excursion was recorded by goniometry of the ankle and knee joint.ResultsAfter WBV, (1 SOL SRs were decreased (p < 0.01 while (2 maximal voluntary activation (p < 0.05 and (3 angular excursion in the knee joint (p < 0.01 were significantly increased. No changes could be observed for GM SR amplitudes or ankle joint excursion. Neuromuscular coordination expressed by greater agonist–antagonist ratios during aROM was significantly enhanced (p < 0.05.DiscussionThe findings point toward acute neuromuscular and kinematic effects following one bout of WBV. Protocols demonstrate that pathological reflex responses are reduced (spinal level, while the execution of voluntary movement (supraspinal level is improved in regards to kinematic and neuromuscular control. This facilitation of muscle and joint control is probably due to a reduction of spasticity-associated spinal excitability in favor of giving access for greater supraspinal input during voluntary motor

  4. Effect of age on the hemodynamic and sympathetic responses at the onset of isometric handgrip exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalande, Sophie; Sawicki, Carolyn P; Baker, Jacquie R; Shoemaker, J Kevin

    2014-01-15

    Cardiac and peripheral vasomotor factors contribute to the rapid pressor response at the onset of isometric handgrip exercise. We tested the hypothesis that age enhances the sympathetic and vasoconstrictor response at the onset of isometric handgrip exercise so that the pressor response is maintained, despite a diminished cardiac function. Twelve young and twelve older (24 ± 3 and 63 ± 8 yr) individuals performed 20-s isometric handgrip exercise at 30, 40, or 50% of maximal voluntary contraction force. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) was measured using microneurography. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and cardiac output (Q) were assessed continuously by finger plethysmography and total peripheral resistance was calculated. MAP increased with the onset of handgrip; this increase was associated with handgrip intensity and was similar in both groups. Heart rate and Q increased with increasing handgrip intensity in both groups, but increases were greater in young vs. older individuals (age × handgrip intensity interaction, P change in MSNA between baseline and handgrip, for both frequency and incidence, increased with increasing handgrip intensity for both groups. There was no effect of handgrip intensity or age on total peripheral resistance. The smaller heart rate and Q response during the first 20 s of handgrip exercise in older individuals was not accompanied by a greater sympathetic activation or vasoconstrictor response. However, increases in MAP were similar between groups, indicating that the pressor response at the onset of handgrip exercise is preserved with aging.

  5. 偏瘫型脑瘫患儿腕屈伸肌群最大等长收缩时的表面肌电特征研究%Characteristic surface myoelectric signals of maximum isometric voluntary contraction of the wrist flexors and extensors in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐开寿; 何璐; 麦坚凝

    2014-01-01

    目的 观察偏瘫型脑瘫患儿腕屈伸肌群最大等长收缩时肌肉募集和协调功能的肌电信号特征.方法 选取痉挛型偏瘫患儿68例,年龄2~14岁,采用表面肌电图(sEMG)检测其健手和患手腕屈伸肌群最大等长收缩时的表面肌电信号,通过配对t检验和Pearson相关性分析确定其积分肌电值(iEMG)、均方根值(RMS)和协同收缩率的特征.结果 使用患手抓握时,患手腕部的RMS、iEMG均明显高于健手(P<0.05),患手与健手腕伸肌RMS、腕屈伸肌iEMG间具有良好的相关性(P<0.05).使用健手抓握时,健手腕部的RMS、iEMG均明显高于患手(P<0.05),健手与患手腕屈伸肌iEMG间具有良好的相关性(P<0.05).健手抓握时健手腕部的RMS、iEMG均明显高于患手抓握时患手腕部的RMS、iEMG,但健手腕部的协同收缩率(0.48±0.02)明显低于患手(0.54±0.04)(P<0.05).结论 偏瘫型脑瘫患儿使用患手时腕屈肌群存在过度协同激活,患手肌肉募集能力明显弱于健手,其双手的分离运动控制能力可能受限,提示增强腕伸肌收缩功能、抑制腕屈肌协同激活水平、合理引导患手开展功能锻炼应成为偏瘫患儿康复的重点之一.%Objective To study the characteristic surface myoelectric signals generated by children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (HCP) during maximum isometric voluntary contraction (MIVC) of the wrist flexors and extensors.Methods Sixty-eight children with HCP 2 to 14 years of age were assessed with surface electromyography (sEMG).The electrodes were applied on the skin over the wrist flexors and extensors.The integrated EMG signals (iEMGs),root mean square amplitudes (RMSs) and co-contraction ratios during MIVC were recorded and analyzed.Results In a MIVC,the RMS,iEMG and co-contraction ratio were all significantly different between the involved and uninvolved hands,though the iEMGs of the wrists of the two hands were strongly correlated.The RMSs of the wrists of the

  6. Comparative adaptations in oxidative and glycolytic muscle fibers in a low voluntary wheel running rat model performing three levels of physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Hayden W; Toedebusch, Ryan G; Ruegsegger, Greg; Mobley, C Brooks; Fox, Carlton D; McGinnis, Graham R; Quindry, John C; Booth, Frank W; Roberts, Michael D; Kavazis, Andreas N

    2015-11-01

    A unique polygenic model of rat physical activity has been recently developed where rats were selected for the trait of low voluntary wheel running. We utilized this model to identify differences in soleus and plantaris muscles of sedentary low voluntary wheel running rats and physically active low voluntary wheel running rats exposed to moderate amounts of treadmill training. Three groups of 28-day-old male Wistar rats were used: (1) rats without a running wheel (SEDENTARY, n = 7), (2) rats housed with a running wheel (WHEEL, n = 7), and (3) rats housed with a running wheel and exercised on the treadmill (5 days/week for 20 min/day at 15.0 m/min) (WHEEL + TREADMILL, n = 7). Animals were euthanized 5 weeks after the start of the experiment and the soleus and plantaris muscles were excised and used for analyses. Increases in skeletal muscle gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha and fibronectin type III domain-containing protein 5 in WHEEL + TREADMILL group were observed. Also, WHEEL + TREADMILL had higher protein levels of superoxide dismutase 2 and decreased levels of oxidative damage. Our data demonstrate that the addition of treadmill training induces beneficial muscular adaptations compared to animals with wheel access alone. Furthermore, our data expand our understanding of differential muscular adaptations in response to exercise in mitochondrial, antioxidant, and metabolic markers.

  7. [Changes in the position of the ureterovesical junction during maximal voluntary contractions and during maximal vaginal electric stimulation of the pelvic floor muscles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martan, A; Masata, J; Halaska, M; Voigt, R

    1998-06-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate and compare the effect of the maximal voluntary muscle contraction of the pelvic floor (PFM) and contractions of the PFM evoked by maximal electric stimulation using an electrostimulation apparatus Conmax by monitoring the position of the urethrovesical junction by ultrasound. The trial comprised 20 women with confirmed stress incontinence of urine. With the patients in a supine position with abducted lower extremities an electrostimulation probe was inserted into the vagina. This was followed by perineal ultrasound (US) examination using an ACUSON 128 XP-10 apparatus and a convex tube 5 MHz. The ultrasound examination was made using the electrostimulation probe--at rest and during maximal voluntary contraction of the PFM. This was followed by maximal electric stimulation and after five minutes during stimulation the US examination was repeated. It was performed also during maximal electric stimulation (MES) concurrently with maximal voluntary contraction of the PFM. For electrostimulation a Conmax appartus was used. The applied frequency was 50 Hz, amplitude from 0 to 90 mA (grade 0-6), duration of pulse 0.75 ms. The maximum intensity of stimulation was determined by the patient, i.e. when stimulation was not yet painful. During US the authors investigated the gamma angle, i.e. the angle between the axis of the symphysis and the connecting line between the UV junction and the lower borderline of the symphysis. The mean difference of the gamma angle during voluntary contraction of the PFM and at rest was 13.6. During contraction caused by maximal electric stimulation of the PFM and at rest this difference was 21.3. The difference did not differ significantly during maximal electric stimulation of the PFM and during maximal electric stimulation and voluntary contraction of the PFM. From the trial ensues that contraction of the pelvic floor muscles during maximal electric stimulation is stronger as compared with the

  8. Significance of peripheral afferent input to the alpha-motoneurone pool for enhancement of tremor during an isometric fatiguing contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresswell, A G; Löscher, W N

    2000-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the contribution of peripheral afferent input to the enhancement of isometric tremor during a sustained submaximal isometric contraction. It was hypothesised that during muscle fatigue, when excitatory drive is high, peripheral afferent input may augment oscillations in the stretch reflex arc and result in bursting motor-unit activity and increased tremor. Nine healthy subjects maintained isometric plantar flexions at 30% of their maximum voluntary contraction until the limit of endurance, under three test conditions. Two paradigms were used to reduce afferent input to the triceps surae alpha-motoneurone pool: (1) continued vibration of the Achilles tendon, and (2) ischaemic partial block of the tibial nerve. These were compared to a control experiment, in which there was no intervention. By recording H-reflexes from the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, it was possible to assess the effectiveness of reducing the afferent input. When H-reflex suppression had stabilised, the fatiguing contraction was commenced and tremor was computed from the continuously recorded torque signal. Superimposed maximum twitches were elicited as indirect measures of excitatory drive. The increase in tremor root mean square throughout the fatiguing contraction was significantly less for both the vibration and ischaemic conditions. Furthermore, tremor mean power frequency decreased significantly with endurance time in the control experiment, while no significant change was seen in the other two experimental conditions. It is concluded that the enhancement of isometric tremor seen during a fatiguing submaximal isometric contraction is facilitated by peripheral afferent input to the alpha-motoneurone pool.

  9. Torze kolenních extenzorových svalů během izometrických cvičení a ruská elektrická stimulace po zranění kolenních vazů Knee extensor muscles' torque during isometric exercises and russian electrical stimulation following a knee ligament injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Płaszewski

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Dobrovolné izometrické cvičení (VOL i neuromuskulární elektrická stimulace (NMES jsou metody rozvoje statické svalové síly. Používají se v programech pro rozvoj síly u zdravých svalů a také pro zotavování svalové funkce za určitých ortopedických podmínek. Obě metody se používají pro zpomalování svalové atrofie a ztráty síly v důsledku imobilizace kolena po zranění (Eriksson & Häggmark, 1979; Ingemann-Hansen & Halkjær-Kristensen, 1985; Johnson, 1988; Wigerstad-Lossing, Tromby, Jonsson, Morelli, Peterson, & Rentröm, 1988. NMES může vyvolat záškuby nebo tetanické svalové kontrakce, a to v závislosti na frekvenci proudových impulsů. Během tetanické stimulace jsou hlavními rysy nácvikových režimů: 1 cyklus zapnutí/vypnutí (pracovní cyklus, tvořený dobou kontrakce a dobou uvolnění; 2 počet kontrakcí; 3 intenzita kontrakcí (dána proudovou amplitudou nebo tolerancí subjektu. Voluntary isometric exercise (VOL and neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES are both methods of static muscle strength and girth training. They are applied in strength training programs to healthy muscle as well as for muscle function recovery under certain orthopaedic conditions. Both methods are used to retard muscle atrophy and strength loss resulting from post injury knee immobilization (Eriksson & Häggmark, 1979; Ingemann-Hansen & Halkjær-Kristensen, 1985; Johnson, 1988; Wigerstad-Lossing, Tromby, Jonsson, Morelli, Peterson, & Rentröm, 1988. NMES can elicit twitch or tetanic muscle contractions, determined by current pulse frequency. During tetanic stimulation, the main features of training regimes are: 1 on/off cycle (or duty cycle, made up of the time of contraction plus rest time; 2 the number of contractions; 3 the intensity of contractions (determined by the current amplitude and/or the subject’s tolerance.

  10. Transcranial magnetic stimulation during voluntary action: directional facilitation of outputs and relationships to force generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cros, Didier; Soto, Oscar; Chiappa, Keith H

    2007-12-14

    Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the human motor cortex evokes simple muscle jerks whose physiological significance is unclear. Indeed, in subjects performing a motor task, there is uncertainty as to whether TMS-evoked outputs reflect the ongoing behavior or, alternatively, a disrupted motor plan. Considering force direction and magnitude to reflect qualitative and quantitative features of the motor plan respectively, we studied the relationships between voluntary forces and those evoked by TMS. In five healthy adults, we recorded the isometric forces acting a hand joint and the electromyographic activity in the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle. Responses obtained at rest were highly invariant. Evoked responses obtained while subjects generated static and dynamic contractions were highly codirectional with the voluntary forces. Such directional relationships were independent of stimulation intensity, stimulated cortical volume, or magnitude of voluntary force exerted. Dynamic force generation was associated with a marked increase in the magnitude of the evoked force that was linearly related to the rate of force generation. The timing of central conduction was different depending on functional role of the target muscle, as either agonist or joint fixator. These results indicate that the architecture of motor plans remain grossly undisrupted by cortical stimulation applied during voluntary motor behavior. The significant magnitude modulation of responses during dynamic force generation suggests an essential role of the corticospinal system in the specification of force changes. Finally, the corticospinal activation depends on the functional role assumed by the target muscle, either postural or agonist.

  11. Robustness of muscle synergies underlying three-dimensional force generation at the hand in healthy humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymer, William Z.; Beer, Randall F.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies using advanced matrix factorization techniques have shown that the coordination of human voluntary limb movements may be accomplished using combinations of a small number of intermuscular coordination patterns, or muscle synergies. However, the potential use of muscle synergies for isometric force generation has been evaluated mostly using correlational methods. The results of such studies suggest that fixed relationships between the activations of pairs of muscles are relatively rare. There is also emerging evidence that the nervous system uses independent strategies to control movement and force generation, which suggests that one cannot conclude a priori that isometric force generation is accomplished by combining muscle synergies, as shown in movement control. In this study, we used non-negative matrix factorization to evaluate the ability of a few muscle synergies to reconstruct the activation patterns of human arm muscles underlying the generation of three-dimensional (3-D) isometric forces at the hand. Surface electromyographic (EMG) data were recorded from eight key elbow and shoulder muscles during 3-D force target-matching protocols performed across a range of load levels and hand positions. Four synergies were sufficient to explain, on average, 95% of the variance in EMG datasets. Furthermore, we found that muscle synergy composition was conserved across biomechanical task conditions, experimental protocols, and subjects. Our findings are consistent with the view that the nervous system can generate isometric forces by assembling a combination of a small number of muscle synergies, differentially weighted according to task constraints. PMID:22279190

  12. Isometric exercise and chronic heart failure

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    Efthimia Zerva

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The resistance exercise is an important part of all rehabilitation programs in patients with chronic heart failure. Among several kinds of resistance exercises, the one mainly applied is isotonic exercise, whereas, in the contrary, isometric is not heavily used although it affects the daily lives of patients who, trying to look after themselves (moving, walking, lifting objects, twitch in an isometric way their peripheral muscles due to reduced cardiovascular endurance. Purpose: The purpose of the present review was to present the data available so far for isometric exercise in cardiovascular patients and to examine the importance of applying this kind of exercise in rehabilitation programs in the context of, firstly, evaluation, and secondly therapeutic intervention. Material - Methods: The methodology followed included searching inquiries and reviews from international databases (Pubmed, Medline, Scopus on the effects of isometric exercise in patients with chronic heart failure. The progress and development of the studies are of particular importance to this work and, to this end, the literature refers to the entire range of time in the last three decades, from 1985 to 2012 according the key words noted. Results: In rehabilitation programs for patients with chronic heart failure, resistance exercise if applied in an isotonic way helps improve hemodynamic and functional parameters. In contrast, resistance exercise applied in an isometric way requires further investigation because most findings are related to hemodynamic disturbances. The data which is encouraging for isometric exercise programs are few and, therefore, it cannot be directly recommended as a proper way to exercise. Conclusions: Isometric exercise has an important place in the evaluation of patients with chronic heart failure, and limits should be "placed" in its application as a therapeutic tool to prevent complications.

  13. Alleviation of Motor Impairments in Patients with Cerebral Palsy: Acute Effects of Whole-body Vibration on Stretch Reflex Response, Voluntary Muscle Activation and Mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Anne; Schönau, Eckhard; Gollhofer, Albert; Duran, Ibrahim; Ferrari-Malik, Anja; Freyler, Kathrin; Ritzmann, Ramona

    2017-01-01

    Individuals suffering from cerebral palsy (CP) often have involuntary, reflex-evoked muscle activity resulting in spastic hyperreflexia. Whole-body vibration (WBV) has been demonstrated to reduce reflex activity in healthy subjects, but evidence in CP patients is still limited. Therefore, this study aimed to establish the acute neuromuscular and kinematic effects of WBV in subjects with spastic CP. 44 children with spastic CP were tested on neuromuscular activation and kinematics before and immediately after a 1-min bout of WBV (16-25 Hz, 1.5-3 mm). Assessment included (1) recordings of stretch reflex (SR) activity of the triceps surae, (2) electromyography (EMG) measurements of maximal voluntary muscle activation of lower limb muscles, and (3) neuromuscular activation during active range of motion (aROM). We recorded EMG of m. soleus (SOL), m. gastrocnemius medialis (GM), m. tibialis anterior, m. vastus medialis, m. rectus femoris, and m. biceps femoris. Angular excursion was recorded by goniometry of the ankle and knee joint. After WBV, (1) SOL SRs were decreased (p control. This facilitation of muscle and joint control is probably due to a reduction of spasticity-associated spinal excitability in favor of giving access for greater supraspinal input during voluntary motor control.

  14. Identification of time-varying dynamics of the human triceps surae stretch reflex. I. Rapid isometric contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, R F; Kearney, R E; MacNeil, J B

    1993-01-01

    We have examined the time variations of stretch reflex dynamics throughout rapid voluntary changes in the isometric contraction level of the human triceps surae muscles. This was achieved by superimposing a small stochastic displacement upon many such changing contractions and then identifying the time-varying relationship between the perturbation and the evoked electromyograms (EMGs). An "ensemble" time-varying system identification technique was used to estimate these input-output dynamics as a set of impulse response functions, one for each time before, during, and after the change in contraction level, with a temporal resolution equal to the data acquisition rate. Three main findings resulted. First, stretch reflex gain (relating joint velocity to EMG) was significantly modulated during changes in voluntary contraction level, increasing as the subject contracted the muscles and decreasing as the subject relaxed. Second, stretch reflex dynamics did not change with contraction level, even when its gain varied substantially. Third, the time course of the gain changes closely followed the level of the EMG, even though the subjects used rather different activation and deactivation patterns. These results suggest that, for the behavior studied (i.e., rapid changes in isometric contraction level), stretch reflex gain and motoneuron pool activation level were controlled by a common descending command rather than being independently specified.

  15. 基于蓝牙通信的等长肌力测试仪的设计%Testing System Based on Bluetooth Communication Technique for Isometric Muscle Strength

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐秀林; 蒋奇永; 严荣国; 朱政康; 郭旭东

    2011-01-01

    设计一种集肌力测试与评定于一体的等长肌力测试仪.采用无线蓝牙通信技术,手持式肌力测试装置与上位机之间可在10 m距离范围内进行无线通信,将肌力相关的数据进行传输,由上位机对肌肉功能障碍患者不同部位的等长肌力、肌张力、峰力矩等参数进行定量检测与分析.软件采用统一的建模语言(UML),使用VC++应用软件编程,并通过开放数据库互连(ODBC)的方式,实现肌力、肌电数据同步采集和处理.对20名正常人进行初步测试,各参数的组内相关系数(ICC)均大于0.6.该仪器具有操作简便,实用性强等特点,可为临床制定康复计划和评价康复疗效提供客观的数据.%This study is aimed to design a multi-functional isometric muscle strength testing system based on bluetooth communication technique. Wireless communication between portable muscle strength testing device and PC could be conducted within 10 meters to collect muscle strength related data. The collected data were transmitted to PC for isometric muscle strength, muscle tension, peak torque measurement and analysis. Software used in this system was built by unified modeling language ( UML) , VC + + and open database connectivity ( ODBC) connection mode to realize the synchronization of muscle strength, EMG data collection and process. After a preliminary test of 20 healthy subjects, the result showed that intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was more than 0. 6. The system is easily operated and the interface is user friendly to provide reliable and objective data for clinical rehabilitation plan setting and evaluation.

  16. Hand-grip isometric strength in judo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan G Bonitch-Góngora

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The grip is an important technical and tactical aspect through which the judokas dominate the adversary, hindering the application of appropriate techniques and favoring their own attack. The judokas must have high levels of isometric force and endurance to this type of force on the gripping muscles of the forearms, as one of the key aspects for success. This article reviews the grip muscular strength and endurance profiles of judokas of different groups (gender, age and competitive level. In general, the peak isometric strength of elite judokas has not changed in the last 40 years and is similar to that reached by non-elite judokas or even registered in large populations. This indicate that the evaluation of the isometric hand grip endurance may be a more relevant parameter than the peak isometric force in judokas, as during the bouts the grip must be maintained for relatively long periods of time and the maximum force cannot be maintained for long. However there are few studies on the ability to resist successive isometric handgrip stress in judokas.

  17. Reference values of maximum isometric muscle force obtained in 270 children aged 4-16 years by hand-held dynamometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beenakker, EAC; van der Hoeven, JH; Fock, JM; Maurits, NM

    2001-01-01

    Since muscle force and functional ability are not related linearly; maximum force can be reduced while functional ability is still maintained. For diagnostic and therapeutic reasons loss of muscle force should be detected as early and accurately as possible. Because of growth factors, maximum muscle

  18. Coherent motor unit rhythms in the 6-10 Hz range during time-varying voluntary muscle contractions: neural mechanism and relation to rhythmical motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erimaki, Sophia; Christakos, Constantinos N

    2008-02-01

    In quasi-sinusoidal (0.5-3.0 Hz) voluntary muscle contractions, we studied the 6- to 10-Hz motor unit (MU) firing synchrony and muscle force oscillation with emphasis on their neural substrate and relation to rhythmical motor control. Our analyses were performed on data from 121 contractions of a finger muscle in 24 human subjects. They demonstrate that coherent 6- to 10-Hz components of MU discharges coexist with carrier components and coherent modulation components underlying the voluntary force variations. The 6- to 10-Hz synchrony has the frequency of the tremor synchrony in steady contractions and is also widespread and in-phase. Its strength ranges from very small to very large (MU/MU coherence >0.50) among contractions; moreover, it is not related to the contraction parameters, in accord with the notion of a distinct 6- to 10-Hz synaptic input to the MUs. Unlike the coherent MU modulations and the voluntary force variations, the in-phase 6- to 10-Hz MU components are suppressed or even eliminated during ischemia, while the respective force component is drastically reduced. These findings agree with the widely assumed supraspinal origin of the MU modulations, but they also strongly suggest a key role for muscle spindle feedback in the generation of the 6- to 10-Hz synaptic input. They therefore provide important information for the study of generators of the 6- to 10-Hz rhythm which subserves the postulated rhythmical control and is manifested as force and movement components. Moreover, they argue for a participation of oscillating spinal stretch reflex loops in the rhythm generation, possibly in interaction with supraspinal oscillators.

  19. Postactivation Potentiation Biases Maximal Isometric Strength Assessment

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    Leonardo Coelho Rabello Lima

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Postactivation potentiation (PAP is known to enhance force production. Maximal isometric strength assessment protocols usually consist of two or more maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVCs. The objective of this study was to determine if PAP would influence isometric strength assessment. Healthy male volunteers (n=23 performed two five-second MVCs separated by a 180-seconds interval. Changes in isometric peak torque (IPT, time to achieve it (tPTI, contractile impulse (CI, root mean square of the electromyographic signal during PTI (RMS, and rate of torque development (RTD, in different intervals, were measured. Significant increases in IPT (240.6 ± 55.7 N·m versus 248.9 ± 55.1 N·m, RTD (746 ± 152 N·m·s−1versus 727 ± 158 N·m·s−1, and RMS (59.1 ± 12.2% RMSMAX  versus 54.8 ± 9.4% RMSMAX were found on the second MVC. tPTI decreased significantly on the second MVC (2373 ± 1200 ms versus 2784 ± 1226 ms. We conclude that a first MVC leads to PAP that elicits significant enhancements in strength-related variables of a second MVC performed 180 seconds later. If disconsidered, this phenomenon might bias maximal isometric strength assessment, overestimating some of these variables.

