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Sample records for voluntary exercise decreased

  1. Voluntary exercise protects against stress-induced decreases in brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlard, P A; Cotman, C W

    2004-01-01

    Exercise is increasingly recognized as an intervention that can reduce CNS dysfunctions such as cognitive decline, depression and stress. Previously we have demonstrated that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is increased in the hippocampus following exercise. In this study we tested the hypothesis that exercise can counteract a reduction in hippocampal BDNF protein caused by acute immobilization stress. Since BDNF expression is suppressed by corticosterone (CORT), circulating CORT levels were also monitored. In animals subjected to 2 h immobilization stress, CORT was elevated immediately following, and at 1 h after the cessation of stress, but remained unchanged from baseline up to 24 h post-stress. The stress protocol resulted in a reduction in BDNF protein at 5 and 10 h post-stress that returned to baseline at 24 h. To determine if exercise could prevent this stress-induced reduction in BDNF protein, animals were given voluntary access to running wheels for 3 weeks prior to the stress. Stressed animals, in the absence of exercise, again demonstrated an initial elevation in CORT (at 0 h) and a subsequent decrease in hippocampal BDNF at the 10 h time point. Exercising animals, both non-stressed and stressed, demonstrated circulating CORT and hippocampal BDNF protein levels that were significantly elevated above control values at both time points examined (0 and 10 h post-stress). Thus, the persistently high CORT levels in exercised animals did not affect the induction of BDNF with exercise, and the effect of immobilization stress on BDNF protein was overcome. To examine the role of CORT in the stress-related regulation of BDNF protein, experiments were carried out in adrenalectomized (ADX) animals. BDNF protein was not downregulated as a result of immobilization stress in ADX animals, while there continued to be an exercise-induced upregulation of BDNF. This study demonstrates that CORT modulates stress-related alterations in BDNF protein. Further, exercise

  2. Voluntary exercise decreases amyloid load in a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease.

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    Adlard, Paul A; Perreau, Victoria M; Pop, Viorela; Cotman, Carl W

    2005-04-27

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder for which there are few therapeutics that affect the underlying disease mechanism. Recent epidemiological studies, however, suggest that lifestyle changes may slow the onset/progression of AD. Here we have used TgCRND8 mice to examine directly the interaction between exercise and the AD cascade. Five months of voluntary exercise resulted in a decrease in extracellular amyloid-beta (Abeta) plaques in the frontal cortex (38%; p = 0.018), the cortex at the level of the hippocampus (53%; p = 0.0003), and the hippocampus (40%; p = 0.06). This was associated with decreased cortical Abeta1-40 (35%; p = 0.005) and Abeta1-42 (22%; p = 0.04) (ELISA). The mechanism appears to be mediated by a change in the processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) after short-term exercise, because 1 month of activity decreased the proteolytic fragments of APP [for alpha-C-terminal fragment (alpha-CTF), 54% and p = 0.04; for beta-CTF, 35% and p = 0.03]. This effect was independent of mRNA/protein changes in neprilysin and insulin-degrading enzyme and, instead, may involve neuronal metabolism changes that are known to affect APP processing and to be regulated by exercise. Long-term exercise also enhanced the rate of learning of TgCRND8 animals in the Morris water maze, with significant (p exercise is a simple behavioral intervention sufficient to inhibit the normal progression of AD-like neuropathology in the TgCRND8 mouse model.

  3. Voluntary exercise decreases atherosclerosis in nephrectomised ApoE knockout mice.

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    Cecilia M Shing

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with kidney disease. The effectiveness of exercise for cardiovascular disease that is accelerated by the presence of chronic kidney disease remains unknown. The present study utilized apolipoprotein E knockout mice with 5/6 nephrectomy as a model of combined kidney disease and cardiovascular disease to investigate the effect of exercise on aortic plaque formation, vascular function and systemic inflammation. Animals were randomly assigned to nephrectomy or control and then to either voluntary wheel running exercise or sedentary. Following 12-weeks, aortic plaque area was significantly (p0.05. Nephrectomy increased IL-6 and TNF-α concentrations compared with control mice (p0.05. Exercise was an effective non-pharmacologic approach to slow cardiovascular disease in the presence of kidney disease in the apolipoprotein E knockout mouse.

  4. Voluntary exercise counteracts Aβ25-35-induced memory impairment in mice.

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    Wang, Qin; Xu, Zhiqiang; Tang, Jinrong; Sun, Jianguo; Gao, Junying; Wu, Ting; Xiao, Ming

    2013-11-01

    Exercise has been shown to enhance hippocampus-related cognition and slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, whether voluntary exercise directly decreases the neurotoxicity of amyloid peptide (Aβ) needs to be determined. In the present study, two-month old male C57bl/6 mice were intracerebroventricularly injected with Aβ25-35, and then allowed for voluntary exercise for 12 days. Y-maze test revealed that voluntary exercise mitigated spatial memory impairment induced by Aβ25-35. Consistently, Aβ25-35 treated mice with exercise showed reduced neuronal degeneration and synaptic protein loss in the hippocampus compared with sedentary controls. Moreover, voluntary exercise significantly ameliorated oxidative stress markers and increased vessel branches in the hippocampus of Aβ25-35 treated mice. Our results suggest that voluntary exercise counteracts the neurotoxicity of Aβ by reducing oxidative stress and increasing angiogenesis, which may underlie the beneficial effect of exercise on AD.

  5. The repeated bout effect of eccentric exercise is not associated with changes in voluntary activation.

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    Kamandulis, Sigitas; Skurvydas, Albertas; Brazaitis, Marius; Skikas, Laimutis; Duchateau, Jacques

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the possible changes in muscle activation level between a first and second bout of damaging eccentric exercise performed at 2 weeks interval (i.e. repeated bout effect). To that purpose, ten physically active males took part in this study. The eccentric exercise consisted of 10 sets of 12 maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) produced by the knee extensors during movements performed at a constant speed of 160 degrees s(-1). Changes in voluntary and electrically evoked torque in concentric and/or isometric conditions were assessed at the following time points: pre-exercise, and 2 min, 1 and 24 h after each eccentric exercise. At the same time points, voluntary activation was quantified by the superimposed electrical stimulation technique. Muscle soreness and plasma CK activity were measured within 48 h after the eccentric exercise. The results showed that the decrease in eccentric peak torque was linear throughout the exercise protocol. At the end of bouts 1 and 2, torque was significantly reduced by 27.7 +/- 9.1 and 23.4 +/- 11.2, respectively, with no difference between bouts (P > 0.05). At 24 h post-exercise, a lower reduction (P eccentric exercise appears to reduce muscle damage, but does not influence the level of voluntary activation.

  6. Cardiovascular responses to voluntary and nonvoluntary static exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, D B; Peel, C; Mitchell, J H

    1992-11-01

    We have measured the cardiovascular responses during voluntary and nonvoluntary (electrically induced) one-leg static exercise in humans. Eight normal subjects were studied at rest and during 5 min of static leg extension at 20% of maximal voluntary contraction performed voluntarily and nonvoluntarily in random order. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and cardiac output (CO) were determined, and peripheral vascular resistance (PVR) and stroke volume (SV) were calculated. HR increased from approximately 65 +/- 3 beats/min at rest to 80 +/- 4 and 78 +/- 6 beats/min (P voluntary and nonvoluntary contractions, respectively. CO increased from 5.1 +/- 0.7 to 6.0 +/- 0.8 and 6.2 +/- 0.8 l/min (P voluntary and nonvoluntary contractions, respectively. PVR and SV did not change significantly during voluntary or nonvoluntary contractions. Thus the cardiovascular responses were not different between voluntary and electrically induced contractions. These results suggest that the increases in CO, HR, SV, MAP, and PVR during 5 min of static contractions can be elicited without any contribution from a central neural mechanism (central command). However, central command could still have an important role during voluntary static exercise.

  7. Cardioprotective Effects of Voluntary Exercise in a Rat Model: Role of Matrix Metalloproteinase-2

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    Anikó Pósa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Regular exercise at moderate intensity reduces cardiovascular risks. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs play a major role in cardiac remodeling, facilitating physiological adaptation to exercise. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of voluntary physical exercise on the MMP-2 enzyme activity and to investigate the cardiac performance by measurement of angina susceptibility of the heart, the basal blood pressure, the surviving aorta ring contraction, and the cardiac infarct size after I/R-induced injury. Methods. Male Wistar rats were divided into control and exercising groups. After a 6-week period, the serum level of MMP-2, basal blood pressure, cardiac angina susceptibility (the ST segment depression provoked by epinephrine and 30 s later phentolamine, AVP-induced heart perfusion and aorta ring contraction, infarct size following 30 min ischemia and 120 min reperfusion, and coronary effluent MMP-2 activity were measured. Results. Voluntary wheel-running exercise decreased both the sera (64 kDa and 72 kDa and the coronary effluent (64 kDa MMP-2 level, reduced the development of ST depression, improved the isolated heart perfusion, and decreased the ratio of infarct size. Conclusion. 6 weeks of voluntary exercise training preserved the heart against cardiac injury. This protective mechanism might be associated with the decreased activity of MMP-2.

  8. Forearm muscle oxygenation decreases with low levels of voluntary contraction

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    Murthy, G.; Kahan, N. J.; Hargens, A. R.; Rempel, D. M.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of our investigation was to determine if the near infrared spectroscopy technique was sensitive to changes in tissue oxygenation at low levels of isometric contraction in the extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle. Nine subjects were seated with the right arm abducted to 45 degrees, elbow flexed to 85 degrees, forearm pronated 45 degrees, and wrist and forearm supported on an armrest throughout the protocol. Altered tissue oxygenation was measured noninvasively with near infrared spectroscopy. The near infrared spectroscopy probe was placed over the extensor carpi radialis brevis of the subject's right forearm and secured with an elastic wrap. After 1 minute of baseline measurements taken with the muscle relaxed, four different loads were applied just proximal to the metacarpophalangeal joint such that the subjects isometrically contracted the extensor carpi radialis brevis at 5, 10, 15, and 50% of the maximum voluntary contraction for 1 minute each. A 3-minute recovery period followed each level of contraction. At the end of the protocol, with the probe still in place, a value for ischemic tissue oxygenation was obtained for each subject. This value was considered the physiological zero and hence 0% tissue oxygenation. Mean tissue oxygenation (+/-SE) decreased from resting baseline (100% tissue oxygenation) to 89 +/- 4, 81 +/- 8, 78 +/- 8, and 47 +/- 8% at 5, 10, 15, and 50% of the maximum voluntary contraction, respectively. Tissue oxygenation levels at 10, 15, and 50% of the maximum voluntary contraction were significantly lower (p muscle contraction and that near infrared spectroscopy is a sensitive technique for detecting deoxygenation noninvasively at low levels of forearm muscle contraction. Our findings have important implications in occupational medicine because oxygen depletion induced by low levels of muscle contraction may be directly linked to muscle fatigue.

  9. 7 CFR 4290.585 - Voluntary decrease in RBIC's Regulatory Capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Voluntary decrease in RBIC's Regulatory Capital. 4290... INVESTMENT COMPANY (âRBICâ) PROGRAM Managing the Operations of a RBIC Voluntary Decrease in Regulatory Capital § 4290.585 Voluntary decrease in RBIC's Regulatory Capital. You must obtain the Secretary's prior...

  10. 13 CFR 107.585 - Voluntary decrease in Licensee's Regulatory Capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Voluntary decrease in Licensee's... SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee Voluntary Decrease in Licensee's Regulatory Capital § 107.585 Voluntary decrease in Licensee's Regulatory Capital. You must obtain...

  11. Voluntary exercise improves performance of a discrimination task through effects on the striatal dopamine system

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    Eddy, Meghan C.; Stansfield, Katherine J.; Green, John T.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that voluntary exercise facilitates discrimination learning in a modified T-maze. There is evidence implicating the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) as the substrate for this task. The present experiments examined whether changes in DLS dopamine receptors might underlie the exercise-associated facilitation. Infusing a D1R antagonist into the DLS prior to discrimination learning facilitated the performance of nonexercising rats but not exercising rats. Infusing a D2R antagonist impaired the performance of exercising rats but not nonexercising rats. Exercise-associated facilitation of this task may rely on an exercise-induced decrease in D1R and increase in D2R activation in the DLS. PMID:24934332

  12. Voluntary Exercise Preconditioning Activates Multiple Antiapoptotic Mechanisms and Improves Neurological Recovery after Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury.

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    Zhao, Zaorui; Sabirzhanov, Boris; Wu, Junfang; Faden, Alan I; Stoica, Bogdan A

    2015-09-01

    Physical activity can attenuate neuronal loss, reduce neuroinflammation, and facilitate recovery after brain injury. However, little is known about the mechanisms of exercise-induced neuroprotection after traumatic brain injury (TBI) or its modulation of post-traumatic neuronal cell death. Voluntary exercise, using a running wheel, was conducted for 4 weeks immediately preceding (preconditioning) moderate-level controlled cortical impact (CCI), a well-established experimental TBI model in mice. Compared to nonexercised controls, exercise preconditioning (pre-exercise) improved recovery of sensorimotor performance in the beam walk task, as well as cognitive/affective functions in the Morris water maze, novel object recognition, and tail-suspension tests. Further, pre-exercise reduced lesion size, attenuated neuronal loss in the hippocampus, cortex, and thalamus, and decreased microglial activation in the cortex. In addition, exercise preconditioning activated the brain-derived neurotrophic factor pathway before trauma and amplified the injury-dependent increase in heat shock protein 70 expression, thus attenuating key apoptotic pathways. The latter include reduction in CCI-induced up-regulation of proapoptotic B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-homology 3-only Bcl-2 family molecules (Bid, Puma), decreased mitochondria permeabilization with attenuated release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), reduced AIF translocation to the nucleus, and attenuated caspase activation. Given these neuroprotective actions, voluntary physical exercise may serve to limit the consequences of TBI.

  13. Downregulation of cough by exercise and voluntary hyperpnea.

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    Fontana, Giovanni A

    2010-01-01

    No information exists on the effects of hyperpnea on the sensory and cognitive aspects of coughing evoked by inhalation of tussigenic agents. The threshold for the cough reflex induced by inhalation of increasing concentrations of ultrasonically nebulized distilled water (fog), and the index of cough reflex sensitivity, was assessed in 12 healthy humans in control conditions, during exercise, and during voluntary isocapnic hyperventilation (VIH) to the same level as the exercise. The intensity of the urge-to-cough (UTC), a cognitive component of coughing, was also recorded throughout the trials. The log-log relationship between inhaled fog concentrations and the correspondingly evoked UTC values, an index of the perceptual magnitude of the UTC sensitivity, was also calculated. Cough appearance was always assessed audiovisually. At an exercise level of 80% of anaerobic threshold, the mean cough threshold was increased from a control value of 1.03 +/- 0.65 to 2.25 +/- 1.14 ml/min (p VIH, the mean (+/-SD) threshold increased from 1.03 +/- 0.65 to 2.42 +/- 1.16 ml/min (p VIH compared with control, mean UTC values at cough threshold were not significantly changed: control, 3.83 +/- 1.11 cm; exercise, 3.12 +/- 0.82 cm; VIH, 4.08 +/- 1.67 cm. Since the slopes of the log fog concentration/log UTC value were approximately halved during exercise and VIH compared with control, the UTC sensitivity to fog was depressed (p < 0.01). The results indicate that the adjustments brought into action by exercise-induced or voluntary hyperventilation exert inhibitory influences on the sensory and cognitive components of fog-induced cough.

  14. Eucapnic voluntary hyperventilation in diagnosing exercise-induced laryngeal obstructions.

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    Christensen, Pernille M; Rasmussen, Niels

    2013-11-01

    Exercise-induced laryngeal obstructions (EILOs) cause exercise-related respiratory symptoms (ERRS) and are important differential diagnoses to exercise-induced asthma. The diagnostic method for EILOs includes provocation to induce the obstruction followed by a verification of the obstruction and the degree thereof. The objective of the present study was to examine if a eucapnic voluntary hyperventilation (EVH) test could induce laryngeal obstructions laryngoscopically identical in subtypes and development as seen during an exercise test. EVH and exercise testing with continuous laryngoscopy were performed during a screening of two national athletic teams (n = 67). The laryngoscopic recordings were examined for usability, abnormalities and maximal supraglottic and glottic obstruction using two currently available methods (Eilomea and CLE-score). The participants were asked questions on ERRS, and whether the symptoms experienced during each provocation matched those experienced during regular training. A total of 39 completed both tests. There were no significant differences in subtypes and development thereof, the experience of symptoms, and specificity and sensitivity between the methods. Significantly more recordings obtained during the exercise test were usable for evaluation primarily due to resilient mucus on the tip of the fiber-laryngoscope in the EVH test. Only recordings of six athletes from both provocation methods were usable for evaluation using the Eilomea method (high-quality demand). Amongst these, a linear correlation was found for the glottic obstruction. EVH tests can induce EILOs. However, the present test protocol needs adjustments to secure better visualisation of the larynx during provocation.

  15. Voluntary exercise and its effects on body composition depend on genetic selection history.

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    Nehrenberg, Derrick L; Hua, Kunjie; Estrada-Smith, Daria; Garland, Theodore; Pomp, Daniel

    2009-07-01

    Little is known about how genetic variation affects the capacity for exercise to change body composition. We examined the extent to which voluntary exercise alters body composition in several lines of selectively bred mice compared to controls. Lines studied included high runner (HR) (selected for high wheel running), M16 (selected for rapid weight gain), Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) (randomly bred as control for M16), M16i (an inbred line derived from M16), HE (selected for high percentage of body fat while holding body weight constant), LF (selected for low percentage of body fat), C57BL/6J (common inbred line), and the F1 between HR and C57BL/6J. Body weight and body fat were recorded before and after 6 days of free access to running wheels in males and females that were individually caged. Total food intake was measured during this 6-day period. All pre- and postexercise measures showed significant strain effects. While HR mice predictably exercised at higher levels, all other selection lines had decreased levels of wheel running relative to ICR. The HR x B6 F1 ran at similar levels to HR demonstrating complete dominance for voluntary exercise. Also, all strains lost body fat after exercise, but the relationships between exercise and changes in percent body were not uniform across genotypes. These results indicate that there is significant genetic variation for voluntary exercise and its effects on body composition. It is important to carefully consider genetic background and/or selection history when using mice to model effects of exercise on body composition, and perhaps, other complex traits as well.

  16. Voluntary exercise prevents cisplatin-induced muscle wasting during chemotherapy in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernille Hojman

    Full Text Available Loss of muscle mass related to anti-cancer therapy is a major concern in cancer patients, being associated with important clinical endpoints including survival, treatment toxicity and patient-related outcomes. We investigated effects of voluntary exercise during cisplatin treatment on body weight, food intake as well as muscle mass, strength and signalling. Mice were treated weekly with 4 mg/kg cisplatin or saline for 6 weeks, and randomized to voluntary wheel running or not. Cisplatin treatment induced loss of body weight (29.8%, P < 0.001, lean body mass (20.6%, P = 0.001, as well as anorexia, impaired muscle strength (22.5% decrease, P < 0.001 and decreased glucose tolerance. In addition, cisplatin impaired Akt-signalling, induced genes related to protein degradation and inflammation, and reduced muscle glycogen content. Voluntary wheel running during treatment attenuated body weight loss by 50% (P < 0.001, maintained lean body mass (P < 0.001 and muscle strength (P < 0.001, reversed anorexia and impairments in Akt and protein degradation signalling. Cisplatin-induced muscular inflammation was not prevented by voluntary wheel running, nor was glucose tolerance improved. Exercise training may preserve muscle mass in cancer patients receiving cisplatin treatment, potentially improving physical capacity, quality of life and overall survival.

  17. Effects of voluntary exercise on anxiety-like behavior and voluntary morphine consumption in rat pups borne from morphine-dependent mothers during pregnancy.

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    Haydari, Sakineh; Miladi-Gorji, Hossein; Mokhtari, Amin; Safari, Manouchehr

    2014-08-22

    Exposure to morphine during pregnancy produced long-term effects in offspring behaviors. Recent studies have shown that voluntary exercise decreases the severity of anxiety behaviors in both morphine-dependent and withdrawn rats. Thus, the aims of the present study were to examine whether maternal exercise decreases prenatal dependence-induced anxiety and also, voluntary consumption of morphine in animal models of craving in rat pups. Pregnant rats were made dependent by chronic administration of morphine in drinking water simultaneously with access to a running wheel that lasted at least 21 days. Then, anxiety-like behaviors using the elevated plus-maze (EPM) and voluntary consumption of morphine using a two-bottle choice paradigm (TBC) were tested in male rat pups. The results showed that the rat pups borne from exercising morphine-dependent mothers exhibited an increase in EPM open arm time (Pexercising morphine-dependent mothers was less in the second (Pexercise decreases the severity of the anxiogenic-like behaviors and voluntary consumption of morphine in rat pups.

  18. Voluntary exercise rescues sevoflurane-induced memory impairment in aged male mice.

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    Tian, Dan; Tian, Miao; Ma, Zhiming; Zhang, Leilei; Cui, Yunfeng; Li, Jinlong

    2016-12-01

    Postoperative cognitive impairment is especially common in older patients following major surgery. Although exposure to sevoflurane is known to cause memory deficits, few studies have examined the putative approaches to reduce such impairments. This study tested the hypotheses that sevoflurane exposure can decrease NR2B subunit-containing NMDA receptor activity in hippocampus of aged mice, and voluntary exercise may counteract the declining hippocampal functions. We found that long exposure (3 h/day for 3 days), but not short exposure (1 h/day for 3 days), to 3 % sevoflurane produced a long-lasting spatial memory deficits up to 3 weeks in aged mice, and such an effect was not due to the neuronal loss in the hippocampus, but was correlated with a long-term decrease in Fyn kinase expression and NR2B subunit phosphorylation in the hippocampus. Furthermore, voluntary exercise rescued sevoflurane-induced spatial memory deficits in aged mice and restored Fyn kinase expression and NR2B subunit phosphorylation in the hippocampus to a level comparable to control animals. Generally, our results suggested that Fyn-mediated NR2B subunit phosphorylation may play a critical role in sevoflurane-induced impairment in cognitive functions in aged animals, and voluntary exercise might be an important non-pharmacological approach to treatment of inhaled anesthetics-induced postoperative cognitive impairment in clinical settings.

  19. 13 CFR 108.585 - Voluntary decrease in NMVC Company's Regulatory Capital.

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    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Voluntary decrease in NMVC Company's Regulatory Capital. 108.585 Section 108.585 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS... Decrease in Regulatory Capital § 108.585 Voluntary decrease in NMVC Company's Regulatory Capital. You must...

  20. Effect of voluntary exercise on BDNF/TrkB gene expression and alcohol intake.

    OpenAIRE

    Jonsson, Josefine

    2012-01-01

    Voluntary wheel running is rewarding and believed to activate the same brain reward system as in alcohol and drug addiction. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a well-known growth factor widely expressed in the brain, is modulated by both voluntary exercise and alcohol consumption. The aim of this study was to evaluate how voluntary exercise affects the expression levels of BDNF and its receptor TrkB in brain regions involved in positive and negative reinforcement. Additionally we want...

  1. Increased Skeletal Muscle GLUT4 Expression in Obese Mice After Voluntary Wheel Running Exercise Is Posttranscriptional.

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    Gurley, Jami M; Griesel, Beth A; Olson, Ann Louise

    2016-10-01

    Exercise promotes glucose clearance by increasing skeletal muscle GLUT4-mediated glucose uptake. Importantly, exercise upregulates muscle GLUT4 expression in an insulin-independent manner under conditions of insulin resistance, such as with type 2 diabetes. However, the insulin-independent mechanism responsible for rescued muscle GLUT4 expression is poorly understood. We used voluntary wheel running (VWR) in mice to test the prevailing hypothesis that insulin-independent upregulation of skeletal muscle GLUT4 protein expression with exercise is through increased Glut4 transcription. We demonstrate that 4 weeks of VWR exercise in obese mice rescued high-fat diet-induced decreased muscle GLUT4 protein and improved both fasting plasma insulin and hepatic triacylglyceride levels, but did not rescue muscle Glut4 mRNA. Persistent reduction in Glut4 mRNA suggests that a posttranscriptional mechanism regulated insulin-independent muscle GLUT4 protein expression in response to exercise in lean and obese mice. Reduction of GLUT4 protein in sedentary animals upon treatment with rapamycin revealed mTORC1-dependent GLUT4 regulation. However, no difference in GLUT4 protein expression was observed in VWR-exercised mice treated with either rapamycin or Torin 1, indicating that exercise-dependent regulation on GLUT4 was mTOR independent. The findings provide new insight into the mechanisms responsible for exercise-dependent regulation of GLUT4 in muscle.

  2. Voluntary exercise and increased food intake after mild chronic stress improve social avoidance behavior in mice.

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    Otsuka, Airi; Shiuchi, Tetsuya; Chikahisa, Sachiko; Shimizu, Noriyuki; Séi, Hiroyoshi

    2015-11-01

    It is well-established that exercise can influence psychological conditions, cognitive function, and energy metabolism in peripheral tissues including the skeletal muscle. However, it is not clear whether exercise can influence social interaction with others and alleviate defeat stress. This study investigated the effect of voluntary wheel running on impaired social interaction induced by chronic social defeat stress (SDS) using the resident-intruder social defeat model. Mice were divided into three groups: control, stress alone, and stress+exercise. SDS was performed by exposing C57BL/6 mice to retired ICR mice for 2.5 min. The C57BL/6 mice were continuously defeated by these resident (aggressor) mice and, following 5 days of SDS, experienced 2 days of rest with no SDS. Mice in the stress+exercise group were allowed to voluntarily run on a wheel for 2h after every SDS exposure. Two weeks later, compared to the control group, the stress group showed a higher ratio of time spent in the corner zone of a social interaction paradigm even though SDS did not elicit depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors. We also observed that voluntary exercise, which did not affect muscle weight and gene expression, decreased social avoidance behavior of stressed mice without clear changes in brain monoamine levels. Interestingly, food intake in the stress+exercise group was the greatest among the three groups. To test the effect of the exercise-induced increase in food intake on social behavior, we set up a pair-fed group where food intake was restricted. We then compared these mice to mice in the stress alone group. We found that the ratio of time spent in the corner zone of the social interaction test was not different between ad libitum- and pair-fed groups, although pair-fed mice spent more time in the corner zone when an aggressor mouse was present than when it was absent. In addition, pair-feeding did not show exercise-induced reductions of adrenal gland weight and enhanced the

  3. Effects of early-onset voluntary exercise on adult physical activity and associated phenotypes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Wendy; Meek, Thomas H; Schutz, Heidi; Dlugosz, Elizabeth M; Vu, Kim T; Garland, Theodore

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of early-life exercise on adult physical activity (wheel running, home-cage activity), body mass, food consumption, and circulating leptin levels in males from four replicate lines of mice selectively bred for high voluntary wheel running (High Runner or HR) and their four non-selected control (C) lines. Half of the mice were given wheel access shortly after weaning for three consecutive weeks. Wheel access was then removed for 52 days, followed by two weeks of adult wheel access for all mice. A blood sample taken prior to adult wheel testing was analyzed for circulating leptin concentration. Early-life wheel access significantly increased adult voluntary exercise on wheels during the first week of the second period of wheel access, for both HR and C mice, and HR ran more than C mice. During this same time period, activity in the home cages was not affected by early-age wheel access, and did not differ statistically between HR and C mice. Throughout the study, all mice with early wheel access had lower body masses than their sedentary counterparts, and HR mice had lower body masses than C mice. With wheel access, HR mice also ate significantly more than C mice. Early-life wheel access increased plasma leptin levels (adjusted statistically for fat-pad mass as a covariate) in C mice, but decreased them in HR mice. At sacrifice, early-life exercise had no statistically significant effects on visceral fat pad, heart (ventricle), liver or spleen masses (all adjusted statistically for variation in body mass). Results support the hypothesis that early-age exercise in mice can have at least transitory positive effects on adult levels of voluntary exercise, in addition to reducing body mass, and may be relevant for the public policy debates concerning the importance of physical education for children. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Voluntary Running Attenuates Memory Loss, Decreases Neuropathological Changes and Induces Neurogenesis in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

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    Tapia-Rojas, Cheril; Aranguiz, Florencia; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of memory and cognitive abilities, and the appearance of amyloid plaques composed of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) and neurofibrillary tangles formed of tau protein. It has been suggested that exercise might ameliorate the disease; here, we evaluated the effect of voluntary running on several aspects of AD including amyloid deposition, tau phosphorylation, inflammatory reaction, neurogenesis and spatial memory in the double transgenic APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mouse model of AD. We report that voluntary wheel running for 10 weeks decreased Aβ burden, Thioflavin-S-positive plaques and Aβ oligomers in the hippocampus. In addition, runner APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice showed fewer phosphorylated tau protein and decreased astrogliosis evidenced by lower staining of GFAP. Further, runner APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice showed increased number of neurons in the hippocampus and exhibited increased cell proliferation and generation of cells positive for the immature neuronal protein doublecortin, indicating that running increased neurogenesis. Finally, runner APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice showed improved spatial memory performance in the Morris water maze. Altogether, our findings indicate that in APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice, voluntary running reduced all the neuropathological hallmarks of AD studied, reduced neuronal loss, increased hippocampal neurogenesis and reduced spatial memory loss. These findings support that voluntary exercise might have therapeutic value on AD.

  5. Voluntary exercise attenuates obesity-associated inflammation through ghrelin expressed in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizaki, Takako; Maegawa, Taketeru; Sakurai, Takuya; Ogasawara, Jun-etsu; Ookawara, Tomomi; Oh-ishi, Shuji; Izawa, Tetsuya; Haga, Shukoh; Ohno, Hideki

    2011-09-30

    Chronic low-level inflammation is associated with obesity and a sedentary lifestyle, causing metabolic disturbances such as insulin resistance. Exercise training has been shown to decrease chronic low-level systemic inflammation in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating its beneficial effects are not fully understood. Ghrelin is a peptide hormone predominantly produced in the stomach that stimulates appetite and induces growth hormone release. In addition to these well-known functions, recent studies suggest that ghrelin localizes to immune cells and exerts an anti-inflammatory effect. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the role of ghrelin expressed in macrophages in the anti-inflammatory effects of voluntary exercise training. Expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 and F4/80 was increased in adipose tissue from mice fed a HFD (HFD mice) compared with mice fed a standard diet (SD mice), whereas the expression of these inflammatory cytokines was markedly decreased in mice performing voluntary wheel running during the feeding of a HFD (HFEx mice). The expression of TNF-α was also increased in peritoneal macrophages by a HFD and exercise training inhibited the increase of TNF-α expression. Interestingly, expression of ghrelin in peritoneal macrophages was decreased by a HFD and recovered by exercise training. Suppression of ghrelin expression by siRNA increased TNF-α expression and LPS-stimulated NF-κB activation in RAW264 cells, which is a macrophage cell line. TNF-α expression by stimulation with LPS was significantly suppressed in RAW264 cells cultured in the presence of ghrelin. These results suggest that ghrelin exerts potent anti-inflammatory effects in macrophages and functions as a mediator of the beneficial effects of exercise training. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of chemically induced ovarian failure on voluntary wheel-running exercise and cardiac adaptation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Jessica N; Chen, Hao; Regan, Jessica A; Emert, Ashlie; Constantopoulos, Eleni; Lynn, Melissa; Konhilas, John P

    2013-06-01

    The role of exercise in decreasing the risk of cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women has not been studied sufficiently. Accordingly, we investigated the effect of voluntary wheel-running and forced treadmill exercise on cardiac adaptation in mice treated with 4-vinylcyclohexine diepoxide (VCD), which selectively accelerates the loss of primary and primordial follicles and results in a state that closely mimics human menopause. Two-month-old female C57BL/6 mice injected with VCD (160 mg/kg) for 20 consecutive days underwent ovarian failure by 60 to 90 d after injection. Responses to voluntary wheel running and treadmill exercise did not differ between VCD- and vehicle-treated 7-mo-old C57BL/6 or outbred B6C3F1 mice. Moreover, adaptive cardiac hypertrophy, hypertrophic marker expression, and skeletal muscle characteristics after voluntary cage-wheel exercise did not differ between VCD- and vehicle-treated mice. Because 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key component for the maintenance of cardiac energy balance during exercise, we determined the effect of exercise and VCD-induced ovarian failure on the AMPK signaling axis in the heart. According to Western blotting, VCD treatment followed by voluntary cage-wheel exercise differently affected the upstream AMPK regulatory components AMPKα1 and AMPKα2. In addition, net downstream AMPK signaling was reduced after VCD treatment and exercise. Our data suggest that VCD did not affect exercise-induced cardiac hypertrophy but did alter cellular cardiac adaptation in a mouse model of menopause.

  7. Hippocampal cell proliferation is reduced following prenatal ethanol exposure but can be rescued with voluntary exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redila, Van A; Olson, Andrea K; Swann, Sarah E; Mohades, Gisou; Webber, Alina J; Weinberg, Joanne; Christie, Brian R

    2006-01-01

    The ingestion of ethanol during pregnancy has a number of deleterious consequences for the unborn offspring, producing structural and functional deficits that affect the brain and many other organs into adulthood. The hippocampus is a brain area that is particularly sensitive to ethanol's adverse effects. In a previous study we showed that voluntary exercise can ameliorate deficits in long-term potentiation and behavior that occur following prenatal ethanol exposure (Eur J Neurosci, 2005, 21, 1719-1726). In the present study, we investigated the effects of prenatal ethanol exposure on neurogenesis in adulthood, and tested the hypothesis that voluntary exercise would ameliorate any deficits observed. Sprague-Dawley females were administered one of three diets throughout gestation: (i) ethanol (E), a liquid diet containing 36.5% ethanol-derived calories; (ii) pair-fed (PF), a liquid control diet, with maltose-dextrin isocalorically substituted for ethanol, in the amount consumed by an E partner (g/kg body wt/day of gestation); and (iii) ad-libitum-fed control (C), normal laboratory chow and water, ad libitum. The offspring were housed individually at postnatal day (PND) 35, and at PND 50 were randomly assigned to cages either with or without an exercise wheel. BrdU (200 mg/kg, I.P.) was injected on PND 57, and animals terminated either 24 h (proliferation) or 4 weeks (neurogenesis) later. Our results demonstrate that prenatal ethanol exposure significantly decreases both cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the adult dentate gyrus. Animals in the PF condition also showed reduced neurogenesis. In contrast, all animals that engaged in voluntary exercise showed a significant increase in cell proliferation and neurogenesis. These results indicate that prenatal ethanol exposure can suppress both cell proliferation and neurogenesis, and that these effects may be, at least in part, nutritionally mediated. Importantly, voluntary exercise appears to have beneficial effects

  8. A candidate syntenic genetic locus is associated with voluntary exercise levels in mice and humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kostrzewa, E.; Brandys, M. K.; van Lith, H. A.; Kas, M. J H

    2015-01-01

    Individual levels of physical activity, and especially of voluntary physical exercise, highly contribute to the susceptibility for developing metabolic, cardiovascular diseases, and potentially to psychiatric disorders. Here, we applied a cross-species approach to explore a candidate genetic region

  9. Facilitation of corticospinal tract excitability by transcranial direct current stimulation combined with voluntary grip exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gi-Wook; Ko, Myoung-Hwan

    2013-08-26

    Previous studies have established that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a powerful technique for the deliberate manipulation of the activity of human cerebral cortex. Moreover, it has also been shown that the non-exhausted voluntary motor exercise increases the excitability of corticospinal tract. We conducted this study to define the facilitation effect following anodal tDCS combined with the voluntary grip exercise as compared with single use of tDCS or voluntary grip exercise. Our result showed that the combination of anodal tDCS with voluntary grip exercise produced a 2-fold increase in the amplitude of MEP as compared with single use of anodal tDCS or voluntary grip exercise. In conclusion, our result could indicate that the treatment outcomes of brain and neurorehabilitation using tDCS would be better when tDCS is combined with the appropriate method of voluntary exercise as compared with single use of tDCS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Voluntary Exercise Improves Performance of a Discrimination Task through Effects on the Striatal Dopamine System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Meghan C.; Stansfield, Katherine J.; Green, John T.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that voluntary exercise facilitates discrimination learning in a modified T-maze. There is evidence implicating the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) as the substrate for this task. The present experiments examined whether changes in DLS dopamine receptors might underlie the exercise-associated facilitation. Infusing a…

  11. Voluntary exercise increases cholesterol efflux but not macrophage reverse cholesterol transport in vivo in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuipers Folkert

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Physical exercise beneficially impacts on the plasma lipoprotein profile as well as on the incidence of cardiovascular events and is therefore recommended in primary and secondary prevention strategies against atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. However, the underlying mechanisms of the protective effect of exercise remain largely unknown. Therefore, the present study tested the hypothesis that voluntary exercise in mice impacts on cholesterol efflux and in vivo reverse cholesterol transport (RCT. After two weeks of voluntary wheel running (average 10.1 ± 1.4 km/day plasma triglycerides were lower (p

  12. Protein synthesis and antioxidant capacity in aging mice: effects of long-term voluntary exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaanholt, Lobke M; Speakman, John R; Garland, Theodore; Lobley, Gerald E; Visser, G Henk

    2008-01-01

    Exercise increases metabolic rate and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) but also elevates protein turnover. ROS cause damage to macromolecules (e.g., proteins) and thereby contribute to aging. Protein turnover removes and replaces damaged proteins. The balance between these two responses may underlie beneficial effects of physical activity on aging. Effects of lifelong exercise on antioxidant enzyme activities and fractional synthesis rate of protein (FSRP) were examined at various ages (2-26 mo) in heart, liver, and muscle of mice that had been selectively bred for high wheel-running activity, housed with (S+) or without (S-) a running wheel, and their random-bred controls (C+) housed with running wheels. FSRP decreased with age and increased in muscle of young, but not old, activity-selected mice. Enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase decreased with age and showed a peak at 10 mo of age in liver. Selection for wheel-running activity did not affect antioxidant enzyme activity. Daily energy expenditure correlated positively with antioxidant levels in liver. This might indicate that oxidative stress (ROS production) increases with metabolic rate, driving upregulation of antioxidant enzymes. Alternatively, the elevated energy expenditure may reflect the energetic cost of elevated protection, consistent with the disposable-soma hypothesis and with other studies showing positive links between energy expenditure and life span. Long-term elevations in voluntary exercise did not result in elevations in antioxidant enzyme activities or protein synthesis rates.

  13. Voluntary stand-up physical activity enhances endurance exercise capacity in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dae Yun; Lee, Sung Ryul; Kwak, Hyo-Bum; Seo, Kyo Won; McGregor, Robin A; Yeo, Ji Young; Ko, Tae Hee; Bolorerdene, Saranhuu; Kim, Nari; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo

    2016-01-01

    Involuntary physical activity induced by the avoidance of electrical shock leads to improved endurance exercise capacity in animals. However, it remains unknown whether voluntary stand-up physical activity (SPA) without forced simulating factors improves endurance exercise capacity in animals. We examined the eff ects of SPA on body weight, cardiac function, and endurance exercise capacity for 12 weeks. Twelve male Sprague-Dawley rats (aged 8 weeks, n=6 per group) were randomly assigned to a control group (CON) or a voluntary SPA group. The rats were induced to perform voluntary SPA (lifting a load equal to their body weight), while the food height (18.0 cm) in cages was increased progressively by 3.5 every 4 weeks until it reached 28.5 cm for 12 weeks. The SPA group showed a lower body weight compared to the CON group, but voluntary SPA did not affect the skeletal muscle and heart weights, food intake, and echocardiography results. Although the SPA group showed higher grip strength, running time, and distance compared to the CON group, the level of irisin, corticosterone, genetic expression of mitochondrial biogenesis, and nuclei numbers were not affected. These findings show that voluntary SPA without any forced stimuli in rats can eff ectively reduce body weight and enhance endurance exercise capacity, suggesting that it may be an important alternative strategy to enhance endurance exercise capacity. PMID:27162483

  14. Delayed voluntary exercise does not enhance cognitive performance after hippocampal injury: an investigation of differentially distributed exercise protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wogensen, Elise; Gram, Marie Gajhede; Sommer, Jens Bak; Vilsen, Christina Rytter; Mogensen, Jesper; Malá, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Voluntary exercise has previously been shown to enhance cognitive recovery after acquired brain injury (ABI). The present study evaluated effects of two differentially distributed protocols of delayed, voluntary exercise on cognitive recovery using an allocentric place learning task in an 8-arm radial maze. Fifty-four Wistar rats were subjected to either bilateral transection of the fimbria-fornix (FF) or to sham surgery. Twenty-one days postinjury, the animals started exercising in running wheels either for 14 consecutive days (FF/exercise daily [ExD], sham/ExD) or every other day for 14 days (FF/exercise every second day [ExS], sham/ExS). Additional groups were given no exercise treatment (FF/not exercise [NE], sham/NE). Regardless of how exercise was distributed, we found no cognitively enhancing effects of exercise in the brain injured animals. Design and protocol factors possibly affecting the efficacy of post-ABI exercise are discussed. PMID:27807517

  15. MRI-detectable changes in mouse brain structure induced by voluntary exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Lindsay S; Steadman, Patrick E; Jones, Carly E; Laliberté, Christine L; Dazai, Jun; Lerch, Jason P; Stefanovic, Bojana; Sled, John G

    2015-06-01

    Physical exercise, besides improving cognitive and mental health, is known to cause structural changes in the brain. Understanding the structural changes that occur with exercise as well as the neuroanatomical correlates of a predisposition for exercise is important for understanding human health. This study used high-resolution 3D MR imaging, in combination with deformation-based morphometry, to investigate the macroscopic changes in brain structure that occur in healthy adult mice following four weeks of voluntary exercise. We found that exercise induced changes in multiple brain structures that are involved in motor function and learning and memory including the hippocampus, dentate gyrus, stratum granulosum of the dentate gyrus, cingulate cortex, olivary complex, inferior cerebellar peduncle and regions of the cerebellum. In addition, a number of brain structures, including the hippocampus, striatum and pons, when measured on MRI prior to the start of exercise were highly predictive of subsequent exercise activity. Exercise tended to normalize these pre-existing differences between mice.

  16. Voluntary exercise produces antidepressant and anxiolytic behavioral effects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duman, Catharine H; Schlesinger, Lee; Russell, David S; Duman, Ronald S

    2008-03-14

    Reports of beneficial effects of exercise on psychological health in humans are increasingly supported by basic research studies. Exercise is hypothesized to regulate antidepressant-related mechanisms and we therefore characterized the effects of chronic exercise in mouse behavioral paradigms relevant to antidepressant actions. Mice given free access to running wheels showed antidepressant-like behavior in learned helplessness, forced-swim (FST) and tail suspension paradigms. These responses were similar to responses of antidepressant drug-treated animals. When tested under conditions where locomotor activity was not altered, exercising mice also showed reduced anxiety compared to sedentary control mice. In situ hybridization analysis showed that BDNF mRNA was increased in specific subfields of hippocampus after wheel running. We chose one paradigm, the FST, in which to investigate a functional role for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the behavioral response to exercise. We tested mice heterozygous for a deletion of the BDNF gene in the FST after wheel-running. Exercising wild-type mice showed the expected antidepressant-like behavioral response in the FST but exercise was ineffective in improving FST performance in heterozygous BDNF knockout mice. A possible functional contribution of a BDNF signaling pathway to FST performance in exercising mice was investigated using the specific MEK inhibitor PD184161 to block the MAPK signaling pathway. Subchronic administration of PD184161 to exercising mice blocked the antidepressant-like behavioral response seen in vehicle-treated exercising mice in the FST. In summary, chronic wheel-running exercise in mice results in antidepressant-like behavioral changes that may involve a BDNF related mechanism similar to that hypothesized for antidepressant drug treatment.

  17. Testosterone and Voluntary Exercise, Alone or Together Increase Cardiac Activation of AKT and ERK1/2 in Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodari, Leila; Mohammadi, Mustafa; Mohaddes, Gisou; Alipour, Mohammad Reza; Ghorbanzade, Vajiheh; Dariushnejad, Hassan; Mohammadi, Shima

    2016-01-01

    Background Impaired angiogenesis in cardiac tissue is a major complication of diabetes. Protein kinase B (AKT) and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways play important role during capillary-like network formation in angiogenesis process. Objectives To determine the effects of testosterone and voluntary exercise on levels of vascularity, phosphorylated Akt (P- AKT) and phosphorylated ERK (P-ERK) in heart tissue of diabetic and castrated diabetic rats. Methods Type I diabetes was induced by i.p injection of 50 mg/kg of streptozotocin in animals. After 42 days of treatment with testosterone (2mg/kg/day) or voluntary exercise alone or in combination, heart tissue samples were collected and used for histological evaluation and determination of P-AKT and P-ERK levels by ELISA method. Results Our results showed that either testosterone or exercise increased capillarity, P-AKT, and P-ERK levels in the heart of diabetic rats. Treatment of diabetic rats with testosterone and exercise had a synergistic effect on capillarity, P-AKT, and P-ERK levels in heart. Furthermore, in the castrated diabetes group, capillarity, P-AKT, and P-ERK levels significantly decreased in the heart, whereas either testosterone treatment or exercise training reversed these effects. Also, simultaneous treatment of castrated diabetic rats with testosterone and exercise had an additive effect on P-AKT and P-ERK levels. Conclusion Our findings suggest that testosterone and exercise alone or together can increase angiogenesis in the heart of diabetic and castrated diabetic rats. The proangiogenesis effects of testosterone and exercise are associated with the enhanced activation of AKT and ERK1/2 in heart tissue.

  18. Quantitative genomics of voluntary exercise in mice: transcriptional analysis and mapping of expression QTL in muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Scott A; Nehrenberg, Derrick L.; Hua, Kunjie; Garland, Theodore; Pomp, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Motivation and ability both underlie voluntary exercise, each with a potentially unique genetic architecture. Muscle structure and function are one of many morphological and physiological systems acting to simultaneously determine exercise ability. We generated a large (n = 815) advanced intercross line of mice (G4) derived from a line selectively bred for increased wheel running (high runner) and the C57BL/6J inbred strain. We previously mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL) contributing to v...

  19. Voluntary exercise has long-term in vivo protective effects on osteocyte viability and bone strength following ovariectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Hélder; Moreira-Gonçalves, Daniel; Esteves, José Luís Soares; Viriato, Nuno; Vaz, Mário; Mota, Maria Paula; Duarte, José Alberto

    2011-06-01

    Osteocytes are recognized as having a pivotal role in bone tissue homeostasis, and stimuli that increase osteocyte death result in decreased bone tissue quality. Previous in vitro studies have shown that mechanical stimulation prevents osteocyte death; however, in vivo evidence of this protective effect is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate if mechanical stimulation provided by voluntary exercise reduces osteocyte death caused by estrogen deficiency. Thirty-two female Wistar rats (5 months old) were either sacrificed as baseline controls (BSL, n = 7), ovariectomized or sham-operated and housed in cages with a voluntary running wheel (OVXEX, n = 7; SHAMEX, n = 6), or ovariectomized or sham-operated and housed in standard cages of equivalent size (OVXSED, n = 6; SHAMSED, n = 6) and sacrificed at age 14 months. Histomorphometric analysis of femur mid-diaphysis cortical bone revealed a significantly higher osteocyte number (N.Ot) and lower empty lacunae number (N.Lc) in both the OVXEX and SHAMEX groups compared to their SED counterparts. Intracortical porosity (Po.Ar) was also lower in both EX groups compared to their SED counterparts and significantly correlated with N.Lc (r = 0.616; P bone ultimate stress (r = -0.451, P < 0.05). Our results show that voluntary exercise prevented osteocyte death and that this protective effect was associated with increases in femur ultimate stress, which could be partially explained by decreases in Po.Ar.

  20. Changes in spatial memory and BDNF expression to concurrent dietary restriction and voluntary exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabour, Omar F; Alzoubi, Karem H; Alomari, Mahmoud A; Alzubi, Mohammad A

    2010-05-01

    Substantial data suggest that cognitive function can be influenced by many lifestyle activities associated with changes in energy metabolism such as exercise and diet. In the current study, we investigated the combined effects of voluntary exercise (access to running wheels) and dietary restriction (every other day fasting, EODF) on spatial memory formation and on the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus of Wistar male rats. Spatial learning and memory formation was assessed using the radial arm water maze (RAWM) paradigm, while BDNF protein was measured using ELISA test. Voluntary exercise and/or EODF were instituted for 6 weeks. Voluntary exercise alone significantly enhanced short-term, intermediate-term, and long-term memory formation, and increased BDNF protein levels in the hippocampus. EODF enhanced mean running wheel activity by approximately twofold. However, EODF did not modulate the effects of exercise on memory formation and expression of BDNF. In addition, EODF alone had no effect on memory and BDNF protein in the hippocampus. In conclusion, results of this study indicate that exercise enhanced while EODF had neutral effect on both spatial memory formation and hippocampus BDNF levels.

  1. Voluntary exercise prevents cisplatin-induced muscle wasting during chemotherapy in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille; Fjelbye, Jonas; Zerahn, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Loss of muscle mass related to anti-cancer therapy is a major concern in cancer patients, being associated with important clinical endpoints including survival, treatment toxicity and patient-related outcomes. We investigated effects of voluntary exercise during cisplatin treatment on body weight...

  2. Swimming exercise attenuates psychological dependence and voluntary methamphetamine consumption in methamphet- amine withdrawn rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Damghani

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: This study showed that regular swimming exercise reduced voluntary METH consumption in animal models of craving by reducing anxiety, OCD, and depression in the METH-withdrawn rats. Thus, physical training may be ameliorating some of the withdrawal behavioral consequences of METH.

  3. Telemetric analysis of haemodynamic regulation during voluntary exercise training in mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danson, E. J.; Zhang, M. H.; Casadei, B.; Paterson, D. J.; Channon, K. M.

    2017-01-01

    Regular physical exercise reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease and improves outcome in patients with cardiovascular diseases. The dynamic changes in blood pressure and heart rate with acute exercise are independently predictive of prognosis. Quantification of the haemodynamic response to exercise training in genetically modified mouse models may provide insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of exercise. We describe, for the first time, the use of radiotelemetry to provide continuous blood pressure monitoring in C57BL/6J mice during a programme of voluntary wheel exercise with continuous simultaneous recording and analysis of wheel rotations and beat-by-beat haemodynamic parameters. We define distinct haemodynamic profiles at rest, during normal cage activity and during episodes of voluntary wheel running. We show that whilst cage activity is associated with significant rises both in blood pressure and in heart rate, voluntary wheel running leads to a further substantial rise in heart rate with only a small increment in blood pressure. With 5 weeks of chronic exercise training, resting heart rate progressively falls, but heart rate during episodes of wheel running initially increases. In contrast, there are minimal changes in blood pressure in response to chronic exercise training. Finally, we have quantified the acute changes in heart rate at the onset of and recovery from individual episodes of wheel running, revealing that changes in heart rate are extremely rapid and that the peak rate of change of heart rate increases with chronic exercise training. The results of this study have important implications for the use of genetically modified mouse models to investigate the beneficial haemodynamic effects of chronic exercise on blood pressure and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:21824998

  4. Voluntary exercise induces neurogenesis in the hypothalamus and ependymal lining of the third ventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Atsuko; Nishibori, Masahiro; Hamasaki, Shinichi; Kobori, Takuro; Liu, Keyue; Wake, Hidenori; Mori, Shuji; Yoshino, Tadashi; Takahashi, Hideo

    2016-04-01

    In the adult hypothalamus and ependymal lining of the third ventricle, tanycytes function as multipotential progenitor cells that enable continuous neurogenesis, suggesting that tanycytes may be able to mediate the restoration of homeostatic function after stroke. Voluntary wheel running has been shown to alter neurochemistry and neuronal function and to increase neurogenesis in rodents. In the present study, we found that voluntary exercise improved the survival rate and energy balance of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP/Kpo). We also investigated the effect of exercise on the proliferation and differentiation of hypothalamic cells using immunoreactivity for tanycytes and neural markers. The proliferation of elongated cells, which may be the tanycytes, was enhanced in exercising SHRSP compared to sedentary rats before and after stroke. In addition, the proliferation of cells was correlated with the induction of fibroblast growth factor-2 in the subependymal cells of the third ventricle and in the cerebrospinal fluid. Some of the newborn cells of exercising SHRSP showed differentiation into mature neurons after stroke. Our results suggest that voluntary exercise correlates with hypothalamic neurogenesis, leading to recovery of homeostatic functions in the adult brain after stroke.

  5. Voluntary aerobic exercise increases the cognitive enhancing effects of working memory training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew M; Spiegler, Kevin M; Sauce, Bruno; Wass, Christopher D; Sturzoiu, Tudor; Matzel, Louis D

    2013-11-01

    Increases in performance on tests of attention and learning are often observed shortly after a period of aerobic exercise, and evidence suggests that humans who engage in regular exercise are partially protected from age-related cognitive decline. However, the cognitive benefits of exercise are typically short-lived, limiting the practical application of these observations. Here, we explored whether physical exercise might induce lasting changes in general cognitive ability if that exercise was combined with working memory training, which is purported to broadly impact cognitive performance. Mice received either exercise treatment (6 weeks of voluntary running wheel access), working memory training (in a dual radial-arm maze), both treatments, or various control treatments. After this period of exercise, working memory training was initiated (alternating with days of exercise), and continued for several weeks. Upon completion of these treatments, animals were assessed (2-4 weeks later) for performance on four diverse learning tasks, and the aggregate performance of individual animals across all four learning tasks was estimated. Working memory training alone promoted small increases in general cognitive performance, although any beneficial effects of exercise alone had dissipated by the time of learning assessments. However, the two treatments in combination more than doubled the improvement in general cognitive performance supported by working memory training alone. Unlike the transient effects that acute aerobic exercise can have on isolated learning tasks, these results indicate that an acute period of exercise combined with working memory training can have synergistic and lasting impact on general cognitive performance.

  6. Voluntary Exercise Training: Analysis of Mice in Uninjured, Inflammatory, and Nerve-Injured Pain States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayler D Sheahan

    Full Text Available Both clinical and animal studies suggest that exercise may be an effective way to manage inflammatory and neuropathic pain conditions. However, existing animal studies commonly use forced exercise paradigms that incorporate varying degrees of stress, which itself can elicit analgesia, and thus may complicate the interpretation of the effects of exercise on pain. We investigated the analgesic potential of voluntary wheel running in the formalin model of acute inflammatory pain and the spared nerve injury model of neuropathic pain in mice. In uninjured, adult C57BL/6J mice, 1 to 4 weeks of exercise training did not alter nociceptive thresholds, lumbar dorsal root ganglia neuronal excitability, or hindpaw intraepidermal innervation. Further, exercise training failed to attenuate formalin-induced spontaneous pain. Lastly, 2 weeks of exercise training was ineffective in reversing spared nerve injury-induced mechanical hypersensitivity or in improving muscle wasting or hindpaw denervation. These findings indicate that in contrast to rodent forced exercise paradigms, short durations of voluntary wheel running do not improve pain-like symptoms in mouse models of acute inflammation and peripheral nerve injury.

  7. Voluntary exercise prevents colonic inflammation in high-fat diet-induced obese mice by up-regulating PPAR-γ activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei-Xin, E-mail: weixinliu@yahoo.com [Department of Gastroenterology, First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110001, Liaoning (China); Wang, Ting; Zhou, Feng; Wang, Ying; Xing, Jun-Wei; Zhang, Shen [Department of Gastroenterology, First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110001, Liaoning (China); Gu, Shou-Zhi [Department of Anatomy, Seirei Christopher College, Hamamatsu 433-8558 (Japan); Sang, Li-Xuan [Department of Cadre Ward II, First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110001, Liaoning (China); Dai, Cong [Department of Gastroenterology, First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110001, Liaoning (China); Wang, Hai-Lan [Guangdong Province Hospital for Occupational Disease Prevention and Treatment, Guangzhou 510300, Guangdong (China)

    2015-04-10

    Obesity is associated with increased colonic inflammation, which elevates the risk of colon cancer. Although exercise exerts anti-inflammatory actions in multiple chronic diseases associated with inflammation, it is unknown whether this strategy prevents colonic inflammation in obesity. We hypothesized that voluntary exercise would suppress colonic inflammation in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity by modulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ. Male C57Bl/6J mice fed either a control diet (6.5% fat, CON) or a high-fat diet (24% fat, HFD) were divided into sedentary, voluntary exercise or voluntary exercise with PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 (10 mg/kg/day). All interventions took place for 12 weeks. Compared with CON-sedentary group, HFD-sedentary mice gained significantly more body weight and exhibited metabolic disorders. Molecular studies revealed that HFD-sedentary mice had increased expression of inflammatory mediators and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB in the colons, which were associated with decreased expression and activity of PPAR-γ. Voluntary exercise markedly attenuated body weight gain, improved metabolic disorders, and normalized the expression of inflammatory mediators and activation of NF-κB in the colons in HFD-mice while having no effects in CON-animals. Moreover, voluntary exercise significantly increased expression and activity of PPAR-γ in the colons in both HFD- and CON-animals. However, all of these beneficial effects induced by voluntary exercise were abolished by GW9662, which inhibited expression and activity of PPAR-γ. The results suggest that decreased PPAR-γ activity in the colon of HFD-induced obesity may facilitate the inflammatory response and colon carcinogenesis. Voluntary exercise prevents colonic inflammation in HFD-induced obesity by up-regulating PPAR-γ activity. - Highlights: • Obesity down-regulates PPAR-γ in the colon. • Down-regulated colonic PPAR-γ may facilitate inflammatory

  8. Cardiometabolic and reproductive benefits of early dietary energy restriction and voluntary exercise in an obese PCOS-prone rodent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diane, Abdoulaye; Kupreeva, Maria; Borthwick, Faye; Proctor, Spencer D; Pierce, W David; Vine, Donna F

    2015-09-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine-metabolic disorders in women of reproductive age characterized by ovulatory dysfunction, hyperandrogenism and cardiometabolic risk. The overweight-obese PCOS phenotype appears to have exacerbated reproductive dysfunction and cardiometabolic risk. In overweight-obese adult women with PCOS, exercise and energy restricted diets have shown limited and inconsistent effects on both cardiometabolic indices and reproductive outcomes. We hypothesized that an early lifestyle intervention involving exercise and dietary energy restriction to prevent or reduce the propensity for adiposity would modulate reproductive indices and cardiometabolic risk in an obese PCOS-prone rodent model. Weanling obese PCOS-prone and Lean-Control JCR:LA-cp rodents were given a chow diet ad libitum or an energy-restricted diet combined with or without voluntary exercise (4  h/day) for 8 weeks. Dietary energy restriction and exercise lowered total body weight gain and body fat mass by 30% compared to free-fed sedentary or exercising obese PCOS-prone animals (Pexercise intensity compared to free-feeding plus exercise conditions. Energy restriction and exercise decreased fasting plasma triglycerides and apoB48 concentrations in obese PCOS-prone animals compared to free-fed and exercise or sedentary groups. The energy restriction and exercise combination in obese PCOS-prone animals significantly increased plasma sex-hormone binding globulin, hypothalamic cocaine-and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) and Kisspeptin mRNA expression to levels of the Lean-Control group, and this was further associated with improvements in estrous cyclicity. The combination of exercise and dietary energy restriction when initiated in early life exerts beneficial effects on cardiometabolic and reproductive indices in an obese PCOS-prone rodent model, and this may be associated with normalization of the hypothalamic neuropeptides, Kisspeptin and CART.

  9. Voluntary exercise at the expense of reproductive success in Djungarian hamsters ( Phodopus sungorus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, Ines; Scherbarth, Frank; Steinlechner, Stephan

    2010-09-01

    Energy demands of gestation and lactation represent a severe challenge for small mammals. Therefore, additional energetic burdens may compromise successful breeding. In small rodents, food restriction, cold exposure (also in combination) and wheel running to obtain food have been shown to diminish reproductive outcome. Although exhibited responses such as lower incidence of pregnancy, extended lactation periods and maternal infanticide were species dependent, their common function is to adjust energetic costs to the metabolic state reflecting the trade-off between maternal investment and self-maintenance. In the present study, we sought to examine whether voluntary exercise affects reproduction in Djungarian hamsters ( Phodopus sungorus), which are known for their high motivation to run in a wheel. Voluntary exercise resulted in two different effects on reproduction; in addition to increased infanticide and cannibalism, which was evident across all experiments, the results of one experiment provided evidence that free access to a running wheel may prevent successful pregnancy. It seems likely that the impact of voluntary wheel running on reproduction was associated with a reduction of internal energy resources evoked by extensive exercise. Since the hamsters were neither food-restricted nor forced to run in the present study, an energetic deficit as reason for infanticide in exercising dams would emphasise the particularly high motivation to run in a wheel.

  10. Voluntary Exercise Promotes Glymphatic Clearance of Amyloid Beta and Reduces the Activation of Astrocytes and Microglia in Aged Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-fei He

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Age is characterized by chronic inflammation, leading to synaptic dysfunction and dementia because the clearance of protein waste is reduced. The clearance of proteins depends partly on the permeation of the blood–brain barrier (BBB or on the exchange of water and soluble contents between the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and the interstitial fluid (ISF. A wealth of evidence indicates that physical exercise improves memory and cognition in neurodegenerative diseases during aging, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD, but the influence of physical training on glymphatic clearance, BBB permeability and neuroinflammation remains unclear. In this study, glymphatic clearance and BBB permeability were evaluated in aged mice using in vivo two-photon imaging. The mice performed voluntary wheel running exercise and their water-maze cognition was assessed; the expression of the astrocytic water channel aquaporin 4 (AQP4, astrocyte and microglial activation, and the accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ were evaluated with immunofluorescence or an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA; synaptic function was investigated with Thy1–green fluorescent protein (GFP transgenic mice and immunofluorescent staining. Voluntary wheel running significantly improved water-maze cognition in the aged mice, accelerated the efficiency of glymphatic clearance, but which did not affect BBB permeability. The numbers of activated astrocytes and microglia decreased, AQP4 expression increased, and the distribution of astrocytic AQP4 was rearranged. Aβ accumulation decreased, whereas dendrites, dendritic spines and postsynaptic density protein (PSD95 increased. Our study suggests that voluntary wheel running accelerated glymphatic clearance but not BBB permeation, improved astrocytic AQP4 expression and polarization, attenuated the accumulation of amyloid plaques and neuroinflammation, and ultimately protected mice against synaptic dysfunction and a decline in spatial cognition

  11. Voluntary exercise does not ameliorate spatial learning and memory deficits induced by chronic administration of nandrolone decanoate in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanehkar, Fatemeh; Rashidy-Pour, Ali; Vafaei, Abbas Ali; Sameni, Hamid Reza; Haghighi, Saeed; Miladi-Gorji, Hossien; Motamedi, Fereshteh; Akhavan, Maziar Mohammad; Bavarsad, Kowsar

    2013-01-01

    Chronic exposure to the anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) nandrolone decanoate (ND) in supra-physiological doses is associated with learning and memory impairments. Given the well-known beneficial effects of voluntary exercise on cognitive functions, we examined whether voluntary exercise would improve the cognitive deficits induced by chronic administration of ND. We also investigated the effects of ND and voluntary exercise on hippocampal BDNF levels. The rats were randomly distributed into 4 experimental groups: the vehicle-sedentary group, the ND-sedentary group, the vehicle-exercise group, and the ND-exercise group. The vehicle-exercise and the ND-exercise groups were allowed to freely exercise in a running wheel for 15 days. The vehicle-sedentary and the ND-sedentary groups were kept sedentary for the same period. Vehicle or ND injections were started 14 days prior to the voluntary exercise and continued throughout the 15 days of voluntary exercise. After the 15-day period, the rats were trained and tested on a water maze spatial task using four trials per day for 5 consecutive days followed by a probe trial two days later. Exercise significantly improved performance during both the training and retention of the water maze task, and enhanced hippocampal BDNF. ND impaired spatial learning and memory, and this effect was not rescued by exercise. ND also potentiated the exercise-induced increase in hippocampal BDNF levels. These results seem to indicate that voluntary exercise is unable to improve the disruption of cognitive functions by chronic ND. Moreover, increased levels of BDNF may play a role in ND-induced impairments in learning and memory. The harmful effects of ND and other AAS on learning and memory should be taken into account when athletes decide to use AAS for performance or body image improvement.

  12. Domain dependent associations between cognitive functioning and regular voluntary exercise behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swagerman, Suzanne C; de Geus, Eco J C; Koenis, Marinka M G; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Boomsma, Dorret I; Kan, Kees-Jan

    2015-07-01

    Regular exercise has often been suggested to have beneficial effects on cognition, but empirical findings are mixed because of heterogeneity in sample composition (age and sex); the cognitive domain being investigated; the definition and reliability of exercise behavior measures; and study design (e.g., observational versus experimental). Our aim was to scrutinize the domain specificity of exercise effects on cognition, while controlling for the other sources of heterogeneity. In a population based sample consisting of 472 males and 668 females (aged 10-86 years old) we administered the Computerized Neurocognitive Battery (CNB), which provided accuracy and speed measures of abstraction and mental flexibility, attention, working memory, memory (verbal, face, and spatial), language and nonverbal reasoning, spatial ability, emotion identification, emotion- and age differentiation, sensorimotor speed, and motor speed. Using univariate and multivariate regression models, CNB scores were associated with participants' average energy expenditure per week (weekly METhours), which were derived from a questionnaire on voluntary regular leisure time exercise behavior. Univariate models yielded generally positive associations between weekly METhours and cognitive accuracy and speed, but multivariate modeling demonstrated that direct relations were small and centered around zero. The largest and only significant effect size (β = 0.11, p effects of voluntary regular leisure time exercise on cognition are limited. Only a relation between exercise and attention inspires confidence.

  13. Quantitative genomics of voluntary exercise in mice: transcriptional analysis and mapping of expression QTL in muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Scott A; Nehrenberg, Derrick L; Hua, Kunjie; Garland, Theodore; Pomp, Daniel

    2014-08-15

    Motivation and ability both underlie voluntary exercise, each with a potentially unique genetic architecture. Muscle structure and function are one of many morphological and physiological systems acting to simultaneously determine exercise ability. We generated a large (n = 815) advanced intercross line of mice (G4) derived from a line selectively bred for increased wheel running (high runner) and the C57BL/6J inbred strain. We previously mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL) contributing to voluntary exercise, body composition, and changes in body composition as a result of exercise. Using brain tissue in a subset of the G4 (n = 244), we have also previously reported expression QTL (eQTL) colocalizing with the QTL for the higher-level phenotypes. Here, we examined the transcriptional landscape of hind limb muscle tissue via global mRNA expression profiles. Correlations revealed an ∼1,168% increase in significant relationships between muscle transcript expression levels and the same exercise and body composition phenotypes examined previously in the brain. The exercise trait most often significantly correlated with gene expression in the brain was running duration while in the muscle it was maximum running speed. This difference may indicate that time spent engaging in exercise behavior may be more influenced by central (neurobiological) mechanisms, while intensity of exercise may be largely controlled by peripheral mechanisms. Additionally, we used subsets of cis-acting eQTL, colocalizing with QTL, to identify candidate genes based on both positional and functional evidence. We discuss three plausible candidate genes (Insig2, Prcp, Sparc) and their potential regulatory role.

  14. Desensitization of the cough reflex by exercise and voluntary isocapnic hyperpnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavorini, Federico; Fontana, Giovanni A; Chellini, Elisa; Magni, Chiara; Duranti, Roberto; Widdicombe, John

    2010-05-01

    Little is known about the effects of exercise on the sensory and cognitive aspects of coughing evoked by inhalation of tussigenic agents. The threshold for the cough reflex induced by inhalation of increasing nebulizer outputs of ultrasonically nebulized distilled water (fog), an index of cough reflex sensitivity, was assessed in twelve healthy humans in control conditions, during exercise and during voluntary isocapnic hyperpnea (VIH) at the same ventilatory level as the exercise. The intensity of the urge to cough (UTC), a cognitive component of coughing, was recorded throughout the trials on a linear scale. The relationships between inhaled fog nebulizer outputs and the correspondingly evoked UTC values, an index of the perceptual magnitude of the UTC sensitivity, were also calculated. Cough appearance was always assessed audiovisually. At an exercise level of 80% of anaerobic threshold, the median cough threshold was increased from a control value of 0.73 to 2.22 ml/min (PVIH, the threshold increased from 0.73 to 2.22 ml/min (PVIH compared with control, mean UTC values at cough threshold were unchanged, i.e., control, 3.83 cm; exercise, 3.12 cm; VIH, 4.08 cm. The relationship of the fog nebulizer output/UTC value was linear in control conditions and logarithmic during both exercise and VIH. The perception of the magnitude of the UTC seems to be influenced by signals or sensations arising from exercising limb and thoracic muscles and/or by higher nervous (cortical) mechanisms. The results indicate that the adjustments brought into action by exercise-induced or voluntary hyperpnea exert inhibitory influences on the sensory and cognitive components of fog-induced cough.

