WorldWideScience

Sample records for voluntary active learning

  1. Voluntary Participation in an Active Learning Exercise Leads to a Better Understanding of Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Helena; West, Crystal A.

    2011-01-01

    Students learn best when they are focused and thinking about the subject at hand. To teach physiology, we must offer opportunities for students to actively participate in class. This approach aids in focusing their attention on the topic and thus generating genuine interest in the mechanisms involved. This study was conducted to determine if…

  2. Voluntary control of electrogastric activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, B B; Lawton, C A; Sandman, C A

    1978-12-01

    The tonic component of the electrogastrogram (EGG) has been shown to differentiate duodenal ulcer patients from healthy individuals (15). It has therefore been of considerable interest to investigate the possibility that individuals can learn to modify electrogastric activity. Using a discriminative conditioning paradigm with analogue feedback (Experiment I), subjects were generally unsuccessful at controlling tonic EGG activity. However, when the conditioning paradigm was altered (Experiment II) it was clear that subjects were able to modify specific electrogastric changes. In addition to EGG, heart rate, respiration, abdominal muscle activity, and digital blood flow were measured in order to assess the physiological concomitants of learned control of gastrointestinal activity. Subjects who evidenced discriminative control also showed the least amount of abdominal muscle activity and reported being the most relaxed. The results of these studies suggest that exploration of the physiological processes underlying the electrical activity of the gastrointestinal system and the ability of individuals to modify this activity may lead to significant clinical and theoretical advances.

  3. Improving Voluntary Environmental Management Programs: Facilitating Learning and Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genskow, Kenneth D.; Wood, Danielle M.

    2011-05-01

    Environmental planners and managers face unique challenges understanding and documenting the effectiveness of programs that rely on voluntary actions by private landowners. Programs, such as those aimed at reducing nonpoint source pollution or improving habitat, intend to reach those goals by persuading landowners to adopt behaviors and management practices consistent with environmental restoration and protection. Our purpose with this paper is to identify barriers for improving voluntary environmental management programs and ways to overcome them. We first draw upon insights regarding data, learning, and adaptation from the adaptive management and performance management literatures, describing three key issues: overcoming information constraints, structural limitations, and organizational culture. Although these lessons are applicable to a variety of voluntary environmental management programs, we then present the issues in the context of on-going research for nonpoint source water quality pollution. We end the discussion by highlighting important elements for advancing voluntary program efforts.

  4. Human Economy and Entrepreneurial Learning in a Voluntary Organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Revsbech, Christine

    2014-01-01

    "Based on five months anthropological field study in a British affiliate of an American charity in London, Revsbech asks what does learning look like in a social voluntary organization for youth. Her chapter argues that volunteers develop entrepreneurial abilities by shifting flexibly between...

  5. Assessing voluntary muscle activation with the twitch interpolation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shield, Anthony; Zhou, Shi

    2004-01-01

    The twitch interpolation technique is commonly employed to assess the completeness of skeletal muscle activation during voluntary contractions. Early applications of twitch interpolation suggested that healthy human subjects could fully activate most of the skeletal muscles to which the technique had been applied. More recently, however, highly sensitive twitch interpolation has revealed that even healthy adults routinely fail to fully activate a number of skeletal muscles despite apparently maximal effort. Unfortunately, some disagreement exists as to how the results of twitch interpolation should be employed to quantify voluntary activation. The negative linear relationship between evoked twitch force and voluntary force that has been observed by some researchers implies that voluntary activation can be quantified by scaling a single interpolated twitch to a control twitch evoked in relaxed muscle. Observations of non-linear evoked-voluntary force relationships have lead to the suggestion that the single interpolated twitch ratio can not accurately estimate voluntary activation. Instead, it has been proposed that muscle activation is better determined by extrapolating the relationship between evoked and voluntary force to provide an estimate of true maximum force. However, criticism of the single interpolated twitch ratio typically fails to take into account the reasons for the non-linearity of the evoked-voluntary force relationship. When these reasons are examined, it appears that most are even more challenging to the validity of extrapolation than they are to the linear equation. Furthermore, several factors that contribute to the observed non-linearity can be minimised or even eliminated with appropriate experimental technique. The detection of small activation deficits requires high resolution measurement of force and careful consideration of numerous experimental details such as the site of stimulation, stimulation intensity and the number of interpolated

  6. Suicide and voluntary active euthanasia: why the difference in attitude?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beech, I

    1995-06-01

    It appears that the attitudes of health professionals differ towards suicide and voluntary active euthanasia. An acceptance of, if not an agreement with, voluntary active euthanasia exists, while there is a general consensus that suicide should be prevented. This paper searches for a working definition of suicide, to discover ethical reasons for the negative value that suicide assumes, and also to provide a term of reference when comparing suicide with euthanasia. On arriving at a working definition of suicide, it is compared with voluntary active euthanasia. An analysis of utilitarian and deontological considerations is provided and proves to be inconclusive with respect to the ethical principles informing the attitudes of professionals. Therefore, a search for other influences is attempted; this indicates that psychological influences inform attitudes to a greater degree than ethical principles.

  7. 77 FR 55487 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Voluntary Customer Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-10

    ... U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security, and sent via electronic mail to... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities; Voluntary Customer Survey AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: 30-Day...

  8. A cardiorespiratory classifier of voluntary and involuntary electrodermal activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sejdic Ervin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electrodermal reactions (EDRs can be attributed to many origins, including spontaneous fluctuations of electrodermal activity (EDA and stimuli such as deep inspirations, voluntary mental activity and startling events. In fields that use EDA as a measure of psychophysiological state, the fact that EDRs may be elicited from many different stimuli is often ignored. This study attempts to classify observed EDRs as voluntary (i.e., generated from intentional respiratory or mental activity or involuntary (i.e., generated from startling events or spontaneous electrodermal fluctuations. Methods Eight able-bodied participants were subjected to conditions that would cause a change in EDA: music imagery, startling noises, and deep inspirations. A user-centered cardiorespiratory classifier consisting of 1 an EDR detector, 2 a respiratory filter and 3 a cardiorespiratory filter was developed to automatically detect a participant's EDRs and to classify the origin of their stimulation as voluntary or involuntary. Results Detected EDRs were classified with a positive predictive value of 78%, a negative predictive value of 81% and an overall accuracy of 78%. Without the classifier, EDRs could only be correctly attributed as voluntary or involuntary with an accuracy of 50%. Conclusions The proposed classifier may enable investigators to form more accurate interpretations of electrodermal activity as a measure of an individual's psychophysiological state.

  9. Voluntary activation of trapezius measured with twitch interpolation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Janet L; Olsen, Henrik Baare; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of measuring voluntary activation of the trapezius muscle with twitch interpolation. Subjects (n=8) lifted the right shoulder or both shoulders against fixed force transducers. Stimulation of the accessory nerve in the neck was used to evoke maximal twitche...

  10. The dead donor rule, voluntary active euthanasia, and capital punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coons, Christian; Levin, Noah

    2011-06-01

    We argue that the dead donor rule, which states that multiple vital organs should only be taken from dead patients, is justified neither in principle nor in practice. We use a thought experiment and a guiding assumption in the literature about the justification of moral principles to undermine the theoretical justification for the rule. We then offer two real world analogues to this thought experiment, voluntary active euthanasia and capital punishment, and argue that the moral permissibility of terminating any patient through the removal of vital organs cannot turn on whether or not the practice violates the dead donor rule. Next, we consider practical justifications for the dead donor rule. Specifically, we consider whether there are compelling reasons to promulgate the rule even though its corresponding moral principle is not theoretically justified. We argue that there are no such reasons. In fact, we argue that promulgating the rule may actually decrease public trust in organ procurement procedures and medical institutions generally - even in states that do not permit capital punishment or voluntary active euthanasia. Finally, we examine our case against the dead donor rule in the light of common arguments for it. We find that these arguments are often misplaced - they do not support the dead donor rule. Instead, they support the quite different rule that patients should not be killed for their vital organs.

  11. Human dignity and the future of the voluntary active euthanasia debate in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donrich W Jordaan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The issue of voluntary active euthanasia was thrust into the public policy arena by the Stransham-Ford lawsuit. The High Court legalised voluntary active euthanasia – however, ostensibly only in the specific case of Mr Stransham-Ford. The Supreme Court of Appeal overturned the High Court judgment on technical grounds, not on the merits. This means that in future the courts can be approached again to consider the legalisation of voluntary active euthanasia. As such, Stransham-Ford presents a learning opportunity for both sides of the legalisation divide. In particular, conceptual errors pertaining to human dignity were made in Stransham-Ford, and can be avoided in future. In this article, I identify these errors and propose the following three corrective principles to inform future debate on the subject: (i human dignity is violable; (ii human suffering violates human dignity; and (iii the ‘natural’ causes of suffering due to terminal illness do not exclude the application of human dignity.

  12. Is there a place for voluntary active euthanasia in modern-day medicine?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ogunbanjo, GA; Knapp van Bogaert, D

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses various ethical and legal concepts regarding euthanasia and includes notions such as physician-assisted suicide, assisted suicide, voluntary active euthanasia, killing versus...

  13. Maximal force, voluntary activation and muscle soreness after eccentric damage to human elbow flexor muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasartwuth, O; Taylor, JL; Gandevia, SC

    2005-01-01

    Muscle damage reduces voluntary force after eccentric exercise but impaired neural drive to the muscle may also contribute. To determine whether the delayed-onset muscle soreness, which develops ∼1 day after exercise, reduces voluntary activation and to identify the possible site for any reduction, voluntary activation of elbow flexor muscles was examined with both motor cortex and motor nerve stimulation. We measured maximal voluntary isometric torque (MVC), twitch torque, muscle soreness and voluntary activation in eight subjects before, immediately after, 2 h after, 1, 2, 4 and 8 days after eccentric exercise. Motor nerve stimulation and motor cortex stimulation were used to derive twitch torques and measures of voluntary activation. Eccentric exercise immediately reduced the MVC by 38 ± 3% (mean ±s.d., n = 8). The resting twitch produced by motor nerve stimulation fell by 82 ± 6%, and the estimated resting twitch by cortical stimulation fell by 47 ± 15%. While voluntary torque recovered after 8 days, both measures of the resting twitch remained depressed. Muscle tenderness occurred 1–2 days after exercise, and pain during contractions on days 1–4, but changes in voluntary activation did not follow this time course. Voluntary activation assessed with nerve stimulation fell 19 ± 6% immediately after exercise but was not different from control values after 2 days. Voluntary activation assessed by motor cortex stimulation was unchanged by eccentric exercise. During MVCs, absolute increments in torque evoked by nerve and cortical stimulation behaved differently. Those to cortical stimulation decreased whereas those to nerve stimulation tended to increase. These findings suggest that reduced voluntary activation contributes to the early force loss after eccentric exercise, but that it is not due to muscle soreness. The impairment of voluntary activation to nerve stimulation but not motor cortical stimulation suggests that the activation deficit lies in the

  14. Voluntary activation of human knee extensors measured using transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodall, S; Romer, L M; Ross, E Z

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the applicability and reliability of a transcranial magnetic stimulation twitch interpolation technique for measuring voluntary activation of a lower limb muscle group. Cortical voluntary activation of the knee extensors was determined in nine healthy men on two separate visits by measuring superimposed twitch torques evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation during isometric knee extensions of varying intensity. Superimposed twitch amplitude decreased linearly with increasing voluntary torque between 50 and 100% of mean maximal torque, allowing estimation of resting twitch amplitude and subsequent calculation of voluntary activation. There were no systematic differences for maximal voluntary activation within day (mean +/- s.d. 90.9 +/- 6.2 versus 90.7 +/- 5.9%; P = 0.98) or between days (90.8 +/- 6.0 versus 91.2 +/- 5.7%; P = 0.92). Systematic bias and random error components of the 95% limits of agreement were 0.23 and 9.3% within day versus 0.38 and 7.5% between days. Voluntary activation was also determined immediately after a 2 min maximal voluntary isometric contraction; in four of these subjects, voluntary activation was determined 30 min after the sustained contraction. Immediately after the sustained isometric contraction, maximal voluntary activation was reduced from 91.2 +/- 5.7 to 74.2 +/- 12.0% (P knee extensors.

  15. Win-stay-lose-learn promotes cooperation in the prisoner's dilemma game with voluntary participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chen; Liu, Jinzhuo; Shen, Chen; Jin, Jiahua; Shi, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Voluntary participation, demonstrated to be a simple yet effective mechanism to promote persistent cooperative behavior, has been extensively studied. It has also been verified that the aspiration-based win-stay-lose-learn strategy updating rule promotes the evolution of cooperation. Inspired by this well-known fact, we combine the Win-Stay-Lose-Learn updating rule with voluntary participation: Players maintain their strategies when they are satisfied, or players attempt to imitate the strategy of one randomly chosen neighbor. We find that this mechanism maintains persistent cooperative behavior, even further promotes the evolution of cooperation under certain conditions.

  16. Comparison of body-powered voluntary opening and voluntary closing prehensor for activities of daily life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey Berning

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Persons with an upper-limb amputation who use a body-powered prosthesis typically control the prehensor through contralateral shoulder movement, which is transmitted through a Bowden cable. Increased cable tension either opens or closes the prehensor; when tension is released, some passive element, such as a spring, returns the prehensor to the default state (closed or open. In this study, we used the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure to examine functional differences between these two types of prehensors in 29 nondisabled subjects (who used a body-powered bypass prosthesis and 2 persons with unilateral transradial amputations (who used a conventional body-powered device. We also administered a survey to determine whether subjects preferred one prehensor or the other for specific tasks, with a long-term goal of assessing whether a prehensor that could switch between both modes would be advantageous. We found that using the voluntary closing prehensor was 1.3 s faster (p = 0.02 than using the voluntary opening prehensor, across tasks, and that there was consensus among subjects on which types of tasks they preferred to do with each prehensor type. Twenty-five subjects wanted a device that could switch between the two modes in order to perform particular tasks.

