WorldWideScience

Sample records for voluntary incident reporting

  1. Analyzing voluntary medical incident reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yang; Richardson, James; Zhijian, Luan; Alafaireet, Patricia; Yoo, Illhoi

    2008-11-06

    Voluntary medical incident reports lacking consistency and accuracy impede the ultimate use of the reports for patient safety research. To improve this, two coders examined harm score usage in a voluntary medical incident reporting system where the harm scores were selected from a predefined list by different reporters. The two coders inter-rater agreement percent was 82%. The major categories and reviewed harm score jointly demonstrate that this process is critical and necessary in preparing the voluntary reports for further content and semantics analysis.

  2. Developing a user-centered voluntary medical incident reporting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Lei; Gong, Yang

    2010-01-01

    Medical errors are one of leading causes of death among adults in the United States. According to the Institute of Medicine, reporting of medical incidents could be a cornerstone to learn from errors and to improve patient safety, if incident data are collected in a properly structured format which is useful for the detection of patterns, discovery of underlying factors, and generation of solutions. Globally, a number of medical incident reporting systems were deployed for collecting observable incident data in care delivery organizations (CDO) over the past several years. However, few researches delved into design of user-centered reporting system for improving completeness and accuracy of medical incident collection, let alone design models created for other institutes to follow. In this paper, we introduce the problems identified in a current using voluntary reporting system and our effort is being made towards complete, accurate and useful user-centered new reporting system through a usability engineering process.

  3. Voluntary Medical Incident Reporting Tool to Improve Physician Reporting of Medical Errors in an Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nnaemeka G. Okafor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical errors are frequently under-reported, yet their appropriate analysis, coupled with remediation, is essential for continuous quality improvement. The emergency department (ED is recognized as a complex and chaotic environment prone to errors. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a web-based ED-specific incident reporting system using an iterative process. Methods: A web-based, password-protected tool was developed by members of a quality assurance committee for ED providers to report incidents that they believe could impact patient safety. Results: The utilization of this system in one residency program with two academic sites resulted in an increase from 81 reported incidents in 2009, the first year of use, to 561 reported incidents in 2012. This is an increase in rate of reported events from 0.07% of all ED visits to 0.44% of all ED visits. In 2012, faculty reported 60% of all incidents, while residents and midlevel providers reported 24% and 16% respectively. The most commonly reported incidents were delays in care and management concerns. Conclusion: Error reporting frequency can be dramatically improved by using a web-based, userfriendly, voluntary, and non-punitive reporting system.

  4. 14 CFR 234.7 - Voluntary reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Voluntary reporting. 234.7 Section 234.7 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS AIRLINE SERVICE QUALITY PERFORMANCE REPORTS § 234.7 Voluntary reporting. (a) In addition to the...

  5. Voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    The Voluntary Reporting Program for greenhouse gases is part of an attempt by the U.S. Government to develop innovative, low-cost, and nonregulatory approaches to limit emissions of greenhouse gases. It is one element in an array of such programs introduced in recent years as part of the effort being made by the United States to comply with its national commitment to stabilize emissions of greenhouse gases under the Framework Convention on Climate Change. The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions of greenhouse gases.

  6. Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions: Voluntary reporting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report on their emissions of greenhouse gases, and on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions or sequestered carbon, to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This, the second annual report of the Voluntary Reporting Program, describes information provided by the participating organizations on their aggregate emissions and emissions reductions, as well as their emissions reduction or avoidance projects, through 1995. This information has been compiled into a database that includes reports from 142 organizations and descriptions of 967 projects that either reduced greenhouse gas emissions or sequestered carbon. Fifty-one reporters also provided estimates of emissions, and emissions reductions achieved, for their entire organizations. The projects described actions taken to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide from energy production and use; to reduce methane and nitrous oxide emissions from energy use, waste management, and agricultural processes; to reduce emissions of halocarbons, such as CFCs and their replacements; and to increase carbon sequestration.

  7. Voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    The Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program, required by Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, records the results of voluntary measures to reduce, avoid, or sequester greenhouse gas emissions. In 1998, 156 US companies and other organizations reported to the Energy information Administration that, during 1997, they had achieved greenhouse gas emission reductions and carbon sequestration equivalent to 166 million tons of carbon dioxide, or about 2.5% of total US emissions for the year. For the 1,229 emission reduction projects reported, reductions usually were measured by comparing an estimate of actual emissions with an estimate of what emissions would have been had the project not been implemented.

  8. Critical incident reporting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Jag; Marriott, Lin

    2005-02-01

    Approximately 10% of all hospital admissions are complicated by critical incidents in which harm is caused to the patient - this amounts to more than 850,000 incidents annually. Critical incident reporting (CIR) systems refer to the structured reporting, collation and analysis of such incidents. This article describes the attributes required for an effective CIR system. Example neonatal trigger events and a management pathway for handling a critical incident report are described. The benefits and limitations of CIR systems, reactive and prospective approaches to the analysis of actual or potential critical incidents and the assessment of risk are also reviewed. Individual human error is but one contributor in the majority of critical incidents. Recognition of this and the fostering of an organisational culture that views critical incident reports as an opportunity to learn and to improve future patient care is vital if CIR systems are to be effective.

  9. Incident Report - Legacy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Incident Report is a mandatory post trip legal document observers fill out to report any enforcement related situations they have encountered on an observed trip...

  10. Medication incidents reported to an online incident reporting system.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Alrwisan, Adel

    2011-01-15

    AIMS: Approximately 20% of deaths from adverse events are related to medication incidents, costing the NHS an additional £500 million annually. Less than 5% of adverse events are reported. This study aims to assess the reporting rate of medication incidents in NHS facilities in the north east of Scotland, and to describe the types and outcomes of reported incidents among different services. Furthermore, we wished to quantify the proportion of reported incidents according to the reporters\\' profession. METHODS: A retrospective description was made of medication incidents reported to an online reporting system (DATIX) over a 46-month-period (July 2005 to April 2009). Reports originated from acute and community hospitals, mental health, and primary care facilities. RESULTS: Over the study period there were 2,666 incidents reported with a mean monthly reporting rate of 78.2\\/month (SD±16.9). 6.1% of all incidents resulted in harm, with insulin being the most commonly implicated medication. Nearly three-quarters (74.2%, n=1,978) of total incidents originated from acute hospitals. Administration incidents were implicated in the majority of the reported medication incidents (59%), followed by prescribing (10.8%) and dispensing (9.9%), while the nondescript "other medication incidents" accounted for 20.3% of total incidents. The majority of reports were made by nursing and midwifery staff (80%), with medical and dental professionals reporting the lowest number of incidents (n=56, 2%). CONCLUSIONS: The majority of medication incidents in this study were reported by nursing and midwifery staff, and were due to administration incidents. There is a clear need to elucidate the reasons for the limited contribution of the medical and dental professionals to reporting medication incidents.

  11. Final voluntary release assessment/corrective action report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-12

    The US Department of Energy, Carlsbad Area Office (DOE-CAO) has completed a voluntary release assessment sampling program at selected Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This Voluntary Release Assessment/Corrective Action (RA/CA) report has been prepared for final submittal to the Environmental protection Agency (EPA) Region 6, Hazardous Waste Management Division and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) Hazardous and Radioactive Materials Bureau to describe the results of voluntary release assessment sampling and proposed corrective actions at the SWMU sites. The Voluntary RA/CA Program is intended to be the first phase in implementing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) and corrective action process at the WIPP. Data generated as part of this sampling program are intended to update the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) for the WIPP (Assessment of Solid Waste Management Units at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant), NMED/DOE/AIP 94/1. This Final Voluntary RA/CA Report documents the results of release assessment sampling at 11 SWMUs identified in the RFA. With this submittal, DOE formally requests a No Further Action determination for these SWMUs. Additionally, this report provides information to support DOE`s request for No Further Action at the Brinderson and Construction landfill SWMUs, and to support DOE`s request for approval of proposed corrective actions at three other SWMUs (the Badger Unit Drill Pad, the Cotton Baby Drill Pad, and the DOE-1 Drill Pad). This information is provided to document the results of the Voluntary RA/CA activities submitted to the EPA and NMED in August 1995.

  12. Incident Reporting in Mashhad Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davoodi R

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In this study, our aim was to evaluate and classify the voluntary error reports in the hospitals of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. Patients have the right to receive health care in accordance to the best standards. Health care carries a risk of harm for patient safety, and with respect to today’s stressful systems with a large number of patients, it would be inevitable. The meaning of risk management is to predict adverse events and reduce their occurrence.Materials and Methods: A voluntary medical error reporting form was designed and approved by the clinical governance team of Mashhad Medical University. They were then distributed inside hospitals in the way in which everyone (health providers and patients could access them easily. The forms were collected and classified monthly in all wards. Classification was performed on the base of type, outcome and reporter. Data gathering took place from spring to autumn 2012. The data was analyzed by the SPSS software. Results: 2500 errors were extracted from 1000 voluntary error reporting forms of the 12 hospitals of Mashhad Medical University. The most frequent error type was treatment errors (36% related to drug administration, standard procedures and surgical events. Conclusions: Error reporting as a basic activity has an important role in discovering pitfalls of the health care system. To promote the reporting culture, its non punitive base must become clear for all professors and staff members, because this kind of reporting could lead to fewer medical errors and higher staff awareness about probable errors.

  13. Board and auditor interlocks and voluntary disclosure in annual reports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braam, G.J.M.; Borghans, L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this study is to explore whether interlock ties between the board of directors and the external auditors facilitate the cross-firm diffusion of voluntary disclosures in annual reports. Design/methodology/approach – Using a sample of 149 non-financial companies publicly lis

  14. Study of the Voluntary Public School Choice Program. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Robert K.; Ahonen, Pirkko S.

    2008-01-01

    The Voluntary Public School Choice (VPSC) Program supports the emergence and growth of choice initiatives across the country, by assisting states and local school districts in developing innovative strategies to expand public school choice options for students. This report contains the final assessment of the first five years of the VPSC Program…

  15. Study of the Voluntary Public School Choice Program. Interim Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Robert K.; Ahonen, Pirkko; Kim, Dawn

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the Voluntary Public School Choice (VPSC) Program is to assist states and local school districts in the development of innovative strategies to expand options for students, and to encourage transfers of students from low-performing to higher-performing schools. This report presents interim findings from the National Evaluation of…

  16. [The critical incident reporting system as an instrument of risk management for better patient safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzica, M; Krettek, C; Cartes, M

    2011-09-01

    The probability that an inpatient will be harmed by a medical procedure is at least 3% of all patients. As a consequence, hospital risk management has become a central management task in the health care sector. The critical incident reporting system (CIRS) as a voluntary instrument for reporting (near) incidents plays a key role in the implementation of a risk management system. The goal of the CIRS is to register system errors without assigning guilt or meting out punishment and at the same time increasing the number of voluntary reports.

  17. FREE CASH FLOW AS PART OF VOLUNTARY REPORTING. LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negrea Laura Georgeta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study has as main objective to reflect the state of literature regarding free cash flow, and to withdraw the main pro's and con's in order to create an objective image upon this indicator. The main idea generating this research was the growing interest on cash flow reporting. As many say, 'Cash Flow is King', while in Anglo Saxon countries the interest of investors and analysts in concentrated on operating cash flow, as the most important indicator of the probability of bankruptcy. In this context, voluntary additional reporting, like free cash flow may come either as an aid in providing the fair view or as an opportunistically reported figure. Throughout the paper, the intention was to provide answers to three main research questions: What are the definition and calculation method of free cash flow? Why is there an interest in free cash flow reporting? What is the impact of free cash flow on the agency theory? In order to provide relevant conclusions, four international data basis were used, and related articles and studies were extracted. The results proved that there is no generally accepted definition and computing method, while the format depends on the end-user of the report (shareholders, investors, analysts, bankers, a.s.o.. As stated below, this aspect generates confusion and lack of comparability, giving room to creative accounting techniques. Moreover, the interest on free cash flow reporting is connected mainly to liquidity assessment, company valuation and investors choice. Still, in the context of agency theory, results show that in presence of high free cash flow, managers tend to make investment choices that satisfy their personal interest and that generate low efficiency and profitability for the company. The contribution to current state of research is providing a literature review study, focused on a comparative approach, as well as on underlying an objective image upon a debatable financial indicator and

  18. National Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The National Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS) is a reporting standard that fire departments use to uniformly report on the full range of their activities, from...

  19. Semantic Theme Analysis of Pilot Incident Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumalainambi, Rajkumar

    2009-01-01

    Pilots report accidents or incidents during take-off, on flight and landing to airline authorities and Federal aviation authority as well. The description of pilot reports for an incident contains technical terms related to Flight instruments and operations. Normal text mining approaches collect keywords from text documents and relate them among documents that are stored in database. Present approach will extract specific theme analysis of incident reports and semantically relate hierarchy of terms assigning weights of themes. Once the theme extraction has been performed for a given document, a unique key can be assigned to that document to cross linking the documents. Semantic linking will be used to categorize the documents based on specific rules that can help an end-user to analyze certain types of accidents. This presentation outlines the architecture of text mining for pilot incident reports for autonomous categorization of pilot incident reports using semantic theme analysis.

  20. Segurança do paciente: comparação entre notificações voluntárias manuscritas e informatizadas sobre incidentes em saúde Seguridad del Paciente: comparación entre la notificación espontánea manuscrita y computadorizada de incidentes en la salud Patient Safety: a comparison between handwritten and computerized voluntary incident reporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helaine Carneiro Capucho

    2013-03-01

    , consecutivamente, una mayor seguridad de los pacientes.This study's objective was to compare two types of voluntary incident reporting methods that affect patient safety, handwritten (HR and computerized (CR, in relation to the number of reports, type of incident reported, the individual submitting the report, and quality of reports. This was a descriptive, retrospective and cross-sectional study. CR were more frequent than HR (61.2% vs. 38.6% among the 1,089 reports analyzed and were submitted every day of the month, while HR were submitted only on weekdays. The highest number of reports referred to medication, followed by problems related to medical-hospital material, and the professional who most frequently submitted reports were nurses in both cases. Overall, CR presented higher quality than HR (86.1% vs. 61.7%; 36.8% of HR were illegible, a problem that was eliminated in CR. Therefore, the use of computerized incident reporting in hospitals favors qualified voluntary reports, increasing patient safety.

  1. What to do with healthcare Incident Reporting Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius Cuong Pham

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Incident Reporting Systems (IRS are and will continue to be an important influence on improving patient safety. They can provide valuable insights into how and why patients can be harmed at the organizational level. However, they are not the panacea that many believe them to be. They have several limitations that should be considered. Most of these limitations stem from inherent biases of voluntary reporting systems. These limitations include: i IRS can’t be used to measure safety (error rates; ii IRS can’t be used to compare organizations; iii IRS can’t be used to measure changes over time; iv IRS generate too many reports; v IRS often don’t generate in-depth analyses or result in strong interventions to reduce risk; vi IRS are associated with costs. IRS do offer significant value; their value is found in the following: i IRS can be used to identify local system hazards; ii IRS can be used to aggregate experiences for uncommon conditions; iii IRS can be used to share lessons within and across organizations; iv IRS can be used to increase patient safety culture. Moving forward, several strategies are suggested to maximize their value: i make reporting easier; ii make reporting meaningful to the reporter; iii make the measure of success system changes, rather than events reported; iv prioritize which events to report and investigate, report and investigate them well; v convene with diverse stakeholders to enhance the value of IRS.

  2. Incidence of recent HCV infection among persons seeking voluntary counselling and testing for HIV and sexually transmitted infections in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ching Su

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The incidence of recent hepatitis C virus infection (HCV infection has been noted to be increasing among men who have sex with men (MSM, especially those with HIV infection, in several resource-rich settings. In Taiwan, the incidence of recent HCV infection increased from 0 in 1994–2000, 2.29 in 2001–2005 to 10.13 per 1000 person-years of follow-up (PYFU in 2006–2010. In this study, we aimed to estimate the incidence rate of recent HCV infection among those individuals who sought voluntary counselling and testing (VCT service at a University Hospital. Methods: Between May 2006 and December 2013, 18,246 tests for HIV antibody were performed among 12,143 individuals at the VCT services. A total of 2157 clients without HIV or HCV infection at baseline were included for estimation of incidence rate of recent HCV infection. Antibodies to HCV were determined with a third-generation enzyme immunoassay. A nested case-control study with four matched controls without HCV seroconversion for one HCV seroconverter was conducted to investigate the factors associated with recent HCV infection. Phylogenetic analysis was performed among the HCV strains obtained from VCT clients and patients coinfected with HIV and HCV between 2006 and 2013. Results: During the study period, 2157 clients received a total of 8260 tests. The HCV seroprevalence at baseline was 0.3%. Of the 2150 HCV-negative clients who contributed 5074.99 PYFU, 17 developed HCV seroconversion (incidence rate, 3.35 per 1000 PYFU; 95% CI, 1.76–4.94; the rate increased from 2.28 per 1000 PYFU (95% CI, 0.05–4.51 in 2006–2009, to 3.33 per 1000 PYFU (95% CI, 0.86–5.80 in 2010–2011, to 4.94 per 1000 PYFU (95% CI, 0.99–8.99 in 2012–2013. In case-control study, HCV seroconverters were more likely to have HIV-infected partners, recent syphilis and a Rapid Plasma Reagin (RPR titre of 4 or greater. In multivariate analysis, having HIV-infected partners remained as the only

  3. Incident reporting in post-operative patients managed by acute pain service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syeda Fauzia Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Incident reporting is a reliable and inexpensive tool used in anaesthesia to identify errors in patient management. A hospital incident reporting system was already present in our hospital, but we were unable to find any incident related to acute pain management. Hence, acute pain service (APS was started for voluntary incident reporting in post-operative patients to identify critical incidents, review the root cause and suggest remedial measures. Methods: All post-operative patients managed by APS were included in this observational study. A proforma was developed by APS, which included information about the type of incident (equipment and patient-related, human errors, severity of incident, person responsible and suggestions to prevent the same incident in the future. Patients and medical staff were informed about the reporting system. Whenever an incident was identified, a proforma was filled out by APS resident and data entered in SPSS programme. Results: Total of 98 (1.80% incidents were reported in 5432 patients managed by APS during 3 years period. Average age of the patients was 46 ± 17 years. Majority of incidents were related to epidural care (71% and occurred in surgical wards (87%. Most of the incidents occurred due to human error and infusion delivery set-related defects. Conclusion: Incident reporting proved to be a feasible method of improving quality care in developing countries. It not only provides valuable information about areas which needed improvement, but also helped in developing strategies to improve care. Knowledge and attitudes of medical and paramedical staff are identified as the targeted area for improvement.

  4. Voluntary Control of the Near Reflex: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serpil Akar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Spasm of the near reflex is a rare disorder that involves intermittent and variable episodes of esotropia, pseudomyopia, and pupillary myosis. It is usually functional in origin and is seen mainly in young patients. Treatment options for spasm of the near reflex have had variable success. In instances where the etiology of spasm of the near reflex was suspected to be hysteria, psychotherapy has proven beneficial. We report the case of an 11-year-old girl who had functional spasm of the near reflex. The symptoms persisted for two years. Symptomatic relief was achieved by cycloplegia and spectacle correction (added plus lenses at near. The patient also underwent psychological counseling. In our case, the functional spasm of the near reflex spontaneously resolved after 2 years. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 161-3

  5. Hazmat 10 Year Incident Summary Reports - Data Mining Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Series of Incident data and summary statistics reports produced which provide statistical information on incidents by type, year, geographical location, and others....

  6. Hazmat Yearly Incident Summary Reports - Data Mining Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Series of Incident data and summary statistics reports produced which provide statistical information on incidents by type, year, geographical location, and others....

  7. Inaccurate reporting of simulated critical anaesthetic incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, A J; Jones, J G

    1997-06-01

    Eleven anaesthetists completed a simulated anaesthetic which was deliberately complicated by a slow progressive bradycardia followed by an episode of severe bronchospasm. After the simulation, each anaesthetist was asked to complete an anaesthetic chart and a critical incident report. Considerable discrepancies were found between the anaesthetists' written accounts, a videotape of their performance and actual data from the simulator. During the simulations, all of the anaesthetists reacted appropriately and treated their "patient" successfully but their written accounts showed a tendency to record "typical" rather than actual events and to ignore events not consistent with their final diagnosis. Only four anaesthetists mentioned bradycardia in their written description and none accurately described the changes in arterial pressure during the episode of bronchospasm. The findings are in keeping with other studies which suggest that people record events as "schemata" rather than as collections of discrete facts. These results have significant implications for those involved in the teaching of anaesthesia and in the analysis of critical incidents.

  8. Report of the procedure of voluntary interruption of pregnancy at a university hospital in Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Bentancor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe the constitution and operation of a voluntary interruption of pregnancy team of a university hospital, from the outlook of the mental health team. METHODS In this case study, the following aspects were analyzed: 1 historical background; 2 implementation of Law 18,897 of October 22, 2012; and 3 functioning of the program at the Hospital de Clínicas of the Facultad de Medicina (Universidad de la República, Uruguay, taking into account three dimensions: structure, process, and results. RESULTS Between December 2012 and November 2013, a total of 6,676 voluntary interruptions of pregnancy were reported in Uruguay; out of these, 80 were conducted at the Hospital de Clínicas. The patients’ demographic data agreed with those reported at the national level: Of the total patients, 81.0% were aged over 19 years; 6.2% decided to continue with the pregnancy; and only 70.0% attended the subsequent control and received advice on contraception. CONCLUSIONS In its implementation year in Uruguay, we can assess the experience as positive from the point of view of women’s health. Our experience as a mental health team at the Hospital de Clínicas, inserted into the multidisciplinary voluntary interruption of pregnancy team, is in the process of assessment and reformulation of practices.

  9. Grazing incidence absorption measurements. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-07-31

    This final report summarizes the results of a series of different measurements to characterize various mirrors of interest to Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Boeing Aerospace free electron laser program. Most of the measurements were of the glancing incidence characteristics of different overcoated silver mirrors. These included the absolute absorptance as a function of angle of incidence (0--88{degrees}), laser wavelength (0.5145 and 1.06 {mu}m), polarization, and exposure to room air. The latter measurement examined the ability of the overcoated silver mirrors to resist tarnishing. Overcoating materials used were single-layer ThF{sub 4} and MgF{sub 2}, a very thin layer of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and diamond. As a result of the work performed during this program, significant progress has been made to find a better alternative to bare silver mirrors for high-power laser applications. Thick dielectric overcoats do protect the silver mirrors from tarnishing, but problems associated with accurately controlling the optical constants of the dielectric during the coating process appear to make it difficult to achieve the desired optical properties of the mirrors at high angles of incidence.

  10. The relationship between the implementation of voluntary Five-Star occupational health and safety management system and the incidence of fatal and permanently disabling injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedlund, Frank Huess

    2014-01-01

    injury. The second is the association between the Star audit rating and rates of serious occupational injury. Although there are many uncertainties involved the paper argues that companies committed to the NOSA system experienced fewer fatal and permanently disabling injuries than the general...... manufacturing sector. The paper also examines an inverse correlation between the Star rating and the injury incidence rate. It is concluded that the Star rating is a sound although imperfect predictor of injury rates. The fact that auditing is an entirely voluntary activity likely distorts the Star rating...... to some extent. It is speculated that some (unsafe) companies may abandon or pause auditing if they experience too many injuries. There is also some evidence to suggest that companies with poor safety attitudes are able to successfully deceive auditors. The paper suggests that voluntary OHS audit systems...

  11. Discovering patterns of activity in unstructured incident reports at scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-12

    2015 Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh , PA 15213 Discovering patterns of activity...patterns of activity in incident reports • US-CERT receives incident reports from a diverse constituency. • Each ticket is an observation of...patterns of activity in incident reports Indicators across tickets Indicators occur with diverse patterns across tickets, reporters and time. Time on

  12. Improving reporting of critical incidents through education and involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Critical incident reporting involves highlighting events and near-misses which have a potential impact on patient care and patient safety. Reporting of critical incidents is a recognised tool in improving patient safety. Within the community paediatric setting in the Belfast Health & Social Care Trust (BHSCT) there is a paucity of incident report forms. The purpose of this quality improvement project was to establish the barriers to reporting critical incidents and to implement plan-do-study-act (PDSA) cycles to create a climate for change. The methodology for this project was to firstly perform a baseline audit to review all submitted critical incident reports for the Community Paediatric team in the BHSCT for a six month period. A questionnaire was distributed to staff within the multidisciplinary team to establish examples of barriers to reporting. Interventions performed included introducing an agreed definition of a critical incident, distributing/presenting questionnaire findings to senior members of the various management teams and providing feedback to healthcare workers after presentation of a critical incident presentation. A review of incident reports was performed over the subsequent six month period to assess how the interventions impacted on incident reporting. Over 12 questionnaires 28 barriers to reporting critical incidents were reported which fell into five separate categories. Staff members were twice as likely to report negativity after reporting a critical incident. Overall critical incident reporting within the BHSCT Community Paediatric team improved from 11 incident reports (1.8 per month) to 22 incident reports (3.7 per month) after completion of the quality improvement project. This represents an increase of 100%.

  13. 16 CFR 1115.5 - Reporting of failures to comply with a voluntary consumer product safety standard relied upon by...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... voluntary consumer product safety standard relied upon by the Commission under section 9 of the CPSA. 1115.5 Section 1115.5 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SUBSTANTIAL PRODUCT HAZARD REPORTS General Interpretation § 1115.5 Reporting of failures to...

  14. Automatic Analysis of Critical Incident Reports: Requirements and Use Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denecke, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Increasingly, critical incident reports are used as a means to increase patient safety and quality of care. The entire potential of these sources of experiential knowledge remains often unconsidered since retrieval and analysis is difficult and time-consuming, and the reporting systems often do not provide support for these tasks. The objective of this paper is to identify potential use cases for automatic methods that analyse critical incident reports. In more detail, we will describe how faceted search could offer an intuitive retrieval of critical incident reports and how text mining could support in analysing relations among events. To realise an automated analysis, natural language processing needs to be applied. Therefore, we analyse the language of critical incident reports and derive requirements towards automatic processing methods. We learned that there is a huge potential for an automatic analysis of incident reports, but there are still challenges to be solved.

  15. Prevalence, estimated HIV-1 incidence and viral diversity among people seeking voluntary counseling and testing services in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastos Francisco I

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background BED-EIA HIV-1 Incidence Test (BED-CEIA has been described as a tool to discriminate recent (RS from long-term (LTS seroconversion of HIV-1 infection, contributing to a better understanding of the dynamics of the HIV/AIDS epidemic over time. This study determined the prevalence, estimated incidence and HIV-1 subtype infection among individuals seeking testing in Voluntary Counseling and Testing centers (VCTs from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Methods Demographics and behavioral data were obtained from 434 individuals, diagnosed as HIV-positive among 9,008 volunteers screened from November 2004 to October 2005 in three VCTs located in the Rio de Janeiro Metropolitan area, Brazil. BED-CEIA protocol was performed to identify RS. DNA samples from RS and a subset of LTS (under a proportion of 1:2 were selected for gp120 C2-V3 and pol (protease and reverse transcriptase regions genomic sequencing. Results Overall HIV-1 prevalence was 4.8%. Sixty-one of 434 seropositive individuals were classified as RS, corresponding to an incidence rate of 1.68%/year (95%CI 1.26% -2.10%. Estimated incidence between Men Who Have Sex with Men (MSM was 11 times higher than among heterosexual men and 55% of the new cases were identified in volunteers aged 25-40 years. A similar distribution of different HIV-1 subtypes was found among RS and LTS. Conclusions Our data suggest that prevention for MSM remains a challenge and efforts focusing on prevention targeting this population should be prioritized. No significant changes in HIV-1 subtypes were observed among the RS and LTS subgroups. One case of HIV-1 AUK (pol/A (env recombinant genome was detected for the first time in Brazil.

  16. Clinical incidents involving students on placement: an analysis of incident reports to identify potential risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaida, J E; Maloney, S; Lo, K; Morgan, P

    2015-06-01

    Students are sometimes involved in incidents during clinical training. To the authors' knowledge, no quantitative studies of incidents specifically involving physiotherapy students on clinical placement are available in the literature. A retrospective audit (2008 to 2011) of incident reports involving physiotherapy students was conducted to identify the nature and features of incidents. The study aimed to determine if injuries to a student or patient were more or less likely when the supervisor was in close proximity, and whether students with lower academic performance in their preclinical semester were more likely to be involved in an incident. There were 19 care-delivery-related and three equipment-related incidents. There were no incidents of violent, aggressive or demeaning behaviour towards students. The incident rate was 9.0/100,000 student-hours for third-year students and 6.8/100,000 student-hours for fourth-year students. The majority of incidents (55%) occurred from 11 am to 12-noon and from 3 pm to 3.30 pm. Incidents more often resulted in patient or student injury when the supervisor was not in close proximity (approximately 50% vs approximately 20%), although the difference was not significant (P=0.336). The academic results of students involved in incidents were equivalent to the whole cohort in their preclinical semester {mean 75 [standard deviation (SD) 6] vs 76 (SD 7); P=0.488}. The unexpected temporal clustering of incidents warrants further investigation. Student fatigue may warrant attention as a potential contributor; however, contextual factors, such as staff workload, along with organisational systems, structures and procedures may be more relevant. The potential relationship between supervisor proximity and injury also warrants further exploration. The findings of the present study should be integrated into clinical education curricula and communicated to clinical educators. Copyright © 2014 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by

  17. Report of the procedure of voluntary interruption of pregnancy at a university hospital in Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentancor, Ana; Hernández, Ana Laura; Godoy, Yamile; Dapueto, Juan J

    2016-07-04

    To describe the constitution and operation of a voluntary interruption of pregnancy team of a university hospital, from the outlook of the mental health team. In this case study, the following aspects were analyzed: 1) historical background; 2) implementation of Law 18,897 of October 22, 2012; and 3) functioning of the program at the Hospital de Clínicas of the Facultad de Medicina (Universidad de la República, Uruguay), taking into account three dimensions: structure, process, and results. Between December 2012 and November 2013, a total of 6,676 voluntary interruptions of pregnancy were reported in Uruguay; out of these, 80 were conducted at the Hospital de Clínicas. The patients' demographic data agreed with those reported at the national level: Of the total patients, 81.0% were aged over 19 years; 6.2% decided to continue with the pregnancy; and only 70.0% attended the subsequent control and received advice on contraception. In its implementation year in Uruguay, we can assess the experience as positive from the point of view of women's health. Our experience as a mental health team at the Hospital de Clínicas, inserted into the multidisciplinary voluntary interruption of pregnancy team, is in the process of assessment and reformulation of practices. Describir la conformación y funcionamiento de un equipo de interrupción voluntaria del embarazo de un hospital universitario, desde la mirada del equipo de salud mental. En este estudio de caso, se analizan los siguientes aspectos: 1) antecedentes históricos; 2) implementación de la Ley 18.897 de 22 de octubre de 2012; y 3) funcionamiento del programa en el Hospital de Clínicas de la Facultad de Medicina (Universidad de la República, Uruguay), teniendo en cuenta tres dimensiones (estructura, proceso y resultados). Entre diciembre de 2012 y noviembre de 2013, se reportaron en Uruguay un total de 6.676 interrupciones voluntarias del embarazo; de ellas, 80 se llevaron a cabo en el Hospital de Clínicas. Los

  18. SU-E-P-07: Retrospective Analysis of Incident Reports at a Radiology Department: Feedback From Incident Reporting System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakinohana, Y; Toita, T; Heianna, J; Murayama, S [School of medicine, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara-cho, Okinawa (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To provide an overview of reported incidents that occurred in a radiology department and to describe the most common causal source of incidents. Methods: Incident reports from the radiology department at the University of the Ryukyus Hospital between 2008 and 2013 were collected and analyzed retrospectively. The incident report form contains the following items, causal factors of the incident and desirable corrective actions to prevent recurrence of similar incidents. These items allow the institution to investigate/analyze root causes of the incidents and suggest measures to be taken to prevent further, similar incidents. The ‘causal factors of the incident’ item comprises multiple selections from among 24 selections and includes some synonymous selections. In this study, this item was re-categorized into four causal source types: (i) carelessness, (ii) lack of skill or knowledge, (iii) deficiencies in communication, and (iv) external factors. Results: There were a total of 7490 incident reports over the study period and 276 (3.7%) were identified as originating from the radiology department. The most frequent causal source type was carelessness (62%). The other three types showed similar frequencies (10–14%). The staff members involved in incidents indicate three predominant desirable corrective actions to prevent or decrease the recurrence of similar incidents. These are ‘improvement in communication’ (24%), ‘staff training/education’ (19%), and ‘daily medical procedures’ (22%), and the most frequent was ‘improvement in communication’. Even though the most frequent causal factor was related to carelessness, the most desirable corrective action indicated by the staff members was related to communication. Conclusion: Our finding suggests that the most immediate causes are strongly related to carelessness. However, the most likely underlying causes of incidents would be related to deficiencies in effective communication. At our

  19. Costs and benefits of industrial reporting and voluntary targets for energy efficiency. A report to the Congress of the United States. Volume II: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    This part sets forth the regulations for the Industrial Energy conservation Program established under Part E of Title III of the Act. It includes criteria and procedures for the identification of reporting corporations, reporting requirements, criteria and procedures for exemption from filing reports directly with DOE, voluntary industrial energy efficiency improvement targets and voluntary recovered materials utilization targets. The purpose of the program is to promote increased energy conservation by American industry and, as it relates to the use of recovered materials, to conserve valuable energy and scarce natural resources.

  20. 2003 status report savings estimates for the energy star(R)voluntary labeling program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; McWhinney, Marla

    2004-11-09

    ENERGY STAR(R) is a voluntary labeling program designed to identify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices. Operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), ENERGY STAR labels exist for more than thirty products, spanning office equipment, residential heating and cooling equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics, and major appliances. This report presents savings estimates for a subset of ENERGY STAR program activities, focused primarily on labeled products. We present estimates of the energy, dollar and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2002, what we expect in 2003, and provide savings forecasts for two market penetration scenarios for the period 2003 to 2020. The target market penetration forecast represents our best estimate of future ENERGY STAR savings. It is based on realistic market penetration goals for each of the products. We also provide a forecast under the assumption of 100 percent market penetration; that is, we assume that all purchasers buy ENERGY STAR-compliant products instead of standard efficiency products throughout the analysis period.

  1. Savings estimates for the ENERGY STAR (registered trademark) voluntary labeling program: 2001 status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Mahajan, Akshay; Koomey, Jonathan G.

    2002-02-15

    ENERGY STAR(Registered Trademark) is a voluntary labeling program designed to identify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices. Operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), ENERGY STAR labels exist for more than thirty products, spanning office equipment, residential heating and cooling equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics, and major appliances. This report presents savings estimates for a subset of ENERGY STAR program activities, focused primarily on labeled products. We present estimates of the energy, dollar and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2000, what we expect in 2001, and provide savings forecasts for two market penetration scenarios for the period 2001 to 2020. The target market penetration forecast represents our best estimate of future ENERGY STAR savings. It is based on realistic market penetration goals for each of the products. We also provide a forecast under the assumption of 100 percent market penetration; that is, we assume that all purchasers buy ENERGY STAR-compliant products instead of standard efficiency products throughout the analysis period.

  2. 2002 status report: Savings estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R) voluntary labeling program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; McWhinney, Marla; Koomey, Jonathan

    2003-03-03

    ENERGY STAR [registered trademark] is a voluntary labeling program designed to identify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices. Operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), ENERGY STAR labels exist for more than thirty products, spanning office equipment, residential heating and cooling equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics, and major appliances. This report presents savings estimates for a subset of ENERGY STAR program activities, focused primarily on labeled products. We present estimates of the energy, dollar and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2001, what we expect in 2002, and provide savings forecasts for two market penetration scenarios for the period 2002 to 2020. The target market penetration forecast represents our best estimate of future ENERGY STAR savings. It is based on realistic market penetration goals for each of the products. We also provide a forecast under the assumption of 100 percent market penetration; that is, we assume that all purchasers buy ENERGY STAR-compliant products instead of standard efficiency products throughout the analysis period.

  3. 2005 Status Report Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R)Voluntary Labeling Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Sanchez, Marla

    2006-03-07

    ENERGY STAR(R) is a voluntary labeling program designed toidentify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices.Operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and theU.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Star labels exist for more thanforty products, spanning office equipment, residential heating andcooling equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics,and major appliances. This report presents savings estimates for a subsetof ENERGY STAR labeled products. We present estimates of the energy,dollar and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2004, whatwe expect in 2005, and provide savings forecasts for two marketpenetration scenarios for the periods 2005 to 2010 and 2005 to 2020. Thetarget market penetration forecast represents our best estimate of futureENERGY STAR savings. It is based on realistic market penetration goalsfor each of the products. We also provide a forecast under the assumptionof 100 percent market penetration; that is, we assume that all purchasersbuy ENERGY STAR-compliant products instead of standard efficiencyproducts throughout the analysis period.

  4. 2006 Status Report Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R)Voluntary Labeling Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Sanchez, Marla; Homan,Gregory K.

    2006-03-07

    ENERGY STAR(R) is a voluntary labeling program designed toidentify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices.Operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and theU.S. Department of Energy (DOE), ENERGY STAR labels exist for more thanthirty products, spanning office equipment, residential heating andcooling equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics,and major appliances. This report presents savings estimates for a subsetof ENERGY STAR labeled products. We present estimates of the energy,dollar and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2005, whatwe expect in 2006, and provide savings forecasts for two marketpenetration scenarios for the periods 2006 to 2015 and 2006 to 2025. Thetarget market penetration forecast represents our best estimate of futureENERGY STAR savings. It is based on realistic market penetration goalsfor each of the products. We also provide a forecast under the assumptionof 100 percent market penetration; that is, we assume that all purchasersbuy ENERGY STAR-compliant products instead of standard efficiencyproducts throughout the analysis period.

  5. 2007 Status Report: Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R)VoluntaryLabeling Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Marla; Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Homan,Gregory K.

    2007-03-23

    ENERGY STAR(R) is a voluntary labeling program designed toidentify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices.Operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and theU.S. Department of Energy (DOE), ENERGY STAR labels exist for more thanthirty products, spanning office equipment, residential heating andcooling equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics,and major appliances. This report presents savings estimates for a subsetof ENERGY STAR labeled products. We present estimates of the energy,dollar and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2006, whatwe expect in 2007, and provide savings forecasts for two marketpenetration scenarios for the periods 2007 to 2015 and 2007 to 2025. Thetarget market penetration forecast represents our best estimate of futureENERGY STAR savings. It is based on realistic market penetration goalsfor each of the products. We also provide a forecast under the assumptionof 100 percent market penetration; that is, we assume that all purchasersbuy ENERGY STAR-compliant products instead of standard efficiencyproducts throughout the analysis period.

  6. 49 CFR 171.16 - Detailed hazardous materials incident reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... at the reporting person's principal place of business. If the written or electronic Hazardous... Safety Administration, Department of Transportation, Washington, DC 20590-0001, or an electronic... incident involving transportation by aircraft, submit a written or electronic copy of the...

  7. Costs and benefits of industrial reporting and voluntary targets for energy efficiency. A report to the Congress of the United States. Volume I: Main report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    Section 131(c) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) (Public Law 102-486) requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the costs and benefits of federally mandated energy efficiency reporting requirements and voluntary energy efficiency improvement targets for energy-intensive industries. It also requires DOE to evaluate the role of reporting and targets in improving energy efficiency. Specifically, the legislation states: Not later than one year after the data of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall, in consultation with affected industries, evaluate and report to the Congress regarding the establishment of Federally mandated energy efficiency reporting requirements and voluntary energy efficiency improvement targets for energy intensive industries. Such report shall include an evaluation of the costs and benefits of such reporting requirements and voluntary energy efficiency improvement targets, and recommendations regarding the role of such activities in improving energy efficiency in energy intensive industries. This report is DOE`s response to that directive. It is the culmination of a year-long study that included (1) analysis of documents pertaining to a previous reporting and targets effort, the industrial Energy Efficiency Improvements Program (or the CE-189 program, following the designation of the reporting form used to collect data in that program), administered by DOE from 1976 to 1985, as well as other important background information; (2) extensive consultations with government and industry officials regarding the CE-189 Program, experience with other programs that have reporting elements, and the attributes of possible alternative strategies for reporting and targets; and (3) analyses of the costs and benefits of the CE-189 Program and several alternatives to the CE-189 approach.

  8. [Slowly progressive anarthria and disturbed voluntary respiration--a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eiyai; Uchihara, Toshiki; Machida, Akira; Watabiki, Sadakiyo

    2007-06-01

    A 68 year-old right-handed male initially felt an abnormal sensation in the throat and slight difficulties in phonation and articulation. The difficulties slowly progressed. Dementia and kinetic disorder of limbs has not been observed over two years after onset. Although bilateral cortico-bulbar tract sign such as pathological laughter was noted. His articulatory movements were small and indistinct. Phonation was slightly explosive and breathy as if panting out. His clinical feature could be differentiated from primary progressive aphasia because he was not aphasic with excellent word finding, and fell into the realm of progressive anarthria. On SPECT, hypoperfusion was seen in the left frontal region, the left parieto-temporal region, and the right frontal region to a lesser extent. A peculiarity of the patient was in that he had accompanied a difficulty in voluntary inspiration such as taking a deep breath. Because fiberoptic examination of the larynx demonstrated that the vocal cords opened normally when he tried to take a deep breath, the difficulty in inspiration was best explained by loss of voluntary control over diaphragmatic contractions. On voluntary expiration, sustained blowing through the pursued lips (soft blowing) was not successful either. On the other hand, blowing out several candles one by one or blowing up a balloon (hard blowing) was successful. In soft blowing, a voluntary and meticulous control of the diaphragm is necessary to counteract the spontaneous recoil of the lungs. In hard blowing, expiratory muscles may contract forcefully without participation of the diaphragm. This discrepancy is again explained by loss of voluntary control over the diaphragmatic movements. This deficit could have affected phonation; maintaining an adequate vibration on the vocal cords for a certain period of time, it is necessary to control the subglotal pressure at an appropriate level by diaphragmatic control. We believe this is the first patient with a

  9. The evaluation of a web-based incident reporting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ya-Hui; Lee, Ting-Ting; Mills, Mary Etta; Lin, Kuan-Chia

    2012-07-01

    A Web-based reporting system is essential to report incident events anonymously and confidentially. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a Web-based reporting system in Taiwan. User satisfaction and impact of system use were evaluated through a survey answered by 249 nurses. Incident events reported in paper and electronic systems were collected for comparison purposes. Study variables included system user satisfaction, willingness to report, number of reports, severity of the events, and efficiency of the reporting process. Results revealed that senior nurses were less willing to report events, nurses on internal medicine units had higher satisfaction than others, and lowest satisfaction was related to the time it took to file a report. In addition, the Web-based reporting system was used more often than the paper system. The percentages of events reported were significantly higher in the Web-based system in laboratory, environment/device, and incidents occurring in other units, whereas the proportions of reports involving bedsores and dislocation of endotracheal tubes were decreased. Finally, moderate injury event reporting decreased, whereas minor or minimal injury event reporting increased. The study recommends that the data entry process be simplified and the network system be improved to increase user satisfaction and reporting rates.

  10. Reporting Helicopter Emergency Medical Services in Major Incidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fattah, Sabina; Johnsen, Anne Siri; Sollid, Stephen J M

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Research on helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) in major incidents is predominately based on case descriptions reported in a heterogeneous fashion. Uniform data reported with a consensus-based template could facilitate the collection, analysis, and exchange of experiences...... interacted through e-mail. We asked these experts to define data variables and rank which were most important to report during an immediate prehospital medical response to a major incident. Five rounds were conducted. RESULTS: In the first round, the experts suggested 98 variables. After 5 rounds, 21...

  11. Wackenhut Services, Incorporated: Report from the DOE Voluntary Protection Program onsite review, August 10--14, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    This report summarizes the Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP) Review Team`s findings from the five-day onsite evaluation of Wackenhut Services, Inc. (WSI) at Savannah River Site (SRS), conducted August 10-14, 1998. The site was evaluated against the program requirements contained in US Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program, Part 1: Program Elements to determine its success in implementing the five DOE-VPP tenets. The Team determined that WSI has met in varying degrees, all the tenets of the DOE-VPP. In every case, WSI programs and procedures exceed the level or degree necessary for compliance with existing standards, DOE Orders, and guidelines. In addition, WSI has systematically integrated their occupational safety and health (OSH) program into management and work practices at all levels. WSI`s efforts toward implementing the five major DOE-VPP tenets are summarized.

  12. Self-reported participation in voluntary nonprescription syringe sales in California's Central Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollini, Robin A

    2017-08-11

    California Senate Bill 41 (SB41), effective January 2012, is a human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus prevention measure designed to expand syringe access among injection drug users (IDUs) by allowing pharmacies to sell syringes without a prescription. This study assesses self-reported implementation of SB41 and characterizes barriers amenable to intervention. Interviewer-administered survey. Fresno and Kern Counties, CA. Pharmacists and other pharmacy staff (n = 404) at 212 pharmacies. Self-reported nonprescription pharmacy sales to known or suspected IDUs. Overall, 29.3% of participants said their pharmacy would sell nonprescription syringes to a known or suspected IDU, whereas a far higher proportion (79.3%) would sell nonprescription syringes to a person with diabetes. More than one-half said that their pharmacy requires nonprescription syringe purchasers to enter their signature and name and address in a log book although that is not required under SB41. Fewer than 2 out of 3 participants (61.1%) knew that it is legal to sell nonprescription syringes to IDUs. That knowledge, as well as having syringe sales practices based on both store policy and discretion, were positively associated with IDU syringe sales after controlling for other factors. Working at an independent pharmacy, agreeing that only people with "medical conditions" such as diabetes should be able to buy syringes, and viewing syringe sales to IDUs as "not good business" were independently but negatively associated with IDU syringe sales. This study complements an earlier syringe purchase trial documenting low participation in voluntary nonprescription syringe sales under SB41 in Fresno and Kern Counties. In the absence of legislation requiring mandatory syringe sales, interventions should be developed to increase knowledge of the law and frame addiction as a medical condition, with a special focus on independent pharmacies. Informational interventions should stress the need to eliminate

  13. Critical incident reporting in anaesthesia: a prospective internal audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sunanda; Naithani, Udita; Brajesh, Saroj Kumar; Pathania, Vikrant Singh; Gupta, Apoorva

    2009-08-01

    Critical incident monitoring is useful in detecting new problems, identifying 'near misses' and analyzing factors or events leading to mishaps, which can be instructive for trainees. This study was aimed at investigating potential risk factors and analyze events leading to peri-operative critical incidents in order to develop a critical incident reporting system. We conducted a one year prospective analysis of voluntarily reported 24- hour-perioperative critical incidents, occurring in patients subjected to anaesthesia. During a one year period from December 2006 to December 2007, 14,134 anaesthetics were administered and 112(0.79%) critical incidents were reported with complete recovery in 71.42%(n=80) and mortality in 28.57% (n=32) cases. Incidents occurred maximally in 0-10 years age (23.21%), ASA 1(61.61%), in general surgery patients (43.75%), undergoing emergency surgery (52.46%) and during day time (75.89%). Incidence was more in the operating theatre (77.68%), during maintenance (32.04%) and post-operative phase (25.89%) and in patients who received general anaesthesia (75.89%). Critical incidents occurred clue to factors related to anaesthesia (42.85%), patient (37.50%) and surgery (16.96%). Among anaesthesia related critical incidents (42.85% n=48/112), respiratory events were maximum (66.66%) mainly at induction (37.5%) and emergence (43.75%), and factors responsible were human error (85.41%), pharmacological factors (10.41%) and equipment error (4.17%). Incidence of mortality was 22.6 per 10, 000 anaesthetics (32/14,314), mostly attributable to risk factors in patient (59.38%) as compared to anaesthesia (25%) and surgery (9.38%). There were 8 anaesthesia related deaths (5.6 per 10, 000 anaesthetics) where human error (75%) attributed to lack of judgment (67.50%) was an important causative factor. We conclude that critical incident reporting system may be a valuable part of quality assurance to develop policies to prevent recurrence and enhance patient

  14. Materials released from spill incidents reported to Iowa DNR and tracked in the Hazardous Substance Incident database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Materials released from spill incidents reported to Iowa DNR and tracked in the Hazardous Substance Incident database. These Emergency Release Notifications are...

  15. Incident reporting: a technique for studying police corruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vigneswaran, D.V.

    2011-01-01

    The study of police corruption faces seemingly insurmountable sampling and validity problems. This paper outlines an experimental technique for overcoming these issues by challenging the assumption that corruption is not prone to systematic observational research. Incident reporting combines a ‘comb

  16. Incident reporting: a technique for studying police corruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.V. Vigneswaran

    2011-01-01

    The study of police corruption faces seemingly insurmountable sampling and validity problems. This paper outlines an experimental technique for overcoming these issues by challenging the assumption that corruption is not prone to systematic observational research. Incident reporting combines a ‘comb

  17. Blind Persons Report Critical Incidents of Science and Mathematics Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sica, Morris G.

    This project identified over 500 critical incidents of successful and unsuccessful instruction in science and mathematics courses reported through interviews of 105 blind college students. The principal categories of effective teacher behavior included planned concrete learning experiences, creative use of learning materials, and detailed…

  18. Safety Incident Management Team Report for NIMLT Case 50796

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2017-01-17

    This is a report on the management of a patient safety incident involving BowelScreen and symptomatic colonoscopy services at Wexford General Hospital (WGH). The patient safety incident relates to the work of a Consultant Endoscopist (referred to as Clinician Y) employed by WGH who undertook screening colonoscopies on behalf of the BowelScreen Programme since the commencement of the screening programme in WGH in March 2013. Clinician Y also performed non-screening colonoscopies for the diagnosis of symptomatic patients as part of routine surgical service provision at WGH.\\r\

  19. Standardizing the classification of abortion incidents: the Procedural Abortion Incident Reporting and Surveillance (PAIRS) Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Diana; Upadhyay, Ushma D; Fjerstad, Mary; Battistelli, Molly F; Weitz, Tracy A; Paul, Maureen E

    2017-07-01

    To develop and validate standardized criteria for assessing abortion-related incidents (adverse events, morbidities, near misses) for first-trimester aspiration abortion procedures and to demonstrate the utility of a standardized framework [the Procedural Abortion Incident Reporting & Surveillance (PAIRS) Framework] for estimating serious abortion-related adverse events. As part of a California-based study of early aspiration abortion provision conducted between 2007 and 2013, we developed and validated a standardized framework for defining and monitoring first-trimester (≤14weeks) aspiration abortion morbidity and adverse events using multiple methods: a literature review, framework criteria testing with empirical data, repeated expert reviews and data-based revisions to the framework. The final framework distinguishes incidents resulting from procedural abortion care (adverse events) from morbidity related to pregnancy, the abortion process and other nonabortion related conditions. It further classifies incidents by diagnosis (confirmatory data, etiology, risk factors), management (treatment type and location), timing (immediate or delayed), seriousness (minor or major) and outcome. Empirical validation of the framework using data from 19,673 women receiving aspiration abortions revealed almost an equal proportion of total adverse events (n=205, 1.04%) and total abortion- or pregnancy-related morbidity (n=194, 0.99%). The majority of adverse events were due to retained products of conception (0.37%), failed attempted abortion (0.15%) and postabortion infection (0.17%). Serious or major adverse events were rare (n=11, 0.06%). Distinguishing morbidity diagnoses from adverse events using a standardized, empirically tested framework confirms the very low frequency of serious adverse events related to clinic-based abortion care. The PAIRS Framework provides a useful set of tools to systematically classify and monitor abortion-related incidents for first

  20. Voluntary Truck and Bus Fuel-Economy-Program marketing plan. Final technical report, September 29, 1980-January 29, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-01-01

    The aim of the program is to improve the utilization of fuel by commercial trucks and buses by updating and implementing specific approaches for educating and monitoring the trucking industry on methods and means of conserving fuels. The following outlines the marketing plan projects: increase use of program logo by voluntary program members and others; solicit trade publication membership and support; brief Congressional delegations on fuel conservation efforts; increase voluntary program presence before trade groups; increase voluntary program presence at truck and trade shows; create a voluntary program display for use at trade shows and in other areas; review voluntary program graphics; increase voluntary program membership; and produce placemats carrying fuel conservation messages; produce a special edition of Fuel Economy News, emphasizing the driver's involvement in fuel conservation; produce posters carrying voluntary program fuel conservation message. Project objectives, activities, and results for each project are summarized.

  1. Scrutinizing incident reporting in anaesthesia: why is an incident perceived as critical?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maaløe, R; la Cour, M; Hansen, A

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to measure the incidence and type of incidents that occurred in relation to anaesthesia and surgery during a 1-year period in six Danish hospitals. Furthermore, we wanted to identify risk factors for incidents, as well as risk factors for incidents being deemed...

  2. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project: Report from the DOE voluntary protection program onsite review, November 17--21, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-28

    This report summarizes the Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP) Review Team`s findings from the five-day onsite evaluation of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP), conducted November 17--21, 1997. The site was evaluated against the program requirements contained in ``US Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program, Part 1: Program Elements`` to determine its success in implementing the five tenets of DOE-VPP. DOE-VPP consists of three programs, with names and functions similar to those in OSHA`s VPP. These programs are STAR, MERIT, and DEMONSTRATION. The STAR program is the core of DOE-VPP. The program is aimed at truly outstanding protectors of employee safety and health. The MERIT program is a steppingstone for contractors and subcontractors that have good safety and health programs but need time and DOE guidance to achieve STAR status. The DEMONSTRATION program is rarely used; it allows DOE to recognize achievements in unusual situations about which DOE needs to learn more before determining approval requirements for the STAR status.

  3. Brief report: The bystander effect in cyberbullying incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machackova, Hana; Dedkova, Lenka; Mezulanikova, Katerina

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the bystander effect in cyberbullying. Using self-reported data from 257 Czech respondents who had witnessed a cyberbullying attack, we tested whether provided help decreased with increased number of other bystanders. We controlled for several individual and contextual factors, including empathy, social self-efficacy, empathic response to victimization, and relationship to the victim. Results showed that participants tend to help the victims more in incidents with only one or two other bystanders. We also found that, as in the "offline" realm, bystander effect is not linear: no significant differences were found between incidents with a moderate number (3-10) and a larger number of total bystanders. Our findings, thus, provide support for the presence of the bystander effect in cyberbullying.

  4. Report of incidence and mortality in China cancer registries, 2009

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wanqing Chen; Rongshou Zheng; Siwei Zhang; Ping Zhao; Guanglin Li; Lingyou Wu; Jie He

    2013-01-01

    The National Central Cancer Registry (NCCR) collected cancer registration data in 2009 from local cancer registries in 2012,and analyzed to describe cancer incidence and mortality in China.Methods.:On basis of the criteria of data quality from NCCR,data subrnitted from 104 registries were checked and evaluated.There were 72 registries' data qualified and accepted for cancer registry annual report in 2012.Descriptive analysis included incidence and mortality stratified by area (urban/rural),sex,age group and cancer site.The top 10 common cancers in different groups,proportion and cumulative rates were also calculated.Chinese population census in 1982 and Segi's population were used for age-standardized incidence/mortality rates.Results:All 72 cancer registries covered a total of 85,470,522 population (57,489,009 in urban and 27,981,513 in rural areas).The total new cancer incident cases and cancer deaths were 244,366 and 154,310,respectively.The morphology verified cases accounted for 67.23%,and 3.14% of incident cases only had information from death certifications.The crude incidence rate in Chinese cancer registration areas was 285.91/100,000(males 317.97/100,000,females 253.09/100,000),age-standardized incidence rates by Chinese standard population (ASIRC) and by world standard population (ASIRW) were 146.87/100,000 and 191.72/100,000 with the cumulative incidence rate (0-74 age years old) of 22.08%.The cancer incidence and ASIRC were 303.39/100,000 and 150.31/100,000 in urban areas whereas in rural areas,they were 249.98/100,000 and 139.68/100,000,respectively.The cancer mortality in Chinese cancer regist-ation areas was 180.54/100,000 (224.20/100,000 in males and 135.85/100,000 in females),age-standardized umortality rates by Chinese standard population (ASMRC) and by world standard population (ASMRW) were 85.06/100,000 and 115.65/100,000,and the cumulative incidence rate (0-74 age years old) was 12.94%.The cancer mortality and ASMRC were 181

  5. Voluntary Slavery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Frederick

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The permissibility of actions depends upon facts about the flourishing and separateness of persons. Persons differ from other creatures in having the task of discovering for themselves, by conjecture and refutation, what sort of life will fulfil them. Compulsory slavery impermissibly prevents some persons from pursuing this task. However, many people may conjecture that they are natural slaves. Some of these conjectures may turn out to be correct. In consequence, voluntary slavery, in which one person welcomes the duty to fulfil all the commands of another, is permissible. Life-long voluntary slavery contracts are impermissible because of human fallibility; but fixed-term slavery contracts should be legally enforceable. Each person has the temporarily alienable moral right to direct her own life.

  6. Voluntary Slavery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Frederick

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The permissibility of actions depends upon facts about the flourishing and separateness of persons. Persons differ from other creatures in having the task of discovering for themselves, by conjecture and refutation, what sort of life will fulfil them. Compulsory slavery impermissibly prevents some persons from pursuing this task. However, many people may conjecture that they are natural slaves. Some of these conjectures may turn out to be correct. In consequence, voluntary slavery, in which one person welcomes the duty to fulfil all the commands of another, is permissible. Life-long voluntary slavery contracts are impermissible because of human fallibility; but fixed-term slavery contracts should be legally enforceable. Each person has the temporarily alienable moral right to direct her own life.

  7. I-35w incident management and impact of incidents on freeway operations. Final report, 1976-1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lari, A.; Christianson, D.; Porter, S.

    1982-01-01

    I-35W and I-94 Traffic Management System have been in operation since 1974. As of December 1979, the TMS operation included six principal functional subsystems. These are (1) a 24 camera closed circuit television network (2) 38 ramp meter signals, (3) eleven express bus and/or carpool meter bypass ramps, (4) a motorist information program including changeable message signs, lane control signals, highway advisory radio and a traffic grade information sign, (5) the Traffic Management Center and (6) an incident detection and response program. The purpose of this study was twofold: first, available incident records accumulated on the TMS were analyzed to develop a comprehensive view of the types and quantities of incidents that have occurred. Second, the incident data base and companion volume and occupancy data was used to determine the impact of 'typical' incidents and the impact of the total incident problem. Included in the report is an analysis of incident types detected, mode of incident detection, duration of incidents, and incident response activities.

