WorldWideScience

Sample records for voluntary industrial energy

  1. A policy analysis of voluntary agreements for energy efficiency in industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Anders; Krarup, Signe; Kraemer, Trine Pipi [AKF, Inst. of Local Government Studies, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    1998-12-31

    To a growing degree voluntary agreements are used as an energy policy instrument in industrial energy policy in Europe. This paper investigates voluntary agreements of Great Britain, Denmark, Finland, the Netherlands and Sweden. The paper analyses the design and effects of these agreements and on this background discusses general implications of using voluntary agreements as a policy instrument in industrial energy policy. (au) EFP-95. 23 refs.

  2. Energy efficiency in energy-intensive industries - an evaluation of the Swedish voluntary agreement PFE

    OpenAIRE

    Stenqvist, Christian; Nilsson, Lars J.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we evaluate the Swedish Programme for improving energy efficiency in energy-intensive industries (PFE). Since 2005, some 100 energy-intensive companies have entered this five year voluntary agreement (VA) and been exempted from the EU minimum tax on electricity. In return, each company is required to: conduct an energy audit and analysis; identify and invest in profitable electricity saving measures; implement and certify an energy management system; introduce routines for energ...

  3. Voluntary agreements - a measure for energy-efficiency in industry? Lessons from a Swedish programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linden, Anna- Lisa [Department of Sociology, Lund University P.O. Box 114, SE-221 00, Lund, (Sweden); Carlsson-Kanyama, Annika [Environmental Strategies Research Group, P.O. Box 2142, SE-103 14, Stockholm, (Sweden)

    2002-08-01

    Voluntary agreements represent a policy instrument for applying new knowledge, routines or technology to specified issues. The traditional role of an authority when using information, and taking economic, or administrative measures is that of an initiator and controller. Voluntary agreements, on the other hand, represent a communication process between an authority and a partner where relations of dependency and mutuality are more important in advancing the programme. This article analyses and discusses the motivational aspects of voluntary agreements, the role of the contract, advising, information, education, time planning and the importance of reporting and evaluation in energy-efficiency programmes. Besides sociological and communication theories, the discussion is based on the outcome of an evaluation of a Swedish energy-efficiency programme. Among the conclusions are that communication processes have to be planned and implemented in time sequences and steps of measures, which was partially neglected in the Swedish programme. Also, agreements between partners have to be defined in ways valid for all partners. In the Swedish programme, quantitative goals, at least measured in kWh, were impossible to achieve for some industries. On the other hand, most industries reported progress in side effects of energy efficiency as for example transportation policy for products, recirculation of waste material, lighting policy and behaviour, qualifications for ISO labelling. Information in combination with voluntary agreements can be efficient for industrial energy conservation. The education and auditing that was part of the Swedish programme were highly appreciated and added to the achievements. (Author)

  4. Energy efficiency in energy-intensive industries-an evaluation of the Swedish voluntary agreement PFE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenqvist, C.; Nilsson, L.J. [Environmental and Energy Systems Studies, Department of Technology and Society, Faculty of Engineering, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, 22100 Lund (Sweden)

    2012-05-15

    In this paper, we evaluate the Swedish Programme for improving energy efficiency in energy-intensive industries (PFE). Since 2005, some 100 energy-intensive companies have entered this 5-year voluntary agreement (VA) and been exempted from the EU minimum tax on electricity. In return, each company is required to: conduct an energy audit and analysis; identify and invest in profitable electricity saving measures; implement and certify an energy management system; introduce routines for energy efficient procurement and project planning. For most participants the first programme period was completed in 2009 and available data enables this PFE ex-post evaluation. An impact evaluation compiles and analyse data that the companies have reported to the administrating agency, the Swedish Energy Agency (SEA). This assessment of quantifiable results is complemented by a process-oriented approach that combines studies of policy documents, previous evaluations and personal communication with administrators as well as companies. The bottom-up calculation method distinguishes between gross and net impact. While the SEA estimates a gross impact of 1,450 GW h/year, the net impact consists of an interval between 689 and 1,015 GW h of net annual electricity savings. PFE has effectively and, to a low cost, exceeded the estimated impact of a minimum tax and can thus be judged as successful. A comprehensive evaluation plan could facilitate relevant data gathering in PFE and similar VAs and could, in doing so, improve accuracy and possibly reduce evaluation cost. Such a plan should give weight also to the organisational changes, with potential long-lasting effects, that these programmes are capable of promoting.

  5. Voluntary Agreements for Energy Efficiency or GHG EmissionsReduction in Industry: An Assessment of Programs Around the World

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Lynn

    2005-06-01

    Voluntary agreements for energy efficiency improvement and reduction of energy-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have been a popular policy instrument for the industrial sector in industrialized countries since the 1990s. A number of these national-level voluntary agreement programs are now being modified and strengthened, while additional countries--including some recently industrialized and developing countries--are adopting these type of agreements in an effort to increase the energy efficiency of their industrial sectors.Voluntary agreement programs can be roughly divided into three broad categories: (1) programs that are completely voluntary, (2) programs that use the threat of future regulations or energy/GHG emissions taxes as a motivation for participation, and (3) programs that are implemented in conjunction with an existing energy/GHG emissions tax policy or with strict regulations. A variety of government-provided incentives as well as penalties are associated with these programs. This paper reviews 23 energy efficiency or GHG emissions reduction voluntary agreement programs in 18 countries, including countries in Europe, the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, South Korea, and Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) and discusses preliminary lessons learned regarding program design and effectiveness. The paper notes that such agreement programs, in which companies inventory and manage their energy use and GHG emissions to meet specific reduction targets, are an essential first step towards GHG emissions trading programs.

  6. Voluntary agreements for increasing energy-efficiency in industry: Case study of a pilot project with the steel industry in Shandong Province, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Sinton, Jonathan; Yun, Jiang

    2003-03-01

    China faces a significant challenge in the years ahead to continue to provide essential materials and products for a rapidly-growing economy while addressing pressing environmental concerns. China's industrial sector is heavily dependent on the country's abundant, yet polluting, coal resources. While tremendous energy conservation and environmental protection achievements were realized in the industrial sector in the past, there remains a great gulf between the China's level of energy efficiency and that of the advanced countries of the world. Internationally, significant energy efficiency improvement in the industrial sector has been realized in a number of countries using an innovative policy mechanism called Voluntary Agreements. This paper describes international experience with Voluntary Agreements in the industrial sector as well as the development of a pilot program to test the use of such agreements with two steel mills in Shandong Province, China.

  7. Costs and benefits of industrial reporting and voluntary targets for energy efficiency. A report to the Congress of the United States. Volume II: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    This part sets forth the regulations for the Industrial Energy conservation Program established under Part E of Title III of the Act. It includes criteria and procedures for the identification of reporting corporations, reporting requirements, criteria and procedures for exemption from filing reports directly with DOE, voluntary industrial energy efficiency improvement targets and voluntary recovered materials utilization targets. The purpose of the program is to promote increased energy conservation by American industry and, as it relates to the use of recovered materials, to conserve valuable energy and scarce natural resources.

  8. Costs and benefits of industrial reporting and voluntary targets for energy efficiency. A report to the Congress of the United States. Volume I: Main report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    Section 131(c) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) (Public Law 102-486) requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the costs and benefits of federally mandated energy efficiency reporting requirements and voluntary energy efficiency improvement targets for energy-intensive industries. It also requires DOE to evaluate the role of reporting and targets in improving energy efficiency. Specifically, the legislation states: Not later than one year after the data of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall, in consultation with affected industries, evaluate and report to the Congress regarding the establishment of Federally mandated energy efficiency reporting requirements and voluntary energy efficiency improvement targets for energy intensive industries. Such report shall include an evaluation of the costs and benefits of such reporting requirements and voluntary energy efficiency improvement targets, and recommendations regarding the role of such activities in improving energy efficiency in energy intensive industries. This report is DOE`s response to that directive. It is the culmination of a year-long study that included (1) analysis of documents pertaining to a previous reporting and targets effort, the industrial Energy Efficiency Improvements Program (or the CE-189 program, following the designation of the reporting form used to collect data in that program), administered by DOE from 1976 to 1985, as well as other important background information; (2) extensive consultations with government and industry officials regarding the CE-189 Program, experience with other programs that have reporting elements, and the attributes of possible alternative strategies for reporting and targets; and (3) analyses of the costs and benefits of the CE-189 Program and several alternatives to the CE-189 approach.

  9. Voluntary agreements in the industrial sector in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Sinton, Jonathan

    2003-03-31

    China faces a significant challenge in the years ahead to continue to provide essential materials and products for a rapidly-growing economy while addressing pressing environmental concerns. China's industrial sector is heavily dependent on the country's abundant, yet polluting, coal resources. While tremendous energy conservation and environmental protection achievements were realized in the industrial sector in the past, there remains a great gulf between the China's level of energy efficiency and that of the advanced countries of the world. Internationally, significant energy efficiency improvement in the industrial sector has been realized in a number of countries using an innovative policy mechanism called Voluntary Agreements. This paper describes international experience with Voluntary Agreements in the industrial sector as well as the development of a pilot program to test the use of such agreements with two steel mills in Shandong Province, China.

  10. International Voluntary Renewable Energy Markets (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, J.

    2012-06-01

    This presentation provides an overview of international voluntary renewable energy markets, with a focus on the United States and Europe. The voluntary renewable energy market is the market in which consumers and institutions purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs on a voluntary basis. In 2010, the U.S. voluntary market was estimated at 35 terawatt-hours (TWh) compared to 300 TWh in the European market, though key differences exist. On a customer basis, Australia has historically had the largest number of customers, pricing for voluntary certificates remains low, at less than $1 megawatt-hour, though prices depend on technology.

  11. Redefining RECs: Additionality in the voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillenwater, Michael Wayne

    In the United States, electricity consumers are told that they can "buy" electricity from renewable energy projects, versus fossil fuel-fired facilities, through participation in a voluntary green power program. The marketing messages communicate to consumers that their participation and premium payments for a green label will cause additional renewable energy generation and thereby allow them to claim they consume electricity that is absent pollution as well as reduce pollutant emissions. Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) and wind energy are the basis for the majority of the voluntary green power market in the United States. This dissertation addresses the question: Do project developers respond to the voluntary REC market in the United States by altering their decisions to invest in wind turbines? This question is investigated by modeling and probabilistically quantifying the effect of the voluntary REC market on a representative wind power investor in the United States using data from formal expert elicitations of active participants in the industry. It is further explored by comparing the distribution of a sample of wind power projects supplying the voluntary green power market in the United States against an economic viability model that incorporates geographic factors. This dissertation contributes the first quantitative analysis of the effect of the voluntary REC market on project investment. It is found that 1) RECs should be not treated as equivalent to emission offset credits, 2) there is no clearly credible role for voluntary market RECs in emissions trading markets without dramatic restructuring of one or both markets and the environmental commodities they trade, and 3) the use of RECs in entity-level GHG emissions accounting (i.e., "carbon footprinting") leads to double counting of emissions and therefore is not justified. The impotence of the voluntary REC market was, at least in part, due to the small magnitude of the REC price signal and lack of

  12. Voluntary energy optimisation - Taking responsibility; Verantwortungsvoll

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baettig, I.

    2006-07-01

    This interview with Konrad Kyburz, CEO of a printing shop in Dielsdorf, Switzerland, discusses how energy consumption can be reduced on a voluntary basis. The provision free-of-charge of heat recovered from the drying ovens of the printing presses to a nearby sports facility is discussed. The realisation of an energy consumption analysis and the resulting increases in the efficiency of energy usage in the printing facility are discussed. Further improvements such as the use of variable-frequency compressor drives and heating with natural gas that helped in making energy savings of well over 15% are discussed.

  13. Market Motivations for Voluntary Carbon Disclosure in Real Estate Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ufere, Kalu Joseph; Alias, Buang; Godwin Uche, Aliagha

    2016-07-01

    Climate change mitigation in developing economies is a balancing act, between economic development and environmental sustainability. The need for market friendly determinants for low carbon economy, without compromising economic development is of essence. The aim of the study is to determine market friendly factors, which motivates voluntary carbon information disclosure, in the real estate industry. The study modeled economic factor with three variables and financial market factor with three variables against voluntary carbon information disclosure in the real estate industry. Structural equation modeling was used for the modeling and content analysis was used to collect data on the level of voluntary carbon information disclosure, from 2013 annual reports of 126 real estate sector companies listed in the Kuala Lumpur Stock Exchange (KLSE). The model achieved a good fit, and was acceptable prediction. The results show that financial market factor has a significant predictive influence on voluntary carbon disclosure. The application of the result is that financial market factor is has a significantly positive influence on companies’ willingness to make voluntary carbon disclosure in the real estate industry. The result may be limited to the real estate industry that is highly leveraged on syndicated fund.

  14. Industrial electricity demand and energy efficiency policy

    OpenAIRE

    Henriksson, Eva

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation consists of an introduction and five self-contained papers addressing the issues of industrial electricity demand and the role of energy efficiency policy. An important context for the study is the increased interest in so-called voluntary energy efficiency programs in which different types of tax exemptions are granted if the participating firms carry out energy efficiency measures following an energy audit. Paper 1 conceptually analyses the cost-effectiveness of voluntary ...

  15. Current State of the Voluntary Renewable Energy Market (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, J.

    2013-09-01

    This presentation highlights the status of the voluntary green power market in 2012. The voluntary green power market totaled more than 48 million MWh in 2012, with about 1.9 million customers participating. The supply continues to be dominated by wind, though solar is increasing its share of utility green pricing programs. Prices for voluntary renewable energy certificates (RECs) increased to above $1/MWh.

  16. Interaction of Compliance and Voluntary Renewable Energy Markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, L.; Lokey, E.

    2007-10-01

    In recent years, both compliance and voluntary markets have emerged to help support the development of renewable energy resources. Both of these markets are growing rapidly and today about half of U.S. states have RPS policies in place, with a number of these policies adopted in the last several years. In addition, many states have recently increased the stringency of their RPS policies. This paper examines key market interaction issues between compliance and voluntary renewable energy markets. It provides an overview of both the compliance and voluntary markets, addressing each market's history, purpose, size, scope, and benefits while addressing issues, including double counting.

  17. Interaction of Compliance and Voluntary Renewable Energy Markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, Lori [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lokey, Elizabeth [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2007-10-01

    In recent years, both compliance and voluntary markets have emerged to help support the development of renewable energy resources. Both of these markets are growing rapidly and today about half of U.S. states have RPS policies in place, with a number of these policies adopted in the last several years. In addition, many states have recently increased the stringency of their RPS policies. This paper examines key market interaction issues between compliance and voluntary renewable energy markets. It provides an overview of both the compliance and voluntary markets, addressing each market's history, purpose, size, scope, and benefits while addressing issues, including double counting.

  18. Industry and energy; Industrie et energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birules y Bertran, A.M. [Ministere des Sciences et de la Technologie (Spain); Folgado Blanco, J. [Secretariat d' Etat a l' Economie, a l' Energie et aux PME du Royaume d' Espagne (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    This document is the provisional version of the summary of the debates of the 2433. session of the European Union Council about various topics relative to the industry and the energy. The energy-related topics that have been debated concern: the government helps in coal industry, the internal electricity and gas market, the trans-European energy networks, the bio-fuels in transportation systems, the energy charter, the pluri-annual energy program, and the green book on the security of energy supplies. (J.S.)

  19. International industrial sector energy efficiency policies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst

    2000-01-01

    Over 40 percent of the energy consumed globally is used in the industrial sector. In China, this sector consumes an even larger proportion, reaching nearly 70 percent in 1997. A variety of energy efficiency policies and programs have been instituted in both industrialized and developing countries in an effort to improve the energy efficiency of the industrial sector. There are very few comprehensive evaluations of these industrial sector energy efficiency policies; however a number of recent workshops and conferences have included a focus on these policies. Three important meetings were the International Energy Agency's Industrial Energy Efficiency: Policies and Programs Conference in 1994, Industrial Energy Efficiency Policies: Understanding Success and Failure - A Workshop Organized by the International Network for Energy Demand Analysis in the Industrial Sector in 1998, and the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy's 1999 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry. Man y articles from these meetings are included as attachments to this memo. This paper provides a brief description of each of seven categories of individual industrial energy efficiency policies and programs, discuss which industrial sectors or types of equipment they apply to, and provide references for articles and reports that discuss each policy or program in more detail. We begin with mandatory-type policies and move to more voluntary-type policies. We then provide a brief description of four integrated industrial energy efficiency policies and provide references for articles and reports that describe these policies in greater detail.

  20. Industrial energy-efficiency-improvement program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    Progress made by industry toward attaining the voluntary 1980 energy efficiency improvement targets is reported. The mandatory reporting population has been expanded from ten original industries to include ten additional non-targeted industries and all corporations using over one trillion Btu's annually in any manufacturing industry. The ten most energy intensive industries have been involved in the reporting program since the signing of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act and as industrial energy efficiency improvement overview, based primarily on information from these industries (chemicals and allied products; primary metal industry; petroleum and coal products; stone, clay, and glass products; paper and allied products; food and kindred products; fabricated metal products; transportation equipment; machinery, except electrical; and textile mill products), is presented. Reports from industries, now required to report, are included for rubber and miscellaneous plastics; electrical and electronic equipment; lumber and wood; and tobacco products. Additional data from voluntary submissions are included for American Gas Association; American Hotel and Motel Association; General Telephone and Electronics Corporation; and American Telephone and Telegraph Company. (MCW)

  1. Market Brief: Status of the Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Market (2011 Data)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, J.; Armstrong, P.; Bird, L.

    2012-09-01

    This report documents the status and trends of U.S. 'voluntary' markets -- those in which consumers and institutions purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs on a voluntary basis. Voluntary REC markets continue to exhibit growth and spur renewable energy development. Voluntary green power markets provide an additional revenue stream for renewable energy projects and raise consumer awareness of the benefits of renewable energy. Although a full estimate of the size of the voluntary market is not available for 2011, this review uses indicative metrics to capture 2011 voluntary market trends.

  2. Market Brief. Status of the Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Market (2011 Data)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, Jenny [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Armstrong, Philip [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bird, Lori [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2012-09-01

    This report documents the status and trends of U.S. 'voluntary' markets -- those in which consumers and institutions purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs on a voluntary basis. Voluntary REC markets continue to exhibit growth and spur renewable energy development. Voluntary green power markets provide an additional revenue stream for renewable energy projects and raise consumer awareness of the benefits of renewable energy. Although a full estimate of the size of the voluntary market is not available for 2011, this review uses indicative metrics to capture 2011 voluntary market trends.

  3. Department of Energy workshops on industrial energy conservation reporting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, Douglas G.

    1979-01-01

    A voluntary industrial energy-conservation program was initiated and now includes 50 trade organizations representing over 3,000 companies. Their current reporting system is an effort to respond to the Energy Policy and Conservation Act requirements, as now modified by the National Energy Conservation Policy Act. DOE's Office of Industrial Programs held six workshops in various key locations between November 1978 and February 1979 to enable energy managers to develop ideas and make suggestions that would improve the current and future energy-reporting programs. This report is a summary of the wide range of recommendations that the workshop participants offered as a means of meeting the NECPA requirements and the criticism of the current reporting program. It also reflects industry's views on potential approaches to future reporting. (MCW)

  4. 2002 Industry Studies: Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    natural gas may be met in part by new LNG regasification facilities such as the one planned for Baja , California . Foreign countries, including Australia...renewables sector of the energy industry is defined by its major sources, including hydropower, the burning of biomass as fuel, geothermal , wind...large scale biomass systems, solving geothermal technical problems, improving the cost effectiveness and reliability of wind energy , improving the

  5. Feed Efficiency: An Assessment of Current Knowledge from a Voluntary Subsample of the Swine Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flohr, Josh R.; Tokach, Mike D.; DeRouchey, Joel M.; Goodband, Robert D.; Dritz, Steve S.; Nelssen, Jim L.; Patience, John F.

    2014-01-01

    A voluntary sample of pork producers and advisers to the swine industry were surveyed about feed efficiency. The questionnaire was designed to accomplish three objectives: (a) determine the level of knowledge related to feed efficiency topics, (b) identify production practices used that influence feed efficiency, and (c) identify information gaps…

  6. Energy Industry 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Support Center Energy supply and distribution for DOD Alexandria, VA H2Gen Hydrogen generation Frederick, MD BP Solar Photovoltaic panel manufacturing...Richard Allen, Office of Management and Budget COL Muslim Altynbayev, Kazakhstan Army Lt Col Linda Dahl, USAF Lt Col Harold Elkins, USAF COL Margie...hydro, geothermal, solar and wind. The following section on current conditions highlights the trends and challenges facing the industry. CURRENT

  7. Energy Management Programmes for Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-09-05

    The IEA Policy Pathway publications provide details on how to implement specific recommendations drawn from the IEA 25 Energy Efficiency Policy Recommendations. This Policy Pathway, jointly produced by the International Energy Agency and the Institute for Industrial Productivity, develops the critical steps for policy makers implementing energy management programmes for industry. Optimising energy use in industry is essential to improve industrial competitiveness and achieve wider societal goals such as energy security, economic recovery and development, climate change mitigation and environmental protection. While there is significant potential to decrease energy consumption in this sector, opportunities to improve energy efficiency are still under-exploited. Energy management programmes have shown to be instrumental in addressing many of the barriers that inhibit wide-scale uptake of energy management in industry. The Policy Pathway builds on lessons learned from country experiences and provides actionable guidance on how to plan and design, implement, evaluate and monitor energy management programmes for industry.

  8. German Cement Industry's voluntary efforts on the issue of climate change : a success story

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoenig, V.; Schneider, M. [German Cement Industry (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    In 1995, the cement industry in Germany stated that it would reduce energy consumption by 20 per cent between 1987 and 2005. In 2000, this commitment was adapted to international agreements such as the Kyoto Protocol. The voluntary agreement now includes a reduction of the specific energy-related carbon dioxide emissions from 1990 to 2008/12 by 28 per cent. Burning and grinding facilities have been optimized in recent years and the cement industry in Germany is planning to increase the use of fossil fuels by using waste products and by promoting the marketing of blended cements. The energy related carbon dioxide emissions were reduced by 3.6 million tonnes per year from 1987 to 1999 in the German cement industry as a result of these efforts. The use of waste products has also been increased from 4 to 23 per cent during this same time period and the clinker portion in cement has been decreased from 86 to 80.6 per cent. Granulated blast-furnace slag and unburned limestone has become the main constituent in cement. This paper also discussed the extent to which other instruments such as emissions trading, joint implementation and the clean development mechanism will have on the future of the cement industry. This paper was divided into several sections entitled: (1) voluntary agreement on climate change, (2) improvement in manufacturing processes, (3) optimization of existing kilns, (4) waste heat recovery, (5) reduction of electric power consumption, (6) remaining energy reduction potentials, (7) promotion of blended cement consumption, (8) market development, (9) use of secondary fuels, (10) greenhouse gas emissions, (11) energy related carbon dioxide emissions, (12) carbon dioxide emissions from the calcination of limestone, and (13) other greenhouse gas emissions. 3 tabs., 9 figs.

  9. Status and Trends in U.S. Compliance and Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Markets (2010 Data)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, Jenny [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bird, Lori [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2011-10-01

    The "voluntary" or "green power" market is that in which consumers and institutions voluntarily purchase renewable energy to match all or part of their electricity needs. Voluntary action provides a revenue stream for renewable energy projects and raises consumer awareness of the benefits of renewable energy. There are numerous ways consumers and institutions can purchase renewable energy. Historically, the voluntary market has consisted of three market sectors: (1) utility green pricing programs (in states with regulated electricity markets), (2) competitive suppliers (in states with restructured electricity markets), and (3) unbundled renewable electricity certificate (REC) markets, where RECs are purchased by consumers separately from electricity ("unbundled").

  10. Energy End-Use : Industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banerjee, R.; Gong, Y; Gielen, D.J.; Januzzi, G.; Marechal, F.; McKane, A.T.; Rosen, M.A.; Es, D. van; Worrell, E.

    2012-01-01

    The industrial sector accounts for about 30% of the global final energy use and accounts for about 115 EJ of final energy use in 2005. 1Cement, iron and steel, chemicals, pulp and paper and aluminum are key energy intensive materials that account for more than half the global industrial use. There i

  11. Mining Industry Energy Bandwidth Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2007-07-01

    The Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) relies on analytical studies to identify large energy reduction opportunities in energy-intensive industries and uses these results to guide its R&D portfolio. The energy bandwidth illustrates the total energy-saving opportunity that exists in the industry if the current processes are improved by implementing more energy-efficient practices and by using advanced technologies. This bandwidth analysis report was conducted to assist the ITP Mining R&D program in identifying energy-saving opportunities in coal, metals, and mineral mining. These opportunities were analyzed in key mining processes of blasting, dewatering, drilling, digging, ventilation, materials handling, crushing, grinding, and separations.

  12. Industrial energy conservation technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, P.S.; Williams, M.A. (eds.)

    1980-01-01

    A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 60 papers included in this volume, all of which will appear in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA); 21 were selected for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA). (MCW)

  13. Industrial Energy Conservation Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 55 papers presented in this volume, all of which will appear in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA); 18 were selected for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA). (MCW)

  14. Status and Trends in U.S. Compliance and Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Markets (2010 Data)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, J.; Bird, L.

    2011-10-01

    This report documents the status and trends of 'compliance'--renewable energy certificate (REC) markets used to meet state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requirements--and 'voluntary' markets--those in which consumers and institutions purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs on a voluntary basis. Today, 29 states and the District of Columbia have an RPS, more than half of all U.S. electricity customers have an option to purchase some type of green power product directly from a retail electricity provider, and all consumers have the option to purchase RECs. This report documents REC activities and trends in the United States. The compliance REC market analysis includes analysis of REC trading, regional REC markets, REC tracking systems, types of compliance RECs, compliance REC pricing trends, and an overview of compliance with RPS polices. The voluntary REC analysis presents data and analysis on voluntary market sales and customer participation, products and premiums, green pricing marketing and administrative expenses, voluntary REC pricing, and the voluntary carbon offsets market. The report concludes with a discussion of upcoming guidance from the Federal Trade Commission on green marketing claims, the emergence of community solar programs, and the potential impact of Dodd-Frank regulations on the REC market.

  15. A roadmap for navigating voluntary and mandated programs for building energy efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterman, A.; Kourula, A.; Levitt, R.

    2012-01-01

    Commercial building owners and managers often face the challenge of selecting the appropriate combination of voluntary and mandated programs for commercial building energy efficiency. Using a mixed-method, both quantitative and qualitative approach, this study finds that barriers to energy efficienc

  16. Voluntary agreements with white certificates for energy efficiency improvement as a hybrid policy instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oikonomou, V.; Patel, M. K.; van der Gaast, W.; Rietbergen, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we examine the implementation of a combined policy scheme that consists of a traditional instrument, the voluntary agreements (VAs), and an innovative one, the white certificates (WhC). The basic structure of this scheme is that energy suppliers who undertake an energy efficiency oblig

  17. A roadmap for navigating voluntary and mandated programs for building energy efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterman, A.; Kourula, A.; Levitt, R.

    2012-01-01

    Commercial building owners and managers often face the challenge of selecting the appropriate combination of voluntary and mandated programs for commercial building energy efficiency. Using a mixed-method, both quantitative and qualitative approach, this study finds that barriers to energy

  18. Economic analysis of proposed voluntary energy conservation standard for new residential buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, S.J.; Roop, J.M.; Callaway, J.W.; Taylor, Z.T.

    1989-06-01

    The objective of this document is to present an analysis of the impacts of the proposed voluntary energy conservation standard for the construction of new residential buildings. This analysis examines the impacts of having the proposed residential standard apply immediately and, alternatively, having the proposed standard phased in over a five-year period. It does not address the question of whether realistically the standard would be adopted by states, nor does it weight the improbable impact of states with higher energy efficiency standards modifying their standard to comply with this voluntary standard. 19 refs., 1 fig., 12 tabs.

  19. Quantifying the savings of an industry energy efficiency programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahill, C.J. [Sustainable Energy Research Group, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Gallachoir, B.P.O. [Environmental Research Institute, University College Cork, Lee Road, Cork (Ireland)

    2012-05-15

    In a developed economy, improving the energy performance of the industry sector can make an important contribution to achieving national energy efficiency goals. Policy measures aimed at increasing energy efficiency in industry must be proven to be effective. In Ireland one such measure is the Large Industry Energy Network (LIEN) programme. LIEN is a voluntary network of large energy users, facilitated by the national energy agency, working to maintain strong energy management practices. In this paper, we combine top-down methods for analysing national energy statistics with company-level figures supplied by LIEN participants to quantify the energy savings achieved by the companies and to determine the fraction of national savings that can be attributed to them. By comparing the collective performance of participant companies with the performance of the rest of industry we provide an indication of the effectiveness of the programme and quantify the savings that may be directly attributable to it. These figures when combined with national energy forecasts for industry help us assess the likely contribution of the programme to future national energy savings targets.

  20. Benefits of voluntary industry standards: The triumph of experience over regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Leary, J.T. [National Mining Association, Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Voluntary international standards for mining machinery may gradually replace many national regulations. The days of establishing voluntary standards nation by nation, inhibiting the important flow of international trade, could be numbered. This does not mean that nations will cease domestic regulatory activities within their boundaries, but rulemaking will pay considerable attention to voluntary international standards and will likely strive for compatibility with voluntary international standards. International standards setting bodies are developing standards for machine safety. When these standards are complete and adopted, some nations will require machinery to comport with them. International commerce in products that do not conform to these voluntary international standards may be discouraged.

  1. New approaches for improving energy efficiency in the Brazilian industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique de Mello Santana

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian government has been promoting energy efficiency measures for industry since the eighties but with very limited returns, as shown in this paper. The governments of some other countries dedicated much more effort and funds for this area and reached excellent results. The institutional arrangements and types of programmes adopted in these countries are briefly evaluated in the paper and provide valuable insights for several proposals put forward here to make more effective the Brazilian government actions directed to overcome market barriers and improve energy efficiency in the local industry. The proposed measures include the creation of Industrial Assessment Centres and an executive agency charged with the coordination of all energy efficiency programmes run by the Federal government. A large share of the Brazilian industry energy consumption comes from energy-intensive industrial branches. According to a recent survey, most of them have substantial energy conservation potentials. To materialize a fair amount of them, voluntary targets concerning energy efficiency gains should start to be negotiated between the Government and associations representing these industrial branches. Credit facilities and tax exemptions for energy-efficient equipment’s should be provided to stimulate the interest of the entrepreneurs and the setting-up of bolder targets.

  2. Efficiency of energy utilisation and voluntary feed intake in ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolkamp, B J

    2010-07-01

    Energy requirements of animals are most readily expressed in terms of net energy (NE), while the energy yield of feed is, at least initially, expressed in terms of metabolisable energy (ME). Energy evaluation systems 'translate' NE requirements into ME requirements (ME systems) or assign NE values to feeds (NE systems). Efficiency of ME utilisation is higher for maintenance than for production and the NE yield of a feed varies, therefore, with ME intake. In addition, energetic efficiency for maintenance and production is thought to be different for lactating and non-lactating animals and to be affected by diet quality. As a result, there are currently many national energy evaluation systems that are complex, differ in their approach and are, as a result, difficult to compare. As ruminants in most production systems are fed ad libitum, this is also the most appropriate intake level at which to estimate energetic efficiency. Analyses of older as well as more recent data suggest that ad libitum feeding (i) abolishes the effects of diet quality on energetic efficiency (almost) completely, (ii) abolishes the differences between lactating and non-lactating animals (almost) entirely and (iii) results in overall energetic efficiencies that are always close to 0.6. The paper argues that there is now sufficient information to develop an international energy evaluation system for ad libitum fed ruminants. Such a system should (i) unify ME and NE systems, (ii) avoid the systematic bias and large errors that can be associated with current systems (iii) be simpler than current systems and (iv) have as a starting point a constant efficiency of ME utilisation, with a value of around 0.6. The remarkably constant efficiency of ME utilisation in ad libitum fed ruminants could be the result of energetic efficiency as well as feed intake regulation being affected by the same variables or of a direct role of energetic efficiency in feed intake regulation. Models to predict intake on the

  3. Energy Management in Industrial Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Bruneo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Smart Grid vision imposes a new approach towards energy supply that is more affordable, reliable and sustainable. The core of this new vision is the use of advanced technology to monitor power system dynamics in real time and identify system in stability. In order to implement strategic vision for energy management, it is possible to identify three main areas of investigation such as smart generation, smart grid and smart customer. Focusing on the latter topic, in this paper we present an application specifically designed to monitor an industrial site with particular attention to power consumption. This solution is a real time analysis tool, able to produce useful results to have a strategic approach in the energy market and to provide statistic analysis useful for the future choices of the industrial company. The application is based on a three layers architecture. The technological layer uses a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN to acquire data from the electrical substations. The middleware layer faces the integration problems by processing the raw data. The application layer manages the data acquired from the sensors. This WSN based architecture represents an interesting example of a low cost and non-invasive monitoring application to keep the energy consumption of an industrial site under control. Some of the added value features of the proposed solution are the routing network protocol, selected in order to have an high availability of the WSN, and the use of the WhereX middleware, able to easily implement integration among the different architectural parts.

  4. California Industrial Energy Efficiency Potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coito, Fred; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Masanet, Eric; RafaelFriedmann; Rufo, Mike

    2005-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of the modeling approach andhighlights key findings of a California industrial energy efficiencypotential study. In addition to providing estimates of technical andeconomic potential, the study examines achievable program potential undervarious program-funding scenarios. The focus is on electricity andnatural gas savings for manufacturing in the service territories ofCalifornia's investor-owned utilities (IOUs). The assessment is conductedby industry type and by end use. Both crosscutting technologies andindustry-specific process measures are examined. Measure penetration intothe marketplace is modeled as a function of customer awareness, measurecost effectiveness, and perceived market barriers. Data for the studycomes from a variety of sources, including: utility billing records, theEnergy Information Association (EIA) Manufacturing Energy ConsumptionSurvey (MECS), state-sponsored avoided cost studies, energy efficiencyprogram filings, and technology savings and cost data developed throughLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The study identifies 1,706GWh and 47 Mth (million therms) per year of achievable potential over thenext twelve years under recent levels of program expenditures, accountingfor 5.2 percent of industrial electricity consumption and 1.3 percent ofindustrial natural gas consumption. These estimates grow to 2,748 GWh and192 Mth per year if all cost-effective and achievable opportunities arepursued. Key industrial electricity end uses, in terms of energy savingspotential, include compressed air and pumping systems that combine toaccount for about half of the total achievable potential estimates. Fornatural gas, savings are concentrated in the boiler and process heatingend uses, accounting for over 99 percent to total achievablepotential.

  5. California Industrial Energy Efficiency Potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coito, Fred; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Masanet, Eric; RafaelFriedmann; Rufo, Mike

    2005-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of the modeling approach andhighlights key findings of a California industrial energy efficiencypotential study. In addition to providing estimates of technical andeconomic potential, the study examines achievable program potential undervarious program-funding scenarios. The focus is on electricity andnatural gas savings for manufacturing in the service territories ofCalifornia's investor-owned utilities (IOUs). The assessment is conductedby industry type and by end use. Both crosscutting technologies andindustry-specific process measures are examined. Measure penetration intothe marketplace is modeled as a function of customer awareness, measurecost effectiveness, and perceived market barriers. Data for the studycomes from a variety of sources, including: utility billing records, theEnergy Information Association (EIA) Manufacturing Energy ConsumptionSurvey (MECS), state-sponsored avoided cost studies, energy efficiencyprogram filings, and technology savings and cost data developed throughLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The study identifies 1,706GWh and 47 Mth (million therms) per year of achievable potential over thenext twelve years under recent levels of program expenditures, accountingfor 5.2 percent of industrial electricity consumption and 1.3 percent ofindustrial natural gas consumption. These estimates grow to 2,748 GWh and192 Mth per year if all cost-effective and achievable opportunities arepursued. Key industrial electricity end uses, in terms of energy savingspotential, include compressed air and pumping systems that combine toaccount for about half of the total achievable potential estimates. Fornatural gas, savings are concentrated in the boiler and process heatingend uses, accounting for over 99 percent to total achievablepotential.

  6. Policy Pathways: Energy Management Programmes for Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-09-06

    The IEA Policy Pathway publications provide details on how to implement specific recommendations drawn from the IEA 25 Energy Efficiency Policy Recommendations. This Policy Pathway, jointly produced by the International Energy Agency and the Institute for Industrial Productivity, develops the critical steps for policy makers implementing energy management programmes for industry. Optimising energy use in industry is essential to improve industrial competitiveness and achieve wider societal goals such as energy security, economic recovery and development, climate change mitigation and environmental protection.While there is significant potential to decrease energy consumption in this sector, opportunities to improve energy efficiency are still under-exploited. Energy management programmes have shown to be instrumental in addressing many of the barriers that inhibit wide-scale uptake of energy management in industry. The Policy Pathway builds on lessons learned from country experiences and provides actionable guidance on how to plan and design, implement, evaluate and monitor energy management programmes for industry.

  7. Sector-specific issues and reporting methodologies supporting the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Volume 1: Part 1, Electricity supply sector; Part 2, Residential and commercial buildings sector; Part 3, Industrial sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    DOE encourages you to report your achievements in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and sequestering carbon under this program. Global climate change is increasingly being recognized as a threat that individuals and organizations can take action against. If you are among those taking action, reporting your projects may lead to recognition for you, motivation for others, and synergistic learning for the global community. This report discusses the reporting process for the voluntary detailed guidance in the sectoral supporting documents for electricity supply, residential and commercial buildings, industry, transportation, forestry, and agriculture. You may have reportable projects in several sectors; you may report them separately or capture and report the total effects on an entity-wide report.

  8. Energy conservation in mechanical industry; Maitrise de l`energie dans les industries mecaniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The workshop is composed of 12 communications on the theme of energy consumption, conservation and management in industry, and more especially in metal industry: evaluation of the energy savings potential in the French industry; official energy diagnosis procedure in buildings; the French national gas utility policy for energy conservation and economical performance in industry; energy conservation with speed variators for electric motors; energy audits and energy metering for conservation objectives. Examples of energy efficient systems or energy audits in various industrial sectors (compressed air, industrial buildings, heat treatments, curing...) are also presented. The electric power quality EDF`s contract is also discussed

  9. Industrial energy efficiency policy in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Sinton, Jonathan; Yun, Jiang

    2001-05-01

    Chinese industrial sector energy-efficiency policy has gone through a number of distinct phases since the founding of the People s Republic in 1949. An initial period of energy supply growth in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s was followed by implementation of significant energy efficiency programs in the 1980s. Many of these programs were dismantled in the 1990s during the continuing move towards a market-based economy. In an effort to once again strengthen energy efficiency, the Chinese government passes the Energy Conservation Law in 1997 which provides broad guidance for the establishment of energy efficiency policies. Article 20 of the Energy Conservation Law requires substantial improvement in industrial energy efficiency in the key energy-consuming industrial facilities in China. This portion of the Law declares that ''the State will enhance energy conservation management in key energy consuming entities.'' In 1999, the industrial sector consumed nearly 30 EJ, or 76 percent of China's primary energy. Even though primary energy consumption has dropped dramatically in recent years, due mostly to a decline in coal consumption, the Chinese government is still actively developing an overall policy for energy efficiency in the industrial sector modeled after policies in a number of industrialized countries. This paper will describe recent Chinese government activities to develop industrial sector energy-efficiency targets as a ''market-based'' mechanism for improving the energy efficiency of key industrial facilities.

  10. Energy Industry. Industry Study, Spring 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    and E. Kyle Datta, “Winning the Oil Endgame”, Rocky Mountain Institute, 2005 4 Energy Information Administration (EIA), “ Crude Oil Production ,” Data...Analysis of Crude Oil Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, available at www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/servicefpt/anwr/introduction.html 11 CIA

  11. Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worrell, Ernst; Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Harnisch, Jochen

    2009-02-02

    Industry contributes directly and indirectly (through consumed electricity) about 37% of the global greenhouse gas emissions, of which over 80% is from energy use. Total energy-related emissions, which were 9.9 GtCO2 in 2004, have grown by 65% since 1971. Even so, industry has almost continuously improved its energy efficiency over the past decades. In the near future, energy efficiency is potentially the most important and cost-effective means for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions from industry. This paper discusses the potential contribution of industrial energy efficiency technologies and policies to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions to 2030.

  12. Energy efficiency regulation for industrial products and manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badea George-Vlad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the energy efficiency of industrial products or manufacturing as compared to the framework legislative measures implemented by EU through the Eco-design and Energy Labeling Directives. The Eco-design implementing measures such as taking into account all phases of the life cycle (manufacturing, transport, use, disposal, as well as the essential environmental aspects (consumption, materials, emissions, waste, etc. for each phase, are considered. The implementing measures should have no significant negative impact on the functionality, health and safety, affordability and industry's competitiveness, as well as they should not impose proprietary technology on manufacturers and not be an excessive administrative burden for them. In this paper a method for implementing Legislative measures concerning the Eco-design and Energy labeling of industrial product is proposed. It grounds on the analysis of particular interest versus general interest relation, for each product case. Method application consists in products classifying relative to the two types of interest, followed by a voluntary agreement between manufacturers operating on market and EU. Finally, the paper presents the limits and possibilities for Eco-design of industrial products and manufacturing industry.

  13. Supporting industries energy and environmental profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2005-09-21

    As part of its Industries of the Future strategy, the Industrial Technologies Program within the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy works with energy-intensive industries to improve efficiency, reduce waste, and increase productivity. These seven Industries of the Future (IOFs) – aluminum, chemicals, forest products, glass, metal casting, mining, and steel – rely on several other so-called “supporting industries” to supply materials and processes necessary to the products that the IOFs create. The supporting industries, in many cases, also provide great opportunities for realizing energy efficiency gains in IOF processes.

  14. Restructuring the energy industry: A financial perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrams, W.A.

    1995-12-31

    This paper present eight tables summarizing financial aspects of energy industry restructuring. Historical, current, and future business characteristics of energy industries are outlined. Projections of industry characteristics are listed for the next five years and for the 21st century. Future independent power procedures related to financial aspects are also outlined. 8 tabs.

  15. Effect of red bull energy drink on auditory reaction time and maximal voluntary contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Vartika; Manjunatha, S; Pai, Kirtana M

    2014-01-01

    The use of "Energy Drinks" (ED) is increasing in India. Students specially use these drinks to rejuvenate after strenuous exercises or as a stimulant during exam times. The most common ingredient in EDs is caffeine and a popular ED available and commonly used is Red Bull, containing 80 mg of caffeine in 250 ml bottle. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Red Bull energy drink on Auditory reaction time and Maximal voluntary contraction. A homogeneous group containing twenty medical students (10 males, 10 females) participated in a crossover study in which they were randomized to supplement with Red Bull (2 mg/kg body weight of caffeine) or isoenergetic isovolumetric noncaffeinated control drink (a combination of Appy Fizz, Cranberry juice and soda) separated by 7 days. Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) was recorded as the highest of the 3 values of maximal isometric force generated from the dominant hand using hand grip dynamometer (Biopac systems). Auditory reaction time (ART) was the average of 10 values of the time interval between the click sound and response by pressing the push button using hand held switch (Biopac systems). The energy and control drinks after one hour of consumption significantly reduced the Auditory reaction time in males (ED 232 ± 59 Vs 204 ± 34 s and Control 223 ± 57 Vs 210 ± 51 s; p caffeine in the beneficial effect seen after the drinks.

  16. Voluntary running in deer mice: speed, distance, energy costs and temperature effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Mark A; Garland, Theodore; Rezende, Enrico L; Gomes, Fernando R

    2004-10-01

    The energetics of terrestrial locomotion are of considerable interest to ecologists and physiologists, but nearly all of our current knowledge comes from animals undergoing forced exercise. To explore patterns of energy use and behavior during voluntary exercise, we developed methods allowing nearly continuous measurements of metabolic rates in freely behaving small mammals, with high temporal resolution over periods of several days. We used this approach to examine relationships between ambient temperature (Ta), locomotor behavior and energy costs in the deer mouse, a small mammal that routinely encounters a large range of temperatures in its natural habitat. We tested for individual consistency in running behavior and metabolic traits, and determined how locomotor costs vary with speed and Ta. Because of the importance of thermoregulatory costs in small mammals, we checked for substitution of exercise heat for thermostatic heat production at Ta below the thermal neutral zone and determined the fraction of the daily energy budget comprising exercise costs. Locomotor behavior was highly variable among individuals but had high repeatability, at least over short intervals. We found few temperature-related changes in speed or distance run, but Ta strongly affected energy costs. Partial substitution of exercise heat for thermogenic heat occurred at low Ta. This reduced energy expenditure during low-temperature running by 23-37%, but running costs comprised a fairly minor fraction of the energy budget, so the daily energy savings via substitution were much smaller. Deer mice did not adjust running speed to maximize metabolic economy, as they seldom used the high speeds that provide the lowest cost of transport. The highest voluntary speeds (4-5 km h(-1)) were almost always below the predicted maximal aerobic speed, and were much less than the species' maximal sprint speed. Maximum voluntarily attained rates of oxygen consumption (VO2) were highest at low Ta, but rarely

  17. 2003 status report savings estimates for the energy star(R)voluntary labeling program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; McWhinney, Marla

    2004-11-09

    ENERGY STAR(R) is a voluntary labeling program designed to identify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices. Operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), ENERGY STAR labels exist for more than thirty products, spanning office equipment, residential heating and cooling equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics, and major appliances. This report presents savings estimates for a subset of ENERGY STAR program activities, focused primarily on labeled products. We present estimates of the energy, dollar and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2002, what we expect in 2003, and provide savings forecasts for two market penetration scenarios for the period 2003 to 2020. The target market penetration forecast represents our best estimate of future ENERGY STAR savings. It is based on realistic market penetration goals for each of the products. We also provide a forecast under the assumption of 100 percent market penetration; that is, we assume that all purchasers buy ENERGY STAR-compliant products instead of standard efficiency products throughout the analysis period.

  18. Savings estimates for the ENERGY STAR (registered trademark) voluntary labeling program: 2001 status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Mahajan, Akshay; Koomey, Jonathan G.

    2002-02-15

    ENERGY STAR(Registered Trademark) is a voluntary labeling program designed to identify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices. Operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), ENERGY STAR labels exist for more than thirty products, spanning office equipment, residential heating and cooling equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics, and major appliances. This report presents savings estimates for a subset of ENERGY STAR program activities, focused primarily on labeled products. We present estimates of the energy, dollar and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2000, what we expect in 2001, and provide savings forecasts for two market penetration scenarios for the period 2001 to 2020. The target market penetration forecast represents our best estimate of future ENERGY STAR savings. It is based on realistic market penetration goals for each of the products. We also provide a forecast under the assumption of 100 percent market penetration; that is, we assume that all purchasers buy ENERGY STAR-compliant products instead of standard efficiency products throughout the analysis period.

  19. 2002 status report: Savings estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R) voluntary labeling program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; McWhinney, Marla; Koomey, Jonathan

    2003-03-03

    ENERGY STAR [registered trademark] is a voluntary labeling program designed to identify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices. Operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), ENERGY STAR labels exist for more than thirty products, spanning office equipment, residential heating and cooling equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics, and major appliances. This report presents savings estimates for a subset of ENERGY STAR program activities, focused primarily on labeled products. We present estimates of the energy, dollar and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2001, what we expect in 2002, and provide savings forecasts for two market penetration scenarios for the period 2002 to 2020. The target market penetration forecast represents our best estimate of future ENERGY STAR savings. It is based on realistic market penetration goals for each of the products. We also provide a forecast under the assumption of 100 percent market penetration; that is, we assume that all purchasers buy ENERGY STAR-compliant products instead of standard efficiency products throughout the analysis period.

  20. 2005 Status Report Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R)Voluntary Labeling Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Sanchez, Marla

    2006-03-07

    ENERGY STAR(R) is a voluntary labeling program designed toidentify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices.Operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and theU.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Star labels exist for more thanforty products, spanning office equipment, residential heating andcooling equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics,and major appliances. This report presents savings estimates for a subsetof ENERGY STAR labeled products. We present estimates of the energy,dollar and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2004, whatwe expect in 2005, and provide savings forecasts for two marketpenetration scenarios for the periods 2005 to 2010 and 2005 to 2020. Thetarget market penetration forecast represents our best estimate of futureENERGY STAR savings. It is based on realistic market penetration goalsfor each of the products. We also provide a forecast under the assumptionof 100 percent market penetration; that is, we assume that all purchasersbuy ENERGY STAR-compliant products instead of standard efficiencyproducts throughout the analysis period.

  1. 2006 Status Report Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R)Voluntary Labeling Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Sanchez, Marla; Homan,Gregory K.

    2006-03-07

    ENERGY STAR(R) is a voluntary labeling program designed toidentify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices.Operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and theU.S. Department of Energy (DOE), ENERGY STAR labels exist for more thanthirty products, spanning office equipment, residential heating andcooling equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics,and major appliances. This report presents savings estimates for a subsetof ENERGY STAR labeled products. We present estimates of the energy,dollar and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2005, whatwe expect in 2006, and provide savings forecasts for two marketpenetration scenarios for the periods 2006 to 2015 and 2006 to 2025. Thetarget market penetration forecast represents our best estimate of futureENERGY STAR savings. It is based on realistic market penetration goalsfor each of the products. We also provide a forecast under the assumptionof 100 percent market penetration; that is, we assume that all purchasersbuy ENERGY STAR-compliant products instead of standard efficiencyproducts throughout the analysis period.

  2. 2007 Status Report: Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R)VoluntaryLabeling Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Marla; Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Homan,Gregory K.

    2007-03-23

    ENERGY STAR(R) is a voluntary labeling program designed toidentify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices.Operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and theU.S. Department of Energy (DOE), ENERGY STAR labels exist for more thanthirty products, spanning office equipment, residential heating andcooling equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics,and major appliances. This report presents savings estimates for a subsetof ENERGY STAR labeled products. We present estimates of the energy,dollar and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2006, whatwe expect in 2007, and provide savings forecasts for two marketpenetration scenarios for the periods 2007 to 2015 and 2007 to 2025. Thetarget market penetration forecast represents our best estimate of futureENERGY STAR savings. It is based on realistic market penetration goalsfor each of the products. We also provide a forecast under the assumptionof 100 percent market penetration; that is, we assume that all purchasersbuy ENERGY STAR-compliant products instead of standard efficiencyproducts throughout the analysis period.

  3. Current and future industrial energy service characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krawiec, F.; Thomas, T.; Jackson, F.; Limaye, D.R.; Isser, S.; Karnofsky, K.; Davis, T.D.

    1980-10-01

    Current and future energy demands, end uses, and cost used to characterize typical applications and resultant services in the industrial sector of the United States and 15 selected states are examined. A review and evaluation of existing industrial energy data bases was undertaken to assess their potential for supporting SERI research on: (1) market suitability analysis, (2) market development, (3) end-use matching, (3) industrial applications case studies, and (4) identification of cost and performance goals for solar systems and typical information requirements for industrial energy end use. In reviewing existing industrial energy data bases, the level of detail, disaggregation, and primary sources of information were examined. The focus was on fuels and electric energy used for heat and power purchased by the manufacturing subsector and listed by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC, primary fuel, and end use. Projections of state level energy prices to 1990 are developed using the energy intensity approach. The effects of federal and state industrial energy conservation programs on future industrial sector demands were assessed. Future end-use energy requirements were developed for each 4-digit SIC industry and were grouped as follows: (1) hot water, (2) steam (212 to 300/sup 0/F, each 100/sup 0/F interval from 300 to 1000/sup 0/F, and greater than 1000/sup 0/F), and (3) hot air (100/sup 0/F intervals). Volume I details the activities performed in this effort.