  17. Comparison of body-powered voluntary opening and voluntary closing prehensor for activities of daily life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berning, Kelsey; Cohick, Sarah; Johnson, Reva; Miller, Laura Ann; Sensinger, Jonathon W

    2014-01-01

    Persons with an upper-limb amputation who use a body-powered prosthesis typically control the prehensor through contralateral shoulder movement, which is transmitted through a Bowden cable. Increased cable tension either opens or closes the prehensor; when tension is released, some passive element, such as a spring, returns the prehensor to the default state (closed or open). In this study, we used the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure to examine functional differences between these two types of prehensors in 29 nondisabled subjects (who used a body-powered bypass prosthesis) and 2 persons with unilateral transradial amputations (who used a conventional body-powered device). We also administered a survey to determine whether subjects preferred one prehensor or the other for specific tasks, with a long-term goal of assessing whether a prehensor that could switch between both modes would be advantageous. We found that using the voluntary closing prehensor was 1.3 s faster (p = 0.02) than using the voluntary opening prehensor, across tasks, and that there was consensus among subjects on which types of tasks they preferred to do with each prehensor type. Twenty-five subjects wanted a device that could switch between the two modes in order to perform particular tasks.

  18. Active learning

    CERN Document Server

    Settles, Burr

    2012-01-01

    The key idea behind active learning is that a machine learning algorithm can perform better with less training if it is allowed to choose the data from which it learns. An active learner may pose "queries," usually in the form of unlabeled data instances to be labeled by an "oracle" (e.g., a human annotator) that already understands the nature of the problem. This sort of approach is well-motivated in many modern machine learning and data mining applications, where unlabeled data may be abundant or easy to come by, but training labels are difficult, time-consuming, or expensive to obtain. This book is a general introduction to active learning. It outlines several scenarios in which queries might be formulated, and details many query selection algorithms which have been organized into four broad categories, or "query selection frameworks." We also touch on some of the theoretical foundations of active learning, and conclude with an overview of the strengths and weaknesses of these approaches in practice, inclu...

  19. 16 CFR 1031.5 - Criteria for Commission involvement in voluntary standards activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Commission involvement in the development of voluntary safety standards for consumer products: (a) The... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Criteria for Commission involvement in voluntary standards activities. 1031.5 Section 1031.5 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT...

  20. Time-dependent cortical activation in voluntary muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qi; Wang, Xiaofeng; Fang, Yin; Siemionow, Vlodek; Yao, Wanxiang; Yue, Guang H

    2011-01-01

    This study was to characterize dynamic source strength changes estimated from high-density scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) at different phases of a submaximal voluntary muscle contraction. Eight healthy volunteers performed isometric handgrip contractions of the right arm at 20% maximal intensity. Signals of the handgrip force, electromyography (EMG) from the finger flexor and extensor muscles and 64-channel EEG were acquired simultaneously. Sources of the EEG were analyzed at 19 time points across preparation, execution and sustaining phases of the handgrip. A 3-layer boundary element model (BEM) based on the MNI (Montréal Neurological Institute) brain MRI was used to overlay the sources. A distributed current density model, LORETA L1 norm method was applied to the data that had been processed by independent component analysis (ICA). Statistical analysis based on a mixed-effects polynomial regression model showed a significant and consistent time-dependent non-linear source strength change pattern in different phases of the handgrip. The source strength increased at the preparation phase, peaked at the force onset time and decreased in the sustaining phase. There was no significant difference in the changing pattern of the source strength among Brodmann's areas 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6. These results show, for the first time, a high time resolution increasing-and-decreasing pattern of activation among the sensorimotor regions with the highest activity occurs at the muscle activity onset. The similarity in the source strength time courses among the cortical centers examined suggests a synchronized parallel function in controlling the motor activity.

  1. Startle activation is additive with voluntary cortical activation irrespective of stimulus modality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslovat, Dana; Drummond, Neil M; Carter, Michael J; Carlsen, Anthony N

    2015-10-01

    When a startling acoustic stimulus (SAS) is presented during a simple reaction time (RT) task, it can trigger the prepared response through an involuntary initiation pathway. Previous research modelling the effects of presenting a SAS at various intervals following a non-startling auditory imperative signal (IS) suggested that involuntary initiation-related neural activation is additive with the voluntary initiation processes. The current study tested the predictions of this additive model when the SAS and IS are of different modalities by using a visual rather than auditory go-signal. Because voluntary RT latencies are delayed for visual stimuli compared to acoustic stimuli, it was hypothesised that the time course of additive activation would be similarly delayed. Participants performed 150 RT trials requiring a targeted 20° wrist extension task with a SAS presented 0-125 ms following a visual go-signal. Results were not different to those predicted by an additive model (p=0.979), yet were significantly different to those predicted by a horse-race model (p=0.037), indicating a joint contribution of voluntary and involuntary activation, even when the IS and SAS are of different modalities. Furthermore, the results indicated that voluntary RT differences due to stimulus modality are attributable to processes that occur prior to the increase in initiation-related activation.

  2. 78 FR 57818 - Commission Participation and Commission Employee Involvement in Voluntary Standards Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION 16 CFR Part 1031 Commission Participation and Commission Employee Involvement in Voluntary Standards Activities AGENCY: Consumer Product Safety Commission. ACTION: Notice of proposed...

  3. 75 FR 78257 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Voluntary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-15

    ... in evaluating reports of alleged injuries and adverse reactions from the use of cosmetics. The... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Voluntary Cosmetic Registration Program AGENCY: Food and Drug...

  4. Attitudinal and motivational antecedents of participation in voluntary employee development activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtz, Gregory M; Williams, Kevin J

    2009-05-01

    This study investigated factors influencing ongoing participation in employee development activities. A multiple-indicator structural equation model building on the theory of planned behavior and prior employee development literature was tested with a survey across 4 organizations on 2 occasions. The model uses reactions to past participation and past supportiveness of the social and organizational environment as indirect antecedents of participation, filtered through their impact on attitudes and behavioral intentions toward future participation. Learning goal orientation also influenced attitudes toward participation. Whereas personal control over participation and higher levels of voluntariness were negatively related to participation, intentions to participate and availability of opportunities arose as strong predictors of higher participation rates. Many significant hypothesized paths were found, and 85% of the variance in participation was explained by the model variables. Increasing employee awareness of opportunities and managing positive attitudes toward those opportunities are recommended as key factors for increasing participation rates.

  5. Physiological alterations of maximal voluntary quadriceps activation by changes of knee joint angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, R; Awiszus, F

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of different angles of the knee joint on voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle, estimating the ability of a subject to activate a muscle maximally by means of voluntary contraction. Isometric torque measurement was performed on 6 healthy subjects in 5 degrees intervals between 30 degrees and 90 degrees of knee joint flexion. Superimposed twitches at maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and at a level of 60% and 40% of the MVC were applied and the voluntary activation estimated. At between 30 degrees and 75 degrees of knee flexion, the maximal extension torque increased at an average rate of 2.67 +/- 0.6 Nm/degree, followed by a decline with further flexion. However, throughout the joint-angle range tested, voluntary activation increased on average by 0.37%/degree with a maximum at 90 degrees of flexion. Due to the influence of joint position it is not possible to generalize results obtained at the knee joint angle of 90 degrees of flexion, which is usually used for the quadriceps twitch-interpolation technique. Consequently, it is useful to investigate voluntary activation deficits in knee joint disorders at a range of knee joint angles that includes, in particular, the more extended joint angles used frequently during daily activity.

  6. Creating a movement heuristic for voluntary action: electrophysiological correlates of movement-outcome learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednark, Jeffery G; Reynolds, John N J; Stafford, Tom; Redgrave, Peter; Franz, Elizabeth A

    2013-03-01

    Performance of voluntary behavior requires the selection of appropriate movements to attain a desired goal. We propose that the selection of voluntary movements is often contingent on the formation of a movement heuristic or set of internal rules governing movement selection. We used event-related potentials (ERPs) to identify the electrophysiological correlates of the formation of movement heuristics during movement-outcome learning. In two experiments, ERPs from non-learning control tasks were compared to a movement-learning task in which a movement heuristic was formed. We found that novelty P3 amplitude was negatively correlated with improved performance in the movement-learning task. Additionally, enhancement of novelty P3 amplitude was observed during learning even after controlling for memory, attentional and inter-stimulus interval parameters. The feedback correct-related positivity (fCRP) was only elicited by sensory effects following intentional movements. These findings extend previous studies demonstrating the role of the fCRP in performance monitoring and the role of the P3 in learning. In particular, the present study highlights an integrative role of the fCRP and the novelty P3 for the acquisition of movement heuristics. While the fCRP indicates that the goal of intentional movements has been attained, the novelty P3 engages stimulus-driven attentional mechanisms to determine the primary aspects of movement and context required to elicit the sensory effect.

  7. Percent voluntary inactivation and peak force predictions with the interpolated twitch technique in individuals with high ability of voluntary activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herda, Trent J; Walter, Ashley A; Costa, Pablo B; Ryan, Eric D; Hoge, Katherine M; Stout, Jeffrey R; Cramer, Joel T

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the sensitivity and peak force prediction capability of the interpolated twitch technique (ITT) performed during submaximal and maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) in subjects with the ability to maximally activate their plantar flexors. Twelve subjects performed two MVCs and nine submaximal contractions with the ITT method to calculate percent voluntary inactivation (%VI). Additionally, two MVCs were performed without the ITT. Polynomial models (linear, quadratic and cubic) were applied to the 10-90% VI and 40-90% VI versus force relationships to predict force. Peak force from the ITT MVC was 6.7% less than peak force from the MVC without the ITT. Fifty-eight percent of the 10-90% VI versus force relationships were best fit with nonlinear models; however, all 40-90% VI versus force relationships were best fit with linear models. Regardless of the polynomial model or the contraction intensities used to predict force, all models underestimated the actual force from 22% to 28%. There was low sensitivity of the ITT method at high contraction intensities and the predicted force from polynomial models significantly underestimated the actual force. Caution is warranted when interpreting the % VI at high contraction intensities and predicted peak force from submaximal contractions.

  8. Neural activation during submaximal contractions seems more reflective of neuromuscular ageing than maximal voluntary activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil eScaglioni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at testing the hypothesis that differences in neural activation strategy during submaximal but not maximal plantarflexions exist between young and older men. Eleven young men (YM, 26±4 yr and 13 OM (76±3 yr volunteered for the investigation. Maximal voluntary torque (MVT was 38.2%, lower (P<0.001 in OM than in YM, while voluntary activation was equivalent (~97%. The relationship between the interpolated twitch-torque and the voluntary torque (IT-VT relationship was composite (curvilinear+exponential for both age-groups. However, the OM showed accentuated concavity, as attested by the occurrence of the deviation from linearity at a lower contraction intensity (OM: 54.9 vs. YM: 71.9% MVT. In conclusion, ageing does not affect the capacity to fully activate the plantar flexors during maximal performances, but it alters the activation pattern for submaximal levels of effort. The greater age-related concavity of the IT-VT relationship suggests that, during submaximal contractions, OM need to reach a level of activation higher than YM to develop an equivalent relative torque.

  9. Pavlov's conceptualization of voluntary movements within the framework of the theory of higher nervous activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windholz, G

    1998-01-01

    Pavlov became interested in the nature of voluntary movements after receiving Konorski and Miller's letter in 1928 describing their experiments on conditioning of motor movements in dogs. Their paradigmatic experiment involved presenting an indifferent stimulus, followed by passive raising of the dog's leg and then reinforcement. If the same stimulus was provided during a number of trials, the animal lifted its corresponding leg. In 1928 Pavlov asked his students to condition motor movements in his laboratory. Although their findings were equivocal, Pavlov incorporated the so-called voluntary movements into his theory of higher nervous activity. Voluntary movements were responses to external environmental contingencies. On the cortical level, the motor analyzer's cells had both afferent and efferent functions. In Pavlov's view, the motor analyzer's cells established connections with the afferent cells of other sensory analyzers. Pavlov held that motor movements, as responses to external and internal environments, give humans the illusion of voluntary behavior.

  10. Trainability of muscular activity level during maximal voluntary co-contraction: comparison between bodybuilders and nonathletes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumiaki Maeo

    Full Text Available Antagonistic muscle pairs cannot be fully activated simultaneously, even with maximal effort, under conditions of voluntary co-contraction, and their muscular activity levels are always below those during agonist contraction with maximal voluntary effort (MVE. Whether the muscular activity level during the task has trainability remains unclear. The present study examined this issue by comparing the muscular activity level during maximal voluntary co-contraction for highly experienced bodybuilders, who frequently perform voluntary co-contraction in their training programs, with that for untrained individuals (nonathletes. The electromyograms (EMGs of biceps brachii and triceps brachii muscles during maximal voluntary co-contraction of elbow flexors and extensors were recorded in 11 male bodybuilders and 10 nonathletes, and normalized to the values obtained during the MVE of agonist contraction for each of the corresponding muscles (% EMGMVE. The involuntary coactivation level in antagonist muscle during the MVE of agonist contraction was also calculated. In both muscles, % EMGMVE values during the co-contraction task for bodybuilders were significantly higher (P<0.01 than those for nonathletes (biceps brachii: 66±14% in bodybuilders vs. 46±13% in nonathletes, triceps brachii: 74±16% vs. 57±9%. There was a significant positive correlation between a length of bodybuilding experience and muscular activity level during the co-contraction task (r = 0.653, P = 0.03. Involuntary antagonist coactivation level during MVE of agonist contraction was not different between the two groups. The current result indicates that long-term participation in voluntary co-contraction training progressively enhances muscular activity during maximal voluntary co-contraction.