  8. The Thai Anesthesia Incident Monitoring Study (Thai AIMS) of anesthetic equipment failure/malfunction: an analysis of 1996 incident reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumaphanyo, Chaiyapruk; Charuluxananan, Somrat; Sriramatr, Dujduen; Pulnitiporn, Aksorn; Sriraj, Wimonrat

    2009-11-01

    The present study is a part of the multi-centered study of model of anesthesia relating adverse events in Thailand by incident report (The Thai Anesthesia Incident Monitoring Study or Thai AIMS). The objective was to identify the frequency distribution, contributing factors, and factors minimizing incident of equipment failure/malfunction. As a prospective descriptive research design, anesthesia providers reported the data as soon as the incidents of equipment failure/malfunction occurred. Standardized forms of incident report were then mailed to the center at Chulalongkorn University and three anesthesiologists reviewed the data. Ninety-two cases of equipment failure/malfunction were reported from 51 hospitals across Thailand Between January and June 2007, 92 incidents of equipment failure/malfunction were reported out of 1996 anesthesia-related incidents (4.6%). Failed/malfunctioned equipment included anesthetic circuit (17.4%), anesthesia machine (15.2%), capnography (15.2%), laryngoscope (15.2%), ventilator (12%), pulse oximeter (8.7%), vaporizer (4.3%), endotracheal tube (3.3%), sodalime (3.3%), and electrocardiogram (2.2%). All 16 anesthetic circuit incidents (100%) were detected by clinical signs whereas five incidents (31.3%) were detected firstly by monitors. All 14 laryngoscope malfunction (100%) were detected solely by clinical signs. Only one out of eight (12.5%) of pulse oximeter incidents was detected by clinical signs before the pulse oximeter itself. Three out of four (75%) incidents of vaporizer were detected by clinical signs before monitors. The majority of equipment malfunction was considered as related to anesthetic (69.6%) and system factors (69.6%) and 71.7% of incidents were preventable. Seventy-four incidents (80.4%) were caused by human error and, specifically, rule-based error in three fourths. Contributing factors were ineffective equipment, haste, lack of experience, ineffective monitors, and inadequate equipment. Factors minimizing

  9. 42 CFR 137.205 - Will this voluntary uniform data set reporting activity be required of all Self-Governance Tribes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... resources, hardware, software, and technical assistance to the Self-Governance Tribes to facilitate data... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Will this voluntary uniform data set reporting activity be required of all Self-Governance Tribes entering into a compact with the IHS under Title V? 137...

  10. Self reported incidence and morbidity of acute respiratory illness among deployed U.S. military in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryony W Soltis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Historically, respiratory infections have had a significant impact on U.S. military missions. Deployed troops are particularly at high risk due to close living conditions, stressful work environments and increased exposure to pathogens. To date, there are limited data available on acute respiratory illness (ARI among troops deployed in support of ongoing military operations, specifically Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF. METHODS: Using self-report data from two sources collected from troops deployed to Iraq, Afghanistan and the surrounding region, we analyzed incidence and risk factors for ARI. Military personnel on mid-deployment Rest & Recuperation (R&R or during redeployment were eligible to participate in the voluntary self-report survey. RESULTS: Overall, 39.5% reported having at least one ARI. Of these, 18.5% sought medical care and 33.8% reported having decreased job performance. The rate of self-reported ARI was 15 episodes per 100 person-months among those taking the voluntary survey, and 24.7 episodes per 100 person-months among those taking the clinic health questionnaire. Negative binomial regression analysis found female sex, Navy branch of service and lack of flush toilets to be independently associated with increased rates of ARI. Deployment to OIF, increasing age and higher rank were also positively associated with ARI risk. CONCLUSIONS: The overall percentage of deployed military personnel reporting at least one acute respiratory illness decreased since earlier parts of OIF/OEF. However, the reported effect on job performance increased tremendously. The most important factors associated with increased respiratory infection are female sex, Navy branch of service, lack of improved latrine facilities, deployment to OIF, increasing age and higher rank.

  11. Application of an aviation model of incident reporting and investigation to the neurosurgical scenario: method and preliminary data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferroli, Paolo; Caldiroli, Dario; Acerbi, Francesco; Scholtze, Maurizio; Piro, Alfonso; Schiariti, Marco; Orena, Eleonora F; Castiglione, Melina; Broggi, Morgan; Perin, Alessandro; DiMeco, Francesco

    2012-11-01

    Incident reporting systems are universally recognized as important tools for quality improvement in all complex adaptive systems, including the operating room. Nevertheless, introducing a safety culture among neurosurgeons is a slow process, and few studies are available in the literature regarding the implementation of an incident reporting system within a neurosurgical department. The authors describe the institution of an aviation model of incident reporting and investigation in neurosurgery, focusing on the method they have used and presenting some preliminary results. In 2010, the Inpatient Safety On-Board project was developed through cooperation between a team of human factor and safety specialists with aviation backgrounds (DgSky team) and the general manager of the Fondazione Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta. In 2011, after specific training in safety culture, the authors implemented an aviation-derived prototype of incident reporting within the Department of Neurosurgery. They then developed an experimental protocol to track, analyze, and categorize any near misses that happened in the operating room. This project officially started in January 2012, when a dedicated team of assessors was established. All members of the neurosurgical department were asked to report near misses on a voluntary, confidential, and protected form (Patient Incident Reporting System form, Besta Safety Management Programme). Reports were entered into an online database and analyzed by a dedicated team of assessors with the help of a facilitator, and an aviation-derived root cause analysis was performed. Since January 2012, 14 near misses were analyzed and classified. The near-miss contributing factors were mainly related to human factors (9 of 14 cases), technology (1 of 14 cases), organizational factors (3 of 14 cases), or procedural factors (1 of 14 cases). Implementing an incident reporting system is quite demanding; the process should involve all of the people who work within

  12. Effects on incident reporting after educating residents in patient safety: a controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansma José D

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical residents are key figures in delivering health care and an important target group for patient safety education. Reporting incidents is an important patient safety domain, as awareness of vulnerabilities could be a starting point for improvements. This study examined effects of patient safety education for residents on knowledge, skills, attitudes, intentions and behavior concerning incident reporting. Methods A controlled study with follow-up measurements was conducted. In 2007 and 2008 two patient safety courses for residents were organized. Residents from a comparable hospital acted as external controls. Data were collected in three ways: 1] questionnaires distributed before, immediately after and three months after the course, 2] incident reporting cards filled out by course participants during the course, and 3] residents' reporting data gathered from hospital incident reporting systems. Results Forty-four residents attended the course and 32 were external controls. Positive changes in knowledge, skills and attitudes were found after the course. Residents' intentions to report incidents were positive at all measurements. Participants filled out 165 incident reporting cards, demonstrating the skills to notice incidents. Residents who had reported incidents before, reported more incidents after the course. However, the number of residents reporting incidents did not increase. An increase in reported incidents was registered by the reporting system of the intervention hospital. Conclusions Patient safety education can have immediate and long-term positive effects on knowledge, skills and attitudes, and modestly influence the reporting behavior of residents.

  13. Voluntary disclosure of Value Chain in Financial Reports of Companies Brazilian Capital Open

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro da Costa Lopes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Managing the value chain with the aim to achieve competitive advantage in relation to their competitors and in order to reduce costs has become increasingly important for business organizations. The aim of this paper is to analyse whether Brazilian organisations listed on Sao Paulo´s Stock Exchange (BOVESPA publish information relating to value chain management in their financial reports. In addition, this research aims to investigate the potential relationtionship between evidentiation of this information and two independent variables, gross margin and number of pages. Content Analysis was adopted in the management report and report notes of the year 2011. The analysis was based on the strategic cost management framework developed by Wrubel et al. (2010. The sample selected includes the ten largest non financial organizations, according to their total assets. Despite the fact that publishing the value chain management is not compulsory, it was observed that the businesses studied present on average 30 sentences regarding the topic in their reports. The category internal and external value chain activities represents 54.58% of the total sentences found. It has been found that there is a significant positive correlation between the amount of sentences disclosed and page number of reports, however, it was found that the same does not occur when attempted to correlate the gross margin. As a consequence, the hypothesis that gross margin could be a motivation for higher volume of information regarding value chain was not confirmed.

  14. Voluntary medical male circumcision: a cross-sectional study comparing circumcision self-report and physical examination findings in Lesotho.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Goldzier Thomas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Overwhelming evidence, including three clinical trials, shows that male circumcision (MC reduces the risk of HIV infection among men. However, data from recent Lesotho Demographic and Health Surveys do not demonstrate MC to be protective against HIV. These contradictory findings could partially be due to inaccurate self-reported MC status used to estimate MC prevalence. This study describes MC characteristics among men applying for Lesotho Defence Force recruitment and seeks to assess MC self-reported accuracy through comparison with physical-examination-based data. METHODS AND FINDINGS: During Lesotho Defence Force applicant screening in 2009, 241 (77% of 312 men, aged 18-25 y, consented to a self-administered demographic and MC characteristic survey and physician-performed genital examination. The extent of foreskin removal was graded on a scale of 1 (no evidence of MC to 4 (complete MC. MC was self-reported by 27% (n = 64/239 of participants. Of the 64 men self-reporting being circumcised, physical exam showed that 23% had no evidence of circumcision, 27% had partial circumcision, and 50% had complete circumcision. Of the MCs reportedly performed by a medical provider, 3% were Grade 1 and 73% were Grade 4. Of the MCs reportedly performed by traditional circumcisers, 41% were Grade 1, while 28% were Grade 4. Among participants self-reporting being circumcised, the odds of MC status misclassification were seven times higher among those reportedly circumcised by initiation school personnel (odds ratio = 7.22; 95% CI = 2.29-22.75. CONCLUSIONS: Approximately 27% of participants self-reported being circumcised. However, only 50% of these men had complete MC as determined by a physical exam. Given this low MC self-report accuracy, countries scaling up voluntary medical MC (VMMC should obtain physical-exam-based MC data to guide service delivery and cost estimates. HIV prevention messages promoting VMMC should provide

  15. Board independence, internal information environment and voluntary disclosure of auditors’ reports on internal controls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Sun; Yang Yi; Bin Lin

    2012-01-01

    When there is high information asymmetry between directors and managers,independent directors do not have enough information to perform their functions. Only when faced with a good internal information environment can such directors acquire enough information to provide advice and monitor managers,and only under these conditions can increasing their proportion on the board effectively reduce agency problems, such as driving managers to disclose information to investors. Using a sample of Chinese listed firms that voluntarily disclose their auditors’ reports on internal controls from 2007 to 2009, this study explores how the information acquisition costs of independent directors affect their monitoring effectiveness by investigating the disclosure decisions of their internal control audits. We find that when the information asymmetry between insiders and outside directors is low and the proportion of independent directors on a board is high, a firm is more likely to voluntarily disclose its internal control audit report.

  16. Board independence, internal information environment and voluntary disclosure of auditors’ reports on internal controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Sun

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available When there is high information asymmetry between directors and managers, independent directors do not have enough information to perform their functions. Only when faced with a good internal information environment can such directors acquire enough information to provide advice and monitor managers, and only under these conditions can increasing their proportion on the board effectively reduce agency problems, such as driving managers to disclose information to investors. Using a sample of Chinese listed firms that voluntarily disclose their auditors’ reports on internal controls from 2007 to 2009, this study explores how the information acquisition costs of independent directors affect their monitoring effectiveness by investigating the disclosure decisions of their internal control audits. We find that when the information asymmetry between insiders and outside directors is low and the proportion of independent directors on a board is high, a firm is more likely to voluntarily disclose its internal control audit report.

  17. Semantic Language and Tools for Reporting Human Factors Incidents Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Incidents related to impaired human performance in space operations can be caused by environmental conditions, situational challenges, and operational deficiencies....

  18. Semantic Language and Tools for Reporting Human Factors Incidents Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Incidents related to impaired human performance in space operations can be caused by environmental conditions, situational challenges, and operational deficiencies....

  19. Medication Incidents Related to Automated Dose Dispensing in Community Pharmacies and Hospitals - A Reporting System Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Ka-Chun; van den Bemt, Patricia M. L. A.; Bouvy, Marcel L.; Wensing, Michel; De Smet, Peter A. G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Automated dose dispensing (ADD) is being introduced in several countries and the use of this technology is expected to increase as a growing number of elderly people need to manage their medication at home. ADD aims to improve medication safety and treatment adherence, but it may introduce new safety issues. This descriptive study provides insight into the nature and consequences of medication incidents related to ADD, as reported by healthcare professionals in community pharmacies and hospitals. Methods The medication incidents that were submitted to the Dutch Central Medication incidents Registration (CMR) reporting system were selected and characterized independently by two researchers. Main Outcome Measures Person discovering the incident, phase of the medication process in which the incident occurred, immediate cause of the incident, nature of incident from the healthcare provider's perspective, nature of incident from the patient's perspective, and consequent harm to the patient caused by the incident. Results From January 2012 to February 2013 the CMR received 15,113 incidents: 3,685 (24.4%) incidents from community pharmacies and 11,428 (75.6%) incidents from hospitals. Eventually 1 of 50 reported incidents (268/15,113 = 1.8%) were related to ADD; in community pharmacies more incidents (227/3,685 = 6.2%) were related to ADD than in hospitals (41/11,428 = 0.4%). The immediate cause of an incident was often a change in the patient's medicine regimen or relocation. Most reported incidents occurred in two phases: entering the prescription into the pharmacy information system and filling the ADD bag. Conclusion A proportion of incidents was related to ADD and is reported regularly, especially by community pharmacies. In two phases, entering the prescription into the pharmacy information system and filling the ADD bag, most incidents occurred. A change in the patient's medicine regimen or relocation was the immediate causes of an incident

  20. An Evaluation of Departmental Radiation Oncology Incident Reports: Anticipating a National Reporting System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terezakis, Stephanie A., E-mail: stereza1@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Harris, Kendra M. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Ford, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Michalski, Jeff [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); DeWeese, Theodore [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Santanam, Lakshmi; Mutic, Sasa; Gay, Hiram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Systems to ensure patient safety are of critical importance. The electronic incident reporting systems (IRS) of 2 large academic radiation oncology departments were evaluated for events that may be suitable for submission to a national reporting system (NRS). Methods and Materials: All events recorded in the combined IRS were evaluated from 2007 through 2010. Incidents were graded for potential severity using the validated French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN) 5-point scale. These incidents were categorized into 7 groups: (1) human error, (2) software error, (3) hardware error, (4) error in communication between 2 humans, (5) error at the human-software interface, (6) error at the software-hardware interface, and (7) error at the human-hardware interface. Results: Between the 2 systems, 4407 incidents were reported. Of these events, 1507 (34%) were considered to have the potential for clinical consequences. Of these 1507 events, 149 (10%) were rated as having a potential severity of ≥2. Of these 149 events, the committee determined that 79 (53%) of these events would be submittable to a NRS of which the majority was related to human error or to the human-software interface. Conclusions: A significant number of incidents were identified in this analysis. The majority of events in this study were related to human error and to the human-software interface, further supporting the need for a NRS to facilitate field-wide learning and system improvement.

  1. Incidence Of Predominant Desicion Style And Degree Of Cultural Uncertainty On Effectiveness Of Desicions Taken By Voluntary Military Personnel In Peace Missions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piñeyro, Diego Raúl

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Argentine militaries who voluntarily take part in Peace Keeping Operations, have to take decisions in environments which are influenced by multicultural contexts and uncertainty (Azzollini, Torres, Depaula, Clotet & Nistal, 2010. The effectiveness of their actions requires the use of intuitive and/or analytical processing strategies according to the circumstances. The aim of this work is to analyze the relationships between the predominant decisive style and its effectiveness under different levels of cultural uncertainty. A sample of 116 voluntary servicemen was evaluated in different situations in which such variables were experimentally manipulated. Results show that the subjects with a predominantly analytical style has taken decisions much more effective (f = 17.069; gl = 1; p = .000 being more effective their strategies in situations of low uncertainty. Meanwhile those subjects, with a predominantly intuitive style but with a minor level of general effectiveness, are more effective in the decision making contexts of high uncertainty (f = 5.450; gl = 1; p = .02.

  2. Critical incidents related to cardiac arrests reported to the Danish Patient Safety Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Oluf; Maaløe, Rikke; Andersen, Henning Boje

    2010-01-01

    Background Critical incident reports can identify areas for improvement in resuscitation practice. The Danish Patient Safety Database is a mandatory reporting system and receives critical incident reports submitted by hospital personnel. The aim of this study is to identify, analyse and categorize...... critical incidents related to cardiac arrests reported to the Danish Patient Safety Database. Methods The search terms “cardiac arrest” and “resuscitation” were used to identify reports in the Danish Patient Safety Database. Identified critical incidents were then classified into categories. Results One...... hundred and seven reports describing 122 separate incidents were identified and classified into incidents related to: alerting the resuscitation team (n = 32; 26%), human performance (n = 22; 18%), equipment failure (n = 19; 16%), resuscitation equipment not available (n = 13; 11%), physical environment...

  3. Voluntary Disclosure Reporting Program -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The VDRP system is a Web-based application which supports the FAA and the Office of Aviation Safety (AVS) Flight Standards Service (AFS) with the online acquisition,...

  4. Self-reported impact of caregiving on voluntary home-based caregivers in Mutale Municipality, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ntsieni S. Mashau

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The establishment of home-based care (HBC programmes in developing countries has resulted in a shift of burden from hospitals to communities where palliative care is provided by voluntary home-based caregivers.Aim: The study investigated the impact of caregiving on voluntary home-based caregivers.Setting: The study was conducted at HBC organisations located in Mutale Municipality of Limpopo Province, South Africa.Methods: A quantitative cross-sectional descriptive survey design was applied to investigate the impact of caregiving on voluntary home-based caregivers. The sample was comprised of (N = 190 home-based caregivers. Home-based caregivers provide care to people in need of care in their homes, such as orphans, the elderly and those suffering from chronic illnesses such as tuberculosis, HIV and/or AIDS, cancer and stroke. Self-administered questionnaires were used to collect data which were analysed descriptively using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software, Version 20.Results: The results showed that 101 (53.2% participants were worried about their financial security because they were not registered as workers, whilst 74 (39.0% participants were always worried about getting infection from their clients because they often do not have protective equipment.Conclusion: Voluntary home-based caregivers have an important role in the provision of palliative care to people in their own homes, and therefore, the negative caregiving impact on the lives of caregivers may compromise the provision of quality palliative care.

  5. Report of Incidence and Mortality in China Cancer Registries, 2008

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan-qing Chen; Rong-shou Zheng; Si-wei Zhang; Ni Li; Ping Zhao; Guang-lin Li; Liang-you Wu; Jie He

    2012-01-01

    Objective:Annual cancer incidence and mortality in 2008 were provided by National Central Cancer Registry in China,which data were collected from population-based cancer registries in 2011.Methods:There were 56 registries submitted their data in 2008.After checking and evaluating the data quality,total 41 registries' data were accepted and pooled for analysis.Incidence and mortality rates by area (urban or rural areas) were assessed,as well as the age-and sex-specific rates,age-standardized rates,proportions and cumulative rate.Results:The coverage population of the 41 registries was 66,138,784 with 52,158,495 in urban areas and 13,980,289 in rural areas.There were 197,833 new cancer cases and 122,136 deaths in cancer with mortality to incidence ratio of 0.62.The morphological verified rate was 69.33%,and 2.23% of cases were identified by death certificate only.The crude cancer incidence rate in all areas was 299.12/100,000 (330.16/100,000 in male and 267.56/100,000 in female) and the age-standardized incidence rates by Chinese standard population (ASIRC) and world standard population (ASIRW) were 148.75/100,000 and 194.99/100,000,respectively.The cumulative incidence rate (0-74 years old) was of 22.27%.The crude incidence rate in urban areas was higher than that in rural areas.However,after adjusted by age,the incidence rate in urban was lower than that in rural.The crude cancer mortality was 184.67/100,000 (228.14/100,000 in male and 140.48/100,000 in female),and the age-standardized mortality rates by Chinese standard population (ASMRC) and by world population were 84.36/100,000 and 114.32/100,000,respectively.The cumulative mortality rate (0-74 years old) was of 12.89%.Age-adjusted mortality rates in urban areas were lower than that in rural areas.The most common cancer sites were lung,stomach,colon-rectum,liver,esophagus,pancreas,brain,lymphoma,breast and cervix which accounted for 75% of all cancer incidence.Lung cancer was the leading cause of

  6. Safety and Health Standard 110: Incident/accident reporting and investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sones, K. [West Kootenay Power, BC (Canada)

    1999-10-01

    Incident/accident reporting requirements in effect at West Kootenay Power are discussed. Details provided include definitions of low risk, high risk, and critical events, the incidents to be reported, the nature of the reports, the timelines, the investigation to be undertaken for each type of incident/accident, counselling services available to employees involved in serious incidents, and the procedures to be followed in accidents involving serious injury to non-employees. The emphasis is on the `critical five` high risk events and the procedures relating to them.

  7. Lessons learnt from the development of the Patient Safety Incidents Reporting an Learning System for the Spanish National Health System: SiNASP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo-Gutiérrez, Paula; Bañeres-Amella, Joaquim; Sierra, Eduardo; Casal, Jesús; Agra, Yolanda

    2014-01-01

    To describe the development process and characteristics of a patient safety incidents reporting system to be implemented in the Spanish National Health System, based on the context and the needs of the different stakeholders. Literature review and analysis of most relevant reporting systems, identification of more than 100 stakeholder's (patients, professionals, regional governments representatives) expectations and requirements, analysis of the legal context, consensus of taxonomy, development of the software and pilot test. Patient Safety Events Reporting and Learning system (Sistema de Notificación y Aprendizajepara la Seguridad del Paciente, SiNASP) is a generic reporting system for all types of incidents related to patient safety, voluntary, confidential, non punitive, anonymous or nominative with anonimization, system oriented, with local analysis of cases and based on the WHO International Classification for Patient Safety. The electronic program has an on-line form for reporting, a software to manage the incidents and improvement plans, and a scoreboard with process indicators to monitor the system. The reporting system has been designed to respond to the needs and expectations identified by the stakeholders, taking into account the lessons learned from the previous notification systems, the characteristics of the National Health System and the existing legal context. The development process presented and the characteristics of the system provide a comprehensive framework that can be used for future deployments of similar patient safety systems. Copyright © 2013 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Case report of critical incident stress debriefing through translators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    True, P K

    2000-01-01

    The United States Navy has SPRINT (Special Psychiatric Rapid Intervention Team) teams stationed in National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, Naval Regional Medical Center in Portsmouth, Virginia, Naval Regional Medical Center in San Diego, California, and US Naval Hospital, Bremerton, Washington. These teams are large units of psychiatrists, psychologists, nurses, chaplains, and hospital corpsmen who are trained in the techniques of Critical Incident Stress using the model developed by Jeffrey T. Mitchell and George S. Everly, Jr. (Mitchell & Everly, 1996; Everly & Mitchell, 1999). In addition to these large SPRINT teams, smaller Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) teams exist at several Navy commands, including US Naval Hospital, Jacksonville, Florida. Since the formation of SPRINT teams, there have been several hundred interventions done at various military sites. This article discusses an intervention that was particularly unusual in that it was done by US military personnel for the members of the Argentine military, none of whom could speak English.

  9. 75 FR 922 - Notification and Reporting of Aircraft Accidents or Incidents and Overdue Aircraft, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-07

    ... SAFETY BOARD 49 CFR Part 830 Notification and Reporting of Aircraft Accidents or Incidents and Overdue Aircraft, and Preservation of Aircraft Wreckage, Mail, Cargo, and Records AGENCY: National Transportation... notification and reporting requirements regarding aircraft accidents or incidents. In particular, the NTSB is...

  10. Using Pareto Analysis with Trend Analysis: Statistical Techniques to Investigate Incident Reports within a Housing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Andrew L.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine trends and difficulties concerning student incident reports within the residence halls as they relate to the incident reporting system from the Department of Housing and Residential Life at a Southeastern Doctoral I Granting Institution. This study used the frequency distributions of each classified…

  11. 77 FR 53779 - Reports by Air Carriers on Incidents Involving Animals During Air Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-04

    ... Incidents Involving Animals During Air Transport AGENCY: Office of the Secretary (OST), Department of... comment period of an NPRM on the reporting of incidents involving animals during air transport that was... animal during air transport. The NPRM proposed to: (1) Expand the reporting requirement to U.S....

  12. 75 FR 35329 - Notification and Reporting of Aircraft Accidents or Incidents and Overdue Aircraft, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-22

    ... SAFETY BOARD 49 CFR Part 830 Notification and Reporting of Aircraft Accidents or Incidents and Overdue... addition, the NTSB is correcting a footnote because the NTSB no longer has a regional office in Parsippany... NPRM titled ``Notification and Reporting of Aircraft Accidents or Incidents and Overdue Aircraft, and...

  13. Risk factors for radiotherapy incidents and impact of an online electronic reporting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, David W; Cheetham, Lynn; te Marvelde, Luc; Bressel, Mathias; Kron, Tomas; Gill, Suki; Tai, Keen Hun; Ball, David; Rose, William; Silva, Linas; Foroudi, Farshad

    2014-08-01

    To ascertain the rate, type, significance, trends and the potential risk factors associated with radiotherapy incidents in a large academic department. Data for all radiotherapy activities from July 2001 to January 2011 were reviewed from radiotherapy incident reporting forms. Patient and treatment data were obtained from the radiotherapy record and verification database (MOSAIQ) and the patient database (HOSPRO). Logistic regression analyses were performed to determine variables associated with radiotherapy incidents. In that time, 65,376 courses of radiotherapy were delivered with a reported incident rate of 2.64 per 100 courses. The rate of incidents per course increased (1.96 per 100 courses to 3.52 per 100 courses, p5% deviation in dose (10.50 to 2.75%, p<0.001) had decreased after the introduction of an online electronic reporting system. The following variables were associated with an increased rate of incidents: afternoon treatment time, paediatric patients, males, inpatients, palliative plans, head-and-neck, skin, sarcoma and haematological malignancies. In general, complex plans were associated with higher incidence rates. Radiotherapy incidents were infrequent and most did not result in significant dose deviation. A number of risk factors were identified and these could be used to highlight high-risk cases in the future. Introduction of an online electronic reporting system resulted in a significant increase in the number of incidents being reported. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Voluntary Environmental Governance Arrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, J.

    2012-01-01

    Voluntary environmental governance arrangements have focal attention in studies on environmental policy, regulation and governance. The four major debates in the contemporary literature on voluntary environmental governance arrangements are studied. The literature falls short of sufficiently

  15. Voluntary Environmental Governance Arrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, J.

    2012-01-01

    Voluntary environmental governance arrangements have focal attention in studies on environmental policy, regulation and governance. The four major debates in the contemporary literature on voluntary environmental governance arrangements are studied. The literature falls short of sufficiently specify

  16. Voluntary Service System (VSS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Voluntary Service System (VSS) is a national-level application which replaced the site-based Voluntary Timekeeping System (VTK). VTK was used for many years at the...

  17. A Profile of Criminal Incidents at School: Results from the 2003-05 National Crime Victimization Survey Crime Incident Report NCES 2010-318

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, Sally A.; Bauer, Lynn; Neiman, Samantha

    2010-01-01

    This report provides estimates of criminal incidents that occur at school. Incident-level data were obtained from the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS), the nation's primary source of information on criminal victimization and criminal incidents in the United States. The NCVS collects demographic information on respondents in the NCVS…

  18. Schistosomal appendicitis: Incidence in Japan and a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tadashi Terada

    2009-01-01

    Schistosomal appendicitis is very rare in developed countries like the USA, Europe, and Japan. The author reviewed 311 pathologic archival specimens of vermiform appendix over the past 10 years. One case of schistosomal appendicitis was recognized. Therefore, the incidence of this disease was 0.32% in all appendices surgically resected in our hospital. The patient was a 41-year-old woman presenting with lower abdominal pain. She was a sailor traveling to many countries including endemic areas. Physical examination, laboratory data, and imaging modalities suggested an acute appendicitis, and appendectomy was performed under the diagnosis of ordinary appendicitis. Histologically, numerous schistosomal eggs were present in the vasculatures throughout the appendiceal walls. Some of the eggs were calcified. Stromal foreign body reaction was also recognized. The appendicitis was phlegmonous consisting of severe infiltrations of neutrophils and eosinophils. Acute serositis was also noted. Examination of feces revealed numerous eggs of Schistosoma mansoni. Clinicians should be aware of schistosomal appendicitis.

  19. China Initiates Voluntary Certification of Public Security Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Reporters learned from the Certification and Accreditation Administration of China(CNCA)that burglar-proof door became the first batch of voluntary certification product in public security products.China has formally initiated voluntary certification of public security products.

  20. 18 CFR 12.10 - Reporting safety-related incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... at the project, the applicant or licensee must report that drowning or other accident to the Regional... the Regional Engineer any condition affecting the safety of a project or projects works, as defined in...)(1), the applicant or licensee must submit to the Regional Engineer a written report on the condition...

  1. Cancer incidence in south-east Nigeria: a report from Nnewi Cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cancer incidence in south-east Nigeria: a report from Nnewi Cancer Registry. ... Journal Home > Vol 29, No 1-2 (2017) > ... 000 per annum and age-standardized incidence rates per 100 000 per annum using the world standard population.

  2. SU-E-T-511: Inter-Rater Variability in Classification of Incidents in a New Incident Reporting System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pappas, D; Reis, S; Ali, A [Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY (United States); Kapur, A [Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To determine how consistent the results of different raters are when reviewing the same cases within the Radiation Oncology Incident Learning System (ROILS). Methods Three second-year medical physics graduate students filled out incident reports in spreadsheets set up to mimic ROILS. All students studied the same 33 cases and independently entered their assessments, for a total of 99 reviewed cases. The narratives for these cases were obtained from a published International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) report which included shorter narratives selected from the Radiation Oncology Safety Information System (ROSIS) database. Each category of questions was reviewed to see how consistent the results were by utilizing free-marginal multirater kappa analysis. The percentage of cases where all raters shared full agreement or full disagreement was recorded to show which questions were answered consistently by multiple raters for a given case. The consistency among the raters was analyzed between ICRP and ROSIS cases to see if either group led to more reliable results. Results The categories where all raters agreed 100 percent in their choices were the event type (93.94 percent of cases 0.946 kappa) and the likelihood of the event being harmful to the patient (42.42 percent of cases 0.409 kappa). The categories where all raters disagreed 100 percent in their choices were the dosimetric severity scale (39.39 percent of cases 0.139 kappa) and the potential future toxicity (48.48 percent of cases 0.205 kappa). ROSIS had more cases where all raters disagreed than ICRP (23.06 percent of cases compared to 15.58 percent, respectively). Conclusion Despite reviewing the same cases, the results among the three raters was widespread. ROSIS narratives were shorter than ICRP, which suggests that longer narratives lead to more consistent results. This study shows that the incident reporting system can be optimized to yield more consistent results.

  3. Plutonium Reclamation Facility incident response project progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austin, B.A.

    1997-11-25

    This report provides status of Hanford activities in response to process deficiencies highlighted during and in response to the May 14, 1997, explosion at the Plutonium Reclamation Facility. This report provides specific response to the August 4, 1997, memorandum from the Secretary which requested a progress report, in 120 days, on activities associated with reassessing the known and evaluating new vulnerabilities (chemical and radiological) at facilities that have been shut down, are in standby, are being deactivated or have otherwise changed their conventional mode of operation in the last several years. In addition, this report is intended to provide status on emergency response corrective activities as requested in the memorandum from the Secretary on August 28, 1997. Status is also included for actions requested in the second August 28, 1997, memorandum from the Secretary, regarding timely notification of emergencies.

  4. [Learning from mistakes in hospitals. A system perspective on errors and incident reporting systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofinger, G

    2009-06-01

    Analysis of incidents and near-incidents is an important factor for continuous improvement in patient safety in hospitals and for the promotion of organizational learning. From a system perspective, accidents occur when decision-making at several levels of a working system is faulty and the safety barriers fail. Human error is inevitable but accidents are not. Errors can be used as an opportunity for organizational learning and this is especially true for incidents when patients come to no harm. Starting with explanations of a system perspective on errors, this paper deals with the prerequisites for organizational learning and general rules for establishing incident reporting systems in hospitals.

  5. Diagnostic strategies and the incidence of prostate cancer:reasons for the low reported incidence of prostate cancer in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Zhang; Shan Wu; Li-Rong Guo; Xue-Jian Zhao

    2009-01-01

    We have analysed the reasons for the low reported incidence of prostate cancer in China and argue for early diagnosis and treatment of this disease.According to the 2002 database of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC),the age-standardized incidence of prostate cancer in China is 1.6/105 person years (PY),with a mortality rate of 1.0/105PY and mortality-to-incidence rate ratio (MR/IR)=0.63.The MR/IR ratio of prostate cancer in China was found to be higher than the average in Asia (MR/IR=0.57) and much higher than that in North America (MR/IR=0.13).These data indicate that in China most prostate cancers were in the advanced stages at the time of diagnosis,and that patients had a short survival time thereafter.In 2004,Stamey et al.reported a retrospective American study of prostate cancer for the years 1983-2003.It was shown that most cases of prostate cancer detected by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening were in the advanced stage at the start of this 20-year period.These early follow-up data are quite similar to the results obtained from mass PSA screening of elderly men in Changchun,China.However,after the American programmes for early diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer were accepted,tumours were diagnosed at earlier stages.On the basis of these findings,mass screening should be performed in the whole of China using serum PSA to facilitate early diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer.

  6. Department of Veterans Affairs - Monthly Report to Congress of Data Incidents (April 2014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This is a monthly report that the VA Office of Information Technology provides to congress about data incidents that took place during the month (April 2014). The...

  7. Incident reporting by acute pain service at a tertiary care university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliya Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Reporting of untoward incidents and their regular analysis by APS is recommended to ensure high-quality patient care and to provide guidance in making teaching strategies and guidelines to improve patient safety.

  8. Incident Reporting and Lessons Learned [Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this procedure is to create an effective and consistent process to report all incidences as defined by this procedure - maintain and distribute...

  9. Change in Reported Lyme Disease Incidence in the Northeast and Upper Midwest, 1991-2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This indicator shows how reported Lyme disease incidence has changed by state since 1991, based on the number of new cases per 100,000 people. The total change has...

  10. Rating and Classification of Incident Reporting in Radiology in a Large Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Mohammad; Aran, Shima; Shaqdan, Khalid W; Abujudeh, Hani H

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a rate of safety incident report of adverse events in a large academic radiology department and to share the various types that may occur. This is a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant, institutional review board-approved study. Consent requirement was waived. All incident reports from April 2006-September 2012 were retrieved. Events were further classified as follows: diagnostic test orders, identity document or documentation or consent, safety or security or conduct, service coordination, surgery or procedure, line or tube, fall, medication or intravenous safety, employee general incident, environment or equipment, adverse drug reaction (ADR), skin or tissue, and diagnosis or treatment. Overall rates and subclassification rates were calculated. There were 10,224 incident reports and 4,324,208 radiology examinations (rate = 0.23%). The highest rates of the incident reports were due to diagnostic test orders (34.3%; 3509/10,224), followed by service coordination (12.2%; 1248/10,224) and ADR (10.3%; 1052/4,324,208). The rate of incident reporting was highest in inpatient (0.30%; 2949/970,622), followed by emergency radiology (0.22%; 1500/672,958) and outpatient (0.18%; 4957/2,680,628). Approximately 48.5% (4947/10,202) of incidents had no patient harm and did not affect the patient, followed by no patient harm, but did affect the patient (35.2%, 3589/10,202), temporary or minor patient harm (15.5%, 1584/10,202), permanent or major patient harm (0.6%, 62/10,202), and patient death (0.2%, 20/10,202). Within an academic radiology department, the rate of incident reports was only 0.23%, usually did not harm the patient, and occurred at higher rates in inpatients. The most common incident type was in the category of diagnostic test orders, followed by service coordination, and ADRs.

  11. Analysis of immediate transfusion incidents reported in a regional blood bank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Lemos de Sousa Neto

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Blood transfusion is imperative when treating certain patients; however, it is not risk free. In addition to the possible transmission of contagious infectious diseases, incidents can occur immediately after transfusion and at a later time. AIMS: This study aimed to examine the immediate transfusion incidents reported in a regional blood bank in the state of Minas Gerais between December 2006 and December 2009. A retrospective quantitative epidemiological study was conducted. Data were obtained from 202 transfusion incident reports of 42 health institutions served by the blood bank. Data processing and analysis were carried out using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS software. RESULTS: The rate of immediate transfusion incidents reported in the period was 0.24%; febrile non-hemolytic reactions were the most common type of incident (56.4%. The most frequent clinical manifestations listed in transfusion incident reports were chills (26.9% and fever (21.6%. There was a statistically significant association (p-value < 0.05 between the infusion of platelet concentrates and febrile non-hemolytic reactions and between fresh frozen plasma and febrile non-hemolytic reaction. The majority (73.3% of transfused patients who suffered immediate transfusion incidents had already been transfused and 36.5% of the cases had previous transfusion incident reports. CONCLUSIONS: Data from the present study corroborate the implementation of new professional training programs aimed at blood transfusion surveillance. These measures should emphasize prevention, identification and reporting of immediate transfusion incidents aiming to increase blood transfusion quality and safety.

  12. Factors that affect voluntary vaccination of children in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shono, Aiko; Kondo, Masahide

    2015-03-10

    Some important vaccinations are not included in the routine childhood immunization schedule in Japan. Voluntary vaccinations are usually paid as an out-of-pocket expense. Low voluntary vaccination coverage rates and high target disease incidence are assumed to be a consequence of voluntary vaccination. Therefore, this study aimed to explore factors associated with voluntary vaccination patterns in children. We conducted an online survey of 1243 mothers from a registered survey panel who had at least one child 2 months to vaccination mainly correlated positively with annual household income and mothers' positive opinions about voluntary vaccinations, but negatively with number of children. Financial support, especially for low income households and households with more than one child, may motivate parents to vaccinate their children. Communication is also an important issue. More opportunities for education and information about voluntary vaccinations should be provided to mothers without distinguishing between voluntary and routine vaccination.

  13. Flight Attendant Fatigue. Part IV. Analysis of Incident Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    other airline not listed above that operates within a specific niche market [e.g., hawaiian Airlines]) 3. When did your air carrier become involved...into JFk, ny. 592062 Narrative: reported to work on Jul/ Wed /03 at xA10. Boarded airplane at approximately xA35 and departed ZZZ. Captain discovered...Something must be done to change or eliminate the hawaiian island turns, especially the all night turns. My concerns are not regarding violations

  14. 75 FR 5640 - Pipeline Safety: Implementation of Revised Incident/Accident Report Forms for Distribution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    .../Accident Report Forms for Distribution Systems, Gas Transmission and Gathering Systems, and Hazardous... PHMSA`s Revised Incident/Accident Report Forms for Gas Distribution Systems, Gas Transmission and... Transmission and Gathering Systems, and (3) PHMSA Form F 7000-1--Accident Report for Hazardous Liquid...

  15. Westinghouse Savannah River Company: Report from the DOE Voluntary Protection Program onsite reviews, February 24--March 7, 1997, and June 15--19, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    This report summarizes the Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP) Initial and Update Review Teams` findings from the onsite evaluations of the Westinghouse Savannah River Site (SRS), conducted February 24--March 7, 1997, and June 15-19, 1998. The site was evaluated against the program requirements contained in US Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program, Part 1: Program Elements to determine its success in implementing the five tenets of DOE-VPP. The Initial Review Team concluded that WSRC met or surpassed all DOE-VPP requirements, with the exception of 12 minor findings and 5 recommendations. WSRC was asked to resolve the findings within 90 days. During a follow-up visit in January 1996, representatives of the Team verified that all 90-day actions were completed. The Update Team detected though that the program did not demonstrate thorough and meaningful employee involvement. The ability to attain and sustain VPP-level performance on employee involvement is a significant challenge. Large companies with multiple layers of management and geographically disperse personnel have particular difficulty.

  16. Statistical analysis of incidents reported in the Greek Petrochemical Industry for the period 1997-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstandinidou, Myrto; Nivolianitou, Zoe; Markatos, Nikolaos; Kiranoudis, Chris

    2006-07-31

    This paper makes an analysis of all reported accidents and incidents in the Greek Petrochemical Industry for the period spanning from 1997 to 2003. The work performed is related to the analysis of important parameters of the incidents, their inclusion in a database adequately designed for the purposes of this analysis and an importance assessment of this reporting scheme. Indeed, various stakeholders have highlighted the importance of a reporting system for industrial accidents and incidents. The European Union has established for this purpose the Major Accident Reporting System (MARS) for the reporting of major accidents in the Member States. However, major accidents are not the only measure that can characterize the safety status of an establishment; neither are the former the only events from which important lessons can be learned. Near misses, industrial incidents without major consequences, as well as occupational accidents could equally supply with important findings the interested analyst, while statistical analysis of these incidents could give significant insight in the understanding and the prevention of similar incidents or major accidents in the future. This analysis could be more significant, if each industrial sector was separately analyzed, as the authors do for the petrochemical sector in the present article.

  17. Quality review of an adverse incident reporting system and root cause analysis of serious adverse surgical incidents in a teaching hospital of Scotland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khorsandi Maziar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A significant proportion of surgical patients are unintentionally harmed during their hospital stay. Root Cause Analysis (RCA aims to determine the aetiology of adverse incidents that lead to patient harm and produce a series of recommendations, which would minimise the risk of recurrence of similar events, if appropriately applied to clinical practice. A review of the quality of the adverse incident reporting system and the RCA of serious adverse incidents at the Department of Surgery of Ninewells hospital, in Dundee, United Kingdom was performed. Methods The Adverse Incident Management (AIM database of the Department of Surgery of Ninewells Hospital was retrospectively reviewed. Details of all serious (red, sentinel incidents recorded between May 2004 and December 2009, including the RCA reports and outcomes, where applicable, were reviewed. Additional related information was gathered by interviewing the involved members of staff. Results The total number of reported surgical incidents was 3142, of which 81 (2.58% cases had been reported as red or sentinel. 19 of the 81 incidents (23.4% had been inappropriately reported as red. In 31 reports (38.2% vital information with regards to the details of the adverse incidents had not been recorded. In 12 cases (14.8% the description of incidents was of poor quality. RCA was performed for 47 cases (58% and only 12 cases (15% received recommendations aiming to improve clinical practice. Conclusion The results of our study demonstrate the need for improvement in the quality of incident reporting. There are enormous benefits to be gained by this time and resource consuming process, however appropriate staff training on the use of this system is a pre-requisite. Furthermore, sufficient support and resources are required for the implementation of RCA recommendations in clinical practice.

  18. Community pharmacy incident reporting: a new tool for community pharmacies in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Certina; Hung, Patricia; Lee, Gary; Kadija, Medina

    2010-01-01

    Incident reporting offers insight into a variety of intricate processes in healthcare. However, it has been found that medication incidents are under reported in the community pharmacy setting. The Community Pharmacy Incident Reporting (CPhIR) program was created by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices Canada specifically for incident reporting in the community pharmacy setting in Canada. The initial development of key elements for CPhIR included several focus-group teleconferences with pharmacists from Ontario and Nova Scotia. Throughout the development and release of the CPhIR pilot, feedback from pharmacists and pharmacy technicians was constantly incorporated into the reporting program. After several rounds of iterative feedback, testing and consultation with community pharmacy practitioners, a final version of the CPhIR program, together with self-directed training materials, is now ready to launch. The CPhIR program provides users with a one-stop platform to report and record medication incidents, export data for customized analysis and view comparisons of individual and aggregate data. These unique functions allow for a detailed analysis of underlying contributing factors in medication incidents. A communication piece for pharmacies to share their experiences is in the process of development. To ensure the success of the CPhIR program, a patient safety culture must be established. By gaining a deeper understanding of possible causes of medication incidents, community pharmacies can implement system-based strategies for quality improvement and to prevent potential errors from occurring again in the future. This article highlights key features of the CPhIR program that will assist community pharmacies to improve their drug distribution system and, ultimately, enhance patient safety.

  19. E-Community: Mobile application for reporting incidents of public services of a city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Suárez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the mobile application call E-Community, an application of a social nature with the objective that the civilian population in the city of La Paz, Baja California Sur, Mexico, have an alternative to report incidents that deal with services public. Generally, citizens reported by telephone different types of incidents such as traffic accidents, water leaks, lighting shabby, fire, garbage collection, however sometimes the phone is not attended for various reasons so regularly only remains in the record attempt. E-community, is a mobile application that aims to make ads via a click, registering the report in a database making use of Geographical Positioning System (GPS and a smarthphone with the option to write a message describing details of the this information, this message is routed through the operations center to the appropriate authority depending on incident.

  20. Application of Hospital Information Systems-Construction of an Incident Reporting System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yii-Ching Lee

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study depicts hospitals’ need to establish an incident reporting system to avoid disputes and enhance reporting intention. A series of implement are provided, including an RCA team is partied to make improvements based on the root cause of a case, a reward system needs to be provided to encourage the employees’ intentions to report incident events, and the root causes is analyzed to deliver the improvement measures. In addition, Medical Quality and Patient Safety Committee should be organized to promote better medical quality and patient safety. Last, the promotion of patient safety culture should pay more attention to the implement process, rather than separate strategies.

  1. Incidence and pattern of 12 years of reported transfusion adverse events in Zimbabwe: A retrospective analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mafirakureva, Nyashadzaishe; Khoza, Star; Mvere, David A.; Chitiyo, McLeod E.; Postma, Maarten J.; Van Hulst, Marinus

    2014-01-01

    Background. Haemovigilance hinges on a systematically structured reporting system, which unfortunately does not always exist in resource-limited settings. We determined the incidence and pattern of transfusion-related adverse events reported to the National Blood Service Zimbabwe. Materials and meth

  2. Educators' Reports on Incidence of Harassment and Advocacy toward LGBTQ Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragowski, Eliza A.; McCabe, Paul C.; Rubinson, Florence

    2016-01-01

    This study is based on a national survey investigation of 968 educators, who reported the incidence of LGBTQ harassment in schools, and their advocacy efforts on behalf of this population. LGBTQ-related knowledge, attitudes, norms, and perceived ability to advocate were also assessed. Ninety percent of educators reported observing LGBTQ harassment…

  3. Longitudinal trends in organophosphate incidents reported to the National Pesticide Information Center, 1995–2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenkins Jeffrey J

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulatory decisions to phase-out the availability and use of common organophosphate pesticides among the general public were announced in 2000 and continued through 2004. Based on revised risk assessments, chlorpyrifos and diazinon were determined to pose unacceptable risks. To determine the impact of these decisions, organophosphate (OP exposure incidents reported to the National Pesticide Information Center (NPIC were analyzed for longitudinal trends. Methods Non-occupational human exposure incidents reported to NPIC were grouped into pre- (1995–2000 and post-announcement periods (2001–2007. The number of total OP exposure incidents, as well as reports for chlorpyrifos, diazinon and malathion, were analyzed for significant differences between these two periods. The number of informational inquiries from the general public was analyzed over time as well. Results The number of average annual OP-related exposure incidents reported to NPIC decreased significantly between the pre- and post-announcement periods (p Conclusion Consistent with other findings, the number of chlorpyrifos and diazinon exposure incidents reported to NPIC significantly decreased following public announcement and targeted regulatory action.

  4. Attitudes and perceived barriers of tertiary level health professionals towards incident reporting in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Raees Malik

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: A limited framework of incident reporting exists in most of the health care system in Pakistan. This poses a risk to the patient population and therefore there is a need to find the causes behind the lack of such a system in healthcare settings in Pakistan. Aims: To determine the attitudes and perceived barriers towards incident reporting among tertiary care health professionals in Pakistan. Materials and Methods: The study was done in Shifa International Hospitals and consisted of a questionnaire given to 217 randomly selected doctors and nurses. Mean ± SD of continuous variables and frequency (percentage % of categorical variables are presented. Chi square statistical analysis was used to test the significance of association among doctors and nurses with various outcome variables (motivators to report, perceived barriers, preferred person to report and patient’s outcome that influence reporting behaviors. P value of <0.05 was considered significant. Student doctors and student nurses were not included in the study. Results: Unlike consultant, registrars, medical officers and nurses (more than 95% are willing to report, only 20% of house officers will report the incident happened through them. Sixty nine percent of doctors and 67% of nurses perceive ‘administration sanction’ as a common barrier to incident reporting. Sixty percent of doctors and 80% of nurses would prefer reporting to the head of the department. Conclusions: By giving immunity from administrative sanction, providing prompt feedback and assurance that the incident reporting will be used to make changes in the system, there is considerable willingness of doctors and nurses to take time out of their busy schedules to submit reports.

  5. Reported fatal and non-fatal incidents involving tourists in Thailand, July 1997-June 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggat, Peter A; Leggat, Frances W

    2003-05-01

    Objectives. To examine fatal and non-fatal incidents involving tourists in Thailand. Methods. Press records from a major English language newspaper for the period from July 1997 to June 1999 were examined for reports of fatal and non-fatal incidents involving tourists. Results. From July 1997 to June 1999, up to 233 deaths were reported and up to a further 216 were reported injured in incidents involving tourists. One hundred and one deaths and 45 injured were reported following one major domestic jet aircraft crash in southern Thailand, however, it was not stated what proportion of casualties were tourists. Approximately 90 people perished in a single hotel fire in southeast Thailand. Most of the victims were local travellers attending meetings of two Thai companies. Sixteen deaths and 86 injured resulted from five road accidents. The majority of deaths and injuries involved foreigners. Twelve deaths and at least 33 injured resulted from three ferry and tour boat accidents. Most victims were reported to be foreigners. Three deaths and 35 injured resulted from a single cable car accident in northern Thailand. Most of these were Thai tourists, however, four of the injured were foreigners. Eight deaths and six injured resulted from 11 muggings and other violent incidents. All were foreigners. Six deaths were reportedly connected to a scam at the airport in Bangkok involving unlicensed airport taxis. Three deaths and four injured were due to other reported incidents. Conclusions. Newspaper reports of fatal and non-fatal incidents involving tourists in Thailand were probably uncommon, particularly given the volume of tourists entering the Kingdom, although better reporting mechanisms are needed. With the exception of the unusual major incidents, most reported fatal and non-fatal incidents involving tourists were due to road trauma and other transportation accidents, muggings, and occasional water sports and other accidents, which could occur at any major tourist

  6. Medication incidents related to automated dose dispensing in community pharmacies and hospitals--a reporting system study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Ka-Chun; van den Bemt, Patricia M L A; Bouvy, Marcel L; Wensing, Michel; De Smet, Peter A G M

    2014-01-01

    Automated dose dispensing (ADD) is being introduced in several countries and the use of this technology is expected to increase as a growing number of elderly people need to manage their medication at home. ADD aims to improve medication safety and treatment adherence, but it may introduce new safety issues. This descriptive study provides insight into the nature and consequences of medication incidents related to ADD, as reported by healthcare professionals in community pharmacies and hospitals. The medication incidents that were submitted to the Dutch Central Medication incidents Registration (CMR) reporting system were selected and characterized independently by two researchers. Person discovering the incident, phase of the medication process in which the incident occurred, immediate cause of the incident, nature of incident from the healthcare provider's perspective, nature of incident from the patient's perspective, and consequent harm to the patient caused by the incident. From January 2012 to February 2013 the CMR received 15,113 incidents: 3,685 (24.4%) incidents from community pharmacies and 11,428 (75.6%) incidents from hospitals. Eventually 1 of 50 reported incidents (268/15,113 = 1.8%) were related to ADD; in community pharmacies more incidents (227/3,685 = 6.2%) were related to ADD than in hospitals (41/11,428 = 0.4%). The immediate cause of an incident was often a change in the patient's medicine regimen or relocation. Most reported incidents occurred in two phases: entering the prescription into the pharmacy information system and filling the ADD bag. A proportion of incidents was related to ADD and is reported regularly, especially by community pharmacies. In two phases, entering the prescription into the pharmacy information system and filling the ADD bag, most incidents occurred. A change in the patient's medicine regimen or relocation was the immediate causes of an incident.

  7. In situ simulation: Taking reported critical incidents and adverse events back to the clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Jonas; Paltved, Charlotte; Krogh, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    does not tap into situational resources, e.g. individual, team, and organisational characteristics such as routines, personal relations, distributed skill-levels etc. Therefore, it fails to fully mimic real clinical team processes. Alternatively, in situ simulation offers a unique opportunity...... improve patient safety if coupled with training and organisational support2. Insight into the nature of reported critical incidents and adverse events can be used in writing in situ simulation scenarios and thus lead to interventions that enhance patient safety. The patient safety literature emphasises...... well-developed non-technical skills in preventing medical errors3. Furthermore, critical incidents and adverse events reporting systems comprise a knowledgebase to gain in-depth insights into patient safety issues. This study explores the use of critical incidents and adverse events reports to inform...

  8. Time-sampled versus continuous-time reporting for measuring incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamee, Roseanne; Chen, Yiqun; Hussey, Louise; Agius, Raymond

    2010-05-01

    Accuracy of incidence estimates may be affected by biases that depend on frequency of approach to reporters and reporting window length. A time-sampling strategy enables infrequent approaches with short windows but has never been evaluated. A randomized crossover trial compared incidence estimates of work-related diseases using time-sampled versus continuous-time reporting. Physicians were randomly allocated either to report every month (12/12) in 2004 and for 1 randomly chosen month (1/12) in 2005, or to the reverse sequence. Numbers of new cases of work-related disease reported per reporter per month for 1/12 and 12/12 reporting periods were compared. Response rates were high (87%). Withdrawal from the study was higher under 12/12 reporting. The rate ratio for 1/12 versus 12/12 reporting was 1.26 (95% confidence interval = 1.11-1.42). Rates declined gradually in the 12/12 groups over the year, consistent with reporting fatigue. Increased frequency of data collection may reduce incidence estimates.

  9. Violent behaviour in a forensic psychiatric hospital in Finland: an analysis of violence incident reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuivalainen, S; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, K; Putkonen, A; Louheranta, O; Tiihonen, J

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to explore the frequency and provocation of physically violent incidents in a Finnish forensic psychiatric hospital. Three years (2007-2009) of violent incident reports were analysed retrospectively. The data were analysed by content analysis, and statistically by Poisson regression analysis. During the study period a total of 840 incidents of physical violence occurred. Six main categories were found to describe the provocation of violence where three of these categories seemed to be without a specified reason (61%), and three represented a reaction to something (36%). The risk for violent behaviour was highest for the civil patients (RR = 11.96; CI 95% 9.43-15.18; P violence incidents. Patients undergoing a forensic mental examination did not frequently behave aggressively (RR = 1.97; CI 95% 0.91-4.28). These results can be used in the reorganization of health-care practices and the allocation of resources. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. A study of cases reported as incidents in a public hospital from 2011 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göttems, Leila Bernarda Donato; Santos, Maria do Livramento Gomes Dos; Carvalho, Paloma Aparecida; Amorim, Fábio Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing incidents reported in a public hospital in the Federal District, Brasilia, according to the characteristics and outcomes involving patients. A descriptive and retrospective study of incidents reported between January 2011 and September 2014. 209 reported incidents were categorized as reportable occurrences (n = 22, 10.5%), near misses (n = 16, 7.7%); incident without injury (n = 4, 1.9%) and incident with injury (adverse events) (n = 167, 79.9%). The average age of patients was 44 years and the hospitalization time until the moment of the incident was on average 38.5 days. Nurses were the healthcare professionals who most reported the incidents (n = 55, 67%). No outcomes resulted in death. Incidents related to blood/hemoderivatives, medical devices/equipment, patient injuries and intravenous medication/fluids were the most frequent. Standardizing the reporting processes and enhancing participation by professionals in managing incidents is recommended. Analisar os incidentes notificados em um hospital público do Distrito Federal, segundo as características e os desfechos quando envolveram pacientes. Estudo descritivo e retrospectivo dos incidentes notificados entre janeiro de 2011 e setembro de 2014. Notificados 209 incidentes categorizados em ocorrência comunicável (n = 22, 10,5%), quase evento (n = 16, 7,7%), incidente sem dano (n = 4, 1,9%) e incidente com dano (eventos adversos) (n = 167, 79,9%). A idade média dos pacientes foi de 44 anos e o tempo da internação até o momento do incidente teve média de 38,5 dias. Os enfermeiros foram os que mais notificaram (n = 55, 67%). Nenhum desfecho resultou em morte. Os incidentes relacionados a sangue/hemoderivados, dispositivos/equipamento médico, acidentes do doente e medicação/fluidos endovenosos foram os mais frequentes. Recomenda-se padronizar os processos de notificação e potencializar a participação dos profissionais no manejo dos incidentes.