  15. The impact of voluntary exercise on relative telomere length in a rat model of developmental stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botha Martmari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to early adverse events can result in the development of later psychopathology, and is often associated with cognitive impairment. This may be due to accelerated cell aging, which can be catalogued by attritioned telomeres. Exercise enhances neurogenesis and has been proposed to buffer the effect of psychological stress on telomere length. This study aimed to investigate the impact of early developmental stress and voluntary exercise on telomere length in the ventral hippocampus (VH and prefrontal cortex (PFC of the rat. Forty-five male Sprague–Dawley rats were categorised into four groups: maternally separated runners (MSR, maternally separated non-runners (MSnR, non-maternally separated runners (nMSR and non-maternally separated non-runners (nMSnR. Behavioural analyses were conducted to assess anxiety-like behaviour and memory performance in the rats, after which relative telomere length was measured using qPCR. Results Maternally separated (MS rats exhibited no significant differences in either anxiety levels or memory performance on the elevated-plus maze and the open field compared to non-maternally separated rats at 49 days of age. Exercised rats displayed increased levels of anxiety on the day that they were removed from the cages with attached running wheels, as well as improved spatial learning and temporal recognition memory compared to non-exercised rats. Exploratory post-hoc analyses revealed that maternally separated non-exercised rats exhibited significantly longer telomere length in the VH compared to those who were not maternally separated; however, exercise appeared to cancel this effect since there was no difference in VH telomere length between maternally separated and non-maternally separated runners. Conclusions The increased telomere length in the VH of maternally separated non-exercised rats may be indicative of reduced cellular proliferation, which could, in turn, indicate hippocampal

  16. Control of heart rate variability by cardiac parasympathetic nerve activity during voluntary static exercise in humans with tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Makoto; Matsukawa, Kanji; Nakamoto, Tomoko; Tsuchimochi, Hirotsugu; Sakaguchi, Akihiro; Kawaguchi, Kotaro; Onari, Kiyoshi

    2007-11-01

    Heart rate (HR) is controlled solely by via cardiac parasympathetic outflow in tetraplegic individuals, who lack supraspinal control of sympathetic outflows and circulating catecholamines but have intact vagal pathways. A high-frequency component (HF; at 0.15-0.40 Hz) of the power spectrum of HR variability and its relative value against total power (HF/Total) were assessed using a wavelet transform to identify cardiac parasympathetic outflow. The relative contribution of cardiac parasympathetic and sympathetic outflows to controlling HR was estimated by comparing the HF/Total-HR relationship between age-matched tetraplegic and normal men. Six tetraplegic men with complete cervical spinal cord injury performed static arm exercise at 35% of the maximal voluntary contraction until exhaustion. Although resting cardiac output and arterial blood pressure were lower in tetraplegic than normal subjects, HR, HF, and HF/Total were not statistically different between the two groups. When tetraplegic subjects developed the same force during exercise as normal subjects, HF and HF/Total decreased to 67-90% of the preexercise control and gradually recovered 1.5 min after exercise. The amount and time course of the changes in HF/Total during and after exercise coincided well between both groups. In contrast, the increase in HR at the start of exercise was blunted in tetraplegic compared with normal subjects, and the HR recovery following exercise was also delayed. It is likely that, although the withdrawal response of cardiac parasympathetic outflow is preserved in tetraplegic subjects, sympathetic decentralization impairs the rapid acceleration of HR at the onset of exercise and the rapid deceleration following exercise.

  17. Burrowing as a novel voluntary strength training method for mice : A comparison of various voluntary strength or resistance exercise methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roemers, P; Mazzola, P N; De Deyn, P P; Bossers, W J; van Heuvelen, M J G; van der Zee, E A

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Voluntary strength training methods for rodents are necessary to investigate the effects of strength training on cognition and the brain. However, few voluntary methods are available. NEW METHOD: The current study tested functional and muscular effects of two novel voluntary strength

  18. Voluntary exercise improves murine dermal connective tissue status in high-fat diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lőrincz, Kende; Haluszka, Dóra; Kiss, Norbert; Gyöngyösi, Nóra; Bánvölgyi, András; Szipőcs, Róbert; Wikonkál, Norbert M

    2017-04-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for several cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Its influence on the skin is less obvious, yet certain negative effects of adipose tissue inflammation on the dermis have been suggested. Excess weight is closely associated with sedentary behavior, so any increase in physical activity is considered beneficial against obesity. To investigate the effects of obesity and physical exercise on the skin, we established a mouse model in which mice were kept either on a high-fat diet or received standard chow. After the two groups achieved a significant weight difference, physical exercise was introduced to both. Animals were given the opportunity to perform voluntary exercise for 40 min daily in a hamster wheel for a period of 8 weeks. We evaluated the status of the dermis at the beginning and at the end of the exercise period by in vivo nonlinear microscopy. Obese mice kept on high-fat diet lost weight steadily after they started to exercise. In the high-fat diet group, we could detect significantly larger adipocytes and a thicker layer of subcutaneous tissue; both changes started to normalize after exercise. Nonlinear microscopy revealed an impaired collagen structure in obese mice that improved considerably after physical activity was introduced. With the ability to detect damage on collagen structure, we set out to address the question whether this process is reversible. With the use of a novel imaging method, we were able to show the reversibility of connective tissue deterioration as a benefit of physical exercise.

  19. Eccentric exercise decreases maximal insulin action in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asp, Svend; Daugaard, J R; Kristiansen, S

    1996-01-01

    1. Unaccustomed eccentric exercise decreases whole-body insulin action in humans. To study the effects of one-legged eccentric exercise on insulin action in muscle and systemically, the euglycaemic clamp technique combined with arterial and bilateral femoral venous catheterization was used. Seven...... subjects participated in two euglycaemic clamps, performed in random order. One clamp was preceded 2 days earlier by one-legged eccentric exercise (post-eccentric exercise clamp (PEC)) and one was without the prior exercise (control clamp (CC)). 2. During PEC the maximal insulin-stimulated glucose uptake......) necessary to maintain euglycaemia during maximal insulin stimulation was lower during PEC compared with CC (15.7%, 81.3 +/- 3.2 vs. 96.4 +/- 8.8 mumol kg-1 min-1, P eccentric exercise, muscle and whole-body insulin action is impaired at maximal...

  20. Effects of long-term voluntary exercise on learning and memory processes: dependency of the task and level of exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Capdevila, Sílvia; Portell-Cortés, Isabel; Torras-Garcia, Meritxell; Coll-Andreu, Margalida; Costa-Miserachs, David

    2009-09-14

    The effect of long-term voluntary exercise (running wheel) on anxiety-like behaviour (plus maze and open field) and learning and memory processes (object recognition and two-way active avoidance) was examined on Wistar rats. Because major individual differences in running wheel behaviour were observed, the data were analysed considering the exercising animals both as a whole and grouped according to the time spent in the running wheel (low, high, and very-high running). Although some variables related to anxiety-like behaviour seem to reflect an anxiogenic compatible effect, the view of the complete set of variables could be interpreted as an enhancement of defensive and risk assessment behaviours in exercised animals, without major differences depending on the exercise level. Effects on learning and memory processes were dependent on task and level of exercise. Two-way avoidance was not affected either in the acquisition or in the retention session, while the retention of object recognition task was affected. In this latter task, an enhancement in low running subjects and impairment in high and very-high running animals were observed.

  1. Epigenetic alterations in hippocampus of SAMP8 senescent mice and modulation by voluntary physical exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosín-Tomás, Marta; Alvarez-López, María J.; Sanchez-Roige, Sandra; Lalanza, Jaume F.; Bayod, Sergi; Sanfeliu, Coral; Pallàs, Merce; Escorihuela, Rosa M.; Kaliman, Perla

    2014-01-01

    The senescence-accelerated SAMP8 mouse model displays features of cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease. With the purpose of identifying potential epigenetic markers involved in aging and neurodegeneration, here we analyzed the expression of 84 mature miRNAs, the expression of histone-acetylation regulatory genes and the global histone acetylation in the hippocampus of 8-month-old SAMP8 mice, using SAMR1 mice as control. We also examined the modulation of these parameters by 8 weeks of voluntary exercise. Twenty-one miRNAs were differentially expressed between sedentary SAMP8 and SAMR1 mice and seven miRNAs were responsive to exercise in both strains. SAMP8 mice showed alterations in genes involved in protein acetylation homeostasis such as Sirt1 and Hdac6 and modulation of Hdac3 and Hdac5 gene expression by exercise. Global histone H3 acetylation levels were reduced in SAMP8 compared with SAMR1 mice and reached control levels in response to exercise. In sum, data presented here provide new candidate epigenetic markers for aging and neurodegeneration and suggest that exercise training may prevent or delay some epigenetic alterations associated with accelerated aging. PMID:24688469

  2. Exercise increases lactoferrin, but decreases lysozyme in salivary granulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillum, Trevor; Kuennen, Matthew; McKenna, Zachary; Castillo, Micaela; Jordan-Patterson, Alex; Bohnert, Caitlin

    2017-05-01

    Intracellular lactoferrin (Lac) and lysozyme (Lys) content play an important role in regulating inflammation and promoting host protection. While exercise has demonstrated an increase in Lac and Lys concentration in exocrine solutions, little is known regarding intracellular concentration changes in response to exercise. To quantify intracellular Lac and Lys concentration before and after exercise in salivary CD45(+)CD15(+) cells. 11 males (20.3 ± 0.8 years, 57.2 ± 7.6 mL/kg/min V̇O2pk, 11.1 ± 3.9% body fat) ran for 45 min at 75% of VO2pk. 12 mL of stimulated saliva were collected pre and immediately post exercise. Saliva was filtered through a 30-µm filter before analysis of leukocytes (CD45(+)) and granulocytes (CD45(+)CD15(+)) using flow cytometry. Median fluorescent intensity (MFI) of Lac increased from pre (64,268 ± 46,036 MFI) to post (117,134 ± 88,115 MFI) exercise (p exercise (pre: 16,933 ± 8249; post: 11,616 ± 6875) (p exercise. Conversely, the exercise-associated decrease of intracellular Lys content could be the cause of increased Lys in exocrine solutions.

  3. Effect of long-term voluntary exercise wheel running on susceptibility to bacterial pulmonary infections in a mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van de Weert-van Leeuwen, Pauline B; de Vrankrijker, Angélica M M; Fentz, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    moderate exercise has many health benefits, healthy mice showed increased bacterial (P. aeruginosa) load and symptoms, after regular voluntary exercise, with perseverance of the phagocytic capacity of monocytes and neutrophils. Whether patients, suffering from bacterial infectious diseases, should......Regular moderate exercise has been suggested to exert anti-inflammatory effects and improve immune effector functions, resulting in reduced disease incidence and viral infection susceptibility. Whether regular exercise also affects bacterial infection susceptibility is unknown. The aim...... of this study was to investigate whether regular voluntary exercise wheel running prior to a pulmonary infection with bacteria (P. aeruginosa) affects lung bacteriology, sickness severity and phagocyte immune function in mice. Balb/c mice were randomly placed in a cage with or without a running wheel. After 28...

  4. Maternal swimming exercise during pregnancy attenuates anxiety/depressive-like behaviors and voluntary morphine consumption in the pubertal male and female rat offspring born from morphine dependent mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabi, Masoumeh; Pooriamehr, Alireza; Bigdeli, Imanollah; Miladi-Gorji, Hossein

    2017-09-01

    This study was designed to examine whether maternal swimming exercise during pregnancy would attenuate prenatally morphine-induced anxiety, depression and voluntary consumption of morphine in the pubertal male and female rat offspring. Pregnant rats during the development of morphine dependence were allowed to swim (30-45min/d, 3days per a week) on gestational days 11-18. Then, the pubertal male and female rat offspring were tested for the elevated plus-maze (EPM), sucrose preference test (SPT) and voluntary morphine consumption using a two-bottle choice (TBC) paradigm. The results showed that male and female rat offspring born of the swimmer morphine-dependent mothers exhibited an increase in EPM open arm time and entries, higher levels of sucrose preference than their sedentary control mothers. Voluntary consumption of morphine was less in the male and female rat offspring born of the swimmer morphine-dependent mothers as compared with their sedentary control mothers during three periods of the intake of drug. Thus, swimming exercise in pregnant morphine dependent mothers decreased anxiety, depressive-like behavior and also the voluntary morphine consumption in the pubertal male and female offspring, which may prevent prenatally morphine-induced behavioral sensitization in offspring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Physical exercise performance in temperate and warm environments is decreased by an impaired arterial baroreflex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Washington Pires

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate whether running performance in different environments is dependent on intact arterial baroreceptor reflexes. We also assessed the exercise-induced cardiovascular and thermoregulatory responses in animals lacking arterial baroafferent signals. To accomplish these goals, male Wistar rats were subjected to sinoaortic denervation (SAD or sham surgery (SHAM and had a catheter implanted into the ascending aorta to record arterial pressure and a telemetry sensor implanted in the abdominal cavity to record core temperature. After recovering from these surgeries, the animals were subjected to constant- or incremental-speed exercises performed until the voluntary interruption of effort under temperate (25° C and warm (35° C conditions. During the constant-speed exercises, the running time until the rats were fatigued was shorter in SAD rats in both environments. Although the core temperature was not significantly different between the groups, tail skin temperature was higher in SAD rats under temperate conditions. The denervated rats also displayed exaggerated increases in blood pressure and double product compared with the SHAM rats; in particular, in the warm environment, these exaggerated cardiovascular responses in the SAD rats persisted until they were fatigued. These SAD-mediated changes occurred in parallel with increased variability in the very low and low components of the systolic arterial pressure power spectrum. The running performance was also affected by SAD during the incremental-speed exercises, with the maximal speed attained being decreased by approximately 20% in both environments. Furthermore, at the maximal power output tolerated during the incremental exercises, the mean arterial pressure, heart rate and double product were exaggerated in the SAD relative to SHAM rats. In conclusion, the chronic absence of the arterial baroafferents accelerates exercise fatigue in temperate and warm

  6. Physical Exercise Performance in Temperate and Warm Environments Is Decreased by an Impaired Arterial Baroreflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Washington; Wanner, Samuel P.; Lima, Milene R. M.; Fonseca, Ivana A. T.; Fumega, Ubirajara; Haibara, Andrea S.; Coimbra, Cândido C.; Lima, Nilo R. V.

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether running performance in different environments is dependent on intact arterial baroreceptor reflexes. We also assessed the exercise-induced cardiovascular and thermoregulatory responses in animals lacking arterial baroafferent signals. To accomplish these goals, male Wistar rats were subjected to sinoaortic denervation (SAD) or sham surgery (SHAM) and had a catheter implanted into the ascending aorta to record arterial pressure and a telemetry sensor implanted in the abdominal cavity to record core temperature. After recovering from these surgeries, the animals were subjected to constant- or incremental-speed exercises performed until the voluntary interruption of effort under temperate (25° C) and warm (35° C) conditions. During the constant-speed exercises, the running time until the rats were fatigued was shorter in SAD rats in both environments. Although the core temperature was not significantly different between the groups, tail skin temperature was higher in SAD rats under temperate conditions. The denervated rats also displayed exaggerated increases in blood pressure and double product compared with the SHAM rats; in particular, in the warm environment, these exaggerated cardiovascular responses in the SAD rats persisted until they were fatigued. These SAD-mediated changes occurred in parallel with increased variability in the very low and low components of the systolic arterial pressure power spectrum. The running performance was also affected by SAD during the incremental-speed exercises, with the maximal speed attained being decreased by approximately 20% in both environments. Furthermore, at the maximal power output tolerated during the incremental exercises, the mean arterial pressure, heart rate and double product were exaggerated in the SAD relative to SHAM rats. In conclusion, the chronic absence of the arterial baroafferents accelerates exercise fatigue in temperate and warm environments. Our findings

  7. Voluntary exercise promotes beneficial anti-aging mechanisms in SAMP8 female brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayod, Sergi; Guzmán-Brambila, Carolina; Sanchez-Roige, Sandra; Lalanza, Jaume F; Kaliman, Perla; Ortuño-Sahagun, Daniel; Escorihuela, Rosa M; Pallàs, Mercè

    2015-02-01

    Regular physical exercise mediates health and longevity promotion involving Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1)-regulated pathways. The anti-aging activity of SIRT1 is achieved, at least in part, by means of fine-tuning the adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway by preventing the transition of an originally pro-survival program into a pro-aging mechanism. Additionally, SIRT1 promotes mitochondrial function and reduces the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through regulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), the master controller of mitochondrial biogenesis. Here, by using senescence-accelerated mice prone 8 (SAMP8) as a model for aging, we determined the effect of wheel-running as a paradigm for long-term voluntary exercise on SIRT1-AMPK pathway and mitochondrial functionality measured by oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex content in the hippocampus and cortex. We found differential activation of SIRT1 in both tissues and hippocampal-specific activation of AMPK. These findings correlated well with significant changes in OXPHOS in the hippocampal, but not in the cerebral cortex, area. Collectively, the results revealed greater benefits of the exercise in the wheel-running intervention in a murine model of senescence, which was directly related with mitochondrial function and which was mediated through the modulation of SIRT1 and AMPK pathways.

  8. Voluntary exercise increases IgA concentration and polymeric Ig receptor expression in the rat submandibular gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurimoto, Yuki; Saruta, Juri; To, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Yuko; Kimura, Koji; Tsukinoki, Keiichi

    2016-12-01

    Salivary IgA-a primary factor in local immunity of the oral cavity-plays an important role in maintaining local immune function in the oral cavity and prevent upper respiratory tract infections. Oral IgA levels are known to fluctuate in an exercise-dependent manner; thus, we investigated the effects of voluntary exercise on salivary IgA secretion in rats to better understand the mechanism by which this occurs. Six-week-old male Wistar rats were placed in individual cages with or without access to exercise wheels for three weeks. Notably, animals who engaged in voluntary exercise demonstrated significant increases in IgA concentration in saliva and submandibular gland tissue, as well as a markedly higher salivary IgA flow rate. Moreover, active rats also exhibited elevated polymeric Ig receptor (pIgR) mRNA expression in submandibular gland tissue. Collectively, these results suggest that voluntary exercise may increase salivary IgA concentration and boost immune function in the oral cavity.

  9. Voluntary Movement Frequencies in Submaximal One- and Two-Legged Knee Extension Exercise and Pedaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stang, Julie; Wiig, Håvard; Hermansen, Marte; Hansen, Ernst Albin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding of behavior and control of human voluntary rhythmic stereotyped leg movements is useful in work to improve performance, function, and rehabilitation of exercising, healthy, and injured humans. The present study aimed at adding to the existing understanding within this field. To pursue the aim, correlations between freely chosen movement frequencies in relatively simple, single-joint, one- and two-legged knee extension exercise were investigated. The same was done for more complex, multiple-joint, one- and two-legged pedaling. These particular activities were chosen because they could be considered related to some extent, as they shared a key aspect of knee extension, and because they at the same time were different. The activities were performed at submaximal intensities, by healthy individuals (n = 16, thereof eight women; 23.4 ± 2.7 years; 1.70 ± 0.11 m; 68.6 ± 11.2 kg). High and fair correlations (R-values of 0.99 and 0.75) occurred between frequencies generated with the dominant leg and the nondominant leg during knee extension exercise and pedaling, respectively. Fair to high correlations (R-values between 0.71 and 0.95) occurred between frequencies performed with each of the two legs in an activity, and the two-legged frequency performed in the same type of activity. In general, the correlations were higher for knee extension exercise than for pedaling. Correlations between knee extension and pedaling frequencies were of modest occurrence. The correlations between movement frequencies generated separately by each of the legs might be interpreted to support the following working hypothesis, which was based on existing literature. It is likely that involved central pattern generators (CPGs) of the two legs share a common frequency generator or that separate frequency generators of each leg are attuned via interneuronal connections. Further, activity type appeared to be relevant. Thus, the apparent common rhythmogenesis for the two legs appeared

  10. Voluntary movement frequencies in submaximal one- and two-legged knee extension exercise and pedaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Sørbø Stang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of behavior and control of human voluntary rhythmic stereotyped leg movements is useful in work to improve performance, function, and rehabilitation of exercising, healthy, and injured humans. The present study aimed at adding to the existing understanding within this field. To pursue the aim, correlations between freely chosen movement frequencies in relatively simple, single-joint, one- and two-legged knee extension exercise were investigated. The same was done for more complex, multiple-joint, one- and two-legged pedaling. These particular activities were chosen because they could be considered related to some extent, as they shared a key aspect of knee extension, and because they at the same time were different. The activities were performed at submaximal intensities, by healthy individuals (n=16, thereof 8 women; 23.4±2.7 years; 1.70±0.11 m; 68.6±11.2 kg.High and fair correlations (R-values of 0.99 and 0.75 occurred between frequencies generated with the dominant leg and the nondominant leg during knee extension exercise and pedaling, respectively. Fair to high correlations (R-values between 0.71 and 0.95 occurred between frequencies performed with each of the two legs in an activity, and the two-legged frequency performed in the same type of activity. In general, the correlations were higher for knee extension exercise than for pedaling. Correlations between knee extension and pedaling frequencies were of modest occurrence.The correlations between movement frequencies generated separately by each of the legs might be interpreted to support the following working hypothesis, which was based on existing literature. It is likely that involved central pattern generators (CPGs of the two legs share a common frequency generator or that separate frequency generators of each leg are attuned via interneuronal connections. Further, activity type appeared to be relevant. Thus, the apparent common rhythmogenesis for the two legs

  11. Effect of long-term voluntary exercise wheel running on susceptibility to bacterial pulmonary infections in a mouse model.

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    Pauline B van de Weert-van Leeuwen

    Full Text Available Regular moderate exercise has been suggested to exert anti-inflammatory effects and improve immune effector functions, resulting in reduced disease incidence and viral infection susceptibility. Whether regular exercise also affects bacterial infection susceptibility is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether regular voluntary exercise wheel running prior to a pulmonary infection with bacteria (P. aeruginosa affects lung bacteriology, sickness severity and phagocyte immune function in mice. Balb/c mice were randomly placed in a cage with or without a running wheel. After 28 days, mice were intranasally infected with P. aeruginosa. Our study showed that regular exercise resulted in a higher sickness severity score and bacterial (P. aeruginosa loads in the lungs. The phagocytic capacity of monocytes and neutrophils from spleen and lungs was not affected. Although regular moderate exercise has many health benefits, healthy mice showed increased bacterial (P. aeruginosa load and symptoms, after regular voluntary exercise, with perseverance of the phagocytic capacity of monocytes and neutrophils. Whether patients, suffering from bacterial infectious diseases, should be encouraged to engage in exercise and physical activities with caution requires further research.

  12. The glucocorticoid system is required for the voluntary exercise-induced enhancement of learning and memory in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajisoltani, Razieh; Rashidy-Pour, Ali; Vafaei, Abbas A; Ghaderdoost, Behshid; Bandegi, Ahmad Reza; Motamedi, Fereshteh

    2011-05-16

    Although it is well established that voluntary exercise can improve cognitive functions, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Glucocorticoids play an important role in learning and memory functions. This study addressed whether the glucocorticoid system would play a role in the exercise-induced enhancement of learning and memory. Intact rats or those that were either adrenalectomized or daily given the corticosterone-synthesis inhibitor metyrapone were allowed to freely exercise in a running wheel for 10 days. Control animals were kept sedentary for this period. After this period, they were trained and tested on a water-maze spatial task using three-trial per day for 5 consecutive days, succeeded by a probe trial two days later. Exercise increased plasma corticosterone levels, as assessed after this 10-day period. Both adrenalectomy and metyrapone slightly reduced running-wheel activity. Adrenalectomy reduced the plasma corticosterone levels to almost zero whereas metyrapone selectively blocked the exercise-induced increase in corticosterone levels. Exercise significantly improved performance during both training and retention of the water-maze task whereas this effect was absent in both adrenalectomized and metyrapone-treated rats. These findings indicate that the glucocorticoid system play a crucial role in the beneficial effects of voluntary exercise on cognitive functions in rats.

  13. The biological control of voluntary exercise, spontaneous physical activity and daily energy expenditure in relation to obesity: human and rodent perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Theodore; Schutz, Heidi; Chappell, Mark A.; Keeney, Brooke K.; Meek, Thomas H.; Copes, Lynn E.; Acosta, Wendy; Drenowatz, Clemens; Maciel, Robert C.; van Dijk, Gertjan; Kotz, Catherine M.; Eisenmann, Joey C.

    2011-01-01

    Mammals expend energy in many ways, including basic cellular maintenance and repair, digestion, thermoregulation, locomotion, growth and reproduction. These processes can vary tremendously among species and individuals, potentially leading to large variation in daily energy expenditure (DEE). Locomotor energy costs can be substantial for large-bodied species and those with high-activity lifestyles. For humans in industrialized societies, locomotion necessary for daily activities is often relatively low, so it has been presumed that activity energy expenditure and DEE are lower than in our ancestors. Whether this is true and has contributed to a rise in obesity is controversial. In humans, much attention has centered on spontaneous physical activity (SPA) or non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT), the latter sometimes defined so broadly as to include all energy expended due to activity, exclusive of volitional exercise. Given that most people in Western societies engage in little voluntary exercise, increasing NEAT may be an effective way to maintain DEE and combat overweight and obesity. One way to promote NEAT is to decrease the amount of time spent on sedentary behaviours (e.g. watching television). The effects of voluntary exercise on other components of physical activity are highly variable in humans, partly as a function of age, and have rarely been studied in rodents. However, most rodent studies indicate that food consumption increases in the presence of wheels; therefore, other aspects of physical activity are not reduced enough to compensate for the energetic cost of wheel running. Most rodent studies also show negative effects of wheel access on body fat, especially in males. Sedentary behaviours per se have not been studied in rodents in relation to obesity. Several lines of evidence demonstrate the important role of dopamine, in addition to other neural signaling networks (e.g. the endocannabinoid system), in the control of voluntary exercise. A

  14. The biological control of voluntary exercise, spontaneous physical activity and daily energy expenditure in relation to obesity: human and rodent perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Theodore; Schutz, Heidi; Chappell, Mark A; Keeney, Brooke K; Meek, Thomas H; Copes, Lynn E; Acosta, Wendy; Drenowatz, Clemens; Maciel, Robert C; van Dijk, Gertjan; Kotz, Catherine M; Eisenmann, Joey C

    2011-01-15

    Mammals expend energy in many ways, including basic cellular maintenance and repair, digestion, thermoregulation, locomotion, growth and reproduction. These processes can vary tremendously among species and individuals, potentially leading to large variation in daily energy expenditure (DEE). Locomotor energy costs can be substantial for large-bodied species and those with high-activity lifestyles. For humans in industrialized societies, locomotion necessary for daily activities is often relatively low, so it has been presumed that activity energy expenditure and DEE are lower than in our ancestors. Whether this is true and has contributed to a rise in obesity is controversial. In humans, much attention has centered on spontaneous physical activity (SPA) or non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT), the latter sometimes defined so broadly as to include all energy expended due to activity, exclusive of volitional exercise. Given that most people in Western societies engage in little voluntary exercise, increasing NEAT may be an effective way to maintain DEE and combat overweight and obesity. One way to promote NEAT is to decrease the amount of time spent on sedentary behaviours (e.g. watching television). The effects of voluntary exercise on other components of physical activity are highly variable in humans, partly as a function of age, and have rarely been studied in rodents. However, most rodent studies indicate that food consumption increases in the presence of wheels; therefore, other aspects of physical activity are not reduced enough to compensate for the energetic cost of wheel running. Most rodent studies also show negative effects of wheel access on body fat, especially in males. Sedentary behaviours per se have not been studied in rodents in relation to obesity. Several lines of evidence demonstrate the important role of dopamine, in addition to other neural signaling networks (e.g. the endocannabinoid system), in the control of voluntary exercise. A

  15. Effects of voluntary exercise on spontaneous physical activity and food consumption in mice: Results from an artificial selection experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copes, Lynn E; Schutz, Heidi; Dlugosz, Elizabeth M; Acosta, Wendy; Chappell, Mark A; Garland, Theodore

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated the effect of voluntary exercise on spontaneous physical activity (SPA) and food consumption in mice from 4 replicate lines bred for 57 generations for high voluntary wheel running (HR) and from 4 non-selected control (C) lines. Beginning at ~24 days of age, mice were housed in standard cages or in cages with attached wheels. Wheel activity and SPA were monitored in 1-min intervals. Data from the 8th week of the experiment were analyzed because mice were sexually mature and had plateaued in body mass, weekly wheel running distance, SPA, and food consumption. Body mass, length, and masses of the retroperitoneal fat pad, liver, and heart were recorded after the 13th week. SPA of both HR and C mice decreased with wheel access, due to reductions in both duration and average intensity of SPA. However, total activity duration (SPA+wheel running; min/day) was ~1/3 greater when mice were housed with wheels, and food consumption was significantly increased. Overall, food consumption in both HR and C mice was more strongly affected by wheel running than by SPA. Duration of wheel running had a stronger effect than average speed, but the opposite was true for SPA. With body mass as a covariate, chronic wheel access significantly reduced fat pad mass and increased heart mass in both HR and C mice. Given that both HR and C mice housed with wheels had increased food consumption, the energetic cost of wheel running was not fully compensated by concomitant reductions in SPA. The experiment demonstrates that both duration and intensity of both wheel running and SPA were significant predictors of food consumption. This sort of detailed analysis of the effects of different aspects of physical activity on food consumption has not previously been reported for a non-human animal, and it sets the stage for longitudinal examination of energy balance and its components in rodent models.

  16. Circulating levels of endocannabinoids respond acutely to voluntary exercise, are altered in mice selectively bred for high voluntary wheel running, and differ between the sexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Zoe; Argueta, Donovan; Garland, Theodore; DiPatrizio, Nicholas

    2017-03-01

    The endocannabinoid system serves many physiological roles, including in the regulation of energy balance, food reward, and voluntary locomotion. Signaling at the cannabinoid type 1 receptor has been specifically implicated in motivation for rodent voluntary exercise on wheels. We studied four replicate lines of high runner (HR) mice that have been selectively bred for 81 generations based on average number of wheel revolutions on days five and six of a six-day period of wheel access. Four additional replicate lines are bred without regard to wheel running, and serve as controls (C) for random genetic effects that may cause divergence among lines. On average, mice from HR lines voluntarily run on wheels three times more than C mice on a daily basis. We tested the general hypothesis that circulating levels of endocannabinoids (i.e., 2-arachidonoylglycerol [2-AG] and anandamide [AEA]) differ between HR and C mice in a sex-specific manner. Fifty male and 50 female mice were allowed access to wheels for six days, while another 50 males and 50 females were kept without access to wheels (half HR, half C for all groups). Blood was collected by cardiac puncture during the time of peak running on the sixth night of wheel access or no wheel access, and later analyzed for 2-AG and AEA content by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. We observed a significant three-way interaction among sex, linetype, and wheel access for 2-AG concentrations, with females generally having lower levels than males and wheel access lowering 2-AG levels in some but not all subgroups. The number of wheel revolutions in the minutes or hours immediately prior to sampling did not quantitatively predict plasma 2-AG levels within groups. We also observed a trend for a linetype-by-wheel access interaction for AEA levels, with wheel access lowering plasma concentrations of AEA in HR mice, while raising them in C mice. In addition, females tended to have higher AEA

  17. Differential cortical neurotrophin and cytogenetic adaptation after voluntary exercise in normal and amnestic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J M; Vetreno, R P; Savage, L M

    2014-01-31

    Voluntary exercise (VEx) has profound effects on neural and behavioral plasticity, including recovery of CNS trauma and disease. However, the unique regional cortical adaption to VEx has not been elucidated. In a series of experiments, we first examined whether VEx would restore and retain neurotrophin levels in several cortical regions (frontal cortex [FC], retrosplenial cortex [RSC], occipital cortex [OC]) in an animal model (pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency [PTD]) of the amnestic disorder Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. In addition, we assessed the time-dependent effect of VEx to rescue performance on a spontaneous alternation task. Following 2-weeks of VEx or stationary housing conditions (Stat), rats were behaviorally tested and brains were harvested either the day after VEx (24-h) or after an additional 2-week period (2-wk). In both control pair-fed (PF) rats and PTD rats, all neurotrophin levels (brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF], nerve growth factor [NGF], and vascular endothelial growth factor) increased at the 24-h period after VEx in the FC and RSC, but not OC. Two-weeks following VEx, BDNF remained elevated in both FC and RSC, whereas NGF remained elevated in only the FC. Interestingly, VEx only recovered cognitive performance in amnestic rats when there was an additional 2-wk adaptation period after VEx. Given this unique temporal profile, Experiment 2 examined the cortical cytogenetic responses in all three cortical regions following a 2-wk adaptation period after VEx. In healthy (PF) rats, VEx increased the survival of progenitor cells in both the FC and RSC, but only increased oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OLPs) in the FC. Furthermore, VEx had a selective effect of only recovering OLPs in the FC in PTD rats. These data reveal the therapeutic potential of exercise to restore cortical plasticity in the amnestic brain, and that the FC is one of the most responsive cortical regions to VEx.

  18. Post-exercise depression following submaximal and maximal isometric voluntary contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, David A; Janini, Daniel; Wyant, Alexandria; Bonnett, Corin; Varnerin, Nicole; Sankarasubramanian, Vishwanath; Potter-Baker, Kelsey A; Roelle, Sarah; Wang, Xiaofeng; Siemionow, Vlodek; Yue, Guang H; Plow, Ela B

    2016-06-21

    It is well known that corticomotor excitability is altered during the post-exercise depression following fatigue within the primary motor cortex (M1). However, it is currently unknown whether corticomotor reorganization following muscle fatigue differs between magnitudes of force and whether corticomotor reorganization occurs measured with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Fifteen young healthy adults (age 23.8±1.4, 8 females) participated in a within-subjects, repeated measures design study, where they underwent three testing sessions separated by one-week each. Subjects performed separate sessions of each: low-force isometric contraction (30% maximal voluntary contraction [MVC]), high-force isometric contraction (95% MVC) of the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle until self-perceived exhaustion, as well as one session of a 30-min rest as a control. We examined changes in corticomotor map area, excitability and location of the FDI representation in and around M1 using TMS. The main finding was that following low-force, but not high-force fatigue (HFF) corticomotor map area and excitability reduced [by 3cm(2) (t(14)=-2.94, p=0.01) and 56% respectively t(14)=-4.01, p<0.001)]. Additionally, the region of corticomotor excitability shifted posteriorly (6.4±2.5mm) (t(14)=-6.33, p=.019). Corticomotor output became less excitable particularly in regions adjoining M1. Overall, post-exercise depression is present in low-force, but not for HFF. Further, low-force fatigue (LFF) results in a posterior shift in corticomotor output. These changes may be indicative of increased sensory feedback from the somatosensory cortex during the recovery phase of fatigue.

  19. Effect of voluntary hypocapnic hyperventilation or moderate hypoxia on metabolic and heart rate responses during high-intensity intermittent exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobashi, Kohei; Fujii, Naoto; Watanabe, Kazuhito; Tsuji, Bun; Sasaki, Yosuke; Fujimoto, Tomomi; Tanigawa, Satoru; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the effect of voluntary hypocapnic hyperventilation or moderate hypoxia on metabolic and heart rate responses during high-intensity intermittent exercise. Ten males performed three 30-s bouts of high-intensity cycling [Ex1 and Ex2: constant-workload at 80% of the power output in the Wingate anaerobic test (WAnT), Ex3: WAnT] interspaced with 4-min recovery periods under normoxic (Control), hypocapnic or hypoxic (2500 m) conditions. Hypocapnia was developed through voluntary hyperventilation for 20 min prior to Ex1 and during each recovery period. End-tidal CO2 pressure was lower before each exercise in the hypocapnia than control trials. Oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text]) was lower in the hypocapnia than control trials (822 ± 235 vs. 1645 ± 245 mL min(-1); mean ± SD) during Ex1, but not Ex2 or Ex3, without a between-trial difference in the power output during the exercises. Heart rates (HRs) during Ex1 (127 ± 8 vs. 142 ± 10 beats min(-1)) and subsequent post-exercise recovery periods were lower in the hypocapnia than control trials, without differences during or after Ex2, except at 4 min into the second recovery period. [Formula: see text] did not differ between the control and hypoxia trials throughout. These results suggest that during three 30-s bouts of high-intensity intermittent cycling, (1) hypocapnia reduces the aerobic metabolic rate with a compensatory increase in the anaerobic metabolic rate during the first but not subsequent exercises; (2) HRs during the exercise and post-exercise recovery periods are lowered by hypocapnia, but this effect is diminished with repeated exercise bouts, and (3) moderate hypoxia (2500 m) does not affect the metabolic response during exercise.

  20. Ghrelin knockout mice show decreased voluntary alcohol consumption and reduced ethanol-induced conditioned place preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahi, Amine; Tolle, Virginie; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Brunel, Luc; Martinez, Jean; Tomasetto, Catherine-Laure; Karam, Sherif M

    2013-05-01

    Recent work suggests that stomach-derived hormone ghrelin receptor (GHS-R1A) antagonism may reduce motivational aspects of ethanol intake. In the current study we hypothesized that the endogenous GHS-R1A agonist ghrelin modulates alcohol reward mechanisms. For this purpose ethanol-induced conditioned place preference (CPP), ethanol-induced locomotor stimulation and voluntary ethanol consumption in a two-bottle choice drinking paradigm were examined under conditions where ghrelin and its receptor were blocked, either using ghrelin knockout (KO) mice or the specific ghrelin receptor (GHS-R1A) antagonist "JMV2959". We showed that ghrelin KO mice displayed lower ethanol-induced CPP than their wild-type (WT) littermates. Consistently, when injected during CPP-acquisition, JMV2959 reduced CPP-expression in C57BL/6 mice. In addition, ethanol-induced locomotor stimulation was lower in ghrelin KO mice. Moreover, GHS-R1A blockade, using JMV2959, reduced alcohol-stimulated locomotion only in WT but not in ghrelin KO mice. When alcohol consumption and preference were assessed using the two-bottle choice test, both genetic deletion of ghrelin and pharmacological antagonism of the GHS-R1A (JMV2959) reduced voluntary alcohol consumption and preference. Finally, JMV2959-induced reduction of alcohol intake was only observed in WT but not in ghrelin KO mice. Taken together, these results suggest that ghrelin neurotransmission is necessary for the stimulatory effect of ethanol to occur, whereas lack of ghrelin leads to changes that reduce the voluntary intake as well as conditioned reward by ethanol. Our findings reveal a major, novel role for ghrelin in mediating ethanol behavior, and add to growing evidence that ghrelin is a key mediator of the effects of multiple abused drugs.

  1. Pre-infection physical exercise decreases mortality and stimulates neurogenesis in bacterial meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liebetanz David

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Physical exercise has been shown to increase neurogenesis, to decrease neuronal injury and to improve memory in animal models of stroke and head trauma. Therefore, we investigated the effect of voluntary wheel running on survival, neuronal damage and cell proliferation in a mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis. Mice were housed in cages equipped with voluntary running wheels or in standard cages before induction of bacterial meningitis by a subarachnoid injection of a Streptococcus pneumoniae type 3 strain. 24 hours later antibiotic treatment was initiated with ceftriaxone (100 mg/kg twice daily. Experiments were terminated either 30 hours or 4 days (short-term or 7 weeks (long-term after infection, and the survival time, inflammatory cytokines and corticosterone levels, neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation and the cognitive function were evaluated in surviving mice. Survival time was significantly increased in running mice compared to control animals (p = 0.0087 in short-term and p = 0.016 in long-term experiments, log-rank test. At the end of the long-term experiment, mortality was lower in trained than in sedentary animals (p = 0.031, Fisher’s Exact test. Hippocampal neurogenesis – assessed by the density of doublecortin-, TUC-4- and BrdU + NeuN-colabeled cells - was significantly increased in running mice in comparison to the sedentary group after meningitis. However, Morris water maze performance of both groups 6 weeks after bacterial meningitis did not reveal differences in learning ability. In conclusion, physical exercise prior to infection increased survival in a mouse model of bacterial meningitis and stimulated neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation.

  2. Effect of Voluntary Ethanol Consumption Combined with Testosterone Treatment on Cardiovascular Function in Rats: Influence of Exercise Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engi, Sheila A; Planeta, Cleopatra S; Crestani, Carlos C

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of voluntary ethanol consumption combined with testosterone treatment on cardiovascular function in rats. Moreover, we investigated the influence of exercise training on these effects. To this end, male rats were submitted to low-intensity training on a treadmill or kept sedentary while concurrently being treated with ethanol for 6 weeks. For voluntary ethanol intake, rats were given access to two bottles, one containing ethanol and other containing water, three 24-hour sessions per week. In the last two weeks (weeks 5 and 6), animals underwent testosterone treatment concurrently with exercise training and exposure to ethanol. Ethanol consumption was not affected by either testosterone treatment or exercise training. Also, drug treatments did not influence the treadmill performance improvement evoked by training. However, testosterone alone, but not in combination with ethanol, reduced resting heart rate. Moreover, combined treatment with testosterone and ethanol reduced the pressor response to the selective α1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine. Treatment with either testosterone or ethanol alone also affected baroreflex activity and enhanced depressor response to acetylcholine, but these effects were inhibited when drugs were coadministrated. Exercise training restored most cardiovascular effects evoked by drug treatments. Furthermore, both drugs administrated alone increased pressor response to phenylephrine in trained animals. Also, drug treatments inhibited the beneficial effects of training on baroreflex function. In conclusion, the present results suggest a potential interaction between toxic effects of testosterone and ethanol on cardiovascular function. Data also indicate that exercise training is an important factor influencing the effects of these substances.

  3. Acute Sodium Ingestion Before Exercise Increases Voluntary Water Consumption Resulting In Preexercise Hyperhydration and Improvement in Exercise Performance in the Heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, David M; Huot, Joshua R; Jetton, Adam M; Collier, Scott R; Utter, Alan C

    2015-10-01

    Dehydration has been shown to hinder performance of sustained exercise in the heat. Consuming fluids before exercise can result in hyperhydration, delay the onset of dehydration during exercise and improve exercise performance. However, humans normally drink only in response to thirst, which does not result in hyperhydration. Thirst and voluntary fluid consumption have been shown to increase following oral ingestion or infusion of sodium into the bloodstream. We measured the effects of acute sodium ingestion on voluntary water consumption and retention during a 2-hr hydration period before exercise. Subjects then performed a 60-min submaximal dehydration ride (DR) followed immediately by a 200 kJ performance time trial (PTT) in a warm (30 °C) environment. Water consumption and retention during the hydration period was greater following sodium ingestion (1380 ± 580 mL consumed, 821 ± 367 ml retained) compared with placebo (815 ± 483 ml consumed, 244 ± 402 mL retained) and no treatment (782 ± 454 ml consumed, 148 ± 289 mL retained). Dehydration levels following the DR were significantly less after sodium ingestion (0.7 ± 0.6%) compared with placebo (1.3 ± 0.7%) and no treatment (1.6 ± 0.4%). Time to complete the PTT was significantly less following sodium consumption (773 ± 158 s) compared with placebo (851 ± 156 s) and no treatment (872 ± 190 s). These results suggest that voluntary hyperhydration can be induced by acute consumption of sodium and has a favorable effect on hydration status and performance during subsequent exercise in the heat.

  4. Effectiveness of adding voluntary pelvic floor muscle contraction to a Pilates exercise program: an assessor-masked randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torelli, Luiza; de Jarmy Di Bella, Zsuzsanna Ilona Katalin; Rodrigues, Claudinei Alves; Stüpp, Liliana; Girão, Manoel João Batista Castello; Sartori, Marair Gracio Ferreira

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of adding voluntary pelvic floor muscle contraction (PFMC) to a Pilates exercise program in sedentary nulliparous women. Fifty-seven healthy nulliparous and physically inactive women were randomized to a Pilates exercise program (PEP) with or without PFMC. Forty-eight women concluded this study (24 participants for each group). Each woman was evaluated before and after the PEP, by a physiotherapist and an urogynecologist (UG). Neither of the professionals was revealed to them. This physiotherapist measured their pelvic floor muscle strength by using both a perineometer (Peritron) and vaginal palpation (Oxford Scale). The UG, who performed 3D perineal ultrasound examinations, collected their data and evaluated the results for pubovisceral muscle thickness and the levator hiatus area (LA). Both professionals were blinded to the group allocation. The protocol for both groups consisted of 24 bi-weekly 1-h individual sessions of Pilates exercises, developed by another physiotherapist who specializes in PFM rehabilitation and the Pilates technique. The PEP+ PFMC group showed significantly greater strength improvements than the PEP group when comparing the Oxford scale, vaginal pressure and pubovisceral muscle thickness during contraction measurements at baseline and post-treatment. Our findings suggest that adding a voluntary PFMC to a Pilates exercise program is more effective than Pilates alone in improving PFM strength in sedentary nulliparous women.

  5. Voluntary exercise offers anxiolytic potential and amplifies galanin gene expression in the locus coeruleus of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciolino, Natale R; Dishman, Rodney K; Holmes, Philip V

    2012-07-15

    Although exercise improves anxiety in humans, it is controversial whether exercise is anxiolytic in rodents. We tested the hypothesis that stress influences the effect of exercise on anxiety-like and defensive behaviors. To explore the neurobiological mechanisms of exercise, we also examined whether exercise alters gene expression for the stress-related peptide galanin. Rats were housed in the presence or absence of a running wheel for 21 d. A subset of these rats were (1) not injected or received a single high, dose of the β-carboline FG7142 (inverse agonist at the benzodiazepine receptor site) immediately prior to testing or (2) were injected repeatedly with vehicle or FG7142 during the last 10d of exercise. On day 22, anxiety-like and defensive behaviors were measured in the elevated plus maze, shock probe defensive burying, and defensive withdrawal tests. Locus coeruleus prepro-galanin mRNA was measured by in situ hybridization. Exercise and sedentary rats that were not injected exhibited similar behavior in all tests, whereas FG7142 injected immediately prior to the test battery produced intense avoidance and immobility consistent with an anxiety-like response. However, exercise produced anxiolytic-like and active defensive behaviors in the test battery relative to the sedentary condition in rats injected repeatedly with vehicle or FG7142. Exercise also increased prepro-galanin mRNA in the locus coeruleus relative to sedentary controls. These data suggest that the emergence of enhanced adaptive behavior after chronic voluntary exercise is influenced by stress. Our data support a role for galanin in the beneficial consequences of wheel running.

  6. Voluntary exercise and clomipramine treatment elevate prepro-galanin mRNA levels in the locus coeruleus in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Philip V; Yoo, Ho Sang; Dishman, Rod K

    2006-11-06

    Exercise exerts antidepressant effects in humans and rodent models of affective disorders. These effects may be mediated by the upregulation of endogenous factors that exert antidepressant actions. The physiological functions and behavioral actions of the neuropeptide galanin (GAL) suggest antidepressant activity. Previous studies have shown that various modes of exercise elevate GAL gene expression in the locus coeruleus (LC) in rats. The present experiments examined the interaction between voluntary exercise and antidepressant pharmacotherapy. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were provided access to activity wheels (exercise condition) or inoperative wheels (sedentary condition) for 28 days. Rats in each group were injected with clomipramine (10mg/kg/day) or vehicle throughout this period (for 3 weeks). Prepro-GAL mRNA in the LC was measured by in situ hybridization histochemistry. Exercise and clomipramine treatment significantly elevated GAL gene expression, though prepro-GAL mRNA levels in rats receiving both interventions did not differ from sedentary controls that received vehicle. Prepro-GAL mRNA levels were significantly correlated with running distance. The results further implicate a role for GAL in the antidepressant effects of exercise and pharmacotherapy, though the mechanisms through which these treatments influence GAL gene expression appear to differ significantly.

  7. Effect of Voluntary Ethanol Consumption Combined with Testosterone Treatment on Cardiovascular Function in Rats: Influence of Exercise Training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila A Engi

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effects of voluntary ethanol consumption combined with testosterone treatment on cardiovascular function in rats. Moreover, we investigated the influence of exercise training on these effects. To this end, male rats were submitted to low-intensity training on a treadmill or kept sedentary while concurrently being treated with ethanol for 6 weeks. For voluntary ethanol intake, rats were given access to two bottles, one containing ethanol and other containing water, three 24-hour sessions per week. In the last two weeks (weeks 5 and 6, animals underwent testosterone treatment concurrently with exercise training and exposure to ethanol. Ethanol consumption was not affected by either testosterone treatment or exercise training. Also, drug treatments did not influence the treadmill performance improvement evoked by training. However, testosterone alone, but not in combination with ethanol, reduced resting heart rate. Moreover, combined treatment with testosterone and ethanol reduced the pressor response to the selective α1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine. Treatment with either testosterone or ethanol alone also affected baroreflex activity and enhanced depressor response to acetylcholine, but these effects were inhibited when drugs were coadministrated. Exercise training restored most cardiovascular effects evoked by drug treatments. Furthermore, both drugs administrated alone increased pressor response to phenylephrine in trained animals. Also, drug treatments inhibited the beneficial effects of training on baroreflex function. In conclusion, the present results suggest a potential interaction between toxic effects of testosterone and ethanol on cardiovascular function. Data also indicate that exercise training is an important factor influencing the effects of these substances.

  8. Effect of voluntary physical exercise and post-training epinephrine on acquisition of a spatial task in the barnes maze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacotte-Simancas, Alejandra; Costa-Miserachs, David; Torras-Garcia, Meritxell; Coll-Andreu, Margalida; Portell-Cortés, Isabel

    2013-06-15

    A number of experiments have shown that physical exercise improves acquisition and retention for a variety of learning tasks in rodents. Most of these works have been conducted with tasks associated with a considerable level of stress, physical effort and/or food deprivation that might interact with exercise, thus hindering the interpretation of the results. On the other hand, it is well established that post-training epinephrine is able to facilitate memory consolidation, but only a few works have studied its effect on the process of acquisition. The present work was aimed at studying whether 17 days of voluntary physical exercise (running wheels) and/or post-training epinephrine (0.01 or 0.05 mg/kg) could improve the acquisition of a spatial task in the Barnes maze, and whether the combination of the two treatments have additive effects. Our results showed that exercise improved acquisition, and 0.01 mg/kg of epinephrine tended to enhance it, by reducing the distance needed to find the escape hole. The combination of both treatments failed to further improve the acquisition level. We concluded that both treatments exerted their effect on acquisition by enhancing the process of learning itself, and that exercise is able to improve acquisition even using tasks with a low level of stress and physical effort.

  9. Voluntary exercise contributed to an amelioration of abnormal feeding behavior, locomotor activity and ghrelin production concomitantly with a weight reduction in high fat diet-induced obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mifune, Hiroharu; Tajiri, Yuji; Nishi, Yoshihiro; Hara, Kento; Iwata, Shimpei; Tokubuchi, Ichiro; Mitsuzono, Ryouichi; Yamada, Kentaro; Kojima, Masayasu

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, effects of voluntary exercise in an obese animal model were investigated in relation to the rhythm of daily activity and ghrelin production. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either a high fat diet (HFD) or a chow diet (CD) from four to 16 weeks old. They were further subdivided into either an exercise group (HFD-Ex, CD-Ex) with a running wheel for three days of every other week or sedentary group (HFD-Se, CD-Se). At 16 weeks old, marked increases in body weight and visceral fat were observed in the HFD-Se group, together with disrupted rhythms of feeding and locomotor activity. The induction of voluntary exercise brought about an effective reduction of weight and fat, and ameliorated abnormal rhythms of activity and feeding in the HFD-Ex rats. Wheel counts as voluntary exercise was greater in HFD-Ex rats than those in CD-Ex rats. The HFD-obese had exhibited a deterioration of ghrelin production, which was restored by the induction of voluntary exercise. These findings demonstrated that abnormal rhythms of feeding and locomotor activity in HFD-obese rats were restored by infrequent voluntary exercise with a concomitant amelioration of the ghrelin production and weight reduction. Because ghrelin is related to food anticipatory activity, it is plausible that ghrelin participates in the circadian rhythm of daily activity including eating behavior. A beneficial effect of voluntary exercise has now been confirmed in terms of the amelioration of the daily rhythms in eating behavior and physical activity in an animal model of obesity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Telemetric analysis of haemodynamic regulation during voluntary exercise training in mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Adlam, D; De Bono, J. P.; Danson, E. J.; Zhang, M. H.; Casadei, B.; Paterson, D.J.; Channon, K M

    2011-01-01

    Regular physical exercise reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease and improves outcome in patients with cardiovascular diseases. The dynamic changes in blood pressure and heart rate with acute exercise are independently predictive of prognosis. Quantification of the haemodynamic response to exercise training in genetically modified mouse models may provide insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of exercise. We describe, for the first time, the use of radiot...

  11. The Utilization of Exercise to Decrease Depressive Symptoms in Young Adult Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkin, Richard S.; Tietjen-Smith, Tara; Caldwell, Charmaine; Shen, Yu-Pei

    2007-01-01

    Depression is a prevalent issue for women on college campuses. Undergraduate women participated in (a) an aerobic exercise class, (b) a weight-lifting class, or (c) a control group to determine the effect of exercise on depressive symptoms. Participants in the aerobic exercise group exhibited a significant decrease in depressive symptoms.…

  12. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis along the dorsoventral axis contributes differentially to environmental enrichment combined with voluntary exercise in alleviating chronic inflammatory pain in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jie; Jiang, Ying-Ying; Xu, Ling-Chi; Ma, Long-Yu; Liu, Feng-Yu; Cui, Shuang; Cai, Jie; Liao, Fei-Fei; Wan, You; Yi, Ming

    2017-03-14

    Cognitive behavioral therapy, such as environmental enrichment combined with voluntary exercise (EE-VEx), is under active investigation as an adjunct to pharmaceutical treatment for chronic pain. However, the effectiveness and underlying mechanisms of EE-VEx remain unclear. In mice with intra-plantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), our results revealed that EE-VEx alleviated perceptual, affective and cognitive dimensions of chronic inflammatory pain. These effects of EE-VEx on chronic pain were contingent on the occurrence of adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus in a functionally dissociated manner along the dorsoventral axis: neurogenesis in the ventral dentate gyrus participated in alleviating perceptual and affective components of chronic pain by EE-VEx, whereas neurogenesis in the dorsal dentate gyrus was involved in EE-VEx's cognitive-enhancing effects. Chronic inflammatory pain was accompanied by decreased levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the dentate gyrus, which were reversed by EE-VEx. Over-expression of BDNF in the dentate mimicked the effects of EE-VEx. Our results demonstrate distinct contribution of adult hippocampal neurogenesis along the dorsoventral axis to EE-VEx's beneficial effects on different dimensions of chronic pain.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTEnvironmental enrichment combined with voluntary exercise (EE-VEx) is under active investigation as an adjunct to pharmaceutical treatment for chronic pain, but its effectiveness and underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In a mouse model of inflammatory pain, the present study demonstrates that the beneficial effects of EE-VEx on chronic pain depend on adult neurogenesis with a dorsoventral dissociation along the hippocampal axis. Adult neurogenesis in the ventral dentate gyrus participates in alleviating perceptual and affective components of chronic pain by EE-VEx, whereas that in the dorsal pole is involved in EE-VEx's cognitive-enhancing effects in chronic pain.

  13. Repeated Prolonged Exercise Decreases Maximal Fat Oxidation in Older Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morville, Thomas; Rosenkilde, Mads; Munch-Andersen, Thor

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION/PURPOSE: Fat metabolism and muscle adaptation was investigated in 6 older trained men (age: 61 ± 4 years; VO2max: 48 ± 2 mL kg min) following repeated prolonged exercise). METHODS: 2706 km (1,681 miles) cycling was performed over 14 days and a blood sample and a muscle biopsy were...

  14. Voluntary exercise prevents oxidative stress in the brain of phenylketonuria mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazzola, Priscila Nicolao; Bruinenberg, Vibeke; Anjema, Karen; van Vliet, Danique; Dutra-Filho, Carlos Severo; van Spronsen, Francjan J; van der Zee, Eddy A; Zschocke, Johannes; Baumgartner, Matthias; Patterson, Marc; Rahman, Shamima

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High phenylalanine levels in phenylketonuria (PKU) have been associated with brain oxidative stress and amino acid imbalance. Exercise has been shown to improve brain function in hyperphenylalaninemia and neurodegenerative diseases. This study aimed to verify the effects of exercise on c

  15. Nitric oxide and voluntary exercise together promote quadriceps hypertrophy and increase vascular density in female 18-mo-old mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Jeff R S; Upadhaya, Ritika; Anderson, Judy E

    2012-05-01

    Age-related sarcopenia reduces the size, strength, and function of muscle, and the diameter of muscle fibers. It also disrupts the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex, dislocating nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS-1) and reducing sarcolemmal integrity. This study of quadriceps muscle in 18-mo-old mice showed that NO-donor treatment with isosorbide dinitrate (I) for 6 wk, in combination with voluntary exercise for 3 wk, increased muscle mass by 25% and stimulated cell proliferation. The resulting fiber hypertrophy was accompanied by a lower ratio of protein:DNA, consistent with myogenic-cell hyperplasia. Treatment enhanced the ratio of NOS-1:β-dystroglycan in correlation with fiber diameter, improved sarcolemmal integrity, and increased vascular density after an increase in vascular endothelial growth factor protein at 3 wk. Results demonstrate that age-related muscle refractoriness to exercise can be overcome with NO-donor treatment. Since activation of muscle stem cells and vascular perfusion are limiting factors in the maintenance, regeneration, and growth of aged muscle, results suggest the feasibility of using NO-donor drugs to combat atrophy and muscle ischemia. Improved function and quality of life from the NO-amplified effects of exercise may be useful in aging and other conditions such as disuse, insulin resistance, or microgravity.

  16. Brain Glycogen Decreases During Intense Exercise Without Hypoglycemia: The Possible Involvement of Serotonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Takashi; Soya, Shingo; Kawanaka, Kentaro; Soya, Hideaki

    2015-07-01

    Brain glycogen stored in astrocytes, a source of lactate as a neuronal energy source, decreases during prolonged exercise with hypoglycemia. However, brain glycogen dynamics during exercise without hypoglycemia remain unknown. Since intense exercise increases brain noradrenaline and serotonin as known inducers for brain glycogenolysis, we hypothesized that brain glycogen decreases with intense exercise not accompanied by hypoglycemia. To test this hypothesis, we employed a well-established acute intense exercise model of swimming in rats. Rats swam for fourteen 20 s bouts with a weight equal to 8 % of their body mass and were sacrificed using high-power (10 kW) microwave irradiation to inactivate brain enzymes for accurate detection of brain glycogen and monoamines. Intense exercise did not alter blood glucose, but did increase blood lactate levels. Immediately after exercise, brain glycogen decreased and brain lactate increased in the hippocampus, cerebellum, cortex, and brainstem. Simultaneously, serotonin turnover in the hippocampus and brainstem mutually increased and were associated with decreased brain glycogen. Intense swimming exercise that does not induce hypoglycemia decreases brain glycogen associated with increased brain lactate, implying an importance of glycogen in brain energetics during intense exercise even without hypoglycemia. Activated serotonergic regulation is a possible underlying mechanism for intense exercise-induced glycogenolysis at least in the hippocampus and brainstem.

  17. The NAD+ precursor nicotinamide riboside decreases exercise performance in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Kourtzidis, Ioannis A.; Stoupas, Andreas T.; Gioris, Ioannis S.; Veskoukis, Aristidis S.; Margaritelis, Nikos V.; Tsantarliotou, Maria; Taitzoglou, Ioannis; Vrabas, Ioannis S.; Paschalis, Vassilis; Kyparos, Antonios; Nikolaidis, Michalis G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) and its phosphorylated form (NADP+) are key molecules in ubiquitous bioenergetic and cellular signaling pathways, regulating cellular metabolism and homeostasis. Thus, supplementation with NAD+ and NADP+ precursors emerged as a promising strategy to gain many and multifaceted health benefits. In this proof-of-concept study, we sought to investigate whether chronic nicotinamide riboside administration (an NAD+ precursor) affects exercise perf...

  18. Effects of pre-exercise alkalosis on the decrease in VO2 at the end of all-out exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Claire; Delfour-Peyrethon, Rémi; Bishop, David J; Perrey, Stéphane; Leprêtre, Pierre-Marie; Dorel, Sylvain; Hanon, Christine

    2016-01-01

    This study determined the effects of pre-exercise sodium bicarbonate ingestion (ALK) on changes in oxygen uptake (VO2) at the end of a supramaximal exercise test (SXT). Eleven well-trained cyclists completed a 70-s all-out cycling effort, in double-blind trials, after oral ingestion of either 0.3 g kg(-1) of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) or 0.2 g kg(-1) body mass of calcium carbonate (PLA). Blood samples were taken to assess changes in acid-base balance before the start of the supramaximal exercise, and 0, 5 and 8 min after the exercise; ventilatory parameters were also measured at rest and during the SXT. At the end of the PLA trial, which induced mild acidosis (blood pH = 7.20), subjects presented a significant decrease in VO2 (P decrease in minute ventilation (VE) during the SXT (r = 0.70, P decrease in VO2 in eleven well-trained participants (PLA:12.5 ± 2.1 % and ALK: 4.9 ± 0.9 %, P decrease in mean power output was significantly less pronounced in ALK (P decrease between PLA and ALK trials were positively related to changes in the VE decrease (r = 0.74, P 0.05). Pre-exercise alkalosis counteracted the VO2 decrease related to mild acidosis, potentially as a result of changes in VE and in muscle acid-base status during the all-out supramaximal exercise.

  19. Habitual exercise decreases systolic blood pressure during low-intensity resistance exercise in healthy middle-aged and older individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Takeshi; Kotato, Takahiro; Zempo-Miyaki, Asako

    2016-10-01

    Since aerobic exercise (e.g., walking) and resistance exercise (e.g., lifting objects and mopping) are both parts of the activities of daily living, an exaggerated elevation in systolic blood pressure (SBP) during aerobic and resistance exercise is an early marker of cardiovascular disease. This study investigated the effects of habitual exercise on SBP during low-intensity resistance exercise using both cross-sectional and interventional approaches. First, in 57 normotensive women (61.9 ± 1.0 yr of age), daily physical activity level, as assessed by triaxial accelerometry, was correlated with SBP during resistance exercise at 20 and 40% of the 1 repetition maximum (r = -0.408 and r = -0.348, respectively). Maximal oxygen uptake was correlated with SBP during exercise at 20% (r = -0.385) and 40% (r = -0.457). Physical activity level or maximal oxygen uptake was identified as a predictor of SBP during the exercise in stepwise regression analysis, independent of SBP at rest and other factors (R(2) = 0.729-0.781). Second, 66 men and women (64.6 ± 0.9 yr of age) participated in a 6-wk intervention as a part of the training (walking, 4.3 ± 0.3 days/wk, 55.6 ± 4.1 min/day, 70.7 ± 1.2% of maximal heart rate) or control group. SBP during resistance exercise in the training group decreased after the intervention (before vs. after: 20%, 143 ± 4 vs. 128 ± 4 mmHg; and 40%, 148 ± 5 vs. 134 ± 4 mmHg). In the control group, there were no significant differences in SBP before and after the intervention. SBP during resistance exercise after the intervention was lower in the training group relative to the control group. These results suggest that habitual exercise decreases SBP during low-intensity resistance exercise. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Voluntary exercise increases cholesterol efflux but not macrophage reverse cholesterol transport in vivo in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meissner, Maxi; Nijstad, Niels; Kuipers, Folkert; Tietge, Uwe J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Physical exercise beneficially impacts on the plasma lipoprotein profile as well as on the incidence of cardiovascular events and is therefore recommended in primary and secondary prevention strategies against atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. However, the underlying mechanisms of the

  1. Gonadal Hormones and Voluntary Exercise Interact to Improve Discrimination Ability in a Set-Shift Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Meghan C.; Rifken, Katharine M.; Toufexis, Donna J.; Green, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Exercise has been demonstrated to improve multiple facets of health, including cognitive function. Rodent studies have suggested that exercise has robust effects on the hippocampus, and on tasks that require the hippocampus. However, studies of the effects of exercise in humans often focus on the benefits to cognitive processes that engage areas outside of the hippocampus, such as executive function. Additionally, when exercise’s cognitive benefits are examined, consideration of both males and females, and gonadal hormones, is rarely made. Here we looked at the interaction of gonadal hormones and exercise in terms of the ability of male and female rats to learn to discriminate rewarded from unrewarded arms in a T-maze based on either brightness (white vs. black) or texture (rough vs. smooth), and then to set-shift (a measure of executive function), where this required discrimination based on the opposite dimension. Gonadectomized or intact males and females had access to running wheels for two weeks before being tested. Intact males and females given access to unlocked running wheels performed better at the initial discrimination (Set 1) compared to intact males and females with locked running wheels, but not at the set-shift (Set 2). No advantage of exercise was observed in gonadectomized rats. PMID:23978149

  2. Effects of voluntary and treadmill exercise on spontaneous withdrawal signs, cognitive deficits and alterations in apoptosis-associated proteins in morphine-dependent rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari-Zaer, Amin; Ghodrati-Jaldbakhan, Shahrbanoo; Vafaei, Abbas Ali; Miladi-Gorji, Hossein; Akhavan, Maziar M; Bandegi, Ahmad Reza; Rashidy-Pour, Ali

    2014-09-01

    Chronic exposure to morphine results in cognitive deficits and alterations of apoptotic proteins in favor of cell death in the hippocampus, a brain region critically involved in learning and memory. Physical activity has been shown to have beneficial effects on brain health. In the current work, we examined the effects of voluntary and treadmill exercise on spontaneous withdrawal signs, the associated cognitive defects, and changes of apoptotic proteins in morphine-dependent rats. Morphine dependence was induced through bi-daily administrations of morphine (10mg/kg) for 10 days. Then, the rats were trained under two different exercise protocols: mild treadmill exercise or voluntary wheel exercise for 10 days. After exercise training, their spatial learning and memory and aversive memory were examined by a water maze and by an inhibitory avoidance task, respectively. The expression of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax and the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 in the hippocampus were determined by immunoblotting. We found that chronic exposure to morphine impaired spatial and aversive memory and remarkably suppressed the expression of Bcl-2, but Bax expression remained constant. Both voluntary and treadmill exercise alleviated memory impairment, increased the expression of Bcl-2 protein, and only the later suppressed the expression of Bax protein in morphine-dependent animals. Moreover, both exercise protocols diminished the occurrence of spontaneous morphine withdrawal signs. Our findings showed that exercise reduces the spontaneous morphine-withdrawal signs, blocks the associated impairment of cognitive performance, and overcomes morphine-induced alterations in apoptotic proteins in favor of cell death. Thus, exercise may be a useful therapeutic strategy for cognitive and behavioral deficits in addict individuals.