  4. Biomass energy conversion workshop for industrial executives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-01-01

    The rising costs of energy and the risks of uncertain energy supplies are increasingly familiar problems in industry. Bottom line profits and even the simple ability to operate can be affected by spiralling energy costs. An often overlooked alternative is the potential to turn industrial waste or residue into an energy source. On April 9 and 10, 1979, in Claremont, California, the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), the California Energy Commission (CEC), and the Western Solar Utilization Network (WSUN) held a workshop which provided industrial managers with current information on using residues and wastes as industrial energy sources. Successful industrial experiences were described by managers from the food processing and forest product industries, and direct combustion and low-Btu gasification equipment was described in detail. These speakers' presentations are contained in this document. Some major conclusions of the conference were: numerous current industrial applications of wastes and residues as fuels are economic and reliable; off-the-shelf technologies exist for converting biomass wastes and residues to energy; a variety of financial (tax credits) and institutional (PUC rate structures) incentives can help make these waste-to-energy projects more attractive to industry. However, many of these incentives are still being developed and their precise impact must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

  5. Energy and the English Industrial Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrigley, E A

    2013-03-13

    Societies before the Industrial Revolution were dependent on the annual cycle of plant photosynthesis for both heat and mechanical energy. The quantity of energy available each year was therefore limited, and economic growth was necessarily constrained. In the Industrial Revolution, energy usage increased massively and output rose accordingly. The energy source continued to be plant photosynthesis, but accumulated over a geological age in the form of coal. This poses a problem for the future. Fossil fuels are a depleting stock, whereas in pre-industrial time the energy source, though limited, was renewed each year.

  6. Implications of carbon cap-and-trade for US voluntary renewable energy markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, Lori A. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Holt, Edward [Ed Holt and Associates, Inc., 28 Headland Road, Harpswell, ME 04079-2923 (United States); Levenstein Carroll, Ghita [University of Colorado at Boulder, 3315 Folsom Street, Boulder, CO 80304 (United States)

    2008-06-15

    Many consumers today are purchasing renewable energy in large part for the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions benefits that they provide. Emerging carbon regulation in the US has the potential to affect existing markets for renewable energy. Carbon cap-and-trade programs are now under development in the Northeast under the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) and in early stages of development in the West and Midwest. There is increasing discussion about carbon regulation at the national level as well. While renewable energy will likely benefit from carbon cap-and-trade programs because compliance with the cap will increase the costs of fossil fuel generation, cap-and-trade programs can also impact the ability of renewable energy generation to affect overall CO{sub 2} emissions levels and obtain value for those emissions benefits. This paper summarizes key issues for renewable energy markets that are emerging with carbon regulation, such as the implications for emissions benefits claims and voluntary market demand and the use of renewable energy certificates (RECs) in multiple markets. It also explores policy options under consideration for designing carbon policies to enable carbon markets and renewable energy markets to work together. (author)

  7. Environmental Stewardship: How Semiconductor Suppliers Help toMeet Energy-Efficiency Regulations and Voluntary Specifications inChina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aizhen, Li; Fanara, Andrew; Fridley, David; Merriman, Louise; Ju,Jeff

    2007-01-15

    Recognizing the role that semiconductor suppliers can playin meeting energy-efficiency regulations and voluntary specifications,this paper provides an overview of Chinese policies and implementingbodies; a discussion of current programs, their goals, and effectiveness;and possible steps that can be taken tomeet these energy-efficiencyrequirements while also meeting products' high performance and costgoals.

  8. Modelling energy demand of Croatian industry sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medić, Zlatko Bačelić; Pukšec, Tomislav; Mathiesen, Brian Vad

    2014-01-01

    Industry represents one of the most interesting sectors when analysing Croatian final energy demand. Croatian industry represents 20% of nation's GDP and employs 25% of total labour force making it a significant subject for the economy. Today, with around 60 PJ of final energy demand...

  9. Energy Industry in China: Marketization and National Energy Security

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DanShi

    2005-01-01

    Opening up the market, breaking the monopoly, and allowing the market to decide prices these are the major items on the agenda for the marketization of China's energy industry, and have a direct bearing on national energy security. Research into China's energy security has so far focused on such fields as strategic energy reserves, stability of energy imports, and diversification of import channels. Little has been done in the study of national energy security from the perspective of marketization of the energy industry. However, opening up the energy market and marketizing the energy industry are not only major commitments to China's accession to WTO, they serve the nation's energy security needs as well. This paper takes a look at the actual results of opening up the energy market, the structure of that market, and the nation's energy pricing mechanisms, and on the basis of the findings, raises suggestions on how to tackle the energy security issue.

  10. Transforming and Building the Future Energy Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Vernon

    1998-12-31

    The petroleum industry is experiencing unprecedented change: increasing competition within a global context, deregulation in the European gas market, technological innovation that will fundamentally alter the economics of the industry. Sustainable Development, the challenge of balancing the Financial, Social and Environmental demands: collectively these demands are fundamentally altering the future shape of the industry. In this presentation the author describes his perspectives on the impact of change on the future shape of the energy industry in the years to come

  11. Energy Industry Expo opens in NW China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    The Fourth China (Taiyuan) International Energy Industry Expo was recently held in Taiyuan, capital of coal-rich Shanxi Province, to discuss the latest trends in China's energy industries. Some 30,000 people, including representatives from 137 companies fi'om 18 countries and regions, attended the Expo, which featured demonstrations of industry breakthroughs in the fields of coal and coalbed gas, water, electricity, natural gas and new energies. Running under a theme of "green energy and transformation", the three-day event also allowed Shanxi,

  12. Industrial energy systems and assessment opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barringer, Frank Leonard, III

    Industrial energy assessments are performed primarily to increase energy system efficiency and reduce energy costs in industrial facilities. The most common energy systems are lighting, compressed air, steam, process heating, HVAC, pumping, and fan systems, and these systems are described in this document. ASME has produced energy assessment standards for four energy systems, and these systems include compressed air, steam, process heating, and pumping systems. ASHRAE has produced an energy assessment standard for HVAC systems. Software tools for energy systems were developed for the DOE, and there are software tools for almost all of the most common energy systems. The software tools are AIRMaster+ and LogTool for compressed air systems, SSAT and 3E Plus for steam systems, PHAST and 3E Plus for process heating systems, eQUEST for HVAC systems, PSAT for pumping systems, and FSAT for fan systems. The recommended assessment procedures described in this thesis are used to set up an energy assessment for an industrial facility, collect energy system data, and analyze the energy system data. The assessment recommendations (ARs) are opportunities to increase efficiency and reduce energy consumption for energy systems. A set of recommended assessment procedures and recommended assessment opportunities are presented for each of the most common energy systems. There are many assessment opportunities for industrial facilities, and this thesis describes forty-three ARs for the seven different energy systems. There are seven ARs for lighting systems, ten ARs for compressed air systems, eight ARs for boiler and steam systems, four ARs for process heating systems, six ARs for HVAC systems, and four ARs for both pumping and fan systems. Based on a history of past assessments, average potential energy savings and typical implementation costs are shared in this thesis for most ARs. Implementing these ARs will increase efficiency and reduce energy consumption for energy systems in

  13. Effect of energy concentration of milk on voluntary intake of lean and obese piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangsness, P J; Soroka, G H

    1978-04-01

    Voluntary intake responses of neonatal lean and obese pigs, fed high and low energy diets, were measured. Piglets were maintained in individual cages from 4 to 22 days of age. The 18-day trial was divided into six 3-day ad libitum feeding periods. All piglets received a purified high energy diet (1.12 kcal/ml) in periods 1, 3, 5, and low energy diet (0.57 kcal/ml) in periods 2, 4, and 6. Average daily volume intakes for periods 1 to 6 were 36.8, 55.2, 41.4, 56.2, 38.4, and 47.8 ml/100 g body weight (BW), respectively. Average daily energy intakes were 40.5, 28.7, 45.5, 29.2, 42.2, and 24.9 kcal/100 g BW. Even though piglets consumed greater volumes of low energy diet, energy intake was not maintained during periods 2, 4, and 6. It is possible that gastrointestinal capacity limited intake before energy demand was met. Compared to lean piglets, obese piglets were hyperphagic and consumed more volume (52.0 versus 39.8 ml/100 g BW/day) and more energy (40.0 versus 30.4 kcal/100 g BW/day). It is conclused that neonatal lean and obese piglets possess a sensitive mechanism (s) to control food intake in response to changes in energy content of the diet. The control mechanism in the obese piglets appears to function at a higher level of energy demand than in the lean piglets.

  14. Industrial energy management; Betriebliches Energiemanagement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goebel, D.

    2007-07-01

    Effective and successful energy and facility management uses a holistic view in which the life cycles of plants and buildings are considered, plus efficient controlling and reporting. The challenge is not in short-term cost reduction but in ensuring long-term effects. This requires management strategies which make use of synergy effects by means of interdisciplinary measures. Main topics: management of energy utilization, energy conversion and energy supply. (GL)

  15. The Strategy of Voluntary Certification in Italian Olive Oil Industry: Who and Why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riganelli, Chiara; Marchini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of asymmetric information is central in the agri-food sector, in which often there is not full information transparency about product quality. This condition is particularly complex considering the high-end products. In particular, there are specific attributes (credence attributes) that are not assessable by consumers. For these reasons, a clear information about certification can give to consumers the possibility to make a rational choice. A company can choose voluntarily to participate in certification programs that can be viewed also as a simplification of some organization issues. Often the incentives to participate in voluntary programs arise from the need to have a positive economic performance of the firm. On the one hand, the firm may have benefits from the technical assistance of the certification, which allows it to reduce costs of controlling particular sensible steps of the process. On the other hand, the firm may provide a new certification label, in order to ensure a greater transparency of its processes. The research aims to understand the characteristics of firms oriented to use voluntary certifications as a tool to reduce information asymmetries between producers and final consumers. In particular, we want to consider two contexts of analysis: a structural one, considering some specific internal aspects and investment choices of the firms (typology, size, extraction system, storage system, material investments, immaterial investments); a second one that takes into account some decisions related to market relationships (sale to consumers, sale to HoReCa, sale to wholesalers, sale to purchasing groups, sale to GDO, export activity). The study concerns small and medium olive oil company of Southern Italy. We apply two logit models in order to show the determinants in the choice to introduce a voluntary certification. The results show significant values in both the two dimensions considered. Among the first one, there are significances

  16. Fact sheets energy efficiency. Meat processing industry; Factsheets energie-efficiency. Vleesverwerkende industrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    To support the activities of the Dutch industry, carried out within the framework of the long-range agreements between the Dutch government and the industry to improve the energy efficiency by 20% in the year 2000, energy efficiency fact sheets have been drafted. Based on the information in the fact sheets specific industries can gain insight into and learn about energy saving options. The information in the fact sheets concerns data about a specific industrial sector, schematic presentation of processes and energy carriers, and technical and economical aspects of energy saving options and how they can be realized. This fact sheet concerns the meat processing industry. 28 refs.

  17. Energy management in the paper industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriott, A.

    1987-12-01

    Energy is a vitally important resource in the paper and board industry. Good energy management can have a dramatic positive effect on profits. This article focusses on the better management of existing resources in terms both of energy price and efficiency of use. The need is stressed for measurement of performance in these respects both in absolute terms and relative to that of others.

  18. Energy efficient industrialized housing research program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, R.; Brown, G.Z.; Finrow, J.; Kellett, R.; Mc Donald, M.; McGinn, B.; Ryan, P.; Sekiguchi, T. (Oregon Univ., Eugene, OR (USA). Center for Housing Innovation); Chandra, S.; Elshennawy, A.K.; Fairey, P.; Harrison, J.; Maxwell, L.; Roland, J.; Swart, W. (Florida Solar Energy Center, Cape Canaveral, FL (USA))

    1989-01-01

    This is the second volume of a two volume report on energy efficient industrialized housing. Volume II contains support documentation for Volume I. The following items are included: individual trip reports; software bibliography; industry contacts in the US, Denmark, and Japan; Cost comparison of industrialized housing in the US and Denmark; draft of the final report on the systems analysis for Fleetwood Mobile Home Manufacturers. (SM)

  19. Plant Profiles - Industrial Energy Management in Action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2001-02-01

    This 24-page brochure profiles industrial manufacturing firms who are achieving significant energy savings in their plants. The DOE Office of Industrial Technologies six plant-of-the-year nominees are featured, and an additional 10 projects from other companies are also highlighted. Information on OIT's awards and recognition process, and information on OIT and BestPractices is also included.

  20. Invigoration of China's Energy Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ The breath and depth of the impact of the ongoing global financial crisis far exceeds initial expectations.And for China's energy sectors,it brought challenges as well as opportunities for restructuring.However,it needs visions and careful plans to take the opportunities.

  1. Energy Industry Powers CTE Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Michael Fields is a recent graduate of Buckeye Union High School in Buckeye, Arizona. Fields is enrolled in the Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) Get Into Energy program, which means he is well on his way to a promising career. Specializing in power plant technology, in two years he will earn a certificate that will all but guarantee a…

  2. Energy Industry Powers CTE Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Michael Fields is a recent graduate of Buckeye Union High School in Buckeye, Arizona. Fields is enrolled in the Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) Get Into Energy program, which means he is well on his way to a promising career. Specializing in power plant technology, in two years he will earn a certificate that will all but guarantee a…

  3. Energy efficient industrialized housing research program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, R.; Brown, G.Z.; Finrow, J.; Kellett, R.; McDonald, M.; McGinn, B.; Ryan, P.; Sekiguchi, Tomoko (Oregon Univ., Eugene, OR (USA). Center for Housing Innovation); Chandra, S.; Elshennawy, A.K.; Fairey, P.; Harrison, J.; Maxwell, L.; Roland, J.; Swart, W. (Florida Solar Energy Center, Cape Canaveral, FL (USA))

    1990-02-01

    This report summarizes three documents: Multiyear Research Plan, Volume I FY 1989 Task Reports, and Volume II Appendices. These documents describe tasks that were undertaken from November 1988 to December 1989, the first year of the project. Those tasks were: (1) the formation of a steering committee, (2) the development of a multiyear research plan, (3) analysis of the US industrialized housing industry, (4) assessment of foreign technology, (5) assessment of industrial applications, (6) analysis of computerized design and evaluation tools, and (7) assessment of energy performance of baseline and advanced industrialized housing concepts. While this document summarizes information developed in each task area, it doesn't review task by task, as Volume I FY 1989 Task Reports does, but rather treats the subject of energy efficient industrialized housing as a whole to give the reader a more coherent view. 7 figs., 9 refs.

  4. Energy efficient industrialized housing research program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, R.; Brown, G.Z.; Finrow, J.; Kellett, R.; McDonald, M.; McGinn, B.; Ryan, P.; Sekiguchi, Tomoko (Oregon Univ., Eugene, OR (USA). Center for Housing Innovation); Chandra, S.; Elshennawy, A.K.; Fairey, P.; Harrison, J.; Mazwell, L.; Roland, J.; Swart, W. (Florida Solar Energy Center, Cape Canaveral, FL (USA))

    1989-12-01

    This document describes the research work completed in five areas in fiscal year 1989. (1) The analysis of the US industrialized housing industry includes statistics, definitions, a case study, and a code analysis. (2) The assessment of foreign technology reviews the current status of design, manufacturing, marketing, and installation of industrialized housing primarily in Sweden and Japan. (3) Assessment of industrialization applications reviews housing production by climate zone, has a cost and energy comparison of Swedish and US housing, and discusses future manufacturing processes and emerging components. (4) The state of computer use in the industry is described and a prototype design tool is discussed. (5) Side by side testing of industrialized housing systems is discussed.

  5. Energy resource management for energy-intensive manufacturing industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner, C.W.; Levangie, J.

    1981-10-01

    A program to introduce energy resource management into an energy-intensive manufacturing industry is presented. The food industry (SIC No. 20) was chosen and 20 companies were selected for interviews, but thirteen were actually visited. The methodology for this program is detailed. Reasons for choosing the food industry are described. The substance of the information gained and the principal conclusions drawn from the interviews are given. Results of the model Energy Resource Management Plan applied to three companies are compiled at length. Strategies for dissemination of the information gained are described. (MCW)

  6. Canadian Industry Program for Energy Conservation: 1997/1998 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    This report reviews the achievements of the Canadian Industry Program for Energy Conservation (CIPEC) during the fiscal year 1997/1998. Notable initiatives include: regular sector task force meetings in which energy-efficiency-related information is exchanged; energy forums to share ideas and information; support for energy management seminars sponsored by NRCan`s Office of Energy Efficiency; the development of individual sector leadership nuclei capable of expanding CIPEC participation within the sector; the creation of communication programs to bolster public and industry awareness; participation in energy efficiency benchmarking and other activities initiated by the Office of Energy Efficiency. CIPEC also cooperates with the Canadian Industry Energy End-Use Database and Analysis Centre (CIEEDAC) at Simon Fraser University in BC, working together to improve the quality of the data used in measuring energy intensity performance. Similarly, CIPEC focuses on transforming the sector-level commitments made by the Task Forces into company-level action by helping to overcome obstacles to energy efficiency. As of the end of 1998, some 250 companies representing 75 per cent of industrial energy use have been participants in the Climate Change Voluntary Challenge and Registry. Voluntary actions of CIPEC sectors are focused on energy intensity improvements, thereby controlling and reducing carbon dioxide emissions. The report contains the reports of the various industry sectors, and highlights the efforts of 12 the many CIPEC participants who are making innovative changes to improve the effectiveness of energy use within their organizations. The sector reports contain a record of the challenges, a summary of the actions taken, achievements and objectives and targets. A list of the member companies in each sector is also included.

  7. Solar energy for industrial process heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, R. H.; Pivirotto, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    Findings of study of potential use for solar energy utilization by California dairy industry, prove that applicable solar energy system furnish much of heat needed for milk processing with large savings in expenditures for oil and gas and ensurance of adequate readily available sources of process heat.

  8. Energy cost reduction in the baking industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Information is presented on methods for saving fuel and electric power in the baking industry; the cost of specific retrofits to bakery equipment and of modifications to processes; ways to reduce transportation costs and energy; and reducing energy demand for lighting, cooling, and heating bakeries. (LCL)

  9. Industrial utilization of geopressured geothermal energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Underhill, Gary K; Carlson, Ronald A.; Clendinning, William A.; Erdos, Jozsef; Gault, John; Hall, James W.; Jones, Robert L.; Michael, Herbert K.; Powell, Paul H.; Riemann, Carl F.; Rios-Castellon, Lorenzo; Shepherd, Burchard P.; Wilson, John S.

    1976-01-01

    Discussion of the industrial utilization of geopressured geothermal energy is currently limited by the limited knowledge of the resource's distribution. However, the resource assessment activity in the Bureau of Economic Geology, The University of Texas at Austin, has identified a number of fairway or potential resource zones. These zones are located in Kenedy County; in and about Corpus Christi and Nueces Bays in Nueces, San Patricio, and Aransas Counties; in the coastal zones of Matagorda County; and in a crescent-shaped zone parallel to the coastline in Brazoria and Galveston Counties. The Kenedy and Matagorda County zones are situated in rural areas with little or no industrial activity. The Corpus Christi and Brazoria-Galveston zones are in and adjacent to highly industrialized and urbanized districts. The rural zones will require the establishment of new industries for geothermal fluid utilization while the industrial-urban zones will require either new industry, expansion to existing industry, or modification to existing plant and process. Proposed industries for geothermal fluid utilization can be considered with respect to fitting the industry to the available fluids; this has been the usual approach. An alternate approach is to fit the abailable fluids to the proposed industry. In order to follow the alternate approach requires consideration of ways to upgrade the quality of existing geothermal fluids or geothermal-derived or -energized fluids.

  10. The biological control of voluntary exercise, spontaneous physical activity and daily energy expenditure in relation to obesity: human and rodent perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Theodore; Schutz, Heidi; Chappell, Mark A.; Keeney, Brooke K.; Meek, Thomas H.; Copes, Lynn E.; Acosta, Wendy; Drenowatz, Clemens; Maciel, Robert C.; van Dijk, Gertjan; Kotz, Catherine M.; Eisenmann, Joey C.

    2011-01-01

    Mammals expend energy in many ways, including basic cellular maintenance and repair, digestion, thermoregulation, locomotion, growth and reproduction. These processes can vary tremendously among species and individuals, potentially leading to large variation in daily energy expenditure (DEE). Locomotor energy costs can be substantial for large-bodied species and those with high-activity lifestyles. For humans in industrialized societies, locomotion necessary for daily activities is often relatively low, so it has been presumed that activity energy expenditure and DEE are lower than in our ancestors. Whether this is true and has contributed to a rise in obesity is controversial. In humans, much attention has centered on spontaneous physical activity (SPA) or non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT), the latter sometimes defined so broadly as to include all energy expended due to activity, exclusive of volitional exercise. Given that most people in Western societies engage in little voluntary exercise, increasing NEAT may be an effective way to maintain DEE and combat overweight and obesity. One way to promote NEAT is to decrease the amount of time spent on sedentary behaviours (e.g. watching television). The effects of voluntary exercise on other components of physical activity are highly variable in humans, partly as a function of age, and have rarely been studied in rodents. However, most rodent studies indicate that food consumption increases in the presence of wheels; therefore, other aspects of physical activity are not reduced enough to compensate for the energetic cost of wheel running. Most rodent studies also show negative effects of wheel access on body fat, especially in males. Sedentary behaviours per se have not been studied in rodents in relation to obesity. Several lines of evidence demonstrate the important role of dopamine, in addition to other neural signaling networks (e.g. the endocannabinoid system), in the control of voluntary exercise. A

  11. The biological control of voluntary exercise, spontaneous physical activity and daily energy expenditure in relation to obesity: human and rodent perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Theodore; Schutz, Heidi; Chappell, Mark A; Keeney, Brooke K; Meek, Thomas H; Copes, Lynn E; Acosta, Wendy; Drenowatz, Clemens; Maciel, Robert C; van Dijk, Gertjan; Kotz, Catherine M; Eisenmann, Joey C

    2011-01-15

    Mammals expend energy in many ways, including basic cellular maintenance and repair, digestion, thermoregulation, locomotion, growth and reproduction. These processes can vary tremendously among species and individuals, potentially leading to large variation in daily energy expenditure (DEE). Locomotor energy costs can be substantial for large-bodied species and those with high-activity lifestyles. For humans in industrialized societies, locomotion necessary for daily activities is often relatively low, so it has been presumed that activity energy expenditure and DEE are lower than in our ancestors. Whether this is true and has contributed to a rise in obesity is controversial. In humans, much attention has centered on spontaneous physical activity (SPA) or non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT), the latter sometimes defined so broadly as to include all energy expended due to activity, exclusive of volitional exercise. Given that most people in Western societies engage in little voluntary exercise, increasing NEAT may be an effective way to maintain DEE and combat overweight and obesity. One way to promote NEAT is to decrease the amount of time spent on sedentary behaviours (e.g. watching television). The effects of voluntary exercise on other components of physical activity are highly variable in humans, partly as a function of age, and have rarely been studied in rodents. However, most rodent studies indicate that food consumption increases in the presence of wheels; therefore, other aspects of physical activity are not reduced enough to compensate for the energetic cost of wheel running. Most rodent studies also show negative effects of wheel access on body fat, especially in males. Sedentary behaviours per se have not been studied in rodents in relation to obesity. Several lines of evidence demonstrate the important role of dopamine, in addition to other neural signaling networks (e.g. the endocannabinoid system), in the control of voluntary exercise. A

  12. Industrial Compressed Air System Energy Efficiency Guidebook.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1993-12-01

    Energy efficient design, operation and maintenance of compressed air systems in industrial plants can provide substantial reductions in electric power and other operational costs. This guidebook will help identify cost effective, energy efficiency opportunities in compressed air system design, re-design, operation and maintenance. The guidebook provides: (1) a broad overview of industrial compressed air systems, (2) methods for estimating compressed air consumption and projected air savings, (3) a description of applicable, generic energy conservation measures, and, (4) a review of some compressed air system demonstration projects that have taken place over the last two years. The primary audience for this guidebook includes plant maintenance supervisors, plant engineers, plant managers and others interested in energy management of industrial compressed air systems.

  13. Industrial Energy-Efficiency Improvement Program. Annual report to the Congress and the President 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    The industrial energy efficiency improvement program to accelerate market penetration of new and emerging industrial technologies and practices which will improve energy efficiency; encourage substitution of more plentiful domestic fuels; and enhance recovery of energy and materials from industrial waste streams is described. The role of research, development, and demonstration; technology implementation; the reporting program; and progress are covered. Specific reports from the chemicals and allied products; primary metals; petroleum and coal products; stone, clay, and glass, paper and allied products; food and kindred products; fabricated metals; transportation equipment; machinery (except electrical); textile mill products; rubber and miscellaneous plastics; electrical and electronic equipment; lumber and wood; and tobacco products are discussed. Additional data from voluntary submissions, a summary on progress in the utilization of recovered materials, and an analysis of industrial fuel mix are briefly presented. (MCW)

  14. Energy Savings from Industrial Water Reductions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Prakash; McKane, Aimee; de Fontaine, Andre

    2015-08-03

    Although it is widely recognized that reducing freshwater consumption is of critical importance, generating interest in industrial water reduction programs can be hindered for a variety of reasons. These include the low cost of water, greater focus on water use in other sectors such as the agriculture and residential sectors, high levels of unbilled and/or unregulated self-supplied water use in industry, and lack of water metering and tracking capabilities at industrial facilities. However, there are many additional components to the resource savings associated with reducing site water use beyond the water savings alone, such as reductions in energy consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, treatment chemicals, and impact on the local watershed. Understanding and quantifying these additional resource savings can expand the community of businesses, NGOs, government agencies, and researchers with a vested interest in water reduction. This paper will develop a methodology for evaluating the embedded energy consumption associated with water use at an industrial facility. The methodology developed will use available data and references to evaluate the energy consumption associated with water supply and wastewater treatment outside of a facility’s fence line for various water sources. It will also include a framework for evaluating the energy consumption associated with water use within a facility’s fence line. The methodology will develop a more complete picture of the total resource savings associated with water reduction efforts and allow industrial water reduction programs to assess the energy and CO2 savings associated with their efforts.

  15. Emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, N.; Worrell, E.; Ruth, M.; Price, L.; Elliott, R.N.; Shipley, A.M.; Thorne, J.

    2000-10-01

    U.S. industry consumes approximately 37 percent of the nation's energy to produce 24 percent of the nation's GDP. Increasingly, industry is confronted with the challenge of moving toward a cleaner, more sustainable path of production and consumption, while increasing global competitiveness. Technology will be essential for meeting these challenges. At some point, businesses are faced with investment in new capital stock. At this decision point, new and emerging technologies compete for capital investment alongside more established or mature technologies. Understanding the dynamics of the decision-making process is important to perceive what drives technology change and the overall effect on industrial energy use. The assessment of emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies can be useful for: (1) identifying R&D projects; (2) identifying potential technologies for market transformation activities; (3) providing common information on technologies to a broad audience of policy-makers; and (4) offering new insights into technology development and energy efficiency potentials. With the support of PG&E Co., NYSERDA, DOE, EPA, NEEA, and the Iowa Energy Center, staff from LBNL and ACEEE produced this assessment of emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies. The goal was to collect information on a broad array of potentially significant emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies and carefully characterize a sub-group of approximately 50 key technologies. Our use of the term ''emerging'' denotes technologies that are both pre-commercial but near commercialization, and technologies that have already entered the market but have less than 5 percent of current market share. We also have chosen technologies that are energy-efficient (i.e., use less energy than existing technologies and practices to produce the same product), and may have additional ''non-energy benefits.'' These benefits are as important (if

  16. Voluntary agreements, implementation and efficiency. Swedish country study report. Covering the EKO-Energi programme. With case studies in pulp and paper and heavy vehicle manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaagstroem, Jonas; Aastrand, Kerstin; Helby, Peter

    2000-03-01

    The VAIE research project is concerned with voluntary agreements for improvement of industrial energy efficiency in five European countries. This national report deals with the Swedish EKO-Energi agreements. It includes case studies in pulp and paper and heavy vehicle manufacturing. The first chapter presents the principal aspects of the Swedish EKO-Energi programme, explains the selection of companies for case studies, and summarises the results of the national study. The chapter shows the EKO-Energi programme to be directed at a fairly exclusive part of Swedish industry, namely environmental front-runners striving for EMAS or ISO 14001 certification. It provides them with paid energy audits and with marketing support. It requires them to establish an energy management system, i.e. to include energy efficiency issues in their certification process. The agreements are 'soft' in the sense that they address mainly organisational issues, are based much on trust in the companies own dedication to improvement, and are very informal in the monitoring. On the balance, the EKO-Energi programme would seem to be a small, but reasonably effective programme, contributing particularly to such organisational developments as are important for long-term trends in industrial energy efficiency. The second chapter provides a brief introduction to the whole VAIE project and outlines the methodology of the study, explained in more detail in a separate report. The third chapter describes the progress of the EKO-Energi programme from policy formulation to implementation, and assesses a number of hypotheses concerning this process. Support is found for the hypotheses (a) that voluntary agreements tend to exclude the influence of third parties, (b) that they tend to continue the logic of previous policies, and (c) that expected short term energy savings tend to be very close to the baseline scenario. The fourth chapter describes how agreements with individual companies are made

  17. Environmental assessment in support of proposed voluntary energy conservation standard for new residential buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadley, D.L.; Parker, G.B.; Callaway, J.W.; Marsh, S.J.; Roop, J.M.; Taylor, Z.T.

    1989-06-01

    The objective of this environmental assessment (EA) is to identify the potential environmental impacts that could result from the proposed voluntary residential standard (VOLRES) on private sector construction of new residential buildings. 49 refs., 15 tabs.

  18. The US textile industry: An energy perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badin, J. S.; Lowitt, H. E.

    1988-01-01

    This report investigates the state of the US textile industry in terms of energy consumption and conservation. Specific objectives were: To update and verify energy and materials consumption data at the various process levels in 1984; to determine the potential energy savings attainable with current (1984), state-of-the-art, and future production practices and technologies (2010); and to identify new areas of research and development opportunity that will enable these potential future savings to be achieved. Results of this study concluded that in the year 2010, there is a potential to save between 34% and 53% of the energy used in current production practices, dependent on the projected technology mix. RandD needs and opportunities were identified for the industry in three categories: process modification, basic research, and improved housekeeping practices that reduce energy consumption. Potential RandD candidates for DOE involvement with the private sector were assessed and selected from the identified list.

  19. Geothermal energy market potential in industrial processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, R.J.; Hanny, J.A.; Knuth, W.H.

    1978-11-01

    Geothermal energy is currently being used for a number of industrial processes in countries throughout the world. Its application in the United States is mainly limited to space heating even though the temperature of the geothermal fluid is sufficient for process uses, and could be sold at attractive prices while maintaining a high return on investment. The temperature span for industrial use ranges from 40 to 275/sup 0/C, thus encompassing both the abundant low temperature and the less available high temperature resources. Hydrothermal fluids can be used either directly or indirectly dependent upon fluid quality and process needs. The barriers facing hydrothermal industrial process development are (a) the development infrastructure does not exist, (b) energy users are not aware of hydrothermal energy and its advantages, (c) federal incentives are limited, (d) resources are not fully defined.

  20. Energy conservation: motors in industry; Maitrise de l`energie: les moteurs dans l`industrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavoine, O.; David, A. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches

    1996-12-31

    The Electricite de France demand side management policy towards industry is particularly aimed at reducing industry`s power consumption from electric motors through the use of electronic speed variators which may induce mean energy savings of 25 percent. Pumps, fans and compressors, amounting to two-third of the total electric motor energy consumption, are the main application fields for electronic variators. EDF proposes technical and energy diagnosis and audits in industrial plants in order to evaluate the possibility and potential of electronic variator introduction

  1. Industrial Energy Audit Guidebook: Guidelines for Conducting an Energy Audit in Industrial Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasanbeigi, Ali; Price, Lynn

    2010-10-07

    Various studies in different countries have shown that significant energy-efficiency improvement opportunities exist in the industrial sector, many of which are cost-effective. These energy-efficiency options include both cross-cutting as well as sector-specific measures. However, industrial plants are not always aware of energy-efficiency improvement potentials. Conducting an energy audit is one of the first steps in identifying these potentials. Even so, many plants do not have the capacity to conduct an effective energy audit. In some countries, government policies and programs aim to assist industry to improve competitiveness through increased energy efficiency. However, usually only limited technical and financial resources for improving energy efficiency are available, especially for small and medium-sized enterprises. Information on energy auditing and practices should, therefore, be prepared and disseminated to industrial plants. This guidebook provides guidelines for energy auditors regarding the key elements for preparing for an energy audit, conducting an inventory and measuring energy use, analyzing energy bills, benchmarking, analyzing energy use patterns, identifying energy-efficiency opportunities, conducting cost-benefit analysis, preparing energy audit reports, and undertaking post-audit activities. The purpose of this guidebook is to assist energy auditors and engineers in the plant to conduct a well-structured and effective energy audit.

  2. Graphene for energy solutions and its industrialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Di; Kivioja, Jani

    2013-10-01

    Graphene attracts intensive interest globally across academia and industry since the award of the Nobel Prize in Physics 2010. Within the last half decade, there has been an explosion in the number of scientific publications, patents and industry projects involved in this topic. On the other hand, energy is one of the biggest challenges of this century and related to the global sustainable economy. There are many reviews on graphene and its applications in various devices, however, few of the review articles connect the intrinsic properties of graphene with its energy. The IUPAC definition of graphene refers to a single carbon layer of graphite structure and its related superlative properties. A lot of scientific results on graphene published to date are actually dealing with multi-layer graphenes or reduced graphenes from insulating graphene oxides (GO) which contain defects and contaminants from the reactions and do not possess some of the intrinsic physical properties of pristine graphene. In this review, the focus is on the most recent advances in the study of pure graphene properties and novel energy solutions based on these properties. It also includes graphene metrology and analysis of both intellectual property and the value chain for the existing and forthcoming graphene industry that may cause a new `industry revolution' with the strong and determined support of governments and industries across the European Union, U. S., Asia and many other countries in the world.

  3. Energy consumption in the pipeline industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, W. F.

    1977-12-31

    Estimates are developed of the energy consumption and energy intensity (EI) of five categories of U.S. pipeline industries: natural gas, crude oil, petroleum products, coal slurry, and water. For comparability with other transportation modes, it is desirable to calculate EI in Btu/Ton-Mile, and this is done, although the necessary unit conversions introduce additional uncertainties. Since water and sewer lines operate by lift and gravity, a comparable EI is not definable.

  4. Energy saving opportunities in Jordanian pharmaceutical industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areen Al-Ali

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of energy consumption saving opportunities in Jordanian pharmaceutical industry has been carried out in this paper, current status of energy consumption, possible saving techniques, and recommendations that could be implemented successfully through Energy Saving Program (ESP is explored. All variables that influence energy consumption are considered accordingly using a suitable methodology. This methodology integrates a simulation programs into the analysis process; thereafter an accurate analysis and a reliable assessment for energy consumption is provided. HAP 4.41software has been used to simulate and to calculate energy consumption and costs. One biggest Jordanian pharmaceutical facility that produces Penicillin and Cephalosporin products is considered as an illustrative example, the facility consists of four main energy consumption centers and includes consuming systems namely; HVAC (Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning system, lighting, compressed air, steam boilers, and miscellaneous equipments like computers, refrigerators, fume hoods, etc. Historical energy consumption quantities are estimated, details of energy data are tabulated accordingly input data files for the computer simulation method using HAP 4.41 are created. Energy saving recommendations has been decided and incorporated into the ESP system. The paper concluded with a good quality room of energy saving opportunities that mirrored positively on the national energy bill with a reduction of 13% of the total annual energy consumption.

  5. Analysis of the California energy industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathaye, J.; Ruderman, H.; Sextro, R.; Benenson, P.; Kunin, L.; Chan, P.; Kooser, J.; Ben Dov, Y.; Green, B.; Clear, R.

    1977-01-01

    The energy-supply system for California is an integral part of the state's economy, both in terms of energy as a commodity and in the economic effects of expanding requirements for new capital and man-power in the energy sector. It is this notion of an expanding energy system that forms one of the motivations for many of the energy policy discussions and formulations currently taking place. Some of the questions to be addressed are (1) if the energy system is to expand, by how much, and in what particular areas of supply; (2) what are the policy ramifications of certain changes as opposed to others; and (3) what are the major economic effects of changes in energy supply system plans. The purpose of this study is to: (a) describe quantitatively the California energy industry and its relationship to the California and U.S. economies; (b) provide the analytic capability for determining the direct and indirect employment and income impacts resulting from a given energy future for California, and (c) demonstrate and test the methodology with scenarios that embody varying combinations of conventional energy technologies, new energy technologies and energy conservation measures. The methodology developed is generally applicable to any set of specified changes. In this report three alternative energy futures for California are selected in order to quantify their resulting economic impacts.

  6. Energy potential in the food industry; Store energipotensialer i naeringsmiddelindustrien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, E; Risberg, T M; Mydske, H J; Helgerud, H E

    2007-07-01

    The food industry is one of the most power consuming industries (excluding the heavy industry) and has large potential for reducing the energy consumption. This report explains the most energy efficient measures and if the injunctions are followed

  7. Setting the Standard for Industrial Energy Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKane, Aimee; Williams, Robert; Perry, Wayne; Li, Tienan

    2007-06-01

    Industrial motor-driven systems use more than 2194 billionkWh annually on a global basis and offer one of the largest opportunitiesfor energy savings.1 The International Energy Agency estimates thatoptimization of motor driven systems could reduce global electricitydemand by 7 percent through the application of commercially availabletechnologies and using well-tested engineering practices. Yet manyindustrial firms remain either unaware of or unable to achieve theseenergy savings. The same factors that make it so challenging to achieveand sustain energy efficiency in motor-driven systems (complexity,frequent changes) apply to the production processes that they support.Yet production processes typically operate within a narrow band ofacceptable performance. These processes are frequently incorporated intoISO 9000/14000 quality and environmental management systems, whichrequire regular, independent audits to maintain ISO certification, anattractive value for international trade. It is our contention that acritical step in achieving and sustaining energy efficiency ofmotor-driven systems specifically, and industrial energy efficiencygenerally, is the adoption of a corporate energy management standard thatis consistent with current industrial quality and environmentalmanagement systems such as ISO. Several energy management standardscurrently exist (US, Denmark, Ireland, Sweden) and specifications(Germany, Netherlands) others are planned (China, Spain, Brazil, Korea).This paper presents the current status of energy management standardsdevelopment internationally, including an analysis of their sharedfeatures and differences, in terms of content, promulgation, andimplementation. The purpose of the analysis is to describe the currentstate of "best practices" for this emerging area of energy efficiencypolicymaking and tosuggest next steps toward the creation of a trulyinternational energy management standard that is consistent with the ISOprinciples of measurement

  8. Improving energy efficiency in industrial energy systems an interdisciplinary perspective on barriers, energy audits, energy management, policies, and programs

    CERN Document Server

    Thollander, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    Industrial energy efficiency is one of the most important means of reducing the threat of increased global warming. Research however states that despite the existence of numerous technical energy efficiency measures, its deployment is hindered by the existence of various barriers to energy efficiency. The complexity of increasing energy efficiency in manufacturing industry calls for an interdisciplinary approach to the issue. Improving energy efficiency in industrial energy systems applies an interdisciplinary perspective in examining energy efficiency in industrial energy systems, and discuss

  9. Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program - Part IV: Onsite review handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    Onsite Review Handbook contains criteria to be used in evaluating the management systems required for initial or continued participation in the Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP), verifying and calculating rates of injury experience, the Onsite Review report format, and sample questions to be used during onsite interviews. This document should be used in conjunction with the first three DOE-VPP manuals (Part I: Program Elements, Part II: Procedures Manual, and Part III: Application Guidelines). This document is intended to assist Onsite Review team members and DOE contractors in evaluating safety and health programs, and to serve as guidance for DOE-VPP participants in performing their required annual evaluation. Requests for additional information or any questions may be addressed to a DOE-VPP Coordinator in the Office of Occupational Safety and Health Policy. The term contractor used throughout this document refers to an applicant to, or a participant in, the DOE-VPP. The term subcontractor refers to any organization that is contracted by the applicant or participant to do work at the site under review. The DOE-VPP Onsite Review Criteria contained in Appendix A provide guidance for evaluating a site`s implementation of the program requirements given in Part I: Program Elements. The program requirements are in bold italicized type, followed by guidance for ensuring implementation. Part I should be consulted for a complete description of the program requirements. These criteria should be used by team members whenever possible, but are not intended to be all inclusive. Determination of adequate implementation of the DOE-VPP requirements is at the team members` discretion. Guidance for calculating recordable injury and lost workday incidence rates is contained in Appendix B. The OSHA injury/illness records review and the associated calculations should be performed by Onsite Review Team members during the pre-onsite planning visit.

  10. Modeling Innovations Advance Wind Energy Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    In 1981, Glenn Research Center scientist Dr. Larry Viterna developed a model that predicted certain elements of wind turbine performance with far greater accuracy than previous methods. The model was met with derision from others in the wind energy industry, but years later, Viterna discovered it had become the most widely used method of its kind, enabling significant wind energy technologies-like the fixed pitch turbines produced by manufacturers like Aerostar Inc. of Westport, Massachusetts-that are providing sustainable, climate friendly energy sources today.

  11. Industrial Scale Energy Systems Integration; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, Mark

    2015-07-28

    The industrial sector consumes 25% of the total energy in the U.S. and produces 18% of the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Energy Systems Integration (ESI) opportunities can reduce those values and increase the profitability of that sector. This presentation outlines several options. Combined heat and power (CHP) is an option that is available today for many applications. In some cases, it can be extended to trigeneration by adding absorbtion cooling. Demand response is another option in use by the industrial sector - in 2012, industry provided 47% of demand response capacity. A longer term option that combines the benefits of CHP with those of demand response is hybrid energy systems (HESs). Two possible HESs are described and development implications discussed. extended to trigeneration by adding absorbtion cooling. Demand response is another option in use by the industrial sector - in 2012, industry provided 47% of demand response capacity. A longer term option that combines the benefits of CHP with those of demand response is hybrid energy systems (HESs). Two possible HESs are described and development implications discussed.

  12. Energy Efficient Industrialized Housing Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    Six area reported progress in the Energy Efficient Industrialized Housing Research Program during FY 1991. As part of Industry Guidance, meetings were held with steering and technical committees in computers, housing design and manufacturing. This task area enables the program to benefit from the expertise of industry representatives and communicate research results directly to them. As part of the Design Process performance specifications were being developed for the future housing system designed last year. These house designs coordinate and optimize predicted and desirable advances in computerized design processes, materials, components, and manufacturing automation to achieve energy efficiency at reduced first cost. Energy design software were being developed for CAD systems, stressed skin insulating core panel manufacturers; and a prototype energy sales tool. A prototype design was to be developed to integrate one or more subsystems with the building skin. As part of the Manufacturing Process we are developing a manufacturing process simulation and data base to help current and new entrants to the industrialized housing industry in assessing the impact of implementing new manufacturing techniques. For Evaluation we are developing testing plans for six units of housing on the UO campus and the stressed skin insulating core house to be constructed in Oregon. The DOW Chemical test structure will be retrofitted with a tile roof and retested to compare to the dome and conventional construction structures. Calibration of the wind tunnel will be completed so that laboratory tests can be conducted to simulate the ventilation cooling efficiency of houses in design. Research utilization and program management were either aspects of this program.

  13. Energy efficiency in buildings, industry and transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanovic, Dobrica; Babic, Milun; Jovicic, Nebojsa; Gordic, Dusan

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature concerning the energy saving and outlines the importance of energy efficiency, particularly in three the most important areas: buildings, industry and transportation. Improving energy efficiency plays a crucial role in minimizing the societal and environmental impacts of economic growth and offers a powerful tool for achieving sustainable development by reducing the need for investment in new infrastructure, by cutting fuel costs, and by increasing competitiveness for businesses and welfare for consumers. It creates environmental benefits through reduced emissions of greenhouse gases and local air pollutants. It can offer social benefits in the form of increased energy security (through reduced dependence on fossil fuels, particularly when imported) and better energy services.

  14. Using contingent valuation to explore willingness to pay for renewable energy: A comparison of collective and voluntary payment vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, Ryan H.

    2002-07-28

    Some of the most basic questions about the organization and functioning of society involve issues raised by the existence of public goods. With respect to environmental public goods, how should funds used to support environmental improvement be collected and used? In particular, are collective, mandatory payments superior to voluntary, charitable payments due to the possibility of free riding? And to what degree should the government be involved in spending these funds: should the government directly fund environmental improvement projects or should the private sector be used to collect funds and determine funding priorities? This report explores these questions from the perspective of renewable energy: wind, geothermal, biomass, hydropower, and solar. In particular, this report analyzes the payment preferences of U.S. households through the implementation of a large-scale contingent valuation (CV) survey of willingness to pay (WTP) for renewable energy. Renewable energy can be supported through a mandatory ''tax'' on electric bills or through voluntary payments via green power marketing; the government may or may not be heavily involved in the collection and expenditure of such funds. The question of how households prefer to pay for renewable energy is therefore highly relevant. The primary objective of this study is to explore variations in stated WTP for renewable energy under the following four payment and provision contexts: (1) A mandatory increase in the electricity bills of all customers, the funds from which are collected and spent by the government on renewable energy projects. (2) A voluntary increase in the electricity bills of those customers who choose to pay, the funds from which are collected and spent by the government on renewable energy projects. (3) A voluntary increase in the electricity bills of those customers who choose to pay, the funds from which are collected and spent by electricity suppliers on renewable energy

  15. Voluntary agreements, implementation and efficiency. Swedish country study report. Covering the EKO-Energi programme. With case studies in pulp and paper and heavy vehicle manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaagstroem, Jonas; Aastrand, Kerstin; Helby, Peter

    2000-03-01

    The VAIE research project is concerned with voluntary agreements for improvement of industrial energy efficiency in five European countries. This national report deals with the Swedish EKO-Energi agreements. It includes case studies in pulp and paper and heavy vehicle manufacturing. The first chapter presents the principal aspects of the Swedish EKO-Energi programme, explains the selection of companies for case studies, and summarises the results of the national study. The chapter shows the EKO-Energi programme to be directed at a fairly exclusive part of Swedish industry, namely environmental front-runners striving for EMAS or ISO 14001 certification. It provides them with paid energy audits and with marketing support. It requires them to establish an energy management system, i.e. to include energy efficiency issues in their certification process. The agreements are 'soft' in the sense that they address mainly organisational issues, are based much on trust in the companies own dedication to improvement, and are very informal in the monitoring. On the balance, the EKO-Energi programme would seem to be a small, but reasonably effective programme, contributing particularly to such organisational developments as are important for long-term trends in industrial energy efficiency. The second chapter provides a brief introduction to the whole VAIE project and outlines the methodology of the study, explained in more detail in a separate report. The third chapter describes the progress of the EKO-Energi programme from policy formulation to implementation, and assesses a number of hypotheses concerning this process. Support is found for the hypotheses (a) that voluntary agreements tend to exclude the influence of third parties, (b) that they tend to continue the logic of previous policies, and (c) that expected short term energy savings tend to be very close to the baseline scenario. The fourth chapter describes how agreements with individual companies are made

  16. E-commerce and the energy industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, C.; Biedenharn, J. [Global Energy Assets, Inc. (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The impact of e-commerce on the future of the energy industry is examined, and the size and scope of business-to-business e-commerce activities are explored. Identification of e-commerce needs in relation to sales and purchasing requirements, and the selection of the e-commerce course and considerations to be taken into account in introducing e-commerce into a business are discussed.

  17. Energy improvements in the hotel industry

    OpenAIRE

    Cingoski, Vlatko; Biljana PETREVSKA; Trajkov, Nikola; Golubovski, Roman; Gelev, Saso

    2015-01-01

    The study explores determinants of energy consumption and efficiency in the hotel industry. It was conducted in Macedonia among managers of three, four and five-star hotels and identified the influencing factors of managing environmental protection practices. Results show that hotel category matters when addressing environmental policy issues. The evidence indicates that hotels support the European environmental impact assessment regulation, but there is a lack of interest due to restricted f...

  18. Data sources and methods for industrial energy analysis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-08-01

    Following an introductory and overview section of industrial energy-use patterns, Section II of this report describes a number of the major industrial-energy-use data bases often used to analyze industrial energy use. Section III gives the results of an analysis which used a number of energy and industrial-location data bases to estimate plant-specific energy use in ten of the largest energy-using industries. The section summarizes the results of the analysis and discusses the implications of the energy use per plant distributions for the industrial market for high- and low-Btu coal gasification and coal liquefaction. Section IV outlines a methodology for segmenting the industrial energy market and evaluating the competitiveness of low- and medium-Btu gas relative to other alternatives. The methodology demonstrates the uses of the industrial energy data bases in performing market penetration analysis.

  19. Advanced Energy Industries, Inc. SEGIS developments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharf, Mesa P. (Advanced Energy Industries, Inc., Bend, OR); Bower, Ward Isaac; Mills-Price, Michael A. (Advanced Energy Industries, Inc., Bend, OR); Sena-Henderson, Lisa; David, Carolyn; Akhil, Abbas Ali; Kuszmaul, Scott S.; Gonzalez, Sigifredo

    2012-03-01

    The Solar Energy Grid Integration Systems (SEGIS) initiative is a three-year, three-stage project that includes conceptual design and market analysis (Stage 1), prototype development/testing (Stage 2), and commercialization (Stage 3). Projects focus on system development of solar technologies, expansion of intelligent renewable energy applications, and connecting large-scale photovoltaic (PV) installations into the electric grid. As documented in this report, Advanced Energy Industries, Inc. (AE), its partners, and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) successfully collaborated to complete the final stage of the SEGIS initiative, which has guided new technology development and development of methodologies for unification of PV and smart-grid technologies. The combined team met all deliverables throughout the three-year program and commercialized a broad set of the developed technologies.

  20. Savings estimates for the United States Environmental Protection Agency?s ENERGY STAR voluntary product labeling program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Marla Christine; Sanchez, Marla Christine; Brown, Richard; Homan, Gregory; Webber, Carrie

    2008-06-03

    ENERGY STAR is a voluntary energy efficiency-labeling program operated jointly by the United States Department of Energy and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). Since the program inception in 1992, ENERGY STAR has become a leading international brand for energy efficient products. ENERGY STAR's central role in the development of regional, national, and international energy programs necessitates an open process whereby its program achievements to date as well as projected future savings are shared with committed stakeholders. Through 2006, US EPA?S ENERGY STAR labeled products saved 4.8 EJ of primary energy and avoided 82 Tg C equivalent. We project that US EPA?S ENERGY STAR labeled products will save 12.8 EJ and avoid 203 Tg C equivalent over the period 2007-2015. A sensitivity analysis examining two key inputs (carbon factor and ENERGY STAR unit sales) bounds the best estimate of carbon avoided between 54 Tg C and 107 Tg C (1993 to 2006) and between 132 Tg C and 278 Tg C (2007 to 2015).

  1. Barriers to Industrial Energy Efficiency - Study (Appendix A), June 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-06-01

    This study examines barriers that impede the adoption of energy efficient technologies and practices in the industrial sector, and identifies successful examples and opportunities to overcome these barriers. Three groups of energy efficiency technologies and measures were examined: industrial end-use energy efficiency, industrial demand response, and industrial combined heat and power. This study also includes the estimated economic benefits from hypothetical Federal energy efficiency matching grants, as directed by the Act.

  2. Barriers to Industrial Energy Efficiency - Report to Congress, June 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-06-01

    This report examines barriers that impede the adoption of energy efficient technologies and practices in the industrial sector, and identifies successful examples and opportunities to overcome these barriers. Three groups of energy efficiency technologies and measures were examined: industrial end-use energy efficiency, industrial demand response, and industrial combined heat and power. This report also includes the estimated economic benefits from hypothetical Federal energy efficiency matching grants, as directed by the Act.

  3. Combining total energy and energy industrial center concepts to increase utilization efficiency of geothermal energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, B. P.