  20. Disturbance of contralateral unipedal postural control after stimulated and voluntary contractions of the ipsilateral limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillard, Thierry; Chaubet, Vincent; Maitre, Julien; Dumitrescu, Michel; Borel, Liliane

    2010-12-01

    One session of sustained unilateral voluntary muscular contractions increases central fatigue and induces a cross-over of fatigue of homologous contralateral muscles. It is not known, however, how this cross-transfer affects contralateral unipedal postural control. Moreover, contralateral neurophysiological effects differ between voluntary muscular contractions and electrically stimulated contractions. The aims of this study were thus to examine the effects of muscle fatigue on contralateral unipedal postural control and to compare the effects of stimulated and voluntary contractions. Fifteen subjects took part in the protocol. Fatigue of the ipsilateral quadriceps femoris was generated either by neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) or by isometric voluntary muscular contraction (VOL). Postural control on the contralateral limb was measured before (PRE condition) and after the completion of the two fatiguing exercises (POST condition) using a force platform. We analyzed body sway area and the spectral power density given by the wavelet transform. In POST condition, postural control recorded in the unipedal stance on the contralateral limb was disturbed after NMES and VOL fatiguing exercises. In addition, postural control was similarly disturbed for both exercises. These results suggest that cross-over fatigue is able to disturb postural control after both stimulated and voluntary contractions.

  1. Isometric torque-angle relationships of the elbow flexors and extensors in the transverse plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinter, Ilona J; Bobbert, Maarten F; van Soest, A J Knoek; Smeets, Jeroen B J

    2010-10-01

    Maximal voluntary isometric torque-angle relationships of elbow extensors and flexors in the transverse plane (humerus elevation angle of 90 degrees ) were measured at two different horizontal adduction angles of the humerus compared to thorax: 20 degrees and 45 degrees . For both elbow flexors and extensors, the torque-angle relationship was insensitive to this 25 degrees horizontal adduction of the humerus. The peak in torque-angle relationship of elbow extensors was found at 55 degrees (0 degrees is full extension). This is closer to full elbow extension than reported by researchers who investigated this relationship in the sagittal plane. Using actual elbow angles during contraction, as we did in this study, instead of angles set by the dynamometer, as others have done, can partly explain this difference. We also measured electromyographic activity of the biceps and triceps muscles with pairs of surface electrodes and found that electromyographic activity level of the agonistic muscles was correlated to measured net torque (elbow flexion torque: Pearson's r=0.21 and extension torque: Pearson's r=0.53). We conclude that the isometric torque-angle relationship of the elbow extensors found in this study provides a good representation of the force-length relationship and the moment arm-angle relationship of the elbow extensors, but angle dependency of neural input gives an overestimation of the steepness. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Muscle Damage following Maximal Eccentric Knee Extensions in Males and Females.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K M Hicks

    Full Text Available To investigate whether there is a sex difference in exercise induced muscle damage.Vastus Lateralis and patella tendon properties were measured in males and females using ultrasonography. During maximal voluntary eccentric knee extensions (12 reps x 6 sets, Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening and maximal voluntary eccentric knee extensions torque were recorded every 10° of knee joint angle (20-90°. Isometric torque, Creatine Kinase and muscle soreness were measured pre, post, 48, 96 and 168 hours post damage as markers of exercise induced muscle damage.Patella tendon stiffness and Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening were significantly higher in males compared to females (p0.05. Creatine Kinase levels post exercise induced muscle damage were higher in males compared to females (p<0.05, and remained higher when maximal voluntary eccentric knee extension torque, relative to estimated quadriceps anatomical cross sectional area, was taken as a covariate (p<0.05.Based on isometric torque loss, there is no sex difference in exercise induced muscle damage. The higher Creatine Kinase in males could not be explained by differences in maximal voluntary eccentric knee extension torque, Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening and patella tendon stiffness. Further research is required to understand the significant sex differences in Creatine Kinase levels following exercise induced muscle damage.

  3. Effects of a resistance training program and subsequent detraining on muscle strength and muscle power in multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Perez, Carlos; de Souza-Teixeira, Fernanda; Fernandez-Gonzalo, Rodrigo; de Paz-Fernandez, Jose Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Although resistance training adaptations in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients have been described, the detraining response in this population is largely unknown. [corrected] This study was designed to evaluate the effects of a 12-week detraining period on muscle strength (isometric and endurance) and muscle power of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients that had previously carried out a 12-week resistance training program (RTP). Forty-two MS patients were randomly assigned into two groups: an exercise group (EG) that performed a 12-week RTP for the knee extensors muscles; and a control group (CG), that did not perform any specific training. Knee extension maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), muscle power and muscle endurance were evaluated before and after the RTP, as well as 12 weeks after training completion. A strain gauge was used to measure the maximal voluntary isometric contraction and muscle power was assessed with a linear encoder. Muscle endurance was interpreted as the number of repetitions that a patient could perform in a single set of knee extension exercise. The EG increased MVIC and muscle power after the training period, although the training did not affect muscle endurance. After 12 weeks of detraining, MVIC returned to pre-training values but muscle power was still greater than pre-training values in the EG. The CG did not present any change in the variables measured during the intervention. A 12-week RTP improved MVIC and muscle power in MS patients. Additionally, 12 weeks of detraining blunted strength training adaptations in MS patients, although muscle power training adaptations were still evident after the detraining period.

  4. Effect of antagonist muscle fatigue on knee extension torque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltman, J G M; Sargeant, A J; Ball, D; Maganaris, C N; de Haan, A

    2003-09-01

    The effect of hamstring fatigue on knee extension torque was examined at different knee angles for seven male subjects. Before and after a dynamic flexion fatigue protocol (180 degrees s(-1), until dynamic torque had declined by 50%), maximal voluntary contraction extension torque was measured at four knee flexion angles (90 degrees, 70 degrees, 50 degrees and 30 degrees ). Maximal torque generating capacity and voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle were determined using electrical stimulation. Average rectified EMG of the biceps femoris was determined. Mean dynamic flexion torque declined by 48+/-11%. Extensor maximal voluntary contraction torque, maximal torque generating capacity, voluntary activation and average rectified EMG at the four knee angles were unaffected by the hamstring fatigue protocol. Only at 50 degrees knee angle was voluntary activation significantly lower (15.7%) after fatigue ( P<0.05). In addition, average rectified EMG before fatigue was not significantly influenced by knee angle. It was concluded that a fatigued hamstring muscle did not increase the maximal voluntary contraction extension torque and knee angle did not change coactivation. Three possible mechanisms may explain the results: a potential difference in recruited fibre populations in antagonist activity compared with the fibres which were fatigued in the protocol, a smaller loss in isometric torque generating capacity of the hamstring muscle than was expected from the dynamic measurements and/or a reduction in voluntary activation.

  5. The repeated bout effect of eccentric exercise is not associated with changes in voluntary activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamandulis, Sigitas; Skurvydas, Albertas; Brazaitis, Marius; Skikas, Laimutis; Duchateau, Jacques

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the possible changes in muscle activation level between a first and second bout of damaging eccentric exercise performed at 2 weeks interval (i.e. repeated bout effect). To that purpose, ten physically active males took part in this study. The eccentric exercise consisted of 10 sets of 12 maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) produced by the knee extensors during movements performed at a constant speed of 160 degrees s(-1). Changes in voluntary and electrically evoked torque in concentric and/or isometric conditions were assessed at the following time points: pre-exercise, and 2 min, 1 and 24 h after each eccentric exercise. At the same time points, voluntary activation was quantified by the superimposed electrical stimulation technique. Muscle soreness and plasma CK activity were measured within 48 h after the eccentric exercise. The results showed that the decrease in eccentric peak torque was linear throughout the exercise protocol. At the end of bouts 1 and 2, torque was significantly reduced by 27.7 +/- 9.1 and 23.4 +/- 11.2, respectively, with no difference between bouts (P > 0.05). At 24 h post-exercise, a lower reduction (P eccentric exercise appears to reduce muscle damage, but does not influence the level of voluntary activation.

  6. Intramuscular fiber conduction velocity, isometric force and explosive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methenitis, Spyridon; Terzis, Gerasimos; Zaras, Nikolaos; Stasinaki, Angeliki-Nikoletta; Karandreas, Nikolaos

    2016-06-01

    Conduction of electrical signals along the surface of muscle fibers is acknowledged as an essential neuromuscular component which is linked with muscle force production. However, it remains unclear whether muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) is also linked with explosive performance. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between vastus lateralis MFCV and countermovement jumping performance, the rate of force development and maximum isometric force. Fifteen moderately-trained young females performed countermovement jumps as well as an isometric leg press test in order to determine the rate of force development and maximum isometric force. Vastus lateralis MFCV was measured with intramuscular microelectrodes at rest on a different occasion. Maximum MFCV was significantly correlated with maximum isometric force (r = 0.66, p rate of force development at 100 ms, 150 ms, 200 ms, and 250 ms (r = 0.85, r = 0.89, r = 0.91, r = 0.92, respectively, p rate of force development than with maximum isometric leg press force. Lower, but significant correlations were found between mean MFCV and countermovement jump power (r = 0.65, p rate of force development than with isometric force, perhaps because conduction velocity is higher in the larger and fastest muscle fibers which are recognized to contribute to explosive actions.

  7. The surface EMG-force relationship during isometric dorsiflexion in males and females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhardt, S A; McIntosh, K C; Gabriel, D A

    2009-01-01

    This study compared the tibialis anterior (TA) surface electromyographic (sEMG) to force relationship for males and females. One-hundred participants (50 males and 50 females) performed three isometric contractions at 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) in an apparatus designed to isolate the action of the dorsiflexors. The sEMG signal was amplified (1000x), band-pass filtered (10-500 Hz), and sampled at 2048 Hz. The load cell signal was low-pass filtered at 100 Hz and sampled at the same rate. Males were stronger than females (p MVC (p MVC, the frequency values for the females plateaued while males showed a decrease (p pattern of means for RMS and MNF between males and females revealed no differences between groups in the sEMG-force relationship. We therefore conclude that there are no differences between males and females in the gradation of muscle force.

  8. Evaluation of electromyographic activity and heart rate responses to isometric exercise. The role played by muscular mass and type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Silva

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between the electromyographic (EMG activity and heart rate (HR responses induced by isometric exercise performed by knee extension (KE and flexion (KF in men. Fifteen healthy male subjects, 21 ± 1.3 years (mean ± SD, were submitted to KE and KF isometric exercise tests at 100% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC. The exercises were performed with one leg (right or left and with two legs simultaneously, for 10 s in the sitting position with the hip and knee flexed at 90o. EMG activity (root mean square values and HR (beats/min were recorded simultaneously both at rest and throughout the sustained contraction. The HR responses to isometric exercise in KE and KF were similar when performed with one and two legs. However, the HR increase was always significantly higher in KE than KF (P0.05 and KF (r = 0.15, P>0.05 contractions were not significant. These results suggest that the predominant mechanism responsible for the larger increase in HR response to KE as compared to KF in our study could be dependent on qualitative and quantitative differences in the fiber type composition found in each muscle group. This mechanism seems to demand a higher activation of motor units with a corresponding increase in central command to the cardiovascular centers that modulate HR control.

  9. Properties of Force Output and Spectral EMG in Young Patients with Nonspecific Low Back Pain during Isometric Trunk Extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Tatsuhiro; Sakuraba, Keishoku

    2014-03-01

    [Purpose] To clarify the influence of nonspecific low back pain (NSLBP) on force fluctuation and the myoelectric data of back muscles during isometric trunk extension at low to high force levels. [Subjects] Fourteen male subjects with NSLBP and 14 healthy male control subjects participated in this study. [Methods] All participants extended their trunk isometrically maintaining 10 levels of target force [2, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 50, 70, 80 and 90% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) in a random order] for about 4 seconds with visual feedback. A force transducer and tri-axis force sensor were positioned at the 7th thoracic vertebra to measure force output and the direction of force. Myoelectric activities of the back muscles (longissimus thoracis, L2 level; multifidus, S1 level) were recorded by surface electromyography. [Results] Force output of NSLBP subjects fluctuated more than that of healthy subjects at 30% and 50%MVC. Higher median power frequency in the multifidus was observed in NSLBP subjects at moderate to high force levels. [Conclusion] These results show that the properties of force output in NSLBP subjects differ from those in healthy subjects, suggesting that the assessment of force fluctuation of back muscles at moderate force levels is a useful index for evaluating and discriminating NSLBP.

  10. Motor unit firing during and after voluntary contractions of human thenar muscles weakened by spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijdewind, Inge; Thomas, CK

    2003-01-01

    Spinal cord injury may change both the distribution and the strength of the synaptic input within a motoneuron pool and therefore alter force gradation. Here, we have studied the relative contributions of motor unit recruitment and rate modulation to force gradation during voluntary contractions of

  11. Reliability of Isometric Knee Extension Muscle Strength Measurements of Healthy Elderly Subjects Made with a Hand-held Dynamometer and a Belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Munenori; Isozaki, Koji

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the reliability of three isometric knee extension strength measurements (IKE) made with a hand-held dynamometer (HHD) and a belt of healthy elderly living in the community as subjects. [Subjects] The subject cohort consisted of 186 healthy elderly people, aged 65 to 79 years, living in local communities. [Methods] IKE of the leg subjects used to kick a ball was measured. IKE of each subject was measured three times using an HHD-belt at intervals of 30 seconds. The reliability of the larger of the first two measurements (LV2) as well as the third measurement (3V) was investigated. [Results] The intraclass correlation coefficients [ICC (1, 1)] for LV2 and 3V were 0.955. Bland-Altman analysis showed a fixed bias, and the limits of agreement ranged from -5.6 to 4.6. [Conclusion] The ICC results show that the test-retest reproducibility of IKE measurements of healthy elderly subjects using an HHD-belt is high. However, Bland-Altman analysis showed a fixed bias, suggesting the need for three measurements.

  12. Blackcurrant Alters Physiological Responses and Femoral Artery Diameter during Sustained Isometric Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew David Cook

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Blackcurrant is rich in anthocyanins that may affect exercise-induced physiological responses. We examined tissue oxygen saturation, muscle activity, cardiovascular responses and femoral artery diameter during a submaximal sustained isometric contraction. In a randomised, double-blind, crossover design, healthy men (n = 13, age: 25 ± 4 years, BMI: 25 ± 3 kg·m−2, mean ± SD ingested New Zealand blackcurrant (NZBC extract (600 mg∙day−1 CurraNZ™ or placebo (PL for 7-days separated by 14-days washout. Participants produced isometric maximal voluntary contractions (iMVC and a 120-s 30%iMVC of the quadriceps with electromyography (EMG, near-infrared spectroscopy, hemodynamic and ultrasound recordings. There was no effect of NZBC extract on iMVC (NZBC: 654 ± 73, PL: 650 ± 78 N. During the 30%iMVC with NZBC extract, total peripheral resistance, systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure were lower with increased cardiac output and stroke volume. With NZBC extract, EMG root mean square of the vastus medialis and muscle oxygen saturation were lower with higher total haemoglobin. During the 30%iMVC, femoral artery diameter was increased with NZBC extract at 30 (6.9%, 60 (8.2%, 90 (7.7% and 120 s (6.0%. Intake of NZBC extract for 7-days altered cardiovascular responses, muscle oxygen saturation, muscle activity and femoral artery diameter during a 120-s 30%iMVC of the quadriceps. The present study provides insight into the potential mechanisms for enhanced exercise performance with intake of blackcurrant.

  13. The human foot and heel–sole–toe walking strategy: a mechanism enabling an inverted pendular gait with low isometric muscle force?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usherwood, J. R.; Channon, A. J.; Myatt, J. P.; Rankin, J. W.; Hubel, T. Y.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanically, the most economical gait for slow bipedal locomotion requires walking as an ‘inverted pendulum’, with: I, an impulsive, energy-dissipating leg compression at the beginning of stance; II, a stiff-limbed vault; and III, an impulsive, powering push-off at the end of stance. The characteristic ‘M’-shaped vertical ground reaction forces of walking in humans reflect this impulse–vault–impulse strategy. Humans achieve this gait by dissipating energy during the heel-to-sole transition in early stance, approximately stiff-limbed, flat-footed vaulting over midstance and ankle plantarflexion (powering the toes down) in late stance. Here, we show that the ‘M’-shaped walking ground reaction force profile does not require the plantigrade human foot or heel–sole–toe stance; it is maintained in tip–toe and high-heel walking as well as in ostriches. However, the unusual, stiff, human foot structure—with ground-contacting heel behind ankle and toes in front—enables both mechanically economical inverted pendular walking and physiologically economical muscle loading, by producing extreme changes in mechanical advantage between muscles and ground reaction forces. With a human foot, and heel–sole–toe strategy during stance, the shin muscles that dissipate energy, or calf muscles that power the push-off, need not be loaded at all—largely avoiding the ‘cost of muscle force’—during the passive vaulting phase. PMID:22572024

  14. The human foot and heel-sole-toe walking strategy: a mechanism enabling an inverted pendular gait with low isometric muscle force?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usherwood, J R; Channon, A J; Myatt, J P; Rankin, J W; Hubel, T Y

    2012-10-07

    Mechanically, the most economical gait for slow bipedal locomotion requires walking as an 'inverted pendulum', with: I, an impulsive, energy-dissipating leg compression at the beginning of stance; II, a stiff-limbed vault; and III, an impulsive, powering push-off at the end of stance. The characteristic 'M'-shaped vertical ground reaction forces of walking in humans reflect this impulse-vault-impulse strategy. Humans achieve this gait by dissipating energy during the heel-to-sole transition in early stance, approximately stiff-limbed, flat-footed vaulting over midstance and ankle plantarflexion (powering the toes down) in late stance. Here, we show that the 'M'-shaped walking ground reaction force profile does not require the plantigrade human foot or heel-sole-toe stance; it is maintained in tip-toe and high-heel walking as well as in ostriches. However, the unusual, stiff, human foot structure--with ground-contacting heel behind ankle and toes in front--enables both mechanically economical inverted pendular walking and physiologically economical muscle loading, by producing extreme changes in mechanical advantage between muscles and ground reaction forces. With a human foot, and heel-sole-toe strategy during stance, the shin muscles that dissipate energy, or calf muscles that power the push-off, need not be loaded at all--largely avoiding the 'cost of muscle force'--during the passive vaulting phase.

  15. Effects of loaded voluntary wheel exercise on performance and muscle hypertrophy in young and old male C57Bl/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffe, Z; Radley-Crabb, H G; McMahon, C; Grounds, M D; Shavlakadze, T

    2016-02-01

    This study compared the capacity of young and old male C57Bl/6J mice to exercise with increasing resistance over 10 weeks, and its impact on muscle mass. Young mice (aged 15-25 weeks) were subjected to low (LR) and high (HR) resistance exercise, whereas only LR was used for old mice (107-117 weeks). Weekly patterns of voluntary wheel activity, food consumption and body weights were measured. Running patterns changed over time and with age, with two peaks of activity detected for young, but only one for old mice: speed and distance run was also less for old mice. The mass for six limb muscles was measured at the end of the experiment. The most pronounced increase in mass in response to exercise was for the soleus in young and old mice, and also quadriceps and gastrocnemius in young mice. Soleus and quadriceps muscles were analyzed histologically for myofiber number and size. A striking feature was the many small myofibers in response to exercise in young (but not old) soleus, whereas these were not present after exercise in young or old quadriceps. Overall, there was a striking difference in response to exercise between muscles and this was influenced by age. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Isometric strength training lowers the O2 cost of cycling during moderate-intensity exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, Jerzy A; Szkutnik, Zbigniew; Majerczak, Joanna; Grandys, Marcin; Duda, Krzysztof; Grassi, Bruno

    2012-12-01

    The effect of maximal voluntary isometric strength training of knee extensor muscles on pulmonary V'O(2) on-kinetics, the O(2) cost of cycling and peak oxygen uptake (V'O(2peak)) in humans was studied. Seven healthy males (mean ± SD, age 22.3 ± 2.0 years, body weight 75.0 ± 9.2 kg, V'O(2peak) 49.5 ± 3.8 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) performed maximal isometric strength training lasting 7 weeks (4 sessions per week). Force during maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) increased by 15 % (P < 0.001) after 1 week of training, and by 19 % (P < 0.001) after 7 weeks of training. This increase in MVC was accompanied by no significant changes in the time constant of the V'O(2) on-kinetics during 6 min of moderate and heavy cycling intensities. Strength training resulted in a significant decrease (by ~7 %; P < 0.02) in the amplitude of the fundamental component of the V'O(2) on-kinetics, and therefore in a lower O(2) cost of cycling during moderate cycling intensity. The amplitude of the slow component of V'O(2) on-kinetics during heavy cycling intensity did not change with training. Training had no effect on the V'O(2peak), whereas the maximal power output reached at V'O(2peak) was slightly but significantly increased (P < 0.05). Isometric strength training rapidly (i.e., after 1 week) decreases the O(2) cost of cycling during moderate-intensity exercise, whereas it does not affect the amplitude of the slow component of the V'O(2) on-kinetics during heavy-intensity exercise. Isometric strength training can have beneficial effects on performance during endurance events.

  17. Contributions of central command and muscle feedback to sympathetic nerve activity in contracting human skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eBoulton

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During voluntary contractions, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA to contracting muscles increases in proportion to force but the underlying mechanisms are not clear. To shed light on these mechanisms, particularly the influences of central command and muscle afferent feedback, the present study tested the hypothesis that MSNA is greater during voluntary compared with electrically-evoked contractions. Seven male subjects performed a series of 1-minute isometric dorsiflexion contractions (left leg separated by 2-minute rest periods, alternating between voluntary and electrically-evoked contractions at similar forces (5-10 % of maximum. MSNA was recorded continuously (microneurography from the left peroneal nerve and quantified from cardiac-synchronised, negative-going spikes in the neurogram. Compared with pre-contraction values, MSNA increased by 51 ± 34 % (P 0.05. MSNA analysed at 15-s intervals revealed that this effect of voluntary contraction appeared 15-30 s after contraction onset (P < 0.01, remained elevated until the end of contraction, and disappeared within 15 s after contraction. These findings suggest that central command, and not feedback from contracting muscle, is the primary mechanism responsible for the increase in MSNA to contracting muscle. The time-course of MSNA suggests that there is a longer delay in the onset of this effect compared with its cessation after contraction.

  18. Quantification of muscle co-contraction using supersonic shear wave imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiteri, Brent J; Hug, François; Cresswell, Andrew G; Lichtwark, Glen A

    2016-02-01

    Muscle stiffness estimated using shear wave elastography can provide an index of individual muscle force during isometric contraction and may therefore be a promising method for quantifying co-contraction. We estimated the shear modulus of the lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscle using supersonic shear wave imaging and measured its myoelectrical activity using surface electromyography (sEMG) during graded isometric contractions of plantar flexion and dorsiflexion (n=7). During dorsiflexion, the average shear modulus was 26 ± 6 kPa at peak sEMG amplitude, which was significantly less (P=0.02) than that measured at the same sEMG level during plantar flexion (42 ± 10 kPa). The passive tension during contraction was estimated using the passive LG muscle shear modulus during a passive ankle rotation measured at an equivalent ankle angle to that measured during contraction. The passive shear modulus increased significantly (Pmuscle shear modulus due to active contraction was significantly greater (Pmuscle, despite measured sEMG activity of 19% of maximal voluntary plantar flexion contraction. This strongly suggests that the sEMG activity recorded from the LG muscle during isometric dorsiflexion was primarily due to cross-talk. However, it is clear that passive muscle tension changes can contribute to joint torque during isometric dorsiflexion.