  3. The effects of voluntary, involuntary, and forced exercises on brain-derived neurotrophic factor and motor function recovery: a rat brain ischemia model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Ke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stroke rehabilitation with different exercise paradigms has been investigated, but which one is more effective in facilitating motor recovery and up-regulating brain neurotrophic factor (BDNF after brain ischemia would be interesting to clinicians and patients. Voluntary exercise, forced exercise, and involuntary muscle movement caused by functional electrical stimulation (FES have been individually demonstrated effective as stroke rehabilitation intervention. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of these three common interventions on brain BDNF changes and motor recovery levels using a rat ischemic stroke model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: One hundred and seventeen Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly distributed into four groups: Control (Con, Voluntary exercise of wheel running (V-Ex, Forced exercise of treadmill running (F-Ex, and Involuntary exercise of FES (I-Ex with implanted electrodes placed in two hind limb muscles on the affected side to mimic gait-like walking pattern during stimulation. Ischemic stroke was induced in all rats with the middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion model and fifty-seven rats had motor deficits after stroke. Twenty-four hours after reperfusion, rats were arranged to their intervention programs. De Ryck's behavioral test was conducted daily during the 7-day intervention as an evaluation tool of motor recovery. Serum corticosterone concentration and BDNF levels in the hippocampus, striatum, and cortex were measured after the rats were sacrificed. V-Ex had significantly better motor recovery in the behavioral test. V-Ex also had significantly higher hippocampal BDNF concentration than F-Ex and Con. F-Ex had significantly higher serum corticosterone level than other groups. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Voluntary exercise is the most effective intervention in upregulating the hippocampal BDNF level, and facilitating motor recovery. Rats that exercised voluntarily also showed less

  4. Metabolic adaptations of skeletal muscle to voluntary wheel running exercise in hypertensive heart failure rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, R L; Kullman, E L; Waters, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    The Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rat mimics the human progression of hypertension from hypertrophy to heart failure. However, it is unknown whether SHHF animals can exercise at sufficient levels to observe beneficial biochemical adaptations in skeletal muscle. Thirty-seven female...... SHHF and Wistar-Furth (WF) rats were randomized to sedentary (SHHFsed and WFsed) and exercise groups (SHHFex and WFex). The exercise groups had access to running wheels from 6-22 months of age. Hindlimb muscles were obtained for metabolic measures that included mitochondrial enzyme function...... and expression, and glycogen utilization. The SHHFex rats ran a greater distance and duration as compared to the WFex rats (Pmuscle citrate synthase and beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase enzyme activity was not altered in the SHHFex group...

  5. Exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, Manja; thor Straten, Eivind Per

    2016-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that voluntary exercise leads to an influx of immune cells in tumors and a greater than 60% reduction in tumor incidence and growth across several mouse models. Improved immunological control of tumor progression may have important clinical implications in the prevention...

  6. Protein synthesis and antioxidant capacity in aging mice : Effects of long-term voluntary exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaanholt, Lobke M.; Speakman, John R.; Garland, Theodore; Lobley, Gerald E.; Visser, G. Henk

    2008-01-01

    Exercise increases metabolic rate and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) but also elevates protein turnover. ROS cause damage to macromolecules (e. g., proteins) and thereby contribute to aging. Protein turnover removes and replaces damaged proteins. The balance between these two

  7. Hyperoxia decreases muscle glycogenolysis, lactate production, and lactate efflux during steady-state exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellingwerff, Trent; Leblanc, Paul J; Hollidge, Melanie G; Heigenhauser, George J F; Spriet, Lawrence L

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the decreased muscle and blood lactate during exercise with hyperoxia (60% inspired O2) vs. room air is due to decreased muscle glycogenolysis, leading to decreased pyruvate and lactate production and efflux. We measured pyruvate oxidation via PDH, muscle pyruvate and lactate accumulation, and lactate and pyruvate efflux to estimate total pyruvate and lactate production during exercise. We hypothesized that 60% O2 would decrease muscle glycogenolysis, resulting in decreased pyruvate and lactate contents, leading to decreased muscle pyruvate and lactate release with no change in PDH activity. Seven active male subjects cycled for 40 min at 70% VO2 peak on two occasions when breathing 21 or 60% O2. Arterial and femoral venous blood samples and blood flow measurements were obtained throughout exercise, and muscle biopsies were taken at rest and after 10, 20, and 40 min of exercise. Hyperoxia had no effect on leg O2 delivery, O2 uptake, or RQ during exercise. Muscle glycogenolysis was reduced by 16% with hyperoxia (267 +/- 19 vs. 317 +/- 21 mmol/kg dry wt), translating into a significant, 15% reduction in total pyruvate production over the 40-min exercise period. Decreased pyruvate production during hyperoxia had no effect on PDH activity (pyruvate oxidation) but significantly decreased lactate accumulation (60%: 22.6 +/- 6.4 vs. 21%: 31.3 +/- 8.7 mmol/kg dry wt), lactate efflux, and total lactate production over 40 min of cycling. Decreased glycogenolysis in hyperoxia was related to an approximately 44% lower epinephrine concentration and an attenuated accumulation of potent phosphorylase activators ADPf and AMPf during exercise. Greater phosphorylation potential during hyperoxia was related to a significantly diminished rate of PCr utilization. The tighter metabolic match between pyruvate production and oxidation resulted in a decrease in total lactate production and efflux over 40 min of exercise during hyperoxia.

  8. Maximal force, voluntary activation and muscle soreness after eccentric damage to human elbow flexor muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasartwuth, O; Taylor, JL; Gandevia, SC

    2005-01-01

    Muscle damage reduces voluntary force after eccentric exercise but impaired neural drive to the muscle may also contribute. To determine whether the delayed-onset muscle soreness, which develops ∼1 day after exercise, reduces voluntary activation and to identify the possible site for any reduction, voluntary activation of elbow flexor muscles was examined with both motor cortex and motor nerve stimulation. We measured maximal voluntary isometric torque (MVC), twitch torque, muscle soreness and voluntary activation in eight subjects before, immediately after, 2 h after, 1, 2, 4 and 8 days after eccentric exercise. Motor nerve stimulation and motor cortex stimulation were used to derive twitch torques and measures of voluntary activation. Eccentric exercise immediately reduced the MVC by 38 ± 3% (mean ±s.d., n = 8). The resting twitch produced by motor nerve stimulation fell by 82 ± 6%, and the estimated resting twitch by cortical stimulation fell by 47 ± 15%. While voluntary torque recovered after 8 days, both measures of the resting twitch remained depressed. Muscle tenderness occurred 1–2 days after exercise, and pain during contractions on days 1–4, but changes in voluntary activation did not follow this time course. Voluntary activation assessed with nerve stimulation fell 19 ± 6% immediately after exercise but was not different from control values after 2 days. Voluntary activation assessed by motor cortex stimulation was unchanged by eccentric exercise. During MVCs, absolute increments in torque evoked by nerve and cortical stimulation behaved differently. Those to cortical stimulation decreased whereas those to nerve stimulation tended to increase. These findings suggest that reduced voluntary activation contributes to the early force loss after eccentric exercise, but that it is not due to muscle soreness. The impairment of voluntary activation to nerve stimulation but not motor cortical stimulation suggests that the activation deficit lies in the

  9. The inflammatory biomarker YKL-40 decreases stepwise after exercise stress test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam Mygind, Naja; Axelsson, Anna; Ruwald, Martin Huth

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Serum YKL-40 is an inflammatory biomarker associated with disease activity and mortality in diseases characterized by inflammation such as coronary artery disease (CAD). Exercise has a positive effect on CAD, possibly mediated by a decreased inflammatory activity. This study aimed to ...... is elevated in patients with documented CAD compared with controls, and it decreases stepwise after exercise in both groups, indicating an anti-inflammatory effect of exercise independent of the presence of coronary atherosclerosis.......BACKGROUND: Serum YKL-40 is an inflammatory biomarker associated with disease activity and mortality in diseases characterized by inflammation such as coronary artery disease (CAD). Exercise has a positive effect on CAD, possibly mediated by a decreased inflammatory activity. This study aimed...

  10. Proper exercise decreases plasma carcinoembryonic antigen levels with the improvement of body condition in elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Il-Gyu; Park, Eung-Mi; Choi, Hye-Jung; Yoo, Jaehyun; Lee, Jong-Kyun; Jee, Yong-Seok

    2014-05-01

    Aging increases the risk of chronic diseases including cancers. Physical exercise has the beneficial effects for the elderly susceptible to the development of cancers, through maintaining a healthy body condition and improving the immune system. However, excessive or insufficient exercise might increase the risk for cancer. In the present study, we investigated what exercise frequency improves cancer-related biomarkers, such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), alpha fetoprotein (AFP), red blood cell (RBC), and white blood cell (WBC), and the body composition of elderly women. Fifty-four females, aged 70 to 77 years, were divided into 4 groups: control, 1-day exercise (1E), 2-3-day exercise (2-3E), and 5-day exercise (5E) groups. The control group did not participate in any physical activity, while the subjects in the exercise groups underwent the exercise program for 12 weeks. As results, CEA was significantly decreased in the exercise groups, with the lowest values in 2-3E group. In contrast, AFP, RBC and WBC were not significantly changed. CEA is an oncofetal glycoprotein that is overexpressed in adenocarcinomas. Although the function of CEA has not been fully understood, CEA has been suggested to be involved in the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines via stimulating monocytes and macrophages. Moreover, body weight and body mass index were improved in the exercise groups, with the lowest levels in 5E group. Thus, we suggest that exercise for 2-3 days per week decreases the expression of CEA and improves body condition, without loading fatigue or stress, which may contribute to preventing cancer in the elderly women.

  11. Comparison of exogenous adenosine and voluntary exercise on human skeletal muscle perfusion and perfusion heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinonen, Ilkka H.A.; Kemppainen, Jukka; Kaskinoro, Kimmo;

    2010-01-01

    femoral artery infusion of adenosine (1 mg * min(-1) * litre thigh volume(-1)), which has previously been shown to induce maximal whole thigh blood flow of ~8 L/min. This response was compared to the blood flow induced by moderate-high intensity one-leg dynamic knee extension exercise. Adenosine increased...... muscle. Additionally, it remains to be determined what proportion of adenosine-induced flow elevation is specifically directed to muscle only. In the present study we measured thigh muscle capillary nutritive blood flow in nine healthy young men using positron emission tomography at rest and during...... muscle blood flow on average to 40 +/- 7 ml. min(-1) per 100g(-1) of muscle and an aggregate value of 2.3 +/- 0.6 L * min(-1) for the whole thigh musculature. Adenosine also induced a substantial change in blood flow distribution within individuals. Muscle blood flow during adenosine infusion...

  12. Hippocampal angiotensin II receptors play an important role in mediating the effect of voluntary exercise on learning and memory in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan, Maziar M; Emami-Abarghoie, Mitra; Sadighi-Moghaddam, Bizhan; Safari, Manouchehr; Yousefi, Yasaman; Rashidy-Pour, Ali

    2008-09-26

    The beneficial effects of physical activity and exercise on brain functions such as improvement in learning and memory are well documented. The aim of this study was to examine the possible role of hippocampal angiotensin II receptors in voluntary exercise-induced enhancement of learning and memory in rat. In order to block the hippocampal angiotension II receptors, the animals received a single injection of latex microbeads for delivery of [Sar1 Thr8]-Angiotensin II into the hippocampus. The animals were exposed to five consecutive nights of exercise and then their learning and memory were tested on the Morris water maze (MWM) task using a two-trial-per-day for five consecutive days. A probe trial was performed 2 days after the last training day. Our results showed that hippocampal angiotensin II receptor blockade reversed the exercise-induced improvement in learning and memory in rat.

  13. Central beta-adrenergic receptors play an important role in the enhancing effect of voluntary exercise on learning and memory in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Shima; Rashidy-Pour, Ali; Vafaei, Abbas A; Akhavan, Maziar M

    2010-03-17

    The beneficial effects of physical activity and exercise on brain functions such as improvement in learning and memory are well documented. The aim of this study was to examine the role of the beta-adrenergic system in voluntary exercise-induced enhancement of learning and memory in rat. In order to block the beta-adrenergic receptors, the animals were received propranolol (a beta-blocker), or nadolol (a peripherally acting beta-blocker) before each night of five consecutive nights of exercise. Then their learning and memory were tested on the water maze task using a two-trials-per-day for 5 consecutive days. A probe trial was performed 2 days after the last training day. Our results showed that propranolol, but not nadolol reversed the exercise-induced improvement in learning and memory in rat. Our findings indicate that central beta-adrenergic receptors play an important role in mediating the beneficial effects of voluntary exercise on learning and memory.

  14. Music Attenuated a Decrease in Parasympathetic Nervous System Activity after Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Tiantian; Ogawa, Yoshiko; Miura, Misa; Ito, Osamu; Kohzuki, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Music and exercise can both affect autonomic nervous system activity. However, the effects of the combination of music and exercise on autonomic activity are poorly understood. Additionally, it remains unknown whether music affects post-exercise orthostatic tolerance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of music on autonomic nervous system activity in orthostatic tolerance after exercise. Twenty-six healthy graduate students participated in four sessions in a random order on four separate days: a sedentary session, a music session, a bicycling session, and a bicycling with music session. Participants were asked to listen to their favorite music and to exercise on a cycle ergometer. We evaluated autonomic nervous system activity before and after each session using frequency analysis of heart rate variability. High frequency power, an index of parasympathetic nervous system activity, was significantly increased in the music session. Heart rate was increased, and high frequency power was decreased, in the bicycling session. There was no significant difference in high frequency power before and after the bicycling with music session, although heart rate was significantly increased. Additionally, both music and exercise did not significantly affect heart rate, systolic blood pressure or also heart rate variability indices in the orthostatic test. These data suggest that music increased parasympathetic activity and attenuated the exercise-induced decrease in parasympathetic activity without altering the orthostatic tolerance after exercise. Therefore, music may be an effective approach for improving post-exercise parasympathetic reactivation, resulting in a faster recovery and a reduction in cardiac stress after exercise.

  15. Music Attenuated a Decrease in Parasympathetic Nervous System Activity after Exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiantian Jia

    Full Text Available Music and exercise can both affect autonomic nervous system activity. However, the effects of the combination of music and exercise on autonomic activity are poorly understood. Additionally, it remains unknown whether music affects post-exercise orthostatic tolerance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of music on autonomic nervous system activity in orthostatic tolerance after exercise. Twenty-six healthy graduate students participated in four sessions in a random order on four separate days: a sedentary session, a music session, a bicycling session, and a bicycling with music session. Participants were asked to listen to their favorite music and to exercise on a cycle ergometer. We evaluated autonomic nervous system activity before and after each session using frequency analysis of heart rate variability. High frequency power, an index of parasympathetic nervous system activity, was significantly increased in the music session. Heart rate was increased, and high frequency power was decreased, in the bicycling session. There was no significant difference in high frequency power before and after the bicycling with music session, although heart rate was significantly increased. Additionally, both music and exercise did not significantly affect heart rate, systolic blood pressure or also heart rate variability indices in the orthostatic test. These data suggest that music increased parasympathetic activity and attenuated the exercise-induced decrease in parasympathetic activity without altering the orthostatic tolerance after exercise. Therefore, music may be an effective approach for improving post-exercise parasympathetic reactivation, resulting in a faster recovery and a reduction in cardiac stress after exercise.

  16. Creatine supplementation does not decrease oxidative stress and inflammation in skeletal muscle after eccentric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luciano A; Tromm, Camila B; Da Rosa, Guilherme; Bom, Karoliny; Luciano, Thais F; Tuon, Talita; De Souza, Cláudio T; Pinho, Ricardo A

    2013-01-01

    Thirty-six male rats were used; divided into 6 groups (n = 6): saline; creatine (Cr); eccentric exercise (EE) plus saline 24 h (saline + 24 h); eccentric exercise plus Cr 24 h (Cr + 24 h); eccentric exercise plus saline 48 h (saline + 48 h); and eccentric exercise plus Cr 48 h (Cr + 48 h). Cr supplementation was administered as a solution of 300 mg · kg body weight(-1) · day(-1) in 1 mL water, for two weeks, before the eccentric exercise. The animals were submitted to one downhill run session at 1.0 km · h(-1) until exhaustion. Twenty-four and forty-eight hours after the exercise, the animals were killed, and the quadriceps were removed. Creatine kinase levels, superoxide production, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) level, carbonyl content, total thiol content, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, interleukin-1b (IL-1β), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kb), and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) were analysed. Cr supplementation neither decreases Cr kinase, superoxide production, lipoperoxidation, carbonylation, total thiol, IL-1β, NF-kb, or TNF nor alters the enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxides in relation to the saline group, respectively (P eccentric exercise. The present study suggests that Cr supplementation does not decrease oxidative stress and inflammation after eccentric contraction.

  17. Duration- and environment-dependent effects of repeated voluntary exercise on anxiety and cued fear in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubreucq, Sarah; Marsicano, Giovanni; Chaouloff, Francis

    2015-04-01

    Several studies have indicated that animal models of exercise, such as voluntary wheel running, might be endowed with anxiolytic properties. Using the light/dark test of unconditioned anxiety, we have reported that one confounding factor in the estimation of wheel running impacts on anxiety might be the housing condition of the sedentary controls. The present mouse study analyzed whether the aforementioned observation in the light/dark test (i) could be repeated in the elevated plus-maze and social interaction tests of unconditioned anxiety, (ii) extended to conditioned anxiety, as assessed during cued fear recall tests, and (iii) required unlimited daily access to the running wheel. Housing with a locked wheel or with a free wheel that allowed limited or unlimited running activity triggered anxiolysis in the light/dark test, but not in the elevated plus-maze test, compared to standard housing. In the social interaction test, the duration, but not the number, of social contacts was increased in mice provided unlimited (but not limited) access to a wheel, compared to standard housing or housing with a locked wheel. Lastly, freezing responses to a cue during fear recall tests indicated that the reduction in freezing observed in mice provided limited or unlimited access to the wheels was fully accounted for by housing with a wheel. Besides confirming that the housing condition of the sedentary controls might bias the estimation of the effects of wheel running on anxiety, this study further shows that this estimation is dependent on the test used to assess anxiety.

  18. Acute Exercise Decreases Tribbles Homolog 3 Protein Levels in the Hypothalamus of Obese Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Barbara De Almeira; Pauli, Luciana Santos Souza; DE Souza, Claudio Teodoro; DA Silva, Adelino Sanchez Ramos; Cintra, Dennys Esper Correa; Marinho, Rodolfo; DE Moura, Leandro Pereira; Ropelle, Eloize Cristina Chiarreotto; Botezelli, José Diego; Ropelle, Eduardo Rochete; Pauli, José Rodrigo

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effects of acute exercise on tribbles homolog 3 (TRB3) protein levels and on the interaction between TRB3 and Akt proteins in the hypothalamus of obese rats. In addition, we evaluated the relationship between TRB3 and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and verified whether an acute exercise session influences them. In the first part of the study, the rats were divided into three groups: control (lean), fed standard rodent chow; DIO, fed a high-fat diet; and DIO-EXE, fed a high-fat diet and submitted to a swimming acute exercise protocol. In the second part of the study, we used three other groups: control (lean) group receiving an intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusion of vehicle, lean group receiving an i.c.v. infusion of thapsigargin, and lean group receiving an i.c.v. infusion of thapsigargin and performing an acute exercise session. Four hours after the exercise session, food intake was measured, and the hypothalamus was dissected and separated for subsequent protein analysis by immunoblotting and real-time polymerase chain reaction. The acute exercise session reduced TRB3 protein levels, disrupted the interaction between TRB3 and Akt proteins, increased the phosphorylation of Foxo1, and restored the anorexigenic effects of insulin on the hypothalamus of DIO rats. Interestingly, the suppressive effects of acute exercise on TRB3 protein levels may be related, at least in part, to decreased ER stress (evaluated though pancreatic ER kinase phosphorylation and C/EBP homologous protein levels) in the hypothalamus. Exercise-mediated reduction of hypothalamic TRB3 protein levels may be associated with reduction of ER stress. These data provide a new mechanism by which an acute exercise session improves insulin sensitivity in the hypothalamus and restores food intake control in obesity.

  19. Maternal Voluntary Exercise during Pregnancy Enhances the Spatial Learning Acquisition but not the Retention of Memory in Rat Pups via a TrkB-mediated Mechanism: The Role of Hippocampal BDNF Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maziar M Akhavan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: The effect of maternal voluntary exercise on hippocampal BDNF level in rat offspring was studied. In addition, the possible role of hippocampal BDNF receptors in maternal exercise induced enhancement of learning in the rat pups was investigated.   Materials and Methods: Pregnant rats have been randomly assigned to sedentary control or voluntary exercise groups. Each of the exercising pregnant rats was given access to a cage that was equipped with a running wheel until the end of their pregnancy. On post natal day (PND 36, two groups consisted of 7 male rat pups in each group from sedentary or exercised mothers were sacrificed and the hippocampus was dissected for BDNF proteins level determination. Also, bilateral injection of K252a to the hippocampus was used to block the hippocampal BDNF action on PND59 in the rat pups. Results: Voluntary exercise during pregnancy significantly increased the level of BDNF protein in the hippocampus of the rat pups on PND36 compared to the control group (P=0.048. Inhibiting BDNF action abolished the exercise-induced improvement of learning acquisition in offspring in training trials (P=0.0001. No difference was observed in the platform location latency and the time spent in the target in the probe test between two groups. Conclusion : This study demonstrates that voluntary exercise during pregnancy via a TrkB-mediated mechanism enhances the spatial learning acquisition, however, not the retention of memory in the rat pups.

  20. Effects of loaded voluntary wheel exercise on performance and muscle hypertrophy in young and old male C57Bl/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffe, Z; Radley-Crabb, H G; McMahon, C; Grounds, M D; Shavlakadze, T

    2016-02-01

    This study compared the capacity of young and old male C57Bl/6J mice to exercise with increasing resistance over 10 weeks, and its impact on muscle mass. Young mice (aged 15-25 weeks) were subjected to low (LR) and high (HR) resistance exercise, whereas only LR was used for old mice (107-117 weeks). Weekly patterns of voluntary wheel activity, food consumption and body weights were measured. Running patterns changed over time and with age, with two peaks of activity detected for young, but only one for old mice: speed and distance run was also less for old mice. The mass for six limb muscles was measured at the end of the experiment. The most pronounced increase in mass in response to exercise was for the soleus in young and old mice, and also quadriceps and gastrocnemius in young mice. Soleus and quadriceps muscles were analyzed histologically for myofiber number and size. A striking feature was the many small myofibers in response to exercise in young (but not old) soleus, whereas these were not present after exercise in young or old quadriceps. Overall, there was a striking difference in response to exercise between muscles and this was influenced by age. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Greater than predicted decrease in energy expenditure during exercise after body weight loss in obese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, Eric; Imbeault, Pascal; St-Pierre, Sylvie; Alméras, Natalie; Mauriège, Pascale; Després, Jean-Pierre; Bouchard, Claude; Tremblay, Angelo

    2003-07-01

    This study was performed retrospectively to investigate whether exercise energy expenditure (EE) measured during a standardized treadmill protocol (4.5 km/h at 0% grade) falls below predicted values after body weight loss in obese men. A reference equation was established to predict net exercise EE in a control sample of 83 obese individuals (27 kg/m(2)hydrodensitometry. Net exercise EE, insulin, leptin, 3,3',5-tri-iodothyronine and free thyroxine were measured after an overnight fast at baseline and 2-4 weeks after the end of the programme, when subjects were weight stable. Body weight was significantly reduced (-11%; P <0.01) at the end of the weight loss programme. At baseline, measured net exercise EE was similar to that predicted from the regression equation [19.6 and 19.8 kJ/min (4.69 and 4.74 kcal/min) respectively; not significant]. However, after the end of the intervention, measured net exercise EE was significantly below the predicted value [15.5 and 17.3 kJ/min (3.71 and 4.14 kcal/min) respectively; P <0.01]. The difference between the predicted and the measured fall in net exercise EE was significantly associated with changes in leptin concentration ( r =0.79, P <0.01), even after correction for changes in fat mass and insulin. These observations suggest that net exercise EE falls below predicted values after body weight loss. In addition, this greater than predicted decrease in net exercise EE was associated with changes in leptin.

  2. Melatonin Supplementation Decreases Aerobic Exercise Training Induced-Lipid Peroxidation and Malondialdehyde in Sedentary Young Women

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    Ziaadini Fatemeh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Five percent of consumed oxygen produces a number of reactive oxygen species (ROS including free radicals and other chemical products such as malondialdehyde (MDA. MDA increases lipid peroxidation such as low density lipoproteins cholesterol (LDL-c. Melatonin can decrease MDA and lipid peroxidation, but there are limited data about melatonin supplementation on MDA and lipid peroxidation of women. So the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of melatonin supplementation on exercise-induced MDA and lipid peroxidation of sedentary young women. Twenty sedentary young (20–25 years old women were selected and randomly divided into two exercise training-supplement (n=10 and exercise training (n=10 groups. Pretest/posttest body mass, BMI, rest heart rate (RHR, body fat percent, menstrual cycle, blood sampling for MDA and lipid profile were collected. Aerobic exercise training was performed for 8 weeks, triple weekly. Melatonin supplementation was ingested at 3 mg/day for exercise training-supplement. Results showed that the long term exercise training increased MDA concentrations, and melatonin supplementation significantly suppressed MDA surge (−25.2±2.87; 95% CI=−30.91 to −19.49. Moreover, post-exercise training LDL-c levels significantly declined due to melatonin supplementation in sedentary young women (19.5±2.41; 95% CI=12.272 to 25.728. We concluded that 3 mg melatonin supplementation following aerobic exercise training would attenuate ROS and improve lipid profile of young sedentary women.

  3. Effects of diet-induced obesity and voluntary exercise in a tauopathy mouse model: implications of persistent hyperleptinemia and enhanced astrocytic leptin receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Shunsuke; Kojima, Ayako; Ishikawa, Chieko; Kuwabara, Satoshi; Arai, Kimihito; Yoshiyama, Yasumasa

    2014-11-01

    The number of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is increasing worldwide, and available drugs have shown limited efficacy. Hence, preventive interventions and treatments for presymptomatic AD are currently considered very important. Obesity rates have also been increasing dramatically and it is an independent risk factor of AD. Therefore, for the prevention of AD, it is important to elucidate the pathomechanism between obesity and AD. We generated high calorie diet (HCD)-induced obese tauopathy model mice (PS19), which showed hyperleptinemia but limited insulin resistance. HCD enhanced tau pathology and glial activation. Conversely, voluntary exercise with a running wheel normalized the serum leptin concentration without reducing body weight, and restored the pathological changes induced by HCD. Thus, we speculated that persistent hyperleptinemia played an important role in accelerating pathological changes in PS19 mice. Leptin primarily regulates food intake and body weight via leptin receptor b (LepRb). Interestingly, the nuclear staining for p-STAT3, which was activated by LepRb, was decreased in hippocampal neurons in HCD PS19 mice, indicating leptin resistance. Meanwhile, astroglial activation and the astrocytic expression of a short LepR isoform, LepRa, were enhanced in the hippocampus of HCD PS19 mice. Real-time PCR analysis demonstrated that leptin increased mRNA levels for pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-1β and TNF-α in primary cultured astrocytes from wild type and LepRb-deficient mice. These observations suggest that persistent hyperleptinemia caused by obesity induces astrocytic activation, astrocytic leptin hypersensitivity with enhanced LepRa expression, and enhanced inflammation, consequently accelerating tau pathology in PS19 mice.

  4. Effects of a High Fat Diet and Voluntary Wheel Running Exercise on Cidea and Cidec Expression in Liver and Adipose Tissue of Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Thomas H; Banerjee, Sayani; Sharma, Vishva Mitra; Donohue, Jacob; Couldwell, Sandrine; Sosinsky, Alexandra; Frulla, Ashton; Robinson, Allegra; Puri, Vishwajeet

    2015-01-01

    Cidea and Cidec play an important role in regulating triglyceride storage in liver and adipose tissue. It is not known if the Cidea and Cidec genes respond to a high fat diet (HFD) or exercise training, two interventions that alter lipid storage. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of a HFD and voluntary wheel running (WR) on Cidea and Cidec mRNA and protein expression in adipose tissue and liver of mice. A HFD promoted a significant increase in Cidea and Cidec mRNA levels in adipose tissue and liver. The increase in Cidea and Cidec mRNAs in adipose tissue and liver in response to a HFD was prevented by WR. Similar to the changes in Cidea mRNA, Cidea protein levels in adipose tissue significantly increased in response to a HFD, a process that was, again, prevented by WR. However, in adipose tissue the changes in Cidec mRNA did not correspond to the changes in Cidec protein levels, as a HFD decreased Cidec protein abundance. Interestingly, in adipose tissue Cidea protein expression was significantly related to body weight (R=.725), epididymal adipose tissue (EWAT) mass (R=.475) and insulin resistance (R=.706), whereas Cidec protein expression was inversely related to body weight (R=-.787), EWAT mass (R=-.706), and insulin resistance (R=-.679). Similar to adipose tissue, Cidea protein expression in liver was significantly related to body weight (R=.660), EWAT mass (R=.468), and insulin resistance (R=.599); however, unlike adipose tissue, Cidec protein levels in liver were not related to body weight or EWAT mass and only moderately associated with insulin resistance (R=-.422, P=0.051). Overall, our findings indicate that Cidea is highly associated with adiposity and insulin resistance, whereas Cidec is related to insulin sensitivity. The present study suggests that Cide proteins might play an important functional role in the development of obesity, hepatic steatosis, as well as the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes.

  5. Cold-water immersion decreases cerebral oxygenation but improves recovery after intermittent-sprint exercise in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minett, G M; Duffield, R; Billaut, F; Cannon, J; Portus, M R; Marino, F E

    2014-08-01

    This study examined the effects of post-exercise cooling on recovery of neuromuscular, physiological, and cerebral hemodynamic responses after intermittent-sprint exercise in the heat. Nine participants underwent three post-exercise recovery trials, including a control (CONT), mixed-method cooling (MIX), and cold-water immersion (10 °C; CWI). Voluntary force and activation were assessed simultaneously with cerebral oxygenation (near-infrared spectroscopy) pre- and post-exercise, post-intervention, and 1-h and 24-h post-exercise. Measures of heart rate, core temperature, skin temperature, muscle damage, and inflammation were also collected. Both cooling interventions reduced heart rate, core, and skin temperature post-intervention (P  0.05). CWI reduced cerebral oxygenation compared to MIX and CONT post-intervention (P < 0.01). Furthermore, cooling interventions reduced cortisol 1-h post-exercise (P < 0.01), although only CWI blunted creatine kinase 24-h post-exercise compared to CONT (P < 0.05). Accordingly, improvements in neuromuscular recovery after post-exercise cooling appear to be disassociated with cerebral oxygenation, rather reflecting reductions in thermoregulatory demands to sustain force production. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Why even active people get fatter--the asymmetric effects ofincreasing and decreasing exercise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Paul T.

    2006-01-06

    Background: Public health policies for preventing obesityneed guidelines for active individuals who are at risk due to exerciserecidivism. Methods: Changes in adiposity were compared to the runningdistances at baseline and follow-up in men and women whose reportedexercise increased (N=4,632 and 1,953, respectively) or decreased (17,280and 5,970, respectively) during 7.7 years of follow-up. Results: PerDelta km/wk, decreases in running distance caused over four-fold greaterweight gain between 0-8 km/wk (slope+-SE, males: -0.068+ -0.005 kg/m2,females: -0.080+-0.01 kg/m2) than between 32-48 km/wk (-0.017+-0.002 and-0.010+-0.005 kg/m2, respectively). In contrast, increases in runningdistance produced the smallest weight losses between 0-8 km/wk andstatistically significant weight loss only above 16 km/wk in males and 32km/wk in females. Above 32 km/wk (30 kcal/kg) in men and 16 km/wk (15kcal/kg) in women, weight loss from increasing exercise was equal to orgreater than weight gained with decreasing exercise, otherwise weightgain exceeded weight loss. Substantial weight gain occurred in runnerswho quit running, which would be mostly retained with resumed activity.Conclusion: Public health recommendations should warn against the risksof irreversible weight gain with exercise cessation. Weight gained due toreductions in exercise below 30 kcal/kg in men and 15 kcal/kg in womenmay not be reversed by resuming prior activity. Current IOM guidelines(i.e., maintain total energy expenditure at 160 percent of basal) agreewith the men s exercise threshold for symmetric weight change withchanging exercise levels.

  7. Voluntary exercise offers anxiolytic potential and amplifies galanin gene expression in the locus coeruleus of the rat

    OpenAIRE

    Sciolino, Natale R.; Dishman, Rodney K.; Holmes, Philip V.

    2012-01-01

    Although exercise improves anxiety in humans, it is controversial whether exercise is anxiolytic in rodents. We tested the hypothesis that stress influences the effect of exercise on anxiety-like and defensive behaviors. To explore the neurobiological mechanisms of exercise, we also examined whether exercise alters gene expression for the stress-related peptide galanin. Rats were housed in the presence or absence of a running wheel for 21 d. A subset of these rats were (1) not injected or rec...

  8. EXERCISES THAT FACILITATE OPTIMAL HAMSTRING AND QUADRICEPS CO-ACTIVATION TO HELP DECREASE ACL INJURY RISK IN HEALTHY FEMALES: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedinsky, Rachel; Baker, Lindsey; Imbus, Samuel; Bowman, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Background Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is common among females due to many anatomic, hormonal, and neuromuscular risk factors. One modifiable risk factor that places females at increased risk of ACL injury is a poor hamstrings: quadriceps (H:Q) co-activation ratio, which should be 0.6 or greater in order to decrease the stress placed on the ACL. Exercises that produce more quadriceps dominant muscle activation can add to the tension placed upon the ACL, potentially increasing the risk of ACL injury. Hypothesis/Purpose The purpose of this systematic review was to compare quadriceps and hamstring muscle activation during common closed kinetic chain therapeutic exercises in healthy female knees to determine what exercises are able to produce adequate H:Q co-activation ratios. Study Design Systematic Review Methods Multiple online databases were systematically searched and screened for inclusion. Eight articles were identified for inclusion. Data on mean electromyography (EMG) activation of both quadriceps and hamstring muscles, % maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), and H:Q co-activation ratios were extracted from the studies. Quality assessment was performed on all included studies. Results Exercises analyzed in the studies included variations of the double leg squat, variations of the single leg squat, lateral step-up, Fitter, Stairmaster® (Core Health and Fitness, Vancouver, WA), and slide board. All exercises, except the squat machine with posterior support at the level of the scapula and feet placed 50 cm in front of the hips, produced higher quadriceps muscle activation compared to hamstring muscle activation. Conclusion Overall, two leg squats demonstrate poor H:Q co-activation ratios. Single leg exercises, when performed between 30 and 90 degrees of knee flexion, produce adequate H:Q ratios, thereby potentially reducing the risk of tensile stress on the ACL and ACL injury. Level of Evidence 2a- Systematic Review of Cohort Studies PMID

  9. Skeletal muscle alterations and exercise performance decrease in erythropoietin-deficient mice: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mille-Hamard Laurence

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Erythropoietin (EPO is known to improve exercise performance by increasing oxygen blood transport and thus inducing a higher maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max. Furthermore, treatment with (or overexpression of EPO induces protective effects in several tissues, including the myocardium. However, it is not known whether EPO exerts this protective effect when present at physiological levels. Given that EPO receptors have been identified in skeletal muscle, we hypothesized that EPO may have a direct, protective effect on this tissue. Thus, the objectives of the present study were to confirm a decrease in exercise performance and highlight muscle transcriptome alterations in a murine EPO functional knock-out model (the EPO-d mouse. Methods We determined VO2max peak velocity and critical speed in exhaustive runs in 17 mice (9 EPO-d animals and 8 inbred controls, using treadmill enclosed in a metabolic chamber. Mice were sacrificed 24h after a last exhaustive treadmill exercise at critical speed. The tibialis anterior and soleus muscles were removed and total RNA was extracted for microarray gene expression analysis. Results The EPO-d mice’s hematocrit was about 50% lower than that of controls (p  1.4 and 115 were strongly down-regulated (normalized ratio  Conclusions Our results showed that the lack of functional EPO induced a decrease in the aerobic exercise capacity. This decrease was correlated with the hematocrit and reflecting poor oxygen supply to the muscles. The observed alterations in the muscle transcriptome suggest that physiological concentrations of EPO exert both direct and indirect muscle-protecting effects during exercise. However, the signaling pathway involved in these protective effects remains to be described in detail.

  10. Chronic low-frequency rTMS of primary motor cortex diminishes exercise training-induced gains in maximal voluntary force in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortobágyi, Tibor; Richardson, Sarah Pirio; Lomarev, Mikhael; Shamim, Ejaz; Meunier, Sabine; Russman, Heike; Dang, Nguyet; Hallett, Mark

    2009-02-01

    Although there is consensus that the central nervous system mediates the increases in maximal voluntary force (maximal voluntary contraction, MVC) produced by resistance exercise, the involvement of the primary motor cortex (M1) in these processes remains controversial. We hypothesized that 1-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of M1 during resistance training would diminish strength gains. Forty subjects were divided equally into five groups. Subjects voluntarily (Vol) abducted the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) (5 bouts x 10 repetitions, 10 sessions, 4 wk) at 70-80% MVC. Another group also exercised but in the 1-min-long interbout rest intervals they received rTMS [Vol+rTMS, 1 Hz, FDI motor area, 300 pulses/session, 120% of the resting motor threshold (rMT)]. The third group also exercised and received sham rTMS (Vol+Sham). The fourth group received only rTMS (rTMS_only). The 37.5% and 33.3% gains in MVC in Vol and Vol+Sham groups, respectively, were greater (P = 0.001) than the 18.9% gain in Vol+rTMS, 1.9% in rTMS_only, and 2.6% in unexercised control subjects who received no stimulation. Acutely, within sessions 5 and 10, single-pulse TMS revealed that motor-evoked potential size and recruitment curve slopes were reduced in Vol+rTMS and rTMS_only groups and accumulated to chronic reductions by session 10. There were no changes in rMT, maximum compound action potential amplitude (M(max)), and peripherally evoked twitch forces in the trained FDI and the untrained abductor digiti minimi. Although contributions from spinal sources cannot be excluded, the data suggest that M1 may play a role in mediating neural adaptations to strength training.

  11. Aerobic Exercise Promotes a Decrease in Right Ventricle Apoptotic Proteins in Experimental Cor Pulmonale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Rafael; Siqueira, Rafaela; Conzatti, Adriana; Fernandes, Tânia Regina Gattelli; Tavares, Angela Maria Vicente; Araújo, Alex Sander da Rosa; Belló-Klein, Adriane

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is characterized by progressive increases in resistance and pressure in the pulmonary artery and Cor pulmonale. The effect of exercise on hydrogen peroxide-dependent signaling in the right ventricle (RV) of Cor pulmonale rats was analyzed. Rats were divided into sedentary control (SC), sedentary monocrotaline (SM), trained control (TC), and trained monocrotaline (TM) groups. Rats underwent exercise training (60% of VO2 max) for 5 weeks, with 3 weeks after monocrotaline injection (60 mg/kg intraperitoneally). Pulmonary resistance was enhanced in SM (2.0-fold) compared with SC. Pulmonary artery pressure was increased in SM (2.7-fold) and TM (2.6-fold) compared with their respective controls (SC and TC). RV hypertrophy indexes increased in SM compared with SC. Hydrogen peroxide was higher in SM (1.7-fold) than SC and was reduced by 47% in TM compared with SM. p-Akt was increased in TM (2.98-fold) compared with SM. The Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and caspase 3 were also increased (2.9-fold and 3.9-fold, respectively) in SM compared with SC. Caspase 3 was decreased in TM compared with SM (P < 0.05). Therefore, exercise training promoted a beneficial response by decreasing hydrogen peroxide concentrations, and consequently, apoptotic signaling in RV.

  12. Effects of a High Fat Diet and Voluntary Wheel Running Exercise on Cidea and Cidec Expression in Liver and Adipose Tissue of Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas H Reynolds

    Full Text Available Cidea and Cidec play an important role in regulating triglyceride storage in liver and adipose tissue. It is not known if the Cidea and Cidec genes respond to a high fat diet (HFD or exercise training, two interventions that alter lipid storage. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of a HFD and voluntary wheel running (WR on Cidea and Cidec mRNA and protein expression in adipose tissue and liver of mice. A HFD promoted a significant increase in Cidea and Cidec mRNA levels in adipose tissue and liver. The increase in Cidea and Cidec mRNAs in adipose tissue and liver in response to a HFD was prevented by WR. Similar to the changes in Cidea mRNA, Cidea protein levels in adipose tissue significantly increased in response to a HFD, a process that was, again, prevented by WR. However, in adipose tissue the changes in Cidec mRNA did not correspond to the changes in Cidec protein levels, as a HFD decreased Cidec protein abundance. Interestingly, in adipose tissue Cidea protein expression was significantly related to body weight (R=.725, epididymal adipose tissue (EWAT mass (R=.475 and insulin resistance (R=.706, whereas Cidec protein expression was inversely related to body weight (R=-.787, EWAT mass (R=-.706, and insulin resistance (R=-.679. Similar to adipose tissue, Cidea protein expression in liver was significantly related to body weight (R=.660, EWAT mass (R=.468, and insulin resistance (R=.599; however, unlike adipose tissue, Cidec protein levels in liver were not related to body weight or EWAT mass and only moderately associated with insulin resistance (R=-.422, P=0.051. Overall, our findings indicate that Cidea is highly associated with adiposity and insulin resistance, whereas Cidec is related to insulin sensitivity. The present study suggests that Cide proteins might play an important functional role in the development of obesity, hepatic steatosis, as well as the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes.

  13. Moderate voluntary exercise attenuates the metabolic syndrome in melanocortin-4 receptor-deficient rats showing central dopaminergic dysregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Obici

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: Central dopamine dysregulation during VWR reinforces the link between MC4R function and molecular and behavioral responding to rewards. The data also suggest that exercise can be a successful lifestyle intervention in MC4R-haploinsufficient individuals despite reduced positive reinforcement during exercise training.

  14. Effects of voluntary physical exercise, citicoline, and combined treatment on object recognition memory, neurogenesis, and neuroprotection after traumatic brain injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacotte-Simancas, Alejandra; Costa-Miserachs, David; Coll-Andreu, Margalida; Torras-Garcia, Meritxell; Borlongan, Cesar V; Portell-Cortés, Isabel

    2015-05-15

    The biochemical and cellular events that lead to secondary neural damage after traumatic brain injury (TBI) contribute to long-term disabilities, including memory deficits. There is a need to search for single and/or combined treatments aimed at reducing these TBI-related disfunctions. The effects of citicoline and of voluntary physical exercise in a running wheel (3 weeks), alone or in combination, on TBI-related short-term (3 h) and long-term (24 h) object recognition memory (ORM) deficits and on neurogenesis and neuroprotection were examined using a rodent model of TBI (controlled cortical impact injury). Citicoline improved memory deficits at the two times tested, while physical exercise only in the long-term test. Physical exercise had a clear neuroprotective effect as indicated by reduced interhemispheric differences in hippocampal formation and lateral ventricle volumes and in density of mature neurons in the hilus of the dentate gyrus and the perirhinal cortex. Physical exercise also increased cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus. Some degree of neuroprotection of citicoline was suggested by reduced interhemispheric differences in the volume of the hippocampal formation. Contrary to what was expected, the effects of citicoline and physical exercise did not sum up. Further, a negative interference between both treatments was found in several behavioral and histological variables. The promising profiles of both treatments as therapeutic tools in TBI when applied singly underscore the need to perform further works looking for other combined treatment regimens that increase the benefit of each treatment alone.

  15. Decreased PDH activation and glycogenolysis during exercise following fat adaptation with carbohydrate restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellingwerff, Trent; Spriet, Lawrence L; Watt, Matthew J; Kimber, Nicholas E; Hargreaves, Mark; Hawley, John A; Burke, Louise M

    2006-02-01

    Five days of a high-fat diet while training, followed by 1 day of carbohydrate (CHO) restoration, increases rates of whole body fat oxidation and decreases CHO oxidation during aerobic cycling. The mechanisms responsible for these shifts in fuel oxidation are unknown but involve up- and downregulation of key regulatory enzymes in the pathways of skeletal muscle fat and CHO metabolism, respectively. This study measured muscle PDH and HSL activities before and after 20 min of cycling at 70% VO2peak and 1 min of sprinting at 150% peak power output (PPO). Estimations of muscle glycogenolysis were made during the initial minute of exercise at 70% VO2peak and during the 1-min sprint. Seven male cyclists undertook this exercise protocol on two occasions. For 5 days, subjects consumed in random order either a high-CHO (HCHO) diet (10.3 g x kg(-1) x day(-1) CHO, or approximately 70% of total energy intake) or an isoenergetic high-fat (FAT-adapt) diet (4.6 g x kg(-1) x day(-1) FAT, or 67% of total energy) while undertaking supervised aerobic endurance training. On day 6 for both treatments, subjects ingested an HCHO diet and rested before their experimental trials on day 7. This CHO restoration resulted in similar resting glycogen contents (FAT-adapt 873 +/- 121 vs. HCHO 868 +/- 120 micromol glucosyl units/g dry wt). However, the respiratory exchange ratio was lower during cycling at 70% VO2peak in the FAT-adapt trial, which resulted in an approximately 45% increase and an approximately 30% decrease in fat and CHO oxidation, respectively. PDH activity was lower at rest and throughout exercise at 70% VO2peak (1.69 +/- 0.25 vs. 2.39 +/- 0.19 mmol x kg wet wt(-1) x min(-1)) and the 1-min sprint in the FAT-adapt vs. the HCHO trial. Estimates of glycogenolysis during the 1st min of exercise at 70% VO2peak and the 1-min sprint were also lower after FAT-adapt (9.1 +/- 1.1 vs. 13.4 +/- 2.1 and 37.3 +/- 5.1 vs. 50.5 +/- 2.7 glucosyl units x kg dry wt(-1) x min(-1)). HSL activity was

  16. Fatigue-related firing of distal muscle nociceptors reduces voluntary activation of proximal muscles of the same limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, David S; McNeil, Chris J; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2014-02-15

    With fatiguing exercise, firing of group III/IV muscle afferents reduces voluntary activation and force of the exercised muscles. These afferents can also act across agonist/antagonist pairs, reducing voluntary activation and force in nonfatigued muscles. We hypothesized that maintained firing of group III/IV muscle afferents after a fatiguing adductor pollicis (AP) contraction would decrease voluntary activation and force of AP and ipsilateral elbow flexors. In two experiments (n = 10) we examined voluntary activation of AP and elbow flexors by measuring changes in superimposed twitches evoked by ulnar nerve stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex, respectively. Inflation of a sphygmomanometer cuff after a 2-min AP maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) blocked circulation of the hand for 2 min and maintained firing of group III/IV muscle afferents. After a 2-min AP MVC, maximal AP voluntary activation was lower with than without ischemia (56.2 ± 17.7% vs. 76.3 ± 14.6%; mean ± SD; P muscle afferents from the hand decreased voluntary drive and force of AP. Moreover, this effect decreased voluntary drive and torque of proximal unfatigued muscles, the elbow flexors. Fatigue-sensitive group III/IV muscle nociceptors act to limit voluntary drive not only to fatigued muscles but also to unfatigued muscles within the same limb.

  17. Acute eccentric resistance exercise decreases matrix metalloproteinase activity in obese elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Dahan da Cunha; Navalta, James Wilfred; Durigan, João Luiz Quagliotti; Marqueti, Rita de Cassia; Tibana, Ramires Alsamir; Luiz Franco, Octavio; de Almeida, Jesser Alves; Camarço, Nathalia Ferreira; Neto, Ivo Vieira de Sousa; Prestes, Jonato

    2016-03-01

    The association of ageing with obesity commits elderly women and has been correlated with multiple degenerative processes, which could be occasioned by an enhancing in levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and metalloproteinase-9 (MMPs) as well by an cytokine unbalance that included an enhancing on interleukin-6 (IL-6). Furthermore, other factors could be also related to degenerative process, as they could be reduced by eccentric resistance exercise (ERE), which seems particularly important to initiate resistance training in obese older adults. In this view, this study aims to determinate the effects of an acute ERE session on serum MMP-2, MMP-9 and IL-6 in elderly obese women. Ten elderly obese women participated in this study and completed a 10 repetitions maximum test (10 RM) utilizing leg extension exercise. Subjects then completed an acute ERE session consisting of seven sets of 10 repetitions at 110% of 10 RM with a rest of 3 min between sets. Blood samples were collected before, immediately after, 3, 24 and 48 h following the ERE session. Zymograms were utilized to measure the MMP-2 and MMP-9 enzymes from all individuals. Moreover, IL-6 concentration was also determinated. After ERE session, MMP-2 and MMP-9 decreased, remaining significantly below baseline values after 48 h (Pelderly obese women, possibly indicating a transient protection against the low grade inflammation present in this specific population.

  18. Physical exercise decreases the number of fetal cells in maternal blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlütter, Jacob Mørup; Kirkegaard, Ida; Christensen, Connie Britta;

    liability company). Fetal cells in the blood, bound to fetal cell specific markers, were initially isolated by magnetic cell sorting, then stained with a cocktail of intracellular antibodies, identified and counted. Information about 6 variables reflecting the physical activity of the participants......Physical exercise decreases the number of fetal cells in maternal blood J. M. Schlütter1, I. Kirkegaard1, B. Christensen2, S. Kølvraa3, N. Uldbjerg1 1. Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Aarhus N, Denmark. 2. FCMB ApS, Vejle, Denmark. 3. Department...... of Clinical Genetics, Vejle Hospital, Vejle, Denmark Objectives We have established a robust method to specifically identify and isolate a subgroup of fetal cells in maternal blood (fcmb) at a gestational age of 12 weeks. The concentration of these cells, however, varies considerably among pregnant women...

  19. Phenylephrine decreases frontal lobe oxygenation at rest but not during moderately intense exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brassard, Patrice; Seifert, Thomas; Wissenberg, Mads

    2010-01-01

    PCO2 (PaCO2) were measured and the cerebral metabolic rate for O2 (CMRO2) was calculated. In randomized order, a bolus of saline or 0.3 mg of phenylephrine was then injected during semisupine cycling, eliciting a low (approximately 110 beats/min) or a high (approximately 150 beats/min) heart rate...... high-intensity exercise (-3%, P=not significant), where PaCO2 decreased 7% (Pexercise eliminated that effect.......Whether sympathetic activity influences cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygenation remains controversial. The influence of sympathetic activity on CBF and oxygenation was evaluated by the effect of phenylephrine on middle cerebral artery (MCA) mean flow velocity (Vmean) and the near...

  20. Music Attenuated a Decrease in Parasympathetic Nervous System Activity after Exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Tiantian Jia; Yoshiko Ogawa; Misa Miura; Osamu Ito; Masahiro Kohzuki

    2016-01-01

    Music and exercise can both affect autonomic nervous system activity. However, the effects of the combination of music and exercise on autonomic activity are poorly understood. Additionally, it remains unknown whether music affects post-exercise orthostatic tolerance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of music on autonomic nervous system activity in orthostatic tolerance after exercise. Twenty-six healthy graduate students participated in four sessions in a random order on fou...

  1. Endurance exercise induces REDD1 expression and transiently decreases mTORC1 signaling in rat skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayasaka, Miki; Tsunekawa, Haruka; Yoshinaga, Mariko; Murakami, Taro

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Working muscle conserves adenosine triphosphate (ATP) for muscle contraction by attenuating protein synthesis through several different pathways. Regulated in development and DNA damage response 1 (REDD1) is one candidate protein that can itself attenuate muscle protein synthesis during muscle contraction. In this study, we investigated whether endurance exercise induces REDD1 expression in association with decreased mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex I (mTORC1) signaling and global protein synthesis in rat skeletal muscle. After overnight fasting, rats ran on a treadmill at a speed of 28 m/min for 60 min, and were killed before and immediately, 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 h after exercise. REDD1 mRNA and corresponding protein levels increased rapidly immediately after exercise, and gradually decreased back to the basal level over a period of 6 h in the gastrocnemius muscle. Phosphorylation of mTOR Ser2448 and S6K1 Thr389 increased with the exercise, but diminished in 1–3 h into the recovery period after cessation of exercise. The rate of protein synthesis, as determined by the surface sensing of translation (SUnSET) method, was not altered by exercise in fasted muscle. These results suggest that REDD1 attenuates exercise‐induced mTORC1 signaling. This may be one mechanism responsible for blunting muscle protein synthesis during exercise and in the early postexercise recovery period. PMID:25539833

  2. Exercise decreases lipogenic gene expression in adipose tissue and alters adipocyte cellularity during weight regain after weight loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Danielle Giles

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Exercise is a potent strategy to facilitate long-term weight maintenance. In addition to increasing energy expenditure and reducing appetite, exercise also favors the oxidation of dietary fat, which likely helps prevent weight re-gain. It is unclear whether this exercise-induced metabolic shift is due to changes in energy balance, or whether exercise imparts additional adaptations in the periphery that limit the storage and favor the oxidation of dietary fat. To answer this question, adipose tissue lipid metabolism and related gene expression were studied in obese rats following weight loss and during the first day of relapse to obesity. Mature, obese rats were weight-reduced for 2 weeks with or without daily treadmill exercise (EX. Rats were weight maintained for 6 weeks, followed by relapse on: a ad libitum low fat diet (LFD, b ad libitum LFD plus EX, or c a provision of LFD to match the positive energy imbalance of exercised, relapsing animals. 24h retention of dietary- and de novo-derived fat were assessed directly using 14C palmitate/oleate and 3H20, respectively. Exercise decreased the size, but increased the number of adipocytes in both retroperitoneal (RP and subcutaneous (SC adipose depots, and prevented the relapse-induced increase in adipocyte size. Further, exercise decreased the expression of genes involved in lipid uptake (CD36 & LPL, de novo lipogenesis (FAS, ACC1, and triacylglycerol synthesis (MGAT & DGAT in RP adipose during relapse following weight loss. This was consistent with the metabolic data, whereby exercise reduced retention of de novo-derived fat even when controlling for the positive energy imbalance. The decreased trafficking of dietary fat to adipose tissue with exercise was explained by reduced energy intake which attenuated energy imbalance during refeeding. Despite having decreased expression of lipogenic genes, the net retention of de novo-derived lipid was higher in both the RP and SC adipose of exercising

  3. Effects of early-life exposure to Western diet and wheel access on metabolic syndrome profiles in mice bred for high voluntary exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, T H; Eisenmann, J C; Keeney, B K; Hannon, R M; Dlugosz, E M; Garland, T

    2014-03-01

    Experimental studies manipulating diet and exercise have shown varying effects on metabolic syndrome components in both humans and rodents. To examine the potential interactive effects of diet, exercise and genetic background, we studied mice from four replicate lines bred (52 generations) for high voluntary wheel running (HR lines) and four unselected control lines (C). At weaning, animals were housed for 60 days with or without wheels and fed either a standard chow or Western diet (WD, 42% kcal from fat). Four serial (three juvenile and one adult) blood samples were taken to measure fasting total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides and glucose. Western diet was obesogenic for all mice, even after accounting for the amount of wheel running and kilojoules consumed. Western diet significantly raised glucose as well as TC and HDL-C concentrations. At the level of individual variation (repeatability), there was a modest correlation (r = 0.3-0.5) of blood lipids over time, which was reduced with wheel access and/or WD. Neither genetic selection history nor wheel access had a statistically significant effect on blood lipids. However, HR and C mice had divergent ontogenetic trajectories for body mass and caloric intake. HR mice also had lower adiposity, an effect that was dependent on wheel access. The environmental factors of diet and wheel access had pronounced effects on body mass, food consumption and fasting glucose concentrations, interacting with each other and/or with genetic strain. These data underscore the importance (and often unpredictable nature) of genotype-by-environment and environment-by-environment interactions when studying body weight regulation.

  4. Decreased leg glucose uptake during exercise contributes to the hyperglycaemic effect of octreotide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovind, Peter; Simonsen, Lene; Bülow, Jens

    2010-01-01

    During prolonged infusion of somatostatin, there is an increase in arterial glucose concentration, and this increase persists even during prolonged exercise. The aim of the study was to measure glucose uptake in the leg muscles during infusion of the somatostatin analogue octreotide before...... and during leg exercise....

  5. Decrease in musculoskeletal pain after 4 and 12 months of an aerobic exercise intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korshøj, Mette; Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Lidegaard, Mark

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prevalence of musculoskeletal pain is high in jobs with high physical work demands. An aerobic exercise intervention targeting cardiovascular health was evaluated for its long term side effects on musculoskeletal pain. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to investigate if aerobic exercise af...

  6. Muscle-enriched microRNA miR-486 decreases in circulation in response to exercise in young men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru eAoi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation. miRNAs are taken in by intracellular exosomes, secreted into circulation, and taken up by other cells, where they regulate cellular functions. We hypothesized that muscle-enriched miRNAs existing in circulation mediate beneficial metabolic responses induced by exercise. To test this hypothesis, we measured changes in muscle-enriched circulating miRNAs in response to acute and chronic aerobic exercise. Methods: Eleven healthy young men (age, 21.5 ± 4.5 y; height, 168.6 ± 5.3 cm; and body weight, 62.5 ± 9.0 kg performed a single bout of steady-state cycling exercise at 70% VO2max for 60 min (acute exercise and cycling training 3 days per week for 4 weeks (chronic exercise. Blood samples were collected from the antecubital vein before and after acute and chronic exercise. RNA was extracted from serum, and the levels of muscle-enriched miRNAs (miR-1, miR-133a, miR-133b, miR-206, miR-208b, miR-486, and miR-499 were measured. Results: All of these miRNAs, except for miR-486, were found at too low copy numbers at baseline to be compared. miR-486 was significantly decreased by both acute (P = 0.013 and chronic exercise (P = 0.014. In addition, the change ratio of miR-486 due to acute exercise showed a significant negative correlation with VO2max for each subject (R = 0.58, P = 0.038. Conclusion: The reduction in circulating miR-486 may be associated with metabolic changes during exercise and adaptation induced by training.

  7. Voluntary exercise during extinction of auditory fear conditioning reduces the relapse of fear associated with potentiated activity of striatal direct pathway neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mika, Agnieszka; Bouchet, Courtney A; Bunker, Preston; Hellwinkel, Justin E; Spence, Katie G; Day, Heidi E W; Campeau, Serge; Fleshner, Monika; Greenwood, Benjamin N

    2015-11-01

    Relapse of previously extinguished fear presents a significant, pervasive obstacle to the successful long-term treatment of anxiety and trauma-related disorders. Thus, identification of a novel means to enhance fear extinction to stand the passage of time and generalize across contexts is of the utmost importance. Acute bouts of exercise can be used as inexpensive, noninvasive treatment strategies to reduce anxiety, and have been shown to enhance memory for extinction when performed in close temporal proximity to the extinction session. However, it is unclear whether acute exercise can be used to prevent relapse of fear, and the neural mechanisms underlying this potential effect are unknown. The current study therefore examined whether acute exercise during extinction of auditory fear can protect against the later relapse of fear. Male F344 rats lacking an extended history of wheel running were conditioned to fear a tone CS and subsequently extinguished within either a freely mobile running wheel, a locked wheel, or a control context lacking a wheel. Rats exposed to fear extinction within a freely mobile wheel ran during fear extinction, and demonstrated reduced fear as well as attenuated corticosterone levels during re-exposure to the extinguished CS during the relapse test in a novel context 1week later. Examination of cfos mRNA patterns elicited by re-exposure to the extinguished CS during the relapse test revealed that acute exercise during extinction decreased activation of brain circuits classically involved in driving fear expression and interestingly, increased activity within neurons of the direct striatal pathway involved in reward signaling. These data suggest that exercise during extinction reduces relapse through a mechanism involving the direct pathway of the striatum. It is suggested that a positive affective state could become associated with the CS during exercise during extinction, thus resulting in a relapse-resistant extinction memory.

  8. Modulation in voluntary neural drive in relation to muscle soreness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringard, A.; Puchaux, K.; Noakes, T. D.; Perrey, S.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether (1) spinal modulation would change after non-exhausting eccentric exercise of the plantar flexor muscles that produced muscle soreness and (2) central modulation of the motor command would be linked to the development of muscle soreness. Ten healthy subjects volunteered to perform a single bout of backward downhill walking exercise (duration 30 min, velocity 1 ms−1, negative grade −25%, load 12% of body weight). Neuromuscular test sessions [H-reflex, M-wave, maximal voluntary torque (MVT)] were performed before, immediately after, as well as 1–3 days after the exercise bout. Immediately after exercise there was a −15% decrease in MVT of the plantar flexors partly attributable to an alteration in contractile properties (−23% in electrically evoked mechanical twitch). However, MVT failed to recover before the third day whereas the contractile properties had significantly recovered within the first day. This delayed recovery of MVT was likely related to a decrement in voluntary muscle drive. The decrease in voluntary activation occurred in the absence of any variation in spinal modulation estimated from the H-reflex. Our findings suggest the development of a supraspinal modulation perhaps linked to the presence of muscle soreness. PMID:17978834

  9. MYOELECTRIC ALTERATIONS AFTER VOLUNTARY INDUCED HIGH - AND LOW - FREQUENCY FATIGUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojko Strojnik

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to find whether voluntary induced high- and low-frequency peripheral fatigue exhibit specific alteration in surface EMG signal (SEMG during evoked and maximum voluntary contractions. Ten male students of physical education performed 60 s long stretch-shortening cycle (SSC exercise with maximal intensity and 30 s long concentric (CON exercise with maximal intensity. To verify voluntary induced peripheral fatigue, knee torques during low- (T20 and high-frequency electrical stimulation (T100 of relaxed vastus lateralis muscle (VL were obtained. Contractile properties of the VL were measured with passive twitch and maximal voluntary knee extension test (MVC. Changes in M-waves and SEMG during MVC test were used to evaluate the differences in myoelectrical signals. T100/T20 ratio decreased by 10.9 ± 8.4 % (p < 0.01 after the SSC exercise and increased by 35.9 ± 17.5 % (p < 0.001 after the CON exercise. Significant SEMG changes were observed only after the CON exercise where peak to peak time of the M-waves increased by 9.2 ± 13.3 % (p < 0.06, SEMG amplitude during MVC increased by 32.9 ± 21.6 % (p < 0.001 and SEMG power spectrum median frequency decreased by 11.0 ± 10.5 % (p < 0.05. It is concluded that high frequency fatigue wasn't reflected in SEMG, however the SEMG changes after the CON seemed to reflect metabolic changes due to acidosis

  10. Exercise training decreases body mass index in subjects aged 50 years and over

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignatio Rika Haryono

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Exercise training can improve blood pressure in normotensive, prehypertensive, and hypertensive subjects. One of the mechanisms of blood pressure reduction in hypertensive patients with obesity is through weight loss. This study aimed to examine the effect of exercise training on bodyweight and the relationship between weight loss and reduction of blood pressure. An experimental pre-post test design without controls was used to evaluate the effect of exercise training on weight loss. The study involved 89 elderly aged 50 years or more, consisting of 40 men and 49 women, who were members of Senayan Sport Fitness Club and had been exercising for at least three months. Exercise training was programmed and performed three times a week, consisting of aerobic (walking, jogging, static cycling, and resistance exercise. All exercise was performed for one to two hours with mild to moderate intensity. Blood pressure and body weight were obtained from medical records. Paired t-test showed that systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, mean arterial pressure (MAP, pulse pressure (PP, and body mass index (BMI were significantly lower after training [(systolic, 126.3 ± 2.9 vs 122.3 ± 2.7, p=0.02, (diastolic, 80.2 ± 3.1 vs 77.2 ± 2.4, p=0.00, (MAP, 95.6 ± 4.6 vs 92.2 ± 3.4, p=0.00, (PP, 46.1 ± 4.2 vs 45.1 ± 3.6, p=0.04, (BMI, 24.5 ± 2.9 vs 23.6 ± 2.9, p=0.04]. Duration of training was the most influential factor affecting rBMI, (Beta = 0.38; p=0.00. Exercise training could lower BMI and the reduction in diastolic blood pressure was higher for the subjects aged 70 years and over.

  11. Exercise training decreases body mass index in subjects aged 50 years and over

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignatio Rika Haryono

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Exercise training can improve blood pressure in normotensive, prehypertensive, and hypertensive subjects. One of the mechanisms of blood pressure reduction in hypertensive patients with obesity is through weight loss. This study aimed to examine the effect of exercise training on bodyweight and the relationship between weight loss and reduction of blood pressure. An experimental pre-post test design without controls was used to evaluate the effect of exercise training on weight loss. The study involved 89 elderly aged 50 years or more, consisting of 40 men and 49 women, who were members of Senayan Sport Fitness Club and had been exercising for at least three months. Exercise training was programmed and performed three times a week, consisting of aerobic (walking, jogging, static cycling, and resistance exercise. All exercise was performed for one to two hours with mild to moderate intensity. Blood pressure and body weight were obtained from medical records. Paired t-test showed that systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, mean arterial pressure (MAP, pulse pressure (PP, and body mass index (BMI were significantly lower after training [(systolic, 126.3 ± 2.9 vs 122.3 ± 2.7, p=0.02, (diastolic, 80.2 ± 3.1 vs 77.2 ± 2.4, p=0.00, (MAP, 95.6 ± 4.6 vs 92.2 ± 3.4, p=0.00, (PP, 46.1 ± 4.2 vs 45.1 ± 3.6, p=0.04, (BMI, 24.5 ± 2.9 vs 23.6 ± 2.9, p=0.04]. Duration of training was the most influential factor affecting rBMI, (Beta = 0.38; p=0.00. Exercise training could lower BMI and the reduction in diastolic blood pressure was higher for the subjects aged 70 years and over.

  12. Constant-load exercise decreases the serum concentration of myeloperoxidase in healthy smokers and smokers with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holz O

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Olaf Holz,1,* Stefan Roepcke,2,* Henrik Watz,3 Uwe Tegtbur,4 Gezim Lahu,2 Jens M Hohlfeld1 1Fraunhofer Institute for Toxicology and Experimental Medicine (ITEM, German Center for Lung Research (DZL, BREATH, Hannover, Germany; 2Takeda Pharmaceuticals International GmbH, Glattpark-Opfikon, Switzerland; 3Pulmonary Research Institute at Lung Clinic Grosshansdorf, German Center for Lung Research (DZL, ARCN, Grosshansdorf, 4Institute for Sports Medicine, Hannover Medical School (MHH, Hannover, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: There is an ongoing demand for easily accessible biomarkers related to pathophysiological processes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Short-term intense exercise is known to increase the peripheral blood levels of cytokines. Therefore, we tested the potential and the repeatability of an exercise challenge to amplify seven serum biomarkers (interleukin 6 [IL6], C-reactive protein [CRP], myeloperoxidase [MPO], leukotriene B4, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and von Willebrand factor [VWF] in smokers with and without COPD. Twenty-three smokers with moderate COPD (GOLD 2 and 23 sex- and age-matched healthy smokers underwent up to 30-minute submaximal, constant-load exercise (75% of maximum work load on two occasions separated by 4 weeks (second challenge n=19/20. Serum samples were obtained before, 5 minutes after the start, at the end of exercise (maximum 30 minutes or until exhaustion, and after additional 20 minutes of rest. The median (interquartile range exercise time until exhaustion in the two challenges was 10.0 (4.0 minutes and 10.0 (8.0 minutes in smokers with COPD and 22.0 (16.0 minutes and 26.5 (14.5 minutes in healthy smokers. The exercise challenge significantly increased the serum concentrations of IL6 and VWF, but decreased the concentrations of MPO. Healthy smokers showed a significantly greater increase (at

  13. Balance Training Exercises Decrease Lower-Limb Strength Asymmetry in Young Tennis Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sannicandro, Italo; Cofano, Giacomo; Rosa, Rosa A.; Piccinno, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The issue of functional asymmetries in the lower-limbs has been the subject of numerous recent investigations concerning many different contact, limited-contact and non-contact sports. The presence of strength asymmetries in the lower-limbs of young athletes practicing various sporting disciplines is considered an intrinsic risk factor for injury; in such cases, compensation strategies should thus be implemented aimed at eliminating, or at least limiting, the degree of asymmetry in order to avoid the negative consequences asymmetries can have upon the health of young sportsmen and women on the long-term. The aim of the present study was to examine the presence of functional asymmetries in the lower-limbs of young tennis players in strength and speed drill performance and to test a specific balance-training programme in its capacity to effectively reduce such asymmetries. Twenty-three young tennis players were randomly assigned to the Experimental Group (EG) (n = 11: 4 females, 7 males; 13.2 ± 0.9 years; 50.8 ± 8.9 Kg; 1.63 ± 0.08 m) or Comparison Group (CG) (n = 12: 4 females, 8 males; 13.0 ± 0.9 years; 51.1 ± 9.2 Kg; 1.61 ± 0.09 m). To quantify percent asymmetries in lower-limb strength before (T0) and following (T1) training, performances were assessed in the one-leg hop test (OLH), side-hop test (SH) and side steps and forward 4.115-m test (4m-SSF). Performances in the 10 and 20m sprint tests and the Foran test were also assessed. The EG completed a total of 12 training sessions directed at balance training: two 30-minute sessions/week over a 6-week period. The CG followed an identical training schedule, but training sessions consisted of tennis-specific drills only. The results reveal significant differences between pre- and post-training tests in the EG only: the degree of lower-limb asymmetry was decreased in the EG following completion of the training programme, as assessed using the OLH test (p < 0.001), SH test (p < 0.001) and 4m-SSF test (p < 0

  14. Menopause is associated with decreased whole body fat oxidation during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildgaard, J; Pedersen, A T; Green, C J

    2013-01-01

    ), and postmenopausal (n = 14)]. Estimated insulin sensitivity was obtained from an oral glucose tolerance test. Body composition was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and magnetic resonance imaging. Fat oxidation and energy expenditure were measured during an acute exercise bout of 45 min of ergometer...... biking at 50% of maximal oxygen consumption (Vo2 max). Muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis of the quadriceps muscle were obtained before and immediately after the exercise bout. Postmenopausal women had 33% [confidence interval (CI) 95%: 12-55] lower whole body fat oxidation (P = 0.005) and 19% (CI...... 95%: 9-22) lower energy expenditure (P = 0.02) during exercise, as well as 4.28 kg lower lean body mass (LBM) than premenopausal women. Correction for LBM reduced differences in fat oxidation to 23% (P = 0.05), whereas differences in energy expenditure disappeared (P = 0.22). No differences between...