    1974-01-01

    Integrating energy production and energy consumption to produce a total energy system within an energy industrial center which would result in more power production from a given energy source and less pollution of the environment is discussed. Strong governmental support would be required for the crash drilling program necessary to implement these concepts. Cooperation among the federal agencies, power producers, and private industry would be essential in avoiding redundant and fruitless projects, and in exploiting most efficiently our geothermal resources.

  4. Industrial energy initiatives; Initiatives energetiques industrielles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lach, P. [Gestion Lach Inc., Anjou, PQ (Canada)

    2003-09-01

    The energy intensive Parmalat dairy processing plant located in Victoriaville, Quebec, produces butter, milk powder, margarine, cheese and condensed milk. Significant energy savings were realized in the past two years through modifications to the production system and by developing energy recovery projects. This paper presents a brief overview of the various projects implemented at the Parmalat dairy processing plant. An economizer was installed on the milk powder dryer which typically used only 50 per cent of the heat to evaporate water from the milk. Careful consideration was given to the selection of the heating medium, Glycol was chosen because it met all the requirements of the food transformation industry. Annual energy savings are estimated at $100,000, at a cost of $125,000 (including equipment and installation costs), for a payback period of 15 months. A better pumping system for the condensed milk increased the return rate by 10 per cent. In addition, the installation of a recovery pipe to preheat water going to an instantaneous water heater resulted in a 10 per cent reduction in steam requirements. Other ongoing projects involve a better electric energy management system, and the implementation of a preventive maintenance program for steam traps.

  5. Examples of industrial achievements. [Energy economies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-07-01

    Several examples are presented of industrial units concerned by energy economies. The problem, the solution, the energy savings and the financial balance are given for each following case: recuperation of smoke from two glass furnaces with continuous heat and power production; a new type of heating furnace for non-ferrous ingots; heating furnace with smoke recuperation; high-power boiler for very wet barks; smokes to supply heat to buildings and for a dryer; heat pump drying of plaster squares; air-conditioning of a workshop by recuperation on a furnace; dehydration of fodder and beetroot pulp with a straw generator; microprocessor-controlled hot water recuperation in cheese-making; electronic speed regulation for electronic motors.

  6. Approaches for Sustainable Development of China's Energy Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Zhongpei; Yan Qingxu

    2007-01-01

    @@ It is well-known that energy industry is a backbone in the development of economy in a country. Energy demand forecasts, adjustment of energy supply structure, energy security, policies concerning energy saving and environmental protection, climate factors, reform of energy pricing system, new energy technologies and renewable energy development, etc. have far-reaching impacts on energy industry and even on the development of national economy. Therefore, the sustainable development of energy industry is critical for the sustainable developments of economy and the society, and its strategic position requires great attention from the whole society.

  7. Heavy Industry Share Increase Is Causing Higher Energy Consumptioni

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐志新; 陈文颖; 吴宗鑫

    2007-01-01

    The"11th Five-Year"plan sets the objective of reducing energy consumption per unit of GDP by 20% in five years.Readjusting industrial structure is one of the possible means to reach this goal.As for energy consumption reduction through industrial readjustment,however,present research only explores the effects of industry structural change in the six sectors such as agriculture,industry,construction,transportation and commerce,yet without considering the ramifications of sub-sector two-digit code industry structure.In this paper,we have calculated the effects of structural change in light- heavy industries on energy consumption and energy intensity from 1993 to 2005 using the factor decomposition method.As a result,we found for each percentage point gain in favour of heavy industry in the light-heavy industry mix,China’s energy consumption increases by nearly 9 million metric tons of coal equivalent.However the overall effects of structural change in light-heavy industry are less than those of sub-sector intensity factors on industrial energy intensity and energy consumption per unit of GDP.The heavy industry share gain has over recent years exerted a significant impact on industrial energy intensity.For example,78% of the abnormal increase in industrial energy intensity in 2003 could be attributed to this factor.Finally,an analytical framework for energy intensity based on this study is presented.

  8. International Experience with Key Program Elements of IndustrialEnergy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-SettingPrograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2008-02-02

    Target-setting agreements, also known as voluntary ornegotiated agreements, have been used by a number of governments as amechanism for promoting energy efficiency within the industrial sector. Arecent survey of such target-setting agreement programs identified 23energy efficiency or GHG emissions reduction voluntary agreement programsin 18 countries. International best practice related to target-settingagreement programs calls for establishment of a coordinated set ofpolicies that provide strong economic incentives as well as technical andfinancial support to participating industries. The key program elementsof a target-setting program are the target-setting process,identification of energy-saving technologies and measures usingenergy-energy efficiency guidebooks and benchmarking as well as byconducting energy-efficiency audits, development of an energy-savingsaction plan, development and implementation of energy managementprotocols, development of incentives and supporting policies, monitoringprogress toward targets, and program evaluation. This report firstprovides a description of three key target-setting agreement programs andthen describes international experience with the key program elementsthat comprise such programs using information from the three keytarget-setting programs as well as from other international programsrelated to industrial energy efficiency or GHG emissionsreductions.

  9. Policy modeling for industrial energy use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worrell, Ernst; Park, Hi-Chun; Lee, Sang-Gon; Jung, Yonghun; Kato, Hiroyuki; Ramesohl, Stephan; Boyd, Gale; Eichhammer, Wolfgang; Nyboer, John; Jaccard, Mark; Nordqvist, Joakim; Boyd, Christopher; Klee, Howard; Anglani, Norma; Biermans, Gijs

    2003-03-01

    The international workshop on Policy Modeling for Industrial Energy Use was jointly organized by EETA (Professional Network for Engineering Economic Technology Analysis) and INEDIS (International Network for Energy Demand Analysis in the Industrial Sector). The workshop has helped to layout the needs and challenges to include policy more explicitly in energy-efficiency modeling. The current state-of-the-art models have a proven track record in forecasting future trends under conditions similar to those faced in the recent past. However, the future of energy policy in a climate-restrained world is likely to demand different and additional services to be provided by energy modelers. In this workshop some of the international models used to make energy consumption forecasts have been discussed as well as innovations to enable the modeling of policy scenarios. This was followed by the discussion of future challenges, new insights in the data needed to determine the inputs into energy model s, and methods to incorporate decision making and policy in the models. Based on the discussion the workshop participants came to the following conclusions and recommendations: Current energy models are already complex, and it is already difficult to collect the model inputs. Hence, new approaches should be transparent and not lead to extremely complex models that try to ''do everything''. The model structure will be determined by the questions that need to be answered. A good understanding of the decision making framework of policy makers and clear communication on the needs are essential to make any future energy modeling effort successful. There is a need to better understand the effects of policy on future energy use, emissions and the economy. To allow the inclusion of policy instruments in models, evaluation of programs and instruments is essential, and need to be included in the policy instrument design. Increased efforts are needed to better understand the

  10. Energy efficiency opportunity guide in the lime industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The lime industry processes limestone, an abundant inorganic mineral, for metallurgical, industrial and chemical, environmental, and construction applications. The energy the industry uses results in greenhouse gas emissions and the Canadian Lime Institute, in collaboration with Natural Resources Canada, sponsored the development of this guidebook which is intended to provide ideas for saving energy in the lime industry. This document is a practical source of information and can be used to develop self-audit and evaluation techniques to monitor energy usage. The report first provides an overview of the lime industry, then presents its energy costs. General energy efficiency methodologies are highlighted and, in conclusion, advice on improving energy efficiency in general and specifically for lime industry operations is given. This guidebook provides useful information for lime industry operators who are trying to improve the energy efficiency of their operations.

  11. Using contingent valuation to explore willingness to pay for renewable energy: A comparison of collective and voluntary payment vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, Ryan H.

    2002-07-28

    Some of the most basic questions about the organization and functioning of society involve issues raised by the existence of public goods. With respect to environmental public goods, how should funds used to support environmental improvement be collected and used? In particular, are collective, mandatory payments superior to voluntary, charitable payments due to the possibility of free riding? And to what degree should the government be involved in spending these funds: should the government directly fund environmental improvement projects or should the private sector be used to collect funds and determine funding priorities? This report explores these questions from the perspective of renewable energy: wind, geothermal, biomass, hydropower, and solar. In particular, this report analyzes the payment preferences of U.S. households through the implementation of a large-scale contingent valuation (CV) survey of willingness to pay (WTP) for renewable energy. Renewable energy can be supported through a mandatory ''tax'' on electric bills or through voluntary payments via green power marketing; the government may or may not be heavily involved in the collection and expenditure of such funds. The question of how households prefer to pay for renewable energy is therefore highly relevant. The primary objective of this study is to explore variations in stated WTP for renewable energy under the following four payment and provision contexts: (1) A mandatory increase in the electricity bills of all customers, the funds from which are collected and spent by the government on renewable energy projects. (2) A voluntary increase in the electricity bills of those customers who choose to pay, the funds from which are collected and spent by the government on renewable energy projects. (3) A voluntary increase in the electricity bills of those customers who choose to pay, the funds from which are collected and spent by electricity suppliers on renewable energy

  12. Energy conservation in industry; Energibesparelser i erhvervslivet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johanson, M. (Dansk Energi Analyse A/S (Denmark)); Maagoee Petersen, P. (Viegand and Maagoee ApS (Denmark))

    2010-02-15

    The report describes the completed survey and the methodology used for the analysis of energy saving opportunities and potentials for processing technologies and equipment in the industry. The report also includes a total of fourteen technology descriptions, of which eleven relate to end use of energy, while the three descriptions are for cross-technologies. The technology descriptions analyse any significant savings opportunities in the processing technologies concerned and work out the potentials of 'here and now' cost savings, with 2, 4 and 10-year payback time, respectively. The survey makes it possible to prioritize the instruments with the shortest payback times. The total savings potential for the eleven end-use technologies is estimated to be 10% at 2 years of payback time, 15% at four year payback time, and 32% at the 10 year payback time. The percentage potential is somewhat greater for the end-use technologies using electricity than the end-use which mainly uses fuel. That the potential is less for fuel-based end-use technologies may be explained by the fact that they are key processes that are regularly upgraded to increase product quality, to reduce production time and waste, etc. Such improvements also help to save energy and means that further improvements are relatively expensive. (ln)

  13. Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of

  14. Energy conservation and emissions reduction strategies in foundry industry

    OpenAIRE

    Li Yuanyuan; Chen Weiping; Huang Dan

    2010-01-01

    Current energy conservation and emissions reduction strategies in iron and steel industry were reviewed. Since foundry industry is one of the major source of energy consumption and pollution emission (especially CO2), issues concerning energy-saving and emission-reduction have been raised by governments and the industry. Specialists from around the world carried out multidimensional analyses and evaluation on the potentials in energy conservation and emissions reduction in iron and steel indu...

  15. Current Status and Prospects of Biomass Energy Industry in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    At present biomass energy industry is in its infancy in China and it has a bright future. Biomass energy production used grain as raw materials has entered industrialization phase.Some key technologies of biomass energy industry are coming to mature.China has issued relevant industrial standards laws and regulations,and has provided support in finance,loan,tax,etc.But China's biomass energy industry is faced with many problems which need to be solved.For example,taking grain as raw materials is unsustain...

  16. 78 FR 11996 - Energy Efficiency Program for Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Commercial and Industrial Pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... Equipment: Commercial and Industrial Pumps AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy... conservation standards for commercial and industrial pumps published on February 1, 2013, is extended to May 2... Document relating to commercial and industrial pumps is extended to May 2, 2013. ADDRESSES: Any...

  17. Industrial Technologies Program Research Plan for Energy-Intensive Process Industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapas, Richard B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Colwell, Jeffery A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2007-10-01

    In this plan, the Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) identifies the objectives of its cross-cutting strategy for conducting research in collaboration with industry and U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories to develop technologies that improve the efficiencies of energy-intensive process industries.

  18. Integrating energy and environmental management in wood furniture industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordić, Dušan; Babić, Milun; Jelić, Dubravka; Konćalović, Davor; Vukašinović, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    As energy costs continue to rise, industrial plants (even those of energy nonintensive industries such as furniture industry) need effective way to reduce the amount of energy they consume. Besides, there are a number of economic and environmental reasons why a company should consider environmental management initiatives. This paper provides a detailed guideline for implementing joint energy and environmental management system in wood furniture industrial company. It covers in detail all essential aspects of the system: initial system assessment, organization, policy development, energy and environmental auditing, action plan development, system promotion, checking system performance, and management review.

  19. Workshop proceeding of the industrial building energy use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, H.; Gadgil, A. (eds.)

    1988-01-01

    California has a large number of small and medium sized industries which have a major impact on the demand growth of California utilities. Energy use in building services (lighting, HVAC, office equipment, computers, etc.). These industries constitute an important but largely neglected fraction of the total site energy use. The ratio of energy use in building service to the total site energy use is a function of the industrial activity, its size, and the climate at the site of the facility. Also, energy use in building services is more responsive to weather and occupant schedules than the traditional base-load'' industrial process energy. Industrial energy use is considered as a base-load'' by utility companies because it helps to increase the utilities' load factor. To increase this further, utilities often market energy at lower rates to industrial facilities. Presently, the energy use in the building services of the industrial sector is often clubbed together with industrial process load. Data on non-process industrial energy use are not readily available in the literature. In cases where the major portion of the energy is used in the building services (with daily and seasonal load profiles that in fact peak at the same time as systemwide load peaks), the utility may be selling below cost at peak power times. These cases frequently happen with electric utilities. 30 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Thermal energy storage for industrial waste heat recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, H. W.; Kedl, R. J.; Duscha, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal energy storage systems designed for energy conservation through the recovery, storage, and reuse of industrial process waste heat are reviewed. Consideration is given to systems developed for primary aluminum, cement, the food processing industry, paper and pulp, and primary iron and steel. Projected waste-heat recovery and energy savings are listed for each category.

  1. Success factors of energy management in energy-intensive industries : energy performance measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Sivill, Leena

    2011-01-01

    This thesis explores energy performance measurement in support of energy management in the energy-intensive industries. In general, performance measurement is used in management for raising awareness, evaluating performance, setting targets and offering decision support. These purposes also apply to energy management, defined here as the management of all activities related to the economic and responsible use of energy in an organisation. This thesis answers the following three questions...

  2. Effective multi-level energy reporting in South African industry

    OpenAIRE

    Maneschijn, R.; Vosloo, J.C.; Pelzer, R.

    2014-01-01

    Energy management standards received significant attention in recent years for assisting intensive users in improving energy management processes. However, applying such a standard to the Energy Management System of an industrial consumer is most effective if supported by an Energy Information Management System. Energy Information Management Systems are commercially available and have been applied in South African industry. However, one notable shortfall of the majority of these systems is in...

  3. China's New Energy Vehicle Industry:Problems and Challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Liuqin; Xi Bing

    2012-01-01

    Evolution of policies for new energy vehicle industry in China For any new energy vehicle industry around the world,the puissant direction of national energy resource strategies and the powerful support from governmental policies are critical impetus for its development.There is no exception for China."Regulation Rules on Access to New Energy Vehicle Production" was enacted formally as of November 1,2007,which indicates the standardization of the new energy vehicle industry and the commencement of its marketization officially encouraged by the government.This is regarded as a milestone in the development of new energy vehicles in China.

  4. Cardiometabolic and reproductive benefits of early dietary energy restriction and voluntary exercise in an obese PCOS-prone rodent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diane, Abdoulaye; Kupreeva, Maria; Borthwick, Faye; Proctor, Spencer D; Pierce, W David; Vine, Donna F

    2015-09-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine-metabolic disorders in women of reproductive age characterized by ovulatory dysfunction, hyperandrogenism and cardiometabolic risk. The overweight-obese PCOS phenotype appears to have exacerbated reproductive dysfunction and cardiometabolic risk. In overweight-obese adult women with PCOS, exercise and energy restricted diets have shown limited and inconsistent effects on both cardiometabolic indices and reproductive outcomes. We hypothesized that an early lifestyle intervention involving exercise and dietary energy restriction to prevent or reduce the propensity for adiposity would modulate reproductive indices and cardiometabolic risk in an obese PCOS-prone rodent model. Weanling obese PCOS-prone and Lean-Control JCR:LA-cp rodents were given a chow diet ad libitum or an energy-restricted diet combined with or without voluntary exercise (4  h/day) for 8 weeks. Dietary energy restriction and exercise lowered total body weight gain and body fat mass by 30% compared to free-fed sedentary or exercising obese PCOS-prone animals (Pexercise intensity compared to free-feeding plus exercise conditions. Energy restriction and exercise decreased fasting plasma triglycerides and apoB48 concentrations in obese PCOS-prone animals compared to free-fed and exercise or sedentary groups. The energy restriction and exercise combination in obese PCOS-prone animals significantly increased plasma sex-hormone binding globulin, hypothalamic cocaine-and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) and Kisspeptin mRNA expression to levels of the Lean-Control group, and this was further associated with improvements in estrous cyclicity. The combination of exercise and dietary energy restriction when initiated in early life exerts beneficial effects on cardiometabolic and reproductive indices in an obese PCOS-prone rodent model, and this may be associated with normalization of the hypothalamic neuropeptides, Kisspeptin and CART.

  5. Major energy users and reforms of the German energy industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfaffenberger, W.

    1994-06-01

    There is a historic tradition of industrial autoproduction of electricity in Germany. Major energy users in the past used to be and today often still are autoproducers of electric power. The public utility sector, according to present legal standards, operates in a framework that protects local and regional monopolies. The large consumers and autoproducers are an important countervailing power in the whole system of the electricity supply industry. Electric utilities (EU) in Germany are semi-public or private enterprises of a wide variety of size. The large producer utilities operate the high voltage grid on the basis of private contracts. Regional distribution companies mostly without a considerable share in production often in cooperation with local distributors deliver electricity (el) in the non-urban areas whereas mostly city owned EU supply the large cities often on the basis of considerable parts of autoproduction and often also with a considerable share of el produced in cogeneration plants. The equilibrium between the parts of this system in the past was ensured by a legal framework protecting local monopolies as well as long term contracts between producers and distributors. Deregulation trends inherent in European legislation on competition have threatened this stability. In the first phase resistance against a more competitive order seemed unanimous. In the meantime however the different actors had time to rethink their position: The European Council has now proposed a more moderate regulation. The German Government has made a proposal for some important changes in the Energy Law and connected passages in the Competition Law, which would introduce some more competitive elements into the system without anticipating the results of a competitive process.

  6. A review on energy saving strategies in industrial sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelaziz, E.A.; Saidur, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Mekhilef, S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2011-01-15

    An industrial sector uses more energy than any other end-use sectors and currently this sector is consuming about 37% of the world's total delivered energy. Energy is consumed in the industrial sector by a diverse group of industries including manufacturing, agriculture, mining, and construction and for a wide range of activities, such as processing and assembly, space conditioning, and lighting. This paper presents a comprehensive literature review about industrial energy saving by management, technologies and policies. Latest literatures in terms of thesis (MS and PhD), journal articles, conference proceedings, web materials, reports, books, handbooks on industrial energy management, policies and energy savings strategies have been compiled. Energy saving by management including energy audit, training programs and housekeeping beside some energy management practices in the world has been reviewed. Energy saving technologies, such as use of high efficiency motors (HEMs), variable speed drives (VSDs), economizers, leak prevention and reducing pressure drop has been reviewed. Based on energy saving technologies results, it has been found that in the industrial sectors, a sizeable amount of electric energy, emissions and utility bill can be saved using these technologies. Payback periods for different energy savings measures have been identified and found to be economically viable in most cases. Finally, various energy-saving policies for few selected countries were reviewed. (author)

  7. Energy conservation in pulp and paper industry: some thoughts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadawarte, N.S.; Prasad, A.K.; Khanolkar, V.D.; Shenoy, S.C.

    1980-03-15

    The pulp and paper industry is highly energy intensive. In view of the spiralling fuel prices and rising power costs, there is an urgent need to conserve energy through better management of various operations in the industry, from the optimal utilization of the forest residues to the shipment of the final product. The total energy concept, e.g., energy generation, distribution and utilization in Indian paper industry is discussed. The need for an energy audit is emphasized and the formats of energy reporting forms are included. Short and long term measures to be enforced to achieve energy savings in the pulp and paper mills are outlined. Some important energy conservation approaches are also discussed. Factors affecting energy efficiency in a pulp and paper mill are reviewed. Some areas where sustained R and D efforts should be focused to make the paper industry nearly self-sufficient in energy generation and utilization are also given. It is essential to have a National Energy Policy clearly defining achievable targets of energy conservation for industry. The Indian paper industry could advantageously form its own committee to review the operation of the various mills in the country and come out with concrete solutions for higher energy efficiency and more effective conservation of energy.

  8. Economic analysis in support of proposed interim energy conservation voluntary performance standards for new non-federal residential buildings: Volume 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-09-01

    The objective of this document is to present an analysis of the impacts of the proposed voluntary energy conservation standard fr the construction of new residential buildings. This analysis examines the impacts of having the proposed residential standard apply immediately and, alternatively, having the proposed standard phased in over a five-year period.

  9. Empirical analysis of energy management in Danish industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Line Block; Larsen, Anders; Togeby, Mikael

    2006-01-01

    In this article we examine energy-management practice in the Danish manufacturing industry. The paper addresses the following: To what extent is energy management put into practice in Danish industry? From which sources does Danish industry obtain its information about making improvements in energy...... management? Based upon the results of a telephone survey covering 304 Danish industrial firms and by use of our definition of the minimum requirements for energy management, we concluded that between 3% and 14% practice energy management. Inspiration to manage energy comes from many different sources......, but the electricity utilities emerge as the main source of inspiration. This leads to a presentation of a statistical model synthesising two types of energy management and two potential avenues that can lead to improved energy management. One-size-fits-all is not appropriate when giving incentives for firms...

  10. Energy and Exergy Analysis of the Danish Industry Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bühler, Fabian; Nguyen, Tuong-Van; Elmegaard, Brian

    2015-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the Danish industry is presented in this paper using the energy, exergy and embodied exergy methods. The 22 most energy-intensive process industries, which represent about 80% of the total primary energy use of the industry, were modelled and analysed in details for the years...... 2006 and 2012. The energy and exergy losses, as well as the exergy destruction, were established, together with the embodied ones, by including the transformation processes in the utility sector. The energy and exergy efficiencies for each sub-sector were calculated in a final step and ranged from 12......% to 56% in 2012. Industries with high-temperature processes, such as the cement and metal production sectors, present the highest exergy efficiencies but the lowest energy ones. The opposite conclusion is drawn for the food, paper and chemical industries. The exergy losses, which indicate the potential...

  11. Energy intensive industry for Alaska. Volume I: Alaskan cost factors; market factors; survey of energy-intensive industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swift, W.H.; Clement, M.; Baker, E.G.; Elliot, D.C.; Jacobsen, J.J.; Powers, T.B.; Rohrmann, C.A.; Schiefelbein, G.L.

    1978-09-01

    The Alaskan and product market factors influencing industry locations in the state are discussed and a survey of the most energy intensive industries was made. Factors external to Alaska that would influence development and the cost of energy and labor in Alaska are analyzed. Industries that are likely to be drawn to Alaska because of its energy resources are analyzed in terms of: the cost of using Alaska energy resources in Alaska as opposed to the Lower 48; skill-adjusted wage and salary differentials between relevant Alaskan areas and the Lower 48; and basic plant and equipment and other operating cost differentials between relevant Alaskan areas and the Lower 48. Screening and evaluation of the aluminum metal industry, cement industry, chlor-alkali industry, lime industry, production of methanol from coal, petroleum refining, and production of petrochemicals and agrichemicals from North Slope natural gas for development are made.

  12. Wind energy development as a part of Poland's industrial development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoerring, Dagmara; Hvelplund, Frede Kloster

    2003-01-01

    The paper concludes with recommendations on how to make wind energy development a part of the industrial development in Poland by introducing renewable energy support mechanisms to improve the conditions for companies to develop wind technology in Poland.......The paper concludes with recommendations on how to make wind energy development a part of the industrial development in Poland by introducing renewable energy support mechanisms to improve the conditions for companies to develop wind technology in Poland....

  13. Pulp and Paper Industry Energy Bandwidth Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2006-08-01

    The study provides energy estimates for the following four cases: current average mill energy consumption, state-of-the-art art mill energy consumption, mill energy consumption if advanced technologies requiring further R&D were employed, and theoretical minimum mill energy consumption.

  14. Success factors of energy management in energy-intensive industries. Energy performance measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivill, L.

    2011-10-15

    This thesis explores energy performance measurement in support of energy management in the energy-intensive industries. In general, performance measurement is used in management for raising awareness, evaluating performance, setting targets and offering decision support. These purposes also apply to energy management, defined here as the management of all activities related to the economic and responsible use of energy in an organisation. This thesis answers the following three questions: 1) what is the concept of energy performance in a business organisation? 2) what is the importance of energy performance measurement to energy management in the energy-intensive industries? and 3) what are the subsequent needs for future research and development? A variety of methods are used, ranging from qualitative research to the modelling of energy systems and case demonstrations. The findings indicate that energy management should focus on improving energy performance, not energy efficiency, because this broader view is able to capture both the operational and strategic perspectives of energy management. This is in line with the trends of managerial integration and the adoption of sustainable development into management practice. The domain of energy performance indicators should entail organisational, systemic and temporal dimensions. From the perspective of operational management, performance measurement should address all the three means to improve energy performance, namely technology, operation and process integration. In addition to the operational management, future research and development should define the role of energy performance measurement in all the other management functions. These recommendations provide a wide spectrum of opportunities for the development of energy performance indicators, energy performance measurement systems and their underlying deployment processes in different industrial sectors, organisations and systems. (orig.)

  15. Fuel Cells in the Coal Energy Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolat Peter

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available In march 1998 at the conference „Coal Utilization & Fuel Systems“ in Clearwater, USA representatives of U.S. Department of Energy presented the vision 21 focused on the electricity generation from coal for 21st century. The goal is a powerplant with the ability to produce the electricity from coal with the efficiency approaching 60% (higher heating value and emission levels of one-tenth of today´s technologies, The CO2 capture and permanent sequestration at the cost of $15/ton of CO2, and a cost of electricity of 3 cents per kilowatt-hour. The goal is believed to be achievable by the first quarter of the next century. The vision 21 is presented with several possible concepts. One of them is based on coal gasification with following hydrogen separation. The obtained hydrogen is used as a fuel for the cogeneration unit with fuel cells. The remaining gas can be liquefied and utilised as a fuel in the automotive industry or further chemically processed. The concept has several important features. Firstly, a very clean low cost electricity production. Secondly, it is comprised of fuel processing section and power processing section. The two sections need not to be co-located. In the world of the deregulated electricity generation this offers a major advantage. The technologies of fuel processing section – coal gasification and hydrogen separation have been successfully developed in the last two decades. A specificity of the fuel processing section of this concept is to obtain hydrogen rich gas with very low concentrations of substances, as CO, which cause a poisoning of electrodes of fuel cells leading to the decreasing fuel cells efficiency. Fuel cells, specially highly efficient coal-gas SOFC and MCFC, are expected to be commercially available by 2020. The natural-gas MCFC and SOFC plants should enter the commercial marketplace by the year 2002.

  16. A simple forecasting model for industrial electric energy consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Shehri, Abdallah [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Electrical Engineering Dept., Dhaharan (Saudi Arabia)

    2000-07-01

    A single-equation model is developed and employed for forecasting industrial electric energy consumption in the Saudi Consolidated Electric Company in the Eastern Province (SCECO-East) of Saudi Arabia. SCECO-East's industrial loads are composed mainly of oil-related and petrochemical industries. Even though industrial loads are generally characterised by their steadiness, the harsh weather conditions of the Eastern Province cause great variations in the industrial electric energy consumption at SCECO-East. The developed model reflects these variations. MATLAB is used to solve the model. (Author)

  17. Energy efficiency improvement potentials and a low energy demand scenario for the global industrial sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kermeli, Katerina; Graus, Wina H J; Worrell, Ernst

    2014-01-01

    The adoption of energy efficiency measures can significantly reduce industrial energy use. This study estimates the future industrial energy consumption under two energy demand scenarios: (1) a reference scenario that follows business as usual trends and (2) a low energy demand scenario that takes i

  18. Energy efficiency improvement potentials and a low energy demand scenario for the global industrial sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kermeli, Katerina; Graus, Wina H J; Worrell, Ernst

    2014-01-01

    The adoption of energy efficiency measures can significantly reduce industrial energy use. This study estimates the future industrial energy consumption under two energy demand scenarios: (1) a reference scenario that follows business as usual trends and (2) a low energy demand scenario that takes

  19. Energy and Exergy Analyses of the Danish Industry Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bühler, Fabian; Nguyen, Tuong-Van; Elmegaard, Brian

    2016-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the Danish industry is presented in this paper using the energy and exergy methods. For the 22 most energy-intensive process industries, which represent about 80% of the total primary energy use of the industrial sector, detailed end-use models were created and analysed...... with data for the years 2006 and 2012. The sectoral energy and exergy losses, as well as the exergy destruction, were further established to quantify the potential for recovering and valorising heat otherwise lost. By also considering transformation processes occurring in the utility sector, the impact...... of using electricity and district heat in the industry is shown. The exergy efficiencies for each process industry were found to be in the range of 12% to 56% in 2012. However variations in the efficiencies within the sectors for individual process industries occur, underlining the need for detailed...

  20. Industrial Energy Efficiency: Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, Amelie [Institute for Industrial Productivity (United States); Taylor, Robert P. [Institute for Industrial Productivity (United States); Hedman, Bruce [Institute for Industrial Productivity (United States)

    2014-03-21

    This report provides state regulators, utilities, and other program administrators with an overview of U.S. industrial energy efficiency programs and assesses some of the key features of programs that have generated increased energy savings.

  1. Refractories for Industrial Processing. Opportunities for Improved Energy Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemrick, James G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hayden, H. Wayne [Metals Manufacture Process and Controls Technology, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Angelini, Peter [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Moore, Robert E. [R.E. Moore Associates, Maricopa, AZ (United States); Headrick, William L. [R.E. Moore Associates, Maricopa, AZ (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Refractories are a class of materials of critical importance to manufacturing industries with high-temperature unit processes. This study describes industrial refractory applications and identifies refractory performance barriers to energy efficiency for processing. The report provides recommendations for R&D pathways leading to improved refractories for energy-efficient manufacturing and processing.

  2. Public/private sector cooperation to promote industrial energy efficiency: Allied partners and the US Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKane, Aimee; Cockrill, Chris; Tutterow, Vestal; Radspieler, Anthony

    2003-05-18

    Since 1996, the US Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Technologies (USDOE) has been involved in a unique voluntary collaboration with industry called the Allied Partner program. Initially developed under the Motor Challenge program, the partnership concept continues as a central element of USDOE's BestPractices, which in 2001 integrated all of USDOE's near-term industrial program offerings including those in motors, compressed air, pump, fan, process heating and steam systems. Partnerships are sought with end use industrial companies as well as equipment suppliers and manufacturers, utilities, consultants, and state agencies that have extensive existing relationships with industrial customers. Partners are neither paid nor charged a fee for participation. Since the inception of Allied Partners, the assumption has been that these relationships could serve as the foundation for conveying a system energy-efficiency message to many more industrial facilities than could be reached through a typical government-to-end-user program model. An independent evaluation of the Motor Challenge program, reported at the last EEMODS conference, attributed US $16.9 million or nearly 67 percent of the total annual program energy savings to the efforts of Allied Partners in the first three years of operation. A recent evaluation of the Compressed Air Challenger, which grew out of the former Motor Challenger program, attribute additional energy savings from compressed air training alone at US $12.1 million per year. Since the reorganization under BestPractices, the Allied Partner program has been reshaped to extend the impact of all BestPractices program activities. This new model is more ambitious than the former Motor Challenge program concerning the level of collaborative activities negotiated with Allied Partners. This paper describes in detail two new types of program initiatives involving Allied Partners: Qualified Specialist Training and Energy Events. The

  3. Impact of recent energy legislation on the aluminum industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelson, E.; Emery, J.G.; Hopp, W.J.; Kretz, A.L.

    1981-06-01

    This report examines the aluminum industry's technology in energy use and emissions control. Data on consumption and pollution levels are presented. A history of the aluminum industry in the Pacific Northwest, its role in providing power reserves, and how that role fits into the present power situation are given. The Northwest Power Act, the rates the industry will probably pay as a result of the Act, the implications of those rates to the industry, as well as the availability of federal power to the industry are discussed. Finally, the Act's effects on the relative competitiveness of the industry in both domestic and world markets are examined.

  4. Solar energy in California industry - Applications, characteristics and potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, R. H.; Pivirotto, D. S.

    1978-01-01

    Results of a survey to determine the potential applicability of solar thermal energy to industrial processes in California are presented. It is found that if the heat for all industrial processes at temperatures below 212 F were supplied by solar energy, total state energy consumption could be reduced by 100 trillion Btus (2%), while the use of solar energy in processes between 212 and 350 F could displace 500 trillion Btus. The issues and problems with which solar energy must contend are illustrated by a description of fluid milk processing operations. Solar energy application is found to be technically feasible for processes with thermal energy requirements below 212 F, with design, and degree of technical, economic and management feasibility being site specific. It is recommended that the state provide support for federal and industrial research, development and demonstration programs in order to stimulate acceptance of solar process heat application by industry.

  5. Solar energy in California industry - Applications, characteristics and potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, R. H.; Pivirotto, D. S.

    1978-01-01

    Results of a survey to determine the potential applicability of solar thermal energy to industrial processes in California are presented. It is found that if the heat for all industrial processes at temperatures below 212 F were supplied by solar energy, total state energy consumption could be reduced by 100 trillion Btus (2%), while the use of solar energy in processes between 212 and 350 F could displace 500 trillion Btus. The issues and problems with which solar energy must contend are illustrated by a description of fluid milk processing operations. Solar energy application is found to be technically feasible for processes with thermal energy requirements below 212 F, with design, and degree of technical, economic and management feasibility being site specific. It is recommended that the state provide support for federal and industrial research, development and demonstration programs in order to stimulate acceptance of solar process heat application by industry.

  6. Plants as a raw material for industry and energy; Pflanzen fuer Industrie und Energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pude, Ralf [Bonn Univ. (Germany); Werner, Antje; Vollrath, Birgit [Bayerische Landesanstalt fuer Weinbau und Gartenbau (LWG), Veitshoechheim (Germany); Goedeke, Katja [Thueringer Landesanstalt fuer Landwirtschaft, Jena (Germany)

    2012-06-21

    Dwindling fossil resources, perceptible climatic change as well as an increased environmental awareness allow a reflection to energy crops and industrial crops. In order to explain the renewable resources by means of examples and illustrations, and in order to maintain an overview on the variety of renewable resources, the Agency for Renewable Ressources (Guelzow, Federal Republic of Germany) has published this brochure. The range and variety of use capacities of renewable resources are discussed. Cultural technical applications on cultivation and harvesting of crops round off the issue.

  7. Energy conservation and emissions reduction strategies in foundry industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yuanyuan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Current energy conservation and emissions reduction strategies in iron and steel industry were reviewed. Since foundry industry is one of the major source of energy consumption and pollution emission (especially CO2, issues concerning energy-saving and emission-reduction have been raised by governments and the industry. Specialists from around the world carried out multidimensional analyses and evaluation on the potentials in energy conservation and emissions reduction in iron and steel industry, and proposed various kinds of analyzing models. The primary measures mainly focus on the targeted policies formulation and also on clean and high-efficient technologies development. The differences and similarities in energy conservation and emission reduction in foundry industry between China and other countries were discussed, while, the future development trend was also pointed out.

  8. Challenges and Strength of Current Industrial Energy Efficiency Management Practices in Steam Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkosi, S. B.; Pretorius, J. H. C.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study is to achieve greater output by examining the existing way of coordinating the determined attempts of Steam Industries in South Africa to successfully reach a sustainable industrial development by using energy source adequately in a more competent way. Furthermore into the study we look at obstacles that prevent and those that leads to maximum utilization of energy management measures and also highlights the effects of implementing cheap available energy source in South Africa. The investigation and analysis have shown that energy is not well managed in Steam Industries and that the use of energy is minimized and not fully utilized due to poor management and lack of knowledge. Another detection was that lack of government structured and strategic measures of implementing and motivating the use of energy effectively. The effective and rational use of available power by Steam Industries in South Africa is a key player in developing a sustainable industrial development. The use of energy efficiency management strategies has contributed an increase in economic and improve environmentally friendly in the industrial sector. The slow pace adoption of energy saving and cost effective management programmes are negatively impacting on the benefits to Steam Industries in South Africa. In conclusion the study finds that the economy can be boosted by implementing energy efficiency management programmes and environmentally friendly. These will also stabilize the negative impact of energy raising prices.

  9. An energy flow analysis in a paper-based industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saidur, R. [University of Malaya, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Sambandam, M.T.; Rajakarunakaran, S. [Kalasalingam University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Krishnankoil (India); Hasanuzzaman, M. [University of Malaya, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); University of Malaya, UM Power Energy Dedicated Advanced Centre (UMPEDAC), Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Devaraj, D. [Kalasalingam University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Krishnankoil (India); Islam, M.D. [The Petroleum Institute, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2012-10-15

    Industrial sector is the largest user of energy in India and many parts of the world. More than half of the total energy is used in industries to operate various energy-using machineries. Energy conservation is a cost-effective approach in any energy optimization program that can be implemented in industrial activities. Energy-intensive industries in developing economies offer significant energy-saving potential owing to the technology gap as well as lower operating efficiency. A detailed energy flow analysis was conducted in a paper carton manufacturing unit in India to quantify the energy-saving potential. The study revealed that the compressed air leakage is responsible for about 50% of the total energy loss. The specific electrical and thermal energy consumption was estimated and found to be 91.85 kWh/ton and 1,619 MJ/ton of biomass, respectively. Annual energy saving potential was found to be 5.9% of the total annual energy consumption. The cost of DG power is found to be 389% higher than the grid power. The share of self-generated DG power is estimated to be 41% of the total power consumed. Electrical energy intensity of the plant could be reduced by 6.36% implementing energy conservation measures proposed in this study. (orig.)

  10. Opportunity knocks - the sustainable energy industry and climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, B.; Keegan, P. [International Institute for Energy Conservation, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Climate change mitigation, if intelligently undertaken, can stimulate economic growth. The main tools available for this task are energy efficiency, renewable energy, and clean energy technologies and services, which are collectively known as sustainable energy. To unleash this potential, the US and other governments need the full cooperation of the sustainable energy industry. This industry knows more than most other about turning energy-related pollution prevention into profits. If engaged, they can help: (1) Identify the economic benefits of greenhouse gas mitigation; (2) Identify barriers to the implementation of greenhouse gas mitigation projects; (3) Develop policies and measures to overcome these barriers; and (4) Implement greenhouse gas mitigation projects. 7 refs.

  11. Measuring industrial energy efficiency: Physical volume versus economic value

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, S.L.; Niefer, M.J.; Roop, J.M.

    1996-12-01

    This report examines several different measures of industrial output for use in constructing estimates of industrial energy efficiency and discusses some reasons for differences between the measures. Estimates of volume-based measures of output, as well as 3 value-based measures of output (value of production, value of shipments, and value added), are evaluated for 15 separate 4-digit industries. Volatility, simple growth rate, and trend growth rate estimates are made for each industry and each measure of output. Correlations are made between the volume- and value-based measures of output. Historical energy use data are collected for 5 of the industries for making energy- intensity estimates. Growth rates in energy use, energy intensity, and correlations between volume- and value-based measures of energy intensity are computed. There is large variability in growth trend estimates both long term and from year to year. While there is a high correlation between volume- and value-based measures of output for a few industries, typically the correlation is low, and this is exacerbated for estimates of energy intensity. Analysis revealed reasons for these low correlations. It appears that substantial work must be done before reliable measures of trends in the energy efficiency of industry can be accurately characterized.

  12. Industrial operations and maintenance energy measures: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, S.A.; Gaustad, K.L.; Winiarski, D.W.

    1994-12-01

    Industry consumes a significant percentage of the total electric energy consumption both nationally and in the Pacific Northwest. However, industrial demand-side management (DSM) activities in this sector are underdeveloped and typically concentrate on new technologies and new equipment. An overlooked opportunity for electric resource development is through operations and maintenance (O and M) activities. The purpose of this project is to determine the industrial DSM potential that may be achieved through O and M practices both in the US and the Pacific Northwest. The overall goal of the project is to identify, quantify, confirm, and develop conservation resources that can be achieved from the industrial sector through O and M practices and energy measures. The results of the study identify a significant electric resource potential available through improved O and M activities in industry. Several O and M type energy-saving measures that increase efficiencies and reduce loads are identified and estimates of potential energy savings associated with each measure are presented. Systems identified with the most potential include compressed-air systems; motors and motor drives; lighting; heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC); and control systems. The results of the research show that industrial electric energy consumption can be notably reduced by implementing key O and M type energy measures. Specifically, the results of industrial energy audits, case studies, and other published sources indicate that reductions in energy consumption from improved O and M activities can average between 8% and 12.5%.

  13. Analyzing industrial energy use through ordinary least squares regression models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Allyson Katherine

    Extensive research has been performed using regression analysis and calibrated simulations to create baseline energy consumption models for residential buildings and commercial institutions. However, few attempts have been made to discuss the applicability of these methodologies to establish baseline energy consumption models for industrial manufacturing facilities. In the few studies of industrial facilities, the presented linear change-point and degree-day regression analyses illustrate ideal cases. It follows that there is a need in the established literature to discuss the methodologies and to determine their applicability for establishing baseline energy consumption models of industrial manufacturing facilities. The thesis determines the effectiveness of simple inverse linear statistical regression models when establishing baseline energy consumption models for industrial manufacturing facilities. Ordinary least squares change-point and degree-day regression methods are used to create baseline energy consumption models for nine different case studies of industrial manufacturing facilities located in the southeastern United States. The influence of ambient dry-bulb temperature and production on total facility energy consumption is observed. The energy consumption behavior of industrial manufacturing facilities is only sometimes sufficiently explained by temperature, production, or a combination of the two variables. This thesis also provides methods for generating baseline energy models that are straightforward and accessible to anyone in the industrial manufacturing community. The methods outlined in this thesis may be easily replicated by anyone that possesses basic spreadsheet software and general knowledge of the relationship between energy consumption and weather, production, or other influential variables. With the help of simple inverse linear regression models, industrial manufacturing facilities may better understand their energy consumption and

  14. RENEWABLE ENERGY BETWEEN AGRICULTURE AND INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana GROSU

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to present the evolution of renewable energy in the entire world, including Moldova and Romania as states that tend to reach their micro- and macro-economic objectives. One of the most important goal remains thedevelopment of renewable energy from agricultural waste and so the energy coming from natural sources such assolar, wind or water without air pollution. As a conclusion, the solution to obtain this renewable energy is to attractfinancial resources from EU or USA investors.

  15. Energy use in the paper industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laurijssen, J

    2013-01-01

    The paper sector is affected by many challenges, especially related to increased competition for raw materials and energy. In this thesis several opportunities are identified that enable the sector to reduce its’ dependency on energy and resources, lower its energy costs and reduce its carbon footpr

  16. Solar energy and the aeronautics industry. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, L.

    1985-01-01

    An introduction to the physical aspects of solar energy, incidental energy and variations in solar flux is presented, along with an explanation of the physical principles of obtaining solar energy. The history of the application of solar energy to aeronautics, including the Gossamer Penguin and the Solar Challenger is given. Finally, an analysis of the possibilities of using a reaction motor with hybrid propulsion combining solar energy with traditional fuels as well as calculations of the proposed cycle and its mode of operation are given.

  17. Cooperative effort for industrial energy data collection (IEDC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, H.J.

    1979-10-01

    The expanding research effort in recent years in industrial energy use has created a need for detailed data on specific industrial processes. To meet this need and eliminate multiple contacts with individual plants, a cooperative effort to collect and centralize industrial energy-use data has been organized by several solar research organizations. To date, a centralized list has been produced of industrial plants and trade associations that have been contracted, and a data format has been created for use by all organizations interested in participating in this effort.

  18. Energy Reporting Practices among Top Energy Intensive Industries in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasrip, N. E.; Mat Husin, N.; Alrazi, B.

    2016-03-01

    This study content analyses the energy content in the corporate report of top 30 Malaysian energy-intensive companies. Motivated by the gap among prior corporate social responsibility and environmental reporting studies in respect of energy, this study provides evidence of Malaysian companies’ initiative to reduce energy consumption. While the evidence suggests that not all 30 companies have reported energy-related information, the findings provide an overview on the response of energy intensive companies in relation to Malaysian government initiatives on energy.

  19. Industrial energy efficiency: Achieving success in a difficult environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellow, Carl

    2010-09-15

    Energy use and the resulting environmental impacts are major points of concern for the world in the 21st century. Opinions that define the challenges of sustainable energy options are as diverse as the proposed solutions. The industrial sector is a key area both from the standpoint of the amount of energy consumed and the magnitude of the energy options that exist there. However, history has shown that success in the industrial energy sector requires careful planning and consideration of the unique challenges of the manufacturing environment.

  20. Internationalization as a strategy to overcome industry barriers-An assessment of the marine energy industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovdal, Nicolai, E-mail: nicolai.lovdal@iot.ntnu.n [Industrial Economics and Technology Management, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Neumann, Frank, E-mail: frank@wave-energy-centre.or [Wave Energy Centre, Av. Manuel Maia, 36, r/c Dto., 1000-201 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2011-03-15

    Research on conditions to develop new innovations within emerging renewable energy industries is often done with a national focus. However, recent research on international entrepreneurship has revealed that firms operate on international levels very early in their life time. Thus, based on former research on international entrepreneurship and case examples, we build the propositions that firms in the marine energy industry use internationalization as a strategy to overcome industry barriers. Our primary source of data is a unique dataset from a global survey of all the companies in the marine energy industry who are aiming to commercialize a wave or tidal energy device. This paper is organized in two steps: first we identified the most challenging industry barriers perceived by companies. Second we use these to form propositions which we assess through empirical data. The two most challenging barriers perceived by the companies are need for capital and need for supportive political schemes. Our findings reveal that internationalization certainly is a common strategy to access capital and attractive support schemes in foreign countries. The early internationalization has implications for researchers, managers and policy makers. - Research highlights: {yields} Industry barriers identified as access to capital and supportive political schemes. {yields} International entrepreneurship is used to overcome industry barriers. {yields} Start-ups in emerging energy industries 'shop' national support schemes. {yields} Future research to provide policy advice should adapt to the international reality. {yields} Research based on a worldwide survey of wave and tidal energy device developers.

  1. Energy Industry:Hunger for Steel Pipe?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Berry Chen

    2009-01-01

    @@ After the ups and downs of Chinese steel pipe market in 2008, industry structure changes are taking place quietly. Some enterprises with high-end oil and natural gas pipes and high-pressure boiler tubes have not been much offected in this storm, and won good market demand, while others with low-end products have been eliminated.

  2. Bright Future for Xinjiang's Energy Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jun

    2010-01-01

    @@ Xinjiang enjoys huge energy resources,and the amount of total storage of petroleum,natural-gas,and coal takes up about 30 percent of the national resource storage.It also benefits from its geographical borders,which extend north to Russia and west to Central Asia.This puts Xinjiang in position to become an international energy city for energy trade and cooperation with China's neighboring countries.

  3. Energy efficiency opportunities in the brewery industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Martin, Nathan

    2002-06-28

    Breweries in the United States spend annually over $200 Million on energy. Energy consumption is equal to 3-8% of the production costs of beer, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce costs, especially in times of high energy price volatility. After a summary of the beer making process and energy use, we examine energy efficiency opportunities available for breweries. We provide specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies that have implemented the measures, as well as references to technical literature. If available, we have also listed typical payback periods. Our findings suggest that there may still be opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively for breweries. Major brewing companies have and will continue to spend capital on cost effective measures that do not impact the quality of the beer. Further research on the economics of the measures, as well as their applicability to different brewing practices, is needed to assess implementation of selected technologies at individual breweries.

  4. Worldwide benchmark for energy efficiency in the brewing industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wouda, P.; Pennartz, A.M.G. Pennartz [KWA Business Consultants, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Reuchlin, H. [Dutch Brewer' s Association, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2002-07-01

    Prompted by an agreement with the government the Dutch brewers set out to develop a method to establish a worldwide benchmark in specific energy consumption for the brewing industry. In total more than 100 breweries from 38 countries participated in this energy benchmark. The study shows that 10 % of the participating breweries have a specific energy consumption lower than 193 MJ/hl.

  5. Energy conservation in the industry. Innovators talking; Energiebesparing in de industrie. Innovators aan het woord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-02-15

    Qualitative studies have been conducted of the results of completed projects focused on energy innovation, spread over the seven themes of the top sector Energy: Energy saving in industry, Energy conservation in the built environment, Gas, Bio-energy, Smart grids, Offshore Wind, Solar PV. This provides insight into the follow-up activities and lessons of some EOS (Energy Research Subsidy) completed projects with the aim to inspire, connect and strengthen the TKIs (Topconsortia for Knowledge and Innovation) and individual companies and researchers working on energy innovation. This report concerns the research on energy conservation in the industry [Dutch] Er is een kwalitatief onderzoek uitgevoerd naar de resultaten van afgeronde projecten gericht op energie-innovatie, verdeeld over de zeven thema's van de topsector Energie: Energiebesparing in de industrie; Energiebesparing in de gebouwde omgeving; Gas; Bio-energie; Smart grids; Wind op zee; Zon-pv. Daarmee wordt inzicht gegeven in de vervolgactiviteiten en lessen van een aantal afgesloten EOS-projecten (Energie Onderzoek Subsidie) met het oog op het inspireren, verbinden en versterken van de TKI's (Topconsortia voor Kennis en Innovatie) en individuele bedrijven en onderzoekers die werken aan energie-innovatie. Dit rapport betreft het onderzoek naar energiebesparing in de industrie.

  6. Voluntary Slavery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Frederick

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The permissibility of actions depends upon facts about the flourishing and separateness of persons. Persons differ from other creatures in having the task of discovering for themselves, by conjecture and refutation, what sort of life will fulfil them. Compulsory slavery impermissibly prevents some persons from pursuing this task. However, many people may conjecture that they are natural slaves. Some of these conjectures may turn out to be correct. In consequence, voluntary slavery, in which one person welcomes the duty to fulfil all the commands of another, is permissible. Life-long voluntary slavery contracts are impermissible because of human fallibility; but fixed-term slavery contracts should be legally enforceable. Each person has the temporarily alienable moral right to direct her own life.

  7. Voluntary Slavery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Frederick

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The permissibility of actions depends upon facts about the flourishing and separateness of persons. Persons differ from other creatures in having the task of discovering for themselves, by conjecture and refutation, what sort of life will fulfil them. Compulsory slavery impermissibly prevents some persons from pursuing this task. However, many people may conjecture that they are natural slaves. Some of these conjectures may turn out to be correct. In consequence, voluntary slavery, in which one person welcomes the duty to fulfil all the commands of another, is permissible. Life-long voluntary slavery contracts are impermissible because of human fallibility; but fixed-term slavery contracts should be legally enforceable. Each person has the temporarily alienable moral right to direct her own life.

  8. Energy-Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Textile Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    China Energy Group; Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2010-09-29

    The textile industry is one of the most complicated manufacturing industries because it is a fragmented and heterogeneous sector dominated by small and medium enterprises (SMEs). Energy is one of the main cost factors in the textile industry. Especially in times of high energy price volatility, improving energy efficiency should be a primary concern for textile plants. There are various energy-efficiency opportunities that exist in every textile plant, many of which are cost-effective. However, even cost-effective options often are not implemented in textile plants mostly because of limited information on how to implement energy-efficiency measures, especially given the fact that a majority of textile plants are categorized as SMEs and hence they have limited resources to acquire this information. Know-how on energy-efficiency technologies and practices should, therefore, be prepared and disseminated to textile plants. This guidebook provides information on energy-efficiency technologies and measures applicable to the textile industry. The guidebook includes case studies from textile plants around the world and includes energy savings and cost information when available. First, the guidebook gives a brief overview of the textile industry around the world, with an explanation of major textile processes. An analysis of the type and the share of energy used in different textile processes is also included in the guidebook. Subsequently, energy-efficiency improvement opportunities available within some of the major textile sub-sectors are given with a brief explanation of each measure. The conclusion includes a short section dedicated to highlighting a few emerging technologies in the textile industry as well as the potential for the use of renewable energy in the textile industry.