  11. SU-E-T-524: Web-Based Radiation Oncology Incident Reporting and Learning System (ROIRLS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapoor, R; Palta, J; Hagan, M [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); National Radiation Oncology Program (10P4H), Richmond, VA (United States); Grover, S; Malik, G [TSG Innovations Inc., Richmond, VA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Describe a Web-based Radiation Oncology Incident Reporting and Learning system that has the potential to improve quality of care for radiation therapy patients. This system is an important facet of continuing effort by our community to maintain and improve safety of radiotherapy.Material and Methods: The VA National Radiation Oncology Program office has embarked on a program to electronically collect adverse events and near miss data of radiation treatment of over 25,000 veterans treated with radiotherapy annually. Software used for this program is deployed on the VAs intranet as a Website. All data entry forms (adverse event or near miss reports, work product reports) utilize standard causal, RT process step taxonomies and data dictionaries defined in AAPM and ASTRO reports on error reporting (AAPM Work Group Report on Prevention of Errors and ASTROs safety is no accident report). All reported incidents are investigated by the radiation oncology domain experts. This system encompasses the entire feedback loop of reporting an incident, analyzing it for salient details, and developing interventions to prevent it from happening again. The operational workflow is similar to that of the Aviation Safety Reporting System. This system is also synergistic with ROSIS and SAFRON. Results: The ROIRLS facilitates the collection of data that help in tracking adverse events and near misses and develop new interventions to prevent such incidents. The ROIRLS electronic infrastructure is fully integrated with each registered facility profile data thus minimizing key strokes and multiple entries by the event reporters. Conclusions: OIRLS is expected to improve the quality and safety of a broad spectrum of radiation therapy patients treated in the VA and fulfills our goal of Effecting Quality While Treating Safely The Radiation Oncology Incident Reporting and Learning System software used for this program has been developed, conceptualized and maintained by TSG Innovations

  12. Differences in reported sepsis incidence according to study design: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saga Elise Mariansdatter

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sepsis and severe sepsis are common conditions in hospital settings, and are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, but reported incidences vary considerably. In this literature review, we describe the variation in reported population-based incidences of sepsis and severe sepsis. We also examine methodological and demographic differences between studies that may explain this variation. Methods We carried out a literature review searching three major databases and reference lists of relevant articles, to identify all original studies reporting the incidence of sepsis or severe sepsis in the general population. Two authors independently assessed all articles, and the final decision to exclude an article was reached by consensus. We extracted data according to predetermined variables, including study country, sepsis definition, and data source. We then calculated descriptive statistics for the reported incidences of sepsis and severe sepsis. The studies were classified according to the method used to identify cases of sepsis or severe sepsis: chart-based (i.e. review of patient charts or code-based (i.e. predetermined International Classification of Diseases [ICD] codes. Results Among 482 articles initially screened, we identified 23 primary publications reporting incidence of sepsis and/or severe sepsis in the general population. The reported incidences ranged from 74 to 1180 per 100,000 person-years and 3 to 1074 per 100,000 person-years for sepsis and severe sepsis, respectively. Most chart-based studies used the Bone criteria (or a modification hereof and Protein C Worldwide Evaluation in Severe Sepsis (PROWESS study criteria to identify cases of sepsis and severe sepsis. Most code-based studies used ICD-9 codes, but the number of codes used ranged from 1 to more than 1200. We found that the incidence varied according to how sepsis was identified (chart-based vs. code-based, calendar year, data source, and

  13. Safe incident reporting in out-of-hours primary care: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustyns, Nele; Lesaffer, Caroline; Teughels, Stefan; Philips, Hilde; Remmen, Roy

    2016-12-01

    The goal of safe incident reporting (SIR) is to recognize avoidable incidents to prevent future harm. Data on the use of SIR in Belgium's out-of-hours primary care (OOHC) services are lacking. We investigated a priori attitudes of managers and GPs, and their willingness to report in OOHC services. We mapped which methods are used. A telephone questionnaire was conducted with the managers of all 27 OOHC centers in Flanders. It assessed the design of used reporting systems and the attitudes towards SIR. A paper survey was administered to assess GPs' attitudes in two large out-of-hours primary care centers. All managers participated (N = 23). Seventy percent used some form of incident reporting system, with a large design variation. All managers thought SIR is important to improve quality and safety. Seven managers predicted that GPs would be hesitant to use SIR. In the GPs' survey (response rate 58%), 69.7% of responders had experienced an incident and 74.5% would tend to report it. 81.1% agreed that an incident has to be analyzed, discussed, and should lead to an improvement plan. The majority believed SIR could create openness about adverse events and would improve job satisfaction. One out of five feared that it would make their job more difficult, and 39% were afraid the report could be used against the reporter. OOHC center managers and GPs show positive attitudes towards SIR. There is a large variation in the currently used methods. Future projects could focus on interventions of implementation of SIR in OOHC.

  14. Cumulative incidence of postoperative severe pain at Hospital Universitario San Jose, Popayan. Preliminar report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Muñoz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Postoperative pain remains as a problem. National studies report incidences of 31% for moderate and 22% for severe pain. Inadequate analgesia is related to dissatisfaction and adverse outcomes. The aim of this study was to describe the incidence and characteristics of the postoperative pain in the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU at Hospital Universitario San José of Popayán (HUSJ in patients undergoing general anesthesia during the first postoperative hour. Methods: Cohort study. We recruited patients attending PACU and undergoing procedures using general anesthesia, between 18 and 70 years. Using a standardized collection form medical history, demographic data, medical history, anesthetic management, intraoperative analgesia and postoperative pain assessment by verbal and numerical pain scale (1-10 were recorded. Postoperative outcome data were also collected in the PACU. Results: The incidence of severe postoperative pain at 10 minutes was 12.3% 95%CI [7.1-18.2] (19 patients. Within 30 minutes of assessment 4.5% 95%CI [1.3-8.4] (7 patients and 1.9% 60 minutes 95%CI [0-4.5] (3 patients. 48.7% required rescue analgesic at PACU. Incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV was significantly different in patients requiring rescue analgesic. Conclusion: The incidence of severe postoperative pain in the first postoperative hour at HUSJ is close to 12% and it decreases as time goes by. Patients requiring rescue analgesic have a higher incidence of postoperative complications such as PONV.

  15. In-depth analysis of the causal factors of incidents reported in the Greek petrochemical industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konstandinidou, Myrto [Institute of Nuclear Technology-Radiation Protection, National Center for Scientific Research ' Demokritos' , Aghia Paraskevi 15310 (Greece); Nivolianitou, Zoe, E-mail: zoe@ipta.demokritos.gr [Institute of Nuclear Technology-Radiation Protection, National Center for Scientific Research ' Demokritos' , Aghia Paraskevi 15310 (Greece); Kefalogianni, Eirini; Caroni, Chrys [School of Applied Mathematical and Physical Sciences, National Technical University of Athens, 9 Iroon Polytexneiou Str., Zografou Campus, 157 80 Athens (Greece)

    2011-11-15

    This paper presents a statistical analysis of all reported incidents in the Greek petrochemical industry from 1997 to 2003. A comprehensive database has been developed to include industrial accidents (fires, explosions and substance releases), occupational accidents, incidents without significant consequences and near misses. The study concentrates on identifying and analyzing the causal factors related to different consequences of incidents, in particular, injury, absence from work and material damage. Methods of analysis include logistic regression with one of these consequences as dependent variable. The causal factors that are considered cover four major categories related to organizational issues, equipment malfunctions, human errors (of commission or omission) and external causes. Further analyses aim to confirm the value of recording near misses by comparing their causal factors with those of more serious incidents. The statistical analysis highlights the connection between the human factor and the underlying causes of accidents or incidents. - Highlights: > The research work is original, based on field data collected directly from the petrochemical industry. > It deals with the in-depth statistical analysis of accident data on human-organizational causes. > It researches underlying causes of accidents and the parameters affecting them. > The causal factors that are considered cover four big taxonomies. > Near misses are worth recording for comparing their causal factors with more serious incidents.

  16. Recommendations for Nuclear Medicine Technologists Drawn from an Analysis of Errors Reported in Australian Radiation Incident Registers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Nicole; Denham, Gary

    2016-12-01

    When a radiation incident occurs in nuclear medicine in Australia, the incident is reported to the relevant state or territory authority, which performs an investigation and sends its findings to the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency. The agency then includes these data in its Australian Radiation Incident Register and makes them available to the public as an annual summary report on its website. The aim of this study was to analyze the radiation incidents included in these annual reports and in the publically available state and territory registers, identify any recurring themes, and make recommendations to minimize future incidents.

  17. Design of a user-centered voluntary patient safety reporting system: understanding the time and response variances by retrospective think-aloud protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Lei; Gong, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Usability is critical to the success of computerized systems, and yet it has received little attention in the field of voluntary patient safety reporting. Failures in this regard may largely account for the issues of low user acceptance and low-quality data that currently confront the system. In this study, we examined the three usability aspects of efficiency, effectiveness and user attitudes on a typical safety reporting system. The system usability was evaluated using the retrospective think-aloud testing method, which measures execution time and response consistency with think-aloud protocols. Ten end-users were recruited for the test. The descriptive statistics on users' time and response variances unveiled system features that influenced the system's reporting efficiency and effectiveness. The think-aloud protocols that reflected users' attitudes helped identify nine categories of usability problems associated with the response variances and system features. In the end, the observed semantic ambiguity, terminology complexity and carry-over effect are noted as challenges and opportunities for further usability improvements.

  18. Effects of patient safety culture interventions on incident reporting in general practice: a cluster randomised trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, N.J.; Langelaan, M.; Verheij, T.J.M.; Wagner, C.; Zwart, D.L.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background A constructive safety culture is essential for the successful implementation of patient safety improvements. Aim To assess the effect of two patient safety culture interventions on incident reporting as a proxy of safety culture. Design and setting A three-arm cluster randomised trial was

  19. 77 FR 38747 - Reports by Air Carriers on Incidents Involving Animals During Air Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... estimate that it would take a Paralegal working in scheduled air transportation making $33.46 (the average... of reported incidents per year is 46. If we were to assume that it takes a Paralegal one hour to... per year. This is based on our estimate of a Paralegal's salary discussed above. Various trade sources...

  20. 14 CFR 234.13 - Reports by air carriers on incidents involving animals during air transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reports by air carriers on incidents involving animals during air transport. 234.13 Section 234.13 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS AIRLINE SERVICE QUALITY PERFORMANCE...

  1. 75 FR 51953 - Notification and Reporting of Aircraft Accidents or Incidents and Overdue Aircraft, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ... Organization (ICAO) amendment 13 to Annex 13, Aircraft Accident and Incident Investigation, defines unmanned... safety. If the NTSB implemented the ICAO standard, it would likely receive many reports that would not be... safety recommendations. In addition, the proposed ICAO standard would not address the concerns of...

  2. Parasitic fibroid: case report and novel approach in reducing incidence of future cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukainah S.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of parasitic fibroid which developed less than 1 year following laparoscopic myomectomy using power morcellation. Following this case, a novel approach in reducing the incidence of future parasitic fibroid is described. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(8.000: 2836-2839

  3. Improvement in the incident reporting and investigation procedures using process excellence (DMAI2C) methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Elizabeth N

    2006-03-17

    In 1996, Health & Safety introduced an incident investigation process called Learning to Look to Johnson & Johnson. This process provides a systematic way of analyzing work-related injuries and illness, uncovers root cause that leads to system defects, and points to viable solutions. The process analyzed involves three steps: investigation and reporting of the incident, determination of root cause, and development and implementation of a corrective action plan. The process requires the investigators to provide an initial communication for work-related serious injuries and illness as well as lost workday cases to Corporate Headquarters within 72 h of the incident with a full investigative report to follow within 10 days. A full investigation requires a written report, a cause-result logic diagram (CRLD), a corrective action plan (CAP) and a report of incident costs (SafeCost) all due to be filed electronically. It is incumbent on the principal investigator and his or her investigative teams to assemble the various parts of the investigation and to follow up with the relevant parties to ensure corrective actions are implemented, and a full report submitted to Corporate executives. Initial review of the system revealed that the process was not working as designed. A number of reports were late, not signed by the business leaders, and in some instances, all cause were not identified. Process excellence was the process used to study the issue. The team used six sigma DMAI2C methodologies to identify and implement system improvements. The project examined the breakdown of the critical aspects of the reporting and investigation process that lead to system errors. This report will discuss the study findings, recommended improvements, and methods used to monitor the new improved process.

  4. Thermohydraulic incidents at full power (safety analysis detailed report no. 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-15

    In this paper, attention is focused on the role of plant-incident analysis during the design stage and the conclusions reached regarding safety. This class of incidents includes sequences arising from the breakdown or anomalous behaviour of components or from errors in plant operation that have repercussions on the process of the system involved and the related systems. The sequences of possible relevance to safety are those which stress the active and passive protection (containment barriers). As these stresses are below the design-basis limits, they have no consequences in terms of radioactivity release. This report illustrates in greater detail the analysis that led to this conclusion, with particular reference to reactor events that have significant consequences on the first barrier (fuel cladding). Thermohydraulic incidents at full power are examined here.

  5. Voluntary agreements, implementation and efficiency. Swedish country study report. Covering the EKO-Energi programme. With case studies in pulp and paper and heavy vehicle manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaagstroem, Jonas; Aastrand, Kerstin; Helby, Peter

    2000-03-01

    The VAIE research project is concerned with voluntary agreements for improvement of industrial energy efficiency in five European countries. This national report deals with the Swedish EKO-Energi agreements. It includes case studies in pulp and paper and heavy vehicle manufacturing. The first chapter presents the principal aspects of the Swedish EKO-Energi programme, explains the selection of companies for case studies, and summarises the results of the national study. The chapter shows the EKO-Energi programme to be directed at a fairly exclusive part of Swedish industry, namely environmental front-runners striving for EMAS or ISO 14001 certification. It provides them with paid energy audits and with marketing support. It requires them to establish an energy management system, i.e. to include energy efficiency issues in their certification process. The agreements are 'soft' in the sense that they address mainly organisational issues, are based much on trust in the companies own dedication to improvement, and are very informal in the monitoring. On the balance, the EKO-Energi programme would seem to be a small, but reasonably effective programme, contributing particularly to such organisational developments as are important for long-term trends in industrial energy efficiency. The second chapter provides a brief introduction to the whole VAIE project and outlines the methodology of the study, explained in more detail in a separate report. The third chapter describes the progress of the EKO-Energi programme from policy formulation to implementation, and assesses a number of hypotheses concerning this process. Support is found for the hypotheses (a) that voluntary agreements tend to exclude the influence of third parties, (b) that they tend to continue the logic of previous policies, and (c) that expected short term energy savings tend to be very close to the baseline scenario. The fourth chapter describes how agreements with individual companies are made

  6. How to simplify and improve incident and near miss reporting in wards:I.R.G.E. (Incident Reporting with Gravity Effect system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco De Caro

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available

    In this paper, an improved system that allows a simplified reporting of errors and near misses in wards, and permits operators to accurately manage all data recorded, is presented. IRGE (Incident Reporting with Gravity Effect System is based on the use of a paper form for reporting accidents and near misses. The severity of an error can be evidenced through the choice of a color similar to the well-known method used in the emergency medicine triage, thus leading to the most evident and immediate understanding of the magnitude of error. In addition, the system is provided with a report form for its users to be compiled with the highest completeness of information.


    A dedicated software for the storage of records and data analysis has been created, which gives one the possibility of alerting key figures within the health facility promptly. The system allows us to store and share records among different care units and also among different hospitals, thus providing a basis for a national database. Moreover, through this system, it is possible to assess the “risk attitude” of the health facility monitored.

  7. Department of the Navy Suicide Incident Report (DONSIR): Summary of Findings, 1999-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-24

    in body weight (p < .01), with 25 out of 330 decedents evidencing recent change. This is possibly a spurious result based on over- or under- eating ...acute than chronic, with major psychological disorders and physical 1999–2007 DON Suicide Incident Report 35 illnesses less prevalent in comparison...performance histories than other personnel, and that perfectionism may distinguish certain types of suicidal behavior such as completed versus attempted

  8. Experience with an anonymous web-based state EMS safety incident reporting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, John M; Kupas, Douglas F

    2012-01-01

    Patient and provider safety is paramount in all aspects of emergency medical services (EMS) systems. The leaders, administrators, and policymakers of these systems must have an understanding of situations that present potential for harm to patients or providers. This study analyzed reports to a statewide EMS safety event reporting system with the purpose of categorizing the types of incidents reported and identifying opportunities to prevent future safety events. This statewide EMS safety incident reporting system is a Web-based system to which any individual can anonymously report any event or situation perceived to impact safety. We reviewed all reports between the system's inception in 2003 through August 2010. A stipulation of the system is that any entry containing information that identifies an EMS provider, agency, or patient will be deleted and thus not included in the analysis. Each event report included the description of the event, the relationship of the reporter, and the year in which the event occurred. Each entry was placed into a category that best represents the situation described. A total of 415 reports were received during the study period, and 186 reports were excluded-163 (39%) excluded by the state because of identifiable information and 23 (6%) excluded by the authors because of nonsensical description. Within the remaining 229 reports, there were 237 distinct safety events. These events were classified as actions/behavior (32%), vehicle/transportation (16%), staffing or ambulance availability (13%), communications (8%), medical equipment (9%), multiple patients/agencies/units and level-of-care issues (7%), medical procedure (6%), medication (5%), accident scene management/scene safety (3%), and protocol issues (1%). EMS providers directly involved in the event represented the largest reporting group (33%). We also provide examples of statewide system and policy changes that were made in direct response to these reports. This EMS safety

  9. Rethinking voluntary euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyles, Byron J; Costreie, Sorin

    2013-12-01

    Our goal in this article is to explicate the way, and the extent to which, euthanasia can be voluntary from both the perspective of the patient and the perspective of the health care providers involved in the patient's care. More significantly, we aim to challenge the way in which those engaged in ongoing philosophical debates regarding the morality of euthanasia draw distinctions between voluntary, involuntary, and nonvoluntary euthanasia on the grounds that drawing the distinctions in the traditional manner (1) fails to reflect what is important from the patient's perspective and (2) fails to reflect the significance of health care providers' interests, including their autonomy and integrity.

  10. Voluntary agreements, implementation and efficiency. Swedish country study report. Covering the EKO-Energi programme. With case studies in pulp and paper and heavy vehicle manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaagstroem, Jonas; Aastrand, Kerstin; Helby, Peter

    2000-03-01

    The VAIE research project is concerned with voluntary agreements for improvement of industrial energy efficiency in five European countries. This national report deals with the Swedish EKO-Energi agreements. It includes case studies in pulp and paper and heavy vehicle manufacturing. The first chapter presents the principal aspects of the Swedish EKO-Energi programme, explains the selection of companies for case studies, and summarises the results of the national study. The chapter shows the EKO-Energi programme to be directed at a fairly exclusive part of Swedish industry, namely environmental front-runners striving for EMAS or ISO 14001 certification. It provides them with paid energy audits and with marketing support. It requires them to establish an energy management system, i.e. to include energy efficiency issues in their certification process. The agreements are 'soft' in the sense that they address mainly organisational issues, are based much on trust in the companies own dedication to improvement, and are very informal in the monitoring. On the balance, the EKO-Energi programme would seem to be a small, but reasonably effective programme, contributing particularly to such organisational developments as are important for long-term trends in industrial energy efficiency. The second chapter provides a brief introduction to the whole VAIE project and outlines the methodology of the study, explained in more detail in a separate report. The third chapter describes the progress of the EKO-Energi programme from policy formulation to implementation, and assesses a number of hypotheses concerning this process. Support is found for the hypotheses (a) that voluntary agreements tend to exclude the influence of third parties, (b) that they tend to continue the logic of previous policies, and (c) that expected short term energy savings tend to be very close to the baseline scenario. The fourth chapter describes how agreements with individual companies are made

  11. Reversal of optic neuropathy secondary to voluntary globe luxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaman, Aylin; Ozturk, Taylan; Soylev, Meltem F

    2009-04-01

    Luxation of the globe is rare in the general population and may be spontaneous, voluntary, or traumatic. Spontaneous or voluntary globe luxation results from shallow orbit, floppy eyelids, lax orbital ligaments, backward displacement of orbital septum, or proptotic eyes due to orbital tumors or infiltrative processes, as in Grave's ophthalmopathy. The authors report a case with unilateral voluntary globe luxation presented with unilateral progressive visual loss.

  12. Change in Reported Lyme Disease Incidence in the Northeast and Upper Midwest, 1991-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    This indicator shows how reported Lyme disease incidence has changed by state since 1991, based on the number of new cases per 100,000 people. The total change has been estimated from the average annual rate of change in each state. This map is limited to the 14 states where Lyme disease is most common, where annual rates are consistently above 10 cases per 100,000. Connecticut, New York, and Rhode Island had too much year-to-year variation in reporting practices to allow trend calculation. For more information: www.epa.gov/climatechange/science/indicators

  13. Voluntary Public Unemployment Insurance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O. Parsons, Donald; Tranæs, Torben; Bie Lilleør, Helene

    Denmark has drawn much attention for its active labor market policies, but is almost unique in offering a voluntary public unemployment insurance program requiring a significant premium payment. A safety net program – a less generous, means-tested social assistance plan – completes the system...

  14. Medication incident reporting in residential aged care facilities: Limitations and risks to residents’ safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq Amina

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medication incident reporting (MIR is a key safety critical care process in residential aged care facilities (RACFs. Retrospective studies of medication incident reports in aged care have identified the inability of existing MIR processes to generate information that can be used to enhance residents’ safety. However, there is little existing research that investigates the limitations of the existing information exchange process that underpins MIR, despite the considerable resources that RACFs’ devote to the MIR process. The aim of this study was to undertake an in-depth exploration of the information exchange process involved in MIR and identify factors that inhibit the collection of meaningful information in RACFs. Methods The study was undertaken in three RACFs (part of a large non-profit organisation in NSW, Australia. A total of 23 semi-structured interviews and 62 hours of observation sessions were conducted between May to July 2011. The qualitative data was iteratively analysed using a grounded theory approach. Results The findings highlight significant gaps in the design of the MIR artefacts as well as information exchange issues in MIR process execution. Study results emphasized the need to: a design MIR artefacts that facilitate identification of the root causes of medication incidents, b integrate the MIR process within existing information systems to overcome key gaps in information exchange execution, and c support exchange of information that can facilitate a multi-disciplinary approach to medication incident management in RACFs. Conclusions This study highlights the advantages of viewing MIR process holistically rather than as segregated tasks, as a means to identify gaps in information exchange that need to be addressed in practice to improve safety critical processes.

  15. Nuclear medicine incident reporting in Australia: control charts and notification rates inform quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larcos, G; Collins, L T; Georgiou, A; Westbrook, J I

    2015-06-01

    Australia has a statutory incident reporting system for radiopharmaceutical maladministrations, but additional research into registry data is required for the purpose of quality improvement in nuclear medicine. We (i) used control charts to identify factors contributing to special cause variation (indicating higher than expected rates) in maladministrations and (ii) evaluated the impact of heterogeneous notification criteria and extent of underreporting among jurisdictions and individual facilities, respectively. Anonymised summaries of Australian Radiation Incident Register reports permitted calculation of national monthly maladministration notification rates for 2007-2012 and preparation of control charts. Multivariate logistic regression assessed the association of population, insurance and regulatory characteristics with maladministration notifications in each Australian State and Territory. Maladministration notification rates from two facilities with familiarity of notification processes and commitment to radiation protection were compared with those elsewhere. Special cause variation occurred in only 3 months, but contributed to 21% of all incidents (42 of 197 patients), mainly because of 'clusters' of maladministrations (n = 24) arising from errors in bulk radiopharmaceutical dispensing. Maladministration notification rates varied significantly between jurisdictions (0 to 12.2 maladministrations per 100 000 procedures (P < 0.05)) and individual facilities (31.7 vs 5.8 per 100 000; χ(2) = 40; 1 degree of freedom, P < 0.001). Unexpected increases in maladministration notifications predominantly relate to incident 'clusters' affecting multiple patients. The bulk preparation of radiopharmaceuticals is a vulnerable process and merits additional safeguards. Maladministration notification rates in Australia are heterogeneous. Adopting uniform maladministration notification criteria among States and Territories and methods to overcome underreporting are

  16. Creating European guidelines for Chiropractic Incident Reporting and Learning Systems (CIRLS: relevance and structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wangler Martin

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2009, the heads of the Executive Council of the European Chiropractors' Union (ECU and the European Academy of Chiropractic (EAC involved in the European Committee for Standardization (CEN process for the chiropractic profession, set out to establish European guidelines for the reporting of adverse reactions to chiropractic treatment. There were a number of reasons for this: first, to improve the overall quality of patient care by aiming to reduce the application of potentially harmful interventions and to facilitate the treatment of patients within the context of achieving maximum benefit with a minimum risk of harm; second, to inform the training objectives for the Graduate Education and Continuing Professional Development programmes of all 19 ECU member nations, regarding knowledge and skills to be acquired for maximising patient safety; and third, to develop a guideline on patient safety incident reporting as it is likely to be part of future CEN standards for ECU member nations. Objective To introduce patient safety incident reporting within the context of chiropractic practice in Europe and to help individual countries and their national professional associations to develop or improve reporting and learning systems. Discussion Providing health care of any kind, including the provision of chiropractic treatment, can be a complex and, at times, a risky activity. Safety in healthcare cannot be guaranteed, it can only be improved. One of the most important aspects of any learning and reporting system lies in the appropriate use of the data and information it gathers. Reporting should not just be seen as a vehicle for obtaining information on patient safety issues, but also be utilised as a tool to facilitate learning, advance quality improvement and to ultimately minimise the rate of the occurrence of errors linked to patient care. Conclusions Before a reporting and learning system can be established it has to be clear

  17. Patient-safety-related hospital deaths in England: thematic analysis of incidents reported to a national database, 2010-2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liam J Donaldson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hospital mortality is increasingly being regarded as a key indicator of patient safety, yet methodologies for assessing mortality are frequently contested and seldom point directly to areas of risk and solutions. The aim of our study was to classify reports of deaths due to unsafe care into broad areas of systemic failure capable of being addressed by stronger policies, procedures, and practices. The deaths were reported to a patient safety incident reporting system after mandatory reporting of such incidents was introduced. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The UK National Health Service database was searched for incidents resulting in a reported death of an adult over the period of the study. The study population comprised 2,010 incidents involving patients aged 16 y and over in acute hospital settings. Each incident report was reviewed by two of the authors, and, by scrutinising the structured information together with the free text, a main reason for the harm was identified and recorded as one of 18 incident types. These incident types were then aggregated into six areas of apparent systemic failure: mismanagement of deterioration (35%, failure of prevention (26%, deficient checking and oversight (11%, dysfunctional patient flow (10%, equipment-related errors (6%, and other (12%. The most common incident types were failure to act on or recognise deterioration (23%, inpatient falls (10%, healthcare-associated infections (10%, unexpected per-operative death (6%, and poor or inadequate handover (5%. Analysis of these 2,010 fatal incidents reveals patterns of issues that point to actionable areas for improvement. CONCLUSIONS: Our approach demonstrates the potential utility of patient safety incident reports in identifying areas of service failure and highlights opportunities for corrective action to save lives.

  18. [Pressure ulcer care quality indicator: analysis of medical records and incident report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Cássia Teixeira; Oliveira, Magáli Costa; Pereira, Ana Gabriela da Silva; Suzuki, Lyliam Midori; Lucena, Amália de Fátima

    2013-03-01

    Cross-sectional study that aimed to compare the data reported in a system for the indication of pressure ulcer (PU) care quality, with the nursing evolution data available in the patients' medical records, and to describe the clinical profile and nursing diagnosis of those who developed PU grade 2 or higher Sample consisted of 188 patients at risk for PU in clinical and surgical units. Data were collected retrospectively from medical records and a computerized system of care indicators and statistically analyzed. Of the 188 patients, 6 (3%) were reported for pressure ulcers grade 2 or higher; however, only 19 (10%) were recorded in the nursing evolution records, thus revealing the underreporting of data. Most patients were women, older adults and patients with cerebrovascular diseases. The most frequent nursing diagnosis was risk of infection. The use of two or more research methodologies such as incident reporting data and retrospective review of patients' records makes the results trustworthy.

  19. Identifying medication error chains from critical incident reports: a new analytic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckels-Baumgart, Saskia; Manser, Tanja

    2014-10-01

    Research into the distribution of medication errors usually focuses on isolated stages within the medication use process. Our study aimed to provide a novel process-oriented approach to medication incident analysis focusing on medication error chains. Our study was conducted across a 900-bed teaching hospital in Switzerland. All reported 1,591 medication errors 2009-2012 were categorized using the Medication Error Index NCC MERP and the WHO Classification for Patient Safety Methodology. In order to identify medication error chains, each reported medication incident was allocated to the relevant stage of the hospital medication use process. Only 25.8% of the reported medication errors were detected before they propagated through the medication use process. The majority of medication errors (74.2%) formed an error chain encompassing two or more stages. The most frequent error chain comprised preparation up to and including medication administration (45.2%). "Non-consideration of documentation/prescribing" during the drug preparation was the most frequent contributor for "wrong dose" during the administration of medication. Medication error chains provide important insights for detecting and stopping medication errors before they reach the patient. Existing and new safety barriers need to be extended to interrupt error chains and to improve patient safety.

  20. Can Patient Safety Incident Reports Be Used to Compare Hospital Safety? Results from a Quantitative Analysis of the English National Reporting and Learning System Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Marie Howell

    Full Text Available The National Reporting and Learning System (NRLS collects reports about patient safety incidents in England. Government regulators use NRLS data to assess the safety of hospitals. This study aims to examine whether annual hospital incident reporting rates can be used as a surrogate indicator of individual hospital safety. Secondly assesses which hospital characteristics are correlated with high incident reporting rates and whether a high reporting hospital is safer than those lower reporting hospitals. Finally, it assesses which health-care professionals report more incidents of patient harm, which report more near miss incidents and what hospital factors encourage reporting. These findings may suggest methods for increasing the utility of reporting systems.This study used a mix methods approach for assessing NRLS data. The data were investigated using Pareto analysis and regression models to establish which patients are most vulnerable to reported harm. Hospital factors were correlated with institutional reporting rates over one year to examine what factors influenced reporting. Staff survey findings regarding hospital safety culture were correlated with reported rates of incidents causing harm; no harm and death to understand what barriers influence error disclosure.5,879,954 incident reports were collected from acute hospitals over the decade. 70.3% of incidents produced no harm to the patient and 0.9% were judged by the reporter to have caused severe harm or death. Obstetrics and Gynaecology reported the most no harm events [OR 1.61(95%CI: 1.12 to 2.27, p<0.01] and pharmacy was the hospital location where most near-misses were captured [OR 3.03(95%CI: 2.04 to 4.55, p<0.01]. Clinicians were significantly more likely to report death than other staff [OR 3.04(95%CI: 2.43 to 3.80 p<0.01]. A higher ratio of clinicians to beds correlated with reduced rate of harm reported [RR = -1.78(95%Cl: -3.33 to -0.23, p = 0.03]. Litigation claims per bed were

  1. 12 CFR 250.181 - Reports of change in control of bank management incident to a merger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... change in control of bank management incident to a merger. (a) A State member bank has inquired whether... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reports of change in control of bank management incident to a merger. 250.181 Section 250.181 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF...

  2. FTO5/470: Critical Incident Monitoring in Emergency Medicine Web-based System (CRIME-base): Current evidence on incident reporting and its impact to quality of care

    OpenAIRE

    Arvanitis, TN; Ryan, J.

    1999-01-01

    Introduction A critical incident is "any event which is inconsistent with routine hospital practice or with the quality of patient care and which has or could have had a demonstrably adverse outcome for a particular patient" (J.A. Williamson, Critical Incident Reporting in Anaesthesia. Anaesthetic Intensive Care, 1988: 16: 101-103). Such "negative incidents" may arise as a result of a variety of reasons during routine hospital practice. Incident monitoring and reporting has been identified as...

  3. Understanding patient-to-worker violence in hospitals: a qualitative analysis of documented incident reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnetz, Judith E; Hamblin, Lydia; Essenmacher, Lynnette; Upfal, Mark J; Ager, Joel; Luborsky, Mark

    2015-02-01

    To explore catalysts to, and circumstances surrounding, patient-to-worker violent incidents recorded by employees in a hospital system database. Violence by patients towards healthcare workers (Type II workplace violence) is a significant occupational hazard in hospitals worldwide. Studies to date have failed to investigate its root causes due to a lack of empirical research based on documented episodes of patient violence. Qualitative content analysis. Content analysis was conducted on the total sample of 214 Type II incidents documented in 2011 by employees of an American hospital system with a centralized reporting system. The majority of incidents were reported by nurses (39·8%), security staff (15·9%) and nurse assistants (14·4%). Three distinct themes were identified from the analysis: Patient Behaviour, Patient Care and Situational Events. Specific causes of violence related to Patient Behaviour were cognitive impairment and demanding to leave. Catalysts related to patient care were the use of needles, patient pain/discomfort and physical transfers of patients. Situational factors included the use/presence of restraints; transitions in the care process; intervening to protect patients and/or staff; and redirecting patients. Identifying catalysts and situations involved in patient violence in hospitals informs administrators about potential targets for intervention. Hospital staff can be trained to recognize these specific risk factors for patient violence and can be educated in how to best mitigate or prevent the most common forms of violent behaviour. A social-ecological model can be adapted to the hospital setting as a framework for prevention of patient violence towards staff. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Market Brief: Status of the Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Market (2011 Data)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, J.; Armstrong, P.; Bird, L.

    2012-09-01

    This report documents the status and trends of U.S. 'voluntary' markets -- those in which consumers and institutions purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs on a voluntary basis. Voluntary REC markets continue to exhibit growth and spur renewable energy development. Voluntary green power markets provide an additional revenue stream for renewable energy projects and raise consumer awareness of the benefits of renewable energy. Although a full estimate of the size of the voluntary market is not available for 2011, this review uses indicative metrics to capture 2011 voluntary market trends.

  5. Market Brief. Status of the Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Market (2011 Data)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, Jenny [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Armstrong, Philip [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bird, Lori [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2012-09-01

    This report documents the status and trends of U.S. 'voluntary' markets -- those in which consumers and institutions purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs on a voluntary basis. Voluntary REC markets continue to exhibit growth and spur renewable energy development. Voluntary green power markets provide an additional revenue stream for renewable energy projects and raise consumer awareness of the benefits of renewable energy. Although a full estimate of the size of the voluntary market is not available for 2011, this review uses indicative metrics to capture 2011 voluntary market trends.

  6. A unique insight into the incidence of rugby injuries using referee replacement reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, J C; Murray, G D; Macleod, D A

    2001-02-01

    To obtain further information the incidence of injuries and playing positions affected in club rugby in Scotland. Routine reports of injury (permanent) and blood (temporary) replacements occurring in competitive club rugby matches by referees to the Scottish Rugby Union during seasons 1990-1991 to 1996-1997 were analysed. A total of 3,513 injuries (87 per 100 scheduled matches) and 1,000 blood replacements (34 per 100 scheduled matches) were reported. Forwards accounted for 60% of the injury and 72% of the blood replacements. Flankers and the front row were the most commonly replaced forwards while wing and centre three quarters were the most vulnerable playing positions among backs. The incidence of injury replacements increased as the match progressed up until the last 10 minutes when the trend was reversed. Blood replacements showed a different pattern with 60% occurring during the first half of the match. The most important finding of the study was reliability of referees in documenting the vulnerability of certain playing positions, and the timing when injuries took place, thus assisting coaches and team selectors when choosing replacement players for competitive club and representative rugby matches. This study re-emphasises the need for continuing epidemiological research.

  7. Can Patient Safety Incident Reports Be Used to Compare Hospital Safety? Results from a Quantitative Analysis of the English National Reporting and Learning System Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Ann-Marie; Burns, Elaine M; Bouras, George; Donaldson, Liam J; Athanasiou, Thanos; Darzi, Ara

    2015-01-01

    The National Reporting and Learning System (NRLS) collects reports about patient safety incidents in England. Government regulators use NRLS data to assess the safety of hospitals. This study aims to examine whether annual hospital incident reporting rates can be used as a surrogate indicator of individual hospital safety. Secondly assesses which hospital characteristics are correlated with high incident reporting rates and whether a high reporting hospital is safer than those lower reporting hospitals. Finally, it assesses which health-care professionals report more incidents of patient harm, which report more near miss incidents and what hospital factors encourage reporting. These findings may suggest methods for increasing the utility of reporting systems. This study used a mix methods approach for assessing NRLS data. The data were investigated using Pareto analysis and regression models to establish which patients are most vulnerable to reported harm. Hospital factors were correlated with institutional reporting rates over one year to examine what factors influenced reporting. Staff survey findings regarding hospital safety culture were correlated with reported rates of incidents causing harm; no harm and death to understand what barriers influence error disclosure. 5,879,954 incident reports were collected from acute hospitals over the decade. 70.3% of incidents produced no harm to the patient and 0.9% were judged by the reporter to have caused severe harm or death. Obstetrics and Gynaecology reported the most no harm events [OR 1.61(95%CI: 1.12 to 2.27), ppharmacy was the hospital location where most near-misses were captured [OR 3.03(95%CI: 2.04 to 4.55), pPatient satisfaction and mortality outcomes were not significantly associated with reporting rates. Staff survey responses revealed that keeping reports confidential, keeping staff informed about incidents and giving feedback on safety initiatives increased reporting rates [r = 0.26 (ppatient safety

  8. Revelation of the voluntary information about Human Capital in the Annual Reports Revelación de la información voluntaria sobre el capital humano en los informes anuales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Villacorta

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The Financial Accounting impedes the registration on behalf of the information on the intangible of the different companies. To attenuate this situation, many companies offer voluntary data on them in the accounting documentation. This work analyzes the voluntary information of the Spanish companies about the intangible, impacting in the place that they occupy inside the Annual Report. The main conclusion of the investigation is that the companies offer the voluntary information that more it interests them for their own motivations and, however, the users of the Financial Accounting need a wider and more comparable information on the Human Capital.La normalización contable actual impide el registro de parte de la información sobre los intangibles de las diferentes empresas. Para atenuar esta situación, muchas empresas ofrecen datos voluntarios sobre ellos en la documentación contable que ofrecen a terceros. Este trabajo analiza la información voluntaria que exponen las empresas españolas cotizadas sobre los intangibles no reconocidos en el Balance, incidiendo en el lugar que ocupan dentro del Informe Anual. La principal conclusión de la investigación es que las empresas ofrecen la información voluntaria que más les interesa para sus propias motivaciones y, sin embargo, los usuarios de la Contabilidad Financiera necesitan una información más amplia y comparable sobre el Capital Humano.

  9. "You just don't report that kind of stuff": investigating teens' ambivalence toward peer-perpetrated, unwanted sexual incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Karen G

    2013-01-01

    An investigation of narratives from the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) finds that one in three teenagers--12-18 years old--who experience an unwanted sexual incident perpetrated by another teen trivialize their incidents as minor, unimportant, or normal kid stuff. This study contextualizes these responses within a framework of ambivalence that highlights separately teens' ambiguity of definitions, or uncertainty that incidents perpetrated by other teens (especially dating partners and schoolmates) are "real" crimes or offenses worth reporting, and adaptive indifference, a more tactical response to conflicting norms and allegiances that discourage teens from reporting their peers' sexual misconduct to authorities. The context and consequences of teens' ambivalence are discussed.

  10. Patient-reported safety incidents in older patients with long-term conditions: a large cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagioti, Maria; Blakeman, Thomas; Hann, Mark; Bower, Peter

    2017-05-30

    Increasing evidence suggests that patient safety is a serious concern for older patients with long-term conditions. Despite this, there is a lack of research on safety incidents encountered by this patient group. In this study, we sought to examine patient reports of safety incidents and factors associated with reports of safety incidents in older patients with long-term conditions. The baseline cross-sectional data from a longitudinal cohort study were analysed. Older patients (n=3378 aged 65 years and over) with a long-term condition registered in general practices were included in the study. The main outcome was patient-reported safety incidents including availability and appropriateness of medical tests and prescription of wrong types or doses of medication. Binary univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were undertaken to examine factors associated with patient-reported safety incidents. Safety incidents were reported by 11% of the patients. Four factors were significantly associated with patient-reported safety incidents in multivariate analyses. The experience of multiple long-term conditions (OR=1.09, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.13), a probable diagnosis of depression (OR=1.36, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.74) and greater relational continuity of care (OR=1.28, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.52) were associated with increased odds for patient-reported safety incidents. Perceived greater support and involvement in self-management was associated with lower odds for patient-reported safety incidents (OR=0.95, 95% CI 0.93 to 0.97). We found that older patients with multimorbidity and depression are more likely to report experiences of patient safety incidents. Improving perceived support and involvement of patients in their care may help prevent patient-reported safety incidents. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Analysis of Aviation Safety Reporting System Incident Data Associated with the Technical Challenges of the Atmospheric Environment Safety Technology Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withrow, Colleen A.; Reveley, Mary S.

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzed aircraft incidents in the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) that apply to two of the three technical challenges (TCs) in NASA's Aviation Safety Program's Atmospheric Environment Safety Technology Project. The aircraft incidents are related to airframe icing and atmospheric hazards TCs. The study reviewed incidents that listed their primary problem as weather or environment-nonweather between 1994 and 2011 for aircraft defined by Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR) Parts 121, 135, and 91. The study investigated the phases of flight, a variety of anomalies, flight conditions, and incidents by FAR part, along with other categories. The first part of the analysis focused on airframe-icing-related incidents and found 275 incidents out of 3526 weather-related incidents over the 18-yr period. The second portion of the study focused on atmospheric hazards and found 4647 incidents over the same time period. Atmospheric hazards-related incidents included a range of conditions from clear air turbulence and wake vortex, to controlled flight toward terrain, ground encounters, and incursions.

  12. Hemochromatosis Patients as Voluntary Blood Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara E Power

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to investigate hemochromatosis patients' suitability as blood donors as well as their perceptions and experience with the current public donation system. Participants were gathered from a list of current hemochromatosis patients (n=120 and members of the Canadian Hemochromatosis Society (n=1000. Of the 1120 surveys mailed out to these groups, 801 surveys were returned completed. The sample respondents had a mean age of 57.44 years (SD=12.73; range 19 to 87 years, and 57% were men. It was found that 20% (160 of the respondents have donated blood since their diagnosis; however, only 12% of the respondents indicated that they use voluntary blood donation as a means of maintaining their iron levels. Forty per cent of the respondents indicated that they had been refused from voluntary donation. Despite the fact that in May 2001 the Canadian Blood Services, in collaboration with the Canadian Hemochromatosis Society, began a promotion campaign to encourage hemochromatosis patients to become voluntary blood donors, the present study found that 15% of the respondents reported having been refused from the voluntary blood donation service due to the diagnosis of hemochromatosis. With respect to quality of life, it was found that individuals who donate blood were generally healthier with respect to physical functioning and bodily pain, however, these findings may indicate that hemochromatosis patients who are healthier are better able to donate at public blood banks, rather than that voluntary blood donation has an effect on the donors' physical functioning over phlebotomy clinic users. These study findings suggest that although there may be other medical factors limiting individuals from donating, hemochromatosis patients are interested in being voluntary blood donors and this potential resource is currently under-used.

  13. Patient and procedural factors associated with an increased risk of harm or death in the first 4,000 incidents reported to webAIRS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, N M; Culwick, M D; Merry, A F

    2017-03-01

    This report describes an analysis of patient and procedural factors associated with a higher proportion of harm or death versus no harm in the first 4,000 incidents reported to webAIRS. The report is supplementary to a previous cross-sectional report on the first 4,000 incidents reported to webAIRS. The aim of this analysis was to identify potential patient or procedural factors that are more common in incidents resulting in harm or death than in incidents with more benign outcomes. There was a >50% higher proportion of harm (versus no harm) for incidents in which the patient's body mass index (BMI) was incidents in post-anaesthesia care units and non-theatre procedural areas, and for incidents under the main category of cardiovascular or neurological. The proportion of incidents associated with death was also higher (risk ratio >1.5) for BMI incidents in non-theatre procedural areas, and incidents under the main category of cardiovascular or neurological. In addition, the proportion of incidents associated with death was higher for incidents in which the patient's age was >80 years, the American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status was 4 or 5, incidents involving non-elective procedures, and incidents occurring after hours (1800 to 0800 hours). When faced with incidents with these potential risk factors, anaesthetists should consider earlier interventions and request assistance at an earlier stage. Educational strategies on incident prevention and management should place even further emphasis on scenarios involving these factors.

  14. Between voluntary agreement and legislation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gwozdz, Wencke; Hedegaard, Liselotte; Reisch, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    Voluntary agreements and self-imposed standards are broadly applied to restrict the influence food advertising exerts on children’s food choices – yet their effects are unknown. The current project will therefore investigate whether and, if yes, how the Danish Code for Responsible Food Marketing...... Communication towards Children (hereafter: CODE) – with its dependence on a supportive institutional environment and acceptance of as well as dynamics between involved key stakeholders like consumers, political actors and firms – contributes to fighting the obesity pandemic.Thus, we explore within this article...... what information about the process of implementing the CODE as well as about the evolved dynamics between key stakeholders is already available. Here, the recently published report of the PolMark project sheds light on the dynamics between the key stakeholders in relation to the current Danish...

  15. First Annual Report: NASA-ONERA Collaboration on Human Factors in Aviation Accidents and Incidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ashok; Fabiani, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    This is the first annual report jointly prepared by NASA and ONERA on the work performed under the agreement to collaborate on a study of the human factors entailed in aviation accidents and incidents particularly focused on consequences of decreases in human performance associated with fatigue. The objective of this Agreement is to generate reliable, automated procedures that improve understanding of the levels and characteristics of flight-crew fatigue factors whose confluence will likely result in unacceptable crew performance. This study entails the analyses of numerical and textual data collected during operational flights. NASA and ONERA are collaborating on the development and assessment of automated capabilities for extracting operationally significant information from very large, diverse (textual and numerical) databases much larger than can be handled practically by human experts. This report presents the approach that is currently expected to be used in processing and analyzing the data for identifying decrements in aircraft performance and examining their relationships to decrements in crewmember performance due to fatigue. The decisions on the approach were based on samples of both the numerical and textual data that will be collected during the four studies planned under the Human Factors Monitoring Program (HFMP). Results of preliminary analyses of these sample data are presented in this report.

  16. Evaluation of the Defense Criminal Investigative Organizations’ Defense Incident-Based Reporting System Reporting and Reporting Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-29

    and management. Additional data collection and reporting requirements are contained in the Victims’ Rights and Restitution Act of 1990 (49 U.S.C...and reporting requirements of the Uniform Federal Crime Reporting Act of 1988, Victims’ Rights and Restitution , and Brady Handgun Violence Prevention...process instead of the back end (with FBI checks). The DIBRS Database Administrator is working with his FBI CJIS counterpart to work out a plan for the

  17. Chlamydia trachomatis Incidence Using Self-Reports and Serology by Gender, Age Period, and Sexual Behavior in a Birth Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righarts, A Antoinette; Morgan, Jane; Horner, Paddy J; Wills, Gillian S; McClure, Myra O; Dickson, Nigel P

    2017-06-01

    Although understanding chlamydia incidence assists prevention and control, analyses based on diagnosed infections may distort the findings. Therefore, we determined incidence and examined risks in a birth cohort based on self-reports and serology. Self-reported chlamydia and behavior data were collected from a cohort born in New Zealand in 1972/3 on several occasions to age 38 years. Sera drawn at ages 26, 32, and 38 years were tested for antibodies to Chlamydia trachomatis Pgp3 antigen using a recently developed assay, more sensitive in women (82.9%) than men (54.4%). Chlamydia incidence by age period (first coitus to age 26, 26-32, and 32-38 years) was calculated combining self-reports and serostatus and risk factors investigated by Poisson regression. By age 38 years, 32.7% of women and 20.9% of men had seroconverted or self-reported a diagnosis. The highest incidence rate was to age 26, 32.7 and 18.4 years per 1000 person-years for women and men, respectively. Incidence rates increased substantially with increasing number of sexual partners. After adjusting age period incidence rates for partner numbers, a relationship with age was not detected until 32 to 38 years, and then only for women. Chlamydia was common in this cohort by age 38, despite the moderate incidence rates by age period. The strongest risk factor for incident infection was the number of sexual partners. Age, up to 32 years, was not an independent factor after accounting for partner numbers, and then only for women. Behavior is more important than age when considering prevention strategies.

  18. Dizziness reported by elderly patients in family practice: prevalence, incidence, and clinical characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Weert Henk C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although dizziness in elderly patients is very common in family practice, most prevalence studies on dizziness are community-based and include a study population that is not representative of family practice. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and incidence of dizziness reported by elderly patients in family practice, to describe their final diagnoses as recorded by the family physician, and to compare the clinical characteristics of dizzy patients with those of non-dizzy patients. Methods Data were obtained from the Second Dutch National Survey of General Practice, a prospective registration study which took place over a 12-month period in 2001. We developed a search strategy consisting of 15 truncated search terms (based on Dutch synonyms for dizziness, and identified all patients aged 65 or older who visited their family physician because of dizziness (N = 3,990. We used the mid-time population as denominator to calculate the prevalence and incidence, and for group comparisons we used the Student's t and Chi-square test, and logistic regression analysis. Results The one-year prevalence of dizziness in family practice in patients aged 65 or older was 8.3%, it was higher in women than in men, and it increased with age. In patients aged 85 or older the prevalence was similar for men and women. The incidence of dizziness was 47.1 per 1000 person-years. For 39% of the dizzy patients the family physicians did not specify a diagnosis, and recorded a symptom diagnosis as the final diagnosis. Living alone, lower level of education, pre-existing cerebrovascular disease, and pre-existing hypertension were independently associated with dizziness. Conclusions Dizziness in family practice patients increases with age. It is more common in women than in men, but this gender difference disappears in the very old. Because a large proportion of dizzy elderly patients in family practice remains undiagnosed, it would be

  19. Status and Trends in the U.S. Voluntary Green Power Market (2015 Data)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Shaughnessy, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Liu, Chang [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Heeter, Jenny [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The voluntary green power market refers to the sale and procurement of renewable energy for voluntary purposes by residential and commercial customers. This report reviews seven green power procurement mechanisms: utility green pricing programs, utility green tariffs, voluntary unbundled renewable energy certificates, competitive supplier green power, community choice aggregations, voluntary power purchase agreements (PPAs), and community solar. This report details the status of trends of those seven green power procurement mechanisms in 2015. Three trends -- significant growth of the voluntary PPA project pipeline, innovative green power mechanisms developed by utilities, and geographic expansion of green power mechanisms -- suggest that the green power market is likely to continue to grow in coming years.

  20. Cancer Incidence in Golestan Province : Report of an Ongoing Population-based Cancer Registry in Iran between 2004 and 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roshandel, Gholamreza; Sadjadi, Alireza; Aarabi, Mohsen; Keshtkar, Abbasali; Sedaghat, Seyed Mehdi; Nouraie, Seyed Mehdi; Semnani, Shahryar; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Background: Golestan Province, at the western end of the Asian esophageal cancer (EC) belt in northeastern Iran, was reported to have one of the highest worldwide rates of EC in the 1970s. We have previously shown a declining incidence of EC in Golestan during the last decades. This study reports ad

  1. Cancer Incidence in Golestan Province : Report of an Ongoing Population-based Cancer Registry in Iran between 2004 and 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roshandel, Gholamreza; Sadjadi, Alireza; Aarabi, Mohsen; Keshtkar, Abbasali; Sedaghat, Seyed Mehdi; Nouraie, Seyed Mehdi; Semnani, Shahryar; Malekzadeh, Reza

    Background: Golestan Province, at the western end of the Asian esophageal cancer (EC) belt in northeastern Iran, was reported to have one of the highest worldwide rates of EC in the 1970s. We have previously shown a declining incidence of EC in Golestan during the last decades. This study reports

  2. Incident reporting in nurse-led national telephone triage in Sweden: the reported errors reveal a pattern that needs to be broken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernesäter, Annica; Engström, Maria; Holmström, Inger; Winblad, Ulrika

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective study of incident reports concerning the national, nurse-led telephone triage system in Sweden. The Swedish Health Care Direct organization (SHD) is staffed by registered nurses who act as telenurses and triage the callers' need for care, using a computerized decision support system. Data were collected during 2007 from all county councils that participated in the SHD and were analysed using content analysis. Incident reports were then compared concerning differences in reported categories and who reported the errors. The 426 incident reports included 452 errors. Of the analysed incident reports, 41% concerned accessibility problems, 25% incorrect assessment, 15% routines/guidelines, 13% technical problems and 6% information and communication. The most frequent outgoing incident reports (i.e. sent from SHD to other health-care providers) concerned accessibility problems and the most frequently incoming reports (i.e. sent to SHD from other health-care providers) concerned incorrect assessment. There was a significant difference (P triage or under-triage the callers' need for care. This over-triage or under-triage may in turn cause other health-care providers to report incorrect assessment to SHD. The implications for practice are that poor accessibility is a matter that should be addressed and that the reasons for incorrect assessment should be explored.

  3. Voluntary Simplicity: A Lifestyle Option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestle, Ruth E.

    This guide provides practical ideas for incorporating the concept of voluntary simplicity into home economics classes. Discussed in the first chapter are the need to study voluntary simplicity, its potential contributions to home economics, and techniques and a questionnaire for measuring student attitudes toward the concept. The remaining…

  4. Operant Variability and Voluntary Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuringer, Allen; Jensen, Greg

    2010-01-01

    A behavior-based theory identified 2 characteristics of voluntary acts. The first, extensively explored in operant-conditioning experiments, is that voluntary responses produce the reinforcers that control them. This bidirectional relationship--in which reinforcer depends on response and response on reinforcer--demonstrates the functional nature…

  5. Toward voluntary parenthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarr, S

    2000-06-01

    David Lykken's proposal to license married parents for child rearing, and to deny the same opportunity to single and inept parents, springs from his deep concern for millions of youngsters cruelly subjected to abusive and neglectful rearing circumstances. Children from such inadequate homes grow up to have high rates of school failure, criminality, and drug addiction. The problem is clear, but Lykken's remedies of mandated marriage and parental licensure are unacceptable in U.S. society, where our reproductive rights are fortunately protected by our Constitution. As a devoted proponent of reproductive rights, I propose a legally and morally acceptable proposal to the same end. Increasing women's effective control of reproduction and moving toward entirely voluntary parenthood will accomplish the same goals without compromising our civil liberties.

  6. Analysis of HIV-1 incidence risk factors in voluntary counselling and testing population in Yunnan province,2009-2010%自愿咨询检测人群艾滋病新发感染危险因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨莉; 方清艳; 马艳玲; 杨志芳; 陈玲; 陈会超; 施玉华; 贾曼红

    2012-01-01

    Objective To detect new infection of human immunodeficiecy virus type 1 (HIV-1) among voluntary counselling and testing population in Yunnan province and to explore the risk factors of the infection for implementation of AIDS prevention and control. Methods BED-capture enzyme immunoassay(BED-CEIA) was performed for positive samples of HIV-1 antibody collected from voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) population in 2009 - 2010, and BED-CE1A results were analyzed combined with demographic and epidemiological data. Results Among 4 882 examinees, 1500 were HTV-1 antibody positive (including 231 previous infections) and the positive rate was 30.7% (1 500/4 882). There were 853 men with a positive rate of 27. 5 % and 647 women with a positive rate of 36. 3 % . Totally 145 new infections were ascertained by BED,among which 84 were male and 61 were female with an average age of 35. 7 years(17 -80). Multivariate logistic analyses showed that the risk of new infection among the participants with the education lower than junior high school, of female, and married was higher than those with junior high school education or higher, of male and unmarried or divorced or widowed with statistically significant differences (P < 0. 05 for all). Risks of new infection among drug users and men who have sex with men(MSM) were 2. 502 times and 5. 551 times higher than that of among heterosexual participants. Conclusion The risks of HIV new infections are significantly different a-mong the populations of different sex, marital status, educational level, drug use, and the reasons for seeking VCT. The risk of new infection is higher among people with low education level MSM and drug users.%目的 用BED-捕获酶联免疫技术(BED-CEIA)在云南省自愿咨询检测(VCT)人群中开展人类免疫缺陷病毒Ⅰ型(HIV-1)新发感染检测,了解危险因素,为有针对性地开展艾滋病防治工作提供科学依据.方法 收集2009-2010年云南省VCT人群样本,对血

  7. Examining the attitudes of hospital pharmacists to reporting medication safety incidents using the theory of planned behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Steven David; Phipps, Denham L; Ashcroft, Darren

    2015-08-01

    To assess the effect of factors within hospital pharmacists' practice on the likelihood of their reporting a medication safety incident. Theory of planned behaviour (TPB) survey. Twenty-one general and teaching hospitals in the North West of England. Two hundred and seventy hospital pharmacists (response rate = 45%). Hospital pharmacists were invited to complete a TPB survey, based on a prescribing error scenario that had resulted in serious patient harm. Multiple regression was used to determine the relative influence of different TPB variables, and participant demographics, on the pharmacists' self-reported intention to report the medication safety incident. The TPB variables predicting intention to report: attitude towards behaviour, subjective norm, perceived behavioural control and descriptive norm. Overall, the hospital pharmacists held strong intentions to report the error, with senior pharmacists being more likely to report. Perceived behavioural control (ease or difficulty of reporting), Descriptive Norms (belief that other pharmacists would report) and Attitudes towards Behaviour (expected benefits of reporting) showed good correlation with, and were statistically significant predictors of, intention to report the error [R = 0.568, R(2) = 0.323, adjusted R(2) = 0.293, P behavioural and control beliefs about the reporting process. This should include instilling greater confidence about the benefits of reporting and not harming professional relationships with doctors, greater clarity about what/not to report and a simpler reporting system. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  8. Sector-specific issues and reporting methodologies supporting the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Volume 2: Part 4, Transportation sector; Part 5, Forestry sector; Part 6, Agricultural sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    This volume, the second of two such volumes, contains sector-specific guidance in support of the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gas emissions and carbon sequestration. This voluntary reporting program was authorized by Congress in Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. The General Guidelines, bound separately from this volume, provide the overall rationale for the program, discuss in general how to analyze emissions and emission reduction/carbon sequestration projects, and address programmatic issues such as minimum reporting requirements, time parameters, international projects, confidentiality, and certification. Together, the General Guidelines and the guidance in these supporting documents will provide concepts and approaches needed to prepare the reporting forms. This second volume of sector-specific guidance covers the transportation sector, the forestry sector, and the agricultural sector.

  9. National Incident Management System (NIMS) Standards Review Panel Workshop Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenner, Robert D.; Kirk, Jennifer L.; Stanton, James R.; Shebell, Peter; Schwartz, Deborah S.; Judd, Kathleen S.; Gelston, Gariann M.