  19. The effect of lumbar posture on abdominal muscle thickness during an isometric leg task in people with and without non-specific low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Rafael Zambelli; Ferreira, Paulo Henrique; Franco, Marcia Rodrigues; Ferreira, Mariana Calais; Ferreira, Manuela Loureiro; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci Fuscaldi; Oliveira, Vinicius C; Maher, Christopher

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of lumbar posture on function of transversus abdominis (TrA) and obliquus internus (OI) in people with and without non-specific low back pain (LBP) during a lower limb task. Rehabilitative ultrasound was used to measure thickness change of TrA and OI during a lower limb task that challenged the stability of the spine. Measures were taken in supine in neutral and flexed lumbar postures in 30 patients and 30 healthy subjects. Data were analysed using a two-way (groups, postures) ANOVA. Our results showed that lumbar posture influenced percent thickness change of the TRA muscle but not for OI. An interaction between group and posture was found for TrA thickness change (F(1,56) = 6.818, p = 0.012). For this muscle, only healthy participants showed greater thickness change with neutral posture compared to flexed (mean difference = 6.2%; 95% CI: 3.1-9.3%; p posture can facilitate an increase in thickness of the TrA muscle while performing a leg task, however this effect was not observed for this muscle in patients with LBP. No significant difference in TrA and OI thickness change between people with and without non-specific LBP was found. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Corticospinal interaction during isometric compensation for modulated forces with different frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurer Christoph

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During isometric compensation of modulated low-level forces corticomuscular coherence (CMC has been shown to occur in high-beta or gamma-range. The influence of the frequency of force modulation on CMC has up to now remained unexplored. We addressed this question by investigating CMC, motor performance, and cortical spectral power during a visuomotor task in which subjects had to compensate a modulated force of 8% of the maximum voluntary contraction exerted on their right index finger. The effect of three frequencies of force modulation (0.6, 1.0 and 1.6 Hz was tested. EEG, EMG from first dorsal interosseus, hand flexor and extensor muscles, and finger position were recorded in eight right-handed women. Results Five subjects showed CMC in gamma- (28-45 Hz and three in beta-range (15-30 Hz. Beta- and gamma-range CMC and cortical motor spectral power were not modulated by the various frequencies. However, a sharp bilateral CMC peak at 1.6 Hz was observed, but only in the five gamma-range CMC subjects. The performance error increased linearly with the frequency. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the frequency of force modulation has no effect on the beta- and gamma-range CMC during isometric compensation for modulated forces at 8% MVC. The beta- and gamma-range CMC may be related to interindividual differences and possibly to strategy differences.

  1. The strength of the corticospinal coherence depends on the predictability of modulated isometric forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez-Balbuena, Ignacio; Naranjo, Jose Raul; Wang, Xi; Andrykiewicz, Agnieska; Huethe, Frank; Schulte-Mönting, Jürgen; Hepp-Reymond, Marie-Claude; Kristeva, Rumyana

    2013-03-01

    Isometric compensation of predictably frequency-modulated low forces is associated with corticomuscular coherence (CMC) in beta and low gamma range. It remains unclear how the CMC is influenced by unpredictably modulated forces, which create a mismatch between expected and actual sensory feedback. We recorded electroencephalography from the contralateral hand motor area, electromyography (EMG), and the motor performance of 16 subjects during a visuomotor task in which they had to isometrically compensate target forces at 8% of the maximum voluntary contraction with their right index finger. The modulated forces were presented with predictable or unpredictable frequencies. We calculated the CMC, the cortical motor alpha-, beta-, and gamma-range spectral powers (SP), and the task-related desynchronization (TRD), as well as the EMG SP and the performance. We found that in the unpredictable condition the CMC was significantly lower and associated with lower cortical motor SP, stronger TRD, higher EMG SP, and worse performance. The findings suggest that due to the mismatch between predicted and actual sensory feedback leading to higher computational load and less stationary motor state, the unpredictable modulation of the force leads to a decrease in corticospinal synchrony, an increase in cortical and muscle activation, and a worse performance.

  2. Corticospinal interaction during isometric compensation for modulated forces with different frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, José R; Wang, Xi; Schulte-Mönting, Jürgen; Huethe, Frank; Maurer, Christoph; Hepp-Reymond, Marie-Claude; Kristeva, Rumyana

    2010-12-31

    During isometric compensation of modulated low-level forces corticomuscular coherence (CMC) has been shown to occur in high-beta or gamma-range. The influence of the frequency of force modulation on CMC has up to now remained unexplored. We addressed this question by investigating CMC, motor performance, and cortical spectral power during a visuomotor task in which subjects had to compensate a modulated force of 8% of the maximum voluntary contraction exerted on their right index finger. The effect of three frequencies of force modulation (0.6, 1.0 and 1.6 Hz) was tested. EEG, EMG from first dorsal interosseus, hand flexor and extensor muscles, and finger position were recorded in eight right-handed women. Five subjects showed CMC in gamma- (28-45 Hz) and three in beta-range (15-30 Hz). Beta- and gamma-range CMC and cortical motor spectral power were not modulated by the various frequencies. However, a sharp bilateral CMC peak at 1.6 Hz was observed, but only in the five gamma-range CMC subjects. The performance error increased linearly with the frequency. Our findings suggest that the frequency of force modulation has no effect on the beta- and gamma-range CMC during isometric compensation for modulated forces at 8% MVC. The beta- and gamma-range CMC may be related to interindividual differences and possibly to strategy differences.

  3. [Association between carbonyl proteins and tumor necrosis factor alpha with muscle strength in young and older women: exploratory study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Huenchullán, Sergio Francisco; Mancilla Solorza, Eladio Bernabé

    2015-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that there is a close relationship between oxidative stress and low-grade chronic inflammation. Both processes have been related separately to muscle function in older adults (OA). Nevertheless, it still has not been determined if this relationship is present particularly in OA. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between the plasma levels of TNF-α and carbonyl proteins (CP) and muscle strength in a group of young and older women. An exploratory study was conducted on 13 older and 8 young women, in whom the plasma levels of CP and TNF-α were measured. Muscle strength was measured by handgrip test, quadriceps voluntary maximal isometric strength, arm curl, and the 30 second sit to stand test. There were no differences in the plasma levels of CP and TNF-α between the groups, but there was relationship between the biomarkers only in the OA group. A non-linear relationship was observed between CP and quadriceps voluntary maximal isometric strength only in the OA group (R(2)=36.2; P=.038). For TNF-α there were no significant association with any of the applied tests. There is an association between CP and quadriceps voluntary maximal isometric strength only in the OA group, which could indicate a deleterious action of oxidative stress on muscle function, particularly in aging. Copyright © 2015 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Group Ia afferents contribute to short-latency interlimb reflexes in the human biceps femoris muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas; Kamavuako, Ernest Nlandu; Geertsen, Svend Sparre

    2017-01-01

    and velocity of the iKnee rotations. Methods 11 seated participants (mean age: 25 ± 5 years) performed a voluntary isometric knee extension with the ipsilateral leg and contralateral knee flexion to 10% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). A mechanical actuator (MTS-Systems Corporation) imposed i...... amplitudes (4 vs. 8°) at the same 150°/s velocity (p’s > 0.08). Conclusion Because fast conducting group Ia muscle spindle afferents are sensitive to changes in muscle stretch velocity, while group II spindle afferents are sensitive to changes in amplitude (Grey et al., JPhysiol., 2001; Matthews, Trends...... Neurosci., 1991), group Ia velocity sensitive muscle spindle afferents likely contribute to the short-latency crossed spinal reflexes in the cBF muscle following iKnee joint rotations. This supports the findings for the short-latency crossed responses in the human soleus muscle (Stubbs & Mrachacz...

  5. Learning Isometric Separation Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Vasiloglou, Nikolaos; Anderson, David V

    2008-01-01

    Maximum Variance Unfolding (MVU) and its variants have been very successful in embedding data-manifolds in lower dimensionality spaces, often revealing the true intrinsic dimensions. In this paper we show how to also incorporate supervised class information into an MVU-like method without breaking its convexity. We call this method the Isometric Separation Map and we show that the resulting kernel matrix can be used for a binary/multiclass Support Vector Machine in a semi-supervised (transductive) framework. We also show that the method always finds a kernel matrix that linearly separates the training data exactly without projecting them in infinite dimensional spaces.

  6. Isometric exercise in the denervated heart: a Doppler echocardiographic study.

    OpenAIRE

    Robson, S C; Furniss, S.S.; Heads, A; Boys, R J; McGregor, C.; Bexton, R S

    1989-01-01

    The haemodynamic responses to isometric exercise of eight recipients of orthotopic heart transplants and eight healthy controls were studied. Each performed sustained exercise at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction for three minutes on a handgrip dynamometer. Cardiac output was measured by combined Doppler and cross sectional echocardiography before exercise and every 30 seconds during and after exercise. In the controls cardiac output and blood pressure increased significantly owing to an i...

  7. Obtaining maximum muscle excitation for normalizing shoulder electromyography in dynamic contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodder, Joanne N; Keir, Peter J

    2013-10-01

    Muscle specific maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) are commonly used to elicit reference amplitudes to normalize electromyographic signals (EMG). It has been questioned whether this is appropriate for normalizing EMG from dynamic contractions. This study compares EMG amplitude when shoulder muscle activity from dynamic contractions is normalized to isometric and isokinetic maximal excitation as well as a hybrid approach currently used in our laboratory. Anterior, middle and posterior deltoid, upper and lower trapezius, pectoralis major, latissimus dorsi and infraspinatus were monitored during (1) manually resisted MVICs, and (2) maximum voluntary dynamic concentric contractions (MVDC) on an isokinetic dynamometer. Dynamic contractions were performed (a) at 30°/s about the longitudinal, frontal and sagittal axes of the shoulder, and (b) during manual bi-rotation of a tilted wheel at 120°/s. EMG from the wheel task was normalized to the maximum excitation from (i) the muscle specific MVIC, (ii) from any MVIC (MVICALL), (iii) for any MVDC, (iv) from any exertion (maximum experimental excitation, MEE). Mean EMG from the wheel task was up to 45% greater when normalized to muscle specific isometric contractions (method i) than when normalized to MEE (method iv). Seventy-five percent of MEE's occurred during MVDCs. This study presents an 20 useful and effective process for obtaining the greatest excitation from the shoulder muscles when normalizing dynamic efforts.

  8. Intramuscular fiber conduction velocity, isometric force and explosive performance

    OpenAIRE

    Methenitis Spyridon; Terzis Gerasimos; Zaras Nikolaos; Stasinaki Angeliki-Nikoletta; Karandreas Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    Conduction of electrical signals along the surface of muscle fibers is acknowledged as an essential neuromuscular component which is linked with muscle force production. However, it remains unclear whether muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) is also linked with explosive performance. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between vastus lateralis MFCV and countermovement jumping performance, the rate of force development and maximum isometric force. Fifteen moder...

  9. Intramuscular fiber conduction velocity, isometric force and explosive performance

    OpenAIRE

    Methenitis, Spyridon; Terzis, Gerasimos; Zaras, Nikolaos; Stasinaki, Angeliki-Nikoletta; Karandreas, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Conduction of electrical signals along the surface of muscle fibers is acknowledged as an essential neuromuscular component which is linked with muscle force production. However, it remains unclear whether muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) is also linked with explosive performance. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between vastus lateralis MFCV and countermovement jumping performance, the rate of force development and maximum isometric force. Fift...

  10. Residual force enhancement following eccentric induced muscle damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Geoffrey A; Rice, Charles L; Vandervoort, Anthony A

    2012-06-26

    During lengthening of an activated skeletal muscle, the force maintained following the stretch is greater than the isometric force at the same muscle length. This is termed residual force enhancement (RFE), but it is unknown how muscle damage following repeated eccentric contractions affects RFE. Using the dorsiflexors, we hypothesised muscle damage will impair the force generating sarcomeric structures leading to a reduction in RFE. Following reference maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVC) in 8 young men (26.5±2.8y) a stretch was performed at 30°/s over a 30° ankle excursion ending at the same muscle length as the reference MVCs (30° plantar flexion). Surface electromyography (EMG) of the tibialis anterior and soleus muscles was recorded during all tasks. The damage protocol involved 4 sets of 25 isokinetic (30°/s) lengthening contractions. The same measures were collected at baseline and immediately post lengthening contractions, and for up to 10min recovery. Following the lengthening contraction task, there was a 30.3±6.4% decrease in eccentric torque (Pmuscle damage (Pmuscle function compared to isometric actions succeeding damage. Thus, active force of cross-bridges is decreased because of impaired excitation-contraction coupling but force generated during stretch remains intact because force contribution from stretched sarcomeric structures is less impaired.

  11. Effects on hamstring muscle extensibility, muscle activity, and balance of different stretching techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kyoung-Il; Nam, Hyung-Chun; Jung, Kyoung-Sim

    2014-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of two different stretching techniques on range of motion (ROM), muscle activation, and balance. [Subjects] For the present study, 48 adults with hamstring muscle tightness were recruited and randomly divided into three groups: a static stretching group (n=16), a PNF stretching group (n=16), a control group (n=16). [Methods] Both of the stretching techniques were applied to the hamstring once. Active knee extension angle, muscle activation during maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVC), and static balance were measured before and after the application of each stretching technique. [Results] Both the static stretching and the PNF stretching groups showed significant increases in knee extension angle compared to the control group. However, there were no significant differences in muscle activation or balance between the groups. [Conclusion] Static stretching and PNF stretching techniques improved ROM without decrease in muscle activation, but neither of them exerted statistically significant effects on balance.

  12. Effects on Hamstring Muscle Extensibility, Muscle Activity, and Balance of Different Stretching Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kyoung-Il; Nam, Hyung-Chun; Jung, Kyoung-Sim

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of two different stretching techniques on range of motion (ROM), muscle activation, and balance. [Subjects] For the present study, 48 adults with hamstring muscle tightness were recruited and randomly divided into three groups: a static stretching group (n=16), a PNF stretching group (n=16), a control group (n=16). [Methods] Both of the stretching techniques were applied to the hamstring once. Active knee extension angle, muscle activation during maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVC), and static balance were measured before and after the application of each stretching technique. [Results] Both the static stretching and the PNF stretching groups showed significant increases in knee extension angle compared to the control group. However, there were no significant differences in muscle activation or balance between the groups. [Conclusion] Static stretching and PNF stretching techniques improved ROM without decrease in muscle activation, but neither of them exerted statistically significant effects on balance. PMID:24648633

  13. The Isolated Effect of Adductor Canal Block on Quadriceps Femoris Muscle Strength After Total Knee Arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Johan Kløvgaard; Jæger, Pia; Dahl, Jørgen Berg

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Using peripheral nerve block after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), without impeding mobility, is challenging. We hypothesized that the analgesic effect of adductor canal block (ACB) could increase the maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of the quadriceps femoris muscle after......, expressed as a percentage of postoperative preblock values. In this manner, the effect of the ACB could be isolated from the detrimental effect on muscle strength caused by the surgery. Secondary end points were differences between groups in mobility and pain scores. We planned a subgroup analysis dividing......: ACB improves quadriceps femoris muscle strength, but whether this translates into enhanced mobility is not clearly supported by this study....

  14. Real-time noninvasive optical imaging of exercising muscle and brain upon cognitive stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaresima, Valentina; van der Sluijs, Marco C.; Menssen, Jan; Grillotti, Lucia; Ferrari, Marco; Colier, Willy N.

    2001-06-01

    The monitoring of a single muscle location does not reflect the heterogeneity of the muscle groups activation during exercise. In the past, measurements of oxygen consumption (VO2) at single muscle locations could be carried out non-invasively by near-infrared continuous wave spectroscopy (NIRCWS) at rest or during isometric contractions. In the present study, human regional quadriceps (vastus lateralis and rectus femoris) VO2 was investigated at rest and during maximal voluntary contractions using a 12- channel NIRCWS system with an acquisition time of 0.1 s.

  15. Enhanced force production in old age is not a far stretch: an investigation of residual force enhancement and muscle architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Geoffrey A; Makrakos, Demetri P; Rice, Charles L; Vandervoort, Anthony A

    2013-06-01

    In older adults, isometric force production is enhanced following a voluntary lengthening contraction when compared with isometric force produced at the same muscle length without a prior lengthening contraction. This phenomenon is termed residual force enhancement (RFE), and appears to be related to the age-related maintenance of eccentric (ECC) strength. However, it is unknown whether age-related changes in muscle architecture contribute to greater RFE at short and long muscle lengths in old age. Neuromuscular properties of the knee extensors were assessed on a HUMAC NORM dynamometer. Torque was examined in young (26 ± 3 year, n = 11) and old men (77 ± 6 year, n = 11) during brief maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVC) at 80° and 120° (180° representing full knee extension) and then compared with torque during a steady-state phase at the same joint angle following a maximal voluntary lengthening contraction at 30°/sec over a 60° joint excursion; either from 140 to 80° (long), or from 180 to 120° (short). Ultrasound images were obtained from the vastus lateralis during the isometric phase for each condition. When comparing the ECC torque with the MVC isometric torque, old men had 17% greater ECC:MVC ratios than young men, confirming an age-related maintenance of ECC strength. The extent of RFE was greater at long versus short but independent of age. At rest, old had shorter (∼18%) and less pennated (∼22%) fascicles. However, changes in fascicle length and pennation during contraction did not contribute to RFE in either group. Thus, age-related changes in muscle architecture may not contribute to RFE.

  16. The role of passive muscle stiffness in symptoms of exercise-induced muscle damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, M P; Connolly, D A; Eston, R G; Kremenic, I J; Nicholas, S J; Gleim, G W

    1999-01-01

    We examined whether passive stiffness of an eccentrically exercising muscle group affects the subsequent symptoms of muscle damage. Passive hamstring muscle stiffness was measured during an instrumented straight-leg-raise stretch in 20 subjects (11 men and 9 women) who were subsequently classified as "stiff" (N = 7), "normal" (N = 6), or "compliant" (N = 7). Passive stiffness was 78% higher in the stiff subjects (36.2 +/- 3.3 N.m.rad(-1)) compared with the compliant subjects (20.3 +/- 1.8 N.m.rad(-1)). Subjects then performed six sets of 10 isokinetic (2.6 rad.s(-1)) submaximal (60% maximal voluntary contraction) eccentric actions of the hamstring muscle group. Symptoms of muscle damage were documented by changes in isometric hamstring muscle strength, pain, muscle tenderness, and creatine kinase activity on the following 3 days. Strength loss, pain, muscle tenderness, and creatine kinase activity were significantly greater in the stiff compared with the compliant subjects on the days after eccentric exercise. Greater symptoms of muscle damage in subjects with stiffer hamstring muscles are consistent with the sarcomere strain theory of muscle damage. The present study provides experimental evidence of an association between flexibility and muscle injury. Muscle stiffness and its clinical correlate, static flexibility, are risk factors for more severe symptoms of muscle damage after eccentric exercise.

  17. A simple test of muscle coactivation estimation using electromyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U.F. Ervilha

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In numerous motor tasks, muscles around a joint act coactively to generate opposite torques. A variety of indexes based on electromyography signals have been presented in the literature to quantify muscle coactivation. However, it is not known how to estimate it reliably using such indexes. The goal of this study was to test the reliability of the estimation of muscle coactivation using electromyography. Isometric coactivation was obtained at various muscle activation levels. For this task, any coactivation measurement/index should present the maximal score (100% of coactivation. Two coactivation indexes were applied. In the first, the antagonistic muscle activity (the lower electromyographic signal between two muscles that generate opposite joint torques is divided by the mean between the agonistic and antagonistic muscle activations. In the second, the ratio between antagonistic and agonistic muscle activation is calculated. Moreover, we computed these indexes considering different electromyographic amplitude normalization procedures. It was found that the first algorithm, with all signals normalized by their respective maximal voluntary coactivation, generates the index closest to the true value (100%, reaching 92 ± 6%. In contrast, the coactivation index value was 82 ± 12% when the second algorithm was applied and the electromyographic signal was not normalized (P < 0.04. The new finding of the present study is that muscle coactivation is more reliably estimated if the EMG signals are normalized by their respective maximal voluntary contraction obtained during maximal coactivation prior to dividing the antagonistic muscle activity by the mean between the agonistic and antagonistic muscle activations.

  18. Electromyographic response of global abdominal stabilizers in response to stable- and unstable-base isometric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Stephen J; Bentley, Ian; Brooks, Darrell; Burrows, Mark P; Hurst, Howard T; Sinclair, Jonathan K

    2015-06-01

    Core stability training traditionally uses stable-base techniques. Less is known as to the use of unstable-base techniques, such as suspension training, to activate core musculature. This study sought to assess the neuromuscular activation of global core stabilizers when using suspension training techniques, compared with more traditional forms of isometric exercise. Eighteen elite level, male youth swimmers (age, 15.5 ± 2.3 years; stature, 163.3 ± 12.7 cm; body mass, 62.2 ± 11.9 kg) participated in this study. Surface electromyography (sEMG) was used to determine the rate of muscle contraction in postural musculature, associated with core stability and torso bracing (rectus abdominus [RA], external obliques [EO], erector spinae [ES]). A maximal voluntary contraction test was used to determine peak amplitude for all muscles. Static bracing of the core was achieved using a modified "plank" position, with and without a Swiss ball, and held for 30 seconds. A mechanically similar "plank" was then held using suspension straps. Analysis of sEMG revealed that suspension produced higher peak amplitude in the RA than using a prone or Swiss ball "plank" (p = 0.04). This difference was not replicated in either the EO or ES musculature. We conclude that suspension training noticeably improves engagement of anterior core musculature when compared with both lateral and posterior muscles. Further research is required to determine how best to activate both posterior and lateral musculature when using all forms of core stability training.

  19. Shear modulus estimation on vastus intermedius of elderly and young females over the entire range of isometric contraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong-Zhi Wang

    Full Text Available Elderly people often suffer from sarcopenia in their lower extremities, which gives rise to the increased susceptibility of fall. Comparing the mechanical properties of the knee extensor/flexors on elderly and young subjects is helpful in understanding the underlying mechanisms of the muscle aging process. However, although the stiffness of skeletal muscle has been proved to be positively correlated to its non-fatiguing contraction intensity by some existing methods, this conclusion has not been verified above 50% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC due to the limitation of their measurement range. In this study, a vibro-ultrasound system was set up to achieve a considerably larger measurement range on muscle stiffness estimation. Its feasibility was verified on self-made silicone phantoms by comparing with the mechanical indentation method. The system was then used to assess the stiffness of vastus intermedius (VI, one of the knee extensors, on 10 healthy elderly female subjects (56.7 ± 4.9 yr and 10 healthy young female subjects (27.6 ± 5.0 yr. The VI stiffness in its action direction was confirmed to be positively correlated to the % MVC level (R2 = 0.999 over the entire range of isometric contraction, i.e. from 0% MVC (relaxed state to 100% MVC. Furthermore, it was shown that there was no significant difference between the mean VI shear modulus of the elderly and young subjects in a relaxed state (p > 0.1. However, when performing step isometric contraction, the VI stiffness of young female subjects was found to be larger than that of elderly participants (p < 0.001, especially at the relatively higher contraction levels. The results expanded our knowledge on the mechanical property of the elderly's skeletal muscle and its relationship with intensity of active contraction. Furthermore, the vibro-ultrasound system has a potential to become a powerful tool for investigating the elderly's muscle diseases.

  20. Effects of cold and hot water immersion on the mechanical properties of human muscle and tendon in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Keitaro; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo

    2005-03-01

    Cooling and heating have been shown to affect the contractile properties of muscles. However, the reasons for these changes remain unclear. The present study aimed to quantify the mechanical properties of muscle and tendon during passive stretch and active contraction, and to investigate the effects of cooling and heating on the mechanical properties of muscle and tendon. Before and after these conditions, the elongation of the muscle fascicle, tendon and aponeurosis of the medial gastrocnemius muscle was directly measured by ultrasonography, while the ankle joint was passively moved within the joint range of +15 to -30 deg (0 deg = neutral anatomic position; positive values for plantar flexion) and subjects performed ramp isometric plantar flexion up to the voluntary maximum. While the muscle fascicle, tendon and aponeurosis stretched during passive dorsi-flexion, the elongation of the tendon was significantly greater than that of the aponeurosis. During isometric contraction, the maximal elongation of the tendon was significantly greater than that of the aponeurosis. After cooling and heating, no significant changes in the elongation of muscle fascicle, tendon and aponeurosis were found during passive stretch. Similarly, after both the immersions there were no changes in the relationship between the estimated muscle force and elongation of each structure (tendon-aponeurosis complex, tendon) during isometric contraction. These results implied that the general application of icing and hot pack did not change the mechanical properties of muscle and tendon.