  9. Waste energy boosts tomato industry at distillery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McColl, J.

    1989-04-01

    A trial project aimed at using waste hot water from the cooling process at a Scottish whisky distillery to heat a glasshouse for tomato production is described. Later developments have involved the installation of a waste heat boiler to make use of the heat from the still burner flue gases. Steam from the boiler is used within the distillery and to supplement the glasshouse system. The payback within the distillery industry has been excellent, but tomato production, though continuing, was adversely affected by severe cutbacks in distillery production in the early eighties. Recently further significant savings have been made in the distillery industry by the installation of a regenerative burner in one of the stills and thermo-compressors in the cooling tower condensers to produce low pressure steam which can be fed back into the system. (U.K.).

  10. Industrial relocation and energy consumption: Evidence from China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Xiaoli, E-mail: email99zxl@vip.sina.co [School of Economics and Business, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Erb Institute for Global Sustainable Enterprise, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Yin Haitao, E-mail: htyin@sjtu.edu.c [Antai College of Economics and Management, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200052 (China); Erb Institute for Global Sustainable Enterprise, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    With economic development and the change of industrial structure, industrial relocation is an inevitable trend. In the process of industrial relocation, environmental externality and social cost could occur due to market failure and government failure. Little attention has been paid to this issue. In this paper, we address it with a theoretical analysis and an empirical investigation on the relationship between China's industrial relocation in the early 1990s and energy consumption which is the primary source of CO{sub 2} emission, an environmental externality that causes increasing concerns. The macro-policy analysis suggests that there would be a positive link between China's industrial relocation in the early 1990s and energy saving (and environmental externalities reduction). Using fixed-effect regression model and simulation method, we provide an empirical support to this argument. In order to further reduce environmental externalities and social cost in the process of industrial relocation, we provide policy suggestions as follows: First, strengthen the evaluation of environmental benefits/costs; Second, pay more attention to the coordinated social-economic development; Third, avoid long-lived investment in high-carbon infrastructure in areas with industries moved in; Fourth, address employment issue in the areas with industries moved out. - Research highlights: {yields} Little attention has been paid to the linkage between industrial relocation and environmental externality. {yields} Our macro-policy analysis suggests that there would be a positive link between China's industrial relocation in the early 1990s and energy saving (and environmental externalities reduction). {yields} Using fixed-effect regression model and simulation method, we find a positive link between China's industrial relocation in the early 1990s and energy saving. {yields} Policy suggestions to further reduce environmental externalities and social cost in the process

  11. The quid-pro-quo of environmental agreements: Reflections on industrial energy efficiency agreements from five countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helby, Peter

    2001-10-01

    This workshop paper reflects on the exchange of values between the government side and the business side, which is a core logic of environmental agreements. The reflections refer to case studies of industrial energy efficiency agreements from Denmark, France, Germany, Netherlands and Sweden, originating from the VAIE project (Voluntary Agreements, Implementation and Efficiency). The government bargaining chips discussed are monetary rewards, help to gain competitive advantage, regulatory flexibility and political protection. The business side bargaining chips are emission limits, organisational change, investments, information, submission to control and political pain reduction. The discussion underlines the need for substantial commitments by the government side, as a precondition for achieving effective agreements.

  12. Many energy conservation options for the industry in the Netherlands; Nog steeds veel mogelijkheden energiebesparing industrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-01-01

    An overview is given of possibilities to strengthen and broaden the so-called long-range energy efficiency agreements (MJA) between industrial sectors in the Netherlands and the Dutch government. Technical-economical energy saving options for the long-term concern available information and data on existing and new techniques for energy conservation, attention for different greenhouse gases, and integrated chain management

  13. Energy efficiency programs and policies in the industrial sector in industrialized countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst

    2004-06-01

    About 37% of the primary energy consumed both in the U.S. and globally is used by the industrial sector. A variety of energy efficiency policies and programs have been implemented throughout the world in an effort to improve the energy efficiency of this sector. This report provides an overview of these policies and programs in twelve industrialized nations and the European Union (EU). We focus on energy efficiency products and services that are available to industrial consumers, such as reports, guidebooks, case studies, fact sheets, profiles, tools, demonstrations, roadmaps and benchmarking. We also focus on the mechanisms to communicate the availability and features of these products and services and to disseminate them to the industrial consumers who can use them. Communication channels include customer information centers and websites, conferences and trade shows, workshops and other training mechanisms, financial assistance programs, negotiated agreements, newsletters, publicity, assessments, tax and subsidy schemes and working groups. In total, over 30 types of industrial sector energy efficiency products, services and delivery channels have been identified in the countries studied. Overall, we found that the United States has a large variety of programs and offers industry a number of supporting programs for improving industrial energy efficiency. However, there are some products and services found in other industrialized countries that are not currently used in the U.S., including benchmarking programs, demonstration of commercialized technologies and provision of energy awareness promotion materials to companies. Delivery mechanisms found in other industrialized countries that are not employed in the U.S. include negotiated agreements, public disclosure and national-level tax abatement for energy-efficient technologies.

  14. Study on the Development Capability of New Energy Industry in China -A Case Study of New Energy Industry Development in Tianjin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Wang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study first introduces the development history of new energy industry. In order to evaluate the development capability of new energy industry, the study set up an evaluation model for development capability of new energy industry. Using this model the study evaluates the development capability of new energy industry in Tianjin.

  15. Energy efficiency and CO2 emissions in Swedish manufacturing industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardo Martinez, C.I. [Faculty of Environmental Engineering, University of La Salle, Bogota (Colombia); Silveira, S [Energy and Climate Studies, Department of Energy Technology, KTH, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-02-15

    This paper analyses the trends in energy consumption and CO2 emissions as a result of energy efficiency improvements in Swedish manufacturing industries between 1993 and 2008. Using data at the two-digit level, the performance of this sector is studied in terms of CO2 emissions, energy consumption, energy efficiency measured as energy intensity, value of production, fuel sources, energy prices and energy taxes. It was found that energy consumption, energy intensity and CO2 emission intensity, measured as production values, have decreased significantly in the Swedish manufacturing industries during the period studied. The results of the decomposition analysis show that output growth has not required higher energy consumption, leading to a reduction in both energy and CO2 emission intensities. The role of structural changes has been minor, and the trends of energy efficiency and CO2 emissions have been similar during the sample period. A stochastic frontier model was used to determine possible factors that may have influenced these trends. The results demonstrate that high energy prices, energy taxes, investments and electricity consumption have influenced the reduction of energy and CO2 emission intensities, indicating that Sweden has applied an adequate and effective energy policy. The study confirms that it is possible to achieve economic growth and sustainable development whilst also reducing the pressure on resources and energy consumption and promoting the shift towards a low-carbon economy.

  16. Energy Efficiency in Industrial Areas: Application of Best Practices for Energy Efficiency In Mediterranean Industrial Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Anna Segreto

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The results presented in this paper originate from an EU research project that is near toits completion. The goal was to build a model that can be applied to all industrial sites inthe Mediterranean area. The approach followed to achieve the objectives was to study allthe new technologies and systems that, if applied globally, can make the whole areasustainable both energetically and environmentally. The application of the model allowsthe design and implementation of self-sufficient green areas in terms of energy which alsobrings to the reduction of the emissions into the atmosphere. An aim of the project wasalso to identify possible sources of funding or incentives. The main beneficiaries of theresults are SMEs that through a more responsible approach to the environment could getgreater market competitiveness and reduce energy costs of their enterprises. Otherbeneficiaries are the people who obtain advantages from a clearer and less pollutedsurrounding environment.The paper presents the results obtained from the application of the model in some pilotcases.

  17. Spatial monopoly and the U. S. electrical energy industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uri, N.D.

    1984-11-01

    The authors examine the effectiveness of regulation in the electrical energy industry in the U.S. On the whole, the industry is not allowed to act as a spatial monopolist. It is not justifiable, however, to conclude that monopolistic tendencies are absent. In particular, the pricing structure departs from the competitive criterion, which requires price to equal the marginal cost of supplying electrical energy to a given consumer.

  18. Tracking industrial energy efficiency and CO2 emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-06-25

    Industry accounts for about one-third of global energy demand. Most of that energy is used to produce raw materials: chemicals, iron and steel, non-metallic minerals, pulp and paper and non-ferrous metals. Just how efficiently is this energy put to work? This question was on the minds of the G8 leaders at their summit in Gleneagles in 2005, when they set a 'Plan of Action for Climate Change, Clean Energy and Sustainable Development'. They called upon the International Energy Agency to provide information and advice in a number of areas including special attention to the industrial sector. Tracking Industrial Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions responds to the G8 request. This major new analysis shows how industrial energy efficiency has improved dramatically over the last 25 years. Yet important opportunities for additional gains remain, which is evident when the efficiencies of different countries are compared. This analysis identifies the leaders and the laggards. It explains clearly a complex issue for non-experts. With new statistics, groundbreaking methodologies, thorough analysis and advice, and substantial industry consultation, this publication equips decision makers in the public and private sectors with the essential information that is needed to reshape energy use in manufacturing in a more sustainable manner.

  19. Study of energy conservation potential in the baking industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-05-01

    The U.S. baking industry consumes more than 82 trillion BTU/yr or 7% of the gross energy used by the U.S. food system. In order to establish energy saving possibilities in the baking industry, energy audits were performed for 5 bakery plants. These audits resulted in suggestions for formal programs for energy conservation and involve changes in operating procedures, equipment improvement, increased thermal insulation in buildings and equipment, recovery of waste heat, and the substitution of fossil fuel for higher cost electric power for heating. The economic advantages of such modifications are given. (LCL)

  20. Elasticity of Energy Demand and Challenges for China's Energy Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jason Zunsheng Yin; David Forrest Gates

    2006-01-01

    The rapid growth of energy demand, the lagging growth of energy production and rising pollution problems have raised concerns in several policy areas, including the availability and cost of energy supply and the possibility of further adverse impacts on the environment. This paper begins with an overview of recent developments in energy demand and supply in China.Using a traditional demand elasticity approach, it analyzes the elasticity of each of four major energy end uses and the potential for adjustments in their relationships. The paper concludes with suggestions for public policy to meet the challenge of growing energy demand and implications for the private sector, including both private and foreign investments.

  1. Energy conservation in the industry. Special issue; Energiebesparing in de industrie, Thema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuiper, N. (ed.)

    2012-07-01

    In every issue of this magazine attention is paid to ne specific subject. In this issue the focus is on energy saving in the industry [Dutch] In elke aflevering van dit magazine wordt aandacht besteed aan een bepaald thema. In deze aflevering is het onderwerp energiebesparing in de industrie.

  2. New Industrial Park Energy Supply (NIPES): a method of efficiently supplying energy to a community of industrial users

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-08-01

    The New Industrial Park Energy Supply (NIPES) concept allows the use of coal by small as well as large industrial users. The NIPES concept consists of a system of Energy Supply Stations groups of cogeneration plants) and steam transmission lines that supplies process heat and electricity to multiple existing and/or new users in an industrial park(s) setting. The Energy Supply Stations grow along with the industrial park(s) as new industries are attracted by a reliable reasonably priced energy source. The growth of the Energy Supply Stations over a period of years allows the introduction of new energy sources and technologies as they become established. This report describes the generic NIPES concept and the results of the evaluation of a specific NIPES system for the Lake Charles, Louisiana, area. A ten-year process steam load growth scenario is developed including both new and existing industrial users. During the initial years of the growth scenario, process steam is supplied to the industrial users by several coal-fired plants. Later, as the process steam load develops, a two-unit nuclear plant is integrated into the specific NIPES system. An evaluation is also performed for a NIPES system consisting of all coal-fired plants. The specific NIPES system is compared to: (1) individual user owned oil-fired facilities for existing industrial users; and (2) individual user owned coal-fired facilities for new industrial plants. A financial analysis is performed to determine the total economic advantages associated with the NIPES system: savings in a steam costs for industrial users, potential return on investment for investors.

  3. Energy and materials flows in the iron and steel industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparrow, F.T.

    1983-06-01

    Past energy-consumption trends and future energy-conservation opportunities are investigated for the nation's iron and steel industry. It is estimated that, in 1980, the industry directly consumed approximately 2.46 x 10/sup 15/ Btu of energy (roughly 3% of total US energy consumption) to produce 111 million tons of raw steel and to ship 84 million tons of steel products. Direct plus indirect consumption is estimated to be about 3.1 x 10/sup 15/ Btu. Of the set of conservation technologies identified, most are judged to be ready for commercialization if and when the industry's capital formation and profitability problems are solved and the gradual predicted increase in energy prices reduces the payback periods to acceptable levels.

  4. Technology Roadmap. Energy Loss Reduction and Recovery in Industrial Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2004-11-01

    To help guide R&D decision-making and gain industry insights on the top opportunities for improved energy systems, ITP sponsored the Energy Loss Reduction and Recoveryin Energy Systems Roadmapping Workshopin April 2004 in Baltimore, Maryland. This Technology Roadmapis based largely on the results of the workshop and additional industrial energy studies supported by ITP and EERE. It summarizes industry feedback on the top opportunities for R&D investments in energy systems, and the potential for national impacts on energy use and the environment.

  5. Industrial Energy Efficiency Practices in Indonesia: Lesson Learned from Astra Green Energy (AGen) Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telaga, A. S.; Hartanto, I. D.

    2017-03-01

    Many countries have used award system to promote energy efficiency practices in industry. The award system has been found to have significant impact to increase energy conservation and sustainability adoption in companies. Astra International (AI) as a holding company of more than 200 companies also organised Astra green energy (AGen) award to all affiliated companies (AFFCO) in Astra group. The event has been used to share energy efficiency best practices among AFFCO in Astra group. AFFCOs of Astra International are among the biggest and the leader in their industrial sectors Therefore, analyses from AFFO’s energy efficiency case studies represents current practices in Indonesia industrial sectors. Analyses are divided into industry, building, and renewable energy. The results from analyses found that AFFCOs already aware of energy conservation and have implemented projects to promote energy efficiency. However, the AFFCOs do not optimally use monitoring data for energy reduction.

  6. Potential environmental effects of energy conservation measures in northwest industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baechler, M C; Gygi, K F; Hendrickson, P L

    1992-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) has identified 101 plants in the Pacific Northwest that account for 80% of the region's industrial electricity consumption. These plants offer a precise target for a conservation program. PNL determined that most of these 101 plants were represented by 11 major industries. We then reviewed 36 major conservation technologies used in these 11 industrial settings to determine their potential environmental impacts. Energy efficiency technologies designed for industrial use may result in direct or indirect environmental impacts. Effects may result from the production of the conservation measure technology, changes in the working environment due to different energy and material requirements, or changes to waste streams. Industry type, work-place conditions, worker training, and environmental conditions inside and outside the plant are all key variables that may affect environmental outcomes. To address these issues this report has three objectives: Describe potential conservation measures that Bonneville may employ in industrial programs and discuss potential primary impacts. Characterize industrial systems and processes where the measure may be employed and describe general environmental issues associated with each industry type. Review environmental permitting, licensing, and other regulatory actions required for industries and summarize the type of information available from these sources for further analysis.

  7. Energy analysis of 108 industrial processes. Phase 1, industrial applications study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamel, B. B.; Brown, H. L.

    1979-06-01

    Extensive data are compiled for energy balances in 108 industrial processes. Specific information on unit operation, material, temperature, unrecoverable losses, along with the process flow diagram is given for each of the industries. The following industries are included: meak packing; milk; canned fruits and vegetables; baked goods; sugar refining; soybean; textiles; wood products; building materials; alkalies and chlorine; inorganic gases; pigments, chemicals; plastic materials and resins; synthetic rubbers; organic fibers; pharmaceutical preparations; organic chemicals; petroleum products; fertilizers; rubber products; glass; blast furnaces and steel mills; metals; farm machinery; motor vehicles; and photographic materials. The SIC's for each industry are identified.

  8. Power from industrial waste waters; Energie aus Industrieabwaessern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vith, Christian; Fischer, Peter; Wunsch, Michael; Koeppl, Stefan [Hager und Elsaesser GmbH, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2009-04-15

    Strongly loaded industrial waste waters contain an interesting energy potential. Even if high nitrogen concentrations are present beside a high organic freight, an ideal field of deployment results for the anaerobic pre-treatment. An energy-optimized processing can consist of a combination of fermentation gas production by means of methanization and a nitrogen release by means of deammonification.

  9. Energy, economic and environmental benefits of using high-efficiency motors to replace standard motors for the Malaysian industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saidur, R.; Mahlia, T.M.I. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2010-08-15

    Electric motors use major share (i.e. about 30-80% of total industrial energy consumption) of total industrial energy use around the world. Experiences from other countries show that government intervention in the form of regulations such as mandatory and voluntary approaches can save sizeable amount of energy along with the reduction in emissions associated with energy savings. This paper presents potential energy savings by introducing high-efficiency motors as a case study in Malaysian industrial sector. Emission reductions associated with the energy savings has been estimated and presented as well. It was also estimated that a cumulative amount of 1940 and 892 GWh of energy can be saved for 20 and 120 kW motors, respectively, in Malaysia relative to BAU over the next 10 years. Similarly, a cumulative amount of USD 100 million and USD 60 million can be saved as utility bills for the same motor categories. It has been found that the payback period of different capacities of motors are less than a year. Based on results, it was found that 1789 million kg of CO{sub 2} emission can be avoided by replacing standard motors with high-efficiency motors. (author)

  10. Energy Supply System for Industrial Poultry Houses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sit M.L.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The gas engine driven carbon dioxide heat pump designed for providing the heat, cold and electricity for industrial poultry house is proposed. The scheme differs from the known by using recuperative heat exchanger installed between the exhaust air duct of poultry house and heat pump evaporator and the heat curtain installed on the air duct after the evaporator. The air coming into the poultry house after the regenerative heat exchanger is supplied to the heat pump gas cooler. The heat pump produces heat of the required parameters of the input air and water for watering of poultry, space heating, etc. Heat pump compressor is driven by gas engine (GPA, by natural gas or biogas. The part of the gas-piston engine heat is used for adjusting the optimal heat pump mode and for regeneration of the absorbent in an evaporative cooler. The proposed technical solution of the above scheme provides a higher COP of the heat pump. Installing of heat curtain does not require the use of non-freezing solution to prevent icing of the air outlet of heat pump evaporator. The latter allows producing, besides electric power and heat, still cold (with the use off the adsorption-refrigerating machine and provide drying air inlet evaporative cooler (if necessary.

  11. Power electronics for renewable energy systems, transportation and industrial applications

    CERN Document Server

    Malinowski, Mariusz; Al-Haddad, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Power Electronics for Renewable Energy, Transportation, and Industrial Applications combines state-of-the-art global expertise to present the latest research on power electronics and its application in transportation, renewable energy, and different industrial applications. This timely book aims to facilitate the implementation of cutting-edge techniques to design problems offering innovative solutions to the growing power demands in small- and large-size industries. Application areas in the book range from smart homes and electric and plug-in hybrid electrical vehicles (PHEVs), to smart distribution and intelligence operation centers where significant energy efficiency improvements can be achieved through the appropriate use and design of power electronics and energy storage devices.

  12. Economic implications of reducing carbon emissions from energy use and industrial processes in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y-H Henry; Timilsina, Govinda R; Landis, Florian

    2013-11-30

    This study assesses the economy-wide impacts of cutting CO2 emissions on the Brazilian economy. It finds that in 2040, the business-as-usual CO2 emissions from energy use and industrial processes would be almost three times as high as those in 2010 and would account for more than half of total national CO2 emissions. The current policy aims to reduce deforestation by 70 percent by 2017 and lower emissions intensity of the overall economy by 36-39 percent by 2020. If the policy were implemented as planned and continued to 2040, there would be no need to cut CO2 emissions from energy use and industrial processes until 2035, as emissions reduction through controlling deforestation would be enough to meet the voluntary carbon mitigation target of Brazil. The study also finds that using the carbon tax revenue to subsidize wind power can effectively increase the country's wind power output if that is the policy priority. Further, it finds evidence supporting the double dividend hypothesis, i.e., using revenue from a hypothetical carbon tax to finance a cut in labor income tax can significantly lower the GDP impacts of the carbon tax. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Energy conservation and cost benefits in the dairy processing industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-01-01

    Guidance is given on measuring energy consumption in the plant and pinpointing areas where energy-conservation activities can return the most favorable economics. General energy-conservation techniques applicable to most or all segments of the dairy processing industry, including the fluid milk segment, are emphasized. These general techniques include waste heat recovery, improvements in electric motor efficiency, added insulation, refrigeration improvements, upgrading of evaporators, and increases in boiler efficiency. Specific examples are given in which these techniques are applied to dairy processing plants. The potential for energy savings by cogeneration of process steam and electricity in the dairy industry is also discussed. Process changes primarily applicable to specific milk products which have resulted in significant energy cost savings at some facilities or which promise significant contributions in the future are examined. A summary checklist of plant housekeeping measures for energy conservation and guidelines for economic evaluation of conservation alternatives are provided. (MHR)

  14. Economic analysis of waste-to-energy industry in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin-Gang; Jiang, Gui-Wu; Li, Ang; Wang, Ling

    2016-02-01

    The generation of municipal solid waste is further increasing in China with urbanization and improvement of living standards. The "12th five-year plan" period (2011-2015) promotes waste-to-energy technologies for the harmless disposal and recycling of municipal solid waste. Waste-to-energy plant plays an important role for reaching China's energy conservation and emission reduction targets. Industrial policies and market prospect of waste-to-energy industry are described. Technology, cost and benefit of waste-to-energy plant are also discussed. Based on an economic analysis of a waste-to-energy project in China (Return on Investment, Net Present Value, Internal Rate of Return, and Sensitivity Analysis) the paper makes the conclusions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Energy Conservation Projects to Benefit the Railroad Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifford Mirman; Promod Vohra

    2009-12-31

    The Energy Conservation Projects to benefit the railroad industry using the Norfolk Southern Company as a model for the railroad industry has five unique tasks which are in areas of importance within the rail industry, and specifically in the area of energy conservation. The NIU Engineering and Technology research team looked at five significant areas in which research and development work can provide unique solutions to the railroad industry in energy the conservation. (1) Alternate Fuels - An examination of various blends of bio-based diesel fuels for the railroad industry, using Norfolk Southern as a model for the industry. The team determined that bio-diesel fuel is a suitable alternative to using straight diesel fuel, however, the cost and availability across the country varies to a great extent. (2) Utilization of fuel cells for locomotive power systems - While the application of the fuel cell has been successfully demonstrated in the passenger car, this is a very advanced topic for the railroad industry. There are many safety and power issues that the research team examined. (3) Thermal and emission reduction for current large scale diesel engines - The current locomotive system generates large amount of heat through engine cooling and heat dissipation when the traction motors are used to decelerate the train. The research team evaluated thermal management systems to efficiently deal with large thermal loads developed by the operating engines. (4) Use of Composite and Exotic Replacement Materials - Research team redesigned various components using new materials, coatings, and processes to provide the needed protection. Through design, analysis, and testing, new parts that can withstand the hostile environments were developed. (5) Tribology Applications - Identification of tribology issues in the Railroad industry which play a significant role in the improvement of energy usage. Research team analyzed and developed solutions which resulted in friction

  16. Energy Efficiency Practices: Assessment of Ohrid Hotel Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Biljana PETREVSKA; Cingoski, Vlatko

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides information on the extent how the hotel industry in Ohrid meets the energy efficiency practices in terms of the current level of involvement. By undertaking an online survey in three, four and five-star hotels, the study assesses the attitudes and willingness of hotel managers concerning applying energy efficiency and environmental protection concepts and practices. Moreover, it investigates various determinants of energy consumption, like: solid waste management, resource...

  17. Energy and materials flows in the copper industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaines, L.L.

    1980-12-01

    The copper industry comprises both the primary copper industry, which produces 99.9%-pure copper from copper ore, and the secondary copper industry, which salvages and recycles copper-containing scrap metal to extract pure copper or copper alloys. The United States uses about 2 million tons of copper annually, 60% of it for electrical applications. Demand is expected to increase less than 4% annually for the next 20 years. The primary copper industry is concentrated in the Southwest; Arizona produced 66% of the 1979 total ore output. Primary production uses about 170 x 10/sup 12/ Btu total energy annually (about 100 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton pure copper produced from ore). Mining and milling use about 60% of the total consumption, because low-grade ore (0.6% copper) is now being mined. Most copper is extracted by smelting sulfide ores, with concomitant production of sulfur dioxide. Clean air regulations will require smelters to reduce sulfur emissions, necessitating smelting process modifications that could also save 20 x 10/sup 12/ Btu (10 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton of copper) in smelting energy. Energy use in secondary copper production averages 20 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton of copper. If all copper products were recycled, instead of the 30% now salvaged, the energy conservation potential would be about one-half the total energy consumption of the primary copper industry.

  18. Use of solar energy to produce process heat for industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, K.

    1980-04-01

    The role of solar energy in supplying heat and hot water to residential and commercial buildings is familiar. On the other hand, the role that solar energy may play in displacing imported energy supplies in the industrial and utility sectors often goes unrecognized. The versatility of solar technology lends itself well to applications in industry; particularly to the supplemental supply of process heat of all kinds. The realization of that potential will depend, however, on the identification of the most suitable applications and locations for industrial solar energy and the continued improvement in cost, durability, and reliability of solar equipment. The status of solar thermal technology for industrial process heat applications is surveyed, including a description of current costs and operating histories. Because the current status is unsatisfactory in view of the goals established by President Carter for solar industrial energy, the most important objectives to be met in improving system performance, reducing cost, and identifying markets for solar IPH are outlined. The effect of government tax policy will be of little impact until technical efficiency and cost effectiveness are significantly improved.

  19. Energy and materials flows in the copper industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaines, L.L.

    1980-12-01

    The copper industry comprises both the primary copper industry, which produces 99.9%-pure copper from copper ore, and the secondary copper industry, which salvages and recycles copper-containing scrap metal to extract pure copper or copper alloys. The United States uses about 2 million tons of copper annually, 60% of it for electrical applications. Demand is expected to increase less than 4% annually for the next 20 years. The primary copper industry is concentrated in the Southwest; Arizona produced 66% of the 1979 total ore output. Primary production uses about 170 x 10/sup 12/ Btu total energy annually (about 100 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton pure copper produced from ore). Mining and milling use about 60% of the total consumption, because low-grade ore (0.6% copper) is now being mined. Most copper is extracted by smelting sulfide ores, with concomitant production of sulfur dioxide. Clean air regulations will require smelters to reduce sulfur emissions, necessitating smelting process modifications that could also save 20 x 10/sup 12/ Btu (10 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton of copper) in smelting energy. Energy use in secondary copper production averages 20 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton of copper. If all copper products were recycled, instead of the 30% now salvaged, the energy conservation potential would be about one-half the total energy consumption of the primary copper industry.

  20. Energy optimization in industrial bakery : refrigeration, compressed air, ovens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    Ontario's $3.3 billion baking industry includes 459 companies with 20,000 employees. Although the industry relies on grain and other raw materials, the location and geographic market potential has been broadened by the use of refrigeration technology. The cost of refrigeration and baking has rendered bakeries energy intensive, requiring gas for baking and electricity for freezers. The rising energy costs are becoming a major portion of the ingredient costs of baked goods. The Ontario Food Industry Cost Reduction Program was prepared to help the food industry reduce their energy, water and sewer costs. This paper describes the participation of Oakrun Farm Bakery in an Industrial Energy Efficiency Audit in the winter of 2001. The audit revealed that the bakery has the potential to reduce natural gas consumption by 17 per cent and reduce electricity consumption by 13 per cent for a potential reduction in greenhouse gas emissions of 800 tonnes per year. The audit identified 4 energy saving opportunities for the refrigeration system: reduce compressor discharge; increase suction pressure; install an evaporative condenser; and, install electronic temperature controls. The company plans to implement the opportunities on a prioritized basis in 2003 following an expansion to the plant. 1 tab., 2 figs.

  1. Energy audit in industry; Auditoria energetica na industria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Americo, Marcio; Soares, George Alves; Castro Mello, Alex Jean [Centro de Pesquisas de Energia Eletrica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pereira, Marcio J.T.M.; Pereira, Roberto W.L. [FURNAS Centrais Eletricas S.A., Brasilia, DF (Brazil). ACE.T

    1997-12-31

    CEPEL and FURNAS carried out an energy audit in a treatment plant of industrial residuals of a petrochemical complex. The main objective of this energy audit was to find the potential savings of electrical energy in the treatment processes. This paper describes the methodology used and the proposed actions, showing the capital cost and payback of this investment. The results indicates a great electrical energy saving potential about 9% of the total consumption, which represents a energy saving about 4.5 GWh per year. The average payback is approximately 15 months. (author) 2 figs.; e-mail: marcioa at fund.cepel.br

  2. Energy conservation in industry: Technical feasibility and obstacles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzarin, R. (Padua Univ. (Italy))

    A comparison of Italy's energy requirements with those of other industrialized countries reveals that, while this nation does not have a particularly burdensome energy demand, it is strongly dependent on foreign energy supplies, and thus must have recourse to energy conservation. This analysis of energy demand and energy conservation in Italy focusses on industrial trends witnessed over the last decade. Here, it is noted that energy conservation received attention early in the 1980's as energy prices increased - a trend which died, however, with this current span of relatively stable prices. Noted obstacles to vigorous energy conservation include: a strong tendency towards the use of conventional, proven technologies; difficulties in evaluating the benefits of innovative energy savings equipment alternatives due to oil price uncertainty; and the pronounced lack of sufficiently well trained energy managers. On the technical side, sound energy savings systems are coming on the market, e.g., heat pumps, cogeneration systems, etc., but marketing efforts for these products have yet to incorporate effective programs for information dissemination and operator training.

  3. A model for Long-term Industrial Energy Forecasting (LIEF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.; Hwang, R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1992-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to establish the content and structural validity of the Long-term Industrial Energy Forecasting (LIEF) model, and to provide estimates for the model`s parameters. The model is intended to provide decision makers with a relatively simple, yet credible tool to forecast the impacts of policies which affect long-term energy demand in the manufacturing sector. Particular strengths of this model are its relative simplicity which facilitates both ease of use and understanding of results, and the inclusion of relevant causal relationships which provide useful policy handles. The modeling approach of LIEF is intermediate between top-down econometric modeling and bottom-up technology models. It relies on the following simple concept, that trends in aggregate energy demand are dependent upon the factors: (1) trends in total production; (2) sectoral or structural shift, that is, changes in the mix of industrial output from energy-intensive to energy non-intensive sectors; and (3) changes in real energy intensity due to technical change and energy-price effects as measured by the amount of energy used per unit of manufacturing output (KBtu per constant $ of output). The manufacturing sector is first disaggregated according to their historic output growth rates, energy intensities and recycling opportunities. Exogenous, macroeconomic forecasts of individual subsector growth rates and energy prices can then be combined with endogenous forecasts of real energy intensity trends to yield forecasts of overall energy demand. 75 refs.

  4. A model for Long-term Industrial Energy Forecasting (LIEF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, M. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.); Hwang, R. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1992-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to establish the content and structural validity of the Long-term Industrial Energy Forecasting (LIEF) model, and to provide estimates for the model's parameters. The model is intended to provide decision makers with a relatively simple, yet credible tool to forecast the impacts of policies which affect long-term energy demand in the manufacturing sector. Particular strengths of this model are its relative simplicity which facilitates both ease of use and understanding of results, and the inclusion of relevant causal relationships which provide useful policy handles. The modeling approach of LIEF is intermediate between top-down econometric modeling and bottom-up technology models. It relies on the following simple concept, that trends in aggregate energy demand are dependent upon the factors: (1) trends in total production; (2) sectoral or structural shift, that is, changes in the mix of industrial output from energy-intensive to energy non-intensive sectors; and (3) changes in real energy intensity due to technical change and energy-price effects as measured by the amount of energy used per unit of manufacturing output (KBtu per constant $ of output). The manufacturing sector is first disaggregated according to their historic output growth rates, energy intensities and recycling opportunities. Exogenous, macroeconomic forecasts of individual subsector growth rates and energy prices can then be combined with endogenous forecasts of real energy intensity trends to yield forecasts of overall energy demand. 75 refs.

  5. Methods for assessing the energy-saving efficiency of industrial symbiosis in industrial parks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenfeng; Cui, Zhaojie; Han, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The available energy resources are being depleted worldwide. Industrial symbiosis (IS) provides a promising approach for increasing the efficiency of energy utilization, with numerous studies reporting the superiority of this technology. However, studies quantifying the energy-saving efficiency of IS remain insufficient. This paper proposes an index system for the quantitative evaluation of the energy-saving efficiency of IS. Both energy-saving and financial indexes were selected, the former include the IS energy-saving index, the contribution rate of energy saved through IS, fractional energy savings, and cut rate of energy consumption per total output value; and the latter include the IS investment payback period, IS input-output ratio, net present value (NPV), and internal rate of return (IRR) of IS. The proposed methods were applied to a case study on the XF Industrial Park (XF IP), in the city of Liaocheng in Shandong Province of China. Three energy-saving channels using IS were found in the XF IP: (a) utilizing the energy of high-temperature materials among industrial processes, (b) recovering waste heat and steam between different processes, and (c) saving energy by sharing infrastructures. The results showed that the energy efficiency index of IS was 0.326, accounting for 34.6% of the comprehensive energy-saving index in 2011, and the fractional energy-savings were 12.42%. The index of energy consumption per total industrial output value varied from 90.9 tce/MRMB to 51.6 tce/MRMB. Thus, the cut rate of energy consumption per total industrial output value was 43.42%. The average values of the IS input-output ratio was 406.2 RMB/tce, 57.2% lower than the price of standard coal. Static investment payback period in the XF IP was 8.5 months, indicating that the XF IP began to earn profit 8.5 months after the construction of all IS modes. The NVP and IRR of each IS mode in the XF IP were greater than zero, with average values equal to 1,789.96 MRMB and 140

  6. Energy Transition for Industry: India and the Global Context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    This publication further develops the analysis presented in the India chapter of Energy Technology Perspectives 2010 and provides insights on the implications of achieving deep energy and CO2 emission cuts in the industrial sector both for India and globally. It investigates the least-cost combination of options that can significantly reduce energy and CO2 emissions in India's industrial sector, while enabling the Indian economy to continue to grow and alleviate energy poverty. For India to play its part in helping to realise deep cuts in global CO2 emissions by the middle of the 21st century, it will need to achieve rapid economic development over the next 40 years with only a very small increase in emissions. Currently there is no precedent for such a low-CO2 development path. The challenge for India will be to achieve strong economic growth while improving energy security, but without locking in high emissions.

  7. Diffusion of energy-efficient technologies in industry. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, S.Y.

    1979-01-01

    United States energy policies aim at cutting down dependence on foreign oil in two ways: by energy conservation and by finding new domestic supplies. The study investigates how the first goal can be achieved in the industrial sector (manufacturing) of the economy, which accounts for about 40% (about 7.3 million barrels per day) of the total energy consumption in the US. It is noted that industry is able to conserve as much as 25 to 30% of its energy consumption by adopting simple conservation measures and energy-efficient technologies. These technologies can be implemented without major alterations of the original equipment. The schools of thought on innovative processes are discussed; these will serve as the conceptual and methodological base of the project. (MCW)

  8. Prospects for energy conservation in the pipeline industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, W. F.

    1977-11-30

    A qualitative projection (the ''baseline scenario'') is made of the pipeline industry growth to the year 2000. This projection is based on the conventional wisdom of the industry. It is concluded that, to achieve significant growth, the industry must develop the capability, called freight pipeline, to move other commodities than oil and gas, i.e., bulk and packaged goods. Technical and economic performance criteria are identified which, if met by the freight pipeline capability, could induce modal shifts resulting in a reduction of total transportation energy consumption, and would offer other benefits, including compatibility with high-speed rail passenger service.

  9. Environmental and Energy Aspects of Construction Industry and Green Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauskale, L.; Geipele, I.; Zeltins, N.; Lecis, I.

    2017-04-01

    Green building is an important component of sustainable real estate market development, and one of the reasons is that the construction industry consumes a high amount of resources. Energy consumption of construction industry results in greenhouse gas emissions, so green buildings, energy systems, building technologies and other aspects play an important role in sustainable development of real estate market, construction and environmental development. The aim of the research is to analyse environmental aspects of sustainable real estate market development, focusing on importance of green buildings at the industry level and related energy aspects. Literature review, historical, statistical data analysis and logical access methods have been used in the research. The conducted research resulted in high environmental rationale and importance of environment-friendly buildings, and there are many green building benefits during the building life cycle. Future research direction is environmental information process and its models.

  10. Potential for energy conservation in the glass industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, A.G.; Bruno, G.A.

    1986-06-01

    While the glass industry (flat glass, container glass, pressed and blown glass, and insulation fiber glass) has reduced its specific energy use (Btu/ton) by almost 30% since 1972, significant potential for further reduction still remains. State-of-the-art technologies are available which could lead to incremental improvements in glass industry energy productivity; however, these technologies must compete for capital with projects undertaken for other reasons (e.g., capacity expansion, equipment rebuild, labor cost reduction, product quality improvement, or compliance with environmental, health or safety regulations). Narrowing profit margins in the large tonnage segments of the glass industry in recent years and the fact that energy costs represent less than 25% of the value added in glass manufacture have combined to impede the widespread adoption of many state-of-the-art conservation technologies. Savings in energy costs alone have not provided the incentive to justify the capital expenditures required to realize the energy savings. Beyond implementation of state-of-the-art technologies, significant potential energy savings could accrue from advanced technologies which represent a radical departure from current glass making technology. Long-term research and development (R and D) programs, which address the technical and economic barriers associated with advanced, energy-conserving technologies, offer the opportunity to realize this energy-saving potential.

  11. Human resources needs in the Canadian wind energy industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittholz, H. [Synova International Business Development, London, ON (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    This paper reviewed human resources issues related to wind energy expansion. As the fastest growing energy source in the world, wind energy has the potential to provide thousands of jobs. With the signing of the Kyoto Protocol, the Canadian government and industry will take measures to increase the use of renewable energy. As such, forecasters predict that Canada's total installed capacity will increase from 444 MW in 2004 to 5,600 MW by 2012. Initially, employment opportunities will be in the service industry, followed by an increased demand for scientists, engineers, technicians and other personnel with specialized knowledge in the wind industry. This paper described the assumptions on which the forecasted demand for skilled labour is based. Approximately 2,230 technicians will be required by 2012 to develop and manufacture wind turbines and to establish an infrastructure that would maximize the benefits of the emerging industry for Canadians. Wind energy initiatives include the establishment of a competitive manufacturing and service base; the provision of specialized training and education to meet the human resources demands of the industry; and, support from research and development to reduce the knowledge gap between Canada and Europe. Canada also holds the potential to establish a niche market for hybrid wind-diesel-storage systems. Insurance companies and investors will require high standards to safeguard their investments. A breakdown of various jobs in the wind power industry was presented along with forecasts of revenues and employment in Canada's wind energy industry. This paper also outlined the wind energy research programs available at Canadian universities, colleges and institutes. It was recommended that education and training programs in this field of study should be developed based on proven programs with a governing body to ensure industry requirements are met. It was also suggested that partnerships should be formed with successful

  12. Regional characteristics relevant to advanced technology cogeneration development. [industrial energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manvi, R.

    1981-01-01

    To assist DOE in establishing research and development funding priorities in the area of advanced energy conversion technoloy, researchers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory studied those specific factors within various regions of the country that may influence cogeneration with advanced energy conversion systems. Regional characteristics of advanced technology cogeneration possibilities are discussed, with primary emphasis given to coal derived fuels. Factors considered for the study were regional industry concentration, purchased fuel and electricity prices, environmental constraints, and other data of interest to industrial cogeneration.

  13. Thermal energy storage for industrial waste heat recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, H. W.; Kedl, R. J.; Duscha, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    The potential is examined for waste heat recovery and reuse through thermal energy storage in five specific industrial categories: (1) primary aluminum, (2) cement, (3) food processing, (4) paper and pulp, and (5) iron and steel. Preliminary results from Phase 1 feasibility studies suggest energy savings through fossil fuel displacement approaching 0.1 quad/yr in the 1985 period. Early implementation of recovery technologies with minimal development appears likely in the food processing and paper and pulp industries; development of the other three categories, though equally desirable, will probably require a greater investment in time and dollars.

  14. Current and future industrial energy service characterizations. Volume II. Energy data on the US manufacturing subsector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krawiec, F.; Thomas, T.; Jackson, F.; Limaye, D.R.; Isser, S.; Karnofsky, K.; Davis, T.D.

    1980-10-01

    In order to characterize industrial energy service, current energy demand, its end uses, and cost of typical energy applications and resultant services in the industrial sector were examined and a projection of state industrial energy demands and prices to 1990 was developed. Volume II presents in Section 2 data on the US manufacturing subsector energy demand, intensity, growth rates, and cost for 1971, 1974, and 1976. These energy data are disaggregated not only by fuel type but also by user classifications, including the 2-digit SIC industry groups, 3-digit subgroups, and 4-digit SIC individual industries. These data characterize typical energy applications and the resultant services in this subsector. The quantities of fuel and electric energy purchased by the US manufacturing subsector were converted to British thermal units and reported in billions of Btu. The conversion factors are presented in Table 4-1 of Volume I. To facilitate the descriptive analysis, all energy cost and intensity data were expressed in constant 1976 dollars. The specific US industrial energy service characteristics developed and used in the descriptive analysis are presented in Volume I. Section 3 presents the computer program used to produce the tabulated data.

  15. Energy efficiency as an opportunity for the natural gas industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Love, P. [Canadian Energy Efficiency Alliance (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Energy conservation, energy efficiency and demand side management are defined and the role played in the promotion and advancement of energy efficiency objectives by the Canadian Energy Efficiency Alliance are explained. Direct and indirect economic and environmental benefits and the potential impacts in terms of savings and jobs are discussed, with examples of successful greenhouse gas emission reduction programs by industry. The total potential for energy efficiency in Canada is estimated at 18 per cent lower energy use by 2010, and 33 per cent by 2020, assuming that specific policy recommendations and other cost effective efficiency measures are implemented. Overall conclusions are that there is a large potential for cost-effective energy savings over and above of what has been done already. Furthermore, utilities can play a leading role in realizing these efficiencies, and in the process achieve substantial benefits for themselves.

  16. Multi criteria analysis in the renewable energy industry

    CERN Document Server

    San Cristóbal Mateo, José Ramón

    2012-01-01

    Decision makers in the Renewable Energy sector face an increasingly complex social, economic, technological, and environmental scenario in their decision process. Different groups of decision-makers become involved in the process, each group bringing along different criteria therefore, policy formulation for fossil fuel substitution by Renewable Energies must be addressed in a multi-criteria context. Multi Criteria Analysis in the Renewable Energy Industry is a direct response to the increasing interest in the Renewable Energy industry which can be seen as an important remedy to many environmental problems that the world faces today. The multiplicity of criteria and the increasingly complex social, economic, technological, and environmental scenario makes multi-criteria analysis a valuable tool in the decision-making process for fossil fuel substitution. The detailed chapters explore the use of the Multi-criteria decision-making methods and how they provide valuable assistance in reaching equitable and accept...

  17. Design for energy efficiency: Energy efficient industrialized housing research program. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellett, R.; Berg, R.; Paz, A.; Brown, G.Z.

    1991-03-01

    Since 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy has sponsored the Energy Efficient Industrialized Housing research program (EEIH) to improve the energy efficiency of industrialized housing. Two research centers share responsibility for this program: The Center for Housing Innovation at the University of Oregon and the Florida Solar Energy Center, a research institute of the University of Central Florida. Additional funding is provided through the participation of private industry, state governments and utilities. The program is guided by a steering committee comprised of industry and government representatives. This report summarizes Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 activities and progress, and proposed activities for FY 1991 in Task 2.1 Design for Energy Efficiency. This task establishes a vision of energy conservation opportunities in critical regions, market segments, climate zones and manufacturing strategies significant to industrialized housing in the 21st Century. In early FY 1990, four problem statements were developed to define future housing demand scenarios inclusive of issues of energy efficiency, housing design and manufacturing. Literature surveys were completed to assess seven areas of influence for industrialized housing and energy conservation in the future. Fifty-five future trends were identified in computing and design process; manufacturing process; construction materials, components and systems; energy and environment; demographic context; economic context; and planning policy and regulatory context.

  18. Sustainable Industrialization in the Building Industry: On the Road to Energy Efficient Construction Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandahl, Søren; Ussing, Lene Faber

    2013-01-01

    in this discussion paper. The main method is a review to track past merits in the two domains and to detect knowledge gaps that have research potential. A strategic research agenda focusing on energy-efficient construction management is outlined showing the need for future focus on combining industrialization......Since the Brundtland report in 1987, sustainability has been an issue in all parts of the world, and the focus is increasing in these years. In the same period, the building industry has in the same period also been under heavy pressure to increase productivity in the same pace as other...... in construction management with sustainability and energy concerns in construction management....

  19. Potential for energy conservation in the cement industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett-Price, B.A.

    1985-02-01

    This report assesses the potential for energy conservation in the cement industry. Energy consumption per ton of cement decreased 20% between 1972 and 1982. During this same period, the cement industry became heavily dependent on coal and coke as its primary fuel source. Although the energy consumed per ton of cement has declined markedly in the past ten years, the industry still uses more than three and a half times the fuel that is theoretically required to produce a ton of clinker. Improving kiln thermal efficiency offers the greatest opportunity for saving fuel. Improving the efficiency of finish grinding offers the greatest potential for reducing electricity use. Technologies are currently available to the cement industry to reduce its average fuel consumption per ton by product by as much as 40% and its electricity consumption per ton by about 10%. The major impediment to adopting these technologies is the cement industry's lack of capital as a result of low or no profits in recent years.

  20. Utilization of waste heat from energy conversion and industrial processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, A.R.; Hamilton, R.W.

    The laws of thermodynamics state that no process of energy transformation can take place with perfect efficiency--some waste heat is always produced. The generation of waste heat from energy conversion and industrial processes are discussed. First-law and second-law efficiencies are defined. After listing the amounts of waste heat produced, some technological options for reducing waste heat or using it for other purposes, such as district heating, are described.

  1. The evolution of nuclear energy Opportunities for the industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez, M. T.

    2013-10-01

    At the turn of the XXI century, the world energy context underwent a significant change due mainly to the increases in the demand for energy in the developing countries, a rise in gas prices and increased government support of clean energies in response to environmental issues. these boundary conditions led rapidly to renewed interest in nuclear energy worldwide. The phrase a Renaissance in nuclear energy was included in almost all energy forecasts. Unexpectedly, however, just then years later the panorama changed once again: unconventional gas appeared as new energy source, the world financial crisis hampered investment, and the demand for energy fell. This panorama has lowered expectations with regard to the size of the nuclear energy renaissance to a less buoyant but more balance scenario of nuclear energy deployment that we could now dub as the evolution of nuclear energy. This article describes how fission nuclear energy has continuously been evolving to adjust itself to these changing scenarios, and, in particular, how it is being adapted itself to todays vision of the role of the nuclear energy in the long term. The analysis in this paper focuses on those programs that could bring opportunities for Spanish nuclear industry participation. Starting with the development programs affecting existing reactors already in operation, the analysis moves on the new builds of Light Water Reactors (LWR) Generation III+, to then address, in two sections, Research Reactors and finally, the opportunities presented by Generation IV technologies. The development of fusion technology is not covered in this paper. (Author)

  2. DEFINITION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF POSTS FOR ENERGY INDUSTRY PROFESSIONALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    COROIU N.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the work is to identify the personnel categories from energy industry, the approach in the selection, recruitment, hiring, as well as optimizing the working process, with examples from the process in a multinational company with private capital and integrated compartment in the human resources S.C. ELECTRICA S.A.

  3. Industrial Sector Energy Efficiency Modeling (ISEEM) Framework Documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karali, Nihan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Xu, Tengfang [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sathaye, Jayant [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-12-12

    The goal of this study is to develop a new bottom-up industry sector energy-modeling framework with an agenda of addressing least cost regional and global carbon reduction strategies, improving the capabilities and limitations of the existing models that allows trading across regions and countries as an alternative.

  4. Energy requirements of the U. S. pulp and paper industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosman, C.M.

    1979-01-01

    According to the American Paper Institute, the paper industry is the fifth largest consumer of purchased energy in the U.S. and the largest consumer of fuel oil. Almost one-half of its total energy consumption comes from the industry's own process wasts: spent pulping liquors, bark, and hogged wood. In 1976 non-fossil fuels provided 44.6% of the total Btu consumption, up from 41.1% in 1972 and 42.6% in 1975. (Self-generated hydro power and other electricity produced from fossil fuel supplied another 1.5% of total needs in 1972 and 2.1% in 1975.) The industry has established a mechanism for self-policing by submitting periodic reports on its energy consumption to the API. The target set by the industry is a 20% saving of purchased energy by 1980. So far a reduction of about 15% has been achieved, making adjustments for add-ons required because of environmental regulations and other changes vs the base year of 1972.

  5. Changing Dynamics in the Voluntary Market (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, J.

    2014-12-01

    Voluntary green power markets are those in which consumers and institutions voluntarily purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs. This presentation, presented at the Renewable Energy Markets Conference in December 2014, outlines the voluntary market in 2013, including community choice aggregation and community solar.

  6. Advances in Energy Conservation of China Steel Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqiang Sun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The course, technical progresses, and achievements of energy conservation of China steel industry (CSI during 1980–2010 were summarized. Then, the paper adopted e-p method to analyze the variation law and influencing factors of energy consumptions of large- and medium-scale steel plants within different stages. It is pointed out that energy consumption per ton of crude steel has been almost one half lower in these thirty years, with 60% as direct energy conservation owing to the change of process energy consumption and 40% as indirect energy conservation attributed to the adjustment of production structure. Next, the latest research progress of some key common technologies in CSI was introduced. Also, the downtrend of energy consumption per ton of crude steel and the potential energy conservation for CSI during 2011–2025 were forecasted. Finally, it is indicated that the key topic of the next 15 years’ research on the energy conservation of CSI is the synergistic operation of material flow and energy flow. It could be achieved by the comprehensive study on energy flow network optimization, such as production, allocation, utilization, recovery, reuse, and resource, according to the energy quantity, quality, and user demand following the first and second laws of thermodynamics.

  7. Advances in energy conservation of China steel industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenqiang; Cai, Jiuju; Ye, Zhu

    2013-01-01

    The course, technical progresses, and achievements of energy conservation of China steel industry (CSI) during 1980-2010 were summarized. Then, the paper adopted e-p method to analyze the variation law and influencing factors of energy consumptions of large- and medium-scale steel plants within different stages. It is pointed out that energy consumption per ton of crude steel has been almost one half lower in these thirty years, with 60% as direct energy conservation owing to the change of process energy consumption and 40% as indirect energy conservation attributed to the adjustment of production structure. Next, the latest research progress of some key common technologies in CSI was introduced. Also, the downtrend of energy consumption per ton of crude steel and the potential energy conservation for CSI during 2011-2025 were forecasted. Finally, it is indicated that the key topic of the next 15 years' research on the energy conservation of CSI is the synergistic operation of material flow and energy flow. It could be achieved by the comprehensive study on energy flow network optimization, such as production, allocation, utilization, recovery, reuse, and resource, according to the energy quantity, quality, and user demand following the first and second laws of thermodynamics.