    2006-02-07

    The importance and need for full compliant implementation of NIMS nationwide was clearly demonstrated during the Hurricane Katrina event, which was clearly expressed in Secretary Chertoff's October 4, 2005 letter addressed to the State's governors. It states, ''Hurricane Katrina was a stark reminder of how critical it is for our nation to approach incident management in a coordinated, consistent, and efficient manner. We must be able to come together, at all levels of government, to prevent, prepare for, respond to, and recover from any emergency or disaster. Our operations must be seamless and based on common incident management doctrine, because the challenges we face as a nation are far greater than capabilities of any one jurisdiction.'' The NIMS is a system/architecture for organizing response on a ''national'' level. It incorporations ICS as a main component of that structure (i.e., it institutionalizes ICS in NIMS). In a paper published on the NIMS Website, the following statements were made: ''NIMS represents a core set of doctrine, principles, terminology, and organizational processes to enable effective, efficient and collaborative incident management at all levels. To provide the framework for interoperability and compatibility, the NIMS is based on a balance between flexibility and standardization.'' Thus the NIC is challenged with the need to adopt quality SDO generated standards to support NIMS compliance, but in doing so maintain the flexibility necessary so that response operations can be tailored for the specific jurisdictional and geographical needs across the nation. In support of this large and complex challenge facing the NIC, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was asked to provide technical support to the NIC, through their DHS Science and Technology ? Standards Portfolio Contract, to help identify, review, and develop key standards for NIMS compliance. Upon

  10. Effects of patient safety culture interventions on incident reporting in general practice : A cluster randomised trial a cluster randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, Natasha J.; Langelaan, Maaike; Verheij, Theo J M; Wagner, Cordula; Zwart, Dorien L M

    2015-01-01

    Background: A constructive safety culture is essential for the successful implementation of patient safety improvements. Aim: To assess the effect of two patient safety culture interventions on incident reporting as a proxy of safety culture. Design and setting: A three-arm cluster randomised trial

  11. Using Critical Incident Reporting to Promote Objectivity and Self-Knowledge in Pre-Service School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Maureen L.; Scherr, Tracey G.

    2010-01-01

    This longitudinal project consisted of exploring the usefulness of Critical Incident Reporting (CIR) as an instructional tool (Griffin, 2003) to first increase objectivity and self-knowledge among practicum students and then to guide practices when those students became interns the following academic year. Analysis included 120 CIRs written by 15…

  12. The Diffuse Involvement of Bilateral Breasts in the Incidence of Burkitt's Lymphoma: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myung Su; Lee, Sa Rah; Yang, Woo Ick; Kim, Eun Kyung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hae Kyoung [CHA University, Bundang CHA Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    The incidence of Burkitt's lymphoma involving both breasts is rare. We report such a case that was diagnosed by a core biopsy of a hypoechoic lesion visualized from the ultrasonographic results of a patient that was clinically suspected of mastitis.

  13. Parent-Reported Otorrhea in Children with Tympanostomy Tubes: Incidence and Predictors

    OpenAIRE

    van Dongen, T. M.; van der Heijden, G. J.; Freling, H. G.; Venekamp, R. P.; Schilder, A. G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Although common in children with tympanostomy tubes, the current incidence of tympanostomy tube otorrhea (TTO) is uncertain. TTO is generally a sign of otitis media, when middle ear fluid drains through the tube. Predictors for otitis media are therefore suggested to have predictive value for the occurrence of TTO. Objective To determine the incidence of TTO and its predictors. Methods We performed a cohort study, using a parental web-based questionnaire to retrospec...

  14. Estimating the incidence reporting rates of new influenza pandemics at an early stage using travel data from the source country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, K C; Fong, H F; Zee, C Y

    2014-05-01

    During the surveillance of influenza pandemics, underreported data are a public health challenge that complicates the understanding of pandemic threats and can undermine mitigation efforts. We propose a method to estimate incidence reporting rates at early stages of new influenza pandemics using 2009 pandemic H1N1 as an example. Routine surveillance data and statistics of travellers arriving from Mexico were used. Our method incorporates changes in reporting rates such as linearly increasing trends due to the enhanced surveillance. From our results, the reporting rate was estimated at 0·46% during early stages of the pandemic in Mexico. We estimated cumulative incidence in the Mexican population to be 0·7% compared to 0·003% reported by officials in Mexico at the end of April. This method could be useful in estimation of actual cases during new influenza pandemics for policy makers to better determine appropriate control measures.

  15. The spinal reflex cannot be perceptually separated from voluntary movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Arko; Haggard, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Both voluntary and involuntary movements activate sensors in the muscles, skin, tendon and joints. As limb movement can result from a mixture of spinal reflexes and voluntary motor commands, the cortical centres underlying conscious proprioception might either aggregate or separate the sensory inputs generated by voluntary movements from those generated by involuntary movements such as spinal reflexes. We addressed whether healthy volunteers could perceive the contribution of a spinal reflex during movements that combined both reflexive and voluntary contributions. Volunteers reported the reflexive contribution in leg movements that were partly driven by the knee-jerk reflex induced by a patellar tendon tap and partly by voluntary motor control. In one condition, participants were instructed to kick back in response to a tendon tap. The results were compared to reflexes in a resting baseline condition without voluntary movement. In a further condition, participants were instructed to kick forwards after a tap. Volunteers reported the perceived reflex contribution by repositioning the leg to the perceived maximum displacement to which the reflex moved the leg after each tendon tap. In the resting baseline condition, the reflex was accurately perceived. We found a near-unity slope of linear regressions of perceived on actual reflexive displacement. Both the slope value and the quality of regression fit in individual volunteers were significantly reduced when volunteers were instructed to generate voluntary backward kicks as soon as they detected the tap. In the kick forward condition, kinematic analysis showed continuity of reflex and voluntary movements, but the reflex contribution could be estimated from electromyography (EMG) recording on each trial. Again, participants' judgements of reflexes showed a poor relation to reflex EMG, in contrast to the baseline condition. In sum, we show that reflexes can be accurately perceived from afferent information. However

  16. The Notion of Voluntary Unemployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standing, Guy

    1981-01-01

    Considers the distinction between voluntary and involuntary unemployment by analyzing six behavioral characteristics attributed to groups of workers suspected of indulging in the former, and the labor market mechanisms supposedly encouraging them. (Author/CT)

  17. Estimating the incidence reporting rates of new influenza pandemics at an early stage using travel data from the source country

    OpenAIRE

    CHONG, K. C.; Fong, H. F.; ZEE, C. Y.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY During the surveillance of influenza pandemics, underreported data are a public health challenge that complicates the understanding of pandemic threats and can undermine mitigation efforts. We propose a method to estimate incidence reporting rates at early stages of new influenza pandemics using 2009 pandemic H1N1 as an example. Routine surveillance data and statistics of travellers arriving from Mexico were used. Our method incorporates changes in reporting rates such as linearly inc...

  18. Analysis of Aviation Safety Reporting System Incident Data Associated With the Technical Challenges of the Vehicle Systems Safety Technology Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withrow, Colleen A.; Reveley, Mary S.

    2014-01-01

    This analysis was conducted to support the Vehicle Systems Safety Technology (VSST) Project of the Aviation Safety Program (AVsP) milestone VSST4.2.1.01, "Identification of VSST-Related Trends." In particular, this is a review of incident data from the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS). The following three VSST-related technical challenges (TCs) were the focus of the incidents searched in the ASRS database: (1) Vechicle health assurance, (2) Effective crew-system interactions and decisions in all conditions; and (3) Aircraft loss of control prevention, mitigation, and recovery.

  19. Self-reported incident type 2 diabetes in the Ibadan study of ageing: relationship with urban residence and socioeconomic status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogun, Williams O; Gureje, Oye

    2013-01-01

    There is no incident study of diabetes among elderly Nigerians and it is unclear what factors may constitute risks for the condition in this society undergoing rapid social changes. This study explores the link between urban residence and socioeconomic status, and incident diabetes among community-dwelling elderly Nigerians. A cohort of 2,149 persons, aged 65 years and above, were recruited through a clustered multistage sampling in eight contiguous predominantly Yoruba-speaking states in south-western and north-central regions of Nigeria. Follow-up evaluation was conducted approximately 39 months after the baseline assessments. Face-to-face assessments obtained self-report of chronic medical conditions, including diabetes, using a standardized checklist as well as information on social factors, including residence. Incident diabetes was determined among persons who were free of the problem at baseline (n = 1,330). At follow-up, 38 subjects had developed diabetes giving an incidence rate of 8.87% [95% confidence interval (CI): 6.45-12.19] per 1,000 person-years. A stepwise relationship was found between incident diabetes and urbanicity as well as increasing economic status. The highest incidence of diabetes (13.57%; 95% CI: 8.75-21.03 per 1,000 person-years) occurred among subjects residing in urban areas, representing an adjusted relative risk of 4.25 (95% CI: 1.81-9.94) compared to those residing in rural areas. Also, compared with persons in the lowest economic group, those in the highest group had about a 3-fold elevated risk of having incident diabetes. Urban residence and increasing socioeconomic status are risk factors for new onset diabetes among elderly Nigerians. These social factors may be proxies for lifestyles that increase the likelihood of developing the disorder. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. SU-E-T-469: Implementation of VAs Web-Based Radiotherapy Incident Reporting and Analysis System (RIRAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapoor, R; Palta, J; Hagan, M [Veteran Health Administration, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Malik, G [TSG Innovations Inc. (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This Web-based Radiotherapy Incident Reporting and Analysis System (RIRAS) is a tool to improve quality of care for radiation therapy patients. This system is an important facet of continuing effort by our community to maintain and improve safety of radiotherapy.Material and Methods: VA’s National Radiation Oncology Program office has embarked on a program to electronically collect adverse events and good-catch data of radiation treatment of over 25,000 veterans treated with radiotherapy annually. This VA-Intranet based software design has made use of dataset taxonomies and data dictionaries defined in AAPM/ASTRO reports on error reporting. We used proven industrial and medical event reporting techniques to avoid several common problems faced in effective data collection such as incomplete data due to data entry fatigue by the reporters, missing data due to data difficult to obtain or not familiar to most reporters, missing reports due to fear of reprisal etc. This system encompasses the entire feedback loop of reporting an incident, analyzing it for salient details, and developing interventions to prevent it from happening again. The analysis reports with corrective, learning actions are shared with the reporter/facility and made public to the community (after deidentification) as part of the learning process. Results: Till date 50 incident/good catches have been reported in RIRAS and we have completed analysis on 100% of these reports. This is done due to the fact that each reported incidents is investigated and a complete analysis/patient-safety-work-product report is generated by radiation oncology domain-experts. Conclusions Because of the completeness of the data, the system has enabled us to analyze process steps and track trends of major errors which in the future will lead to implementing system wide process improvement steps and safe standard operating procedures for each radiotherapy treatment modality/technique and fulfills our goal of

  1. EP&R Standards Project Report: Technical Review of National Incident Management Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenner, Robert D.

    2007-04-24

    The importance and necessity for a fully developed and implemented National Incident Management System (NIMS) has been demonstrated in recent years by the impact of national events such as Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Throughout the history of emergency response to major disasters, especially when multiple response organizations are involved, there have been systemic problems in the consistency and uniformity of response operations. Identifying national standards that support the development and implementation of NIMS is key to helping solve these systemic problems. The NIMS seeks to provide uniformity and consistency for incident management by using common terminology and protocols that will enable responders to coordinate their efforts to ensure an efficient response.

  2. Masking in reports of "most serious" events: bias in estimators of sports injury incidence in Canadian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gupta

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surveys that collect information on injuries often focus on the single "most serious" event to help limit recall error and reduce survey length. However, this can mask less serious injuries and result in biased incidence estimates for specific injury subcategories. Methods: Data from the 2002 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC survey and from the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program (CHIRPP were used to compare estimates of sports injury incidence in Canadian children. Results: HBSC data indicate that 6.7% of children report sustaining a sports injury that required an emergency department (ED visit. However, details were only collected on a child's "most serious" injury, so children who had multiple injuries requiring an ED visit may have had sports injuries that went unreported. The rate of 6.7% can be seen to be an underestimate by as much as 4.3%. Corresponding CHIRPP surveillance data indicate an incidence of 9.9%. Potential masking bias is also highlighted in our analysis of injuries attended by other health care providers. Conclusion: The "one most serious injury" line of questioning induces potentially substantial masking bias in the estimation of sports injury incidence, which limits researchers' ability to quantify the burden of sports injury. Longer survey recall periods naturally lead to greater masking. The design of future surveys should take these issues into account. In order to accurately inform policy decisions and the direction of future research, researchers must be aware of these limitations.

  3. Prostate cancer incidence in men with self-reported prostatitis after 15 years of follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaarala, Markku H; Mehik, Aare; Ohtonen, Pasi; Hellström, Pekka A

    2016-08-01

    Controversy exists regarding a possible association between prostatitis and prostate cancer. To further evaluate the incidence of prostate cancer following prostatitis, a study of prostate cancer incidence in a cohort of Finnish men was performed. The original survey evaluating self-reported prostatitis was conducted in 1996-1997. A database review was conducted focusing on prostate cancer diagnoses in the cohort. In 2012, there were 13 (5.2%) and 27 (1.8%) prostate cancer cases among men with (n=251) and without (n=1,521) prostatitis symptoms, respectively. There were no significant differences in age, primary therapy distribution, prostate-specific antigen levels, Gleason score, clinical T-class at the time of prostate cancer diagnosis, or time lag between the original survey and prostate cancer diagnosis. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of prostate cancer was 1.16 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.62-1.99] and 0.44 (95% CI, 0.29-0.64) among men with and without prostatitis symptoms, respectively. After 15 years of follow-up subsequent to self-reported prostatitis, no evident increase in incidence of prostate cancer was detected among Finnish men with prostatitis symptoms. The higher percentage of prostate cancer among men with prostatitis symptoms appears to be due to coincidentally low SIR of prostate cancer among men without prostatitis symptoms, and may additionally be due to increased diagnostic examinations. Further research is required to confirm this speculation.

  4. Burden of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection in London acute hospitals: retrospective on a voluntary surveillance programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumtaz, S; Bishop, L A; Wright, A L; Kanfoudi, L; Duckworth, G; Fraser, G G

    2011-12-01

    Although meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is recognized as an important cause of hospital and community healthcare-associated morbidity, and colonization as a precursor to infection, few studies have attempted to assess the burden of both colonization and infection across acute healthcare providers within a defined health economy. This study describes the prevalence and incidence of MRSA colonization and infection in acute London hospital Trusts participating in a voluntary surveillance programme in 2000-2001. Hospital infection control staff completed a weekly return including details on incident and prevalent colonizations, bacteraemias and other significant infections due to MRSA. Incidence and prevalence rates were calculated for hospitals with sufficient participation across both years. Colonizations accounted for 79% of incident MRSA cases reported; 4% were bacteraemias, and 17% other significant infections. There was no change in incidence of colonization of hospital patients between 2000 and 2001. By contrast, there was an unexplained 49% increase in prevalence of colonizations over this period. For any given month, prevalent colonizations outnumbered incident colonizations at least twofold. This MRSA surveillance programme was unusual for prospective ascertainment of incident and prevalent cases of both colonization and infection within an English regional health economy. Consistent with other studies, the incidence and prevalence of colonization substantially exceeded infection. Given the small contribution of bacteraemias to the overall MRSA burden, and the surveillance, screening and control interventions of recent years, it may be appropriate to review the present reliance on bacteraemia surveillance.

  5. The impact of under-reporting of cases on the estimates of childhood cancer incidence and survival in Estonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paapsi, Keiu; Mägi, Margit; Mikkel, Sirje; Saks, Kadri; Aareleid, Tiiu; Innos, Kaire

    2017-06-09

    About 35 new childhood cancer cases are diagnosed in Estonia (population 1.3 million in 2011) every year. Despite continuous improvements in the healthcare system and available cancer treatment options, the survival rates for childhood cancers have appeared to remain lower than the European average. These observations and the accompanying decrease in incidence led us to hypothesize that some nonfatal cases might be missing from the Estonian Cancer Registry (ECR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the completeness of reporting of childhood cancer cases to the ECR and its impact on the estimates of cancer incidence and survival. All cases of benign and malignant tumours, diagnosed in 2000-2011 among children aged 0-17 years and eligible for registration in the ECR, were included in the study. Completeness of reporting was evaluated for cases aged 0-17 years, and incidence and survival were analysed for cases aged 0-14 for international comparisons. The total number of new cancer cases increased from 459 to 515. Overall completeness of case ascertainment was estimated to be 89.5%. After adding the missing cases, the overall incidence rate increased from 12.9 to 14.9/100 000 (from 3.4 to 4.7 for leukaemias). The 2010-2014 period estimate of the 5-year survival increased from 70 to 76% for all sites combined and from 71 to 82% for leukaemias. In conclusion, the under-reporting of nonfatal childhood cancer cases to the ECR had an important impact on incidence and survival rates, causing a considerable underestimation of both.

  6. Voluntary Green Power Market Forecast through 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, L.; Holt, E.; Sumner, J.; Kreycik, C.

    2010-05-01

    Various factors influence the development of the voluntary 'green' power market--the market in which consumers purchase or produce power from non-polluting, renewable energy sources. These factors include climate policies, renewable portfolio standards (RPS), renewable energy prices, consumers' interest in purchasing green power, and utilities' interest in promoting existing programs and in offering new green options. This report presents estimates of voluntary market demand for green power through 2015 that were made using historical data and three scenarios: low-growth, high-growth, and negative-policy impacts. The resulting forecast projects the total voluntary demand for renewable energy in 2015 to range from 63 million MWh annually in the low case scenario to 157 million MWh annually in the high case scenario, representing an approximately 2.5-fold difference. The negative-policy impacts scenario reflects a market size of 24 million MWh. Several key uncertainties affect the results of this forecast, including uncertainties related to growth assumptions, the impacts that policy may have on the market, the price and competitiveness of renewable generation, and the level of interest that utilities have in offering and promoting green power products.

  7. Learning from incident reports in the Australian medical imaging setting: handover and communication errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannaford, N; Mandel, C; Crock, C; Buckley, K; Magrabi, F; Ong, M; Allen, S; Schultz, T

    2013-02-01

    To determine the type and nature of incidents occurring within medical imaging settings in Australia and identify strategies that could be engaged to reduce the risk of their re-occurrence. 71 search terms, related to clinical handover and communication, were applied to 3976 incidents in the Radiology Events Register. Detailed classification and thematic analysis of a subset of incidents that involved handover or communication (n=298) were undertaken to identify the most prevalent types of error and to make recommendations about patient safety initiatives in medical imaging. Incidents occurred most frequently during patient preparation (34%), when requesting imaging (27%) and when communicating a diagnosis (23%). Frequent problems within each of these stages of the imaging cycle included: inadequate handover of patients (41%) or unsafe or inappropriate transfer of the patient to or from medical imaging (35%); incorrect information on the request form (52%); and delayed communication of a diagnosis (36%) or communication of a wrong diagnosis (36%). The handover of patients and clinical information to and from medical imaging is fraught with error, often compromising patient safety and resulting in communication of delayed or wrong diagnoses, unnecessary radiation exposure and a waste of limited resources. Corrective strategies to address safety concerns related to new information technologies, patient transfer and inadequate test result notification policies are relevant to all healthcare settings. Handover and communication errors are prevalent in medical imaging. System-wide changes that facilitate effective communication are required.

  8. Dizziness reported by elderly patients in family practice: prevalence, incidence, and clinical characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maarsingh, O.R.; Dros, J.; Schellevis, F.G.; van Weert, H.C.; Bindels, P.J.; van der Horst, H.E.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Although dizziness in elderly patients is very common in family practice, most prevalence studies on dizziness are community-based and include a study population that is not representative of family practice. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and incidence of dizzin

  9. Dizziness reported by elderly patients in family practice: prevalence, incidence, and clinical characteristics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maarsingh, O.R.; Dros, J.; Schellevis, F.G.; Weert, H.C. van; Bindels, P.J.; Horst, H.E. van der

    2010-01-01

    Background: Although dizziness in elderly patients is very common in family practice, most prevalence studies on dizziness are community-based and include a study population that is not representative of family practice. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and incidence of dizzin

  10. Comparing Voluntary and Mandatory Gameplay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Kuindersma

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Gameplay is commonly considered to be a voluntary activity. Game designers generally believe that voluntary gameplay is essentially different from mandatory gameplay. Such a belief may be a challenge for serious games, as instruction is usually mandatory. The article describes the outcomes of two experiments on the impact of voluntariness on the learning effect and enjoyment of a serious game. In the first experiment freedom of choosing to play a serious game was studied, with participants who had volunteered to participate. The results suggested that, contrary to the opinion of many game designers, being required to play a serious game does not automatically take the fun out of the game. The second experiment had voluntary participants and mandatory participants, who had to participate as part of a homework assignment. The outcomes show that mandatory participants enjoyed the game as much as the voluntary participants, even if they had to play the game for a minimum required time. These studies indicate that mandatory gameplay does not reduce enjoyment and learning effect.

  11. Voluntary organisation and adult education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Elsdon

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available The author starts by offering a definition of voluntary organisations. He then discusses their importance and role, focusing on the issue of adult education wi­ thin these organisations. He also wells upon learning and change of voluntary organisation members, making use of the results of a study he conducted together with his collaborators. One of their fin­dings has been that voluntary organisati­ons, due to their organisational targets li­ke painting, singing or caring for people in need, lead their members to learning, i.e. essentially content learning. Moreo­ver, voluntary organisations offer a fair number of opportunities for social lear­ning and change. ln spite of the fact that the respondents were mostly not aware of the outcomes of their learning and change, careful listeners conducting the interview made them understand the im­portance of the learning they had gone through. The author concludes by poin­ ting out that formal education of adults can get its inspiration in learning in voluntary organisations. On the other hand, such learning would benefit greatly from findings and methods of formal education of adults.

  12. SCORE Study Report #11: Incidences of Neovascular Events in Eyes with Retinal Vein Occlusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Clement K.; Ip, Michael S.; VanVeldhuisen, Paul C.; Oden, Neal L.; Scott, Ingrid U.; Tolentino, Michael J.; Blodi, Barbara A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate in The Standard Care versus COrticosteroid for REtinal Vein Occlusion (SCORE) Study: 1) incidences of neovascular events and retinal capillary nonperfusion (abbreviated as “nonperfusion”), and their relationship with treatment groups; 2) neovascular incidences by nonperfusion status; and 3) pertinent baseline factors for their potential risk for neovascular events. Design Two multi-center, randomized clinical trials: one evaluating participants with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) and the other evaluating participants with branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO). Participants At 36 months, data were available for 81 participants with CRVO and 128 with BRVO. Intervention Standard care (observation or grid photocoagulation) versus 1 mg or 4 mg intravitreal triamcinolone. Main Outcome Measures Neovascularization of the iris (NVI), neovascular glaucoma (NVG), disc or retinal neovascularization (NVD/NVE), pre-retinal or vitreous hemorrhage (PRH/VH), and nonperfusion. Results Cumulative 36-month incidences for CRVO and BRVO eyes, respectively, were: 8.5% and 2.4% for NVI or NVG; 8.8 % and 7.6% for NVD/NVE or PRH/VH. There were no differences in incidences of neovascular events or risk of nonperfusion when comparing the 3 treatment groups within diseases. For CRVO at 36 months, 16.6% of eyes with ≥ 5.5 disc areas of nonperfusion vs. 4.0% of eyes with retinal capillary details caused by dense hemorrhage at baseline for CRVO eyes. Increased risk of neovascularization was noted below the historical threshold of 10 disc areas of nonperfusion for retinal vein occlusion. PMID:21440942

  13. Office of Inspector General inspection report on ``Inspection of an allegation regarding the voluntary separation program at the Savannah River Operations Office``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    In April 1996, the Savannah River Operations Office received approval from DOE Headquarters to offer Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) and Bechtel Savannah River, Inc. (BSRI) employees early termination incentives to facilitate downsizing of the contractor workforce thereby minimizing involuntary separations. In 1996, 217 individuals at the Savannah River Site (SRS) accepted a Voluntary Separation Program (VSP) incentive. The Office of Inspector General (OIG) received an allegation that a former senior manager of the WSRC was provided an opportunity to terminate employment through a VSP. The complainant wrote that after separating from WSRC, and receiving a large bonus for doing so, the former senior manager returned to work at the Savannah River Site (SRS) without observing a required waiting period of one year. The inspection determined that the former senior manager terminated employment with WSRC under the VSP program. It was found that the former senior manager`s departure from WSRC was delayed for six months, until December 31, 1996, in order for a replacement to be relocated from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to SRS and be familiarized with the position. The underlying principle of the VSP was to allow WSRC and BSRI employees to voluntarily leave the SRS workforce, and, if necessary, only be replaced by current SRS employees. The Office of Inspector General concluded that WSRC allowed the former senior manager to participate in the VSP, and then replaced the senior manager with an individual from Westinghouse`s headquarters in Pittsburgh. Consequently, WSRC did not meet the test of prudent business judgment required by its contract with DOE. It was recommended that both the former senior manager`s VSP bonus payment of $99,762, as well as $36,892 in travel and relocation costs expended to move the replacement from Pittsburgh to SRS, be recovered from WSRC. They also recommended that the Manager, Savannah River Operations Office, determine whether any

  14. Accidental nuclear excursion Recuplex operation 234-5 facility. Final report: Date of incident: April 7, 1962

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1962-08-01

    On Saturday morning, April 7, 1962, at about 1059 Armed Forces time, an accidental nuclear excursion occurred in the plutonium waste recovery facility (Recuplex) of the 234-5 Building. This excursion did not result in any mechanical damage or spread of contamination. Three employees of the General Electric Company received overexposures to gamma and neutron radiation. None were fatally exposed; in each case the overexposure was recognized promptly, and following medical observation and testing the men were released to return to work. In compliance with AEC Manual Chapter 0703, an AEC-HAPO committee composed of two AEC employees and five General Electric employees was appointed by the Manger, HOO, with the concurrence of the General Manager, HAPO, to conduct an investigation of the incident. The committee`s purpose was to determine the cause, nature, and extent of the incident, and recommend action to be taken by others to minimize or preclude future incidents of this magnitude. A study of operating practices and operating conditions that appeared to exist prior to, during, and subsequent to the accident was made by the committee. The committee believes that this report provides sufficient information to answer questions which may arise as a result of the criticality incident except those relating to its cause.

  15. Disseminação de informações ambientais voluntárias: relatórios contábeis versus internet The spread of voluntary environmental information: accounting reports versus internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Calixto

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Com o advento da Internet, grandes mudanças têm ocorrido na maneira que as empresas divulgam informações sobre a performance econômica, financeira e ambiental de suas atividades. A divulgação de informações de natureza ambiental ocorre voluntariamente por parte das empresas e essa é uma prática crescente entre elas. Acredita-se que essa é uma forma de as empresas responderem a mudanças estruturais, assim como estabelecer um diálogo mais transparente com os seus stakeholders. Este estudo exploratório teve por objetivo identificar as diferenças na divulgação voluntária de informações ambientais via Internet e via relatórios contábeis de uma amostra de 60 companhias brasileiras que exercem atividades potencialmente poluidoras. Ao comparar o conteúdo de informações divulgadas via relatórios contábeis com as informações divulgadas na Internet, observou-se diferenças significativas, ou seja, foram encontradas mais que o dobro de informações ambientais divulgadas voluntariamente na Internet. Entretanto, foram identificadas muitas divergências na forma de divulgação entre empresas do mesmo setor, tanto através da Internet como por meio dos relatórios contábeis.Due to the Internet arrival, companies have drastically changed the way to present information about economic, financial and environmental activities performance. Most companies voluntarily report environmental data and this is a growing tendency. This is probably a way companies react to structural changes, as well as establish a clearer dialogue with its stakeholders. This exploratory study aimed to identify the differences between disclosing environmental voluntary information on the Internet and through accounting reports from a sample universe of 60 Brazilian companies performing potentially polluting activities. There were meaningful differences between the information contents in accounting reports and Internet data. More than the double of the amount

  16. Impact of Canada's Voluntary Agreement on Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Light Duty Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2006-01-01

    On April 5, 2005, a voluntary agreement between the automobile industry and government officials of Canada was reached to commit to greenhouse gas emission reductions through the year 2010. This report compares Canada's voluntary agreement with other voluntary and mandatory greenhouse gas reduction programs around the world in terms of what technologies are likely to be deployed and how much vehicle fuel consumption is likely to improve. It investigates various methods and measurement approac...

  17. Sector-specific issues and reporting methodologies supporting the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Volume 1: Part 1, Electricity supply sector; Part 2, Residential and commercial buildings sector; Part 3, Industrial sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    DOE encourages you to report your achievements in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and sequestering carbon under this program. Global climate change is increasingly being recognized as a threat that individuals and organizations can take action against. If you are among those taking action, reporting your projects may lead to recognition for you, motivation for others, and synergistic learning for the global community. This report discusses the reporting process for the voluntary detailed guidance in the sectoral supporting documents for electricity supply, residential and commercial buildings, industry, transportation, forestry, and agriculture. You may have reportable projects in several sectors; you may report them separately or capture and report the total effects on an entity-wide report.

  18. Voluntary euthanasia: a utilitarian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Peter

    2003-10-01

    Belgium legalised voluntary euthanasia in 2002, thus ending the long isolation of the Netherlands as the only country in which doctors could openly give lethal injections to patients who have requested help in dying. Meanwhile in Oregon, in the United States, doctors may prescribe drugs for terminally ill patients, who can use them to end their life--if they are able to swallow and digest them. But despite President Bush's oft-repeated statements that his philosophy is to 'trust individuals to make the right decisions' and his opposition to 'distant bureaucracies', his administration is doing its best to prevent Oregonians acting in accordance with a law that its voters have twice ratified. The situation regarding voluntary euthanasia around the world is therefore very much in flux. This essay reviews ethical arguments regarding voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide from a utilitarian perspective. I shall begin by asking why it is normally wrong to kill an innocent person, and whether these reasons apply to aiding a person who, when rational and competent, asks to be killed or given the means to commit suicide. Then I shall consider more specific utilitarian arguments for and against permitting voluntary euthanasia.

  19. Social Cohesion and Voluntary Associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuser, Brian L.

    2005-01-01

    Voluntary organizations exert great influence over how social norms and ethical codes are guided into action. As such, they have a significant impact on societal levels of social cohesion. Although social capital involves generalized trust becoming manifest as spontaneous sociability, social cohesion is determined by how that sociability is…

  20. Voluntary Incentive Early Retirement Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Dialogues, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Arrangements in educational institutions for voluntary early retirement programs are discussed. Retirement at any age can be a profound and stressful lifetime change; and it can also represent a welcome transition into newly satisfying and rewarding opportunities. The focus is on: mandatory retirement (exceptions and the new meaning of "early");…

  1. Voluntary disclosure: Evidence from UK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.S. Zourarakis (Nicolaos)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThis paper investigates the voluntary disclosure of Intellectual Capital (IC) of British firms and provides some evidence on an unexplored area of the literature; that of the association of Corporate Governance (CG) with IC disclosure. Inconsistent with expectations, the results show tha

  2. Characteristics of health IT outage and suggested risk management strategies: an analysis of historical incident reports in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jianbo; Guan, Pengcheng; Gao, Kaihua; Lu, Xueqin; Chen, Yunan; Li, Yuefeng; Meng, Qun; Zhang, Jiajie; Sittig, Dean F; Zheng, Kai

    2014-02-01

    The healthcare industry has become increasingly dependent on using information technology (IT) to manage its daily operations. Unexpected downtime of health IT systems could therefore wreak havoc and result in catastrophic consequences. Little is known, however, regarding the nature of failures of health IT. To analyze historical health IT outage incidents as a means to better understand health IT vulnerabilities and inform more effective prevention and emergency response strategies. We studied news articles and incident reports publicly available on the internet describing health IT outage events that occurred in China. The data were qualitatively analyzed using a deductive grounded theory approach based on a synthesized IT risk model developed in the domain of information systems. A total of 116 distinct health IT incidents were identified. A majority of them (69.8%) occurred in the morning; over 50% caused disruptions to the patient registration and payment collection functions of the affected healthcare facilities. The outpatient practices in tertiary hospitals seem to be particularly vulnerable to IT failures. Software defects and overcapacity issues, followed by malfunctioning hardware, were among the principal causes. Unexpected health IT downtime occurs more and more often with the widespread adoption of electronic systems in healthcare. Risk identification and risk assessments are essential steps to developing preventive measures. Equally important is institutionalization of contingency plans as our data show that not all failures of health IT can be predicted and thus effectively prevented. The results of this study also suggest significant future work is needed to systematize the reporting of health IT outage incidents in order to promote transparency and accountability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Reported fried food consumption and the incidence of hypertension in a Mediterranean cohort: the SUN (Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayon-Orea, Carmen; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira; Gea, Alfredo; Zazpe, Itziar; Basterra-Gortari, Francisco J; Martinez-Gonzalez, Miguel A

    2014-09-28

    Reported associations between the consumption of fried foods and the incidence of obesity or weight gain make it likely that fried food consumption might also be associated with the development of hypertension. However, evidence from long-term prospective studies is scarce. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to longitudinally evaluate this association in a prospective cohort. The SUN (Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra) project is a Mediterranean cohort study of university graduates conducted in Spain, which started in December 1999 and is still ongoing. In the present study, we included 13,679 participants (5059 men and 8620 women), free of hypertension at baseline with a mean age of 36·5 (SD 10·8) years. Total fried food consumption was estimated at baseline. The outcome was the incidence of a medical diagnosis of self-reported hypertension during the follow-up period. To assess the association between the consumption of fried foods and the subsequent risk of developing incident hypertension during the follow-up period, Cox regression models were used. During a median follow-up period of 6·3 years, 1232 incident cases of hypertension were identified. After adjusting for potential confounders, the adjusted hazard ratios for developing hypertension were 1·18 (95% CI 1·03, 1·36) and 1·21 (95% CI 1·04, 1·41) for those consuming fried foods 2-4 and >4 times/week, respectively, compared with those consuming fried foods < 2 times/week (P for trend = 0·009). In conclusion, frequent consumption of fried foods at baseline was found to be associated with a higher risk of hypertension during the follow-up period in a Mediterranean cohort of university graduates.

  4. Structural problems of medical news reports in newspapers: a verification of news reports on an incident of mass nosocomial Serratia infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Yasuhiro; Narimatsu, Hiroto; Kishi, Yukiko; Kodama, Yuko; Murashige, Naoko; Yuji, Koichiro; Matsumura, Tomoko; Kami, Masahiro

    2010-04-01

    It is unclear how changes in the content and number of news reports over time affect the impressions made in the minds of newspaper readers. This study targeted news reports in major newspapers regarding an incident of mass nosocomial Serratia infection that occurred at one clinic. The trends in the total number of articles and total number of characters contained in the articles were congruent, with a peak on the day after the incident was disclosed and a rapid decrease thereafter. The numbers of articles and characters that appeared during the first 3 days corresponded to 45 and 51% of those that appeared during the entire study period. On day 9, it was published that Serratia liquefaciens propagated on medical instruments, and both the number of articles and the number of characters increased by approximately 40% in comparison to those published on the day after the initial report of the incident. The individual articles were deemed to be medically accurate; however, the main problem was that only part of the specific medical issue had been emphasized because of a poor balance in the number of news reports on this topic.

  5. To what extent are adverse events found in patient records reported by patients and healthcare professionals via complaints, claims and incident reports?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Wal Gerrit

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient record review is believed to be the most useful method for estimating the rate of adverse events among hospitalised patients. However, the method has some practical and financial disadvantages. Some of these disadvantages might be overcome by using existing reporting systems in which patient safety issues are already reported, such as incidents reported by healthcare professionals and complaints and medico-legal claims filled by patients or their relatives. The aim of the study is to examine to what extent the hospital reporting systems cover the adverse events identified by patient record review. Methods We conducted a retrospective study using a database from a record review study of 5375 patient records in 14 hospitals in the Netherlands. Trained nurses and physicians using a method based on the protocol of The Harvard Medical Practice Study previously reviewed the records. Four reporting systems were linked with the database of reviewed records: 1 informal and 2 formal complaints by patients/relatives, 3 medico-legal claims by patients/relatives and 4 incident reports by healthcare professionals. For each adverse event identified in patient records the equivalent was sought in these reporting systems by comparing dates and descriptions of the events. The study focussed on the number of adverse event matches, overlap of adverse events detected by different sources, preventability and severity of consequences of reported and non-reported events and sensitivity and specificity of reports. Results In the sample of 5375 patient records, 498 adverse events were identified. Only 18 of the 498 (3.6% adverse events identified by record review were found in one or more of the four reporting systems. There was some overlap: one adverse event had an equivalent in both a complaint and incident report and in three cases a patient/relative used two or three systems to complain about an adverse event. Healthcare professionals

  6. Voluntary sterilization in Serbia: Unmet need?

    OpenAIRE

    Rašević Mirjana M.

    2002-01-01

    Is voluntary sterilization as a birth control method accepted in Serbia? This is certainly a question that is being imposed for research, regardless of the fact that voluntary sterilization is neither accessible nor promoted. Most importantly because there is no understanding in the social nor political sphere for legalization of voluntary sterilization as a form of birth control, apart from the clear necessity for this, first, step. They are: the recognition that voluntary sterilization is a...

  7. Voluntary agreements as instruments for international environmental policy; Frivillege avtaler som internasjonalt miljoepolitisk verkemiddel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torvanger, Asbjoern

    1997-12-31

    According to this report, voluntary agreements have a potential as instruments for environmental policy. Such agreements can be national or international. Through an international voluntary agreement the authorities in one country may make contracts with factories in another country about emission reductions against some kind of compensation. A supranational organisation of voluntary agreements may ensure equal environmental political conditions for factories in different countries and be a useful means for the regulation of environmental problems of regional or global extent. It is most realistic to establish a supranational system of voluntary agreements in a group of countries that have already institutionalized their relations, such as the European Union. 14 refs., 1 table

  8. Parent-reported otorrhea in children with tympanostomy tubes: incidence and predictors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thijs M A van Dongen

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Although common in children with tympanostomy tubes, the current incidence of tympanostomy tube otorrhea (TTO is uncertain. TTO is generally a sign of otitis media, when middle ear fluid drains through the tube. Predictors for otitis media are therefore suggested to have predictive value for the occurrence of TTO. OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence of TTO and its predictors. METHODS: We performed a cohort study, using a parental web-based questionnaire to retrospectively collect data on TTO episodes and its potential predictors from children younger than 10 years of age with tympanostomy tubes. RESULTS: Of the 1,184 children included in analyses (total duration of time since tube placement was 768 person years with a mean of 7.8 months per child, 616 children (52% experienced one or more episodes of TTO. 137 children (12% had TTO within the calendar month of tube placement. 597 (50% children had one or more acute TTO episodes (duration <4 weeks and 46 children (4% one or more chronic TTO episodes (duration ≥4 weeks. 146 children (12% experienced recurrent TTO episodes. Accounting for time since tube placement, 67% of children developed one or more TTO episodes in the year following tube placement. Young age, recurrent acute otitis media being the indication for tube placement, a recent history of recurrent upper respiratory tract infections and the presence of older siblings were independently associated with the future occurrence of TTO, and can therefore be seen as predictors for TTO. CONCLUSIONS: Our survey confirms that otorrhea is a common sequela in children with tympanostomy tubes, which occurrence can be predicted by age, medical history and presence of older siblings.

  9. An Empirical Study of Voluntary-Disclosure of the Assurance Report on Internal Controls for Listed Company%上市公司自愿披露内部控制的实证分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林丽花

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the voluntary-disclosure of the assurance report on internal controls for listed company in China.The result shows that the internal control quality,which is measured by the company size,listing period,auditors and equity ratio of major shareholders,will pose impact on whether the listed company disclosure the internal controls report.The company size and equity ratio of major shareholders have the positive impact while the auditor size and listing period have the negative impact.%对沪深两市2009年度上市公司财务报告中自愿性披露内部控制鉴证报告情况进行的理论分析和实证检验结果表明:上市公司内部控制质量如公司规模、上市年限、审计机构、大股东股权比例都对公司是否披露内部控制鉴证报告产生影响。其中,规模越大,大股东股权比例越高的公司越愿意披露内部控制鉴证报告;相反,审计机构规模越大,上市年限越长,越不愿意披露。

  10. 22 CFR 513.210 - Voluntary exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Voluntary exclusion. 513.210 Section 513.210... GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Effect of Action § 513.210 Voluntary exclusion. Persons who accept voluntary exclusions under § 513.315 are excluded in accordance with the terms of...

  11. Incidence of self-reported brain injury and the relationship with substance abuse: findings from a longitudinal community survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butterworth Peter

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traumatic or serious brain injury (BI has persistent and well documented adverse outcomes, yet 'mild' or 'moderate' BI, which often does not result in hospital treatment, accounts for half the total days of disability attributed to BI. There are currently few data available from community samples on the incidence and correlates of these injuries. Therefore, the study aimed to assess the 1 incidence of self-reported mild (not requiring hospital admission and moderate (admitted to hospital brain injury (BI, 2 causes of injury 3 physical health scores and 4 relationship between BI and problematic alcohol or marijuana use. Methods An Australian community sequential-cohort study (cohorts aged 20-24, 40-44 and 60-64 years at wave one used a survey methodology to assess BI and substance use at baseline and four years later. Results Of the 7485 wave one participants, 89.7% were re-interviewed at wave two. There were 56 mild (230.8/100000 person-years and 44 moderate BI (180.5/100000 person-years reported between waves one and two. Males and those in the 20-24 year cohort had increased risk of BI. Sports injury was the most frequent cause of BI (40/100 with traffic accidents being a greater proportion of moderate (27% than mild (7% BI. Neither alcohol nor marijuana problems at wave one were predictors of BI. BI was not a predictor of developing substance use problems by wave two. Conclusions BI were prevalent in this community sample, though the incidence declined with age. Factors associated with BI in community samples differ from those reported in clinical samples (e.g. typically traumatic brain injury with traffic accidents the predominate cause. Further, detailed evaluation of the health consequences of these injuries is warranted.

  12. 78 FR 77601 - Adjustment of Monetary Threshold for Reporting Rail Equipment Accidents/Incidents for Calendar...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    ...) and (e) of 49 CFR 225.19 further provide that the dollar figure that constitutes the reporting... include these advances will ensure it appropriately reflects changes in costs, wages, and inflation. New... reported in the Federal Register); Wnew = New average hourly wage rate, in dollars; Wprior = Prior...

  13. International Voluntary Renewable Energy Markets (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, J.

    2012-06-01

    This presentation provides an overview of international voluntary renewable energy markets, with a focus on the United States and Europe. The voluntary renewable energy market is the market in which consumers and institutions purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs on a voluntary basis. In 2010, the U.S. voluntary market was estimated at 35 terawatt-hours (TWh) compared to 300 TWh in the European market, though key differences exist. On a customer basis, Australia has historically had the largest number of customers, pricing for voluntary certificates remains low, at less than $1 megawatt-hour, though prices depend on technology.

  14. 14 CFR 234.10 - Voluntary disclosure of on-time performance codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Voluntary disclosure of on-time performance codes. 234.10 Section 234.10 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS AIRLINE SERVICE QUALITY PERFORMANCE REPORTS § 234.10 Voluntary...

  15. 7 CFR 1955.10 - Voluntary conveyance of real property by the borrower to the Government.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... will submit the voluntary conveyance offer, the case file and a narrative report to the appropriate... on present income and potential earning ability. Exception for SFH loans: FmHA or its successor... with the effective date being the date the voluntary conveyance is closed. If an oral lease is in...

  16. A human error taxonomy for analysing healthcare incident reports: assessing reporting culture and its effects on safety perfomance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Itoh, Kenji; Omata, N.; Andersen, Henning Boje

    2009-01-01

    The present paper reports on a human error taxonomy system developed for healthcare risk management and on its application to evaluating safety performance and reporting culture. The taxonomy comprises dimensions for classifying errors, for performance-shaping factors, and for the maturity...

  17. Tobacco-related cancers in India: A review of incidence reported from population-based cancer registries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asthana, Smita; Patil, Rakshit S.; Labani, Satyanarayana

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tobacco related cancers (TRC) account for major share of all cancers and updated of incidence data are helpful in policy changes. The aim was to present an update of TRCs on age-adjusted incidence data and corresponding lifetime risk of developing TRC for different regions of the country. Methods: The data for this study were obtained from published reports of 25 population-based cancer registries (PBCRs) in India. The PBCRs in different parts of India were divided into seven regions such as North, South, Central, Northeast, West, Rural West, and East. Data indicators such as age-adjusted rates (AARs) of incidence and the cumulative risks of TRCs up to the age of 64 years for each of the 10 TRC sites of either sex in each of 25 registries were obtained from the National Cancer Registry Programme reports. Results: Among all TRCs, esophagus, lung, hypopharynx, and mouth are the leading sites for both males and females. Males in Northeast region had the highest risk 1 in 27 of developing esophageal cancer, 1 in 67 for cancer of lungs and hypopharynx, followed by 1 in 143 for both mouth and tongue cancers. Females also had the highest risk of esophagus and lungs (1 in 63 female) and cancer of mouth (1 in 250) in Northeast region. Proportion of TRC in comparison of all cancer ranged from 11–25% for men and 3–18% for women. Conclusions: Proportion of TRC in relation to all cancers was still high in different registries of India including the Northeast region. PMID:27688608

  18. Tobacco-related cancers in India: A review of incidence reported from population-based cancer registries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Asthana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tobacco related cancers (TRC account for major share of all cancers and updated of incidence data are helpful in policy changes. The aim was to present an update of TRCs on age-adjusted incidence data and corresponding lifetime risk of developing TRC for different regions of the country. Methods: The data for this study were obtained from published reports of 25 population-based cancer registries (PBCRs in India. The PBCRs in different parts of India were divided into seven regions such as North, South, Central, Northeast, West, Rural West, and East. Data indicators such as age-adjusted rates (AARs of incidence and the cumulative risks of TRCs up to the age of 64 years for each of the 10 TRC sites of either sex in each of 25 registries were obtained from the National Cancer Registry Programme reports. Results: Among all TRCs, esophagus, lung, hypopharynx, and mouth are the leading sites for both males and females. Males in Northeast region had the highest risk 1 in 27 of developing esophageal cancer, 1 in 67 for cancer of lungs and hypopharynx, followed by 1 in 143 for both mouth and tongue cancers. Females also had the highest risk of esophagus and lungs (1 in 63 female and cancer of mouth (1 in 250 in Northeast region. Proportion of TRC in comparison of all cancer ranged from 11–25% for men and 3–18% for women. Conclusions: Proportion of TRC in relation to all cancers was still high in different registries of India including the Northeast region.

  19. Market Motivations for Voluntary Carbon Disclosure in Real Estate Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ufere, Kalu Joseph; Alias, Buang; Godwin Uche, Aliagha

    2016-07-01

    Climate change mitigation in developing economies is a balancing act, between economic development and environmental sustainability. The need for market friendly determinants for low carbon economy, without compromising economic development is of essence. The aim of the study is to determine market friendly factors, which motivates voluntary carbon information disclosure, in the real estate industry. The study modeled economic factor with three variables and financial market factor with three variables against voluntary carbon information disclosure in the real estate industry. Structural equation modeling was used for the modeling and content analysis was used to collect data on the level of voluntary carbon information disclosure, from 2013 annual reports of 126 real estate sector companies listed in the Kuala Lumpur Stock Exchange (KLSE). The model achieved a good fit, and was acceptable prediction. The results show that financial market factor has a significant predictive influence on voluntary carbon disclosure. The application of the result is that financial market factor is has a significantly positive influence on companies’ willingness to make voluntary carbon disclosure in the real estate industry. The result may be limited to the real estate industry that is highly leveraged on syndicated fund.

  20. European downstream oil industry safety performance. Statistical summary of reported incidents - 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, A. [Awaken Consulting, Shropshire, Herefordshire (United Kingdom); Den Haan, K.H.

    2013-08-15

    In this nineteenth annual report on European downstream oil industry safety performance, 2012 statistics are presented on work-related personal injuries for the industry's own employees and contractors. Data were received from 38 CONCAWE Member Companies representing approximately 98% of the European refining capacity. Trends over the last nineteen years are also highlighted and the data are compared to similar statistics from related industries. This report also presents the fourth year of results for Process Safety Performance Indicators from CONCAWE members.

  1. European downstream oil industry safety performance. Statistical summary of reported incidents - 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, A. [Awaken Consulting, Shropshire, Herefordshire (United Kingdom); Den Haan, K.H.

    2012-07-15

    In this eighteenth annual report on European downstream oil industry safety performance, 2011 statistics are presented on work-related personal injuries for the industry's own employees and contractors. Data were received from 34 CONCAWE Member Companies representing approximately 96% of the European refining capacity. Trends over the last eighteen years are also highlighted and the data are compared to similar statistics from related industries. This report also presents the third year of results for Process Safety Performance Indicators from CONCAWE members.

  2. Integrating Data From the UK National Reporting and Learning System With Work Domain Analysis to Understand Patient Safety Incidents in Community Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Denham L; Tam, W Vanessa; Ashcroft, Darren M

    2017-03-01

    To explore the combined use of a critical incident database and work domain analysis to understand patient safety issues in a health-care setting. A retrospective review was conducted of incidents reported to the UK National Reporting and Learning System (NRLS) that involved community pharmacy between April 2005 and August 2010. A work domain analysis of community pharmacy was constructed using observational data from 5 community pharmacies, technical documentation, and a focus group with 6 pharmacists. Reports from the NRLS were mapped onto the model generated by the work domain analysis. Approximately 14,709 incident reports meeting the selection criteria were retrieved from the NRLS. Descriptive statistical analysis of these reports found that almost all of the incidents involved medication and that the most frequently occurring error types were dose/strength errors, incorrect medication, and incorrect formulation. The work domain analysis identified 4 overall purposes for community pharmacy: business viability, health promotion and clinical services, provision of medication, and use of medication. These purposes were served by lower-order characteristics of the work system (such as the functions, processes and objects). The tasks most frequently implicated in the incident reports were those involving medication storage, assembly, or patient medication records. Combining the insights from different analytical methods improves understanding of patient safety problems. Incident reporting data can be used to identify general patterns, whereas the work domain analysis can generate information about the contextual factors that surround a critical task.

  3. Training Early Interventionists in Low Incidence Disabilities (September 1996-August 2000). Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarek, Louise A.

    This final report summarizes the objectives, activities and outcomes of a federally-funded project that was designed to add an interdisciplinary specialization in multiple disabilities for infants and toddlers to an existing Early Intervention Master of Education/Early Childhood Education Certificate Program at the University of Pittsburgh. Seven…

  4. Voluntary Financial Reporting on the Internet: Analysis of the Practice of Stock-Market Listed Croatian and Slovene Joint Stock Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivica Pervan

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available An investigation into Internet financial reporting carried out in June 2005 that focused on stock-market listed Croatian and Slovene joint-stock companies has two basic aspects, comparative and explanatory. The comparative aspect of the research showed that Slovene corporations have a statistically significant higher level of financial reporting (as measured with IFR score. The average IFR score for 55 corporate entities from Croatia came to just 6.85, while the average IFR score for 30 Slovene firms was 17.63. The second aspect of the investigation was explanatory, and at the level of each state and sample the intention was to find the variables that affect IFR scores significantly. With respect to the Croatian sample it was shown that the IFR score was statistically significantly and positively correlated with size, profitability, number of shareholders, and amount of traffic on the stock markets. Then regression analysis showed that majority foreign ownership had a positive effect on the IFR score. A statistically significant but negative correlation was established for two sectors, tourism and marine transport. For the Slovene sample, comprising 30 firms, the size, profitability and number of stockholders were not significant variables. However, official listing, proportion of market capitalisation and ratio of market to book values of shares were statistically significantly and positively correlated with the IFR score. Only one sector, transport, was significantly and negatively correlated with the IFR score.

  5. A comprehensive overview of medical error in hospitals using incident-reporting systems, patient complaints and chart review of inpatient deaths.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeantine M de Feijter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Incident reporting systems (IRS are used to identify medical errors in order to learn from mistakes and improve patient safety in hospitals. However, IRS contain only a small fraction of occurring incidents. A more comprehensive overview of medical error in hospitals may be obtained by combining information from multiple sources. The WHO has developed the International Classification for Patient Safety (ICPS in order to enable comparison of incident reports from different sources and institutions. METHODS: The aim of this paper was to provide a more comprehensive overview of medical error in hospitals using a combination of different information sources. Incident reports collected from IRS, patient complaints and retrospective chart review in an academic acute care hospital were classified using the ICPS. The main outcome measures were distribution of incidents over the thirteen categories of the ICPS classifier "Incident type", described as odds ratios (OR and proportional similarity indices (PSI. RESULTS: A total of 1012 incidents resulted in 1282 classified items. Large differences between data from IRS and patient complaints (PSI = 0.32 and from IRS and retrospective chart review (PSI = 0.31 were mainly attributable to behaviour (OR = 6.08, clinical administration (OR = 5.14, clinical process (OR = 6.73 and resources (OR = 2.06. CONCLUSIONS: IRS do not capture all incidents in hospitals and should be combined with complementary information about diagnostic error and delayed treatment from patient complaints and retrospective chart review. Since incidents that are not recorded in IRS do not lead to remedial and preventive action in response to IRS reports, healthcare centres that have access to different incident detection methods should harness information from all sources to improve patient safety.

  6. Determinants of self-reported bystander behavior in cyberbullying incidents amongst adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSmet, Ann; Veldeman, Charlene; Poels, Karolien; Bastiaensens, Sara; Van Cleemput, Katrien; Vandebosch, Heidi; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse

    2014-04-01

    This study explores behavioral determinants of self-reported cyberbullying bystander behavior from a behavioral change theoretical perspective, to provide levers for interventions. Nine focus groups were conducted with 61 young adolescents (aged 12-16 years, 52% girls). Assertive defending, reporting to others, providing advice, and seeking support were the most mentioned behaviors. Self-reported bystander behavior heavily depended on contextual factors, and should not be considered a fixed participant role. Bystanders preferred to handle cyberbullying offline and in person, and comforting the victim was considered more feasible than facing the bully. Most prevailing behavioral determinants to defend or support the victim were low moral disengagement, that the victim is an ingroup member, and that the bystander is popular. Youngsters felt they received little encouragement from their environment to perform positive bystanding behavior, since peers have a high acceptance for not defending and perceived parental support for defending behavior is largely lacking. These results suggest multilevel models for cyberbullying research, and interventions are needed. With much previous research into cyberbullying insufficiently founded in theoretical models, the employed framework of the Integrative Model and Social Cognitive Theory may inspire future studies into bystander behavior.

  7. Preliminary report on operational guidelines developed for use in emergency preparedness and response to a radiological dispersal device incident.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, C.; Cheng, J.-J.; Kamboj, S.; Domotor, S.; Wallo, A.; Environmental Science Division; DOE

    2006-12-15

    This report presents preliminary operational guidelines and supporting work products developed through the interagency Operational Guidelines Task Group (OGT). The report consolidates preliminary operational guidelines, all ancillary work products, and a companion software tool that facilitates their implementation into one reference source document. The report is intended for interim use and comment and provides the foundation for fostering future reviews of the operational guidelines and their implementation within emergency preparedness and response initiatives in the event of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) incident. The report principally focuses on the technical derivation and presentation of the operational guidelines. End-user guidance providing more details on how to apply these operational guidelines within planning and response settings is being considered and developed elsewhere. The preliminary operational guidelines are categorized into seven groups on the basis of their intended application within early, intermediate, and long-term recovery phases of emergency response. We anticipate that these operational guidelines will be updated and refined by interested government agencies in response to comments and lessons learned from their review, consideration, and trial application. This review, comment, and trial application process will facilitate the selection of a final set of operational guidelines that may be more or less inclusive of the preliminary operational guidelines presented in this report. These and updated versions of the operational guidelines will be made available through the OGT public Web site (http://ogcms.energy.gov) as they become finalized for public distribution and comment.

  8. A 12-month follow-up of an influenza vaccination campaign based on voluntary adherence: report on upper-respiratory symptoms among volunteers and non-volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Páris Ali Ramadan

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Routine immunization of groups at high risk for influenza has been progressively implemented as a matter of Brazilian public health policy. Although the benefits of the vaccination for healthy young adults are still controversial, it has been offered yearly to hundreds of thousands of Brazilian workers, generally as part of wellness initiatives in the workplace. OBJECTIVE: To study the characteristics of subjects that accepted or refused to be vaccinated against influenza and to report on respiratory symptoms in both groups, one year after the campaign date. DESIGN: A prospective observational study. SETTING: Workers at a subsidiary of an international bank in São Paulo, Brazil. PARTICIPANTS: 124 persons that did not accept and 145 that voluntarily accepted the vaccine completed 12 months of follow-up. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Data concerning gender, age, tobacco use, and any history of chronic respiratory illness such as asthma, bronchitis, rhinitis, and repetitive upper-respiratory infections, were recorded at the time of vaccination. After that, workers were asked monthly by questionnaire or telephone about respiratory symptoms, days of work lost and medical consultations. RESULTS: The results showed statistically significant differences regarding age (P = 0.004 with the vaccinated group (V being younger than the non-vaccinated (NV one, and with reference to previous repetitive upper-respiratory infections being higher among the V group (P < 0.0001. During the follow-up, the V group reported more occurrences of upper respiratory symptoms (P < 0.0001, due to both non-influenza (P < 0.0001 and influenza-like illness (P = 0.045. Differences were also found between V and NV groups concerning days off work and number of medical consultations due to upper-respiratory symptoms and non-influenza illness. Gender and history of repetitive upper-respiratory infections were the best predictors of influenza-like illness-related events. CONCLUSIONS

  9. The reported incidence of work-related musculoskeletal disease in the UK: MOSS 1997-2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, N M; Meyer, J D; Chen, Y; Holt, D L; McDonald, J C

    2001-10-01

    Consultant rheumatologists participate in surveillance of work-related musculoskeletal conditions under the Musculoskeletal Occupational Surveillance Scheme (MOSS), which has been in operation since 1997. During the first 3 years of the scheme, an estimated total of 8070 cases and 8442 diagnoses were obtained, an average of slightly less than 2700 estimated cases each year. Disorders of the upper limb accounted for approximately 66% (5502) of the total, with hand/wrist/arm conditions (3693 cases) comprising the majority of these. Conditions of the lumbar spine and trunk (13% of cases), the cervical spine (12%) and the shoulder (12%) were also frequently reported. Pain with ill-defined pathology was reported in 35% of cases with hand and forearm disorders. Overall, 82% of cases were related to repetitive rather than single injury. The largest numbers of cases were seen in workers in craft occupations (1659) and in clerical and secretarial workers (1524). High rates of musculoskeletal conditions, particularly of upper limb disorders, are notable in mining. In most occupations, and overall, women were at greater risk than men.