  1. Characteristics of the Motor Units during Sternocleidomastoid Isometric Flexion among Patients with Mechanical Neck Disorder and Asymptomatic Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chia-Chi; Su, Fong-Chin; Yang, Po-Ching; Lin, Hwai-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical neck disorder is a widespread and non-neurological musculoskeletal condition resulting from modern lifestyles. Presently, the fundamental electrophysiological properties of the motor units of the sternocleidomastoid muscles and the characteristics of the short-term synchronization of the motor unit in patients with neck pain are ambiguous. This study therefore aims to clarify the fundamental electrophysiological properties of the motor units of the sternocleidomastoid muscles in patients with mechanical neck disorder and in asymptomatic individuals. We further investigated whether alterations in the degree of motor unit short-term synchronization occur. The surface electrophysiological signals of the bilateral sternal heads of the sternocleidomastoid muscles of twelve patients with mechanical neck disorder and asymptomatic individuals were detected at 25% of the maximum voluntary contraction during cervical isometric flexion and then decomposed into individual motor unit action potential trains. We found that the patients with mechanical neck disorder showed significantly higher initial and mean firing rates of the sternocleidomastoid muscles and displayed substantially lower motor unit short-term synchronization values compared with the asymptomatic subjects. Consequently, these convincing findings support the assertion that patients with mechanical neck disorder display altered neuromuscular control strategies, such as the reinforcement of motor unit recruitment firing rates in the sternocleidomastoid muscles. The motor units of these patients also revealed neural recruitment strategies with relatively poor efficiency when executing the required motor tasks. PMID:27941995

  2. Validity of surface electromyography for vastus intermedius muscle assessed by needle electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kohei; Akima, Hiroshi

    2011-06-15

    Recently, a new recording technique for surface electromyography (EMG) of the deeper muscle component of the quadriceps femoris muscle group, i.e., vastus intermedius (VI) muscle, from the distal portion of the VI muscle has been developed; however, the effect of electrode location on EMG signal of the VI muscle remains unclear. The aim of this study is to compare neuromuscular activation detected at the middle and distal portions of the VI muscle, in order to clarify whether the surface EMG of the VI muscle can be used to assess the neuromuscular activation of the entire muscle. Six healthy men participated in this study. During incremental ramp contraction of isometric knee extension (~30% of maximal voluntary contraction), needle EMG was recorded from the middle and distal regions of the VI muscle and surface EMG was performed at the distal region of the VI muscle. Excellent correlation was observed between needle EMG at the middle and distal regions (r=0.897-0.984, pEMG detected at the distal versus needle EMG detected at the middle and that of surface EMG detected at distal versus needle EMG detected at distal (pEMG at the distal portion of the VI muscle, which is the only region available for surface EMG, can be used to evaluate global neuromuscular activation of the VI muscle during isometric contraction at a low force level.

  3. Fatigue and recovery from dynamic contractions in men and women differ for arm and leg muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senefeld, Jonathon; Yoon, Tejin; Bement, Marie Hoeger; Hunter, Sandra K

    2013-09-01

    Whether there is a gender difference in fatigue and recovery from maximal velocity fatiguing contractions and across muscles is not understood. Sixteen men and 19 women performed 90 isotonic contractions at maximal voluntary shortening velocity (maximal velocity concentric contractions, MVCC) with the elbow flexor and knee extensor muscles (separate days) at a load equivalent to 20% maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). Power (from MVCCs) decreased similarly for men and women for both muscles (P > 0.05). Men and women had similar declines in MVIC of elbow flexors, but men had greater reductions in knee extensor MVIC force and MVIC electromyogram activity than women (P contractions for upper and lower limb muscles. Copyright © Published 2013 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. This article is a US Government wmusork and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  4. The number of active motor units and their firing rates in voluntary contraction of human brachialis muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanosue, K; Yoshida, M; Akazawa, K; Fujii, K

    1979-01-01

    To make clear the control mechanism of force generation in human muscle, the electrical activity of the brachialis muscle was studied at various levels of contraction force by recording single motor unit discharges as well as mass electromyograms (EMGs). The firing rate of motor units increased with force along an S-shaped curve. At low levels of force, motor units increased their firing rates steeply with force. At intermediate levels of force, each motor unit increased its firing rate linearly with force at lower rates. As the maximum of force was approached, the firing rate increased very steeply, reaching as high as 50 Hz or more. By applying a new method of statistical processing to mass EMGs, the number of active motor units and the size of action potential were estimated at each level of force. The number of active motor units increased monotonously with muscle force. Motor units recruited at high levels of force had larger amplitudes of action potentials than those recruited at lower levels. Calculations were made to determine how the relative contribution to an increase in muscle force is varied between recruitment and the increase in firing rate. The contribution of recruitment gradually decreased with the increase in force. Up to about 70% of the maximum force, recruitment is the major mechanism for increasing the force of contraction.

  5. Brain-imaging during an isometric leg extension task at graded intensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera eAbeln

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Imaging the brain during complex and intensive movements is challenging due to the susceptibility of brain-imaging methods for motion and myogenic artifacts. A few studies measured brain activity during either single-joint or low-intensity exercises; however, the cortical activation state during larger movements with increases up to maximal intensity has barely been investigated so far. Eleven right-handed volunteers (22-45 years in age performed isometric leg extensions with their right leg at 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% and 100% of their maximal voluntary contraction. Contractions were hold for 20 seconds respectively. Electroencephalographic (EEG and electromyographic (EMG activity was recorded. Standardized low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA was used to localize the cortical current density within the premotor (PMC, primary motor (M1, primary somatosensory (S1 and somatosensory association cortex (SAC. ANOVA was used for repeated measures for comparison of intensities and between the left and right hemispheres.The quality of the EEG signal was satisfying up to 80% intensity. At 100% half of the participants were not able to keep their neck and face muscles relaxed, leading to myogenic artifacts. Higher contralateral versus ipsilateral hemispheric activity was found for the S1, SAC and PMC. M1 possessed higher ipsilateral activity. The highest activity was localized in the M1, followed by S1, PMC and SAC. EMG activity and cortical current density within the M1 increased with exercise intensity. EEG recordings during bigger movements up to submaximal intensity (80% are possible, but maximal intensities are still hard to investigate when subjects contracted their neck and face muscles at the same time. Isometric contractions mainly involve the M1, whereas the S1, PMC and SAC seem not to be involved in the force output. Limitations and recommendations for future studies are discussed.

  6. Brain-imaging during an isometric leg extension task at graded intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeln, Vera; Harig, Alexandra; Knicker, Axel; Vogt, Tobias; Schneider, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Imaging the brain during complex and intensive movements is challenging due to the susceptibility of brain-imaging methods for motion and myogenic artifacts. A few studies measured brain activity during either single-joint or low-intensity exercises; however, the cortical activation state during larger movements with increases up to maximal intensity has barely been investigated so far. Eleven right-handed volunteers (22-45 years in age) performed isometric leg extensions with their right leg at 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100% of their maximal voluntary contraction. Contractions were hold for 20 s respectively. Electroencephalographic (EEG) and electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded. Standardized low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA) was used to localize the cortical current density within the premotor (PMC), primary motor (M1), primary somatosensory (S1) and somatosensory association cortex (SAC). ANOVA was used for repeated measures for comparison of intensities and between the left and right hemispheres. The quality of the EEG signal was satisfying up to 80% intensity. At 100% half of the participants were not able to keep their neck and face muscles relaxed, leading to myogenic artifacts. Higher contralateral vs. ipsilateral hemispheric activity was found for the S1, SAC and, PMC. M1 possessed higher ipsilateral activity. The highest activity was localized in the M1, followed by S1, PMC, and SAC. EMG activity and cortical current density within the M1 increased with exercise intensity. EEG recordings during bigger movements up to submaximal intensity (80%) are possible, but maximal intensities are still hard to investigate when subjects contracted their neck and face muscles at the same time. Isometric contractions mainly involve the M1, whereas the S1, PMC, and SAC seem not to be involved in the force output. Limitations and recommendations for future studies are discussed.

  7. Construct validity of change scores of the Chair Stand Test versus Timed Up and Go Test, KOOS questionnaire and the isometric muscle strength test in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis undergoing total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Erika O; Meichtry, Andre; de Bie, Rob A; Bastiaenen, Caroline H

    2016-02-01

    The Chair Stand Test (CST) is a frequently used performance-based test in clinical studies involving individuals with knee osteoarthritis and demonstrates good reliability. To assess the construct validity of change scores of the CST compared to three other measures in patients before and after total knee replacement surgery. The construct validity of change scores of the CST compared to the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score questionnaire (KOOS, subscale ADL) and the isometric muscle strength test of the knee extensors (IMS sum) was measured 1-2 week before and 3 months after surgery. Change (%) CST = -4.45, TUG = -2.08, KOOS ADL = 43.90, IMS sum = -13.24. Correlations CST-TUG = 0.56 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.29, 0.74), CST-KOOS = -0.31 (95% CI -0.57, 0.01), CST-IMS sum = -0.11 (95% CI -0.42, 0.22). Comparison of pairwise correlations: CST-KOOS versus CST-TUG (p < 0.0004), CST-TUG versus CST-IMS sum (p < 0.0068), CST-KOOS versus CST-IMS sum (p < 0.3100). For patients undergoing TKR, the CST might not be an ideal measure to assess change between pre-surgery and 3 months post-surgery. Construct validity of change scores was close to zero but the result might have been influenced by the relatively small homogeneous sample size and the chosen timespan of measurement. We ordered pairwise correlations based on the strength of correlation between the different instruments, which to our knowledge has never been done before. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Avaliação da inibição recíproca em humanos durante contrações isométricas dos músculos tibial anterior e sóleo Assessment of reciprocal inhibition in humans during isometric contractions of the tibialis anterior and soleus muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Eduardo Pompeu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Os objetivos do presente trabalho foram: (1 desenvolver um método para estimar o grau de inibição recíproca (IR entre músculos antagonistas em humanos (sóleo e tibial anterior e (2 comparar os níveis de IR no repouso, na dorsiflexão (DF e na flexão plantar (FP. Participaram nove sujeitos saudáveis com idade entre 20 e 30 anos, quatro homens e cinco mulheres. Os sujeitos permaneceram sentados numa cadeira com o pé direito apoiado e fixo num pedal acoplado a um torquímetro; as medições foram feitas no repouso e durante contração isométrica dos músculos dorsiflexores e flexores plantares do tornozelo. A onda H do músculo sóleo foi captada por eletrodos de superfície. O reflexo H (RH "teste" do músculo sóleo foi medido aplicando-se um estímulo na fossa poplítea (nervo tibial. O reflexo H "condicionado" foi obtido pelo pareamento de dois estímulos: o primeiro aplicado sobre a cabeça da fíbula e o segundo, na fossa poplítea, após 1 a 3 ms.. As amplitudes pico-a-pico dos RH teste e condicionado foram utilizadas para o cálculo da IR. Os valores de IR foram: 16,41%±8,68 no repouso; 21,94%±5,39 na DF e 3,12%±11,84 na FP. Foi constatada menor inibição recíproca na FP quando comparada às demais condições (pThe purposes of the present study were (1 to develop a method to estimate the level of reciprocal inhibition (RI between antagonist (soleus and anterior tibial muscles in humans, and (2 to compare RI levels during rest, dorsiflexion (DF and plantar flexion (PF. Nine healthy subjects (four men, five women aged between 20 and 30 years were assessed. Each subject remained seated with his/her right foot strapped to a rigid foot plate coupled to a torquemeter; measurements were taken at rest and during isometric contraction of the ankle dorsiflexor and plantar flexor muscles. The soleus muscle H-wave was captured by surface electrodes. A "test" H- reflex was elicited by a stimulus (electrical pulse to the popliteal fossa

  9. Isometric thermogenesis at rest and during movement: a neglected variable in energy expenditure and obesity predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulloo, A G; Miles-Chan, J L; Montani, J-P; Schutz, Y

    2017-02-01

    Isometric thermogenesis as applied to human energy expenditure refers to heat production resulting from increased muscle tension. While most physical activities consist of both dynamic and static (isometric) muscle actions, the isometric component is very often essential for the optimal performance of dynamic work given its role in coordinating posture during standing, walking and most physical activities of everyday life. Over the past 75 years, there has been sporadic interest into the relevance of isometric work to thermoregulatory thermogenesis and to adaptive thermogenesis pertaining to body-weight regulation. This has been in relation to (i) a role for skeletal muscle minor tremor or microvibration - nowadays referred to as 'resting muscle mechanical activity' - in maintaining body temperature in response to mild cooling; (ii) a role for slowed skeletal muscle isometric contraction-relaxation cycle as a mechanism for energy conservation in response to caloric restriction and weight loss and (iii) a role for spontaneous physical activity (which is contributed importantly by isometric work for posture maintenance and fidgeting behaviours) in adaptive thermogenesis pertaining to weight regulation. This paper reviews the evidence underlying these proposed roles for isometric work in adaptive thermogenesis and highlights the contention that variability in this neglected component of energy expenditure could contribute to human predisposition to obesity.

  10. Effect of generalized joint hypermobility on knee function and muscle activation in children and adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bente Rona; Olesen, Annesofie T.; Pedersen, Mogens Theisen

    2013-01-01

    were evaluated in 39 children and 36 adults during isometric knee extension and flexion. Subjects performed isometric maximum contractions, submaximal contractions at 25% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), and explosive contractions. Results: Agonist activation was reduced, and coactivation ratio...

  11. Abnormalities of skeletal muscle in patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipkin, D P; Jones, D A; Round, J M; Poole-Wilson, P A

    1988-02-01

    We have examined muscle strength, mitochondrial enzyme activity, histochemistry and fibre size in the quadriceps muscle of 9 patients with severe chronic heart failure. A needle biopsy of the quadriceps muscle was taken with patients at rest. Maximum oxygen uptake was measured during treadmill exercise. Mean maximal oxygen consumption was 11.7 ml.kg-1.min-1. Isometric maximum voluntary contraction was reduced to 55% of the predicted value for weight. Eight biopsies were abnormal. Findings included increased acid phosphatase, increased interstitial cellularity, excess intracellular lipid accumulation, atrophy of both type I and II fibres and variation in size with hypertrophy and atrophy of fibers. Muscle fibre capillary density and the activity of mitochondrial enzymes were normal. Changes in skeletal muscle strength may play a role in the limitation of exercise capacity seen in patients with congestive heart failure.

  12. Shear Modulus Estimation on Vastus Intermedius of Elderly and Young Females over the Entire Range of Isometric Contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong-Zhi; Li, Tian-Jie; Zheng, Yong-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Elderly people often suffer from sarcopenia in their lower extremities, which gives rise to the increased susceptibility of fall. Comparing the mechanical properties of the knee extensor/flexors on elderly and young subjects is helpful in understanding the underlying mechanisms of the muscle aging process. However, although the stiffness of skeletal muscle has been proved to be positively correlated to its non-fatiguing contraction intensity by some existing methods, this conclusion has not been verified above 50% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) due to the limitation of their measurement range. In this study, a vibro-ultrasound system was set up to achieve a considerably larger measurement range on muscle stiffness estimation. Its feasibility was verified on self-made silicone phantoms by comparing with the mechanical indentation method. The system was then used to assess the stiffness of vastus intermedius (VI), one of the knee extensors, on 10 healthy elderly female subjects (56.7±4.9 yr) and 10 healthy young female subjects (27.6±5.0 yr). The VI stiffness in its action direction was confirmed to be positively correlated to the % MVC level (R2 = 0.999) over the entire range of isometric contraction, i.e. from 0% MVC (relaxed state) to 100% MVC. Furthermore, it was shown that there was no significant difference between the mean VI shear modulus of the elderly and young subjects in a relaxed state (p>0.1). However, when performing step isometric contraction, the VI stiffness of young female subjects was found to be larger than that of elderly participants (pmuscle and its relationship with intensity of active contraction. Furthermore, the vibro-ultrasound system has a potential to become a powerful tool for investigating the elderly’s muscle diseases. PMID:24991890

  13. Computation and Evaluation of Features of Surface Electromyogram to Identify the Force of Muscle Contraction and Muscle Fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridhar P. Arjunan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between force of muscle contraction and muscle fatigue with six different features of surface electromyogram (sEMG was determined by conducting experiments on thirty-five volunteers. The participants performed isometric contractions at 50%, 75%, and 100% of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC. Six features were considered in this study: normalised spectral index (NSM5, median frequency, root mean square, waveform length, normalised root mean square (NRMS, and increase in synchronization (IIS index. Analysis of variance (ANOVA and linear regression analysis were performed to determine the significance of the feature with respect to the three factors: muscle force, muscle fatigue, and subject. The results show that IIS index of sEMG had the highest correlation with muscle fatigue and the relationship was statistically significant (P0.05.

  14. The test-retest reliability of a new measurement of lower extremity isometric muscle strength for patients with knee osteoarthritis%膝关节骨性关节炎患者下肢等长肌力测试新方法的重测信度

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭燕梅; 瓮长水; 陈蔚; 王秋华; 李晓瑛

    2010-01-01

    目的 检验功能性蹲屈测试训练系统在膝关节骨性关节炎患者下肢等长肌力测试中的重测信度.方法 由同一测试者在1周内对30例膝关节骨性关节炎患者进行前、后2次双下肢等长肌力测试,最终得到最大等长伸展肌力、最大等长伸展肌力发生时间和平均等长伸展肌力3项测试结果.应用组内相关系数(ICCs)对这3项测试结果进行重测信度的评价.结果 健患侧的最大等长伸展肌力和平均等长伸展肌力的组内相关系数(ICCs)分别为0.87、0.88、0.92和0.89;健患侧最大等长伸展肌力发生时间的组内相关系数(ICCs)分别为0.25和0.41.结论 在应用功能性蹲屈测试训练系统对膝关节骨性关节炎患者进行等长肌力测试的结果中,最大等长伸展肌力和平均等长伸展肌力2项结果具有很好的重测信度,这2项测试结果可以作为膝关节骨性关节炎患者治疗方案选择和康复疗效评判的可靠性指导依据.%Objective To determine the test-retest reliability of functional squat system (FSS) isometric muscle strength tests for patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods The isometric muscle strength of thirty patientswith knee osteoarthritis (21 males and 9 females; age 45 to 89 years, mean age 68.73 ± 12.19 years) was tested twice within 1 week by the same tester. Three test results were obtained: maximum isometric extension strength, the time to initiate isometric extension and the average isometric extension strength. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) for the three tests were computed to evaluate their retest reliability. Results The ICCs of the maximum isometric extension strength and average isometric extension strength of the uninvolved and involved extremities were respectively 0.87, 0.88, 0.92 and 0.89. The ICCs of the initiation time for the uninvolved and involved legs were respectively 0.25 and 0.41. Conclusion In these tests of patients with knee osteoarthritis using

  15. Increased spinal reflex excitability is associated with enhanced central activation during voluntary lengthening contractions in human spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyosub E.; Corcos, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    This study of chronic incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) subjects investigated patterns of central motor drive (i.e., central activation) of the plantar flexors using interpolated twitches, and modulation of soleus H-reflexes during lengthening, isometric, and shortening muscle actions. In a recent study of the knee extensors, SCI subjects demonstrated greater central activation ratio (CAR) values during lengthening (i.e., eccentric) maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs), compared with during isometric or shortening (i.e., concentric) MVCs. In contrast, healthy controls demonstrated lower lengthening CAR values compared with their isometric and shortening CARs. For the present investigation, we hypothesized SCI subjects would again produce their highest CAR values during lengthening MVCs, and that these increases in central activation were partially attributable to greater efficacy of Ia-α motoneuron transmission during muscle lengthening following SCI. Results show SCI subjects produced higher CAR values during lengthening vs. isometric or shortening MVCs (all P reflex testing revealed normalized H-reflexes (maximal SOL H-reflex-to-maximal M-wave ratios) were greater for SCI than controls during passive (P = 0.023) and active (i.e., 75% MVC; P = 0.017) lengthening, suggesting facilitation of Ia transmission post-SCI. Additionally, measures of spinal reflex excitability (passive lengthening maximal SOL H-reflex-to-maximal M-wave ratio) in SCI were positively correlated with soleus electromyographic activity and CAR values during lengthening MVCs (both P < 0.05). The present study presents evidence that patterns of dynamic muscle activation are altered following SCI, and that greater central activation during lengthening contractions is partly due to enhanced efficacy of Ia-α motoneuron transmission. PMID:25972590

  16. Correlation of Kinematic Parameters and Isometric Muscle Strength of Elite Pitcher%优秀棒球投手的等速肌力与投球运动学参数间关联研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙逊; 罗炯; 张庭然; 秦春莉; 宋吉祥

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the correlation of kinematic parameters and isometric muscle strength of elite pitchers, and the difference between different type pitchers. Methods: Isometric test system and three high-speed camera were used to obtained raw data in kinematics and kinetics parameters in this study. Results:( a) High correlation of the rations of peak torques between external and internal rotation, flexion and extension on shoulder joints, both high positive correlation with elbow swing velocity, release velocity of baseball and velocity of contact barrier. ( b) There are many significantly differences between non -balanced type and balanced type:total pithing time, lifting knee time, stretching and treading time, and acceleration time became signifi-cantly shorter in the latter;whereas , flexion and extension amplitude of elbow joints were significantly larger in the latter. ( c) There are significantly positive correlation between velocity of elbow swing and maximal angle of external abduction, whereas, negative correlation with total time of pitching;there are negative correlation be-tween acceleration time and maximal abduction angle and positive correlation with twist angle of trunk. ( d) There are significantly positive correlation between release velocity of pitching, or contact barrier and maximal abduction angle in shoulder joints. Conclusion: To date the difference between Chinese elite baseball pitcher and foreign pitcher indicated that many kinematical parameters are significant, the key point is the unbalance development of pitching arm.%目的::探讨棒球投手运动学与等速肌力参数间关联关系,并比较不同类型投手各类参数的差异性。方法:采用德国ISOMED2000等速肌力测试系统及三台高速摄像机获取相关参数。结果:( a)肩关节外、内旋峰力矩及屈、伸峰力矩两个比值高度相关,两者均与挥肘速度、棒球出手及触垒速度高度正相关;( b)与“非衡

  17. Core Muscle Activation in Suspension Training Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugliari, Giovanni; Boccia, Gennaro

    2017-02-01

    A quantitative observational laboratory study was conducted to characterize and classify core training exercises executed in a suspension modality on the base of muscle activation. In a prospective single-group repeated measures design, seventeen active male participants performed four suspension exercises typically associated with core training (roll-out, bodysaw, pike and knee-tuck). Surface electromyographic signals were recorded from lower and upper parts of rectus abdominis, external oblique, internal oblique, lower and upper parts of erector spinae muscles using concentric bipolar electrodes. The average rectified values of electromyographic signals were normalized with respect to individual maximum voluntary isometric contraction of each muscle. Roll-out exercise showed the highest activation of rectus abdominis and oblique muscles compared to the other exercises. The rectus abdominis and external oblique reached an activation higher than 60% of the maximal voluntary contraction (or very close to that threshold, 55%) in roll-out and bodysaw exercises. Findings from this study allow the selection of suspension core training exercises on the basis of quantitative information about the activation of muscles of interest. Roll-out and bodysaw exercises can be considered as suitable for strength training of rectus abdominis and external oblique muscles.