  8. Regulation proposal for voluntary energy efficiency labelling of commercial buildings; Regulamentacao de etiquetagem voluntaria de nivel de eficiencia energetica de edificios comerciais e publicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamberts, Roberto; Goulart, Solange; Carlo, Joyce; Westphal, Fernando [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC/LabEEE), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Lab. de Eficiencia Energetica em Edificacoes], e-mail: lamberts@ecv.ufsc.br, e-mail: solange@labeee.ufsc.br, e-mail: joyce@labeee.ufsc.br, e-mail: fernando@labeee.ufsc.br

    2006-07-01

    Despite of Brazil not being between the major world energy consumers, the consumption of electricity has significantly increased in the late years. The National Energy Balance of 2005, published by the Brazilian Ministry of Energy, showed an increasing of the participation of electricity in the final energy consumption of 15.7% in 2002 to 16.2% in 2004. Initially, a brief review of the initiatives taken by Brazilian Government aiming to limit and control the energy consumption in buildings is presented. Then, the regulation proposal containing the technical requirements to classify the energy efficiency level of buildings is shown. The purpose of this voluntary regulation is to provide conditions to certify the energy efficiency level of Brazilian buildings (commercial and public). It specifies the methods for energy efficiency rating of buildings and includes requirements to attend energy conservation measures in three main issues: lighting system; air conditioning system and envelope. The regulation applies to large buildings (minimum total area of 500 m{sup 2} or when the energy demand is greater than or equal to 2,3 kV, including: Conditioned buildings; Partially conditioned buildings and Naturally ventilated buildings. (author)

  9. Diffusion of energy efficient technologies in the German steel industry and their impact on energy consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arens, M.; Worrell, E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/106856715

    2014-01-01

    We try to understand the role of technological change and diffusion of energy efficient technologies in order to explain the trend of energy intensity developments in the German steel industry. We selected six key energy efficient technologies and collected data to derive their diffusion since their

  10. Diffusion of energy efficient technologies in the German steel industry and their impact on energy consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arens, M.; Worrell, E.

    2014-01-01

    We try to understand the role of technological change and diffusion of energy efficient technologies in order to explain the trend of energy intensity developments in the German steel industry. We selected six key energy efficient technologies and collected data to derive their diffusion since their

  11. Industrial Assessment Centers - Small Manufacturers Reduce Energy & Increase Productivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-11-06

    Since 1976, the Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs), administered by the US Department of Energy, have supported small and medium-sized American manufacturers to reduce energy use and increase their productivity and competitiveness. The 24 IACs, located at premier engineering universities around the country (see below), send faculty and engineering students to local small and medium-sized manufacturers to provide no-cost assessments of energy use, process performance and waste and water flows. Under the direction of experienced professors, IAC engineering students analyze the manufacturer’s facilities, energy bills and energy, waste and water systems, including compressed air, motors/pumps, lighting, process heat and steam. The IACs then follow up with written energy-saving and productivity improvement recommendations, with estimates of related costs and payback periods.

  12. Spatial distribution of China׳s renewable energy industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, Liang; Liang, Hanwei; Gao, Zhiqiu

    2016-01-01

    China applies no efforts to promote the development of renewable energy (REE) so as to enhance China׳s energy security and address climate change. National top-down support scheme and the local renewable energy industry (REEI) development are the two important and intervened countermeasures...... for promoting REEI development in China. Considering China׳s vast regional disparity, the review on the spatial distribution of REEI in provincial level is critical and enlightening for future appropriate policy-making, while to date, there has been few related studies. With this circumstance, this paper made...

  13. Impacts of Large Scale Wind Penetration on Energy Supply Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Kabouris

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Large penetration of Renewable Energy Sources (RES impacts Energy Supply Industry (ESI in many aspects leading to a fundamental change in electric power systems. It raises a number of technical challenges to the Transmission System Operators (TSOs, Distribution System Operators (DSOs and Wind Turbine Generators (WTG constructors. This paper aims to present in a thorough and coherent way the redrawn picture for Energy Systems under these conditions. Topics related to emergent technical challenges, technical solutions required and finally the impact on ESI due to large wind power penetration, are analyzed. Finally, general conclusions are extracted about the ESI current and future state and general directions are recommended.

  14. Mobilizing private finance to drive an energy industrial revolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathews, John A. [Eni Chair in Competitive Dynamics and Global Strategy, LUISS Guido Carli University, Viale Romania, 32, 00197 Roma (Italy); Kidney, Sean [ClimateRisk Ltd, London (United Kingdom); Mallon, Karl; Hughes, Mark [ClimateRisk Ltd, Sydney (Australia)

    2010-07-15

    While uptake of renewable energies as a solution to climate change is widely discussed, the issue of public vs. private financing is not yet adequately explored. The debates over the Kyoto Protocol and its successor, culminating in the COP15 Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen in December 2009, maintained a strong preference for public over private financing. Yet it is also clear to most observers that the energy revolution will never happen without the involvement of private finance to drive private investment. In this Viewpoint, we discuss the ways in which private financing could be mobilized to drive the energy industrial revolution that is needed if climate change mitigation is to succeed. (author)

  15. Energy use in the biscuit-baking industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleland, A.C.; Earle, M.D.

    1980-05-01

    A survey was carried out to ascertain the level of energy use in the New Zealand biscuit baking industry. All firms in the New Zealand food processing industry that produce biscuits were sent a questionnaire requesting information on energy consumption and production. Replies were received from five factories and the information from these was supplemented by detailed factory surveys in two other factories. Measures to reduce energy consumption are proposed. Replacement of existing steam boilers with boilers better suited to provide the requirements for process steam would lead to significant reductions in baseload boiler fuel use. Small savings both in boiler fuel consumption and oven fuel consumption can be made by improvements to insulation. Further savings in oven fuel consumption are unlikely except by replacement of the existing ovens with more energy-conscious designs. The design of the biscuit coolers used in the industry can be improved to reduce the electricity consumed by the refrigeration equipment for these coolers. Process flow charts are presented. An analysis of energy consumption was made. (MCW)

  16. Energy use and energy intensity of the U.S. chemical industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worrell, E.; Phylipsen, D.; Einstein, D.; Martin, N.

    2000-04-01

    The U.S. chemical industry is the largest in the world, and responsible for about 11% of the U.S. industrial production measured as value added. It consumes approximately 20% of total industrial energy consumption in the U.S. (1994), and contributes in similar proportions to U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. Surprisingly, there is not much information on energy use and energy intensity in the chemical industry available in the public domain. This report provides detailed information on energy use and energy intensity for the major groups of energy-intensive chemical products. Ethylene production is the major product in terms of production volume of the petrochemical industry. The petrochemical industry (SIC 2869) produces a wide variety of products. However, most energy is used for a small number of intermediate compounds, of which ethylene is the most important one. Based on a detailed assessment we estimate fuel use for ethylene manufacture at 520 PJ (LHV), excluding feedstock use. Energy intensity is estimated at 26 GJ/tonne ethylene (LHV), excluding feedstocks.The nitrogenous fertilizer production is a very energy intensive industry, producing a variety of fertilizers and other nitrogen-compounds. Ammonia is the most important intermediate chemical compound, used as basis for almost all products. Fuel use is estimated at 268 PJ (excluding feedstocks) while 368 PJ natural gas is used as feedstock. Electricity consumption is estimated at 14 PJ. We estimate the energy intensity of ammonia manufacture at 39.3 GJ/tonne (including feedstocks, HHV) and 140 kWh/tonne, resulting in a specific primary energy consumption of 40.9 GJ/tonne (HHV), equivalent to 37.1 GJ/tonne (LHV). Excluding natural gas use for feedstocks the primary energy consumption is estimated at 16.7 GJ/tonne (LHV). The third most important product from an energy perspective is the production of chlorine and caustic soda. Chlorine is produced through electrolysis of a salt-solution. Chlorine production is

  17. US energy industry financial developments, 1994 first quarter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-23

    This report traces key financial trends in the US energy industry for the first quarter of 1994. Financial data (only available for publicly-traded US companies) are included in two broad groups -- fossil fuel production and rate-regulated electric utilities. All financial data are taken from public sources such as energy industry corporate reports and press releases, energy trade publications, and The Wall Street Journal`s, Earnings Digest. Return on equity is calculated from data available from Standard and Poor`s Compustat data service. Since several major petroleum companies disclose their income by lines of business and geographic area. These data are also presented in this report. Although the disaggregated income concept varies by company and is not strictly comparable to corporate income, relative movements in income by lines of business and geographic area are summarized as useful indicators of short-term changes in the underlying profitability of these operations.

  18. US energy industry financial developments, 1993 first quarter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-25

    Net income for 259 energy companies-- including, 20 major US petroleum companies-- rose 38 percent between the first quarter of 1992 and the first quarter of 1993. An increased level of economic activity, along with colder weather, helped lift the demand for natural gas. crude oil, coal, and electricity. The sharp rise in the domestic price of natural gas at the wellhead relative to the year-ago quarter was the most significant development in US energy during the first quarter. As a consequence of higher natural gas prices, the upstream segment of the petroleum industry reported large gains in income, while downstream income rose due to higher refined product demand. Increased economic activity and higher weather-related natural gas demand also led to improvements in income for the rate-regulated energy segment. However, declining domestic oil production continued to restrain upstream petroleum industry earnings growth, despite a moderate rise in crude oil prices.

  19. Estimating energy-augmenting technological change in developingcountry industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanstad, Alan H.; Roy, Joyashree; Sathaye, Jayant A.

    2006-07-07

    Assumptions regarding the magnitude and direction ofenergy-related technological change have long beenrecognized as criticaldeterminants of the outputs and policy conclusions derived fromintegrated assessment models. Particularly in the case of developingcountries, however, empirical analysis of technological change has laggedbehind simulation modeling. This paper presents estimates of sectoralproductivity trends and energy-augmenting technological change forseveral energy-intensive industries in India and South Korea, and, forcomparison, the United States. The key findings are substantialheterogeneity among both industries and countries, and a number of casesof declining energy efficiency. The results are subject to certaintechnical qualifications both in regards to the methodology and to thedirect comparison to integrated assessment parameterizations.Nevertheless, they highlight the importance of closer attention to theempirical basis for common modeling assumptions.

  20. Effect of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control and voluntary industry health warning labels on passage of mandated cigarette warning labels from 1965 to 2012: transition probability and event history analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders-Jackson, Ashley N; Song, Anna V; Hiilamo, Heikki; Glantz, Stanton A

    2013-11-01

    We quantified the pattern and passage rate of cigarette package health warning labels (HWLs), including the effect of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) and HWLs voluntarily implemented by tobacco companies. We used transition probability matrices to describe the pattern of HWL passage and change rate in 4 periods. We used event history analysis to estimate the effect of the FCTC on adoption and to compare that effect between countries with voluntary and mandatory HWLs. The number of HWLs passed during each period accelerated, from a transition rate among countries that changed from 2.42 per year in 1965-1977 to 6.71 in 1977-1984, 8.42 in 1984-2003, and 22.33 in 2003-2012. The FCTC significantly accelerated passage of FCTC-compliant HWLs for countries with initially mandatory policies with a hazard of 1.27 per year (95% confidence interval = 1.11, 1.45), but only marginally increased the hazard for countries that had an industry voluntary HWL of 1.68 per year (95% confidence interval = 0.95, 2.97). Passage of HWLs is accelerating, and the FCTC is associated with further acceleration. Industry voluntary HWLs slowed mandated HWLs.

  1. Energy study of railroad freight transportation. Volume 2. Industry description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-08-01

    The United States railroad industry plays a key role in transporting materials to support our industrial economy. One of the oldest industries in the US, the railroads have developed over 150 years into their present physical and operational configuration. Energy conservation proposals to change industry facilities, equipment, or operating practices must be evaluated in terms of their cost impact. A current, comprehensive and accurate data baseline of railroad economic activity and energy consumption is presented. Descriptions of the history of railroad construction in the US and current equipment, facilities, and operation practices follow. Economic models that relate cost and energy of railroad service to the volume of railroad output and to physical and operational parameters are provided. The analyses and descriptions should provide not only an analytical baseline for evaluating the impact of proposed conservation measures, but they should also provide a measure of understanding of the system and its operations to analysts and policy makers who are involved in proposing, analyzing, and implementing such changes.

  2. Energy situation and competitiveness of the aluminium industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legler, H.

    1984-04-01

    The west german aluminium industry has heavily run into the wake of price competition; the high energy price level in the FRG in international comparison carries heavy weight. The technological potential of energy saving is limited. The electricity prices to aluminium smelters are politically determined: They depend on the importance which economic policy attaches to the competitiveness of electricity intensive industries. Since the end of the seventies the tendency of improved results in international trade has been broken. Other important supply factors are not advantageous. Compared to a lot of other economies the west german aluminium industry invests too little in research and development. Although the share of unskilled workers is high, it does not seem impossible to close the technological gap. - The environmental protection expenditures are considerable. Energy is not the only problem of the aluminium industry Electricity price subsidies do not produce any effect in the long run. The prospects of cheap electricity in comparison with other nations are not bright. Without a doubt the considerable regional and sectoral discriminations in setting electricity prices could be - and have to be - removed. Then the competition within FRG between electricity users would be less heavily distorted. The electricity price level will tend to drop significantly in an economy which applies more competitive pressure to power companies than today.

  3. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Masanet, Eric; Graus, Wina

    2008-03-01

    The U.S. glass industry is comprised of four primary industry segments--flat glass, container glass, specialty glass, and fiberglass--which together consume $1.6 billion in energy annually. On average, energy costs in the U.S. glass industry account for around 14 percent of total glass production costs. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There is a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. glass industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, system, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. glass industry is provided along with a description of the major process steps in glass manufacturing. Expected savings in energy and energy-related costs are given for many energy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world applications in glass production facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. glass industry reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures--as well on as their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess potential implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

  4. Understanding industrial energy use: Physical energy intensity changes in Indian manufacturing sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudhakara Reddy, B., E-mail: sreddy@igidr.ac.in [Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Goregaon (E), Mumbai 400 065 (India); Kumar Ray, Binay [Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Goregaon (E), Mumbai 400 065 (India)

    2011-11-15

    This study develops and examines physical energy intensity indicators in five industrial sub-sectors-iron and steel, aluminum, textiles, paper, and cement-and investigates mitigation options for energy related CO{sub 2} emissions (during 1991-2005). Decomposition analysis has been employed to separate the structural effect (share of different products in the sector) from pure intensity effect (efficiency increase through technical improvement) for each industry. The results show that the combined effect (considering both structural and intensity effects together) on both iron and steel and paper and pulp industries is negative while it is positive for aluminum and textiles. The intensity effect for all the industries, barring textiles, is negative showing improvement in energy efficiency; iron and steel in particular, has seen a decrease of 134 PJ in energy consumption owing to improvements in efficiency. However, energy intensity in textiles has risen by 47 PJ due to increased mechanization. Structural effect is positive in aluminum and iron and steel industries indicating a movement towards higher energy-intensive products. In the case of aluminum, positive structural effect dominates over negative intensive effect whereas negative intensive effect dominates iron and steel industry. The paper helps in designing policies for improving productivity and reduce energy consumption in India's manufacturing sector. - Highlights: > The study develops physical energy intensity indicators in industrial sub-sectors of India. > It identifies technological and other options for reduction in energy consumption. > The study quantifies savings in energy as well as CO{sub 2} emissions. > The indicators are useful in examining structural changes.

  5. Industrial sustainability of competing wood energy options in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackom, Emmanuel K; Mabee, Warren E; Saddler, John N

    2010-12-01

    The amount of sawmill residue available in Canada to support the emerging cellulosic ethanol industry was examined. A material flow analysis technique was employed to determine the amount of sawmill residue that could possibly be available to the ethanol industry per annum. A combination of two key trends--improved efficiency of lumber recovery and increased uptake of sawmill residues for self-generation and for wood pellet production--have contributed to a declining trend of sawmill residue availability. Approximately 2.3 x 10⁶ bone-dry tons per year of sawmill residue was estimated to be potentially available to the cellulosic ethanol industry in Canada, yielding 350 million liters per year of cellulosic ethanol using best practices. An additional 2.7 billion liters of cellulosic ethanol might be generated from sawmill residue that is currently used for competing wood energy purposes, including wood pellet generation. Continued competition between bioenergy options will reduce the industrial sustainability of the forest industry. Recommendations for policy reforms towards improved industrial sustainability practices are provided.

  6. Energy Efficient Industrialized Housing Research Program. Annual report, FY 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    Six area reported progress in the Energy Efficient Industrialized Housing Research Program during FY 1991. As part of Industry Guidance, meetings were held with steering and technical committees in computers, housing design and manufacturing. This task area enables the program to benefit from the expertise of industry representatives and communicate research results directly to them. As part of the Design Process performance specifications were being developed for the future housing system designed last year. These house designs coordinate and optimize predicted and desirable advances in computerized design processes, materials, components, and manufacturing automation to achieve energy efficiency at reduced first cost. Energy design software were being developed for CAD systems, stressed skin insulating core panel manufacturers; and a prototype energy sales tool. A prototype design was to be developed to integrate one or more subsystems with the building skin. As part of the Manufacturing Process we are developing a manufacturing process simulation and data base to help current and new entrants to the industrialized housing industry in assessing the impact of implementing new manufacturing techniques. For Evaluation we are developing testing plans for six units of housing on the UO campus and the stressed skin insulating core house to be constructed in Oregon. The DOW Chemical test structure will be retrofitted with a tile roof and retested to compare to the dome and conventional construction structures. Calibration of the wind tunnel will be completed so that laboratory tests can be conducted to simulate the ventilation cooling efficiency of houses in design. Research utilization and program management were either aspects of this program.

  7. Energy and environmental market in industrial enterprises in Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-01

    This paper discusses markets related with energy conservation and environment preservation in industrial enterprises in Thailand. The present Thailand is not in a situation that investments are made into environmental businesses or energy saving businesses. However, the attitude of the government toward environment is that emphasis is placed on solving the environmental pollution problems. Laws and regulations are defined for assistance in environment preservation to corporations making efforts to increase export, resource protection and energy conservation. These measures lead to expectation on bright future in developing technologies and markets related to environment preservation and energy conservation. Control of wastes by using clean technologies and enhancement in productivity are very important issues for the export of Thailand partly because European countries and America set these requirements as a condition for transaction. The markets related to energy conservation and environment preservation are anticipated of participation from such businesses as consultants, device manufacturers, and inspection and analysis of environmental effects. (NEDO)

  8. Advanced Energy Saving and its Applications in Industry

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuda, Kazuo; Fushimi, Chihiro; Tsutsumi, Atsushi; Kishimoto, Akira

    2013-01-01

    The conventional approach for energy saving in a process system is to maximize heat recovery without changing any process conditions by using pinch technology. “Self-heat recuperation technology” was developed to achieve further energy saving in the process system by eliminating the necessity for any external heat input, such as firing or imported steam. Advanced Energy Saving and its Applications in Industry introduces the concept of self-heat recuperation and the application of such technology to a wide range of processes from heavy chemical complexes to other processes such as drying and gas separation processes, which require heating and cooling during operation.   Conventional energy saving items in a utility system are applied and implemented based on a single site approach, however, when looking at heavy chemical complexes, it was apparent that the low-grade heat discharged as waste from a refinery could also be used in an adjacent petrochemical plant. There could therefore be a large energy savin...

  9. Thinking Globally: How ISO 50001 - Energy Management can make industrial energy efficiency standard practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKane, Aimee; Desai, Deann; Matteini, Marco; Meffert, William; Williams, Robert; Risser, Roland

    2009-08-01

    Industry utilizes very complex systems, consisting of equipment and their human interface, which are organized to meet the production needs of the business. Effective and sustainable energy efficiency programs in an industrial setting require a systems approach to optimize the integrated whole while meeting primary business requirements. Companies that treat energy as a manageable resource and integrate their energy program into their management practices have an organizational context to continually seek opportunities for optimizing their energy use. The purpose of an energy management system standard is to provide guidance for industrial and commercial facilities to integrate energy efficiency into their management practices, including fine-tuning production processes and improving the energy efficiency of industrial systems. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has identified energy management as one of its top five priorities for standards development. The new ISO 50001 will establish an international framework for industrial, commercial, or institutional facilities, or entire companies, to manage their energy, including procurement and use. This standard is expected to achieve major, long-term increases in energy efficiency (20percent or more) in industrial, commercial, and institutional facilities and to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions worldwide.This paper describes the impetus for the international standard, its purpose, scope and significance, and development progress to date. A comparative overview of existing energy management standards is provided, as well as a discussion of capacity-building needs for skilled individuals to assist organizations in adopting the standard. Finally, opportunities and challenges are presented for implementing ISO 50001 in emerging economies and developing countries.

  10. The thermoelectric power industry and the Italian energy program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ninni, A.; Villa, A.

    The reduction of technological and market uncertainty in the thermoelectric power industry can be considered as one of the most important consequences of a large public demand program acting on the supply sector. However, possible results must be analyzed by taking into account the features of the demand (amount, time sharing, degree of certainty of public commitment, behaviour of the buyer-user utility), and the features of the supply sector (its competitiveness and degree of technological content, vis-a-vis the international market and the main foreign suppliers). From the analysis in this article, the reduction of the technological gap in industry results as a likely product of the energy program, while the size and the uncertainty of the program, coupled with some particular behaviour of the utility, do not seem to be able by themselves to trigger off a permanent process of improvement of the relative international competitiveness of the industry.

  11. Assisting the Tooling and Machining Industry to Become Energy Efficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curry, Bennett [Arizona Commerce Authority, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2016-12-30

    The Arizona Commerce Authority (ACA) conducted an Innovation in Advanced Manufacturing Grant Competition to support and grow southern and central Arizona’s Aerospace and Defense (A&D) industry and its supply chain. The problem statement for this grant challenge was that many A&D machining processes utilize older generation CNC machine tool technologies that can result an inefficient use of resources – energy, time and materials – compared to the latest state-of-the-art CNC machines. Competitive awards funded projects to develop innovative new tools and technologies that reduce energy consumption for older generation machine tools and foster working relationships between industry small to medium-sized manufacturing enterprises and third-party solution providers. During the 42-month term of this grant, 12 competitive awards were made. Final reports have been included with this submission.

  12. Improving Energy Efficiency in Industrial Solutions – Walk the Talk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Dieter; Finkbeiner, Matthias; Holst, Jens-Christian

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the outline of the energy efficiency and environmental care policy and management at Siemens Industry Solutions Division. This environmental policy coherently embraces strategic planning, eco-design of energy-efficient industrial processes and solutions, design evaluation...... and finally communication of both environmental and economic performance of solutions to customers. One of the main tools supporting eco-design and evaluation & controlling of derived design solutions is the so called “Eco-Care-Matrix” (ECM). The ECM simply visualizes the eco-efficiency of solutions compared...... to a given baseline. In order to prevent from “green washing” criticism and to ensure “walk the talk” attitude the ECM should be scientifically well-founded using appropriate and consistent methodology. The vertical axis of an ECM illustrates the environmental performance and the horizontal axis describes...

  13. Socioeconomic impact management in the western energy industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz, W.C.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of what western energy companies are doing with respect to socioeconomic impact mitigation. Coal and uranium energy industries can initiate a variety of long-term and short-term impact mitigating actions in parallel with their plans for new coal and uranium mines, coal-fired power plants, uranium mills, and coal gasification and liquefaction plants. There are essentially eight socioeconomic impact management actions; these being the following: (1) construction of a whole community, (2) dramatic alteration of an existing community, (3) subdivision development, (4) temporary construction phase housing, (5) house financing, (6) community services being upgraded, (7) community planning, and (8) industry-community communication. Each of these actions is discussed. 37 references.

  14. Industrial applications of hot dry rock geothermal energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchane, D. V.

    1992-07-01

    Geothermal resources in the form of naturally occurring hot water or steam have been utilized for many years. While these hydrothermal resources are found in many places, the general case is that the rock at depth is hot, but does not contain significant amounts of mobile fluid. An extremely large amount of geothermal energy is found around the world in this hot dry rock (HDR). Technology has been under development for more than twenty years at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in the United States and elsewhere to develop the technology to extract the geothermal energy from HDR in a form useful for electricity generation, space heating, or industrial processing. HDR technology is especially attractive for industrial applications because of the ubiquitous distribution of the HDR resource and the unique aspects of the process developed to recover it. In the HDR process, as developed at Los Alamos, water is pumped down a well under high pressure to open up natural joints in hot rock and create an artificial geothermal reservoir. Energy is extracted by circulating water through the reservoir. Pressurized hot water is returned to the surface through the production well, and its thermal energy is extracted for practical use. The same water is then recirculated through the system to mine more geothermal heat. Construction of a pilot HDR facility at Fenton Hill, NM, USA, has recently been completed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory. It consists of a large underground reservoir, a surface plant, and the connecting wellbores. This paper describes HDR technology and the current status of the development program. Novel industrial applications of geothermal energy based on the unique characteristics of the HDR energy extraction process are discussed.

  15. Industrial applications of hot dry rock geothermal energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duchane, D.V.

    1992-09-01

    Geothermal resources in the form of naturally occurring hot water or steam have been utilized for many years. While these hydrothermal resources are found in many places, the general case is that the rock at depth is hot, but does not contain significant amounts of mobile fluid. An extremely large amount of geothermal energy is found around the world in this hot dry rock (HDR). Technology has been under development for more than twenty years at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in the United States and elsewhere to develop the technology to extract the geothermal energy from HDR in a form useful for electricity generation, space heating, or industrial processing. HDR technology is especially attractive for industrial applications because of the ubiquitous distribution of the HDR resource and the unique aspects of the process developed to recover it. In the HDR process, as developed at Los Alamos, water is pumped down a well under high pressure to open up natural joints in hot rock and create an artificial geothermal reservoir. Energy is extracted by circulating water through the reservoir. Pressurized hot water is returned to the surface through the production well, and its thermal energy is extracted for practical use. The same water is then recirculated through the system to mine more geothermal heat. Construction of a pilot HDR facility at Fenton Hill, NM, USA, has recently been completed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory. It consists of a large underground reservoir, a surface plant, and the connecting wellbores. This paper describes HDR technology and the current status of the development program. Novel industrial applications of geothermal energy based on the unique characteristics of the HDR energy extraction process are discussed.

  16. Securing the energy industry : perspectives in security risk management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurd, G.L. [Anadarko Canada Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    This presentation offered some perspectives in security risk management as it relates to the energy sector. Since the events of September 11, 2001 much attention has been given to terrorism and the business is reviewing protection strategies. The paper made reference to each of the following vulnerabilities in the energy sector: information technology, globalization, business restructuring, interdependencies, political/regulatory change, and physical/human factors. The vulnerability of information technology is that it can be subject to cyber and virus attacks. Dangers of globalization lie in privacy and information security, forced nationalization, organized crime, and anti-globalization efforts. It was noted that the Y2K phenomenon provided valuable lessons regarding interdependencies and the effects of power outages, water availability, transportation disruption, common utility corridor accidents, and compounding incidents. The paper also noted the conflict between the government's desire to have a resilient infrastructure that can withstand and recover from attacks versus a company's ability to afford this capability. The physical/human factors that need to be considered in risk management include crime, domestic terrorism, and disasters such as natural disasters, industrial disasters and crisis. The energy industry has geographically dispersed vulnerable systems. It has done a fair job of physical security and has good emergency management practices, but it was noted that the industry cannot protect against all threats. A strategy of vigilance and awareness is needed to deal with threats. Other strategies include contingency planning, physical security, employee communication, and emergency response plans. tabs., figs.

  17. Global scenarios for the energy industry: challenge and response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahane, A.

    1991-01-01

    Three areas of far reaching change that will affect the future of the energy industry are identified - geopolitical changes, such as the collapse of communist regimes in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union, the relative decline of economic importance of the USA and the stimulus of European Community programmes; changes and difficulties in the international economy such as disagreement over trade and foreign direct investment; and thirdly, changing attitudes towards man's impact on the natural environment. These changes suggest two different images of the future, one called 'global mercantilism' and the other 'sustainable change'. In the first, the main global challenge is to deal with decline in the hegemonic position of the USA and Japan and the instability in international markets - the energy industry here faces new rules for business; in the 'sustainable world' the main challenge is to deal with common problems with implications for the redefining of the value of clean fuels and processes as well as substantial reconstruction of the energy industry. 10 figs.

  18. Canadian Industry Program for Energy Conservation success stories 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-10-01

    This document revealed how twelve Canadian industrial organizations managed an improvement of their energy efficiency. A selection was made among hundreds of success stories encompassing a dozen or so industries. Each company had a unique vision and a singular perspective on the best way to meet its goals. Their efforts resulted in reductions in emissions of greenhouse gases. BHP Billiton Diamonds Inc. in the Northwest Territories strove to minimize energy consumption at its mine. The Clorox Company of Canada Ltd. preserved an operated a railway line, providing a vital link between local manufacturers and their supply chains. General Motors of Canada Limited is working toward a 25 per cent reduction in energy usage with a baseline year of 1995. IMC Potash Colonsay improved dryer fuel efficiency by 11 per cent, reducing its consumption of natural gas and electricity. Michelin North America (Canada) Inc. improved the energy efficiency of its systems for refrigeration, compressed air, motor drives and heating air conditioning and ventilation at facilities in Nova Scotia. Midwest Food Products Inc. improved energy usage. Nexen Inc. found ways to capture waste energy to reduce the emissions of greenhouse gases. Ontario Power Generation Inc. launched a series of energy-saving activities. Schneider Foods conducted an energy audit of steam and refrigeration systems and identified opportunities for cogeneration. Stelfil Ltee converted its operations from propane to natural gas. St. Lawrence Cement Inc. substituted supplementary cementitious materials for Portland cement. Versacold Group improved its performance through innovation and cooperation, after having participated in workshops conducted by Natural Resources Canada.

  19. Energy industry and energy policy - a lexicon entry; Energiewirtschaft und Energiepolitik - ein Lexikonbeitrag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroebele, W.

    1992-06-01

    Definitions in the fields of energy industry and energy policy are presented in the concise manner of lexicon entries. (UA). [Deutsch] Es werden abschnittsweise verschiedene Begriffe aus den Gebieten Energiewirtschaft und Energiepolitik erlaeutert und zwar auf eine fuer einen Lexikoneintrag geeignete praegnante Art und Weise. (UA).

  20. Potential for energy efficiency in the Norwegian land-based industry; Potensial for energieffektivisering i norsk landbasert industri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-07-01

    Process Industry Association (PIL, now the Federation of Norwegian Industries) conducted in collaboration with Enova SF, Kjelforeningen - Norwegian Energy and Institute for Energy Technology, in 2002 a study to determine the potential for more environmentally efficient energy use and production in the Norwegian process industry. It was in 2007 conducted a review of the 2002-study, and this work showed that large parts of the potential identified in 2002 were not realized, and that in addition there was further potential. Enova therefore took the initiative in 2009 to do a new review of the potential for energy efficiency in the Norwegian industry. (AG)

  1. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galitsky, Christina; Galitsky, Christina; Chang, Sheng-chieh; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2008-03-01

    The U.S. pharmaceutical industry consumes almost $1 billion in energy annually. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. pharmaceutical industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, system, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. pharmaceutical industry is provided along with a description of the major process steps in the pharmaceutical manufacturing process. Expected savings in energy and energy-related costs are given for many energy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world applications in pharmaceutical and related facilities worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while meeting regulatory requirements and maintaining the quality of products manufactured. At individual plants, further research on the economics of the measures?as well as their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess potential implementation of selected technologies.

  2. Energy cost reduction in the pulp and paper industry - an energy benchmarking perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, D.W.; Towers, M.T.; Browne, T.C. [Pulp and Paper Research Institute of Canada (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    With the increasing cost of energy and the rising concerns over the environment, interest in energy saving methods is growing in the industry sector. In the pulp and paper sector, energy represents a significant part of costs and the aims of this paper are first, to demonstrate that there is a potential for energy use reduction in the pulp and paper industry and secondly, to show how it can be achieved. Benchmarking studies have been carried out for both the kraft market pulp and newsprint sectors; in both cases the energy consumption of existing Canadian mills was compared to that of a modern mill using the best current technologies. Results showed that in both sectors, the application of best practices could result in significant savings. This study demonstrated that the application of current technologies in existing mills would yield significant energy use reductions.

  3. Developing an energy efficiency service industry in Shanghai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jiang; Goldman, Charles; Levine, Mark; Hopper, Nicole

    2004-02-10

    industrial space over the last 5 years. It is one reason that China consumed over 60% of the world's cement production in 2003 (NBS 2004). Energy consumption in Shanghai has been growing at 6-8% annually, with the growth of electricity demand at over 10% per year. Shanghai, with very limited local energy resources, relies heavily on imported coal, oil, natural gas, and electricity. While coal still constitutes over half of Shanghai's energy consumption, oil and natural gas use have been growing in importance. Shanghai is the major market for China's West to East (natural gas) Pipeline (WEP). With the input from WEP and off-shore pipelines, it is expected that natural gas consumption will grow from 250 million cubic meters in 2000 to 3000-3500 million cubic meters in 2005. In order to secure energy supply to power Shanghai's fast-growing economy, the Shanghai government has set three priorities in its energy strategy: (1) diversification of its energy structure, (2) improving its energy efficiency, and (3) developing renewable and other cleaner forms of energy. Efficiency improvements are likely to be most critical, particularly in the near future, in addressing Shanghai's energy security, especially the recent electricity shortage in Shanghai. Commercial buildings and industries consume the majority of Shanghai's, as well as China's, commercial energy. In the building sector, Shanghai has been very active implementing energy efficiency codes for commercial and residential buildings. Following a workshop on building codes implementation held at LBNL for senior Shanghai policy makers in 2001, the Shanghai government recently introduced an implementation guideline on residential building energy code compliance for the downtown area of Shanghai to commence in April, 2004, with other areas of the city to follow in 2005. A draft code for commercial buildings has been developed as well. In the industrial sector, the Shanghai government started an

  4. Energy survey of the coal based sponge iron industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishant R. Dey

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A survey is made on a typical coal based Indian sponge iron plant of capacity 500 t/d in order to identify the largest energy losses and find ways to increase the efficiency. The required data are obtained by measurements or taken from production industries. The process efficiency is about 51.31%. The energy balances of the process show that the gap between theoretical and actual energy consumption is 45.2% and the exhausts make up the largest loss of 43.5%. A huge amount of waste gas is generated during operation and substantial part of it associated with the waste gas, remains unutilized. The energy content in the exhaust gases which is found at useful temperature can be used in three different ways: by internal use; by external energy supply; or by power generation. The four possible potential areas are identified where energy is being lost and untapped. The largest improvements would be made by design modifications adopting a novel energy conservation scenario by process integration and thereby decreasing the coal and water consumption and by decreasing the cold fresh air.

  5. Energy use in the animal-feeds industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleland, A.C.; Earle, M.D.

    1980-05-01

    Fuel and electricity use in the animal feeds industry is discussed. Data were collected by postal survey and by detailed energy survey from plant records. Energy conservation measures are discussed. Large energy savings are unlikely in lucerne pellet production but significant savings in imported fuel oil could be made by conversion to coal or other indigenous fuels. When heat pump technology has improved it may be economically feasible to use a heat pump to recover heat from the dryer outlet air and use it to preheat the incoming air stream. Electricity savings are unlikely in feed mills but the boiler fuel consumption can by reduced by better situation of boilers and upgrading of steam reticulation systems. Energy consumption in dog biscuit factories can be reduced by similar methods to those suggested in the biscuit baking industry report, in particular conversion to direct gas heating (where available) and waste heat recovery for hot water production offer potential savings. Methods used to manufacture processed animal foods differ between factories and a general list of conservation measures could not be prepared. Useful savings are likely by reduced baseload boiler fuel consumption and waste heat recovery for hot water production.

  6. Energy conservation and alternative energies in agriculture and in food industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    Food industry is an important thermal energy consumer, mostly in drying processes. This convention investigates many possibilities of energy savings by thermal insulation, heat recovery, mechanical vapor recompression, heat pump utilization, thermal regulation and energy conservation by waste processing: waste biomass conversion (biochemical and thermochemical processes), waste matter combustion for heat production. This book also illustrates some examples of rationalized food processes such as inverse osmosis milk concentration etc....

  7. Field survey analysis of the public's cognition on the new energy industry in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Q. F.; Song, Y.

    2016-08-01

    The public enjoy an important role in the development of China's new energy industry. However, the role has not attracted sufficient attention. By the way of field investigation, the paper acquired the first hand data of the public cognition on the China's new energy industry. Survey data showed that the public enjoyed awareness of China's new energy industry to some extent. And the public had optimistic expectations on the future development of new energy industry. Moreover, there were obvious differences in the degree of public's familiarity with different new energy varieties. The education level and age of the individual public had a significant impact on his awareness of China's new energy industry. To raise public participation in China's new energy industry, it entailed highlighting the status of the public in China's new energy industry, increasing the publicity of the new energy industry with different measures for different types of public group.

  8. Industrial application of geothermal energy in Southeast Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batdorf, J.A.; McClain, D.W.; Gross, M.; Simmons, G.M.

    1980-02-01

    Those phosphate related and food processing industries in Southeastern Idaho are identified which require large energy inputs and the potential for direct application of geothermal energy is assessed. The total energy demand is given along with that fractional demand that can be satisfied by a geothermal source of known temperature. The potential for geothermal resource development is analyzed by examining the location of known thermal springs and wells, the location of state and federal geothermal exploration leases, and the location of federal and state oil and gas leasing activity in Southeast Idaho. Information is also presented regarding the location of geothermal, oil, and gas exploration wells in Southeast Idaho. The location of state and federal phosphate mining leases is also presented. This information is presented in table and map formats to show the proximity of exploration and development activities to current food and phosphate processing facilities and phosphate mining activities. (MHR)

  9. ANALYSIS METHODS OF BANKRUPTCY RISK IN ROMANIAN ENERGY MINING INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CORICI MARIAN CATALIN

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study is an analysis of bankruptcy risk and assessing the economic performance of the entity in charge of energy mining industry from southwest region. The scientific activity assesses the risk of bankruptcy using score’s method and some indicators witch reflecting the results obtained and elements from organization balance sheet involved in mining and energy which contributes to the stability of the national energy system. Analysis undertaken is focused on the application of the business organization models that allow a comprehensive assessment of the risk of bankruptcy and be an instrument of its forecast. In this study will be highlighted developments bankruptcy risk within the organization through the Altman model and Conan-Holder model in order to show a versatile image on the organization's ability to ensure business continuity

  10. Voluntary Environmental Governance Arrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, J.

    2012-01-01

    Voluntary environmental governance arrangements have focal attention in studies on environmental policy, regulation and governance. The four major debates in the contemporary literature on voluntary environmental governance arrangements are studied. The literature falls short of sufficiently

  11. Voluntary Environmental Governance Arrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, J.

    2012-01-01

    Voluntary environmental governance arrangements have focal attention in studies on environmental policy, regulation and governance. The four major debates in the contemporary literature on voluntary environmental governance arrangements are studied. The literature falls short of sufficiently specify

  12. Voluntary Service System (VSS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Voluntary Service System (VSS) is a national-level application which replaced the site-based Voluntary Timekeeping System (VTK). VTK was used for many years at the...

  13. Energy and process substitution in the frozen-food industry: geothermal energy and the retortable pouch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, M.W.; Hanemann, W.M.; Eckhouse, K.

    1981-12-01

    An assessment is made of the possibilities of using geothermal energy and an aseptic retortable pouch in the food processing industry. The focus of the study is on the production of frozen broccoli in the Imperial Valley, California. Background information on the current status of the frozen food industry, the nature of geothermal energy as a potential substitute for conventional fossil fuels, and the engineering details of the retortable pouch process are covered. The analytical methodology by which the energy and process substitution were evaluated is described. A four-way comparison of the economics of the frozen product versus the pouched product and conventional fossil fuels versus geothermal energy was performed. A sensitivity analysis for the energy substitution was made and results are given. Results are summarized. (MCW)

  14. Voluntary disclosures of intangible assets and legitimization: The production industry of olive oil Divulgación voluntaria de intangibles y legitimación: La industria productora de aceite de oliva Voluntary disclosures of intangible assets and legitimization: The production industry of olive oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Castilla-Polo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this paper is to analyze whether the decision to disclose intangible assets could be explained by Institutional Theory. Our interest is to provide evidence of his interpretative capacity through an empirical study applied to the olive oil mill industry. Design/methodology/approach: We used a mixed methodological design that combines quantitative and qualitative methods. Findings: In an industry like olive oil mills, not use to providing additional information on intangible assets on a voluntary basis, social legitimization can be seen as a long-term objective because of the lack of urgency associated to it. Instead, a more pragmatic behavior concerned with economic legitimization has been observed, such as those that have been already found. Research limitations/implications: Greater efforts should be made to complete comparative results in a specific industry as well as we consider necessary to analyze longitudinally the evolution of the relationship legitimation-disclosure of intangibles. Originality/value: The results obtained help contribute to the literature coming from Institutional Theory in the sense that the legitimization of a new practice can vary between industries according to the state of the process of its institutionalization in each of them.Objeto: El objetivo de este trabajo es analizar si la decisión de divulgar información sobre intangibles puede ser explicada por la Teoría Institucional. Nuestro interés es proporcionar evidencia de su capacidad interpretativa a través del estudio de la industria productora de aceite de oliva. Diseño/metodología: Empleamos un diseño mixto que combina métodos cuantitativos y cualitativos. Aportaciones y resultados: En una industria como la del aceite de oliva, poco dada a proporcionar información adicional sobre intangibles de manera voluntaria, la legitimación social se considera un objetivo a largo plazo, no así la legitimación económica que sí se asocia al

  15. UP-report. Energy intensive industry. Basis of the Development platform. Industry to the Swedish Energy Agency's strategy work FOKUS; UP-rapport. Energiintensiv industri. Underlag fraan Utvecklingsplattformen. Industri till Energimyndighetens strategiarbete FOKUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-11-01

    The report serves as input to the Swedish Energy Agency's strategies and priorities for research and innovation under the thematic area of energy intensive industry for the period 2011 - 2016. The report has been compiled by members of the Development platform Industry. This report provides background and conditions for the energy intensive industry, and proposed priorities and activities for future efforts in this area. The development platform has contributed with valuable experience and knowledge which enabled the Swedish Energy Agency to then develop a strategy that meets needs of the society and business.

  16. Multiple-energy Techniques in Industrial Computerized Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneberk, D.; Martz, H.; Azevedo, S.

    1990-08-01

    Considerable effort is being applied to develop multiple-energy industrial CT techniques for materials characterization. Multiple-energy CT can provide reliable estimates of effective Z (Z{sub eff}), weight fraction, and rigorous calculations of absolute density, all at the spatial resolution of the scanner. Currently, a wide variety of techniques exist for CT scanners, but each has certain problems and limitations. Ultimately, the best multi-energy CT technique would combine the qualities of accuracy, reliability, and wide range of application, and would require the smallest number of additional measurements. We have developed techniques for calculating material properties of industrial objects that differ somewhat from currently used methods. In this paper, we present our methods for calculating Z{sub eff}, weight fraction, and density. We begin with the simplest case -- methods for multiple-energy CT using isotopic sources -- and proceed to multiple-energy work with x-ray machine sources. The methods discussed here are illustrated on CT scans of PBX-9502 high explosives, a lexan-aluminum phantom, and a cylinder of glass beads used in a preliminary study to determine if CT can resolve three phases: air, water, and a high-Z oil. In the CT project at LLNL, we have constructed several CT scanners of varying scanning geometries using {gamma}- and x-ray sources. In our research, we employed two of these scanners: pencil-beam CAT for CT data using isotopic sources and video-CAT equipped with an IRT micro-focal x-ray machine source.

  17. Political and economic structure and energy industry status of Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, K.Y. [Korea Energy Economics Institute, Euiwang (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-06-01

    Looking at the composition of energy resources import of Korea per each country, Australian-made import takes up 11.8% of total energy resources import. It possesses the highest import composition of 30.5% when petroleum sector is excluded. In the order of Korea`s mineral import per each country, Australia still keep the number one position every year though Korea keep promoting the diversification of import sources. In the mean time, reflecting on the treatment aspect of import country of Australia, when Korea`s energy, the import size of resources, import intensity of Australia`s primary raw material resources and international resources situation are considered, Korea is thought to receive less treatment from Australia as the second export country of Australia than Japan who is the number one export country of Australia, relatively. Though the increase ratio of Korean tourists in Australia is the highest for the past few years and international promotion effect shows big with the IMF financial support of Korea who faces sudden economic crisis recently as a momentum, sincere evaluation through in-depth analysis between Korea and Australia is still in the initial stage. The necessity to diagnosis the general political and economic structure of Australia more in detail emerges as trade volume between two countries keep growing, esp. in the import of energy and resources sectors, the number of visits between two countries keep increasing. Therefore, the purpose of this study lies mainly in the structure of the new Australian government, general macroeconomics structure and the understanding of energy industry-related status such as energy supply and demand, development status of energy, related laws, and government`s energy agencies, etc. 6 refs., 3 figs., 22 tabs.

  18. Low energy electron beams for industrial and environmental applications

    CERN Document Server

    Skarda, Vlad

    2017-01-01

    EuCARD-2 Workshop, 8-9 December 2016, Warsaw, Poland. Organizers: Science and Technology Facilities Council, UK CERN - The European Organization for Nuclear Research, Switzerland, Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Poland, Fraunhofer Institute for Electron Beam and Plasma Technology, Germany, Warsaw University of Technology, Poland. An article presents short information about EuCARD-2 Workshop “Low energy electron beams for industrial and environmental applications”, which was held in December 2016 in Warsaw. Objectives, main topics and expected output of meeting are described. List of organizers is included.

  19. Production of cement requiring low energy expenditure. An industrial test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimenez, S.; Blanco, M.T.; Palomo, A.; Puertas, F. (Instituto de Ciencias de la Construccion, Madrid (Spain))

    1991-01-01

    A new method for making cement is proposed. It is based on the use of CaF{sub 2} and CaSO{sub 4} for partial replacement of the usual raw materials in cement manufacturing. This paper shows the feasibility of the proposed method on an industrial scale. A test carried out in a Spanish cement factory (1500 t yield of the new cement) has revealed that the mehtod can not only be adapted to the current technology but also requires a much lower energy expenditure. The final product is shown to have excellent properties in comparison with OPC. (orig.).

  20. The Holyoke Industrial Energy Conservation And Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaufler, Edward R.; Bateman, Robert H.; Connor, Frederick J.

    1982-03-01

    An innovative approach to the development of a model system for comprehensive industrial sector thermographic investigations and inspections will be taken during the winter of 1981-82 in Holyoke, MA. Infrared thermography techniques will be utilized for cost effective identification of building and process heat losses. The Holyoke program provides for a wide range of energy conservation services and will result in the implementation of no-cost, low-cost, and cost-effective capital intensive measures financed through a cooperative effort of government and private funding.

  1. Energy optimization in industrial drying systems; Optimizacion energetica en sistemas de secado industrial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alarcon, Daniel; Ambriz, Juan Jose; Romero Paredes, Hernando [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1994-12-31

    The drying of products -meaning the extraction of water or excess humidity down to adequate levels for its conservation and final presentation- demands a large amount of energy, mainly from fuels of fossil origin. Nevertheless, from the standpoint of the energy efficiency, the burning of fuels at very high temperature for using them at a very low temperature, represents an astonishing energy waste, which can be clearly established by means of an energy and exergy balance of these drying installations. In this study the methodology for the energy analysis for industrial drying systems is presented and it is applied to different practical cases. The efficiency of the entire system is evaluated and the losses for each concept, in order to obtain the potential energy saving. [Espanol] El secado de productos, entendido como la extraccion de agua o humedad en exceso, hasta niveles adecuados para su conservacion o presentacion final, demanda una gran cantidad de energeticos, principalmente de origen fosil. No obstante, desde el punto de vista de la eficiencia energetica, el quemar combustible a muy alta temperatura para emplearlos a una muy baja, representa un dispendio energetico impresionante, lo cual puede ser claramente establecido mediante el balance energetico y exergetico de dichas instalaciones de secado. En el presente estudio se presenta la metodologia de analisis energetico de sistemas industriales de secado y se aplica a distintos casos practicos. Se evalua la eficiencia total del sistema y las perdidas por cada concepto con la finalidad de obtener los potenciales de ahorro de energia.

  2. Energy Audit as a Tool for Improving System Efficiency in Industrial Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopi Srinath,

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the characteristics of energy consumption in industrial sector, the methodology and results of energy audits (EA performed in industrial sites and potentials for energy efficiency (EE improvements. The present state of industrial energy in India could be characterized by significant technological out-of–date, low energy efficiency and low level of environmental protection. Presented analysis of the results of conducted energy audits in selected industrial companies in previous period has shown the significant potentials for energy efficiency improvements in industrial sector (upgrading or replacement of equipment in the industrial energy sources and processes, introduction of energy management, improvement of steam supply and condensate return systems, the waste heat utilization, introduction of energy efficiency technology, improvement of energy efficiency in electrical equipment, usage of waste materials etc.

  3. Efficient energy conversion in the pulp and paper industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marechal, F.; Perin-Levasseur, Z.

    2005-07-01

    This yearly report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) takes a look at the work done in 2005 and the work planned for 2006 within the framework of the Efficient Energy Conversion in the Pulp and Paper Industry project. The results of investigations made at a large pulp and paper facility in Switzerland are presented and analysed. Data models of the steam and condensate networks and of the processes involved are examined. An additional model of the sulphur loop has been also elaborated. From this analysis, a list of required measurements has been developed. Several performance indicators have also been calculated: A systematic analysis method developed to identify sections where condensate could be recovered is discussed. A systematic definition of the hot and cold streams in the process is being developed in order to compute the minimum energy requirements of the process. Evaluating this minimum energy requirement from the data available is to be used to prepare definitions of the energy savings possible.

  4. Energy Efficiency and Emissions Reduction Potential of China's Industrial Sector%Energy Efficiency and Emissions Reduction Potential of China's Industrial Sector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Xiaohong; Zhang Chao

    2012-01-01

    Based on the total-factor energy efficiency framework, this paper calculates China's industrial energy efficiency and CO2 emissions reduction potential from 2000 to 2009 by utilizing the directional distance function and data envelopment analysis. The empirical results show that: China's industrial overall energy effi- ciency is relatively lower while the emis-sions reduction potential is relatively greater, given the optimum production frontier. Sig- nificant indus-trial disparities of energy efficiency and emissions reduction potential exist. Energy efficiency and emis-sions reduc- tion potential significantly show different tendencies of industrial dynamic variation. This paper suggests the Chinese government impose differential carbon taxes, flexibly utilize carbon market me-cha-nism, strengthen energy-saving technological R&D, promote the utilization of renewable energy, and strengthen environmental supervision and regulation, so as to improve China's industrial en- ergy efficiency and reduce CO2 emissions.

  5. Energy Saving Separations Technologies for the Petroleum Industry: An Industry-University-National Laboratory Research Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorgan, John R.; Stewart, Frederick F.; Way, J. Douglas

    2003-03-28

    This project works to develop technologies capable of replacing traditional energy-intensive distillations so that a 20% improvement in energy efficiency can be realized. Consistent with the DOE sponsored report, Technology Roadmap for the Petroleum Industry, the approach undertaken is to develop and implement entirely new technology to replace existing energy intensive practices. The project directly addresses the top priority issue of developing membranes for hydrocarbon separations. The project is organized to rapidly and effectively advance the state-of-the-art in membranes for hydrocarbon separations. The project team includes ChevronTexaco and BP, major industrial petroleum refiners, who will lead the effort by providing matching resources and real world management perspective. Academic expertise in separation sciences and polymer materials found in the Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining Department of the Colorado School of Mines is used to invent, develop, and test new membrane materials. Additional expertise and special facilities available at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) are also exploited in order to effectively meet the goals of the project. The proposed project is truly unique in terms of the strength of the team it brings to bear on the development and commercialization of the proposed technologies.