  10. High incidence of sperm dysfunction in a varicocele infertile man:case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vineeth VS; Suttur S Malini; Sreenivasa G; Usha R Dutta

    2012-01-01

    Studies indicate abnormal semen indicators among varicocele infertile men can be reversed to normal status after surgical repair.While semen indicators andDNA damage of sperms are reported frequently, sperm function tests are rarely performed to assess the functional status of sperms among these individuals.We report a35-year-old male with4 years of primary infertility who otherwise has a normal sexual life.Various analyses performed revealed the interplay of multiple abnormalities leading to the observed phenotype.The individual was diagnosed with severe sperm defects, bilateral varicocele(gradeII) and endocrinopathy.The percentage of functionally normal sperms were found to be24% for hypo-osmotic swelling,28% for acrosome reaction and21% for nuclear chromatin decondensationtest.Cytogenetic analyses showed normal karyotype and sequence-tagged-site markers basedPCR showed no deletions involving key candidate genes of theY chromosome.A thorough investigation of infertile subjects and simple diagnostic tests are essential to detect the treatable defects, in general as well as severe infertile cases, which can improve the chances of normal conception or the success rates ofin-vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

  11. Confirmation of the reported association of clonal chromosomal mosaicism with an increased risk of incident hematologic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursula M Schick

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities provide clinical utility in the diagnosis and treatment of hematologic malignancies, and may be predictive of malignant transformation in individuals without apparent clinical presentation of a hematologic cancer. In an effort to confirm previous reports of an association between clonal mosaicism and incident hematologic cancer, we applied the anomDetectBAF algorithm to call chromosomal anomalies in genotype data from previously conducted Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS. The genotypes were initially collected from DNA derived from peripheral blood of 12,176 participants in the Group Health electronic Medical Records and Genomics study (eMERGE and the Women's Health Initiative (WHI. We detected clonal mosaicism in 169 individuals (1.4% and large clonal mosaic events (>2 mb in 117 (1.0% individuals. Though only 9.5% of clonal mosaic carriers had an incident diagnosis of hematologic cancer (multiple myeloma, myelodysplastic syndrome, lymphoma, or leukemia, the carriers had a 5.5-fold increased risk (95% CI: 3.3-9.3; p-value = 7.5×10(-11 of developing these cancers subsequently. Carriers of large mosaic anomalies showed particularly pronounced risk of subsequent leukemia (HR = 19.2, 95% CI: 8.9-41.6; p-value = 7.3×10(-14. Thus we independently confirm the association between detectable clonal mosaicism and hematologic cancer found previously in two recent publications.

  12. Confirmation of the Reported Association of Clonal Chromosomal Mosaicism with an Increased Risk of Incident Hematologic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Paul K.; Weston, Noah; Ehrlich, Kelly; Newton, Katherine M.; Wallace, Robert; Bookman, Ebony; Harrison, Tabitha; Aragaki, Aaron; Crosslin, David R.; Wang, Sophia S.; Reiner, Alex P.; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Peters, Ulrike; Larson, Eric B.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Carlson, Christopher S.

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities provide clinical utility in the diagnosis and treatment of hematologic malignancies, and may be predictive of malignant transformation in individuals without apparent clinical presentation of a hematologic cancer. In an effort to confirm previous reports of an association between clonal mosaicism and incident hematologic cancer, we applied the anomDetectBAF algorithm to call chromosomal anomalies in genotype data from previously conducted Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). The genotypes were initially collected from DNA derived from peripheral blood of 12,176 participants in the Group Health electronic Medical Records and Genomics study (eMERGE) and the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI). We detected clonal mosaicism in 169 individuals (1.4%) and large clonal mosaic events (>2 mb) in 117 (1.0%) individuals. Though only 9.5% of clonal mosaic carriers had an incident diagnosis of hematologic cancer (multiple myeloma, myelodysplastic syndrome, lymphoma, or leukemia), the carriers had a 5.5-fold increased risk (95% CI: 3.3–9.3; p-value = 7.5×10−11) of developing these cancers subsequently. Carriers of large mosaic anomalies showed particularly pronounced risk of subsequent leukemia (HR = 19.2, 95% CI: 8.9–41.6; p-value = 7.3×10−14). Thus we independently confirm the association between detectable clonal mosaicism and hematologic cancer found previously in two recent publications. PMID:23533652

  13. Data Mining and the Twitter Platform for Prescribed Burn and Wildfire Incident Reporting with Geospatial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endsley, K.; McCarty, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    Data mining techniques have been applied to social media in a variety of contexts, from mapping the evolution of the Tahrir Square protests in Egypt to predicting influenza outbreaks. The Twitter platform is a particular favorite due to its robust application programming interface (API) and high throughput. Twitter, Inc. estimated in 2011 that over 2,200 messages or "tweets" are generated every second. Also helpful is Twitter's semblance in operation to the short message service (SMS), better known as "texting," available on cellular phones and the most popular means of wide telecommunications in many developing countries. In the United States, Twitter has been used by a number of federal, state and local officials as well as motivated individuals to report prescribed burns in advance (sometimes as part of a reporting obligation) or to communicate the emergence, response to, and containment of wildfires. These reports are unstructured and, like all Twitter messages, limited to 140 UTF-8 characters. Through internal research and development at the Michigan Tech Research Institute, the authors have developed a data mining routine that gathers potential tweets of interest using the Twitter API, eliminates duplicates ("retweets"), and extracts relevant information such as the approximate size and condition of the fire. Most importantly, the message is geocoded and/or contains approximate locational information, allowing for prescribed and wildland fires to be mapped. Natural language processing techniques, adapted to improve computational performance, are used to tokenize and tag these elements for each tweet. The entire routine is implemented in the Python programming language, using open-source libraries. As such, it is demonstrated in a web-based framework where prescribed burns and/or wildfires are mapped in real time, visualized through a JavaScript-based mapping client in any web browser. The practices demonstrated here generalize to an SMS platform (or any short

  14. Male-female differences in the number of reported incident dengue fever cases in six Asian countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Anker

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Demographic factors, such as age and sex, are associated with the likelihood of exposure to Aedes aegypti, the vector for dengue. However, dengue date disaggregated by both sex and ageare not routinely reported or analyzed by national surveillance systems. This study analysed the reported number of incident dengue cases by age and sex for six countries in Asia. Methods. Data for the Lao People's Democratic Republic, the Philippines, Singapore and Sri Lanka were obtained from DengueNet; the number of male and female dengue cases was available for four age groups ( 15 years over a cumulative period of six to 10 years. Data for Cambodia (2010 and Malaysia (1997–2008 were obtained from their respective ministries of health. Results. An excess of males was found among reported dengue cases > 15 years of age. This pattern was observed consistently over several years across six culturally and economically diverse countries. Discussion. These data indicated the importance of reporting data stratified by both sex and age since collapsing the data over all ages would have masked some of the observed differences. In order to target preventive measures appropriately, assessment of gender by age is important for dengue because biological or gender-related factors can change over the human lifespan and gender-related factors may differ across countries.

  15. In situ simulation: Taking reported critical incidents and adverse events back to the clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Jonas; Paltved, Charlotte; Krogh, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In situ simulation offers a novel approach to training in the healthcare setting. It models clinical processes in a real clinical environment and provides the opportunity to correct errors and adjust team interactions without endangering patients. Training in the simulation laboratory...... does not tap into situational resources, e.g. individual, team, and organisational characteristics such as routines, personal relations, distributed skill-levels etc. Therefore, it fails to fully mimic real clinical team processes. Alternatively, in situ simulation offers a unique opportunity...... to explore and improve team processes in the clinical environment. Though research on in situ simulation in healthcare is in its infancy, literature is abundant on patient safety, medical simulation, team training and human factors1. Patient safety reporting systems that identify risks to patients can...

  16. Peters Anomaly in Twins: A Case Report of a Rare Incident with Novel Comorbidities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashem S. Almarzouki

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Peters anomaly is a rare developmental malformation involving the anterior segment of the eye, which culminates in amblyopia or congenital blindness. Multiple ocular and/or systemic malformations have been observed with this anomaly, and novel comorbidities continue to be reported. Case Presentation: The probands were monozygotic twin boys (twin I and twin II born to consanguineous parents at 36 weeks of gestation. Coarse facial features and deep-seated eyes were noted at birth. At 6 months, ophthalmic examination revealed that both twins were unable to blink in response to light, or to fixate and follow a moving object. Both twins had prominent horizontal nystagmus. Slit-lamp examination demonstrated varying degrees of central leukoma (corneal opacity associated with iridocorneal adhesion, which is characteristic of type I Peters anomaly. No cataractous changes were observed. Normal intraocular pressure and disorganized retina were observed. Pupillary abnormalities included bilaterally underdeveloped pupils and bilateral absence of pupils was noted. Ocular MRI showed bilateral microphthalmia and optic nerve hypoplasia, with a small optic chiasm in both twins. At this age, the diagnosis of Peters anomaly was made. At 16 months of age, both twins developed deep venous thrombosis and purpuric skin lesions. Investigations revealed a hereditary thrombophilia secondary to a homozygous mutation causing protein C deficiency, which is a rare thrombotic condition. Ocular ultrasonography revealed bilateral vitreous hemorrhaging linked to altered coagulation. One twin developed bilateral inguinal hernia and cryptorchidism. Conclusion: The novel concordance of Peters anomaly in these monozygotic twins sharing a mutation in PROC gene provides further evidence that this anomaly has a genetic basis. Hypoplasia of the optic nerves and optic chiasm, along with severe protein C deficiency and bilateral absence of the pupils, are associated

  17. Conceptualisation of socio-technical integrated information technology solutions to improve incident reporting through Maslow's hierarchy of needs: a qualitative study of junior doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Kwang Chien

    2007-01-01

    Medical errors are common, especially within the acute healthcare delivery. The identification of systemic factors associated with adverse events and the construction of models to improve the safety of the healthcare system seems straightforward, this process has been proven to be much more difficult in the realism of medical practice due to the failure of the incident reporting system to capture the essential information, especially from the perspective of junior doctors. The failure of incidence reporting system has been related to the lack of socio-technical consideration for both system designs and system implementations. The main reason of non-reporting can be conceptualised through the motivation psychology model: Maslow's hierarchy of needs; in order to achieve a change in the socio-cultural domain for incident reporting. This paper presents a qualitative research methodology approach to generate contextual-rich insights into the socio-cultural and technological factors of incident reporting among junior doctors. The research illuminates the guiding principles for future socio-technical integrated information communication technology designs and implementations. Using Maslow's hierarchy of needs as the conceptual framework, the guiding principles aim to design electronic incident reporting systems which will motivate junior doctors to participate in the process. This research paper aims to make a significant contribution to the fields of socio-technical systems and medical errors management. The design and implementation of the new incident reporting system has great potential to motivate junior doctors to change the culture of incident reporting and to work towards a safer future healthcare system.

  18. Geophysical variables and behavior: LIII. Epidemiological considerations for incidence of cancer and depression in areas of frequent UFO reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persinger, M A

    1988-12-01

    Luminous phenomena and anomalous physical forces have been hypothesized to be generated by focal tectonic strain fields that precede earthquakes. If these geophysical processes exist, then their spatial and temporal density should be greatest during periods of protracted, localized UFO reports; they might be used as dosimetric indicators. Contemporary epidemiological data concerning the health risks of power frequency electromagnetic fields and radon gas levels (expected correlates of certain tectonic strain fields), suggest that increased incidence (odds ratios greater 1:3) of brain tumors and leukemia should be evident within "flap" areas. In addition the frequency of variants of temporal lobe lability, psychological depression and posttraumatic stress should be significantly elevated. UFO field investigators, because they have repeated, intermittent close proximity to these fields, are considered to be a particularly high risk population for these disorders.

  19. 国际财务报告准则的自愿选择与应用--研究梳理与展望%Voluntary Choices and Adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards:A Literature Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨丹; ANDRE Paul

    2013-01-01

      采用国际财务报告准则能否给企业带来益处是近几年国际会计的研究热点。强制性使用和自愿选择国际财务报告准则的应用效果是不同的。基于此,本文对现有研究中自愿选择国际财务报告准则的企业特征和应用收益进行研究梳理,旨在考察研究结论中哪一类企业预期会从国际财务报告准则应用中受益,以及是否确实受益。现有研究表明企业因素和国家因素对企业选择会计准则的倾向性产生显著影响,但就应用收益方面并未达成共识。%  Whether the worldwide adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) benefits to improving effectiveness and comparability of accounting information across firms from different countries has been a hot topic for these years .This paper reviews voluntary choices and adoption of IFRS . It is found that the international orientation , cross-listed, size, ownership structure and IPO attribute to firms'choices of IFRS.While inconsistent results are found according to economic consequences of IFRS adoption.It should be the interest of standard setters by indicating the type of firms which may prefer to use and benefit from a particular set of accounting standards .

  20. 78 FR 49382 - Voluntary Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    ... English, reading, writing, speaking, mathematics, and computer skills that are essential to successful job... education advisor: Education Services Specialist, Education Services Officer (ESO), Voluntary...

  1. [Critical incidents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidegger, D

    2005-03-01

    In medicine real severe mishaps are rare. On the other hand critical incidents are frequent. Anonymous critical incident reporting systems allow us to learn from these mishaps. This learning process will make our daily clinical work safer Unfortunately, before these systems can be used efficiently our professional culture has to be changed. Everyone in medicine has to admit that errors do occur to see the need for an open discussion. If we really want to learn from errors, we cannot punish the individual, who reported his or her mistake. The interest is primarily in what has happened and why it has happened and not who has committed this mistake. The cause for critical incidents in medicine is in over 80% the human factor Poor communication, work under enormous stress, conflicts and hierarchies are the main cause. This has been known for many years, therefore have already 15 years ago high-tech industries, like e.g. aviation, started to invest in special courses on team training. Medicine is a typical profession were until now only the individual performance decided about the professional career Communication, conflict management, stress management, decision making, risk management, team and team resource management were subjects that have never been taught during our preor postgraduate education. These points are the most important ones for an optimal teamwork. A multimodular course designed together with Swissair (Human Aspect Development medical, HADmedical) helps to cover, as in aviation, the soft factor and behavioural education in medicine and to prepare professionals in health care to work as a real team.

  2. Dynamics of Voluntary Cough Maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naire, Shailesh

    2008-11-01

    Voluntary cough maneuvers are characterized by transient peak expiratory flows (PEF) exceeding the maximum expiratory flow-volume (MEFV) curve. In some cases, these flows can be well in excess of the MEFV, generally referred to as supramaximal flows. Understanding the flow-structure interaction involved in these maneuvers is the main goal of this work. We present a simple theoretical model for investigating the dynamics of voluntary cough and forced expiratory maneuvers. The core modeling idea is based on a 1-D model of high Reynolds number flow through flexible-walled tubes. The model incorporates key ingredients involved in these maneuvers: the expiratory effort generated by the abdominal and expiratory muscles, the glottis and the flexibility and compliance of the lung airways. Variations in these allow investigation of the expiratory flows generated by a variety of single cough maneuvers. The model successfully reproduces PEF which is shown to depend on the cough generation protocol, the glottis reopening time and the compliance of the airways. The particular highlight is in simulating supramaximal PEF for very compliant tubes. The flow-structure interaction mechanisms behind these are discussed. The wave speed theory of flow limitation is used to characterize the PEF. Existing hypotheses of the origin of PEF, from cough and forced expiration experiments, are also tested using this model.

  3. Pesticide residues in honeybees, honey and bee pollen by LC-MS/MS screening: reported death incidents in honeybees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasiotis, Konstantinos M; Anagnostopoulos, Chris; Anastasiadou, Pelagia; Machera, Kyriaki

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate reported cases of honeybee death incidents with regard to the potential interrelation to the exposure to pesticides. Thus honeybee, bee pollen and honey samples from different areas of Greece were analyzed for the presence of pesticide residues. In this context an LC-ESI-MS/MS multiresidue method of total 115 analytes of different chemical classes such as neonicotinoids, organophosphates, triazoles, carbamates, dicarboximides and dinitroanilines in honeybee bodies, honey and bee pollen was developed and validated. The method presents good linearity over the ranges assayed with correlation coefficient values r(2)≥0.99, recoveries ranging for all matrices from 59 to 117% and precision (RSD%) values ranging from 4 to 27%. LOD and LOQ values ranged - for honeybees, honey and bee pollen - from 0.03 to 23.3 ng/g matrix weight and 0.1 up to 78 ng/g matrix weight, respectively. Therefore this method is sufficient to act as a monitoring tool for the determination of pesticide residues in cases of suspected honeybee poisoning incidents. From the analysis of the samples the presence of 14 active substances was observed in all matrices with concentrations ranging for honeybees from 0.3 to 81.5 ng/g, for bee pollen from 6.1 to 1273 ng/g and for honey one sample was positive to carbendazim at 1.6 ng/g. The latter confirmed the presence of such type of compounds in honeybee body and apicultural products. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Status and Trends in the U.S. Voluntary Green Power Market (2013 Data)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, J.; Belyeu, K.; Kuskova-Burns, K.

    2014-11-01

    Voluntary green power markets are those in which consumers and institutions voluntarily purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs. This report surveys utilities, competitive suppliers, renewable energy certificate (REC) marketers, and, for the first time, the community choice aggregation market. This report finds that the voluntary market totaled 62 million megawatt-hours in 2013. Approximately 5.4 million customers are purchasing green power. This report presents data and analysis on voluntary market sales and customer participation, products and premiums, green pricing marketing, and administrative expenses. The report also details trends in REC tracking systems, REC pricing in voluntary and compliance markets, community and crowd-funded solar, and interest in renewable energy by the information and communication technologies sector.

  5. 75 FR 78257 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Voluntary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-15

    ... in evaluating reports of alleged injuries and adverse reactions from the use of cosmetics. The... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Voluntary Cosmetic Registration Program AGENCY: Food and Drug...

  6. Fire Incident Reporting Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-02-01

    are backstage areas, dressing rooms, ice rinks, boxing rings, and basketball floors. 37. Projection room or area. Included are stage light and...or taper . 45. Match. 46. Lighter (flame type). 47. Open fire. Included are campfires, bonfires, warning flares, rubbish fires, open trash burners, open

  7. Impact of Canada’s Voluntary Agreement on Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Light Duty Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2006-01-01

    On April 5, 2005, a voluntary agreement between the automobile industry and government officials of Canada was reached to commit to greenhouse gas emission reductions through the year 2010. This report compares Canada’s voluntary agreement with other voluntary and mandatory greenhouse gas reduction programs around the world in terms of what technologies are likely to be deployed and how much vehicle fuel consumption is likely to improve. It investigates various methods and measurement appro...

  8. 75 FR 47504 - Voluntary Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ... America. TTT helps relieve teacher shortages, especially in math, science, special education, and other... of the Secretary 32 CFR Part 68 RIN 0790-AI50 Voluntary Education Programs AGENCY: Office of the... for the operation of voluntary education programs within DoD. Included are: Procedures for Service...

  9. Pedagogical Aspects of Voluntary School Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mária Jármai, Erzsébet; Palányi, Ildikó Zsupanekné

    2015-01-01

    The economic importance of voluntary work has been exceedingly appreciated in the last few decades. This is not surprising at all, because it is highly profitable according to the related estimated data. There are 115,9 million people doing voluntary work only in Europe, which means that they would create the world's 7th biggest economy with EUR…

  10. Changing Dynamics in the Voluntary Market (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, J.

    2014-12-01

    Voluntary green power markets are those in which consumers and institutions voluntarily purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs. This presentation, presented at the Renewable Energy Markets Conference in December 2014, outlines the voluntary market in 2013, including community choice aggregation and community solar.

  11. 12 CFR 546.4 - Voluntary dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Voluntary dissolution. 546.4 Section 546.4... ASSOCIATIONS-MERGER, DISSOLUTION, REORGANIZATION, AND CONVERSION § 546.4 Voluntary dissolution. A Federal savings association's board of directors may propose a plan for dissolution of the association. The plan...

  12. Cancer Incidence and Mortality in Ardabil: Report of an Ongoing Population-Based Cancer Registry in Iran, 2004-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Babaei

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Ardabil cancer registry is the first population-based cancer registry in Iran that was established in 2000. The first report from this registry revealed that Ardabil has one of the highest rate of gastric cardia cancer and the lowest rate of cer­vical cancer in the world. We aim to update the cancer incidence in this area by the second follow up report from this registry."nMethod: Data on all newly diagnosed cancer cases between 2004 and 2006 were actively collected. CanReg4 software was used for data entry and the data of cancer-related death were obtained from the comprehensive death registry system."nResults: More than 4300 new cases were registered during 3 years. Diagnosis of cancer was based on histopathology in 69%, clinical investigation 8%, clinical only 5%, and Death Certificate Only (DCO in 18% of cases. In terms of age-stan­dardized rate (/100,000, the five leading cancers in men (excluding skin cancer were stomach (51.8, esophagus (19.5, blad­der (13.1, lung and bronchus (10.8, and colorectal (9.6; in women, they were stomach (24.9, esophagus (19.7, breast (11.9, colon and rectum (7.4, and brain tumors (6.9. According to death registration data, upper gastrointestinal can­cers constituted more than 43% of cancer-related death in Ardabil."nConclusions: The ASR for gastric cancer is among the highest rate for this cancer in male and female in the world. Most of the cancers, especially in female, have a significant increase compared to previous report from Ardabil. This is most likely due to the change in the registration practice.  

  13. Self-Reported Periodontitis and Incident Type 2 Diabetes among Male Workers from a 5-Year Follow-Up to MY Health Up Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Miyawaki

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine whether periodontitis is associated with incident type 2 diabetes in a Japanese male worker cohort.The study participants were Japanese men, aged 36-55 years, without diabetes. Data were extracted from the MY Health Up study, consisting of self-administered questionnaire surveys at baseline and following annual health examinations for an insurance company in Japan. The oral health status of the participants was classified by two self-reported indicators: (1 gingival hemorrhage and (2 tooth loosening. Type 2 diabetes incidence was determined by self-reporting or blood test data. Modified Poisson regression approach was used to estimate the relative risks and the 95% confidence intervals of incident diabetes with periodontitis. Covariates included age, body mass index, family history of diabetes, hypertension, current smoking habits, alcohol use, dyslipidemia, and exercise habits.Of the 2895 candidates identified at baseline in 2004, 2469 men were eligible for follow-up analysis, 133 of whom were diagnosed with diabetes during the 5-year follow-up period. Tooth loosening was associated with incident diabetes [adjusted relative risk = 1.73, 95% confidence interval = 1.14-2.64] after adjusting for other confounding factors. Gingival hemorrhage displayed a similar trend but was not significantly associated with incident diabetes [adjusted relative risk = 1.32, 95% confidence interval = 0.95-1.85].Tooth loosening is an independent predictor of incident type 2 diabetes in Japanese men.

  14. Self-Reported Periodontitis and Incident Type 2 Diabetes among Male Workers from a 5-Year Follow-Up to MY Health Up Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Atsushi; Toyokawa, Satoshi; Inoue, Kazuo; Miyoshi, Yuji; Kobayashi, Yasuki

    2016-01-01

    Aims The purpose of this study was to examine whether periodontitis is associated with incident type 2 diabetes in a Japanese male worker cohort. Methods The study participants were Japanese men, aged 36–55 years, without diabetes. Data were extracted from the MY Health Up study, consisting of self-administered questionnaire surveys at baseline and following annual health examinations for an insurance company in Japan. The oral health status of the participants was classified by two self-reported indicators: (1) gingival hemorrhage and (2) tooth loosening. Type 2 diabetes incidence was determined by self-reporting or blood test data. Modified Poisson regression approach was used to estimate the relative risks and the 95% confidence intervals of incident diabetes with periodontitis. Covariates included age, body mass index, family history of diabetes, hypertension, current smoking habits, alcohol use, dyslipidemia, and exercise habits. Results Of the 2895 candidates identified at baseline in 2004, 2469 men were eligible for follow-up analysis, 133 of whom were diagnosed with diabetes during the 5-year follow-up period. Tooth loosening was associated with incident diabetes [adjusted relative risk = 1.73, 95% confidence interval = 1.14–2.64] after adjusting for other confounding factors. Gingival hemorrhage displayed a similar trend but was not significantly associated with incident diabetes [adjusted relative risk = 1.32, 95% confidence interval = 0.95–1.85]. Conclusions Tooth loosening is an independent predictor of incident type 2 diabetes in Japanese men. PMID:27115749

  15. Measurable improvement in patient safety culture: A departmental experience with incident learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusano, Aaron S; Nyflot, Matthew J; Zeng, Jing; Sponseller, Patricia A; Ermoian, Ralph; Jordan, Loucille; Carlson, Joshua; Novak, Avrey; Kane, Gabrielle; Ford, Eric C

    2015-01-01

    Rigorous use of departmental incident learning is integral to improving patient safety and quality of care. The goal of this study was to quantify the impact of a high-volume, departmental incident learning system on patient safety culture. A prospective, voluntary, electronic incident learning system was implemented in February 2012 with the intent of tracking near-miss/no-harm incidents. All incident reports were reviewed weekly by a multiprofessional team with regular department-wide feedback. Patient safety culture was measured at baseline with validated patient safety culture survey questions. A repeat survey was conducted after 1 and 2 years of departmental incident learning. Proportional changes were compared by χ(2) or Fisher exact test, where appropriate. Between 2012 and 2014, a total of 1897 error/near-miss incidents were reported, representing an average of 1 near-miss report per patient treated. Reports were filed by a cross section of staff, with the majority of incidents reported by therapists, dosimetrists, and physicists. Survey response rates at baseline and 1 and 2 years were 78%, 80%, and 80%, respectively. Statistically significant and sustained improvements were noted in several safety metrics, including belief that the department was openly discussing ways to improve safety, the sense that reports were being used for safety improvement, and the sense that changes were being evaluated for effectiveness. None of the surveyed dimensions of patient safety culture worsened. Fewer punitive concerns were noted, with statistically significant decreases in the worry of embarrassment in front of colleagues and fear of getting colleagues in trouble. A comprehensive incident learning system can identify many areas for improvement and is associated with significant and sustained improvements in patient safety culture. These data provide valuable guidance as incident learning systems become more widely used in radiation oncology. Copyright © 2015

  16. 中期财务报告自愿审计的动机和市场反应分析——基于中国上市公司的经验数据%Empirical Research on the Factors and Market Reaction of Voluntary Auditing of the Interim Reports --Based on the listed companies in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    简建辉; 杨帆

    2012-01-01

    Audit is an important guarantee for information disclosure quality as an external governance mechanism. There are no mandatory legal requirements for audit of interim financial reports of listed companies, and many listed companies select voluntary audit of their interim financial statements which is an active process of transmission of information for them. Based on a classical phenomenon underlying Chinese developing capital markets, the factors and market reactions of voluntary auditing of the interim reports are investigated. Though the analyses of data from 2007 to 2010, we found that the corporate growth rate and size are significantly related with the demands of corporate voluntary auditing, and corporate financial condition and shareholders nature can also influence the action of voluntary auditing. For the market reaction, capital market has positive reaction on voluntary auditing of interim report. However, it can not last to long.%作为外部治理机制的审计是公司信息披露质量的重要保证,目前法规对上市公司中期财务报告的审计并无强制性法规要求,许多上市公司选择中期财务报表自愿审计,其行为是一种主动传递信息的过程。本文通过对我国上市公司2007至2010年证券市场自愿中报审计的经验数据分析,对公司自愿中报审计的动机和市场反应进行了实证研究。研究发现:公司中期财务报表自愿审计与公司的成长性和公司规模显著相关,且公司的财务状况和股权性质对公司的自愿审计有一定影响;同时,市场对上市公司中期财务报告自愿审计行为有一定的正面反应,但这种反应效力不足,且持续力较低。

  17. Does the implementation of an electronic prescribing system create unintended medication errors? A study of the sociotechnical context through the analysis of reported medication incidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hodson James

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Even though electronic prescribing systems are widely advocated as one of the most effective means of improving patient safety, they may also introduce new risks that are not immediately obvious. Through the study of specific incidents related to the processes involved in the administration of medication, we sought to find out if the prescribing system had unintended consequences in creating new errors. The focus of this study was a large acute hospital in the Midlands in the United Kingdom, which implemented a Prescribing, Information and Communication System (PICS. Methods This exploratory study was based on a survey of routinely collected medication incidents over five months. Data were independently reviewed by two of the investigators with a clinical pharmacology and nursing background respectively, and grouped into broad types: sociotechnical incidents (related to human interactions with the system and non-sociotechnical incidents. Sociotechnical incidents were distinguished from the others because they occurred at the point where the system and the professional intersected and would not have occurred in the absence of the system. The day of the week and time of day that an incident occurred were tested using univariable and multivariable analyses. We acknowledge the limitations of conducting analyses of data extracted from incident reports as it is widely recognised that most medication errors are not reported and may contain inaccurate data. Interpretation of results must therefore be tentative. Results Out of a total of 485 incidents, a modest 15% (n = 73 were distinguished as sociotechnical issues and thus may be unique to hospitals that have such systems in place. These incidents were further analysed and subdivided into categories in order to identify aspects of the context which gave rise to adverse situations and possible risks to patient safety. The analysis of sociotechnical incidents by time of day and day of

  18. [The Influence of the Functioning of Brain Regulatory Systems onto the Voluntary Regulation of Cognitive Performance in Children. Report 2. Neuropsychological and Electrophysiological Assessment of Brain Regulatory Functions in Children Aged 10-12 with Learning Difficulties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenova, O A; Machinskaya, R I

    2015-01-01

    A total number of 172 children aged 10-12 were electrophysiologically and neuropsychologically assessed in order to analyze the influence of the functioning of brain regulatory systems onto the voluntary regulation of cognitive performance during the preteen years. EEG patterns associated with the nonoptimal functioning of brain regulatory systems, particularly fronto-thalamic, limbic and fronto-striatal structures were significantly more often observed in children with learning and behavioral difficulties, as compared to the control group. Neuropsychological assessment showed that the nonoptimal functioning of different brain regulatory systems specifically affect the voluntary regulation of cognitive performance. Children with EEG patterns of fronto-thalamic nonoptimal functioning demonstrated poor voluntary regulation such as impulsiveness and difficulties in continuing the same algorithms. Children with EEG patterns of limbic nonoptimal functioning showed a less pronounced executive dysfunction manifested only in poor switching between program units within a task. Children with EEG patterns of fronto-striatal nonoptimal functioning struggled with such executive dysfunctions as motor and tactile perseverations and emotional-motivational deviations such as poor motivation and communicative skills.

  19. Voluntary exercise increases cholesterol efflux but not macrophage reverse cholesterol transport in vivo in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuipers Folkert

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Physical exercise beneficially impacts on the plasma lipoprotein profile as well as on the incidence of cardiovascular events and is therefore recommended in primary and secondary prevention strategies against atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. However, the underlying mechanisms of the protective effect of exercise remain largely unknown. Therefore, the present study tested the hypothesis that voluntary exercise in mice impacts on cholesterol efflux and in vivo reverse cholesterol transport (RCT. After two weeks of voluntary wheel running (average 10.1 ± 1.4 km/day plasma triglycerides were lower (p

  20. AN ECONOMETRIC APPROACH ABOUT VOLUNTARY TURNOVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADALET EREN

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes individual and organizational variables that affect voluntary turnover are determined in the special defence and security companies. A binomial logistic regression model is used to estimate voluntary turnover.  Binomial Logistic regression, reliability test (scale alfa, variance (ANOVA, Post-hoc/Tukey, correlation (Pearson and other basic statistical techniques  with SPSS 13 statistical packet program was used in the analyzes ofresearch data. The study finds that; situation of suppose working, number of child, number of death child, number of home’s moving, support of rent, total monthly income of household, last work’s region, number of prizes, affect voluntary turnover are determined.

  1. Substantiated Reports of Child Maltreatment From the Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect 2008: Examining Child and Household Characteristics and Child Functional Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Tracie O; Taillieu, Tamara; Cheung, Kristene; Katz, Laurence Y; Tonmyr, Lil; Sareen, Jitender

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Identifying child and household characteristics that are associated with specific child maltreatment types and child functional impairment are important for informing prevention and intervention efforts. Our objectives were to examine the distribution of several child and household characteristics among substantiated child maltreatment types in Canada; to determine if a specific child maltreatment type relative to all other types was associated with increased odds of child functional impairment; and to determine which child and household characteristics were associated with child functional impairment. Method: Data were from the Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect (collection 2008) from 112 child welfare sites across Canada (n = 6163 children). Results: Physical abuse, sexual abuse, and emotional maltreatment were highly prevalent among children aged 10 to 15 years. For single types of child maltreatment, the highest prevalence of single-parent homes (50.6%), social assistance (43.0%), running out of money regularly (30.7%), and unsafe housing (30.9%) were reported for substantiated cases of neglect. Being male, older age, living in a single-parent home, household running out of money, moving 2 or more times in the past year, and household overcrowding were associated with increased odds of child functional impairment. Conclusions: More work is warranted to determine if providing particular resources for single-parent families, financial counselling, and facilitating adequate and stable housing for families with child maltreatment histories or at risk for child maltreatment could be effective for improving child functional outcomes. PMID:26175390

  2. Factors related to voluntary parental decision-making in pediatric oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Victoria A; Nelson, Robert M

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine demographic and contextual correlates of voluntariness in parents making research or treatment decisions for their children with cancer. Participants included 184 parents of children with cancer who made a decision about enrolling the child in a research or treatment protocol within the previous 10 days. Parents completed questionnaires that assessed voluntariness, external influence by others, concern that the child's care would be negatively affected if the parent did not agree, time pressure, information adequacy, and demographics. Lower perceived voluntariness was associated with lower education, male gender, minority status, and not having previous experience with a similar decision. Parents who reported lower voluntariness also perceived more external influence and time pressure, had more concern about the child's care being negatively affected if they declined, and perceived that they had either too much or not enough information about the decision. In a multivariate regression, education, minority status, gender, external influence, and too little information remained significantly associated with voluntariness. Several groups of parents appear to be at risk for decreased voluntariness when making research or treatment decisions for their seriously ill children, including fathers, nonwhite parents, and those with less education. Parental voluntariness may be enhanced by helping parents to mitigate the effects of unhelpful or unwanted influences by others and ensuring that their information needs are met.

  3. What Would You Like? Identifying the Required Characteristics of an Industry-Wide Incident Reporting and Learning System for the Led Outdoor Activity Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Natassia; Finch, Caroline F.; Cassell, Erin; Lenne, Michael G.; Salmon, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the characteristics that led outdoor activity providers agree are necessary for the development of a new industry-wide incident reporting and learning system (UPLOADS). The study involved: 1) a literature review to identify a set of characteristics that are considered to be hallmarks of successful reporting…

  4. Analysis of Aviation Safety Reporting System Incident Data Associated with the Technical Challenges of the System-Wide Safety and Assurance Technologies Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withrow, Colleen A.; Reveley, Mary S.

    2015-01-01

    The Aviation Safety Program (AvSP) System-Wide Safety and Assurance Technologies (SSAT) Project asked the AvSP Systems and Portfolio Analysis Team to identify SSAT-related trends. SSAT had four technical challenges: advance safety assurance to enable deployment of NextGen systems; automated discovery of precursors to aviation safety incidents; increasing safety of human-automation interaction by incorporating human performance, and prognostic algorithm design for safety assurance. This report reviews incident data from the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) for system-component-failure- or-malfunction- (SCFM-) related and human-factor-related incidents for commercial or cargo air carriers (Part 121), commuter airlines (Part 135), and general aviation (Part 91). The data was analyzed by Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR) part, phase of flight, SCFM category, human factor category, and a variety of anomalies and results. There were 38 894 SCFM-related incidents and 83 478 human-factorrelated incidents analyzed between January 1993 and April 2011.

  5. Voluntary activation of the trapezius muscle in cases with neck/shoulder pain compared to healthy controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Katrine Tholstrup; Larsen, Camilla Marie; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    2017-01-01

    Subjects reporting neck/shoulder pain have been shown to generate less force during maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVC) of the shoulder muscles compared to healthy controls. This has been suggested to be caused by a pain-related decrease in voluntary activation (VA) rather than lack of...

  6. 42 CFR 137.203 - May a Self-Governance Tribe participate in a voluntary national uniform data collection effort...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... voluntary national uniform data collection effort with the IHS? 137.203 Section 137.203 Public Health PUBLIC...-Governance Tribe participate in a voluntary national uniform data collection effort with the IHS? Yes, in... participate, at its option, in national IHS data reporting activities such as Government Performance...

  7. Opportunities for prevention and intervention with young children: lessons from the Canadian incidence study of reported child abuse and neglect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fallon Barbara

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The most effective way to provide support to caregivers with infants in order to promote good health, social, emotional and developmental outcomes is the subject of numerous debates in the literature. In Canada, each province adopts a different approach which range from universal to targeted programs. Nonetheless, each year a group of vulnerable infants is identified to the child welfare system with concerns about their well-being and safety. This study examines maltreatment-related investigations in Canada involving children under the age of one year to identify which factors determine service provision at the conclusion of the investigation. Methods A secondary analysis of the Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect CIS-2008 (PHAC, 2010 dataset was conducted. Multivariate analyses were conducted to understand the profile of investigations involving infants (n=1,203 and which predictors were significant in the decision to transfer a case to ongoing services at the conclusion of the investigation. Logistic Regression and Classification and Regression Trees (CART were conducted to examine the relationship between the outcome and predictors. Results The results suggest that there are three main sources that refer infants to the Canadian child welfare system: hospital, police, and non-professionals. Infant maltreatment-related investigations involve young caregivers who struggle with poverty, single-parenthood, drug/solvent and alcohol abuse, mental health issues, lack of social supports, and intimate partner violence. Across the three referral sources, primary caregiver risk factors are the strongest predictor of the decision to transfer a case to ongoing services. Conclusions Multivariate analyses indicate that the presence of infant concerns does not predict ongoing service provision, except when the infant is identified with positive toxicology at birth. The opportunity for early intervention and the

  8. Workplace interpersonal conflicts among the healthcare workers: Retrospective exploration from the institutional incident reporting system of a university-affiliated medical center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Szu-Fen; Liang, Huey-Wen; Chen, Li-Chin; Lin, Chia-Kuei; Huang, Hsiao-Fang; Hsieh, Ming-Yuan; Sun, Jui-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Objective There have been concerns about the workplace interpersonal conflict (WIC) among healthcare workers. As healthcare organizations have applied the incident reporting system (IRS) widely for safety-related incidents, we proposed that this system might provide a channel to explore the WICs. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the reports to the IRS from July 2010 to June 2013 in a medical center. We identified the WICs and typed these conflicts according to the two foci (task content/process and interpersonal relationship) and the three properties (disagreement, interference, and negative emotion), and analyzed relevant data. Results Of the 147 incidents with WIC, the most common related processes were patient transfer (20%), laboratory tests (17%), surgery (16%) and medical imaging (16%). All of the 147 incidents with WIC focused on task content or task process, but 41 (27.9%) also focused on the interpersonal relationship. We found disagreement, interference, and negative emotion in 91.2%, 88.4%, and 55.8% of the cases, respectively. Nurses (57%) were most often the reporting workers, while the most common encounter was the nurse-doctor interaction (33%), and the majority (67%) of the conflicts were experienced concurrently with the incidents. There was a significant difference in the distribution of worker job types between cases focused on the interpersonal relationship and those without (p = 0.0064). The doctors were more frequently as the reporter when the conflicts focused on the interpersonal relationship (34.1%) than not on it (17.0%). The distributions of worker job types were similar between those with and without negative emotion (p = 0.125). Conclusions The institutional IRS is a useful place to report the workplace interpersonal conflicts actively. The healthcare systems need to improve the channels to communicate, manage and resolve these conflicts. PMID:28166260

  9. Anticipatory signatures of voluntary memory suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanslmayr, Simon; Leipold, Philipp; Pastötter, Bernhard; Bäuml, Karl-Heinz

    2009-03-04

    Voluntary memory suppression can keep unwanted memories from entering consciousness, inducing later forgetting of the information. In the present study, we searched for the existence of anticipatory processes, mediating such voluntary memory suppression. Using the think/no-think paradigm, subjects received a cue whether to prepare to think of a previously studied cue-target pair or whether to not let a previously studied cue-target pair enter consciousness. Examining event-related potentials, we identified two electrophysiological processes of voluntary memory suppression: (1) an early anticipatory process operating before the memory cue for a to-be-suppressed memory was provided, and (2) a later process operating after memory cue presentation. Both ERP effects were due to a decreased right frontal and left parietal positivity. They were positively related and predicted later forgetting. The results point to the existence of anticipatory processes, mediating voluntary memory suppression.

  10. Pedagogical Aspects of Voluntary School Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Jármai Erzsébet

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The economic importance of voluntary work has been exceedingly appreciated in the last few decades. This is not surprising at all, because it is highly profitable according to the related estimated data. There are 115,9 million people doing voluntary work only in Europe, which means that they would create the world's 7th biggest economy with EUR 282 billion value creation if they formed an individual state. The organizations know that voluntary work has several advantages apart from the economic benefits. It is profitable both for the society and for the individuals as well. Several researches have proven that voluntary work positively influences the development of the personality, because the key-competencies - such as: co-operation, empathy, solidarity, conflict handling, problem solving, etc. - expected in the labor market can be improved.

  11. Managing voluntary turnover through challenging assignments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preenen, P.T.Y.; Pater, I.E. de; Vianen, A.E.M. van; Keijzer, L.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines employees' challenging assignments as manageable means to reduce turnover intentions, job search behaviors, and voluntary turnover. Results indicate that challenging assignments are negatively related to turnover intentions and job search behaviors and that these relationships

  12. Corticospinal excitability in human voluntary movement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elswijk, G.A.F. van

    2008-01-01

    The research described in this thesis addressed the neurophysiologic changes in the human corticospinal system during preparation and execution of voluntary hand movements. The experiments involved transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex combined with electromyography (EMG) and e

  13. Contemplated Suicide Among Voluntary and Involuntary Retirees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretti, Peter O.; Wilson, Cedric

    1978-01-01

    This study explored anomic and egoistic dimensions of contemplated suicide among voluntary and involuntary retired males. Results indicated a direct relationship between anomie and egoism on the one hand, and contemplation of suicide on the other. (Author)

  14. A Free Market Requires Voluntary Actions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sløk-Madsen, Stefan Kirkegaard

    are essential to the construct of consumer sovereignty. Understanding the degree of voluntary actions in a given commercial setting has implications for both business strategy and policy making. This paper thus aims to contribute to explain why restricted markets become crony capitalism.......This paper draws attention to the importance of the understanding of voluntary actions in the free market construct. Failing to understand the role of voluntary actions in the free market construct will often result in discussions of capitalism versus socialism focusing on asset ownership...... and not consumer sovereignty. I argue that asset ownership is less important than true consumer sovereignty, which again is the essential argument for why capitalism is the superior mode of resource allocation and social organization. The paper analyzes how our understanding of markets and voluntary actions...

  15. Contemplated Suicide Among Voluntary and Involuntary Retirees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretti, Peter O.; Wilson, Cedric

    1978-01-01

    This study explored anomic and egoistic dimensions of contemplated suicide among voluntary and involuntary retired males. Results indicated a direct relationship between anomie and egoism on the one hand, and contemplation of suicide on the other. (Author)

  16. Pull factors of Finland and voluntary work

    OpenAIRE

    Jurvakainen, Janika

    2016-01-01

    This thesis studies pull factors of Finland and voluntary work. The aim of this study is to understand the pull factors of Finland from the perspective of young travelers. Which pull factors attract to choose Finland as their destination? In addition, which pull factors attract young travelers to participate in international voluntary work? The commissioner of this thesis is Allianssi Youth Exchange. The thesis is research-based and includes a quantitative Webropol survey and some qualit...

  17. Status and Trends in U.S. Compliance and Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Markets (2010 Data)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, J.; Bird, L.

    2011-10-01

    This report documents the status and trends of 'compliance'--renewable energy certificate (REC) markets used to meet state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requirements--and 'voluntary' markets--those in which consumers and institutions purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs on a voluntary basis. Today, 29 states and the District of Columbia have an RPS, more than half of all U.S. electricity customers have an option to purchase some type of green power product directly from a retail electricity provider, and all consumers have the option to purchase RECs. This report documents REC activities and trends in the United States. The compliance REC market analysis includes analysis of REC trading, regional REC markets, REC tracking systems, types of compliance RECs, compliance REC pricing trends, and an overview of compliance with RPS polices. The voluntary REC analysis presents data and analysis on voluntary market sales and customer participation, products and premiums, green pricing marketing and administrative expenses, voluntary REC pricing, and the voluntary carbon offsets market. The report concludes with a discussion of upcoming guidance from the Federal Trade Commission on green marketing claims, the emergence of community solar programs, and the potential impact of Dodd-Frank regulations on the REC market.

  18. 47 CFR 80.310 - Watch required by voluntary vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Watches § 80.310 Watch required by voluntary vessels. Voluntary vessels not equipped with DSC must.... Voluntary vessels equipped with VHF-DSC equipment must maintain a watch on 2182 kHz and on either 156.525... used to communicate. Voluntary vessels equipped with MF-HF DSC equipment must have the radio turned...

  19. Self-reported whole-grain intake and plasma alkylresorcinol concentrations in combination in relation to the incidence of colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Markus Dines; Kyrø, Cecilie; Olsen, Anja;

    2014-01-01

    (colon, proximal, distal or rectum cancer) when using an FFQ as the measure/exposure variable for whole-grain intake. The results suggest that assessing whole-grain intake using a combination of FFQs and biomarkers slightly increases the precision in estimating the risk of colon or rectal cancer......-grain consumption (HELGA, 1992-1998). Incidence rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using conditional logistic regression. Plasma alkylresorcinol concentrations alone and Howe's score with ranks were inversely associated with the incidence of distal colon cancer when the highest quartile......Self-reported food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) have occasionally been used to investigate the association between whole-grain intake and the incidence of colorectal cancer, but the results from those studies have been inconsistent. We investigated this association using intakes of whole grains...

  20. Perceived coercion in voluntary hospital admission.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donoghue, Brian

    2014-01-30

    The legal status of service users admitted to psychiatric wards is not synonymous with the level of coercion that they can perceive during the admission. This study aimed to identify and describe the proportion of individuals who were admitted voluntarily but experienced levels of perceived coercion comparable to those admitted involuntarily. Individuals admitted voluntarily and involuntarily to three psychiatric hospitals were interviewed using the MacArthur Admission Experience Interview and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV diagnoses. One hundered sixty-one individuals were interviewed and 22% of the voluntarily admitted service users had levels of perceived coercion similar to that of the majority of involuntarily admitted service users. Voluntarily admitted service users who experienced high levels of perceived coercion were more likely to have more severe psychotic symptoms, have experienced more negative pressures and less procedural justices on admission. Individuals brought to hospital under mental health legislation but who subsequently agreed to be admitted voluntarily and those treated on a secure ward also reported higher levels of perceived coercion. It needs to be ensured that if any service user, whether voluntary or involuntary, experiences treatment pressures or coercion that there is sufficient oversight of the practice, to ensure that individual\\'s rights are respected.

  1. Drug related critical incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, F A; Hoda, M Q

    2005-01-01

    Drug related incidents are a common form of reported medical errors. This paper reviews the critical incidents related to drug errors reported from the main operating theatre suite in a teaching hospital in a developing country from January 1997 to December 2002. Each report was evaluated individually by two reviewers using a structured process. During this period, 44 874 anaesthetics were administered; 768 critical incidents were reported, 165 (21%) of which were related to drug errors. Underdosage, side-effect/drug reaction and syringe swap were the most common. A total of 76% were classified as preventable; 56% due to human error and 19% due to system error. High risk incidents accounted for 10% of all drug errors and most of these were related to the use of neuromuscular blocking drugs. This analysis has been found useful in addressing some issues about priorities.

  2. Police Incident Blotter (Archive)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The Police Blotter Archive contains crime incident data after it has been validated and processed to meet Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) standards, published on a...

  3. Can the surgical checklist reduce the risk of wrong site surgery in orthopaedics? - can the checklist help? Supporting evidence from analysis of a national patient incident reporting system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleary Kevin

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical procedures are now very common, with estimates ranging from 4% of the general population having an operation per annum in economically-developing countries; this rising to 8% in economically-developed countries. Whilst these surgical procedures typically result in considerable improvements to health outcomes, it is increasingly appreciated that surgery is a high risk industry. Tools developed in the aviation industry are beginning to be used to minimise the risk of errors in surgery. One such tool is the World Health Organization's (WHO surgery checklist. The National Patient Safety Agency (NPSA manages the largest database of patient safety incidents (PSIs in the world, already having received over three million reports of episodes of care that could or did result in iatrogenic harm. The aim of this study was to estimate how many incidents of wrong site surgery in orthopaedics that have been reported to the NPSA could have been prevented by the WHO surgical checklist. Methods The National Reporting and Learning Service (NRLS database was searched between 1st January 2008- 31st December 2008 to identify all incidents classified as wrong site surgery in orthopaedics. These incidents were broken down into the different types of wrong site surgery. A Likert-scale from 1-5 was used to assess the preventability of these cases if the checklist was used. Results 133/316 (42% incidents satisfied the inclusion criteria. A large proportion of cases, 183/316 were misclassified. Furthermore, there were fewer cases of actual harm [9% (12/133] versus 'near-misses' [121/133 (91%]. Subsequent analysis revealed a smaller proportion of 'near-misses' being prevented by the checklist than the proportion of incidents that resulted in actual harm; 18/121 [14.9% (95% CI 8.5 - 21.2%] versus 10/12 [83.3% (95%CI 62.2 - 104.4%] respectively. Summatively, the checklist could have been prevented 28/133 [21.1% (95%CI 14.1 - 28.0%] patient safety

  4. Dutch perfusion incident survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenenberg, Ingrid; Weerwind, Patrick W; Everts, Peter A M; Maessen, Jos G

    2010-09-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass procedures remain complex, involving many potential risks. Therefore, a nationwide retrospective study was conducted to gain insight into the number of incidents and accidents in Dutch adult perfusion practice. An anonymous postal survey (85 questions about hardware, disposables, fluids and medication, air emboli, anticoagulation, practice, and safety measures) was sent to all Dutch perfusionists involved in adult cardiovascular perfusion during 2006 and 2007. To guarantee complete anonymity, respondents were asked to return the survey to a notary who discarded personal information. The net response rate was 72% and covered 23,500 perfusions. Individual respondents performed 240 ± 103 perfusions during the 2-year study period and had 13.8 ± 8.7 years of practical experience. The incident rate was 1 per 15.6 perfusions and the adverse event rate was 1 per 1,236 perfusions. The three most reported incidents were: (1) persistent inability to raise the activated coagulation time above 400s during perfusion (184 incidents); (2) an allergic or anaphylactic reaction to drugs, fluids, or blood products (114 incidents); and (3) clotting formation in the extracorporeal circuit (74 incidents). Furthermore, pre-bypass safety measures showed no statistically significant association with the reported incidents. In comparison with data from the recent literature, the reported number of incidents is high. Nevertheless, the adverse outcome rate is well matched to other published surveys. The relatively high response rate conveys the impression that the Dutch perfusionist is vigilant and willing to report incidents. Hence, a web-based Dutch perfusion incident registration system is recommended.

  5. Increasing Incidence of Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease in Allogeneic Transplantation – A Report from CIBMTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Sally; Arora, Mukta; Wang, Tao; Spellman, Stephen R.; He, Wensheng; Couriel, Daniel R.; Urbano-Ispizua, Alvaro; Cutler, Corey S.; Bacigalupo, Andrea A.; Battiwalla, Minoo; Flowers, Mary E.; Juckett, Mark B.; Lee, Stephanie J.; Loren, Alison W.; Klumpp, Thomas R.; Prockup, Susan E.; Ringdén, Olle T.H.; Savani, Bipin N.; Socié, Gérard; Schultz, Kirk R.; Spitzer, Thomas; Teshima, Takanori; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Jacobsohn, David A.; Hayashi, Robert J.; Drobyski, William R.; Frangoul, Haydar A.; Akpek, Görgün; Ho, Vincent T.; Lewis, Victor A.; Gale, Robert Peter; DSc(hon); Koreth, John; Chao, Nelson J.; Aljurf, Mahmoud D.; Cooper, Brenda W.; Laughlin, Mary J.; Hsu, Jack W.; Hematti, Peiman; Verdonck, Leo F.; Solh, Melhelm M.; Norkin, Maxim; Reddy, Vijay; Martino, Rodrigo; Gadalla, Shahinaz; Goldberg, Jenna D.; McCarthy, Philip L.; Pérez-Simón, José A.; Khera, Nandita; Lewis, Ian D.; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Olsson, Richard F.; Saber, Wael; Waller, Edmund K.; Blaise, Didier; Pidala, Joseph A.; Martin, Paul J.; Satwani, Prakash; Bornhäuser, Martin; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Pavletic, Steven Z.

    2015-01-01

    Although transplant practices have changed over the last decades there is no information on trends in incidence and outcome of cGVHD over time. This study utilized the central database of the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) to describe the time trends for cGVHD incidence, non-relapse mortality, and the risk factors for cGVHD. The 12-year period was divided into three intervals: 1995-1999, 2000-2003, 2004-2007, and included 26,563 patients with acute leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. In the multivariate analysis, the incidence of cGVHD was shown to be increased in more recent years (odds ratio= 1.19, p<0.0001) and this trend was still seen when adjusting for donor type, graft type, or conditioning intensity. In patients with cGVHD, non-relapse mortality has decreased over time, but at 5-years there were no significant differences among different time periods. Risk factors for cGVHD were in line with previous studies. This is the first comprehensive characterization of the trends in cGVHD incidence and underscores the mounting need for addressing this major late complication of transplantation in future research. PMID:25445023

  6. Reported incidence and treatment of dermatophytosis in children in general practice: a comparison between 1987 and 2001.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammedamin, R.S.A.; Wouden, J.C. van der; Koning, S.; Schellevis, F.G.; Suijlekom-Smit, L.W.A. van; Koes, B.W.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Dermatophytosis is a common skin infection in children. Although the epidemiology is relatively unknown it is becoming a major health problem in some countries. We determine the incidence and management of dermatophytosis in Dutch general practice in 1987 and 2001. Methods: We used da

  7. Incidence of bovine neonatal pancytopenia in 243 farms in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichmann, Frederike; Pfitzner, Annette; Rademacher, Guenter; Schwedinger, Elke; Cussler, Klaus; Sauter-Louis, Carola M

    2016-10-07

    Several research groups from different European countries have worked on the aetiopathogenesis of bovine neonatal pancytopenia (BNP) and an association between the use of the vaccine PregSure BVD (Pfizer, Germany) and the development of this haemorrhagic disease was confirmed. Because BNP is not a notifiable disease, it is difficult to obtain information on its incidence. Based on pharmacovigilance (PhV) data, which are the only officially available data at the national level, the incidence of BNP is considered low. However, voluntary reporting of the disease can lead to underreporting. To gain more insight into the incidence of BNP among the affected herds, an epidemiological study was performed, which focused on 243 farms in Germany with cases of BNP. Farmers were asked to report the occurrence of BNP, including the number of cases, which allowed calculation of incidence in the affected herds. Matching such data with the registered cases in the National PhV System (NPhVS) gave us an opportunity to assess the extent of BNP underreporting. On 243 farms, a total of 1195 calves younger than 4 weeks with haemorrhagic diathesis were registered. In 58 % of the reports, a diagnosis of BNP was confirmed by blood analysis and or by necropsy. The number of cases observed on individual farms ranged from 1 to 80. Based on these results, the incidence of BNP on affected farms ranged from 0.3 to 15.2 % (median 2.9 %). The maximal incidence in the year with the highest number of BNP calves ranged between 0.4 and 18.6 % (median 3.3 %). Comparing the number of cases registered in the NPhVS to the numbers found in this study revealed considerable underreporting to the national database: only 44 % of the farms and 41 % of the BNP calves included in the study were registered in the NPhVS. In spite of the opportunity to report BNP calves to the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut (Langen, Germany), the estimated number of undetected BNP cases is remarkably high. However, even if the revealed

  8. Correlation of multiple sclerosis (MS incidence trends with solar and geomagnetic indices: Time to revise the method of reporting MS epidemiological data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahimeh Abdollahi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, we introduced solar related geomagnetic disturbances (GMD as a potential environmental risk factor for multiple sclerosis (MS. The aim of this study was to test probable correlation between solar activities and GMD with long-term variations of MS incidence.After a systematic review, we studied the association betwee n alterations in the solar wind velocity (VSW and planetary A index (AP, a GMD index with MS incidence in Tehran and western Greece, during the 23(rd solar cycle (1996-2008, by an ecological-correlational study.We found moderate to strong correlations among MS incidence of Tehran with VSW (rS = 0.665, P = 0.013, with 1 year delay, and also with AP (rS = 0.864, P = 0.001 with 2 year delay. There were very strong correlations among MS incidence data of Greece with VSW (r = 0.906, P < 0.001 and with AP (r = 0.844, P = 0.001, both with 1 year lag.It is the first time that a hypothesis has introduced an environmental factor that may describe MS incidence alterations; however, it should be reminded that correlation does not mean necessarily the existence of a causal relationship. Important message of these findings for researchers is to provide MS incidence reports with higher resolution for consecutive years, based on the time of disease onset and relapses, not just the time of diagnosis. Then, it would be possible to further investigate the validity of GMD hypothesis or any other probable environmental risk factors.

  9. SHOT conference report 2016: serious hazards of transfusion - human factors continue to cause most transfusion-related incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton-Maggs, P H B

    2016-12-01

    The Annual SHOT Report for incidents reported in 2015 was published on 7 July at the SHOT symposium. Once again, the majority of reports (77·7%) were associated with mistakes ('human factors'). Pressures and stress in the hospital environment contributed to several error reports. There were 26 deaths where transfusion played a part, one due to haemolysis from anti-Wr(a) (units issued electronically). The incidence of haemolysis due to this antibody has increased in recent years. Transfusion-associated circulatory overload is the most common contributor to death and major morbidity. Reports of delays to transfusion have increased, some caused by the failure of correct patient identification. There were seven ABO-incompatible red cell transfusions (one death) with an additional six to allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients. Near-miss reporting and analysis is useful and demonstrated nearly 300 instances of wrong blood in tube, which could have resulted in ABO-incompatible transfusion had the error not been detected. Errors with anti-D immunoglobulin continue, and preliminary data from the new survey of new anti-D found in pregnancy has shown that sensitisation occurs in some women even with apparently 'ideal' care. For the first time, the SHOT report now incorporates a chapter on donor events.