  18. Superficial aponeurosis of human gastrocnemius is elongated during contraction: implications for modeling muscle-tendon unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Tadashi; Muraoka, Tetsuro; Kawakami, Yasuo; Fukunaga, Tetsuo

    2002-02-01

    Two questions were addressed in this study: (1) how much strain of the superficial aponeurosis of the human medial gastrocnemius muscle (MG) was obtained during voluntary isometric contractions in vivo, (2) whether there existed inhomogeneity of the strain along the superficial aponeurosis. Seven male subjects, whose knees were extended and ankles were flexed at right angle, performed isometric plantar flexion while elongation of superficial aponeurosis of MG was determined from the movements of the intersections made by the superficial aponeurosis and fascicles using ultrasonography. The strain of the superficial aponeurosis at the maximum voluntary contraction, estimated from the elongation and length data, was 5.6+/-1.2%. There was no significant difference in strain between the proximal and distal parts of the superficial aponeurosis. Based on the present result and that of our previous study for the same subjects (J. Appl. Physiol 90 (2001) 1671), a model was formulated for a contracting uni-pennate muscle-tendon unit. This model, which could be applied to isometric contractions at other angles and therefore of wide use, showed that similar strain between superficial and deep aponeuroses of MG contributed to homogeneous fascicle length change within MG during contractions. These findings would contribute to clarifying the functions of the superficial aponeurosis and the effects of the superficial aponeurosis elongation on the whole muscle behavior.

  19. The Effects of Positive and Negative Feedback on Maximal Voluntary Contraction Level of the Biceps Brachii Muscle: Moderating Roles of Gender and Conscientiousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarıkabak, Murat; Yaman, Çetin; Tok, Serdar; Binboga, Erdal

    2016-11-02

    We investigated the effect of positive and negative feedback on maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the biceps brachii muscle and explored the mediating effects of gender and conscientiousness. During elbow flexion, MVCs were measured in positive, negative, and no-feedback conditions. Participants were divided into high- and low-conscientiousness groups based on the median split of their scores on Tatar's five-factor personality inventory. Considering all participants 46 college student athletes (21 female, 28 male), positive feedback led to a greater MVC percentage change (-5.76%) than did negative feedback (2.2%). MVC percentage change in the positive feedback condition differed significantly by gender, but the negative feedback condition did not. Thus, positive feedback increased female athletes' MVC level by 3.49%, but decreased male athletes' MVC level by 15.6%. For conscientiousness, MVC percentage change in the positive feedback condition did not differ according to high and low conscientiousness. However, conscientiousness interacted with gender in the positive feedback condition, increasing MVC in high-conscientiousness female athletes and decreasing MVC in low-conscientiousness female athletes. Positive feedback decreased MVC in both high- and low-conscientiousness male athletes.

  20. Autonomic control of heart rate by metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisher, James P; Seifert, Thomas; Hartwich, Doreen

    2010-01-01

    moderate (PEI-M) and high (PEI-H) intensity isometric handgrip performed at 25% and 40% maximum voluntary contraction, under control (no drug), parasympathetic blockade (glycopyrrolate) and beta-adrenergic blockade (metoprolol or propranalol) conditions, while beat-to-beat HR and BP were continuously...... was similarly increased from rest during PEI-M and further elevated during PEI-H (P Collectively, these findings suggest that the muscle metaboreflex increases cardiac SNA during PEI in humans; however, it requires a robust muscle metaboreflex activation to offset the influence...

  1. Relationship Between Erectores Spinae Voltage and Back-Lift Strength for Isometric, Concentric, and Eccentric Contractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, T. Edwin J.; Singh, Mohan

    1975-01-01

    This study determined the maximal mean values for concentric and eccentric back-lift strength as well as isometric, and examined and compared the relationships between the mean peak voltage of the erectores spinae muscle(s) and maximal force exerted for the three types of muscle contractions. (RC)

  2. Whey protein isolate attenuates strength decline after eccentrically-induced muscle damage in healthy individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cribb Paul J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We examined the effects of short-term consumption of whey protein isolate on muscle proteins and force recovery after eccentrically-induced muscle damage in healthy individuals. Methods Seventeen untrained male participants (23 ± 5 yr, 180 ± 6 cm, 80 ± 11 kg were randomly separated into two supplement groups: i whey protein isolate (WPH; n = 9; or ii carbohydrate (CHO; n = 8. Participants consumed 1.5 g/kg.bw/day supplement (~30 g consumed immediately, and then once with breakfast, lunch, in the afternoon and after the evening meal for a period of 14 days following a unilateral eccentric contraction-based resistance exercise session, consisting of 4 sets of 10 repetitions at 120% of maximum voluntary contraction on the leg press, leg extension and leg flexion exercise machine. Plasma creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH levels were assessed as blood markers of muscle damage. Muscle strength was examined by voluntary isokinetic knee extension using a Cybex dynamometer. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA with an alpha of 0.05. Results Isometric knee extension strength was significantly higher following WPH supplementation 3 (P Conclusions The major finding of this investigation was that whey protein isolate supplementation attenuated the impairment in isometric and isokinetic muscle forces during recovery from exercise-induced muscle injury.

  3. Assessment of Muscle Pain Induced by Elbow-Flexor Eccentric Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Wing Yin; Blazevich, Anthony J; Newton, Michael J; Wu, Sam Shi Xuan; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2015-11-01

    Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a common muscle pain that many people experience and is often used as a model of acute muscle pain. Researchers have reported the effects of various interventions on DOMS, but different DOMS assessment protocols used in these studies make it difficult to compare the effects. To investigate DOMS characteristics after elbow-flexor eccentric exercise to establish a standardized DOMS assessment protocol. Descriptive laboratory study. Research laboratory. Ten healthy, untrained men (21-39 years). Participants performed 10 sets of 6 maximal isokinetic eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors. Indirect muscle-damage markers were maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque, range of motion, and serum creatine kinase activity. Muscle pain was assessed before exercise, immediately postexercise, and 1 to 5 days postexercise using (1) a visual analog scale (VAS), (2) a category ratio-10 scale (CR-10) when applying static pressure and palpation at different sites (3, 9, and 15 cm above the elbow crease), and (3) pressure-pain thresholds (PPTs) at 50 sites (pain mapping). Maximal voluntary isometric contraction and range of motion decreased and creatine kinase activity increased postexercise, indicating muscle damage. Palpation induced greater pain than static pressure, and longitudinal and transverse palpations induced greater pain than circular palpation (P exercise, but the pain-sensitive regions shifted to the central and distal regions of the biceps brachii at 1 to 3 days postexercise (P eccentric exercise.

  4. Muscle Damage following Maximal Eccentric Knee Extensions in Males and Females

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate whether there is a sex difference in exercise induced muscle damage. Materials and Method Vastus Lateralis and patella tendon properties were measured in males and females using ultrasonography. During maximal voluntary eccentric knee extensions (12 reps x 6 sets), Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening and maximal voluntary eccentric knee extensions torque were recorded every 10° of knee joint angle (20–90°). Isometric torque, Creatine Kinase and muscle soreness were measured pre, post, 48, 96 and 168 hours post damage as markers of exercise induced muscle damage. Results Patella tendon stiffness and Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening were significantly higher in males compared to females (ptorque loss and muscle soreness post exercise induced muscle damage (p>0.05). Creatine Kinase levels post exercise induced muscle damage were higher in males compared to females (pknee extension torque, relative to estimated quadriceps anatomical cross sectional area, was taken as a covariate (ptorque loss, there is no sex difference in exercise induced muscle damage. The higher Creatine Kinase in males could not be explained by differences in maximal voluntary eccentric knee extension torque, Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening and patella tendon stiffness. Further research is required to understand the significant sex differences in Creatine Kinase levels following exercise induced muscle damage. PMID:26986066

  5. Reliability of electromyographic and force measures during prone isometric back extension in subjects with and without low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Mark J; Behm, David G; MacKinnon, Scott N

    2008-02-01

    Maximal voluntary isometric activations (MVIA) are frequently used as inputs for models attempting to predict muscle force and as normalization values in studies assessing muscle function. However, pain may adversely affect maximal muscle activation. The purpose of this study was to assess reliability of MVIA force and electromyographic (EMG) activity during prone isometric back extension in subjects with and without low back pain (LBP). A novel sub-maximal method using the percentages of the estimated mass of the head-arms-trunk (HAT) segment was also investigated. Repeated measures on 20 male volunteers divided into an LBP (n=10) and a control group (n=10) were made on 4 occasions. Force and EMG activity were recorded bilaterally from upper lumbar erector spinae (ULES), lower lumbar erector spinae (LLES), and biceps femoris (BF). Subjects exerted a maximal extension effort against a harness assembly that was attached to a force transducer. Submaximal exertions were also performed with an additional resistance of 100%, 110%, 120%, 130%, 140%, 150%, 160%, and 170% of HAT. Mean MVIA forces were significantly (pEMG indicated high reliability in controls (R>0.90), but were significantly less in LBP (R=0.36-0.80). EMG of BF demonstrated excellent reliability across both groups (R>0.90). The resistance at 100% HAT demonstrated the highest reliability for LBP patients, whereas higher percentages of HAT showed either similar or higher reliability for controls. Force output and back EMG activity are less reliable with LBP individuals and should be taken into consideration when testing.

  6. The relationships between exercise intensity, heart rate, and blood pressure during an incremental isometric exercise test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Jonathan D; Allum, Simon R; Coleman, Damian A; Swaine, Ian L

    2008-01-15

    Currently, it is not possible to prescribe isometric exercise at an intensity that corresponds to given heart rates or systolic blood pressures. This might be useful in optimizing the effects of isometric exercise training. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore the relationships between isometric exercise intensity and both heart rate and systolic blood pressure during repeated incremental isometric exercise tests. Fifteen participants performed seated isometric double-leg knee extension, during which maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) was assessed, using an isokinetic dynamometer. From this, a corresponding peak electromyographic activity (EMG(peak)) was determined. Subsequently, participants performed two incremental isometric exercise tests (at least 48 h apart) at 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30% EMG(peak), during which steady-state heart rate and systolic blood pressure were recorded. In all participants, there were linear relationships between %EMG(peak) and heart rate (r at least 0.91; P blood pressure (r at least 0.92; P 0.50) or elevations (P > 0.10) for either of the relationships. Therefore, these linear relationships could be used to identify isometric exercise training intensities that correspond to precise heart rates or systolic blood pressures. Training performed in this way might provide greater insight into the underlying mechanisms for the cardiovascular adaptations that are known to occur as a result.

  7. Voluntary Slavery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Frederick

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The permissibility of actions depends upon facts about the flourishing and separateness of persons. Persons differ from other creatures in having the task of discovering for themselves, by conjecture and refutation, what sort of life will fulfil them. Compulsory slavery impermissibly prevents some persons from pursuing this task. However, many people may conjecture that they are natural slaves. Some of these conjectures may turn out to be correct. In consequence, voluntary slavery, in which one person welcomes the duty to fulfil all the commands of another, is permissible. Life-long voluntary slavery contracts are impermissible because of human fallibility; but fixed-term slavery contracts should be legally enforceable. Each person has the temporarily alienable moral right to direct her own life.

  8. Voluntary Slavery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Frederick

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The permissibility of actions depends upon facts about the flourishing and separateness of persons. Persons differ from other creatures in having the task of discovering for themselves, by conjecture and refutation, what sort of life will fulfil them. Compulsory slavery impermissibly prevents some persons from pursuing this task. However, many people may conjecture that they are natural slaves. Some of these conjectures may turn out to be correct. In consequence, voluntary slavery, in which one person welcomes the duty to fulfil all the commands of another, is permissible. Life-long voluntary slavery contracts are impermissible because of human fallibility; but fixed-term slavery contracts should be legally enforceable. Each person has the temporarily alienable moral right to direct her own life.

  9. Monitoring elbow isometric contraction by novel wearable fabric sensing device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi; Tao, Xiaoming; So, Raymond C. H.; Shu, Lin; Yang, Bao; Li, Ying

    2016-12-01

    Fabric-based wearable technology is highly desirable in sports, as it is light, flexible, soft, and comfortable with little interference to normal sport activities. It can provide accurate information on the in situ deformation of muscles in a continuous and wireless manner. During elbow flexion in isometric contraction, upper arm circumference increases with the contraction of elbow flexors, and it is possible to monitor the muscles’ contraction by limb circumferential strains. This paper presents a new wireless wearable anthropometric monitoring device made from fabric strain sensors for the human upper arm. The materials, structural design and calibration of the device are presented. Using an isokinetic testing system (Biodex3®) and the fabric monitoring device simultaneously, in situ measurements were carried out on elbow flexors in isometric contraction mode with ten subjects for a set of positions. Correlations between the measured values of limb circumferential strain and normalized torque were examined, and a linear relationship was found during isometric contraction. The average correlation coefficient between them is 0.938 ± 0.050. This wearable anthropometric device thus provides a useful index, the limb circumferential strain, for upper arm muscle contraction in isometric mode.

  10. Differential effects of low-intensity motor cortical stimulation on the inspiratory activity in scalene muscles during voluntary and involuntary breathing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nicolas Caesar; Taylor, Janet L; Murray, Nicholas P S

    2011-01-01

    To assess the cortical contribution to breathing, low-intensity transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was delivered over the motor cortex in 10 subjects during: (i) voluntary static inspiratory efforts, (ii) hypocapnic voluntary ventilation (end-tidal CO(2), 2.7±0.4% mean±SD), and (iii) hyperca...

  11. Task-dependent spatial distribution of neural activation pattern in human rectus femoris muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kohei; Kouzaki, Motoki; Moritani, Toshio

    2012-04-01

    Compartmentalization of skeletal muscle by multiple motor nerve branches, named as neuromuscular compartment (NMC), has been demonstrated in animals as well as humans. While different functional roles among individual NMCs were reported in the animal studies, no studies have clarified the region-specific functional role within a muscle related with NMCs arrangement in human skeletal muscle. It was reported that the rectus femoris (RF) muscle is innervated by two nerve branches attached at proximal and distal parts of the muscle. The purpose of the present study is to clarify the possible region-specific functional role in the human RF muscle. Multi-channel surface electromyography (SEMG) were recorded from the RF muscle by using 128 electrodes during two different submaximal isometric contractions that the muscle contributes, i.e. isometric knee extension and hip flexion, at 20%, 40%, 60% and 80% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Results indicated that the central locus activation for the amplitude map of SEMG during hip flexion located at more proximal region compared with that during knee extension. Significant higher normalized root mean square (RMS) values were observed at the proximal region during the hip flexion in comparison to those at middle and distal regions at 60% and 80% of MVC (pMVC (p<0.05). The results of the present study suggest possible region-specific functional role in the human RF muscle.

  12. Influence of fatigue on hand muscle coordination and EMG-EMG coherence during three-digit grasping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danna-Dos Santos, Alessander; Poston, Brach; Jesunathadas, Mark; Bobich, Lisa R; Hamm, Thomas M; Santello, Marco

    2010-12-01

    Fingertip force control requires fine coordination of multiple hand muscles within and across the digits. While the modulation of neural drive to hand muscles as a function of force has been extensively studied, much less is known about the effects of fatigue on the coordination of simultaneously active hand muscles. We asked eight subjects to perform a fatiguing contraction by gripping a manipulandum with thumb, index, and middle fingers while matching an isometric target force (40% maximal voluntary force) for as long as possible. The coordination of 12 hand muscles was quantified as electromyographic (EMG) muscle activation pattern (MAP) vector and EMG-EMG coherence. We hypothesized that muscle fatigue would cause uniform changes in EMG amplitude across all muscles and an increase in EMG-EMG coherence in the higher frequency bands but with an invariant heterogeneous distribution across muscles. Muscle fatigue caused a 12.5% drop in the maximum voluntary contraction force (P muscles increased during the fatiguing contraction (P muscle coordination pattern was used throughout the fatiguing contraction. Last, EMG-EMG coherence (0-35 Hz) was significantly greater at the end than at the beginning of the fatiguing contraction (P hand muscles. These findings suggest that similar mechanisms are involved for modulating and sustaining digit forces in nonfatiguing and fatiguing contractions, respectively.

  13. Contraction level-related modulation of corticomuscular coherence differs between the tibialis anterior and soleus muscles in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushiyama, Junichi; Masakado, Yoshihisa; Fujiwara, Toshiyuki; Tsuji, Tetsuya; Hase, Kimitaka; Kimura, Akio; Liu, Meigen; Ushiba, Junichi

    2012-04-01

    The sensorimotor cortex activity measured by scalp EEG shows coherence with electromyogram (EMG) activity within the 15- to 35-Hz frequency band (β-band) during weak to moderate intensity of isometric voluntary contraction. This coupling is known to change its frequency band to the 35- to 60-Hz band (γ-band) during strong contraction. This study aimed to examine whether such contraction level-related modulation of corticomuscular coupling differs between muscles with different muscle compositions and functions. In 11 healthy young adults, we quantified the coherence between EEG over the sensorimotor cortex and rectified EMG during tonic isometric voluntary contraction at 10-70% of maximal voluntary contraction of the tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL) muscles, respectively. In the TA, the EEG-EMG coherence shifted from the β-band to the γ-band with increasing contraction level. Indeed, the magnitude of β-band EEG-EMG coherence was significantly decreased, whereas that of γ-band coherence was significantly increased, when the contraction level was above 60% of maximal voluntary contraction. In contrast to the TA, the SOL showed no such frequency changes of EEG-EMG coherence with alterations in the contraction levels. In other words, the maximal peak of EEG-EMG coherence in the SOL existed within the β-band, irrespective of the contraction levels. These findings suggest that the central nervous system regulates the frequency of corticomuscular coupling to exert the desired levels of muscle force and, notably, that the applicable rhythmicity of the coupling for performing strong contractions differs between muscles, depending on the physiological muscle compositions and functions of the contracting muscle.

  14. Assessing altered motor unit recruitment patterns in paretic muscles of stroke survivors using surface electromyography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaogang; Suresh, Aneesha K.; Rymer, William Z.; Suresh, Nina L.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. The advancement of surface electromyogram (sEMG) recording and signal processing techniques has allowed us to characterize the recruitment properties of a substantial population of motor units (MUs) non-invasively. Here we seek to determine whether MU recruitment properties are modified in paretic muscles of hemispheric stroke survivors. Approach. Using an advanced EMG sensor array, we recorded sEMG during isometric contractions of the first dorsal interosseous muscle over a range of contraction levels, from 20% to 60% of maximum, in both paretic and contralateral muscles of stroke survivors. Using MU decomposition techniques, MU action potential amplitudes and recruitment thresholds were derived for simultaneously activated MUs in each isometric contraction. Main results. Our results show a significant disruption of recruitment organization in paretic muscles, in that the size principle describing recruitment rank order was materially distorted. MUs were recruited over a very narrow force range with increasing force output, generating a strong clustering effect, when referenced to recruitment force magnitude. Such disturbances in MU properties also correlated well with the impairment of voluntary force generation. Significance. Our findings provide direct evidence regarding MU recruitment modifications in paretic muscles of stroke survivors, and suggest that these modifications may contribute to weakness for voluntary contractions.

  15. Resistance Exercise with concurrent whole body vibration preserves isometric knee extension strength during 8 weeks of horizontal bed rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, E. R.; Stegeman, D. F.; Gerrits, K.; Rittweger, J.; Felsenberg, D.; de Haan, A.

    2005-08-01

    Changes in the quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle with respect to anatomical cross sectional area (CSA), neural activation level and isometric maximal voluntary torque (MVT) were determined in 18 healthy men subjected to 8 weeks of horizontal bed rest (BR) with (n = 9) and without (Ctrl; n = 9) 6 days/week resistance exercise concurrent with whole body vibration (RVE). For Ctrl, mean QF CSA decreased linearly over time to a reduction of 14.3 ± 4.9% at the end of BR. For RVE, exercise during BR significantly mitigated this reduction (3.9 ± 4.4%). Prior to and seven times during BR, MVT values were obtained together with neural activation levels, the latter by means of a superimposed stimulation technique. MVT was maintained for RVE during BR, whereas for Ctrl, MVT was significantly reduced by 14.2 ± 8.1% after 8 weeks. In contrast to previous reports, the maximal voluntary activation remained unaltered for both groups throughout the study. For Ctrl, the absence of a change in neural activation might be related to the repeated testing during the bed rest, which had presumably resulted in a habituation to the task. When both groups were pooled, a significant positive correlation (R= 0.62; P < 0.01) was observed between changes in CSA and changes in MVT.

  16. Muscle Damage following Maximal Eccentric Knee Extensions in Males and Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, K M; Onambélé, G L; Winwood, K; Morse, C I

    2016-01-01

    To investigate whether there is a sex difference in exercise induced muscle damage. Vastus Lateralis and patella tendon properties were measured in males and females using ultrasonography. During maximal voluntary eccentric knee extensions (12 reps x 6 sets), Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening and maximal voluntary eccentric knee extensions torque were recorded every 10° of knee joint angle (20-90°). Isometric torque, Creatine Kinase and muscle soreness were measured pre, post, 48, 96 and 168 hours post damage as markers of exercise induced muscle damage. Patella tendon stiffness and Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening were significantly higher in males compared to females (pexercise induced muscle damage (p>0.05). Creatine Kinase levels post exercise induced muscle damage were higher in males compared to females (peccentric knee extension torque, relative to estimated quadriceps anatomical cross sectional area, was taken as a covariate (pexercise induced muscle damage. The higher Creatine Kinase in males could not be explained by differences in maximal voluntary eccentric knee extension torque, Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening and patella tendon stiffness. Further research is required to understand the significant sex differences in Creatine Kinase levels following exercise induced muscle damage.

  17. Plantarflexor muscle function in healthy and chronic Achilles tendon pain subjects evaluated by the use of EMG and PET imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masood, Tahir; Kalliokoski, Kari; Bojsen-Møller, Jens

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Achilles tendon pathologies may alter the coordinative strategies of synergistic calf muscles. We hypothesized that both surface electromyography and positron emission tomography would reveal differences between symptomatic and asymptomatic legs in Achilles tendinopathy patients...... and between healthy controls. METHODS: Eleven subjects with unilateral chronic Achilles tendon pain (28 years) and eleven matched controls (28 years) were studied for triceps surae and flexor hallucis longus muscle activity in response to repetitive isometric plantarflexion tasks performed at 30% of maximal...... voluntary contraction using surface electromyography and glucose uptake using positron emission tomography. Additionally, Achilles tendon glucose uptake was quantified. FINDINGS: Normalized myoelectric activity of soleus was higher (P

  18. Effects of Massage on Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness, Swelling, and Recovery of Muscle Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainuddin, Zainal; Newton, Mike; Sacco, Paul; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2005-01-01

    Context: Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) describes muscle pain and tenderness that typically develop several hours postexercise and consist of predominantly eccentric muscle actions, especially if the exercise is unfamiliar. Although DOMS is likely a symptom of eccentric-exercise–induced muscle damage, it does not necessarily reflect muscle damage. Some prophylactic or therapeutic modalities may be effective only for alleviating DOMS, whereas others may enhance recovery of muscle function without affecting DOMS. Objective: To test the hypothesis that massage applied after eccentric exercise would effectively alleviate DOMS without affecting muscle function. Design: We used an arm-to-arm comparison model with 2 independent variables (control and massage) and 6 dependent variables (maximal isometric and isokinetic voluntary strength, range of motion, upper arm circumference, plasma creatine kinase activity, and muscle soreness). A 2-way repeated-measures analysis of variance and paired t tests were used to examine differences in changes of the dependent variable over time (before, immediately and 30 minutes after exercise, and 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 10, and 14 days postexercise) between control and massage conditions. Setting: University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Ten healthy subjects (5 men and 5 women) with no history of upper arm injury and no experience in resistance training. Intervention(s): Subjects performed 10 sets of 6 maximal isokinetic (90°·s−1) eccentric actions of the elbow flexors with each arm on a dynamometer, separated by 2 weeks. One arm received 10 minutes of massage 3 hours after eccentric exercise; the contralateral arm received no treatment. Main Outcome Measure(s): Maximal voluntary isometric and isokinetic elbow flexor strength, range of motion, upper arm circumference, plasma creatine kinase activity, and muscle soreness. Results: Delayed-onset muscle soreness was significantly less for the massage condition for peak

  19. Force enhancement during and following muscle stretch of maximal voluntarily activated human quadriceps femoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Daniel; Seiberl, Wolfgang; Schwirtz, Ansgar

    2007-08-01

    Force enhancement during and following muscle stretch has been observed for electrically and voluntarily activated human muscle. However, especially for voluntary contractions, the latter observation has only been made for adductor pollicis and the ankle joint muscles, but not for large muscles like quadriceps femoris. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of active muscle stretch on force production for maximal voluntary contractions of in vivo human quadriceps femoris (n = 15). Peak torques during and torques at the end of stretch, torques following stretch, and passive torques following muscle deactivation were compared to the isometric torques at corresponding muscle length. In addition, muscle activation of rectus femoris, vastus medialis and vastus lateralis was obtained using surface EMG. Stretches with different amplitudes (15, 25 and 35 degrees at a velocity of 60 degrees s(-1)) were performed on the plateau region and the descending limb of the force-length relation in a random order. Data analysis showed four main results: (1) peak torques did not occur at the end of the stretch, but torques at the end of the stretch exceeded the corresponding isometric torque; (2) there was no significant force enhancement following muscle stretch, but a small significant passive force enhancement persisted for all stretch conditions; (3) forces during and following stretch were independent of stretch amplitude; (4) muscle activation during and following muscle stretch was significantly reduced. In conclusion, although our results showed passive force enhancement, we could not provide direct evidence that there is active force enhancement in voluntarily activated human quadriceps femoris.