  6. Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn

    2008-01-31

    This report provides information on the energy savings, costs, and carbon dioxide emissions reductions associated with implementation of a number of technologies and measures applicable to the cement industry. The technologies and measures include both state-of-the-art measures that are currently in use in cement enterprises worldwide as well as advanced measures that are either only in limited use or are near commercialization. This report focuses mainly on retrofit measures using commercially available technologies, but many of these technologies are applicable for new plants as well. Where possible, for each technology or measure, costs and energy savings per tonne of cement produced are estimated and then carbon dioxide emissions reductions are calculated based on the fuels used at the process step to which the technology or measure is applied. The analysis of cement kiln energy-efficiency opportunities is divided into technologies and measures that are applicable to the different stages of production and various kiln types used in China: raw materials (and fuel) preparation; clinker making (applicable to all kilns, rotary kilns only, vertical shaft kilns only); and finish grinding; as well as plant wide measures and product and feedstock changes that will reduce energy consumption for clinker making. Table 1 lists all measures in this report by process to which they apply, including plant wide measures and product or feedstock changes. Tables 2 through 8 provide the following information for each technology: fuel and electricity savings per tonne of cement; annual operating and capital costs per tonne of cement or estimated payback period; and, carbon dioxide emissions reductions for each measure applied to the production of cement. This information was originally collected for a report on the U.S. cement industry (Worrell and Galitsky, 2004) and a report on opportunities for China's cement kilns (Price and Galitsky, in press). The information provided in

  7. Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Kristie L.; Wang, Anbo; Pickrell, Gary R.

    2006-11-14

    This report summarizes technical progress during the program “Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries”, performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The objective of this program was to use technology recently invented at Virginia Tech to develop and demonstrate the application of self-calibrating optical fiber temperature and pressure sensors to several key energy-intensive industries where conventional, commercially available sensors exhibit greatly abbreviated lifetimes due primarily to environmental degradation. A number of significant technologies were developed under this program, including • a laser bonded silica high temperature fiber sensor with a high temperature capability up to 700°C and a frequency response up to 150 kHz, • the world’s smallest fiber Fabry-Perot high temperature pressure sensor (125 x 20 μm) with 700°C capability, • UV-induced intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensors for distributed measurement, • a single crystal sapphire fiber-based sensor with a temperature capability up to 1600°C. These technologies have been well demonstrated and laboratory tested. Our work plan included conducting major field tests of these technologies at EPRI, Corning, Pratt & Whitney, and Global Energy; field validation of the technology is critical to ensuring its usefulness to U.S. industries. Unfortunately, due to budget cuts, DOE was unable to follow through with its funding commitment to support Energy Efficiency Science Initiative projects and this final phase was eliminated.

  8. [Method for grading industrial sectors in energy consumption and its application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jian-Su; Ma, Lan

    2013-04-01

    Energy is mainly consumed by the urban industry system, thus grading industrial sectors for their energy consumption may help to identify the concerned industrial sectors and provide necessary information for industrial energy management in China's industrialization and urbanization. In present article, based on a review of the fundamental relationships between energy consumption and industrial sectors, the contribution rates and energy efficiency of industrial sectors are chosen as typical parameters for energy consumption. The concept of distance index of industrial sectors for energy consumption is defined through China's average level as a reference base. The grade of industrial sectors in energy consumption is classed into 9 types from extreme advantage to extreme disadvantage according to the scope of distance index values, and the types of industrial sectors that need to be more concerned are pointed out. Taking Chongqing as a case study, the application for grading industrial sectors for their energy consumption was exhibited, by which, the main industrial sectors are grated and the industrial sectors that should be special concerned in energy management are determined.

  9. Geothermal power for communities and industry. Lecture meeting; Geothermische Energie fuer Kommunen und Industrie. Vortragsveranstaltung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    Geothermal energy is utilized in many ways in Germany for heating, cooling and power generation. The first industrial-scale power generation plant was commissioned in Neustadt-Glewe, Mecklenburg, in late 2003. This marks the beginning of an era of rapid development which will make geothermal power a key element of power supply in Germany. Studies show a vast geothermal potential. This proceedings volume comprises 17 papers which illustrate the many applications of geothermal power and its legal and economic boundary conditions. (orig.)

  10. Energy conservation by hyperfiltration: food industry background literature survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-04-15

    The application of hyperfiltration to selected food product streams and food processing wastewaters for energy conservation was examined. This literature survey had led to the following conclusions: no research has been conducted in the food industry using membranes with hot process streams due to the temperature limitation (< 40/sup 0/C) of the typically studied cellulose acetate membranes; based on the bench-scale research reviewed, concentration of fruit and vegetable juices with membranes appears to be technically feasible; pretreatment and product recovery research was conducted with membranes on citrus peel oil, potato processing and brine wastewaters and wheys. The experiments demonstrated that these applications are feasible; many of the problems that have been identified with membranes are associated with either the suspended solids or the high osmotic pressure and viscosity of many foods; research using dynamic membranes has been conducted with various effluents, at temperatures to approx. 100/sup 0/C, at pressures to 1200 psi and with suspended solids to approx. 2%; and, the dynamic membrane is being prototype tested by NASA for high temperature processing of shower water. The literature review substantiates potential for dynamic membrane on porous stainless tubes to process a number of hot process and effluent streams in the food processing industry. Hot water for recycle and product concentrations are major areas with potential for economic application. The two plants involved in the first phase of the project should be reviewed to identify potential energy conservation applications. As many as possible of the conservation applications should be tested during the screening phase at each site. The most promising applications at each site should be evaluated more intensively to establish engineering estimates of the economics of this technology for the canned fruit and vegetable segment of the food industry.

  11. Saving Energy in Industrial Companies: Case Studies of Energy Efficiency Programs in Large U.S. Industrial Corporations and the Role of Ratepayer-Funded Support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-03-08

    This paper is designed for companies looking to cut costs through energy savings, ratepayer-funded program administrators interested in increasing large industrial company participation in energy efficiency program offerings, and state utility commissions.

  12. Assessing industrial energy use and CO2 emissions : Opportunities for energy efficiency, biomass and CCS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saygin, D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314118101

    2012-01-01

    A large body of literature deals with issues related to monitoring of industrial energy use and CO2 emissions, assessment of the potentials of low-carbon technologies and the development of long term scenarios. However, in these assessments knowledge gaps and large uncertainties continue to exist. M

  13. The Economic Potential of Three Nuclear-Renewable Hybrid Energy Systems Providing Thermal Energy to Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, Mark [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cutler, Dylan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Flores-Espino, Francisco [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Stark, Greg [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jenkin, Thomas [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This report is one of a series of reports that Idaho National Laboratory and National Renewable Energy Laboratory are producing to investigate the technical and economic aspects of nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems (N-R HESs). Previous reports provided results of an analysis of two N-R HES scenarios. This report builds that analysis with a Texas-synthetic gasoline scenario providing the basis in which the N-R HES sells heat directly to an industrial customer. Subsystems were included that convert electricity to heat, thus allowing the renewable energy subsystem to generate heat and benefit from that revenue stream. Nuclear and renewable energy sources are important to consider in the energy sector's evolution because both are considered to be clean and non-carbon-emitting energy sources.

  14. Energy Economical and Environmental Analysis of Industrial Boilers Using Fuel Switching

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelaziz Emdeldin Atabani; Saidur Rahman; Arridina Susan Silitonga; Abdi Hanra Sebayang

    2011-01-01

    The successful implementation of the industrialization plan  in Malaysia  in 1985 has led to change this country from an agricultural economy into industrial based economy. The industrial sector represents the highest consuming sector across all other sectors and accounts for about 48% of all total  energy demand. This study is concerned with an energy saving, economic and environmental analysis of industrial boilers in Malaysian paper and pulp industries when applying the concept of fuel swi...

  15. US Energy Industry Financial Developments, 1993 fourth quarter, April 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-14

    This report traces key financial trends in the US energy industry for the fourth quarter of 1993. Financial data (only available for publicly-traded US companies) are included in two broad groups -- fossil fuel production and rate-regulated electric utilities. All financial data are taken from public sources such as energy industry corporate reports and press releases, energy trade publications, and The Wall Street Journal`s Earnings Digest; return on equity is calculated from data available from Standard and Poor`s Compustat data service. Since several major petroleum companies disclose their income by lines of business and geographic area, these data are also presented in this report. Although the disaggregated income concept varies by company and is not strictly comparable to corporate income, relative movements in income by lines of business and geographic area are summarized as useful indicators of short-term changes in the underlying profitability of these operations. Based on information provided in 1993 fourth quarter financial disclosures, the net income for 82 petroleum companies -- including 18 majors -- was unchanged between the fourth quarter of 1992 and the fourth quarter of 1993. An 18-percent decline in crude oil prices resulted in a deterioration of the performance of upstream (oil and gas production) petroleum companies during the final quarter of 1993. However, prices for refined products fell much less than the price of crude oil, resulting in higher refined product margins and downstream (refining, marketing and transport) petroleum earnings. An increase in refined product demand also contributed to the rise in downstream income.

  16. Forecasting energy demand and CO{sub 2}-emissions from energy production in the forest industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinen, H.

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to develops new energy forecasting methods for the forest industry energy use. The scenarios have been the most commonly used forecasts, but they require a lot of work. The recent scenarios, which are made for the forest industry, give a wide range of results; e.g. from 27,8 TWh to 38 TWh for electricity use in 2010. There is a need for more simple and accurate methods for forecasting. The time scale for the study is from 1975 to 2010, i.e. 36 years. The basic data for the study is collected from time period 1975 - 1995. It includes the wood use, production of main product categories and energy use in the forest industry. The factors affecting energy use at both industry level and at mill level are presented. The most probable technology trends, which can have an effect on energy production and use and CO{sub 2}-emissions are studied. Recent forecasts for the forest industry energy use till the year 2010 are referred and analysed. Three alternative forecasting methods are studied more closely. These methods are (a) Regression analysis, (b) Growth curves and (c) Delphi-method. Total electricity demand, share of purchased electricity, total fuel demand and share of process-based biofuels are estimated for the time period 1996 - 2010. The results from the different methods are compared to each other and to the recent scenarios. The comparison is made for the results concerning the energy use and the usefulness of the methods in practical work. The average energy consumption given by the forecasts for electricity was 31,6 TWh and for fuel 6,2 Mtoe in 2010. The share of purchased electricity totalled 73 % and process based fuels 77 %. The figures from 1995 are 22,8 TWh, 5,5 Mtoe, 64 % and 68 % respectively. All three methods were suitable for forecasting. All the methods required less working hours and were easier to use than scenarios. The methods gave results with a smaller deviation than scenarios, e.g. with electricity use in 2010 from

  17. Energy conservation: Industry measures. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning techniques and equipment, and program overviews regarding industrial energy conservation measures. Topics include case histories and energy audits in a variety of industries, financial and investment aspects, and descriptions of specific energy conservation projects undertaken in the United States and abroad. The food, metals, pulp and paper, wood, and textile industries are among the industries discussed. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  18. 78 FR 17890 - Energy Efficiency Program for Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Public Meeting and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-25

    .... Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, EE-2J... CFR Part 431 RIN 1904-AC82 Energy Efficiency Program for Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Public... Terminal Heat Pumps AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy....

  19. 77 FR 13121 - Solar Energy Industries Association: Notice of Petition for Rulemaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Solar Energy Industries Association: Notice of Petition for Rulemaking Take notice that on February 16, 2012, Solar Energy Industries Association, pursuant to sections 205 and...

  20. India's Fertilizer Industry: Productivity and Energy Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, K.; Sathaye, J.

    1999-07-01

    Historical estimates of productivity growth in India's fertilizer sector vary from indicating an improvement to a decline in the sector's productivity. The variance may be traced to the time period of study, source of data for analysis, and type of indices and econometric specifications used for reporting productivity growth. Our analysis shows that in the twenty year period, 1973 to 1993, productivity in the fertilizer sector increased by 2.3% per annum. An econometric analysis reveals that technical progress in India's fertilizer sector has been biased towards the use of energy, while it has been capital and labor saving. The increase in productivity took place during the era of total control when a retention price system and distribution control was in effect. With liberalization of the fertilizer sector and reduction of subsidies productivity declined substantially since the early 1990s. Industrial policies and fiscal incentives still play a major role in the Indian fertilizer sect or. As substantial energy savings and carbon reduction potential exists, energy policies can help overcome barriers to the adoption of these measures in giving proper incentives and correcting distorted prices.

  1. Proposal to Include Electrical Energy in the Industrial Return Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    At its 108th session on the 20 June 1997, the Council approved the Report of the Finance Committee Working Group on the Review of CERN Purchasing Policy and Procedures. Among other topics, the report recommended the inclusion of utility supplies in the calculation of the return statistics as soon as the relevant markets were deregulated, without reaching a consensus on the exact method of calculation. At its 296th meeting on the 18 June 2003, the Finance Committee approved a proposal to award a contract for the supply of electrical energy (CERN/FC/4693). The purpose of the proposal in this document is to clarify the way electrical energy will be included in future calculations of the return statistics. The Finance Committee is invited: 1. to agree that the full cost to CERN of electrical energy (excluding the cost of transport) be included in the Industrial Service return statistics; 2. to recommend that the Council approves the corresponding amendment to the Financial Rules set out in section 2 of this docum...

  2. Preliminary assessment of coal-based industrial energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study, performed by Mittelhauser Corp. and Resource Engineering, Inc. to identify the potential economic, environmental, and energy impacts of possible New Source Performance Standards for industrial steam generators on the use of coal and coal-derived fuels. A systems-level approach was used to take mine-mouth coal and produce a given quantity of heat input to a new boiler at an existing Chicago industrial-plant site. The technologies studied included post-combustion clean-up, atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion, solvent-refined coal liquids, substitute natural gas, and low-Btu gas. Capital and operating costs were prepared on a mid-1985 basis from a consistent set of economic guidelines. The cases studied were evaluated using three levels of air emission controls, two coals, two boiler sizes, and two operating factors. Only those combinations considered likely to make a significant impact on the 1985 boiler population were considered. The conclusions drawn in the report are that the most attractive applications of coal technology are atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion and post-combustion clean-up. Solvent-refined coal and probably substitute natural gas become competitive for the smaller boiler applications. Coal-derived low-Btu gas was found not to be a competitive boiler fuel at the sizes studied. It is recommended that more cases be studied to broaden the applicability of these results.

  3. Energy conservation in the primary aluminum and chlor-alkali industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    The primary aluminum and chlor-alkali industries together use nearly 13% of the electrical energy consumed by US industry. As part of its mission to promote energy conservation in basic US industries, the DOE surveys the present technological status of the major electrochemical industries and evaluates promising technological innovations that may lead to reduced energy requirements. This study provides technical and economic analyses in support of a government program of research and development in advanced electrolytic technology. This program is intended to supplement the development efforts directed toward energy savings by private industry. Sections II and III of this report cover aluminum and chlorine production processes only, since these two industries represent over 90% of the electrical energy requirements of all electrolytic industries in the United States. Section IV examines barriers to accelerated research and development by the electrolytic industries, and makes suggestions for government actions to overcome these barriers.

  4. Energy, industry and politics: Energy, vested interests, and long-term economic growth and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moe, Espen [School of Policy Studies, Kwansei Gakuin University, Kobe-Sanda Campus, Sanda, Hyogo (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    The article seeks to explicate a link between energy and long-term economic growth and development. While in many ways intuitive, attempts at sketching theoretical frameworks explicating this link have been few and simplistic, typically limited to technology and economics. This article emphasizes the importance of politics as well, fostering a symbiosis between the dominant industries of a historical epoch and the energy system that enabled them to flourish. The framework combines Joseph Schumpeter and Mancur Olson, emphasizing 1) the importance of structural economic change for long-term growth and development and 2) vested interests. The framework yields one theoretical proposition: In order to rise, states must prevent vested interests from blocking structural change. States that are unable to do this will get locked into yesterday's technologies, industries and energy systems, effectively consigning themselves to stagnation and decline. A brief empirical section provides historical data from 6 historical epochs (including present-day renewables) over a period of 250 years to demonstrate the usefulness of the approach. While no exhaustive test, the data suggests that countries that have prevented vested interests from blocking change have been far more successful in fostering a symbiosis between energy and industry than those countries that have not. (author)

  5. 76 FR 37678 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-28

    ..., Blowers, and Fume Hoods as Covered Equipment AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy... Energy (DOE) proposes to determine that commercial and industrial fans, blowers, and fume hoods meet the... . Follow the instructions for submitting comments. E-mail:...

  6. Energy conservation in the meat-processing industry. Part 1. Executive summary. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, E.J.; Hendrickson, R.L.

    1979-06-30

    This summary covers the following aspects of the meat processing industry: hot boning and electrical stimulation, refrigeration energy - hot vs cold processing, the role of locational factors and industrial orientation, modeling energy consumption in the meat processing industry, and management considerations. (MHR)

  7. Improving energy efficiency in industrial solutions - Walk the talk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegener, D. (Siemens AG. Industry Solutions Div., Erlangen (Germany)); Finkbeiner, M. (Technische Univ. Berlin (TUB). Sustainable Engineering, Berlin (Germany)); Holst, J.-C.; Walachowicz, F. (Siemens AG. Corporate Technology, Berlin (Germany)); Irving Olsen, S. (Technical Univ. of Denmark (DTU). Management Engineering, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark))

    2011-05-15

    This paper describes the outline of the energy efficiency and environmental care policy and management at Siemens Industry Solutions Division. This environmental policy coherently embraces strategic planning, eco-design of energy-efficient industrial processes and solutions, design evaluation and finally communication of both environmental and economic performance of solutions to customers. One of the main tools supporting eco-design and evaluation and controlling of derived design solutions is the so called 'Eco-Care-Matrix' (ECM). The ECM simply visualizes the eco-efficiency of solutions compared to a given baseline. In order to prevent from 'green washing' criticism and to ensure 'walk the talk' attitude the ECM should be scientifically well-founded using appropriate and consistent methodology. The vertical axis of an ECM illustrates the environmental performance and the horizontal axis describes the economical customer benefit of one or more green solutions compared to a defined reference solution. Different scientific approaches for quantifying the environmental performance based on life cycle assessment methodology are discussed especially considering the ISO standards 14040/14044:2006. Appropriate ECM application is illustrated using the example of the Siemens MEROS technology (Maximized Emission Reduction of Sintering) for the steel industry. MEROS is currently the most modern and powerful system for cleaning off-gas in sinter plants. As an environmental technology MEROS is binding and removing sulfur dioxide and other acidic gas components present in the off-gas stream by using dry absorbents and additional electrical power. Advantage in the impact category of acidification potential (by desulfurization) is a trade-off to disadvantages in global warming and resource depletion potential caused by use of electricity. Representing different impacts, indicator results for impact categories with different tendencies have to be

  8. The lessons learned from the development of the wind energy industry that might be applied to marine industry renewables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrad, Andrew

    2012-01-28

    This paper considers the early experiences of the development of wind turbines and the wind energy industry in order to try and identify lessons learned that could now be applied to the developing marine renewables technology and industry. It considers both political and commercial incentives and engineering development.

  9. Energy policy conference on the regulation of energy industries; Conference de politique energetique sur la regulation des industries energetiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-11-01

    This document is the report of the conference meeting jointly organized by the French general plan commission and the general direction of energy and raw materials on the regulation of energy industries: 1 - the changes in the regulation of public utilities in competition: harmonization, respect of impartiality and social cohesion, organization of a loyal competition, specialized regulation and regulation of competition, open debates; 2 - towards an homogenous model of regulatory authority?: the US model (collegial and hybrid organizations), the UK model (individual and independent), missions of regulation and institutional 'meccano', theory and practice, draft classification of the institutional approaches of IEA countries (role of ministries and regulatory agencies), independent regulatory authorities or not, significant differences in converging models, dominant types of regulation in the different sectors, situation of the French energy regulatory system (institutional plan, regulation processes, relations of the regulation authority with the government), reasons of the differences between different countries, expected evolution of the regulation systems in the coming years. (J.S.)

  10. Valorization of rendering industry wastes and co-products for industrial chemicals, materials and energy: review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonnen, Tizazu; Mussone, Paolo; Bressler, David

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, strong global demand for industrial chemicals, raw materials and energy has been driven by rapid industrialization and population growth across the world. In this context, long-term environmental sustainability demands the development of sustainable strategies of resource utilization. The agricultural sector is a major source of underutilized or low-value streams that accompany the production of food and other biomass commodities. Animal agriculture in particular constitutes a substantial portion of the overall agricultural sector, with wastes being generated along the supply chain of slaughtering, handling, catering and rendering. The recent emergence of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) resulted in the elimination of most of the traditional uses of rendered animal meals such as blood meal, meat and bone meal (MBM) as animal feed with significant economic losses for the entire sector. The focus of this review is on the valorization progress achieved on converting protein feedstock into bio-based plastics, flocculants, surfactants and adhesives. The utilization of other rendering streams such as fat and ash rich biomass for the production of renewable fuels, solvents, drop-in chemicals, minerals and fertilizers is also critically reviewed.

  11. Long-term energy efficiency analysis requires solid energy statistics. The case of the German basic chemical industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saygin, D.; Worrell, E.; Weiss, M.; Patela, M.K. [Utrecht University, Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Faculty of Geosciences, Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CS Utrecht (Netherlands); Tam, C.; Trudeau, N. [International Energy Agency IEA, 9 rue de la Federation, 75739 Paris Cedex 15 (France); Gielen, D.J. [International Renewable Energy Agency IRENA, IITC, Robert-Schuman-Platz 3, 53175 Bonn (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    Analyzing the chemical industry's energy use is challenging because of the sector's complexity and the prevailing uncertainty in energy use and production data. We develop an advanced bottom-up model (PIE-Plus) which encompasses the energy use of the 139 most important chemical processes. We apply this model in a case study to analyze the German basic chemical industry's energy use and energy efficiency improvements in the period between 1995 and 2008. We compare our results with data from the German Energy Balances and with data published by the International Energy Agency (IEA). We find that our model covers 88% of the basic chemical industry's total final energy use (including non-energy use) as reported in the German Energy Balances. The observed energy efficiency improvements range between 2.2 and 3.5% per year, i.e., they are on the higher side of the values typically reported in literature. Our results point to uncertainties in the basic chemical industry's final energy use as reported in the energy statistics and the specific energy consumption values. More efforts are required to improve the quality of the national and international energy statistics to make them usable for reliable monitoring of energy efficiency improvements of the chemical industry.

  12. Essays on Industry Response to Energy and Environmental Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Richard Leonard

    This dissertation consists of three essays on the relationship between firm incentives and energy and environmental policy outcomes. Chapters 1 and 2 study the impact of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments on the United States oil refining industry. This legislation imposed extensive restrictions on refined petroleum product markets, requiring select end users to purchase new cleaner versions of gasoline and diesel. In Chapter 2, I estimate the static impact of this intervention on refining costs, product prices and consumer welfare. Isolating these effects is complicated by several challenges likely to appear in other regulatory settings, including overlap between regulated and non-regulated markets and deviations from perfect competition. Using a rich database of refinery operations, I estimate a structural model that incorporates each of these dimensions, and then use this cost structure to simulate policy counterfactuals. I find that the policies increased gasoline production costs by 7 cents per gallon and diesel costs by 3 cents per gallon on average, although these costs varied considerably across refineries. As a result of these restrictions, consumers in regulated markets experienced welfare losses on the order of 3.7 billion per year, but this welfare loss was partially offset by gains of 1.5 billion dollars per year among consumers in markets not subject to regulation. The results highlight the importance of accounting for imperfect competition and market spillovers when assessing the cost of environmental regulation. Chapter 2 estimates the sunk costs incurred by United States oil refineries as a result of the low sulfur diesel program. The complex, regionally integrated nature of the industry poses many challenges for estimating these costs. I overcome them by placing the decision to invest in sulfur removal technology within the framework of a two period model and estimate the model using moment inequalities. I find that the regulation induced between 2

  13. Risk management tools from the traditional energy industry to wind energy projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall, G.; Marks, R. [Det Norske Veritas, Katy, TX (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Risk-based analysis techniques are used to quantify and prioritize a wide variety of problems within the traditional fossil fuel and nuclear power industries. This poster presentation evaluated some of the risk analysis tools and methods used by the energy industry to quantify and manage wind energy development risks. A comprehensive risk-based approach for identifying the probability and consequences of potential concerns was presented for a sample wind energy project. The process determined objectives in relation to the project's net present value. Contributing domains included the energy production, prices, and operating costs of the project. Decision criteria used to evaluate the desirability of the wind project were then developed. Monte Carlo simulations were the used to aggregate individual risks into an overall total. The contribution of each element to the decision objective was calculated separately. The element outputs were than combined into a measure of aggregate risk exposure. Aggregate results were used to calculate the decision criteria. The decision objective was to determine if the energy cost was less than the avoided cost of other project options. The study showed that the approach can allow decision-makers to mitigate risks. However, the results are dependent on the quality of the input data. tabs., figs.

  14. Comparison and Evolution of Energy Consumption in Moroccan Agro-food Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Badaoui, Meryem; Touzani, Abdellatif

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this article is to establish a comparison between the Moroccan energy consumption and the BREF the reference document on best available techniques in the food industries, then an evolution of this consumption by 2030 in order to better understand it and to define strategies to reduce energy bill. According to a survey conducted among 5000 Moroccan companies, we were able to compare the energy consumption of the agro-food industries including sugar industry, dairy industry, cereal industry; fatty substances industry and fishing industry with that of the BREF. Also an evolution of Moroccan consumption was established by 2030 using the linear regression method, and then calculated a non-negligible average annual growth rate (AAGR). The results show that the Moroccan energy consumption is adequate to that of the BREF, and an energy consumption constantly increasing by registering a non-negligible AAGR.

  15. Energy use in the U.S. steel industry: An historical perspective and future opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stubbles, John [Steel Industry Consultant, Mason, OH (United States)

    2000-09-01

    Renowned industry expert Dr. John Stubbles has projected the energy savings that the U.S. steel industry could reasonably expect to achieve in the report, Energy Use in the U.S. Steel Industry: Historical Perspective and Future Opportunities (PDF 432 KB). The report examines the potential impacts of state-of-the-art technologies and operating practices, as well as structural changes in the industry itself.

  16. Status and Trends in the U.S. Voluntary Green Power Market (2012 Data)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, J.; Nicholas, T.

    2013-10-01

    Voluntary green power markets are those in which consumers and institutions voluntarily purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs. Voluntary action provides a revenue stream for renewable energy projects and raises consumer awareness of the benefits of renewable energy. These markets continued to exhibit growth and stimulate renewable energy development in 2012. This paper reviews the voluntary market and identifies market trends.

  17. Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: teacher's guide. Field test edition. [Includes glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    An instructional aid is presented which integrates the subject of solar energy into the classroom study of industrial arts. This guide for teachers was produced in addition to the student activities book for industrial arts by the USDOE Solar Energy Education. A glossary of solar energy terms is included. (BCS)

  18. Structural Decomposition Analysis of China’s Industrial Energy Consumption Based on Input-Output Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, X. Y.; Zhou, J. Q.; Wang, Z.; Deng, L. C.; Hong, S.

    2017-05-01

    China is now at a stage of accelerated industrialization and urbanization, with energy-intensive industries contributing a large proportion of economic growth. In this study, we examined industrial energy consumption by decomposition analysis to describe the driving factors of energy consumption in China. Based on input-output (I-O) tables from the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) website and China’s energy use data from 1995 to 2011, we studied the sectorial changes of energy efficiency during the examined period. The results showed that all industries increased their energy efficiency. Energy consumption was decomposed into three factors by the logarithmic mean Divisia index (LMDI) method. The increase in production output was the leading factor that drives up China’s energy consumption. World Trade Organization accession and financial crises had great impact on the energy consumption. Based on these results, a series of energy policy suggestions for decision-makers has been proposed.

  19. Solar energy for agricultural and industrial process heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-22

    A state-of-the-art review of solar process heat is given; near term prospects are discussed; and the federal solar industrial process heat program is reviewed. Existing solar industrial process heat projects are tabulated. (WHK)

  20. Assessment of the industrial energy-conservation program. Final report of the Committee on Assessment of the Industrial Energy Conservation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-01-01

    Industrial operations in the United States account for some 37% of the nation's consumptions of energy. It has been estimated that this figure will increase to 50% by 1990 unless appropriate industrial energy conservation measures are adopted. However, such measures are difficult to implement in spite of the potential of various existing, emerging, and advanced technologies that can be applied to the problem. Specifically, the application of many industrial energy conservation measures entails high economic, technological, and institutional risks and uncertainties that constrain industries from adopting such measures. Accordingly, in 1975 the federal government started a program designed to mitigate these risks and uncertainties via government-industry partnership arrangements in the interests of national energy conservation. An important element of this program is the Industrial Energy Conservation Program in the Federal Department of Energy (DOE). In June 1980, DOE asked the National Materials Advisory Board, a unit of the National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council, to form a study committee to assess the effectiveness of the Industrial Energy Conservation Program. The committee concluded that federal support embodied in the DOE program, present and planned, is important to conserving additional industrial energy. However, the committee also concluded that the program needs various improvements in project selection and management and in transfer of results to industry. The committee's findings and recommendations and the results of the deliberation of the committee's three panels, a special report on heat and power, and a report on the visit by four members of the committee to Japan are presented.

  1. Energy conservation and circular economy in China's process industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Huiquan; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Hongbin [National Engineering Laboratory for Clean Production Technology of Hydrometallurgy, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 353, Beijing 100080 (China); Bao, Weijun; Xiu, Caihong [National Engineering Laboratory for Clean Production Technology of Hydrometallurgy, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 353, Beijing 100080 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2010-11-15

    Since energy consumption in process industries accounts for a great proportion of China's total energy consumption, energy conservation becomes the practical choice to reduce the conflict between energy demand and energy supply in China, and therefore, promoting energy conservation is the long-term solution to China's energy and environment problems from the source. In this paper, based on the introduction of the concept of energy consumption status in China's key energy-consuming process industries, the main technical bottlenecks and resource-environment problems were analyzed with special emphasis on energy utilization efficiency, energy consumption mode, and waste emission. As for the measures to resolve these problems, at the policy level, policies and programs of Chinese government related to energy conservation were introduced in combination with China's circular economy structure. At the technical level, the key technologies and research progress to improve energy utilization efficiency, reducing energy consumption, as well as utilizing the resource of discharged wastes were reviewed. Finally, three typical cases of the development of circular economy at three levels, namely the chemical industry, metallurgical industry, and electric power industry, were studied for the enforcement of circular economy and energy conservation in China's process industries. (author)

  2. Energy characterisation of ultrasonic systems for industrial processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Juboori, Raed A; Yusaf, Talal; Bowtell, Leslie; Aravinthan, Vasantha

    2015-03-01

    Obtaining accurate power characteristics of ultrasonic treatment systems is an important step towards their industrial scalability. Calorimetric measurements are most commonly used for quantifying the dissipated ultrasonic power. However, accuracy of these measurements is affected by various heat losses, especially when working at high power densities. In this work, electrical power measurements were conducted at all locations in the piezoelectric ultrasonic system equipped with ½″ and ¾″ probes. A set of heat transfer calculations were developed to estimate the convection heat losses from the reaction solution. Chemical dosimeters represented by the oxidation of potassium iodide, Fricke solution and 4-nitrophenol were used to chemically correlate the effect of various electrical amplitudes and treatment regimes. This allowed estimation of sonochemical-efficiency (SE) and energy conversion (XUS) of the ultrasonic system. Results of this study showed overall conversion efficiencies of 60-70%. This correlated well with the chemical dosimeter yield curves of both organic and inorganic aqueous solutions. All dosimeters showed bubble shielding and coalescence effects at higher ultrasonic power levels, less pronounced for the ½″ probe case. SE and XUS values in the range of 10(-10) mol/J and 10(-3) J/J respectively confirmed that conversion of ultrasonic power to chemical yield declined with amplitude.

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION SUSTAINABILITY STRATEGIC FACTOR IN THE ENERGY INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CÎRNU Doru

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We propose to conceive an environmental strategy intended to integrate harmoniously Gorj energy industry with principles of sustainable development. The sustainable development complies trinomial: ecological-economic-social. In our view, sustainable development, requires clean water and unpolluted air, land consolidated rejuvenated forests, biodiversity and protected nature reserves, churches and monasteries secular admired by visitors, welcoming places entered in the natural and cultural harmony. It is also necessary to reduce the pressure generated by socio-economic factors on the environment and the principles of sustainable development. The quality of life in urban and rural areas show extreme differences compared to European standards. For efficiency, we addressed the modeling method by designing a model valid for all thermoelectric power plants based on fossil fuels, allowing simultaneously, so adding value and environmental protection. The general objective that we propose for the environment, natural resources and patrimony, is related to the prevention of climate change by limiting the emission of toxic gases and their adverse effects on the environment The achievement of strategic objectives and implementation of proposals submitted, we consider that would have a double impact, on the one side, to protect the environment and the quality of life and, on the other side a positive influence on economic and social level.

  4. Energy and Process Assessment Protocol for Industrial Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    operation and maintenance procedures pertaining to building energy efficiency . _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ ERDC

  5. The Development of the Renewable Energy Power Industry under Feed-In Tariff and Renewable Portfolio Standard: A Case Study of China’s Photovoltaic Power Industry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yuzhuo Zhang; Xingang Zhao; Yi Zuo; Lingzhi Ren; Ling Wang

    2017-01-01

    ...) are the most popular to promote the development of renewable energy power industry. They can significantly contribute to the expansion of domestic industrial activities in terms of sustainable energy...

  6. Energy Intensity Development of the German Iron and Steel Industry between 1991 and 2007

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arens, M.; Worrell, E.; Schleich, J.

    2012-01-01

    The iron and steel sector is the largest industrial CO2 emitter and energy consumer in the world. Energy efficiency is key to reduce energy consumption and GHG emissions. To understand future developments of energy use in the steel sector, it is worthwhile to analyze energy efficiency developments o

  7. Energy efficiency and recovery of heat lost in the Industrial Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounkid, S.; Loukili, A.

    2017-03-01

    the economic importance of energy is manifested at all levels of farms, the demand for energy is today one of the major challenges of societies, it constitutes an indispensable element to any activity of production, it is for this, the industry has an interest to anticipate and invest in energy efficiency in order to gain competitiveness, this last represents a tremendous lever for performance and economy. The Energy diagnosis allows unveils the potential energy sinks and the discovery of the various sources of energy losses in a manufacturing process or in all system user of energy. Use with the effectiveness of the energy help the industry to meet the challenges of competitiveness.

  8. Measurement of the Industrial Collaboration of the Diversified Coal Industry: China Coal Energy Company as an Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong-Mao Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the diversified development of coal enterprises in China, the industries related to coal, including coal chemical, electric power, transportation, and building materials, have witnessed rapid development. There is a collaboration relation between the coal industries and most of the aforementioned industries. Based on the synergy theory and the theory of industrial cooperation, the collaboration among coal industries is assessed in this research. Examining China Coal Energy Company as an example, this research divides the compound enterprise system into subsystems such as coal-electric, coal-chemical, and coal-equipment. Next, collaboration indices, including market, scale, and management, are created for each subsystem. Then, the overall collaboration degree of the China Coal Energy Company since it was listed was calculated by standardizing data and estimating the order degree of order parameters and subsystems. Thus, a model measuring the industrial collaboration degree of coal enterprises was established to quantitatively reflect the collaboration degree between various industries. At the same time, the factors influencing the collaboration effect between various industries were analyzed so as to improve this effect, which then can provide a decision basis for enterprises.

  9. Energy and Water Consumption End-Use Survey in Commercial and Industrial Sectors in Georgia

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The objective of survey was to collect statistical energy and water end-use data for commercial and industrial sectors. The survey identified volumes of energy and...

  10. Effects of cereal breakfasts on postprandial glucose, appetite regulation and voluntary energy intake at a subsequent standardized lunch; focusing on rye products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björck Inger ME

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rye products have been demonstrated to lower the acute insulin demand, induce a low and prolonged blood glucose response (high Glycemic Profile, GP and reduce subclinical inflammation. These products may therefore contribute to a lowered risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardio vascular disease. The objective of the present paper was to evaluate the mechanism for a reduced postprandial insulin demand with rye products, and to explore possible appetite regulating properties. Methods 10 healthy subjects were served breakfast meals (50 g of available starch with endosperm- or whole grain rye breads, with and without lactic acid, boiled whole grain rye- (RK or wheat (WK kernels, or white wheat bread reference (WWB in random order in a cross-over design. Plasma concentrations of glucose, ghrelin, serum insulin, free fatty acids, adiponectin, breath hydrogen excretion (H2, and subjective satiety was evaluated during the postprandial phase. 270 min after the breakfast, an ad lib lunch buffet was served and the voluntary energy intake (EI was registered. Results All rye products and WK induced lower insulinemic indices (II than WWB. A lower incremental insulin peak following breakfast correlated with a lower EI at lunch (r = 0.38. A low II was related to improved satiety in the early postprandial phase (fullness AUC 0-60 min, r = -0.36. RK induced a higher GP compared to WWB and WK. A higher GP was related to a lowered desire to eat before lunch (AUC 210-270 and to a lower concentration of ghrelin in the late postprandial phase after breakfast (270 min, r = -0.29 and -0.29, which in turn was related to a lower voluntary EI (r = 0.43 and 0.33. The RK breakfast improved satiety in the early postprandial phase (0-60 min compared to WWB, and induced a lower EI at lunch (-16%. A high content of indigestible carbohydrates in the breakfast products was related to improved satiety (0-60 min, r = 0.68 for fullness, and a higher breath H2

  11. Priority listing of industrial processes by total energy consumption and potential for savings. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streb, A.J.

    1977-01-01

    A survey of eight of the most energy-intensive segments of the U.S. industry is made to quantify the energy consumed in the principal process units, to identify areas in which significant improvement appear possible, and to rank the process units in terms of total energy consumption and the potential for improvement. Data on the steel, paper, aluminum, textile, cement, and glass industries, petroleum refineries, and olefins and derivative products industries were compiled to help plan the development of new energy sources and to provide targets for energy conservation activities. (MCW)

  12. 78 FR 7306 - Energy Efficiency Program for Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Public Meeting and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ... Meeting and Availability of the Framework Document for Commercial and Industrial Fans and Blowers AGENCY... considering energy conservation standards for commercial and industrial fans and blowers. To inform interested... Technologies Program, Mailstop EE-2J, Framework Document for Commercial and Industrial Fans and Blowers,...

  13. Performance analysis of CO(2) emissions and energy efficiency of metal industries in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Chaofeng; Guan, Yang; Wan, Zheng; Chu, Chunli; Ju, Meiting

    2014-02-15

    Nonferrous metal industries play an important role in China's national economy and are some of the country's largest energy consumers. To better understand the nature of CO(2) emissions from these industries and to further move towards low-carbon development in this industry sector, this study investigates the CO(2) emissions of 12 nonferrous metal industries from 2003 to 2010 based on their life-cycle assessments. It then classifies these industries into four "emission-efficiency" types through cluster analysis. The results show that (1) the industrial economy and energy consumption of China's nonferrous metal industries have grown rapidly, although their recent energy consumption rate shows a declining trend. (2) The copper, aluminum, zinc, lead, and magnesium industries, classified as high-emission industries, are the main contributors of CO(2) emissions. The results have implications for policy decisions that aim to enhance energy efficiency, particularly for promoting the transformation of low-efficiency industries to high-efficiency ones. The study also highlights the important role of policy development in technological innovations, optimization, and upgrades, the reduction of coal proportion in energy consumption, and the advancement of new energy sources.

  14. Energy Saving Potential, Costs and Uncertainties in the Industry: A Case Study of the Chemical Industry in Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bühler, Fabian; Guminski, Andrej; Gruber, Anna

    2017-01-01

    the uncertainties of the results and identifying the most influential input parameters. The identification of energy efficiency measures and the quantification of the associated technical potentials and costs are identified based on literature data and own assessments. Based on these findings, a cost curve...... to 1990. To achieve this ambitious goal, energy planners and industries alike require an overview of the existing energy efficiency measures, their technical potential as well as the costs for realizing this potential. Energy efficiency opportunities are commonly presented in marginal cost curves (MCCs......), which rank these measures according to specific implementation costs. Existing analyses, however, often do not take uncertainties in costs and potentials into account. The aim of this paper is to create a MCC of energy efficiency measures for the chemical industry in Germany, while quantifying...

  15. Greenland island infrastructures – energy challenges to the fishing industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Kåre

    The most important export industry in Greenland are fisheries - they contribute 90% of the total export value. The local trading and processing is challenged by the fact that Greenland largely depends on island operation, which complicates and limits the infrastructure. For the fishing industry...

  16. Energy conservation projects implementation at Jordan's industrial sector: a total quality management approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kablan, M.M. [Mutah University, Alkarak (Jordan). Engineering College

    2003-12-01

    This paper presents insights into the energy problem in Jordan and specifically into the energy conservation status in the industrial sector in Jordan. The results of a recent survey of the energy consumption of the industrial sector were used to draw deductions about the energy conservation situation. The country of Jordan imports oil from its neighbouring countries to cover about 94% of its total energy demand. In the year 2000, the annual share of the industrial sector of the final energy consumption of the country is around 23%. Energy conservation in the industrial sector is a crucial area for energy saving. Many representatives of industrial firms are reluctant to participate in energy conservation projects because they think that the investment in energy-saving equipment may result in higher prices for their products, which may lead to reducing their competitiveness in the local market. Some managers are resistant to change because they do not know how to implement an energy conservation project. This research proposes a methodology for the effective implementation of energy conservation projects for Jordanian industries. The proposed methodology is useful for other countries. (author)

  17. Emergy-based comparative analysis of energy intensity in different industrial systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhe; Geng, Yong; Wang, Hui; Sun, Lu; Ma, Zhixiao; Tian, Xu; Yu, Xiaoman

    2015-12-01

    With the rapid economic development, energy consumption of China has been the second place in the world next to the USA. Usually, measuring energy consumption intensity or efficiency applies heat unit which is joule per gross domestic production (GDP) or coal equivalent per GDP. However, this measuring approach is only oriented by the conversion coefficient of heat combustion which does not match the real value of the materials during their formation in the ecological system. This study applied emergy analysis to evaluate the energy consumption intensity to fill this gap. Emergy analysis is considered as a bridge between ecological system and economic system, which can evaluate the contribution of ecological products and services as well as the load placed on environmental systems. In this study, emergy indicator for performing energy consumption intensity of primary energy was proposed. Industrial production is assumed as the main contributor of energy consumption compared to primary and tertiary industries. Therefore, this study validated this method by investigating the two industrial case studies which were Dalian Economic Development Area (DEDA) and Fuzhou economic and technological area (FETA), to comparatively study on their energy consumption intensity between the different kinds of industrial systems and investigate the reasons behind the differences. The results show that primary energy consumption (PEC) of DEDA was much higher than that of FETA during 2006 to 2010 and its primary energy consumption ratio (PECR) to total emergy involvement had a dramatically decline from year 2006 to 2010. In the same time, nonrenewable energy of PEC in DEDA was also much higher than that in FETA. The reason was that industrial structure of DEDA was mainly formed by heavy industries like petro-chemistry industry, manufacturing industries, and high energy-intensive industries. However, FETA was formed by electronic business, food industry, and light industries. Although

  18. World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for Selected Industrial Sectors

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    "World best practice" energy intensity values, representing the most energy-efficient processes that are in commercial use in at least one location worldwide, are provided for the production of iron and steel, aluminium, cement, pulp and paper, ammonia, and ethylene. Energy intensity is expressed in energy use per physical unit of output for each of these commodities; most commonly these are expressed in metric tonnes (t). The energy intensity values are provided by major energy-consumin...

  19. Linking Energy Efficiency and ISO: Creating a Framework forSustainable Industrial Energy Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKane, Aimee; Perry, Wayne; Aixian, Li; Tienan, Li; Williams,Robert

    2005-04-01

    Industrial motor-driven systems consume more than 2194billion kWh annually on a global basis and offer one of the largestopportunities for energy savings. In the United States (US), they accountfor more than 50 percent of all manufacturing electricity use. Incountries with less well-developed consumer economies, the proportion ofelectricity consumed by motors is higher-more than 50 percent ofelectricity used in all sectors in China is attributable to motors.Todate, the energy savings potential from motor-driven systems haveremained largely unrealized worldwide. Both markets and policy makerstend to focus on individual system components, which have a typicalimprovement potential of 2-5 percent versus 20-50 percent for completesystems. Several factors contribute to this situation, most notably thecomplexity of the systems themselves. Determining how to optimize asystem requires a high level of technical skill. In addition, once anenergy efficiency project is completed, the energy savings are often notsustained due to changes in personnel and production processes. Althoughtraining and educational programs in the US, UK, and China to promotesystem optimization have proven effective, these resource-intensiveefforts have only reached a small portion of the market.The same factorsthat make it so challenging to achieve and sustain energy efficiency inmotor-driven systems (complexity, frequent changes) apply to theproduction processes that they support. Yet production processestypically operate within a narrow band of acceptable performance. Theseprocesses are frequently incorporated into ISO 9000/14000 quality andenvironmental management systems, which require regular, independentaudits to maintain ISO certification, an attractive value forinternational trade.This paper presents a new approach to achievingindustrial system efficiency (motors and steam) that will encourageplants to incorporate system energy efficiency into their existing ISOmanagement systems. We will

  20. College Industrial Park : An Innovative Approach to Energy Conservation Through the Use of Geothermal Energy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oregon Institute of Technology (Klamath Falls, Or.). Geo-Heat Center; William E. Nork, Inc.

    1986-11-18

    Geothermal effluent from the Oregon Institute of Technology campus and Merle West Medical Center has been discharged to an open drainage ditch adjacent to the City's College Industrial Park since 1964. Over the past few years there has been increasing concern for conservation and preservation of the geothermal aquifers in Klamath Falls, Oregon. An effective way of improving the energy utilization is to cascade the approximately 130/sup 0/F effluent for heating buildings in the industrial park and disposal of the effluent in an existing injection well. An aquifer stress test was performed using the 1500 foot well in the industrial park. Based on the specific capacity, data indicate that the well is capable of accepting an injection rate of at least 700 gpm of the thermal effluent. A plume of degraded water will develop down-gradient of the well. However, the plume is expected to bypass nearby water supply wells and will have no impact on OIT and MWMC space heating wells.

  1. Energy balance of the global photovoltaic (PV) industry--is the PV industry a net electricity producer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Michael; Benson, Sally M

    2013-04-02

    A combination of declining costs and policy measures motivated by greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction and energy security have driven rapid growth in the global installed capacity of solar photovoltaics (PV). This paper develops a number of unique data sets, namely the following: calculation of distribution of global capacity factor for PV deployment; meta-analysis of energy consumption in PV system manufacture and deployment; and documentation of reduction in energetic costs of PV system production. These data are used as input into a new net energy analysis of the global PV industry, as opposed to device level analysis. In addition, the paper introduces a new concept: a model tracking energetic costs of manufacturing and installing PV systems, including balance of system (BOS) components. The model is used to forecast electrical energy requirements to scale up the PV industry and determine the electricity balance of the global PV industry to 2020. Results suggest that the industry was a net consumer of electricity as recently as 2010. However, there is a >50% that in 2012 the PV industry is a net electricity provider and will "pay back" the electrical energy required for its early growth before 2020. Further reducing energetic costs of PV deployment will enable more rapid growth of the PV industry. There is also great potential to increase the capacity factor of PV deployment. These conclusions have a number of implications for R&D and deployment, including the following: monitoring of the energy embodied within PV systems; designing more efficient and durable systems; and deploying PV systems in locations that will achieve high capacity factors.

  2. Prospects of Energy Industry in 21st Century - Power Shift to customers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.S. [Korea Energy Economics Institute, Euiwang (Korea)

    2001-05-01

    The energy industry in every country is experiencing a radical transformation in its structure. Being a public corporation, the energy industry in most countries was organized as type of vertically integrated monopolistic industrial structure. Removing energy price regulation and entry barriers, many countries have pursued privatization of public energy corporation and transition to market oriented corporation system for the energy industry. Furthermore, the transaction cost in the energy industry has been dramatically lowered due to a rapid technology progress. Such changes inevitably have forced the vertically integrated industry to break down into stand-alone business. Beyond such a superficial change, more importantly, the energy industry faces the fundamental paradigm shift. The new paradigm of the energy industry is characterized: shifting market power from producers to consumers, accelerating globalization and liberalization of energy market, becoming more conscious of risk management, and emerging and enlarging e-Business. The shift in market power from producers to consumers, among these, should be particularly concerned. Energy industry has been traditionally supply-oriented market, resulting in that consumers inevitably take price and quality of energy provided by producers. The progress of technology and liberalization shifts market power from producers to consumers. In the near future, therefore, consumers will choose the energy firms and commodities. Consequently, the firm that does not meets consumers' preferences will face serious setbacks on its development. Such a change in the market power, in the long run, results in lowering energy price and enhancing services. Based on the paradigm shifts described above, the energy firms in the future can be re-categorized into three major types: asset companies, energy trading companies, customer serving companies. Energy trading companies will take charge of energy trade, risk management, and total

  3. Research and Development Financing in the Renewable Energy Industry in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel de Oliveira Gavira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, the Brazilian government has put many public policies in place in order to create a favourable environment to promote energy efficiency and clean energy. In this paper we discuss the use of research and development financing support by the clean energy industry in Brazil. To do so, we carried out an empirical research analysing secondary data from legislation, literature case studies, and public and industry reports in order to determine if the companies of the clean energy industry have public financial support to research and development. Our ongoing research shows that, despite incentives to stimulate the dissemination of clean energy, the participation of some of the clean energy is very small (especially solar. We believe that the contributions of this study will assist policy makers, and the whole industry, to improve clean energy research and development investments in Brazil.

  4. Role of national labs in energy and environmental R & D: An industrial perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaz, N.

    1995-12-31

    The perceived role of national laboratories in energy and environmental research and development is examined from an industrial perspective. A series of tables are used to summarize issues primarily related to the automotive industry. Impacts of policy on energy, environment, society, and international competition are outlined. Advances and further needs in automotive efficiency and pollution control, and research roles for national labs and industry are also summarized. 6 tabs.

  5. Strategies for energy efficiency funding in the absence of industrial Eskom-IDM support

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of industrial Eskom-IDM (Industrial Demand Management) funding, industry is forced to look elsewhere for energy efficiency project funding. This paper outlines various taxes and government incentives for cleaner production and energy efficiency technologies in the South African mining and manufacturing context. The applicability, eligibility and financial benefit for each of the following incentives are investigated: National Cleaner Production Centre (NCPC); Clean Development ...

  6. Energy Efficient Industrialized Housing Research Program, Center for Housing Innovation, University of Oregon and the Florida Solar Energy Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G.Z.

    1990-01-01

    This research program addresses the need to increase the energy efficiency of industrialized housing. Two research centers have responsibility for the program: the Center for Housing Innovation at the University of Oregon and the Florida Solar Energy Center, a research institute of the University of Central Florida. The two organizations provide complementary architectural, systems engineering, and industrial engineering capabilities. In 1989 we worked on these tasks: (1) the formation of a steering committee, (2) the development of a multiyear research plan, (3) analysis of the US industrialized housing industry, (4) assessment of foreign technology, (5) assessment of industrial applications, (6) analysis of computerized design and evaluation tools, and (7) assessment of energy performance of baseline and advanced industrialized housing concepts. The current research program, under the guidance of a steering committee composed of industry and government representatives, focuses on three interdependent concerns -- (1) energy, (2) industrial process, and (3) housing design. Building homes in a factory offers the opportunity to increase energy efficiency through the use of new materials and processes, and to increase the value of these homes by improving the quality of their construction. Housing design strives to ensure that these technically advanced homes are marketable and will meet the needs of the people who will live in them.

  7. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worrell, Ernst; Blinde, Paul; Neelis, Maarten; Blomen, Eliane; Masanet, Eric

    2010-10-21

    Energy is an important cost factor in the U.S iron and steel industry. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. iron and steel industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the structure, production trends, energy consumption, and greenhouse gas emissions of the iron and steel industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in the steel and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. iron and steel industry reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures?and on their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  8. Energy conservation and technological change as factors in climate change - a pulp and paper industry example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koleff, A.M. [Stone Container Corp., Tucker, GA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The Pulp and Paper Industry in the United States is one of this country`s most energy intensive industries with energy generally being the second or third largest direct operating expense in mill budgets. As such, the industry has long had an effective energy conservation program and has recorded impressive reductions in energy use. It is also one of the two most capital intensive industries in the United States and has a long capital investment cycle, which can be estimated by various techniques at between 20 and 30 years. This paper discusses the estimated impact of the industry`s energy conservation achievements on long term emission reductions of greenhouse gases and will show how technological changes within the industry have impacted past emission reductions and the prospects for continued progress through emerging technologies. The importance to the global competitiveness of the industry of implementing technological change designed to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases within the industry`s normal investment cycle will also be reviewed.