  11. The glucocorticoid system is required for the voluntary exercise-induced enhancement of learning and memory in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajisoltani, Razieh; Rashidy-Pour, Ali; Vafaei, Abbas A; Ghaderdoost, Behshid; Bandegi, Ahmad Reza; Motamedi, Fereshteh

    2011-05-16

    Although it is well established that voluntary exercise can improve cognitive functions, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Glucocorticoids play an important role in learning and memory functions. This study addressed whether the glucocorticoid system would play a role in the exercise-induced enhancement of learning and memory. Intact rats or those that were either adrenalectomized or daily given the corticosterone-synthesis inhibitor metyrapone were allowed to freely exercise in a running wheel for 10 days. Control animals were kept sedentary for this period. After this period, they were trained and tested on a water-maze spatial task using three-trial per day for 5 consecutive days, succeeded by a probe trial two days later. Exercise increased plasma corticosterone levels, as assessed after this 10-day period. Both adrenalectomy and metyrapone slightly reduced running-wheel activity. Adrenalectomy reduced the plasma corticosterone levels to almost zero whereas metyrapone selectively blocked the exercise-induced increase in corticosterone levels. Exercise significantly improved performance during both training and retention of the water-maze task whereas this effect was absent in both adrenalectomized and metyrapone-treated rats. These findings indicate that the glucocorticoid system play a crucial role in the beneficial effects of voluntary exercise on cognitive functions in rats.

  12. Voluntary activation during maximal contraction with advancing age: a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klass, Malgorzata; Baudry, Stéphane; Duchateau, Jacques

    2007-07-01

    It is well established that the loss of muscle mass (i.e. sarcopenia) is the primary factor contributing to the reduction in muscle force with ageing. Based on the observation that force declines at a faster rate than muscle mass, neural alterations are also thought to contribute to muscle weakness by reducing central drive to the agonist muscles and by increasing coactivation of the antagonist muscles. Researchers have attempted to quantify the contribution of impaired voluntary drive to the decline in muscle force using superimposed electrical stimulation during maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) and by recording surface electromyographic (EMG) activity. Although reduced voluntary activation of agonist muscles and increased coactivation of antagonist muscles during a MVC have been reported with advancing age, such changes are not supported by all studies. These discrepancies may be explained by differences in sensitivity between the methods used to assess voluntary activation, as well as differences between the characteristics of the study population, the muscle group that is tested, and the type of contraction that is performed. The objective of this review is to summarize current knowledge regarding the activation of agonist and antagonist muscles during MVC in elderly and to try to clarify the disparities in literature concerning the influence of a possible deficit in voluntary activation on the maximal force capacity of muscles in elderly adults.

  13. Motivation and benefits of voluntary activities. Case study: EYOF 2013 Braşov

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Codruţa Adina BĂLTESCU

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Voluntary activities have become natural concerns among an increasing number of European citizens. Romania, as a member state of the EU, has a low number of participations in voluntary activities, situation partly justified by the lack of presence of our country on the map of large scale events organization which is based to a high extent, on volunteers’ involvement. The present paper presents the results of a quantitative marketing research organized among volunteers who participated at EYOF 2013 Braşov and highlights the participation’s motivations and benefits felt by volunteers at the end of the event. The authors of the article highlight the differences reported between volunteers’ expectations and their opinions after the event, the results obtained being considered useful for planning the voluntary activities in organizing future events hosted in our country.

  14. Voluntary stand-up physical activity enhances endurance exercise capacity in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dae Yun; Lee, Sung Ryul; Kwak, Hyo-Bum; Seo, Kyo Won; McGregor, Robin A; Yeo, Ji Young; Ko, Tae Hee; Bolorerdene, Saranhuu; Kim, Nari; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo

    2016-01-01

    Involuntary physical activity induced by the avoidance of electrical shock leads to improved endurance exercise capacity in animals. However, it remains unknown whether voluntary stand-up physical activity (SPA) without forced simulating factors improves endurance exercise capacity in animals. We examined the eff ects of SPA on body weight, cardiac function, and endurance exercise capacity for 12 weeks. Twelve male Sprague-Dawley rats (aged 8 weeks, n=6 per group) were randomly assigned to a control group (CON) or a voluntary SPA group. The rats were induced to perform voluntary SPA (lifting a load equal to their body weight), while the food height (18.0 cm) in cages was increased progressively by 3.5 every 4 weeks until it reached 28.5 cm for 12 weeks. The SPA group showed a lower body weight compared to the CON group, but voluntary SPA did not affect the skeletal muscle and heart weights, food intake, and echocardiography results. Although the SPA group showed higher grip strength, running time, and distance compared to the CON group, the level of irisin, corticosterone, genetic expression of mitochondrial biogenesis, and nuclei numbers were not affected. These findings show that voluntary SPA without any forced stimuli in rats can eff ectively reduce body weight and enhance endurance exercise capacity, suggesting that it may be an important alternative strategy to enhance endurance exercise capacity. PMID:27162483

  15. Fatigue-related firing of distal muscle nociceptors reduces voluntary activation of proximal muscles of the same limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, David S; McNeil, Chris J; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2014-02-15

    With fatiguing exercise, firing of group III/IV muscle afferents reduces voluntary activation and force of the exercised muscles. These afferents can also act across agonist/antagonist pairs, reducing voluntary activation and force in nonfatigued muscles. We hypothesized that maintained firing of group III/IV muscle afferents after a fatiguing adductor pollicis (AP) contraction would decrease voluntary activation and force of AP and ipsilateral elbow flexors. In two experiments (n = 10) we examined voluntary activation of AP and elbow flexors by measuring changes in superimposed twitches evoked by ulnar nerve stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex, respectively. Inflation of a sphygmomanometer cuff after a 2-min AP maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) blocked circulation of the hand for 2 min and maintained firing of group III/IV muscle afferents. After a 2-min AP MVC, maximal AP voluntary activation was lower with than without ischemia (56.2 ± 17.7% vs. 76.3 ± 14.6%; mean ± SD; P muscle afferents from the hand decreased voluntary drive and force of AP. Moreover, this effect decreased voluntary drive and torque of proximal unfatigued muscles, the elbow flexors. Fatigue-sensitive group III/IV muscle nociceptors act to limit voluntary drive not only to fatigued muscles but also to unfatigued muscles within the same limb.

  16. Win-stay-lose-learn promotes cooperation in the prisoner’s dilemma game with voluntary participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chen; Liu, Jinzhuo; Shen, Chen; Jin, Jiahua; Shi, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Voluntary participation, demonstrated to be a simple yet effective mechanism to promote persistent cooperative behavior, has been extensively studied. It has also been verified that the aspiration-based win-stay-lose-learn strategy updating rule promotes the evolution of cooperation. Inspired by this well-known fact, we combine the Win-Stay-Lose-Learn updating rule with voluntary participation: Players maintain their strategies when they are satisfied, or players attempt to imitate the strategy of one randomly chosen neighbor. We find that this mechanism maintains persistent cooperative behavior, even further promotes the evolution of cooperation under certain conditions. PMID:28182707

  17. The repeated bout effect of eccentric exercise is not associated with changes in voluntary activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamandulis, Sigitas; Skurvydas, Albertas; Brazaitis, Marius; Skikas, Laimutis; Duchateau, Jacques

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the possible changes in muscle activation level between a first and second bout of damaging eccentric exercise performed at 2 weeks interval (i.e. repeated bout effect). To that purpose, ten physically active males took part in this study. The eccentric exercise consisted of 10 sets of 12 maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) produced by the knee extensors during movements performed at a constant speed of 160 degrees s(-1). Changes in voluntary and electrically evoked torque in concentric and/or isometric conditions were assessed at the following time points: pre-exercise, and 2 min, 1 and 24 h after each eccentric exercise. At the same time points, voluntary activation was quantified by the superimposed electrical stimulation technique. Muscle soreness and plasma CK activity were measured within 48 h after the eccentric exercise. The results showed that the decrease in eccentric peak torque was linear throughout the exercise protocol. At the end of bouts 1 and 2, torque was significantly reduced by 27.7 +/- 9.1 and 23.4 +/- 11.2, respectively, with no difference between bouts (P > 0.05). At 24 h post-exercise, a lower reduction (P eccentric exercise appears to reduce muscle damage, but does not influence the level of voluntary activation.

  18. Intrinsic muscle strength and voluntary activation of both lower limbs and functional performance after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstman, Astrid M; Beltman, Marijke J; Gerrits, Karin H; Koppe, Peter; Janssen, Thomas W; Elich, Peter; de Haan, Arnold

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the nature of muscle weakness in both legs after stroke compared with able-bodied control individuals and to examine whether there is a relationship between the degree of muscle weakness and coactivation of knee extensors and flexors as well as voluntary activation capacity of knee extensors of both paretic and non-paretic legs and indices of functional performance. Maximal voluntary isometric torques of knee extensors (MVCe) and flexors (MVCf) were determined in 14 patients (bilaterally) and 12 able-bodied controls. Simultaneous measurements were made of torque and surface EMG from agonist and antagonist muscles. Coactivation was calculated. Supramaximal triplets were evoked with electrical stimulation to estimate maximal torque capacity and degree of voluntary activation of knee extensors. MVCs, activation and coactivation parameters were correlated to scores of seven functional performance tests. MVCe, MVCf and voluntary activation were lower in paretic lower limb (PL) compared with both non-paretic lower limb (NL) and control. Besides, all these parameters of NL were also lower than control. Electrically evoked torque capacity of knee extensors of PL was about 60% of both NL and control, which were not significantly different from each other. Strong significant correlations between strength, as well as voluntary activation, and functional performance were found. Coactivation did not correlate well with functional performance. Thus, whereas for NL activation failure can explain weakness, for PL both activation failure and reduced intrinsic torque capacity are responsible for the severe weakness. Activation capacity and muscle strength correlated strongly to functional performance, while coactivation did not.

  19. Measurement of voluntary activation based on transcranial magnetic stimulation over the motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Gabrielle; Taylor, Janet L; Gandevia, Simon C

    2016-09-01

    This article reviews the use of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the motor cortex to make estimates of the level of voluntary drive to muscles. The method, described in 2003 (Todd et al. J Physiol 551: 661-671, 2003), uses a TMS pulse to produce descending corticospinal volleys that synaptically activate motoneurons, resulting in a muscle twitch. Linear regression of the superimposed twitch amplitude and voluntary force (or torque) can generate an "estimated" resting twitch for muscles involved in a task. This procedure has most commonly been applied to elbow flexors but also to knee extensors and other muscle groups. Data from 44 papers using the method were tabulated. We identify and discuss five major technical challenges, and the frequency with which they are addressed. The technical challenges include inadvertent activation of the cortical representation of antagonist muscles, the role of antagonist torques at the studied joint, uncertainty about the effectiveness of the TMS pulse in activating the motoneuron pool, the linearity of the voluntary force (or torque) and superimposed twitch relationship, and variability in the TMS-evoked EMG and force/torque responses. The ideal situation in which the descending corticospinal volleys recruit all of the agonist motoneurons and none of the antagonist motoneurons is unlikely to ever occur, and hence results must be carefully examined to assess the authenticity of the voluntary activation estimates in the context of the experimental design. A partial compromise lies in the choice of stimulus intensity. We also identify aspects of the procedure that require further investigation.

  20. Voluntary Activity of Polish People and Its Motives in Recent Years: New Volunteering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosewska, Bernadetta

    2015-01-01

    This article covers an issue or the phenomenon of volunteering. The introduction is a recall of a definition of volunteering. Then it shows the distribution of voluntary activity in different countries of the European Union in order to look at some aspects of the phenomenon in the microscale of one country--Poland. It shows the percentage of…

  1. Voluntary access to a warm plate reduces hyperactivity in activity-based anorexia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillebrand, Jacquelien J G; de Rijke, Corine E; Brakkee, Jan H; Kas, Martien J H; Adan, Roger A H

    2005-01-01

    Activity-based anorexia (ABA) is considered an animal model of anorexia nervosa. In ABA, scheduled feeding in combination with voluntary wheel running leads to hyperactivity, reduced food intake, severe body weight loss and hypothermia. In this study it was investigated whether hyperactivity in ABA

  2. Voluntary exercise does not ameliorate spatial learning and memory deficits induced by chronic administration of nandrolone decanoate in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanehkar, Fatemeh; Rashidy-Pour, Ali; Vafaei, Abbas Ali; Sameni, Hamid Reza; Haghighi, Saeed; Miladi-Gorji, Hossien; Motamedi, Fereshteh; Akhavan, Maziar Mohammad; Bavarsad, Kowsar

    2013-01-01

    Chronic exposure to the anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) nandrolone decanoate (ND) in supra-physiological doses is associated with learning and memory impairments. Given the well-known beneficial effects of voluntary exercise on cognitive functions, we examined whether voluntary exercise would improve the cognitive deficits induced by chronic administration of ND. We also investigated the effects of ND and voluntary exercise on hippocampal BDNF levels. The rats were randomly distributed into 4 experimental groups: the vehicle-sedentary group, the ND-sedentary group, the vehicle-exercise group, and the ND-exercise group. The vehicle-exercise and the ND-exercise groups were allowed to freely exercise in a running wheel for 15 days. The vehicle-sedentary and the ND-sedentary groups were kept sedentary for the same period. Vehicle or ND injections were started 14 days prior to the voluntary exercise and continued throughout the 15 days of voluntary exercise. After the 15-day period, the rats were trained and tested on a water maze spatial task using four trials per day for 5 consecutive days followed by a probe trial two days later. Exercise significantly improved performance during both the training and retention of the water maze task, and enhanced hippocampal BDNF. ND impaired spatial learning and memory, and this effect was not rescued by exercise. ND also potentiated the exercise-induced increase in hippocampal BDNF levels. These results seem to indicate that voluntary exercise is unable to improve the disruption of cognitive functions by chronic ND. Moreover, increased levels of BDNF may play a role in ND-induced impairments in learning and memory. The harmful effects of ND and other AAS on learning and memory should be taken into account when athletes decide to use AAS for performance or body image improvement.

  3. Intermittent Voluntary Ethanol Drinking during Periadolescence Impairs Adult Spatial Learning after a Long Abstinence Period in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Ana; Garcia-Burgos, David; Manrique, Tatiana; Gonzalez, Felisa; Gallo, Milagros

    2011-01-01

    Although previous findings point to the long-term impact of ethanol exposure during periadolescence on hippocampal-dependent learning tasks, comparisons considering different onset and exposure periods during this developmental range of ages are still needed. The aim of this experiment was to determine whether intermittent voluntary chronic…

  4. Voluntary activation of the trapezius muscle in cases with neck/shoulder pain compared to healthy controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Katrine Tholstrup; Larsen, Camilla Marie; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    2017-01-01

    Subjects reporting neck/shoulder pain have been shown to generate less force during maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVC) of the shoulder muscles compared to healthy controls. This has been suggested to be caused by a pain-related decrease in voluntary activation (VA) rather than lack of...