  20. Tendon vibration during submaximal isometric strength and postural tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiliopoulou, S I; Amiridis, I G; Hatzitaki, V; Patikas, D; Kellis, E

    2012-11-01

    To establish the effect of tendon vibration (TV) on steady submaximal strength and static balance control, 29 women performed isometric plantarflexions at 10, 20, 30 and 50% of MVC and postural tasks of increasing difficulty (Normal Quiet Stance, NQS, Sharpened Tandem Stance and One Leg Stance) with vibrators (80 Hz) applied to the Achilles tendon. Both tasks were performed under four conditions (10 s each): eyes open, eyes closed, eyes closed with TV, eyes open with TV. During the isometric tasks, the application of TV increased the plantarflexion torque at 20 and 30% of MVC, accompanied by a greater (p vibration-induced muscle excitation and accompanying increase in motor output, probably due to excitatory Ia afferent input, was confirmed during strength and postural tasks. However, motor output attenuates when the magnitude of central drive to the ankle muscles increases.

  1. Effects of hip center location on the moment-generating capacity of the muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delp, S L; Maloney, W

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional biomechanical model of the human lower extremity to study how the location of the hip center affects the moment-generating capacity of four muscle groups: the hip abductors, adductors, flexors, and extensors. The model computes the maximum isometric force and the resulting joint moments that each of 25 muscle-tendon complexes develops at any body position. Abduction, adduction, flexion, and extension moments calculated with the model correspond closely with isometric joint moments measured during maximum voluntary contractions. We used the model to determine (1) the hip center locations that maximize and minimize the moment-generating capacity of each muscle group and (2) the effects of superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and medial-lateral displacement of the hip center on the moment arms, maximum isometric muscle forces, and maximum isometric moments generated by each muscle group. We found that superior-inferior displacement of the hip center has the greatest effect on the force- and moment-generating capacity of the muscles. A 2 cm superior displacement decreases abduction force (44%), moment arm (12%), and moment (49%), while a 2 cm inferior displacement increases abduction force (20%), moment arm (7%) and moment (26%). Similarly, a 2 cm superior displacement decreases flexion force (27%), moment arm (6%), and moment (22%), while inferior displacement increases all three variables. Anterior-posterior displacement alters the moment-generating capacity of the flexors and extensors considerably, primarily due to moment arm changes. Medial-lateral displacement has a large effect on the moment-generating capacity of the adductors only. A 2 cm medial displacement decreases adduction moment arm (20%), force (26%) and moment (40%). These results demonstrate that the force- and moment-generating capacities of the muscles are sensitive to the location of the hip center.

  2. The influence of patellar tendon and muscle-tendon unit stiffness on quadriceps explosive strength in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Garry J; Balshaw, Thomas G; Maden-Wilkinson, Thomas M; Tillin, Neale A; Folland, Jonathan P

    2017-02-15

    The influence of musculotendinous tissue stiffness on contractile rate of torque development (RTD) remains opaque. This study examined the relationships between both patellar tendon (PT) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscle-tendon unit (MTU) stiffness, and voluntary and evoked knee extension RTD. Fifty-two healthy untrained males completed duplicate laboratory sessions. Absolute and relative RTD was measured at 50 Nm/25%MVT increments from onset and sequentially during explosive voluntary and evoked octet (supramaximal stimulation: [8 pulses at 300 Hz]) isometric contractions. Isometric maximum voluntary torque (MVT) was also assessed. PT and MTU stiffness were derived from simultaneous force and ultrasound recordings of the PT and VL aponeurosis during constant RTD ramp contractions. Absolute and relative (to MVT and resting tissue length) stiffness (k) was measured over identical torque increments as RTD. Pearson's correlations tested relationships between stiffness and RTD measurements over matching absolute/relative torque increments. Absolute and relative PT k was unrelated to equivalent voluntary or evoked RTD (r = 0.020.255, P = 0.069-0.891). Absolute MTU k was unrelated to voluntary or evoked RTD (r ≤ 0.191, P ≥ 0.184), however some measures of relative MTU k were related to relative voluntary/evoked RTD (e.g. RTD25-50%MVT r = 0.374/0.353, P = 0.007/0.014). In conclusion, relative MTU k explained a small proportion of the variance in relative voluntary and evoked RTD (both ≤19%), despite no association of absolute MTU k or absolute/relative PT k with equivalent RTD measures. Therefore the muscle-aponeurosis component, but not free tendon was associated with relative RTD, although it seems an overriding influence of MVT negated any relationship of absolute MTU k and absolute RTD. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. MUSCLE ACTIVATION DURING LOW-INTENSITY MUSCLE CONTRACTIONS WITH VARYING LEVELS OF EXTERNAL LIMB COMPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Yasuda

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose was to investigate muscle activation during low- intensity muscle contractions with various levels of external limb compression to reduce muscle perfusion/outflow. A series of unilateral elbow flexion muscle contractions (30 repetitive contractions followed by 3 sets x 15 contractions was performed at 20% of 1RM with varying levels of external compression (0 (without compression, 98, 121, and 147 mmHg external compression around the upper arm. Electromyography (EMG signals were recorded from surface electrodes placed on the biceps brachii muscle and analyzed for integrated EMG (iEMG. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC decreased similarly during the control (0 mmHg and 98 mmHg external compression bout (~18%; the decline in MVC with 121 and 147 mmHg external compression was significantly greater (~37%. Muscle activation increased progressively throughout the contraction bout with each level of external compression, but iEMG was significantly greater during 147 mmHg external compression. In conclusion, low-intensity muscle contractions performed with external compression of 147 mmHg appears to alter muscle perfusion/outflow leading to increased muscle activation without decrements in work performed during the contraction bout

  4. Comparing trapezius muscle activity in the different planes of shoulder elevation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigaki, Tomonobu; Ishida, Tomoya; Samukawa, Mina; Saito, Hiroshi; Hirokawa, Motoki; Ezawa, Yuya; Sugawara, Makoto; Tohyama, Harukazu; Yamanaka, Masanori

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the upper, middle, and lower trapezius muscles' activity in the different planes of shoulder elevation. [Subjects] Twenty male subjects volunteered for this study. [Methods] Surface electromyographic (EMG) activity for each of the three regions of the trapezius muscles in the three different planes of elevation were collected while the participants maintained 30, 60, and 90 degrees of elevation in each plane. The EMG data were normalized with maximum voluntary isometric contraction (%MVIC), and compared among the planes at each angle of elevation. [Results] There were significantly different muscle activities among the elevation planes at each angle. [Conclusion] This study found that the three regions of the trapezius muscles changed their activity depending on the planes of shoulder elevation. These changes in the trapezius muscles could induce appropriate scapular motion to face the glenoid cavity in the correct directions in different planes of shoulder elevation.

  5. The relationships between muscle force steadiness and visual steadiness in young and old adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupenevich, Rebecca L; Murray, Nick; Rider, Patrick M; Domire, Zachary J; DeVita, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Since vision is used in studies of muscle force control, reduced muscle force control might be related to reduced visual ability. We investigated relationships between steadiness in eye movements and quadriceps muscle torque (a surrogate for force) during isometric contractions of constant and varying torques. Nineteen young adults with an average age of 20.7 years and 18 old adults with an average age of 71.6 years performed three vision tasks, three vision and torque tasks at 40% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and three vision and torque tasks at 54 nm. Age groups had identical torque steadiness (CV) in 40%-MVC and 54-nm conditions (p > .05). Old had similar vertical (p > .05) but decreased horizontal visual steadiness (SD) (p .05). We were unable to identify a substantial relationship between muscle torque steadiness and eye movement, as a component of visual steadiness, and conclude that reduced visual steadiness does not contribute to reduced muscle torque steadiness.

  6. Effect of abdominal bracing training on strength and power of trunk and lower limb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayashiki, Kota; Maeo, Sumiaki; Usui, Seiji; Miyamoto, Naokazu; Kanehisa, Hiroaki

    2016-09-01

    It is unknown whether maximal voluntary co-contraction of abdominal muscles, called abdominal bracing, can be a training maneuver for improving strength and power of trunk and lower limb muscles. The present study aimed to elucidate this. Twenty young adult men (23.3 ± 1.8 years) were allocated to training (TG, n = 11) or control (CG, n = 9) group. TG conducted an 8-week training program (3 days/week) consisting of 2-s maximal abdominal bracing followed by 2-s muscle relaxation (5 × 10 repetitions/day). Maximal voluntary isometric strength during trunk flexion and extension, hip extension, and knee extension, maximal lifting power from sitting position, and the thicknesses of abdominal muscles were measured before and after the intervention. In addition, surface electromyograms from trunk and lower limb muscles and intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) during the maximal abdominal bracing and maximal lifting tasks were also determined. After the intervention, TG showed significant increases in isometric trunk extension (+14.4 %) and hip extension (+34.7 %) strength and maximal lifting power (+15.6 %), while CG did not show any changes in strength and power variables. Furthermore, TG had significant gains in the muscle thickness of the oblique internal (+22.4 %), maximal IAP during abdominal bracing (+36.8 %), and the rate of IAP rise during lifting task (+58.8 %), without corresponding changes in CG. The current study indicates that a training style with maximal voluntary co-contraction of abdominal muscles can be an effective maneuver for increasing strength and power during movements involving trunk and hip extensions, without using external load.

  7. No Critical Peripheral Fatigue Threshold during Intermittent Isometric Time to Task Failure Test with the Knee Extensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froyd, Christian; Beltrami, Fernando G.; Millet, Guillaume Y.; Noakes, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that group III and IV muscle afferents provide inhibitory feedback from locomotor muscles to the central nervous system, setting an absolute threshold for the development of peripheral fatigue during exercise. The aim of this study was to test the validity of this theory. Thus, we asked whether the level of developed peripheral fatigue would differ when two consecutive exercise trials were completed to task failure. Ten trained sport students performed two exercise trials to task failure on an isometric dynamometer, allowing peripheral fatigue to be assessed 2 s after maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) post task failure. The trials, separated by 8 min, consisted of repeated sets of 10 × 5-s isometric knee extension followed by 5-s rest between contractions. In each set, the first nine contractions were performed at a target force at 60% of the pre-exercise MVC, while the 10th contraction was a MVC. MVC and evoked force responses to supramaximal electrical femoral nerve stimulation on relaxed muscles were assessed during the trials and at task failure. Stimulations at task failure consisted of single stimulus (SS), paired stimuli at 10 Hz (PS10), paired stimuli at 100 Hz (PS100), and 50 stimuli at 100 Hz (tetanus). Time to task failure for the first trial (12.84 ± 5.60 min) was longer (P < 0.001) than for the second (5.74 ± 1.77 min). MVC force was significantly lower at task failure for both trials compared with the pre-exercise values (both P < 0.001), but there were no differences in MVC at task failure in the first and second trials (P = 1.00). However, evoked peak force for SS, PS100, and tetanus were all reduced more at task failure in the second compared to the first trial (P = 0.014 for SS, P < 0.001 for PS100 and tetanus). These results demonstrate that subjects do not terminate exercise at task failure because they have reached a critical threshold in peripheral fatigue. The present data therefore question the existence of a

  8. Foot posture influences the electromyographic activity of selected lower limb muscles during gait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menz Hylton B

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some studies have found that flat-arched foot posture is related to altered lower limb muscle function compared to normal- or high-arched feet. However, the results from these studies were based on highly selected populations such as those with rheumatoid arthritis. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare lower limb muscle function of normal and flat-arched feet in people without pain or disease. Methods Sixty adults aged 18 to 47 years were recruited to this study. Of these, 30 had normal-arched feet (15 male and 15 female and 30 had flat-arched feet (15 male and 15 female. Foot posture was classified using two clinical measurements (the arch index and navicular height and four skeletal alignment measurements from weightbearing foot x-rays. Intramuscular fine-wire electrodes were inserted into tibialis posterior and peroneus longus under ultrasound guidance, and surface EMG activity was recorded from tibialis anterior and medial gastrocnemius while participants walked barefoot at their self-selected comfortable walking speed. Time of peak amplitude, peak and root mean square (RMS amplitude were assessed from stance phase EMG data. Independent samples t-tests were performed to assess for significant differences between the normal- and flat-arched foot posture groups. Results During contact phase, the flat-arched group exhibited increased activity of tibialis anterior (peak amplitude; 65 versus 46% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction and decreased activity of peroneus longus (peak amplitude; 24 versus 37% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction. During midstance/propulsion, the flat-arched group exhibited increased activity of tibialis posterior (peak amplitude; 86 versus 60% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction and decreased activity of peroneus longus (RMS amplitude; 25 versus 39% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction. Effect sizes for these significant findings ranged from 0.48 to 1

  9. Muscle strength in girls with congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodda, C; Jones, D A; Round, J; Grant, D B

    1987-05-01

    To assess whether exposure to excessive adrenal androgens increases muscle strength in girls with congenital adrenal hyperplasia, eighteen girls with 21 hydroxylase type congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), aged 4.3-12.1 years were studied and compared with 78 healthy control girls aged 4-16 years. Maximum voluntary isometric strength was measured using a muscle testing chair, and the highest value from at least three attempts with each leg was recorded. Height and weight were also measured in the patients and controls. When compared with normal girls of similar age, some of the girls with CAH seemed unusually strong, but this difference was less marked when the CAH girls were compared with controls of similar weights. However, our data suggest that girls diagnosed later in childhood may have unusual muscle strength.

  10. Análise de parâmetros de força e resistência dos músculos eretores da espinha lombar durante a realização de exercício isométrico em diferentes níveis de esforço Análisis de los parametros de fuerza y resistencia de los músculos erectores de la columna lumbar durante la realizacion de exercício isométrico en diferentes níveles de esfuerzo Analysis of strength and resistance parameters of the lumbar spinae erector muscles during isometric exercise at different effort levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Gonçalves

    2005-04-01

    los músculos accesorios de este movimiento, la sobrecarga sobre la columna vertebral se desarrolla como consecuencia del compromiso de la estabilidad de la columna vertebral consecuente de la fatiga muscular identificada después del ejercicio isométrico.The low-back pain has demonstrated to be a common finding among athletes and particularly the overload in the lumbar column resulting from a strength or isometric resistance involvement of muscles of this segment as result of the muscular fatigue has been considered as important etiological factor for its development. In this context, tests used for the training evaluation of the lumbar spinae erector muscles are emphasized. In the present study, the analysis of the strength and isometric resistance parameters was used with the objective of evaluating responses of these muscles during maximal and sub-maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC in two situations: with fatigue and without fatigue induced by isometric exercise performed until exhaustion. Nine male healthy volunteers performed MVIC before and after vertebral column extension exercises supporting 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% of the MVIC. In each one of these situations, the electromyographic signal (EMG of the iliocostalis and multifidus muscles as well as the strength level generated in the MVIC were recorded. Muscular fatigue was identified through the MVIC values decrease verification and median frequency (MF of the EMG signals obtained after isometric exercise. The results demonstrated that while the strength was able to evidence muscular fatigue, the MF demonstrated in a statistically significant way the iliocostalis and multifidus muscles fatigue, and the multifidus muscles presented a higher muscular fatigue level. Interestingly, loads between 5% and 20% of the MVIC induced the same level of muscular fatigue. Thus, although the strength generated during vertebral column extension after isometric exercise-induced exhaustion remains unchanged, probably

  11. Strenuous resistance exercise effects on magnetic resonance diffusion parameters and muscle-tendon function in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Osamu; Kurihara, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Naoyuki; Fukubayashi, Toru

    2011-10-01

    To assess the effects of strenuous exercise on magnetic resonance diffusion parameters and muscle-tendon complex function in skeletal muscle. Six men performed ankle plantar flexion exercises with eccentric contraction. The fractional anisotropy (FA), λ(1) , λ(2) , λ(3) , mean diffusivity (MD), and T(2) values in the triceps surae muscles were measured by magnetic resonance diffusion tensor and spin-echo imaging. Passive torque of plantar flexors, maximal voluntary isometric plantar flexion torques (MVIP), and Achilles tendon stiffness during MVIP were measured by combined ultrasonography and dynamometry. Plasma creatine kinase and muscle soreness were also assessed. These parameters were measured before and 1-8 days postexercise. The medial gastrocnemius exhibited significantly decreased FA 2-5 days after, increased λ(2) 3 days after, and increased λ(3) 2 and 3 days after exercise. This muscle also showed significantly increased MD and T(2) values 3 days postexercise. MVIP significantly decreased 2 and 3 days postexercise, while passive torque significantly increased 2 days postexercise. Creatine kinase and muscle soreness increased 3-5 days and 1-5 days postexercise, respectively. Exercise-induced muscle damage manifested as significant changes in muscle diffusion parameters with muscle-tendon complex dysfunction and delayed-onset muscle soreness. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Quadriceps femoris electromyogram during concentric, isometric and eccentric phases of fatiguing dynamic knee extensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincivero, Danny M; Gandhi, Varsha; Timmons, Mark K; Coelho, Alan J

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the superficial quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle electromyogram (EMG) during fatiguing knee extensions. Thirty young adults were evaluated for their one-repetition maximum (1RM) during a seated, right-leg, inertial knee extension. All subjects then completed a single set of repeated knee extensions at 50% 1RM, to failure. Subjects performed a knee extension (concentric phase), held the weight with the knee extended for 2s (isometric phase), and lowered the weight in a controlled manner (eccentric phase). Raw EMG of the vastus medialis (VM), vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) muscles were full-wave rectified, integrated and normalized to the 1RM EMG, for each respective phase and repetition. The EMG median frequency (f(med)) was computed during the isometric phase. An increase in QF muscle EMG was observed during the concentric phase across the exercise duration. VL EMG was greater than the VM and RF muscles during the isometric phase, in which no significant changes occurred in any of the muscles across the exercise duration. A significant decrease in EMG across the exercise duration was observed during the eccentric phase, with the VL EMG greater than the VM and RF muscles. A greater decrease in VL and RF muscle f(med) during the isometric phase, than the VM muscle, was observed with no gender differences. The findings demonstrated differential recruitment of the superficial QF muscle, depending on the contraction mode during dynamic knee extension exercise, where VL muscle dominance appears to manifest across the concentric-isometric-eccentric transition.

  13. Effect of shoulder angle on the activation pattern of the elbow extensors during a submaximal isometric fatiguing contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Andrew W; Rice, Charles L

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of shoulder angle on the electromyographic (EMG) activation pattern of the elbow extensors during a fatiguing contraction. Ten young men (23.5 ± 1.7) were tested on two occasions with the elbow angle at 90° and the shoulder at either 0° or 90° of flexion. EMG was recorded by fine wire electrodes inserted into the lateral, medial, and long heads of the triceps brachii and the anconeus. An EMG-torque relationship was determined prior to a sustained isometric contraction at 20% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) until target failure. Endurance time was shorter, and postfatigue MVC torque was lower at 90° (40.4 ± 12.7 Nm) versus 0° (47.9 ± 14.7 Nm) of flexion. EMG activity of the long head during the final 10% of the fatiguing contraction was significantly greater at 90° versus 0° with no effect of shoulder angle on any other muscle portions. The findings suggest that measures from one muscle portion of the elbow extensors are not representative of the whole group, and the relative activation of the two-joint long head was changed depending on shoulder angle during a fatigue task.

  14. Higher Neuromuscular Manifestations of Fatigue in Dynamic than Isometric Pull-Up Tasks in Rock Climbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, Gennaro; Pizzigalli, Luisa; Formicola, Donato; Ivaldi, Marco; Rainoldi, Alberto

    2015-09-29

    Neuromuscular assessment of rock climbers has been mainly focused on forearm muscles in the literature. We aimed to extend the body of knowledge investigating on two other upper limb muscles during sport-specific activities in nine male rock climbers. We assessed neuromuscular manifestations of fatigue recording surface electromyographic signals from brachioradialis and teres major muscles, using multi-channel electrode arrays. Participants performed two tasks until volitional exhaustion: a sequence of dynamic pull-ups and an isometric contraction sustaining the body at half-way of a pull-up (with the elbows flexed at 90°). The tasks were performed in randomized order with 10 minutes of rest in between. The normalized rate of change of muscle fiber conduction velocity was calculated as the index of fatigue. The time-to-task failure was significantly shorter in the dynamic (31 ±10 s) than isometric contraction (59 ±19 s). The rate of decrease of muscle fiber conduction velocity was found steeper in the dynamic than isometric task both in brachioradialis (isometric: -0.2 ±0.1%/s; dynamic: -1.2 ±0.6%/s) and teres major muscles (isometric: -0.4±0.3%/s; dynamic: -1.8±0.7%/s). The main finding was that a sequence of dynamic pull-ups lead to higher fatigue than sustaining the body weight in an isometric condition at half-way of a pull-up. Furthermore, we confirmed the possibility to properly record physiological CV estimates from two muscles, which had never been studied before in rock climbing, in highly dynamic contractions.

  15. Reduced susceptibility to eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage in resistance-trained men is not linked to resistance training-related neural adaptations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, TW; Wages, NP

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of maximal concentric vs. eccentric exercise on the isometric strength of the elbow flexor, as well as the biceps brachii muscle electromyographic (EMG) responses in resistance-trained (RT) vs. untrained (UT) men. Thirteen RT men (age: 24 ± 4 years; height: 180.2 ± 7.7 cm; body weight: 92.2 ± 16.9 kg) and twelve UT men (age: 23 ± 4 years; height: 179.2 ± 5.0 cm; body weight: 81.5 ± 8.6 kg) performed six sets of ten maximal concentric isokinetic (CON) or eccentric isokinetic (ECC) elbow flexion exercise in two separate visits. Before and after the exercise interventions, maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) were performed for testing isometric strength. In addition, bipolar surface EMG signals were detected from the biceps brachii muscle during the strength testing. Both CON and ECC caused isometric strength to decrease, regardless of the training status. However, ECC caused greater isometric strength decline than CON did for the UT group (p = 0.006), but not for the RT group. Both EMG amplitude and mean frequency significantly decreased and increased, respectively, regardless of the training status and exercise intervention. Resistance-trained men are less susceptible to eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage, but this advantage is not likely linked to the chronic resistance training-induced neural adaptations. PMID:26424922

  16. Avaliação eletromiográfica dos músculos estabilizadores da patela durante exercício isométrico de agachamento em indivíduos com síndrome da dor femoropatelar Evaluacion eletromiográfica de los músculos estabilizadores patelares durante el ejercício isométrico de agachamiento en indivíduos con síndrome de dolor femoropatelar Electromyographic activity evaluation of the patella muscles during squat isometric exercise in individuals with patellofemoral pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Bevilaqua-Grossi

    2005-06-01

    with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PPS participated in this study. The EMG activity was registered during WS 45º and WS 60º performed at maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MIVC using surface differential electrodes connected to an EMG system. The EMG signals were analyzed using the root mean square (RMS values and were normalized by MIVC obtained at 75º of knee flexion. To compare data between groups and exercises, the ANOVA-two-way and Duncan post hoc tests were applied (p < 0.05. The results demonstrated higher EMG activity for all muscles studied at WS 60º when compared to WS 45º in both control and PPS groups. There were not significant differences between muscles during WS 60º in the control group, although a higher activity of VLL in relation to VMO and VLO was observed during WS 45º in control group. For the PPS group, no statistical difference was observed between muscles during both exercises. Thus, strengthening programs using WS 60º could be more effective for healthy women; however, both exercises could be indicated for rehabilitation programs aimed at women with PPS. In addition, the absence of significant differences between muscles in PPS group verified in this study suggests that muscle unbalance could not be a predisposing factor for PPS in women.