  9. Model documentation report: Industrial sector demand module of the National Energy Modeling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description of the NEMS Industrial Model for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its models. Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements as future projects. The NEMS Industrial Demand Model is a dynamic accounting model, bringing together the disparate industries and uses of energy in those industries, and putting them together in an understandable and cohesive framework. The Industrial Model generates mid-term (up to the year 2015) forecasts of industrial sector energy demand as a component of the NEMS integrated forecasting system. From the NEMS system, the Industrial Model receives fuel prices, employment data, and the value of industrial output. Based on the values of these variables, the Industrial Model passes back to the NEMS system estimates of consumption by fuel types.

  10. Model documentation report: Industrial sector demand module of the National Energy Modeling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description of the NEMS Industrial Model for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its models. Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements as future projects. The NEMS Industrial Demand Model is a dynamic accounting model, bringing together the disparate industries and uses of energy in those industries, and putting them together in an understandable and cohesive framework. The Industrial Model generates mid-term (up to the year 2015) forecasts of industrial sector energy demand as a component of the NEMS integrated forecasting system. From the NEMS system, the Industrial Model receives fuel prices, employment data, and the value of industrial output. Based on the values of these variables, the Industrial Model passes back to the NEMS system estimates of consumption by fuel types.

  11. Canadian Industry for Energy Conservation (CIPEC) annual report 2007 : seven ideas that can change your world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-03-15

    The Canadian Industry Program for Energy Conservation (CIPEC) was founded in 1975 as an umbrella organization to oversee partnerships between government and private industry. Its primary objective was to promote energy efficiency within the Canadian industrial sector. This report described the energy efficiency initiatives taken by CIPEC member companies for the year 2005 and highlighted CIPEC's accomplishments in 2006-2007. Several successes achieved by individual companies in various industrial sectors were also documented. Many energy-savings ideas have been implemented as a result of programs and services offered by Natural Resources Canada through CIPEC. This report reviewed the following 7 ideas that can be adapted to fit a variety of operating environments: (1) improve processes, (2) transform employee mindsets, (3) upgrade equipment, (4) adopt new technologies, (5) measure energy performance, (6) rethink facility design, and (7) introduce alternative sources of energy. This report revealed that 2005 was a successful year in terms of the energy efficiency accomplishments of Canadian industry. Energy intensity improved by 1.4 per cent in 2005 compared with 2004, contributing to an average annual improvement in energy intensity of 0.7 per cent since 1990 for all of CIPEC industries. Through CIPEC, the mining, manufacturing and construction sectors have voluntarily met and exceeded annual targets to reduce their energy intensity. Upstream oil and gas companies have implemented projects to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by millions of tonnes and electrical utilities have significantly increased their production of alternative energy. refs., tabs., figs.

  12. Approximation of theoretical energy-saving potentials for the petrochemical industry using energy balances for 68 key processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neelis, M.L.; Patel, M.K.; Bach, P.; Haije, W.G.; Blok, K.

    2007-01-01

    We prepared energy and carbon balances for 68 petrochemical processes in the petrochemical industry for Western Europe, the Netherlands and the world. We analysed the process energy use in relation to the heat effects of the chemical reactions and quantified in this way the sum of all energy inputs

  13. Improving Energy Efficiency for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: A Discrete Event Simulation Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oumer, Abduaziz; Mekbib Atnaw, Samson; Kie Cheng, Jack; Singh, Lakveer

    2016-11-01

    This paper presented a Discrete Event Simulation (DES) model for investigating and improving energy efficiency in vehicle assembly line. The car manufacturing industry is one of the highest energy consuming industries. Using Rockwell Arena DES package; a detailed model was constructed for an actual vehicle assembly plant. The sources of energy considered in this research are electricity and fuel; which are the two main types of energy sources used in a typical vehicle assembly plant. The model depicts the performance measurement for process- specific energy measures of painting, welding, and assembling processes. Sound energy efficiency model within this industry has two-fold advantage: reducing CO2 emission and cost reduction associated with fuel and electricity consumption. The paper starts with an overview of challenges in energy consumption within the facilities of automotive assembly line and highlights the parameters for energy efficiency. The results of the simulation model indicated improvements for energy saving objectives and reduced costs.

  14. Towards consistent and reliable Dutch and international energy statistics for the chemical industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neelis, M.L.; Pouwelse, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Consistent and reliable energy statistics are of vital importance for proper monitoring of energy-efficiency policies. In recent studies, irregularities have been reported in the Dutch energy statistics for the chemical industry. We studied in depth the company data that form the basis of the energy

  15. ENERGY EFFICIENCY OPPORTUNITIES IN THE U.S. PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Klaas Jan; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. pulp and paper industry consumes over $7 billion worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. pulp and paper industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This paper provides a brief overview of the U.S. EPA ENERGY STAR(R) for Industry energy efficiency guidebook (a.k.a. the"Energy Guide") for pulp and paper manufacturers. The Energy Guide discusses a wide range of energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. Also provided is a discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. pulp and paper industry along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Many energy efficiency measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in pulp and paper mills and related industries worldwide. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. pulp and paper industry reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures?as well as on their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  16. The industrial development of atomic energy; Le developpement industriel de l'energie atomique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowarski, L. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Paris (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-07-01

    Countries with large stock of fissile material and producing large quantity of nuclear pure {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu are able to allocate part of the stock to non military research. For countries with low stock of fissile material, all the stock is allocated to military research. An economical and technical solution has to be find to dedicate a part of fissile material to non military research and develop the atomic energy industry. It stated the industrial and economical problems and in particular the choice between the use of enriched fuel with high refining cost or depleted fuel with low production cost. It discusses of four possible utilizations of the natural resources: reactors functioning with pure fissile material ({sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu) or concentrated material ({sup 235}U mixed with small quantities of {sup 238}U after an incomplete isotopic separation), breeder reactors functioning with enriched material mixed with {sup 238}U or Thorium placed in an appropriate spatial distribution to allow neutrons beam to activate {sup 238}U or Thorium with the regeneration of fissile material in {sup 239}Pu, reactors using natural uranium or low enriched uranium can also produce Plutonium with less efficiency than breeder reactors and the last solution being the use of natural uranium with the only scope of energy production and no production of secondary fissile material. The first class using pure fissile material has a low energy efficiency and is used only by large fissile material stock countries to accumulate energy in small size fuel for nuclear engines researches for submarines and warships. The advantage of the second class of reactors, breeder reactors, is that they produce energy and plutonium. Two type of breeder reactor are considered: breeder reactor using pure fissile material and {sup 238}U or breeder reactor using the promising mixture of pure fissile material and Thorium. Different projects are in phase of development in United States, England

  17. Implementation planning for industrial energy conservation: approach and methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alston, T.G.; Falk, G.; Grogan, P.J.; Katz, D.; Tatar, J.

    1981-01-01

    Details of an industry-specific Conservation Technology Implementation Branch implementation plan is described in detail. CTIB has conducted implementation planning in the steel, pulp/paper, and agriculture/food processing industries, but in FY 1981, CTIB plans to conduct planning for the chemicals, petroleum refining, aluminum, glass, cement, and textile industries. Guidelines are presented for each contractor for each industry toward a common methodology in terms of approach, areas of analysis, assumptions, and reporting. The major parts of the CTIB plan are: an implementation study consisting of technology selection, market demand analysis, and policy analysis, and a plan consisting of a detailed description and schedule of future CTIB actions, followed by a recommended system for monitoring market results when the plan is implemented. (MCW)

  18. 78 FR 48413 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Voluntary Self-Disclosure of Antiboycott...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Voluntary Self- Disclosure of Antiboycott Violations AGENCY: Bureau of Industry and Security, Commerce. ACTION: Notice... industry to voluntarily self-disclose Antiboycott violations. II. Method of Collection Submitted on paper...

  19. 75 FR 43486 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Voluntary Self-Disclosure of Antiboycott...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Voluntary Self- Disclosure of Antiboycott Violations AGENCY: Bureau of Industry and Security, Commerce ACTION: Notice... Regulations (EAR) by providing a method for industry to voluntarily self-disclose antiboycott violations...

  20. Industrial Energy Management Decision Making for Improved Energy Efficiency—Strategic System Perspectives and Situated Action in Combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrik Thollander

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Improved industrial energy efficiency is a cornerstone in climate change mitigation. Research results suggest that there is still major untapped potential for improved industrial energy efficiency. The major model used to explain the discrepancy between optimal level of energy efficiency and the current level is the barrier model, e.g., different barriers to energy efficiency inhibit adoption of cost-effective measures. The measures outlined in research and policy action plans are almost exclusively technology-oriented, but great potential for energy efficiency improvements is also found in operational measures. Both technology and operational measures are combined in successful energy management practices. Most research in the field of energy management is grounded in engineering science, and theoretical models on how energy management in industry is carried out are scarce. One way to further develop and improve energy management, both theoretically as well as practically, is to explore how a socio-technical perspective can contribute to this understanding. In this article we will further elaborate this potential of cross-pollinating these fields. The aim of this paper is to relate energy management to two theoretical models, situated action and transaction analysis. We conclude that the current model for energy management systems, the input-output model, is insufficient for understanding in-house industrial energy management practices. By the incorporation of situated action and transaction analysis to the currently used input-output model, an enhanced understanding of the complexity of energy management is gained. It is not possible to find a single energy management solution suitable for any industrial company, but rather the idea is to find a reflexive model that can be adjusted from time to time. An idea for such a reflexive model would contain the structural elements from energy management models with consideration for decisions being

  1. International Data Base for the U.S. Renewable Energy Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none

    1986-05-01

    The International Data Base for the US Renewable Energy Industry was developed to provide the US renewable energy industry with background data for identifying and analyzing promising foreign market opportunities for their products and services. Specifically, the data base provides the following information for 161 developed and developing countries: (1) General Country Data--consisting of general energy indicators; (2) Energy Demand Data--covering commercial primary energy consumption; (3) Energy Resource Data--identifying annual average insolation, wind power, and river flow data; (4) Power System Data--indicating a wide range of electrical parameters; and (5) Business Data--including currency and credit worthiness data.

  2. Investment risk evaluation techniques: use in energy-intensive industries and implications for ERDA's Industrial Conservation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-07-13

    The trade-off between risk and rate-of-return in investment evaluations is crucial in assessing the commercial potential of future energy-conservation technologies. The focus of the Industrial Conservation Program at ERDA is to reduce the perceived risks of a given technology to the extent that the private sector will adopt the technology within the normal course of its business operations. These perceived risks may emanate from technical, institutional, or commercial uncertainties, or in many cases they may result merely from a company's or industry's lack of previous experience with a particular technology. Regardless of the source of the risk surrounding a project, the uncertainty it poses to the private sector will serve to inhibit decisions to invest. This study evaluates the treatment of risk in capital investments in certain energy-intensive industries which are the primary targets of ERDA's Industrial Conservation Program. These risks evaluation considerations were placed within a context that includes capital budgeting practices and procedures, organizational considerations, and basic rate-of-return evaluation procedures in the targeted energy-intensive industries (petroleum, chemicals, paper, textiles, cement, food processing, aluminum, steel, glass, and agriculture).

  3. Environmental assessment in support of proposed interim energy conservation voluntary performance standards for new non-federal residential buildings: Volume 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-09-01

    The objective of this environmental assessment (EA) is to identify the potential environmental impacts that could result from the proposed voluntary residential standard (VOLRES) on private sector construction of new residential buildings. In this report, the scope, objectives, and approach of this EA are presented.

  4. Energy efficiency in small and medium scale foundry industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Patange

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the research results of surveys which were conducted in an Indian foundry cluster which are potential members of such sectors are presented. These results indicate that there is an enough potential improvement in the energy use. The use of energy efficient practices can result in their energy use effectively as well as cost reduction. The key findings about the energy pattern are a lack of energy efficient practices. The suggested recommendations can contribute to an increase in energy efficiency in such cluster.

  5. Sustained Energy Savings Achieved through Successful Industrial Customer Interaction with Ratepayer Programs: Case Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, Amelie [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hedman, Bruce [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Taylor, Robert P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Russell, Christopher [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Many states have implemented ratepayer-funded programs to acquire energy efficiency as a predictable and reliable resource for meeting existing and future energy demand. These programs have become a fixture in many U.S. electricity and natural gas markets as they help postpone or eliminate the need for expensive generation and transmission investments. Industrial energy efficiency (IEE) is an energy efficiency resource that is not only a low cost option for many of these efficiency programs, but offers productivity and competitive benefits to manufacturers as it reduces their energy costs. However, some industrial customers are less enthusiastic about participating in these programs. IEE ratepayer programs suffer low participation by industries across many states today despite a continual increase in energy efficiency program spending across all types of customers, and significant energy efficiency funds can often go unused for industrial customers. This paper provides four detailed case studies of companies that benefited from participation in their utility’s energy efficiency program offerings and highlights the business value brought to them by participation in these programs. The paper is designed both for rate-payer efficiency program administrators interested in improving the attractiveness and effectiveness of industrial efficiency programs for their industrial customers and for industrial customers interested in maximizing the value of participating in efficiency programs.

  6. A model for improving energy efficiency in industrial motor system using multicriteria analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrero Sola, Antonio Vanderley, E-mail: sola@utfpr.edu.br [Federal University of Technology, Parana, Brazil (UTFPR)-Campus Ponta Grossa, Av. Monteiro Lobato, Km 4, CEP: 84016-210 (Brazil); Mota, Caroline Maria de Miranda, E-mail: carolmm@ufpe.br [Federal University of Pernambuco, Cx. Postal 7462, CEP 50630-970, Recife (Brazil); Kovaleski, Joao Luiz [Federal University of Technology, Parana, Brazil (UTFPR)-Campus Ponta Grossa, Av. Monteiro Lobato, Km 4, CEP: 84016-210 (Brazil)

    2011-06-15

    In the last years, several policies have been proposed by governments and global institutions in order to improve the efficient use of energy in industries worldwide. However, projects in industrial motor systems require new approach, mainly in decision making area, considering the organizational barriers for energy efficiency. Despite the wide application, multicriteria methods remain unexplored in industrial motor systems until now. This paper proposes a multicriteria model using the PROMETHEE II method, with the aim of ranking alternatives for induction motors replacement. A comparative analysis of the model, applied to a Brazilian industry, has shown that multicriteria analysis presents better performance on energy saving as well as return on investments than single criterion. The paper strongly recommends the dissemination of multicriteria decision aiding as a policy to support the decision makers in industries and to improve energy efficiency in electric motor systems. - Highlights: > Lack of decision model in industrial motor system is the main motivation of the research. > A multicriteria model based on PROMETHEE method is proposed with the aim of supporting the decision makers in industries. > The model can contribute to transpose some barriers within the industries, improving the energy efficiency in industrial motor system.

  7. Army Energy Initiatives Task Force Industry Summit (portfolio)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-03

    financing to accelerate efficiency projects – Implement technologies to significantly reduce energy footprint in the field • Build Resilience through...for patrols and required for Soldier sustainment • Alternative energy capabilities & interoperability builds flexibility and resilience Soldiers of...https://eko.usace.army.mil/public/fa/ netzero / • http://army-energy.hqda.pentagon.mil/ netzero / Energy Initiatives Task Force UNCLASSIFIED Assistant

  8. Legal System Construction for Energy Industry in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Rongsi; Zhu Li

    2009-01-01

    @@ In a very real sense, China did not have a legal system of energy until 1978 when the policy of reform and opening-up was carried out. Over the 30 years since then, China has achieved great accomplishments in energy development, which have attracted worldwide attention, and has set up a relatively perfect energy supply system with coal as the mainstay, electricity as the center, and oil, gas and renewable energy etc.

  9. EU energy-intensive industries and emissions trading: losers becoming winners?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wettestad, Joergen

    2008-11-15

    The EU Emissions Trading System (ETS) initially treated power producers and energy-intensive industries similarly, despite clear structural differences between these industries regarding pass through of costs and vulnerability to global competition. Hence, the energy-intensive industries could be seen as losing out in the internal distribution. In the January 2008 proposal for a reformed ETS post-2012, a differentiated system was proposed where the energy-intensive industries come out relatively much better. What is the explanation for the change taking place? Although power producers still have a dominant position in the system, the increasing consensus about windfall profits has weakened their standing. Conversely, the energy-intensive industries have become better organised and more active. This balance shift is first and foremost noticeable in several important EU-level stake holder consultation processes. Energy-intensive industries have, however, also successfully utilised the national pathway to exert influence on Brussels policy-making. Finally, growing fear of lax global climate policies and related carbon leakage has strengthened the case of these industries further. The latter dimension indicates that although energy-intensive industries have managed to reduce internal distribution anomalies, external challenges remain. (author). 9 refs

  10. Business, industry, government preview energy research at Virginia Tech Showcase

    OpenAIRE

    Felker, Susan B.

    2006-01-01

    The Nov. 29-30 Energy Research Engagement Showcase offers business and community leaders the opportunity to learn about more than 300 energy-related activities at Virginia Tech, as well as energy efforts by faculty members at other public universities in Virginia.

  11. Insufficient voluntary intake of nutrients and energy in hospitalized patients Ingestión voluntariamente insuficiente de nutrientes y energía en pacientes hospitalizados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Tavares

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of our study was to evaluate the inadequacy of voluntary energy and nutrient intake on the first day of hospital admission. Patients and methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in two terciary care hospitals, with a probabilistic sample of 50% of in-patients. Dietary intake was evaluated by a 24-hour dietary recall, and undernutrition was screened through the Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 tool. The overall frequency of inadequate energy and nutrient intake was estimated using Dietary Reference Intakes. Results: Energy and nutrient intakes from 258 patients showed very low values for both men and women. No significant differences were found for energy and nutrient intakes across age groups (Objetivo: El propósito de nuestro estudio fue evaluar la inadecuación de la ingestión voluntaria de energía y nutrientes durante el primer día de ingreso hospitalario. Pacientes y métodos: Se realizó un estudio transversal en dos centros hospitalarios de atención terciaria con una muestra probabilística del 50% de pacientes ingresados. Se evaluó la ingestión alimenticia mediante un diario de 24 horas, y se hizo un cribado de desnutrición mediante la herramienta Nutritional Risk Screening 2002. Se estimó la falta de adecuación del consumo de energía y nutrientes mediante el Dietary Reference Intakes. Resultados: El consumo de energía y nutrientes en 258 pacientes mostró niveles muy bajos tanto en hombre como en mujeres. No se hallaron diferencias significativas en el consumo de energía y nutrientes entre los distintos grupos de edad (< 65 años y ≥ 65 años. Cuando se analizó la proporción de sujetos del estudio con consumo inadecuado de nutrientes, se halló una alta proporción de inadecuación. El grado de inadecuación fue mayor para la fibra, niacina, folato, vitamina B12, magnesio y zinc. No se hallaron diferencias significativas en la energía y los nutrientes estudiados y los consumos inferiores a 1/3 de las

  12. World scenario for energy industries (Problems and responses). ; Creating new values in fuels and restructuring the energy industries. Energy sangyo no sekai shinario (kadai to taio). ; Nenryo no shinkachi no sozo to energy sangyo no saikochiku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-05

    This paper describes the following matters on the future images of the energy industries: The following two scenarios may be drawn on the future world order from the changing signs seen in three regions of the geopolitical factors, international economies, and environmental problems : One is the world of mercantilism where several blocks are formed, with the economic power of each block regarded as the ultimate purpose. Trades within a block are executed according to the market principles, while trades between the blocks are operated politically. The energy industries in this case should face incessantly new rules and market restructuring. Another scenario is a coordination maintaining world where international cooperations are preferred to the common benefits. Affluent nations determine the necessity of global systems for trade and environmental problems, while less affluent nations are forced to coordinate with these determinations. In this case, the energy industries will face directly a cost rise associated with conversions to cleaner fuels and industrial restructuring. 8 figs.

  13. Opportunity Analysis for Recovering Energy from Industrial Waste Heat and Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Vish V.; Davies, Richard W.; Holbery, Jim D.

    2006-04-01

    United States industry consumed 32.5 Quads (34,300 PJ) of energy during 2003, which was 33.1% of total U.S. energy consumption (EIA 2003 Annual Energy Review). The U.S. industrial complex yields valuable goods and products. Through its manufacturing processes as well as its abundant energy consumption, it supports a multi-trillion dollar contribution to the gross domestic product and provides millions of jobs in the U.S. each year. Industry also yields waste products directly through its manufacturing processes and indirectly through its energy consumption. These waste products come in two forms, chemical and thermal. Both forms of waste have residual energy values that are not routinely recovered. Recovering and reusing these waste products may represent a significant opportunity to improve the energy efficiency of the U.S. industrial complex. This report was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Industrial Technologies Program (DOE-ITP). It analyzes the opportunity to recover chemical emissions and thermal emissions from U.S. industry. It also analyzes the barriers and pathways to more effectively capitalize on these opportunities. A primary part of this analysis was to characterize the quantity and energy value of the emissions. For example, in 2001, the industrial sector emitted 19% of the U.S. greenhouse gases (GHG) through its industrial processes and emitted 11% of GHG through electricity purchased from off-site utilities. Therefore, industry (not including agriculture) was directly and indirectly responsible for emitting 30% of the U.S. GHG. These emissions were mainly comprised of carbon dioxide (CO2), but also contained a wide-variety of CH4 (methane), CO (carbon monoxide), H2 (hydrogen), NMVOC (non-methane volatile organic compound), and other chemicals. As part of this study, we conducted a survey of publicly available literature to determine the amount of energy embedded in the emissions and to identify technology opportunities to capture and

  14. Long-range agreements with the industry on energy efficiency: The first results, 1989-1993. Meerjarenafspraken met de industrie over energie-efficiency: Eerste resultaten, 1989-1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-01-01

    Since 1990 the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs enters into long-range agreements on the improvement of energy efficiency with industrial sectors. The aim of the agreements is to realize an averaged energy efficiency of 20% for the year 2000, compared to the energy efficiency in 1989. So far 22 long-range agreements or declarations of intent are entered into. In this brochure the experiences are reported, in particular for twelve industrial sectors for which results are available (iron and steel industry, non-ferro industry, paper and board industry, Philips (electronics), textile industry, sand-lime bricks industry, glass industry, cement industry, breweries and malting plants, meat-packing industry, margarine-, fat- and oil-industry, sugar industry, and dairy industry). In the period 1989-1993 8% efficiency improvement has been realized on average. It is concluded that the method of long-range agreements is successful. It is expected that more important improvements will be realized

  15. The Status of Energy Monitoring in Science and Industry by the Example of Material Handling Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Fekete

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Global mega trends attract increased resource preservation as well as system efficiency and arouse growing scientific, industrial and public attention, whereas process and technologic developments still lack realisation due to inaccurate knowledge of real process energy demand, associated possible savings and a low inducement for investment. This investigation develops a generally applicable process for energy data collection focussing on material handling systems based on a predefined target model for energy monitoring in order to generate a valid reference model. The introduction of Standardised Energy Consuming Activities (SECA model enables the development of energy based process functions as reference for its implementation to energetic investigations in various industrial applications. Analysing current and target state of energy monitoring in scientific and industrial investigations for logistics shows the developmental deficit of standardisation and realisation in energy monitoring.

  16. Potential industrial applications for composite phase-change materials as thermal energy storage media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spanner, G.E.; Wilfert, G.L.

    1989-07-01

    Considerable effort has been spent by the US Department of Energy and its contractors over the last few years to develop composite phase-change materials (CPCMs) for thermal energy storage (TES). This patented TES medium consists of a phase-change material (typically a salt or metal alloy) that is retained within the porous structure of a supporting material (typically a ceramic). The objectives of this study were to (1) introduce CPCMs to industries that may not otherwise be aware of them, (2) identify potentially attractive applications for CPCM in industry, (3) determine technical requirements that will affect the design of CPCM's for specific applications, and (4) generate interest among industrial firms for employing CPCM TES in their processes. The approach in this study was to examine a wide variety of industries using a series of screens to select those industries that would be most likely to adopt CPCM TES in their processes. The screens used in this study were process temperature, presence of time-varying energy flows, energy intensity of the industry, and economic growth prospects over the next 5 years. After identifying industries that passed all of the screens, representatives of each industry were interviewed by telephone to introduce them to CPCM TES, assess technical requirements for CPCM TES in their industry, and determine their interest in pursuing applications for CPCM TES. 11 refs., 4 tabs.

  17. Deregulation of Electricity Market and Drivers of Demand for Electrical Energy in Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojnec Štefan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates deregulation of electricity market focusing on electricity prices and drivers of demand for electrical energy in industry in Slovenia. The patterns in evolution of real electricity price developments and the three main components of the electricity price are calculated: liberalized market share for purchased electricity price, regulated infrastructure share for use of electricity network grids and mandatory state charges in the sale of electricity (duty, excise duty and value-added tax. To calculate the real value of electricity prices, producer price index of industrial commodities for electricity prices in industry is used as deflator and implicit deflator of gross domestic product for the size of the economy. In the empirical econometric part is used regression analysis for the amount electricity consumption in the industry depending on the real gross domestic product, direct and cross-price elasticity for natural gas prices in the industry. The results confirmed volatility in real electricity price developments with their increasing tendency and the increasing share of different taxes and state charges in the electricity prices for industry. Demand for electrical energy in industry is positively associated with gross domestic product and price of natural gas as substitute for electrical energy in industry use, and negatively associated with prices of electrical energy for industry.

  18. Lower energy costs in the ceramics industry - via ceramic fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zander, H.P.

    1983-04-01

    Ceramic fibres, due to their high thermal and chemical resistance, receive increasing attention as insulating material for industrial purposes. After a short characterisation, examples of furnace wall lining are given, and a tunnel-kiln car for baking of sanitation ceramics is investigated with a view to possibilities of supplementary insulation.

  19. Industrial wireless monitoring with energy-harvesting devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brian Blake, M.; Das, Kallol; Zand, P.; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    Vibration monitoring and analysis techniques are used increasingly for predictive maintenance. While traditional vibration monitoring relies on wired sensor networks, recent industrial technologies such as WirelessHART, ISA100.11a, and IEEE802.15.4e have brought a paradigm shift in the automation

  20. Exergy analysis on industrial boiler energy conservation and emission evaluation applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Henan

    2017-06-01

    Industrial boiler is one of the most energy-consuming equipments in china, the annual consumption of energy accounts for about one-third of the national energy consumption. Industrial boilers in service at present have several severe problems such as small capacity, low efficiency, high energy consumption and causing severe pollution on environment. In recent years, our country in the big scope, long time serious fog weather, with coal-fired industrial boilers is closely related to the regional characteristics of high strength and low emissions [1]. The energy-efficient and emission-reducing of industry boiler is of great significance to improve China’s energy usage efficiency and environmental protection. Difference in thermal equilibrium theory is widely used in boiler design, exergy analysis method is established on the basis of the first law and second law of thermodynamics, by studying the cycle of the effect of energy conversion and utilization, to analyze its influencing factors, to reveal the exergy loss of location, distribution and size, find out the weak links, and a method of mining system of the boiler energy saving potential. Exergy analysis method is used for layer combustion boiler efficiency and pollutant emission characteristics analysis and evaluation, and can more objectively and accurately the energy conserving potential of the mining system of the boiler, find out the weak link of energy consumption, and improve equipment performance to improve the industrial boiler environmental friendliness.

  1. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kermeli, Katerina; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2011-12-01

    The U.S. concrete industry is the main consumer of U.S.-produced cement. The manufacturing of ready mixed concrete accounts for more than 75% of the U.S. concrete production following the manufacturing of precast concrete and masonry units. The most significant expenditure is the cost of materials accounting for more than 50% of total concrete production costs - cement only accounts for nearly 24%. In 2009, energy costs of the U.S. concrete industry were over $610 million. Hence, energy efficiency improvements along with efficient use of materials without negatively affecting product quality and yield, especially in times of increased fuel and material costs, can significantly reduce production costs and increase competitiveness. The Energy Guide starts with an overview of the U.S. concrete industry’s structure and energy use, a description of the various manufacturing processes, and identification of the major energy consuming areas in the different industry segments. This is followed by a description of general and process related energy- and cost-efficiency measures applicable to the concrete industry. Specific energy and cost savings and a typical payback period are included based on literature and case studies, when available. The Energy Guide intends to provide information on cost reduction opportunities to energy and plant managers in the U.S. concrete industry. Every cost saving opportunity should be assessed carefully prior to implementation in individual plants, as the economics and the potential energy and material savings may differ.

  2. Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for the Pulp and Paper Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Lingbo [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); South China Univ. of Technology (SCUT), Guangzhou (China); Hasanbeigi, Ali [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Price, Lynn [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-11-01

    The pulp and paper industry ranks fourth in terms of energy consumption among industries worldwide. Globally, the pulp and paper industry accounted for approximately 5 percent of total world industrial final energy consumption in 2007, and contributed 2 percent of direct carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industry. Worldwide pulp and paper demand and production are projected to increase significantly by 2050, leading to an increase in this industry’s absolute energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Development of new energy-efficiency and GHG mitigation technologies and their deployment in the market will be crucial for the pulp and paper industry’s mid- and long-term climate change mitigation strategies. This report describes the industry’s processes and compiles available information on the energy savings, environmental and other benefits, costs, commercialization status, and references for 36 emerging technologies to reduce the industry’s energy use and GHG emissions. Although studies from around the world identify a variety of sector-specific and cross-cutting energy-efficiency technologies that have already been commercialized for the pulp and paper industry, information is scarce and/or scattered regarding emerging or advanced energy-efficiency and low-carbon technologies that are not yet commercialized. The purpose of this report is to provide engineers, researchers, investors, paper companies, policy makers, and other interested parties with easy access to a well-structured resource of information on these technologies.

  3. Renewable energy resources in a restructured electric industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galen, P.S. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This paper highlights a conference presentation addressing changes in the residential energy sector in view of the increasing competitiveness of the energy market. Renewable energy characteristics are briefly outlined, and capacity and generation data for non-hydroelectric power in 1994 are listed. A review of critical factors in renewables development and policy responses to market impediments is made. Current market barriers are identified, and proposals for Federal policies are made. 17 tabs., 2 figs.

  4. Evaporation: a prime target for industrial energy conservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-12-01

    The overwhelming increase in the cost of energy in relation to other evaporation costs has made energy conservation the leading concern of evaporator designers. Fuel costs, energy losses, and options for upgrading evaporators are discussed. Among these options are extensive heat exchange between outgoing streams and incoming feeds, automated controls to maintain optimum operation, increased maintenance, use of heat recovery equipment, and careful engineering and economic analyses of evaporator systems. (LCL)

  5. Voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    The Voluntary Reporting Program for greenhouse gases is part of an attempt by the U.S. Government to develop innovative, low-cost, and nonregulatory approaches to limit emissions of greenhouse gases. It is one element in an array of such programs introduced in recent years as part of the effort being made by the United States to comply with its national commitment to stabilize emissions of greenhouse gases under the Framework Convention on Climate Change. The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions of greenhouse gases.

  6. On Some Aspects of Energy Conservation in Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Keerti; Seksena, S. B. L.; Thakur, A. N.

    2016-06-01

    Energy demand has increased continuously due to advancement in technology and living standards of a large section of people resulting in a wide gap between supply and demand. One of the approaches to reduce this gap would be the adoption of measures of energy conservation in general and the efficient use of energy particularly in motor. This paper presents a review of the research activity in the field of efficiency optimization of three-phase induction motor drive. The approach is analyzed and the better option of energy conservation are identified.

  7. Energy savings and emission reductions in industrial boilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saidur R.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper energy use of boiler fan motors has been estimated using energy audit data. Energy savings using VSD by modulating fan speed has been estimated as well. Bill savings and associated emission reductions using VSD have been estimated and presented in this paper. It has been found that 139,412 MWh, 268,866, 159,328 MWh, and 99,580 MWh electrical energy can be saved for 40%, 60%, 80% and 100% motor loadings, respectively for 60% speed reduction. Corresponding bill savings for the aforementioned energy savings have been found to be US$7,318,335, US$14,113,933, US$8,363,812, and US135,911,944 for 40%, 60%, 80% and 100% motor loadings, respectively for 60% speed reduction. Along with energy savings, 69,770,744 kg, 134,558,329 kg, 79,738,065 kg, 49,836,603 kg of CO2 emission can be avoided for the associated energy savings as a result of energy savings using VSD for 40%, 60%, 80% and 100% motor loadings. Moreover, 32,503,558 GJ of fossil fuel can be saved for the flue gas temperature reduction as a result of reducing fan motor speed reduction. Flue gas energy savings for oxegen trim system has been estimated and found to be 549,310,130 GJ for 16.9% of excess air reduction with payback period less than a day.

  8. Saving energy in the baking industry. Energiesparen in der Baeckerei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    Measures for energy conservation and rational energy use have been given priority in almost all sectors of our economy. Between July and December 1991, 40 bakeries were studied for their energy consumptions in a study commissioned by BEWAG/EBAG in Berlin. Most bakeries will have to reckon with annual turnovers which will not rise as they used to. This brochure explains those measures which are best suited to use electric power in the business effectively to save energy, to lower costs and to reduce pollution. (orig./UA)

  9. Eighth Project book TIEC, Tenders Industrial Energy Conservation: Accepted Projects 1997; Achtste Projectenboek TIEB, Tenders Industriele Energiebesparing: Gehonoreerde projecten 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The aim of the title subsidy regulation is to stimulate industrial companies to invest in taking energy conservation measures. This brochure gives insight into newly applied techniques or developments in the industry. An overview is given of studies, demonstration projects and market introduction projects regarding energy conservation. Also, overall and indicative figures of the different projects are presented. The industries in which projects were carried out concern the food industry, paper industry, chemical industry, rubber and synthetic materials processing industry, petroleum and coal processing industry, ceramics industry, graphics industry, electrotechnical industry, furniture industry, transportation sector and the metal industry. The eighth Call for Tenders resulted in 83 subsidy agreements, worth 21.5 million Dutch guilders of commitments. The subsidies applied, not only concern energy conservation projects, but also knowledge transfer

  10. Ninth Project book TIEC, Tenders Industrial Energy Conservation. Accepted Projects 1998; Negende Projectenboek TIEB, Tenders Industriele Energiebesparing. Gehonoreerde projecten 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    The aim of the title subsidy regulation is to stimulate industrial companies to invest in taking energy conservation measures. This brochure gives insight into newly applied techniques or developments in the industry. An overview is given of studies, demonstration projects and market introduction projects regarding energy conservation. Also, overall and indicative figures of the different projects are presented. The industries in which projects were carried out concern the food industry, paper industry, chemical industry, rubber and synthetic materials processing industry, petroleum and coal processing industry, ceramics industry, graphics industry, electrotechnical industry, furniture industry, transportation sector and the metal industry. The ninth Call for Tenders resulted in 78 subsidy agreements, worth 15.6 million Dutch guilders of commitments. The subsidies applied, not only concern energy conservation projects, but also knowledge transfer.

  11. Development of alternative energies for oil and the problems facing industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idemura, H.

    1982-01-01

    According to a provisional long-term energy forecast, Japan's degree of dependence on oil will drop from its present 74% to 62.9% in 1985 and to 48.1% in 1995. This is an indication of the amount of alternative energy required. Explanations are given of the characteristics of the following alternative energy sources: coal, natural gas, atomic energy, geothermal, solar energy, biomass, chemical energy, and energy from wastes. There is an introduction to the role and function of the engineering industry, which is closely related to the development of these energies.

  12. Operational energy management in the industrial production. Brief study; Betriebliches Energiemanagement in der industriellen Produktion. Kurzstudie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirzel, Simon; Sontag, Benjamin; Rohde, Clemens

    2011-09-15

    Increasing energy prices and raw material prices, an increased public interest in energy issues and new customer requirements result in a responsible utilization of energy as a resource. The energy management provides the opportunity to evaluate and assess energy flows. Measures for a better utilization of resources can be derived and implemented by means of an energy management system. Under this aspect, the authors of the contribution under consideration report on current issues and developments in the field of corporate energy management in industry as well as the future developments of energy management.

  13. Energy conversion strategies in the European paper industry : A case study in three countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laurijssen, J.; Faaij, A.P.C.; Worrell, E.

    2012-01-01

    The pulp and paper industry both uses and produces large amounts of energy and rising fuel prices bring along significant challenges to the sector. Several strategies can be applied in order to remain competitive e.g. an increase in energy efficiency, a switch in fuel and/or a novel energy

  14. 77 FR 36532 - Review of Small Generator Interconnection Agreements and Procedures; Solar Energy Industries...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ...-001; ER12-1855-000] Review of Small Generator Interconnection Agreements and Procedures; Solar Energy... discuss issues related to a petition for rulemaking recently submitted by the Solar Energy Industries... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  15. Energy efficiency opportunities in the U.S. dairy processing industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masanet, Eric; Brush, Adrian; Worrell, Ernst

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. dairy processing industry consumes around 1.5 billion worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvements are a critical way for plants to reduce these costs, lower emissions of energy-related pollutants, and reduce susceptibility to volatile energy prices.

  16. Energy efficiency opportunities in the U.S. dairy processing industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masanet, Eric; Brush, Adrian; Worrell, Ernst

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. dairy processing industry consumes around 1.5 billion worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvements are a critical way for plants to reduce these costs, lower emissions of energy-related pollutants, and reduce susceptibility to volatile energy prices. Thi

  17. The oil industry in France: contribution to the debate on energy; L'industrie petroliere en France contribution au debat sur l'energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-01-15

    Proposed by the professional body of the French oil industry, this document proposes a contribution of this body to the energy challenge. The authors first discuss the context and its evolution in terms of energy demand and of energy sources. They outline the necessary development of renewable energies. While giving recommendations, they state how the oil sector will support the economy and employment, how this sector will keep on exploring and producing hydrocarbons, how the refining activity needs to be adapted, how the oil logistics must evolve, and how the service station network is already evolving

  18. Benchmark Energiebelasting glastuinbouw : vergelijking energie-intensiteit met de industrie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, M.J.; Nelissen, D.; Schepers, B.L.; Velden, van der N.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Onderzoek naar de energie-intensiteit en de lastendruk van de Energiebelasting voor de glastuinbouwsector in vergelijking tot andere energie-intensieve sectoren van de Nederlandse economie. Dit in het kader vanwege de aanvraag voor goedkeuring van tuinbouw-tarief voor 2011 en 2012 bij de Europese Co

  19. Meeting the Energy Challenge: New Standards for Industrial Motor Efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    ’s “Total Cost of Ownership” (TCO) philosophy. This is important for Grundfos, as important pump improvements address the energy performance and service cost in the product’s operation period. These improvements include energy savings and increased overall pump efficiency. TCO can, therefore, be used...

  20. Energy management in wooden industry; Gestao energetica em industrias madeireiras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cagnon, Jose Angelo; Valarelli, Ivaldo de Domenico; Rodrigues, Ricardo Martini [Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Bauru, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia. Dept. de Engenharia Eletrica], Emails: jacagnon@feb.unesp.br, ivaldo@feb.unesp.br, martini@feb.unesp.br

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this work is the use of a methodology developed for the evaluation of the energy performance in wooden plants, aiming the application of a energy management program, for products and processes improvement, observing a reliable technical and economic implementation. (author)

  1. Legal System Construction for Energy Industry in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In a very real sense,China did not have a legal system of energy until 1978 when the policy of reform and opening-up was carried out.Over the 30 years since then,China has achieved great accomplishments in energy development,which have attracted worldwide attention,

  2. Rethinking voluntary euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyles, Byron J; Costreie, Sorin

    2013-12-01

    Our goal in this article is to explicate the way, and the extent to which, euthanasia can be voluntary from both the perspective of the patient and the perspective of the health care providers involved in the patient's care. More significantly, we aim to challenge the way in which those engaged in ongoing philosophical debates regarding the morality of euthanasia draw distinctions between voluntary, involuntary, and nonvoluntary euthanasia on the grounds that drawing the distinctions in the traditional manner (1) fails to reflect what is important from the patient's perspective and (2) fails to reflect the significance of health care providers' interests, including their autonomy and integrity.

  3. Energy conservation and use of renewable energies in the bio-industries 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, F.

    1982-01-01

    The proceedings are presented of the Second International Seminar on Energy Conservation and the Use of Renewable Energies in the Bio-industries. Of 106 papers presented, the following 5 are of particular forestry interest: Brewbaker, J.L.; MacDicken, K.; Beldt, R. van den. Tropical nitrogen-fixing fuelwood trees. 108-119 (Refs. 15). Farnham, R.S.; Garton, S.; Louis, K.A.; Read, P.E. Propagating and establishing bioenergy plantations. 274-283 (Refs. 14). Salix and Alnus spp. in the marginal wetlands of northern Minnesota, USA. Kio, P.R.O. Factors and policies affecting forest resources use and conservation in Africa. 425-432 (Refs. 9), including discussion of the causes and consequences of deforestation. Plumptre, R.A.; Sandells, A. Construction, performance and economics of simple solar timber drying kilns. 577-586 (Refs. 11). Yermanos, D.M. Jojoba - outlook for maximizing oil production. 738-748 (Refs. 1). It describes experiments on seed and oil yields of Simmondsia chinensis in California.

  4. A multivariate linear regression model for the Jordanian industrial electric energy consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ghandoor, A.; Nahleh, Y.A.; Sandouqa, Y.; Al-Salaymeh, M. [Hashemite Univ., Zarqa (Jordan). Dept. of Industrial Engineering

    2007-08-09

    The amount of electricity used by the industrial sector in Jordan is an important driver for determining the future energy needs of the country. This paper proposed a model to simulate electricity and energy consumption by industry. The general model approach was based on multivariate regression analysis to provide valuable information regarding energy demands and analysis, and to identify the various factors that influence Jordanian industrial electricity consumption. It was determined that industrial gross output and capacity utilization are the most important variables that drive electricity consumption. The results revealed that the multivariate linear regression model can be used to adequately model the Jordanian industrial electricity consumption with coefficient of determination (R2) and adjusted R2 values of 99.3 and 99.2 per cent, respectively. 19 refs., 4 tabs., 2 figs.

  5. Modeling the effects of involvement and attitudes on energy industry pursuit intentions: A systems analysis of the university-industry environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jordan M.

    The energy industry's struggle to attract and retain qualified employees continues to threaten the nation's economy, global competitiveness, and national security. Given the nationwide skills and labor shortage in the energy industry, this study was conducted in response to a need to identify causes of person-environment fit and its effects on engineering students' intentions to work in the energy industry after graduation. Structural equation modeling was used to examine the relationships between student inputs, environmental factors, and career-related outcomes. Two models were compared using data collected from 381 undergraduate engineering students from across the country. Results suggest that students who gained knowledge about professions in the energy industry from participating in an internship or co-op at an energy-related company perceived greater fit with the goals and values of the energy industry. In addition, this study found that students who perceive high levels of fit with the energy industry also have high industry attraction, which directly affects their energy industry pursuit intentions. Overall, this research indicates that high quality internships have the potential to increase students' perceived industry fit, which is closely tied to their career intentions. Outcomes of this study are expected to provide stakeholders with new insights to improve practices within the university-industry environment that will educate, promote, and sustain a strong energy workforce for years to come.

  6. ENERGY RECOVERY FOR CONTINUOUS DYEING PROCESS IN TEXTILE INDUSTRY ENTERPRISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Romaniuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper ascertains and presents alteration in the energy consumption as a consequence of utilizing the low-temperature waste streams commonly used in the lines of continuous dyeing at the finishing shops of textile enterprises of Belarus. The utilization realizes through the engagement of lithium-bromide absorption heat pumps with various energy characteristics such as the heating coefficient (relative conversion ratio COPhp = 1,15; 1,7; 2,2 and the heating capacity. The latter associates with the converted heat-flow energy utilization variant with the heat-transfer medium heating system scheme (one-, twoand multistage heating. The article considers transition to previously not applied service-water preheating due to the technological acceptance of feeding higher temperature water into the dyeing machine and widening specification of the heattransfer media. The authors adduce variants of internal and external energy use and their evaluation based on the relative energy and exergy characteristics. With results of the thermodynamic analysis of the modernized production effectiveness the researchers prove that alongside with traditional and apparent interior utilization of the energy associated with the stream heat recuperation, it is advisable to widen the range of applied heat-transfer media. The transition to the service water twoand multi-stage preheating is feasible. The study shows that the existing energy supply efficiency extremely low index-numbers improve by one or two degrees. Since they are conditioned, inter alia, by the machinery design, traditional approach to energy supply and heat-medium usage as well as the enterprise whole heating system answering requirements of the bygone era of cheap energy resources. The authors examine the continuous dyeing line modernization options intending considerable investments. Preliminary economic assessment of such inevitable modernization options for the enterprise entire heat-and-power system

  7. Feasibility study on recovering hydrogen energy from industrial wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ming Der BAI; Chia-Jung HSIAO [Energy and Resource Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, 195, sec. 4 Chung Hsing Rd., Chutung, Hsinchu, Taiwan, 301 R.O.C. (China)

    2006-07-01

    Three wastewater obtained from different industries were evaluated for the feasibility of hydrogen fermentation. Because of the various components of the wastewater, the characteristics of the hydrogen accumulation were different. Several stages with different hydrogen producing rate were observed during the batch hydrogen fermentation of each wastewater. The obvious hydrogen consumption was observed in the last phase of hydrogen fermentation of the wastewater from the winery. It is similar to the reported hydrogen fermentation characteristic of starch. The wastewater coming from the fructose manufactory has the greatest hydrogen potential nearly 150 L-H{sub 2}/kg-COD. The wastewater from food industry has the lower hydrogen potential of 65 L-H{sub 2}/kg-COD. Some of its compounds were not suitable for hydrogen production. The lowest hydrogen potential was observed in the fermentation of the wastewater from the winery, because hydrogen consumption affects the hydrogen recovery from the wastewater from winery. (authors)

  8. Feasibility study on recovering hydrogen energy from industrial wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ming Der Bai; Chia-Jung Hsiao [Energy and Resource Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, 195, sec. 4 Chung Hsing Rd., Chutung, Hsinchu, Taiwan, 301 R.O.C. (China)

    2006-07-01

    Three wastewater obtained from different industries were evaluated for the feasibility of hydrogen fermentation. Because of the various components of the wastewater, the characteristics of the hydrogen accumulation were different. Several stages with different hydrogen producing rate were observed during the batch hydrogen fermentation of each wastewater. The obvious hydrogen consumption was observed in the last phase of hydrogen fermentation of the wastewater from the winery. It is similar to the reported hydrogen fermentation characteristic of starch. The wastewater coming from the fructose manufactory has the greatest hydrogen potential nearly 150 L-H{sub 2}/kg-COD. The wastewater from food industry has the lower hydrogen potential of 65 L-H{sub 2}/kg-COD. Some of its compounds were not suitable for hydrogen production. The lowest hydrogen potential was observed in the fermentation of the wastewater from the winery, because hydrogen consumption affects the hydrogen recovery from the wastewater from winery. (authors)

  9. Licensing arrangements and the development of the solar energy industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, M.

    1979-06-01

    The process by which technology and information related to technology are transferred within industry is explored. Property rights in technology are part of the broader field of intellectual property. The general contours of legal protection for knowledge are explored. The four basic forms of intellectual property - patents, trade secrets (or know-how), trademarks, and copyrights - are covered in varying degrees of depth, depending on their relative applicability to the development of the solar industry. Once this background has been established, the legal aspects of licensing are examined. A license is a legal arrangement whereby a party (licensor) who controls the right to use an idea, invention, etc. shares the right to use the particular intellectual property with someone else (licensee). The advantages and disadvantages of licensing are described from the point of view of potential licensees and licensors. Barriers to licensing are discussed.

  10. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neelis, Maarten; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2008-09-01

    Energy is the most important cost factor in the U.S petrochemical industry, defined in this guide as the chemical industry sectors producing large volume basic and intermediate organic chemicals as well as large volume plastics. The sector spent about $10 billion on fuels and electricity in 2004. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. petrochemical industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the petrochemical industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in the petrochemical and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. petrochemical industry reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--and on their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  11. Solar energy based industrial applications at the "Politehnica" University of Timisoara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luminosu Ioan V.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A short overview of a more than 30 years long activity in industrial and home applications of solar energy at the "Politehnica" University of Timişoara, Romania is presented. A built "Solar House", an industrial system for preheating bitumen, a solution for waste water cleaning and an industrial hall for drying ceramic products are described. Some recent studies on solar concentrators are reported.

  12. Energy use and distribution in the pulp paper and boardmaking industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, S. I.

    1977-08-01

    The Pulp, Paper and Boardmaking Industries (PPBI) are major energy consumers in the U.S. economy, ranking fourth among all industry groups in this respect. Including the consumption of waste streams generated within the industry's manufacturing processes, the overall energy consumption in 1972 was 2.2 x 10/sup 15/ Btu (2.2 quads or 2.3 x 10/sup 18/ joules). Energy consumption is almost equally distributed between pulpmaking and recovery or regeneration of pulping chemicals, on the one hand, and pulp drying, papermaking and boardmaking, on the other. The impact of proposed near-term pollution abatement regulations upon the industry's overall energy consumption is expected to be modest, with additional energy use for discharge control to both air and water aggregating less than 5%. Zero Pollution Discharge (ZPD) regulations could nearly double the energy requirements per ton of product however, due mainly to liquid effluent treatment requirements. The energy savings predicted by the industry, assuming that ZPD is not required, is approximately 10% below the 1972 level, per unit of product, by 1980. Full utilization of all industry alternatives for conservation could probably double this savings.

  13. Technology Roadmap: Energy and GHG reductions in the chemical industry via catalytic processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-06-01

    The chemical industry is a large energy user; but chemical products and technologies also are used in a wide array of energy saving and/or renewable energy applications so the industry has also an energy saving role. The chemical and petrochemical sector is by far the largest industrial energy user, accounting for roughly 10% of total worldwide final energy demand and 7% of global GHG emissions. The International Council of Chemical Associations (ICCA) has partnered with the IEA and DECHEMA (Society for Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology) to describe the path toward further improvements in energy efficiency and GHG reductions in the chemical sector. The roadmap looks at measures needed from the chemical industry, policymakers, investors and academia to press on with catalysis technology and unleash its potential around the globe. The report uncovers findings and best practice opportunities that illustrate how continuous improvements and breakthrough technology options can cut energy use and bring down greenhouse gas (GHG) emission rates. Around 90% of chemical processes involve the use of catalysts – such as added substances that increase the rate of reaction without being consumed by it – and related processes to enhance production efficiency and reduce energy use, thereby curtailing GHG emission levels. This work shows an energy savings potential approaching 13 exajoules (EJ) by 2050 – equivalent to the current annual primary energy use of Germany.

  14. ANALYSIS OF THE CORRELATION BETWEEN ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND INDUSTRIAL COMPETITIVENESS IN THE EUROPEAN UNION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Ionescu SAS

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the author analyzes the dependence between energy and industrial competitiveness before and after the 2008 economic crisis in the European Union. The Europe 2020 strategy aims energy major industrial competitiveness and increasing energy efficiency. But the economic crisis of 2008 led to reduced energy consumption and prices have increased considerably, so prices in the European Union in the energy industry are estimated to be twice higher than in the United States and Russia and 20% higher than those in China. According to the 2020 European Strategy for Sustainable Growth proposed increasing share of renewables to 20% increasing 20% energy efficiency and 20% reduction of greenhouse gas emissions greenhouse (or even 30 %, in favorable conditions compared to 1990. The economic analysis in this paper are based on statistical quantitative method. Indicators used in this analysis are available on major platforms Eurostat data.