  5. The relationships among sprint performance, voluntary swimming activity, and social dominance in juvenile rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, D G; Keeler, R A; McFarlane, W J

    2007-01-01

    The specific objectives of this study were to determine whether sprint performance in juvenile rainbow trout is correlated with either voluntary swimming activity or aggressive behaviors and to determine the reciprocal: the effect of swimming activity and aggression on sprint performance. Sprint performance was assessed by rapidly accelerating trout (5-7-cm fork length) to a fixed velocity (40, 42, or 45 cm s(-1)) and then holding them at that velocity until fatigue. There was considerable interindividual variation in sprint performance not explained by variations in body size, but intraindividual performance was highly repeatable over at least 2 mo. Voluntary swimming was measured as the frequency of transits (voluntary transit activity, VTA) between two identical tanks via a connecting channel with two different flow regimes: zero or minimum velocity (0 or 2.5 cm s(-1)) and high velocity (84 cm s(-1)). There was a strong correlation between sprint performance and VTA in minimal current but no correlation in high current. Furthermore, sprint performance did not predict the outcome of dominance encounters. Experience with rapid acceleration, especially when voluntary, led to a pronounced improvement in sprint performance in proportion to the number of acceleration events. Social dominance encounters had a more complex effect: a significant reduction in sprint performance in previously high-performance sprinters and the reverse for low performers. We propose that there are four independent axes of interindividual variation in juvenile rainbow trout: spontaneous and rheotaxis-stimulated locomotor activity, aggressive activity, and the trainability of sprint performance. The independence of these axes has the potential to produce a much larger diversity in behavioral and ultimately physiological phenotypes than would be produced if the axes were linked.

  6. Central beta-adrenergic receptors play an important role in the enhancing effect of voluntary exercise on learning and memory in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Shima; Rashidy-Pour, Ali; Vafaei, Abbas A; Akhavan, Maziar M

    2010-03-17

    The beneficial effects of physical activity and exercise on brain functions such as improvement in learning and memory are well documented. The aim of this study was to examine the role of the beta-adrenergic system in voluntary exercise-induced enhancement of learning and memory in rat. In order to block the beta-adrenergic receptors, the animals were received propranolol (a beta-blocker), or nadolol (a peripherally acting beta-blocker) before each night of five consecutive nights of exercise. Then their learning and memory were tested on the water maze task using a two-trials-per-day for 5 consecutive days. A probe trial was performed 2 days after the last training day. Our results showed that propranolol, but not nadolol reversed the exercise-induced improvement in learning and memory in rat. Our findings indicate that central beta-adrenergic receptors play an important role in mediating the beneficial effects of voluntary exercise on learning and memory.

  7. U.K. physicians' attitudes toward active voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, George E; Lancaster, Carol J; Clark, David; Ahmedzai, Sam H; Noble, William

    2002-01-01

    A comparison of the views of geriatric medicine physicians and intensive care physicians in the United Kingdom on the topics of active voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide revealed rather different attitudes. Eighty percent of geriatricians, but only 52% of intensive care physicians, considered active voluntary euthanasia as never justified ethically. Gender and age did not play a major part in attitudinal differences of the respondents. If the variability of attitudes of these two medical specialties are anywhere near illustrative of other physicians in the United Kingdom, it would be difficult to formulate and implement laws and policies concerning euthanasia and assisted suicide. In addition, ample safeguards would be required to receive support from physicians regarding legalization.

  8. Hippocampal angiotensin II receptors play an important role in mediating the effect of voluntary exercise on learning and memory in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan, Maziar M; Emami-Abarghoie, Mitra; Sadighi-Moghaddam, Bizhan; Safari, Manouchehr; Yousefi, Yasaman; Rashidy-Pour, Ali

    2008-09-26

    The beneficial effects of physical activity and exercise on brain functions such as improvement in learning and memory are well documented. The aim of this study was to examine the possible role of hippocampal angiotensin II receptors in voluntary exercise-induced enhancement of learning and memory in rat. In order to block the hippocampal angiotension II receptors, the animals received a single injection of latex microbeads for delivery of [Sar1 Thr8]-Angiotensin II into the hippocampus. The animals were exposed to five consecutive nights of exercise and then their learning and memory were tested on the Morris water maze (MWM) task using a two-trial-per-day for five consecutive days. A probe trial was performed 2 days after the last training day. Our results showed that hippocampal angiotensin II receptor blockade reversed the exercise-induced improvement in learning and memory in rat.

  9. Effects of long-term voluntary exercise on learning and memory processes: dependency of the task and level of exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Capdevila, Sílvia; Portell-Cortés, Isabel; Torras-Garcia, Meritxell; Coll-Andreu, Margalida; Costa-Miserachs, David

    2009-09-14

    The effect of long-term voluntary exercise (running wheel) on anxiety-like behaviour (plus maze and open field) and learning and memory processes (object recognition and two-way active avoidance) was examined on Wistar rats. Because major individual differences in running wheel behaviour were observed, the data were analysed considering the exercising animals both as a whole and grouped according to the time spent in the running wheel (low, high, and very-high running). Although some variables related to anxiety-like behaviour seem to reflect an anxiogenic compatible effect, the view of the complete set of variables could be interpreted as an enhancement of defensive and risk assessment behaviours in exercised animals, without major differences depending on the exercise level. Effects on learning and memory processes were dependent on task and level of exercise. Two-way avoidance was not affected either in the acquisition or in the retention session, while the retention of object recognition task was affected. In this latter task, an enhancement in low running subjects and impairment in high and very-high running animals were observed.

  10. The origin of activity in the biceps brachii muscle during voluntary contractions of the contralateral elbow flexor muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijdewind, Inge; Butler, Jane E.; Gandevia, Simon C.; Taylor, Janet L.

    2006-01-01

    During strong voluntary contractions, activity is not restricted to the target muscles. Other muscles, including contralateral muscles, often contract. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to analyse the origin of these unintended contralateral contractions (termed "associated" contractio

  11. The origin of activity in the biceps brachii muscle during voluntary contractions of the contralateral elbow flexor muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijdewind, Inge; Butler, Jane E.; Gandevia, Simon C.; Taylor, Janet L.

    2006-01-01

    During strong voluntary contractions, activity is not restricted to the target muscles. Other muscles, including contralateral muscles, often contract. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to analyse the origin of these unintended contralateral contractions (termed "associated"

  12. Comparing Voluntary and Mandatory Gameplay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Kuindersma

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Gameplay is commonly considered to be a voluntary activity. Game designers generally believe that voluntary gameplay is essentially different from mandatory gameplay. Such a belief may be a challenge for serious games, as instruction is usually mandatory. The article describes the outcomes of two experiments on the impact of voluntariness on the learning effect and enjoyment of a serious game. In the first experiment freedom of choosing to play a serious game was studied, with participants who had volunteered to participate. The results suggested that, contrary to the opinion of many game designers, being required to play a serious game does not automatically take the fun out of the game. The second experiment had voluntary participants and mandatory participants, who had to participate as part of a homework assignment. The outcomes show that mandatory participants enjoyed the game as much as the voluntary participants, even if they had to play the game for a minimum required time. These studies indicate that mandatory gameplay does not reduce enjoyment and learning effect.

  13. Changes in voluntary quadriceps activation predict changes in muscle strength and gait biomechanics following knee joint effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrosimone, Brian; Lepley, Adam S; Murray, Amanda M; Thomas, Abbey C; Bahhur, Nael O; Schwartz, Todd A

    2014-09-01

    It has been hypothesized that arthrogenic muscle inhibition is responsible for altering physical function following knee injury. The association between the onset of arthrogenic muscle inhibition, measured using voluntary quadriceps activation, and changes in muscle strength and gait biomechanics are unknown. Outcomes were collected before and following a 60 ml experimental knee effusion in eighteen healthy participants. Voluntary quadriceps activation was the predictor variable, while the criterion variable included, maximal voluntary isometric strength, peak knee flexion angle, peak internal knee extension moment, and peak vertical ground reaction forces during the first half of stance phase upon stair descent. Percent change scores (Δ) were imputed into linear regression equations to determine associations between predictor and criterion variables. The variance in Δ voluntary quadriceps activation significantly predicted 87% the variance in the Δ strength (R(2)=0.87, Pknee flexion angle, Δ voluntary quadriceps activation predicted an additional 29% (Δ R(2)=0.29, P=0.007) of the variance in the Δ knee extension moment (R(2)=0.54, P=0.003, Δ knee extension moment=-10.79+0.74Δ knee flexion angle+1.64Δ voluntary quadriceps activation) following knee effusion. Immediate quadriceps activation deficits following joint effusion result in immediate alterations in muscle strength, knee extensor moment and vertical ground reaction force during gait. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Maximal intermittent contractions of the first dorsal interosseous inhibits voluntary activation of the contralateral homologous muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Justin J; Feldman, Matthew R; Simmonds, Michael J

    2016-09-07

    The aim of this study was to investigate how maximal intermittent contractions for a hand muscle influence cortical and reflex activity, as well as the ability to voluntarily activate, the homologous muscle in the opposite limb. Twelve healthy subjects (age: 24 ± 3 years, all right hand dominant) performed maximal contractions of the dominant limb first dorsal interosseous (FDI), and activity of the contralateral FDI was examined in a series of experiments. Index finger abduction force, FDI EMG, motor evoked potentials and heteronomous reflexes were obtained from the contralateral limb during brief non-fatiguing contractions. The same measures, as well as the ability to voluntarily activate the contralateral FDI, were then assessed in an extended intermittent contraction protocol that elicited fatigue. Brief contractions under non-fatigued conditions increased index finger abduction force, FDI EMG, and motor evoked potential amplitude of the contralateral limb. However, when intermittent maximal contractions were continued until fatigue, there was an inability to produce maximal force with the contralateral limb (~30%) which was coupled to a decrease in the level of voluntary activation (~20%). These declines were present without changes in reflex activity, and regardless of whether cortical or motor point stimulation was used to assess voluntary activation. It is concluded that performing maximal intermittent contractions with a single limb causes an inability of the CNS to maximally drive the homologous muscle of the contralateral limb. This was, in part, mediated by mechanisms that involve the motor cortex ipsilateral to the contracting limb.

  15. Active Learning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayapragassarazan, Z.; Kumar, Santosh

    2012-01-01

    Present generation students are primarily active learners with varied learning experiences and lecture courses may not suit all their learning needs. Effective learning involves providing students with a sense of progress and control over their own learning. This requires creating a situation where learners have a chance to try out or test their…

  16. Fatigue-related firing of muscle nociceptors reduces voluntary activation of ipsilateral but not contralateral lower limb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, David S; Fitzpatrick, Siobhan C; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2015-02-15

    During fatiguing upper limb exercise, maintained firing of group III/IV muscle afferents can limit voluntary drive to muscles within the same limb. It is not known if this effect occurs in the lower limb. We investigated the effects of group III/IV muscle afferent firing from fatigued ipsilateral and contralateral extensor muscles and ipsilateral flexor muscles of the knee on voluntary activation of the knee extensors. In three experiments, we examined voluntary activation of the knee extensors by measuring changes in superimposed twitches evoked by femoral nerve stimulation. Subjects attended on 2 days for each experiment. On one day a sphygmomanometer cuff occluded blood flow of the fatigued muscles to maintain firing of group III/IV muscle afferents. After a 2-min extensor contraction (experiment 1; n = 9), mean voluntary activation was lower with than without maintained ischemia (47 ± 19% vs. 87 ± 8%, respectively; P contraction (MVC) (experiment 2; n = 8), mean voluntary activation was also lower with than without ischemia (59 ± 21% vs. 79 ± 9%; P muscle afferents reduces voluntary activation of the fatigued muscle and nonfatigued antagonist muscles in the same leg. However, group III/IV muscle afferents from the fatigued left leg had no effect on the unfatigued right leg. This suggests that any "crossover" of central fatigue in the lower limbs is not mediated by group III/IV muscle afferents.

  17. Dental students and faculty members' attitudes towards care for underserved patients and community service: do community-based dental education and voluntary service-learning matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volvovsky, Mariya; Vodopyanov, Dmitry; Inglehart, Marita R

    2014-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore 1) how students across the four years of a dental curriculum differed in attitudes towards underserved patients and community service at the beginning and end of each school year; 2) how these attitudes changed as a function of participating in required vs. voluntary community-based activities; and 3) what attitudes faculty members held about the effects of community service-learning on students. Surveys were distributed to 440 students at one dental school at the beginning and end of the school year. The overall response rate for those surveys was 75 percent, with variations among classes: first year, 94 percent; second year, 92 percent; third year, 69 percent; and fourth year, 43 percent. Survey data were also collected from twenty-two students (out of a possible forty-seven) who participated in voluntary service-learning and from fifty-four faculty members (out of approximately 150). The results showed that, at the beginning of the year, the first-year students' attitudes were more positive than the responses of students in all other cohorts. However, at the end of the year, their attitudes were less positive. Participating in voluntary service-learning improved students' attitudes towards treating underserved patients only in the short run, and experiencing ten weeks of community-based dental education did not improve their attitudes. The faculty respondents' attitudes, however, were quite positive. The decrease in students' positive attitudes towards treating underserved patients and participating in community service should raise questions about why this loss of idealism occurred.