  17. Effect of eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage on electromyographyic activity of quadriceps in untrained healthy females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Mandana; Ebrahimi-Takamjani, Ismael; Jamshidi, Ali A; Vassaghi-Gharamaleki, Behnoush; Hedayatpour, Nosratollah; Havaei, Naser

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate muscle damage indicators and electromyography activities of quadriceps muscles at 25° of hip flexion in untrained healthy females after an eccentric exercise induced muscle fiber damage. A total of 14 healthy females participated in this pre-experimental study. The subjects performed maximal eccentric quadriceps contractions at 25˚ of hip flexion. Maximum voluntary extensor isometric and concentric moments, angle of maximum moment for concentric contractions, perceived pain intensity, and pain pressure threshold were examined before, immediately, 48 hours, 120 hours and 14 days after eccentric exercise. Additionally, electromyography of three parts of quadriceps muscle, knee flexion range of motion and thigh circumference were measured before and after eccentric exercise. Significant reductions in maximum isometric moment and maximum concentric moment were observed at angular velocity of 60˚ per sec immediately after eccentric exercise (peccentric exercise. Increased pain intensity and decreased knee joint range of motion manifested 48 hours after eccentric exercise. Pain pressure threshold for the quadriceps was higher 14 days after exercise as compared to 48 and 120 hours (p0.05). Eccentric exercise performed at 25˚ of hip flexion resulted in muscle fiber injuries within the quadriceps muscle. However, electromyography of quadriceps muscle was not significantly different than the baseline. The result indicates that hip joint position may modify the effect of eccentric exercise on muscle activation.

  18. The effect of increasing resistance on trunk muscle activity during extension and flexion exercises on training devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Veerle K; Parlevliet, Thierry G; Coorevits, Pascal L; Mahieu, Nele N; Bouche, Katie G; Vanderstraeten, Guy G; Danneels, Lieven A

    2008-06-01

    Although progressive resistance training of trunk muscles on devices is very common, today, the effects of increasing resistance on trunk muscle activity during dynamic extension and flexion movements on training devices have not been reported yet. Thirty healthy subjects participated in maximal isometric and submaximal dynamic (at 30%, 50% and 70% of maximum mean torque (MMT)) extension and flexion exercises on Tergumed lumbar training devices. The normalized (as a percentage of maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC)) electromyographic activity of 16 abdominal and back muscles was investigated. The results of the present study indicated that in general, with increasing resistance from 30% MMT to 50% MMT and 70% MMT, the activity of all back muscles during the extension exercises and the activity of all abdominal muscles during the flexion exercises increased significantly. To train strength (>60% of MVIC), low intensities (30% and 50% MMT) appeared sufficient to affect the back muscles, but for the abdominals higher resistance (70% MMT) was required. In contrast to the other back muscles, the lumbar multifidus demonstrated high activity levels during both the extension and the flexion exercises. As the lumbar multifidus is demonstrated to be an important muscle in segmental stabilization of the lumbar spine, this finding may help in understanding the efficacy of rehabilitation programs using specific training devices.

  19. Knee joint angle affects EMG-force relationship in the vastus intermedius muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Akira; Akima, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    It is not understood how the knee joint angle affects the relationship between electromyography (EMG) and force of four individual quadriceps femoris (QF) muscles. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the knee joint angle on the EMG-force relationship of the four individual QF muscles, particularly the vastus intermedius (VI), during isometric knee extensions. Eleven healthy men performed 20-100% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) at knee joint angles of 90°, 120° and 150°. Surface EMG of the four QF synergists was recorded and normalized by the root mean square during MVC. The normalized EMG of the four QF synergists at a knee joint angle of 150° was significantly lower than that at 90° and 120° (P knee joint angle of 150°. Furthermore, the neuromuscular activation of the VI was the most sensitive to change in muscle length among the four QF synergistic muscles.

  20. Age-related greater Achilles tendon compliance is not associated with larger plantar flexor muscle fascicle strains in senior women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csapo, R; Malis, V; Hodgson, J; Sinha, S

    2014-04-15

    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the age-associated decrease of tendon stiffness would necessitate greater muscle fascicle strains to produce similar levels of force during isometric contraction. Greater fascicle strains could force sarcomeres to operate in less advantageous regions of their force-length and force-velocity relationships, thus impairing the capacity to generate strong and explosive contractions. To test this hypothesis, sagittal-plane dynamic velocity-encoded phase-contrast magnetic resonance images of the gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscle and Achilles tendon (AT) were acquired in six young (YW; 26.1 ± 2.3 yr) and six senior (SW; 76.7 ± 8.3 yr) women during submaximal isometric contraction (35% maximum voluntary isometric contraction) of the plantar flexor muscles. Multiple GM fascicle lengths were continuously determined by automatically tracking regions of interest coinciding with the end points of muscle fascicles evenly distributed along the muscle's proximo-distal length. AT stiffness and Young's modulus were measured as the slopes of the tendon's force-elongation and stress-strain curves, respectively. Despite significantly lower AT stiffness at older age (YW: 120.2 ± 52.3 N/mm vs. SW: 53.9 ± 44.4 N/mm, P = 0.040), contraction-induced changes in GM fascicle lengths were similar in both age groups at equal levels of absolute muscular force (4-5% fascicle shortening in both groups), and even significantly larger in YW (YW: 11-12% vs. SW: 6-8% fascicle shortening) at equal percentage of maximum voluntary contraction. These results suggest that factors other than AT stiffness, such as age-associated changes in muscle composition or fascicle slack, might serve as compensatory adaptations, limiting the degree of fascicle strains upon contraction.

  1. Characterizing rapid-onset vasodilation to single muscle contractions in the human leg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credeur, Daniel P; Holwerda, Seth W; Restaino, Robert M; King, Phillip M; Crutcher, Kiera L; Laughlin, M Harold; Padilla, Jaume; Fadel, Paul J

    2015-02-15

    Rapid-onset vasodilation (ROV) following single muscle contractions has been examined in the forearm of humans, but has not yet been characterized in the leg. Given known vascular differences between the arm and leg, we sought to characterize ROV following single muscle contractions in the leg. Sixteen healthy men performed random ordered single contractions at 5, 10, 20, 40, and 60% of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) using isometric knee extension made with the leg above and below heart level, and these were compared with single isometric contractions of the forearm (handgrip). Single thigh cuff compressions (300 mmHg) were utilized to estimate the mechanical contribution to leg ROV. Continuous blood flow was determined by duplex-Doppler ultrasound and blood pressure via finger photoplethysmography (Finometer). Single isometric knee extensor contractions produced intensity-dependent increases in peak leg vascular conductance that were significantly greater than the forearm in both the above- and below-heart level positions (e.g., above heart level: leg 20% MVC, +138 ± 28% vs. arm 20% MVC, +89 ± 17%; P contractions in the leg. Collectively, these data demonstrate the presence of a rapid and robust vasodilation to single muscle contractions in the leg that is largely independent of mechanical factors, thus establishing the leg as a viable model to study ROV in humans.

  2. Neuromuscular responses to mild-muscle damaging eccentric exercise in a low glycogen state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, James P; Myers, Stephen D; Willems, Mark E T

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of low muscle glycogen on the neuromuscular responses to maximal eccentric contractions. Fourteen healthy men (22 ± 3 years) performed single-leg cycling (20 min at ~75% maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2 max); eight 90 s sprints at a 1:1 work-to-rest ratio (5% decrements from 90% to 55% V̇O2 max until exhaustion) the evening before 100 eccentric (1.57 rads(-1)) with reduced (RED) and normal glycogen (NORM). Neuromuscular responses were measured during and up to 48 h after with maximal voluntary and involuntary (twitch, 20 Hz and 50 Hz) isometric contractions. During eccentric contractions, peak torque decreased (RED: -16.1 ± 2.5%; NORM: -6.2 ± 5.1%) and EMG frequency increased according to muscle length. EMG activity decreased for RED only. After eccentric contractions, maximal isometric force was reduced up to 24h for NORM (-13.5 ± 5.8%) and 48 h for RED (-7.4 ± 10.9%). Twelve hours after eccentric contractions, twitch force and the 20:50 Hz ratio were decreased for RED but not for NORM. Immediate involuntary with prolonged voluntary force loss suggests that reduced glycogen is associated with increased susceptibility to mild muscle-damaging eccentric exercise with contributions of peripheral and central mechanisms to be different during recovery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Normalized force, activation, and coactivation in the arm muscles of young and old men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, C S; Rice, C L; Marsh, G D

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the loss of muscle strength in the elderly could be explained entirely by a decline in the physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) of muscle. Isometric force, muscle activation (twitch interpolation), and coactivation (surface electromyograph) were measured during maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) of the elbow flexors (EFs) and extensors (EEs) in 20 young (23 +/- 3 yr) and 13 older (81 +/- 6 yr) healthy men. PCSA was determined using magnetic resonance imaging, and normalized force (NF) was calculated as the MVC/PCSA ratio. The PCSA was smaller in the old compared with the young men, more so in the EEs (28%) compared with the EFs (19%) (P MVC (approximately 30%) with age was similar in the two muscle groups. Muscle activation was not different between the groups, but coactivation was greater (5%) (P architecture of the triceps brachii muscle. In conclusion, although the decline in PCSA explained the majority of strength loss in the old men, additional factors such as greater coactivation or reduced specific tension also may have contributed to the age-related loss of isometric strength.

  4. Beta-range EEG-EMG coherence with isometric compensation for increasing modulated low-level forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakarov, Vihren; Naranjo, José Raúl; Schulte-Mönting, Jürgen; Omlor, Wolfgang; Huethe, Frank; Kristeva, Rumyana

    2009-08-01

    Corticomuscular synchronization has been shown to occur in beta (15-30 Hz) and gamma range (30-45 Hz) during isometric compensation of static and dynamic (periodically modulated) low-level forces, respectively. However, it is still unknown to what extent these synchronization processes in beta and gamma range are modified with increasing modulated force. We addressed this question by investigating the corticomuscular coherence (CMC) between the electroencephalogram (EEG) and electromyogram (EMG) from the first dorsal interosseus muscle (FDI) as well as the cortical and muscular spectral power during a visuomotor task where different levels of a dynamic (modulated) force were used. Seven healthy right-handed female subjects compensated dynamic forces at 8, 16, and 24% of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) isometrically with their right index finger. Under the three conditions investigated, we found a broad-band CMC comprising both beta and gamma range and peaking at approximately 22 Hz within the beta band. This broad-band coherence increased linearly with higher force level. A separate analysis of the gamma range CMC did not show significant modulation of the CMC by the force levels. EEG and EMG spectral power did not show any significant difference among the three force conditions. Our results favor the view that the function of beta range CMC is not specific for low-level static forces only. The sensorimotor system may resort to stronger and also broader beta-range CMC to generate stable corticospinal interaction during increased force level, as well as when compensating for dynamic modulated forces. This finding re-enforces the importance of the beta-range EEG-EMG coherence in sensorimotor integration.

  5. COMPARISON OF EFFECTIVENESS OF ISOMETRIC EXERCISES WITH AND WITHOUT STRETCHING EXERCISES IN NON SPECIFIC CERVICAL PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warda Hassan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cervical pain is a common condition and almost two thirds of population suffers with this condition. Cervical region is the commonest region for non-traumatic neck pain. Neck pain generates many muscular disturbances in the neck region and may result in tightness of muscles of cervical region. Stretching is considered as an effective mean of treating cervical pain. Isometric exercise is used to enhance the performance of muscles because it provides strength required to perform dynamic exercise. Both of the regimens either separately or combined are used in clinical settings to treat nonspecific cervical pain. This study aims to compare the results of cervical isometrics with and without stretching exercises in reducing non-specific cervical pain Methods: A randomized controlled trial research was performed at physiotherapy department of Mayo Hospital Lahore, Pakistan. A convenience sample of 40 participants was divided into two groups. The cervical isometric exercise was applied to group A and stretching plus isometric exercise to group B for 3 weeks. Nonspecific neck pain was analyzed by using visual analogue scale and goniometry for pre and post treatment assessment. Results: Isometric exercises play an effective role in relieving pain (p value is 0.03 and minimizing inability of the body to perform functional activities (p value is 0.004 in contrast to the patients of group A. Isometric exercises were applied to the patients of group A (Level of pain: pain value is 0.172 and (physical inability to perform functional activities has P value 0.201. Conclusion: The result showed that the patients with the complain of non-specific neck discomfort who were treated by cervical isometric alone, showed less improvement in pain relief in contrast to the patients who were treated by the cervical isometric long with stretching.

  6. Effect of muscle contraction strength on gating of somatosensory magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Kazuhiro; Onishi, Hideaki; Yamashiro, Koya; Kotan, Shinichi; Kojima, Sho; Miyaguchi, Shota; Tsubaki, Atsuhiro; Kirimoto, Hikari; Tamaki, Hiroyuki; Shirozu, Hiroshi; Kameyama, Shigeki

    2016-11-01

    Afferent somatosensory information is modulated before the afferent input arrives at the primary somatosensory cortex during voluntary movement. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of muscular contraction strength on somatosensory evoked fields (SEFs) during voluntary movement. In addition, we examined the differences in gating between innervated and non-innervated muscle during contraction. We investigated the changes in gating effect by muscular contraction strength and innervated and non-innervated muscles in human using 306-channel magnetoencephalography. SEFs were recorded following the right median nerve stimulation in a resting condition and during isometric muscular contractions from 10 % electromyographic activity (EMG), 20 and 30 % EMG of the right extensor indicis muscle and abductor pollicis brevis muscle. Our results showed that the equivalent current dipole (ECD) strength for P35m decreased with increasing strength of muscular contraction of the right abductor pollicis brevis muscle. However, changes were observed only at 30 % EMG contraction level of the right extensor indicis muscle, which was not innervated by the median nerve. There were no significant changes in the peak latencies and ECD locations of each component in all conditions. The ECD strength did not differ significantly for N20m and P60m regardless of the strength of muscular contraction and innervation. Therefore, we suggest that the gating of SEF waveforms following peripheral nerve stimulation was affected by the strength of muscular contraction and innervation of the contracting muscle.

  7. Age-related changes in motor unit firing pattern of vastus lateralis muscle during low-moderate contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kohei; Holobar, Aleš; Kouzaki, Motoki; Ogawa, Madoka; Akima, Hiroshi; Moritani, Toshio

    2016-06-01

    Age-related changes in motor unit activation properties remain unclear for locomotor muscles such as quadriceps muscles, although these muscles are preferentially atrophied with aging and play important roles in daily living movements. The present study investigated and compared detailed motor unit firing characteristics for the vastus lateralis muscle during isometric contraction at low to moderate force levels in the elderly and young. Fourteen healthy elderly men and 15 healthy young men performed isometric ramp-up contraction to 70 % of the maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) during knee extension. Multichannel surface electromyograms were recorded from the vastus lateralis muscle using a two-dimensional grid of 64 electrodes and decomposed with the convolution kernel compensation technique to extract individual motor units. Motor unit firing rates in the young were significantly higher (~+29.7 %) than in the elderly (p  0.05). Firing rates at 60 % of the MVC force level for the motor units recruited at MVC were significantly correlated with MVC force in the elderly (r = 0.885, p  0.05). These results suggest that the motor unit firing rate in the vastus lateralis muscle is affected by aging and muscle strength in the elderly and/or age-related strength loss is related to motor unit firing/recruitment properties.

  8. Effect of stride length on symptoms of exercise-induced muscle damage during a repeated bout of downhill running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eston, R G; Lemmey, A B; McHugh, P; Byrne, C; Walsh, S E

    2000-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of changes in stride length on the symptoms of exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) during a repeated bout of downhill running in a group of 18 men and women. Muscle tenderness, plasma creatine kinase activity (CK) and maximal voluntary isometric force were measured before and after two downhill runs, with each run separated by 5 weeks. The first downhill run was at the preferred stride frequency (PSF). Participants were then randomly allocated to one of three sex-balanced groups with equal numbers of men and women: overstride (-8% PSF), understride (+8% PSF) and normal stride frequency for the second downhill run. Stride length had no effect (P>0.05) on muscle tenderness, CK or isometric peak force. Increases in muscle tenderness (Prun, although there was no difference in the pattern and extent of the strength decrement between the two runs. There were also no differences (P>0.05) in muscle tenderness, CK or the relative strength loss between the men and the women. Results suggest that the symptoms of EIMD are unaffected by gender and small alterations to the normal stride pattern during constant velocity downhill running. The observation that muscle tenderness and CK were reduced following a repeated bout of similar eccentric exercise is consistent with the phenomenon known as the 'repeated bout effect' of muscle damage.

  9. M-wave potentiation after voluntary contractions of different durations and intensities in the tibialis anterior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Falces, Javier; Duchateau, Jacques; Muraoka, Yoshiho; Baudry, Stéphane

    2015-04-15

    The study was undertaken to provide insight into the mechanisms underlying the potentiation of the muscle compound action potential (M wave) after conditioning contractions. M waves were evoked in the tibialis anterior before and after isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) of 1, 3, 6, 10, 30, and 60 s, and after 3-s contractions at 10, 30, 50, 70, 90, and 100% MVC. The amplitude, duration, and area of the first and second phases of the M wave, together with the median frequency (Fmedian) and muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) were recorded. Furthermore, twitch force, muscle fascicle length, and pennation angle were measured at rest, before, and 1 s after the conditioning contractions. The results indicate that only the amplitude of the second phase of the M wave was significantly increased after conditioning contractions. The extent of this potentiation was similar for MVC durations ranging from 1 to 10 s and augmented progressively with contraction intensity from 30 to 70% MVC. After these conditioning contractions, the duration and area of the two M-wave phases decreased (P contraction. Changes in MFCV after the contractions were correlated with those in M-wave second-phase amplitude (r(2) = 0.42; P contractions. It is concluded that the potentiation of the second phase of the M wave is mainly due to an increased MFCV.

  10. Muscle fatigue in women with primary biliary cirrhosis: Spectral analysis of surface electromyography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria Rosa Biagini; Alessandro Tozzi; Antonello Grippo; Andrea Galli; Stefano Milani; Aldo Amantini

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the myoelectric manifestations of peripheral fatigability in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis in comparison to healthy subjects. METHODS: Sixteen women with primary biliary cirrhosis without comorbidity and 13 healthy women matched for age and body mass index (BMI) completed the self reported questionnaire fatigue impact scale. All subjects underwent surface electromyography assessment of peripheral fatigability. Anterior tibial muscle isometric voluntary contraction was executed for 20 s at 80% of maximal voluntary isometric contraction. During the exercise electromyographic signal series were recorded and root mean square (expression of central drive) as well as mean and median of electromyographic signal frequency spectrum (estimates of muscle fatigability) were computed. Each subject executed the trial two times. EMG parameters were normalized, then linear regression was applied and slopes were calculated. RESULTS: Seven patients were fatigued (median fatigue impact scale score: 38, range: 26-66) and 9 were not fatigued (median fatigue impact scale score: 7, range: 0-17). The maximal voluntary isometric contraction was similar in patients (82, 54-115 N) and controls (87,74-101 N), and in patients with high (81, 54-115 N) and low fatigue impact scale scores (86, 65-106 N). Root mean square as well as mean and median of frequency spectrum slopes were compared with the Mann-Whitney U test, and no significant difference was found between fatigued and non-fatigued patients and controls. CONCLUSION: No instrumental evidence of peripheral fatigability can be found in women with primary biliary cirrhosis but no comorbidity, suggesting that fatigue in such patients may be of central origin.

  11. Synchronization of muscular oscillations between two subjects during isometric interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura V. Schaefer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Muscles oscillate with a frequency around 10 Hz. But what happens with myofascial oscillations, if two neuromuscular systems interact? The purpose of this study was to examine this question, initially, on the basis of a case study. Oscillations of the triceps brachii muscles of two subjects were determined through mechanomyography (MMG during isometric interaction. The MMG-signals were analyzed concerning the interaction of the two subjects with algorithms of nonlinear dynamics. In this case study it could be shown, that the muscles of both neuromuscular systems also oscillate with the known frequency (here 12 Hz during interaction. Furthermore, both subjects were able to adapt their oscillations against each other. This adjustment induced a significant ( < .05 coherent behavior, which was characterized by a phase shifting of approximately 90°. The authors draw the conclusion, that the complementary neuromuscular partners potentially have the ability of mutual synchronization.

  12. Synchronization of muscular oscillations between two subjects during isometric interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura V. Schaefer

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Muscles oscillate with a frequency around 10 Hz. But what happens with myofascial oscillations, if two neuromuscular systems interact? The purpose of this study was to examine this question, initially, on the basis of a case study. Oscillations of the triceps brachii muscles of two subjects were determined through mechanomyography (MMG during isometric interaction. The MMG-signals were analyzed concerning the interaction of the two subjects with algorithms of nonlinear dynamics. In this case study it could be shown, that the muscles of both neuromuscular systems also oscillate with the known frequency (here 12 Hz during interaction. Furthermore, both subjects were able to adapt their oscillations against each other. This adjustment induced a significant ( < .05 coherent behavior, which was characterized by a phase shifting of approximately 90°. The authors draw the conclusion, that the complementary neuromuscular partners potentially have the ability of mutual synchronization.

  13. Agonist muscle activity and antagonist muscle co-activity levels during standardized isotonic and isokinetic knee extensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remaud, Anthony; Cornu, Christophe; Guével, Arnaud

    2009-06-01

    This study aimed to analyze the effects of the contraction mode (isotonic vs. isokinetic concentric conditions), the joint angle and the investigated muscle on agonist muscle activity and antagonist muscle co-activity during standardized knee extensions. Twelve healthy adult subjects performed three sets of isotonic knee extensions at 40% of their maximal voluntary isometric torque followed by three sets of maximal isokinetic knee extensions on an isokinetic dynamometer. For each set, the mean angular velocity and the total external amount of work performed were standardized during the two contraction modes. Surface electromyographic activity of vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM), rectus femoris (RF), semitendinosus (ST) and biceps femoris (BF) muscles was recorded. Root mean square values were then calculated for each 10 degrees between 85 degrees and 45 degrees of knee extension (0 degrees =horizontal position). Results show that agonist muscle activity and antagonist muscle co-activity levels are significantly greater in isotonic mode compared to isokinetic mode. Quadriceps activity and hamstrings co-activity are significantly lower at knee extended position in both contraction modes. Considering agonist muscles, VL reveals a specific pattern of activity compared to VM and RF; whereas considering hamstring muscles, BF shows a significantly higher co-activity than ST in both contraction modes. Results of this study confirmed our hypothesis that higher quadriceps activity is required during isotonic movements compared to isokinetic movements leading to a higher hamstrings co-activity.

  14. The effects of kinesio taping on architecture, strength and pain of muscles in delayed onset muscle soreness of biceps brachii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Sin; Bae, Sea Hyun; Hwang, Jin Ah; Kim, Kyung Yoon

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to confirm the effects of kinesio taping (KT) on muscle function and pain due to delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) of the biceps brachii. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven subjects with induced DOMS were randomized into either Group I (control, n=19) or Group II (KT, n=18). Outcome measures were recorded before the intervention (application of KT) and at 24, 48, and 72 hours after the intervention. DOMS was induced, and muscle thickness was measured using ultrasonic radiography. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (%MVIC) was measured via electromyography (EMG). Subjective pain was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS). [Results] Group I exhibited a positive correlation between muscle thickness and elapsed time from intervention (24, 48, and 72 hours post induction of DOMS); they also showed a significant decrease in MVIC(%). Group II showed significant increases in muscle thickness up to the 48-hour interval post induction of DOMS, along with a significant decrease in MVIC (%). However, in contrast to Group I, Group II did not show a significant difference in muscle thickness or MVIC (%) at the 72-hour interval in comparison with the values prior to DOMS induction. [Conclusion] In adults with DOMS, activation of muscles by applying KT was found to be an effective and faster method of recovering muscle strength than rest alone.