  10. Voluntary attention increases perceived spatial frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Jared; Barbot, Antoine; Carrasco, Marisa

    2010-08-01

    Voluntary covert attention selects relevant sensory information for prioritized processing. The behavioral and neural consequences of such selection have been extensively documented, but its phenomenology has received little empirical investigation. Involuntary attention increases perceived spatial frequency (Gobell & Carrasco, 2005), but involuntary attention can differ from voluntary attention in its effects on performance in tasks mediated by spatial resolution (Yeshurun, Montagna, & Carrasco, 2008). Therefore, we ask whether voluntary attention affects the subjective appearance of spatial frequency--a fundamental dimension of visual perception underlying spatial resolution. We used a demanding rapid serial visual presentation task to direct voluntary attention and measured perceived spatial frequency at the attended and unattended locations. Attention increased the perceived spatial frequency of suprathreshold stimuli and also improved performance on a concurrent orientation discrimination task. In the control experiment, we ruled out response bias as an alternative account by using a lengthened interstimulus interval, which allows observers to disengage attention from the cued location. In contrast to the main experiment, the observers showed neither increased perceived spatial frequency nor improved orientation discrimination at the attended location. Thus, this study establishes that voluntary attention increases perceived spatial frequency. This phenomenological consequence links behavioral and neurophysiological studies on the effects of attention.

  11. Examining the Relationship between Economic Hardship and Child Maltreatment Using Data from the Ontario Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect-2013 (OIS-2013)

    OpenAIRE

    Rachael Lefebvre; Barbara Fallon; Melissa Van Wert; Joanne Filippelli

    2017-01-01

    There is strong evidence that poverty and economic disadvantage are associated with child maltreatment; however, research in this area is underdeveloped in Canada. The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between economic hardship and maltreatment for families and children identified to the Ontario child protection system for a maltreatment concern. Secondary analyses of the Ontario Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect-2013 (OIS-2013) were conducted. The OIS-201...

  12. Status and Trends in the U.S. Voluntary Green Power Market (2014 Data)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Shaughnessy, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Heeter, Jenny [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Liu, Chang [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Nobler, Erin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-10-16

    NREL's annual report on green power markets summarizes status and trends in the voluntary demand for renewable energy. U.S. green power markets have become more complex over time as state-level policies have enabled more avenues for green power purchases. In recent years, community solar, community choice aggregation (CCA), and voluntary power purchase agreements (PPAs) have significantly increased the number of U.S. voluntary green power customers. The community solar model has grown rapidly with 90 projects in 25 states by 2015. Renewable energy sales in CCAs declined slightly in 2014 in response to less favorable economic conditions in Illinois. At the same time, several California CCAs continued to grow, and many more communities are planning to pursue green power through aggregation. Voluntary green power purchasing through bi-lateral PPAs took off in 2014 due to several large-scale agreements signed by information and communication technology firms. Traditional green power options, such as utility green pricing programs and voluntary RECs markets, also grew in 2014. Current trends suggest strong continued growth in U.S. voluntary green power markets.

  13. Predicting discordance between self-reports of sexual behavior and incident sexually transmitted infections with African American female adolescents: results from a 4-city study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jennifer L; Sales, Jessica M; DiClemente, Ralph J; Salazar, Laura F; Vanable, Peter A; Carey, Michael P; Brown, Larry K; Romer, Daniel; Valois, Robert F; Stanton, Bonita

    2012-08-01

    This study examined correlates of the discordance between sexual behavior self-reports and Incident Sexually Transmitted Infections. African American adolescent females (N = 964) from four U.S. cities were recruited for an HIV/STI prevention trial. Self-reported sexual behaviors, demographics, and hypothesized psychosocial antecedents of sexual risk behavior were collected at baseline, 6-, 12-, and 18-month follow-up assessments. Urine specimens were collected and tested for three prevalent STIs (chlamydia, gonorrhea, trichomonas) at each assessment. Seventeen percent of participants with a laboratory-confirmed STI reported either lifetime abstinence or recent abstinence from vaginal sex (discordant self-report). Lower STI knowledge, belief that fewer peers were engaging in sex, and belief that more peers will wait until marriage to have sex were associated with discordant reports. Discordance between self-reported abstinence and incident STIs was marked among African American female adolescents. Lack of STI knowledge and sexual behavior peer norms may result in underreporting of sexual behaviors.

  14. Global warming potentials; Part 7 of 7 supporting documents. Sector-specific issues and reporting methodologies supporting the general guidelines for voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992; Public review draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-31

    This document provides methods to account for the different effects of different gases on the atmosphere. It discusses the rationale and uses for simplified measures to represent human-related effects on climate and provides a brief introduction to a major index, the global warming potential (GWP) index. Appendix 7.A analyzes the science underlying the development of indices for concerns about climate, which is still evolving, evaluates the usefulness of currently available indices, and presents the state of the art for numerical indices and their uncertainties. For concerns about climate, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has been instrumental in examining relative indices for comparing the radiative influences of greenhouse gases. The IPCC developed the concept of GWPs to provide a simple representation of the relative effects on climate resulting from a unit mass emission of a greenhouse gas. Alternative measures and variations on the definition of GWPs have also been considered and reported.

  15. From Voluntary Collective Action to Organized Collaboration?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattke, Fabian; Blaschke, Steffen; Frost, Jetta

    2016-01-01

    internationalization. Based on our results, we suggest that, depending on the field of action, voluntary collective action and organized collaboration are substitutes with regard to performance. Our study contributes to the literature on collective action and to research on public organizations in pluralistic......Our study examines the relationship between voluntary collective action, organized collaboration, and the provision of public goods in pluralistic organizations. Using German higher education as a context, we investigate whether specialized central support structures contribute to performance...... in three fields of action: the training of young scientists, internationalization, and gender diversity. The findings indicate that organized collaboration may lead to improved performance in the training of young scientists and gender diversity. Conversely, voluntary collective action enhances...

  16. The Determinants of Voluntary Risk Disclosures: The Case of Shariah Compliant Companies in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosli Nurul Fida

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Risk reporting is essential in notifying investors on how companies manage the risks they engage in. Even though companies nowadays release information through press releases, corporate websites, and other forms of communications, they still have to disclose more information in their annual reports. The objective of this study is to examine the determinants of voluntary risk disclosures of Shariah compliant companies (ShCCs in Malaysia, focusing on the religiosity factor and the ownership structure. A quantitative analysis using secondary data was employed as a method to assess the annual reports of 116 Shariah compliant companies in Malaysia for the financial years of 2012 and 2013. The findings of this study reveal that the voluntary risk disclosures in ShCCs on average are not more than sixty per cent. This study indicates no relationship between the religiosity of board members and directors’ ownership to the level of voluntary risk disclosure. More importantly, this study finds the relationship between the existence of government ownership and voluntary risk disclosure in ShCCs. The study adds value to the current body of knowledge in voluntary risk disclosures and suggests the importance of risk management information in the annual reports of ShCCs as Malaysia grows as a leading country in the Islamic economy.

  17. A global model of malaria climate sensitivity: comparing malaria response to historic climate data based on simulation and officially reported malaria incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlund, Stefan; Davis, Matthew; Douglas, Judith V; Kershenbaum, Arik; Waraporn, Narongrit; Lessler, Justin; Kaufman, James H

    2012-09-18

    The role of the Anopheles vector in malaria transmission and the effect of climate on Anopheles populations are well established. Models of the impact of climate change on the global malaria burden now have access to high-resolution climate data, but malaria surveillance data tends to be less precise, making model calibration problematic. Measurement of malaria response to fluctuations in climate variables offers a way to address these difficulties. Given the demonstrated sensitivity of malaria transmission to vector capacity, this work tests response functions to fluctuations in land surface temperature and precipitation. This study of regional sensitivity of malaria incidence to year-to-year climate variations used an extended Macdonald Ross compartmental disease model (to compute malaria incidence) built on top of a global Anopheles vector capacity model (based on 10 years of satellite climate data). The predicted incidence was compared with estimates from the World Health Organization and the Malaria Atlas. The models and denominator data used are freely available through the Eclipse Foundation's Spatiotemporal Epidemiological Modeller (STEM). Although the absolute scale factor relating reported malaria to absolute incidence is uncertain, there is a positive correlation between predicted and reported year-to-year variation in malaria burden with an averaged root mean square (RMS) error of 25% comparing normalized incidence across 86 countries. Based on this, the proposed measure of sensitivity of malaria to variations in climate variables indicates locations where malaria is most likely to increase or decrease in response to specific climate factors. Bootstrapping measures the increased uncertainty in predicting malaria sensitivity when reporting is restricted to national level and an annual basis. Results indicate a potential 20x improvement in accuracy if data were available at the level ISO 3166-2 national subdivisions and with monthly time sampling. The

  18. The institutional dynamics of voluntary organisations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Peter

    this theoretical frame to analyse case studies of three voluntary organisations.  As a part of the analysis I describe four sets of institutional settings that can influence voluntary organisations ability to create institutional dynamic: institutionalization, moderation, self-organisation and loose-coupling....... organisations. I establish a theoretical frame of institutional dynamic, build primarily on J.G. March's theory on exploration and exploitation. I focus on two organisational arrangements drawn from the theory: The degree of strategic decision-making and the degree of diversity among the volunteers. I use...

  19. US Voluntary Observing Ship (VOS) - International Maritime Meteorological Tape (IMMT) data from TurboWin+ E-Logbook Software

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The US Voluntary Observing Ships (VOS) report surface marine observations in both real-time (FM-13 ship format) and delayed-mode (International Maritime...

  20. Prevalence, Incidence, and Clearance of Anogenital Warts in Kenyan Men Reporting High-Risk Sexual Behavior, Including Men Who Have Sex With Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neme, Santiago; Wahome, Elizabeth; Mwashigadi, Grace; Thiong'o, Alexander N.; Stekler, Joanne D.; Wald, Anna; Sanders, Eduard J.; Graham, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes a spectrum of disease, ranging from warts to cancer. Prevalence, incidence, and factors associated with anogenital warts in East African men are unknown. Methods. Kenyan men reporting high-risk sexual behavior were inspected for anogenital warts at enrollment and follow-up visits. Logistic regression was performed to identify associations with anogenital warts at baseline. Cox regression was performed to analyze predictors of incident anogenital warts, and Kaplan–Meier curves were used to estimate clearance. Results. Baseline anogenital wart prevalence in 1137 men was 2.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0%–4.0%) overall, 2.0% in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-uninfected men, and 9.4% in HIV-1-infected men (adjusted odds ratio, 5.43; 95% CI, 2.03–11.29). Over a median of 1.4 years, anogenital wart incidence among 1104 men was 5.3 (95% CI, 4.3–6.5) per 100 person-years. Having HIV-1 infection at baseline (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.66; 95% CI, 1.01–2.72) or a genital syndrome during follow-up (aHR, 4.78; 95% CI, 3.03–7.56) was associated with increased wart incidence. Wart clearance was lower in HIV-1-infected men (log-rank Pwart prevalence and incidence were increased in HIV-1-infected men, and anogenital warts co-occurred with other genital syndromes. Quadrivalent HPV vaccination should be recommended for young men in settings with high HIV-1 prevalence. PMID:26110169

  1. Seventy Years of Asthma in Italy: Age, Period and Cohort Effects on Incidence and Remission of Self-Reported Asthma from 1940 to 2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Pesce

    Full Text Available It is well known that asthma prevalence has been increasing all over the world in the last decades. However, few data are available on temporal trends of incidence and remission of asthma.To evaluate the rates of asthma incidence and remission in Italy from 1940 to 2010.The subjects were randomly sampled from the general Italian population between 1991 and 2010 in the three population-based multicentre studies: ECRHS, ISAYA, and GEIRD. Individual information on the history of asthma (age at onset, age at the last attack, use of drugs for asthma control, co-presence of hay-fever was collected on 35,495 subjects aged 20-84 and born between 1925-1989. Temporal changes in rates of asthma incidence and remission in relation to age, birth cohort and calendar period (APC were modelled using Poisson regression and APC models.The average yearly rate of asthma incidence was 2.6/1000 (3,297 new cases among 1,263,885 person-years. The incidence rates have been linearly increasing, with a percentage increase of +3.9% (95%CI: 3.1-4.5, from 1940 up to the year 1995, when the rates begun to level off. The stabilization of asthma incidence was mainly due to a decrease in the rates of atopic asthma after 1995, while non-atopic asthma has continued to increase. The overall rate of remission was 43.2/1000person-years, and it did not vary significantly across generations, but was associated with atopy, age at asthma onset and duration of the disease.After 50 years of a continuous upward trend, the rates of asthma incidence underwent a substantial stabilization in the late 90s. Despite remarkable improvements in the treatment of asthma, the rate of remission did not change significantly in the last seventy years. Some caveats are required in interpreting our results, given that our estimates are based on self-reported events that could be affected by the recall bias.

  2. Disparities in Reportable Communicable Disease Incidence by Census Tract-Level Poverty, New York City, 2006–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin-Rector, Alison; Hadler, James L.; Fine, Annie D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We described disparities in selected communicable disease incidence across area-based poverty levels in New York City, an area with more than 8 million residents and pronounced household income inequality. Methods. We geocoded and categorized cases of 53 communicable diseases diagnosed during 2006 to 2013 by census tract-based poverty level. Age-standardized incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were calculated for areas with 30% or more versus fewer than 10% of residents below the federal poverty threshold. Results. Diseases associated with high poverty included rickettsialpox (IRR = 3.69; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.29, 5.95), chronic hepatitis C (IRR for new reports = 3.58; 95% CI = 3.50, 3.66), and malaria (IRR = 3.48; 95% CI = 2.97, 4.08). Diseases associated with low poverty included domestic tick-borne diseases acquired through travel to areas where infected vectors are prevalent, such as human granulocytic anaplasmosis (IRR = 0.08; 95% CI = 0.03, 0.19) and Lyme disease (IRR = 0.34; 95% CI = 0.32, 0.36). Conclusions. Residents of high poverty areas were disproportionately affected by certain communicable diseases that are amenable to public health interventions. Future work should clarify subgroups at highest risk, identify reasons for the observed associations, and use findings to support programs to minimize disparities. PMID:26180961

  3. 77 FR 72941 - Voluntary Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-07

    ... decision will be made by the selected DoD contractor for the complete `third party review' process. Comment... seeks to enhance the educational opportunities to Service members who may have difficulty in completing... transitions to second careers in teaching. Voluntary education programs. Continuing, adult, or...

  4. Decentralized trade with bargaining and voluntary matching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tranæs, Torben; Sloth, Birgitte; Hendon, Ebbe

    1994-01-01

    Rubinstein and Wolinsky (1990) study a market with one seller, two buyers, and voluntary matching. Both the competitive outcomepc and the bilateral bargaining outcomepb are possible in subgame perfect equilibrium. We consider two variations. First, if there is a cost larger thanpc−pc to the seller...

  5. Social orienting: reflexive versus voluntary control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Julia L; Patel, Saumil; Gu, Xue; Seyedali, Nassim S; Bachevalier, Jocelyne; Sereno, Anne B

    2010-09-24

    Many studies have shown that the direction of gaze of a face covertly facilitates the response to a target presented in the matching direction. In this study we seek to determine whether there exist separate reflexive and voluntary forms of such covert social orienting and how they interact with each other. We measured the effect of the predictive value of a gaze cue on manual choice reaction times. When the predictive value of the gaze cue was zero, a facilitatory cueing effect was still observed which peaked at a cue onset to target onset delay (CTD) of 150ms and largely diminished beyond a CTD of 500ms. When the gaze cue was 100% predictive of the future location of the target, at CTDs greater than 200, the predictive cue resulted in a significantly greater facilitation of response than occurred with a non-predictive cue. These results suggest that given enough time (about 200ms), the social cue is interpreted and a willful or voluntary spatially-specific social cueing effect occurs. In addition, we found that a predictive cue resulted in a significant slowing of the observer's responses up to a CTD of 200ms. These findings show that, similar to non-social spatial orienting, there appear to be two forms of social orienting including a reflexive component and voluntary component. We suggest a model of social orienting in which the voluntary social orienting system modulates tonic inhibition of the reflexive social orienting system. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Equality, self‐respect and voluntary separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.S. Merry

    2012-01-01

    This paper argues that self‐respect constitutes an important value, and further, an important basis for equality. It also argues that under conditions of inequality‐producing segregation, voluntary separation in schooling may be more likely to provide the resources necessary for self‐respect. A prim

  7. School Ethical Climate and Teachers' Voluntary Absence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira-Lishchinsky, Orly; Rosenblatt, Zehava

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to offer a theoretical framework for linking school ethical climate with teachers' voluntary absence. The paper attempts to explain this relationship using the concept of affective organizational commitment. Design/methodology/approach: Participants were 1,016 school teachers from 35 high schools in Israel. Data were…

  8. Voluntary Oral Administration of Losartan in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diogo, Lucília N; Faustino, Inês V; Afonso, Ricardo A; Pereira, Sofia A; Monteiro, Emília C; Santos, Ana I

    2015-09-01

    Gavage is a widely performed technique for daily dosing in laboratory rodents. Although effective, gavage comprises a sequence of potentially stressful procedures for laboratory animals that may introduce bias into experimental results, especially when the drugs to be tested interfere with stress-dependent parameters. We aimed to test vehicles suitable for drug delivery by voluntary ingestion in rats. Specifically, Male Wistar rats (age, 2 to 3 mo) were used to test nut paste (NUT), peanut butter (PB), and sugar paste (SUG) as vehicles for long-term voluntary oral administration of losartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker. Vehicles were administered for 28 d without drug to assess effects on the glucose level and serum lipid profile. Losartan was mixed with vehicles and either offered to the rats or administered by gavage (14 d) for subsequent quantification of losartan plasma levels by HPLC. After a 2-d acclimation period, all rats voluntarily ate the vehicles, either alone or mixed with losartan. NUT administration reduced blood glucose levels. The SUG group had higher concentrations of losartan than did the gavage group, without changes in lipid and glucose profiles. Our results showed that NUT, PB, and SUG all are viable for daily single-dose voluntary ingestion of losartan and that SUG was the best alternative overall. Drug bioavailability was not reduced after voluntary ingestion, suggesting that this method is highly effective for chronic oral administration of losartan to laboratory rodents.

  9. Staff's perceptions of voluntary assertiveness skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVanel, Sarah; Morris, Beth

    2010-01-01

    Clinicians' ability to be assertive when unsure or concerned about procedures, treatment modalities, or patients' symptoms is key in reducing risk and preventing sentinel events. In this article, the authors provide a framework for generic, voluntary assertiveness communication skills workshops that any educator can implement.

  10. Voluntary Organizations: Commitment, Leadership, and Organizational Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekeland, Terry P.

    2004-01-01

    Voluntary organizations offer a unique opportunity to interpret participant relationships, leadership influences, and organizational effectiveness unencumbered by employment relationships. Regardless of organizational structure or purpose, all organizations are affected to some degree by their leadership and their membership. Based on the…

  11. Environmental Voluntary Agreements in the Dutch Context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bressers, Johannes T.A.; de Bruijn, Theo; Croci, Edoardo

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes and analyses the use of environmental voluntary agreements, or covenants, in Dutch environmental policy. Covenants have become a widely used policy instrument in the Netherlands. This trend reinforces the strong neo-corporatist traits of Dutch society with its tendency towards

  12. Voluntary Community Organisations in Metropolitan Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jacob Norvig

    While short-term enrolling of citizens in urban regeneration projects often has proven quite successful, permanent embedding of projects in voluntary community-based settings seems to be much more difficult to obtain. This has implications for long term sustainability of urban regeneration projec...

  13. Eligibility and Exclusion of Hemochromatosis Patients as Voluntary Blood Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Levstik

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hereditary hemochromatosis patients are excluded in many countries as voluntary blood donors. In 1991, changes in the Canadian Red Cross policy allowed healthy hemochromatosis patients to become voluntary donors.

  14. Results of the global survey on Voluntary Sustainability Standards

    OpenAIRE

    Lernoud, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Results of the global survey on Voluntary Sustainability Standards: - Voluntary Sustainability Standards (VSS) area worldwide and selected commodities - Cocoa: Area growth by VSS 2008-2014 - Growth of VSS compliant area worldwide 2008-2013 (selected crops)

  15. Voluntary sterilization in Serbia: Unmet need?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rašević Mirjana M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Is voluntary sterilization as a birth control method accepted in Serbia? This is certainly a question that is being imposed for research, regardless of the fact that voluntary sterilization is neither accessible nor promoted. Most importantly because there is no understanding in the social nor political sphere for legalization of voluntary sterilization as a form of birth control, apart from the clear necessity for this, first, step. They are: the recognition that voluntary sterilization is an efficient and safe birth control method, respectability of basic human as well as sexual and reproductive rights, spreading of sterilization as a form of birth control among population of both developed and developing countries and an epidemic diffusion of repeated induced abortions in Serbia. Thus individual recognition of the advantages of relying on voluntary sterilization, in a non-encouraging atmosphere, certainly represents one more argument to enable couples to prevent conception by sterilization. Since it was impossible to carry out a representative research among the population of men and women who are at risk for conception, an attempt was made to obtain a reply to the set question among women who decided to induce abortion. It was done out of at least two reasons. The first being that women with induced abortion in their reproductive history were the target group for voluntary sterilization. The second reason was based on the assumption that bringing a decision on induced abortion is preceded by the reconsideration of an earlier adopted strategy regarding children, giving birth and contraception and thus its rational component is revealed more and therefore more easily measurable. The research was carried out in the University Clinic of Obstetrics and Gynecology 'Narodni front' in Belgrade from January 21st o March 1st 2002, and included 296 women. By comparing the social and demographic characteristics of the female respondents, as well as

  16. Effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation during voluntary and non-voluntary stepping movements in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solopova, I A; Selionov, V A; Kazennikov, O V; Ivanenko, Y P

    2014-09-05

    Here, we compared motor evoked potentials (MEP) in response to transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex and the H-reflex during voluntary and vibration-induced air-stepping movements in humans. Both the MEPs (in mm biceps femoris, rectus femoris and tibialis anterior) and H-reflex (in m soleus) were significantly smaller during vibration-induced cyclic leg movements at matched amplitudes of angular motion and muscle activity. These findings highlight differences between voluntary and non-voluntary activation of the spinal pattern generator circuitry in humans, presumably due to an extra facilitatory effect of voluntary control/triggering of stepping on spinal motoneurons and interneurons. The results support the idea of active engagement of supraspinal motor areas in developing central pattern generator-modulating therapies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Moving from voluntary euthanasia to non-voluntary euthanasia: equality and compassion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaraskekara, Kumar; Bagaric, Mirko

    2004-09-01

    The recent Dutch law legalising active voluntary euthanasia will reignite the euthanasia debate. An illuminating method for evaluating the moral status of a practice is to follow the implications of the practice to its logical conclusion. The argument for compassion is one of the central arguments in favour of voluntary active euthanasia. This argument applies perhaps even more forcefully in relation to incompetent patients. If active voluntary euthanasia is legalised, arguments based on compassion and equality will be directed towards legalising active non-voluntary euthanasia in order to make accelerated termination of death available also to the incompetent. The removal of discrimination against the incompetent has the potential to become as potent a catch-cry as the right to die. However, the legalisation of non-voluntary euthanasia is undesirable. A review of the relevant authorities reveals that there is no coherent and workable "best interests" test which can be invoked to decide whether an incompetent patient is better off dead. This provides a strong reason for not stepping onto the slippery path of permitting active voluntary euthanasia.

  18. State Methods for a Cyber Incident

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Statewide Emergency Response and Response Plan SIPC State Infrastructure Protection Center SIRT Security Incident Response Team SIRT State Incident...by statute and policy to report agency information security incidents to the state Security Incident Response Team ( SIRT ). Those reports are made...through recent state statutes. P-16 Yes, agencies are required by statute and policy to report information security incidents to the SIRT . Q-17

  19. 5 CFR 919.1020 - Voluntary exclusion or voluntarily excluded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Voluntary exclusion or voluntarily excluded. 919.1020 Section 919.1020 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED...) Definitions § 919.1020 Voluntary exclusion or voluntarily excluded. (a) Voluntary exclusion means a person's...

  20. 37 CFR 351.2 - Voluntary negotiation period; settlement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Voluntary negotiation period... CONGRESS COPYRIGHT ROYALTY JUDGES RULES AND PROCEDURES PROCEEDINGS § 351.2 Voluntary negotiation period..., the Copyright Royalty Judges will announce the beginning of a voluntary negotiation period and...

  1. 15 CFR 12.3 - Development of voluntary product standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Development of voluntary product... AND LABELING § 12.3 Development of voluntary product standards. (a) Invitation to participate in the development of a voluntary product standard. Whenever the Secretary publishes a final determination of...

  2. Report from Mongolia – How much do we know about the incidence of rare cases in less developed countries: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dünser Martin W

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Case reports are important instruments to describe rare disease conditions and give a rough estimation of their global incidence. Even though collected in international databases, most case reports are published by clinicians from industrialized nations and little is known about the incidence of rare cases in less developed countries, which are home to 75% of the world's population. Case presentation We present seven patients who suffered from diseases which are either considered to be rare or have not yet been described before according to international databases, but occurred during a 5-month period in one intensive care unit of a less developed country. During the observation period, patients with a spontaneous infratentorial subdural hematoma (Asian, female, 41 years, general exanthema and acute renal failure after diesel ingestion (Asian, male, 30 years, transient cortical blindness complicating hepatic encephalopathy (Asian, female, 49 years, Fournier gangrene complicating acute necrotizing pancreatitis (Asian, male, 37 years, acute renal failure due to acetic acid intoxication (Asian, male, 42 years, haemolytic uremic syndrome following septic abortion (Asian, female, 45 years, and a metal needle as an unusual cause of chest pain (Asian, male, 41 years were treated. According to the current literature, all seven disease conditions are considered either rare or have so far not yet been reported. Conclusion The global incidence of rare cases may be underestimated by contemporary international databases. Diseases which are currently considered to be rare in industrialized nations may occur at a higher frequency in less developed countries. Reasons may not only be a geographically different burden of certain diseases, limited diagnostic and therapeutic facilities, but also a relevant publication bias.

  3. Neurofibromatosis with male breast cancer--risk factor or co-incidence? Report of two rare cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Megha; Panwar, Pankaj; Garg, Praveen; Chintamani; Siraj, Fauzia

    2015-01-01

    The genetic link between neurofibromatosis and breast cancer has recently intrigued the researchers and breast practitioners alike. While the association is well established in females, the same cannot be said for the male breast cancer due to paucity of cases. With only two cases reported previously, our knowledge is sparse. We hereby report two cases of male breast cancer with neurofibromatosis.

  4. Monozygotic twinning after assisted reproductive technologies: a case report of asymmetric development and incidence during 19 years in an international group of in vitro fertilization clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocino, Antonia; Blasco, Víctor; Prados, Nicolás; Vargas, Manuel J; Requena, Antonio; Pellicer, Antonio; Fernández-Sánchez, Manuel

    2015-05-01

    To describe a case of monozygotic twinning with asymmetric development following a single fresh embryo transfer as part of an intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) treatment. Secondarily, to report the incidence of monozygotic twinning at the IVI (Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad) clinics. Case report. Private fertility centers. A 33-year-old woman with a 2-year history of primary infertility. Controlled ovarian hyperstimulation and ICSI treatment with single-embryo transfer. Incidence of monozygotic twinning at the IVI clinics. We report a twin pregnancy after a single-embryo transfer. Twins were dichorionic and diamniotic. One fetus had a 6-day delay in its growth compared with the other when observed by ultrasound. Two female infants were delivered, and despite presenting congenital diseases, they were successfully treated and evolved correctly. A subsequent DNA analysis confirmed that the infants were monozygotic. Furthermore, we estimated a monozygotic twinning rate of 1.17% at the IVI clinics, taking into account those cases in which two or more embryos with heart beats were observed by ultrasound scanning after single-embryo transfers. Ultrasound scans performed during pregnancy suggested a possible dizygotic origin of the twins, but DNA analysis performed after birth established that they were monozygotic. Genetic analysis is the only valid tool to confirm if like-sex dichorionic twins are monozygotic or dizygotic. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Field evidence of bird poisonings by imidacloprid-treated seeds: a review of incidents reported by the French SAGIR network from 1995 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millot, Florian; Decors, Anouk; Mastain, Olivier; Quintaine, Thomas; Berny, Philippe; Vey, Danièle; Lasseur, Romain; Bro, Elisabeth

    2017-02-01

    The large-scale use of neonicotinoid insecticides has raised growing concerns about their potential adverse effects on farmland birds, and more generally on biodiversity. Imidacloprid, the first neonicotinoid commercialized, has been identified as posing a risk for seed-eating birds when it is used as seed treatment of some crops since the consumption of a few dressed seeds could cause mortality. But evidence of direct effects in the field is lacking. Here, we reviewed the 103 wildlife mortality incidents reported by the French SAGIR Network from 1995 to 2014, for which toxicological analyses detected imidacloprid residues. One hundred and one incidents totalling at least 734 dead animals were consistent with an agricultural use as seed treatment. Grey partridges (Perdix perdix) and "pigeons" (Columba palumbus, Columba livia and Columba oenas) were the main species found. More than 70% of incidents occurred during autumn cereal sowings. Furthermore, since there is no biomarker for diagnosing neonicotinoid poisonings, we developed a diagnostic approach to estimate the degree of certainty that these mortalities were due to imidacloprid poisoning. By this way, the probability that mortality was due to poisoning by imidacloprid-treated seeds was ranked as at least "likely" in 70% of incidents. As a result, this work provides clear evidence to risk managers that lethal effects due to the consumption by birds of imidacloprid-treated seeds regularly occur in the field. This in turn raises the question of the effectiveness of the two main factors (seed burying and imidacloprid-treated seeds avoidance) that are supposed to make the risk to birds negligible. Risk factors and the relevance of mitigation measures are discussed.

  6. A Decade of Child-Initiated Family Violence: Comparative Analysis of Child-Parent Violence and Parricide Examining Offender, Victim, and Event Characteristics in a National Sample of Reported Incidents, 1995-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Jeffrey A.; Krienert, Jessie L.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines 11 years (1995-2005) of National Incident Based Reporting System data comparing victim, offender, and incident characteristics for two types of child-initiated family violence: child-parent violence (CPV) and parricide. The objective is to better understand the victim-offender relationship for CPV and parricide and to…

  7. Incidence and body location of reported acute sport injuries in seven sports using a national insurance database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åman, M; Forssblad, M; Larsén, K

    2017-08-07

    Sports with high numbers of athletes and acute injuries are an important target for preventive actions at a national level. Both for the health of the athlete and to reduce costs associated with injury. The aim of this study was to identify injuries where injury prevention should focus, in order to have major impact on decreasing acute injury rates at a national level. All athletes in the seven investigated sport federations (automobile sports, basketball, floorball, football (soccer), handball, ice hockey, and motor sports) were insured by the same insurance company. Using this insurance database, the incidence and proportion of acute injuries, and injuries leading to permanent medical impairment (PMI), at each body location, was calculated. Comparisons were made between sports, sex, and age. In total, there were 84 754 registered injuries during the study period (year 2006-2013). Athletes in team sports, except in male ice hockey, had the highest risk to sustain an injury and PMI in the lower limb. Females had higher risk of injury and PMI in the lower limb compared to males, in all sports except in ice hockey. This study recommends that injury prevention at national level should particularly focus on lower limb injuries. In ice hockey and motor sports, head/neck and upper limb injuries also need attention. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Burrowing as a novel voluntary strength training method for mice : A comparison of various voluntary strength or resistance exercise methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roemers, P; Mazzola, P N; De Deyn, P P; Bossers, W J; van Heuvelen, M J G; van der Zee, E A

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Voluntary strength training methods for rodents are necessary to investigate the effects of strength training on cognition and the brain. However, few voluntary methods are available. NEW METHOD: The current study tested functional and muscular effects of two novel voluntary strength

  9. Voluntary simulation workshops in nursing education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selberg, Hanne; Nielsen, Mette Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Voluntary simulation workshops in nursing education Hanne Selberg1, Mette Elisabeth Nielsen1, Mette Wenzel Horsted2, Karen Bertelsen2, Marianne Linnet Rasmussen2,Rikke Lohmann Panton3, Copenhagen, Mette Kjeldal Jensen4 Background Changes in nursing education in Denmark towards an academic approach...... with more theory and less practical training have resulted in discussions regarding the lack of practical skills amongst novice nurses. A Danish study of students’ drop-out from the nursing education indicates that difficulties in combining theory and practice are one of the motivating factors behind...... the students’ decision to drop out (Jensen et al. 2008). Within the past year our faculty has conducted several projects with the aim of integrating simulation into the curriculum. Furthermore, voluntary simulation workshop has been carried out as an additional offer in the nursing education. The purpose has...

  10. The Political Importance of Voluntary Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunneman, Harry

    This paper aims to develop a complex articulation of the civic meaningfulness of voluntary work that clarifies its political importance as a countervailing narrative pointing beyond dominant neoliberal and consumptive articulations of a good life. To start with, it sketches a hermeneutic perspective on civic meaningfulness based on the work of Paul Ricoeur. Subsequently, it introduces the ideas of 'ethical complexity', 'epistemological complexity' and 'diapoiesis', building on insights from critical complexity thinking and relational biology. It argues that these notions can provide a bridge between hermeneutic perspectives on meaning and values, on the one hand, and questions of meaning and values on the level of scientific and technological developments and within professional organizations, on the other. Thus a broader, more complex picture emerges of the civic meaningfulness of voluntary work in our times.

  11. Voluntary Management Earnings Forecasts and Discretionary Accruals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramlich, Jeffrey; Sørensen, Ole Vagn

    2004-01-01

    This paper seeks to determine whether Danish managers exercise discretionary accruals to reach earnings forecast targets they voluntarily specify in conjunction with initial public offerings (IPOs). Because the Danish accounting and legal environment is more permissive than the US, we use Denmark...... as a natural laboratory for learning how business would occur without strict rules, enforcement and sanctions. Danish managers often volunteer pro forma financial statements for results that are expected to occur subsequent to the IPO. We examine a sample of 58 Danish firms that issue voluntary management...... earnings forecasts in connection with IPOs that occur between 1984 and 1996. The evidence we uncover strongly suggests that pre-managed earnings are adjusted toward these targets. In contrast with Kasznik's (1999 Kasznik, R. (1999). On the association between voluntary disclosure and earnings management...

  12. Examining the Relationship between Economic Hardship and Child Maltreatment Using Data from the Ontario Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect-2013 (OIS-2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Rachael; Fallon, Barbara; Van Wert, Melissa; Filippelli, Joanne

    2017-01-01

    There is strong evidence that poverty and economic disadvantage are associated with child maltreatment; however, research in this area is underdeveloped in Canada. The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between economic hardship and maltreatment for families and children identified to the Ontario child protection system for a maltreatment concern. Secondary analyses of the Ontario Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect-2013 (OIS-2013) were conducted. The OIS-2013 examines the incidence of reported maltreatment and the characteristics of children and families investigated by child welfare authorities in Ontario in 2013. Descriptive and bivariate chi-square analyses were conducted in addition to a logistic regression predicting the substantiation of maltreatment. In 9% of investigations, the household had run out of money for food, housing, and/or utilities in the past 6 months. Children in these households were more likely to have developmental concerns, academic difficulties, and caregivers with mental health concerns and substance use issues. Controlling for key clinical and case characteristics, children living in families facing economic hardship were almost 2 times more likely to be involved in a substantiated maltreatment investigation (OR = 1.91, p < 0.001). The implications in regard to future research and promoting resilience are discussed. PMID:28208690

  13. Examining the Relationship between Economic Hardship and Child Maltreatment Using Data from the Ontario Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect-2013 (OIS-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Rachael; Fallon, Barbara; Van Wert, Melissa; Filippelli, Joanne

    2017-02-08

    There is strong evidence that poverty and economic disadvantage are associated with child maltreatment; however, research in this area is underdeveloped in Canada. The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between economic hardship and maltreatment for families and children identified to the Ontario child protection system for a maltreatment concern. Secondary analyses of the Ontario Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect-2013 (OIS-2013) were conducted. The OIS-2013 examines the incidence of reported maltreatment and the characteristics of children and families investigated by child welfare authorities in Ontario in 2013. Descriptive and bivariate chi-square analyses were conducted in addition to a logistic regression predicting the substantiation of maltreatment. In 9% of investigations, the household had run out of money for food, housing, and/or utilities in the past 6 months. Children in these households were more likely to have developmental concerns, academic difficulties, and caregivers with mental health concerns and substance use issues. Controlling for key clinical and case characteristics, children living in families facing economic hardship were almost 2 times more likely to be involved in a substantiated maltreatment investigation (OR = 1.91, p < 0.001). The implications in regard to future research and promoting resilience are discussed.

  14. Examining the Relationship between Economic Hardship and Child Maltreatment Using Data from the Ontario Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect-2013 (OIS-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael Lefebvre

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available There is strong evidence that poverty and economic disadvantage are associated with child maltreatment; however, research in this area is underdeveloped in Canada. The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between economic hardship and maltreatment for families and children identified to the Ontario child protection system for a maltreatment concern. Secondary analyses of the Ontario Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect-2013 (OIS-2013 were conducted. The OIS-2013 examines the incidence of reported maltreatment and the characteristics of children and families investigated by child welfare authorities in Ontario in 2013. Descriptive and bivariate chi-square analyses were conducted in addition to a logistic regression predicting the substantiation of maltreatment. In 9% of investigations, the household had run out of money for food, housing, and/or utilities in the past 6 months. Children in these households were more likely to have developmental concerns, academic difficulties, and caregivers with mental health concerns and substance use issues. Controlling for key clinical and case characteristics, children living in families facing economic hardship were almost 2 times more likely to be involved in a substantiated maltreatment investigation (OR = 1.91, p < 0.001. The implications in regard to future research and promoting resilience are discussed.

  15. Emergency preparedness incident response and radiation monitoring in Finland. Annual report 1998; Valmiustapahtumat ja valtakunnallinen saeteilyvalvonta. Vuosiraportti 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ristonmaa, S. [ed.

    1999-03-01

    The Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) publishes annually a report about STUK's preparedness measures. The report describes notifications received by STUK's on duty system and further measures carried out after receiving a message. In addition, the emergence exercises STUK participated in during the year are described. The radiation situation in Finland is continuously monitored. STUK is the authority who carries out a wide range of environmental measurements, sampling and sensitive laboratory analyses. The measurement results are presented in the form of tables and graphically. (editor)

  16. Emergency preparedness incident response and radiation monitoring in Finland. Annual report 1999; Valmiustapahtumat ja saeteilyvalvonta. Vuosiraportti 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ristonmaa, S. [ed.

    2000-04-01

    The Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) publishes annually a report about STUK's preparedness measures. The report describes notifications received by STUK's on duty system and further measures carried out after receiving a message. In addition, the emergence exercises STUK participated in during the year are described. The radiation situation in Finland is continuously monitored. STUK is the authority who carries out a wide range of environmental measurements, sampling and sensitive laboratory analyses. The measurement results are presented in the form of tables and graphically. (editor)

  17. Emergency preparedness incident response and radiation monitoring in Finland. Annual report 1999; Valmiustapahtumat ja saeteilyvalvonta. Vuosiraportti 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ristonmaa, S. [ed.

    2000-04-01

    The Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) publishes annually a report about STUK's preparedness measures. The report describes notifications received by STUK's on duty system and further measures carried out after receiving a message. In addition, the emergence exercises STUK participated in during the year are described. The radiation situation in Finland is continuously monitored. STUK is the authority who carries out a wide range of environmental measurements, sampling and sensitive laboratory analyses. The measurement results are presented in the form of tables and graphically. (editor)

  18. Voluntary control of electrogastric activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, B B; Lawton, C A; Sandman, C A

    1978-12-01

    The tonic component of the electrogastrogram (EGG) has been shown to differentiate duodenal ulcer patients from healthy individuals (15). It has therefore been of considerable interest to investigate the possibility that individuals can learn to modify electrogastric activity. Using a discriminative conditioning paradigm with analogue feedback (Experiment I), subjects were generally unsuccessful at controlling tonic EGG activity. However, when the conditioning paradigm was altered (Experiment II) it was clear that subjects were able to modify specific electrogastric changes. In addition to EGG, heart rate, respiration, abdominal muscle activity, and digital blood flow were measured in order to assess the physiological concomitants of learned control of gastrointestinal activity. Subjects who evidenced discriminative control also showed the least amount of abdominal muscle activity and reported being the most relaxed. The results of these studies suggest that exploration of the physiological processes underlying the electrical activity of the gastrointestinal system and the ability of individuals to modify this activity may lead to significant clinical and theoretical advances.

  19. Voluntary activation during maximal contraction with advancing age: a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klass, Malgorzata; Baudry, Stéphane; Duchateau, Jacques

    2007-07-01

    It is well established that the loss of muscle mass (i.e. sarcopenia) is the primary factor contributing to the reduction in muscle force with ageing. Based on the observation that force declines at a faster rate than muscle mass, neural alterations are also thought to contribute to muscle weakness by reducing central drive to the agonist muscles and by increasing coactivation of the antagonist muscles. Researchers have attempted to quantify the contribution of impaired voluntary drive to the decline in muscle force using superimposed electrical stimulation during maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) and by recording surface electromyographic (EMG) activity. Although reduced voluntary activation of agonist muscles and increased coactivation of antagonist muscles during a MVC have been reported with advancing age, such changes are not supported by all studies. These discrepancies may be explained by differences in sensitivity between the methods used to assess voluntary activation, as well as differences between the characteristics of the study population, the muscle group that is tested, and the type of contraction that is performed. The objective of this review is to summarize current knowledge regarding the activation of agonist and antagonist muscles during MVC in elderly and to try to clarify the disparities in literature concerning the influence of a possible deficit in voluntary activation on the maximal force capacity of muscles in elderly adults.

  20. Benzyl alcohol increases voluntary ethanol drinking in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etelälahti, T J; Eriksson, C J P

    2014-09-01

    The anabolic steroid nandrolone decanoate has been reported to increase voluntary ethanol intake in Wistar rats. In recent experiments we received opposite results, with decreased voluntary ethanol intake in both high drinking AA and low drinking Wistar rats after nandrolone treatment. The difference between the two studies was that we used pure nandrolone decanoate in oil, whereas in the previous study the nandrolone product Deca-Durabolin containing benzyl alcohol (BA) was used. The aims of the present study were to clarify whether the BA treatment could promote ethanol drinking and to assess the role of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-gonadal axes (HPAGA) in the potential BA effect. Male AA and Wistar rats received subcutaneously BA or vehicle oil for 14 days. Hereafter followed a 1-week washout and consecutively a 3-week voluntary alcohol consumption period. The median (± median absolute deviation) voluntary ethanol consumption during the drinking period was higher in BA-treated than in control rats (4.94 ± 1.31 g/kg/day vs. 4.17 ± 0.31 g/kg/day, p = 0.07 and 1.01 ± 0.26 g/kg/day vs. 0.38 ± 0.27 g/kg/day, p = 0.05, for AA and Wistar rats, respectively; combined effect p < 0.01). The present results can explain the previous discrepancy between the two nandrolone studies. No significant BA effects on basal and ethanol-mediated serum testosterone and corticosterone levels were observed in blood samples taken at days 1, 8 and 22. However, 2h after ethanol administration significantly (p = 0.02) higher frequency of testosterone elevations was detected in high drinking AA rats compared to low drinking Wistars, which supports our previous hypotheses of a role of testosterone elevation in promoting ethanol drinking. Skin irritation and dermatitis were shown exclusively in the BA-treated animals. Altogether, the present results indicate that earlier findings obtained with Deca-Durabolin containing BA need to be re-evaluated.

  1. Avoiding a fate worse than death: an argument for legalising voluntary physician-based euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werren, Julia; Yuksel, Necef; Smith, Saxon

    2012-09-01

    The legalisation of voluntary physician-based euthanasia is currently the subject of much political, social and ethical debate and there is evidence in Australia of growing support for its implementation. In addressing many of the issues that surround legalisation, the article looks at some overseas jurisdictions that have legalised euthanasia to determine whether the social, political and ethical concerns prominent in the Australian debate have proved problematic in other jurisdictions. In addition, the article examines the report on the Dying with Dignity Bill 2009 (Tas) which commented extensively on the issues relating to voluntary physician-based euthanasia.

  2. Determinants and features of voluntary disclosure in the Chinese stock market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Lan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper offers in-depth analysis of the determinants and features of voluntary disclosure based on information in the annual reports of 1066 Chinese firms listed on the Shanghai and Shenzhen Stock Exchanges. This extensive sample represents about 80% of all public companies in China. Our findings suggest that voluntary disclosure in China is positively related to firm size, leverage, assets-in-place, and return on equity and is negatively related to auditor type and the level of maturity or sophistication of the intermediary and legal environments. We also find some evidence to suggest a quadratic convex association between state ownership and voluntary disclosure. However, our analysis provides no evidence that extensive disclosure benefits public companies in China in the form of a lower cost of equity.

  3. Motivation and benefits of voluntary activities. Case study: EYOF 2013 Braşov

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Codruţa Adina BĂLTESCU

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Voluntary activities have become natural concerns among an increasing number of European citizens. Romania, as a member state of the EU, has a low number of participations in voluntary activities, situation partly justified by the lack of presence of our country on the map of large scale events organization which is based to a high extent, on volunteers’ involvement. The present paper presents the results of a quantitative marketing research organized among volunteers who participated at EYOF 2013 Braşov and highlights the participation’s motivations and benefits felt by volunteers at the end of the event. The authors of the article highlight the differences reported between volunteers’ expectations and their opinions after the event, the results obtained being considered useful for planning the voluntary activities in organizing future events hosted in our country.

  4. Determinants and features of voluntary disclosure in the Chinese stock market

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang; Lan; Lili; Wang; Xueyong; Zhang

    2013-01-01

    This paper offers in-depth analysis of the determinants and features of voluntary disclosure based on information in the annual reports of 1066 Chinese firms listed on the Shanghai and Shenzhen Stock Exchanges. This extensive sample represents about 80% of all public companies in China. Our findings suggest that voluntary disclosure in China is positively related to firm size,leverage, assets-in-place, and return on equity and is negatively related to auditor type and the level of maturity or sophistication of the intermediary and legal environments. We also find some evidence to suggest a quadratic convex association between state ownership and voluntary disclosure. However, our analysis provides no evidence that extensive disclosure benefits public companies in China in the form of a lower cost of equity.

  5. Botulinum toxin injection improved voluntary motor control in selected patients with post-stroke spasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuo-Hsiu Chang; Gerald E Francisco; Sheng Li

    2012-01-01

    The effect of botulinum toxin type A injection on voluntary grip control was examined in a 53-year-old female, who sustained a hemorrhagic right middle cerebral artery stroke 3 years previously, which resulted in finger flexor spasticity and residual weak finger/wrist extension. The patient received 50 units of botulinum toxin type A injection each to the motor points (2 sites/muscle) of the left flexor digitorum superficialis and flexor digitorum profundus, respectively. Botulinum toxin injection led to weakness and tone reduction in the spastic finger flexors, but improved grip release time in grip initiation/release reaction time tasks. Improved release time was accompanied by shortened extensor electromyography activity, and improved release time likely correlated with blocked co-contraction of finger flexors during voluntary finger extension. This case report demonstrated that botulinum toxin injection improved voluntary motor control of the hand in a chronic stroke patient with residual finger extension.

  6. Lower Limb Voluntary Movement Improvement Following a Robot-Assisted Locomotor Training in Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirbagheri Mehdi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI suffer from severe impairments in voluntary movements. Literature reports a reduction in major kinematic and kinetic parameters of lower limbs’ joints. A body weight support treadmill training with robotic assistance has been widely used to improve lower-extremity function and locomotion in persons with SCI. Our objective was to explore the effects of 4-weeks robot-assisted locomotor training on voluntary movement of the ankle musculature in patients with incomplete SCI. In particular, we aimed to characterize the therapeutic effects of Lokomat training on kinematic measures (range of motion, velocity, smoothness during a dorsiflexion movement. We hypothesized that training would improve these measures. Preliminary results show an improvement of kinematic parameters during ankle dorsiflexion voluntary movement after a 4-weeks training in the major part of our participants. Complementary investigations are in progress to confirm these results and understand underlying mechanisms associated with the recovery.

  7. Etiology of Fall-Related Injuries in the Army: Review of Narrative Incident Reports, January to December 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Volleyball .8Game(recess/camp/children) .9 Other Other sports E008.X .0 Boxing .1 Wrestling .2 Racquet/hand sports .3 Frisbee .4 Martial arts ...sports, followed by a mix of human movement activities, including walking/marching and climbing. In non-deployed the most frequently reported types...Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 9. Art . No.: CD007146. 33. Osullivan JO, Wakai A, Osullivan RO, Luke C, Cusack S. Ladder Fall

  8. Leader motives, charismatic leadership, and subordinates' work attitude in the profit and voluntary sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hoogh, Annebel H.B.; den Hartog, Deanne N.; Koopman, Paul L.; Thierry, Henk; van den Berg, Peter T.; van der Weide, J.G.; Wilderom, Celeste P.M.

    2005-01-01

    This multimethod study examined leaders’ motives, charismatic leader behavior, and subordinates’ work attitude for CEOs (N=73) of small and medium-sized organizations in two sectors, namely, the profit and voluntary sector. Interviews with CEOs were coded for motive imagery. Direct reports rated CEO

  9. The Effect of Voluntary Ventilation on Acid-base Responses to a Moo Duk Tkow Form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzler, Ronald K.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Results are reported from a study that investigated the acid-base and lactate reponses to voluntary integration of breathing and exercise movements during beginning level form Ki Cho I, performed at competitive intensities. Findings suggest that respiratory compensation does not occur and that respiratory acidosis may contribute to metabolic…

  10. Inspiratory muscle training lowers the oxygen cost of voluntary hyperpnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Louise A; Tecklenburg-Lund, Sandra L; Chapman, Robert F; Stager, Joel M; Wilhite, Daniel P; Mickleborough, Timothy D

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if inspiratory muscle training (IMT) alters the oxygen cost of breathing (Vo(2RM)) during voluntary hyperpnea. Sixteen male cyclists completed 6 wk of IMT using an inspiratory load of 50% (IMT) or 15% placebo (CON) of maximal inspiratory pressure (Pi(max)). Prior to training, a maximal incremental cycle ergometer test was performed to determine Vo(2) and ventilation (V(E)) at multiple workloads. Pre- and post-training, subjects performed three separate 4-min bouts of voluntary eucapnic hyperpnea (mimic), matching V(E) that occurred at 50, 75, and 100% of Vo(2 max). Pi(max) was significantly increased (P muscles following a period of IMT may facilitate increased O(2) availability to the active muscles during exercise. These data suggest that IMT may reduce the O(2) cost of ventilation during exercise, providing an insight into mechanism(s) underpinning the reported improvements in whole body endurance performance; however, this awaits further investigation.

  11. Wrong intraocular lens events-what lessons have we learned? A review of incidents reported to the National Reporting and Learning System: 2010-2014 versus 2003-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeples, L R; Hingorani, M; Flanagan, D; Kelly, S P

    2016-08-01

    PurposeTo identify the causal factors in wrong intraocular lens (IOL) events from a national data set and to compare with similar historical data (2003-2010) prior to mandatory checklist use, for the purpose of developing strategies to prevent never events.MethodsData from wrong IOL patient safety incidents (PSIs) submitted to the National Reporting and Learning System (2010-2014) were reviewed by thematic analysis and compared with the data previously collected by the group using the same methodology.ResultsOne hundred and seventy eight wrong IOL PSIs were identified. The contributory factors included: transcription errors (n=26); wrong patient biometry (n=21); wrong IOL selection (n=16); changes in planned procedure (n=16); incorrect IOL brought into theatre (n=11); left/right eye selection errors (n=9); communication errors (n=9); and positive/negative IOL power errors (n=9). In 44 PSIs, no causal factor was reported, limiting the learning value of such reports. Compared with the data from previous years, biometry errors were much reduced but IOL transcription and documentation errors were greater, particularly if further checks did not refer to the original source documentation. IOL exchange surgery was reported in 45 cases.ConclusionsThe selection and implantation of the correct IOL is a complex process which is not adequately addressed by existing checking procedures. Despite the introduction of surgical checklists, wrong IOL incidents continue to occur and are probably under-reported. Human or behavioural factors are heavily implicated in these errors and need to be addressed by novel approaches, including simulation training. There is also scope to further improve the quality and detail of incident reporting and analysis to enhance patient safety.

  12. Incidence, puberty, and fertility in 45,X/47,XXX mosaicism: Report of a patient and a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Han Hyuk; Kil, Hong Ryang; Koo, Sun Hoe

    2017-05-09

    Turner syndrome (TS), characterized by short stature and premature ovarian failure, is caused by chromosomal aberrations with total or partial loss of one of the two X chromosomes. Spontaneous puberty, menarche, and pregnancy occur in some patients depending on the abnormality of the X. Moreover, spontaneous pregnancy is uncommon (XXX karyotype is extremely rare. Previous reports have demonstrated that TS with 45,X/47,XXX is less severe than common TS due to higher occurrence of puberty (83%), menarche (57-67%), and fertility (14%) and lower occurrence of congenital anomalies (XXX mosaicism who presented with short stature. She showed mild TS phenotype including short stature but had spontaneous puberty. Based on our case and previous reports, we expect that girls with 45,X/47,XXX mosaicism may progress through puberty normally, without estrogen therapy. Therefore, it is necessary to consider specific guidelines for clinical decisions surrounding pubertal development and fertility in TS with 45,X/47,XXX karyotype. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Episodes of voluntary total fasting (hunger strike) in Spanish prisons: A descriptive analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Guerrero, J; Vera-Remartínez, E J

    2015-08-01

    To provide a description of the frequency and main features of the episodes of voluntary total fasting (VTF) taking place in Spanish prisons. Information on the episodes of VTF reported between 04/01/2013 and 03/31/2014 was gathered. Once the appropriate informed consent was given, other data on social, demographic, penitentiary and clinical aspects were collected. A descriptive study of such variables together with a bivariate analysis was then carried out by means of standard statistical techniques and binary logistic regression models. IBM SPSS Statistics v.20 software was used for this purpose. This study was approved by an accredited Clinical Research Ethics Committee. 354 episodes of VTF took place among an average population of 29,762 prisoners. Therefore, the incidence rate was 11.9 VTF episodes per ‰ inmates-year. Informed consent (IC) was given in 180 cases (50.8%). 114 were of Spanish nationality and the average age was 38.7 years old (95% CI 37.2-40.1). The median duration of the episodes was 3 days (IQR 1-10), ranged between 1 and 71 days. The main reason was a disagreement on the decisions of treatment groups (57 cases, 31.7%). The average weight loss was 1.3 kg (70.8 vs. 69.5; p < 0.0001) and 0.7 of the BMI (24.5 vs. 23.8; p < 0.0001). 60 prisoners (33.3%) lost no weight at all and only 8 (4.4%) lost over 12% of the basal weight (8.5 kg). Ketone smell was identified in 61 cases (33.9%) and ketonuria in 63 (35%). Only one third of those who go on hunger strike in prison actually fast. Revindicative episodes of voluntary total fasting are somewhat common in Spanish prisons, but rarely are they carried out rigorously and entail a risk for those who fast. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Foodborne disease in Australia: incidence, notifications and outbreaks. Annual report of the OzFoodNet network, 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    In 2002, OzFoodNet continued to enhance surveillance of foodborne diseases across Australia. The OzFoodNet network expanded to cover all Australian states and territories in 2002. The National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health together with OzFoodNet concluded a national survey of gastroenteritis, which found that there were 17.2 (95% C.I. 14.5-19.9) million cases of gastroenteritis each year in Australia. The credible range of gastroenteritis that may be due to food each year is between 4.0-6.9 million cases with a mid-point of 5.4 million. During 2002, there were 23,434 notifications of eight bacterial diseases that may have been foodborne, which was a 7.7 per cent increase over the mean of the previous four years. There were 14,716 cases of campylobacteriosis, 7,917 cases of salmonellosis, 505 cases of shigellosis, 99 cases of yersiniosis, 64 cases of typhoid, 62 cases of listeriosis, 58 cases of shiga toxin producing E. coli and 13 cases of haemolytic uraemic syndrome. OzFoodNet sites reported 92 foodborne disease outbreaks affecting 1,819 persons, of whom 5.6 per cent (103/1,819) were hospitalised and two people died. There was a wide range of foods implicated in these outbreaks and the most common agent was Salmonella Typhimurium. Sites reported two outbreaks with potential for international spread involving contaminated tahini from Egypt resulting in an outbreak of Salmonella Montevideo infection and an outbreak of suspected norovirus infection associated with imported Japanese oysters. In addition, there were three outbreaks associated with animal petting zoos or poultry hatching programs and 318 outbreaks of suspected person-to-person transmission. Sites conducted 100 investigations into clusters of gastrointestinal illness where a source could not be identified, including three multi-state outbreaks of salmonellosis. OzFoodNet identified important risk factors for foodborne disease infection, including: Salmonella infections due to chicken and

  15. Para-clinico-pathological observations of insidious incidence of canine hepatozoonosis from a mongrel dog: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Paramjit; Deshmukh, S; Singh, Rajsukhbir; Bansal, B K; Randhawa, C S; Singla, L D

    2012-04-01

    A rare case of canine hepatozoonosis in a mongrel dog with para-clinico-pathological observations has been reported. The study included detailed haemato-biochemical changes at two stages, i.e. before treatment and after treatment with adopted therapy. Before therapy, blood picture revealed normocytic hypochromic anaemia and neutrophilic leucocytosis with variable counts of platelets. Thirty-seven percent of neutrophils were found infected with gametocytes of Hepatozoon canis. Following treatment, further decrease in haemoglobin value with a relative increase in lymphocyte count was seen. Biochemically, increase in alkaline phosphatase, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels along with hyperproteinemia was seen. The 14 days chemotherapy did not bring a respite for the dog and the level of parasitaemia was 33% after the treatment. The alkaline phosphatase and creatinine level further rose up following therapy with sulphadiazine and clindamycin. Continual study is required to explain the best possible therapeutic combination to deal H. canis.