  18. Effects of early-onset voluntary exercise on adult physical activity and associated phenotypes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Wendy; Meek, Thomas H; Schutz, Heidi; Dlugosz, Elizabeth M; Vu, Kim T; Garland, Theodore

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of early-life exercise on adult physical activity (wheel running, home-cage activity), body mass, food consumption, and circulating leptin levels in males from four replicate lines of mice selectively bred for high voluntary wheel running (High Runner or HR) and their four non-selected control (C) lines. Half of the mice were given wheel access shortly after weaning for three consecutive weeks. Wheel access was then removed for 52 days, followed by two weeks of adult wheel access for all mice. A blood sample taken prior to adult wheel testing was analyzed for circulating leptin concentration. Early-life wheel access significantly increased adult voluntary exercise on wheels during the first week of the second period of wheel access, for both HR and C mice, and HR ran more than C mice. During this same time period, activity in the home cages was not affected by early-age wheel access, and did not differ statistically between HR and C mice. Throughout the study, all mice with early wheel access had lower body masses than their sedentary counterparts, and HR mice had lower body masses than C mice. With wheel access, HR mice also ate significantly more than C mice. Early-life wheel access increased plasma leptin levels (adjusted statistically for fat-pad mass as a covariate) in C mice, but decreased them in HR mice. At sacrifice, early-life exercise had no statistically significant effects on visceral fat pad, heart (ventricle), liver or spleen masses (all adjusted statistically for variation in body mass). Results support the hypothesis that early-age exercise in mice can have at least transitory positive effects on adult levels of voluntary exercise, in addition to reducing body mass, and may be relevant for the public policy debates concerning the importance of physical education for children. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Youth Voluntary Activities in Non-governmental Organizations and Perception of Volunteerism: Example of Educational Volunteers Foundation of Turkey (TEGV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslı Yönten Balaban

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractVolunteer activities, which can be described as activities without demanding any recompense, has an important role in strengthening the social structure. Youth participation into voluntary activities makes them active in the field of social integration while contributing their personal development. In this study, youth voluntary activities with regards to non-governmental organizations in Turkey will be discussed. It is also aimed to evaluate perception of volunteerism and the contribution of young volunteers’ activities to themselves in specific and to society in general.Keywords: Participation, Volunteerism, Educational Volunteers Foundation of Turkey (TEGVJEL Classification Codes: I29, L31

  20. Voluntary Exercise Preconditioning Activates Multiple Antiapoptotic Mechanisms and Improves Neurological Recovery after Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zaorui; Sabirzhanov, Boris; Wu, Junfang; Faden, Alan I; Stoica, Bogdan A

    2015-09-01

    Physical activity can attenuate neuronal loss, reduce neuroinflammation, and facilitate recovery after brain injury. However, little is known about the mechanisms of exercise-induced neuroprotection after traumatic brain injury (TBI) or its modulation of post-traumatic neuronal cell death. Voluntary exercise, using a running wheel, was conducted for 4 weeks immediately preceding (preconditioning) moderate-level controlled cortical impact (CCI), a well-established experimental TBI model in mice. Compared to nonexercised controls, exercise preconditioning (pre-exercise) improved recovery of sensorimotor performance in the beam walk task, as well as cognitive/affective functions in the Morris water maze, novel object recognition, and tail-suspension tests. Further, pre-exercise reduced lesion size, attenuated neuronal loss in the hippocampus, cortex, and thalamus, and decreased microglial activation in the cortex. In addition, exercise preconditioning activated the brain-derived neurotrophic factor pathway before trauma and amplified the injury-dependent increase in heat shock protein 70 expression, thus attenuating key apoptotic pathways. The latter include reduction in CCI-induced up-regulation of proapoptotic B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-homology 3-only Bcl-2 family molecules (Bid, Puma), decreased mitochondria permeabilization with attenuated release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), reduced AIF translocation to the nucleus, and attenuated caspase activation. Given these neuroprotective actions, voluntary physical exercise may serve to limit the consequences of TBI.

  1. Plyometric training improves voluntary activation and strength during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Martin; Mau-Moeller, Anett; Mueller, Karoline; Heise, Sandra; Gube, Martin; Beuster, Nico; Herlyn, Philipp K E; Fischer, Dagmar-C; Bruhn, Sven

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated effects of plyometric training (6 weeks, 3 sessions/week) on maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) strength and neural activation of the knee extensors during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions. Twenty-seven participants were randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. Maximum voluntary torques (MVT) during the different types of contraction were measured at 110° knee flexion (180°=full extension). The interpolated twitch technique was applied at the same knee joint angle during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions to measure voluntary activation. In addition, normalized root mean square of the EMG signal at MVT was calculated. The twitch torque signal induced by electrical nerve stimulation at rest was used to evaluate training-related changes at the muscle level. In addition, jump height in countermovement jump was measured. After training, MVT increased by 20Nm (95% CI: 5-36Nm, P=0.012), 24Nm (95% CI: 9-40Nm, P=0.004) and 27Nm (95% CI: 7-48Nm, P=0.013) for isometric, concentric and eccentric MVCs compared to controls, respectively. The strength enhancements were associated with increases in voluntary activation during isometric, concentric and eccentric MVCs by 7.8% (95% CI: 1.8-13.9%, P=0.013), 7.0% (95% CI: 0.4-13.5%, P=0.039) and 8.6% (95% CI: 3.0-14.2%, P=0.005), respectively. Changes in the twitch torque signal of the resting muscle, induced by supramaximal electrical stimulation of the femoral nerve, were not observed, indicating no alterations at the muscle level, whereas jump height was increased. Given the fact that the training exercises consisted of eccentric muscle actions followed by concentric contractions, it is in particular relevant that the plyometric training increased MVC strength and neural activation of the quadriceps muscle regardless of the contraction mode. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Voluntary Activity of Polish People and its Motives in Recent Years: New Volunteering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosewska Bernadetta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article covers an issue or the phenomenon of volunteering. The introduction is a recall of a definition of volunteering. Then it shows the distribution of voluntary activity in different countries of the European Union in order to look at some aspects of the phenomenon in the microscale of one country - Poland. It shows the percentage of involvement of Polish women and men in volunteering, their age, their motives to work for others. It makes the reader to think about an innovative definition of volunteering.

  3. Temporal muscle activation assessment by ultrasound imaging during flexor withdrawal reflex and voluntary contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Gomez-Tames; Shuto, Nakamura; Jose, Gonzalez; Wenwei, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Activating flexor reflexes by electrical stimulation has been used as a mechanism to initiate the swing phase or to enhance it for spinal cord injured patients. However, it is necessary to know their contraction dynamics in order to artificially induce them at the right moment of a walking cycle. This requires understanding the temporal activation pattern of both surface and deep muscles simultaneously. This study aimed at developing a system to measure and analyze the temporal activation of both surface and deep muscles during voluntary contraction and flexor reflexes (also called withdrawal reflexes) using ultrasound imaging. A set of experiments were done to verify the validity of the system, while exploring the temporal pattern of muscle activation during flexor reflexes. As a result, we were able to quantify the surface and deep muscle activity by measuring the muscle thickness, pennation angle and long-axis displacement, from the ultrasound images.

  4. Activation of rectus capitis posterior major muscles during voluntary retraction of the head in asymptomatic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Richard C; Rowan, Jacob J; Bai, Peng; Pierce, Steven J; Shafer-Crane, Gail A; Prokop, Lawrence L

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess levels of electromyographic activity measured from rectus capitis posterior major (RCPM) muscles of asymptomatic subjects as their heads moved from a self-defined neutral position to a retracted position. A 2 × 2 within-subjects factorial research design was used. Disposable, intramuscular electrodes were used to collect electromyographic data from asymptomatic subjects between the ages of 20 and 40 years old. Data analysis was performed using mixed effects β regression models. Activation of RCPM muscles was found to significantly increase (P < .0001) as the head moved from a self-defined neutral position to a retracted position. Rectus capitis posterior major muscle activation levels, measured as a function of head position, have not been previously reported. The findings from this study showed that RCPM muscle activation significantly increases during voluntary retraction of the head. Copyright © 2014 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Voluntary activation level and muscle fiber recruitment of human quadriceps during lengthening contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltman, J G M; Sargeant, A J; van Mechelen, W; de Haan, A

    2004-08-01

    Voluntary activation levels during lengthening, isometric, and shortening contractions (angular velocity 60 degrees/s) were investigated by using electrical stimulation of the femoral nerve (triplet, 300 Hz) superimposed on maximal efforts. Recruitment of fiber populations was investigated by using the phosphocreatine-to-creatine ratio (PCr/Cr) of single characterized muscle fibers obtained from needle biopsies at rest and immediately after a series of 10 lengthening, isometric, and shortening contractions (1 s on/1 s off). Maximal voluntary torque was significantly higher during lengthening (270 +/- 55 N.m) compared with shortening contractions (199 +/- 47 N.m, P < 0.05) but was not different from isometric contractions (252 +/- 47 N.m). Isometric torque was higher than torque during shortening (P < 0.05). Voluntary activation level during maximal attempted lengthening contractions (79 +/- 8%) was significantly lower compared with isometric (93 +/- 5%) and shortening contractions (92 +/- 3%, P < 0.05). Mean PCr/Cr values of all fibers from all subjects at rest were 2.5 +/- 0.6, 2.0 +/- 0.7, and 2.0 +/- 0.7, respectively, for type I, IIa, and IIax fibers. After 10 contractions, the mean PCr/Cr values for grouped fiber populations (regardless of fiber type) were all significantly different from rest (1.3 +/- 0.2, 0.7 +/- 0.3, and 0.8 +/- 0.6 for lengthening, isometric, and shortening contractions, respectively; P < 0.05). The cumulative distributions of individual fiber populations after either contraction mode were significantly different from rest (P < 0.05). Curves after lengthening contractions were less shifted compared with curves from isometric and shortening contractions (P < 0.05), with a smaller shift for the type IIax compared with type I fibers in the lengthening contractions. The results indicate a reduced voluntary drive during lengthening contractions. PCr/Cr values of single fibers indicated a hierarchical order of recruitment of all fiber

  6. Self-Access Language Learning Programme: The Case of the English Language Voluntary Intensive Independent Catch-up Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salomi Papadima-Sophocleous

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated whether and to what extent an English Language Voluntary Intensive Independent Catch-up Study (ELVIICS, a Self-Access Language Learning (SALL programme, was effective in helping first-year Greek-Cypriot students fill in the gaps in their English language learning and come closer to the required language competence level of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR B1 level. It also examined students’ perceptions of such learning. The students followed the ELVIICS at their own pace, time and space until they felt they had reached the aimed level. Analysis of the achievement test results revealed that students’ language competence improved and reached the required level. Additional quantitative data also revealed that students felt ELVIICS also helped them improve their self-confidence, computer skills and autonomous learning. Moreover, students claimed that ELVIICS assisted them in getting through and successfully completing their compulsory course.

  7. Voluntary Activities and Online Education for Digital Heritage Inventory Development after the Great East Japan Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Y.; Uozu, T.; Seino, Y.; Ako, T.; Goda, Y.; Fujimoto, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.

    2013-07-01

    Consortium for Earthquake-Damaged Cultural Heritage (CEDACH) is a voluntary initiative launched just after the Great East Japan Earthquake on 11 March 2011. The consortium is developing a social network between local cultural resource managers restoring disaster-damaged cultural heritage on one side and remote researchers including historians, archaeologists and specialists of cultural information studies on the other side, in order to facilitate collaborative projects. This paper presents three projects in which CEDACH contributed to the development of a digital inventory for disaster-damaged heritage management through web-based collaborations by self-motivated workers. The first project, CEDACH GIS, developed an online archaeological site inventory for the disaster area. Although a number of individuals voluntarily participated in the project at the beginning, it gradually stagnated due to limited need for local rescue archaeology. However, the experience of online-based collaborations worked well for the second project proposed by local specialists, in which CEDACH restored the book catalogue of a tsunami-devastated research library. This experience highlighted the need for online education to improve information and communication technologies (ICT) skills of data builders. Therefore, in the third project called CEDACHeLi, an e-Learning management system was developed to facilitate learning the fundamental knowledge and techniques required for information processing in rescue operations of disaster-damaged cultural heritage. This system will contribute to improved skills and motivation of potential workers for further developments in digital heritage inventory.

  8. Feeding frequency, but not dietary water content, affects voluntary physical activity in young lean adult female cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Godoy, M R C; Ochi, K; de Oliveira Mateus, L F; de Justino, A C C; Swanson, K S

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether increased dietary water content and feeding frequency increased voluntary physical activity of young, lean adult female cats. A replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design with a 2 × 2 factorial treatment arrangement (feeding frequency and water content) was used. The 4 treatments consisted of 1 meal daily dry pet food without added water (1D; 12% moisture as is), 1 meal daily dry pet food with added water (1W; 70% total water content), 4 meals daily dry pet food without added water (4D; 12% moisture as is), and 4 meals daily dry pet food with added water (4W; 70% total water content). Eight healthy adult, lean, intact, young, female domestic shorthair cats were used in this experiment. Voluntary physical activity was evaluated using Actical activity monitors placed on collars and worn around the cats' necks for the last 7 d of each experimental period of 14 d. Food anticipatory activity (FAA) was calculated based on 2 h prior to feeding periods and expressed as a percentage of total daily voluntary physical activity. Increased feeding frequency (4 vs. 1 meal daily) resulted in greater average daily activity (P = 0.0147), activity during the light period (P = 0.0023), and light:dark activity ratio (P = 0.0002). In contrast, physical activity during the dark period was not altered by feeding frequency (P > 0.05). Cats fed 4 meals daily had increased afternoon FAA (P= 0.0029) compared with cats fed once daily. Dietary water content did not affect any measure of voluntary physical activity. Increased feeding frequency is an effective strategy to increase the voluntary physical activity of cats. Thus, it may assist in the prevention and management of obesity.

  9. From learning objects to learning activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Christian

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses and questions the current metadata standards for learning objects from a pedagogical point of view. From a social constructivist approach, the paper discusses how learning objects can support problem based, self-governed learning activities. In order to support this approach......, it is argued that it is necessary to focus on learning activities rather than on learning objects. Further, it is argued that descriptions of learning objectives and learning activities should be separated from learning objects. The paper presents a new conception of learning objects which supports problem...... based, self-governed activities. Further, a new way of thinking pedagogy into learning objects is introduced. It is argued that a lack of pedagogical thinking in learning objects is not solved through pedagogical metadata. Instead, the paper suggests the concept of references as an alternative...