  15. Muscle activation patterns of the upper and lower extremity during the windmill softball pitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Gretchen D; Plummer, Hillary A; Keeley, David W

    2011-06-01

    Fast-pitch softball has become an increasingly popular sport for female athletes. There has been little research examining the windmill softball pitch in the literature. The purpose of this study was to describe the muscle activation patterns of 3 upper extremity muscles (biceps, triceps, and rhomboids [scapular stabilizers]) and 2 lower extremity muscles (gluteus maximus and medius) during the 5 phases of the windmill softball pitch. Data describing muscle activation were collected on 7 postpubescent softball pitchers (age 17.7 ± 2.6 years; height 169 ± 5.4 cm; mass 69.1 ± 5.4 kg). Surface electromyographic data were collected using a Myopac Jr 10-channel amplifier (RUN Technologies Scientific Systems, Laguna Hills, CA, USA) synchronized with The MotionMonitor™ motion capture system (Innovative Sports Training Inc, Chicago IL, USA) and presented as a percent of maximum voluntary isometric contraction. Gluteus maximus activity reached (196.3% maximum voluntary isometric contraction [MVIC]), whereas gluteus medius activity was consistent during the single leg support of phase 3 (101.2% MVIC). Biceps brachii activity was greatest during phase 4 of the pitching motion. Triceps brachii activation was consistently >150% MVIC throughout the entire pitching motion, whereas the scapular stabilizers were most active during phase 2 (170.1% MVIC). The results of this study indicate the extent to which muscles are activated during the windmill softball pitch, and this knowledge can lead to the development of proper preventative and rehabilitative muscle strengthening programs. In addition, clinicians will be able to incorporate strengthening exercises that mimic the timing of maximal muscle activation most used during the windmill pitching phases.

  16. Muscle fascicle behavior during eccentric cycling and its relation to muscle soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñailillo, Luis; Blazevich, Anthony J; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2015-04-01

    A single bout of eccentric exercise confers a protective effect against muscle damage and soreness in subsequent eccentric exercise bouts, but the mechanisms underpinning this effect are unclear. This study compared vastus lateralis (VL) muscle-tendon behavior between two eccentric cycling bouts to test the hypothesis that muscle-tendon behavior would be different between bouts and would be associated with the protective effect. Eleven untrained men (27.1 ± 7.0 yr) performed two bouts of eccentric cycling (ECC1 and ECC2) separated by 2 wk for 10 min at 65% of maximal concentric workload (191.9 ± 44.2 W) each. Muscle soreness (by visual analog scale) and maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) torque of the knee extensors were assessed before and 1-2 d after exercise. Using ultrasonography, VL fascicle length and angle changes during cycling were assessed, and tendinous tissue (TT) length changes were estimated. VL EMG amplitude, crank torque, and knee joint angles were measured during cycling. Soreness was greater (P knee angles were evident between bouts. However, fascicle elongation was 16% less during ECC2 than ECC1 (P knee joint angle during ECC2 than ECC1 (P = 0.055). These results suggest that a lesser fascicle elongation and earlier TT elongation were associated with reduced muscle soreness after ECC2 than ECC1; thus, changes in muscle-tendon behavior may be an important mechanism underpinning the protective effect.

  17. Baroreflex modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity during posthandgrip muscle ischemia in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, J.; Wilson, T. E.; Shibasaki, M.; Hodges, N. A.; Crandall, C. G.

    2001-01-01

    To identify whether muscle metaboreceptor stimulation alters baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), MSNA, beat-by-beat arterial blood pressure (Finapres), and electrocardiogram were recorded in 11 healthy subjects in the supine position. Subjects performed 2 min of isometric handgrip exercise at 40% of maximal voluntary contraction followed by 2.5 min of posthandgrip muscle ischemia. During muscle ischemia, blood pressure was lowered and then raised by intravenous bolus infusions of sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine HCl, respectively. The slope of the relationship between MSNA and diastolic blood pressure was more negative (P ischemia (-201.9 +/- 20.4 units. beat(-1). mmHg(-1)) when compared with control conditions (-142.7 +/- 17.3 units. beat(-1). mmHg(-1)). No significant change in the slope of the relationship between heart rate and systolic blood pressure was observed. However, both curves shifted during postexercise ischemia to accommodate the elevation in blood pressure and MSNA that occurs with this condition. These data suggest that the sensitivity of baroreflex modulation of MSNA is elevated by muscle metaboreceptor stimulation, whereas the sensitivity of baroreflex of modulate heart rate is unchanged during posthandgrip muscle ischemia.

  18. Effect of spaceflight on the isotonic contractile properties of single skeletal muscle fibers in the rhesus monkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitts, R. H.; Romatowski, J. G.; Blaser, C.; De La Cruz, L.; Gettelman, G. J.; Widrick, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    Experiments from both Cosmos and Space Shuttle missions have shown weightlessness to result in a rapid decline in the mass and force of rat hindlimb extensor muscles. Additionally, despite an increased maximal shortening velocity, peak power was reduced in rat soleus muscle post-flight. In humans, declines in voluntary peak isometric ankle extensor torque ranging from 15-40% have been reported following long- and short-term spaceflight and prolonged bed rest. Complete understanding of the cellular events responsible for the fiber atrophy and the decline in force, as well as the development of effective countermeasures, will require detailed knowledge of how the physiological and biochemical processes of muscle function are altered by spaceflight. The specific purpose of this investigation was to determine the extent to which the isotonic contractile properties of the slow- and fast-twitch fiber types of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were altered by a 14-day spaceflight.

  19. Increased recovery rates of phosphocreatine and inorganic phosphate after isometric contraction in oxidative muscle fibres and elevated hepatic insulin resistance in homozygous carriers of the A-allele of FTO rs9939609

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Louise Groth; Brøns, Charlotte; Jacobsen, Stine

    2009-01-01

    9939609 A-allele was associated with elevated fasting blood glucose and plasma insulin, hepatic insulin resistance and shorter recovery halftimes of phosphocreatine (PCr) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) after exercise in a primarily type I muscle. These relationships - except for fasting insulin - remained...... or mitochondrially encoded genes in skeletal muscle during rest. Conclusion. Increased energy efficiency - and potentially increased mitochondrial coupling - as suggested by faster recovery rates of PCr and Pi in oxidative muscle fibres may contribute to the increased risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes...... diabetes. Methods. Forty-six young men underwent a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp with excision of skeletal muscle biopsies, an intravenous glucose tolerance test, (31)phosphorous magnetic resonance spectroscopy and 24-hour whole body metabolism was measured in a respiratory chamber. Results. The FTO rs...

  20. Electromyographic activity of masticatory muscles in elderly women – a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaszynska, Ewelina; Kopacz, Karolina; Fronczek-Wojciechowska, Magdalena; Padula, Gianluca; Szatko, Franciszek

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effect of age and chosen factors related to aging such as dentition, muscle strength, and nutrition on masticatory muscles electromyographic activity during chewing in healthy elderly women. Background With longer lifespan there is a need for maintaining optimal quality of life and health in older age. Skeletal muscle strength deteriorates in older age. This deterioration is also observed within masticatory muscles. Methods A total of 30 women, aged 68–92 years, were included in the study: 10 individuals had natural functional dentition, 10 were missing posterior teeth in the upper and lower jaw reconstructed with removable partial dentures, and 10 were edontoulous, using complete removable dentures. Surface electromyography was performed to evaluate masticatory muscles activity. Afterwards, measurement of masseter thickness with ultrasound imaging was performed, body mass index and body cell mass index were calculated, and isometric handgrip strength was measured. Results Isometric maximal voluntary contraction decreased in active masseters with increasing age and in active and passive temporalis muscles with increasing age and increasing body mass index. In active masseter, mean electromyographic activity during the sequence (time from the start of chewing till the end when the test food became ready to swallow) decreased with increasing age and during the cycle (single bite time) decreased with increasing age and increasing body mass index. In active and passive temporalis muscles, mean electromyographic activity during the sequence and the cycle decreased with increasing age, increasing body mass index, and loss of natural dentition. Individuals with natural dentition had significantly higher mean muscle activity during sequence and cycle in active temporalis muscles than those wearing full dentures and higher maximal activity during cycle in individuals with active and passive temporalis muscles than in complete denture wearers

  1. Trunk muscle activity during the simultaneous performance of two motor tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, B G; Koshland, G F

    2000-12-01

    A unique feature of trunk muscles is that they can be activated to meet functional requirements for combined behaviors, including those related to posture and breathing. Trunk muscles therefore may have developed mechanisms for dealing with simultaneous inputs for different task requirements. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that a linear addition in trunk muscle activities would occur when an isometric trunk task and a pulsed expiration task was performed simultaneously. Surface electromyograms (EMG) were recorded from four trunk regions (medial and lateral back, upper and lower lateral abdomen) in sitting during the performance of the individual isometric trunk task, the individual pressure task, and the combined task (isometric trunk and pressure task). The direction of static holding for the isometric trunk task was varied between flexion and extension positions. For the pressure task subjects produced two consecutive pressure pulses (2/s) to a target oral pressure. For each muscle recording, a linear prediction was calculated from the mathematical addition of the EMG recorded from the individual trunk and pressure tasks. This linear prediction was compared to the actual muscle activity recorded during the combined task. Typically the EMG from two muscles showed linear addition, such that the relative contribution of muscle activity did not change for the combined task. This suggests that the motor commands for each task reached these motor neuron pools essentially unmodified. The other two muscles showed nonlinear combination of two EMG patterns. That is, qualitatively both EMG patterns, specific to each command, were evident in the measured EMG traces for the combined task, but quantitatively the muscle did not meet all criteria for linear addition. Linear addition may provide a simple mechanism for combining breathing-related behaviors (expiratory efforts) with other trunk behaviors (holding against gravity). This suggests that some muscles can

  2. Effect of cold-water immersion duration on body temperature and muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiffer, Jeremiah J; Abbiss, Chris R; Watson, Greig; Nosaka, Ken; Laursen, Paul B

    2009-08-01

    This study compared the effect of 5, 10 and 20 min of cold-water (14 degrees C) immersion on rectal and muscle temperature and neuromuscular function. Twelve cyclists performed four cycling time-to-exhaustion trials in hot conditions (40 degrees C and 40%rh), followed 25 min later by cold-water immersion for 5, 10 or 20 min or 20 min in room temperature (24 degrees C; control). Rectal temperature was measured continuously, and muscle temperature was measured before, immediately after and 45 min after the time-to-exhaustion-test, as well as before and after water immersion. Sixty-second maximal voluntary isometric torque and isokinetic torque of the knee extensors were measured before, immediately after and 55 min after time-to-exhaustion-test. A greater rate of decrease in rectal temperature was observed in all water immersion conditions 45-80 min after time-to-exhaustion-test compared with control. Compared with control, muscle temperature 45 min after time-to-exhaustion-test was lower for all water immersion conditions; however, muscle temperature was lower for the 10- and 20-min conditions compared with 5 min. Isometric torque measured 55 min after time-to-exhaustion-test was lower for all conditions. Isokinetic torque was lower for all conditions immediately and 55-min post-time-to-exhaustion-test. Of the durations measured, 5 min of cold-water immersion appeared as the most appropriate duration for reducing rectal temperature but limiting decreases in muscle temperature.

  3. Voluntary Environmental Governance Arrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, J.

    2012-01-01

    Voluntary environmental governance arrangements have focal attention in studies on environmental policy, regulation and governance. The four major debates in the contemporary literature on voluntary environmental governance arrangements are studied. The literature falls short of sufficiently

  4. Voluntary Environmental Governance Arrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, J.

    2012-01-01

    Voluntary environmental governance arrangements have focal attention in studies on environmental policy, regulation and governance. The four major debates in the contemporary literature on voluntary environmental governance arrangements are studied. The literature falls short of sufficiently specify

  5. Voluntary Service System (VSS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Voluntary Service System (VSS) is a national-level application which replaced the site-based Voluntary Timekeeping System (VTK). VTK was used for many years at the...

  6. Rapid increases in training load affects markers of skeletal muscle damage and mechanical performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamandulis, Sigitas; Snieckus, Audrius; Venckunas, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    a program involving a rapid stepwise increase in the number of jumps, drop height, and squat depth, and the addition of weight. Concentric, isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and stimulated knee extension torque were measured before and 10 min after each session. Muscle soreness and plasma...... creatine kinase activity were assessed after each session. Steep increments in stretch-shortening exercise load in sessions 4 and 7 amplified the postexercise decrease in stimulated muscle torque and slightly increased muscle soreness but had a minimal effect on the recovery of MVC and stimulated torque....... Maximal jump height increased by 7.8% ± 6.3% (P MVC (7.9% ± 8.2%) and 100-Hz-evoked torque (9.9% ± 9.6%) (both P

  7. Effects of High-Intensity Blood Flow Restriction Exercise on Muscle Fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neto Gabriel R.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Strength training combined with blood flow restriction (BFR have been used to improve the levels of muscle adaptation. The aim of this paper was to investigate the acute effect of high intensity squats with and without blood flow restriction on muscular fatigue levels. Twelve athletes (aged 25.95 ± 0.84 years were randomized into two groups: without Blood Flow Restriction (NFR, n = 6 and With Blood Flow Restriction (WFR, n = 6 that performed a series of free weight squats with 80% 1-RM until concentric failure. The strength of the quadriceps extensors was assessed in a maximum voluntary isometric contraction integrated to signals from the surface electromyogram. The average frequency showed significant reductions in the WFR group for the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis muscles, and intergroup only for the vastus medialis. In conclusion, a set of squats at high intensity with BFR could compromise muscle strength immediately after exercise, however, differences were not significant between groups.

  8. Fiber-type susceptibility to eccentric contraction-induced damage of hindlimb-unloaded rat AL muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayan, K.; Thompson, J. L.; Norenberg, K. M.; Fitts, R. H.; Riley, D. A.

    2001-01-01

    Slow oxidative (SO) fibers of the adductor longus (AL) were predominantly damaged during voluntary reloading of hindlimb unloaded (HU) rats and appeared explainable by preferential SO fiber recruitment. The present study assessed damage after eliminating the variable of voluntary recruitment by tetanically activating all fibers in situ through the motor nerve while applying eccentric (lengthening) or isometric contractions. Muscles were aldehyde fixed and resin embedded, and semithin sections were cut. Sarcomere lesions were quantified in toluidine blue-stained sections. Fibers were typed in serial sections immunostained with antifast myosin and antitotal myosin (which highlights slow fibers). Both isometric and eccentric paradigms caused fatigue. Lesions occurred only in eccentrically contracted control and HU muscles. Fatigue did not cause lesions. HU increased damage because lesioned- fiber percentages within fiber types and lesion sizes were greater than control. Fast oxidative glycolytic (FOG) fibers were predominantly damaged. In no case did damaged SO fibers predominate. Thus, when FOG, SO, and hybrid fibers are actively lengthened in chronically unloaded muscle, FOG fibers are intrinsically more susceptible to damage than SO fibers. Damaged hybrid-fiber proportions ranged between these extremes.

  9. Alterations in Neural Control of Constant Isometric Contraction with the Size of Error Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ing-Shiou; Lin, Yen-Ting; Huang, Wei-Min; Yang, Zong-Ru; Hu, Chia-Ling; Chen, Yi-Ching

    2017-01-01

    Discharge patterns from a population of motor units (MUs) were estimated with multi-channel surface electromyogram and signal processing techniques to investigate parametric differences in low-frequency force fluctuations, MU discharges, and force-discharge relation during static force-tracking with varying sizes of execution error presented via visual feedback. Fourteen healthy adults produced isometric force at 10% of maximal voluntary contraction through index abduction under three visual conditions that scaled execution errors with different amplification factors. Error-augmentation feedback that used a high amplification factor (HAF) to potentiate visualized error size resulted in higher sample entropy, mean frequency, ratio of high-frequency components, and spectral dispersion of force fluctuations than those of error-reducing feedback using a low amplification factor (LAF). In the HAF condition, MUs with relatively high recruitment thresholds in the dorsal interosseous muscle exhibited a larger coefficient of variation for inter-spike intervals and a greater spectral peak of the pooled MU coherence at 13–35 Hz than did those in the LAF condition. Manipulation of the size of error feedback altered the force-discharge relation, which was characterized with non-linear approaches such as mutual information and cross sample entropy. The association of force fluctuations and global discharge trace decreased with increasing error amplification factor. Our findings provide direct neurophysiological evidence that favors motor training using error-augmentation feedback. Amplification of the visualized error size of visual feedback could enrich force gradation strategies during static force-tracking, pertaining to selective increases in the discharge variability of higher-threshold MUs that receive greater common oscillatory inputs in the β-band. PMID:28125658

  10. Myoelectric manifestations of jaw elevator muscle fatigue and recovery in healthy and TMD subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castroflorio, T; Falla, D; Tartaglia, G M; Sforza, C; Deregibus, A

    2012-09-01

    The effects of muscle pain and fatigue on the control of jaw elevator muscles are not well known. Furthermore, the myoelectric manifestations of fatigue and recovery from fatigue in the masticatory muscles are not reported in literature. The main aims of this study were (i) to evaluate the possible use of surface electromyography (sEMG) as an objective measure of fatigue of the jaw elevator muscles, (ii) to compare the myoelectric manifestations of fatigue in the temporalis anterior and masseter muscles bilaterally, (iii) to assess recovery of the investigated muscles after an endurance test and (iv) to compare fatigue and recovery of the jaw elevator muscles in healthy subjects and patients with muscle-related temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The study was performed on twenty healthy volunteers and eighteen patients with muscle-related TMD. An intra-oral compressive-force sensor was used to measure the voluntary contraction forces close to the intercuspal position and to provide visual feedback of submaximal forces to the subject. Surface EMG signals were recorded with linear electrode arrays during isometric contractions at 20%, 40%, 60% and 80% of the maximum voluntary contraction force, during an endurance test and during the recovery phase. The results showed that (i) the slope of the mean power spectral frequency (MNF) and the initial average rectified value (ARV) could be used to monitor fatigue of the jaw elevators, (ii) the temporalis anterior and masseter muscle show the same myoelectric manifestations of fatigue and recovery and (iii) the initial values of MNF and ARV were lower in patients with muscle-related TMD. The assessment of myoelectric manifestations of fatigue in the masticatory muscles may assist in the clinical assessment of TMDs.

  11. Forward Head Posture and Activation of Rectus Capitis Posterior Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Richard C; Pierce, Steven J; Sharma, Dhruv B; Rowan, Jacob J

    2017-01-01

    Rectus capitis posterior (RCP) muscles have physical attachments to the pain-sensitive spinal dura. Atrophy of these muscles is associated with chronic headache in some patients. The authors suspect that the significance of atrophy in the RCP muscles has been undervalued because the functional role of these muscles is not well defined. To determine whether a statistically significant change in normalized levels of electromyographic activity in RCP muscles occurs when the head is voluntarily moved from a self-selected neutral head position to a protruded head position. Fine wire, intramuscular electrodes were used to collect electromyographic data as asymptomatic participants moved their head from a neutral head position into a forward head position and back into the neutral head position. This sequence was repeated 4 times. Normalized levels of electromyographic activity were quantified using a 2-head position × 2 sides of the body repeated measures design that incorporated mixed-effects β regression models. Twenty participants were studied. Electromyographic activity collected from RCP muscles was found to increase as the head was voluntarily moved from a self-selected neutral head position (11% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction [MVIC] in RCP minor, 14% of MVIC in RCP major) into a protruded head position (35% of MVIC in RCP minor, 39% of MVIC in RCP major) (P<.001). Rectus capitis posterior muscles may contribute to segmental stabilization of the occipitoatlantal and atlantoaxial joints by helping to maintain joint congruency during movement of the head.

  12. Hormonal and neuromuscular responses to mechanical vibration applied to upper extremity muscles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Di Giminiani

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the acute residual hormonal and neuromuscular responses exhibited following a single session of mechanical vibration applied to the upper extremities among different acceleration loads. METHODS: Thirty male students were randomly assigned to a high vibration group (HVG, a low vibration group (LVG, or a control group (CG. A randomized double-blind, controlled-parallel study design was employed. The measurements and interventions were performed at the Laboratory of Biomechanics of the University of L'Aquila. The HVG and LVG participants were exposed to a series of 20 trials ×10 s of synchronous whole-body vibration (WBV with a 10-s pause between each trial and a 4-min pause after the first 10 trials. The CG participants assumed an isometric push-up position without WBV. The outcome measures were growth hormone (GH, testosterone, maximal voluntary isometric contraction during bench-press, maximal voluntary isometric contraction during handgrip, and electromyography root-mean-square (EMGrms muscle activity (pectoralis major [PM], triceps brachii [TB], anterior deltoid [DE], and flexor carpi radialis [FCR]. RESULTS: The GH increased significantly over time only in the HVG (P = 0.003. Additionally, the testosterone levels changed significantly over time in the LVG (P = 0.011 and the HVG (P = 0.001. MVC during bench press decreased significantly in the LVG (P = 0.001 and the HVG (P = 0.002. In the HVG, the EMGrms decreased significantly in the TB (P = 0.006 muscle. In the LVG, the EMGrms decreased significantly in the DE (P = 0.009 and FCR (P = 0.006 muscles. CONCLUSION: Synchronous WBV acutely increased GH and testosterone serum concentrations and decreased the MVC and their respective maximal EMGrms activities, which indicated a possible central fatigue effect. Interestingly, only the GH response was dependent on the acceleration with respect to the subjects' responsiveness.

  13. Age and sex differences in steadiness of elbow flexor muscles with imposed cognitive demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Hugo M; Spears, Vincent C; Schlinder-Delap, Bonnie; Yoon, Tejin; Nielson, Kristy A; Hunter, Sandra K

    2015-06-01

    These studies determined (1) age- and sex-related differences in steadiness of isometric contractions when high cognitive demand was imposed across a range of forces with the elbow flexor muscles (study 1) and; (2) sex differences in steadiness among older adults when low cognitive demand was imposed (study 2). 36 young adults (18-25 years; 18 women) and 30 older adults (60-82 years; 17 women) performed isometric contractions at 5, 30 and 40 % of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Study 1 involved a high-cognitive demand session (serial subtractions by 13 during the contraction) and a control session (no mental math). Study 2 (older adults only) involved a low-cognitive demand session (subtracting by 1s). Older individuals exhibited greater increases in force fluctuations (coefficient of variation of force, CV) with high cognitive demand than young adults, with the largest age difference at 5 % MVC (P = 0.01). Older adults had greater agonist EMG activity with high-cognitive demand and women had greater coactivation than men (P demand for the older women but not for the older men (P = 0.03). Older adults had reduced steadiness and increased muscle activation when high cognitive demand was imposed while low cognitive demand induced increased force fluctuations in older women but not older men. These findings have implications for daily and work-related tasks that involve cognitive demand performed simultaneously during submaximal isometric contractions in an aging workforce.

  14. Effect of neck muscle isometric contraction training on axial symptom postoperative of laminoplasty%颈部肌肉等长收缩训练对颈椎管扩大成形术后颈部轴性症状的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭永传; 张益宏; 马守战; 贾思明

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨颈部肌肉等长收缩训练对颈椎管扩大成型术后轴性症状的影响作用。方法2011年7月至2013年7月收治符合纳入标准条件的患者100例,随机分组A、B组,均采用椎管扩大成型术式,术后3 d B组开始实施颈部肌肉等长收缩训练3个月,分两个阶段进行。术后随访1.5年,记录术后3个月、6个月、1年、1.5年4个时间点患者轴性症状的罹患率及疼痛程度VAS评分,并进行统计分析。结果术后随访3个月、6个月、1年、1.5年4个时间点,A、B两组患者轴性症状疼痛VAS评分及轴性症状发生率比较差异有统计学意义( P<0.05)。结论早期肌肉等长收缩训练能够促进颈椎椎管扩大成型术后轴性症状的恢复,是预防治疗颈椎管扩大成型术后轴性症状的一种有效方法,值得在临床上推广应用。%Objective To investigate the effect of neck muscle isometric contraction training on axial symptom postoperative of laminoplasty. Methods One hundred patients from July 2011 to July 2013 were sel