  15. Human resting extracellular heat shock protein 72 concentration decreases during the initial adaptation to exercise in a hot, humid environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Helen C.; Ferguson, Richard A.; Nimmo, Myra A.

    2006-01-01

    Heat shock protein (Hsp) 72 is a cytosolic protein that also is present in the circulation. Extracellular Hsp72 (eHsp72) is inducible by exercise and is suggested to act as a danger signal to the immune system. The adaptive response of eHsp72 to repeated exercise-heat exposures in humans remains to be determined. An intracellular animal study found a reduced Hsp72 response, with no change in resting levels, during heat stress after a single day of passive heat acclimation. The current study therefore tested whether adaptations in human eHsp72 levels would similarly occur 24 hours after a single exercise-heat exposure. Seven males completed cycle exercise (42.5% V̇O2peak for 2 hours) in a hot, humid environment (38°C, 60% relative humidity) on each of 2 consecutive days. Blood samples were obtained from an antecubital vein before exercise and 0 hours and 22 hours postexercise for the analysis of eHsp72. Exercise-heat stress resulted in enhanced eHsp72, with a similar absolute increase found on both days (day 1: 1.26 ng/mL [0.80 ng/mL]; day 2: 1.29 ng/mL [1.60 ng/mL]). Resting eHsp72 decreased from rest on day 1 to day 2's 22-hour postexercise sample (P < 0.05). It is suggested that the reduction in resting eHsp72 after 2 consecutive exercise-heat exposures is possibly due to an enhanced removal from the circulation, for either immunoregulatory functions, or for improved cellular stress tolerance in this initial, most stressful period of acclimation. PMID:16817318

  16. Balance training exercises decrease lower-limb strength asymmetry in young tennis players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sannicandro, Italo; Cofano, Giacomo; Rosa, Rosa A; Piccinno, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    The issue of functional asymmetries in the lower-limbs has been the subject of numerous recent investigations concerning many different contact, limited-contact and non-contact sports. The presence of strength asymmetries in the lower-limbs of young athletes practicing various sporting disciplines is considered an intrinsic risk factor for injury; in such cases, compensation strategies should thus be implemented aimed at eliminating, or at least limiting, the degree of asymmetry in order to avoid the negative consequences asymmetries can have upon the health of young sportsmen and women on the long-term. The aim of the present study was to examine the presence of functional asymmetries in the lower-limbs of young tennis players in strength and speed drill performance and to test a specific balance-training programme in its capacity to effectively reduce such asymmetries. Twenty-three young tennis players were randomly assigned to the Experimental Group (EG) (n = 11: 4 females, 7 males; 13.2 ± 0.9 years; 50.8 ± 8.9 Kg; 1.63 ± 0.08 m) or Comparison Group (CG) (n = 12: 4 females, 8 males; 13.0 ± 0.9 years; 51.1 ± 9.2 Kg; 1.61 ± 0.09 m). To quantify percent asymmetries in lower-limb strength before (T0) and following (T1) training, performances were assessed in the one-leg hop test (OLH), side-hop test (SH) and side steps and forward 4.115-m test (4m-SSF). Performances in the 10 and 20m sprint tests and the Foran test were also assessed. The EG completed a total of 12 training sessions directed at balance training: two 30-minute sessions/week over a 6-week period. The CG followed an identical training schedule, but training sessions consisted of tennis-specific drills only. The results reveal significant differences between pre- and post-training tests in the EG only: the degree of lower-limb asymmetry was decreased in the EG following completion of the training programme, as assessed using the OLH test (p strategies may be inserted into training programmes

  17. Dietary nitrate supplementation improves exercise performance and decreases blood pressure in COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Michael J; Justus, Nicholas W; Hauser, Jordan I; Case, Ashlee H; Helms, Christine C; Basu, Swati; Rogers, Zachary; Lewis, Marc T; Miller, Gary D

    2015-08-01

    Dietary nitrate (NO3(-)) supplementation via beetroot juice has been shown to increase the exercise capacity of younger and older adults. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of acute NO3(-) ingestion on the submaximal constant work rate exercise capacity of COPD patients. Fifteen patients were assigned in a randomized, single-blind, crossover design to receive one of two treatments (beetroot juice then placebo or placebo then beetroot juice). Submaximal constant work rate exercise time at 75% of the patient's maximal work capacity was the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included plasma NO3(-) and nitrite (NO2(-)) levels, blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen consumption (VO2), dynamic hyperinflation, dyspnea and leg discomfort. Relative to placebo, beetroot ingestion increased plasma NO3(-) by 938% and NO2(-) by 379%. Median (+interquartile range) exercise time was significantly longer (p = 0.031) following the ingestion of beetroot versus placebo (375.0 + 257.0 vs. 346.2 + 148.0 s, respectively). Compared with placebo, beetroot ingestion significantly reduced iso-time (p = 0.001) and end exercise (p = 0.008) diastolic blood pressures by 6.4 and 5.6 mmHg, respectively. Resting systolic blood pressure was significantly reduced (p = 0.019) by 8.2 mmHg for the beetroot versus the placebo trial. No other variables were significantly different between the beetroot and placebo trials. These results indicate that acute dietary NO3(-) supplementation can elevate plasma NO3(-) and NO2(-) concentrations, improve exercise performance, and reduce blood pressure in COPD patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dietary Nitrate Supplementation Improves Exercise Performance and Decreases Blood Pressure in COPD Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Michael J.; Justus, Nicholas W.; Hauser, Jordan I.; Case, Ashlee H.; Helms, Christine C.; Basu, Swati; Rogers, Zachary; Lewis, Marc T.; Miller, Gary D.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary nitrate (NO3−) supplementation via beetroot juice has been shown to increase the exercise capacity of younger and older adults. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of acute NO3− ingestion on the submaximal constant work rate exercise capacity of COPD patients. Fifteen patients were assigned in a randomized, single-blind, crossover design to receive one of two treatments (beetroot juice then placebo or placebo then beetroot juice). Submaximal constant work rate exercise time at 75% of the patient’s maximal work capacity was the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included plasma NO3− and nitrite (NO2−) levels, blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen consumption (VO2), dynamic hyperinflation, dyspnea and leg discomfort. Relative to placebo, beetroot ingestion increased plasma NO3− by 938% and NO2− by 379%. Median (+ interquartile range) exercise time was significantly longer (p = 0.031) following the ingestion of beetroot versus placebo (375.0 + 257.0 vs. 346.2 + 148.0 sec., respectively). Compared to placebo, beetroot ingestion significantly reduced iso-time (p = 0.001) and end exercise (p = 0.008) diastolic blood pressures by 6.4 and 5.6 mmHg, respectively. Resting systolic blood pressure was significantly reduced (p = 0.019) by 8.2 mmHg for the beetroot versus the placebo trial. No other variables were significantly different between the beetroot and placebo trials. These results indicate that acute dietary NO3− supplementation can elevate plasma NO3− and NO2− concentrations, improve exercise performance, and reduce blood pressure in COPD patients. PMID:25445634

  19. A warm water pool-based exercise program decreases immediate pain in female fibromyalgia patients: uncontrolled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Jiménez, V; Carbonell-Baeza, A; Aparicio, V A; Samos, B; Femia, P; Ruiz, J R; Delgado-Fernández, M

    2013-07-01

    Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic and extended musculoskeletal pain. The combination of exercise therapy with the warm water may be an appropriate treatment. However, studies focusing on the analysis of immediate pain during and after an exercise session are rare. This study aimed to determine the immediate changes of a warm water pool-based exercise program (12 weeks) on pain (before vs. after session) in female fibromyalgia patients. 33 Spanish women with fibromyalgia were selected to participate in a 12 weeks (2 sessions/week) low-moderate intensity warm water pool-based program. We assessed pain by means of a Visual Analogue Scale before and after each single session (i. e., 24 sessions). We observed immediate benefits on pain with a mean decrease ~15% in all sessions, except in the fourth one. There was an association of pain difference (pre-post) session with pain pre session (p=0.005; β=0.097±0.034) and with age (p0.05). Therefore this study showed that a warm water pool-based exercise program for 12 weeks (2 times/week) led to a positive immediate decrease in level of pain in female patients with fibromyalgia. Improvements were higher in older women and in those with more intense pain.

  20. Strenuous exercise decreases the percentage of type 1 T cells in the circulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensberg, A; Toft, A D; Bruunsgaard, H

    2001-01-01

    Prolonged strenuous exercise is followed by a temporary functional immune impairment. Low numbers of CD4+ T helper (Th) and CD8+ T cytotoxic (Tc) cells are found in the circulation. These cells can be divided according to their cytokine profile into type 1 (Th1 and Tc1), which produce interferon...

  1. Exercise induced hypercoagulability, increased von Willebrand factor and decreased thyroid hormone concentrations in sled dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Anne Kirstine Havnsøe; Legind, Pernille; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads;

    2014-01-01

    Sled dogs performing endurance races have been reported to have a high incidence of gastric erosions or ulcerations and an increased risk of gastro intestinal bleeding leading to death in some cases. In addition, these dogs also become hypothyroid during training and exercise. Canine hypothyroidi...

  2. Voluntary Slavery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Frederick

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The permissibility of actions depends upon facts about the flourishing and separateness of persons. Persons differ from other creatures in having the task of discovering for themselves, by conjecture and refutation, what sort of life will fulfil them. Compulsory slavery impermissibly prevents some persons from pursuing this task. However, many people may conjecture that they are natural slaves. Some of these conjectures may turn out to be correct. In consequence, voluntary slavery, in which one person welcomes the duty to fulfil all the commands of another, is permissible. Life-long voluntary slavery contracts are impermissible because of human fallibility; but fixed-term slavery contracts should be legally enforceable. Each person has the temporarily alienable moral right to direct her own life.

  3. Voluntary Slavery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Frederick

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The permissibility of actions depends upon facts about the flourishing and separateness of persons. Persons differ from other creatures in having the task of discovering for themselves, by conjecture and refutation, what sort of life will fulfil them. Compulsory slavery impermissibly prevents some persons from pursuing this task. However, many people may conjecture that they are natural slaves. Some of these conjectures may turn out to be correct. In consequence, voluntary slavery, in which one person welcomes the duty to fulfil all the commands of another, is permissible. Life-long voluntary slavery contracts are impermissible because of human fallibility; but fixed-term slavery contracts should be legally enforceable. Each person has the temporarily alienable moral right to direct her own life.

  4. Balance Training Exercises Decrease Lower-Limb Strength Asymmetry in Young Tennis Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Italo Sannicandro, Giacomo Cofano, Rosa A. Rosa, Andrea Piccinno

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The issue of functional asymmetries in the lower-limbs has been the subject of numerous recent investigations concerning many different contact, limited-contact and non-contact sports. The presence of strength asymmetries in the lower-limbs of young athletes practicing various sporting disciplines is considered an intrinsic risk factor for injury; in such cases, compensation strategies should thus be implemented aimed at eliminating, or at least limiting, the degree of asymmetry in order to avoid the negative consequences asymmetries can have upon the health of young sportsmen and women on the long-term. The aim of the present study was to examine the presence of functional asymmetries in the lower-limbs of young tennis players in strength and speed drill performance and to test a specific balance-training programme in its capacity to effectively reduce such asymmetries. Twenty-three young tennis players were randomly assigned to the Experimental Group (EG (n = 11: 4 females, 7 males; 13.2 ± 0.9 years; 50.8 ± 8.9 Kg; 1.63 ± 0.08 m or Comparison Group (CG (n = 12: 4 females, 8 males; 13.0 ± 0.9 years; 51.1 ± 9.2 Kg; 1.61 ± 0.09 m. To quantify percent asymmetries in lower-limb strength before (T0 and following (T1 training, performances were assessed in the one-leg hop test (OLH, side-hop test (SH and side steps and forward 4.115-m test (4m-SSF. Performances in the 10 and 20m sprint tests and the Foran test were also assessed. The EG completed a total of 12 training sessions directed at balance training: two 30-minute sessions/week over a 6-week period. The CG followed an identical training schedule, but training sessions consisted of tennis-specific drills only. The results reveal significant differences between pre- and post-training tests in the EG only: the degree of lower-limb asymmetry was decreased in the EG following completion of the training programme, as assessed using the OLH test (p < 0.001, SH test (p < 0.001 and 4m-SSF test (p

  5. 自主运动可促进大鼠下丘脑神经祖细胞的增殖与分化%Voluntary exercise promotes proliferation and differentiation of adult rat hypothalamus progenitor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李光华; 松崎健太郎; 王银; 赵楠; 杨敏; 紫藤治

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of voluntary exercise on the proliferation and differentiation of hypothalamus progenitor cells in adult rats.Methods Male Wistar rats were divided into voluntary exercise (EX) and sedentary (SE) groups,both of which were further divided into 6 subgroups for observation on days 6,13,23,33,43 and 53.Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was intraperitoneally injected daily for 5 consecutive days after commencing voluntary exercise,and at the specified time points during voluntary exercise,the rats' brains were removed to observe the numbers of BrdU-positive cells in the hypothalamus.Results Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the numbers of BrdU-positive cells in the hypothalamus of EX subgroups were significantly greater than those of SE subgroups on days 23,33,43 and 53.In EX group,the number of BrdU-positive cells double-stained for a mature neuron marker increased after 43 days of voluntary exercise,which did not occur in SE group.Conclusion Long-term voluntary exercise can promote the proliferation of neuronal progenitor cells in the hypothalamus and their differentiation into neurons.%目的 探讨自主运动对大鼠下丘脑神经细胞增殖与分化的影响.方法 雄性Wistar大鼠,随机分为对照组(SE)和自主运动组(EX),以上两组又进一步分为6、13、23、33、43、53 d共6个亚组.各组大鼠从实验开始,连续5d腹腔注射BrdU,于上述时间点处死大鼠并取脑组织观察下丘脑的BrdU阳性细胞数的变化.结果 免疫组化结果表明,EX组下丘脑的BrdU阳性细胞数在23、33、43、53 d亚组中明显高于SE组(P<0.05).EX组中经43 d的自主运动后,BrdU阳性细胞数与神经元双染色细胞数明显增加(P<0.05),对照组各亚组则无显著性变化.结论 自主运动可促进下丘脑的神经祖细胞增殖并分化为神经元,这可能与长期的运动锻炼有一定关系.

  6. Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... COPD: Overview COPD: Lifestyle Management COPD: Exercises COPD: Exercises Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... lifelong activity you enjoy. Medication to Help You Exercise People with COPD often use inhaled short acting ...

  7. Cerebral oxygenation decreases during exercise in humans with beta-adrenergic blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifert, T.; Rasmussen, P.; Secher, Niels H.

    2009-01-01

    AIM: Beta-blockers reduce exercise capacity by attenuated increase in cardiac output, but it remains unknown whether performance also relates to attenuated cerebral oxygenation. METHODS: Acting as their own controls, eight healthy subjects performed a continuous incremental cycle test to exhaustion...... with or without administration of the non-selective beta-blocker propranolol. Changes in cerebral blood flow velocity were measured with transcranial Doppler ultrasound and those in cerebral oxygenation were evaluated using near-infrared spectroscopy and the calculated cerebral mitochondrial oxygen tension...

  8. Menopause is associated with decreased whole body fat oxidation during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abildgaard, J; Pedersen, A T; Green, C J; Harder-Lauridsen, N M; Solomon, T P; Thomsen, C; Juul, A; Pedersen, M; Pedersen, J T; Mortensen, O H; Pilegaard, H; Pedersen, B K; Lindegaard, B

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine if fat oxidation was affected by menopausal status and to investigate if this could be related to the oxidative capacity of skeletal muscle. Forty-one healthy women were enrolled in this cross-sectional study [premenopausal (n = 19), perimenopausal (n = 8), and postmenopausal (n = 14)]. Estimated insulin sensitivity was obtained from an oral glucose tolerance test. Body composition was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and magnetic resonance imaging. Fat oxidation and energy expenditure were measured during an acute exercise bout of 45 min of ergometer biking at 50% of maximal oxygen consumption (Vo2 max). Muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis of the quadriceps muscle were obtained before and immediately after the exercise bout. Postmenopausal women had 33% [confidence interval (CI) 95%: 12-55] lower whole body fat oxidation (P = 0.005) and 19% (CI 95%: 9-22) lower energy expenditure (P = 0.02) during exercise, as well as 4.28 kg lower lean body mass (LBM) than premenopausal women. Correction for LBM reduced differences in fat oxidation to 23% (P = 0.05), whereas differences in energy expenditure disappeared (P = 0.22). No differences between groups were found in mRNA [carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (β-HAD), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α, citrate synthase (CS), pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α)], protein [phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), vascular endothelial growth factor, pyruvate dehydrogenase-1Eα, cytochrome oxidase I], or enzyme activities (β-HAD, CS) in resting skeletal muscle, except for an increased protein level of cytochrome c in the post- and perimenopausal women relative to premenopausal women. Postmenopausal women demonstrated a trend to a blunted exercise-induced increase in phosphorylation of AMPK compared with premenopausal women (P = 0.06). We conclude

  9. Effects of voluntary exercise on the viability, proliferation and BDNF levels of bone marrow stromal cells in rat pups born from morphine- dependent mothers during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydari, Sakineh; Safari, Manouchehr; Zarbakhsh, Sam; Bandegi, Ahmad Reza; Miladi-Gorji, Hossein

    2016-11-10

    This study was designed to investigate whether free access to a running wheel during pregnancy in morphine-dependent mothers would influence the viability, proliferation and BDNF levels of bone marrow stromal cells in rat pups. Pregnant rats were made dependent by chronic administration of morphine in drinking water simultaneously with free access to a running wheel. Male pups are weaned at 21days of birth and their bones marrows were aspirated from the femurs and tibias and also the bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) cultured. MTT assay was used to determine cell viability and proliferation rate. The level of BDNF was measured in the supernant of BMSCs culture by ELISA. The sedentary morphine-dependent mothers' pups showed a significant increase in the percentage cell viability and proliferation rate and also a significant decrease in the BDNF protein levels in BMSCs. The rat pups borne from exercising the control and morphine-dependent mothers exhibited an increase in the percentage viability, proliferation rate and BDNF levels of the BMSCs. This study showed that maternal exercise during pregnancy in morphine-dependent and non-dependent mothers, with increasing of BDNF levels increased the proliferation and viability of BMSCs in the rat pups. Also, chronic administration of morphine during pregnancy was able to increase the proliferation and viability of BMSCs in the rat pups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Supporting South Asian Taxi Drivers to Exercise through Pedometers (SSTEP) to decrease cardiovascular disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gany, Francesca; Gill, Pavan; Baser, Raymond; Leng, Jennifer

    2014-06-01

    There is considerable evidence demonstrating the positive impact of pedometers and walking programs for increasing physical activity and reducing risk for cardiovascular disease among diverse populations. However, no interventions have been targeted towards South Asian taxi drivers, a population that may be at high risk for developing cardiovascular disease. Supporting South Asian Taxi Drivers to Exercise through Pedometers (SSTEP) was a 12-week pilot study among South Asian taxi drivers to increase their daily step counts. SSTEP assessed the feasibility, acceptability, and potential impact of an exercise intervention employing pedometers, a step diary, written materials, and telephone follow-up to initiate or increase physical activity in this at-risk occupational group. Seventy-four drivers were recruited to participate at sites frequented by South Asian taxi drivers. Participant inclusion criteria were: (1) age 18 or over; (2) birthplace in India, Pakistan, or Bangladesh; (3) fluent in English, Hindi, Urdu, Punjabi, or Bengali; and (4) intention to remain in New York City for the 3-month study period. Comprehensive intake and exit questionnaires were administered to participants in their preferred languages. Intake and exit health screenings, including blood pressure, cholesterol, and glucose were completed. Daily step counts were obtained 4 days after recruitment, and at the 4-, 8-, and 12-week mark via phone calls. To measure the impact of the intervention, step counts, blood pressure, cholesterol, and body mass index were compared at intake and exit. Participants in SSTEP were sedentary at baseline. The SSTEP intervention resulted in a small increase in step counts among participants overall, and in a significant increase (>2,000 steps) among a subset ("Bigsteppers"). Drivers with higher baseline glucose values had significantly greater improvements in their step counts. Focused lifestyle interventions for drivers at high risk for cardiovascular disease may

  11. Effects of voluntary wheeling exercise on the learning and memory and c-fos expression of basolateral amygdaloid nucleus of depression model rats%自愿转轮运动对抑郁模型大鼠学习记忆及基底外侧杏仁核c-fos表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔建梅; 药宏慧; 李中华; 庞立杰; 贺继平

    2013-01-01

    automatic movement ability and explorative behavior of the rats, ap-plied the 8-arm radial maze experiment to measure the space learning and memorizing ability of the rats, applied immunohistochemical and image semi-quantitative methods to measure and analyze the number, area and grey level of c-fos neurons of basolateral amygdaloid nucleus, and revealed the following findings:1) as compared with the rats in the stress model group, the rats in the stress exercise group had a significantly increased number of squares crossed, number of times of standing up, number of times of decoration (P0.05) although it decreased. The said findings indicated the followings: voluntary wheeling exercise can enhance the learning and memorizing ability of depressive rats;its mechanism may be related to that long-term voluntary wheeling exercise decreases the level of blood serum cortisol of depressive rats and enhances the c-fos expression of basolateral amygdaloid nucleus of their brains.

  12. Characteristics of fast voluntary and electrically evoked isometric knee extensions during 56 days of bed rest with and without exercise countermeasure.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, E.R.; Gerrits, K.H.; Rittweger, J.; Felsenberg, D.; Stegeman, D.F.; Haan, A. de

    2008-01-01

    The contractile characteristics of fast voluntary and electrically evoked unilateral isometric knee extensions were followed in 16 healthy men during 56 days of horizontal bed rest and assessed at bed rest days 4, 7, 10, 17, 24, 38 and 56. Subjects were randomized to either an inactive control group

  13. The effect of heating and cooling on time course of voluntary and electrically induced muscle force variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazaitis, Marius; Skurvydas, Albertas; Vadopalas, Kazys; Daniusevičiūtė, Laura; Senikienė, Zibuoklė

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of heating and cooling on time course of voluntary and electrically induced muscle force variation. Ten volunteers performed 50 maximal voluntary and electrically induced contractions of the knee extensors at an angle of 120 degrees under the control conditions and after passive lower body heating and cooling in the control, heating, and cooling experiments. Peak torque, torque variation, and half-relaxation time were assessed during the exercise. Passive lower body heating increased muscle and core temperatures, while cooling lowered muscle temperature, but did not affect core temperature. We observed significantly lower muscle fatigue during voluntary contraction compared with electrically induced contractions. Body heating (opposite to cooling) increased involuntarily induced muscle force, but caused greater electrically induced muscle fatigue. In the middle of the exercise, the coefficient of correlation for electrically induced muscle torque decreased significantly as compared with the beginning of the exercise, while during maximal voluntary contractions, this relation for torque remained significant until the end of the exercise. It was shown that time course of voluntary contraction was more stable than in electrically induced contractions.

  14. Effect of voluntary exercise on the expression of IGF-I and androgen receptor in three rat skeletal muscles and on serum IGF-I and testosterone levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsakas, A; Nikolaidis, M G; Kokalas, N; Mougios, V; Diel, P

    2004-10-01

    The effects of anabolic agents and training on skeletal muscle are believed to be mediated by a variety of growth and transcription factors. Among these regulatory proteins, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and androgen receptor (AR) play a crucial role. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of wheel running on IGF-I and AR mRNA expression in three distinct rat skeletal muscles (i.e., gastrocnemius, vastus lateralis, and soleus), as well as on the serum levels of IGF-I and testosterone. Twenty male Wistar rats were housed in cages with free access to running wheels for 12 weeks, while nine rats served as controls. Analysis of the mRNA expression of IGF-I and AR using real time RT-PCR revealed no significant differences between the trained and untrained rats in any of the muscles studied. Enzyme immunoassay showed significantly lower serum levels of IGF-I and testosterone in the trained compared to the untrained animals. These results suggest that chronic exercise in wheels does not affect IGF-I and AR mRNA levels in rat skeletal muscle, while decreasing the circulating levels of two anabolic factors, i.e., IGF-I and testosterone. It is concluded that IGF-I, AR and testosterone seem to play a marginal role during the adaptation process of rat skeletal muscle to long-term wheel running.

  15. Feasibility of Pilates exercise to decrease falls risk: a pilot randomized controlled trial in community-dwelling older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Anna L; Talevski, Jason; Bohensky, Megan A; Brand, Caroline A; Cameron, Peter A; Morello, Renata T

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of Pilates exercise in older people to decrease falls risk and inform a larger trial. Pilot Randomized controlled trial. Community physiotherapy clinic. A total of 53 community-dwelling people aged ⩾60 years (mean age, 69.3 years; age range, 61-84). A 60-minute Pilates class incorporating best practice guidelines for exercise to prevent falls, performed twice weekly for 12 weeks. All participants received a letter to their general practitioner with falls risk information, fall and fracture prevention education and home exercises. Indicators of feasibility included: acceptability (recruitment, retention, intervention adherence and participant experience survey); safety (adverse events); and potential effectiveness (fall, fall injury and injurious fall rates; standing balance; lower limb strength; and flexibility) measured at 12 and 24 weeks. Recruitment was achievable but control group drop-outs were high (23%). Of the 20 participants who completed the intervention, 19 (95%) attended ⩾75% of the classes and reported classes were enjoyable and would recommend them to others. The rate of fall injuries at 24 weeks was 42% lower and injurious fall rates 64% lower in the Pilates group, however, was not statistically significant (P = 0.347 and P = 0.136). Standing balance, lower-limb strength and flexibility improved in the Pilates group relative to the control group (P Pilates in older people would be feasible and is warranted given the acceptability and potential positive effects of Pilates on fall injuries and fall risk factors. The protocol for this study is registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN1262000224820). © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. 自愿适量运动对脑的有益作用及其生物学机制%Beneficial effects of moderate voluntary physical exercise and its biological mechanisms on brain health

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马强

    2008-01-01

    本文综述了在人和动物方面有关自愿适量运动有益于脑作用的研究,包括改善心理状态和认知功能、增强心理幸福感、降低老年痴呆症发生危险度和发挥抗抑郁及抗焦虑药的作用等.运动对脑的作用机制包含上游和下游两方面:上游途径主要涉及投射到海马的几种神经递质系统的功能增强,其中包括去甲肾上腺素、5.羟色胺、乙酰胆碱和γ-氨基丁酸;下游途径主要涉及脑源性神经营养因子的表达提高和神经元发生的增强;其中,激活β-受体介导的去甲肾上腺素能神经的传递被认为是运动导致脑源性神经营养因子表达增强的前提,上述过程在细胞内的可能信号转导机制主要涉及G-蛋白偶联受体-促分裂原活化蛋白激酶-磷脂酰肌醇(-3)激酶等细胞信号转导通路的交互及正反馈调控.%This article reviewed the beneficial effects of moderate voluntary physical exercise on brain health according to the studies on humans and animals, which includes improving psychological status and cognitive function, enhancing psycho- logical well-being, decreasing the risks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementia, and promoting the effects of antidepressant and anxiolytic. The possible underlying neurobiological mechanisms are involved up-active and down-active pathways. The up-active pathway is associated with enhancements of several neurotransmitters systems afferent to hippocampus, including norepinephrine (NE), serotonin (5-Hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), acetylcholine (ACh) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The down-active pathway is mainly concerned with up-regulation of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurogenesis. It is suggested that NE activation via β-adrenergic receptors may be essential for exercise-induced BDNF up-regulation. The possible intraceUular signaling pathways of NE-mediated BDNF up-expression may be involved in GPCR-MAPK-PI-3K crosstalk and positive feedback.

  17. Regular Exercise Is Associated with a Reduction in the Risk of NAFLD and Decreased Liver Enzymes in Individuals with NAFLD Independent of Obesity in Korean Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Se Eun; Rhee, Eun Jung; Park, Cheol Young; Oh, Ki Won; Park, Sung Woo; Kim, Sun Woo; Hur, Kyu Yeon; Kim, Jae Hyeon; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, Moon Kyu; Kim, Kwang-Won; Lee, Won-Young

    2012-01-01

    Background We evaluated the association of regular physical exercise with the presence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and liver enzymes in relation to obesity and insulin resistance. Methodology/Principal Findings A cross-sectional analysis was conducted in 72,359 healthy Korean adults without diabetes who participated in a comprehensive health check-up. Subjects who have been exercising regularly (more than 3 times per week, at least for 30 minutes each time and for consecutive 3 month) were categorized into exercise group. All subjects were categorized into deciles based on their body mass index (BMI) and we estimated the odds ratios (ORs) for having NAFLD according to exercise regularity in each decile. The diagnosis of NAFLD was based on ultrasonography findings. Individuals with NAFLD (n = 19,921) were analyzed separately to evaluate ORs for having elevated liver enzymes based on regularity of exercise. The risk for NAFLD was significantly reduced in exercise group with age- and sex-adjusted ORs of 0.53–0.72 for all BMI deciles except at BMI categories of <19.6 and 20.7–21.6 kg/m2. While no difference was seen in BMI between subjects in exercise and non-exercise group across the BMI deciles, the values of body fat percentage and metabolic risk factors differed. Among NAFLD patients, subjects in exercise group had a lower risk for having elevated liver enzymes with multivariable adjusted OR of 0.85 (95% CI 0.74–0.99, for AST) and 0.74 (95% CI 0.67–0.81, for ALT) than did subjects in non-exercise group. Conclusions/Significance Regular exercise was associated with a reduced risk for having NAFLD and decreased liver enzymes in patients with NAFLD, and this relationship was also independent of obesity. PMID:23110056

  18. Regular exercise is associated with a reduction in the risk of NAFLD and decreased liver enzymes in individuals with NAFLD independent of obesity in Korean adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Cheol Bae

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We evaluated the association of regular physical exercise with the presence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and liver enzymes in relation to obesity and insulin resistance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A cross-sectional analysis was conducted in 72,359 healthy Korean adults without diabetes who participated in a comprehensive health check-up. Subjects who have been exercising regularly (more than 3 times per week, at least for 30 minutes each time and for consecutive 3 month were categorized into exercise group. All subjects were categorized into deciles based on their body mass index (BMI and we estimated the odds ratios (ORs for having NAFLD according to exercise regularity in each decile. The diagnosis of NAFLD was based on ultrasonography findings. Individuals with NAFLD (n = 19,921 were analyzed separately to evaluate ORs for having elevated liver enzymes based on regularity of exercise. The risk for NAFLD was significantly reduced in exercise group with age- and sex-adjusted ORs of 0.53-0.72 for all BMI deciles except at BMI categories of <19.6 and 20.7-21.6 kg/m(2. While no difference was seen in BMI between subjects in exercise and non-exercise group across the BMI deciles, the values of body fat percentage and metabolic risk factors differed. Among NAFLD patients, subjects in exercise group had a lower risk for having elevated liver enzymes with multivariable adjusted OR of 0.85 (95% CI 0.74-0.99, for AST and 0.74 (95% CI 0.67-0.81, for ALT than did subjects in non-exercise group. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Regular exercise was associated with a reduced risk for having NAFLD and decreased liver enzymes in patients with NAFLD, and this relationship was also independent of obesity.

  19. Regular exercise is associated with a reduction in the risk of NAFLD and decreased liver enzymes in individuals with NAFLD independent of obesity in Korean adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Ji Cheol; Suh, Sunghwan; Park, Se Eun; Rhee, Eun Jung; Park, Cheol Young; Oh, Ki Won; Park, Sung Woo; Kim, Sun Woo; Hur, Kyu Yeon; Kim, Jae Hyeon; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, Moon Kyu; Kim, Kwang-Won; Lee, Won-Young

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the association of regular physical exercise with the presence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and liver enzymes in relation to obesity and insulin resistance. A cross-sectional analysis was conducted in 72,359 healthy Korean adults without diabetes who participated in a comprehensive health check-up. Subjects who have been exercising regularly (more than 3 times per week, at least for 30 minutes each time and for consecutive 3 month) were categorized into exercise group. All subjects were categorized into deciles based on their body mass index (BMI) and we estimated the odds ratios (ORs) for having NAFLD according to exercise regularity in each decile. The diagnosis of NAFLD was based on ultrasonography findings. Individuals with NAFLD (n = 19,921) were analyzed separately to evaluate ORs for having elevated liver enzymes based on regularity of exercise. The risk for NAFLD was significantly reduced in exercise group with age- and sex-adjusted ORs of 0.53-0.72 for all BMI deciles except at BMI categories of exercise and non-exercise group across the BMI deciles, the values of body fat percentage and metabolic risk factors differed. Among NAFLD patients, subjects in exercise group had a lower risk for having elevated liver enzymes with multivariable adjusted OR of 0.85 (95% CI 0.74-0.99, for AST) and 0.74 (95% CI 0.67-0.81, for ALT) than did subjects in non-exercise group. Regular exercise was associated with a reduced risk for having NAFLD and decreased liver enzymes in patients with NAFLD, and this relationship was also independent of obesity.

  20. Effects of voluntary wheel exercise on spatial learning and memory and Notch signal pathway of mice%自主跑轮运动对小鼠空间学习记忆及Notch信号通路的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宪亮; 徐波; 陆乐; 何标; 余锋; 季浏

    2014-01-01

    为了解自主跑轮运动对C57BL/6小鼠空间学习记忆能力及海马内Notch信号通路的影响,选用12只雄性5周龄C57BL/6小鼠,随机分为运动组(R组,n=6只)和对照组(C组,n=6只),运动组进行8周的自主跑轮运动,对照组安静饲养,第8周开始利用Morris水迷宫测试其学习记忆能力。运动结束后,断颈处死小鼠取双侧海马,用Western Blot检测小鼠大脑海马内NICD的蛋白表达水平,用RT-PCR检测小鼠大脑海马内的Jagged-1、Notch-1、PS-1、Hes-1的mRNA表达水平。结果显示:Morris水迷宫实验显示,运动组小鼠学习记忆能力明显强于对照组;Western Blot 测试,运动组小鼠海马内 NICD 表达显著上调,RT-PCR 测试,运动组小鼠海马内 Jagged-1 mRNA、Notch-1 mRNA、PS-1 mRNA和Hes-1 mRNA表达水平较对照组显著上调。结果说明,8周自主跑轮运动激活Notch信号通路,提高了海马空间学习记忆能力。%In order to understand the effects of voluntary wheel exercise on spatial learning and memory and Notch signal pathway in hippocampus of C57BL/6 mice, the authors prepared 12 5-week old male C57BL/6 mice, ran-domly divided them into an exercise group (group R, n=6) and a control group (group C, n=6), let the mice in group R do a voluntary wheel exercise for 8 weeks, let the mice in group C live in a calm condition, starting from week 8, tested their learning and memory ability by utilizing Morris water maze, after the exercise was finished, cut the neck of the mice and took out hippocampus at both sides, measured the protein expression level of NICD in hippocampus of the mice by means of Western blot, measured the mRNA expression levels of Jagged-1, Notch-1, PS-1 and Hes-1 in hippocampus in the brains of the mice by means of RT-PCR, and revealed the following findings:the Morris water maze experiment showed that the learning and memory ability of the mice in group R was signifi-cantly stronger than that of

  1. Systolic blood pressure response after high-intensity interval exercise is independently related to decreased small arterial elasticity in normotensive African American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Stephen J; Goldsby, TaShauna U; Fisher, Gordon; Plaisance, Eric P; Gower, Barbara A; Glasser, Stephen P; Hunter, Gary R

    2016-05-01

    Aerobic exercise transiently lowers blood pressure. However, limited research has concurrently evaluated blood pressure and small arterial elasticity (SAE), an index of endothelial function, among African American (AA) and European American (EA) women the morning after (i.e., ≈22 h later) acute bouts of moderate-intensity continuous (MIC) and high-intensity interval (HII) exercise matched for total work. Because of greater gradients of shear stress, it was hypothesized that HII exercise would elicit a greater reduction in systolic blood pressure (SBP) compared to MIC exercise. After baseline, 22 AA and EA women initiated aerobic exercise training 3 times/week. Beginning at week 8, three follow-up assessments were conducted over the next 8 weeks at random to measure resting blood pressure and SAE. In total all participants completed 16 weeks of training. Follow-up evaluations were made: (i) in the trained state (TS; 8-16 weeks of aerobic training); (ii) ≈22 h after an acute bout of MIC exercise; and (iii) ≈22 h after an acute bout of HII exercise. Among AAs, the acute bout of HII exercise incited a significant increase in SBP (mm Hg) (TS, 121 ± 14 versus HII, 128 ± 14; p = 0.01) whereas responses (TS, 116 ± 12 versus HII, 113 ± 9; p = 0.34) did not differ in EAs. After adjusting for race, changes in SAE were associated (partial r = -0.533; p = 0.01) with changes in SBP following HII exercise. These data demonstrate an acute, unaccustomed bout of HII exercise produces physiological perturbations resulting in a significant increase in SBP that are independently associated with decreased SAE among AA women, but not EA women.

  2. The effect of Pilates based exercise on mobility, postural stability, and balance in order to decrease fall risk in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pata, Rachel W; Lord, Katrina; Lamb, Jamie

    2014-07-01

    Falls are a common problem in older adults. Impaired balance, mobility and postural stability are risk factors for falling. Limited research has been performed on Pilates exercise and the ability to decrease fall risk. In this quasi-experimental study, 35 adults (61-87 years old) participated in an 8-week Pilates based exercise program. Blind examiners conducted the Timed Up and Go (TUG), Forward Reach Test, and Turn 180 Test before and after the intervention. Number of falls, perception of Pilates, and fear of falling was also recorded. Thirty-two (91.4%) participants completed post-test measures. Significant improvements were seen in the TUG (p Pilates program and decreased fear of falling was shown. Results suggest a Pilates based exercise program may be effective in improving balance, mobility and postural stability to decrease fall risk. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Voluntary Environmental Governance Arrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, J.

    2012-01-01

    Voluntary environmental governance arrangements have focal attention in studies on environmental policy, regulation and governance. The four major debates in the contemporary literature on voluntary environmental governance arrangements are studied. The literature falls short of sufficiently

  4. Voluntary Environmental Governance Arrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, J.

    2012-01-01

    Voluntary environmental governance arrangements have focal attention in studies on environmental policy, regulation and governance. The four major debates in the contemporary literature on voluntary environmental governance arrangements are studied. The literature falls short of sufficiently specify

  5. Voluntary Service System (VSS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Voluntary Service System (VSS) is a national-level application which replaced the site-based Voluntary Timekeeping System (VTK). VTK was used for many years at the...

  6. Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Related Conditions Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis (ADEM) Balo’s Disease HTLV-I Associated Myelopathy (HAM) Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) Schilder's ... a Muscle, Too: The Relationship Between Exercise and Cognition - telelearning brought to you by the National MS ...

  7. Treadmill exercise decreases amyloid-β burden possibly via activation of SIRT-1 signaling in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Jung-Hoon; Kang, Eun-Bum; Oh, Yoo-Sung; Yang, Dae-Seung; Cho, Joon-Yong

    2017-02-01

    Accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) correlates significantly with progressive cognitive deficits, a main symptom of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although treadmill exercise reduces Aβ levels, the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects are not fully understood. We hypothesize that treadmill exercise decreases Aβ production and alleviates cognitive deficits by activating the non-amyloidogenic pathway via SIRT-1 signaling. Treadmill exercise improved cognitive deficits and alleviated neurotoxicity. Most importantly, treadmill exercise increased SIRT-1 level, which subsequently resulted in increased ADAM-10 level by down-regulation of ROCK-1 and upregulation of RARβ, ultimately facilitating the non-amyloidogenic pathway. Treadmill exercise-induced activation in SIRT-1 level also elevated PGC-1α level and reduced BACE-1 and C-99 level, resulting in inhibition of the amyloidogenic pathway. Treadmill exercise may thus inhibit Aβ production via upregulation of SIRT-1, which biases amyloid precursor protein processing toward the non-amyloidogenic pathway. This study provides novel and valuable insight into the molecular mechanisms possibly by which treadmill exercise reduces Aβ production.

  8. A Selective Corrective Exercise to Decrease Falling and Improve Functional Balance in Idiopathic Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedaghati

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Posture instability and unsteady gait disorders in Parkinson’s Disease (PD usually contribute to fall-related fractures. Fall-related trauma in PD is the most common reason for injury. Despite providing modern care for PD patients (PP in the recent years, anti-PD drugs have no effect on falling. There is an urgent need to administer exercise interventions to reduce falls and related injuries in the rehabilitation program of PP. Objectives To explore the effect of a selective 10-week corrective exercise with an emphasis on gait training activities (GTA on the number of falls (NOFs, fear of falling, functional balance, timed up and go (TUG test among PD patients. Patients and Methods A purposeful sampling was performed on PP who had fallen or were at risk of falling in 2014. The study intervention consisted of a 10-week (3 sessions each week, each lasting 60 min corrective exercise program. Participants were randomly allocated to control and two exercise groups; the exercise group with balance pad (EGBP or exercise group with no balance pad (EGNBP. The analysis of variance (ANOVA and paired t-test were used for comparison between the groups (P ≤ 0.05. Results Administrating a selective corrective exercise in exercise group with balance pad (EGBP showed a significant difference in number of falls (NOF, Fall Efficacy Scale-international (FES-I, Berg balance scale (BBS (and timed up and go TUG (P = 0.001; while administrating the same exercise in exercise group with no balance pad (EGNBP showed no significant difference in NOF (P = 0.225 and a significant difference in FES-I (P = 0.031, BBS (P = 0.047 and TUG (P = 0.012. The control group showed no significant difference in each of the dependent variables. Conclusions Performing a selective corrective exercise on balance pad improves falling and functional balance in idiopathic PD.

  9. Combined aerobic and resistance exercise training decreases peripheral but not central artery wall thickness in subjects with type 2 diabetes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, T.H.A.; Munckhof, I.C.L. van den; Poelkens, F.; Hopman, M.T.; Thijssen, D.H.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Little is known about the impact of exercise training on conduit artery wall thickness in type 2 diabetes. We examined the local and systemic impact of exercise training on superficial femoral (SFA), brachial (BA), and carotid artery (CA) wall thickness in type 2 diabetes patients and con

  10. Combined aerobic and resistance exercise training decreases peripheral but not central artery wall thickness in subjects with type 2 diabetes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, T.H.A.; Munckhof, I.C.L. van den; Poelkens, F.; Hopman, M.T.; Thijssen, D.H.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Little is known about the impact of exercise training on conduit artery wall thickness in type 2 diabetes. We examined the local and systemic impact of exercise training on superficial femoral (SFA), brachial (BA), and carotid artery (CA) wall thickness in type 2 diabetes patients and

  11. Moderate intensity supine exercise causes decreased cardiac volumes and increased outer volume variations: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steding-Ehrenborg, Katarina; Jablonowski, Robert; Arvidsson, Per M;

    2013-01-01

    The effects on left and right ventricular (LV, RV) volumes during physical exercise remains controversial. Furthermore, no previous study has investigated the effects of exercise on longitudinal contribution to stroke volume (SV) and the outer volume variation of the heart. The aim of this study...

  12. Are substrate use during exercise and mitochondrial respiratory capacity decreased in arm and leg muscle in type 2 diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Steen; Ara, I; Rabøl, R

    2009-01-01

    AIM/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of the study was to investigate mitochondrial function, fibre type distribution and substrate oxidation in arm and leg muscle during exercise in patients with type 2 diabetes and in obese and lean controls. METHODS: Indirect calorimetry was used to calculate fat...... and carbohydrate oxidation during both progressive arm-cranking and leg-cycling exercises. Muscle biopsies from arm and leg were obtained. Fibre type, as well as O(2) flux capacity of saponin-permeabilised muscle fibres were measured, the latter by high resolution respirometry, in patients with type 2 diabetes......, age- and BMI-matched obese controls, and age-matched lean controls. RESULTS: Fat oxidation was similar in the groups during either arm or leg exercise. During leg exercise at higher intensities, but not during arm exercise, carbohydrate oxidation was lower in patients with type 2 diabetes compared...

  13. Caffeine, carnitine and choline supplementation of rats decreases body fat and serum leptin concentration as does exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongu, N; Sachan, D S

    2000-02-01

    The effect of a combination of caffeine, carnitine and choline with or without exercise on changes in body weight, fat pad mass, serum leptin concentration and metabolic indices was determined in 20 male, 7-wk-old Sprague-Dawley rats. They were given free access to a nonpurified diet without or with caffeine, carnitine and choline at concentrations of 0.1, 5 and 11.5 g/kg diet, respectively. In a 2x2 factorial design, one-half of each dietary group was exercised, and the other half was sedentary. Body weight and food intake of all rats were measured every day for 28 d. Rats were killed and blood and tissue samples were collected and analyzed for biochemical markers. Food intake of the groups was not different, but the body weight was significantly reduced by exercise in both dietary groups. Fat pad weights and total lipids of epididymal, inguinal and perirenal regions were significantly reduced by the supplements as well as by exercise. Regardless of exercise, supplements significantly lowered triglycerides in serum but increased levels in skeletal muscle. Serum leptin concentrations were equally lowered by supplements and exercise. Serum leptin was correlated with body weight (r = 0.55, Pweight (r = 0.82, Ploss due to dietary supplements were similar to those due to mild exercise, and there were no interactive effects of the two variables.

  14. Prevalence of cardio-respiratory factors in the occurrence of the decrease in oxygen uptake during supra-maximal, constant-power exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanon, Christine; Dorel, Sylvain; Delfour-Peyrethon, Rémi; Leprêtre, Pierre-Marie; Bishop, David J; Perrey, Stéphane; Thomas, Claire

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the physiological mechanisms that explain the end-exercise decrease in oxygen uptake [Formula: see text] during strenuous constant-power exercise, we recruited eleven trained, track cyclists. On two separated days they performed 1) resting spirometric measures, followed by an incremental test on a cycle ergometer to determine the power output at [Formula: see text] and 2) an exhaustive isokinetic supramaximal cycling exercise (Tlimsupra) at 185 ± 24% of [Formula: see text] (i.e., 640.5 ± 50.8 W). During cycling exercise tests, [Formula: see text], ventilation parameters, stroke volume (SV) and heart rate were continuously recorded. Furthermore, arterialised capillary blood samples were collected to measure blood pH, arterial oxygen saturation, lactate and bicarbonate concentration before and 5 min after Tlimsupra. A > 5% decrease in [Formula: see text] and/or SV was observed in 6 subjects, with 5 out of 6 subjects presenting both phenomena. The magnitude of the [Formula: see text] decrease was correlated with the magnitude of the SV decrease (R = 0.75, P decrease in forced vital capacity and forced inspiratory volume corroborate with a possible respiratory muscle fatigue. Based on these findings, we demonstrate that the occurrence of [Formula: see text] decrease in more than half of our subjects, during a strenuous constant-power exercise leading to a mild-acidosis (pH = 7.21 ± 0.04), results mainly from cardio-respiratory factors and not from blood metabolic responses.

  15. Decreased luteinizing hormone pulse frequency is associated with elevated 24-hour ghrelin after calorie restriction and exercise in premenopausal women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scheid, Jennifer L; De Souza, Mary Jane; Hill, Brenna R; Leidy, Heather J; Williams, Nancy I

    2013-01-01

    ...) pulsatility in Rhesus monkeys, rats, men, and recently women. We previously reported that 24-h ghrelin concentrations are elevated in women following a 3-mo exercise and diet program leading to weight loss...

  16. Influence of Exercise-induced Fatigue on Brain Activity during Voluntary Movement%运动疲劳对大脑随意运动控制的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯莉娟; 宋争; 于勇; 朱凌泽; 王君

    2012-01-01

    目的:观察运动疲劳前后,随意运动执行阶段脑区激活情况,探讨运动疲劳中枢调控的机制。方法:采用全脑功能磁共振成像(fMRI)技术,在7名健康男性大学生一次性功率自行车力竭运动前后,进行手握拳运动阶段大脑功能活动的扫描。数据经过头动校正、空间标准化、高斯平滑等预处理后,通过相关分析获得随意运动阶段脑激活图,采用SPM软件对参与随意运动的脑区进行解剖定位,并对运动疲劳前后参与调控的脑区进行配对样本t检验组间分析,寻找激活程度发生变化的脑区。结果:运动疲劳前后非利手执行握拳随意运动时大脑激活位点分别包括对侧初级感觉运动区、双侧运动前区、辅助运动区、小脑、丘脑、岛叶、纹状体及苍白球等,激活位点没有显著差别。但运动疲劳前激活程度显著高于运动疲劳后的脑区包括同侧基底神经节的丘脑和纹状体。利手执行握拳随意运动时大脑激活位点及激活量没有显著差异。结论:运动疲劳对参与随意运动控制的脑区位点没有显著的影响,但是同侧基底神经节的纹状体和丘脑参与调控的激活程度发生显著变化。%Objective: Investigating the brain activity during hand voluntary movements before and after exercise-induced fatigue,and discussing the related central mechanism.Method: Seven healthy male volunteers recruited from university were scanned before and after exhaustive bicycling exercise while performing the visually instructive movement tasks with their right and left hands.Image datasets were spatially normalized according to the standard coordinate,and spatially smoothed with isotopic Guassian Kernel.Statistical parametric maps(activation maps) for left hand and difference active brain areas were found respectively by cross-correlation analysis.Result: Non-dominant hand movement before and after fatigue exercise mainly

  17. A conceptual model for worksite intelligent physical exercise training - IPET - intervention for decreasing life style health risk indicators among employees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøgaard, Gisela; Justesen, Just Bendix; Murray, Mike

    2014-01-01

    with a conceptual model for planning the optimal individually tailored physical exercise training for each worker based on individual health check, existing guidelines and state of the art sports science training recommendations in the broad categories of cardiorespiratory fitness, muscle strength in specific body......BACKGROUND: Health promotion at the work site in terms of physical activity has proven positive effects but optimization of relevant exercise training protocols and implementation for high adherence are still scanty.Methods/design: The aim of this paper is to present a study protocol...... parts, and functional training including balance training. The hypotheses of this research are that individually tailored worksite-based intelligent physical exercise training, IPET, among workers with inactive job categories will: 1) Improve cardiorespiratory fitness and/or individual health risk...

  18. Reduced neural response to food cues following exercise is accompanied by decreased energy intake in obese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnbach, S N; Silvert, L; Keller, K L; Genin, P M; Morio, B; Pereira, B; Duclos, M; Boirie, Y; Thivel, D

    2016-01-01

    Acute exercise has been found to favor a transient anorexigenic effect in obese adolescents. Although the role of some gastro-peptides has been suggested as an explanation for this observed reduced energy intake after exercise, it is unknown whether neural pathways involved in the regulation of food intake are modulated in youth. Body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) and aerobic capacities were assessed in 19 obese adolescent boys. Participants were randomized to remain at rest in a sitting position (CON condition) or to exercise 45 min at 65% of their maximal capacities (EX condition) by the end of the morning. An attentional computer task with electroencephalography recording was completed immediately after the exercise or sitting period to measure an event-related component (P3b) reflecting the level of cognitive engagement in the processing of food cues. A lunch test-meal was offered ad libitum and appetite feelings assessed at regular intervals using visual analog scales. The 45-min cycling exercise set at 65% VO2max induced a mean energy expenditure of 399±75 kcal. Both absolute (Pintake were significantly reduced after EX (1037±260 and 639±256 kcal, respectively) compared with CON (1116±243 and 1011±239 kcal, respectively). The energy ingested derived from each macronutrient and self-reported appetite remained unchanged. Although the amplitudes of the P3b component evoked by food and non-food visual stimuli were not significantly different during CON, the response to food cues was significantly reduced compared with non-food stimuli after exercise (Pfood cues compared with non-food ones in obese adolescents that may contribute to their subsequently reduced energy intake.

  19. Taurine: A Potential Ergogenic Aid for Preventing Muscle Damage and Protein Catabolism and Decreasing Oxidative Stress Produced by Endurance Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia G. De Carvalho

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of taurine and chocolate milk supplementation on oxidative stress and protein metabolism markers, and aerobic parameters in triathletes.Methods: A double-blind, crossover study was conducted with 10 male triathletes, aged 30.9 ± 1.3 year, height 1.79 ± 0.01 m and body weight 77.45 ± 2.4 kg. Three grams of taurine and 400 ml of chocolate milk (TAUchoc, or a placebo (chocolate milk (CHOC was ingested post exercise for 8 weeks. Oxidative stress marker levels, and 24 h urinary nitrogen, creatinine, and urea excretion were measured before and after 8 weeks of training and supplementation with TAUchoc or CHOC. A maximal incremental running test on a treadmill was performed in order to evaluate aerobic parameters: Vmax, heart rate (HR and rate of perceived exertion (RPE.Results: TAUchoc treatment during the 8 weeks resulted in increased taurine plasma levels (PRE 201.32 ± 29.03 μmol/L and POST 234.36 ± 35.51 μmol/L, p = 0.01, decreased malondialdehyde levels (19.4%, p = 0.03 and urinary nitrogen excretion (−33%, p = 0.03, and promoted positive nitrogen balance (p = 0.01. There were no changes in reduced glutathione (TAUchoc PRE 0.72 ± 0.08 mmol/L and POST 0.83 ± 0.08 mmol/L; CHOC PRE 0.69 ± 0.08 mmol/L and POST 0.81 ± 0.06 mmol/L, vitamin E plasma levels (TAUchoc PRE 33.99 ± 2.52 μmol/L and 35.95 ± 2.80 μmol/L and CHOC PRE 31.48 ± 2.12 μmol/L and POST 33.77 ± 3.64 μmol/L, or aerobic parameters, which were obtained in the last phase of the maximal incremental running test (Vmax TAUchoc PRE 13 ± 1.4 km/h and POST 13.22 ± 1.34 km/h; CHOC PRE 13.11 ± 2.34 km/h and POST 13.11 ± 2.72 km/h, the heart rate values were TAUchoc PRE 181.89 ± 24.18 bpm and POST 168.89 ± 46.56 bpm; CHOC PRE 181.56 ± 2.14 bpm and POST 179.78 ± 3.4 bpm, and the RPE were TAUchoc PRE 8.33 ± 2.4 AU and POST 9.1 ± 2.1 AU; CHOC PRE 8.11 ± 4.94 AU and POST 8.78 ± 2.78 AU.Conclusion: Taurine supplementation

  20. Mouth rinsing with a sweet solution increases energy expenditure and decreases appetite during 60 min of self-regulated walking exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deighton, Kevin; Duckworth, Lauren; Matu, Jamie; Suter, Matthew; Fletcher, Charlotte; Stead, Samuel; Ali, Shaho; Gunby, Neil; Korsness, Keelie

    2016-12-01

    Carbohydrate mouth rinsing can improve endurance exercise performance and is most ergogenic when exercise is completed in the fasted state. This strategy may also be beneficial to increase exercise capacity and the energy deficit achieved during moderate-intensity exercise relevant to weight control when performed after an overnight fast. Eighteen healthy men (mean (SD); age, 23 (4) years; body mass index, 23.1 (2.4) kg·m(-2)) completed a familiarisation trial and 3 experimental trials. After an overnight fast, participants performed 60 min of treadmill walking at a speed that equated to a rating of perceived exertion of 13 ("fairly hard"). Participants manually adjusted the treadmill speed to maintain this exertion. Mouth rinses for the experimental trials contained either a 6.4% maltodextrin solution with sweetener (CHO), a taste-matched placebo (PLA), or water (WAT). Appetite ratings were collected using visual analogue scales and exercise energy expenditure and substrate oxidation were calculated from online gas analysis. Increased walking distance during CHO and PLA induced greater energy expenditure compared with WAT (mean difference (90% confidence interval); 79 (60) kJ, P = 0.035, d = 0.24; and 90 (63) kJ, P = 0.024, d = 0.27, respectively). Appetite area under the curve was lower in CHO and PLA than WAT (8 (6) mm, P = 0.042, d = 0.43; and 6 (8) mm, P = 0.201, d = 0.32, respectively). Carbohydrate oxidation was higher in CHO than PLA and WAT (7.3 (6.7) g, P = 0.078, d = 0.47; and 10.1 (6.5) g, P = 0.015, d = 0.81, respectively). This study provides novel evidence that mouth rinsing with a sweetened solution may promote a greater energy deficit during moderate-exertion walking exercise by increasing energy expenditure and decreasing appetite. A placebo effect may have contributed to these benefits.

  1. Erythropoietin elevates VO2,max but not voluntary wheel running in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, E M; Kelly, S A; Middleton, K M; Sermsakdi, L S; Chappell, M A; Garland, T

    2010-02-01

    Voluntary activity is a complex trait, comprising both behavioral (motivation, reward) and anatomical/physiological (ability) elements. In the present study, oxygen transport was investigated as a possible limitation to further increases in running by four replicate lines of mice that have been selectively bred for high voluntary wheel running and have reached an apparent selection limit. To increase oxygen transport capacity, erythrocyte density was elevated by the administration of an erythropoietin (EPO) analogue. Mice were given two EPO injections, two days apart, at one of two dose levels (100 or 300 microg kg(-1)). Hemoglobin concentration ([Hb]), maximal aerobic capacity during forced treadmill exercise (VO2,max) and voluntary wheel running were measured. [Hb] did not differ between high runner (HR) and non-selected control (C) lines without EPO treatment. Both doses of EPO significantly (PVO2,max by approximately 5% in both the HR and C lines, with no dosexline type interaction. However, wheel running (revolutions per day) did not increase with EPO treatment in either the HR or C lines, and in fact significantly decreased at the higher dose in both line types. These results suggest that neither [Hb] per se nor VO2,max is limiting voluntary wheel running in the HR lines. Moreover, we hypothesize that the decrease in wheel running at the higher dose of EPO may reflect direct action on the reward pathway of the brain.

  2. The beta-1 adrenergic antagonist, atenolol, decreases acylation stimulating protein, exercise capacity and plasma free fatty acids in men with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J; Ferland, A; Méthot, J; Brassard, P; Lacroix, S; Poirier, P; Cianflone, K

    2012-06-01

    Atenolol is a beta-1 adrenergic antagonist commonly prescribed for the treatment of systemic hypertension or coronary artery disease yet its use in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is controversial due to potentially negative side effects on insulin resistance. Non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) metabolism is altered in T2DM especially under conditions of metabolic stress such as exercise or the postprandial state. We evaluated atenolol effects on circulating NEFA and related hormones in men with T2DM during acute cardiorespiratory exercise in both the fasting and postprandial state, including the adipokine acylation stimulating protein (ASP) which stimulates adipose tissue NEFA uptake. Ten men with T2DM underwent four 1-h exercise sessions at 60% of their maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2max)) under the following conditions: 1) fasting (F), and 2) 2 h postprandial (PP) without medication; and 3) fasting (F-Atenolol), and 4) 2 h postprandial (PP-Atenolol) after a one-week treatment with atenolol. Results were tested for the effects of atenolol via two-way ANOVA for the F vs F-Atenolol and PP vs PP-Atenolol states separately. Atenolol treatment decreased fasting and postprandial glycerol (p cortisol (p = 0.02), postprandial ASP (p = 0.04) and postprandial dopamine (p effects are more apparent during conditions of stress such as the postprandial state, acute exercise and obesity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of maternal diet and exercise during pregnancy on glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle and fat of weanling rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raipuria, Mukesh; Bahari, Hasnah; Morris, Margaret J

    2015-01-01

    Obesity during pregnancy contributes to the development of metabolic disorders in offspring. Maternal exercise may limit gestational weight gain and ameliorate these programming effects. We previously showed benefits of post-weaning voluntary exercise in offspring from obese dams. Here we examined whether voluntary exercise during pregnancy influences lipid and glucose homeostasis in muscle and fat in offspring of both lean and obese dams. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed chow (C) or high fat (F) diet for 6 weeks before mating. Half underwent voluntary exercise (CE/FE) with a running wheel introduced 10 days prior to mating and available until the dams delivered; others remained sedentary (CS/FS). Male and female pups were killed at postnatal day (PND)19 and retroperitoneal fat and gastrocnemius muscle were collected for gene expression. Lean and obese dams achieved similar modest levels of exercise. At PND1, both male and female pups from exercised lean dams were significantly lighter (CE versus CS), with no effect in those from obese dams. At PND19, maternal obesity significantly increased offspring body weight and adiposity, with no effect of maternal exercise. Exercise significantly reduced insulin concentrations in males (CE/FE versus CS/FS), with reduced glucose in male FE pups. In males, maternal obesity significantly decreased muscle myogenic differentiation 1 (MYOD1) and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) mRNA expressions (FS vs CS); these were normalized by exercise. Maternal exercise upregulated adipose GLUT4, interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC1α) mRNA expression in offspring of dams consuming chow. Modest voluntary exercise during pregnancy was associated with lower birth weight in pups from lean dams. Maternal exercise appeared to decrease the metabolic risk induced by maternal obesity, improving insulin/glucose metabolism, with greater effects in

  4. Anticipatory signatures of voluntary memory suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanslmayr, Simon; Leipold, Philipp; Pastötter, Bernhard; Bäuml, Karl-Heinz

    2009-03-04

    Voluntary memory suppression can keep unwanted memories from entering consciousness, inducing later forgetting of the information. In the present study, we searched for the existence of anticipatory processes, mediating such voluntary memory suppression. Using the think/no-think paradigm, subjects received a cue whether to prepare to think of a previously studied cue-target pair or whether to not let a previously studied cue-target pair enter consciousness. Examining event-related potentials, we identified two electrophysiological processes of voluntary memory suppression: (1) an early anticipatory process operating before the memory cue for a to-be-suppressed memory was provided, and (2) a later process operating after memory cue presentation. Both ERP effects were due to a decreased right frontal and left parietal positivity. They were positively related and predicted later forgetting. The results point to the existence of anticipatory processes, mediating voluntary memory suppression.

  5. Decreased eccentric exercise-induced macrophage infiltration in skeletal muscle after supplementation with a class of ginseng-derived steroids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Hsien Yu

    Full Text Available Dammarane steroids (DS are a class of chemical compounds present in Panax ginseng. Here, we evaluated the effect of 10 weeks of DS supplementation on inflammatory modulation in the soleus muscle following eccentric exercise (EE-induced muscle damage (downhill running. Eighty rats were randomized into 4 groups of DS supplementation (saline, 20, 60, 120 mg/kg body weight. Inflammatory markers were measured at rest and again 1 h after EE. At rest, NFκB signaling, TNF-alpha and IL-6 mRNAs, 3-nitrotyrosine, glutathione peroxidase, and GCS (glutamylcysteine synthetase levels were significantly elevated in the skeletal muscle of DS-treated rats in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, there were no detectable increases in the number of necrotic muscle fibers or CD68+ M1 macrophages. However, muscle strength, centronucleation, IL-10 mRNA expression, and the number of CD163+ M2 macrophages increased significantly over controls with DS treatment in rat soleus muscle. Under EE-challenged conditions, significant increases in muscle fiber necrosis, CD68+ M1 macrophage distribution, and 3-nitrotyrosine were absent in rats that received low and medium doses (20 and 60 mg/kg of DS treatment, suggesting that DS possess anti-inflammatory action protecting against a muscle-damaging challenge. However, this protective activity was diminished when a high dose of DS (120 mg/kg was administered, suggesting that DS possess hormetic properties. In conclusion, our study provides new evidence suggesting that DS is an ergogenic component of ginseng that potentiate inflammation at baseline but that produce anti-inflammatory effects on skeletal muscle following muscle-damaging exercise. Furthermore, high doses should be avoided in formulating ginseng-based products.

  6. Changbai Mountain Ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Mey) Extract Supplementation Improves Exercise Performance and Energy Utilization and Decreases Fatigue-Associated Parameters in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Guo-Dong; Chiu, Chun-Hui; Hsu, Yi-Ju; Hou, Chien-Wen; Chen, Yi-Ming; Huang, Chi-Chang

    2017-02-05

    Changbai Mountain Ginseng (CMG, Panax ginseng C.A. Mey) is a traditional medicine commonly found in Northeast China and grows at elevations of 2000 m or higher in the Changbai Mountain Range. CMG, considered to be a "buried treasure medicine", is priced higher than other types of ginseng. However, few studies have demonstrated the effects of CMG supplementation on exercise performance, physical fatigue, and the biochemical profile. The major compound of CMG extract was characterized by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). Male ICR mice were divided into 3 groups, the vehicle, CMG-1X and CMG-5X groups (n = 8 per group), and respectively administered 0, 5, or 25 mg/kg/day of CMG extract orally for four weeks. HPLC-ESI-MS/MS results showed that the major compound in CMG extract is ginsenoside Ro. CMG extract significantly increased muscle weight and relative muscle weight (%). CMG extract supplementation dose-dependently increased grip strength (p < 0.0001) and endurance swimming time, decreased levels of serum lactate (p < 0.0001), ammonia (p < 0.0001), creatine kinase (CK, p = 0.0002), and blood urea nitrogen (p < 0.0001), and economized glucose levels (p < 0.0001) after acute exercise challenge. The glycogen in the gastrocnemius muscle was significantly increased with CMG extract treatment. Biochemical profile results showed that creatinine and triacylglycerol significantly decreased and total protein and glucose increased with CMG treatment. This is the first report that CMG extract supplementation increases muscle mass, improves exercise performance and energy utilization, and decreases fatigue-associated parameters in vivo. The major component of CMG extract is ginsenoside Ro, which could be a potential bioactive compound for use as an ergogenic aid ingredient by the food industry.

  7. Changbai Mountain Ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Mey Extract Supplementation Improves Exercise Performance and Energy Utilization and Decreases Fatigue-Associated Parameters in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Dong Ma

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Changbai Mountain Ginseng (CMG, Panax ginseng C.A. Mey is a traditional medicine commonly found in Northeast China and grows at elevations of 2000 m or higher in the Changbai Mountain Range. CMG, considered to be a “buried treasure medicine”, is priced higher than other types of ginseng. However, few studies have demonstrated the effects of CMG supplementation on exercise performance, physical fatigue, and the biochemical profile. The major compound of CMG extract was characterized by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Male ICR mice were divided into 3 groups, the vehicle, CMG-1X and CMG-5X groups (n = 8 per group, and respectively administered 0, 5, or 25 mg/kg/day of CMG extract orally for four weeks. HPLC-ESI-MS/MS results showed that the major compound in CMG extract is ginsenoside Ro. CMG extract significantly increased muscle weight and relative muscle weight (%. CMG extract supplementation dose-dependently increased grip strength (p < 0.0001 and endurance swimming time, decreased levels of serum lactate (p < 0.0001, ammonia (p < 0.0001, creatine kinase (CK, p = 0.0002, and blood urea nitrogen (p < 0.0001, and economized glucose levels (p < 0.0001 after acute exercise challenge. The glycogen in the gastrocnemius muscle was significantly increased with CMG extract treatment. Biochemical profile results showed that creatinine and triacylglycerol significantly decreased and total protein and glucose increased with CMG treatment. This is the first report that CMG extract supplementation increases muscle mass, improves exercise performance and energy utilization, and decreases fatigue-associated parameters in vivo. The major component of CMG extract is ginsenoside Ro, which could be a potential bioactive compound for use as an ergogenic aid ingredient by the food industry.