  16. Intricate correlation between body posture, personality trait and incidence of body pain: a cross-referential study report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Guimond

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Occupational back pain is a disorder that commonly affects the working population, resulting in disability, health-care utilization, and a heavy socioeconomic burden. Although the etiology of occupational pain remains largely unsolved, anecdotal evidence exists for the contribution of personality and posture to long-term pain management, pointing to a direct contribution of the mind-body axis. In the current study, we have conducted an extensive evaluation into the relationships between posture and personality. METHOD: We have sampled a random population of 100 subjects (50 men and 50 women in the age range of 13-82 years based on their personality and biomechanical profiles. All subjects were French-Canadian, living in Canada between the Québec and Sorel-Tracy areas. The Biotonix analyses and report were used on the subjects being tested in order to distinguish postural deviations. Personality was determined by using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator questionnaire. RESULTS: We establish a correlation between ideal and kyphosis-lordosis postures and extraverted personalities. Conversely, our studies establish a correlative relationship between flat back and sway-back postures with introverted personalities. CONCLUSION: Overall, our studies establish a novel correlative relationship between personality, posture and pain.

  17. Concentrated bovine colostrum protein supplementation reduces the incidence of self-reported symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection in adult males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkworth, Grant D; Buckley, Jonathan D

    2003-08-01

    Anecdotal reports suggest that bovine colostrum may prevent upper respiratory tract infection (URTI). There is scant evidence to support such claims, although salivary IgA protects against URTI, and it was recently shown that bovine colostrum increases salivary IgA. The present invesigation examined whether concentrated bovine colostrum protein (CBC) affected the incidence or duration of self-reported symptoms of URTI in adult males. We examined logbooks containing self-reported symptoms of illness from previous studies which examined physiological effects of CBC. In these double-blind, placebo controlled studies, subjects had been randomly allocated to consume 60g. day(-1) of CBC (n = 93) or whey protein (WP) (n = 81) for eight weeks. Symptoms were coded using established criteria to identify those related to URTI. Since the incubation period for an URTI is up to five days, symptoms reported during the first week of supplementation (PRE-EXP) were analysed separately to preclude those arising from infection prior to study commencement. During PRE-EXP, there was no difference in the proportion of subjects taking the different supplements who reported symptoms of URTI (CBC, 11%,WP, 5%; 95% Confidence Interval (95% CI) -14% to 2%; P = 0.16). During the subsequent seven weeks (i. e. the experimental period), a significantly lesser proportion of subjects taking CBC reported symptoms of URTI compared with those taking WP (CBC, 32%,WP, 48%, P = 0.03; 95 % CI -30 % to -2 %), but symptom duration did not differ (CBC, 6.8 +/- 4.2 days,WP, 6.0 +/- 4.4 days; P = 0.27). This study provides preliminary evidence that CBC may enhance resistance to the development of symptoms of URTI.

  18. The association between incident self-reported fibromyalgia and nonpsychiatric factors: 25-years follow-up of the Adventist Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chan-Jin; Knutsen, Raymond; Oda, Keiji; Fraser, Gary E; Knutsen, Synnove Fonnebo

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the association between incident self-reported fibromyalgia (FM) and prior somatic diseases, lifestyle factors, and health behaviors among 3,136 women who participated in 2 cohort studies 25 to 26 years apart (the Adventist Health Study 1 and 2). The women completed a comprehensive lifestyle and medical history questionnaire at baseline in 1976. Information on new diagnosis of doctor-told FM was obtained at the second survey in 2002. A total of 136 women reported a diagnosis of FM during 25 years of follow-up, giving a period incidence of 43/1,000 or 1.72/1000 per year. In multivariable logistic regression analyses, a significant, dose-response association was found with number of allergies with OR of 1.61 (95% CI: .92-2.83) and 3.99 (95% CI: 2.31-6.88), (P[trend] < .0001), respectively, for 1 and 2 or more allergies versus none. A history of hyperemesis gravidarum was also associated with FM with OR of 1.32 (95% CI: .75-2.32) and 1.73 (95% CI: .99-3.03), (P[trend] < .05), respectively, for some or all pregnancies versus none. A positive association with smoking was also found with OR of 2.37 (95% CI: 1.33-4.23) for ever smokers versus never smokers. No significant association was found with number of surgeries, history of peptic ulcer, or taking medications to control various symptoms. Smoking as well as prevalent allergies, and a history of hyperemesis gravidarum, seem to predict development of FM in women during 25 years of follow-up. This information may help in identifying persons at high risk of developing FM and thus initiate effective prevention strategies. Copyright © 2010 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Determinants of Voluntary National Health Insurance Drop-Out in Eastern Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberholz, Chantal; Fakihammed, Wael Ahmed

    2017-04-01

    Low enrolment and high drop-out rates are common problems in voluntary health insurance schemes. Yet, most studies in this research area focus on community-based health insurance and enrolment, rather than drop-out. This study examines what causes informal sector families not to renew their voluntary National Health Insurance Fund (NHIF) health insurance membership in Eastern Sudan. Primary data from about 600 informal sector households that dropped out or remained insured, collected through a household survey conducted in March 2014, were used. Logistic regressions were employed to examine what determines drop-out of the voluntary NHIF scheme. The logistic regression results are consistent with the existing literature and confirm the importance of household head, household and community characteristics. Notably, worse family health status and higher health care utilization decrease the probability of drop-out, which requires further analysis as it may indicate the problem of adverse selection and insufficient risk management. Most importantly, the results consistently show that household heads who are satisfied with health services and those who understand the main features of the voluntary NHIF scheme are less likely to drop out. Also, 30 % of drop-out households hold a social support card and reported that the social support scheme is the main reason for not renewing their voluntary NHIF health insurance membership as they qualify for sponsored NHIF health insurance membership. This study shows that satisfaction with health services and knowledge of the health insurance scheme are important factors explaining drop-out of a national health insurance programme. The results suggest that education and information campaigns should be developed further to raise understanding of the NHIF voluntary scheme. In addition, information systems and coordination between the main agencies should be strengthened to reduce administrative costs and ensure policy coherence.

  20. The parallel programming of voluntary and reflexive saccades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Robin; McSorley, Eugene

    2006-06-01

    A novel two-step paradigm was used to investigate the parallel programming of consecutive, stimulus-elicited ('reflexive') and endogenous ('voluntary') saccades. The mean latency of voluntary saccades, made following the first reflexive saccades in two-step conditions, was significantly reduced compared to that of voluntary saccades made in the single-step control trials. The latency of the first reflexive saccades was modulated by the requirement to make a second saccade: first saccade latency increased when a second voluntary saccade was required in the opposite direction to the first saccade, and decreased when a second saccade was required in the same direction as the first reflexive saccade. A second experiment confirmed the basic effect and also showed that a second reflexive saccade may be programmed in parallel with a first voluntary saccade. The results support the view that voluntary and reflexive saccades can be programmed in parallel on a common motor map.

  1. Voluntary energy optimisation - Taking responsibility; Verantwortungsvoll

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baettig, I.

    2006-07-01

    This interview with Konrad Kyburz, CEO of a printing shop in Dielsdorf, Switzerland, discusses how energy consumption can be reduced on a voluntary basis. The provision free-of-charge of heat recovered from the drying ovens of the printing presses to a nearby sports facility is discussed. The realisation of an energy consumption analysis and the resulting increases in the efficiency of energy usage in the printing facility are discussed. Further improvements such as the use of variable-frequency compressor drives and heating with natural gas that helped in making energy savings of well over 15% are discussed.

  2. Voluntary participation and cooperation in a collective-good game.

    OpenAIRE

    Kene Boun My; Benoît Chalvignac

    2009-01-01

    We study the effect of voluntary participation in the context of a collective-good experiment. We investigate whether the freedom to participate in the game or not increases contribution levels and enhances their evolution. The analysis of two voluntary participation treatments supports a positive effect of an attractive exit option on both contribution levels and their sustainability. We conclude that the voluntary contribution mechanism can provide sustainable cooperation levels and that th...

  3. Current State of the Voluntary Renewable Energy Market (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, J.

    2013-09-01

    This presentation highlights the status of the voluntary green power market in 2012. The voluntary green power market totaled more than 48 million MWh in 2012, with about 1.9 million customers participating. The supply continues to be dominated by wind, though solar is increasing its share of utility green pricing programs. Prices for voluntary renewable energy certificates (RECs) increased to above $1/MWh.

  4. Voluntary agreements - a measure for energy-efficiency in industry? Lessons from a Swedish programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linden, Anna- Lisa [Department of Sociology, Lund University P.O. Box 114, SE-221 00, Lund, (Sweden); Carlsson-Kanyama, Annika [Environmental Strategies Research Group, P.O. Box 2142, SE-103 14, Stockholm, (Sweden)

    2002-08-01

    Voluntary agreements represent a policy instrument for applying new knowledge, routines or technology to specified issues. The traditional role of an authority when using information, and taking economic, or administrative measures is that of an initiator and controller. Voluntary agreements, on the other hand, represent a communication process between an authority and a partner where relations of dependency and mutuality are more important in advancing the programme. This article analyses and discusses the motivational aspects of voluntary agreements, the role of the contract, advising, information, education, time planning and the importance of reporting and evaluation in energy-efficiency programmes. Besides sociological and communication theories, the discussion is based on the outcome of an evaluation of a Swedish energy-efficiency programme. Among the conclusions are that communication processes have to be planned and implemented in time sequences and steps of measures, which was partially neglected in the Swedish programme. Also, agreements between partners have to be defined in ways valid for all partners. In the Swedish programme, quantitative goals, at least measured in kWh, were impossible to achieve for some industries. On the other hand, most industries reported progress in side effects of energy efficiency as for example transportation policy for products, recirculation of waste material, lighting policy and behaviour, qualifications for ISO labelling. Information in combination with voluntary agreements can be efficient for industrial energy conservation. The education and auditing that was part of the Swedish programme were highly appreciated and added to the achievements. (Author)

  5. Spike-coding mechanisms of cerebellar temporal processing in classical conditioning and voluntary movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Kenji; Sakurai, Yoshio

    2014-10-01

    Time is a fundamental and critical factor in daily life. Millisecond timing, which is the underlying temporal processing for speaking, dancing, and other activities, is reported to rely on the cerebellum. In this review, we discuss the cerebellar spike-coding mechanisms for temporal processing. Although the contribution of the cerebellum to both classical conditioning and voluntary movements is well known, the difference of the mechanisms for temporal processing between classical conditioning and voluntary movements is not clear. Therefore, we review the evidence of cerebellar temporal processing in studies of classical conditioning and voluntary movements and report the similarities and differences between them. From some studies, which used tasks that can change some of the temporal properties (e.g., the duration of interstimulus intervals) with keeping identical movements, we concluded that classical conditioning and voluntary movements may share a common spike-coding mechanism because simple spikes in Purkinje cells decrease at predicted times for responses regardless of the intervals between responses or stimulation.

  6. Altering spinal cord excitability enables voluntary movements after chronic complete paralysis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeli, Claudia A; Edgerton, V Reggie; Gerasimenko, Yury P; Harkema, Susan J

    2014-05-01

    Previously, we reported that one individual who had a motor complete, but sensory incomplete spinal cord injury regained voluntary movement after 7 months of epidural stimulation and stand training. We presumed that the residual sensory pathways were critical in this recovery. However, we now report in three more individuals voluntary movement occurred with epidural stimulation immediately after implant even in two who were diagnosed with a motor and sensory complete lesion. We demonstrate that neuromodulating the spinal circuitry with epidural stimulation, enables completely paralysed individuals to process conceptual, auditory and visual input to regain relatively fine voluntary control of paralysed muscles. We show that neuromodulation of the sub-threshold motor state of excitability of the lumbosacral spinal networks was the key to recovery of intentional movement in four of four individuals diagnosed as having complete paralysis of the legs. We have uncovered a fundamentally new intervention strategy that can dramatically affect recovery of voluntary movement in individuals with complete paralysis even years after injury.

  7. Voluntary self-touch increases body ownership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki eHara

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Experimental manipulations of body ownership have indicated that multisensory integration is central to forming bodily self-representation. Voluntary self-touch is a unique multisensory situation involving corresponding motor, tactile and proprioceptive signals. Yet, even though self-touch is frequent in everyday life, its contribution to the formation of body ownership is not well understood. Here we investigated the role of voluntary self-touch in body ownership using a novel adaptation of the rubber hand illusion (RHI, in which a robotic system and virtual reality allowed participants self-touch of real and virtual hands. In the first experiment, active and passive self-touch were applied in the absence of visual feedback. In the second experiment, we tested the role of visual feedback in this bodily illusion. Finally, in the third experiment, we compared active and passive self-touch to the classical RHI in which the touch is administered by the experimenter. We hypothesized that active self-touch would increase ownership over the virtual hand through the addition of motor signals strengthening the bodily illusion. The results indicated that active self-touch elicited stronger illusory ownership compared to passive self-touch and sensory only stimulation, and indicate an important role of active self-touch in the formation of bodily self.

  8. Incidence by occupation and industry of work-related skin diseases in the United Kingdom, 1996-2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, J C; Beck, M H; Chen, Y; Cherry, Nicola M

    2006-09-01

    Work-related skin disease is common but few cases are documented in statutory reports or disability systems. Voluntary reporting by specialist physicians provides more complete information. To summarize incidence rates of work-related skin diseases reported by consultant dermatologists and occupational physicians, with emphasis on contact and allergic dermatitis by occupation and industry. Cases reported in 1996-2001 to the EPIDERM and OPRA national surveillance schemes were analysed by causal agent, occupation and industry, with incidence rates calculated against appropriate denominators. Average annual incidence rates based on data from dermatologists were 97 per million overall, 74 for contact dermatitis and 14 for neoplasia. The corresponding rates for occupational physicians were 623 overall, 510 and 2, respectively. For infective disease, the rates for occupational physicians were 28 compared to 2 for dermatologists. Contact dermatitis was most frequently attributed to rubber chemicals, soaps and cleaners, wet work, nickel and acrylics; most cases of contact urticaria were attributed to rubber chemicals or foods and flour. The pattern of incidence rates by occupation and industry was complex, but correlated with the probable type of exposure. Rates of contact dermatitis were highest among skilled workers in the petrochemical and rubber and plastic manufacturing industries, with machine operators and technical workers in metal and automotive industries also at increased risk. High proportions of cases attributed to rubber chemicals were in nurses and technicians in the health and social services. These findings identify jobs and types of work where contact with causal agents is common and potentially preventable.

  9. The Regressivity of the Property Tax. The Incidence of the Property Tax Under Alternative Assumptions of Incidence in Four States--Connecticut, Minnesota, Missouri and South Dakota. Report No. F76-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odden, Allan; Vincent, Phillip E.

    This booklet summarizes the recent debate over the regressivity or progressivity of the property tax and presents some evidence on how the property tax burden is distributed among income classes. Section 1 discusses property tax incidence under both the conventional and new economic views. Discussed specifically are the conditions under which…

  10. Incidence, management, and reporting of severe and fatal Plasmodium falciparum malaria in secondary and tertiary health facilities of Alipurduar, India in 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Jagannath; Shah, Naman K; Murhekar, Manoj V

    2012-09-01

    The proportion of malaria cases that are complicated and fatal are not well described in India. Alipurduar sub-division of Jalpaiguri district in West Bengal is highly endemic for malaria. We constructed a retrospective cohort of severe malaria patients admitted in the secondary and tertiary care facilities in Alipurduar to determine the incidence, assess the management, and evaluate the reporting of severe and fatal malaria. We reviewed routine surveillance data and the case records of all the malaria patients admitted in all secondary and tertiary care facilities, both public and private. We defined severe malaria cases as Plasmodium falciparum infection with clinical signs and symptoms of organ involvement in a resident of Alipurduar admitted during January to December 2009. We compared clinical and demographic characteristics of severe malaria cases that died with those who survived. We also reviewed human resources and laboratory facilities available for the treatment of severe malaria in these health facilities. During 2009, 6191 cases of P. falciparum in Alipurduar were reported to the malaria surveillance system. We identified 336 (5.4%) cases of severe malaria among which 33 (9.8%) patients died. Four malaria deaths were also recorded from primary health centres. Only 17 of the 37 (46%) total deaths recorded were reported to the routine surveillance system. Most severe cases were males (65%), aged >15 years (72%), and nearly half were admitted to secondary care hospitals (48%). In multivariate analysis, the risk factors associated with death included increased delay fever onset and hospitalization, treatment in a secondary level hospital, younger age, and multi-organ involvement. The secondary level public hospital had too few physicians and nurses for supporting severe malaria patients as well as inadequate laboratory facilities for monitoring such patients. Severe and fatal malaria continue to burden Alipurduar and record keeping in health facilities was

  11. Police Incident Blotter (30 Day)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The 30 Day Police Blotter contains the most recent initial crime incident data, updated on a nightly basis. All data is reported at the block/intersection level,...

  12. Voluntary exercise at the expense of reproductive success in Djungarian hamsters ( Phodopus sungorus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, Ines; Scherbarth, Frank; Steinlechner, Stephan

    2010-09-01

    Energy demands of gestation and lactation represent a severe challenge for small mammals. Therefore, additional energetic burdens may compromise successful breeding. In small rodents, food restriction, cold exposure (also in combination) and wheel running to obtain food have been shown to diminish reproductive outcome. Although exhibited responses such as lower incidence of pregnancy, extended lactation periods and maternal infanticide were species dependent, their common function is to adjust energetic costs to the metabolic state reflecting the trade-off between maternal investment and self-maintenance. In the present study, we sought to examine whether voluntary exercise affects reproduction in Djungarian hamsters ( Phodopus sungorus), which are known for their high motivation to run in a wheel. Voluntary exercise resulted in two different effects on reproduction; in addition to increased infanticide and cannibalism, which was evident across all experiments, the results of one experiment provided evidence that free access to a running wheel may prevent successful pregnancy. It seems likely that the impact of voluntary wheel running on reproduction was associated with a reduction of internal energy resources evoked by extensive exercise. Since the hamsters were neither food-restricted nor forced to run in the present study, an energetic deficit as reason for infanticide in exercising dams would emphasise the particularly high motivation to run in a wheel.

  13. USFA NFIRS 2013 Fire Incident & Cause Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The 2013 Fire Causes & Incident data was provided by the U.S. Fire Administration’s (USFA) National Fire Data Center’s (NFDC’s) National Fire Incident Reporting...

  14. US Voluntary Observing Ship (VOS) - International Maritime Meteorological Tape (IMMT) data from SEAS version 9.1 E-Logbook Software

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The US Voluntary Observing Ships (VOS) report surface marine observations in both real-time (FM-13 ship format) and delayed-mode (International Maritime...

  15. US Voluntary Observing Ship (VOS) - International Maritime Meteorological Tape (IMMT) data from TurboWin version 5.0 E-Logbook Software

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The US Voluntary Observing Ships (VOS) report surface marine observations in both real-time (FM-13 ship format) and delayed-mode (International Maritime...

  16. Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program - Part IV: Onsite review handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    Onsite Review Handbook contains criteria to be used in evaluating the management systems required for initial or continued participation in the Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP), verifying and calculating rates of injury experience, the Onsite Review report format, and sample questions to be used during onsite interviews. This document should be used in conjunction with the first three DOE-VPP manuals (Part I: Program Elements, Part II: Procedures Manual, and Part III: Application Guidelines). This document is intended to assist Onsite Review team members and DOE contractors in evaluating safety and health programs, and to serve as guidance for DOE-VPP participants in performing their required annual evaluation. Requests for additional information or any questions may be addressed to a DOE-VPP Coordinator in the Office of Occupational Safety and Health Policy. The term contractor used throughout this document refers to an applicant to, or a participant in, the DOE-VPP. The term subcontractor refers to any organization that is contracted by the applicant or participant to do work at the site under review. The DOE-VPP Onsite Review Criteria contained in Appendix A provide guidance for evaluating a site`s implementation of the program requirements given in Part I: Program Elements. The program requirements are in bold italicized type, followed by guidance for ensuring implementation. Part I should be consulted for a complete description of the program requirements. These criteria should be used by team members whenever possible, but are not intended to be all inclusive. Determination of adequate implementation of the DOE-VPP requirements is at the team members` discretion. Guidance for calculating recordable injury and lost workday incidence rates is contained in Appendix B. The OSHA injury/illness records review and the associated calculations should be performed by Onsite Review Team members during the pre-onsite planning visit.

  17. A Survey of Institutional Practices and an Assessment of Possible Options Relating to Voluntary Mid- and Late-Career Changes and Early Retirement for University and College Faculty. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Carl Vernon; And Others

    The project reported here studied increased-benefit early retirement programs and mid-career change programs in academic institutions, business, industry, and government. The search and analysis had two objectives: (1) to assemble information useful to colleges and universities; and (2) to assemble information helpful to individual academics. The…

  18. Reflex changes in muscle spindle discharge during a voluntary contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniss, A M; Gandevia, S C; Burke, D

    1988-03-01

    1. This study was undertaken to determine whether low-threshold cutaneous and muscle afferents from mechanoreceptors in the foot reflexly affect fusimotor neurons innervating the plantar and dorsiflexors of the ankle during voluntary contractions. 2. Recordings were made from 29 identified muscle spindle afferents innervating triceps surae and the pretibial flexors. Trains of electrical stimuli (5 stimuli, 300 impulses per second) were delivered to the sural nerve at the ankle (intensity: 2-4 times sensory threshold) and to the posterior tibial nerve at the ankle (intensity: 1.5-3 times motor threshold for the small muscles of the foot). The stimuli were delivered while the subject maintained an isometric voluntary contraction of the receptor-bearing muscle, sufficient to accelerate the discharge of each spindle ending. This ensured that the fusimotor neurons directed to the ending were active and influencing the spindle discharge. The effects of these stimuli on muscle spindle discharge were assessed using raster displays, frequencygrams, poststimulus time histograms (PSTHs) and cumulative sums ("CUSUMs") of the PSTHs. Reflex effects onto alpha-motoneurons were determined from poststimulus changes in the averaged rectified electromyogram (EMG). Reflex effects of these stimuli onto single-motor units were assessed in separate experiments using PSTHs and CUSUMs. 3. Electrical stimulation of the sural or posterior tibial nerves at nonnoxious levels had no significant effect on the discharge of the 14 spindle endings in the pretibial flexor muscles. The electrical stimuli also produced no significant change in discharge of 11 of 15 spindle endings in triceps surae. With the remaining four endings in triceps surae, the overall change in discharge appeared to be an increase for two endings (at latencies of 60 and 68 ms) and a decrease for two endings (at latencies of 110 and 150 ms). The difference in the incidence of the responses of spindle endings in tibialis

  19. The incidence of transient neurologic syndrome after spinal anesthesia with lidocaine or bupivacaine: The effects of needle type and surgical position: brief report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etezadi F

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available "nBurning Transient Neurologic Syndrome (TNS which was first described by Schneider et al in 1993, is defined as a transient pain and dysesthesia in waist, buttocks and the lower limbs after spinal anesthesia.1,2 The incidence of TNS after spinal anesthesia with lidocaine is reported to be as high as 10-40%.3,4 This prospective study was designed to determine the incidence of TNS with two different types of drugs, lidocaine and bupivacaine, in lithotomy or supine positions as the primary outcomes and to determine the association between two different types of needles and surgical positions with the occurrence of TNS as the secondary outcome."nThe present study was conducted on 250 patients (ASA I-II, aged 18-60 years old, who were candidates for surgery in supine or lithotomy positions. According to the needle type (Sprotte or Quincke and the local anesthetic (lidocaine or bupivacaine all patients were randomly divided into four groups. After establishing standard monitoring, spinal anesthesia was performed in all sitting patients by attending anesthesiologists at L2-L3 or L3-L4 levels. The patients were placed in supine or lithotomy position, in regards to the surgical procedure. During the first three postoperative days, patients were observed for post spinal anesthesia complications, especially TNS. Any sensation of pain, dysesthesia, paresthesia or hyperalgesia in the low back area, buttocks, the anterior or posterior thigh, knees, either foot or both feet were recorded. Moreover, duration of pain, its radiation and its relation to sleep and the patients' position were all carefully considered. Ultimately, the patients' response to opioid (pethidine for analgesia was determined."nThe incidence of TNS was higher when spinal anesthesia was induced with lidocaine (68% vs. 22%, P=0.003. TNS developed in 85% of the patients in lidocaine group and 58% in bupivacaine group after surgery in lithotomy position (P=0.002. In 77 patients pain

  20. Association between firm characteristics and corporate voluntary disclosure: Evidence from Turkish listed companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Uyar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper empirically investigates the factors that impact voluntary information disclosure level of Turkish manufacturing companies listed in the Istanbul Stock Exchange (ISE. Design/methodology/approach: The methodology of the study is content analysis of annual reports of the corporations listed on the ISE for the year 2010. Findings: The findings provide evidence of a positive association between voluntary information disclosure level and the variables such as firm size, auditing firm size, proportion of independent directors on the board, institutional/corporate ownership, and corporate governance. However, leverage and ownership diffusion were found to have negative significant association with the extent of voluntary disclosure. The remaining variables, namely, profitability, listing age, and board size were found to be insignificant. Research limitations/implications: Since this study was conducted solely on listed manufacturing companies, the results may not be generalizable to non-listed and non-manufacturing industries. The study has some implications for firms, auditors, investors, and regulators. All these parties play an important role in improving the transparency and disclosure practices of corporations. Originality/value: We extend previous research on the determinants of voluntary information disclosure in the emerging market context.

  1. 5 CFR 831.405 - Interest on voluntary contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....405 Section 831.405 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE... contributions stop earning interest on the earliest of— (1) The date when OPM authorizes payment to the... voluntary contributions to purchase additional annuity, voluntary contributions stop earning interest on...

  2. Efficiency of voluntary closing hand and hook prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, G.; Plettenburg, D.H.

    2010-01-01

    The Delft Institute of Prosthetics and Orthotics has started a research program to develop an improved voluntary closing, body-powered hand prosthesis. Five commercially available voluntary closing terminal devices were mechanically tested: three hands [Hosmer APRL VC hand, Hosmer Soft VC Male hand,

  3. Voluntary and involuntary adaptation of gait in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, W; Rutgers, AWF; Van Weerden, TW

    1998-01-01

    Voluntary and involuntary adaptation of gait in Parkinson's disease (PD) were studied in two separate experiments. In the first experiment, effects of changes in voluntary control were studied by asking PD patients and age-matched healthy subjects to adapt their walking pattern to visual cues result

  4. Re-Examining the Relationship between Age and Voluntary Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Thomas W. H.; Feldman, Daniel C.

    2009-01-01

    In their quantitative review of the literature, Healy, Lehman, and McDaniel [Healy, M. C., Lehman, M., & McDaniel, M. A. (1995). Age and voluntary turnover: A quantitative review. "Personnel Psychology, 48", 335-345] concluded that age is only weakly related to voluntary turnover (average r = -0.08). However, with the significant changes in…

  5. Conditioning Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops Truncatus Gilli) for Voluntary Diving Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-31

    heartrate (EKG) to validate "voluntary" nature of dive EXAMINE ACTIVE DIVING CONDITIONS (open Ocean Mewwmenr) dive profiles using TDR respiration... heartrate electrodes Open Ocean Experiments ’wear instrument package (TDR) perform voluntary dive up to 200 meters readily present tail flukes for

  6. Students' vocational choices and voluntary action: A 12-nation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Haski-Leventhal (Debbie); R.A. Cnaan (Ram); F. Handy (Femida); J.L. Brudney (Jeffrey); K. Holmes (Kirsten); L. Hustinx (Lesley); C. Kang (Chulhee); M. Kassam (Meenaz); L.C.P.M. Meijs (Lucas); B. Ranade (Bhagyashree); N. Yamauchi (Naoto); A.B. Yeung (Anne Birgitta); S. Zrinscak (Sinisa)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractPrevious research on student involvement suggested that business and engineering students manifest lowest rates of voluntary action. Similarly, it was thought that social science students are the most involved in voluntary action, with students of natural sciences and humanities in the m

  7. Integrating Voluntary Simplicity of Lifestyle into Home Economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestle, Ruth E.

    This curriculum guide presents guidelines for teaching concepts of Voluntary Simplicity in home economics in Florida. (Voluntary Simplicity is a lifestyle in which individuals choose to live more simply, considering the limited nature of the world's resources.) It is designed for use as a separate unit within different subject matter areas or as…

  8. 5 CFR 831.406 - Withdrawal of voluntary contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... precedence set forth in section 8342(c) of title 5, United States Code, is entitled to payment of the balance... contributions. (a) Before receiving additional annuity payments based on the voluntary contributions, a person who has made voluntary contributions may withdraw the balance while still an employee or Member,...

  9. 78 FR 54444 - Advisory Committee on Voluntary Foreign Aid Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-04

    ...; ] AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Advisory Committee on Voluntary Foreign Aid Meeting AGENCY: United... Aid (ACVFA). Date: Wednesday, September 18, 2013. Time: 2:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Location: Horizon Room..., Executive Director, Advisory Committee on Voluntary Foreign Aid (ACVFA), U.S. Agency for...

  10. 27 CFR 25.221 - Voluntary destruction of beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... beer. 25.221 Section 25.221 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Voluntary Destruction § 25.221 Voluntary destruction of beer. (a) On brewery premises. (1) A brewer may destroy, at the brewery, beer on which the tax has...

  11. Voluntary chemical castration of a mental patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahams, D

    1988-06-01

    Britain's High Court recently overruled two decisions of the Mental Health Act Commission that denied certification of a voluntary experimental drug treatment to a mental patient, holding that the standard for informed consent is determined not by the subjective judgment of the commissioners but by whether the patient knows the nature and likely effects of treatment and that its use in his case is a novel one. The background facts of the case involving a 27-year-old pedophile receiving goserelin implantations to reduce testosterone levels are presented and the issues of jurisdiction under the Mental Health Act 1983 and the commissioners' duty to act fairly and to consider the likely benefits of treatment are discussed.

  12. Comparing electronic news media reports of potential bioterrorism-related incidents involving unknown white powder to reports received by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Federal Bureau of Investigation: U.S.A., 2009-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, Geroncio C; Posid, Joseph; Papagiotas, Stephen; Lowe, Luis

    2015-01-01

    There have been periodic electronic news media reports of potential bioterrorism-related incidents involving unknown substances (often referred to as "white powder") since the 2001 intentional dissemination of Bacillus anthracis through the U.S. Postal System. This study reviewed the number of unknown "white powder" incidents reported online by the electronic news media and compared them with unknown "white powder" incidents reported to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) during a 2-year period from June 1, 2009 and May 31, 2011. Results identified 297 electronic news media reports, 538 CDC reports, and 384 FBI reports of unknown "white powder." This study showed different unknown "white powder" incidents captured by each of the three sources. However, the authors could not determine the public health implications of this discordance.

  13. Lateral asymmetry of voluntary attention orienting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.A. Castro-Barros

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We recently demonstrated that automatic attention favors the right side of space and, in the present study, we investigated whether voluntary attention also favors this side. Six reaction time experiments were conducted. In each experiment, 12 new 18-25-year-old male right-handed individuals were tested. In Experiments 1, 2, 3 (a, b and 4 (a, b, tasks with increasing attentional demands were used. In Experiments 1, 2, 3a, and 4a, attention was oriented to one or both sides by means of a central spatially informative visual cue. A left or right side visual target appeared 100, 300, or 500 ms later. Attentional effects were observed in the four experiments. In Experiments 2, 3a and 4a, these effects were greater when the cue indicated the right side than when it indicated the left side (respectively: 16 ± 10 and 44 ± 6 ms, P = 0.015, for stimulus onset asynchrony of 500 ms in Experiment 2; 38 ± 10 and 70 ± 7 ms, P = 0.011, for Experiment 3a, and 23 ± 11 and 61 ± 10 ms, P = 0.009, for Experiment 4a. In Experiments 3b and 4b, the central cue pointed to both sides and was said to be non-relevant for task performance. In these experiments right and left reaction times did not differ. The most conservative interpretation of the present findings is that voluntary attention orienting favors the right side of space, particularly when a difficult task has to be performed.

  14. 代理成本与内部控制自我评价报告的自愿披露——基于2010年沪市A股上市公司数据%The Correlation Study on Agency Cost and the Voluntary Disclosure of Self-assessment Report on Internal Control: Based on the Data of Listed Companies in Shanghai Stock Exchange in 2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜海霞

    2012-01-01

    Based on the data from listed companies of Shanghai Stock Exchanges in 2010, this study analyses the relationship between agency cost and the voluntary disclosure of self-assessment reports. The results show that the voluntary disclosure is negatively correlated with administrative expenses ratio and significantly positively correlated with total asset turnover ratio. It is also significantly positively correlated with the size and significantly negatively correlated with LEV and the listed years. Thus, it is necessary to demand companies to disclose self-assessment reports on internal control.%使用2010年沪市A股公司数据,对代理成本与内部控制自我评价报告自愿披露的关系进行实证分析,结果表明内部控制自我评价报告的自愿披露水平与管理费用率负相关,与总资产周转率显著正相关。此外,公司的规模显著正向影响自愿披露水平,资产负债率与公司上市年限显著负向影响自愿披露水平。因此,监管部门有必要强制要求上市公司披露内部控制自我评价报告。

  15. Reporting of unintended events in an intensive care unit: comparison between staff and observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verri Marco

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to identify relevant targets for change, it is essential to know the reliability of incident staff reporting. The aim of this study is to compare the incidence and type of unintended events (UE reported by facilitated Intensive Care Unit (ICU staff with those recorded concurrently by an observer. Methods The study is a prospective data collection performed in two 4-bed multidisciplinary ICUs of a teaching hospital. The format of the UE reporting system was voluntary, facilitated and not necessarily anonymous, and used a structured form with a predetermined list of items. UEs were reported by ICU staff over a period of 4 weeks. The reporting incidence during the first fourteen days was compared with that during the second fourteen. During morning shifts in the second fourteen days, one observer in each ICU recorded any UE seen. The staff was not aware of the observers' study. The incidence of UEs reported by staff was compared with that recorded by the observers. Results The staff reported 36 UEs in the first fourteen days and 31 in the second.. The incidence of UE detection during morning shifts was significantly higher than during afternoon or night shifts (p Conclusion UE incidence is strongly underreported by staff in comparison with observers. Also the types of UEs reported are different. Invaluable information about incidents in ICU can be obtained in a few days by observer monitoring.

  16. Exposure incidents among medical students in a high-prevalence HIV setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossouw, Theresa Marié; Van Rooyen, Marietjie; Richter, Karin Louise

    2017-01-30

    Occupational injuries in medical students are concerning, especially in countries with a high prevalence of bloodborne infections. With more HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral treatment, appropriate post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) depends on knowledge of source patients' infection status and treatment response. This study determined the number and type of exposure incidents, reporting practices, and PEP use among medical students at the University of Pretoria, South Africa. Data were collected from an anonymous voluntary questionnaire completed by medical students from years 1 to 6 of study as well as from incident records archived at the Department of Family Medicine. Data were described and tests of association performed in Stata 11. Thirteen percent of students overall and 21% of senior students reported an incident in the preceding year. The majority of incidents occurred during phlebotomy, with fatigue and work pressure found to be major contributing factors. Underreporting was common and many students displayed a lack of risk awareness and a preference for managing the incident privately. Although 59% knew the HIV-status of the source patient, less than a third knew the viral load and only 16.9% the regimen. Side-effects on antiretroviral treatment used for PEP were common and only about three-quarters of the students completed the course. We recommend targeted training, especially in the senior years, together with improving the work environment through attention to working hours, sharps disposal and ready availability of safety devices, improved reporting systems, individualised PEP, and possibly the implementation of an occupational injury support line.

  17. Priming voluntary autobiographical memories: Implications for the organisation of autobiographical memory and voluntary recall processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, John H; Clevinger, Amanda M

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to show that voluntary autobiographical memories could be primed by the prior activation of autobiographical memories. Three experiments demonstrated voluntary memory priming with three different approaches. In Experiment 1 primed participants were asked to recall memories from their elementary school years. In a subsequent memory task primed participants were asked to recall memories from any time period, and they produced significantly more memories from their elementary school years than unprimed participants. In Experiment 2 primed participants were asked to recall what they were doing when they had heard various news events occurring between 1998 and 2005. Subsequently these participants produced significantly more memories from this time period than unprimed participants. In Experiment 3 primed participants were asked to recall memories from their teenage years. Subsequently these participants were able to recall more memories from ages 13-15 than unprimed participants, where both had only 1 second to produce a memory. We argue that the results support the notion that episodic memories can activate one another and that some of them are organised according to lifetime periods. We further argue that the results have implications for the reminiscence bump and voluntary recall of the past.

  18. SeaWIFS Postlaunch Technical Report Series. Volume 13; The SeaWiFS Photometer Revision for Incident Surface Measurement (SeaPRISM) Field Commissioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Zibordi, Giuseppe; Berthon, Jean-Francois; Bailey, Sean W.; Pietras, Christophe M.; Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    This report documents the scientific activities that took place at the Acqua Alta Oceanographic Tower (AAOT) in the northern Adriatic Sea off the coast of Italy from 2-6 August 1999. The ultimate objective of the field campaign was to evaluate the capabilities of a new instrument called the SeaWiFS Photometer Revision for Incident Surface Measurements (SeaPRISM). SeaPRISM is based on a CE-318 sun photometer made by CIMEL Electronique (Paris, France). The CE-318 is an automated, robotic system which measures the direct sun irradiance plus the sky radiance in the sun plane and in the almucantar plane. The data are transmitted over a satellite link, and this remote operation capability has made the device very useful for atmospheric measurements. The revision to the CE-318 that makes the instrument potentially useful for SeaWiFS calibration and validation activities is to include a capability for measuring the radiance leaving the sea surface in wavelengths suitable for the determination of chlorophyll a concentration. The initial evaluation of this new capability involved above- and in-water measurement protocols. An intercomparison of the water-leaving radiances derived from SeaPRISM and an in-water system showed the overall spectral agreement was approximately 8.6%, but the blue-green channels intercompared at the 5% level. A blue-green band ratio comparison was at the 4% level.

  19. Association between isotretinoin use and central retinal vein occlusion in an adolescent with minor predisposition for thrombotic incidents: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labiris Georgios

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We report an adolescent boy with minimal pre-existing risk for thromboses who suffered central retinal vein occlusion associated with isotretinoin use for acne. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first well documented case of this association. Case presentation An otherwise healthy 17-year-old white man who was treated with systemic isotretinoin for recalcitrant acne was referred with central retinal vein occlusion in one eye. Although a detailed investigation was negative, DNA testing revealed that the patient was a heterozygous carrier of the G20210A mutation of the prothrombin gene. Despite the fact that this particular mutation is thought to represent only a minor risk factor for thromboses, it is probable that isotretinoin treatment greatly increased the risk of a vaso-occlusive incident in this patient. Conclusion Isotretinoin use may be associated with sight- and life-threatening thrombotic adverse effects even in young patients with otherwise minimal thrombophilic risk. Physicians should be aware of such potential dangers.

  20. Land Use and Land Cover - MO 2008 Brownfields Voluntary Cleanup Program Sites (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — The Brownfields/Voluntary Cleanup Program (BVCP) provides property buyers, sellers, developers, bankers, development agencies, local government and other voluntary...

  1. Cardiovascular responses to voluntary and nonvoluntary static exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, D B; Peel, C; Mitchell, J H

    1992-11-01

    We have measured the cardiovascular responses during voluntary and nonvoluntary (electrically induced) one-leg static exercise in humans. Eight normal subjects were studied at rest and during 5 min of static leg extension at 20% of maximal voluntary contraction performed voluntarily and nonvoluntarily in random order. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and cardiac output (CO) were determined, and peripheral vascular resistance (PVR) and stroke volume (SV) were calculated. HR increased from approximately 65 +/- 3 beats/min at rest to 80 +/- 4 and 78 +/- 6 beats/min (P voluntary and nonvoluntary contractions, respectively. CO increased from 5.1 +/- 0.7 to 6.0 +/- 0.8 and 6.2 +/- 0.8 l/min (P voluntary and nonvoluntary contractions, respectively. PVR and SV did not change significantly during voluntary or nonvoluntary contractions. Thus the cardiovascular responses were not different between voluntary and electrically induced contractions. These results suggest that the increases in CO, HR, SV, MAP, and PVR during 5 min of static contractions can be elicited without any contribution from a central neural mechanism (central command). However, central command could still have an important role during voluntary static exercise.

  2. Prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen & its subtypes in high risk group subjects & voluntary blood donors in Bombay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elavia, A J; Banker, D D

    1991-09-01

    HBsAg positive subjects belonging to high risk groups and voluntary blood donors were analysed for prevalence of HBsAg among various groups of subjects for ascertaining the carrier status among the voluntary blood donors, HBsAg subtype distribution, and association of HBsAg with blood groups and caste or religion. The prevalence of HBsAg varied from 2.02 per cent in voluntary blood donors to 58.38 per cent in patients of acute viral hepatitis. 70.5 per cent subjects had subtype 'ay' while 23.9 per cent of the subjects had subtype 'ad'. We also found compound 'ady' subtype in 5.6 per cent of our subjects. HBsAg/adr, a subtype not usually prevalent in India, was found in 30 of the 90 'ad' sera. Co-occurrence of HBsAg and anti-HBs was noted in 9 subjects. Homotypic anti-HBs was found to occur together mainly in voluntary blood donors, while heterotypic anti-HBs was found to occur together mainly multi-transfused patients. There was no significant correlation between HBsAg and blood group antigens and a relatively higher incidence of HBsAg among the Jain community was observed.

  3. Non-voluntary and involuntary euthanasia in The Netherlands: Dutch perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Almagor, Raphael

    2003-01-01

    During the summer of 1999, twenty-eight interviews with some of the leading authorities on euthanasia policy were conducted in the Netherlands. They were asked about cases of non-voluntary (when patients are incompetent) and involuntary euthanasia (when patients are competent and made no request to die). This study reports the main findings, showing that most respondents are quite complacent with regard to breaches of the guideline that require the patient's consent as a prerequisite to performance of euthanasia.

  4. Voluntary Noise Mapping for Smart City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poslončec-Petrić, V.; Vuković, V.; Frangeš, S.; Bačić, Ž.

    2016-09-01

    One of the main concept objectives of smart cities is to create a quality living environment that is long-term sustainable and economically justified. In that context, modern cities are aware of the exposure to various forms of physical and non-physical pollution that needs to be remediated, eliminated or reduced. To achieve that it is necessary to quality determine the sources and reasons of each pollution. The most prominent examples of physical pollution that affects the quality of life of citizens in cities are light and noise pollution. Noise pollution or noise, is mostly the consequence of road and rail traffic in cities and it directly affects the health of citizens. Traffic control, reduction of peak congestion, dispersion and traffic redirection or building protective barriers, are ways that cities use to reduce the amount of noise or its effects. To make these measures efficient it is necessary to obtain the information related to the level of noise in certain areas, streets, cities. To achieve this, smart cities use noise mapping. The city of Zagreb since 2012, participates in the i-SCOPE project (interoperable Smart City services trough Open Platform for urban Ecosystems). i-SCOPE delivers an open platform on top of which it develops, three "smart city" services: optimization of energy consumption through a service for accurate assessment of solar energy potential and energy loss at building level, environmental monitoring through a real-time environmental noise mapping service leveraging citizen's involvement will who act as distributed sensors city-wide measuring noise levels through an application on their mobile phones and improved inclusion and personal mobility of aging and diversely able citizens through an accurate personal routing service. The students of Faculty of Geodesy University of Zagreb, who enrolled in the course Thematic Cartography, were actively involved in the voluntary data acquisition in order to monitor the noise in real time

  5. VOLUNTARY NOISE MAPPING FOR SMART CITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Poslončec-Petrić

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the main concept objectives of smart cities is to create a quality living environment that is long-term sustainable and economically justified. In that context, modern cities are aware of the exposure to various forms of physical and non-physical pollution that needs to be remediated, eliminated or reduced. To achieve that it is necessary to quality determine the sources and reasons of each pollution. The most prominent examples of physical pollution that affects the quality of life of citizens in cities are light and noise pollution. Noise pollution or noise, is mostly the consequence of road and rail traffic in cities and it directly affects the health of citizens. Traffic control, reduction of peak congestion, dispersion and traffic redirection or building protective barriers, are ways that cities use to reduce the amount of noise or its effects. To make these measures efficient it is necessary to obtain the information related to the level of noise in certain areas, streets, cities. To achieve this, smart cities use noise mapping. The city of Zagreb since 2012, participates in the i-SCOPE project (interoperable Smart City services trough Open Platform for urban Ecosystems. i-SCOPE delivers an open platform on top of which it develops, three "smart city" services: optimization of energy consumption through a service for accurate assessment of solar energy potential and energy loss at building level, environmental monitoring through a real-time environmental noise mapping service leveraging citizen's involvement will who act as distributed sensors city-wide measuring noise levels through an application on their mobile phones and improved inclusion and personal mobility of aging and diversely able citizens through an accurate personal routing service. The students of Faculty of Geodesy University of Zagreb, who enrolled in the course Thematic Cartography, were actively involved in the voluntary data acquisition in order to monitor the

  6. Interaction of Compliance and Voluntary Renewable Energy Markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, L.; Lokey, E.

    2007-10-01

    In recent years, both compliance and voluntary markets have emerged to help support the development of renewable energy resources. Both of these markets are growing rapidly and today about half of U.S. states have RPS policies in place, with a number of these policies adopted in the last several years. In addition, many states have recently increased the stringency of their RPS policies. This paper examines key market interaction issues between compliance and voluntary renewable energy markets. It provides an overview of both the compliance and voluntary markets, addressing each market's history, purpose, size, scope, and benefits while addressing issues, including double counting.

  7. Interaction of Compliance and Voluntary Renewable Energy Markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, Lori [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lokey, Elizabeth [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2007-10-01

    In recent years, both compliance and voluntary markets have emerged to help support the development of renewable energy resources. Both of these markets are growing rapidly and today about half of U.S. states have RPS policies in place, with a number of these policies adopted in the last several years. In addition, many states have recently increased the stringency of their RPS policies. This paper examines key market interaction issues between compliance and voluntary renewable energy markets. It provides an overview of both the compliance and voluntary markets, addressing each market's history, purpose, size, scope, and benefits while addressing issues, including double counting.

  8. Ecological Research of the Voluntary Disclosure about Listed Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jing-Jing; Yan, Guang-Le

    In the paper, the research subject is the ecological relationship between the Small and Medium-sized Enterprises(SMEs) and the Large-scale Enterprises(Les). From the perspective of ecology, setting up the competitive model basic on the Logistic model, and carrying out further analysis about the voluntary information disclosure of listed company, then getting the strategic choice about the voluntary information disclosure and the ecological explanation of false information, and the dynamic mechanism and strategy of the voluntary information disclosure of listed company.

  9. Cyber Incidents Involving Control Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert J. Turk

    2005-10-01

    The Analysis Function of the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has prepared this report to document cyber security incidents for use by the CSSC. The description and analysis of incidents reported herein support three CSSC tasks: establishing a business case; increasing security awareness and private and corporate participation related to enhanced cyber security of control systems; and providing informational material to support model development and prioritize activities for CSSC. The stated mission of CSSC is to reduce vulnerability of critical infrastructure to cyber attack on control systems. As stated in the Incident Management Tool Requirements (August 2005) ''Vulnerability reduction is promoted by risk analysis that tracks actual risk, emphasizes high risk, determines risk reduction as a function of countermeasures, tracks increase of risk due to external influence, and measures success of the vulnerability reduction program''. Process control and Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems, with their reliance on proprietary networks and hardware, have long been considered immune to the network attacks that have wreaked so much havoc on corporate information systems. New research indicates this confidence is misplaced--the move to open standards such as Ethernet, Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol, and Web technologies is allowing hackers to take advantage of the control industry's unawareness. Much of the available information about cyber incidents represents a characterization as opposed to an analysis of events. The lack of good analyses reflects an overall weakness in reporting requirements as well as the fact that to date there have been very few serious cyber attacks on control systems. Most companies prefer not to share cyber attack incident data because of potential financial repercussions. Uniform reporting requirements will do much to make this

  10. Corporate volunteering - motivation for voluntary work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Azevedo

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, when the welfare state is a responsibility of the entire society, organizations in the private sector assume co-responsibility for social issues. They are also pressured by the challenges presented by technological advances and the globalization , involving new parameters and requirements for quality. In this context, the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility (RSC emerges as an option for solutions to the issues related to the company and the whole community. Among the actions of the RSC is the Corporate Volunteering-program, which aims to promote / encourage employes to do voluntary work. A central issue when talking about volunteering is the withdrawal of these (SILVA and FEITOSA, 2002; TEODÓSIO, 1999 and, in accordance with the Community Solidarity (1997, one of the possible causes for the withdrawal is the lack of clarity as to the motives and expectations that lead the person to volunteer themselves. This study uses qualitative research and triangulation of feedback from volunteers, coordinators of volunteers and social organizations, to present a framework from which it is possible to analyze the various motivations for the volunteer work. Key words: Corporate Volunteering program. Volunteering. Corporate social responsibility.

  11. Expectations and voluntary attrition in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Hugh

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a series of findings generated during a larger study which aimed to develop a theoretical understanding of the reasons why nursing students voluntarily leave pre-registration nursing programmes. In this study, significant incongruence was found to exist between student expectations of pre-registration nursing programmes and the reality of these programmes following entry. The resulting dissonance was identified as an important factor in student decisions to voluntarily withdraw. A single case study design was selected to explore the causes of voluntary attrition in nursing students within a School of Nursing and Midwifery. The study population was obtained through purposeful sampling and consisted of 15 students who had previously voluntarily withdrawn from pre-registration nursing programmes. A semi-structured interview method was used to collect data from study participants. The interview schedule developed for use in the study reflected the key components of the conceptual model of higher education (HE) student attrition (Tinto, 1975, 1987, 1993). All interviews were tape recorded to facilitate later transcription. The Cyclical or Interactive Model of Qualitative Research (Miles and Huberman, 1994) was used to analyse data collected from study participants. This paper describes the unrealistic range of expectations which nursing students have of nursing, the information sources and experiences which inform student expectations and how ambiguous expectations contributed to voluntarily attrition.

  12. Voluntary work organization in higher educational establishment: theory and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Polatayko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses basic questions of voluntary work formation in higher educational establishment, its conceptual and legislative basis, defines basic directions of students agencies activities and forms of their participation in higher educational establishment activities.

  13. Respiratory inductance plethysmography is suitable for voluntary hyperventilation test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Pascale; Besleaga, Tudor; Eberhard, André; Vovc, Victor; Baconnier, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the goodness of fit of a signal issued of the respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) derivative to the airflow signal during rest, voluntary hyperventilation, and recovery. RIP derivative signal was filtered with an adjusted filter based on each subject airflow signal (pneumotachography). For each subject and for each condition (rest, voluntary hyperventilation, and recovery) comparisons were performed between the airflow signal and the RIP derivative signal filtered with an adjusted filter obtained either on rest signal or on the studied part of the signals (voluntary hyperventilation or recovery). Results show that the goodness of fit was : (1) higher than 90% at almost all comparisons (122 on 132), (2) not improved by applying an adjusted filter obtained on the studied part of the signals. These results suggest that RIP could be used for studying breathing during voluntary hyperventilation and recovery using adjusted filters obtained from comparison to airflow signal at rest.

  14. 78 FR 71476 - Authority for Voluntary Withholding on Other Payments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    ...)(3) authorizes the Secretary to provide regulations for withholding from (A) remuneration for... AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Temporary regulations. SUMMARY: This document contains temporary regulations under the Internal Revenue Code (Code) relating to voluntary withholding...

  15. Improving Voluntary Environmental Management Programs: Facilitating Learning and Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genskow, Kenneth D.; Wood, Danielle M.

    2011-05-01

    Environmental planners and managers face unique challenges understanding and documenting the effectiveness of programs that rely on voluntary actions by private landowners. Programs, such as those aimed at reducing nonpoint source pollution or improving habitat, intend to reach those goals by persuading landowners to adopt behaviors and management practices consistent with environmental restoration and protection. Our purpose with this paper is to identify barriers for improving voluntary environmental management programs and ways to overcome them. We first draw upon insights regarding data, learning, and adaptation from the adaptive management and performance management literatures, describing three key issues: overcoming information constraints, structural limitations, and organizational culture. Although these lessons are applicable to a variety of voluntary environmental management programs, we then present the issues in the context of on-going research for nonpoint source water quality pollution. We end the discussion by highlighting important elements for advancing voluntary program efforts.

  16. Influence of a Weak Field of Pulsed DC Electricity on the Behavior and Incidence of Injury in Adult Steelhead and Pacific Lamprey, Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesa, Matthew

    2009-02-13

    Predation by pinnipeds, such as California sea lions Zalophus californianus, Pacific harbor seals Phoca vitulina, and Stellar sea lions Eumetopias jubatus on adult Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp in the lower Columbia River has become a serious concern for fishery managers trying to conserve and restore runs of threatened and endangered fish. As a result, Smith-Root, Incorporated (SRI; Vancouver, Washington), manufacturers of electrofishing and closely-related equipment, proposed a project to evaluate the potential of an electrical barrier to deter marine mammals and reduce the amount of predation on adult salmonids (SRI 2007). The objectives of their work were to develop, deploy, and evaluate a passive, integrated sonar and electric barrier that would selectively inhibit the upstream movements of marine mammals and reduce predation, but would not injure pinnipeds or impact anadromous fish migrations. However, before such a device could be deployed in the field, concerns by regional fishery managers about the potential effects of such a device on the migratory behavior of Pacific salmon, steelhead O. mykiss, Pacific lampreys Entoshpenus tridentata, and white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus, needed to be addressed. In this report, we describe the results of laboratory research designed to evaluate the effects of prototype electric barriers on adult steelhead and Pacific lampreys. The effects of electricity on fish have been widely studied and include injury or death (e.g., Sharber and Carothers 1988; Dwyer et al. 2001; Snyder 2003), physiological dysfunction (e.g., Schreck et al. 1976; Mesa and Schreck 1989), and altered behavior (Mesa and Schreck 1989). Much of this work was done to investigate the effects of electrofishing on fish in the wild. Because electrofishing operations would always use more severe electrical settings than those proposed for the pinniped barrier, results from these studies are probably not relevant to the work proposed by SRI. Field

  17. Assessing voluntary muscle activation with the twitch interpolation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shield, Anthony; Zhou, Shi

    2004-01-01

    The twitch interpolation technique is commonly employed to assess the completeness of skeletal muscle activation during voluntary contractions. Early applications of twitch interpolation suggested that healthy human subjects could fully activate most of the skeletal muscles to which the technique had been applied. More recently, however, highly sensitive twitch interpolation has revealed that even healthy adults routinely fail to fully activate a number of skeletal muscles despite apparently maximal effort. Unfortunately, some disagreement exists as to how the results of twitch interpolation should be employed to quantify voluntary activation. The negative linear relationship between evoked twitch force and voluntary force that has been observed by some researchers implies that voluntary activation can be quantified by scaling a single interpolated twitch to a control twitch evoked in relaxed muscle. Observations of non-linear evoked-voluntary force relationships have lead to the suggestion that the single interpolated twitch ratio can not accurately estimate voluntary activation. Instead, it has been proposed that muscle activation is better determined by extrapolating the relationship between evoked and voluntary force to provide an estimate of true maximum force. However, criticism of the single interpolated twitch ratio typically fails to take into account the reasons for the non-linearity of the evoked-voluntary force relationship. When these reasons are examined, it appears that most are even more challenging to the validity of extrapolation than they are to the linear equation. Furthermore, several factors that contribute to the observed non-linearity can be minimised or even eliminated with appropriate experimental technique. The detection of small activation deficits requires high resolution measurement of force and careful consideration of numerous experimental details such as the site of stimulation, stimulation intensity and the number of interpolated

  18. A real-time safety and quality reporting system: assessment of clinical data and staff participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahn, Douglas A; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Mundt, Arno J; Pawlicki, Todd

    2014-12-01

    To report on the use of an incident learning system in a radiation oncology clinic, along with a review of staff participation. On September 24, 2010, our department initiated an online real-time voluntary reporting system for safety issues, called the Radiation Oncology Quality Reporting System (ROQRS). We reviewed these reports from the program's inception through January 18, 2013 (2 years, 3 months, 25 days) to assess error reports (defined as both near-misses and incidents of inaccurate treatment). During the study interval, there were 60,168 fractions of external beam radiation therapy and 955 brachytherapy procedures. There were 298 entries in the ROQRS system, among which 108 errors were reported. There were 31 patients with near-misses reported and 27 patients with incidents of inaccurate treatment reported. These incidents of inaccurate treatment occurred in 68 total treatment fractions (0.11% of treatments delivered during the study interval). None of these incidents of inaccurate treatment resulted in deviation from the prescription by 5% or more. A solution to the errors was documented in ROQRS in 65% of the cases. Errors occurred as repeated errors in 22% of the cases. A disproportionate number of the incidents of inaccurate treatment were due to improper patient setup at the linear accelerator (Psafety and quality in patient care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The primary motor area for voluntary diaphragmatic motion identified by high field fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Takahiro; Fujii, Yukihiko; Suzuki, Kiyotaka; Kanazawa, Ichiro; Nakada, Tsutomu

    2004-06-01

    In order to identify the precise location of the primary motor area for the diaphragm with respect to the classical motor homunculus, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments were performed utilizing independent component-cross correlation- sequential epoch (ICS) analysis on a high-field (3.0 Tesla) system. Activations which correlated with voluntary diaphragmatic motion mapped onto the area anterolateral to that for voluntary hand motion (internal control in ICS analysis). Multiple subject analysis yielded the primary motor cortex for the diaphragm to be (+/-48, -4, 47) in the Talairach and Tournoux coordinates. The results were highly consistent with the previously reported cortical area for the diaphragm determined by transcranial electrical/magnetic stimulation.

  20. Voluntary reaction time and long-latency reflex modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgaard, Christopher J; Franks, Ian M; Maslovat, Dana; Chin, Laurence; Chua, Romeo

    2015-12-01

    Stretching a muscle of the upper limb elicits short (M1) and long-latency (M2) reflexes. When the participant is instructed to actively compensate for a perturbation, M1 is usually unaffected and M2 increases in size and is followed by the voluntary response. It remains unclear if the observed increase in M2 is due to instruction-dependent gain modulation of the contributing reflex mechanism(s) or results from voluntary response superposition. The difficulty in delineating between these alternatives is due to the overlap between the voluntary response and the end of M2. The present study manipulated response accuracy and complexity to delay onset of the voluntary response and observed the corresponding influence on electromyographic activity during the M2 period. In all active conditions, M2 was larger compared with a passive condition where participants did not respond to the perturbation; moreover, these changes in M2 began early in the appearance of the response (∼ 50 ms), too early to be accounted for by voluntary overlap. Voluntary response latency influenced the latter portion of M2, with the largest activity seen when accuracy of limb position was not specified. However, when participants aimed for targets of different sizes or performed movements of various complexities, reaction time differences did not influence M2 period activity, suggesting voluntary activity was sufficiently delayed. Collectively, our results show that while a perturbation applied to the upper limbs can trigger a voluntary response at short latency (reflex gain modulation remains an important contributor to EMG changes during the M2 period. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Voluntary "involuntary" commitment--the briar-patch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R D

    1980-01-01

    Szasz and others have pointed out that many so-called voluntary admissions to mental hospitals have various elements of coercion involved, and are thus not truly voluntary. The author contends that the converse situation is also true, that many patients admitted under involuntary commitment papers arrange for their own commitments. Reasons for such choices are discussed in the context of a review of the literature and several case histories.