  10. High efficacy and students' satisfaction after voluntary vs mandatory use of an e-learning program in traumatology and orthopedics--a follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, David Alexander; Haberstroh, Nicole; Sostmann, Kai; Schmidmaier, Gerhard; Putzier, Michael; Perka, Carsten; Hoff, Eike

    2014-01-01

    Within the last decade, e-learning has gained a consistent place in surgical teaching. However, as the use of new programs is often voluntary, more information on the implications of the data regarding user acceptance and knowledge with mandatory use is desirable, especially in the context of the long-term developments of courses. Starting in 2009, the e-learning program Network for Students in Traumatology and Orthopedics was offered in a voluntary blended learning context. Students' satisfaction and increase in knowledge were evaluated using questionnaires and written tests. With proven effectiveness, the program became a mandatory part of the curriculum, and students' attitudes and gain of knowledge were re-evaluated in 2010 and 2011 to detect differences in voluntary vs mandatory use. In the evaluation questionnaires (n = 108 voluntary vs n = 361 mandatory), the overall appreciation regarding the offerings remained high. Significantly more students felt better prepared for clinical situations (p orthopedics and traumatology. Data can support the assumption that even if the voluntary evaluation of e-learning offerings might be subject to a selection bias, the results can serve as a representative impression for the students' overall mood and their gain in knowledge. However, as changes would have to be anticipated when shifting to mandatory use, users' perceptions should be constantly evaluated. © 2013 Published by Association of Program Directors in Surgery on behalf of Association of Program Directors in Surgery.

  11. Voluntary running-enhanced synaptic plasticity, learning and memory are mediated by Notch1 signal pathway in C57BL mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaochen; Yang, Chunxiao; Gao, Jing; Yin, Hongqiang; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Tao; Yang, Zhuo

    2017-09-20

    It is well known that voluntary running can enhance synaptic plasticity and improve learning and memory abilities. The Notch1 receptor is also reported to be associated with these processes, but its role in running-induced alterations is unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether the Notch1 signalling pathway was involved in voluntary running-induced enhancement of synaptic plasticity, learning and memory. Notch1 heterozygous deficient (Notch1(+/-)) mice and wildtype (WT) C57BL littermates were randomly divided into runner group and non-runner group. Mice were given free access to running wheels for 14 days in both the Notch1(+/-) runner group and the WT runner group. Our results demonstrate that Notch1 knockdown impairs the performance in the novel object recognition (NOR) test and Morris water maze test and decreases the synaptic plasticity. Voluntary running improves spatial learning and memory abilities, promotes synaptic plasticity and increases expressions of postsynaptic proteins in WT mice but not in Notch1(+/-) mice. Our results suggest that Notch1 plays a vital role in spatial learning and memory, synaptic plasticity under normal physiological conditions and voluntary running conditions. These findings will set the groundwork and fill in some gaps for understanding the role of Notch1 signalling in voluntary running-induced phenomena.

  12. Asymmetrical Brain Activity Induced by Voluntary Spatial Attention Depends on the Visual Hemifield: A Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harasawa, Masamitsu; Shioiri, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the visual hemifield to which spatial attention was oriented on the activities of the posterior parietal and occipital visual cortices was examined using functional near-infrared spectroscopy in order to investigate the neural substrates of voluntary visuospatial attention. Our brain imaging data support the theory put forth in a…

  13. Asymmetrical Brain Activity Induced by Voluntary Spatial Attention Depends on the Visual Hemifield: A Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harasawa, Masamitsu; Shioiri, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the visual hemifield to which spatial attention was oriented on the activities of the posterior parietal and occipital visual cortices was examined using functional near-infrared spectroscopy in order to investigate the neural substrates of voluntary visuospatial attention. Our brain imaging data support the theory put forth in a…

  14. Voluntary muscle activation improves with power training and is associated with changes in gait speed in mobility-limited older adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Lars G; Strotmeyer, Elsa S; Skjødt, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Incomplete voluntary muscle activation may contribute to impaired muscle mechanical function and physical function in older adults. Exercise interventions have been shown to increase voluntary muscle activation, although the evidence is sparse for mobility-limited older adults, particularly in as...

  15. Guilty but good: defending voluntary active euthanasia from a virtue perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begley, Ann Marie

    2008-07-01

    This article is presented as a defence of voluntary active euthanasia from a virtue perspective and it is written with the objective of generating debate and challenging the assumption that killing is necessarily vicious in all circumstances. Practitioners are often torn between acting from virtue and acting from duty. In the case presented the physician was governed by compassion and this illustrates how good people may have the courage to sacrifice their own security in the interests of virtue. The doctor's action created huge tensions for the nurse, who was governed by the code of conduct and relevant laws. Appraising active euthanasia from a virtue perspective can offer a more compassionate approach to the predicament of practitioners and clients. The tensions arising from the virtue versus rules debate generates irreconcilable difficulties for nurses. A shift towards virtue would help to resolve this problem and support the call for a change in the law. The controversial nature of this position is acknowledged. The argument is put forward on the understanding that many practitioners will not agree with the conclusions reached.

  16. 16 CFR 1031.7 - Commission support of voluntary standards activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... or subsidizing technical assistance, including research, health science data, and engineering support.... (5) Providing assistance on methods of disseminating information and education about the voluntary... conflicting State and local regulations. (8) Monitoring the number and market share of products conforming...

  17. Within- and between-session reliability of the maximal voluntary knee extension torque and activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jihong; Hopkins, J Ty

    2013-01-01

    A ratio between the torque generated by maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) and exogenous electrical stimulus, central activation ratio (CAR), has been widely used to assess quadriceps function. To date, no data exist regarding between-session reliability of this measurement. Thirteen neurologically sound volunteers underwent three testing sessions (three trials per session) with 48 hours between-session. Subjects performed MVICs of the quadriceps with the knee locked at 90° flexion and the hip at 85°. Once the MVIC reached a plateau, an electrical stimulation from superimposed burst technique (SIB: 125 V with peak output current 450 mA) was manually delivered and transmitted directly to the quadriceps via stimulating electrodes. CAR was calculated by using the following equation: CAR = MVIC torque/MVIC + SIB torque. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated within- (ICC((2,1))) and between-session (ICC((2,k))) for MVIC torques and CAR values. Our data show that quadriceps MVIC and CAR are very reliable both within- (ICC((2,1)) = 0.99 for MVIC; 0.94 for CAR) and between-measurement sessions (ICC((2,k)) = 0.92 for MVIC; 0.86 for CAR) in healthy young adults. For clinical research, more data of the patients with pathological conditions are required to ensure reproducibility of calculation of CAR.

  18. Time course of human motoneuron recovery after sustained low-level voluntary activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héroux, Martin E; Butler, Annie A; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L; Butler, Jane E

    2016-02-01

    Motoneurons often fire repetitively and for long periods. In sustained voluntary contractions the excitability of motoneurons declines. We provide the first detailed description of the time course of human motoneuron recovery after sustained activity at a constant discharge rate. We recorded the discharge of single motor units (MUs, n = 30) with intramuscular wire electrodes inserted in triceps brachii during weak isometric contractions. Subjects (n = 15) discharged single MUs at a constant frequency (∼10 Hz) with visual feedback for prolonged durations (3-7 min) until rectified surface electromyogram (sEMG) of triceps brachii increased by ∼100%. After a rest of 1-2, 15, 30, 60, 120, or 240 s, subjects briefly resumed the contraction with the target MU at the same discharge rate. Each MU was tested with three to four rest periods. The magnitude of sEMG was increased when contractions were resumed, and the target motoneuron discharged at the test frequency following rest intervals of 2-60 s (P = 0.001-0.038). The increased sEMG indicates that greater excitatory drive was needed to discharge the motoneuron at the test rate. The increase in EMG recovered exponentially with a time constant of 28 s but did not return to baseline even after a rest period of ∼240 s. Thus the decline in motoneuron excitability from a weak contraction takes several minutes to recover fully.

  19. GPi Oscillatory Activity Differentiates Tics from the Resting State, Voluntary Movements, and the Unmedicated Parkinsonian State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Shahed, Joohi; Telkes, Ilknur; Viswanathan, Ashwin; Ince, Nuri F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an emerging treatment strategy for severe, medication-refractory Tourette syndrome (TS). Thalamic (Cm-Pf) and pallidal (including globus pallidus interna, GPi) targets have been the most investigated. While the neurophysiological correlates of Parkinson's disease (PD) in the GPi and subthalamic nucleus (STN) are increasingly recognized, these patterns are not well characterized in other disease states. Recent findings indicate that the cross-frequency coupling (CFC) between beta band and high frequency oscillations (HFOs) within the STN in PD patients is pathologic. Methods: We recorded intraoperative local field potentials (LFPs) from the postero-ventrolateral GPi in three adult patients with TS at rest, during voluntary movements, and during tic activity and compared them to the intraoperative GPi-LFP activity recorded from four unmedicated PD patients at rest. Results: In all PD patients, we noted excessive beta band activity (13–30 Hz) at rest which consistently modulated the amplitude of the co-existent HFOs observed between 200 and 400 Hz, indicating the presence of beta-HFO CFC. In all 3TS patients at rest, we observed theta band activity (4–7 Hz) and HFOs. Two patients had beta band activity, though at lower power than theta oscillations. Tic activity was associated with increased high frequency (200–400 Hz) and gamma band (35–200 Hz) activity. There was no beta-HFO CFC in TS patients at rest. However, CFC between the phase of 5–10 Hz band activity and the amplitude of HFOs was found in two TS patients. During tics, this shifted to CFC between the phase of beta band activity and the amplitude of HFOs in all subjects. Conclusions: To our knowledge this is the first study that shows that beta-HFO CFC exists in the GPi of TS patients during tics and at rest in PD patients, and suggests that this pattern might be specific to pathologic/involuntary movements. Furthermore, our findings suggest that during tics

  20. GPi oscillatory activity differentiates tics from the resting state, voluntary movements, and the unmedicated parkinsonian state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joohi Jimenez-Shahed

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Deep brain stimulation (DBS is an emerging treatment strategy for severe, medication-refractory Tourette syndrome (TS. Thalamic (Cm-Pf and pallidal (including globus pallidus interna, GPi targets have been the most investigated. While the neurophysiological correlates of Parkinson’s disease (PD in the GPi and subthalamic nucleus (STN are increasingly recognized, these patterns are not well characterized in other disease states. Recent findings indicate that the cross-frequency coupling (CFC between beta band and high frequency oscillations (HFOs within the STN in PD patients is pathologic. Methods: We recorded intraoperative local field potentials (LFPs from the postero-ventrolateral GPi in three adult patients with TS at rest, during voluntary movements, and during tic activity and compared them to the intraoperative GPi-LFP activity recorded from four unmedicated PD patients at rest. Results: In all PD patients, we noted excessive beta band activity (13-30Hz at rest which consistently modulated the amplitude of the co-existent HFOs observed between 200-400Hz, indicating the presence of beta-HFO CFC. In all 3 TS patients at rest, we observed theta band activity (4-7Hz and HFOs. Two patients had beta band activity, though at lower power than theta oscillations. Tic activity was associated with increased high frequency (200-400Hz and gamma band (35-200Hz activity. There was no beta-HFO CFC in TS patients at rest. However, CFC between the phase of 5-10Hz band activity and the amplitude of HFOs was found in two TS patients. During tics, this shifted to CFC between the phase of beta band activity and the amplitude of HFOs in all subjects. Conclusions: To our knowledge this is the first study that shows that beta-HFO CFC exists in the GPi of TS patients during tics and at rest in PD patients, and suggests that this pattern might be specific to pathologic/involuntary movements. Furthermore, our findings suggest that during tics, resting

  1. Grooming. Learning Activity Package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Pamela

    This learning activity package on grooming for health workers is one of a series of 12 titles developed for use in health occupations education programs. Materials in the package include objectives, a list of materials needed, information sheets, reviews (self evaluations) of portions of the content, and answers to reviews. These topics are…

  2. Active Math Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The presentation is concerned with general course planning philosophy and a specific case study (boomerang flight geometro-dynamics) for active learning of mathematics via computer assisted and hands-on unfolding of first principles - in this case the understanding of rotations and Eulers equatio...

  3. Sensory modulation of voluntary and TMS-induced activation in hand muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofler, Markus; Valls-Solé, Josep; Fuhr, Peter; Schindler, Christian; Zaccaria, Barbara R; Saltuari, Leopold

    2008-07-01

    Nociceptive suppression of tonic voluntary electromyographic (EMG) activity in human hand muscles (cutaneous silent period, CSP) is in its functional organization consistent with a spinal protective reflex. Motoneuronal excitability and its modulation may also be investigated by conditioned motor evoked potentials (MEPs). To date, effects of exteroceptive stimuli on tonic EMG and on MEPs have been compared mainly using innocuous stimuli, while noxious stimuli have not been studied in great detail. In ten subjects, we recorded CSPs induced in volitionally activated flexor pollicis brevis muscle (FPB) by noxious digit II (D2) stimulation, and in first dorsal interosseous muscle (FDI) following noxious D2 and digit V (D5) stimulation. Then, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to evoke MEPs in the same hand muscles at rest--conditioned by equal noxious D2 or D5 stimulation and individually delayed--so that the MEPs occurred at times corresponding to immediately before, during, and immediately after the CSP in each subject. Immediately before the CSP, there was no significant difference between nociceptive MEP modulation and tonic EMG modulation in any muscle-finger-combination. In the middle of the CSP, noxious finger stimulation exerted suppression of TMS-induced MEPs in all the three muscle-finger-combinations, but less so as compared to corresponding tonic EMG levels. After the CSP, MEPs remained suppressed when corresponding tonic EMG levels were significantly enhanced. Notably, MEPs were also suppressed in cases when occurring at times corresponding to the excitatory long-loop reflex. Incomplete MEP suppression during the CSP may allow for an "emergency grip" even during noxious stimulation. MEP suppression outlasting the CSP is compatible with a "passive" re-synchronization of volitionally activated motor units rather than an "active" reflex involving recruitment of corticospinal motoneurons. The differences in tonic EMG and MEP modulation favors an

  4. Voluntary activities and online education for digital heritage inventory development after the Great East Japan Earthquake

    OpenAIRE

    近藤康久; Yasuhisa Kondo; 魚津知克; Tomokatsu Uozu; 清野陽一; Yoichi Seino; 阿児雄之; Takayuki Ako; 合田美子; Yoshiko Goda; 藤本悠; Yu Fujimoto; 山口欧志; Hiroshi Yamaguchi

    2013-01-01

    Consortium for Earthquake-Damaged Cultural Heritage (CEDACH) is a voluntary initiative launched just after the Great East Japan Earthquake on 11 March 2011. The consortium is developing a social network between local cultural resource managers restoring disaster-damaged cultural heritage on one side and remote researchers including historians, archaeologists and specialists of cultural information studies on the other side, in order to facilitate collaborative projects. This paper presents th...