  15. U.S. Renewable Energy Policy and Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Ella

    2015-10-01

    From 2005 to 2014, wind and solar power generation has seen an almost tenfold increase in the United States. Such rapid development is the result of a variety of federal and state, top-down and bottom-up drivers, as well as the macro-environment of cost-reduction globally and early adoption in Europe. This presentation, prepared for a meeting with China National Renewable Energy Center and National Energy Administration (of China), is a summary of some of the key drivers for renewable energy deployment in the United States.

  16. Challenges and Opportunities Faced by China's Energy Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Guobao

    2005-01-01

    @@ The sustainable and rapid development of Chinese economy entails fast growth of energy demand. In recent years, power is in short supply; supply and transportation of coal is tense, causing a price rise;crude oil import increases, and oil price lingers on high end. These phenomena reflecting energy shortage have become people's hot-debated issues in economic life, and public economic regulators and economists have shown unprecedented concerns about the energy-, environment-,and resources-related issues from the sustainable development point of view.

  17. Energy Technology Solutions: Public-Private Partnerships Transforming Industry - December 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2010-12-01

    AMO's research and development partnerships with industry have resulted in more than 220 technologies and other solutions that can be purchased today. This document includes a description of each solution, its benefits, and vendor contact information. The document also identifies emerging technologies and other resources to help industry save energy.

  18. Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Petroleum Refining Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellegrino, Joan [Energetics, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States); Brueske, Sabine [Energetics, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States); Carole, Tracy [Energetics, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States); Andres, Howard [Energetics, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States)

    2007-11-01

    This 2007 report provides an overview of the U.S. petroleum refining industry, including new data on market trends and energy and material consumption, as well as information on environmental performance.

  19. Candidate thermal energy storage technologies for solar industrial process heat applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, E. R.

    1979-01-01

    A number of candidate thermal energy storage system elements were identified as having the potential for the successful application of solar industrial process heat. These elements which include storage media, containment and heat exchange are shown.

  20. Collection and dissemination of thermal energy storage system information for the pulp and paper industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edde, H.

    1981-01-01

    The collection and dissemination of thermal energy storage (TES) system technology for the pulp and paper industry with the intent of reducing fossil fuel usage is discussed. The study plan is described and a description presented of example TES systems.

  1. CREATING THE STANDARD FOR SPECIFIC ENERGY CONSUMPTION AT PALM OIL INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfa Firdaus

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available There is currently no standard for the Specific Energy Consumption (SEC in the palm oil industry. SEC is a value that can be used as an indicator to measure the optimization level in the use of energy. Indonesia as one of the largest palm oil producing countries requires a standard for energy intensity in the palm oil industry. SEC in palm oil mill is defined in the amount of energy per unit of production (kWh/kg. The classifying method that has been used in this study is K-means cluster analysis with the measurement samples in 14 palm oil mills for 12 months of period. This study has suggested the SEC standard for Indonesian palm oil industry and it is expected to be SEC reference for other studies in the palm oil industry.

  2. Reliability estimation for multiunit nuclear and fossil-fired industrial energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, W. G.; Wilson, J. V.; Klepper, O. H.

    1977-06-29

    As petroleum-based fuels grow increasingly scarce and costly, nuclear energy may become an important alternative source of industrial energy. Initial applications would most likely include a mix of fossil-fired and nuclear sources of process energy. A means for determining the overall reliability of these mixed systems is a fundamental aspect of demonstrating their feasibility to potential industrial users. Reliability data from nuclear and fossil-fired plants are presented, and several methods of applying these data for calculating the reliability of reasonably complex industrial energy supply systems are given. Reliability estimates made under a number of simplifying assumptions indicate that multiple nuclear units or a combination of nuclear and fossil-fired plants could provide adequate reliability to meet industrial requirements for continuity of service.

  3. The Relationship Between Oil and Gas Industry Investment in Alternative Energy and Corporate Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konyushikhin, Maxim

    The U.S. Energy Information Administration forecasted energy consumption in the United States to increase approximately 19% between 2006 and 2030, or about 0.7% annually. The research problem addressed in this study was that the oil and gas industry's interest in alternative energy is contrary to its current business objectives and profit goals. The purpose of the quantitative study was to explore the relationship between oil and gas industry investments in alternative energy and corporate social responsibilities. Research questions addressed the relationship between alternative energy investment and corporate social responsibility, the role of oil and gas companies in alternative energy investment, and why these companies chose to invest in alternative energy sources. Systems theory was the conceptual framework, and data were collected from a sample of 25 companies drawn from the 28,000 companies in the oil and gas industry from 2004 to 2009. Multiple regression and correlation analysis were used to answer the research questions and test hypotheses using corporate financial data and company profiles related to alternative energy investment and corporate social responsibility in terms of oil and gas industry financial support of programs that serve the greater social good. Results indicated significant relationships between alternative energy investment and corporate social responsibility. With an increasing global population with energy requirements in excess of what is available using traditional means, the industry should increase investment in alternative sources. The research results may promote positive social change by increasing public awareness regarding the degree to which oil and gas companies invest in developing alternative energy sources, which might, in turn, inspire public pressure on companies in the oil and gas industry to pursue use of alternative energy.

  4. Energy saving in the baking industry by more selective use of energy and by recovery of waste heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vries, L.; Nieman, W.; Rouwen, W.

    1986-01-01

    Approximately 7000 Tj energy are used yearly by the bakery industry in the Netherlands. Until now, very little is known about energy use in this sector, this being partly due to the extremely decentralised production. The aim of the study is to pinpoint and evaluate methods for energy saving and heat recovery in the bakery. Priority was given to the procedures or places where a large amount of energy is used or is lost. A second important part of the study is to identify the situations where energy can easly be saved in very simple ways. The study was subsidised by the European Economic Community, the Industry group for bakeries and the Dutch Ministry for Economic Affairs. Monitoring was in the hands of a committee, with representation by the Nederlandse Bakkerijstichting (Dutch Bakery Organisation), the Stichting Voorlichting Energiebesparing Nederland (Organisation for Information about Energy Conservation), the Ministry of Agriculture/Fisheries and the Ministry of Economic Affairs.

  5. Energy conservation in the pulp and paper industry. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-05-01

    Almost 40 specific research and development ideas were formulated by the 67 participants at this workshop. Projects were assessed with the following criteria in mind: potential energy savings, cost, risk, Federal role, time frame, and priority. Data are tabulated on the projects followed by six topics discussed by panel members: waste and recycling, energy management in the mill, papermaking, pulping and bleaching, power generation in the mill, and coating and conversion. Three summary speeches are included. (MCW)

  6. Airflow energy harvesting with high wind velocities for industrial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Z. J.; Tuddenham, S. B.; Zhu, M.

    2016-11-01

    An airflow energy harvester capable of harvesting energy from vortices at high speed is presented in this paper. The airflow energy harvester is implemented using a modified helical Savonius turbine and an electromagnetic generator. A power management module with maximum power point finding capability is used to manage the harvested energy and convert the low voltage magnitude from the generator to a usable level for wireless sensors. The airflow energy harvester is characterized using vortex generated by air hitting a plate in a wind tunnel. By using an aircraft environment with wind speed of 17 m/s as case study, the output power of the airflow energy harvester is measured to be 126 mW. The overall efficiency of the power management module is 45.76 to 61.2%, with maximum power point tracking efficiency of 94.21 to 99.72% for wind speed of 10 to 18 m/s, and has a quiescent current of 790 nA for the maximum power point tracking circuit.

  7. Energy consumption at potato processing industry Aviko in the Netherlands; Klant bepaalt energieverbruik frietspecialist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-05-01

    A brief overview is given of energy saving measures that were carried out at the potato processing industry Aviko in Steenderen, Netherlands. [Dutch] Energie is een serieuze kostenpost voor de aardappelverwerkende industrie Aviko. De eigen warmtekrachtinstallatie voldoet (nogal ongebruikelijk) precies aan de elektriciteitsbehoefte. De extra warmtevraag produceert het bedrijf met twee afgassenketels. Ook ontvangt het warmte uit de nieuwe biogasinstallatie, die in een samenwerkingsverband met Nuon is gerealiseerd.

  8. Applications of thermal energy storage to waste heat recovery in the food processing industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnar, F.; Lunberg, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    A study to assess the potential for waste heat recovery in the food industry and to evaluate prospective waste heat recovery system concepts employing thermal energy storage was conducted. The study found that the recovery of waste heat in canning facilities can be performed in significant quantities using systems involving thermal energy storage that are both practical and economical. A demonstration project is proposed to determine actual waste heat recovery costs and benefits and to encourage system implementation by the food industry.

  9. Limits to leapfrogging in energy technologies? Evidence from the Chinese automobile industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher, Kelly Sims [Energy Technology Innovation Project, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge MA (United States)

    2006-03-01

    Limits to leapfrogging in energy technologies? One of the most attractive notions in the field of sustainable energy development is the concept of energy-technology {sup l}eapfrogging{sup .} Leapfrogging through international technology transfer can be especially problematic because often developing countries do not have the technological capabilities to produce or integrate the advanced energy technologies themselves. Until they have acquired the capabilities to produce the advanced technologies themselves, most late-industrializing countries buy their new technologies from industrialized countries, usually through licensing or joint-venture arrangements. Empirical case studies of the three main Sino-US passenger-car joint ventures reveal that until the late 1990s, little energy or environmental leapfrogging occurred in the Chinese automobile industry as the result of the introduction of US automotive technology. An improvement in Chinese capabilities and more stringent Chinese energy and environmental policies are needed to induce energy leapfrogging in the Chinese automobile industry. Foreign firms also have a social responsibility to contribute to China's sustainable industrial development. In order to realize the promise of the leapfrogging, the limits to leapfrogging must be identified and acknowledged so that strategies can be devised to surmount the barriers to the introduction of advanced energy technologies in developing countries. (author)

  10. Factors affecting the energy consumption intensity in industrial sector in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Abbasi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Energy, one of the main inputs for production, has a foundational role in the economic life of industries, of inappropriate use of it leads to adverse uneconomical and environmental consequences.Studying improvements in energy efficiency and its effective factors is of the utmost importance when energy resources are limited. Reducing production costs and paying less subsidies and cost of industrial products are result of improvement of energy efficiency in industry and its subdivision. High use of energy in industrial products ismostly in developing countries, including Iran.The present study aims to investigate the effective factors on energy consumption intensity in Iranian industry. The methodology is descriptive - correlational with a practical purpose. The study population is Iran. The results show that the physical capital, value added in economic sectors and energy consumptionintensity variables were significant in the error level of 5% in previous period, and work force and GDP variables have significantly negative effect on the energy range in the error level of 5%.

  11. Optimal Design of Water Utilization Network with Energy Integration in Process Industries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    都健; 孟小琼; 杜红彬; 俞红梅; 樊希山; 姚平经

    2004-01-01

    Effective utilization of water and energy is the key factor of sustainable development in process industries, and also an important science and technology problem to be solved in systems engineering. In this paper,two new methods of optimal design of water utilization network with energy integration in process industries are presented, that is, stepwise and simultaneous optimization methods. They are suitable for both single contaminant and multi-contaminant systems, and the integration of energy can be carried out in the whole process system, not only limited in water network, so that energy can be utilized effectively. The two methods are illustrated by case study.

  12. Voluntary Public Unemployment Insurance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O. Parsons, Donald; Tranæs, Torben; Bie Lilleør, Helene

    Denmark has drawn much attention for its active labor market policies, but is almost unique in offering a voluntary public unemployment insurance program requiring a significant premium payment. A safety net program – a less generous, means-tested social assistance plan – completes the system...

  13. Simulation of industrial power consumption with electric energy storage

    OpenAIRE

    Suescun Zudaire, Iñaki; Equiza Arbizu, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Este proyecto fin de carrera se basa en el desarrollo de un modelo para la simulación del consumo eléctrico de una empresa de ámbito industrial. Para proveer la carga eléctrica se dispone de la red eléctrica, una batería, un sistema de cogeneración y una entrada para potencia de un sistema solar. Matlab es el programa elegido para dicha simulación, utilizando mayoritariamente el entorno de programación visual “Simulink", que funciona bajo la plataforma de Matlab. Se ha hecho...

  14. Fostering a Renewable Energy Technology Industry: An InternationalComparison of Wind Industry Policy Support Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Joanna; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-11-15

    This article examines the importance of national and sub-national policies in supporting the development of successful global wind turbine manufacturing companies. We explore the motivations behind establishing a local wind power industry, and the paths that different countries have taken to develop indigenous large wind turbine manufacturing industries within their borders. This is done through a cross-country comparison of the policy support mechanisms that have been employed to directly and indirectly promote wind technology manufacturing in twelve countries. We find that in many instances there is a clear relationship between a manufacturer's success in its home country market and its eventual success in the global wind power market. Whether new wind turbine manufacturing entrants are able to succeed will likely depend in part on the utilization of their turbines in their own domestic market, which in turn will be influenced by the annual size and stability of that market. Consequently, policies that support a sizable, stable market for wind power, in conjunction with policies that specifically provide incentives for wind power technology to be manufactured locally, are most likely to result in the establishment of an internationally competitive wind industry.

  15. Fostering a Renewable Energy Technology Industry: An InternationalComparison of Wind Industry Policy Support Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Joanna; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-11-15

    This article examines the importance of national and sub-national policies in supporting the development of successful global wind turbine manufacturing companies. We explore the motivations behind establishing a local wind power industry, and the paths that different countries have taken to develop indigenous large wind turbine manufacturing industries within their borders. This is done through a cross-country comparison of the policy support mechanisms that have been employed to directly and indirectly promote wind technology manufacturing in twelve countries. We find that in many instances there is a clear relationship between a manufacturer's success in its home country market and its eventual success in the global wind power market. Whether new wind turbine manufacturing entrants are able to succeed will likely depend in part on the utilization of their turbines in their own domestic market, which in turn will be influenced by the annual size and stability of that market. Consequently, policies that support a sizable, stable market for wind power, in conjunction with policies that specifically provide incentives for wind power technology to be manufactured locally, are most likely to result in the establishment of an internationally competitive wind industry.

  16. End-user GHG emissions from energy. Reallocation of emissions from energy industries to end users 2005-2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, R. (European Environment Agency (EEA), Copenhagen (Denmark)); Watterson, J. (AEA Technology plc - EEA' s European Topic Centre on Air Pollution and Climate Change Mitigation (ETC/ACM) (United Kingdom))

    2011-12-15

    The objective of this report is to help improve the understanding of past greenhouse gas (GHG) emission trends in the energy sector from the demand or end-user side. To do this, the report develops a methodology to redistributes emissions from energy industries to the final users (by sector) of that energy. This reallocation is done on the basis of Eurostat's energy balances and GHG inventories for the energy sector as reported to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), for the period 2005-2009. (Author)

  17. End-user GHG emissions from energy. Reallocation of emissions from energy industries to end users 2005-2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, R. [European Environment Agency (EEA), Copenhagen (Denmark); Watterson, J. [AEA Technology plc - EEA' s European Topic Centre on Air Pollution and Climate Change Mitigation (ETC/ACM) (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-15

    The objective of this report is to help improve the understanding of past GHG emission trends in the energy sector from the demand or end-user side. To do this, the report develops a methodology to redistributes emissions from energy industries to the final users (by sector) of that energy. This reallocation is done on the basis of Eurostat's energy balances and GHG inventories for the energy sector as reported to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), for the period 2005-2010. (Author)

  18. Effects of segregation and impact of specific feeding behaviour and additional fruit on voluntary nutrient and energy intake in yellow-shouldered amazons (Amazona barbadensis) when fed a multi-component seed diet ad libitum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmar, I D; Veys, A C; Geeroms, B; Reinschmidt, M; Waugh, D; Werquin, G; Janssens, G P J

    2010-12-01

    Parrots are commonly fed multi-component seed diets; however, both segregation and feeding behaviour might alter ingredient and nutrient composition of the offered diet. First, the nutritional impact of segregation was assessed as it occurs when multi-component diets are temporarily stored in food containers that are replenished before completely emptied and birds being fed from the upper layer. The most detrimental effect hereof was a vast decrease in mineral supplements, leading to a decrease in Ca:P ratio in the offered food in relation to the formulated diet. Next, caloric distribution shifted towards more EE energy at the expense of NFE energy, as proportion of oilseeds increased and NFE-rich seeds decreased. Next, a feeding trial was performed on six yellow-shouldered amazons (Amazona Barbadensis) in which nutritional impact of parrot-specific feeding behaviour was assessed as well as the influence of additional provision of fruit next to the seed mixture. Profound selective feeding behaviour and dehusking of seeds resulted in a vast increase in energetic density by up to 64% in the ingested fraction in relation to the offered mixture in toto. Furthermore, the already suboptimal Ca:P ratio further deteriorated and caloric distribution shifted by over twofold towards EE energy accompanied with a vast decline in NFE energy, CP energy remaining similar. Finally, provision of fruit next to the seed diet significantly lowered voluntary energy intake from 936 ± 71 to 809 ± 109 kJ ME/kg(0.75)/day, without compromising adequate protein intake. In conclusion, notwithstanding efforts of nutritionists to formulate diets to approximate estimated, species-specific requirements, nutritional composition of the actually consumed fraction of multi-component seed diets can be vastly deteriorated by both animal and management factors. Furthermore, offering of fruit next to a seed-based diet effectively reduces voluntary energy intake and can hence be applied to abate obesity.

  19. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masanet, Eric; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Graus, Wina; Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry--defined in this Energy Guide as facilities engaged in the canning, freezing, and drying or dehydrating of fruits and vegetables--consumes over $800 million worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvement isan important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures applicable to fruit and vegetable processing plants are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in fruit and vegetable processing facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. Given the importance of water in fruit and vegetable processing, a summary of basic, proven measures for improving plant-level water efficiency are also provided. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry reduce energy and water consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--as well as on their applicability to different production

  20. Decoupling of CO2-emissions from Energy Intensive Industries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M. S.; Enevoldsen, M. K.; Ryelund, A. V.

    for own-price and cross-price elasticities of the individual fuels. Whereas elasticities for electricity and gas are found to be moderate, the own-price elasticity for oil, coal and waste is relatively high (-0.4 to -0.6), indicating that consumption of these fuels is relatively price elastic......This report shows that a decoupling between economic growth, expressed as gross value added, and CO2 emissions has been achieved in the period from 1990-2001 in many energy-intensive and less energy-intensive sectors across the Nordic countries. The report investigates the impact of prices...... and taxes on the trends in CO2 emissions on the basis of a novel method that relies on sector-specific energy prices. Whereas previous research has been unable to account for the implications of complex tax exemptions and price discounts, the present report bridges the gap and provides innovative estimates...

  1. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

    2003-07-01

    Corn wet milling is the most energy intensive industry within the food and kindred products group (SIC 20), using 15 percent of the energy in the entire food industry. After corn, energy is the second largest operating cost for corn wet millers in the United States. A typical corn wet milling plant in the United States spends approximately $20 to $30 million per year on energy, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce costs and increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy-price volatility. This report shows energy efficiency opportunities available for wet corn millers. It begins with descriptions of the trends, structure and production of the corn wet milling industry and the energy used in the milling and refining process. Specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies of plants and references to technical literature are provided. If available, typical payback periods are also listed. The report draws upon the experiences of corn, wheat and other starch processing plants worldwide for energy efficiency measures. The findings suggest that given available resources and technology, there are opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the corn wet milling industry while maintaining the quality of the products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures, as well as the applicability of these to different wet milling practices, is needed to assess the feasibility of implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

  2. [Reflection on developing bio-energy industry of large oil company].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haiyang; Su, Haijia; Tan, Tianwei; Liu, Shumin; Wang, Hui

    2013-03-01

    China's energy supply becomes more serious nowadays and the development of bio-energy becomes a major trend. Large oil companies have superb technology, rich experience and outstanding talent, as well as better sales channels for energy products, which can make full use of their own advantages to achieve the efficient complementary of exist energy and bio-energy. Therefore, large oil companies have the advantages of developing bio-energy. Bio-energy development in China is in the initial stage. There exist some problems such as available land, raw material supply, conversion technologies and policy guarantee, which restrict bio-energy from industrialized development. According to the above key issues, this article proposes suggestions and methods, such as planting energy plant in the marginal barren land to guarantee the supply of bio-energy raw materials, cultivation of professional personnel, building market for bio-energy counting on large oil companies' rich experience and market resources about oil industry, etc, aimed to speed up the industrialized process of bio-energy development in China.

  3. Embodied energy consumption and carbon emissions evaluation for urban industrial structure optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xi; Chen, Zhanming; Li, Jinkai

    2014-03-01

    Cities are the main material processors associated with industrialization. The development of urban production based on fossil fuels is the major contributor to the rise of greenhouse gas density, and to global warming. The concept of urban industrial structure optimization is considered to be a solution to urban sustainable development and global climate issues. Enforcing energy conservation and reducing carbon emissions are playing key roles in addressing these issues. As such, quantitative accounting and the evaluation of energy consumption and corresponding carbon emissions, which are by-products of urban production, are critical, in order to discover potential opportunities to save energy and to reduce emissions. Conventional evaluation indicators, such as "energy consumption per unit output value" and "emissions per unit output value", are concerned with immediate consumptions and emissions; while the indirect consumptions and emissions that occur throughout the supply chain are ignored. This does not support the optimization of the overall urban industrial system. To present a systematic evaluation framework for cities, this study constructs new evaluation indicators, based on the concepts of "embodied energy" and "embodied carbon emissions", which take both the immediate and indirect effects of energy consumption and emissions into account. Taking Beijing as a case, conventional evaluation indicators are compared with the newly constructed ones. Results show that the energy consumption and emissions of urban industries are represented better by the new indicators than by conventional indicators, and provide useful information for urban industrial structure optimization.

  4. Efficient energy management measures in steel industry for economic utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurinderbir Singh Grewal

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The application of energy efficient Induction Machines (IM is explained in reference to power consumption savings. In energy efficient IM, losses for various Horse Power (HP ratings are summarized for bringing effective changes in design. Emphasis is laid on how load factor, speed & power quality affect machine’s efficiency. Replacement of conventional IM of higher power rating is done with required energy efficient Doubly Fed Induction Machine (DFIM to enhance the performance at variable speeds near rated power outputs. Results of the proposed approach will give substantial savings in energy & loss reduction. The field data of Jindal Steel Rolling Mill (JSRM at Hisar, Haryana (India is taken into consideration. This paper proposes a non-intrusive air gap torque method for efficiency estimation of in-service IMs. This approach gives results considering stray-load and friction-windage loss according to IEC standard and IEEE112-B standard. The proposed method is validated experimentally whose effectiveness is witnessed using MATLAB/SIMULINK.

  5. Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: student activities. Field test edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-02-01

    In this teaching manual several activities are presented to introduce students to information on solar energy through classroom instruction. Wind power is also included. Instructions for constructing demonstration models for passive solar systems, photovoltaic cells, solar collectors and water heaters, and a bicycle wheel wind turbine are provided. (BCS)

  6. 77 FR 54777 - Accelerating Investment in Industrial Energy Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    ... Executive Order 13625--Improving Access to Mental Health Services for Veterans, Service Members, and... energy costs, free up future capital for businesses to invest, reduce air pollution, and create jobs.... competitiveness, create jobs, and reduce harmful air pollution. In doing so, they shall engage States,...

  7. Grand Challenge Portfolio: Driving Innovation in Industrial Energy Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-01-04

    Under the Recovery Act, AMO provided cost-shared funding for early-stage, low-cost, "concept definition studies" of 47 promising innovations for next-generation manufacturing, energy-intensive processes, advanced materials, and greenhouse gas emissions reduction. The brochure provides information on each of these projects.

  8. Measures to reduce industrial consumption of petroleum under a short-term energy emergency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tessmer, R.G. Jr; D' Acierno, J.; Pilati, D.A.

    1979-02-01

    Significant opportunities for petroleum conservation in the industrial sector in the event of an energy emergency are discussed. The most feasible government options identified are presented. These and the probable savings are: removing institutional barriers to fuel switching in industrial boilers and burners (384 to 407 Mbbl/day); rescinding certain air pollution regulations (19 to 100 Mbbl/day); restricting export of energy-intensive goods (20 to 60 Mbbl/day); rescinding thermal pollution regulations for power plants (16 to 27 Mbbl/day); removing trade barriers on certain imports; restricting electricity production by industry; and restricting export of recyclable materials. The bases for many of the recommended options are presented. Specifically, characteristics of industrial petroleum consumption for the chemical, steel, cement, and paper industries are presented.

  9. World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for SelectedIndustrial Sectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Neelis, Maarten; Galitsky,Christina; Zhou, Nan

    2007-06-05

    "World best practice" energy intensity values, representingthe most energy-efficient processes that are in commercial use in atleast one location worldwide, are provided for the production of iron andsteel, aluminium, cement, pulp and paper, ammonia, and ethylene. Energyintensity is expressed in energy use per physical unit of output for eachof these commodities; most commonly these are expressed in metric tonnes(t). The energy intensity values are provided by major energy-consumingprocesses for each industrial sector to allow comparisons at the processlevel. Energy values are provided for final energy, defined as the energyused at the production facility as well as for primary energy, defined asthe energy used at the production facility as well as the energy used toproduce the electricity consumed at the facility. The "best practice"figures for energy consumption provided in this report should beconsidered as indicative, as these may depend strongly on the materialinputs.

  10. Development of a performance-based industrial energy efficiency indicator for corn refining plants.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, G. A.; Decision and Information Sciences; USEPA

    2006-07-31

    Organizations that implement strategic energy management programs have the potential to achieve sustained energy savings if the programs are carried out properly. A key opportunity for achieving energy savings that plant managers can take is to determine an appropriate level of energy performance by comparing their plant's performance with that of similar plants in the same industry. Manufacturing facilities can set energy efficiency targets by using performance-based indicators. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), through its ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program, has been developing plant energy performance indicators (EPIs) to encourage a variety of U.S. industries to use energy more efficiently. This report describes work with the corn refining industry to provide a plant-level indicator of energy efficiency for facilities that produce a variety of products--including corn starch, corn oil, animal feed, corn sweeteners, and ethanol--for the paper, food, beverage, and other industries in the United States. Consideration is given to the role that performance-based indicators play in motivating change; the steps needed to develop indicators, including interacting with an industry to secure adequate data for an indicator; and the actual application and use of an indicator when complete. How indicators are employed in the EPA's efforts to encourage industries to voluntarily improve their use of energy is discussed as well. The report describes the data and statistical methods used to construct the EPI for corn refining plants. Individual equations are presented, as are the instructions for using them in an associated Excel spreadsheet.

  11. SAIT students develop tool for wind energy industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2009-01-15

    This article presented a newly developed tool to help the wind power industry select potential sites for wind farms. The Site Locator Management System (SLOMASS) was developed by 3 students in the GIS applied degree program at SAIT Polytechnic in Calgary, Alberta. The tool considers the many variables, both spatial and non-spatial, that should be considered when determining an optimum location for a wind farm. It processes several layers of information, such as wind patterns, transmission lines, bird and bat habitat, land use, land cover, hydrology and topography. The template created by the students can be applied to locations worldwide. The Bachelor of Applied Technology Geographic Information Systems program at SAIT Polytechnic focuses on digital cartography, database technology, remote sensing and project management for analyzing the past, monitoring the present and modelling the future. SLOMASS earned a student innovation award in 2008. 1 fig.

  12. Energy efficiency business options for industrial end users in Latin American competitive energy markets: The case of Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botero, Sergio

    2002-01-01

    Energy markets today in Latin America and worldwide are being restructured from monopolies, either state-owned or privately-owned, to be more openly competitive and incorporate more participation from the private sector. Thus, the schemes that were formerly developed to foster end use energy efficiency are no longer applicable because they were based on mandatory regulations made with political decisions, without sufficiently considering economic feasibility. A consensus exists that the only way energy efficiency could survive in this new paradigm is by being market oriented, giving better services, and additional options to users. However; there is very little information on what end users prefer, and which options would most satisfy customers. Using Colombia as a case study, this research determines and categorizes the energy efficiency business options for large energy end users that can freely participate in the competitive energy market. The energy efficiency market is understood as a market of services aiming to increase efficiency in energy use. These services can be grouped into seven business options. A survey, following the descriptive method, was sent to energy end users in order to determine their preferences for specific energy efficiency business options, as well as the decision-making criteria taken into account for such options. This data was categorized in ten industry groups. As a conclusion, energy efficiency providers should adapt not only to the economic activity or processes of each customer, but also to the potential business options. It was also found that not all industries consider performance contracting as their most preferred option, as a matter of fact, some industries show much higher preference for conventional business options. Among end users, the divergence in option preferences contrasted with the convergence in decision-making criteria. The decision-making criteria "cost-benefit ratio" overwhelmed all other criterion. End users

  13. Research and development separation technology: The DOE Industrial Energy Conservation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-07-01

    This brochure summarizes the Office of Industrial Programs' RandD efforts in the advancement of separation technology. The purpose of this brochure is to provide interested parties with information on federal industrial energy conservation activities in separation technology. The brochure is comprised of the following sections: Separation Technology, summarizes the current state of separation technology and its uses. Potential Energy Savings, discusses the potential for industrial energy conservation through the implementation of advanced separation processes. Office of Industrial Programs' RandD Efforts in Separation Technology Development, describes the separation RandD projects conducted by IP. RandD Data Base, lists contractor, principal investigator, and location of each separation-related RandD effort sponsored by IP.

  14. Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and energy industry; Cororate Social Responsibility (CSR) und Energiewirtschaft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landhaeusser, Werner (ed.) [Mader GmbH und Co. KG, Leinfelden-Echterdingen (Germany); Hildebrandt, Alexandra

    2016-05-01

    What means Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in the energy industry? A rising energy demand with limited natural resources pose utilities, industry and consumers with new challenges. This book follows an interdisciplinary approach and for the first time brings together debates and findings from industry, science, politics, culture and media. Because the energy transition can only succeed if it is comprehensible for the individual and fragmented perspectives and interests are merged. [German] Was bedeutet CSR in der Energiewirtschaft? Ein steigender Energiebedarf bei begrenzten natuerlichen Ressourcen stellt Energieversorger, Industrie und Verbraucher vor immer neue Herausforderungen. Dieses Buch folgt einem interdisziplinaeren Ansatz und fuehrt erstmals Debatten und Erkenntnisse aus Wirtschaft, Wissenschaft, Politik, Kultur und Medien zusammen. Denn die Energiewende kann nur gelingen, wenn sie fuer den Einzelnen fassbar wird und fragmentierte Sichtweisen und Interessenlagen zusammengefuehrt werden.

  15. The Role of Emerging Technologies in Improving Energy Efficiency:Examples from the Food Processing Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lung, Robert Bruce; Masanet, Eric; McKane, Aimee

    2006-05-01

    For over 25 years, the U.S. DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) has championed the application of emerging technologies in industrial plants and monitored these technologies impacts on industrial energy consumption. The cumulative energy savings of more than 160 completed and tracked projects is estimated at approximately 3.99 quadrillion Btu (quad), representing a production cost savings of $20.4 billion. Properly documenting the impacts of such technologies is essential for assessing their effectiveness and for delivering insights about the optimal direction of future technology research. This paper analyzes the impacts that several emerging technologies have had in the food processing industry. The analysis documents energy savings, carbon emissions reductions and production improvements and assesses the market penetration and sector-wide savings potential. Case study data is presented demonstrating the successful implementation of these technologies. The paper's conclusion discusses the effects of these technologies and offers some projections of sector-wide impacts.

  16. EVALUATION OF ENERGY CONSUMPTION IN AGRO-INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Dąbrowski

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Energy consumption during waste water treatment is a very important factor affecting food industry plants. Apart from highly efficient treatment of dairy and meat sewage, a low energy consumption is required in order to lower its costs. During the research period parameters of raw and treated sewage were tested (BOD, COD, N-total, P-total. Also, the energy consumption from selected processes as well as total consumption were measured. Indicators of energy consumption per m3 and removed load were calculated. It was found that biological treatment and aeration played the main role in energy consumption in both objects. It was respectively 40 and 47% for Bielmlek and JBB plants. The second biggest energy consuming stage of treatment in both objects was sludge processing. Energy required to process excessive sludge equaled 30% of the total energy usage in both plants. Energy consumption factors related to hydraulic flow gave results in the range from 2,05 to 3,3 kWhm-3 and from 2,72 to 3,23 kWhm-3 for Bielmlek and JBB plants respectively. The research will be continued in order to optimize energy consumption while retaining high efficiency treatment in food industry WWTPs. Finally a mathematical model will be prepared for optimizing energy consumption in food industry WWTPs.

  17. Generation and Use of Thermal Energy in the U.S. Industrial Sector and Opportunities to Reduce its Carbon Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillan, Colin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Boardman, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McKellar, Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sabharwall, Piyush [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ruth, Mark [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bragg-Sitton, Shannon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This report quantifies greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the industrial sector and identifies opportunities for non-GHG-emitting thermal energy sources to replace the most significant GHG-emitting U.S. industries based on targeted, process-level analysis of industrial heat requirements. The intent is to provide a basis for projecting opportunities for clean energy use. This provides a prospectus for small modular nuclear reactors (including nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems), solar industrial process heat, and geothermal energy. This report provides a complement to analysis of process-efficiency improvement by considering how clean energy delivery and use by industry could reduce GHG emissions.

  18. US energy industry financial developments, First quarter 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-19

    This report traces key developments in US energy companies` financial performance for the first quarter of 1995. Financial data (only available for publicly-traded US companies) are included in two broad groups -- fossil fuel production and rate-regulated utilities. All financial data are taken from public sources such as corporate reports and press releases, energy trade publications, and The Wall Street Journal`s Earnings Digest. Return on equity is calculated from data available from Standard and Poor`s Compustat data service. Since several major petroleum companies disclose their income by lines of business and geographic area, these data are also presented in this report. Although the disaggregated income concept varies by company and is not strictly comparable to corporate income, relative movements in income by lines of business and geographic area are summarized as useful indicators of short-term changes in the underlying profitability of these operations.

  19. Procurement risk management: a case in Turkish energy industry

    OpenAIRE

    HAKSÖZ, Çağrı; Haksoz, Cagri; Arslan, Özgür; Arslan, Ozgur

    2010-01-01

    We present the current procurement risk management practice of Enerjisa, a major energy company in Turkey. We provide results of a managerial survey and interview conducted at Enerjisa, which illuminates the current perception of the critical procurement risks and how they are being managed effectively. Especially, we shed light on the procurement risk awareness and perception, critical drivers of procurement risks, risk assessment strategies, operational and financial hedging of procurement ...

  20. Industrial waste exchange: a mechanism for saving energy and money

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaines, L.L.

    1983-01-01

    Although considerable savings of both energy and money are possible through waste exchange, several major impediments limit the number of actual exchanges that take place. These impediments include the lack of economical separation technology, the small quantities of material available at each site, restrictive or uncertain regulation, and lack of knowledge on the part of potential waste users. None of these barriers is insurmountable if appropriate action is taken.

  1. Modeling energy efficiency to improve air quality and health effects of China's cement industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Shaohui; Worrell, Ernst; Crijns-Graus, Wina; Krol, Maarten; de Bruine, Marco; Geng, Guangpo; Wagner, Fabian; Cofala, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    Actions to reduce the combustion of fossil fuels often decrease GHG emissions as well as air pollutants and bring multiple benefits for improvement of energy efficiency, climate change, and air quality associated with human health benefits. The China's cement industry is the second largest energy co

  2. Development of a localisation strategy for the South African Wind Energy Industry

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Szewczuk, S

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available to play a strategic role in paving the way for the gradual phasing in of wind energy in South Africa. The global and South African wind industries, energy markets and support mechanisms were critically reviewed where after a strategic analysis...

  3. Science for Energy Technology: Strengthening the Link Between Basic Research and Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-04-01

    The nation faces two severe challenges that will determine our prosperity for decades to come: assuring clean, secure, and sustainable energy to power our world, and establishing a new foundation for enduring economic and jobs growth. These challenges are linked: the global demand for clean sustainable energy is an unprecedented economic opportunity for creating jobs and exporting energy technology to the developing and developed world. But achieving the tremendous potential of clean energy technology is not easy. In contrast to traditional fossil fuel-based technologies, clean energy technologies are in their infancy, operating far below their potential, with many scientific and technological challenges to overcome. Industry is ultimately the agent for commercializing clean energy technology and for reestablishing the foundation for our economic and jobs growth. For industry to succeed in these challenges, it must overcome many roadblocks and continuously innovate new generations of renewable, sustainable, and low-carbon energy technologies such as solar energy, carbon sequestration, nuclear energy, electricity delivery and efficiency, solid state lighting, batteries and biofuels. The roadblocks to higher performing clean energy technology are not just challenges of engineering design but are also limited by scientific understanding.Innovation relies on contributions from basic research to bridge major gaps in our understanding of the phenomena that limit efficiency, performance, or lifetime of the materials or chemistries of these sustainable energy technologies. Thus, efforts aimed at understanding the scientific issues behind performance limitations can have a real and immediate impact on cost, reliability, and performance of technology, and ultimately a transformative impact on our economy. With its broad research base and unique scientific user facilities, the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) is ideally positioned to address these needs. BES has laid

  4. 78 FR 48413 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Voluntary Self-Disclosure of Violations of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Voluntary Self- Disclosure of Violations of the Export Administration Regulations AGENCY: Bureau of Industry and Security... an investigation or prosecution is necessary and to reach a settlement with violators. Voluntary self...

  5. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry: An ENERGY STAR? Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brush, Adrian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Masanet, Eric [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Worrell, Ernst [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-10-01

    The U.S. dairy processing industry—defined in this Energy Guide as facilities engaged in the conversion of raw milk to consumable dairy products—consumes around $1.5 billion worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. dairy processing industry to reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. dairy processing industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures applicable to dairy processing plants are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in dairy processing facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. Given the importance of water in dairy processing, a summary of basic, proven measures for improving water efficiency are also provided. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. dairy processing industry reduce energy and water consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures—as well as on their applicability to different production practices—is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  6. Proceedings of the DOE/industry workshop on the interactions of climate and energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacCracken, M.C.; Moses, H.; Knox, J.B. (eds.)

    1984-07-01

    This proceedings volume reports on the findings and recommendations of the joint Industry/DOE Workshop on the Interactions of Climate and Energy, which was designed to bring the providers of climate information and services together with users and representatives of the oil, gas, coal, and electric utility sectors of the US energy industry. Primary discussion topics included current uses of climate data, the perceived impacts of climatic anomalies on the energy sector, ways to improve the uses of climate data, and recommendations for future research by the climate community. Papers have been individually abstracted.

  7. Barriers to the adoption of energy-conserving technologies in the textile industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, A.R.; Zussman, S.K.

    1979-09-01

    An overview of the textile industry and a discussion of energy-conserving technologies currently available at the pilot-demonstration stage are presented. Existing and potential barriers to the adoption of these technologies in the textile industry identified are: economic; technical acceptance; conflict between commitments of capital for compliance with environmental and health regulations and for investment in energy conservation measures; and a lack of information and technical expertise. Possible measures to eliminate barriers to the implementation of energy-conserving technologies are discussed. (MCW)

  8. Model documentation report: Industrial sector demand module of the national energy modeling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description of the NEMS Industrial Model for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirements of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its model. Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements as future projects.

  9. Advanced Nanostructured Molecular Sieves for Energy Efficient Industrial Separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunhao Li, Michael Beaver

    2012-01-18

    Due to the very small relative volatility difference between propane and propylene, current propane/propylene separation by distillation requires very tall distillation towers (150-250 theoretical plates) and large reflux ratios (up to 15), which is considered to be the most energy consuming large-scale separation process. Adsorptive separation processes are widely considered to be more energy-efficient alternatives to distillation. However, slow diffusion kinetics/mass transport rate through the adsorbent bed often limits the performance of such processes, so further improvements are possible if intra-particle mass transfer rates can be improved. Rive Technology, Inc. is developing and commercializing its proprietary mesoporous zeolite technology for catalysis and separation. With well-controlled intracrystalline mesoporosity, diffusion kinetics through such mesoporous zeolite based catalysts is much improved relative to conventional zeolites, leading to significantly better product selectivity. This 'proof-of-principle' project (DE-EE0003470) is intended to demonstrate that Rive mesoporous zeolite technology can be extended and applied in adsorptive propane/propylene separation and lead to significant energy saving compared to the current distillation process. In this project, the mesoporous zeolite Y synthesis technology was successfully extended to X and A zeolites that are more relevant to adsorbent applications. Mesoporosity was introduced to zeolite X and A for the first time while maintaining adequate adsorption capacity. Zeolite adsorbents were tested for liquid phase separation performance using a pulse flow test unit and the test results show that the separation selectivity of the mesoporous zeolite adsorbent is much closer to optimal for a Simulated Moving Bed (SMB) separation process and the enhanced mesoporosity lead to >100% increase of overall mass transport rate for propane and propylene. These improvements will significantly improve the

  10. How Can China Lighten Up? Urbanization, Industrialization and Energy Demand Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aden, Nathaniel T.; Zheng, Nina; Fridley, David G.

    2009-07-01

    Urbanization has re-shaped China's economy, society, and energy system. Between 1990 and 2007 China added 290 million new urban residents, bringing the total urbanization rate to 45%. This population adjustment spurred energy demand for construction of new buildings and infrastructure, as well as additional residential use as rural biomass was replaced with urban commercial energy services. Primary energy demand grew at an average annual rate of 10% between 2000 and 2007. Urbanization's effect on energy demand was compounded by the boom in domestic infrastructure investment, and in the export trade following World Trade Organization (WTO) accession in 2001. Industry energy consumption was most directly affected by this acceleration. Whereas industry comprised 32% of 2007 U.S. energy use, it accounted for 75% of China's 2007 energy consumption. Five sub-sectors accounted for 78% of China's industry energy use in 2007: iron and steel, energy extraction and processing, chemicals, cement, and non-ferrous metals. Ferrous metals alone accounted for 25% of industry and 18% of total primary energy use. The rapid growth of heavy industry has led China to become by far the world's largest producer of steel, cement, aluminum, and other energy-intensive commodities. However, the energy efficiency of heavy industrial production continues to lag world best practice levels. This study uses scenario analysis to quantify the impact of urbanization and trade on industrial and residential energy consumption from 2000 to 2025. The BAU scenario assumed 67% urbanization, frozen export amounts of heavy industrial products, and achievement of world best practices by 2025. The China Lightens Up (CLU) scenario assumed 55% urbanization, zero net exports of heavy industrial products, and more aggressive efficiency improvements by 2025. The five dominant industry sub-sectors were modeled in both scenarios using a LEAP energy end-use accounting model. The results of

  11. European and international energy industry law. Congress transcript; Europaeisches und Internationales Energiewirtschaftsrecht. Tagungsband

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruppel, Nadine (ed.)

    2009-07-01

    The present volume documents the contributions to the Ninth Assistants' Meeting on International Economic Law on 6 and 7 June 2008, organised by the Chair for Public Law, International Law and European Law of the Faculty of Law of the Justus Liebig University of Giessen and dedicated to the topic of ''European and International Energy Industry Law''. Energy industry law has attracted strongly growing interest in the realms of both practice and scholarship over the past decades. This has to do with the public's awareness of the exhaustibility of available natural resources as well as of environmental issues in general. The contributions analyse and discuss the field of energy industry law from various perspectives, including those of international law, European law, the comparative study of legal systems, domestic issues but also of energy policy and culture.

  12. Producing bio-based bulk chemicals using industrial biotechnology saves energy and combats climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, B G; Blok, K; Patel, M K

    2007-11-15

    The production of bulk chemicals from biomass can make a significant contribution to solving two of the most urgent environmental problems: climate change and depletion of fossil energy. We analyzed current and future technology routes leading to 15 bulk chemicals using industrial biotechnology and calculated their CO2 emissions and fossil energy use. Savings of more than 100% in non-renewable energy use and greenhouse gas emissions are already possible with current state of the art biotechnology. Substantial further savings are possible for the future by improved fermentation and downstream processing. Worldwide CO2 savings in the range of 500-1000 million tons per year are possible using future technology. Industrial biotechnology hence offers excellent opportunities for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions and decreasing dependence on fossil energy sources and therefore has the potential to make inroads into the existing chemical industry.

  13. Model of price-dependent management of an industrial enterprise energy consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solovieva I.A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the problems of price-dependent management of energy consumed by industrial enterprises which are involved in purchasing energy in the wholesale and retail energy markets. The article provides the analysis of forming the obligation value to pay for each component of cost of energy. There have been revealed ways and time intervals of energy consumption demand value management in order to minimize the obligation value to pay for cost of energy. The authors have developed a model aimed at managing energy consumption demand which takes into consideration the specific character of forming the obligation to pay in terms of each component of cost bearing in mind to the factors restricting possibilities to manage demand in the time intervals required. The article also covers some description of the parameters developed for information support of the model offered. The practical approval conducted by the authors, permits to state that using the mechanism of price-dependent energy consumption gives industrial enterprises substantial reserves to reduce energy consumption costs. The research results are of practical importance and can be applied in everyday activity connected with energy purchasing by industrial enterprises.

  14. BEST Winery Guidebook: Benchmarking and Energy and Water SavingsTool for the Wine Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Radspieler, Anthony; Healy,Patrick; Zechiel, Susanne

    2005-10-15

    Not all industrial facilities have the staff or the opportunity to perform a detailed audit of their operations. The lack of knowledge of energy efficiency opportunities provides an important barrier to improving efficiency. Benchmarking has demonstrated to help energy users understand energy use and the potential for energy efficiency improvement, reducing the information barrier. In California, the wine making industry is not only one of the economic pillars of the economy; it is also a large energy consumer, with a considerable potential for energy-efficiency improvement. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Fetzer Vineyards developed an integrated benchmarking and self-assessment tool for the California wine industry called ''BEST''(Benchmarking and Energy and water Savings Tool) Winery. BEST Winery enables a winery to compare its energy efficiency to a best practice winery, accounting for differences in product mix and other characteristics of the winery. The tool enables the user to evaluate the impact of implementing energy and water efficiency measures. The tool facilitates strategic planning of efficiency measures, based on the estimated impact of the measures, their costs and savings. BEST Winery is available as a software tool in an Excel environment. This report serves as background material, documenting assumptions and information on the included energy and water efficiency measures. It also serves as a user guide for the software package.

  15. Tax and Fiscal Policies for Promotion of Industrial EnergyEfficiency: A Survey of International Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Sinton, Jonathan; Worrell,Ernst; Graus, Wina

    2005-09-15

    The Energy Foundation's China Sustainable Energy Program (CSEP) has undertaken a major project investigating fiscal and tax policy options for stimulating energy efficiency and renewable energy development in China. This report, which is part of the sectoral sub-project studies on energy efficiency in industry, surveys international experience with tax and fiscal policies directed toward increasing investments in energy efficiency in the industrial sector. The report begins with an overview of tax and fiscal policies, including descriptions and evaluations of programs that use energy or energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) taxes, pollution levies, public benefit charges, grants or subsidies, subsidized audits, loans, tax relief for specific technologies, and tax relief as part of an energy or greenhouse gas (GHG) emission tax or agreement scheme. Following the discussion of these individual policies, the report reviews experience with integrated programs found in two countries as well as with GHG emissions trading programs. The report concludes with a discussion of the best practices related to international experience with tax and fiscal policies to encourage investment in energy efficiency in industry.

  16. The need for a comprehensive energy management information system for industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goosen, P

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Electricity costs in South Africa are increasing rapidly, and the funding hurdle rates for energy conservation incentives are decreasing. Therefore, with rising international competition and increasing operational costs, marginal industries need to focus on energy management strategies where larger savings can be achieved with lower capital expenditure. This paper sketches the need for a comprehensive energy management information system (EMIS. Common industrial energy management pitfalls are identified and energy conservation incentives are outlined. New focus points that improve client awareness and in turn improve the sustainability of energy management interventions are also highlighted. However, benefitting from energy incentives is becoming more complex. Therefore, many clients do not benefit from these incentives unless specialised Energy Service Companies (ESCos are employed. ESCos, however, require large amounts of data to manage clients’ energy effectively. Herein lies the need for a comprehensive EMIS that aids ESCos and their clients with the energy management process. An EMIS was developed and implemented for several industries in South Africa. Data is automatically collected, processed, analysed, and presented on a daily basis. A case study investigates the exorbitant amounts of data and reports that are managed automatically, which further highlights the need for a comprehensive EMIS.

  17. Assessing Energy Efficiency Opportunities in US Industrial and Commercial Building Motor Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Prakash; Sheaffer, Paul; McKane, Aimee; Scheihing, Paul

    2015-09-01

    In 2002, the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) published an energy efficiency assessment of U.S. industrial sector motor systems titled United States Industrial Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities Assessment. The assessment advanced motor system efficiency by providing a greater understanding of the energy consumption, use characteristics, and energy efficiency improvement potential of industrial sector motor systems in the U.S. Since 2002, regulations such as Minimum Energy Performance Standards, cost reductions for motor system components such as variable frequency drives, system-integrated motor-driven equipment, and awareness programs for motor system energy efficiency have changed the landscape of U.S. motor system energy consumption. To capture the new landscape, the USDOE has initiated a three-year Motor System Market Assessment (MSMA), led by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The MSMA will assess the energy consumption, operational and maintenance characteristics, and efficiency improvement opportunity of U.S. industrial sector and commercial building motor systems. As part of the MSMA, a significant effort is currently underway to conduct field assessments of motor systems from a sample of facilities representative of U.S. commercial and industrial motor system energy consumption. The Field Assessment Plan used for these assessments builds on recent LBNL research presented at EEMODS 2011 and EEMODS 2013 using methods for characterizing and determining regional motor system energy efficiency opportunities. This paper provides an update on the development and progress of the MSMA, focusing on the Field Assessment Plan and the framework for assessing the global supply chain for emerging motors and drive technologies.

  18. After Kyoto - and the Implications for the Energy Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myklebust, Egil [Norsk Hydro, Oslo (Norway)

    1998-12-31

    This presentation discusses some conclusions arrived at in the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD). From an international political perspective, the Kyoto Protocol was a major achievement. As a follow-up, WBCS will focus on how business can help to make the agreements work and contribute further to those issues, which were left open at Kyoto. Kyoto has moved the climate issue from a general policy debate to quantified emission targets for 38 countries and established principles for a framework for action. WBCSD encourages a global perspective on climate change and wants to make market-based policies as effective as possible. Innovation will be a key to success. Some of the major environmental challenges the last two decades that have been handled internationally are acid rain, ozone-depleting substances, and emissions that cause local environmental damage. Successful industrial companies have shown their ability to achieve ambitious goals related to environmental performance. These achievements are also relevant with respect to the development of environmentally sound solutions and practices regarding the greenhouse gases. Individual companies should encourage the free flow of best practices, stimulate creativity, and adapt their strategies to environmental `realities`. An example of the transformation of these statements into action is Norsk Hydro`s Hydrokraft, a gas-fired power plant concept. Greenhouse gas emission trading will promote technology development and the implementation of cost-effective solutions. Joint Implementation and especially the Clean Development Mechanism will occur mainly through work on technology transfer. Finally, the presentation discusses some specific Norwegian issues. 3 figs.

  19. NREL's Industry Growth Forum Boosts Clean Energy Commercialization Efforts (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-12-01

    For more than a decade, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Industry Growth Forum has been the nation's premier event for early-stage clean energy investment. The forum features presentations from the most innovative, promising, and emergent clean energy companies; provocative panels led by thought leaders; and organized networking opportunities. It is the perfect venue for growing cleantech companies to present their business to a wide range of investors.

  20. Minimization of Heat Energy Intensity in Food Production Companies Applying Sustainable Industrial Development Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Irina Kliopova; Rasa Lieščinskienė

    2011-01-01

    Lithuanian food and drink sector of industry is characterized by high energy intensity, which is 29% higher than the EU average. At the confectionary plant chosen for the experiment, an environmental impact has been controlled and its maximum managed by creating different procedures to reduce pollution. Assessment of the plant's environmental costs has revealed that the energy costs amount to main part of the environmental ones (up to 55.4%). In recent years several energy efficiency projects...