  8. Prior muscular exercise affects cycling pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieuzen, F; Hausswirth, C; Couturier, A; Brisswalter, J

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of concentric or eccentric fatiguing exercise on cycling pattern. Eleven well trained cyclists completed three sessions of cycling (control cycling test [CTRL], cycling following concentric [CC] or eccentric [ECC] knee contractions) at a mean power of 276.8 +/- 26.6 Watts. Concentric and eccentric knee contractions were performed at a load corresponding to 80 % of one repetition maximum with both legs. Before and after CTRL, CC or ECC knee contractions and after cycling, a maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) test was performed. Cardiorespiratory, mechanical and electromyographic activity (EMG) of the rectus femoris, vastus lateralis and biceps femoris muscles were recorded during cycling. A significant decrease in MVC values was observed after CC and ECC exercises and after the cycling. ECC exercise induced a significant decrease in EMG root mean square during MVC and a decrease in pedal rate during cycling. EMG values of the three muscles were significantly higher during cycling exercise following CC exercise when compared to CTRL. The main finding of this study was that a prior ECC exercise induces a greater neuromuscular fatigue than a CC exercise, and changes in cycling pattern.

  9. Restricted Blood Flow Exercise in Sedentary, Overweight African-American Females May Increase Muscle Strength and Decrease Endothelial Function and Vascular Autoregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon Bond

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Exercise with partially restricted blood flow is a low-load, low-intensity resistance training regimen which may have the potential to increase muscle strength in the obese, elderly and frail who are unable to do high-load training. Restricted blood flow exercise has also been shown to affect blood vessel function variably and can, therefore, contribute to blood vessel dysfunction. This pilot study tests the hypothesis that unilateral resistance training of the leg extensors with partially restricted blood flow increases muscle strength and decreases vascular autoregulation. Methods: The subjects were nine normotensive, overweight, young adult African-Americans with low cardiorespiratory fitness who underwent unilateral training of the quadriceps’ femoris muscles with partially restricted blood flow at 30% of the 1-repetition maximum (1-RM load for 3 weeks. The 1-RM load and post-occlusion blood flow to the lower leg (calf were measured during reactive hyperemia. Results: The 1-RM load increased in the trained legs from 77 ± 3 to 84 ± 4 kg (P 0.1. Post-occlusion blood flow decreased significantly in the trained legs from 19 ± 2 to 13 ± 2 mL· min-1· dL-1 (P < 0.05 and marginally in the contralateral untrained legs from 18 ± 2 to 16 ± 1 mL· min-1· dL-1 (P = 0.09. Changes in post-occlusion blood flow to the skin overlying the trained and the contralateral untrained muscles were not significant. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that restricted blood flow exercise, which results in significant gains in muscle strength, may produce decrements in endothelial dysfunction and vascular autoregulation. Future studies should determine whether pharmacopuncture plays a role in treatments for such blood vessel dysfunction.

  10. Administration of caffeine inhibited adenosine receptor agonist-induced decreases in motor performance, thermoregulation, and brain neurotransmitter release in exercising rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xinyan; Hasegawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects of an adenosine receptor agonist on caffeine-induced changes in thermoregulation, neurotransmitter release in the preoptic area and anterior hypothalamus, and endurance exercise performance in rats. One hour before the start of exercise, rats were intraperitoneally injected with either saline alone (SAL), 10 mg kg(-1) caffeine and saline (CAF), a non-selective adenosine receptor agonist (5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine [NECA]: 0.5 mg kg(-1)) and saline (NECA), or the combination of caffeine and NECA (CAF+NECA). Rats ran until fatigue on the treadmill with a 5% grade at a speed of 18 m min(-1) at 23 °C. Compared to the SAL group, the run time to fatigue (RTTF) was significantly increased by 52% following caffeine administration and significantly decreased by 65% following NECA injection (SAL: 91 ± 14.1 min; CAF: 137 ± 25.8 min; NECA: 31 ± 13.7 min; CAF+NECA: 85 ± 11.8 min; pcaffeine injection inhibited the NECA-induced decreases in the RTTF, Tcore, heat production, heat loss, and extracellular DA release. Neither caffeine nor NECA affected extracellular noradrenaline or serotonin release. These results support the findings of previous studies showing improved endurance performance and overrides in body limitations after caffeine administration, and imply that the ergogenic effects of caffeine may be associated with the adenosine receptor blockade-induced increases in brain DA release.

  11. The parallel programming of voluntary and reflexive saccades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Robin; McSorley, Eugene

    2006-06-01

    A novel two-step paradigm was used to investigate the parallel programming of consecutive, stimulus-elicited ('reflexive') and endogenous ('voluntary') saccades. The mean latency of voluntary saccades, made following the first reflexive saccades in two-step conditions, was significantly reduced compared to that of voluntary saccades made in the single-step control trials. The latency of the first reflexive saccades was modulated by the requirement to make a second saccade: first saccade latency increased when a second voluntary saccade was required in the opposite direction to the first saccade, and decreased when a second saccade was required in the same direction as the first reflexive saccade. A second experiment confirmed the basic effect and also showed that a second reflexive saccade may be programmed in parallel with a first voluntary saccade. The results support the view that voluntary and reflexive saccades can be programmed in parallel on a common motor map.

  12. Rethinking voluntary euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyles, Byron J; Costreie, Sorin

    2013-12-01

    Our goal in this article is to explicate the way, and the extent to which, euthanasia can be voluntary from both the perspective of the patient and the perspective of the health care providers involved in the patient's care. More significantly, we aim to challenge the way in which those engaged in ongoing philosophical debates regarding the morality of euthanasia draw distinctions between voluntary, involuntary, and nonvoluntary euthanasia on the grounds that drawing the distinctions in the traditional manner (1) fails to reflect what is important from the patient's perspective and (2) fails to reflect the significance of health care providers' interests, including their autonomy and integrity.

  13. Voluntary Public Unemployment Insurance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O. Parsons, Donald; Tranæs, Torben; Bie Lilleør, Helene

    Denmark has drawn much attention for its active labor market policies, but is almost unique in offering a voluntary public unemployment insurance program requiring a significant premium payment. A safety net program – a less generous, means-tested social assistance plan – completes the system...

  14. Voluntary Management Earnings Forecasts and Discretionary Accruals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramlich, Jeffrey; Sørensen, Ole Vagn

    2004-01-01

    This paper seeks to determine whether Danish managers exercise discretionary accruals to reach earnings forecast targets they voluntarily specify in conjunction with initial public offerings (IPOs). Because the Danish accounting and legal environment is more permissive than the US, we use Denmark...... as a natural laboratory for learning how business would occur without strict rules, enforcement and sanctions. Danish managers often volunteer pro forma financial statements for results that are expected to occur subsequent to the IPO. We examine a sample of 58 Danish firms that issue voluntary management...... earnings forecasts in connection with IPOs that occur between 1984 and 1996. The evidence we uncover strongly suggests that pre-managed earnings are adjusted toward these targets. In contrast with Kasznik's (1999 Kasznik, R. (1999). On the association between voluntary disclosure and earnings management...

  15. 自主性运动对β淀粉样蛋白25-35诱导的小鼠学习记忆损伤的早期影响%Early influence of voluntary exercise against impairment of learning and memory function in mice induced by β-amyloid peptide 25-35

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪琴; 王蔚; 丁新生; 单春雷; 乔莉; 孙建国; 李敏; 燕兰云; 沈飞飞

    2013-01-01

    目的 观察自主性运动对小鼠散发性阿尔茨海默病学习记忆损伤的早期影响及其影响途径.方法 将24只雄性C57bl/6小鼠[体重(22.5±2.5)g]采用随机数字表法完全随机分为对照组、运动对照组、模型组和治疗组,每组各6只.采用侧脑室注射β淀粉样蛋白25-35(Aβ25-35)制备散发性阿尔茨海默病模型,运动对照组和治疗组进行12 d的自主性运动,对照组和模型组不进行运动.采用Y迷宫和旷场试验分别检测小鼠短期学习记忆能力和情绪改变;HE染色观察海马CA1区神经元病理损伤情况;免疫组织化学染色检测海马区胶质炎性反应.结果 模型组较对照组小鼠短期记忆能力明显下降(进臂正确率:52.60±1.46,65.50±2.78,t =4.111,P=0.003),治疗组与模型组相比,进臂正确率有显著提升(58.57±2.17,52.60±1.46,t=-2.385,P=0.044);与对照组相比,模型组海马CA1区深染的神经细胞比例(%)明显增加(5.11±0.57,2.52±0.52,t=-4.894,P=0.003).另外,海马区星形胶质细胞活化数量以及小胶质细胞数量,治疗组与模型组相比较分别下调17.86%(与对照组比值:0.99±0.13,1.17±0.10,t=2.455,P=0.036)和26.23%(与对照组比值:0.93±0.04,1.19 ±0.11,t =2.412,P=0.043).运动对小鼠的情绪变化没有明显影响.结论 自主性运动能改善Aβ25-35小鼠海马胶质炎性反应,减轻神经细胞损伤,从而改善Aβ25-35诱导的小鼠学习记忆缺陷.%Objective To investigate the early influence and the relevant pathway of voluntary exercise against impairment of learning and memory in mice with sporadic Alzheimer' s disease.Methods Twenty-four male C57bl/6 mice (weight (22.5 ± 2.5) g) were randomly divided into 4 groups:control group,exercise control group,model group and treatment group,6 in each group.Intracerebroventricular injection of β-amyloid peptide-25-35 (Aβ25-35) was used to make mock Alzheimer' s disease,and then mice in exercise control group and

  16. Effects of eccentric exercise on trapezius electromyography during computer work with active and passive pauses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samani, Afshin; Holtermann, Andreas; Søgaard, Karen

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this laboratory study was to investigate the effects of eccentric exercises on the trapezius muscle spatial electromyographic (EMG) activity during computer work with active and passive pauses. METHODS: Twelve healthy male subjects performed computer work with passive (relax......) and active (30% maximum voluntary contraction of shoulder elevation) pauses given every 40s over 2 days, before, immediately and 24h after eccentric exercise. Surface EMG signals were recorded from four parts of the trapezius during computer work. FINDINGS: EMG amplitude during computer work decreased...... immediately after exercise (Pactive pauses compared with passive ones (P

  17. 自主性运动对β淀粉样蛋白25-35诱导小鼠神经细胞凋亡及氧化应激水平的影响%Voluntary Exercise Influencing Neuron Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress in Aβ25-35 Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴婷; 汪琴; 孙建国; 李敏; 王蔚; 燕兰云; 王炜; 李海燕

    2013-01-01

    observed by Hochest staining.Results Compared with the control group,the mice in the model group exhibited decreased learning and memory capacity (Alternation:52.43 ± 2.34,62.43 ± 0.53,t=4.166,P=0.044) accompanied with elevated neuron apoptosis rate (4.43 ± 0.30,1.81 ± 0.33,t=-5.863,P=0.004) in the hippocampal CA1 region,and increased level of serum MDA (43.51 ± 5.22,21.03 ± 1.29,t=-4.181,P=0.043).Compared with the model group,mice in the treatment group exhibited improved learning and memory capacity (Alternation:72.72 ± 1.71,52.43 ± 2.34,t=-6.838,P=0.002),decreased neuron apoptosis rate (2.86 ± 0.22,4.43 ± 0.30,t=4.260,P=0.013) in the hippocampal CA1 region and elevated vitality of T-AOC,GSH-Px and GSH.Conclusion Voluntary exercise may improve the ability of antioxidative stress in Aβ25-35 mice,alleviate hippocampal neuron apoptosis,and furthermore ameliorate learning and memory deficit induced by Aβ25-35.

  18. Assessing voluntary muscle activation with the twitch interpolation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shield, Anthony; Zhou, Shi

    2004-01-01

    stimuli. Sensitive twitch interpolation techniques have revealed small to moderate deficits in voluntary activation during brief maximal efforts and progressively increasing activation deficits (central fatigue) during exhausting exercise. A small number of recent studies suggest that resistance training may result in improved voluntary activation of the quadriceps femoris and ankle plantarflexor muscles but not the biceps brachii. A significantly larger body of evidence indicates that voluntary activation declines as a consequence of bed-rest, joint injury and joint degeneration. Twitch interpolation has also been employed to study the mechanisms by which caffeine and pseudoephedrine enhance exercise performance.

  19. Accounting for flow dependence of respiratory resistance during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bisschop, Claire; Pichon, Aurélien; Guénard, Hervé; Denjean, André

    2003-06-12

    Studies of airway function during exercise have produced conflicting results both in healthy and diseased subjects. Respiratory resistance (Rrs) was measured using an impulse oscillation technique. A flow/resistance curve was established for each of 16 healthy males during voluntary hyperventilation (VHV) at rest. Then, Rrs and flow were measured immediately (t(0)) and 90 sec (t(90)) after exercise on a cycle ergometer at 60, 70, and 80% of maximal aerobic power. The flow/resistance relationship at rest during VHV was used to assess the flow dependence of Rrs. Rrs at t(0) was higher than at rest (P equation. The relative decrease in Rrs with exercise suggests bronchodilation. The bronchodilating effect disappeared promptly when exercise was stopped suggesting that it may have been related to a reflex mechanism.

  20. Decreased spontaneous activity in AMPK alpha 2 muscle specific kinase dead mice is not caused by changes in brain dopamine metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Lisbeth Liliendal Valbjørn; Sylow, Lykke; Gøtzsche, Casper René

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that physical activity has several health benefits, yet many people do not exercise. Dopamine levels in the striatum of the brain are thought to be important for the motivation to exercise. Conversely, we hypothesized that muscle quality can affect the motivation to exercise...... was tested in an open field test. Furthermore, we investigated maximal running capacity and voluntary running over a period of 19 days. AMPK α2 KD mice ran 30% less in daily distance compared to WT. Furthermore, AMPK α2 KD mice showed significantly decreased locomotor activity in the open field test compared...

  1. The Effect of Six Weeks-Voluntary Wheel Running on Brain Amyloid Beta (1-42 Levels of Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziya Fallah-Mohammadi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Amyloid Beta (1-42 is derived from amyloid precursor protein and plays a critical role in AD pathogenesis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of 6 weeks of voluntary wheel running on brain Amyloid beta (1-42 in the diabetic rats induced with alloxan. Materials and Methods: 28 male rats weight 185±1 were assigned randomly to 4 groups (N=7: normal control (C, training (T, control-diabetic (CD and diabetic-training (DT. Diabetes was induced with injecting Alloxan (120 mg/kg dissolved in saline intraperitoneal. Results: 6 weeks of voluntary wheel running decreased the cortex Aβ1-42 in T and DT groups. Aβ1-42 levels significantly decreased in the T and DT in compare with C and CD (p<0.001, respectively. Also Aβ1-42 levels significantly increased in the CD in compare with C (p<0.001.Conclusion: voluntary exercise had positive effects on decreasing of Aβ1-42 levels during 6 weeks. Therefore it can be recommended as therapeutic strategy for diabetes.

  2. A Laboratory Exercise to Understand the Importance of Enzyme Technology in the Fruit-Processing Industry: Viscosity Decrease and Phenols Release from Apple Mash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelo, Manuel; Nielsen, Michael K.; Meyer, Anne S.

    2011-01-01

    In a 4-h laboratory exercise, students accomplish a series of enzymatic macerations of apple mash, assess the viscosity of the mash during the maceration, extract the juice by centrifugation, and measure the levels of antioxidant phenols extracted into the juice after different enzyme treatments. The exercise shows the impact of enzyme-catalyzed…

  3. A Laboratory Exercise To Understand the Importance of Enzyme Technology in the Fruit-Processing Industry: Viscosity Decrease and Phenols Release from Apple Mash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinelo, Manuel; Nielsen, Michael Krogsgaard; Meyer, Anne S.

    2011-01-01

    . The exercise shows the impact of enzyme-catalyzed plant cell-wall degradation on the viscosity of apple fruit mash and on the extraction of antioxidant phenols into experimentally prepared apple juice. The exercise also demonstrates that pectinolytic and cellulolytic enzymes have different effects...

  4. A Laboratory Exercise to Understand the Importance of Enzyme Technology in the Fruit-Processing Industry: Viscosity Decrease and Phenols Release from Apple Mash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelo, Manuel; Nielsen, Michael K.; Meyer, Anne S.

    2011-01-01

    In a 4-h laboratory exercise, students accomplish a series of enzymatic macerations of apple mash, assess the viscosity of the mash during the maceration, extract the juice by centrifugation, and measure the levels of antioxidant phenols extracted into the juice after different enzyme treatments. The exercise shows the impact of enzyme-catalyzed…

  5. A combination of exercise and capsinoid supplementation additively suppresses diet-induced obesity by increasing energy expenditure in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, Kana; Nogusa, Yoshihito; Suzuki, Katsuya; Shinoda, Kosaku; Kajimura, Shingo; Bannai, Makoto

    2015-02-15

    Exercise effectively prevents the development of obesity and obesity-related diseases such as type 2 diabetes. Capsinoids (CSNs) are capsaicin analogs found in a nonpungent pepper that increase whole body energy expenditure. Although both exercise and CSNs have antiobesity functions, the effectiveness of exercise with CSN supplementation has not yet been investigated. Here, we examined whether the beneficial effects of exercise could be further enhanced by CSN supplementation in mice. Mice were randomly assigned to four groups: 1) high-fat diet (HFD, Control), 2) HFD containing 0.3% CSNs, 3) HFD with voluntary running wheel exercise (Exercise), and 4) HFD containing 0.3% CSNs with voluntary running wheel exercise (Exercise + CSN). After 8 wk of ingestion, blood and tissues were collected and analyzed. Although CSNs significantly suppressed body weight gain under the HFD, CSN supplementation with exercise additively decreased body weight gain and fat accumulation and increased whole body energy expenditure compared with exercise alone. Exercise together with CSN supplementation robustly improved metabolic profiles, including the plasma cholesterol level. Furthermore, this combination significantly prevented diet-induced liver steatosis and decreased the size of adipocyte cells in white adipose tissue. Exercise and CSNs significantly increased cAMP levels and PKA activity in brown adipose tissue (BAT), indicating an increase of lipolysis. Moreover, they significantly activated both the oxidative phosphorylation gene program and fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle. These results indicate that CSNs efficiently promote the antiobesity effect of exercise, in part by increasing energy expenditure via the activation of fat oxidation in skeletal muscle and lipolysis in BAT. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Effects of non-motorized voluntary running on experimental and spontaneous metastasis in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physical activity is any form of movement using skeletal muscles. Human population and laboratory studies show that physical exercise may play a favorable role in primary cancer prevention.The present study investigated the effects of voluntary exercise on the development and growth of secondary ca...

  7. Voluntary Simplicity: A Lifestyle Option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestle, Ruth E.

    This guide provides practical ideas for incorporating the concept of voluntary simplicity into home economics classes. Discussed in the first chapter are the need to study voluntary simplicity, its potential contributions to home economics, and techniques and a questionnaire for measuring student attitudes toward the concept. The remaining…

  8. Operant Variability and Voluntary Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuringer, Allen; Jensen, Greg

    2010-01-01

    A behavior-based theory identified 2 characteristics of voluntary acts. The first, extensively explored in operant-conditioning experiments, is that voluntary responses produce the reinforcers that control them. This bidirectional relationship--in which reinforcer depends on response and response on reinforcer--demonstrates the functional nature…

  9. Toward voluntary parenthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarr, S

    2000-06-01

    David Lykken's proposal to license married parents for child rearing, and to deny the same opportunity to single and inept parents, springs from his deep concern for millions of youngsters cruelly subjected to abusive and neglectful rearing circumstances. Children from such inadequate homes grow up to have high rates of school failure, criminality, and drug addiction. The problem is clear, but Lykken's remedies of mandated marriage and parental licensure are unacceptable in U.S. society, where our reproductive rights are fortunately protected by our Constitution. As a devoted proponent of reproductive rights, I propose a legally and morally acceptable proposal to the same end. Increasing women's effective control of reproduction and moving toward entirely voluntary parenthood will accomplish the same goals without compromising our civil liberties.

  10. Inflammatory modulation of exercise salience: using hormesis to return to a healthy lifestyle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bell Jimmy D

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Most of the human population in the western world has access to unlimited calories and leads an increasingly sedentary lifestyle. The propensity to undertake voluntary exercise or indulge in spontaneous physical exercise, which might be termed "exercise salience", is drawing increased scientific attention. Despite its genetic aspects, this complex behaviour is clearly modulated by the environment and influenced by physiological states. Inflammation is often overlooked as one of these conditions even though it is known to induce a state of reduced mobility. Chronic subclinical inflammation is associated with the metabolic syndrome; a largely lifestyle-induced disease which can lead to decreased exercise salience. The result is a vicious cycle that increases oxidative stress and reduces metabolic flexibility and perpetuates the disease state. In contrast, hormetic stimuli can induce an anti-inflammatory phenotype, thereby enhancing exercise salience, leading to greater biological fitness and improved functional longevity. One general consequence of hormesis is upregulation of mitochondrial function and resistance to oxidative stress. Examples of hormetic factors include calorie restriction, extreme environmental temperatures, physical activity and polyphenols. The hormetic modulation of inflammation, and thus, exercise salience, may help to explain the highly heterogeneous expression of voluntary exercise behaviour and therefore body composition phenotypes of humans living in similar obesogenic environments.

  11. Effects of 6-week voluntary wheel exercise on sex-hormones and hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis in high-fat fed SD rats%6周自由转轮运动对高脂饲养雄性大鼠性激素及下丘脑-垂体-睾丸轴的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵岩; 孙景权; 谢敏豪; 严翊

    2016-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of high fat diet and 6⁃week voluntary wheel running on the structure of hypothalamus, pituitary and testis and sex hormone levels in pubertal male rats. Methods Forty 3⁃week⁃old male Spra⁃gue⁃Dawley rats were randomly divided into following groups: the control group fed with normal diet (C), training group fed with normal diet ( CE) , control group fed with high fat diet ( D) , and training group fed with high fat diet ( DE) , 10 rats in each group. The groups C and D were bred for 8 weeks freely, and the groups CE and DE were assigned to have vol⁃untary wheel running twice/d, 1 h/time, 5 d/w, for 6 weeks after a 2⁃week adaptive feeding. Eight weeks later, blood sample was collected to detect the serum T, E2 , FSH and LH, and the E2 and T of testis were also detected. The histology of hypothalamic, pituitary, and testis tissues was observed by light microscopy. Results ( l) Compared with the group C, the group D had significantly decreased levels of serum T and E2 and testicular T (P<0�05), and significantly increased serum E2, FSH and LH levels (P<0�05). In the group D, vacuolar lipid droplets were increased in the hypothalamus, e⁃osinophils and basophils were reduced in the pituitary, and the area of seminiferous tubules, percentage of sperm cells, and quantity of Leygid cells were significantly decreased in the testis. (2) Compared with the group D, the serum T and testic⁃ular T concentrations were increased, but the serum E2, FSH and LH were decreased significantly (P<0�05) in the group DE, and vacuolar lipid drops were increased in the hypothalamus, eosinophil cells were increased in the pituitary gland, and the area of seminiferous tubules was increased but not significantly in the testis. Conclusions 6⁃week voluntary wheel exercise can improve the high fat diet⁃induced abnormal secretion of sex hormones, but not effectively improve the histologi⁃cal changes in hypothalamus, pituitary gland and

  12. Effects of low-intensity concentric and eccentric exercise combined with blood flow restriction on indices of exercise-induced muscle damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Tomohiro; Loenneke, Jeremy P.; Abe, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Low-intensity blood-flow restriction (BFR) resistance training significantly increases strength and muscle size, but some studies report it produces exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) in the lower body after exercise to failure. Purpose: To investigate the effects of a pre-set number of repetitions of upper body concentric and eccentric exercise when combined with BFR on changes in EIMD. Methods: Ten young men had arms randomly assigned to either concentric BFR (CON-BFR) or eccentric BFR (ECC-BFR) dumbbell curl exercise (30% one-repetition maximum (1-RM), 1 set of 30 repetitions followed by 3 sets of 15 repetitions). Maximal isometric voluntary contraction force (MVC), muscle thickness (MTH), circumference, range of motion (ROM), ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), and muscle soreness were measured before, immediately after, and daily for 4 days post-exercise. Results: MVC decreased by 36% for CON-BFR and 12% for ECC-BFR immediately after exercise but was not changed 1–4 days post-exercise (p > 0.05). Only CON-BFR had significant changes in MTH and circumference immediately after exercise (p exercise. Conclusions: Low-intensity ECC-BFR produces significant muscle soreness at 24 h but neither ECC-BFR nor CON-BFR exercise produces significant changes in multiple indices of EIMD. PMID:24265891

  13. Influence of dorsiflexion shoes on neuromuscular fatigue of the plantar flexors after combined tapping-jumping exercises in volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapole, Thomas; Ahmaidi, Said; Gaillien, Benjamin; Leprêtre, Pierre-Marie

    2013-07-01

    Dorsiflexion shoes could be useful to increase jumping performance. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of wearing shoes inducing moderate dorsiflexion (2°) on neuromuscular fatigue induced by volleyball exercises involving multiple stretch-shortening cycles. Squat jump (SJ) and countermovement jump (CMJ) performance, and plantar flexors isometric voluntary and evoked contractile properties were assessed in 10 unfamiliarized trained volleyball players before and after a 10-minute intensive combined tapping-jumping volleyball exercise performed, in blinded randomized conditions, with neutral (0°) or moderate dorsiflexion (2°). No significant difference was observed on SJ performance in neutral and moderate dorsiflexion conditions. However, CMJ height was initially lower with 2° dorsiflexion compared with 0° (p volleyball exercise also induced a significant decrease in maximal voluntary contraction (p volleyball players.

  14. Analyzing voluntary medical incident reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yang; Richardson, James; Zhijian, Luan; Alafaireet, Patricia; Yoo, Illhoi

    2008-11-06

    Voluntary medical incident reports lacking consistency and accuracy impede the ultimate use of the reports for patient safety research. To improve this, two coders examined harm score usage in a voluntary medical incident reporting system where the harm scores were selected from a predefined list by different reporters. The two coders inter-rater agreement percent was 82%. The major categories and reviewed harm score jointly demonstrate that this process is critical and necessary in preparing the voluntary reports for further content and semantics analysis.

  15. The Notion of Voluntary Unemployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standing, Guy

    1981-01-01

    Considers the distinction between voluntary and involuntary unemployment by analyzing six behavioral characteristics attributed to groups of workers suspected of indulging in the former, and the labor market mechanisms supposedly encouraging them. (Author/CT)

  16. Decrease in Ionized and Total Magnesium Blood Concentrations in Endurance Athletes Following an Exercise Bout Restores within Hours-Potential Consequences for Monitoring and Supplementation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terink, R.; Balvers, M.G.J.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Witkamp, R.F.; Mensink, M.; Gunnewiek, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Magnesium is essential for optimal sport performance, generating an interest to monitor its status in athletes. However, before measuring magnesium status in blood could become routine, more insight into its diurnal fluctuations and effects of exercise itself is necessary. Therefore, we measured the

  17. Decrease in ionized and total magnesium blood concentrations in endurance athletes following an exercise bout restores within hours-potential consequences for monitoring and supplementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terink, Rieneke; Balvers, Michiel G.J.; Hopman, Maria T.; Witkamp, Renger F.; Mensink, Marco; Klein Gunnewiek, J.M.T.

    2017-01-01

    Magnesium is essential for optimal sport performance, generating an interest to monitor its status in athletes. However, before measuring magnesium status in blood could become routine, more insight into its diurnal fluctuations and effects of exercise itself is necessary. Therefore, we measured

  18. Effects of exercise and nutrition on postural balance and risk of falling in elderly people with decreased bone mineral density : randomized controlled trial pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swanenburg, Jaap; de Bruin, Eling Douwe; Stauffacher, Marguerite; Mulder, Theo; Uebelhart, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effect of calcium/vitamin D supplements with a combination of calcium/vitamin D supplements and exercise/protein on risk of failing and postural balance. Design: Randomized clinical trial. Setting: University hospital physiotherapy department. Subjects: Twenty-four independ

  19. Effects of exercise and nutrition on postural balance and risk of falling in elderly people with decreased bone mineral density : randomized controlled trial pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swanenburg, Jaap; de Bruin, Eling Douwe; Stauffacher, Marguerite; Mulder, Theo; Uebelhart, Daniel

    Objective: To compare the effect of calcium/vitamin D supplements with a combination of calcium/vitamin D supplements and exercise/protein on risk of failing and postural balance. Design: Randomized clinical trial. Setting: University hospital physiotherapy department. Subjects: Twenty-four

  20. Neuromuscular Changes and Damage after Isoload versus Isokinetic Eccentric Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doguet, Valentin; Nosaka, Kazunori; Plautard, Mathieu; Gross, Raphaël; Guilhem, GaËL; Guével, Arnaud; Jubeau, Marc

    2016-12-01

    This study compared the effects of isoload (IL) and isokinetic (IK) knee extensor eccentric exercises on changes in muscle damage and neuromuscular parameters to test the hypothesis that the changes would be different after IL and IK exercises. Twenty-two young men were paired based on their strength and placed in the IL (N = 11) or the IK (N = 11) group. The IL group performed 15 sets of 10 eccentric contractions with a 150% of predetermined one-repetition maximum load. The IK group performed 15 sets of several maximal eccentric contractions matched set by set for the total amount of work and mean angular velocity with the IL group. Muscle damage markers (voluntary isometric peak torque, muscle soreness, and creatine kinase activity) and neuromuscular variables (e.g., voluntary activation, H-reflex, M-wave, and evoked torque) were measured before, immediately after, and 24, 48, 72, and 96 h postexercise. Voluntary isometric peak torque decreased to the same extent (P = 0.94) in both groups immediately after (IL = -40.6% ± 13.8% vs IK = -42.4% ± 10.2%) to 96 h after the exercise (IL = -21.8% ± 28.5% vs IK = -26.7% ± 23.5%). Neither peak muscle soreness (IL = 48.1 ± 28.2 mm vs IK = 54.7 ± 28.9 mm, P = 0.57) nor creatine kinase activity (IL = 12,811 ± 22,654 U·L vs IK = 15,304 ± 24,739 U·L, P = 0.59) significantly differed between groups. H-reflex (IL = -23% vs IK = -35%) and M-wave (IL = -10% vs IK = -17%) significantly decreased immediately postexercise similarly between groups. The changes in muscle damage and neuromuscular function after the exercise are similar between IL and IK, suggesting that resistance modality has little effects on acute muscle responses.

  1. Reduced arterial diameter during static exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, H L; Mitchell, J H; Friedman, D B

    1995-01-01

    of another limb. Static exercise increased heart rate and mean arterial pressure, which were largest during one-leg knee extension. After exercise heart rate and mean arterial pressure returned to the resting level. No changes were recorded in arterial carbon dioxide tension, and the rate of perceived......In eight subjects luminal diameter of the resting limb radial and dorsalis pedis arteries was determined by high-resolution ultrasound (20 MHz). This measurement was followed during rest and during 2 min of static handgrip or of one-leg knee extension at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction...... exertion was approximately 15 units after both types of exercise. The dorsalis pedis arterial diameter was 1.50 +/- 0.20 mm (mean and SE) and the radial AD 2.45 +/- 0.12 mm. During both types of contractions the luminal diameters decreased approximately 3.5% within the first 30 s (P

  2. Comparative adaptations in oxidative and glycolytic muscle fibers in a low voluntary wheel running rat model performing three levels of physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Hayden W; Toedebusch, Ryan G; Ruegsegger, Greg; Mobley, C Brooks; Fox, Carlton D; McGinnis, Graham R; Quindry, John C; Booth, Frank W; Roberts, Michael D; Kavazis, Andreas N

    2015-11-01

    A unique polygenic model of rat physical activity has been recently developed where rats were selected for the trait of low voluntary wheel running. We utilized this model to identify differences in soleus and plantaris muscles of sedentary low voluntary wheel running rats and physically active low voluntary wheel running rats exposed to moderate amounts of treadmill training. Three groups of 28-day-old male Wistar rats were used: (1) rats without a running wheel (SEDENTARY, n = 7), (2) rats housed with a running wheel (WHEEL, n = 7), and (3) rats housed with a running wheel and exercised on the treadmill (5 days/week for 20 min/day at 15.0 m/min) (WHEEL + TREADMILL, n = 7). Animals were euthanized 5 weeks after the start of the experiment and the soleus and plantaris muscles were excised and used for analyses. Increases in skeletal muscle gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha and fibronectin type III domain-containing protein 5 in WHEEL + TREADMILL group were observed. Also, WHEEL + TREADMILL had higher protein levels of superoxide dismutase 2 and decreased levels of oxidative damage. Our data demonstrate that the addition of treadmill training induces beneficial muscular adaptations compared to animals with wheel access alone. Furthermore, our data expand our understanding of differential muscular adaptations in response to exercise in mitochondrial, antioxidant, and metabolic markers.

  3. Exploring the Mechanisms of Exercise-Induced Hypoalgesia Using Somatosensory and Laser Evoked Potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Matthew D; Taylor, Janet L; Booth, John; Barry, Benjamin K

    2016-01-01

    Exercise-induced hypoalgesia is well described, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of exercise on somatosensory evoked potentials, laser evoked potentials, pressure pain thresholds and heat pain thresholds. These were recorded before and after 3-min of isometric elbow flexion exercise at 40% of the participant's maximal voluntary force, or an equivalent period of rest. Exercise-induced hypoalgesia was confirmed in two experiments (Experiment 1-SEPs; Experiment 2-LEPs) by increased pressure pain thresholds at biceps brachii (24.3 and 20.6% increase in Experiment 1 and 2, respectively; both d > 0.84 and p 0.57 and p evoked potentials (14.6% decrease, d = -0.42, p = 0.004) and somatosensory evoked potentials (10.9% increase, d = -0.02, p = 1) were also observed, while an equivalent period of rest showed similar habituation (laser evoked potential: 7.3% decrease, d = -0.25, p = 0.14; somatosensory evoked potential: 20.7% decrease, d = -0.32, p = 0.006). The differential response of pressure pain thresholds and heat pain thresholds to exercise is consistent with relative insensitivity of thermal nociception to the acute hypoalgesic effects of exercise. Conflicting effects of exercise on somatosensory evoked potentials and laser evoked potentials were observed. This may reflect non-nociceptive contributions to the somatosensory evoked potential, but could also indicate that peripheral nociceptors contribute to exercise-induced hypoalgesia.

  4. Enhanced voluntary wheel running in GPRC6A receptor knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Christoffer; Pehmøller, Christian; Klein, Anders B

    2013-01-01

    to voluntary wheel running and forced treadmill exercise. Moreover, we assessed energy expenditure in the basal state, and evaluated the effects of wheel running on food intake, body composition, and a range of exercise-induced central and peripheral biomarkers. We found that adaptation to voluntary wheel......GPRC6A is an amino acid-sensing receptor highly expressed in the brain and in skeletal muscle. Although recent evidence suggests that genetically engineered GPRC6A receptor knockout (KO) mice are susceptible to develop subtle endocrine and metabolic disturbances, the underlying disruptions...... running is affected by GPRC6A, as ablation of the receptor significantly enhances wheel running in KO relative to WT mice. Both genotypes responded to voluntary exercise by increasing food intake and improving body composition to a similar degree. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that the GPRC6A...

  5. Interaction of poststroke voluntary effort and functional neuromuscular electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Nathaniel; Knutson, Jayme; Chae, John; Crago, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) may be able to augment functional arm and hand movement after stroke. Poststroke neuroprostheses that incorporate voluntary effort and FES to produce the desired movement must consider how forces generated by voluntary effort and FES combine, even in the same muscle, in order to provide an appropriate level of stimulation to elicit the desired assistive force. The goal of this study was to determine whether the force produced by voluntary effort and FES add together independently of effort or whether the increment in force depends on the level of voluntary effort. Isometric force matching tasks were performed under different combinations of voluntary effort and FES. Participants reached a steady level of force, and while attempting to maintain a constant effort level, FES was applied to augment the force. Results indicate that the increment in force produced by FES decreases as the level of initial voluntary effort increases. Potential mechanisms causing the change in force output are proposed, but the relative contribution of each mechanism is unknown.

  6. Effects of the homeopathic remedy arnica on attenuating symptoms of exercise-induced muscle soreness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plezbert, Julie A.; Burke, Jeanmarie R.

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the clinical efficacy of Arnica at a high potency (200c), on moderating delayed onset muscle soreness and accompanying symptoms of muscle dysfunction. Methods Twenty subjects completed a maximal eccentric exercise protocol with the non-dominate elbow flexors to induce delayed onset muscle soreness. Either Arnica or placebo tablets were administered in a random, double- blinded fashion immediately after exercise and at 24 hours and 72 hours after exercise. Before exercise, immediately post-exercise, and at 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours post-exercise, assessments of delayed onset muscle soreness and muscle function included: 1) muscle soreness and functional impairment; 2) maximum voluntary contraction torque; 3) muscle swelling; and 4) range of motion tests to document spontaneous muscle shortening and muscle shortening ability. Blood samples drawn before exercise and at 24, 48, and 96 hours after exercise were used to measure muscle enzymes as indirect indices of muscle damage. Results Regardless of the intervention, the extent of delayed onset muscle soreness and elevations in muscle enzymes were similar on the days following the eccentric exercise protocol. The post-exercise time profiles of decreases in maximum voluntary contraction torque and muscle shortening ability and increases in muscle swelling and spontaneous muscle shortening were similar for each treatment intervention. Conclusions The results of this study did not substantiate the clinical efficacy of Arnica at a high potency on moderating delayed onset muscle soreness and accompanying symptoms of muscle dysfunction. Despite the findings of this study, future investigations on the clinical efficacy of homeopathic interventions should consider incorporating research strategies that emphasize differential therapeutics for each patient rather than treating a specific disease or symptom complex, such as DOMS, with a single homeopathic remedy. PMID:19674657

  7. Prior regular exercise reverses the decreased effects of sleep deprivation on brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in the hippocampus of ovariectomized female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadati, Hakimeh; Sheibani, Vahid; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed; Darvishzadeh-Mahani, Fatemeh; Mazhari, Shahrzad

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies indicated that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is the main candidate to mediate the beneficial effects of exercise on cognitive function in sleep deprived male rats. In addition, our previous findings demonstrate that female rats are more vulnerable to the deleterious effects of sleep deprivation on cognitive performance and synaptic plasticity. Therefore, the current study was designed to investigate the effects of treadmill exercise and/or sleep deprivation (SD) on the levels of BDNF mRNA and protein in the hippocampus of female rats. Intact and ovariectomized (OVX) female Wistar rats were used in the present experiment. The exercise protocol was four weeks treadmill running and sleep deprivation was accomplished using the multiple platform method. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunoblot analysis were used to evaluate the level of BDNF mRNA and protein in the rat hippocampus respectively. Our results showed that protein and mRNA expression of BDNF was significantly (pexercise conditions had a significant (pexercise can exert a protective effect against hippocampus-related functions and impairments induced by sleep deprivation probably by inducing BDNF expression.

  8. Concentrically trained cyclists are not more susceptible to eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage than are stretch-shortening exercise-trained runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snieckus, Audrius; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Venckūnas, Tomas; Brazaitis, Marius; Volungevičius, Gintautas; Skurvydas, Albertas

    2013-03-01

    Here, we test the hypothesis that continuous concentric exercise training renders skeletal muscles more susceptible to damage in response to eccentric exercise. Elite road cyclists (CYC; n = 10, training experience 8.1 ± 2.0 years, age 22.9 ± 3.7 years), long-distance runners (LDR; n = 10, 9.9 ± 2.3 years, 24.4 ± 2.5 years), and healthy untrained (UT) men (n = 10; 22.4 ± 1.7 years) performed 100 submaximal eccentric contractions at constant angular velocity of 60° s(-1). Concentric isokinetic peak torque, isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and electrically induced knee extension torque were measured at baseline and immediately and 48 h after an eccentric exercise bout. Muscle soreness was assessed and plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity was measured at baseline and 48 h after exercise. Voluntary and electrically stimulated knee extension torque reduction were significantly greater (p exercise, MVC decreased by 32 % and 20 % in UT, 20 % and 5 % in LDR, and 25 % and 6 % in CYC. Electrically induced 20 Hz torque decreased at the same times by 61 and 29 % in UT, 40 and 17 % in LDR, and 26 and 14 % in CYC. Muscle soreness and plasma CK activity 48 h after exercise did not differ significantly between athletes and UT subjects. In conclusion, even though elite endurance athletes are more resistant to eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage than are UT people, stretch-shortening exercise-trained LDR have no advantage over concentrically trained CYC.

  9. Impaired neuromuscular function during isometric, shortening, and lengthening contractions after exercise-induced damage to elbow flexor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Tanya S; Tucker, Kylie J; Rogasch, Nigel C; Semmler, John G

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of exercise-induced damage of the elbow flexor muscles on steady motor performance during isometric, shortening, and lengthening contractions. Ten healthy individuals (age 22+/-4 yr) performed four tasks with the elbow flexor muscles: a maximum voluntary contraction, a one repetition maximum (1 RM), an isometric task at three joint angles (short, intermediate, and long muscle lengths), and a constant-load task during slow (approximately 7 degrees/s) shortening and lengthening contractions. Task performance was quantified as the fluctuations in wrist acceleration (steadiness), and electromyography was obtained from the biceps and triceps brachii muscles at loads of 10, 20, and 40% of 1 RM. Tasks were performed before, immediately after, and 24 h after eccentric exercise that resulted in indicators of muscle damage. Maximum voluntary contraction force and 1-RM load declined by approximately 45% immediately after exercise and remained lower at 24 h ( approximately 30% decrease). Eccentric exercise resulted in reduced steadiness and increased biceps and triceps brachii electromyography for all tasks. For the isometric task, steadiness was impaired at the short compared with the long muscle length immediately after exercise (Pshortening compared with the lengthening contractions after exercise (P=0.01), and steadiness remained impaired for shortening contractions 24 h later (P=0.01). These findings suggest that there are profound effects for the performance of these types of fine motor tasks when recovering from a bout of eccentric exercise.

  10. Why Exercise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... editorial staff Home Prevention and Wellness Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Why Exercise? Why Exercise? Share Print Why Exercise? Exercise is an important part of a healthy lifestyle. Exercise prevents health problems, builds strength, boosts energy, ...

  11. Comparing Voluntary and Mandatory Gameplay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Kuindersma

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Gameplay is commonly considered to be a voluntary activity. Game designers generally believe that voluntary gameplay is essentially different from mandatory gameplay. Such a belief may be a challenge for serious games, as instruction is usually mandatory. The article describes the outcomes of two experiments on the impact of voluntariness on the learning effect and enjoyment of a serious game. In the first experiment freedom of choosing to play a serious game was studied, with participants who had volunteered to participate. The results suggested that, contrary to the opinion of many game designers, being required to play a serious game does not automatically take the fun out of the game. The second experiment had voluntary participants and mandatory participants, who had to participate as part of a homework assignment. The outcomes show that mandatory participants enjoyed the game as much as the voluntary participants, even if they had to play the game for a minimum required time. These studies indicate that mandatory gameplay does not reduce enjoyment and learning effect.

  12. Voluntary organisation and adult education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Elsdon

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available The author starts by offering a definition of voluntary organisations. He then discusses their importance and role, focusing on the issue of adult education wi­ thin these organisations. He also wells upon learning and change of voluntary organisation members, making use of the results of a study he conducted together with his collaborators. One of their fin­dings has been that voluntary organisati­ons, due to their organisational targets li­ke painting, singing or caring for people in need, lead their members to learning, i.e. essentially content learning. Moreo­ver, voluntary organisations offer a fair number of opportunities for social lear­ning and change. ln spite of the fact that the respondents were mostly not aware of the outcomes of their learning and change, careful listeners conducting the interview made them understand the im­portance of the learning they had gone through. The author concludes by poin­ ting out that formal education of adults can get its inspiration in learning in voluntary organisations. On the other hand, such learning would benefit greatly from findings and methods of formal education of adults.

  13. Effect of prior exercise in Pi/PC ratio and intracellular pH during a standardized exercise. A study on human muscle using [31P]NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, D; Authier, B; Lebas, J F; Rossi, A

    1992-01-01

    Seven subjects underwent a standard localized exercise of calf muscles in order to investigate whether the metabolic exercise-induced steady-state, as revealed by the evaluation of inorganic phosphate/phosphocreatine ratio, depends on the conditioning of the muscle just prior to the exercise. The experimental protocols consisted of two separate experiments using first [31P]nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and second (on 3 subjects) infrared oxyphotometry to respectively follow variation of energy metabolism and tissular deoxygenation. The exercise consisted of 240 successive plantar flexions (0.5 Hz frequency) against a high load equivalent to 80% of the maximal voluntary contraction. This exercise was accomplished before cold exercise and after warm exercise, a warming-up period bringing to approximately 50% of VO2max. The results showed that: (1) steady-state level of phosphate/phosphocreatine and intracellular acidosis was significantly lowered by warming-up; (2) cold and warm exercise steady-state of calculated adenosine diphosphate values were not significantly different; (3) cold exercise rapidly induced a high tissular deoxygenation that is not observed during warm exercise; and (4) time-constant of phosphocreatine resynthesis is lowered after warm exercise but the initial slope of time-evolution is not modified. Parallel experiments also showed that phosphate/phosphocreatine steady-state was not modified in comparison with warm exercise when the same power of exercise was reached by stepwise incrementation of the charge. From these results we postulate that a better tissue oxygenation due to a global or localized warming-up allows to reach the same mechanical performance with a lower decrease of PCr content, owing to a faster adjustment of oxidative metabolism during the transitional period.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Exercise increases pressure pain tolerance but not pressure and heat pain thresholds in healthy young men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaegter, H. B.; Bement, M. Hoeger; Madsen, A. B.

    2017-01-01

    : On three different days, 20 healthy young men performed two submaximal isometric knee extensions (30% maximal voluntary contraction in 3 min) and a control condition (quiet rest). Before and immediately after exercise and rest, the sensitivity to heat pain and pressure pain was assessed in randomized......BACKGROUND: Exercise causes an acute decrease in the pain sensitivity known as exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH), but the specificity to certain pain modalities remains unknown. This study aimed to compare the effect of isometric exercise on the heat and pressure pain sensitivity. METHODS...... and counterbalanced order. Cuff pressure pain threshold (cPPT) and pain tolerance (cPTT) were assessed on the ipsilateral lower leg by computer-controlled cuff algometry. Heat pain threshold (HPT) was recorded on the ipsilateral foot by a computer-controlled thermal stimulator. RESULTS: Cuff pressure pain tolerance...

  15. Associated decrements in rate of force development and neural drive after maximal eccentric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farup, J; Rahbek, S K; Bjerre, J; de Paoli, F; Vissing, K

    2016-05-01

    The present study investigated the changes in contractile rate of force development (RFD) and the neural drive following a single bout of eccentric exercise. Twenty-four subjects performed 15 × 10 maximal isokinetic eccentric knee extensor contractions. Prior to and at 24, 48, 72, 96, and 168 h during post-exercise recovery, isometric RFD (30, 50 100, and 200 ms), normalized RFD [1/6,1/2, and 2/3 of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC)] and rate of electromyography rise (RER; 30, 50, and 75 ms) were measured. RFD decreased by 28-42% peaking at 48 h (P eccentric exercise. This association suggests that exercise-induced decrements in RFD can, in part, be explained decrements in neural drive. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Effect of resistance exercise contraction mode and protein supplementation on members of the STARS signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissing, Kristian; Rahbek, Stine K; Lamon, Severine; Farup, Jean; Stefanetti, Renae J; Wallace, Marita A; Vendelbo, Mikkel H; Russell, Aaron

    2013-08-01

    The striated muscle activator of Rho signalling (STARS) pathway is suggested to provide a link between external stress responses and transcriptional regulation in muscle. However, the sensitivity of STARS signalling to different mechanical stresses has not been investigated. In a comparative study, we examined the regulation of the STARS signalling pathway in response to unilateral resistance exercise performed as either eccentric (ECC) or concentric (CONC) contractions as well as prolonged training; with and without whey protein supplementation. Skeletal muscle STARS, myocardian-related transcription factor-A (MRTF-A) and serum response factor (SRF) mRNA and protein, as well as muscle cross-sectional area and maximal voluntary contraction, were measured. A single-bout of exercise produced increases in STARS and SRF mRNA and decreases in MRTF-A mRNA with both ECC and CONC exercise, but with an enhanced response occurring following ECC exercise. A 31% increase in STARS protein was observed exclusively after CONC exercise (P exercise (P hypertrophy and produced increases in MRTF-A protein of 125% and 99%, respectively (P exercise provides an acute stimulation of the STARS pathway that is contraction mode dependent. The responses to acute exercise were more pronounced than responses to accumulated training, suggesting that STARS signalling is primarily involved in the initial phase of exercise-induced muscle adaptations.

  17. 自愿运动对快速老化小鼠学习记忆能力和海马生长相关蛋白43的影响%Effects of voluntary exercise on learning ability, memory and hippocampus growth-associated protein 43 expression in senescence-accelerated prone mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苑振云; 姜向明; 王铭维; 顾平; 杨秀芬; 苏冠丽; 杨涛; 李斌

    2012-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of voluntary exercise on the learning ability, memory and hippocampus growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) expression in senescence-accelerated prone mouse (SAMP8), so as to explore the possible mechanism of exercises on improving the cognitive ability and delaying aging. Methods A total of 60 three-month old female SAMP8 mice were evenly assigned to running cage environment (RCE) group and standard environment (SE) group at random. After three months, Morris water maze test was used to test the platform-seeking latency and search strategy. Then 10 mice were sacrificed in each group for RT-PCR analysis of hippocampus GAP43 mRNA expression, 10 for Western blotting analysis of hippocampus GAP43 protein expression, and 10 for immunohistochemistry staining of hippocampus GAP43 expression. Results Morris water maze test showed that RCE mice had a significant shorter platform-seeking latency than SE mice(P<0. 01, P<0. 05) , and RCE mice had a significant longer time in the first quadrant (P<0. 01) and a shorter time in the fourth quadrant (P<0. 05) compared with SE mice. RCE mice had a significantly higher GAP43 expression in the hippocampus compared with SE mice (P<0. 01). Conclusion Voluntary exercise can improve the learning ability and memory of SAMP8, which might be associated with the increase of GAP43 in the hippocampus.%目的 观察自愿运动对快速老化小鼠(senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8,SA MP8)学习记忆能力和海马生长相关蛋白43(growth-associated protein-43,GAP43)表达的影响,探讨运动提高认知能力延缓衰老的机制.方法 60只3个月龄雌性SAMP8小鼠随机平均分为跑笼环境组(RCE组)和标准环境组(SE组).饲养3个月后,用Morris水迷宫测试小鼠的寻找平台潜伏期及搜索策略.行为学测试后,各组分别取10只小鼠的鼠脑用RT-PCR法检测海马GAP43 mRNA的表达;取10只小鼠的鼠脑用免疫印迹实验检测海马GAP43蛋白的表达;剩余10

  18. Fluid consumption, exercise, and cognitive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, T P; Fitzgerald, K

    2016-09-01

    Laboratory evidence supports the notion that dehydration degrades exercise performance and impairs certain cognitive processes. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of a voluntary versus a dictated drinking condition on exercise and cognitive performance. The study used a double-blind and paired design. Twenty male and female college students (10 women, 10 men) participated in an exercise protocol consisting of 1 hr of treadmill running followed by a high intensity portion continuing until voluntary exhaustion. The dictated drinking condition consisted of 900 ml of water equally distributed in 4 pre-prepared opaque bottles. At 15 min intervals the subject was instructed to drink the entire contents until the end of the 1 hr treadmill protocol. The voluntary drinking condition consisted of 225 ml of water within arm's reach of the subjects while on the treadmill. Exercise performance was significantly better (longer duration and faster speed) in the voluntary condition compared with the dictated condition. Cognitive test outcomes were not significantly different between drinking conditions. A difference in fluid absorption is a potential source of exercise impairment seen in the dictated fluid condition. The higher fluid consumption rate presumably would cause greater gastric and esophageal distention resulting in the diversion of blood flow from working muscles to the gastrointestinal system. In situations where dehydration is likely, drinking to recommended guidelines may protect individuals from dehydration and its negative effects. However, when dehydration is not likely, allowing an individual to follow voluntary drinking behavior is preferable for exercise performance.

  19. Exercise protects against methamphetamine-induced aberrant neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Minseon; Levine, Harry; Toborek, Michal

    2016-01-01

    While no effective therapy is available for the treatment of methamphetamine (METH)-induced neurotoxicity, aerobic exercise is being proposed to improve depressive symptoms and substance abuse outcomes. The present study focuses on the effect of exercise on METH-induced aberrant neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus in the context of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) pathology. Mice were administered with METH or saline by i.p. injections for 5 days with an escalating dose regimen. One set of mice was sacrificed 24 h post last injection of METH, and the remaining animals were either subjected to voluntary wheel running (exercised mice) or remained in sedentary housing (sedentary mice). METH administration decreased expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins and increased BBB permeability in the hippocampus. These changes were preserved post METH administration in sedentary mice and were associated with the development of significant aberrations of neural differentiation. Exercise protected against these effects by enhancing the protein expression of TJ proteins, stabilizing the BBB integrity, and enhancing the neural differentiation. In addition, exercise protected against METH-induced systemic increase in inflammatory cytokine levels. These results suggest that exercise can attenuate METH-induced neurotoxicity by protecting against the BBB disruption and related microenvironmental changes in the hippocampus. PMID:27677455

  20. Tendon vibration attenuates superficial venous vessel response of the resting limb during static arm exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ooue Anna

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The superficial vein of the resting limb constricts sympathetically during exercise. Central command is the one of the neural mechanisms that controls the cardiovascular response to exercise. However, it is not clear whether central command contributes to venous vessel response during exercise. Tendon vibration during static elbow flexion causes primary muscle spindle afferents, such that a lower central command is required to achieve a given force without altering muscle force. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate whether a reduction in central command during static exercise with tendon vibration influences the superficial venous vessel response in the resting limb. Methods Eleven subjects performed static elbow flexion at 35% of maximal voluntary contraction with (EX + VIB and without (EX vibration of the biceps brachii tendon. The heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE in overall and exercising muscle were measured. The cross-sectional area (CSAvein and blood velocity of the basilic vein in the resting upper arm were assessed by ultrasound, and blood flow (BFvein was calculated using both variables. Results Muscle tension during exercise was similar between EX and EX + VIB. However, RPEs at EX + VIB were lower than those at EX (P P vein in the resting limb at EX decreased during exercise from baseline (P vein at EX + VIB did not change during exercise. CSAvein during exercise at EX was smaller than that at EX + VIB (P vein did not change during the protocol under either condition. The decreases in circulatory response and RPEs during EX + VIB, despite identical muscle tension, showed that activation of central command was less during EX + VIB than during EX. Abolishment of the decrease in CSAvein during exercise at EX + VIB may thus have been caused by a lower level of central command at EX + VIB rather than EX. Conclusion Diminished central command induced by tendon

  1. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise Health Benefits One of the Healthiest Things You ... activity campaign from the National Institute on Aging. Exercise or Physical Activity? Some people may wonder what ...

  2. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... please turn Javascript on. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise Health Benefits One of the Healthiest Things You Can ... yourself. Studies have shown that exercise provides many health benefits and that older adults can gain a ...

  3. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A-Z > Exercise: Benefits of Exercise: Health Benefits In This Topic Health Benefits Benefits for Everyday Life ... Try Exercise: How to Stay Active The information in this topic was provided by the National Institute ...

  4. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exercise can improve or maintain some aspects of cognitive function, such as your ability to shift quickly ... activity, and ignore irrelevant information. For more on cognitive function and exercise, see "Do Exercise and Physical ...

  5. Voluntary euthanasia: a utilitarian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Peter

    2003-10-01

    Belgium legalised voluntary euthanasia in 2002, thus ending the long isolation of the Netherlands as the only country in which doctors could openly give lethal injections to patients who have requested help in dying. Meanwhile in Oregon, in the United States, doctors may prescribe drugs for terminally ill patients, who can use them to end their life--if they are able to swallow and digest them. But despite President Bush's oft-repeated statements that his philosophy is to 'trust individuals to make the right decisions' and his opposition to 'distant bureaucracies', his administration is doing its best to prevent Oregonians acting in accordance with a law that its voters have twice ratified. The situation regarding voluntary euthanasia around the world is therefore very much in flux. This essay reviews ethical arguments regarding voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide from a utilitarian perspective. I shall begin by asking why it is normally wrong to kill an innocent person, and whether these reasons apply to aiding a person who, when rational and competent, asks to be killed or given the means to commit suicide. Then I shall consider more specific utilitarian arguments for and against permitting voluntary euthanasia.

  6. Social Cohesion and Voluntary Associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuser, Brian L.

    2005-01-01

    Voluntary organizations exert great influence over how social norms and ethical codes are guided into action. As such, they have a significant impact on societal levels of social cohesion. Although social capital involves generalized trust becoming manifest as spontaneous sociability, social cohesion is determined by how that sociability is…

  7. Voluntary Incentive Early Retirement Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Dialogues, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Arrangements in educational institutions for voluntary early retirement programs are discussed. Retirement at any age can be a profound and stressful lifetime change; and it can also represent a welcome transition into newly satisfying and rewarding opportunities. The focus is on: mandatory retirement (exceptions and the new meaning of "early");…

  8. Voluntary disclosure: Evidence from UK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.S. Zourarakis (Nicolaos)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThis paper investigates the voluntary disclosure of Intellectual Capital (IC) of British firms and provides some evidence on an unexplored area of the literature; that of the association of Corporate Governance (CG) with IC disclosure. Inconsistent with expectations, the results show tha

  9. WATER TEMPERATURE, VOLUNTARY DRINKING AND FLUID BALANCE IN DEHYDRATED TAEKWONDO ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Khamnei

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Voluntary drinking is one of the major determiners of rehydration, especially as regards exercise or workout in the heat. The present study undertakes to search for the effect of voluntary intake of water with different temperatures on fluid balance in Taekwondo athletes. Six young healthy male Taekwondo athletes were dehydrated by moderate exercise in a chamber with ambient temperature at 38-40°C and relative humidity between 20-30%. On four separate days they were allowed to drink ad libitum plane water with the four temperatures of 5, 16, 26, and 58°C, after dehydration. The volume of voluntary drinking and weight change was measured; then the primary percentage of dehydration, sweat loss, fluid deficit and involuntary dehydration were calculated. Voluntary drinking of water proved to be statistically different in the presented temperatures. Water at 16°C involved the greatest intake, while fluid deficit and involuntary dehydration were the lowest. Intake of water in the 5°C trial significantly correlated with the subject's plasma osmolality change after dehydration, yet it showed no significant correlation with weight loss. In conclusion, by way of achieving more voluntary intake of water and better fluid state, recommending cool water (~16°C for athletes is in order. Unlike the publicly held view, drinking cold water (~5°C does not improve voluntary drinking and hydration status.

  10. Prenatal exercise research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany

    2012-06-01

    In this review of recent research on prenatal exercise, studies from several different countries suggest that only approximately 40% of pregnant women exercise, even though about 92% are encouraged by their physicians to exercise, albeit with some 69% of the women being advised to limit their exercise. A moderate exercise regime reputedly increases infant birthweight to within the normal range, but only if exercise is decreased in late pregnancy. Lower intensity exercise such as water aerobics has decreased low back pain more than land-based physical exercise. Heart rate and blood pressure have been lower following yoga than walking, and complications like pregnancy-induced hypertension with associated intrauterine growth retardation and prematurity have been less frequent following yoga. No studies could be found on tai chi with pregnant women even though balance and the risk of falling are great concerns during pregnancy, and tai chi is one of the most effective forms of exercise for balance. Potential underlying mechanisms for exercise effects are that stimulating pressure receptors during exercise increases vagal activity which, in turn, decreases cortisol, increases serotonin and decreases substance P, leading to decreased pain. Decreased cortisol is particularly important inasmuch as cortisol negatively affects immune function and is a significant predictor of prematurity. Larger, more controlled trials are needed before recommendations can be made about the type and amount of pregnancy exercise.

  11. Serious gaming and voluntary laparoscopic skills training: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdaasdonk, E G G; Dankelman, J; Schijven, M P; Lange, J F; Wentink, M; Stassen, L P S

    2009-01-01

    This study assesses the issue of voluntary training of a standardized online competition (serious gaming) between surgical residents. Surgical residents were invited to join a competition on a virtual reality (VR) simulator for laparoscopic motor skills. A final score was calculated based on the task performance of three exercises and was presented to all the participants through an online database on the Internet. The resident with the best score would win a lap-top computer. During three months, 31 individuals from seven hospitals participated (22 surgical residents, 3 surgeons and six interns). A total of 777 scores were logged in the database. In order to out-perform others some participants scheduled themselves voluntarily for additional training. More attempts correlated with higher scores. The serious gaming concept may enhance voluntary skills training. Online data capturing could facilitate monitoring of skills progression in surgical trainees and enhance (VR) simulator validation.

  12. Changes in the number of circulating CD34+cells after eccentric exercise of the elbow flexors in relation to muscle damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ho Seong Lee; Makii Muthalib; Takayuki Akimoto; Kazunori Nosaka

    2015-01-01

    Background:It has been reported that strenuous exercise increases the number of bone marrow-derived progenitor cells such as CD34+cells in the blood, but no previous studies have investigated the changes in circulating CD34+cells following resistance exercise. This study tested the hypothesis that the number of CD34+cells in the blood would increase after eccentric exercise of the elbow flexors, but decrease in recovery, and the magnitude of the changes would be dependent on the magnitude of muscle damage. Methods:Nine men (28.0 ± 6.6 years) performed exercises consisting of 10 sets of six maximal voluntary eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors with their non-dominant arm. Six of them performed the same exercise with the same arm 4 weeks later. Changes in indirect markers of muscle damage were measured before, within 10 min after, and at 24, 48, 72, and 96 h after eccentric exercise. Differential leukocyte counts (total leukocytes, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes) and CD34+cells in the blood were measured before, immediately after, and at 2, 24, 48, 72, and 96 h following the exercises. Results:After eccentric exercise, significant ( p<0.05) decreases in maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque and increases in delayed onset muscle soreness and plasma creatine kinase activity were observed. However, no significant changes in leukocytes and CD34+cells were evident. The changes in muscle damage markers were significantly ( p<0.05) smaller following the second exercise session as compared with the first exercise session, but the changes in leukocytes and CD34+cells were not significantly different between sessions. Conclusion:These results did not support the hypothesis, and showed that eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage to the elbow flexors did not influence the number of circulating CD34+cells.

  13. Strength training prior to endurance exercise: impact on the neuromuscular system, endurance performance and cardiorespiratory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceição, Matheus; Cadore, Eduardo Lusa; González-Izal, Miriam; Izquierdo, Mikel; Liedtke, Giane Veiga; Wilhelm, Eurico Nestor; Pinto, Ronei Silveira; Goltz, Fernanda Reistenbach; Schneider, Cláudia Dornelles; Ferrari, Rodrigo; Bottaro, Martim; Kruel, Luiz Fernando Martins

    2014-12-09

    This study aimed to investigate the acute effects of two strength-training protocols on the neuromuscular and cardiorespiratory responses during endurance exercise. Thirteen young males (23.2 ± 1.6 years old) participated in this study. The hypertrophic strength-training protocol was composed of 6 sets of 8 squats at 75% of maximal dynamic strength. The plyometric strength-training protocol was composed of 6 sets of 8 jumps performed with the body weight as the workload. Endurance exercise was performed on a cycle ergometer at a power corresponding to the second ventilatory threshold until exhaustion. Before and after each protocol, a maximal voluntary contraction was performed, and the rate of force development and electromyographic parameters were assessed. After the hypertrophic strength-training and plyometric strength-training protocol, significant decreases were observed in the maximal voluntary contraction and rate of force development, whereas no changes were observed in the electromyographic parameters. Oxygen uptake and a heart rate during endurance exercise were not significantly different among the protocols. However, the time-to-exhaustion was significantly higher during endurance exercise alone than when performed after hypertrophic strength-training or plyometric strength-training (p strength-training, with no oxygen uptake or heart rate changes during the exercise.

  14. Strength Training Prior to Endurance Exercise: Impact on the Neuromuscular System, Endurance Performance and Cardiorespiratory Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conceição Matheus

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the acute effects of two strength-training protocols on the neuromuscular and cardiorespiratory responses during endurance exercise. Thirteen young males (23.2 ± 1.6 years old participated in this study. The hypertrophic strength-training protocol was composed of 6 sets of 8 squats at 75% of maximal dynamic strength. The plyometric strength-training protocol was composed of 6 sets of 8 jumps performed with the body weight as the workload. Endurance exercise was performed on a cycle ergometer at a power corresponding to the second ventilatory threshold until exhaustion. Before and after each protocol, a maximal voluntary contraction was performed, and the rate of force development and electromyographic parameters were assessed. After the hypertrophic strengthtraining and plyometric strength-training protocol, significant decreases were observed in the maximal voluntary contraction and rate of force development, whereas no changes were observed in the electromyographic parameters. Oxygen uptake and a heart rate during endurance exercise were not significantly different among the protocols. However, the time-to-exhaustion was significantly higher during endurance exercise alone than when performed after hypertrophic strength-training or plyometric strength-training (p <0.05. These results suggest that endurance performance may be impaired when preceded by strength-training, with no oxygen uptake or heart rate changes during the exercise.

  15. Disturbance of contralateral unipedal postural control after stimulated and voluntary contractions of the ipsilateral limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillard, Thierry; Chaubet, Vincent; Maitre, Julien; Dumitrescu, Michel; Borel, Liliane

    2010-12-01

    One session of sustained unilateral voluntary muscular contractions increases central fatigue and induces a cross-over of fatigue of homologous contralateral muscles. It is not known, however, how this cross-transfer affects contralateral unipedal postural control. Moreover, contralateral neurophysiological effects differ between voluntary muscular contractions and electrically stimulated contractions. The aims of this study were thus to examine the effects of muscle fatigue on contralateral unipedal postural control and to compare the effects of stimulated and voluntary contractions. Fifteen subjects took part in the protocol. Fatigue of the ipsilateral quadriceps femoris was generated either by neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) or by isometric voluntary muscular contraction (VOL). Postural control on the contralateral limb was measured before (PRE condition) and after the completion of the two fatiguing exercises (POST condition) using a force platform. We analyzed body sway area and the spectral power density given by the wavelet transform. In POST condition, postural control recorded in the unipedal stance on the contralateral limb was disturbed after NMES and VOL fatiguing exercises. In addition, postural control was similarly disturbed for both exercises. These results suggest that cross-over fatigue is able to disturb postural control after both stimulated and voluntary contractions.

  16. Voluntary sterilization in Serbia: Unmet need?

    OpenAIRE

    Rašević Mirjana M.

    2002-01-01

    Is voluntary sterilization as a birth control method accepted in Serbia? This is certainly a question that is being imposed for research, regardless of the fact that voluntary sterilization is neither accessible nor promoted. Most importantly because there is no understanding in the social nor political sphere for legalization of voluntary sterilization as a form of birth control, apart from the clear necessity for this, first, step. They are: the recognition that voluntary sterilization is a...

  17. Voluntary muscle activation improves with power training and is associated with changes in gait speed in mobility-limited older adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Lars G; Strotmeyer, Elsa S; Skjødt, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Incomplete voluntary muscle activation may contribute to impaired muscle mechanical function and physical function in older adults. Exercise interventions have been shown to increase voluntary muscle activation, although the evidence is sparse for mobility-limited older adults, particularly in as...

  18. Exercise Training but not Curcumin Supplementation Decreases Immune Cell Infiltration in the Pancreatic Islets of a Genetically Susceptible Model of Type 1 Diabetes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Oharomari, Leandro Kansuke; de Moraes, Camila; Navarro, Anderson Marliere

    2017-01-01

    .... Therefore, anti-inflammatory factors, such as the intake of bioactive compounds and a physically active lifestyle, may decrease or cease the development of autoimmune diseases. Type 1 diabetes (T1D...

  19. 22 CFR 513.210 - Voluntary exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Voluntary exclusion. 513.210 Section 513.210... GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Effect of Action § 513.210 Voluntary exclusion. Persons who accept voluntary exclusions under § 513.315 are excluded in accordance with the terms of...