  5. VOLUNTARY ACTIVITIES AND ONLINE EDUCATION FOR DIGITAL HERITAGE INVENTORY DEVELOPMENT AFTER THE GREAT EAST JAPAN EARTHQUAKE

    OpenAIRE

    Kondo, Y.; Uozu, T.; Seino, Y.; Ako, T.; Goda, Y; Fujimoto, Y.; Yamaguchi, H

    2013-01-01

    Consortium for Earthquake-Damaged Cultural Heritage (CEDACH) is a voluntary initiative launched just after the Great East Japan Earthquake on 11 March 2011. The consortium is developing a social network between local cultural resource managers restoring disaster-damaged cultural heritage on one side and remote researchers including historians, archaeologists and specialists of cultural information studies on the other side, in order to facilitate collaborative projects. This paper pr...

  6. Flipped Classroom, active Learning?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Dyreborg; Levinsen, Henrik; Philipps, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Action research is conducted in three physics classes over a period of eighteen weeks with the aim of studying the effect of flipped classroom on the pupils agency and learning processes. The hypothesis is that flipped classroom teaching will potentially allocate more time to work actively...... with the teaching subject compared to more traditional teaching, where introductions and theoretical monologs conducted by the teacher prevail. In addition it is assumed that the pupils learning processes move towards more independency and metacognitive thinking.   During the study period interventions...... didactic workshop with the involved teachers. One of the demands of the didactic design is to include a video embedded in a formative evaluation sheet produced in Google Drive by the teachers themselves. The didactic analysis of the collected audio and video recordings will be presented at the NOFA 5...

  7. Sex-dependent effects of developmental exposure to bisphenol A and ethinyl estradiol on metabolic parameters and voluntary physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S A; Painter, M S; Javurek, A B; Ellersieck, M R; Wiedmeyer, C E; Thyfault, J P; Rosenfeld, C S

    2015-12-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) have received considerable attention as potential obesogens. Past studies examining obesogenic potential of one widespread EDC, bisphenol A (BPA), have generally focused on metabolic and adipose tissue effects. However, physical inactivity has been proposed to be a leading cause of obesity. A paucity of studies has considered whether EDC, including BPA, affects this behavior. To test whether early exposure to BPA and ethinyl estradiol (EE, estrogen present in birth control pills) results in metabolic and such behavioral disruptions, California mice developmentally exposed to BPA and EE were tested as adults for energy expenditure (indirect calorimetry), body composition (echoMRI) and physical activity (measured by beam breaks and voluntary wheel running). Serum glucose and metabolic hormones were measured. No differences in body weight or food consumption were detected. BPA-exposed females exhibited greater variation in weight than females in control and EE groups. During the dark and light cycles, BPA females exhibited a higher average respiratory quotient than control females, indicative of metabolizing carbohydrates rather than fats. Various assessments of voluntary physical activity in the home cage confirmed that during the dark cycle, BPA and EE-exposed females were significantly less active in this setting than control females. Similar effects were not observed in BPA or EE-exposed males. No significant differences were detected in serum glucose, insulin, adiponectin and leptin concentrations. Results suggest that females developmentally exposed to BPA exhibit decreased motivation to engage in voluntary physical activity and altered metabolism of carbohydrates v. fats, which could have important health implications.

  8. Augmentation of Voluntary Locomotor Activity by Transcutaneous Spinal Cord Stimulation in Motor-Incomplete Spinal Cord-Injured Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Krenn, Matthias; Danner, Simon M; Hofer, Christian; Kern, Helmut; McKay, William B; Mayr, Winfried; Minassian, Karen

    2015-10-01

    The level of sustainable excitability within lumbar spinal cord circuitries is one of the factors determining the functional outcome of locomotor therapy after motor-incomplete spinal cord injury. Here, we present initial data using noninvasive transcutaneous lumbar spinal cord stimulation (tSCS) to modulate this central state of excitability during voluntary treadmill stepping in three motor-incomplete spinal cord-injured individuals. Stimulation was applied at 30 Hz with an intensity that generated tingling sensations in the lower limb dermatomes, yet without producing muscle reflex activity. This stimulation changed muscle activation, gait kinematics, and the amount of manual assistance required from the therapists to maintain stepping with some interindividual differences. The effect on motor outputs during treadmill-stepping was essentially augmentative and step-phase dependent despite the invariant tonic stimulation. The most consistent modification was found in the gait kinematics, with the hip flexion during swing increased by 11.3° ± 5.6° across all subjects. This preliminary work suggests that tSCS provides for a background increase in activation of the lumbar spinal locomotor circuitry that has partially lost its descending drive. Voluntary inputs and step-related feedback build upon the stimulation-induced increased state of excitability in the generation of locomotor activity. Thus, tSCS essentially works as an electrical neuroprosthesis augmenting remaining motor control.

  9. Voluntary organisation and adult education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Elsdon

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available The author starts by offering a definition of voluntary organisations. He then discusses their importance and role, focusing on the issue of adult education wi­ thin these organisations. He also wells upon learning and change of voluntary organisation members, making use of the results of a study he conducted together with his collaborators. One of their fin­dings has been that voluntary organisati­ons, due to their organisational targets li­ke painting, singing or caring for people in need, lead their members to learning, i.e. essentially content learning. Moreo­ver, voluntary organisations offer a fair number of opportunities for social lear­ning and change. ln spite of the fact that the respondents were mostly not aware of the outcomes of their learning and change, careful listeners conducting the interview made them understand the im­portance of the learning they had gone through. The author concludes by poin­ ting out that formal education of adults can get its inspiration in learning in voluntary organisations. On the other hand, such learning would benefit greatly from findings and methods of formal education of adults.

  10. Voluntary Exercise Promotes Glymphatic Clearance of Amyloid Beta and Reduces the Activation of Astrocytes and Microglia in Aged Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-fei He

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Age is characterized by chronic inflammation, leading to synaptic dysfunction and dementia because the clearance of protein waste is reduced. The clearance of proteins depends partly on the permeation of the blood–brain barrier (BBB or on the exchange of water and soluble contents between the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and the interstitial fluid (ISF. A wealth of evidence indicates that physical exercise improves memory and cognition in neurodegenerative diseases during aging, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD, but the influence of physical training on glymphatic clearance, BBB permeability and neuroinflammation remains unclear. In this study, glymphatic clearance and BBB permeability were evaluated in aged mice using in vivo two-photon imaging. The mice performed voluntary wheel running exercise and their water-maze cognition was assessed; the expression of the astrocytic water channel aquaporin 4 (AQP4, astrocyte and microglial activation, and the accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ were evaluated with immunofluorescence or an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA; synaptic function was investigated with Thy1–green fluorescent protein (GFP transgenic mice and immunofluorescent staining. Voluntary wheel running significantly improved water-maze cognition in the aged mice, accelerated the efficiency of glymphatic clearance, but which did not affect BBB permeability. The numbers of activated astrocytes and microglia decreased, AQP4 expression increased, and the distribution of astrocytic AQP4 was rearranged. Aβ accumulation decreased, whereas dendrites, dendritic spines and postsynaptic density protein (PSD95 increased. Our study suggests that voluntary wheel running accelerated glymphatic clearance but not BBB permeation, improved astrocytic AQP4 expression and polarization, attenuated the accumulation of amyloid plaques and neuroinflammation, and ultimately protected mice against synaptic dysfunction and a decline in spatial cognition

  11. Role of the Dorsal Medial Habenula in the Regulation of Voluntary Activity, Motor Function, Hedonic State, and Primary Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yun-Wei A.; Wang, Si D.; Wang, Shirong; Morton, Glenn; Zariwala, Hatim A.; de la Iglesia, Horacio O.

    2014-01-01

    The habenular complex in the epithalamus consists of distinct regions with diverse neuronal populations. Past studies have suggested a role for the habenula in voluntary exercise motivation and reinforcement of intracranial self-stimulation but have not assigned these effects to specific habenula subnuclei. Here, we have developed a genetic model in which neurons of the dorsal medial habenula (dMHb) are developmentally eliminated, via tissue-specific deletion of the transcription factor Pou4f1 (Brn3a). Mice with dMHb lesions perform poorly in motivation-based locomotor behaviors, such as voluntary wheel running and the accelerating rotarod, but show only minor abnormalities in gait and balance and exhibit normal levels of basal locomotion. These mice also show deficits in sucrose preference, but not in the forced swim test, two measures of depression-related phenotypes in rodents. We have also used Cre recombinase-mediated expression of channelrhodopsin-2 and halorhodopsin to activate dMHb neurons or silence their output in freely moving mice, respectively. Optical activation of the dMHb in vivo supports intracranial self-stimulation, showing that dMHb activity is intrinsically reinforcing, whereas optical silencing of dMHb outputs is aversive. Together, our findings demonstrate that the dMHb is involved in exercise motivation and the regulation of hedonic state, and is part of an intrinsic reinforcement circuit. PMID:25143617

  12. Role of the dorsal medial habenula in the regulation of voluntary activity, motor function, hedonic state, and primary reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yun-Wei A; Wang, Si D; Wang, Shirong; Morton, Glenn; Zariwala, Hatim A; de la Iglesia, Horacio O; Turner, Eric E

    2014-08-20

    The habenular complex in the epithalamus consists of distinct regions with diverse neuronal populations. Past studies have suggested a role for the habenula in voluntary exercise motivation and reinforcement of intracranial self-stimulation but have not assigned these effects to specific habenula subnuclei. Here, we have developed a genetic model in which neurons of the dorsal medial habenula (dMHb) are developmentally eliminated, via tissue-specific deletion of the transcription factor Pou4f1 (Brn3a). Mice with dMHb lesions perform poorly in motivation-based locomotor behaviors, such as voluntary wheel running and the accelerating rotarod, but show only minor abnormalities in gait and balance and exhibit normal levels of basal locomotion. These mice also show deficits in sucrose preference, but not in the forced swim test, two measures of depression-related phenotypes in rodents. We have also used Cre recombinase-mediated expression of channelrhodopsin-2 and halorhodopsin to activate dMHb neurons or silence their output in freely moving mice, respectively. Optical activation of the dMHb in vivo supports intracranial self-stimulation, showing that dMHb activity is intrinsically reinforcing, whereas optical silencing of dMHb outputs is aversive. Together, our findings demonstrate that the dMHb is involved in exercise motivation and the regulation of hedonic state, and is part of an intrinsic reinforcement circuit.

  13. Voluntary Slavery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Frederick

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The permissibility of actions depends upon facts about the flourishing and separateness of persons. Persons differ from other creatures in having the task of discovering for themselves, by conjecture and refutation, what sort of life will fulfil them. Compulsory slavery impermissibly prevents some persons from pursuing this task. However, many people may conjecture that they are natural slaves. Some of these conjectures may turn out to be correct. In consequence, voluntary slavery, in which one person welcomes the duty to fulfil all the commands of another, is permissible. Life-long voluntary slavery contracts are impermissible because of human fallibility; but fixed-term slavery contracts should be legally enforceable. Each person has the temporarily alienable moral right to direct her own life.

  14. Voluntary Slavery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Frederick

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The permissibility of actions depends upon facts about the flourishing and separateness of persons. Persons differ from other creatures in having the task of discovering for themselves, by conjecture and refutation, what sort of life will fulfil them. Compulsory slavery impermissibly prevents some persons from pursuing this task. However, many people may conjecture that they are natural slaves. Some of these conjectures may turn out to be correct. In consequence, voluntary slavery, in which one person welcomes the duty to fulfil all the commands of another, is permissible. Life-long voluntary slavery contracts are impermissible because of human fallibility; but fixed-term slavery contracts should be legally enforceable. Each person has the temporarily alienable moral right to direct her own life.

  15. Strength Training to Contraction Failure Increases Voluntary Activation of the Quadriceps Muscle Shortly After Total Knee Arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Elin Karin; Jakobsen, Thomas Linding; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle during one set of knee extensions performed until contraction failure in patients shortly after total knee arthroplasty. DESIGN: This was a cross-sectional study of 24 patients with total knee...... arthroplasty. One set of knee extensions was performed until contraction failure, using a predetermined 10 repetition maximum loading. In the operated leg, electromyographic (EMG) activity of the lateral and medial vastus, semitendinosus, and biceps femoris muscles was recorded during the set. Muscle activity...... (%EMGmax) and median power frequency of the EMG power spectrum were calculated for each repetition decile (10%-100% contraction failure). RESULTS: Muscle activity increased significantly over contractions from a mean of 90.0 and 93.6 %EMGmax (lateral vastus and medial vastus, respectively) at 10...