  2. Voluntary euthanasia under control? Further empirical evidence from The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochemsen, H; Keown, J

    1999-01-01

    Nineteen ninety-six saw the publication of a major Dutch survey into euthanasia in the Netherlands. This paper outlines the main statistical findings of this survey and considers whether it shows that voluntary euthanasia is under effective control in the Netherlands. The paper concludes that although there has been some improvement in compliance with procedural requirements, the practice of voluntary euthanasia remains beyond effective control. PMID:10070633

  3. Students' vocational choices and voluntary action: A 12-nation study

    OpenAIRE

    Haski-Leventhal, Debbie; Cnaan, Ram; Handy, Femida; Brudney, Jeffrey; Holmes, Kirsten; Hustinx, Lesley; Kang, ChulHee; Kassam, Meenaz; Meijs, Lucas; Ranade, Bhagyashree; Yamauchi, Naoto; Yeung, Anne Birgitta; Zrinscak, Sinisa

    2008-01-01

    textabstractPrevious research on student involvement suggested that business and engineering students manifest lowest rates of voluntary action. Similarly, it was thought that social science students are the most involved in voluntary action, with students of natural sciences and humanities in the middle. However, there were very few studies that empirically compared these assertions. Furthermore, these assertions were not investigated from cross-cultural perspectives. Based on a study of stu...

  4. The We and the I: The Logic of Voluntary Associations

    OpenAIRE

    Melnik, Ekaterina; Zimmermann, Jean-Benoît

    2015-01-01

    This paper sheds new light on the economic logic of voluntary associations and the relationship between individual contribution and collective action. The aims are twofold. Firstly, we seek to explain how "team reasoning" (Bacharach et al. 2006) can deeply change the functioning of voluntary associations (which are considered to produce a public good) when some or all of the individual members group together to make collective decisions about their involvement or contribution, rather than dec...

  5. Mandatory and Voluntary Disclosure of Annual Report on Investor Reaction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hendra Gunawan; Evelyn Octa Lina

    2015-01-01

    ...), cash flows investing activities (AKIn), cash flows financing activities (AKDa) as the control variable and the investor reaction was measured by using trading volume activity as the dependent variable...

  6. Interaction of poststroke voluntary effort and functional neuromuscular electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Nathaniel; Knutson, Jayme; Chae, John; Crago, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) may be able to augment functional arm and hand movement after stroke. Poststroke neuroprostheses that incorporate voluntary effort and FES to produce the desired movement must consider how forces generated by voluntary effort and FES combine, even in the same muscle, in order to provide an appropriate level of stimulation to elicit the desired assistive force. The goal of this study was to determine whether the force produced by voluntary effort and FES add together independently of effort or whether the increment in force depends on the level of voluntary effort. Isometric force matching tasks were performed under different combinations of voluntary effort and FES. Participants reached a steady level of force, and while attempting to maintain a constant effort level, FES was applied to augment the force. Results indicate that the increment in force produced by FES decreases as the level of initial voluntary effort increases. Potential mechanisms causing the change in force output are proposed, but the relative contribution of each mechanism is unknown.

  7. Comparison of body-powered voluntary opening and voluntary closing prehensor for activities of daily life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey Berning

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Persons with an upper-limb amputation who use a body-powered prosthesis typically control the prehensor through contralateral shoulder movement, which is transmitted through a Bowden cable. Increased cable tension either opens or closes the prehensor; when tension is released, some passive element, such as a spring, returns the prehensor to the default state (closed or open. In this study, we used the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure to examine functional differences between these two types of prehensors in 29 nondisabled subjects (who used a body-powered bypass prosthesis and 2 persons with unilateral transradial amputations (who used a conventional body-powered device. We also administered a survey to determine whether subjects preferred one prehensor or the other for specific tasks, with a long-term goal of assessing whether a prehensor that could switch between both modes would be advantageous. We found that using the voluntary closing prehensor was 1.3 s faster (p = 0.02 than using the voluntary opening prehensor, across tasks, and that there was consensus among subjects on which types of tasks they preferred to do with each prehensor type. Twenty-five subjects wanted a device that could switch between the two modes in order to perform particular tasks.

  8. Hedonic value of intentional action provides reinforcement for voluntary generation but not voluntary inhibition of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Jim; Haggard, Patrick

    2013-12-01

    Intentional inhibition refers to stopping oneself from performing an action at the last moment, a vital component of self-control. It has been suggested that intentional inhibition is associated with negative hedonic value, perhaps due to the frustration of cancelling an intended action. Here we investigate hedonic implications of the free choice to act or inhibit. Participants gave aesthetic ratings of arbitrary visual stimuli that immediately followed voluntary decisions to act or to inhibit action. We found that participants for whom decisions to act produced a strong positive hedonic value for the immediately following visual stimulus made more choices to act than those with weaker hedonic value for action. This finding is consistent with reinforcement learning of action decisions. However, participants who experienced inhibition as generating more positive hedonic value did not choose to inhibit more than other participants. Thus, voluntary inhibition of action did not act as reinforcement for future inhibitory behaviour. Our finding that inhibition of action lacks motivational capacity may explain why self-control is both difficult and limited.

  9. Comparison of body-powered voluntary opening and voluntary closing prehensor for activities of daily life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berning, Kelsey; Cohick, Sarah; Johnson, Reva; Miller, Laura Ann; Sensinger, Jonathon W

    2014-01-01

    Persons with an upper-limb amputation who use a body-powered prosthesis typically control the prehensor through contralateral shoulder movement, which is transmitted through a Bowden cable. Increased cable tension either opens or closes the prehensor; when tension is released, some passive element, such as a spring, returns the prehensor to the default state (closed or open). In this study, we used the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure to examine functional differences between these two types of prehensors in 29 nondisabled subjects (who used a body-powered bypass prosthesis) and 2 persons with unilateral transradial amputations (who used a conventional body-powered device). We also administered a survey to determine whether subjects preferred one prehensor or the other for specific tasks, with a long-term goal of assessing whether a prehensor that could switch between both modes would be advantageous. We found that using the voluntary closing prehensor was 1.3 s faster (p = 0.02) than using the voluntary opening prehensor, across tasks, and that there was consensus among subjects on which types of tasks they preferred to do with each prehensor type. Twenty-five subjects wanted a device that could switch between the two modes in order to perform particular tasks.

  10. Voluntary control of human jaw stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiller, Douglas M; Houle, Guillaume; Ostry, David J

    2005-09-01

    Recent studies of human arm movement have suggested that the control of stiffness may be important both for maintaining stability and for achieving differences in movement accuracy. In the present study, we have examined the voluntary control of postural stiffness in 3D in the human jaw. The goal is to address the possible role of stiffness control in both stabilizing the jaw and in achieving the differential precision requirements of speech sounds. We previously showed that patterns of kinematic variability in speech are systematically related to the stiffness of the jaw. If the nervous system uses stiffness control as a means to regulate kinematic variation in speech, it should also be possible to show that subjects can voluntarily modify jaw stiffness. Using a robotic device, a series of force pulses was applied to the jaw to elicit changes in stiffness to resist displacement. Three orthogonal directions and three magnitudes of forces were tested. In all conditions, subjects increased the magnitude of jaw stiffness to resist the effects of the applied forces. Apart from the horizontal direction, greater increases in stiffness were observed when larger forces were applied. Moreover, subjects differentially increased jaw stiffness along a vertical axis to counteract disturbances in this direction. The observed changes in the magnitude of stiffness in different directions suggest an ability to control the pattern of stiffness of the jaw. The results are interpreted as evidence that jaw stiffness can be adjusted voluntarily, and thus may play a role in stabilizing the jaw and in controlling movement variation in the orofacial system.

  11. Neuronal correlates of voluntary facial movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krippl, Martin; Karim, Ahmed A; Brechmann, André

    2015-01-01

    Whereas the somatotopy of finger movements has been extensively studied with neuroimaging, the neural foundations of facial movements remain elusive. Therefore, we systematically studied the neuronal correlates of voluntary facial movements using the Facial Action Coding System (FACS, Ekman et al., 2002). The facial movements performed in the MRI scanner were defined as Action Units (AUs) and were controlled by a certified FACS coder. The main goal of the study was to investigate the detailed somatotopy of the facial primary motor area (facial M1). Eighteen participants were asked to produce the following four facial movements in the fMRI scanner: AU1+2 (brow raiser), AU4 (brow lowerer), AU12 (lip corner puller) and AU24 (lip presser), each in alternation with a resting phase. Our facial movement task induced generally high activation in brain motor areas (e.g., M1, premotor cortex, supplementary motor area, putamen), as well as in the thalamus, insula, and visual cortex. BOLD activations revealed overlapping representations for the four facial movements. However, within the activated facial M1 areas, we could find distinct peak activities in the left and right hemisphere supporting a rough somatotopic upper to lower face organization within the right facial M1 area, and a somatotopic organization within the right M1 upper face part. In both hemispheres, the order was an inverse somatotopy within the lower face representations. In contrast to the right hemisphere, in the left hemisphere the representation of AU4 was more lateral and anterior compared to the rest of the facial movements. Our findings support the notion of a partial somatotopic order within the M1 face area confirming the "like attracts like" principle (Donoghue et al., 1992). AUs which are often used together or are similar are located close to each other in the motor cortex.

  12. Neuronal correlates of voluntary facial movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eKrippl

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Whereas the somatotopy of finger movements has been extensively studied with neuroimaging, the neural foundations of facial movements remain elusive. Therefore, we systematically studied the neuronal correlates of voluntary facial movements using the Facial Action Coding System (FACS,Ekman et al., 2002. The facial movements performed in the MRI scanner were defined as Action Units (AUs and were controlled by a certified FACS coder. The main goal of the study was to investigate the detailed somatotopy of the facial primary motor area (facial M1. Eighteen participants were asked to produce the following four facial movements in the fMRI scanner: AU1+2 (brow raiser, AU4 (brow lowerer, AU12 (lip corner puller and AU24 (lip presser, each in alternation with a resting phase.Our facial movement task induced generally high activation in brain motor areas (e.g. M1, premotor cortex, SMA, putamen, as well as in the thalamus, insula and visual cortex. BOLD activations revealed overlapping representations for the four facial movements. However, within the activated facial M1 areas, we could find distinct peak activities in the left and right hemisphere supporting a rough somatotopic upper to lower face organization within the right facial M1 area, and a somatotopic organization within the right M1 upper face part. In both hemispheres, the order was an inverse somatotopy within the lower face representations. In contrast to the right hemisphere, in the left hemisphere the representation of AU 4 was more lateral and anterior compared to the rest of the facial movements. Our findings support the notion of a partial somatotopic order within the M1 face area confirming the like attracts like principle (Donoghue et al., 1992 . AUs which are often used together or are similar are located close to each other in the motor cortex.

  13. Cortical potentials associated with voluntary mandibular movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, K; Kaji, R; Hamano, T; Kohara, N; Kimura, J; Shibasaki, H; Iizuka, T

    2000-07-01

    Movement-related cortical potentials (MRCPs) are negative potentials over the scalp, which gradually increase prior to voluntary movements, and might be applied to elucidate the cortical efferent function of the mandibular movements. We compared the MRCPs accompanying various mandibular movements to study the motor control mechanism underlying these movements. Electroencephalograms (EEGs) were recorded from 11 electrodes placed over the scalp (F3, Fz, F4, T3, C3, Cz, C4, T4, P3, Pz, and P4), according to the International 10-20 System, and electromyograms (EMGs) were obtained from surface electrodes over the masseter muscle and the anterior belly of the digastric muscle. Ten healthy subjects were requested to make brisk and self-paced mandibular movements in 4 different directions (mouth-opening and -closing, and left and right lateral movements). We obtained MRCPs by averaging the EEG, using the visually determined EMG onset as a trigger signal. In all the movements, a slowly increasing, bilaterally widespread negativity starting 1.5 to 2.0 sec before the EMG onset (Bereitschaftspotential, or BP proper) was observed, with the maximum over the vertex region. The negative slope (NS') occurred about 300 to 700 msec before the EMG onset. The cortical maps of BP/NS' (BP and NS' combined), immediately prior to the mouth-opening and closing, showed a symmetrical distribution, whereas that for the lateral movements showed a tendency of predominance over the hemisphere ipsilateral to the direction of the movement. BP/NS' amplitudes at the onset of movement differed significantly or tended to do so between open, close, and lateral movements, suggesting that MRCP recordings may thus provide a means to explore the role of the cerebral cortex in the control of mandibular movements.

  14. Voluntary organizations in development in South Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, C

    1987-01-01

    The governments of South Asian countries have become aware of the substantial role that nongovernment organizations (NGOs) or voluntary agencies can play in rural development and other nation building activities. Although private agencies cannot substitute for government programs, there is general consensus that NGOs use development funds more efficiently and innovatively than government programs. NGOs in Bangladesh, India, and Pakistan exemplify the influence these organizations have on development in South Asia. The Lutheran World Service in Bangladesh, a foreign origin NGO, has branched out from its original aim of providing relief and war rehabilitation to give skills training and technical assistance to the poor. The Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee, an indigenous NGO, works for the well-being and self-reliance of the landless poor, those with very small farms, and women. NGOs in Bangladesh have been especially innovative in developing methods to encourage self-help, such as local organization and credit, which are often combined with training in practical skills, literacy, nutrition, and family planning. Present NGO activity in India is dominated by the Gandhian tradition. There is a potential conflict between the philosophy of the NGO's in terms of building on the people's felt needs from the bottom up and the tendency of government agencies to want to plan for the people. In Pakistan, the concept of development-oriented NGOs is recent and not yet strong, although the government has adopted a policy of routing funds from government and from bilateral donor agencies through NGOs in 2 areas--family planning and women's welfare. The chief limitation of NGOs is their scope, meaning that the major burden of the development process rests on government agencies.

  15. Effect of long-term voluntary exercise wheel running on susceptibility to bacterial pulmonary infections in a mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van de Weert-van Leeuwen, Pauline B; de Vrankrijker, Angélica M M; Fentz, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    moderate exercise has many health benefits, healthy mice showed increased bacterial (P. aeruginosa) load and symptoms, after regular voluntary exercise, with perseverance of the phagocytic capacity of monocytes and neutrophils. Whether patients, suffering from bacterial infectious diseases, should......Regular moderate exercise has been suggested to exert anti-inflammatory effects and improve immune effector functions, resulting in reduced disease incidence and viral infection susceptibility. Whether regular exercise also affects bacterial infection susceptibility is unknown. The aim...... of this study was to investigate whether regular voluntary exercise wheel running prior to a pulmonary infection with bacteria (P. aeruginosa) affects lung bacteriology, sickness severity and phagocyte immune function in mice. Balb/c mice were randomly placed in a cage with or without a running wheel. After 28...

  16. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis: change in incidence following a switch in gadolinium agents and adoption of a gadolinium policy--report from two U.S. universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altun, Ersan; Martin, Diego R; Wertman, Rebecca; Lugo-Somolinos, Aida; Fuller, Edwin R; Semelka, Richard C

    2009-12-01

    To determine the incidence of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) in tertiary care centers of two U.S. universities following the switch from the use of gadodiamide to gadobenate dimeglumine and gadopentetate dimeglumine, and the adoption of restrictive gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA) policies. Institutional review board approval with waiver of informed consent was obtained for this Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant retrospective study. NSF patients were identified between January 2000 and December 2006 at center A and between October 2003 and February 2007 at center B (preadoption periods); and from June 2007 to June 2008 at both centers (postadoption period). The numbers of patients who underwent gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance at each center, patients at risk for NSF at center A, and dialysis patients at center B were identified in the pre- and postadoption periods. Gadodiamide was the only agent used in the preadoption period. Gadobenate dimeglumine and gadopentetate dimeglumine were the agents used in the postadoption period. A restrictive GBCA policy that limits the use and dose of GBCAs in patients with risk factors was adopted in the postadoption period. Follow-up lasted 9 months from July 2008 to March 2009. Corresponding incidences were determined and compared with the Fisher exact test. Respective total benchmark incidence of NSF at both centers, at-risk incidence of NSF at center A, and dialysis incidence of NSF at center B were 37 of 65 240, 28 of 925, and nine of 312 in the preadoption period and zero of 25 167, zero of 147, and zero of 402 in the postadoption period. All three incidences demonstrated significant differences (P < .0001, .024, and .001, respectively) between the pre- and postadoption periods. Following the switch from gadodiamide to gadobenate dimeglumine and gadopentetate dimeglumine, and the adoption of restrictive GBCA policies, no NSF cases were observed at either center.

  17. Supplier-dependent differences in intermittent voluntary alcohol intake and response to naltrexone in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Shima; Segerström, Lova; Roman, Erika

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is a worldwide public health problem and a polygenetic disorder displaying substantial individual variation. This work aimed to study individual differences in behavior and its association to voluntary alcohol intake and subsequent response to naltrexone in a seamless heterogenic group of animals. Thus, by this approach the aim was to more accurately recapitulate the existing heterogeneity within the human population. Male Wistar rats from three different suppliers (Harlan Laboratories B.V., RccHan™:WI; Taconic Farms A/S, HanTac:WH; and Charles River GmbH, Crl:WI) were used to create a heterogenic group for studies of individual differences in behavior, associations to intermittent voluntary alcohol intake and subsequent response to naltrexone. The rats were tested in the open field prior to the Y-maze and then given voluntary intermittent access to alcohol or water in the home cage for 6 weeks, where after, naltrexone in three different doses or saline was administered in a Latin square design over 4 weeks and alcohol intake and preference was measured. However, supplier-dependent differences and concomitant skew subgroup formations, primarily in open field behavior and intermittent alcohol intake, resulted in a shifted focus to instead study voluntary alcohol intake and preference, and the ensuing response to naltrexone in Wistar rats from three different suppliers. The results showed that outbred Wistar rats are diverse with regard to voluntary alcohol intake and preference in a supplier-dependent manner; higher in RccHan™:WI relative to HanTac:WH and Crl:WI. The results also revealed supplier-dependent differences in the effect of naltrexone that were dose- and time-dependent; evident differences in high-drinking RccHan™:WI rats relative to HanTac:WH and Crl:WI rats. Overall these findings render RccHan™:WI rats more suitable for studies of individual differences in voluntary alcohol intake and response to naltrexone and

  18. Decreasing incidence rates of bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stig Lønberg; Pedersen, C; Jensen, T G

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Numerous studies have shown that the incidence rate of bacteremia has been increasing over time. However, few studies have distinguished between community-acquired, healthcare-associated and nosocomial bacteremia. METHODS: We conducted a population-based study among adults with first......-time bacteremia in Funen County, Denmark, during 2000-2008 (N = 7786). We reported mean and annual incidence rates (per 100,000 person-years), overall and by place of acquisition. Trends were estimated using a Poisson regression model. RESULTS: The overall incidence rate was 215.7, including 99.0 for community......-acquired, 50.0 for healthcare-associated and 66.7 for nosocomial bacteremia. During 2000-2008, the overall incidence rate decreased by 23.3% from 254.1 to 198.8 (3.3% annually, p bacteremia decreased by 25.6% from 119.0 to 93.8 (3.7% annually, p

  19. Increasing incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease in allogeneic transplantation: a report from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Sally; Arora, Mukta; Wang, Tao; Spellman, Stephen R; He, Wensheng; Couriel, Daniel R; Urbano-Ispizua, Alvaro; Cutler, Corey S; Bacigalupo, Andrea A; Battiwalla, Minoo; Flowers, Mary E; Juckett, Mark B; Lee, Stephanie J; Loren, Alison W; Klumpp, Thomas R; Prockup, Susan E; Ringdén, Olle T H; Savani, Bipin N; Socié, Gérard; Schultz, Kirk R; Spitzer, Thomas; Teshima, Takanori; Bredeson, Christopher N; Jacobsohn, David A; Hayashi, Robert J; Drobyski, William R; Frangoul, Haydar A; Akpek, Görgün; Ho, Vincent T; Lewis, Victor A; Gale, Robert Peter; Koreth, John; Chao, Nelson J; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Cooper, Brenda W; Laughlin, Mary J; Hsu, Jack W; Hematti, Peiman; Verdonck, Leo F; Solh, Melhelm M; Norkin, Maxim; Reddy, Vijay; Martino, Rodrigo; Gadalla, Shahinaz; Goldberg, Jenna D; McCarthy, Philip L; Pérez-Simón, José A; Khera, Nandita; Lewis, Ian D; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Olsson, Richard F; Saber, Wael; Waller, Edmund K; Blaise, Didier; Pidala, Joseph A; Martin, Paul J; Satwani, Prakash; Bornhäuser, Martin; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Horowitz, Mary M; Pavletic, Steven Z

    2015-02-01

    Although transplant practices have changed over the last decades, no information is available on trends in incidence and outcome of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) over time. This study used the central database of the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) to describe time trends for cGVHD incidence, nonrelapse mortality, and risk factors for cGVHD. The 12-year period was divided into 3 intervals, 1995 to 1999, 2000 to 2003, and 2004 to 2007, and included 26,563 patients with acute leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and myelodysplastic syndrome. Multivariate analysis showed an increased incidence of cGVHD in more recent years (odds ratio = 1.19, P < .0001), and this trend was still seen when adjusting for donor type, graft type, or conditioning intensity. In patients with cGVHD, nonrelapse mortality has decreased over time, but at 5 years there were no significant differences among different time periods. Risk factors for cGVHD were in line with previous studies. This is the first comprehensive characterization of the trends in cGVHD incidence and underscores the mounting need for addressing this major late complication of transplantation in future research. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. All rights reserved.

  20. Leukaemia incidence and survival in children and adolescents in Europe during 1978-1997. Report from the Automated Childhood Cancer Information System project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coebergh, J. W. W.; Reedijk, A. M. J.; de Vries, E.; Martos, C.; Jakab, Z.; Steliarova-Foucher, E.; Kamps, W. A.

    2006-01-01

    Leukaemias constitute approximately one-third of cancers in children (age 0-14 years) and 10% in adolescents (age 15-19 years). Geographical patterns (1988-1997) and time trends (1978-1997) of incidence and survival from leukaemias in children (n = 29,239) and adolescents (n = 1929) were derived fro

  1. Opt-out HIV testing in prison: informed and voluntary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, David L; Golin, Carol E; Grodensky, Catherine A; May, Jeanine; Bowling, J Michael; DeVellis, Robert F; White, Becky L; Wohl, David A

    2015-01-01

    HIV testing in prison settings has been identified as an important mechanism to detect cases among high-risk, underserved populations. Several public health organizations recommend that testing across health-care settings, including prisons, be delivered in an opt-out manner. However, implementation of opt-out testing within prisons may pose challenges in delivering testing that is informed and understood to be voluntary. In a large state prison system with a policy of voluntary opt-out HIV testing, we randomly sampled adult prisoners in each of seven intake prisons within two weeks after their opportunity to be HIV tested. We surveyed prisoners' perception of HIV testing as voluntary or mandatory and used multivariable statistical models to identify factors associated with their perception. We also linked survey responses to lab records to determine if prisoners' test status (tested or not) matched their desired and perceived test status. Thirty-eight percent (359/936) perceived testing as voluntary. The perception that testing was mandatory was positively associated with age less than 25 years (adjusted relative risk [aRR]: 1.45, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.24, 1.71) and preference that testing be mandatory (aRR: 1.81, 95% CI: 1.41, 2.31) but negatively associated with entry into one of the intake prisons (aRR: 0.41 95% CI: 0.27, 0.63). Eighty-nine percent of prisoners wanted to be tested, 85% were tested according to their wishes, and 82% correctly understood whether or not they were tested. Most prisoners wanted to be HIV tested and were aware that they had been tested, but less than 40% understood testing to be voluntary. Prisoners' understanding of the voluntary nature of testing varied by intake prison and by a few individual-level factors. Testing procedures should ensure that opt-out testing is informed and understood to be voluntary by prisoners and other vulnerable populations.

  2. [Vasectomy and tubal ligation: medicopsychological aspects of voluntary sterilization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, M

    1982-06-01

    Various psychological aspects of voluntary surgical sterilization are examined. Women's own bodies are protected through sterilization from all the risks of pregnancy, but there is an altruistic element of vasectomy which may be perceived by men either positively or as a sacrifice or mutilition. The greater prevalence of female sterilization thus seems logical. Some psychologists view vasectomy as representing the realization of castration fantasies, but despite occurrence of cases which might seem to legitimate this view, most vasectomized men are married adults who have fathered several children and have otherwise proven their maturity. The status of voluntary sterilization appears to differ in the Third World, where rapid population growth threatens collective survival, and in developed countries whose growth rates are low or negative. Requests for reversal are increasingly frequent as women undergo sterilization at younger ages. Remarriage, a change of mind by the couple, or death of a child are the most frequently cited reasons for reversal requests. Reports of the psychological consequences of sterilization tend to vary in different studies, largely because of differences in the socioeconomic and cultural status of the populations studied and also perhaps because some studies are more superficial than others. In numerous questionnaire surveys mostly done in Anglo-Saxon countries, typically 90-99% of subjects have reported themselves satisfied with the results. The great majority report no regrets, an unchanged or improved marital relationship, and an increase in sexual pleasure. Less heterogeneous samples of persons undergoing sterilization for reasons other than simple contraceptive convenience have sometimes given less positive results. Age, economic status, number of children, marital relationship, educational level, religious and moral convictions, and history of medical or psychological problems can all affect satisfaction with sterilization. Men in

  3. Peer-to-peer computing in health-promoting voluntary organizations: a system design analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irestig, Magnus; Hallberg, Niklas; Eriksson, Henrik; Timpka, Toomas

    2005-10-01

    A large part of the health promotion in today's society is performed as peer-to-peer empowerment in voluntary organisations such as sports clubs, charities, and trade unions. In order to prevent work-related illness and long-term sickness absence, the aim of this study is to explore computer network services for empowerment of employees by peer-to-peer communication. The 'technique trade-off method was used for the analysis of the system design. A Critical Incident Technique questionnaire was distributed to a representative sample of trade union shop stewards (n = 386), and focus-group seminars were arranged where a preliminary set of requirements was discussed. Seven basic requirements were identified and matched to a set of 12 design issues for computer network services, allocating a subset of design issues to each requirement. The conclusion is that the systems design displays an inexpensive and potentially feasible method for peer-to-peer computing in voluntary health-promoting organisations.

  4. Redefining RECs: Additionality in the voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillenwater, Michael Wayne

    In the United States, electricity consumers are told that they can "buy" electricity from renewable energy projects, versus fossil fuel-fired facilities, through participation in a voluntary green power program. The marketing messages communicate to consumers that their participation and premium payments for a green label will cause additional renewable energy generation and thereby allow them to claim they consume electricity that is absent pollution as well as reduce pollutant emissions. Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) and wind energy are the basis for the majority of the voluntary green power market in the United States. This dissertation addresses the question: Do project developers respond to the voluntary REC market in the United States by altering their decisions to invest in wind turbines? This question is investigated by modeling and probabilistically quantifying the effect of the voluntary REC market on a representative wind power investor in the United States using data from formal expert elicitations of active participants in the industry. It is further explored by comparing the distribution of a sample of wind power projects supplying the voluntary green power market in the United States against an economic viability model that incorporates geographic factors. This dissertation contributes the first quantitative analysis of the effect of the voluntary REC market on project investment. It is found that 1) RECs should be not treated as equivalent to emission offset credits, 2) there is no clearly credible role for voluntary market RECs in emissions trading markets without dramatic restructuring of one or both markets and the environmental commodities they trade, and 3) the use of RECs in entity-level GHG emissions accounting (i.e., "carbon footprinting") leads to double counting of emissions and therefore is not justified. The impotence of the voluntary REC market was, at least in part, due to the small magnitude of the REC price signal and lack of

  5. Modelling transparency: A research note on accepting a new paradigm in business reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian

    2005-01-01

    Key points: - Measuring intangible assets constitutes an accounting perspective on voluntary disclosure - However, business reporting constitutes a strategy perspective on voluntary disclosure - ICAEW should move from an accounting to a strategy perspective and leave the intangible assets debate...

  6. Incidence of and survival after glottic squamous cell carcinoma in Denmark from 1971 to 2011-A report from the Danish Head and Neck Cancer Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyhne, Nina Munk; Johansen, Jørgen; Kristensen, Claus Andrup

    2016-01-01

    .4 to 0.6). The 5-year DSM was 16% (15–17%) and the 5-year OS was 63% (61–64). The hazard rate of DSM adjusted for patient characteristics, tumour characteristics and waiting-time was significantly lower in the 2000s (p ...Aim To describe the incidence, disease-specific mortality (DSM), and overall survival (OS) of patients with glottic squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) in Denmark from 1971–2011 in a national population-based cohort of consecutive patients. Materials and methods All patients diagnosed with glottic SCC...... and national registries. Results In total 5132 patients with glottic SCC were included. The yearly number of new cases increased from 107 in the 1970s to 139 in the 2000s. Overall, the incidence increased from 1.9 to 2.6 per 100,000, with a more prominent increase in men (3.5 to 4.7) compared with women (0...

  7. Computer Simulation for Emergency Incident Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, D L

    2004-12-03

    This report describes the findings and recommendations resulting from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Incident Management Simulation Workshop held by the DHS Advanced Scientific Computing Program in May 2004. This workshop brought senior representatives of the emergency response and incident-management communities together with modeling and simulation technologists from Department of Energy laboratories. The workshop provided an opportunity for incident responders to describe the nature and substance of the primary personnel roles in an incident response, to identify current and anticipated roles of modeling and simulation in support of incident response, and to begin a dialog between the incident response and simulation technology communities that will guide and inform planned modeling and simulation development for incident response. This report provides a summary of the discussions at the workshop as well as a summary of simulation capabilities that are relevant to incident-management training, and recommendations for the use of simulation in both incident management and in incident management training, based on the discussions at the workshop. In addition, the report discusses areas where further research and development will be required to support future needs in this area.

  8. Incident Information Management Tool

    CERN Document Server

    Pejovic, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Flaws of\tcurrent incident information management at CMS and CERN\tare discussed. A new data\tmodel for future incident database is\tproposed and briefly described. Recently developed draft version of GIS-­‐based tool for incident tracking is presented.

  9. Voluntary Running Suppresses Tumor Growth through Epinephrine- and IL-6-Dependent NK Cell Mobilization and Redistribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Regular exercise reduces the risk of cancer and disease recurrence. Yet the mechanisms behind this protection remain to be elucidated. In this study, tumor-bearing mice randomized to voluntary wheel running showed over 60% reduction in tumor incidence and growth across five different tumor models....... Microarray analysis revealed training-induced upregulation of pathways associated with immune function. NK cell infiltration was significantly increased in tumors from running mice, whereas depletion of NK cells enhanced tumor growth and blunted the beneficial effects of exercise. Mechanistic analyses showed...... that NK cells were mobilized by epinephrine, and blockade of β-adrenergic signaling blunted training-dependent tumor inhibition. Moreover, epinephrine induced a selective mobilization of IL-6-sensitive NK cells, and IL-6-blocking antibodies blunted training-induced tumor suppression, intratumoral NK cell...

  10. Neurons controlling voluntary vocalization in the macaque ventral premotor cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gino Coudé

    Full Text Available The voluntary control of phonation is a crucial achievement in the evolution of speech. In humans, ventral premotor cortex (PMv and Broca's area are known to be involved in voluntary phonation. In contrast, no neurophysiological data are available about the role of the oro-facial sector of nonhuman primates PMv in this function. In order to address this issue, we recorded PMv neurons from two monkeys trained to emit coo-calls. Results showed that a population of motor neurons specifically fire during vocalization. About two thirds of them discharged before sound onset, while the remaining were time-locked with it. The response of vocalization-selective neurons was present only during conditioned (voluntary but not spontaneous (emotional sound emission. These data suggest that the control of vocal production exerted by PMv neurons constitutes a newly emerging property in the monkey lineage, shedding light on the evolution of phonation-based communication from a nonhuman primate species.

  11. Suicide and voluntary active euthanasia: why the difference in attitude?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beech, I

    1995-06-01

    It appears that the attitudes of health professionals differ towards suicide and voluntary active euthanasia. An acceptance of, if not an agreement with, voluntary active euthanasia exists, while there is a general consensus that suicide should be prevented. This paper searches for a working definition of suicide, to discover ethical reasons for the negative value that suicide assumes, and also to provide a term of reference when comparing suicide with euthanasia. On arriving at a working definition of suicide, it is compared with voluntary active euthanasia. An analysis of utilitarian and deontological considerations is provided and proves to be inconclusive with respect to the ethical principles informing the attitudes of professionals. Therefore, a search for other influences is attempted; this indicates that psychological influences inform attitudes to a greater degree than ethical principles.

  12. Propensity for Voluntary Travel Behavior Changes: An Experimental Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meloni, Italo; Sanjust, Benedetta; Sottile, Eleonora;

    2013-01-01

    implementation, which consisted of providing car users with a personalized travel plan after the first week of observation (before) and using the second week to monitoring the post-behavior (after). These data have then been used to estimate a Mixed Logit for the choice to use a personal vehicle or a light metro......In this paper we analyze individual propensity to voluntary travel behavior change combining concepts from theory of change with the methodologies deriving from behavioral models. In particular, following the theory of voluntary changes, we set up a two-week panel survey including soft measure......; and a Multinomial Logit for the decision to change behavior. Results from both models show the relevance of providing information about available alternatives to individuals while promoting voluntary travel behavioral change....

  13. Voluntary vs directed siting -- or somewhere in-between?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peelle, E.B.

    1994-04-01

    Waste siting gridlock in the United States and Canada has led to experimentation with voluntary and hybrid or ``mixed mode`` siting. We review nuclear and hazardous waste voluntary siting (VS) results for selected cases in the U.S, and Canada. Findings indicate that VS is not a panacea, but that current siting efforts are inadequate tests of its potential. We suggest trials of improved VS protocols and more effort on hybrid approaches in which the developer chooses the site but is required to reach agreement on conditions with local stakeholders. Mixed mode siting may be better suited to the US context and its three-tiered governmental system.

  14. The voluntary control of facial action units in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, Pierre; Perron, Mélanie; Beaupré, Martin

    2010-04-01

    We investigated adults' voluntary control of 20 facial action units theoretically associated with 6 basic emotions (happiness, fear, anger, surprise, sadness, and disgust). Twenty young adults were shown video excerpts of facial action units and asked to reproduce them as accurately as possible. Facial Action Coding System (FACS; Ekman & Friesen, 1978a) coding of the facial productions showed that young adults succeeded in activating 18 of the 20 target actions units, although they often coactivated other action units. Voluntary control was clearly better for some action units than for others, with a pattern of differences between action units consistent with previous work in children and adolescents. Copyright 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. Incidence Density and Risk Factors of Diabetic Retinopathy Within Type 2 Diabetes: A Five-Year Cohort Study in China (Report 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Liu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A prospective study was carried out from August 2010 to August 2014 in the community of Fengyutan (China. Six hundred and twenty two T2D subjects were collected. The incidence density of diabetic retinopathy (DR was 1.81% person-year (95% confidence interval, CI: 1.21–2.43% person-year. After a Cox regression model analysis and adjusted confounding factors, independent predictors related to the incidence of DR including male gender (adjusted hazard ratios, aHR: 1.47, 95% CI: 1.21–1.62, with hypertension (aHR: 1.49, 95%: 1.12–1.73, duration of diabetes > 10 years (aHR: 2.28, 95%: 2.05–2.42, uncontrolled diabetes (aHR: 1.76, 95%: 1.41–2.01, total cholesterol ≥ 200 mg/dL (aHR: 1.54, 95%: 1.34–1.72 and HbA1c ≥ 7% (mmol/mol (aHR: 2.12, 95%: 1.87–2.32. Duration of T2D revealed the significantly dose-response relationship to the onset of DR. The incidence density of DR in the Chinese community was relatively low in comparison with other studies. More attention should be paid to the T2D patients, especially of male gender, with hypertension, longer duration of diabetes, uncontrolled diabetes, total cholesterol ≥ 200mg/dL and HbA1c ≥ 7% (mmol/mol.

  16. Incidence, patterns and severity of reported unintentional injuries in Pakistan for persons five years and older: results of the National Health Survey of Pakistan 1990–94

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qureshi Huma I

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background National level estimates of injuries are not readily available for developing countries. This study estimated the annual incidence, patterns and severity of unintentional injuries among persons over five years of age in Pakistan. Methods National Health Survey of Pakistan (NHSP 1990–94 is a nationally representative survey of the household. Through a two-stage stratified design, 18, 315 persons over 5 years of age were interviewed to estimate the overall annual incidence, patterns and severity of unintentional injuries for males and females in urban and rural areas over the preceding one year. Weighted estimates were computed adjusting for complex survey design using surveyfreq and surveylogistic option of SAS 9.1 software. Results The overall annual incidence of all unintentional injuries was 45.9 (CI: 39.3–52.5 per 1000 per year; 59.2 (CI: 49.2–69.2 and 33.2 (CI: 27.0–39.4 per 1000 per year among males and females over five years of age, respectively. An estimated 6.16 million unintentional injuries occur in Pakistan annually among persons over five years of age. Urban and rural injuries were 55.9 (95% CI: 48.1–63.7 and 41.2 (95% CI: 32.2–50.0 per 1000 per year, respectively. The annual incidence of injuries due to falls were 22.2 (95% CI: 18.0–26.4, poisoning 3.3 (95%CI: 0.5–6.1 and burn was 1.5 (95%CI: 0.9–2.1 per 1000 per year. The majority of injuries occurred at home 19.2 (95%CI: 16.0–22.4 or on the roads 17.0 (95%CI: 13.8–20.2. Road traffic/street, school and urban injuries were more likely to result in handicap. Conclusion There is high burden of unintentional injuries among persons over five years of age in Pakistan. These results are useful to plan further studies and prioritizing prevention programs on injuries nationally and other developing countries with similar situation.

  17. A decade of child-initiated family violence: comparative analysis of child--parent violence and parricide examining offender, victim, and event characteristics in a national sample of reported incidents, 1995-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Jeffrey A; Krienert, Jessie L

    2009-09-01

    This article examines 11 years (1995-2005) of National Incident Based Reporting System data comparing victim, offender, and incident characteristics for two types of child-initiated family violence: child-parent violence (CPV) and parricide. The objective is to better understand the victim-offender relationship for CPV and parricide and to highlight distinguishing features between the two offenses. This work extends the research and addresses shortcomings in the extant literature. Data analysis consists of chi-square tests and logistic regression. Findings suggest that CPV and parricide are distinct and unique crimes. In short, parricide offenders and victims are both older than CPV offenders and victims, with CPV offenders more likely to be female, more likely to be African American, and less likely to use a weapon than parricide offenders. The study calls for future research and exploration of preliminary support for a family violence escalation hypothesis.

  18. Incidence of acute mountain sickness in UK Military Personnel on Mount Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazlerigg, Antonia; Woods, D R; Mellor, A J

    2016-12-01

    Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a common problem of trekkers to high altitude. The UK military train at high altitude through adventurous training (AT) or as exercising troops. The ascent of Point Lenana at 4985 m on Mount Kenya is frequently attempted on AT. This study sought to establish the incidence of AMS within this population, to aid future planning for military activities at altitude. A voluntary questionnaire was distributed to all British Army Training Unit Kenya based expeditions attempting to ascend Mount Kenya during the period from February to April 2014. The questionnaire included twice daily Lake Louise and Borg (perceived exertion scale) self-scoring. All expeditions were planned around a 5-day schedule, which included reserve time for acclimatisation, illness and inclement weather. Data were collected on 47 participants, 70% of whom reached the summit of Point Lenana. 62% (29/47) self-reported AMS (defined as Lake Louise score (LLS) ≥3) on at least one occasion during the ascent, and 34% (10/29) suffered severe AMS (LLS ≥6). Those who attempted the climb within 2 weeks of arrival in Kenya had a higher incidence of AMS (12/15 (80%) vs 17/32 (53%), p=0.077). Participants recording a high Borg score were significantly more likely to develop AMS (16/18 vs 9/21, p=0.003). This represents the first informative dataset for Mount Kenya ascents and altitude. The incidence of AMS during AT on Mount Kenya using this ascent profile is high. Adapting the current ascent profile, planning the ascent after time in country and reducing perceived exertion during the trek may reduce the incidence of AMS. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Incidence of Narcolepsy in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberle, Doris; Drechsel-Bäuerle, Ursula; Schmidtmann, Irene; Mayer, Geert; Keller-Stanislawski, Brigitte

    2015-10-01

    Following the 2009 pandemic, reports of an association between an AS03 adjuvanted H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine and narcolepsy were published. Besides determining background incidence rates for narcolepsy in Germany this study aimed at investigating whether there was a change in incidence rates of narcolepsy between the pre-pandemic, pandemic, and the post-pandemic period on the population level. Retrospective epidemiological study on the incidence of narcolepsy with additional capture-recapture analysis. German sleep centers. Eligible were patients with an initial diagnosis of narcolepsy (ICD10 Code G47.4) within the period from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2011. None; observational study. A total of 342 sleep centers were invited to participate in the study. Adequate and suitable data were provided by 233 sleep centers (68.1%). A total of 1,198 patients with an initial diagnosis of narcolepsy within the observed period were included, of whom 106 (8.8%) were children and adolescents under the age of 18 years and 1,092 (91.2%) were adults. In children and adolescents, the age-standardized adjusted incidence rate significantly increased from 0.14/100,000 person-years in the pre-pandemic period to 0.50/100,000 person-years in the post-pandemic period (incidence density ratio, IDR 3.57; 95% CI 1.94-7.00). In adults, no significant change was detectable. This increase started in spring 2009. For the years 2007-2011, valid estimates for the incidence of narcolepsy in Germany were provided. In individuals under 18, the incidence rates continuously increased from spring 2009. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  20. Recruitment of child soldiers in Nepal: Mental health status and risk factors for voluntary participation of youth in armed groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohrt, Brandon A; Yang, Minyoung; Rai, Sauharda; Bhardwaj, Anvita; Tol, Wietse A; Jordans, Mark J D

    2016-08-01

    Preventing involuntary conscription and voluntary recruitment of youth into armed groups are global human rights priorities. Pathways for self-reported voluntary recruitment and the impact of voluntary recruitment on mental health have received limited attention. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors for voluntarily joining armed groups, as well as the association of conscription status and mental health. In Nepal, interviews were conducted with 258 former child soldiers who participated in a communist (Maoist) revolution. Eighty percent of child soldiers joined 'voluntarily'. Girls were 2.07 times as likely to join voluntarily (95% CI, 1.03-4.16, p=0.04). Among girls, 51% reported joining voluntarily because of personal connections to people who were members of the armed group, compared to 22% of boys. Other reasons included escaping difficult life situations (36%), inability to achieve other goals in life (28%), and an appealing philosophy of the armed group (32%). Poor economic conditions were more frequently endorsed among boys (22%) than girls (10%). Voluntary conscription was associated with decreased risk for PTSD among boys but not for girls. Interventions to prevent voluntary association with armed groups could benefit from attending to difficulties in daily life, identifying non-violent paths to achieve life goals, and challenging the political philosophy of armed groups. Among boys, addressing economic risk factors may prevent recruitment, and prevention efforts for girls will need to address personal connections to armed groups, as it has important implications for preventing recruitment through new methods, such as social media.

  1. The Role of Theory in Explaining Motivation for Corporate Social Disclosures: Voluntary Disclosures vs ‘Solicited’ Disclosures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra van der Laan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Corporate social disclosures (CSD are primarily voluntary in nature and subsequently provide an area forresearch into motivational aspects of disclosures. The main focus of prior research has been whethercorporate social disclosures constitute a discharge of accountability or are part of a process of legitimation.Prior research, however, ignores the emergence of an alternate style of corporate social disclosure, the‘solicited’ disclosure. Increasingly companies are requested to report on their interactions with society invarious forms. Non-government organisations (NGOs, regulatory agencies, ethical or socially responsibleinvestment fund managers and other researchers are requesting social information from corporations. Thisshift from voluntary information provision to demanded information can be viewed as a natural consequenceof the increasing pressures on corporations to be ‘responsible’, particularly in light of intensified world wideattention on unethical corporate behaviour and corporate collapse. These contemporary variants of socialdisclosure are worthy of scrutiny when considering these ‘solicited’ disclosures potentially reduce acorporation’s power in defining the scope and nature of disclosures. Two theories, which are similar andderived from the broader political economy perspective, are commonly offered as explanations of motivationsfor social disclosures. Stakeholder theory offers an explanation of accountability to stakeholders. Legitimacytheory, on the other hand, suggests voluntary disclosures are part of a process of legitimation. This paperargues that these theoretical perspectives may provide greater insights into managerial motivation fordisclosure if they are linked more explicitly to the nature of corporate social disclosure under examination:voluntary or solicited.

  2. Does retrieval intentionality really matter? Similarities and differences between involuntary memories and directly and generatively retrieved voluntary memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzykowski, Krystian; Staugaard, Søren Risløv

    2016-08-01

    Theories of autobiographical memory distinguish between involuntary and voluntary retrieval as a consequence of conscious intention (i.e., wanting to remember). Another distinction can be made between direct and generative retrieval, which reflects the effort involved (i.e., trying to remember). However, it is unclear how intention and effort interacts. For example, involuntary memories and directly retrieved memories have been used interchangeably in the literature to refer to the same phenomenon of effortless, non-strategic retrieval. More recent theoretical advances suggest that they are separate types of retrieval, one unintentional (involuntary), another intentional and effortless (direct voluntary retrieval), and a third intentional and effortful (generative voluntary retrieval). Whether this also entails differing phenomenological characteristics, such as vividness, rehearsal, or emotional valence, has not been previously investigated. In the current study, participants reported memories in an experimental paradigm designed to elicit voluntary and involuntary memories and rated them on a number of characteristics. If intention affects the retrieval process, then we should expect differences between the characteristics of involuntary and directly retrieved memories. The results imply that retrieval intention seems to differentiate how a memory appears in a person's mind. Furthermore, we argue that these differences in part could result from differences in encoding and consolidation.

  3. Voluntary Running Attenuates Memory Loss, Decreases Neuropathological Changes and Induces Neurogenesis in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia-Rojas, Cheril; Aranguiz, Florencia; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of memory and cognitive abilities, and the appearance of amyloid plaques composed of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) and neurofibrillary tangles formed of tau protein. It has been suggested that exercise might ameliorate the disease; here, we evaluated the effect of voluntary running on several aspects of AD including amyloid deposition, tau phosphorylation, inflammatory reaction, neurogenesis and spatial memory in the double transgenic APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mouse model of AD. We report that voluntary wheel running for 10 weeks decreased Aβ burden, Thioflavin-S-positive plaques and Aβ oligomers in the hippocampus. In addition, runner APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice showed fewer phosphorylated tau protein and decreased astrogliosis evidenced by lower staining of GFAP. Further, runner APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice showed increased number of neurons in the hippocampus and exhibited increased cell proliferation and generation of cells positive for the immature neuronal protein doublecortin, indicating that running increased neurogenesis. Finally, runner APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice showed improved spatial memory performance in the Morris water maze. Altogether, our findings indicate that in APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice, voluntary running reduced all the neuropathological hallmarks of AD studied, reduced neuronal loss, increased hippocampal neurogenesis and reduced spatial memory loss. These findings support that voluntary exercise might have therapeutic value on AD.

  4. Voluntary Nonmonetary Conservation Approaches on Private Land: A Review of Constraints, Risks, and Benefits for Raptor Nest Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santangeli, Andrea; Laaksonen, Toni

    2015-02-01

    Biodiversity conservation on private land of the developed world faces several challenges. The costs of land are often high, and the attitudes of landowners towards conservation are variable. Scientists and practitioners need to scan for and adopt cost-effective solutions that allow for the long-term sustainability of conservation measures on private land. In this study, we focus on one of such possible solutions: Working with landowners to implement voluntary nonmonetary conservation. We restrict our focus to protection of raptor nests, but the ideas can be applied to other taxa as well. Through a literature review, we show that a voluntary nonmonetary approach for protecting raptor nests has been so far largely neglected and/or rarely reported in the scientific literature. However, results of a questionnaire sent to BirdLife partners across Europe indicate that this approach is more widely used than it appears from the literature. We show that voluntary nonmonetary approaches may represent useful tools to protect raptor nests on private land. We provide a workflow for implementation of such an approach in raptor nest protection, highlighting benefits, potential risks, and constraints in the application of the strategy. We suggest that a voluntary nonmonetary approach may have great potential for cost-effective conservation, but the risks it may entail should be carefully assessed in each case. There is an urgent need to consider and evaluate novel approaches, such as the one described here, which may constitute missed opportunities for cost-effective conservation.

  5. Avaliação da notificação no Distrito Federal de casos de tuberculose residentes em dez municípios goianos do entorno e análise da incidência de tuberculose nestas localidades Evaluation of tuberculosis cases occurring in ten outlying cities and reported in the Entorno region of the state of Goiás and reported in the neighboring Federal District: analysis of the incidence of tuberculosis in those cites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Auxiliadora Carmo Moreira

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a notificação, no Distrito Federal (DF, de casos de tuberculose em residentes nos municípios goianos da região do Entorno e possíveis influências no Plano de Controle da Tuberculose; analisar a taxa de incidência da tuberculose nos municípios e a interferência da situação socioeconômica e das características demográficas sobre esta taxa. MÉTODO: Analisaram-se dados relativos à incidência de tuberculose, taxas de cura, abandono, falência de tratamento, óbito, transferência e informações socioeconômicas e demográficas de dez municípios goianos. RESULTADOS: No período de 2000 a 2004, foram notificados 714 casos novos de tuberculose em residentes nos municípios estudados, sendo que 436 (61,0% foram atendidos no DF, não sendo registrados no Sistema de Informação de Goiás. Considerando-se os casos atendidos somente em Goiás, a média de incidência de tuberculose do grupo variou de 4,40 a 10,02/100.000 habitantes; somando-se os atendidos no DF, a incidência aumentou significativamente, variando de 15,16 a 20,54/100.000 habitantes (p OBJECTIVE: To evaluate tuberculosis cases occurring in the greater metropolitan area of the Distrito Federal (MADF, encompassing the Federal District, i.e., the national capital of Brasília, located in the state of Goiás but reported in Brasília itself and to analyze the influence that this has on the effectiveness of the tuberculosis control program, as well as on the collection of socioeconomic and demographic data related to tuberculosis incidence rates. METHODS: Rates of tuberculosis incidence, cure, noncompliance, treatment failure, mortality, and referral, as well as socioeconomic and demographic data, were reviewed for patients from ten MADF cities. RESULTS: From 2000 to 2004, 714 new cases of tuberculosis were reported in the cities studied, 436 (61% of which were treated in Brasília and were therefore not included in the Goiás database. Among patients treated

  6. Voluntary ingestion of buprenorphine as a refined analgesic strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kirsten Rosenmaj; Kalliokoski, Otto Henrik; Hau, Jann

    2011-01-01

    Buprenorphine is a widely used analgesic for laboratory rodents. Administration of the drug in an attractive food item for voluntary ingestion is a desirable way to administer the drug noninvasively. The method refi nes the standard analgesic procedure and has the potential to improve the welfare...

  7. Value orientations, expectations and voluntary contributions in public goods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offerman, T.J.S.; Schram, A.J.H.C.; Sonnemans, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental analysis of voluntary, binary contributions for step-level public goods is presented. Independent information is obtained on individual value orientation and expectations about the behavior of other subjects using incentive compatible mechanisms. The effects of increasing payoffs for

  8. Value Orientations, Expectations and Voluntary Contributions in Public Goods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonnemans, J.; Schram, A.; Offermans, T.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental analysis of voluntary, binary contributions for step-level public goods is presented. Independent information is obtained on individual value orientation and expectations about the behavior of other subjects using incentive compatible mechanisms. The effects of increasing payoffs for

  9. 77 FR 55487 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Voluntary Customer Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-10

    ... U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security, and sent via electronic mail to... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities; Voluntary Customer Survey AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: 30-Day...

  10. ANALYSIS OF INTENTION TO CONTINUE SERVICES AMONG RECRUITED VOLUNTARY SOLDIERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Wei Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to attract more promising young people to join the military and enhance combat capability, Taiwan’s Department of Defense is transforming the nation’s military service system from a draft system, which has been in effect for more than sixty years, to an all-volunteer military force system. The government hopes that the new system not only can recruit promising voluntary soldiers, but that they also continue their military service after the contract expires in order to ensure stability in recruitment sources. This study explores the intention of voluntary soldiers to continue their military service. This study’s questionnaire encompasses five dimensions: Participation motivation, organization commitment, career planning, personality traits and departure tendency. The questionnaires were issued to 350 voluntary soldiers to explore if they intend to continue their service after their contract expires, with a total of 314 effective questionnaires that were recovered and analyzed. The results find that about half of the voluntary soldiers indicate that they do not plan on staying and continuing their service after contract expiration, which will result in understaffing in the military. In order to stabilize the prescribed number of soldiers, the existing recruiting policy and military management system should be re-adjusted.

  11. Privatizing or socializing corporate responsibility: business participation in voluntary programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, L.W.; Burgoon, B.

    2014-01-01

    This article explores why companies choose some Corporate Responsibility initiatives over others. The focus is on competing voluntary programs to oversee and protect labor standards. These programs may differ with regard to two aspects: the governance of the program and the financial and managerial

  12. 77 FR 50584 - Voluntary Licensing of Amateur Rocket Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ... are summarized below. Total Benefits and Costs The FAA does not require licensing of amateur rocket... of this rule. To the extent the licensing requirements provide a societal benefit, those benefits... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 400 RIN 2120-AJ84 Voluntary Licensing of Amateur...

  13. Refreshing the "Voluntary National Content Standards in Economics"

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Richard A.; Siegfried, John J.

    2012-01-01

    The second edition of the "Voluntary National Content Standards in Economics" was published by the Council for Economic Education in 2010. The authors examine the process for revising these precollege content standards and highlight several changes that appear in the new document. They also review the impact the standards have had on precollege…

  14. Human Economy and Entrepreneurial Learning in a Voluntary Organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Revsbech, Christine

    2014-01-01

    "Based on five months anthropological field study in a British affiliate of an American charity in London, Revsbech asks what does learning look like in a social voluntary organization for youth. Her chapter argues that volunteers develop entrepreneurial abilities by shifting flexibly between...

  15. Voluntary imitation in Alzheimer’s disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambra eBisio

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Although Alzheimer's disease (AD primarily manifests as cognitive deficits, the implicit sensorimotor processes that underlie social interactions, such as automatic imitation, seem to be preserved in mild and moderate stages of the disease, as is the ability to communicate with other persons. Nevertheless, when AD patients face more challenging tasks, which do not rely on automatic processes but on explicit voluntary mechanisms and require the patient to pay attention to external events, the cognitive deficits resulting from the disease might negatively affect patients’ behaviour. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether voluntary motor imitation, i.e. a volitional mechanism that involves observing another person’s action and translating this perception into one’s own action, was affected in patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Further, we tested whether this ability was modulated by the nature of the observed stimulus by comparing the ability to reproduce the kinematic features of a human demonstrator with that of a computerized-stimulus. AD patients showed an intact ability to reproduce the velocity of the observed movements, particularly when the stimulus was a human agent. This result suggests that high-level cognitive processes involved in voluntary imitation might be preserved in mild and moderate stages of AD and that voluntary imitation abilities might benefit from the implicit interpersonal communication established between the patient and the human demonstrator.

  16. 77 FR 53963 - Voluntary Intermodal Sealift Agreement (VISA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-04

    ... amended to note that each voluntary agreement expires five (5) years after the date it becomes effective... Concept The mission of VISA is to provide commercial sealift and intermodal shipping services and systems... commitments or volunteered capacity are insufficient to meet contingency requirements, and adequate shipping...

  17. Voluntary Genital Ablations: Contrasting the Cutters and Their Clients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robyn A. Jackowich, BA

    2014-08-01

    Conclusions: This study may help identify individuals who are at risk of performing illegal castrations. That information may help healthcare providers protect individuals with extreme castration ideations from injuring themselves or others. Jackowich RA, Vale R, Vale K, Wassersug RJ, and Johnson TW. Voluntary genital ablations: Contrasting the cutters and their clients. Sex Med 2014;2:121–132.

  18. Force-directed design of a voluntary closing hand prosthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Visser, H.; Herder, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a body-powered voluntary closing prosthetic hand. It is argued that the movement of the fingers before establishing a grip is much less relevant for good control of the object held than the distribution of forces once the object has been contacted. Based on this not

  19. Mobilising voluntary contributions in public urban regeneration – a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jacob Norvig; Jensen, Jesper Ole; Agger, Annika

    Research on volunteerism indicates that one third of all adults in Denmark regularly contribute with voluntary labour in social relief work, community-based organizations, non-governmental organizations, or otherwise. In this paper we ask if and how urban regeneration might benefit from the appar...... of voluntary labour and voluntary associations in publicly subsidised urban regeneration. Empirical data will be collected through in-depth case studies in selected communities in both metropolitan neighbourhoods and smaller market towns....... to community development, urban policy, etc. In addition to this, the paper presents results from a survey exploring the extent and character of volunteerism in a number of integrated urban regeneration projects. The paper proposes a systematic overview of experiences with voluntary inputs and engagement...... in relation to public policy arenas and activities, particularly within urban policy and the community development fields. A categorization is proposed as regards different ways and models of civic engagement and major challenges are outlined. The paper is first step of a research project exploring potential...

  20. From participation to consumption? : Consumerism in voluntary sport clubs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Roest, J.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years dark clouds seem to have gathered over the institution of the voluntary sport club. General societal developments such as individualisation and commercialisation have given rise to concerns regarding the transfer of such attitudes to sport clubs. Many people who are involved in and a