  20. Voluntary activation of human knee extensors measured using transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodall, S; Romer, L M; Ross, E Z

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the applicability and reliability of a transcranial magnetic stimulation twitch interpolation technique for measuring voluntary activation of a lower limb muscle group. Cortical voluntary activation of the knee extensors was determined in nine healthy men on two separate visits by measuring superimposed twitch torques evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation during isometric knee extensions of varying intensity. Superimposed twitch amplitude decreased linearly with increasing voluntary torque between 50 and 100% of mean maximal torque, allowing estimation of resting twitch amplitude and subsequent calculation of voluntary activation. There were no systematic differences for maximal voluntary activation within day (mean +/- s.d. 90.9 +/- 6.2 versus 90.7 +/- 5.9%; P = 0.98) or between days (90.8 +/- 6.0 versus 91.2 +/- 5.7%; P = 0.92). Systematic bias and random error components of the 95% limits of agreement were 0.23 and 9.3% within day versus 0.38 and 7.5% between days. Voluntary activation was also determined immediately after a 2 min maximal voluntary isometric contraction; in four of these subjects, voluntary activation was determined 30 min after the sustained contraction. Immediately after the sustained isometric contraction, maximal voluntary activation was reduced from 91.2 +/- 5.7 to 74.2 +/- 12.0% (P knee extensors.

  1. Real-time changes in corticospinal excitability during voluntary contraction with concurrent electrical stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomofumi Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available While previous studies have assessed changes in corticospinal excitability following voluntary contraction coupled with electrical stimulation (ES, we sought to examine, for the first time in the field, real-time changes in corticospinal excitability. We monitored motor evoked potentials (MEPs elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation and recorded the MEPs using a mechanomyogram, which is less susceptible to electrical artifacts. We assessed the MEPs at each level of muscle contraction of wrist flexion (0%, 5%, or 20% of maximum voluntary contraction during voluntary wrist flexion (flexor carpi radialis (FCR voluntary contraction, either with or without simultaneous low-frequency (10 Hz ES of the median nerve that innervates the FCR. The stimulus intensity corresponded to 1.2 × perception threshold. In the FCR, voluntary contraction with median nerve stimulation significantly increased corticospinal excitability compared with FCR voluntary contraction without median nerve stimulation (p<0.01. In addition, corticospinal excitability was significantly modulated by the level of FCR voluntary contraction. In contrast, in the extensor carpi radialis (ECR, FCR voluntary contraction with median nerve stimulation significantly decreased corticospinal excitability compared with FCR voluntary contraction without median nerve stimulation (p<0.05. Thus, median nerve stimulation during FCR voluntary contraction induces reciprocal changes in cortical excitability in agonist and antagonist muscles. Finally we also showed that even mental imagery of FCR voluntary contraction with median nerve stimulation induced the same reciprocal changes in cortical excitability in agonist and antagonist muscles. Our results support the use of voluntary contraction coupled with ES in neurorehabilitation therapy for patients.

  2. Voluntary Running Aids to Maintain High Body Temperature in Rats Bred for High Aerobic Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sira Maria Karvinen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The production of heat , i.e. thermogenesis, is a significant component of the metabolic rate, which in turn affects weight gain and health. Thermogenesis is linked to physical activity (PA level. However, it is not known whether intrinsic exercise capacity, aging, and long-term voluntary running affect body temperature. Here we use rat models that differ for maximal running capacity (Low capacity runners, LCR and High capacity Runners, HCR to study the connection between PA and body temperature. Ten HCR and ten LCR female rats were studied between 9 and 21 months of age. Rectal temperature of HCR and LCR rats was measured before and after one year voluntary running/control intervention to explore the effects of aging and PA. Also, we determined whether injected glucose and spontaneous activity affect the body temperature differently between LCR and HCR rats at 9 vs 21 months of age. HCRs had on average 1.3C higher body temperature than LCRs (p < 0.001. Aging decreased the body temperature level of HCRs to similar levels with LCRs. The opportunity to run voluntarily had a marked impact on the body temperature of HCRs (p < 0.001 allowing them to maintain body temperature at a similar level as when at younger age. Compared to LCRs, HCRs were spontaneously more active, had higher relative gastrocnemius muscle mass and higher UCP2, PGC-1α, cyt c and OXPHOS contents in the skeletal muscle (p < 0.050. These results suggest that higher PA level together with greater relative muscle mass and higher mitochondrial content/function contribute to the accumulation of heat in the HCRs. Interestingly, neither aging nor voluntary training had a significant impact on core body temperature of LCRs. However, glucose injection resulted in a lowering of the body temperature of LCRs (p < 0.050, but not that of HCRs. In conclusion, rats born with high intrinsic aerobic capacity and better health have higher body temperature compared to rats born with low aerobic

  3. The Effect of Voluntary Ventilation on Acid-base Responses to a Moo Duk Tkow Form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzler, Ronald K.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Results are reported from a study that investigated the acid-base and lactate reponses to voluntary integration of breathing and exercise movements during beginning level form Ki Cho I, performed at competitive intensities. Findings suggest that respiratory compensation does not occur and that respiratory acidosis may contribute to metabolic…

  4. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... show that people with arthritis, heart disease, or diabetes benefit from regular exercise. Exercise also helps people ... or difficulty walking. To learn about exercise and diabetes, see "Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes" from Go4Life®, ...

  5. International Voluntary Renewable Energy Markets (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, J.

    2012-06-01

    This presentation provides an overview of international voluntary renewable energy markets, with a focus on the United States and Europe. The voluntary renewable energy market is the market in which consumers and institutions purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs on a voluntary basis. In 2010, the U.S. voluntary market was estimated at 35 terawatt-hours (TWh) compared to 300 TWh in the European market, though key differences exist. On a customer basis, Australia has historically had the largest number of customers, pricing for voluntary certificates remains low, at less than $1 megawatt-hour, though prices depend on technology.

  6. Exploring the Mechanisms of Exercise-Induced Hypoalgesia Using Laser Evoked Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew David Jones

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Exercise-induced hypoalgesia is well described, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of exercise on somatosensory evoked potentials, laser evoked potentials, pressure pain thresholds and heat pain thresholds. These were recorded before and after 3-min of isometric elbow flexion exercise at 40% of the participant’s maximal voluntary force, or an equivalent period of rest. Exercise-induced hypoalgesia was confirmed in two experiments (Experiment 1 – SEPs; Experiment 2 – LEPs by increased pressure pain thresholds at biceps brachii (24.3% and 20.6% increase in Experiment 1 and 2, respectively; both d > 0.84 and p 0.57 and p < 0.001. In contrast, heat pain thresholds were not significantly different after exercise (forearm: 10.8% increase, d = 0.35, p = 0.10; hand: 3.6% increase, d = 0.06, p = 0.74. Contrasting effects of exercise on the amplitude of laser evoked potentials (14.6% decrease, d = -0.42, p = 0.004 and somatosensory evoked potentials (10.9% increase, d = -0.02, p = 1.72 were also observed, while an equivalent period of rest showed similar habituation (laser evoked potential: 7.3% decrease, d = -0.25, p = 0.14; somatosensory evoked potential: 20.7% decrease, d = -0.32, p = 0.006. The differential response of pressure pain thresholds and heat pain thresholds to exercise is consistent with relative insensitivity of thermal nociception to the acute hypoalgesic effects of exercise. Conflicting effects of exercise on somatosensory evoked potentials and laser evoked potentials were observed. This may reflect non-nociceptive contributions to the somatosensory evoked potential, but could also indicate that peripheral nociceptors contribute to exercise-induced hypoalgesia.

  7. A COMPARISON OF TOPICAL MENTHOL TO ICE ON PAIN, EVOKED TETANIC AND VOLUNTARY FORCE DURING DELAYED ONSET MUSCLE SORENESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johar, Pramod; Grover, Varun; Topp, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Background: Pain can adversely affect muscle functioning by inhibiting muscle contractions. Delayed onset muscle soreness was used as a tool to ascertain whether a topical menthol-based analgesic or ice was more effective at reducing pain and permitting greater muscular voluntary and evoked force. Methods: Sixteen subjects were randomized to receive either a topical gel containing 3.5% menthol or topical application of ice to the non-dominant elbow flexors two days following the performance of an exercise designed to induce muscle soreness. Two days later, DOMS discomfort was treated with a menthol based analgesic or ice. Maximum voluntary contractions and evoked tetanic contractions of the non-dominant elbow flexors were measured at baseline prior to inducing muscle soreness (T1), two days following inducing DOMS after 20 (T2), 25 (T3) and 35 (T4) minutes of either menthol gel or ice therapy. Pain perception using a 10-point visual analog scale was also measured at these four data collection points. Treatment analysis included a 2 way repeated measures ANOVA (2 × 4). Results: Delayed onset muscle soreness decreased (p = 0.04) voluntary force 17.1% at T2 with no treatment effect. Tetanic force was 116.9% higher (p<0.05) with the topical analgesic than ice. Pain perception at T2 was significantly (p=0.02) less with the topical analgesic versus ice. Conclusions: Compared to ice, the topical menthol-based analgesic decreased perceived discomfort to a greater extent and permitted greater tetanic forces to be produced. Level of Evidence: Level 2b PMID:22666646

  8. A Reduction in Maximal Incremental Exercise Test Duration 48 h Post Downhill Run Is Associated with Muscle Damage Derived Exercise Induced Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrismas, Bryna C. R.; Taylor, Lee; Siegler, Jason C.; Midgley, Adrian W.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To examine whether exercise induced muscle damage (EIMD) and muscle soreness reduce treadmill maximal incremental exercise (MIE) test duration, and true maximal physiological performance as a consequence of exercise induced pain (EIP) and perceived effort. Methods: Fifty (14 female), apparently healthy participants randomly allocated into a control group (CON, n = 10), or experimental group (EXP, n = 40) visited the laboratory a total of six times: visit 1 (familiarization), visit 2 (pre 1), visit 3 (pre 2), visit 4 (intervention), visit 5 (24 h post) and visit 6 (48 h post). Both groups performed identical testing during all visits, except during visit 4, where only EXP performed a 30 min downhill run and CON performed no exercise. During visits 2, 3, and 6 all participants performed MIE, and the following measurements were obtained: time to exhaustion (TTE), EIP, maximal oxygen consumption (V·O2max), rate of perceived exertion (RPE), maximum heart rate (HRmax), maximum blood lactate (BLamax), and the contribution of pain to terminating the MIE (assessed using a questionnaire). Additionally during visits 1, 2, 3, 5, and 6 the following markers of EIMD were obtained: muscle soreness, maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), voluntary activation (VA), creatine kinase (CK). Results: There were no significant differences (p ≥ 0.32) between any trials for any of the measures obtained during MIE for CON. In EXP, TTE decreased by 34 s (3%), from pre 2 to 48 h post (p MVC, and VA. The exact mechanisms responsible for this require further investigation. PMID:28337151

  9. AMPKα in Exercise-Induced Substrate Metabolism and Exercise Training-Induced Metabolic and Mitochondrial Adaptations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fentz, Joachim

    in response to 4 weeks of voluntary running wheel exercise training. However, the acute exercise-induced increase in mRNA expression of several metabolic and mitochondrial marker genes is impaired in the mice lacking AMPKα1 and α2. In addition to the two studies and some currently unpublished data this thesis...

  10. Effect of eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage on electromyographyic activity of quadriceps in untrained healthy females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Mandana; Ebrahimi-Takamjani, Ismael; Jamshidi, Ali A; Vassaghi-Gharamaleki, Behnoush; Hedayatpour, Nosratollah; Havaei, Naser

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate muscle damage indicators and electromyography activities of quadriceps muscles at 25° of hip flexion in untrained healthy females after an eccentric exercise induced muscle fiber damage. A total of 14 healthy females participated in this pre-experimental study. The subjects performed maximal eccentric quadriceps contractions at 25˚ of hip flexion. Maximum voluntary extensor isometric and concentric moments, angle of maximum moment for concentric contractions, perceived pain intensity, and pain pressure threshold were examined before, immediately, 48 hours, 120 hours and 14 days after eccentric exercise. Additionally, electromyography of three parts of quadriceps muscle, knee flexion range of motion and thigh circumference were measured before and after eccentric exercise. Significant reductions in maximum isometric moment and maximum concentric moment were observed at angular velocity of 60˚ per sec immediately after eccentric exercise (peccentric exercise. Increased pain intensity and decreased knee joint range of motion manifested 48 hours after eccentric exercise. Pain pressure threshold for the quadriceps was higher 14 days after exercise as compared to 48 and 120 hours (p0.05). Eccentric exercise performed at 25˚ of hip flexion resulted in muscle fiber injuries within the quadriceps muscle. However, electromyography of quadriceps muscle was not significantly different than the baseline. The result indicates that hip joint position may modify the effect of eccentric exercise on muscle activation.

  11. Reduced muscle activation during exercise related to brain oxygenation and metabolism in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, P; Nielsen, J; Overgaard, M

    2010-01-01

    to the ability to generate a maximal voluntary contraction and to the transcranial magnetic stimulated force generation. To determine the role of a reduced OCI and in central fatigue, 16 males performed low intensity, maximal intensity and hypoxic cycling exercise. Exercise fatigue was evaluated by ratings...... of perceived exertion (RPE), arm maximal voluntary force (MVC), and voluntary activation of elbow flexor muscles assessed with transcranial magnetic stimulation. Low intensity exercise did not produce any indication of central fatigue or marked cerebral metabolic deviations. Exercise in hypoxia (0.10) reduced...

  12. Exercise performance and peripheral vascular insufficiency improve with AMPK activation in high-fat diet-fed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltgalvis, Kristen A; White, Kathy; Li, Wei; Claypool, Mark D; Lang, Wayne; Alcantara, Raniel; Singh, Baljit K; Friera, Annabelle M; McLaughlin, John; Hansen, Derek; McCaughey, Kelly; Nguyen, Henry; Smith, Ira J; Godinez, Guillermo; Shaw, Simon J; Goff, Dane; Singh, Rajinder; Markovtsov, Vadim; Sun, Tian-Qiang; Jenkins, Yonchu; Uy, Gerald; Li, Yingwu; Pan, Alison; Gururaja, Tarikere; Lau, David; Park, Gary; Hitoshi, Yasumichi; Payan, Donald G; Kinsella, Todd M

    2014-04-15

    Intermittent claudication is a form of exercise intolerance characterized by muscle pain during walking in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Endothelial cell and muscle dysfunction are thought to be important contributors to the etiology of this disease, but a lack of preclinical models that incorporate these elements and measure exercise performance as a primary end point has slowed progress in finding new treatment options for these patients. We sought to develop an animal model of peripheral vascular insufficiency in which microvascular dysfunction and exercise intolerance were defining features. We further set out to determine if pharmacological activation of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) might counteract any of these functional deficits. Mice aged on a high-fat diet demonstrate many functional and molecular characteristics of PAD, including the sequential development of peripheral vascular insufficiency, increased muscle fatigability, and progressive exercise intolerance. These changes occur gradually and are associated with alterations in nitric oxide bioavailability. Treatment of animals with an AMPK activator, R118, increased voluntary wheel running activity, decreased muscle fatigability, and prevented the progressive decrease in treadmill exercise capacity. These functional performance benefits were accompanied by improved mitochondrial function, the normalization of perfusion in exercising muscle, increased nitric oxide bioavailability, and decreased circulating levels of the endogenous endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine. These data suggest that aged, obese mice represent a novel model for studying exercise intolerance associated with peripheral vascular insufficiency, and pharmacological activation of AMPK may be a suitable treatment for intermittent claudication associated with PAD.

  13. Monitoring markers of muscle damage during a 3 week periodized drop-jump exercise programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamandulis, Sigitas; Skurvydas, Albertas; Snieckus, Audrius;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine changes in indirect markers of muscle damage during 3 weeks of stretch-shortening exercise with a progressively increasing load and continued modulation of various key training variables. Eight healthy untrained men performed a drop-jump programme involving a ......-stimulation-evoked torque decreased acutely after each training session relative to pre-exercise values (P ......The aim of this study was to examine changes in indirect markers of muscle damage during 3 weeks of stretch-shortening exercise with a progressively increasing load and continued modulation of various key training variables. Eight healthy untrained men performed a drop-jump programme involving...... a progressive increase in load impact with respect to the number of jumps performed, drop (platform) height, squat depth amplitude, and addition of weights. Maximal concentric and isometric knee extensor strength were assessed immediately before and 10 min after each training session. Voluntary and 100 Hz...

  14. Assessment of Muscle Pain Induced by Elbow-Flexor Eccentric Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Wing Yin; Blazevich, Anthony J; Newton, Michael J; Wu, Sam Shi Xuan; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2015-11-01

    Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a common muscle pain that many people experience and is often used as a model of acute muscle pain. Researchers have reported the effects of various interventions on DOMS, but different DOMS assessment protocols used in these studies make it difficult to compare the effects. To investigate DOMS characteristics after elbow-flexor eccentric exercise to establish a standardized DOMS assessment protocol. Descriptive laboratory study. Research laboratory. Ten healthy, untrained men (21-39 years). Participants performed 10 sets of 6 maximal isokinetic eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors. Indirect muscle-damage markers were maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque, range of motion, and serum creatine kinase activity. Muscle pain was assessed before exercise, immediately postexercise, and 1 to 5 days postexercise using (1) a visual analog scale (VAS), (2) a category ratio-10 scale (CR-10) when applying static pressure and palpation at different sites (3, 9, and 15 cm above the elbow crease), and (3) pressure-pain thresholds (PPTs) at 50 sites (pain mapping). Maximal voluntary isometric contraction and range of motion decreased and creatine kinase activity increased postexercise, indicating muscle damage. Palpation induced greater pain than static pressure, and longitudinal and transverse palpations induced greater pain than circular palpation (P exercise, but the pain-sensitive regions shifted to the central and distal regions of the biceps brachii at 1 to 3 days postexercise (P eccentric exercise.

  15. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Exercise: Benefits of Exercise Health Benefits One of the Healthiest Things You Can Do Like most people, ... active on a regular basis is one of the healthiest things you can do for yourself. Studies ...

  16. Middle cerebral artery diameter changes during rhythmic handgrip exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbree, J; Bronzwaer, Agt; van Buchem, M A; Daemen, Mjap; van Lieshout, J J; van Osch, Mjp

    2017-08-01

    Transcranial Doppler (TCD) sonography is a frequently employed technique for quantifying cerebral blood flow by assuming a constant arterial diameter. Given that exercise increases arterial pressure by sympathetic activation, we hypothesized that exercise might induce a change in the diameter of large cerebral arteries. Middle cerebral artery (MCA) cross-sectional area was assessed in response to handgrip exercise by direct magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) observations. Twenty healthy subjects (11 female) performed three 5 min bouts of rhythmic handgrip exercise at 60% maximum voluntary contraction, alternated with 5 min of rest. High-resolution 7 T MRI scans were acquired perpendicular to the MCA. Two blinded observers manually determined the MCA cross-sectional area. Sufficient image quality was obtained in 101 MCA-scans of 19 subjects (age-range 20-59 years). Mixed effects modelling showed that the MCA cross-sectional area decreased by 2.1 ± 0.8% (p = 0.01) during handgrip, while the heart rate increased by 11 ± 2% (p exercise. This further strengthens the current concept of sympathetic control of large cerebral arteries, showing in vivo vasoconstriction during exercise-induced sympathetic activation. Moreover, care must be taken when interpreting TCD exercise studies as diameter constancy cannot be assumed.

  17. Isometric exercise in the denervated heart: a Doppler echocardiographic study.

    OpenAIRE

    Robson, S C; Furniss, S.S.; Heads, A; Boys, R J; McGregor, C.; Bexton, R S

    1989-01-01

    The haemodynamic responses to isometric exercise of eight recipients of orthotopic heart transplants and eight healthy controls were studied. Each performed sustained exercise at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction for three minutes on a handgrip dynamometer. Cardiac output was measured by combined Doppler and cross sectional echocardiography before exercise and every 30 seconds during and after exercise. In the controls cardiac output and blood pressure increased significantly owing to an i...

  18. Inspiratory muscle training lowers the oxygen cost of voluntary hyperpnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Louise A; Tecklenburg-Lund, Sandra L; Chapman, Robert F; Stager, Joel M; Wilhite, Daniel P; Mickleborough, Timothy D

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if inspiratory muscle training (IMT) alters the oxygen cost of breathing (Vo(2RM)) during voluntary hyperpnea. Sixteen male cyclists completed 6 wk of IMT using an inspiratory load of 50% (IMT) or 15% placebo (CON) of maximal inspiratory pressure (Pi(max)). Prior to training, a maximal incremental cycle ergometer test was performed to determine Vo(2) and ventilation (V(E)) at multiple workloads. Pre- and post-training, subjects performed three separate 4-min bouts of voluntary eucapnic hyperpnea (mimic), matching V(E) that occurred at 50, 75, and 100% of Vo(2 max). Pi(max) was significantly increased (P muscles following a period of IMT may facilitate increased O(2) availability to the active muscles during exercise. These data suggest that IMT may reduce the O(2) cost of ventilation during exercise, providing an insight into mechanism(s) underpinning the reported improvements in whole body endurance performance; however, this awaits further investigation.

  19. Dynamics of corticospinal changes during and after high-intensity quadriceps exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruet, Mathieu; Temesi, John; Rupp, Thomas; Levy, Patrick; Verges, Samuel; Millet, Guillaume Y

    2014-08-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that during fatiguing quadriceps exercise, supraspinal fatigue develops late, is associated with both increased corticospinal excitability and inhibition and recovers quickly. Eight subjects performed 20 s contractions [15 s at 50% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) followed by 5 s MVC] separated by a 10 s rest period until task failure. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electrical femoral nerve stimulation (PNS) were delivered ∼ 2 s apart during 50% MVC, during MVC and after MVC in relaxed muscle. Voluntary activation was assessed by TMS (VATMS) immediately before and after exercise and then three times over a 6 min recovery period. During exercise, MVC and twitch force evoked by PNS in relaxed muscle decreased progressively to 48 ± 8 and 36 ± 16% of control values, respectively (both P MVC were observed during the last quarter of exercise only (from 96.4 ± 1.7 to 86 ± 13%, P = 0.03 and from 0.76 ± 0.8 to 4.9 ± 4.7% MVC, P = 0.02, from baseline to task failure, respectively). The TMS-induced silent period increased linearly during both MVC (by ∼ 79 ms) and 50% MVC (by ∼ 63 ms; both P MVC and twitch force evoked by PNS in relaxed muscle recovered to only 84 ± 9 and 73 ± 17% of control values 6 min after exercise, respectively. In conclusion, high-intensity single-joint quadriceps exercise induces supraspinal fatigue near task failure, with increased intracortical inhibition and, in contrast to previous upper-limb results, unchanged corticospinal excitability. These changes recover rapidly after task failure, emphasizing the need to measure corticospinal adaptations immediately at task failure to avoid underestimation of exercise-induced corticospinal changes.

  20. Combined application of neuromuscular electrical stimulation and voluntary muscular contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillard, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    Electromyostimulation (EMS) and voluntary muscle contraction (VC) constitute different modes of muscle activation and induce different acute physiological effects on the neuromuscular system. Long-term application of each mode of muscle activation can produce different muscle adaptations. It seems theoretically possible to completely or partially cumulate the muscle adaptations induced by each mode of muscle activation applied separately. This work consisted of examining the literature concerning the muscle adaptations induced by long-term application of the combined technique (CT) [i.e. EMS is combined with VC - non-simultaneously] compared with VC and/or EMS alone in healthy subjects and/or athletes and in post-operative knee-injured subjects. In general, CT induced greater muscular adaptations than VC whether in sports training or rehabilitation. This efficiency would be due to the fact that CT can facilitate cumulative effects of training completely or partially induced by VC and EMS practiced alone. CT also provides a greater improvement of the performance of complex dynamic movements than VC. However, EMS cannot improve coordination between different agonistic and antagonistic muscles and thus does not facilitate learning the specific coordination of complex movements. Hence, EMS should be combined with specific sport training to generate neuromuscular adaptations, but also allow the adjustment of motor control during a voluntary movement. Likewise, in a therapeutic context, CT was particularly efficient to accelerate recovery of muscle contractility during a rehabilitation programme. Strength loss and atrophy inherent in a traumatism and/or a surgical operation would be more efficiently compensated with CT than with VC. Furthermore, CT also restored more functional abilities than VC. Finally, in a rehabilitation context, EMS is complementary to voluntary exercise because in the early phase of rehabilitation it elicits a strength increase, which is necessary

  1. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise Health Benefits One of the Healthiest Things You Can Do ... can do for yourself. Studies have shown that exercise provides many health benefits and that older adults can gain a lot ...

  2. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise Health Benefits One of the Healthiest Things You Can Do ... can do for yourself. Studies have shown that exercise provides many health benefits and that older adults can gain a lot ...

  3. DHA dietary supplementation enhances the effects of exercise on synaptic plasticity and cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Aiguo; Ying, Zhe; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (i.e., docosahexaenoic acid; DHA), similar to exercise, improve cognitive function, promote neuroplasticity, and protect against neurological lesion. In this study, we investigated a possible synergistic action between DHA dietary supplementation and voluntary exercise on modulating synaptic plasticity and cognition. Rats received DHA dietary supplementation (1.25% DHA) with or without voluntary exercise for 12 days. We found that the DHA-enriched diet significantly increa...

  4. 78 FR 49382 - Voluntary Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    ... English, reading, writing, speaking, mathematics, and computer skills that are essential to successful job... education advisor: Education Services Specialist, Education Services Officer (ESO), Voluntary...

  5. Human investigations into the exercise pressor reflex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Niels H; Amann, Markus

    2012-01-01

    During exercise, neural input from skeletal muscles reflexly maintains or elevates blood pressure (BP) despite a maybe fivefold increase in vascular conductance. This exercise pressor reflex is illustrated by similar heart rate (HR) and BP responses to electrically induced and voluntary exercise....... The importance of the exercise pressor reflex for tight cardiovascular regulation during dynamic exercise is supported by studies using pharmacological blockade of lower limb muscle afferent nerves. These experiments show attenuation of the increase in BP and cardiac output when exercise is performed...... of an increase in BP during exercise with paralysed legs manifests, although electrical stimulation of muscles enhances lactate release and reduces muscle glycogen. Thus, the exercise pressor reflex enhances sympathetic activity and maintains perfusion pressure by restraining abdominal blood flow, while brain...

  6. Dynamics of Voluntary Cough Maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naire, Shailesh

    2008-11-01

    Voluntary cough maneuvers are characterized by transient peak expiratory flows (PEF) exceeding the maximum expiratory flow-volume (MEFV) curve. In some cases, these flows can be well in excess of the MEFV, generally referred to as supramaximal flows. Understanding the flow-structure interaction involved in these maneuvers is the main goal of this work. We present a simple theoretical model for investigating the dynamics of voluntary cough and forced expiratory maneuvers. The core modeling idea is based on a 1-D model of high Reynolds number flow through flexible-walled tubes. The model incorporates key ingredients involved in these maneuvers: the expiratory effort generated by the abdominal and expiratory muscles, the glottis and the flexibility and compliance of the lung airways. Variations in these allow investigation of the expiratory flows generated by a variety of single cough maneuvers. The model successfully reproduces PEF which is shown to depend on the cough generation protocol, the glottis reopening time and the compliance of the airways. The particular highlight is in simulating supramaximal PEF for very compliant tubes. The flow-structure interaction mechanisms behind these are discussed. The wave speed theory of flow limitation is used to characterize the PEF. Existing hypotheses of the origin of PEF, from cough and forced expiration experiments, are also tested using this model.

  7. Real-time surface electromyography in Parkinson's disease patients during exercise-induced muscle fatigue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Gao; Tong Zhang; Xia Gao

    2011-01-01

    To explore the mechanisms underlying exercise-induced local muscle fatigue in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD), we used surface electromyography to record myoelectric signals from the tibialis anterior muscle during isometric contraction-induced fatigue until exhaustion. The results revealed no significant differences between patients with idiopathic PD and healthy controls in maximum voluntary contraction of the tibialis anterior muscle. The basic characteristics of surface electromyography were also similar between the two groups. The duration of isometric contraction at 50% maximum voluntary contraction was shortened in PD patients. In addition, PD patients exhibited a stronger increase in mean square amplitude, but a weaker decrease in median frequency and mean power frequency compared with healthy controls during isometric contraction. The skeletal muscles of PD patients revealed specificity of surface electromyography findings, indicating increased fatigability compared with healthy controls.

  8. The Effects of Combined Exercise on Health-Related Fitness, Endotoxin, and Immune Function of Postmenopausal Women with Abdominal Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Mo; Kwak, Yi-Sub; Ji, Jin-Goo

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effects of combined exercise on health-related fitness, endotoxin concentrations, and immune functions of postmenopausal women with abdominal obesity. 20 voluntary participants were recruited and they were randomly allocated to the combined exercise group (n = 10) or the control group (n = 10). Visceral obesity was defined as a visceral-to-subcutaneous fat ratio ≥0.4 based on computed tomography (CT) results. Body composition, exercise stress testing, fitness measurement, CT scan, and blood variables were analyzed to elucidate the effects of combined exercise. The SPSS Statistics 18.0 program was used to calculate means and standard deviations for all variables. Significant differences between the exercise group and control group were determined with 2-way ANOVA and paired t-tests. The exercise group's abdominal obesity was mitigated due to visceral fat reduction; grip strength, push-ups, and oxygen uptake per weight improved; and HDL-C and IgA level also increased, while TNF-α, CD14, and endotoxin levels decreased. Lowered TNF-α after exercise might have an important role in the obesity reduction. Therefore, we can conclude that combined exercise is effective in mitigating abdominal obesity, preventing metabolic diseases, and enhancing immune function. PMID:26075288

  9. The Effects of Combined Exercise on Health-Related Fitness, Endotoxin, and Immune Function of Postmenopausal Women with Abdominal Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Mo Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to examine the effects of combined exercise on health-related fitness, endotoxin concentrations, and immune functions of postmenopausal women with abdominal obesity. 20 voluntary participants were recruited and they were randomly allocated to the combined exercise group (n=10 or the control group (n=10. Visceral obesity was defined as a visceral-to-subcutaneous fat ratio ≥0.4 based on computed tomography (CT results. Body composition, exercise stress testing, fitness measurement, CT scan, and blood variables were analyzed to elucidate the effects of combined exercise. The SPSS Statistics 18.0 program was used to calculate means and standard deviations for all variables. Significant differences between the exercise group and control group were determined with 2-way ANOVA and paired t-tests. The exercise group’s abdominal obesity was mitigated due to visceral fat reduction; grip strength, push-ups, and oxygen uptake per weight improved; and HDL-C and IgA level also increased, while TNF-α, CD14, and endotoxin levels decreased. Lowered TNF-α after exercise might have an important role in the obesity reduction. Therefore, we can conclude that combined exercise is effective in mitigating abdominal obesity, preventing metabolic diseases, and enhancing immune function.

  10. The Effects of Combined Exercise on Health-Related Fitness, Endotoxin, and Immune Function of Postmenopausal Women with Abdominal Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Mo; Kwak, Yi-Sub; Ji, Jin-Goo

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effects of combined exercise on health-related fitness, endotoxin concentrations, and immune functions of postmenopausal women with abdominal obesity. 20 voluntary participants were recruited and they were randomly allocated to the combined exercise group (n = 10) or the control group (n = 10). Visceral obesity was defined as a visceral-to-subcutaneous fat ratio ≥ 0.4 based on computed tomography (CT) results. Body composition, exercise stress testing, fitness measurement, CT scan, and blood variables were analyzed to elucidate the effects of combined exercise. The SPSS Statistics 18.0 program was used to calculate means and standard deviations for all variables. Significant differences between the exercise group and control group were determined with 2-way ANOVA and paired t-tests. The exercise group's abdominal obesity was mitigated due to visceral fat reduction; grip strength, push-ups, and oxygen uptake per weight improved; and HDL-C and IgA level also increased, while TNF-α, CD14, and endotoxin levels decreased. Lowered TNF-α after exercise might have an important role in the obesity reduction. Therefore, we can conclude that combined exercise is effective in mitigating abdominal obesity, preventing metabolic diseases, and enhancing immune function.

  11. Níveis distintos de Hsp72 no miocárdio de ratas em resposta aos exercícios voluntário e forçado Niveles distintos de Hsp72 en el miocardio de ratas en respuesta a los ejercicios voluntario y forzado Different levels of Hsp72 in female rat myocardium in response to voluntary exercise and forced exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphano Freitas Soares Melo

    2009-11-01

    los grupos ECV, ECF y C (4,54 ± 0,79 mg/g vs. 4,94 ± 0,89 mg/g vs. 4,34 ± 0,87 mg/g, respectivamente. Las ratas entrenadas con carrera presentaron niveles de Hsp72 mayores (pBACKGROUND: Physical exercise induces hemodynamic stress. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate if voluntary running and forced running induced different levels of stress protein (Hsp72 in the myocardium of female Wistar rats. METHODS: Female rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: forced treadmill running group (FR; n= 6, voluntary running group (VR; n=6 and control group (C; n=6. VR group animals had free access to running wheels, and those from FR group underwent a running program on a treadmill (18 m/min, 60 min/day, 5 days/wk for 8 weeks. Left ventricle (LV and right ventricle (RV fragments were collected at sacrifice, and the relative immunoblot contents of stress protein (Hsp72 were determined. RESULTS: VR animals ran on average 4.87 km/wk, and FR rats ran 4.88 km/wk. Animals from VR and FR groups had less body weight gain (p0.05 among VR, FR and C groups (4.54 ± 0.79 mg/g vs 4.94 ± 0.89 mg/g vs 4.34 ± 0.87 mg/g, respectively. FR group animals had levels of Hsp72 (p<0.05 higher than those from VR, both in LV (287.45 ± 35.86 % vs 135.59 ± 5.10 %, respectively and RV (241.31 ± 25.83 % vs 137.91 ± 45.20 %, respectively. CONCLUSION: Voluntary running and forced running induced different levels of Hsp72 in the myocardium of female Wistar rats.

  12. Good maintenance of exercise-induced bone gain with decreased training of female tennis and squash players: a prospective 5-year follow-up study of young and old starters and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontulainen, S; Kannus, P; Haapasalo, H; Sievänen, H; Pasanen, M; Heinonen, A; Oja, P; Vuori, I

    2001-02-01

    This prospective 5-year follow-up study of 64 adult female racquet sports players and 27 controls assessed the changes in the playing-to-nonplaying arm bone mineral content (BMC) differences to answer three questions: (1) Are training-induced bone gains lost with decreased training? (2) Is the bone response to decreased training different if the playing career has been started before or at puberty rather than after it? (3) Are the possible bone changes related to the changes in training? The players were divided into two groups according to the starting age of their tennis or squash playing. The mean starting age was 10.5 years (SD, 2.2) among the players who had started training before or at menarche (young starters; n = 36) while 26.4 years (SD, 8.0) among those players who had begun training a minimum of 1 year after menarche (old starters; n = 28). At baseline of the 5-year follow-up, the mean age of the young starters was 21.6 years (SD, 7.6) and that of old starters was 39.4 years (SD, 10.5). During the follow-up, the young starters had reduced the average training frequency from 4.7 times a week (2.7) to 1.4 times a week (1.3) and the old starters from 4.0 times a week (1.4) to 2.0 times a week (1.4), respectively. The 5-year follow-up revealed that despite reduced training the exercise-induced bone gain was well maintained in both groups of players regardless of their clearly different starting age of activity and different amount of exercise-induced bone gain. The gain was still 1.3-2.2 times greater in favor of the young starters (at the follow-up, the dominant-to-nondominant arm BMC difference was 22% [8.4] in the humeral shaft of the young starters versus 10% [3.8] in the old starters, and 3.5% [2.4] in controls). In the players, changes in training were only weakly related to changes in the side-to-side BMC difference (r(s) = 0.05-0.34, all NS), and this was true even among the players who had stopped training completely a minimum 1 year before the

  13. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Smoking Weight Patient Safety Exercise Strengthening Strengthen Your Core! Stretching/Flexibility Aerobic Exercise Cervical Exercise Strength Training for the Elderly Other Back Pack Safety ...

  14. Neurobiology of exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dishman, Rod K; Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf; Booth, Frank W; Cotman, Carl W; Edgerton, V Reggie; Fleshner, Monika R; Gandevia, Simon C; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando; Greenwood, Benjamin N; Hillman, Charles H; Kramer, Arthur F; Levin, Barry E; Moran, Timothy H; Russo-Neustadt, Amelia A; Salamone, John D; Van Hoomissen, Jacqueline D; Wade, Charles E; York, David A; Zigmond, Michael J

    2006-03-01

    Voluntary physical activity and exercise training can favorably influence brain plasticity by facilitating neurogenerative, neuroadaptive, and neuroprotective processes. At least some of the processes are mediated by neurotrophic factors. Motor skill training and regular exercise enhance executive functions of cognition and some types of learning, including motor learning in the spinal cord. These adaptations in the central nervous system have implications for the prevention and treatment of obesity, cancer, depression, the decline in cognition associated with aging, and neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's dementia, ischemic stroke, and head and spinal cord injury. Chronic voluntary physical activity also attenuates neural responses to stress in brain circuits responsible for regulating peripheral sympathetic activity, suggesting constraint on sympathetic responses to stress that could plausibly contribute to reductions in clinical disorders such as hypertension, heart failure, oxidative stress, and suppression of immunity. Mechanisms explaining these adaptations are not as yet known, but metabolic and neurochemical pathways among skeletal muscle, the spinal cord, and the brain offer plausible, testable mechanisms that might help explain effects of physical activity and exercise on the central nervous system.

  15. Voluntary activation of the trapezius muscle in cases with neck/shoulder pain compared to healthy controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Katrine Tholstrup; Larsen, Camilla Marie; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    2017-01-01

    Subjects reporting neck/shoulder pain have been shown to generate less force during maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVC) of the shoulder muscles compared to healthy controls. This has been suggested to be caused by a pain-related decrease in voluntary activation (VA) rather than lack of...

  16. Revisiting the Force-Joint Angle Relationship After Eccentric Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Molly C; Allen, David L; Batliner, Matthew E; Byrnes, William C

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate force-angle curve fitting techniques pre-eccentric exercise, quantify changes in curve characteristics postexercise, and examine the relationship between curve changes and markers of muscle damage. Fourteen males unaccustomed to eccentric exercise performed 60 eccentric muscle actions of the elbow flexors. Maximal voluntary isometric force was measured throughout a range of angles pre- (Pre1 and Pre2), immediately post (IP), and 1, 2, 4, and 7 days postexercise. Force-angle curves for each visit were constructed using second-order polynomials. Changes in curve characteristics (optimal angle, peak force, curve height), range of motion, soreness, and creatine kinase activity were quantified. Optimal joint angle and force at optimal angle were significantly correlated from Pre1 to Pre2 (ICC = 0.821 and 0.979, respectively). Optimal angle was significantly right shifted (p = 0.035) by 10.4 ± 12.9° from Pre2 to IP and was restored by 1 day post exercise. Interestingly, the r value for curve fit was significantly decreased (p exercise (r = 0.750). Curve height was significantly decreased (39%) IP and restored to pre-exercise height by 4 days postexercise. There was no correlation between optimal angle or curve height and other damage markers. In conclusion, force-angle relationships can be accurately described using second-order polynomials. After eccentric exercise, the force-angle curve is flattened and shifted (downward and rightward), but these changes are not correlated to other markers of muscle damage. Changes in the force-angle relationship are multifaceted, but determining the physiological significance of these changes requires further investigation.

  17. 75 FR 47504 - Voluntary Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ... America. TTT helps relieve teacher shortages, especially in math, science, special education, and other... of the Secretary 32 CFR Part 68 RIN 0790-AI50 Voluntary Education Programs AGENCY: Office of the... for the operation of voluntary education programs within DoD. Included are: Procedures for Service...

  18. Pedagogical Aspects of Voluntary School Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mária Jármai, Erzsébet; Palányi, Ildikó Zsupanekné

    2015-01-01

    The economic importance of voluntary work has been exceedingly appreciated in the last few decades. This is not surprising at all, because it is highly profitable according to the related estimated data. There are 115,9 million people doing voluntary work only in Europe, which means that they would create the world's 7th biggest economy with EUR…

  19. 14 CFR 234.7 - Voluntary reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Voluntary reporting. 234.7 Section 234.7 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS AIRLINE SERVICE QUALITY PERFORMANCE REPORTS § 234.7 Voluntary reporting. (a) In addition to the...

  20. Changing Dynamics in the Voluntary Market (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, J.

    2014-12-01

    Voluntary green power markets are those in which consumers and institutions voluntarily purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs. This presentation, presented at the Renewable Energy Markets Conference in December 2014, outlines the voluntary market in 2013, including community choice aggregation and community solar.

  1. 12 CFR 546.4 - Voluntary dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Voluntary dissolution. 546.4 Section 546.4... ASSOCIATIONS-MERGER, DISSOLUTION, REORGANIZATION, AND CONVERSION § 546.4 Voluntary dissolution. A Federal savings association's board of directors may propose a plan for dissolution of the association. The plan...

  2. Between voluntary agreement and legislation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gwozdz, Wencke; Hedegaard, Liselotte; Reisch, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    Voluntary agreements and self-imposed standards are broadly applied to restrict the influence food advertising exerts on children’s food choices – yet their effects are unknown. The current project will therefore investigate whether and, if yes, how the Danish Code for Responsible Food Marketing...... Communication towards Children (hereafter: CODE) – with its dependence on a supportive institutional environment and acceptance of as well as dynamics between involved key stakeholders like consumers, political actors and firms – contributes to fighting the obesity pandemic.Thus, we explore within this article...... what information about the process of implementing the CODE as well as about the evolved dynamics between key stakeholders is already available. Here, the recently published report of the PolMark project sheds light on the dynamics between the key stakeholders in relation to the current Danish...

  3. Movement-related cortical potential amplitude reduction after cycling exercise relates to the extent of neuromuscular fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme eSpring

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Exercise-induced fatigue affects the motor control and the ability to generate a given force or power. Surface electroencephalography allows researchers to investigate movement-related cortical potentials (MRCP, which reflect preparatory brain activity 1.5 seconds before movement onset. Although the MRCP amplitude appears to increase after repetitive single-joint contractions, the effects of large-muscle group dynamic exercise on such pre-motor potential remain to be described. Sixteen volunteers exercised 30 minutes at 60% of the maximal aerobic power on a cycle ergometer, followed by a 10-km all-out time trial. Before and after each of these tasks, knee extensor neuromuscular function was investigated using maximal voluntary contractions (MVC combined with electrical stimulations of the femoral nerve. MRCP was recorded during 60 knee extensions after each neuromuscular sequence.The exercise resulted in a significant decrease in the knee extensor MVC force after the 30-min exercise (-10±8% and the time trial (-21±9%. The voluntary activation level (VAL (-6±8% and -12±10%, peak twitch (Pt (-21±16% and -32±17% and paired stimuli (P100Hz (-7±11% and -12±13% were also significantly reduced after the 30-min exercise and the time trial. The first exercise was followed by a decrease in the MRCP, mainly above the mean activity measured at electrodes FC1-FC2, whereas the reduction observed after the time trial was related to the FC1-FC2 and C2 electrodes. After both exercises, the reduction in the late MRCP component above FC1-FC2 was significantly correlated with the reduction in P100Hz (r=0.61, and the reduction in the same component above C2 was significantly correlated with the reduction in VAL (r=0.64.In conclusion, large-muscle group exercise induced a reduction in pre-motor potential, which was related to muscle alterations and resulted in the inability to produce a maximal voluntary contraction.

  4. Exercise Headaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sides of the head in most cases Secondary exercise headaches These headaches may cause: The same symptoms ... exercise dilates blood vessels inside the skull. Secondary exercise headaches Secondary exercise headaches are caused by an ...

  5. Factors related to voluntary parental decision-making in pediatric oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Victoria A; Nelson, Robert M

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine demographic and contextual correlates of voluntariness in parents making research or treatment decisions for their children with cancer. Participants included 184 parents of children with cancer who made a decision about enrolling the child in a research or treatment protocol within the previous 10 days. Parents completed questionnaires that assessed voluntariness, external influence by others, concern that the child's care would be negatively affected if the parent did not agree, time pressure, information adequacy, and demographics. Lower perceived voluntariness was associated with lower education, male gender, minority status, and not having previous experience with a similar decision. Parents who reported lower voluntariness also perceived more external influence and time pressure, had more concern about the child's care being negatively affected if they declined, and perceived that they had either too much or not enough information about the decision. In a multivariate regression, education, minority status, gender, external influence, and too little information remained significantly associated with voluntariness. Several groups of parents appear to be at risk for decreased voluntariness when making research or treatment decisions for their seriously ill children, including fathers, nonwhite parents, and those with less education. Parental voluntariness may be enhanced by helping parents to mitigate the effects of unhelpful or unwanted influences by others and ensuring that their information needs are met.

  6. [Cardiopulmonary exercise testing before and after blood donation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellweg, D; Siemon, K; Mahler, F; Appelhans, P; Klauke, M; Köhler, D

    2008-06-01

    The link between haemoglobin and physical performance was established a long time ago and is the underlying principle of blood doping. Blood loss on the other hand decreases physical capacity. The aim of this study is to evaluate physical performance loss and underlying mechanisms following voluntary blood donation. Eleven voluntary subjects (four female) completed a symptom-limiting cardio-pulmonary exercise test before and after blood donation (500 mL blood). The haemoglobin value decreased by 1.2 mg/dL (9%, p blood donation, respectively (p = 0.001). Subjects who practise recreational endurance sports appear to be more effected by endurance loss. The haemoglobin value was the only significant predictor of maximal oxygen uptake in regression analysis (p blood donation. Haemoglobin decline accounts for the decreased oxygen uptake. As a consequence thereof the anaerobic transition occurs earlier. Subjects not engaged in regular sports activity did not experience a decline in their capacity. Inclusion of the haemoglobin value into equations predicting maximal oxygen uptake could improve prediction precision.

  7. Diabetes, insulin and exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Galbo, H

    1986-01-01

    The metabolic and hormonal adaptations to single exercise sessions and to exercise training in normal man and in patients with insulin-dependent as well as non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus are reviewed. In insulin-dependent (type I) diabetes good metabolic control is best obtained...... by a regular pattern of life which will lead to a fairly constant demand for insulin from day to day. Exercise is by nature a perturbation that makes treatment of diabetes difficult: Muscle contractions per se tend to decrease the plasma glucose concentration whereas the exercise-induced response of the so......-called counter-regulatory hormones tend to increase plasma glucose by increasing hepatic glucose production and adipose tissue lipolysis. If the pre-exercise plasma insulin level is high, hypoglycaemia may develop during exercise whereas hyperglycaemia and ketosis may develop if pre-exercise plasma insulin...

  8. Effects of Pilates core stability exercises on the balance abilities of archers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong-Min; Hyun, Gwang-Suk; Jee, Yong-Seok

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to provide fundamental data contributing to archery performance improvement and stabilization of shooting posture in archers by examining the influence of Pilates core stability (PCS) exercises on dynamic and static balance. The study was conducted from December 2015 to March 2016 on high school archers who were registered as archers in the Korea Archery Association with 5 or more years of archery experience. Twenty voluntary subjects (exercise group n=10; control group n=10) with an understanding toward the aims of this study were selected and their body composition, static and dynamic balance abilities, before and after the PCS program, were measured. As for the static balance ability, there were no significant differences between pre- and postvalues in the exercise group after completing the PCS program. Similarly, these results were also represented in the control group. In the aspect of comparisons between postvalues in both groups, there were significant improvements in only the exercise group. As for the dynamic balance ability, there were significant differences between pre- and postvalues in the exercise group, except for up-right and left postures, whereas, there were no changes or decreases between pre- and postvalues in the control group after completing the PCS program. Meanwhile, in the aspect of comparisons between postvalues in both groups, there were significant improvements in up, and up right, and down right part and overall dynamic scores of the exercise groups.

  9. Attenuation of indirect markers of eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage by curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Yoko; Maeda, Seiji; Akazawa, Nobuhiko; Zempo-Miyaki, Asako; Choi, Youngju; Ra, Song-Gyu; Imaizumi, Atsushi; Otsuka, Yoshihiko; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2015-09-01

    Polyphenolic curcumin is known to have potent anti-inflammatory effects; thus the present study investigated the hypothesis that curcumin ingestion would attenuate muscle damage after eccentric exercise. Fourteen untrained young men (24 ± 1 years) performed 50 maximal isokinetic (120°/s) eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors of one arm on an isokinetic dynamometer and the same exercise with the other arm 4 weeks later. They took 150 mg of curcumin (theracurmin) or placebo (starch) orally before and 12 h after each eccentric exercise bout in a randomised, crossover design. Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque of the elbow flexors, range of motion of the elbow joint, upper-arm circumference, muscle soreness, serum creatine kinase (CK) activity, and plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) concentration were measured before, immediately after, and 24, 48, 72 and 96 h after each eccentric exercise. Changes in these variables over time were compared between curcumin and placebo conditions by two-way repeated measures ANOVA. MVC torque decreased smaller and recovered faster (e.g., 4 days post-exercise: -31 ± 13 % vs. -15 ± 15 %), and peak serum CK activity was smaller (peak: 7684 ± 8959 IU/L vs. 3398 ± 3562 IU/L) for curcumin than placebo condition (P exercise. It is concluded that theracurmin ingestion attenuates some aspects of muscle damage such as MVC loss and CK activity increase.

  10. Susceptibility to Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage: a Cluster Analysis with a Large Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damas, F; Nosaka, K; Libardi, C A; Chen, T C; Ugrinowitsch, C

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the responses of indirect markers of exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) among a large number of young men (N=286) stratified in clusters based on the largest decrease in maximal voluntary contraction torque (MVC) after an unaccustomed maximal eccentric exercise bout of the elbow flexors. Changes in MVC, muscle soreness (SOR), creatine kinase (CK) activity, range of motion (ROM) and upper-arm circumference (CIR) before and for several days after exercise were compared between 3 clusters established based on MVC decrease (low, moderate, and high responders; LR, MR and HR). Participants were allocated to LR (n=61), MR (n=152) and HR (n=73) clusters, which depicted significantly different cluster centers of 82%, 61% and 42% of baseline MVC, respectively. Once stratified by MVC decrease, all muscle damage markers were significantly different between clusters following the same pattern: small changes for LR, larger changes for MR, and the largest changes for HR. Stratification of individuals based on the magnitude of MVC decrease post-exercise greatly increases the precision in estimating changes in EIMD by proxy markers such as SOR, CK activity, ROM and CIR. This indicates that the most commonly used markers are valid and MVC orchestrates their responses, consolidating the role of MVC as the best EIMD indirect marker.

  11. Effects of vibratory stimulations on maximal voluntary isometric contraction from delayed onset muscle soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Hyung-Woo; Cho, Sung-Hyoun; Kim, Cheol-Yong; Cho, Byung-Jun; Kim, Jin-Woo; Bo, Kak Hwang

    2013-09-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of vibratory stimulation on maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) from delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). [Subjects] Sixty healthy adults participated in this study. The exclusion criteria were orthopedic or neurologic disease. [Methods] The researchers induced DOMS in the musculus extensor carpi radialis longus of each participant. Subjects in the control group received no treatment. The ultrasound group received ultrasound treatment (intensity, 1.0 W/cm(2;) frequency 1 MHz; time, 10 minutes). The vibration group received vibration stimulation (frequency, 20 MHz; time, 10 minutes). Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) was recorded at baseline, immediately after exercise, and 24, 48, and 72 hours after exercise. [Results] MVIC measurements showed statistically significant differences in the vibration group compared with the control group. [Conclusion] Vibratory stimulation had a positive effect on recovery of muscle function from DOMS.

  12. AN ECONOMETRIC APPROACH ABOUT VOLUNTARY TURNOVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADALET EREN

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes individual and organizational variables that affect voluntary turnover are determined in the special defence and security companies. A binomial logistic regression model is used to estimate voluntary turnover.  Binomial Logistic regression, reliability test (scale alfa, variance (ANOVA, Post-hoc/Tukey, correlation (Pearson and other basic statistical techniques  with SPSS 13 statistical packet program was used in the analyzes ofresearch data. The study finds that; situation of suppose working, number of child, number of death child, number of home’s moving, support of rent, total monthly income of household, last work’s region, number of prizes, affect voluntary turnover are determined.

  13. Blood flow after contraction and cuff occlusion is reduced in subjects with muscle soreness after eccentric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Silva, E; Christensen, S W; Hirata, R P; Larsen, R G; Graven-Nielsen, T

    2017-04-28

    Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) occurs within 1-2 days after eccentric exercise, but the mechanism mediating hypersensitivity is unclear. This study hypothesized that eccentric exercise reduces the blood flow response following muscle contractions and cuff occlusion, which may result in accumulated algesic substances being a part of the sensitization in DOMS. Twelve healthy subjects (five women) performed dorsiflexion exercise (five sets of 10 repeated eccentric contractions) in one leg, while the contralateral leg was the control. The maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the tibialis anterior muscle was recorded. Blood flow was assessed by ultrasound Doppler on the anterior tibialis artery (ATA) and within the anterior tibialis muscle tissue before and immediately after 1-second MVC, 5-seconds MVC, and 5-minutes thigh cuff occlusion. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were recorded on the tibialis anterior muscle. All measures were done bilaterally at day 0 (pre-exercise), day 2, and day 6 (post-exercise). Subjects scored the muscle soreness on a Likert scale for 6 days. Eccentric exercise increased Likert scores at day 1 and day 2 compared with day 0 (Pexercise (day 0), reduced PPT (~25%, Peccentric contractions decreased vessel diameter, impaired the blood flow response, and promoted hyperalgesia. Thus, the results suggest that the blood flow reduction may be involved in the increased pain response after eccentric exercise. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Estrogen and exercise interact to regulate brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA and protein expression in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchtold, N C; Kesslak, J P; Pike, C J; Adlard, P A; Cotman, C W

    2001-12-01

    We investigated the possibility that estrogen and exercise interact in the hippocampus and regulate brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a molecule increasingly recognized for its role in plasticity and neuron function. An important aspect of this study is to examine the effect of different time intervals between estrogen loss and estrogen replacement intervention. We demonstrate that in the intact female rat, physical activity increases hippocampal BDNF mRNA and protein levels. However, the exercise effect on BDNF up-regulation is reduced in the absence of estrogen, in a time-dependent manner. In addition, voluntary activity itself is stimulated by the presence of estrogen. In exercising animals, estrogen deprivation reduced voluntary activity levels, while estrogen replacement restored activity to normal levels. In sedentary animals, estrogen deprivation (ovariectomy) decreased baseline BDNF mRNA and protein, which were restored by estrogen replacement. Despite reduced activity levels in the ovariectomized condition, exercise increased BDNF mRNA levels in the hippocampus after short-term (3 weeks) estrogen deprivation. However, long-term estrogen-deprivation blunted the exercise effect. After 7 weeks of estrogen deprivation, exercise alone no longer affected either BDNF mRNA or protein levels. However, exercise in combination with long-term estrogen replacement increased BDNF protein above the effects of estrogen replacement alone. Interestingly, protein levels across all conditions correlated most closely with mRNA levels in the dentate gyrus, suggesting that expression of mRNA in this hippocampal region may be the major contributor to the hippocampal BDNF protein pool. The interaction of estrogen, physical activity and hippocampal BDNF is likely to be an important issue for maintenance of brain health, plasticity and general well-being, particularly in women.

  15. Forced Aerobic Exercise Preceding Task Practice Improves Motor Recovery Poststroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeldt, Anson B.; Dey, Tanujit; Alberts, Jay L.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To understand how two types of aerobic exercise affect upper-extremity motor recovery post-stroke. Our aims were to (1) evaluate the feasibility of having people who had a stroke complete an aerobic exercise intervention and (2) determine whether forced or voluntary exercise differentially facilitates upper-extremity recovery when paired with task practice. METHOD. Seventeen participants with chronic stroke completed twenty-four 90-min sessions over 8 wk. Aerobic exercise was immediately followed by task practice. Participants were randomized to forced or voluntary aerobic exercise groups or to task practice only. RESULTS. Improvement on the Fugl-Meyer Assessment exceeded the minimal clinically important difference: 12.3, 4.8, and 4.4 for the forced exercise, voluntary exercise, and repetitive task practice–only groups, respectively. Only the forced exercise group exhibited a statistically significant improvement. CONCLUSION. People with chronic stroke can safely complete intensive aerobic exercise. Forced aerobic exercise may be optimal in facilitating motor recovery associated with task practice. PMID:28218596

  16. Effects of Maternal Diet and Exercise during Pregnancy on Glucose Metabolism in Skeletal Muscle and Fat of Weanling Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Mukesh Raipuria; Hasnah Bahari; Morris, Margaret J.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity during pregnancy contributes to the development of metabolic disorders in offspring. Maternal exercise may limit gestational weight gain and ameliorate these programming effects. We previously showed benefits of post-weaning voluntary exercise in offspring from obese dams. Here we examined whether voluntary exercise during pregnancy influences lipid and glucose homeostasis in muscle and fat in offspring of both lean and obese dams. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed chow (C) or high ...

  17. COMPARISON OF ACTIVE AND ELECTROSTIMULATED RECOVERY STRATEGIES AFTER FATIGUING EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Vanderthommen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare an electrostimulated to an active recovery strategy after a submaximal isometric fatiguing exercise. Nineteen healthy men completed three sessions (separated by at least 4 weeks which included a knee extensors provocation exercise consisting of 3 sets of 25 isometric contractions. Contraction intensity level was fixed respectively at 60%, 55% and 50% of previously determined maximal voluntary contraction for the first, second and third sets. This provocation exercise was followed by either an active (AR recovery (25 min pedaling on a cycle ergometer, an electrostimulated (ESR recovery (25-min continuous and non-tetanic (5 Hz stimulation of the quadriceps or a strictly passive recovery (PR. Peak torques of knee extensors and subjective perception of muscle pain (VAS, 0-10 were evaluated before (pre-ex, immediately after the provocation exercise (post-ex, after the recovery period (post-rec, as well as 75 minutes (1h15 and one day (24h after the exercise bout. Time course of peak torque was similar among the different recovery modes: ~ 75% of initial values at post-ex, ~ 90% at post-rec and at 1h15. At 24h, peak torque reached a level close to baseline values (PR: 99.1 ± 10.7%, AR: 105.3 ± 12.2%, ESR: 104.4 ± 10.5%. VAS muscle pain scores decreased rapidly between post-ex and post-rec (p < 0.001; there were no significant differences between the three recovery modes (p = 0.64. In conclusion, following a submaximal isometric knee extension exercise, neither electrostimulated nor active recovery strategies significantly improved the time course of muscle function recovery

  18. Effect of pelvic floor muscle exercises on pulmonary function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, DongWook; Ha, Misook

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the correlation between pelvic floor muscle strength and pulmonary function. In particular, we examined whether pelvic floor muscle exercises can improve pulmonary function. [Subjects] Thirty female college students aged 19–21 with no history of nervous or musculoskeletal system injury were randomly divided into experimental and control groups. [Methods] For the pulmonary function test, spirometry items included forced vital capacity and maximal voluntary ventilation. Pelvic floor muscle exercises consisted of Kegel exercises performed three times daily for 4 weeks. [Results] Kegel exercises performed in the experimental group significantly improved forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, PER, FEF 25–75%, IC, and maximum voluntary ventilation compared to no improvement in the control group. [Conclusion] Kegel exercises significantly improved pulmonary function. When abdominal pressure increased, pelvic floor muscles performed contraction at the same time. Therefore, we recommend that the use of pelvic floor muscle exercises be considered for improving pulmonary function. PMID:26644681

  19. Clinical application of neuromuscular electrical stimulation induced cardiovascular exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, Brian; Crowe, Louis; Coughlan, Garrett; Minogue, Conor

    2011-01-01

    We need to find novel ways of increasing exercise participation, particularly in those populations who find it difficult to participate in voluntary exercise. In recent years researchers have started to investigate the potential for using electrical stimulation to artificially stimulate a pattern of muscle activity that would induce a physiological response consistent with cardiovascular exercise. Work to date has indicated that this is best achieved by using a stimulation protocol that results in rapid rhythmical isometric contractions of the large leg muscle groups at sub tetanic frequencies. Studies completed by our group indicate that this technique can serve as a viable alternative to voluntary cardiovascular exercise. Apart from being able to induce a cardiovascular exercise effect in patient populations (e.g. heart failure, COPD, spinal cord injury, obesity), this approach may also have value in promotion of exercise activity in a microgravity environment.

  20. A history of the pedagogy of voluntary attention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljungdalh, Anders Kruse

    2016-01-01

    The article explores the pedagogical recommendations within late nineteenth century psychological literature on voluntary attention, focusing on what was then understood as pathological conditions of attention. The purpose of the article is double. First, to investigate the reasoning embedded...... in the educational exercises with which to capture and retain the attention of students. What is the link between the educational practices of the late nineteenth century and the psychological interest in the concept of attention within this time period? And second, to explore the epistemological and methodological...... power of the pathological. Is it possible to examine the concept of attention through a focus on its pathological forms? The article demonstrates how the pedagogical recommendations embedded in the late nineteenth century psychological literature on attention aim to develop disinterested citizens...

  1. Pedagogical Aspects of Voluntary School Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Jármai Erzsébet

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The economic importance of voluntary work has been exceedingly appreciated in the last few decades. This is not surprising at all, because it is highly profitable according to the related estimated data. There are 115,9 million people doing voluntary work only in Europe, which means that they would create the world's 7th biggest economy with EUR 282 billion value creation if they formed an individual state. The organizations know that voluntary work has several advantages apart from the economic benefits. It is profitable both for the society and for the individuals as well. Several researches have proven that voluntary work positively influences the development of the personality, because the key-competencies - such as: co-operation, empathy, solidarity, conflict handling, problem solving, etc. - expected in the labor market can be improved.

  2. Managing voluntary turnover through challenging assignments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preenen, P.T.Y.; Pater, I.E. de; Vianen, A.E.M. van; Keijzer, L.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines employees' challenging assignments as manageable means to reduce turnover intentions, job search behaviors, and voluntary turnover. Results indicate that challenging assignments are negatively related to turnover intentions and job search behaviors and that these relationships

  3. Corticospinal excitability in human voluntary movement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elswijk, G.A.F. van

    2008-01-01

    The research described in this thesis addressed the neurophysiologic changes in the human corticospinal system during preparation and execution of voluntary hand movements. The experiments involved transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex combined with electromyography (EMG) and e

  4. Contemplated Suicide Among Voluntary and Involuntary Retirees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretti, Peter O.; Wilson, Cedric

    1978-01-01

    This study explored anomic and egoistic dimensions of contemplated suicide among voluntary and involuntary retired males. Results indicated a direct relationship between anomie and egoism on the one hand, and contemplation of suicide on the other. (Author)

  5. A Free Market Requires Voluntary Actions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sløk-Madsen, Stefan Kirkegaard

    are essential to the construct of consumer sovereignty. Understanding the degree of voluntary actions in a given commercial setting has implications for both business strategy and policy making. This paper thus aims to contribute to explain why restricted markets become crony capitalism.......This paper draws attention to the importance of the understanding of voluntary actions in the free market construct. Failing to understand the role of voluntary actions in the free market construct will often result in discussions of capitalism versus socialism focusing on asset ownership...... and not consumer sovereignty. I argue that asset ownership is less important than true consumer sovereignty, which again is the essential argument for why capitalism is the superior mode of resource allocation and social organization. The paper analyzes how our understanding of markets and voluntary actions...

  6. Contemplated Suicide Among Voluntary and Involuntary Retirees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretti, Peter O.; Wilson, Cedric

    1978-01-01

    This study explored anomic and egoistic dimensions of contemplated suicide among voluntary and involuntary retired males. Results indicated a direct relationship between anomie and egoism on the one hand, and contemplation of suicide on the other. (Author)

  7. A Reduction in Maximal Incremental Exercise Test Duration 48 h Post Downhill Run Is Associated with Muscle Damage Derived Exercise Induced Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrismas, Bryna C R; Taylor, Lee; Siegler, Jason C; Midgley, Adrian W

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To examine whether exercise induced muscle damage (EIMD) and muscle soreness reduce treadmill maximal incremental exercise (MIE) test duration, and true maximal physiological performance as a consequence of exercise induced pain (EIP) and perceived effort. Methods: Fifty (14 female), apparently healthy participants randomly allocated into a control group (CON, n = 10), or experimental group (EXP, n = 40) visited the laboratory a total of six times: visit 1 (familiarization), visit 2 (pre 1), visit 3 (pre 2), visit 4 (intervention), visit 5 (24 h post) and visit 6 (48 h post). Both groups performed identical testing during all visits, except during visit 4, where only EXP performed a 30 min downhill run and CON performed no exercise. During visits 2, 3, and 6 all participants performed MIE, and the following measurements were obtained: time to exhaustion (TTE), EIP, maximal oxygen consumption [Formula: see text], rate of perceived exertion (RPE), maximum heart rate (HRmax), maximum blood lactate (BLamax), and the contribution of pain to terminating the MIE (assessed using a questionnaire). Additionally during visits 1, 2, 3, 5, and 6 the following markers of EIMD were obtained: muscle soreness, maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), voluntary activation (VA), creatine kinase (CK). Results: There were no significant differences (p ≥ 0.32) between any trials for any of the measures obtained during MIE for CON. In EXP, TTE decreased by 34 s (3%), from pre 2 to 48 h post (p < 0.001). There was a significant association between group (EXP, CON) and termination of the MIE due to "pain" during 48 h post (χ(2) = 14.7, p = 0.002). Conclusion: EIMD resulted in premature termination of a MIE test (decreased TTE), which was associated with EIP, MVC, and VA. The exact mechanisms responsible for this require further investigation.

  8. Effects of diet-induced obesity and voluntary wheel running on the microstructure of the murine distal femur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timonen Jussi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity and osteoporosis, two possibly related conditions, are rapidly expanding health concerns in modern society. Both of them are associated with sedentary life style and nutrition. To investigate the effects of diet-induced obesity and voluntary physical activity we used high resolution micro-computed tomography (μCT together with peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT to examine the microstructure of the distal femoral metaphysis in mice. Methods Forty 7-week-old male C57BL/6J mice were assigned to 4 groups: control (C, control + running (CR, high-fat diet (HF, and high-fat diet + running (HFR. After a 21-week intervention, all the mice were sacrificed and the left femur dissected for pQCT and μCT measurements. Results The mice fed the high-fat diet showed a significant weight gain (over 70% for HF and 60% for HFR, with increased epididymal fat pad mass and impaired insulin sensitivity. These obese mice had significantly higher trabecular connectivity density, volume, number, thickness, area and mass, and smaller trabecular separation. At the whole bone level, they had larger bone circumference and cross-sectional area and higher density-weighted maximal, minimal, and polar moments of inertia. Voluntary wheel running decreased all the cortical bone parameters, but increased the trabecular mineral density, and decreased the pattern factor and structure model index towards a more plate-like structure. Conclusions The results suggest that in mice the femur adapts to obesity by improving bone strength both at the whole bone and micro-structural level. Adaptation to running exercise manifests itself in increased trabecular density and improved 3D structure, but in a limited overall bone growth

  9. Pull factors of Finland and voluntary work

    OpenAIRE

    Jurvakainen, Janika

    2016-01-01

    This thesis studies pull factors of Finland and voluntary work. The aim of this study is to understand the pull factors of Finland from the perspective of young travelers. Which pull factors attract to choose Finland as their destination? In addition, which pull factors attract young travelers to participate in international voluntary work? The commissioner of this thesis is Allianssi Youth Exchange. The thesis is research-based and includes a quantitative Webropol survey and some qualit...

  10. 47 CFR 80.310 - Watch required by voluntary vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Watches § 80.310 Watch required by voluntary vessels. Voluntary vessels not equipped with DSC must.... Voluntary vessels equipped with VHF-DSC equipment must maintain a watch on 2182 kHz and on either 156.525... used to communicate. Voluntary vessels equipped with MF-HF DSC equipment must have the radio turned...

  11. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or delay many diseases and disabilities. In some cases, exercise is an effective treatment for many chronic conditions. For example, studies show that people with arthritis, heart disease, or ...

  12. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... use of medicines for a variety of illnesses. Prevent or Delay Disease Scientists have found that staying physically active and exercising regularly can help prevent or delay many diseases and disabilities. In some ...

  13. Exercise and cancer: from "healthy" to "therapeutic"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idorn, Manja; Thor Straten, Per

    2017-05-01

    Exercise improves functional capacity and patient-reported outcomes across a range of cancer diagnoses. The mechanisms behind this protection have been largely unknown, but exercise-mediated changes in body composition, sex hormone levels, systemic inflammation, and immune cell function have been suggested to play a role. We recently demonstrated that voluntary exercise leads to an influx of immune cells in tumors, and a more than 60% reduction in tumor incidence and growth across several mouse models. Given the common mechanisms of immune cell mobilization in mouse and man during exercise, we hypothesize that this link between exercise and the immune system can be exploited in cancer therapy in particular in combination with immunotherapy. Thus, we believe that exercise may not just be "healthy" but may in fact be therapeutic.

  14. Prior Exercise Training Prevent Hyperglycemia in STZ Mice by Increasing Hepatic Glycogen and Mitochondrial Function on Skeletal Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Afonso Kopczynski; da Silva, Sabrina; Serafini, Edenir; de Souza, Daniela Roxo; Farias, Hemelin Resende; de Bem Silveira, Gustavo; Silveira, Paulo Cesar Lock; de Souza, Claudio Teodoro; Portela, Luis Valmor; Muller, Alexandre Pastoris

    2017-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia. We investigated the effect of a prior 30 days voluntary exercise protocol on STZ-diabetic CF1 mice. Glycemia, and the liver and skeletal muscle glycogen, mitochondrial function, and redox status were analyzed up to 5 days after STZ injection. Animals were engaged in the following groups: Sedentary vehicle (Sed Veh), Sedentary STZ (Sed STZ), Exercise Vehicle (Ex Veh), and Exercise STZ (Ex STZ). Exercise prevented fasting hyperglycemia in the Ex STZ group. In the liver, there was decreased on glycogen level in Sed STZ group but not in EX STZ group. STZ groups showed decreased mitochondrial oxygen consumption compared to vehicle groups, whereas mitochondrial H2 O2 production was not different between groups. Addition of ADP to the medium did not decrease H2 O2 production in Sed STZ mice. Exercise increased GSH level. Sed STZ group increased nitrite levels compared to other groups. In quadriceps muscle, glycogen level was similar between groups. The Sed STZ group displayed decreased O2 consumption, and exercise prevented this reduction. The H2 O2 production was higher in Ex STZ when compared to other groups. Also, GSH level decreased whereas nitrite levels increased in the Sed STZ compared to other groups. The PGC1 α levels increased in Sed STZ, Ex Veh, and Ex STZ groups. In summary, prior exercise training prevents hyperglycemia in STZ-mice diabetic associated with increased liver glycogen storage, and oxygen consumption by the mitochondria of skeletal muscle implying in increased oxidative/biogenesis capacity, and improved redox status of both tissues. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 678-685, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A SPECIALIST Prevention Strengthening Exercise Committee Exercise Committee Core Strengthening Many popular forms of exercise focus on ... acute pain, you should stop doing it. Transverse Core Strengthening This strengthens the muscles that cross from ...

  16. The importance of exercise to obesity treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceyda Tuğba Pekmez

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Exercise is an important tool for obesity treatment. Exercise decrease the loss of lean body mass which occurs in restricted diets and also increase energy expenditure. This review discusses the effects of exercise on body composition, metabolism and health, as well as the role of exercise inducing and maintaining weight loss. Furthermore this review demonstrate the components of an exercise prescription and examine the benefits of increasing lifestyle activity, combined  with efforts to decrease sedentary behavior.

  17. The importance of exercise to obesity treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülgün Ersoy

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Exercise is an important tool for obesity treatment. Exercise decrease the loss of lean body mass which occurs in restricted diets and also increase energy expenditure. This review discusses the effects of exercise on body composition, metabolism and health, as well as the role of exercise inducing and maintaining weight loss. Furthermore this review demonstrate the components of an exercise prescription and examine the benefits of increasing lifestyle activity, combined with efforts to decrease sedentary behavior.

  18. Effect of exercise on learning and memory in a rat model of developmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Laurian; Hescham, Sarah; Kellaway, Lauriston A; Bugarith, Kishor; Russell, Vivienne A

    2009-12-01

    Adverse life events occurring in early development can result in long-term effects on behavioural, physiological and cognitive processes. In particular, perinatal stressors impair neurogenesis in the hippocampus which consequently impairs memory formation. Exercise has previously been shown to have antidepressant effects and to increase cognitive functioning by increasing neurogenesis and neurotrophins in the hippocampus. The current study examined the effects of maternal separation, which has been shown to model anxiety in animals, and the effects of exercise on learning and memory. Forty-five male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups, maternally separated / non-runners, maternally separated / runners, non-separated / runners and non-separated / non-runners. Maternal separation occurred from postnatal day 2 (P2) to 14 (P14) for 3 h per day. Exercised rats were given voluntary access to individual running wheels attached to their cages from P29 to P49. Behavioural testing (Morris water maze (MWM) and object recognition tests) took place from P49 to P63. Maternally separated rats showed no significant difference in anxiety levels in the elevated plus maze and the open field compared to the normally reared controls. However, rats that were allowed voluntary access to running wheels showed increased levels of anxiety in the elevated plus maze and in the open field. Maternal separation did not have any effect on memory performance in the MWM or the object recognition tasks. Exercise increased spatial learning and memory in the MWM with the exercised rats displaying a decreased latency in locating the hidden platform than the non-exercised rats. The exercised rats spent significantly less time exploring the most recently encountered object in the temporal order task in comparison to the non-exercised controls, therefore showing improved temporal recognition memory. All groups performed the same on the other recognition tasks, with all rats showing intact

  19. Proposal for a Modified Jaw Opening Exercise for Dysphagia: A Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Yuji; Sugimoto, Ayaka; Hamano, Takahide; Kasahara, Takashi; Toyokura, Minoru; Masakado, Yoshihisa

    2017-07-20

    To verify the feasibility and effectiveness of a newly developed modified jaw opening exercise (MJOE) in post-stroke patients with pharyngeal residue who completed a sixweek exercise regimen. Double-blind, randomized, controlled trial. 16 patients with stroke-related dysphagia. Participants were allocated to an intervention group (MJOE: one set of five repetitions at 80% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) for 6 seconds) or a control group (isometric jaw closing exercise: one set of five repetitions at 20% MVC for 6 seconds). Each group performed four sets a day, five times a week, for a total of six weeks. A videofluorographic swallowing study was performed before and after exercise. The distance between the mental spine and the hyoid bone (DMH) and hyoid displacement (HD) were measured. Twelve participants completed the study. No pain in the temporomandibular joint and/or anterior region of the neck occurred during the exercise period. In the intervention group (N=6), a decrease in DMH where anterior HD ended and an increase in anterior HD were seen. In the control group (N=6), no changes were seen. MJOE is feasible without any adverse events in poststroke patients, and it promotes anterior HD during swallowing.

  20. Fatigue-related firing of muscle nociceptors reduces voluntary activation of ipsilateral but not contralateral lower limb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, David S; Fitzpatrick, Siobhan C; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2015-02-15

    During fatiguing upper limb exercise, maintained firing of group III/IV muscle afferents can limit voluntary drive to muscles within the same limb. It is not known if this effect occurs in the lower limb. We investigated the effects of group III/IV muscle afferent firing from fatigued ipsilateral and contralateral extensor muscles and ipsilateral flexor muscles of the knee on voluntary activation of the knee extensors. In three experiments, we examined voluntary activation of the knee extensors by measuring changes in superimposed twitches evoked by femoral nerve stimulation. Subjects attended on 2 days for each experiment. On one day a sphygmomanometer cuff occluded blood flow of the fatigued muscles to maintain firing of group III/IV muscle afferents. After a 2-min extensor contraction (experiment 1; n = 9), mean voluntary activation was lower with than without maintained ischemia (47 ± 19% vs. 87 ± 8%, respectively; P contraction (MVC) (experiment 2; n = 8), mean voluntary activation was also lower with than without ischemia (59 ± 21% vs. 79 ± 9%; P muscle afferents reduces voluntary activation of the fatigued muscle and nonfatigued antagonist muscles in the same leg. However, group III/IV muscle afferents from the fatigued left leg had no effect on the unfatigued right leg. This suggests that any "crossover" of central fatigue in the lower limbs is not mediated by group III/IV muscle afferents.

  1. Set Configuration in Resistance Exercise: Muscle Fatigue and Cardiovascular Effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Río-Rodríguez

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular responses of traditional resistance (TS training have been extensively explored. However, the fatigue mechanisms associated with an intra-set rest configuration (ISR have not been investigated. This study compares two modalities of set configurations for resistance exercise that equates work to rest ratios and measures the central and peripheral fatigue in combination with cortical, hemodynamic and cardiovascular measures.11 subjects performed two isometric knee extension training sessions using TS and ISR configurations. Voluntary activation (VA, single twitch amplitude, low frequency fatigue (LFF, Mwave, motor evoked potential (MEP, short intracortical inhibition (SICI, intracortical facilitation (ICF and heart rate variability were evaluated before and after each training session. During each session beat to beat heart rate, blood pressure and rate pressure product (RPP were also evaluated.After exercise VA decreased significantly for TS but not for ISR (P < 0.001, single twitch amplitude and LFF values were lower for TS than ISR (P < 0.004, and SICI was reduced only for the TS configuration (P = 0.049. During exercise RPP values were significantly higher for the TS than for ISR (P = 0.001. RPP correlated with VA for TS (r = -.85 P < 0.001 suggesting a relationship between central fatigue and cardiovascular stress.We conclude that ISR induced lower central and peripheral fatigue as well as lower cardiovascular stress in comparison with TS configuration. Our study suggests that set configuration is a key factor in the regulation of the neuromuscular and cardiovascular responses of resistance training.

  2. Voluntary attention increases perceived spatial frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Jared; Barbot, Antoine; Carrasco, Marisa

    2010-08-01

    Voluntary covert attention selects relevant sensory information for prioritized processing. The behavioral and neural consequences of such selection have been extensively documented, but its phenomenology has received little empirical investigation. Involuntary attention increases perceived spatial frequency (Gobell & Carrasco, 2005), but involuntary attention can differ from voluntary attention in its effects on performance in tasks mediated by spatial resolution (Yeshurun, Montagna, & Carrasco, 2008). Therefore, we ask whether voluntary attention affects the subjective appearance of spatial frequency--a fundamental dimension of visual perception underlying spatial resolution. We used a demanding rapid serial visual presentation task to direct voluntary attention and measured perceived spatial frequency at the attended and unattended locations. Attention increased the perceived spatial frequency of suprathreshold stimuli and also improved performance on a concurrent orientation discrimination task. In the control experiment, we ruled out response bias as an alternative account by using a lengthened interstimulus interval, which allows observers to disengage attention from the cued location. In contrast to the main experiment, the observers showed neither increased perceived spatial frequency nor improved orientation discrimination at the attended location. Thus, this study establishes that voluntary attention increases perceived spatial frequency. This phenomenological consequence links behavioral and neurophysiological studies on the effects of attention.

  3. Comparison of intramuscular and venous blood pH, PCO(2) and PO(2) during rhythmic handgrip exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, Babs R; Hagan, R Donald; Shear, Michael; Walz, J Matthias; Landry, Michelle; Anunciacion, Dulce; Orquiola, Alan; Heard, Stephen O

    2007-06-01

    Oxygen and acid-base status during exercise is well established for the lungs, large arteries and veins. However, values for these parameters in exercising muscle are less frequently reported. In this study we examined the relationship between intramuscular PO(2), pH, PCO(2) and the comparable venous values during rhythmic isometric handgrip exercise at target levels of 15%, 30% and 45% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). A small fiber optic sensor was inserted into the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) muscle for continuous measurement of intramuscular (IM) PO(2), pH and PCO(2). Venous blood samples were taken from the forearm every minute during each exercise bout. IM pH and PCO(2) were similar to their venous counterparts at baseline, but the difference between IM and venous values increased when exercise exceeded 30% MVC. During exercise at 15% MVC and greater, venous PO(2) declined from 40 to 21 Torr (approximately 5.3 to 2.8 kPa). IM PO(2) declined from 24 to 8 Torr with 15% MVC, and approached 0 Torr at 30% MVC and 45% MVC. IM pH declined rapidly when IM PO(2) reached 10 Torr and continued to decrease with increasing exertion, despite an IM PO(2) near 0 Torr.

  4. Mental fatigue induced by prolonged self-regulation does not exacerbate central fatigue during subsequent whole-body endurance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pageaux, Benjamin; Marcora, Samuele M; Rozand, Vianney; Lepers, Romuald

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that the mental fatigue induced by prolonged self-regulation increases perception of effort and reduces performance during subsequent endurance exercise. However, the physiological mechanisms underlying these negative effects of mental fatigue are unclear. The primary aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that mental fatigue exacerbates central fatigue induced by whole-body endurance exercise. Twelve subjects performed 30 min of either an incongruent Stroop task to induce a condition of mental fatigue or a congruent Stroop task (control condition) in a random and counterbalanced order. Both cognitive tasks (CTs) were followed by a whole-body endurance task (ET) consisting of 6 min of cycling exercise at 80% of peak power output measured during a preliminary incremental test. Neuromuscular function of the knee extensors was assessed before and after CT, and after ET. Rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was measured during ET. Both CTs did not induce any decrease in maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque (p = 0.194). During ET, mentally fatigued subjects reported higher RPE (mental fatigue 13.9 ± 3.0, control 13.3 ± 3.2, p = 0.044). ET induced a similar decrease in MVC torque (mental fatigue -17 ± 15%, control -15 ± 11%, p = 0.001), maximal voluntary activation level (mental fatigue -6 ± 9%, control -6 ± 7%, p = 0.013) and resting twitch (mental fatigue -30 ± 14%, control -32 ± 10%, p mental fatigue does not reduce the capacity of the central nervous system to recruit the working muscles. The negative effect of mental fatigue on perception of effort does not reflect a greater development of either central or peripheral fatigue. Consequently, mentally fatigued subjects are still able to perform maximal exercise, but they are experiencing an altered performance during submaximal exercise due to higher-than-normal perception of effort.

  5. Core Muscle Activation in Suspension Training Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugliari, Giovanni; Boccia, Gennaro

    2017-02-01

    A quantitative observational laboratory study was conducted to characterize and classify core training exercises executed in a suspension modality on the base of muscle activation. In a prospective single-group repeated measures design, seventeen active male participants performed four suspension exercises typically associated with core training (roll-out, bodysaw, pike and knee-tuck). Surface electromyographic signals were recorded from lower and upper parts of rectus abdominis, external oblique, internal oblique, lower and upper parts of erector spinae muscles using concentric bipolar electrodes. The average rectified values of electromyographic signals were normalized with respect to individual maximum voluntary isometric contraction of each muscle. Roll-out exercise showed the highest activation of rectus abdominis and oblique muscles compared to the other exercises. The rectus abdominis and external oblique reached an activation higher than 60% of the maximal voluntary contraction (or very close to that threshold, 55%) in roll-out and bodysaw exercises. Findings from this study allow the selection of suspension core training exercises on the basis of quantitative information about the activation of muscles of interest. Roll-out and bodysaw exercises can be considered as suitable for strength training of rectus abdominis and external oblique muscles.

  6. From Voluntary Collective Action to Organized Collaboration?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattke, Fabian; Blaschke, Steffen; Frost, Jetta

    2016-01-01

    internationalization. Based on our results, we suggest that, depending on the field of action, voluntary collective action and organized collaboration are substitutes with regard to performance. Our study contributes to the literature on collective action and to research on public organizations in pluralistic......Our study examines the relationship between voluntary collective action, organized collaboration, and the provision of public goods in pluralistic organizations. Using German higher education as a context, we investigate whether specialized central support structures contribute to performance...... in three fields of action: the training of young scientists, internationalization, and gender diversity. The findings indicate that organized collaboration may lead to improved performance in the training of young scientists and gender diversity. Conversely, voluntary collective action enhances...

  7. Voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    The Voluntary Reporting Program for greenhouse gases is part of an attempt by the U.S. Government to develop innovative, low-cost, and nonregulatory approaches to limit emissions of greenhouse gases. It is one element in an array of such programs introduced in recent years as part of the effort being made by the United States to comply with its national commitment to stabilize emissions of greenhouse gases under the Framework Convention on Climate Change. The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions of greenhouse gases.

  8. Rapid Repression of ADP Transport by Palmitoyl-CoA Is Attenuated by Exercise Training in Humans: A Potential Mechanism to Decrease Oxidative Stress and Improve Skeletal Muscle Insulin Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludzki, Alison; Paglialunga, Sabina; Smith, Brennan K; Herbst, Eric A F; Allison, Mary K; Heigenhauser, George J; Neufer, P Darrell; Holloway, Graham P

    2015-08-01

    Mitochondrial ADP transport may represent a convergence point unifying two prominent working models for the development of insulin resistance, as reactive lipids (specifically palmitoyl-CoA [P-CoA]) can inhibit ADP transport and subsequently increase mitochondrial reactive oxygen species emissions. In the current study, we aimed to determine if exercise training in humans diminished P-CoA attenuation of mitochondrial ADP respiratory sensitivity. Six weeks of exercise training increased whole-body glucose homeostasis and skeletal muscle Akt signaling and reduced markers of oxidative stress without reducing maximal mitochondrial H2O2 emissions. To ascertain if enhanced mitochondrial ADP transport contributed to the improvement in the in vivo oxidative state, we determined mitochondrial ADP sensitivity in the presence and absence of P-CoA. In the absence of P-CoA, exercise training reduced mitochondrial ADP sensitivity. In contrast, exercise training increased mitochondrial ADP sensitivity with P-CoA present. We further show that P-CoA noncompetitively inhibits mitochondrial ADP transport and the ability of ADP to attenuate mitochondrial H2O2 emission. Altogether, the current data provide a potential mechanism for how P-CoA contributes to insulin resistance and highlight the ability of exercise training to diminish P-CoA attenuation in mitochondrial ADP transport. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  9. Hemochromatosis Patients as Voluntary Blood Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara E Power

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to investigate hemochromatosis patients' suitability as blood donors as well as their perceptions and experience with the current public donation system. Participants were gathered from a list of current hemochromatosis patients (n=120 and members of the Canadian Hemochromatosis Society (n=1000. Of the 1120 surveys mailed out to these groups, 801 surveys were returned completed. The sample respondents had a mean age of 57.44 years (SD=12.73; range 19 to 87 years, and 57% were men. It was found that 20% (160 of the respondents have donated blood since their diagnosis; however, only 12% of the respondents indicated that they use voluntary blood donation as a means of maintaining their iron levels. Forty per cent of the respondents indicated that they had been refused from voluntary donation. Despite the fact that in May 2001 the Canadian Blood Services, in collaboration with the Canadian Hemochromatosis Society, began a promotion campaign to encourage hemochromatosis patients to become voluntary blood donors, the present study found that 15% of the respondents reported having been refused from the voluntary blood donation service due to the diagnosis of hemochromatosis. With respect to quality of life, it was found that individuals who donate blood were generally healthier with respect to physical functioning and bodily pain, however, these findings may indicate that hemochromatosis patients who are healthier are better able to donate at public blood banks, rather than that voluntary blood donation has an effect on the donors' physical functioning over phlebotomy clinic users. These study findings suggest that although there may be other medical factors limiting individuals from donating, hemochromatosis patients are interested in being voluntary blood donors and this potential resource is currently under-used.

  10. Carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) is required to modulate cardiac hypertrophy and attenuate autophagy during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Monte S; Min, Jin-Na; Wang, Shaobin; McDonough, Holly; Lockyer, Pamela; Wadosky, Kristine M; Patterson, Cam

    2013-12-01

    The carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) is a ubiquitin ligase/cochaperone critical for the maintenance of cardiac function. Mice lacking CHIP (CHIP-/-) suffer decreased survival, enhanced myocardial injury and increased arrhythmias compared with wild-type controls following challenge with cardiac ischaemia reperfusion injury. Recent evidence implicates a role for CHIP in chaperone-assisted selective autophagy, a process that is associated with exercise-induced cardioprotection. To determine whether CHIP is involved in cardiac autophagy, we challenged CHIP-/- mice with voluntary exercise. CHIP-/- mice respond to exercise with an enhanced autophagic response that is associated with an exaggerated cardiac hypertrophy phenotype. No impairment of function was identified in the CHIP-/- mice by serial echocardiography over the 5 weeks of running, indicating that the cardiac hypertrophy was physiologic not pathologic in nature. It was further determined that CHIP plays a role in inhibiting Akt signalling and autophagy determined by autophagic flux in cardiomyocytes and in the intact heart. Taken together, cardiac CHIP appears to play a role in regulating autophagy during the development of cardiac hypertrophy, possibly by its role in supporting Akt signalling, induced by voluntary running in vivo. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. The institutional dynamics of voluntary organisations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Peter

    this theoretical frame to analyse case studies of three voluntary organisations.  As a part of the analysis I describe four sets of institutional settings that can influence voluntary organisations ability to create institutional dynamic: institutionalization, moderation, self-organisation and loose-coupling....... organisations. I establish a theoretical frame of institutional dynamic, build primarily on J.G. March's theory on exploration and exploitation. I focus on two organisational arrangements drawn from the theory: The degree of strategic decision-making and the degree of diversity among the volunteers. I use...

  12. Body weight changes and voluntary fluid intakes during training and competition sessions in team sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broad, E M; Burke, L M; Cox, G R; Heeley, P; Riley, M

    1996-09-01

    Fluid losses (measured by body weight changes) and voluntary fluid intakes were measured in elite basketball, netball, and soccer teams during typical summer and winter exercise sessions to determine fluid requirements and the degree of fluid replacement. Each subject was weighed in minimal clothing before and immediately after training, weights, and competition sessions; fluid intake, duration of exercise, temperature and humidity, and opportunity to drink were recorded. Sweat rates were greatest during competition sessions and significantly lower during weights sessions for all sports. Seasonal variation in dehydration (%DH) was not as great as may have been expected, particularly in sports played indoors. Factors influencing fluid replacement during exercise included provision of an individual water bottle, proximity to water bottles during sessions, encouragement to drink, rules of the game, duration and number of breaks or substitutions, and awareness of personal sweat rates. Guidelines for optimizing fluid intakes in these three sports are provided.

  13. Low level laser therapy before eccentric exercise reduces muscle damage markers in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroni, Bruno Manfredini; Leal Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; De Marchi, Thiago; Lopes, André Luiz; Salvador, Mirian; Vaz, Marco Aurélio

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of low level laser therapy (LLLT) treatment before knee extensor eccentric exercise on indirect markers of muscle damage. Thirty-six healthy men were randomized in LLLT group (n = 18) and placebo group (n = 18). After LLLT or placebo treatment, subjects performed 75 maximal knee extensors eccentric contractions (five sets of 15 repetitions; velocity = 60° seg(-1); range of motion = 60°). Muscle soreness (visual analogue scale--VAS), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) levels were measured prior to exercise, and 24 and 48 h after exercise. Muscle function (maximal voluntary contraction--MVC) was measured before exercise, immediately after, and 24 and 48 h post-exercise. Groups had no difference on kineanthropometric characteristics and on eccentric exercise performance. They also presented similar baseline values of VAS (0.00 mm for LLLT and placebo groups), LDH (LLLT = 186 IU/l; placebo = 183 IU/l), CK (LLLT = 145 IU/l; placebo = 155 IU/l) and MVC (LLLT = 293 Nm; placebo = 284 Nm). VAS data did not show group by time interaction (P = 0.066). In the other outcomes, LLLT group presented (1) smaller increase on LDH values 48 h post-exercise (LLLT = 366 IU/l; placebo = 484 IU/l; P = 0.017); (2) smaller increase on CK values 24 h (LLLT = 272 IU/l; placebo = 498 IU/l; P = 0.020) and 48 h (LLLT = 436 IU/l; placebo = 1328 IU/l; P exercise; (3) smaller decrease on MVC immediately after exercise (LLLT = 189 Nm; placebo = 154 Nm; P = 0.011), and 24 h (LLLT = 249 Nm; placebo = 205 Nm; P = 0.004) and 48 h (LLLT = 267 Nm; placebo = 216 Nm; P = 0.001) post-exercise compared with the placebo group. In conclusion, LLLT treatment before eccentric exercise was effective in terms of attenuating the increase of muscle proteins in the blood serum and the decrease in muscle force.

  14. Impact of loaded sit-to-stand exercises at different speeds on the physiological cost of walking in children with spastic diplegia: A single-blind randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumoto, Yasuaki; Nitta, Osamu; Takaki, Kenji

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, we aimed to determine whether similarly loaded sit-to-stand exercises at different speeds improve the physiological cost of walking in children with spastic diplegia. This design was a single-blind randomized clinical trial. Sixteen children with cerebral palsy (CP), aged 12-18 years, with a diagnosis of spastic diplegia, were randomly allocated to a slow loaded sit-to-stand exercise group (n=8) and a self-paced loaded sit-to-stand exercise group (n=8). Loaded sit-to-stand exercise was conducted at home for 15min, 4 sets per day, 3-4days per week, for 6 weeks. The patients were evaluated immediately before the intervention and after the training. Lower limb muscle strength using a hand-held dynamometer, selective voluntary motor control using SCALE, 6-min walk distance (6MWD), and Physiological Cost Index (PCI) were measured. The 6MWD showed a significant difference before and after intervention. PCI showed a significant difference between the two groups and the two time points. 6MWD and the PCI improved after intervention in the slow sit-to-stand exercise group. Compared to loaded sit-to-stand exercise at a regular speed, slow low-loaded sit-to-stand exercise improved the 6MWD and PCI in children with CP, suggesting that this decrease in speed during exercise improves the physiological cost of walking in these children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Neurochemical and behavioural indices of exercise reward are independent of exercise controllability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Jonathan J; Fedynska, Sofiya; Ghasem, Parsa R; Wieman, Tyler; Clark, Peter J; Gray, Nathan; Loetz, Esteban; Campeau, Serge; Fleshner, Monika; Greenwood, Benjamin N

    2016-05-01

    Brain reward circuits are implicated in stress-related psychiatric disorders. Exercise reduces the incidence of stress-related disorders, but the contribution of exercise reward to stress resistance is unknown. Exercise-induced stress resistance is independent of exercise controllability; both voluntary running (VR) and forced running (FR) protect rats against the anxiety-like and depression-like behavioural consequences of stress. Voluntary exercise is a natural reward, but whether rats find FR rewarding is unknown. Moreover, the contribution of dopamine (DA) and striatal reward circuits to exercise reward is not well characterized. Adult, male rats were assigned to locked wheels, VR, or FR groups. FR rats were forced to run in a pattern resembling the natural wheel running behavior of rats. Both VR and FR increased the reward-related plasticity marker ΔFosB in the dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens, and increased the activity of DA neurons in the lateral ventral tegmental area, as revealed by immunohistochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase and pCREB. Both VR and FR rats developed conditioned place preference (CPP) to the side of a CPP chamber paired with exercise. Re-exposure to the exercise-paired side of the CPP chamber elicited conditioned increases in cfos mRNA in direct-pathway (dynorphin-positive) neurons in the dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens in both VR and FR rats, and in tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons in the lateral ventral tegmental area of VR rats only. The results suggest that the rewarding effects of exercise are independent of exercise controllability and provide insight into the DA and striatal circuitries involved in exercise reward and exercise-induced stress resistance.

  16. Exercise addiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lichtenstein, Mia Beck; Christiansen, Erik; Elklit, Ask

    2014-01-01

    Exercise addiction is characterized by excessive exercise patterns with potential negative consequences such as overuse injuries. The aim of this study was to compare eating disorder symptoms, quality of life, personality traits and attachments styles in exercisers with and without indications...... of exercise addiction. A case-control study with 121 exercisers was conducted. The exercisers were categorized into an addiction group (n=41) or a control group (n=80) on the basis of their responses to the Exercise Addiction Inventory. The participants completed the Eating Disorder Inventory 2, the Short...... of excitement-seeking and achievement striving whereas scores on straightforwardness and compliance were lower than in the exercise control group. The addiction group reported more bodily pain and injuries. This study supports the hypothesis that exercise addiction is separate to an eating disorder, but shares...

  17. EFFECT OF THE VOLUME OF FLUID INGESTED ON URINE CONCENTRATING ABILITY DURING PROLONGED HEAVY EXERCISE IN A HOT ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidenori Otani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effect of the volume of fluid ingested on urine concentrating ability during prolonged heavy exercise in a hot environment at low levels of dehydration. Seven healthy males performed 105 min of intermittent cycle exercise at 70% maximum oxygen uptake (32°C, 60% relative humidity while receiving no fluid ingestion (NF, voluntary fluid ingestion (VF, partial fluid ingestion equivalent to one-half of body mass loss (PF, and full fluid ingestion equivalent to body mass loss (FF. Fluid (5°C, 3.4% carbohydrate, 10.5 mmol·L-1 sodium was ingested just before commencing exercise and at 15, 33, 51, 69, and 87 min of exercise, and the total amount of fluid ingested in PF and FF was divided into six equal volumes. During exercise, body mass loss was 2.2 ± 0.2, 1.1 ± 0.5, 1.1 ± 0.2, and 0.1 ± 0.2% in NF, VF, PF, and FF, respectively, whereas total sweat loss was about 2% of body mass in each trial. Subjects in VF ingested 719 ± 240 ml of fluid during exercise; the volume of fluid ingested was 1.1 ± 0.4% of body mass. Creatinine clearance was significantly higher and free water clearance was significantly lower in FF than in NF during exercise. Urine flow rate during exercise decreased significantly in NF. There were significant decreases in creatinine and osmolar clearance and was a significant increase in free water clearance during exercise in NF and VF. Creatinine clearance decreased significantly and free water clearance increased significantly during exercise in PF. There was no statistical change in urinary indices of renal function during exercise in FF. The findings suggest that full fluid ingestion equivalent to body mass loss has attenuated the decline in urine concentrating ability during prolonged heavy exercise in a hot environment at low levels of dehydration.

  18. 77 FR 72941 - Voluntary Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-07

    ... decision will be made by the selected DoD contractor for the complete `third party review' process. Comment... seeks to enhance the educational opportunities to Service members who may have difficulty in completing... transitions to second careers in teaching. Voluntary education programs. Continuing, adult, or...

  19. Decentralized trade with bargaining and voluntary matching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tranæs, Torben; Sloth, Birgitte; Hendon, Ebbe

    1994-01-01

    Rubinstein and Wolinsky (1990) study a market with one seller, two buyers, and voluntary matching. Both the competitive outcomepc and the bilateral bargaining outcomepb are possible in subgame perfect equilibrium. We consider two variations. First, if there is a cost larger thanpc−pc to the seller...

  20. Social orienting: reflexive versus voluntary control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Julia L; Patel, Saumil; Gu, Xue; Seyedali, Nassim S; Bachevalier, Jocelyne; Sereno, Anne B

    2010-09-24

    Many studies have shown that the direction of gaze of a face covertly facilitates the response to a target presented in the matching direction. In this study we seek to determine whether there exist separate reflexive and voluntary forms of such covert social orienting and how they interact with each other. We measured the effect of the predictive value of a gaze cue on manual choice reaction times. When the predictive value of the gaze cue was zero, a facilitatory cueing effect was still observed which peaked at a cue onset to target onset delay (CTD) of 150ms and largely diminished beyond a CTD of 500ms. When the gaze cue was 100% predictive of the future location of the target, at CTDs greater than 200, the predictive cue resulted in a significantly greater facilitation of response than occurred with a non-predictive cue. These results suggest that given enough time (about 200ms), the social cue is interpreted and a willful or voluntary spatially-specific social cueing effect occurs. In addition, we found that a predictive cue resulted in a significant slowing of the observer's responses up to a CTD of 200ms. These findings show that, similar to non-social spatial orienting, there appear to be two forms of social orienting including a reflexive component and voluntary component. We suggest a model of social orienting in which the voluntary social orienting system modulates tonic inhibition of the reflexive social orienting system. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Equality, self‐respect and voluntary separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.S. Merry

    2012-01-01

    This paper argues that self‐respect constitutes an important value, and further, an important basis for equality. It also argues that under conditions of inequality‐producing segregation, voluntary separation in schooling may be more likely to provide the resources necessary for self‐respect. A prim

  2. School Ethical Climate and Teachers' Voluntary Absence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira-Lishchinsky, Orly; Rosenblatt, Zehava

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to offer a theoretical framework for linking school ethical climate with teachers' voluntary absence. The paper attempts to explain this relationship using the concept of affective organizational commitment. Design/methodology/approach: Participants were 1,016 school teachers from 35 high schools in Israel. Data were…

  3. Voluntary Oral Administration of Losartan in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diogo, Lucília N; Faustino, Inês V; Afonso, Ricardo A; Pereira, Sofia A; Monteiro, Emília C; Santos, Ana I

    2015-09-01

    Gavage is a widely performed technique for daily dosing in laboratory rodents. Although effective, gavage comprises a sequence of potentially stressful procedures for laboratory animals that may introduce bias into experimental results, especially when the drugs to be tested interfere with stress-dependent parameters. We aimed to test vehicles suitable for drug delivery by voluntary ingestion in rats. Specifically, Male Wistar rats (age, 2 to 3 mo) were used to test nut paste (NUT), peanut butter (PB), and sugar paste (SUG) as vehicles for long-term voluntary oral administration of losartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker. Vehicles were administered for 28 d without drug to assess effects on the glucose level and serum lipid profile. Losartan was mixed with vehicles and either offered to the rats or administered by gavage (14 d) for subsequent quantification of losartan plasma levels by HPLC. After a 2-d acclimation period, all rats voluntarily ate the vehicles, either alone or mixed with losartan. NUT administration reduced blood glucose levels. The SUG group had higher concentrations of losartan than did the gavage group, without changes in lipid and glucose profiles. Our results showed that NUT, PB, and SUG all are viable for daily single-dose voluntary ingestion of losartan and that SUG was the best alternative overall. Drug bioavailability was not reduced after voluntary ingestion, suggesting that this method is highly effective for chronic oral administration of losartan to laboratory rodents.

  4. Staff's perceptions of voluntary assertiveness skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVanel, Sarah; Morris, Beth

    2010-01-01

    Clinicians' ability to be assertive when unsure or concerned about procedures, treatment modalities, or patients' symptoms is key in reducing risk and preventing sentinel events. In this article, the authors provide a framework for generic, voluntary assertiveness communication skills workshops that any educator can implement.

  5. Voluntary Organizations: Commitment, Leadership, and Organizational Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekeland, Terry P.

    2004-01-01

    Voluntary organizations offer a unique opportunity to interpret participant relationships, leadership influences, and organizational effectiveness unencumbered by employment relationships. Regardless of organizational structure or purpose, all organizations are affected to some degree by their leadership and their membership. Based on the…

  6. Environmental Voluntary Agreements in the Dutch Context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bressers, Johannes T.A.; de Bruijn, Theo; Croci, Edoardo

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes and analyses the use of environmental voluntary agreements, or covenants, in Dutch environmental policy. Covenants have become a widely used policy instrument in the Netherlands. This trend reinforces the strong neo-corporatist traits of Dutch society with its tendency towards

  7. Voluntary Community Organisations in Metropolitan Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jacob Norvig

    While short-term enrolling of citizens in urban regeneration projects often has proven quite successful, permanent embedding of projects in voluntary community-based settings seems to be much more difficult to obtain. This has implications for long term sustainability of urban regeneration projec...

  8. Eligibility and Exclusion of Hemochromatosis Patients as Voluntary Blood Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Levstik

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hereditary hemochromatosis patients are excluded in many countries as voluntary blood donors. In 1991, changes in the Canadian Red Cross policy allowed healthy hemochromatosis patients to become voluntary donors.

  9. Results of the global survey on Voluntary Sustainability Standards

    OpenAIRE

    Lernoud, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Results of the global survey on Voluntary Sustainability Standards: - Voluntary Sustainability Standards (VSS) area worldwide and selected commodities - Cocoa: Area growth by VSS 2008-2014 - Growth of VSS compliant area worldwide 2008-2013 (selected crops)

  10. China Initiates Voluntary Certification of Public Security Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Reporters learned from the Certification and Accreditation Administration of China(CNCA)that burglar-proof door became the first batch of voluntary certification product in public security products.China has formally initiated voluntary certification of public security products.

  11. Voluntary sterilization in Serbia: Unmet need?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rašević Mirjana M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Is voluntary sterilization as a birth control method accepted in Serbia? This is certainly a question that is being imposed for research, regardless of the fact that voluntary sterilization is neither accessible nor promoted. Most importantly because there is no understanding in the social nor political sphere for legalization of voluntary sterilization as a form of birth control, apart from the clear necessity for this, first, step. They are: the recognition that voluntary sterilization is an efficient and safe birth control method, respectability of basic human as well as sexual and reproductive rights, spreading of sterilization as a form of birth control among population of both developed and developing countries and an epidemic diffusion of repeated induced abortions in Serbia. Thus individual recognition of the advantages of relying on voluntary sterilization, in a non-encouraging atmosphere, certainly represents one more argument to enable couples to prevent conception by sterilization. Since it was impossible to carry out a representative research among the population of men and women who are at risk for conception, an attempt was made to obtain a reply to the set question among women who decided to induce abortion. It was done out of at least two reasons. The first being that women with induced abortion in their reproductive history were the target group for voluntary sterilization. The second reason was based on the assumption that bringing a decision on induced abortion is preceded by the reconsideration of an earlier adopted strategy regarding children, giving birth and contraception and thus its rational component is revealed more and therefore more easily measurable. The research was carried out in the University Clinic of Obstetrics and Gynecology 'Narodni front' in Belgrade from January 21st o March 1st 2002, and included 296 women. By comparing the social and demographic characteristics of the female respondents, as well as

  12. Effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation during voluntary and non-voluntary stepping movements in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solopova, I A; Selionov, V A; Kazennikov, O V; Ivanenko, Y P

    2014-09-05

    Here, we compared motor evoked potentials (MEP) in response to transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex and the H-reflex during voluntary and vibration-induced air-stepping movements in humans. Both the MEPs (in mm biceps femoris, rectus femoris and tibialis anterior) and H-reflex (in m soleus) were significantly smaller during vibration-induced cyclic leg movements at matched amplitudes of angular motion and muscle activity. These findings highlight differences between voluntary and non-voluntary activation of the spinal pattern generator circuitry in humans, presumably due to an extra facilitatory effect of voluntary control/triggering of stepping on spinal motoneurons and interneurons. The results support the idea of active engagement of supraspinal motor areas in developing central pattern generator-modulating therapies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Decrease of muscle fiber conduction velocity correlates with strength loss after an endurance run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, Gennaro; Dardanello, Davide; Tarperi, Cantor; Rosso, Valeria; Festa, Luca; La Torre, Antonio; Pellegrini, Barbara; Schena, Federico; Rainoldi, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    Monitoring surface electromyographic (EMG) signals can provide useful insights for characterizing muscle fatigue, which is defined as an exercise-induced strength loss. This experiment investigated the muscle fiber conduction velocity (CV) changes induced by an endurance run. The day before and immediately after a half-marathon run (21.097 km) 11 amateur runners performed maximum voluntary contractions (MVCs) of knee extensor muscles. During the MVC, multichannel EMG was recorded from the vastus lateralis and EMG amplitude and CV were calculated. After the run, knee extensors showed a decreased strength (-13  ±  9%, p  =  0.001) together with a reduction in EMG amplitude (-13  ±  10%, p  =  0.003) and in CV (-6  ±  8%, p  =  0.032). Knee extensor strength loss positively correlated with vastus lateralis CV differences (r  =  0.76, p  =  0.006). Thus, the exercises-induced muscle fatigue was associated not only with a decrease in EMG amplitude, but also with a reduction in CV. This finding suggests that muscle fibers with higher CV (i.e. those with greater fiber size) were the most impaired during strength production after an endurance run.

  14. The importance of exercise to obesity treatment

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Exercise is an important tool for obesity treatment. Exercise decrease the loss of lean body mass which occurs in restricted diets and also increase energy expenditure. This review discusses the effects of exercise on body composition, metabolism and health, as well as the role of exercise inducing and maintaining weight loss. Furthermore this review demonstrate the components of an exercise prescription and examine the benefits of increasing lifestyle activity, combined with efforts to decr...

  15. Moving from voluntary euthanasia to non-voluntary euthanasia: equality and compassion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaraskekara, Kumar; Bagaric, Mirko

    2004-09-01

    The recent Dutch law legalising active voluntary euthanasia will reignite the euthanasia debate. An illuminating method for evaluating the moral status of a practice is to follow the implications of the practice to its logical conclusion. The argument for compassion is one of the central arguments in favour of voluntary active euthanasia. This argument applies perhaps even more forcefully in relation to incompetent patients. If active voluntary euthanasia is legalised, arguments based on compassion and equality will be directed towards legalising active non-voluntary euthanasia in order to make accelerated termination of death available also to the incompetent. The removal of discrimination against the incompetent has the potential to become as potent a catch-cry as the right to die. However, the legalisation of non-voluntary euthanasia is undesirable. A review of the relevant authorities reveals that there is no coherent and workable "best interests" test which can be invoked to decide whether an incompetent patient is better off dead. This provides a strong reason for not stepping onto the slippery path of permitting active voluntary euthanasia.

  16. Impact of high-fat diet and voluntary running on body weight and endothelial function in LDL receptor knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langbein, Heike; Hofmann, Anja; Brunssen, Coy; Goettsch, Winfried; Morawietz, Henning

    2015-05-01

    Obesity and physical inactivity are important cardiovascular risk factors. Regular physical exercise has been shown to mediate beneficial effects in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. However, the impact of physical exercise on endothelial function in proatherosclerotic low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient (LDLR(-/-)) mice has not been studied so far. Six-week-old male LDLR(-/-) mice were fed a standard diet or a high-fat diet (39 kcal% fat diet) for 20 weeks. The impact of high-fat diet and voluntary running on body weight and amount of white adipose tissue was monitored. Basal tone and endothelial function was investigated in aortic rings using a Mulvany myograph. LDLR(-/-) mice on high-fat diet had increased cumulative food energy intake, but also higher physical activity compared to mice on control diet. Body weight and amount of visceral and retroperitoneal white adipose tissue of LDLR(-/-) mice were significantly increased by high-fat diet and partially reduced by voluntary running. Endothelial function in aortae of LDLR(-/-) mice was impaired after 20 weeks on standard and high-fat diet and could not be improved by voluntary running. Basal tone showed a trend to be increased by high-fat diet. Voluntary running reduced body weight and amount of white adipose tissue in LDLR(-/-) mice. Endothelial dysfunction in LDLR(-/-) mice could not be improved by voluntary running. In a clinical context, physical exercise alone might not have an influence on functional parameters and LDL-C levels in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia. However, physical activity in these patients may be in general beneficial and should be performed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Early Maternal Deprivation Enhances Voluntary Alcohol Intake Induced by Exposure to Stressful Events Later in Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Peñasco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we aimed to assess the impact of early life stress, in the form of early maternal deprivation (MD, 24 h on postnatal day, pnd, 9, on voluntary alcohol intake in adolescent male and female Wistar rats. During adolescence, from pnd 28 to pnd 50, voluntary ethanol intake (20%, v/v was investigated using the two-bottle free choice paradigm. To better understand the relationship between stress and alcohol consumption, voluntary alcohol intake was also evaluated following additional stressful events later in life, that is, a week of alcohol cessation and a week of alcohol cessation combined with exposure to restraint stress. Female animals consumed more alcohol than males only after a second episode of alcohol cessation combined with restraint stress. MD did not affect baseline voluntary alcohol intake but increased voluntary alcohol intake after stress exposure, indicating that MD may render animals more vulnerable to the effects of stress on alcohol intake. During adolescence, when animals had free access to alcohol, MD animals showed lower body weight gain but a higher growth rate than control animals. Moreover, the higher growth rate was accompanied by a decrease in food intake, suggesting an altered metabolic regulation in MD animals that may interact with alcohol intake.

  18. Early maternal deprivation enhances voluntary alcohol intake induced by exposure to stressful events later in life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñasco, Sara; Mela, Virginia; López-Moreno, Jose Antonio; Viveros, María-Paz; Marco, Eva M

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to assess the impact of early life stress, in the form of early maternal deprivation (MD, 24 h on postnatal day, pnd, 9), on voluntary alcohol intake in adolescent male and female Wistar rats. During adolescence, from pnd 28 to pnd 50, voluntary ethanol intake (20%, v/v) was investigated using the two-bottle free choice paradigm. To better understand the relationship between stress and alcohol consumption, voluntary alcohol intake was also evaluated following additional stressful events later in life, that is, a week of alcohol cessation and a week of alcohol cessation combined with exposure to restraint stress. Female animals consumed more alcohol than males only after a second episode of alcohol cessation combined with restraint stress. MD did not affect baseline voluntary alcohol intake but increased voluntary alcohol intake after stress exposure, indicating that MD may render animals more vulnerable to the effects of stress on alcohol intake. During adolescence, when animals had free access to alcohol, MD animals showed lower body weight gain but a higher growth rate than control animals. Moreover, the higher growth rate was accompanied by a decrease in food intake, suggesting an altered metabolic regulation in MD animals that may interact with alcohol intake.

  19. Excitability changes in primary motor cortex just prior to voluntary muscle relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tomotaka; Sugawara, Kenichi; Takagi, Mineko; Higashi, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    We postulated that primary motor cortex (M1) activity does not just decrease immediately prior to voluntary muscle relaxation; rather, it is dynamic and acts as an active cortical process. Thus we investigated the detailed time course of M1 excitability changes during muscle relaxation. Ten healthy participants performed a simple reaction time task. After the go signal, they rapidly terminated isometric abduction of the right index finger from a constant muscle force output of 20% of their maximal voluntary contraction force and performed voluntary muscle relaxation. Transcranial magnetic stimulation pulses were randomly delivered before and after the go signal, and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded from the right first dorsal interosseous muscle. We selected the time course relative to an appropriate reference point, the onset of voluntary relaxation, to detect excitability changes in M1. MEP amplitude from 80 to 60 ms before the estimated electromyographic offset was significantly greater than that in other intervals. Dynamic excitability changes in M1 just prior to quick voluntary muscle relaxation indicate that cortical control of muscle relaxation is established through active processing and not by simple cessation of activity. The cortical mechanisms underlying muscle relaxation need to be reconsidered in light of such dynamics. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  20. 5 CFR 919.1020 - Voluntary exclusion or voluntarily excluded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Voluntary exclusion or voluntarily excluded. 919.1020 Section 919.1020 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED...) Definitions § 919.1020 Voluntary exclusion or voluntarily excluded. (a) Voluntary exclusion means a person's...

  1. 37 CFR 351.2 - Voluntary negotiation period; settlement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Voluntary negotiation period... CONGRESS COPYRIGHT ROYALTY JUDGES RULES AND PROCEDURES PROCEEDINGS § 351.2 Voluntary negotiation period..., the Copyright Royalty Judges will announce the beginning of a voluntary negotiation period and...

  2. 15 CFR 12.3 - Development of voluntary product standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Development of voluntary product... AND LABELING § 12.3 Development of voluntary product standards. (a) Invitation to participate in the development of a voluntary product standard. Whenever the Secretary publishes a final determination of...

  3. Physical exercise improves brain cortex and cerebellum mitochondrial bioenergetics and alters apoptotic, dynamic and auto(mito)phagy markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques-Aleixo, I; Santos-Alves, E; Balça, M M; Rizo-Roca, D; Moreira, P I; Oliveira, P J; Magalhães, J; Ascensão, A

    2015-08-20

    We here investigate the effects of two exercise modalities (endurance treadmill training-TM and voluntary free-wheel activity-FW) on the brain cortex and cerebellum mitochondrial bioenergetics, permeability transition pore (mPTP), oxidative stress, as well as on proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, apoptosis, and quality control. Eighteen male rats were assigned to sedentary-SED, TM and FW groups. Behavioral alterations and ex vivo brain mitochondrial function endpoints were assessed. Proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS, including the adenine nucleotide translocator), oxidative stress markers and regulatory proteins (SIRT3, p66shc, UCP2, carbonyls, MDA, -SH, aconitase, Mn-SOD), as well as proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC1α, TFAM) were evaluated. Apoptotic signaling was measured through quantifying caspase 3, 8 and 9-like activities, Bax, Bcl2, CypD, and cofilin expression. Mitochondrial dynamics (Mfn1/2, OPA1 and DRP1) and auto(mito)phagy (LC3II, Beclin1, Pink1, Parkin, p62)-related proteins were also measured by Western blotting. Only the TM exercise group showed increased spontaneous alternation and exploratory activity. Both exercise regimens improved mitochondrial respiratory activity, increased OXPHOS complexes I, III and V subunits in both brain subareas and decreased oxidative stress markers. Increased resistance to mPTP and decreased apoptotic signaling were observed in the brain cortex from TM and in the cerebellum from TM and FW groups. Also, exercise increased the expression of proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, autophagy and fusion, simultaneous with decreased expression of mitochondrial fission-related protein DRP1. In conclusion, physical exercise improves brain cortex and cerebellum mitochondrial function, decreasing oxidative stress and apoptotic related markers. It is also possible that favorable alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics and autophagy signaling induced by exercise

  4. Physical exercise exacerbates memory deficits induced by intracerebroventricular STZ but improves insulin regulation of H₂O₂ production in mice synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Alexandre P; Zimmer, Eduardo Rigon; Kalinine, Eduardo; Haas, Clarissa B; Oses, Jean Pierre; Martimbianco de Assis, Adriano; Galina, Antonio; Souza, Diogo O; Portela, Luis Valmor

    2012-01-01

    Insulin brain resistant state is associated with cognitive deficits and Alzheimer's disease by mechanisms that may involve mitochondrial damage and oxidative stress. Conversely, physical exercise improves cognitive function and brain insulin signaling. The intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of streptozotocin (STZ) in rodents is an established model of insulin-resistant brain state. This study evaluates the effects of physical exercise on memory performance of i.c.v., STZ-treated mice(1 and 3 mg/kg) and whether insulin (50 and 100 ng/ml) modulates mitochondrial H₂O₂ generation in synaptosomes. S100B levels and SOD and CAT activities were assessed as markers of brain damage caused by STZ. Sedentary and exercise vehicle-treated mice demonstrated similar performance in object recognition memory task. In the water maze test, exercise vehicle-treated mice showed improvement performance in the acquisition and retrieval phases. The administration of STZ (1 mg/kg) before thirty days of voluntary physical exercise protocol impaired recognition and spatial memory only in exercised mice, whereas STZ (3 mg/kg) impaired the performance of sedentary and exercise groups. Moreover, STZ (3 mg/kg) increased hippocampal S100B levels in both groups and SOD/CAT ratio in the sedentary animals. Insulin decreased synaptosomal H₂O₂ production in exercised compared to sedentary mice; however, both STZ doses abolished this effect. Normal brain insulin signaling is mechanistically involved in the improvement of cognitive function induced by exercise through the regulation of mitochondrial H₂O₂ production. However, a prior blockade of brain insulin signaling with STZ abolished the benefits of exercise on memory performance and mitochondrial H₂O₂ regulation.

  5. Simulation Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansey, Pat

    1976-01-01

    Describes five simulation exercises: a problem for a student teacher, an industrial relations game, a series of student problems; an international relations crisis, and a sociological exercise on public and private opinions. (LS)

  6. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... provide well-rounded core strengthening programs. Simple exercises can be done at home as well. Some specific ... benefit from this exercise... Sagittal Core Strengthening You can stretch and strengthen the low back muscles that ...

  7. Benzyl alcohol increases voluntary ethanol drinking in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etelälahti, T J; Eriksson, C J P

    2014-09-01

    The anabolic steroid nandrolone decanoate has been reported to increase voluntary ethanol intake in Wistar rats. In recent experiments we received opposite results, with decreased voluntary ethanol intake in both high drinking AA and low drinking Wistar rats after nandrolone treatment. The difference between the two studies was that we used pure nandrolone decanoate in oil, whereas in the previous study the nandrolone product Deca-Durabolin containing benzyl alcohol (BA) was used. The aims of the present study were to clarify whether the BA treatment could promote ethanol drinking and to assess the role of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-gonadal axes (HPAGA) in the potential BA effect. Male AA and Wistar rats received subcutaneously BA or vehicle oil for 14 days. Hereafter followed a 1-week washout and consecutively a 3-week voluntary alcohol consumption period. The median (± median absolute deviation) voluntary ethanol consumption during the drinking period was higher in BA-treated than in control rats (4.94 ± 1.31 g/kg/day vs. 4.17 ± 0.31 g/kg/day, p = 0.07 and 1.01 ± 0.26 g/kg/day vs. 0.38 ± 0.27 g/kg/day, p = 0.05, for AA and Wistar rats, respectively; combined effect p < 0.01). The present results can explain the previous discrepancy between the two nandrolone studies. No significant BA effects on basal and ethanol-mediated serum testosterone and corticosterone levels were observed in blood samples taken at days 1, 8 and 22. However, 2h after ethanol administration significantly (p = 0.02) higher frequency of testosterone elevations was detected in high drinking AA rats compared to low drinking Wistars, which supports our previous hypotheses of a role of testosterone elevation in promoting ethanol drinking. Skin irritation and dermatitis were shown exclusively in the BA-treated animals. Altogether, the present results indicate that earlier findings obtained with Deca-Durabolin containing BA need to be re-evaluated.

  8. Brain temperature and exercise performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Lars

    2012-01-01

    will impair voluntary motor activation during sustained maximal contractions. In humans the brain temperature increases in parallel with that of the body core making it very difficult to evaluate the independent effect of the cerebral temperature. Experiments with separate manipulation of the brain...... temperature in exercising goats indicate that excessive brain hyperthermia will directly affect motor performance. However, several homeostatic changes arise in parallel with hyperthermia including factors that may influence both peripheral and central fatigue and it is likely that these changes interact...... with the inhibitory effect of an elevated brain temperature....

  9. Oxidative Stress Is a Central Target for Physical Exercise Neuroprotection Against Pathological Brain Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Mesa, Yoelvis; Colie, Sandra; Corpas, Rubén; Cristòfol, Rosa; Comellas, Francesc; Nebreda, Angel R; Giménez-Llort, Lydia; Sanfeliu, Coral

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise is suggested for preventing or delaying senescence and Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have examined its therapeutic value in the advanced stage of AD-like pathology in 3xTg-AD female mice through voluntary wheel running from 12 to 15 months of age. Mice submitted to exercise showed improved body fitness, immunorejuvenation, improvement of behavior and cognition, and reduced amyloid and tau pathology. Brain tissue analysis of aged 3xTg-AD mice showed high levels of oxidative damage. However, this damage was decreased by physical exercise through regulation of redox homeostasis. Network analyses showed that oxidative stress was a central event, which correlated with AD-like pathology and the AD-related behaviors of anxiety, apathy, and cognitive loss. This study corroborates the importance of redox mechanisms in the neuroprotective effect of physical exercise, and supports the theory of the crucial role of oxidative stress in the switch from normal brain aging to pathological aging and AD.

  10. L-citrulline-malate influence over branched chain amino acid utilization during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureda, Antoni; Córdova, Alfredo; Ferrer, Miguel D; Pérez, Gerardo; Tur, Josep A; Pons, Antoni

    2010-09-01

    Exhaustive exercise induces disturbances in metabolic homeostasis which can result in amino acid catabolism and limited L-arginine availability. Oral L-citrulline supplementation raises plasma L-arginine concentration and augments NO-dependent signalling. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of diet supplementation with L-citrulline-malate prior to intense exercise on the metabolic handle of plasma amino acids and on the products of metabolism of arginine as creatinine, urea and nitrite and the possible effects on the hormonal levels. Seventeen voluntary male pre-professional cyclists were randomly assigned to one of two groups: control or supplemented (6 g L-citrulline-malate 2 h prior exercise) and participated in a 137-km cycling stage. Blood samples were taken in basal conditions, 15 min after the race and 3 h post race (recovery). Most essential amino acids significantly decreased their plasma concentration as a result of exercise; however, most non-essential amino acids tended to significantly increase their concentration. Citrulline-malate ingestion significantly increased the plasma concentration of citrulline, arginine, ornithine, urea, creatinine and nitrite (p urea.

  11. Voluntary Running Depreciates the Requirement of Ca[superscript 2+]-Stimulated cAMP Signaling in Synaptic Potentiation and Memory Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fei; Zhang, Ming; Ding, Qi; Sethna, Ferzin; Yan, Lily; Moon, Changjong; Yang, Miyoung; Wang, Hongbing

    2016-01-01

    Mental health and cognitive functions are influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Although having active lifestyle with physical exercise improves learning and memory, how it interacts with the specific key molecular regulators of synaptic plasticity is largely unknown. Here, we examined the effects of voluntary running on long-term…

  12. Role of feedback in voluntary control of heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuck, S B; Levenson, R W; Hinrichsen, J J; Gryll, S L

    1975-06-01

    The relative effectiveness of biofeedback techniques on the voluntary control of heart rate was examined by randomly assigning 32 Ss to one of four feedback conditions in a bi-directional heart-rate control task: (1) no feedback, (2) binary feedback--S was signaled when an interbeat interval had changed in the correct direction, (3) "real-time," proportional feedback--S was provided information about the relative duration of successive interbeat intervals, and (4) numerical, proportional feedback--each interbeat interval was represented as a numeral indicating its relationship to pre-trial mean by direction and magnitude. Significant over-all heart-rate changes were evidenced for both increase and decrease directions, but no differences were found between the feedback conditions. While these data suggest that feedback may be a relatively insignificant factor in voluntary heart-rate control, it was recommended that further investigation examine the role of feedback within the context of other training, mediating and motivational variables.

  13. The dead donor rule, voluntary active euthanasia, and capital punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coons, Christian; Levin, Noah

    2011-06-01

    We argue that the dead donor rule, which states that multiple vital organs should only be taken from dead patients, is justified neither in principle nor in practice. We use a thought experiment and a guiding assumption in the literature about the justification of moral principles to undermine the theoretical justification for the rule. We then offer two real world analogues to this thought experiment, voluntary active euthanasia and capital punishment, and argue that the moral permissibility of terminating any patient through the removal of vital organs cannot turn on whether or not the practice violates the dead donor rule. Next, we consider practical justifications for the dead donor rule. Specifically, we consider whether there are compelling reasons to promulgate the rule even though its corresponding moral principle is not theoretically justified. We argue that there are no such reasons. In fact, we argue that promulgating the rule may actually decrease public trust in organ procurement procedures and medical institutions generally - even in states that do not permit capital punishment or voluntary active euthanasia. Finally, we examine our case against the dead donor rule in the light of common arguments for it. We find that these arguments are often misplaced - they do not support the dead donor rule. Instead, they support the quite different rule that patients should not be killed for their vital organs.

  14. Voluntary Running Aids to Maintain High Body Temperature in Rats Bred for High Aerobic Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvinen, Sira M; Silvennoinen, Mika; Ma, Hongqiang; Törmäkangas, Timo; Rantalainen, Timo; Rinnankoski-Tuikka, Rita; Lensu, Sanna; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Kainulainen, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    The production of heat, i.e., thermogenesis, is a significant component of the metabolic rate, which in turn affects weight gain and health. Thermogenesis is linked to physical activity (PA) level. However, it is not known whether intrinsic exercise capacity, aging, and long-term voluntary running affect core body temperature. Here we use rat models selectively bred to differ in maximal treadmill endurance running capacity (Low capacity runners, LCR and High capacity Runners, HCR), that as adults are divergent for aerobic exercise capacity, aging, and metabolic disease risk to study the connection between PA and body temperature. Ten high capacity runner (HCR) and ten low capacity runner (LCR) female rats were studied between 9 and 21 months of age. Rectal body temperature of HCR and LCR rats was measured before and after 1-year voluntary running/control intervention to explore the effects of aging and PA. Also, we determined whether injected glucose and spontaneous activity affect the body temperature differently between LCR and HCR rats at 9 vs. 21 months of age. HCRs had on average 1.3°C higher body temperature than LCRs (p temperature level of HCRs to similar levels with LCRs. The opportunity to run voluntarily had a significant impact on the body temperature of HCRs (p temperature at a similar level as when at younger age. Compared to LCRs, HCRs were spontaneously more active, had higher relative gastrocnemius muscle mass and higher UCP2, PGC-1α, cyt c, and OXPHOS levels in the skeletal muscle (p temperature of LCRs. However, glucose injection resulted in a lowering of the body temperature of LCRs (p temperature compared to rats born with low exercise capacity and disease risk. Voluntary running allowed HCRs to maintain high body temperature during aging, which suggests that high PA level was crucial in maintaining the high body temperature of HCRs.

  15. Neuromuscular responses to mild-muscle damaging eccentric exercise in a low glycogen state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, James P; Myers, Stephen D; Willems, Mark E T

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of low muscle glycogen on the neuromuscular responses to maximal eccentric contractions. Fourteen healthy men (22 ± 3 years) performed single-leg cycling (20 min at ~75% maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2 max); eight 90 s sprints at a 1:1 work-to-rest ratio (5% decrements from 90% to 55% V̇O2 max until exhaustion) the evening before 100 eccentric (1.57 rads(-1)) with reduced (RED) and normal glycogen (NORM). Neuromuscular responses were measured during and up to 48 h after with maximal voluntary and involuntary (twitch, 20 Hz and 50 Hz) isometric contractions. During eccentric contractions, peak torque decreased (RED: -16.1 ± 2.5%; NORM: -6.2 ± 5.1%) and EMG frequency increased according to muscle length. EMG activity decreased for RED only. After eccentric contractions, maximal isometric force was reduced up to 24h for NORM (-13.5 ± 5.8%) and 48 h for RED (-7.4 ± 10.9%). Twelve hours after eccentric contractions, twitch force and the 20:50 Hz ratio were decreased for RED but not for NORM. Immediate involuntary with prolonged voluntary force loss suggests that reduced glycogen is associated with increased susceptibility to mild muscle-damaging eccentric exercise with contributions of peripheral and central mechanisms to be different during recovery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Acute effect of static stretching on rate of force development and maximal voluntary contraction in older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurjão, André L D; Gonçalves, Raquel; de Moura, Rodrigo F; Gobbi, Sebastião

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate, in older women, the acute effect of static stretching (SS) on both muscle activation and force output. Twenty-three older women (64.6 +/- 7.1 yr) participated in the study. The maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), rate of force development (RFD) (50, 100, 150, and 200 ms relative to onset of muscular contraction), and peak RFD (PRFD) (the steepest slope of the curve during the first 200 ms) were tested under 2 randomly separate conditions: SS and control (C). Electromyographic (EMG) activity of the vastus medialis (VM), vastus lateralis (VL), and biceps femoris (BF) muscles also was assessed. The MVC was significantly lower (p force decreased after their performance of SS exercises. The mechanisms responsible for this effect do not appear to be related to muscle activation. Thus, if flexibility is to be trained, it is recommended that SS does not occur just before the performance of activities that require high levels of muscular force.

  17. Effectiveness of workplace exercise supervised by a physical therapist among nurses conducting shift work: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsugaki, Ryutaro; Kuhara, Satoshi; Saeki, Satoru; Jiang, Ying; Michishita, Ryoma; Ohta, Masanori; Yamato, Hiroshi

    2017-07-27

    This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of supervised exercise among nurses conducting shift work for health promotion. A total of 30 healthy female nurses conducting shift work participated in this study and they were randomly assigned to one of the following 2 groups: The supervised exercise group (SG; participants exercised under the supervision of a physical therapist (PT)) and the voluntary exercise group (VG; participants exercised without supervision). The study participants were asked to exercise twice/week for 12 weeks for 24 sessions. The primary outcome was aerobic fitness, and the secondary outcomes were muscle strength, anthropometric data, biochemical parameters, and mental health. We compared all the outcomes before and after the intervention within each group and between both groups at follow-up. Aerobic fitness increased in the SG whereas it decreased in the VG, but these changes were not statistically significant (p=0.053 and 0.073, respectively). However, the between-group difference was significant in the intervention effect (p=0.010). Muscle strength, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and metabolic profile (high-molecular weight adiponectin), and depressive symptom significantly improved in the SG over time, even though the SG exercised less as compared with the VG. Moreover, significant differences in muscle strength, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and reactive oxygen metabolite levels were observed between both groups, and these parameters were better in the SG than in the VG. Our data-suggest the effectiveness of exercise supervised by a PT at the workplace of nurses conducting shift work for health promotion.

  18. Knee flexion with quadriceps cocontraction: A new therapeutic exercise for the early stage of ACL rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscarini, Andrea; Contemori, Samuele; Busti, Daniele; Botti, Fabio M; Pettorossi, Vito E

    2016-12-08

    Quadriceps strengthening exercises designed for the early phase of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rehabilitation should limit the anterior tibial translation developed by quadriceps contraction near full knee extension, in order to avoid excessive strain on the healing tissue. We hypothesize that knee-flexion exercises with simultaneous voluntary contraction of quadriceps (voluntary quadriceps cocontraction) can yield considerable levels of quadriceps activation while preventing the tibia from translating forward relative to the femur. Electromyographic activity in quadriceps and hamstring muscles was measured in 20 healthy males during isometric knee-flexion exercises executed near full knee extension with maximal voluntary effort of quadriceps cocontraction and external resistance (R) ranging from 0% to 60% of the 1-repetition maximum (1RM). Biomechanical modeling was applied to derive the shear (anterior/posterior) tibiofemoral force developed in each exercise condition. Isometric knee-flexion exercises with small external resistance (R=10% 1RM) and maximal voluntary effort of quadriceps cocontraction yielded a net posterior (ACL-unloading) tibial pull (P=0.005) and levels of activation of 32%, 50%, and 45% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction, for the rectus femoris, vastus medialis, and vastus lateralis, respectively. This exercise might potentially rank as one of the most appropriate quadriceps strengthening interventions in the early phase of ACL rehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. IGF-1 Gene Expression in Rat Colonic Mucosa After Different Exercise Volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehlmeyer, Katja; Doering, Frank; Daniel, Hannelore; Petridou, Anatoli; Mougios, Vassilis; Schulz, Thorsten; Michna, Horst

    2007-01-01

    The evidence is increasing for a close link between the insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system and colon cancer prevention by physical exercise. To reveal exercise-induced alterations in colon mucosa, gene expression of IGF-1 and related genes and serum IGF-1 were investigated. Twenty male Wistar rats performed a 12 week voluntary exercise program. Nine rats served as the control group. Gene expression of IGF-1, IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and IGF-binding protein 3 (IGF-BP3) were quantified by real-time RT-PCR. Circulating IGF-1 was analyzed exercise volume-dependent. Based on 3 distinguished groups with low (L-EX, 8314 m·night-1), we observed lower serum IGF-1 levels (P < 0.05) in all exercise groups as compared to the control group and IGF-1 levels declined proportional to the increase in exercise volume. A significant (p < 0.05) positive correlation was found between IGF-1 concentration and body mass (r = 0.50) and a significant negative correlation exists between body mass and exercise volume (r = -0.50). Significant differences in colonic mRNA levels of IGF-1, IGF-1R and IGF-BP3 could not be observed. Based on our data we propose that the exercise as well as the body mass reduction leads to a decrease in circulating IGF-1 and this might represent a prime link to colon cancer prevention. Key pointsThere were significantly lower serum IGF-1 levels in all exercise groups as compared to the control group.GF-1 levels declined proportional to the increase in exercise volume.A significant positive correlation was found between IGF-1 concentration and body mass and a significant negative correlation was found between body mass and exercise volume.Significant differences in colonic mRNA levels of IGF-1, IGF-1R and IGF-BP3 could not be observed. PMID:24149475

  20. Voluntary running in deer mice: speed, distance, energy costs and temperature effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Mark A; Garland, Theodore; Rezende, Enrico L; Gomes, Fernando R

    2004-10-01

    The energetics of terrestrial locomotion are of considerable interest to ecologists and physiologists, but nearly all of our current knowledge comes from animals undergoing forced exercise. To explore patterns of energy use and behavior during voluntary exercise, we developed methods allowing nearly continuous measurements of metabolic rates in freely behaving small mammals, with high temporal resolution over periods of several days. We used this approach to examine relationships between ambient temperature (Ta), locomotor behavior and energy costs in the deer mouse, a small mammal that routinely encounters a large range of temperatures in its natural habitat. We tested for individual consistency in running behavior and metabolic traits, and determined how locomotor costs vary with speed and Ta. Because of the importance of thermoregulatory costs in small mammals, we checked for substitution of exercise heat for thermostatic heat production at Ta below the thermal neutral zone and determined the fraction of the daily energy budget comprising exercise costs. Locomotor behavior was highly variable among individuals but had high repeatability, at least over short intervals. We found few temperature-related changes in speed or distance run, but Ta strongly affected energy costs. Partial substitution of exercise heat for thermogenic heat occurred at low Ta. This reduced energy expenditure during low-temperature running by 23-37%, but running costs comprised a fairly minor fraction of the energy budget, so the daily energy savings via substitution were much smaller. Deer mice did not adjust running speed to maximize metabolic economy, as they seldom used the high speeds that provide the lowest cost of transport. The highest voluntary speeds (4-5 km h(-1)) were almost always below the predicted maximal aerobic speed, and were much less than the species' maximal sprint speed. Maximum voluntarily attained rates of oxygen consumption (VO2) were highest at low Ta, but rarely

  1. Pre-Exercise Hyperpnea Attenuates Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Without Affecting Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberger, Philipp A.; Scherer, Thomas A.; Spengler, Christina M.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-body warm-up exercises were shown to attenuate exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB). Whether intense pre-exercise hyperpnea offers similar protection and whether this might negatively affect exercise performance is unknown. Nine subjects with EIB (25±5 yrs; forced expiratory volume in 1s [FEV1], 104±15% predicted) performed an exercise challenge (ECh) followed—after 30min—by a constant-load cycling test to exhaustion. The ECh was preceded by one of four conditions: by i) control warm-up (CON) or by 10min of normocapnic hyperpnea with partial rebreathing at either ii) 50% (WU50) or iii) variable intensity (8x 30s-80%/45s-30%; WU80/30), or at iv) 70% (WU70) of maximal voluntary ventilation. FEV1 was measured at baseline and in 5-min intervals until 15min after CON/warm-up and 30min after ECh. None of the warm-up conditions induced EIB. The maximal post-ECh decrease in FEV1 was -13.8±3.1% after CON, −9.3±5.0% after WU50 (p = 0.081 vs. CON), −8.6±7.5% after WU80/30 (p = 0.081 vs. CON) and −7.2±5.0% after WU70 (p = 0.006 vs. CON), and perception of respiratory exertion was significantly attenuated (all p≤0.048), with no difference between warm-up conditions. Only after CON, FEV1 remained significantly reduced up to the start of the cycling endurance test (−8.0±4.3%, p = 0.004). Cycling performance did not differ significantly between test days (CON: 13±7min; WU50: 14±9min; WU80/30: 13±9min; WU70: 14±7min; p = 0.582). These data indicate that intense hyperpnea warm-up is effective in attenuating EIB severity and accelerating lung function recovery while none of the warm-up condition do compromise cycling performance. PMID:27898744

  2. Voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    The Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program, required by Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, records the results of voluntary measures to reduce, avoid, or sequester greenhouse gas emissions. In 1998, 156 US companies and other organizations reported to the Energy information Administration that, during 1997, they had achieved greenhouse gas emission reductions and carbon sequestration equivalent to 166 million tons of carbon dioxide, or about 2.5% of total US emissions for the year. For the 1,229 emission reduction projects reported, reductions usually were measured by comparing an estimate of actual emissions with an estimate of what emissions would have been had the project not been implemented.

  3. Voluntary simulation workshops in nursing education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selberg, Hanne; Nielsen, Mette Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Voluntary simulation workshops in nursing education Hanne Selberg1, Mette Elisabeth Nielsen1, Mette Wenzel Horsted2, Karen Bertelsen2, Marianne Linnet Rasmussen2,Rikke Lohmann Panton3, Copenhagen, Mette Kjeldal Jensen4 Background Changes in nursing education in Denmark towards an academic approach...... with more theory and less practical training have resulted in discussions regarding the lack of practical skills amongst novice nurses. A Danish study of students’ drop-out from the nursing education indicates that difficulties in combining theory and practice are one of the motivating factors behind...... the students’ decision to drop out (Jensen et al. 2008). Within the past year our faculty has conducted several projects with the aim of integrating simulation into the curriculum. Furthermore, voluntary simulation workshop has been carried out as an additional offer in the nursing education. The purpose has...

  4. The Political Importance of Voluntary Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunneman, Harry

    This paper aims to develop a complex articulation of the civic meaningfulness of voluntary work that clarifies its political importance as a countervailing narrative pointing beyond dominant neoliberal and consumptive articulations of a good life. To start with, it sketches a hermeneutic perspective on civic meaningfulness based on the work of Paul Ricoeur. Subsequently, it introduces the ideas of 'ethical complexity', 'epistemological complexity' and 'diapoiesis', building on insights from critical complexity thinking and relational biology. It argues that these notions can provide a bridge between hermeneutic perspectives on meaning and values, on the one hand, and questions of meaning and values on the level of scientific and technological developments and within professional organizations, on the other. Thus a broader, more complex picture emerges of the civic meaningfulness of voluntary work in our times.

  5. Factors that affect voluntary vaccination of children in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shono, Aiko; Kondo, Masahide

    2015-03-10

    Some important vaccinations are not included in the routine childhood immunization schedule in Japan. Voluntary vaccinations are usually paid as an out-of-pocket expense. Low voluntary vaccination coverage rates and high target disease incidence are assumed to be a consequence of voluntary vaccination. Therefore, this study aimed to explore factors associated with voluntary vaccination patterns in children. We conducted an online survey of 1243 mothers from a registered survey panel who had at least one child 2 months to vaccination mainly correlated positively with annual household income and mothers' positive opinions about voluntary vaccinations, but negatively with number of children. Financial support, especially for low income households and households with more than one child, may motivate parents to vaccinate their children. Communication is also an important issue. More opportunities for education and information about voluntary vaccinations should be provided to mothers without distinguishing between voluntary and routine vaccination.

  6. Voluntary limit setting and player choice in most intense online gamblers: an empirical study of gambling behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Michael; Griffiths, Mark D

    2013-12-01

    Social responsibility in gambling has become a major issue for the gaming industry. The possibility for online gamblers to set voluntary time and money limits are a social responsibility practice that is now widespread among online gaming operators. The main issue concerns whether the voluntary setting of such limits has any positive impact on subsequent gambling behaviour and whether such measures are of help to problem gamblers. In this paper, this issue is examined through data collected from a representative random sample of 100,000 players who gambled on the win2day gambling website. When opening an account at the win2day site, there is a mandatory requirement for all players to set time and cash-in limits (that cannot exceed 800 per week). During a 3-month period, all voluntary time and/or money limit setting behaviour by a subsample of online gamblers (n = 5,000) within this mandatory framework was tracked and recorded for subsequent data analysis. From the 5,000 gamblers, the 10 % most intense players (as measured by theoretical loss) were further investigated. Voluntary spending limits had the highest significant effect on subsequent monetary spending among casino and lottery gamblers. Monetary spending among poker players significantly decreased after setting a voluntary time limit. The highest significant decrease in playing duration was among poker players after setting a voluntary playing duration limit. The results of the study demonstrated that voluntary limit setting had a specific and significant effect on the studied gamblers. Therefore, voluntary limits appear to show an appropriate effect in the desired target group (i.e., the most gaming intense players).

  7. Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions: Voluntary reporting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report on their emissions of greenhouse gases, and on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions or sequestered carbon, to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This, the second annual report of the Voluntary Reporting Program, describes information provided by the participating organizations on their aggregate emissions and emissions reductions, as well as their emissions reduction or avoidance projects, through 1995. This information has been compiled into a database that includes reports from 142 organizations and descriptions of 967 projects that either reduced greenhouse gas emissions or sequestered carbon. Fifty-one reporters also provided estimates of emissions, and emissions reductions achieved, for their entire organizations. The projects described actions taken to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide from energy production and use; to reduce methane and nitrous oxide emissions from energy use, waste management, and agricultural processes; to reduce emissions of halocarbons, such as CFCs and their replacements; and to increase carbon sequestration.

  8. Voluntary Green Power Market Forecast through 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, L.; Holt, E.; Sumner, J.; Kreycik, C.

    2010-05-01

    Various factors influence the development of the voluntary 'green' power market--the market in which consumers purchase or produce power from non-polluting, renewable energy sources. These factors include climate policies, renewable portfolio standards (RPS), renewable energy prices, consumers' interest in purchasing green power, and utilities' interest in promoting existing programs and in offering new green options. This report presents estimates of voluntary market demand for green power through 2015 that were made using historical data and three scenarios: low-growth, high-growth, and negative-policy impacts. The resulting forecast projects the total voluntary demand for renewable energy in 2015 to range from 63 million MWh annually in the low case scenario to 157 million MWh annually in the high case scenario, representing an approximately 2.5-fold difference. The negative-policy impacts scenario reflects a market size of 24 million MWh. Several key uncertainties affect the results of this forecast, including uncertainties related to growth assumptions, the impacts that policy may have on the market, the price and competitiveness of renewable generation, and the level of interest that utilities have in offering and promoting green power products.

  9. Strenuous resistance exercise effects on magnetic resonance diffusion parameters and muscle-tendon function in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Osamu; Kurihara, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Naoyuki; Fukubayashi, Toru

    2011-10-01

    To assess the effects of strenuous exercise on magnetic resonance diffusion parameters and muscle-tendon complex function in skeletal muscle. Six men performed ankle plantar flexion exercises with eccentric contraction. The fractional anisotropy (FA), λ(1) , λ(2) , λ(3) , mean diffusivity (MD), and T(2) values in the triceps surae muscles were measured by magnetic resonance diffusion tensor and spin-echo imaging. Passive torque of plantar flexors, maximal voluntary isometric plantar flexion torques (MVIP), and Achilles tendon stiffness during MVIP were measured by combined ultrasonography and dynamometry. Plasma creatine kinase and muscle soreness were also assessed. These parameters were measured before and 1-8 days postexercise. The medial gastrocnemius exhibited significantly decreased FA 2-5 days after, increased λ(2) 3 days after, and increased λ(3) 2 and 3 days after exercise. This muscle also showed significantly increased MD and T(2) values 3 days postexercise. MVIP significantly decreased 2 and 3 days postexercise, while passive torque significantly increased 2 days postexercise. Creatine kinase and muscle soreness increased 3-5 days and 1-5 days postexercise, respectively. Exercise-induced muscle damage manifested as significant changes in muscle diffusion parameters with muscle-tendon complex dysfunction and delayed-onset muscle soreness. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Exercise addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landolfi, Emilio

    2013-02-01

    This article examines the nature of exercise addiction. It presents a broad, congruent and discerning narrative literature review with the aim of providing a deeper understanding of the condition 'exercise addiction', including symptoms and options for treatment. In addition, guidelines are provided with respect to 'healthy' levels of exercise. Criteria used for determining the eligibility of studies evaluated in the review included the provision of relevant information in studies identified using pertinent search terms. The review highlights some of the key distinctions between healthy levels of exercise and exercise addiction. The findings suggest that an individual who is addicted to exercise will continue exercising regardless of physical injury, personal inconvenience or disruption to other areas of life including marital strain, interference with work and lack of time for other activities. 'Addicted' exercisers are more likely to exercise for intrinsic rewards and experience disturbing deprivation sensations when unable to exercise. In contrast, 'committed' exercisers engage in physical activity for extrinsic rewards and do not suffer severe withdrawal symptoms when they cannot exercise. Exercisers must acquire a sense of life-balance while embracing an attitude conducive to sustainable long-term physical, psychological and social health outcomes. Implementation of recommendations by the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology, which states that all apparently healthy adults between 18 and 64 years of age should accumulate at least 150 minutes of moderate (5 or 6 on a scale of 0-10) to vigorous (7 or 8 on a scale of 0-10) intensity aerobic physical activity per week in bouts of 10 minutes or more, also expressed as 30 minutes per day distributed over 5 days per week, would be a good start.

  11. Reduced susceptibility to eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage in resistance-trained men is not linked to resistance training-related neural adaptations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, TW; Wages, NP

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of maximal concentric vs. eccentric exercise on the isometric strength of the elbow flexor, as well as the biceps brachii muscle electromyographic (EMG) responses in resistance-trained (RT) vs. untrained (UT) men. Thirteen RT men (age: 24 ± 4 years; height: 180.2 ± 7.7 cm; body weight: 92.2 ± 16.9 kg) and twelve UT men (age: 23 ± 4 years; height: 179.2 ± 5.0 cm; body weight: 81.5 ± 8.6 kg) performed six sets of ten maximal concentric isokinetic (CON) or eccentric isokinetic (ECC) elbow flexion exercise in two separate visits. Before and after the exercise interventions, maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) were performed for testing isometric strength. In addition, bipolar surface EMG signals were detected from the biceps brachii muscle during the strength testing. Both CON and ECC caused isometric strength to decrease, regardless of the training status. However, ECC caused greater isometric strength decline than CON did for the UT group (p = 0.006), but not for the RT group. Both EMG amplitude and mean frequency significantly decreased and increased, respectively, regardless of the training status and exercise intervention. Resistance-trained men are less susceptible to eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage, but this advantage is not likely linked to the chronic resistance training-induced neural adaptations. PMID:26424922

  12. Exercise and age

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It is never too late to start exercising. Exercise has benefits at any age. Don't worry if you ... to tie your shoes Alternative Names Age and exercise Images Benefit of regular exercise Flexibility exercise Exercise and age ...

  13. Enhanced muscle glucose metabolism after exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Garetto, L P; Goodman, M N

    1984-01-01

    Studies in the rat suggest that after voluntary exercise there are two phases of glycogen repletion in skeletal muscle (preceding study). In phase I glucose utilization and glycogen synthesis are enhanced both in the presence and absence of insulin, whereas in phase II only the increase in the pr......Studies in the rat suggest that after voluntary exercise there are two phases of glycogen repletion in skeletal muscle (preceding study). In phase I glucose utilization and glycogen synthesis are enhanced both in the presence and absence of insulin, whereas in phase II only the increase...... in the presence of insulin is found. To determine whether these alterations and in particular those mediated by insulin are due to local or systemic factors, one hindlimb of an anesthetized rat was electrically stimulated, and both hindlimbs were perfused immediately thereafter. Glucose and glycogen metabolism...... in the stimulated leg closely mimicked that observed previously after voluntary exercise on a treadmill. With no insulin added to the perfusate, glucose incorporation into glycogen was markedly enhanced in muscles that were glycogen depleted as were the uptake of 2-deoxyglucose and 3-O-methylglucose. Likewise...

  14. Brain temperature and exercise performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nybo, Lars

    2012-03-01

    Events arising within the central nervous system seem to be a major factor in the aetiology of hyperthermia-induced fatigue. Thus, various studies with superimposed electrical nerve stimulation or transcranial magnetic stimulation have shown that both passive and exercise-induced hyperthermia will impair voluntary motor activation during sustained maximal contractions. In humans, the brain temperature increases in parallel with that of the body core, making it very difficult to evaluate the independent effect of the cerebral temperature. Experiments with separate manipulation of the brain temperature in exercising goats indicate that excessive brain hyperthermia will directly affect motor performance. However, several homeostatic changes arise in parallel with hyperthermia, including factors that may influence both peripheral and central fatigue, and it is likely that these changes interact with the inhibitory effect of an elevated brain temperature.

  15. Sex modifies exercise and cardiac adaptation in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konhilas, JP; Maass, AH; Luckey, SW; Stauffer, BL; Olson, EN; Leinwand, LA

    2004-01-01

    How an individual's sex and genetic background modify cardiac adaptation to increased workload is a topic of great interest. We systematically evaluated morphological and physiological cardiac adaptation in response to voluntary and forced exercise. We found that sex/gender is a dominant factor in e

  16. Maternal exercise during pregnancy promotes physical activity in adult offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eclarinal, Jesse D; Zhu, Shaoyu; Baker, Maria S; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe B; Coarfa, Cristian; Fiorotto, Marta L; Waterland, Robert A

    2016-07-01

    Previous rodent studies have shown that maternal voluntary exercise during pregnancy leads to metabolic changes in adult offspring. We set out to test whether maternal voluntary exercise during pregnancy also induces persistent changes in voluntary physical activity in the offspring. Adult C57BL/6J female mice were randomly assigned to be caged with an unlocked (U) or locked (L) running wheel before and during pregnancy. Maternal running behavior was monitored during pregnancy, and body weight, body composition, food intake, energy expenditure, total cage activity, and running wheel activity were measured in the offspring at various ages. U offspring were slightly heavier at birth, but no group differences in body weight or composition were observed at later ages (when mice were caged without access to running wheels). Consistent with our hypothesis, U offspring were more physically active as adults. This effect was observed earlier in female offspring (at sexual maturation). Remarkably, at 300 d of age, U females achieved greater fat loss in response to a 3-wk voluntary exercise program. Our findings show for the first time that maternal physical activity during pregnancy affects the offspring's lifelong propensity for physical activity and may have important implications for combating the worldwide epidemic of physical inactivity and obesity.-Eclarinal, J. D., Zhu, S., Baker, M. S., Piyarathna, D. B., Coarfa, C., Fiorotto, M. L., Waterland, R. A. Maternal exercise during pregnancy promotes physical activity in adult offspring. © FASEB.

  17. Can exercise prevent cognitive decline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrman, Sophie; Ebmeier, Klaus P

    2014-01-01

    As the tolerability of pharmacological agents decreases with age, exercise may be particularly helpful as a possible treatment or stabiliser of mood and cognitive function in older age. Exercise has been most commonly evaluated for the treatment of depression. Exercise interventions designed primarily for treatment of physical conditions in the elderly do appear to confer psychological benefits as well, with reduction in depressive symptoms over the course of treatment. The effects of exercise on reducing depressive symptoms are not dissimilar to the effects of antidepressant drugs and cognitive behaviour therapy. Exercise may be a useful low-tech intervention for people with mild to moderate depression. In particular, exercise may be helpful in the elderly and in patients who have had insufficient response to, or are intolerant of, pharmacotherapy. Mastery of a new skill and positive feedback from others may increase feelings of self-esteem and improve mood. Exercise may distract participants from persistent negative thoughts. Exercise has been shown to improve executive function acutely in adults of all ages. It is possible that dance routines or other exercise regimens requiring some cognitive input may confer additional benefit to cognitive function. Exercise has a moderate effect on the ability of people with dementia to perform activities of daily living and may improve cognitive function. Midlife exercise may also have an impact on later cognitive function.

  18. Force depression following muscle shortening in sub-maximal voluntary contractions of human adductor pollicis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousanoglou, Elissavet N; Oskouei, Ali E; Herzog, Walter

    2007-01-01

    Mechanical properties of skeletal muscles are often studied for controlled, electrically induced, maximal, or supra-maximal contractions. However, many mechanical properties, such as the force-length relationship and force enhancement following active muscle stretching, are quite different for maximal and sub-maximal, or electrically induced and voluntary contractions. Force depression, the loss of force observed following active muscle shortening, has been observed and is well documented for electrically induced and maximal voluntary contractions. Since sub-maximal voluntary contractions are arguably the most important for everyday movement analysis and for biomechanical models of skeletal muscle function, it is important to study force depression properties under these conditions. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine force depression following sub-maximal, voluntary contractions. Sets of isometric reference and isometric-shortening-isometric test contractions at 30% of maximal voluntary effort were performed with the adductor pollicis muscle. All reference and test contractions were executed by controlling force or activation using a feedback system. Test contractions included adductor pollicis shortening over 10 degrees, 20 degrees, and 30 degrees of thumb adduction. Force depression was assessed by comparing the steady-state isometric forces (activation control) or average electromyograms (EMGs) (force control) following active muscle shortening with those obtained in the corresponding isometric reference contractions. Force was decreased by 20% and average EMG was increased by 18% in the shortening test contractions compared to the isometric reference contractions. Furthermore, force depression was increased with increasing shortening amplitudes, and the relative magnitudes of force depression were similar to those found in electrically stimulated and maximal contractions. We conclude from these results that force depression occurs in sub

  19. Determinants of Voluntary National Health Insurance Drop-Out in Eastern Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberholz, Chantal; Fakihammed, Wael Ahmed

    2017-04-01

    Low enrolment and high drop-out rates are common problems in voluntary health insurance schemes. Yet, most studies in this research area focus on community-based health insurance and enrolment, rather than drop-out. This study examines what causes informal sector families not to renew their voluntary National Health Insurance Fund (NHIF) health insurance membership in Eastern Sudan. Primary data from about 600 informal sector households that dropped out or remained insured, collected through a household survey conducted in March 2014, were used. Logistic regressions were employed to examine what determines drop-out of the voluntary NHIF scheme. The logistic regression results are consistent with the existing literature and confirm the importance of household head, household and community characteristics. Notably, worse family health status and higher health care utilization decrease the probability of drop-out, which requires further analysis as it may indicate the problem of adverse selection and insufficient risk management. Most importantly, the results consistently show that household heads who are satisfied with health services and those who understand the main features of the voluntary NHIF scheme are less likely to drop out. Also, 30 % of drop-out households hold a social support card and reported that the social support scheme is the main reason for not renewing their voluntary NHIF health insurance membership as they qualify for sponsored NHIF health insurance membership. This study shows that satisfaction with health services and knowledge of the health insurance scheme are important factors explaining drop-out of a national health insurance programme. The results suggest that education and information campaigns should be developed further to raise understanding of the NHIF voluntary scheme. In addition, information systems and coordination between the main agencies should be strengthened to reduce administrative costs and ensure policy coherence.

  20. Metabolic response to light exercise after exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, Stephen P; Clarkson, Priscilla; Patel, Jehangir J

    2002-01-01

    Inherent compromises in substrate metabolism, or impaired perfusion of muscle may contribute to the occurrence of exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis. In this study, the lactate response of the elbow flexor muscles to light exercise was examined in eight subjects (five males, three females) who previously demonstrated rhabdomyolysis with extreme swelling (ES; n = 4) or no swelling (NS; n = 4) of the upper arm after eccentric exercise. Subjects performed identical light exercise bouts (45 s of rapid isotonic biceps curls consisting of both concentric and eccentric actions at 25% of maximum voluntary contraction force) using their previously eccentrically exercised arm (E-ARM) and control arm, which was not used previously to perform eccentric exercise (C-ARM). Blood lactate concentration ([La]b) was assessed 1.5, 3, 4.5, 6, and 9 min post-exercise. Peak [La]b and the area under the curve (AUC) were compared between the E-ARM of the ES and NS groups and between the C-ARM and E-ARM of the ES group. The AUC did not differ between the E-ARM of the ES and NS groups (P > 0.05) or between the C-ARM and E-ARM of the ES group (P > 0.05). In the ES group, the increase in [La]b after light exercise with the C-ARM [mean (SD) change, delta: 1.98 (0.7) mmol/l] was not different from the increase after exercising the E-ARM [delta: 2.10 (0.7) mmol/l; P>0.05]. Comparing the response of the E-ARM between groups, the increase in [La]b of the NS group [delta: 1.40 (0.4) mmol/l] was not different than that observed in the ES group [delta: 2.10 (0.7) mmol/l; P>0.05). Thus, subjects who had previously exhibited signs of exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis did not show an abnormal response to low-intensity anaerobic exercise.

  1. Mitochondrial and performance adaptations to exercise training in mice lacking skeletal muscle LKB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Colby B; Madsen, Steven R; Hallowell, David M; Goring, Darren M J; Moore, Timothy M; Hardman, Shalene E; Heninger, Megan R; Atwood, Daniel R; Thomson, David M

    2013-10-15

    LKB1 and its downstream targets of the AMP-activated protein kinase family are important regulators of many aspects of skeletal muscle cell function, including control of mitochondrial content and capillarity. LKB1 deficiency in skeletal and cardiac muscle (mLKB1-KO) greatly impairs exercise capacity. However, cardiac dysfunction in that genetic model prevents a clear assessment of the role of skeletal muscle LKB1 in the observed effects. Our purposes here were to determine whether skeletal muscle-specific knockout of LKB1 (skmLKB1-KO) decreases exercise capacity and mitochondrial protein content, impairs accretion of mitochondrial proteins after exercise training, and attenuates improvement in running performance after exercise training. We found that treadmill and voluntary wheel running capacity was reduced in skmLKB1-KO vs. control (CON) mice. Citrate synthase activity, succinate dehydrogenase activity, and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase content were lower in KO vs. CON muscles. Three weeks of treadmill training resulted in significantly increased treadmill running performance in both CON and skmLKB1-KO mice. Citrate synthase activity increased significantly with training in both genotypes, but protein content and activity for components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain increased only in CON mice. Capillarity and VEGF protein was lower in skmLKB1-KO vs. CON muscles, but VEGF increased with training only in skmLKB1-KO. Three hours after an acute bout of muscle contractions, PGC-1α, cytochrome c, and VEGF gene expression all increased in CON but not skmLKB1-KO muscles. Our findings indicate that skeletal muscle LKB1 is required for accretion of some mitochondrial proteins but not for early exercise capacity improvements with exercise training.

  2. Cyclin D2 is a critical mediator of exercise-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckey, Stephen W; Haines, Chris D; Konhilas, John P; Luczak, Elizabeth D; Messmer-Kratzsch, Antke; Leinwand, Leslie A

    2017-01-01

    A number of signaling pathways underlying pathological cardiac hypertrophy have been identified. However, few studies have probed the functional significance of these signaling pathways in the context of exercise or physiological pathways. Exercise studies were performed on females from six different genetic mouse models that have been shown to exhibit alterations in pathological cardiac adaptation and hypertrophy. These include mice expressing constitutively active glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3βS9A), an inhibitor of CaMK II (AC3-I), both GSK-3βS9A and AC3-I (GSK-3βS9A/AC3-I), constitutively active Akt (myrAkt), mice deficient in MAPK/ERK kinase kinase-1 (MEKK1(-/-)), and mice deficient in cyclin D2 (cyclin D2(-/-)). Voluntary wheel running performance was similar to NTG littermates for five of the mouse lines. Exercise induced significant cardiac growth in all mouse models except the cyclin D2(-/-) mice. Cardiac function was not impacted in the cyclin D2(-/-) mice and studies using a phospho-antibody array identified six proteins with increased phosphorylation (greater than 150%) and nine proteins with decreased phosphorylation (greater than 33% decrease) in the hearts of exercised cyclin D2(-/-) mice compared to exercised NTG littermate controls. Our results demonstrate that unlike the other hypertrophic signaling molecules tested here, cyclin D2 is an important regulator of both pathologic and physiological hypertrophy. Impact statement This research is relevant as the hypertrophic signaling pathways tested here have only been characterized for their role in pathological hypertrophy, and not in the context of exercise or physiological hypertrophy. By using the same transgenic mouse lines utilized in previous studies, our findings provide a novel and important understanding for the role of these signaling pathways in physiological hypertrophy. We found that alterations in the signaling pathways tested here had no impact on exercise performance. Exercise

  3. Stimulated contractions delay and prolong central fatigue compared with voluntary contractions in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaubet, Vincent; Cormery, Bruno; Maitre, Julien; Paillard, Thierry

    2013-05-01

    Voluntary and stimulated contractions are commonly used in sports training and rehabilitation, and it is well known that both these kinds of contractions generate central fatigue. However, to date, there is a lack of research on the comparison of the mechanisms by which these 2 exercises induce central disturbances. Central fatigue can be characterized by central activation failure during maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Superimposition of an electrical stimulation onto MVC has been used to detect central activation failure. Completeness of activation has been quantified by the central activation ratio (CAR) = MVC/(MVC + stimulated force). The aim was not only to evaluate the CAR immediately after fatiguing voluntary (VOL) and stimulated (STIM) contractions but also to compare recovery duration over different time periods (prefatigue: PRE condition; immediate postfatigue: POST condition; after a 5-minute recovery: POST 5 condition; after a 30-minute recovery: POST 30 condition) (n = 18). Results showed that in the POST condition, the CAR is more affected for the VOL contractions than for the STIM contractions (p contractions only in the POST 5 condition (p contractions, whereas it was complete for the VOL contractions (p contractions alter the CAR more than the STIM contractions immediately after their completion. However, the effects of the STIM contractions on the CAR are delayed and prolonged.

  4. Voluntary Running Suppresses Tumor Growth through Epinephrine- and IL-6-Dependent NK Cell Mobilization and Redistribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Regular exercise reduces the risk of cancer and disease recurrence. Yet the mechanisms behind this protection remain to be elucidated. In this study, tumor-bearing mice randomized to voluntary wheel running showed over 60% reduction in tumor incidence and growth across five different tumor models....... Microarray analysis revealed training-induced upregulation of pathways associated with immune function. NK cell infiltration was significantly increased in tumors from running mice, whereas depletion of NK cells enhanced tumor growth and blunted the beneficial effects of exercise. Mechanistic analyses showed...... that NK cells were mobilized by epinephrine, and blockade of β-adrenergic signaling blunted training-dependent tumor inhibition. Moreover, epinephrine induced a selective mobilization of IL-6-sensitive NK cells, and IL-6-blocking antibodies blunted training-induced tumor suppression, intratumoral NK cell...

  5. The effect of a cognitive-motor intervention on voluntary step execution under single and dual task conditions in older adults: a randomized controlled pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pichierri G

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Pichierri,1 Amos Coppe,1 Silvio Lorenzetti,2 Kurt Murer,1 Eling D de Bruin11Institute of Human Movement Sciences and Sport, Department of Health Sciences and Technology, ETH Zurich, Switzerland; 2Institute for Biomechanics, Department of Health Sciences and Technology, ETH Zurich, SwitzerlandBackground: This randomized controlled pilot study aimed to explore whether a cognitive-motor exercise program that combines traditional physical exercise with dance video gaming can improve the voluntary stepping responses of older adults under attention demanding dual task conditions.Methods: Elderly subjects received twice weekly cognitive-motor exercise that included progressive strength and balance training supplemented by dance video gaming for 12 weeks (intervention group. The control group received no specific intervention. Voluntary step execution under single and dual task conditions was recorded at baseline and post intervention (Week 12.Results: After intervention between-group comparison revealed significant differences for initiation time of forward steps under dual task conditions (U = 9, P = 0.034, r = 0.55 and backward steps under dual task conditions (U = 10, P = 0.045, r = 0.52 in favor of the intervention group, showing altered stepping levels in the intervention group compared to the control group.Conclusion: A cognitive-motor intervention based on strength and balance exercises with additional dance video gaming is able to improve voluntary step execution under both single and dual task conditions in older adults.Keywords: fall prevention, exercise, dance, video game

  6. Environmental and Physiological Factors Associated With Stamina in Dogs Exercising in High Ambient Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J. Robbins

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This IACUC approved study was performed to evaluate the environmental, physiological, and hematological components that contribute to stamina following successive bouts of exercise that included searching (5-min, agility (5-min, and ball retrieve (<10-min. Regularly exercised dogs (N = 12 were evaluated on five separate occasions. The population consisted of eight males and four females ranging in age from 8 to 23 months, which included six Labrador retrievers, three German shepherds, and one each English springer spaniel, German wirehaired pointer, and Dutch shepherd. The exercise period was up to 30 min with 5 min of intermittent rest between the exercise bouts or until a designated trainer determined that the dog appeared fatigued (e.g., curled tongue while panting, seeking shade, or voluntary reluctance to retrieve. At the end of the exercise period, pulse rate (PR, core temperature, blood lactate, and venous blood gas were collected. The median outdoor temperature was 28.9°C (84°F (IQR; 27.2–30°C/81–86°F and median humidity was 47% (IQR; 40–57%. Median duration of exercise was 27 min (IQR; 25–29. No dog showed signs of heat stress that required medical intervention. The components used to measure stamina in this study were total activity, post-exercise core body temperature (CBT, and increase in CBT. When controlling for breed, total activity, as measured by omnidirectional accelerometer device, could be predicted from a linear combination of the independent variables: pre-exercise activity (p = 0.008, post-exercise activity (p < 0.001, outdoor temperature (p = 0.005, reduction in base excess in extracellular fluid compartment (BEecf (p = 0.044, and decrease in TCO2 (p = 0.005. When controlling for breed and sex, increase in CBT could be predicted from a linear combination of the independent variables: study day (p = 0.005, increase in PR (p < 0.001, increase in lactate (p = 0

  7. Effect of motivational music on lactate levels during recovery from intense exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliakim, Michal; Bodner, Ehud; Eliakim, Alon; Nemet, Dan; Meckel, Yoav

    2012-01-01

    The effects of music played during an exercise task on athletic performance have been previously studied. Yet, these results are not applicable for competitive athletes, who can use music only during warm-up or recovery from exercise. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the effect of motivational music (music that stimulates or inspires physical activity) during recovery from intense exercise, on activity pattern, rate of perceived exertion (RPE), and blood lactate concentration. Twenty young, active men (mean age 26.2 ± 2.1 years) performed a 6-minute run at peak oxygen consumption speed (predetermined from the VO(2) max test). The mean heart rate (HR), RPE, number of steps (determined by step counter), and blood lactate concentrations were determined at 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 minutes during the recovery from the exercise, with and without motivational music (2 separate sessions, at random order). There was no difference in the mean HR during the recovery with and without music. Listening to motivational music during the recovery was associated with increased voluntary activity of the participants, determined by increased number of steps (499.4 ± 220.1 vs. 413.2 ± 150.6 steps, with and without music, respectively; p ≤ 0.05). The increased number of steps during the recovery was accompanied by a significantly greater decrease in blood lactate concentration percentage (28.1 ± 12.2 vs. 22.8 ± 10.9%, with and without music, respectively, p ≤ 0.05). This was associated with a greater decrease in RPE (77.7 ± 14.4 vs. 73.1 ± 14.7% with and without music, respectively; p ≤ 0.05). Our results suggest that listening to motivational music during nonstructured recovery from intense exercise leads to increased activity, faster lactate clearance, and reduced RPE and therefore may be used by athletes in their effort to enhance recovery.

  8. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Exercises Electrothermal Modalities Ergonomic Changes Hydrotherapy Manual Therapy Physical Therapy Postural Training Traction Watchful Waiting and Education Injection Treatments for ...

  9. Resistance Exercise with concurrent whole body vibration preserves isometric knee extension strength during 8 weeks of horizontal bed rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, E. R.; Stegeman, D. F.; Gerrits, K.; Rittweger, J.; Felsenberg, D.; de Haan, A.

    2005-08-01

    Changes in the quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle with respect to anatomical cross sectional area (CSA), neural activation level and isometric maximal voluntary torque (MVT) were determined in 18 healthy men subjected to 8 weeks of horizontal bed rest (BR) with (n = 9) and without (Ctrl; n = 9) 6 days/week resistance exercise concurrent with whole body vibration (RVE). For Ctrl, mean QF CSA decreased linearly over time to a reduction of 14.3 ± 4.9% at the end of BR. For RVE, exercise during BR significantly mitigated this reduction (3.9 ± 4.4%). Prior to and seven times during BR, MVT values were obtained together with neural activation levels, the latter by means of a superimposed stimulation technique. MVT was maintained for RVE during BR, whereas for Ctrl, MVT was significantly reduced by 14.2 ± 8.1% after 8 weeks. In contrast to previous reports, the maximal voluntary activation remained unaltered for both groups throughout the study. For Ctrl, the absence of a change in neural activation might be related to the repeated testing during the bed rest, which had presumably resulted in a habituation to the task. When both groups were pooled, a significant positive correlation (R= 0.62; P < 0.01) was observed between changes in CSA and changes in MVT.

  10. Voluntary energy optimisation - Taking responsibility; Verantwortungsvoll

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baettig, I.

    2006-07-01

    This interview with Konrad Kyburz, CEO of a printing shop in Dielsdorf, Switzerland, discusses how energy consumption can be reduced on a voluntary basis. The provision free-of-charge of heat recovered from the drying ovens of the printing presses to a nearby sports facility is discussed. The realisation of an energy consumption analysis and the resulting increases in the efficiency of energy usage in the printing facility are discussed. Further improvements such as the use of variable-frequency compressor drives and heating with natural gas that helped in making energy savings of well over 15% are discussed.

  11. Optimizing Exercise Programs for Arthritis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulware, Dennis W.; Byrd, Shannon L.

    1993-01-01

    Exercise can help decrease pain and improve function in people with rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis. Physicians must provide individualized, realistic, enjoyable exercise programs that help affected joints, build fitness, and maximize patient compliance. Physicians must also provide appropriate follow-up care, adjusting the exercise program…

  12. Exercise and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobf, M Tish; Winters-Stone, Kerri

    2013-01-01

    There are an estimated 13.7 million cancer survivors in the United States. Persistent and late effects of cancer therapy have contributed to an increased risk for co-morbid illness and higher all-cause mortality. Physical exercise is a targeted rehabilitative intervention following cancer therapy and a health promotion risk reduction intervention for patients as they transition into survivorship. This chapter provides a brief overview of the research on exercise and cancer survivor outcomes with a specific focus on randomized controlled trials (RCT) on the effects of exercise on body composition and bone health. There were 17 RCT trials that were identified with body composition outcomes. There was no change in weight in 16/17 trials, 4 reported decreases in percent fat mass and 2 reported increases in lean mass. Eight exercise trials were identified with bone outcomes, two of which had pharmacologic comparison arms. These trials demonstrated preservation of bone in the intervention group compared with loss in the usual care or placebo control group. The majority of trials were with breast cancer survivors, the largest survivor group. Many are overweight or obese at diagnosis; weight gain continues to increase after therapy; and treatment is associated with bone loss. The findings of the 25 trials reviewed suggest that exercise maintains weight and bone mass in a high risk population. However, differences in design, measurement of body composition and bone mass and lack of targeted exercise to the specific outcomes warrants additional research to improve the quality of life for survivors.

  13. [Voluntary wheel running enhances cell proliferation and expression levels of BDNF, IGF1 and WNT4 in dentate gyrus of adult mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jia-Ling; Ma, Li; Ma, Lan; Tao, Ye-Zheng

    2014-10-25

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis plays important roles in learning, memory and mood regulation. External factors, such as physical exercise, have been found to modulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Voluntary running enhances cell proliferation in subgranular zone (SGZ) and increases the number of new born neurons in rodents, but underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we used BrdU assay to identify proliferating cells in 2-month-old C57BL/6 mice after 15 days of voluntary wheel running test. mRNA and protein levels for several neural factors in dentate gyrus, Ammon's horn, and cortex were also analyzed by RT-qPCR and Western blot assay after 15 days of voluntary wheel running. Our data show that voluntary wheel running for 15 days elevated the number of proliferation cells in dentate gyrus and significantly up-regulated the mRNA levels of Bdnf, Igf1 and Wnt4. The protein levels of BDNF and IGF1 in dentate gyrus were also increased after voluntary wheel running. These results indicate that the increase of adult hippocampal neurogenesis caused by voluntary wheel running for 15 days might be through up-regulating BDNF, IGF1 and WNT4 in dentate gyrus.

  14. Voluntary participation and cooperation in a collective-good game.

    OpenAIRE

    Kene Boun My; Benoît Chalvignac

    2009-01-01

    We study the effect of voluntary participation in the context of a collective-good experiment. We investigate whether the freedom to participate in the game or not increases contribution levels and enhances their evolution. The analysis of two voluntary participation treatments supports a positive effect of an attractive exit option on both contribution levels and their sustainability. We conclude that the voluntary contribution mechanism can provide sustainable cooperation levels and that th...

  15. Reversal of optic neuropathy secondary to voluntary globe luxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaman, Aylin; Ozturk, Taylan; Soylev, Meltem F

    2009-04-01

    Luxation of the globe is rare in the general population and may be spontaneous, voluntary, or traumatic. Spontaneous or voluntary globe luxation results from shallow orbit, floppy eyelids, lax orbital ligaments, backward displacement of orbital septum, or proptotic eyes due to orbital tumors or infiltrative processes, as in Grave's ophthalmopathy. The authors report a case with unilateral voluntary globe luxation presented with unilateral progressive visual loss.

  16. Current State of the Voluntary Renewable Energy Market (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, J.

    2013-09-01

    This presentation highlights the status of the voluntary green power market in 2012. The voluntary green power market totaled more than 48 million MWh in 2012, with about 1.9 million customers participating. The supply continues to be dominated by wind, though solar is increasing its share of utility green pricing programs. Prices for voluntary renewable energy certificates (RECs) increased to above $1/MWh.

  17. Compact, Controlled Force Crew Exercise System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spaceflight adaptations include muscle atrophy, decreased bone mineral density and reduced aerobic capacity making effective resistance exercise countermeasure...

  18. Exercise Increases Insulin Content and Basal Secretion in Pancreatic Islets in Type 1 Diabetic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Hung Huang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Exercise appears to improve glycemic control for people with type 1 diabetes (T1D. However, the mechanism responsible for this improvement is unknown. We hypothesized that exercise has a direct effect on the insulin-producing islets. Eight-week-old mice were divided into four groups: sedentary diabetic, exercised diabetic, sedentary control, and exercised control. The exercised groups participated in voluntary wheel running for 6 weeks. When compared to the control groups, the islet density, islet diameter, and β-cell proportion per islet were significantly lower in both sedentary and exercised diabetic groups and these alterations were not improved with exercise. The total insulin content and insulin secretion were significantly lower in sedentary diabetics compared to controls. Exercise significantly improved insulin content and insulin secretion in islets in basal conditions. Thus, some improvements in exercise-induced glycemic control in T1D mice may be due to enhancement of insulin content and secretion in islets.

  19. Spike-coding mechanisms of cerebellar temporal processing in classical conditioning and voluntary movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Kenji; Sakurai, Yoshio

    2014-10-01

    Time is a fundamental and critical factor in daily life. Millisecond timing, which is the underlying temporal processing for speaking, dancing, and other activities, is reported to rely on the cerebellum. In this review, we discuss the cerebellar spike-coding mechanisms for temporal processing. Although the contribution of the cerebellum to both classical conditioning and voluntary movements is well known, the difference of the mechanisms for temporal processing between classical conditioning and voluntary movements is not clear. Therefore, we review the evidence of cerebellar temporal processing in studies of classical conditioning and voluntary movements and report the similarities and differences between them. From some studies, which used tasks that can change some of the temporal properties (e.g., the duration of interstimulus intervals) with keeping identical movements, we concluded that classical conditioning and voluntary movements may share a common spike-coding mechanism because simple spikes in Purkinje cells decrease at predicted times for responses regardless of the intervals between responses or stimulation.

  20. Cold water immersion recovery after simulated collision sport exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pointon, Monique; Duffield, Rob

    2012-02-01

    This investigation examined the effects of cold water immersion (CWI) recovery after simulated collision sport exercise. Ten male rugby athletes performed three sessions consisting of a 2 × 30-min intermittent-sprint exercise (ISE) protocol with either tackling (T) or no tackling (CONT), followed by a 20-min CWI intervention (TCWI) or passive recovery (TPASS and CONT) in a randomized order. The ISE consisted of a 15-m sprint every minute separated by self-paced bouts of hard running, jogging, and walking for the remainder of the minute. Every sixth rotation, participants performed 5 × 10-m runs, receiving a shoulder-led tackle to the lower body on each effort. Sprint time and distance covered during ISE were recorded, with voluntary (maximal voluntary contraction; MVC) and evoked neuromuscular function (voluntary activation; VA), electromyogram (root mean square (RMS)), ratings of perceived muscle soreness (MS), capillary and venous blood markers for metabolites and muscle damage, respectively measured before and after exercise, immediately after recovery, and 2 and 24 h after recovery. Total distance covered during exercise was significantly greater in CONT (P = 0.01), without differences between TPASS and TCWI (P > 0.05). TCWI resulted in increased MVC, VA, and RMS immediately after recovery (P muscle damage (P > 0.05), lactate was significantly reduced after recovery compared with TPASS (P = 0.04). CWI also resulted in reduced MS 2 h after recovery compared with TPASS (P muscle contractile properties and perceptions of soreness after collision-based exercise.

  1. Heat Acclimation Improves Exercise Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    induces metabolic adaptations during exercise by reducing the aerobic metabolic rate (32, 42), or decreasing the rate of glycogenolysis (7, 8, 20...metabolic rate (1, 32, 42), or decreasing the rate of glycogenolysis (7, 8, 20). Alternatively, the increased plasma volume (and thus, total blood volume) (3...8. Febbraio MA, Snow RJ, Stathis CG, Hargreaves M, Carey MF. Blunting the rise in body temperature reduces muscle glycogenolysis during exercise in

  2. Voluntary self-touch increases body ownership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki eHara

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Experimental manipulations of body ownership have indicated that multisensory integration is central to forming bodily self-representation. Voluntary self-touch is a unique multisensory situation involving corresponding motor, tactile and proprioceptive signals. Yet, even though self-touch is frequent in everyday life, its contribution to the formation of body ownership is not well understood. Here we investigated the role of voluntary self-touch in body ownership using a novel adaptation of the rubber hand illusion (RHI, in which a robotic system and virtual reality allowed participants self-touch of real and virtual hands. In the first experiment, active and passive self-touch were applied in the absence of visual feedback. In the second experiment, we tested the role of visual feedback in this bodily illusion. Finally, in the third experiment, we compared active and passive self-touch to the classical RHI in which the touch is administered by the experimenter. We hypothesized that active self-touch would increase ownership over the virtual hand through the addition of motor signals strengthening the bodily illusion. The results indicated that active self-touch elicited stronger illusory ownership compared to passive self-touch and sensory only stimulation, and indicate an important role of active self-touch in the formation of bodily self.

  3. Post-exercise muscle soreness after eccentric exercise: psychophysical effects and implications on mean arterial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, P; Graven-Nielsen, T; Arendt-Nielsen, L

    2001-10-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the time course of changes in pressure pain threshold (PPT), visual analogue scale (VAS) pain and tenderness scores, McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) descriptors, pain areas, skin temperature and mean arterial pressure (MAP) following intensive eccentric exercise. In 11 healthy male subjects, eccentric exercise of the first dorsal interosseous muscle (FDI) of the right hand with 114% maximum voluntary contraction weight (MVC) was used to induce post-exercise muscle soreness (PEMS) in the right hand, while the left hand served as a control. At 24 h to 48 h all the pain profiles indicated the presence of PEMS in the right hand when compared to before exercise (Prole of central mechanisms in the PEMS, thereby giving further insight into clinical aspects of muscle pain.

  4. Low-Frequency Fatigue Assessed as Double to Single Twitch Ratio after Two Bouts of Eccentric Exercise of the Elbow Flexors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Janecki, Anna Jaskólska, Jarosław Marusiak, Artur Jaskólski

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess low-frequency fatigue as a double to single twitch ratio after repeated eccentric exercise of the elbow flexors. Maximal isometric torque, single and double twitch responses and low-frequency fatigue were assessed on the elbow flexors in 16 untrained male volunteers before, immediately after, 24 and 48 hours following two bouts of eccentric exercise consisted of 30 repetitions of lowering a dumbbell adjusted to ~75% of each individual’s maximal isometric torque. Maximal isometric torque and electrically evoked responses decreased significantly in all measurements after the first bout of eccentric exercise (p < 0.05. In measurements performed at 24 and 48 hours after the second bout both maximal voluntary isometric torque and electrically evoked contractions were significantly higher than in measurements performed after the first bout (p < 0.05. Although low-frequency fatigue significantly increased up to 48 hours after each bout of eccentric exercise, its values at 24 and 48 hours after the second bout were significantly lower than at respective time points after the first bout (p < 0.05. Double to single twitch ratio could be used as a sensitive tool in the evaluation of muscle recovery and adaptation to repeated eccentric exercise.

  5. The effect of scapular posterior tilt exercise, pectoralis minor stretching, and shoulder brace on scapular alignment and muscles activity in subjects with round-shoulder posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-hyun; Cynn, Heon-seock; Yoon, Tae-lim; Ko, Chang-hee; Choi, Woo-jeong; Choi, Sil-ah; Choi, Bong-sam

    2015-02-01

    There are various methods for rehabilitating round-shoulder posture (RSP), including strengthening exercises, stretching, and using a shoulder brace or taping to correct the altered posture. However, no study has determined which intervention is the most effective of the three methods to decrease RSP (intervention #1: scapular posterior tilting exercise alone [hereafter, SPT], intervention #2: the scapular posterior tilting exercise after PM stretching [PM stretch+SPT], and intervention #3: the scapular posterior tilting exercise with use of a shoulder brace [SPT+brace]). The purpose of this study was to compare the SPT, PM stretch+SPT, and SPT+brace on RSP, PM index (PMI), and lower trapezius (LT) and serratus anterior (SA) activity in subjects with RSP. In total, fifteen young men with RSP, participated in the study (21.46 ± 2.30 years old). RSP was confirmed using a caliper measure. Surface electromyography (SEMG) data for LT and SA activity were collected during the three interventions, and the SEMG data are expressed as a percentage of the maximal voluntary isometric contraction (%MVIC). RSP was significantly less in the PM stretch+SPT and SPT+brace than in the SPT (Pshoulder brace may help correct RSP and restore the length of the PM. The posterior tilting exercise after PM stretching was the most effective method for eliciting greater LT muscle activation among the interventions tested. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Respiratory exercise in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Susana; Swash, Michael; de Carvalho, Mamede

    2012-01-01

    We have evaluated the potential role of respiratory exercise by implementing specific inspiratory muscle training in a selected population of early-affected amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. We studied 26 patients with ALS with normal respiratory function using two groups of patients in a parallel, control-group, randomized, delayed-start design. Patients in the first group (G1) started the active inspiratory exercise programme at entry and were followed for eight months, while the second group (G2) of patients followed a placebo exercise programme for the first four months and then active exercise for the second four-month period. The primary outcome measure was the ALSFRS. Respiratory tests, neurophysiological measurements, fatigue and quality of life scales were secondary outcomes. Analysis of covariance was used to compare changes between and within groups. Results showed that there was no significant difference between the two patient groups. Within-group analysis suggested that inspiratory exercise promotes a transient improvement in the respiratory subscore and in the maximal voluntary ventilation, peak expiratory flow, and sniff inspiratory pressure. In conclusion, there was no clear positive or negative outcome of the respiratory exercise protocol we have proposed, but we cannot rule out a minor positive effect. Exercise regimes merit more detailed clinical evaluation in ALS.

  7. Longitudinal relationships between perceived stress, exercise self-regulation and exercise involvement among physically active adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Markus; Lindwall, Magnus; Brand, Serge; Lang, Christin; Elliot, Catherine; Pühse, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Stress exposure may undermine exercisers' capability to self-regulate their exercise behaviour. This longitudinal study examined the interplay between perceived stress, exercise self-regulation (assessment of action and coping planning) and participation in vigorous exercise in vocational students. Moreover, this study examined whether high exercise self-regulation moderates the assumed negative relationship between stress and exercise. A sample of 580 physically active vocational students ([Formula: see text] ± s 17.8 ± 1.3 years, 33.8% girls) was assessed. All participants completed two identical validated questionnaires assessing stress, exercise self-regulation and exercise with a span of 10 months in between survey completion periods. The cross-sectional analyses show that high exercise self-regulation attenuated the assumed negative relationship between stress and exercise. In the longitudinal analyses, however, only a non-significant trend was found. Significant longitudinal relationships existed between exercise self-regulation and exercise involvement. Latent difference score models revealed that a drop in the exercise self-regulation was associated with a concurrent decrease in exercise participation. Cross-lagged panel analyses showed that high exercise self-regulation levels positively predicted exercise behaviour, but an inverse relationship was not supported. The findings suggested that higher exercise self-regulation levels were positively associated with future exercise involvement in currently active adolescents. While partial support was found that exercise self-regulation moderated the influence of stress on exercise, the findings demonstrated that higher exercise self-regulation levels had a positive impact on future exercise involvement in already active individuals.

  8. Effects of 7-keto Dehydroepiandrosterone on Voluntary Ethanol Intake in Male Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Worrel, Mary E.; Gurkovskaya, Olga V.; Leonard, Stuart T.; Lewis, Peter B.; Winsauer, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Administration of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), a neurosteroid that can negatively modulate the GABAA receptor, has been shown to decrease voluntary intake of ethanol in rats. In vivo, DHEA can be metabolized to a variety of metabolites, including 7-keto DHEA, a metabolite without the prohormonal effects of DHEA. This study compared the effectiveness of 7-keto DHEA to DHEA for reducing ethanol intake in the same group of rats. The subjects, previously trained to drink ethanol using a sacchar...

  9. Exercise-induced muscle damage is reduced in resistance-trained males by branched chain amino acids: a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howatson Glyn

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well documented that exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD decreases muscle function and causes soreness and discomfort. Branched-chain amino acid (BCAA supplementation has been shown to increase protein synthesis and decrease muscle protein breakdown, however, the effects of BCAAs on recovery from damaging resistance training are unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effects of a BCAA supplementation on markers of muscle damage elicited via a sport specific bout of damaging exercise in trained volunteers. Methods Twelve males (mean ± SD age, 23 ± 2 y; stature, 178.3 ± 3.6 cm and body mass, 79.6 ± 8.4 kg were randomly assigned to a supplement (n = 6 or placebo (n = 6 group. The damaging exercise consisted of 100 consecutive drop-jumps. Creatine kinase (CK, maximal voluntary contraction (MVC, muscle soreness (DOMS, vertical jump (VJ, thigh circumference (TC and calf circumference (CC were measured as markers of muscle damage. All variables were measured immediately before the damaging exercise and at 24, 48, 72 and 96 h post-exercise. Results A significant time effect was seen for all variables. There were significant group effects showing a reduction in CK efflux and muscle soreness in the BCAA group compared to the placebo (P Conclusion The present study has shown that BCAA administered before and following damaging resistance exercise reduces indices of muscle damage and accelerates recovery in resistance-trained males. It seems likely that BCAA provided greater bioavailablity of substrate to improve protein synthesis and thereby the extent of secondary muscle damage associated with strenuous resistance exercise. Clinical Trial Registration Number: NCT01529281.

  10. Unilateral eccentric exercise of the knee flexors affects muscle activation during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dover, Geoffrey C; Legge, Laura; St-Onge, Nancy

    2012-05-01

    Uni-lateral muscle soreness is common yet the effects on gait or electromyographic (EMG) activity are unknown. The purpose of our study was to induce delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) in the knee flexor group and measure the resultant change in EMG activity and knee motion during gait. Nine healthy subjects participated in the study. Measures of function, evoked tenderness of the biceps femoris, as well as knee angle, and EMG activity during gait were assessed prior and 48 h after an eccentric exercise protocol. DOMS was induced unilaterally in the knee flexors using an isokinetic dynamometer and subjects exercised until they could not generate 50% of their maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). There was a significant decrease in biceps femoris activity after DOMS during the last phase of gait. Moreover, there was a day × phase interaction for gastrocnemius activity with the last two phases displaying an increase in activity. There was no significant change in knee angle during gait. The decrease in biceps femoris activity as well as the increase in gastrocnemius activity could be evidence of a protective mechanism designed to decrease activity of the sore muscle while increasing the activity of a synergistic muscle. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of prior dynamic leg exercise on static effort of the elbow flexors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, J W; Gladden, L B; Cresanta, M K

    1983-09-01

    The isometric endurance of the elbow flexors was determined in a control condition and subsequent to a maximal effort exercise bout on a cycle ergometer in seven subjects. Maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), peak rate of tension development (+dP/dt), peak rate of tension relaxation (-dP/dt), one-half contraction time, and one-half relaxation time were also measured. Each subject was tested on four occasions: two control and two experimental sessions. During the control sessions each subject held 40% of MVC to exhaustion, whereas the experimental session included a 1-min maximal effort exercise bout on a cycle ergometer 6 min prior to the isometric endurance task. Arterialized blood samples were drawn and analyzed for lactate, pH, PCO2, and PO2. Plasma bicarbonate was calculated from the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. Subsequent to the cycle ergometer bout, blood lactate concentration rose from 0.8 to 11 mM, pH decreased from 7.43 to 7.20, PCO2 decreased from 40 to 32 Torr, and plasma bicarbonate decreased from 26 to 12 mM. When compared with the control values, no significant changes were evident for any muscle contractile properties following the cycle ergometer bout. However, isometric endurance was significantly reduced from 115.0 +/- 7.2 to 86.3 +/- 7.3 s.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Effects of submaximal eccentric exercise on muscle activity at different elbow joint angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisiel-Sajewicz, Katarzyna; Jaskólska, Anna; Janecki, Damian; Andrzejewska, Renata; Marusiak, Jarosław; Jaskólski, Artur

    2014-01-01

    Our study aimed to determine whether electrical and mechanical factors contributing to acute or long-term maximal torque reduction and muscle soreness due to submaximal eccentric exercise (ECC) are elbow-joint-angle specific and to what extent the joint angle affects the contribution of antagonist coactivation to this torque reduction. Maximal isometric torque (MIT), muscle soreness assessment, agonist electromechanical activities, and antagonist coactivation during the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) were measured at elbow joint angles of 60°, 90°, and 150° before ECC, immediately after exercise, and 24, 48, 72, and 120 hr after exercise. ECC causes an immediate decrease in MIT as well as increased antagonist coactivation at three angles. Antagonist coactivation returned to its baseline level at 24 hr regardless of joint angle. The most rapid torque recovery and the highest force level at which pain occurred were found after ECC at a joint angle of 60°. During the recovery period, no mechanomyographical changes were observed when measuring surface mechanomyography changes at three angles, while the electrical activity differed between angles.

  13. Chronic exercise dampens hippocampal glutamate overflow induced by kainic acid in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Philip V; Reiss, Jenny I; Murray, Patrick S; Dishman, Rod K; Spradley, Jessica M

    2015-05-01

    Our laboratory has previously reported that chronic, voluntary exercise diminishes seizure-related behaviors induced by convulsant doses of kainic acid. The present experiments tested the hypothesis that exercise exerts this protective effect through a mechanism involving suppression of glutamate release in the hippocampal formation. Following three weeks of voluntary wheel running or sedentary conditions, rats were injected with 10 mg/kg of kainic acid, and hippocampal glutamate was measured in real time using a telemetric, in vivo voltammetry system. A separate experiment measured electroencephalographic (EEG) activity following kainic acid treatment. Results of the voltammetry experiment revealed that the rise in hippocampal glutamate induced by kainic acid is attenuated in exercising rats compared to sedentary controls, indicating that the exercise-induced protection against seizures involves regulation of hippocampal glutamate release. The findings reveal the potential benefit of regular exercise in the treatment and prevention of seizure disorders and suggest a possible neurobiological mechanism underlying this effect.

  14. Heart rate variability and blood pressure during dynamic and static exercise at similar heart rate levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weippert, Matthias; Behrens, Kristin; Rieger, Annika; Stoll, Regina; Kreuzfeld, Steffi

    2013-01-01

    Aim was to elucidate autonomic responses to dynamic and static (isometric) exercise of the lower limbs eliciting the same moderate heart rate (HR) response. 23 males performed two kinds of voluntary exercise in a supine position at similar heart rates: static exercise (SE) of the lower limbs (static leg press) and dynamic exercise (DE) of the lower limbs (cycling). Subjective effort, systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), rate pressure product (RPP) and the time between consecutive heart beats (RR-intervals) were measured. Time-domain (SDNN, RMSSD), frequency-domain (power in the low and high frequency band (LFP, HFP)) and geometric measures (SD1, SD2) as well as non-linear measures of regularity (approximate entropy (ApEn), sample entropy (SampEn) and correlation dimension D2) were calculated. Although HR was similar during both exercise conditions (88±10 bpm), subjective effort, SBP, DBP, MAP and RPP were significantly enhanced during SE. HRV indicators representing overall variability (SDNN, SD 2) and vagal modulated variability (RMSSD, HFP, SD 1) were increased. LFP, thought to be modulated by both autonomic branches, tended to be higher during SE. ApEn and SampEn were decreased whereas D2 was enhanced during SE. It can be concluded that autonomic control processes during SE and DE were qualitatively different despite similar heart rate levels. The differences were reflected by blood pressure and HRV indices. HRV-measures indicated a stronger vagal cardiac activity during SE, while blood pressure response indicated a stronger sympathetic efferent activity to the vessels. The elevated vagal cardiac activity during SE might be a response mechanism, compensating a possible co-activation of sympathetic cardiac efferents, as HR and LF/HF was similar and LFP tended to be higher. However, this conclusion must be drawn cautiously as there is no HRV-marker reflecting "pure" sympathetic cardiac activity.

  15. Type of Ground Surface during Plyometric Training Affects the Severity of Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Arazi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the changes in the symptoms of exercise-induced muscle damage from a bout of plyometric exercise (PE; 10 × 10 vertical jumps performed in aquatic, sand and firm conditions. Twenty-four healthy college-aged men were randomly assigned to one of three groups: Aquatic (AG, n = 8, Sand (SG, n = 8 and Firm (FG, n = 8. The AG performed PE in an aquatic setting with a depth of ~130 cm. The SG performed PE on a dry sand surface at a depth of 20 cm, and the FG performed PE on a 10-cm-thick wooden surface. Plasma creatine kinase (CK activity, delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS, knee range of motion (KROM, maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MIVC of the knee extensors, vertical jump (VJ and 10-m sprint were measured before and 24, 48 and 72 h after the PE. Compared to baseline values, FG showed significantly (p < 0.05 greater changes in CK, DOMS, and VJ at 24 until 48 h. The MIVC decreased significantly for the SG and FG at 24 until 48 h post-exercise in comparison to the pre-exercise values. There were no significant (p > 0.05 time or group by time interactions in KROM. In the 10-m sprint, all the treatment groups showed significant (p < 0.05 changes compared to pre-exercise values at 24 h, and there were no significant (p > 0.05 differences between groups. The results indicate that PE in an aquatic setting and on a sand surface induces less muscle damage than on a firm surface. Therefore, training in aquatic conditions and on sand may be beneficial for the improvement of performance, with a concurrently lower risk of muscle damage and soreness.

  16. 5 CFR 831.405 - Interest on voluntary contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....405 Section 831.405 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE... contributions stop earning interest on the earliest of— (1) The date when OPM authorizes payment to the... voluntary contributions to purchase additional annuity, voluntary contributions stop earning interest on...

  17. Efficiency of voluntary closing hand and hook prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, G.; Plettenburg, D.H.

    2010-01-01

    The Delft Institute of Prosthetics and Orthotics has started a research program to develop an improved voluntary closing, body-powered hand prosthesis. Five commercially available voluntary closing terminal devices were mechanically tested: three hands [Hosmer APRL VC hand, Hosmer Soft VC Male hand,

  18. Voluntary and involuntary adaptation of gait in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, W; Rutgers, AWF; Van Weerden, TW

    1998-01-01

    Voluntary and involuntary adaptation of gait in Parkinson's disease (PD) were studied in two separate experiments. In the first experiment, effects of changes in voluntary control were studied by asking PD patients and age-matched healthy subjects to adapt their walking pattern to visual cues result

  19. Re-Examining the Relationship between Age and Voluntary Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Thomas W. H.; Feldman, Daniel C.

    2009-01-01

    In their quantitative review of the literature, Healy, Lehman, and McDaniel [Healy, M. C., Lehman, M., & McDaniel, M. A. (1995). Age and voluntary turnover: A quantitative review. "Personnel Psychology, 48", 335-345] concluded that age is only weakly related to voluntary turnover (average r = -0.08). However, with the significant changes in…

  20. Conditioning Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops Truncatus Gilli) for Voluntary Diving Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-31

    heartrate (EKG) to validate "voluntary" nature of dive EXAMINE ACTIVE DIVING CONDITIONS (open Ocean Mewwmenr) dive profiles using TDR respiration... heartrate electrodes Open Ocean Experiments ’wear instrument package (TDR) perform voluntary dive up to 200 meters readily present tail flukes for

  1. Students' vocational choices and voluntary action: A 12-nation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Haski-Leventhal (Debbie); R.A. Cnaan (Ram); F. Handy (Femida); J.L. Brudney (Jeffrey); K. Holmes (Kirsten); L. Hustinx (Lesley); C. Kang (Chulhee); M. Kassam (Meenaz); L.C.P.M. Meijs (Lucas); B. Ranade (Bhagyashree); N. Yamauchi (Naoto); A.B. Yeung (Anne Birgitta); S. Zrinscak (Sinisa)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractPrevious research on student involvement suggested that business and engineering students manifest lowest rates of voluntary action. Similarly, it was thought that social science students are the most involved in voluntary action, with students of natural sciences and humanities in the m

  2. Integrating Voluntary Simplicity of Lifestyle into Home Economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestle, Ruth E.

    This curriculum guide presents guidelines for teaching concepts of Voluntary Simplicity in home economics in Florida. (Voluntary Simplicity is a lifestyle in which individuals choose to live more simply, considering the limited nature of the world's resources.) It is designed for use as a separate unit within different subject matter areas or as…

  3. 5 CFR 831.406 - Withdrawal of voluntary contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... precedence set forth in section 8342(c) of title 5, United States Code, is entitled to payment of the balance... contributions. (a) Before receiving additional annuity payments based on the voluntary contributions, a person who has made voluntary contributions may withdraw the balance while still an employee or Member,...

  4. 78 FR 54444 - Advisory Committee on Voluntary Foreign Aid Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-04

    ...; ] AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Advisory Committee on Voluntary Foreign Aid Meeting AGENCY: United... Aid (ACVFA). Date: Wednesday, September 18, 2013. Time: 2:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Location: Horizon Room..., Executive Director, Advisory Committee on Voluntary Foreign Aid (ACVFA), U.S. Agency for...

  5. 27 CFR 25.221 - Voluntary destruction of beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... beer. 25.221 Section 25.221 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Voluntary Destruction § 25.221 Voluntary destruction of beer. (a) On brewery premises. (1) A brewer may destroy, at the brewery, beer on which the tax has...

  6. Effects of the Visual Exercise Environments on Cognitive Directed Attention, Energy Expenditure and Perceived Exertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Rogerson

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Green exercise research often reports psychological health outcomes without rigorously controlling exercise. This study examines effects of visual exercise environments on directed attention, perceived exertion and time to exhaustion, whilst measuring and controlling the exercise component. Participants completed three experimental conditions in a randomized counterbalanced order. Conditions varied by video content viewed (nature; built; control during two consistently-ordered exercise bouts (Exercise 1: 60% VO2peakInt for 15-mins; Exercise 2: 85% VO2peakInt to voluntary exhaustion. In each condition, participants completed modified Backwards Digit Span tests (a measure of directed attention pre- and post-Exercise 1. Energy expenditure, respiratory exchange ratio and perceived exertion were measured during both exercise bouts. Time to exhaustion in Exercise 2 was also recorded. There was a significant time by condition interaction for Backwards Digit Span scores (F2,22 = 6.267, p = 0.007. Scores significantly improved in the nature condition (p < 0.001 but did not in the built or control conditions. There were no significant differences between conditions for either perceived exertion or physiological measures during either Exercise 1 or Exercise 2, or for time to exhaustion in Exercise 2. This was the first study to demonstrate effects of controlled exercise conducted in different visual environments on post-exercise directed attention. Via psychological mechanisms alone, visual nature facilitates attention restoration during moderate-intensity exercise.

  7. Voluntary chemical castration of a mental patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahams, D

    1988-06-01

    Britain's High Court recently overruled two decisions of the Mental Health Act Commission that denied certification of a voluntary experimental drug treatment to a mental patient, holding that the standard for informed consent is determined not by the subjective judgment of the commissioners but by whether the patient knows the nature and likely effects of treatment and that its use in his case is a novel one. The background facts of the case involving a 27-year-old pedophile receiving goserelin implantations to reduce testosterone levels are presented and the issues of jurisdiction under the Mental Health Act 1983 and the commissioners' duty to act fairly and to consider the likely benefits of treatment are discussed.

  8. Exercise and pregnancy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, R; O'Neill, M

    1994-06-01

    The effects of pregnancy on the maternal cardiorespiratory system include increases in oxygen consumption, cardiac output, heart rate, stroke volume, and plasma volume. The increase in oxygen reserve seen in early pregnancy is reduced later, suggesting that maternal exercise may present a greater physiologic stress in the third trimester. Evidence suggests that weight-bearing exercise produces a greater decrease in oxygen reserve than nonweight-bearing exercise. Furthermore, to maintain a heart rate below 140 beats per minute during pregnancy, the intensity of weight-bearing exercise must be reduced. Nonweight-bearing, water-based exercise results in smaller fetal heart rate changes and a lower maternal heart rate than the same exercise performed on land. Exercising in the supine position in late pregnancy has raised concerns because cardiac output in the supine position is lower than in the lateral position at rest, presumably because the gravid uterus partially obstructs the inferior vena cava. Sustained exercise produces a training effect on the mother, although reported associations between this effect and the experience of labor are not consistent. Short-term changes in fetal heart rate provide circumstantial evidence that physical activity can influence the fetus. Acute effects