  16. Optimal Combinations of Isometric Normalization Tests for the Production of Maximum Voluntary Activation of the Shoulder Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Maso, Fabien; Marion, Patrick; Begon, Mickaël

    2016-09-01

    To identify the smallest combinations of maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) tests that produce near-maximum voluntary activation (MVA) for a large proportion of participants for the shoulder girdle muscles. Cross-sectional study. Research center. Healthy participants (N=38). Not applicable. The electromyography of 12 shoulder muscles was recorded while participants performed 15 MVIC tests. The smallest combinations of MVIC tests that met our acceptance criterion (ie, produce 90% of MVA for 90% of participants) were identified. Optimal combinations were identified for each of the 12 muscles individually and for the 12 muscles simultaneously. Electromyographic activation levels of the 95th highest percentile obtained with our optimal combinations and with the Four Normalization Tests previously recommended were compared using paired t tests. Between 2 and 6 MVIC tests were required for each of the 12 muscles, and 12 MVIC tests were required for the 12 muscles to meet the acceptance criterion. These optimal combinations produced electromyographic activation levels of the 95th highest percentile comprised between 97% and 100% of MVA. These electromyographic activation levels were significantly higher than the electromyographic activation levels obtained with the Four Normalization Tests. Although the number of MVIC tests to normalize 12 shoulder muscles was increased compared with previous recommendations, the proposed method ensures that near-MVA (>90%) was obtained for a large proportion of participants (>90%). Moreover, because electromyographic activation levels of the 95th highest percentile were at least 97% of MVA, the identified combinations could reduce the interparticipant variability. The proposed combinations could help to improve electromyographic normalization and therefore reduce the misinterpretations regarding shoulder muscle activation levels. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  17. Voluntary Public Unemployment Insurance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O. Parsons, Donald; Tranæs, Torben; Bie Lilleør, Helene

    Denmark has drawn much attention for its active labor market policies, but is almost unique in offering a voluntary public unemployment insurance program requiring a significant premium payment. A safety net program – a less generous, means-tested social assistance plan – completes the system...

  18. Voluntary exercise contributed to an amelioration of abnormal feeding behavior, locomotor activity and ghrelin production concomitantly with a weight reduction in high fat diet-induced obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mifune, Hiroharu; Tajiri, Yuji; Nishi, Yoshihiro; Hara, Kento; Iwata, Shimpei; Tokubuchi, Ichiro; Mitsuzono, Ryouichi; Yamada, Kentaro; Kojima, Masayasu

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, effects of voluntary exercise in an obese animal model were investigated in relation to the rhythm of daily activity and ghrelin production. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either a high fat diet (HFD) or a chow diet (CD) from four to 16 weeks old. They were further subdivided into either an exercise group (HFD-Ex, CD-Ex) with a running wheel for three days of every other week or sedentary group (HFD-Se, CD-Se). At 16 weeks old, marked increases in body weight and visceral fat were observed in the HFD-Se group, together with disrupted rhythms of feeding and locomotor activity. The induction of voluntary exercise brought about an effective reduction of weight and fat, and ameliorated abnormal rhythms of activity and feeding in the HFD-Ex rats. Wheel counts as voluntary exercise was greater in HFD-Ex rats than those in CD-Ex rats. The HFD-obese had exhibited a deterioration of ghrelin production, which was restored by the induction of voluntary exercise. These findings demonstrated that abnormal rhythms of feeding and locomotor activity in HFD-obese rats were restored by infrequent voluntary exercise with a concomitant amelioration of the ghrelin production and weight reduction. Because ghrelin is related to food anticipatory activity, it is plausible that ghrelin participates in the circadian rhythm of daily activity including eating behavior. A beneficial effect of voluntary exercise has now been confirmed in terms of the amelioration of the daily rhythms in eating behavior and physical activity in an animal model of obesity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of voluntary exercise on spontaneous physical activity and food consumption in mice: Results from an artificial selection experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copes, Lynn E; Schutz, Heidi; Dlugosz, Elizabeth M; Acosta, Wendy; Chappell, Mark A; Garland, Theodore

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated the effect of voluntary exercise on spontaneous physical activity (SPA) and food consumption in mice from 4 replicate lines bred for 57 generations for high voluntary wheel running (HR) and from 4 non-selected control (C) lines. Beginning at ~24 days of age, mice were housed in standard cages or in cages with attached wheels. Wheel activity and SPA were monitored in 1-min intervals. Data from the 8th week of the experiment were analyzed because mice were sexually mature and had plateaued in body mass, weekly wheel running distance, SPA, and food consumption. Body mass, length, and masses of the retroperitoneal fat pad, liver, and heart were recorded after the 13th week. SPA of both HR and C mice decreased with wheel access, due to reductions in both duration and average intensity of SPA. However, total activity duration (SPA+wheel running; min/day) was ~1/3 greater when mice were housed with wheels, and food consumption was significantly increased. Overall, food consumption in both HR and C mice was more strongly affected by wheel running than by SPA. Duration of wheel running had a stronger effect than average speed, but the opposite was true for SPA. With body mass as a covariate, chronic wheel access significantly reduced fat pad mass and increased heart mass in both HR and C mice. Given that both HR and C mice housed with wheels had increased food consumption, the energetic cost of wheel running was not fully compensated by concomitant reductions in SPA. The experiment demonstrates that both duration and intensity of both wheel running and SPA were significant predictors of food consumption. This sort of detailed analysis of the effects of different aspects of physical activity on food consumption has not previously been reported for a non-human animal, and it sets the stage for longitudinal examination of energy balance and its components in rodent models.

  20. Voluntary muscle activation improves with power training and is associated with changes in gait speed in mobility-limited older adults - A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvid, Lars G; Strotmeyer, Elsa S; Skjødt, Mathias; Magnussen, Line V; Andersen, Marianne; Caserotti, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    Incomplete voluntary muscle activation may contribute to impaired muscle mechanical function and physical function in older adults. Exercise interventions have been shown to increase voluntary muscle activation, although the evidence is sparse for mobility-limited older adults, particularly in association with physical function. This study examined the effects of 12weeks of power training on outcomes of voluntary muscle activation and gait speed in mobility-limited older adults from the Healthy Ageing Network of Competence (HANC) study. We included 37 older men and women with a usual gait speed of analysis: n=16 in the training group (TG: 12weeks of progressive high-load power training, 2 sessions per week; age: 82.3±1.3years, 56% women) and n=21 in the control group (CG: no interventions; age: 81.6±1.1years, 67% women). Knee extensor muscle thickness (ultrasonography), strength (isokinetic dynamometry), voluntary activation (interpolated twitch technique), and gait speed (2-min maximal walking test) were assessed at baseline and post-intervention. At baseline, TG and CG were comparable for all measures. Post-intervention, significant between-group changes (TG vs. CG; pgait speed (+0.12m/s), whereas the between-group change in muscle thickness was non-significant (+0.08cm). Improvements in voluntary muscle activation were associated with improvements in gait speed in TG (r=0.67, ppower training, and is associated with improved maximal gait speed. Incomplete voluntary muscle activation should be considered one of the key mechanisms influencing muscle mechanical function and gait speed in older adults.

  1. Active Learning with Multiple Views

    CERN Document Server

    Knoblock, C A; Muslea, I; 10.1613/jair.2005

    2011-01-01

    Active learners alleviate the burden of labeling large amounts of data by detecting and asking the user to label only the most informative examples in the domain. We focus here on active learning for multi-view domains, in which there are several disjoint subsets of features (views), each of which is sufficient to learn the target concept. In this paper we make several contributions. First, we introduce Co-Testing, which is the first approach to multi-view active learning. Second, we extend the multi-view learning framework by also exploiting weak views, which are adequate only for learning a concept that is more general/specific than the target concept. Finally, we empirically show that Co-Testing outperforms existing active learners on a variety of real world domains such as wrapper induction, Web page classification, advertisement removal, and discourse tree parsing.

  2. Analgesic Activity of Tramadol and Buprenorphine after Voluntary Ingestion by Rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Bryan F; Ramirez, Harvey E; Battles, August H; Andrutis, Karl A; Neubert, John K

    2016-01-01

    Effective pain management for rats and mice is crucial due to the continuing increase in the use of these species in biomedical research. Here we used a recently validated operant orofacial pain assay to determine dose-response curves for buprenorphine and tramadol when mixed in nut paste and administered to male and female rats. Statistically significant analgesic doses of tramadol in nut paste included doses of 20, 30, and 40 mg/kg for female rats but only 40 mg/kg for male rats. For male rats receiving buprenorphine mixed in nut paste, a significant analgesic response was observed at 0.5 and 0.6 mg/kg. None of the doses tested produced a significant analgesic response in female rats. Our results indicate that at the doses tested, tramadol and buprenorphine produced an analgesic response in male rats. In female rats, tramadol shows a higher analgesic effect than buprenorphine. The analgesic effects observed 60 min after administration of the statistically significant oral doses of both drugs were similar to the analgesic effects of 0.03 mg/kg subcutaneous buprenorphine 30 min after administration. The method of voluntary ingestion could be effective, is easy to use, and would minimize stress to the rats during the immediate postoperative period.

  3. China Initiates Voluntary Certification of Public Security Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Reporters learned from the Certification and Accreditation Administration of China(CNCA)that burglar-proof door became the first batch of voluntary certification product in public security products.China has formally initiated voluntary certification of public security products.

  4. Variation of magnitude and timing of wrist flexor stretch reflex across the full range of voluntary activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathers, I; O'Dwyer, N; Neilson, P

    2004-08-01

    This paper reports an investigation of the magnitude and timing of the stretch reflex over the full range of activation of flexor carpi radialis. While it is well established that the magnitude of the reflex increases with the level of muscle activation, there have been few studies of reflex magnitude above 50% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and virtually no study of the timing of the response in relation to activation level. Continuous small amplitude (approximately 2 degrees) perturbations were applied to the wrist of 12 normal subjects while they maintained contraction levels between 2.5-95% MVC, monitored via surface electromyography (EMG). Both narrow band (4-5 Hz) and broad band (0-10 Hz) stretch perturbations were employed. The gain (EMG output/stretch input) and phase advance of the reflex varied with the level of muscle activation in a similar manner for both types of stretch, but there were significant differences in the patterns of change due to stretch bandwidth. Consistent with previous studies, the group average reflex gain initially increased with muscle activation level and then saturated. Inspection of individual data, however, revealed that the gain reached a peak at about 60% MVC and then decreased at higher contraction levels, the pattern across the full range of activation being well described by quadratic functions (mean r2=0.82). This quadratic pattern has not been reported previously for the neural reflex response in any muscle but is consistent with the pattern that has been reliably observed in studies of the mechanical reflex response in lower limb muscles. In contrast to the pattern for reflex gain, the phase advance of the reflex (at a stretch frequency of 4.5 Hz) decreased linearly from approximately 130 degrees at the lowest contraction levels to approximately 50 degrees as maximum voluntary contraction was reached (mean r2=0.69). This decrease corresponds to a delay of 49 ms introduced centrally in reflex pathways. All

  5. The International Active Learning Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manners, Ian James

    2015-01-01

    For me, internationalisation is a learning outcome, not just about international mobility. It is about ensuring that students actively participate in a learning experience that prepares them for a world that is more and more internationally and interculturally connected - that both Danish and non......-Danish students receive the basic international and intercultural skills and knowledge they need in current society....

  6. Learning as a Subversive Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, J. Amos

    2007-01-01

    "Learning as a subversive activity" is about working with public school students to debunk the shallow conception that achievement equals learning. That means exposing the power relations that keep in place such a narrow definition of what counts and exploring the implications of those powerful forces for students' lives and for society at large.…

  7. Testosterone and Voluntary Exercise, Alone or Together Increase Cardiac Activation of AKT and ERK1/2 in Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodari, Leila; Mohammadi, Mustafa; Mohaddes, Gisou; Alipour, Mohammad Reza; Ghorbanzade, Vajiheh; Dariushnejad, Hassan; Mohammadi, Shima

    2016-01-01

    Background Impaired angiogenesis in cardiac tissue is a major complication of diabetes. Protein kinase B (AKT) and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways play important role during capillary-like network formation in angiogenesis process. Objectives To determine the effects of testosterone and voluntary exercise on levels of vascularity, phosphorylated Akt (P- AKT) and phosphorylated ERK (P-ERK) in heart tissue of diabetic and castrated diabetic rats. Methods Type I diabetes was induced by i.p injection of 50 mg/kg of streptozotocin in animals. After 42 days of treatment with testosterone (2mg/kg/day) or voluntary exercise alone or in combination, heart tissue samples were collected and used for histological evaluation and determination of P-AKT and P-ERK levels by ELISA method. Results Our results showed that either testosterone or exercise increased capillarity, P-AKT, and P-ERK levels in the heart of diabetic rats. Treatment of diabetic rats with testosterone and exercise had a synergistic effect on capillarity, P-AKT, and P-ERK levels in heart. Furthermore, in the castrated diabetes group, capillarity, P-AKT, and P-ERK levels significantly decreased in the heart, whereas either testosterone treatment or exercise training reversed these effects. Also, simultaneous treatment of castrated diabetic rats with testosterone and exercise had an additive effect on P-AKT and P-ERK levels. Conclusion Our findings suggest that testosterone and exercise alone or together can increase angiogenesis in the heart of diabetic and castrated diabetic rats. The proangiogenesis effects of testosterone and exercise are associated with the enhanced activation of AKT and ERK1/2 in heart tissue.

  8. Voluntary exercise prevents colonic inflammation in high-fat diet-induced obese mice by up-regulating PPAR-γ activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei-Xin, E-mail: weixinliu@yahoo.com [Department of Gastroenterology, First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110001, Liaoning (China); Wang, Ting; Zhou, Feng; Wang, Ying; Xing, Jun-Wei; Zhang, Shen [Department of Gastroenterology, First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110001, Liaoning (China); Gu, Shou-Zhi [Department of Anatomy, Seirei Christopher College, Hamamatsu 433-8558 (Japan); Sang, Li-Xuan [Department of Cadre Ward II, First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110001, Liaoning (China); Dai, Cong [Department of Gastroenterology, First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110001, Liaoning (China); Wang, Hai-Lan [Guangdong Province Hospital for Occupational Disease Prevention and Treatment, Guangzhou 510300, Guangdong (China)

    2015-04-10

    Obesity is associated with increased colonic inflammation, which elevates the risk of colon cancer. Although exercise exerts anti-inflammatory actions in multiple chronic diseases associated with inflammation, it is unknown whether this strategy prevents colonic inflammation in obesity. We hypothesized that voluntary exercise would suppress colonic inflammation in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity by modulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ. Male C57Bl/6J mice fed either a control diet (6.5% fat, CON) or a high-fat diet (24% fat, HFD) were divided into sedentary, voluntary exercise or voluntary exercise with PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 (10 mg/kg/day). All interventions took place for 12 weeks. Compared with CON-sedentary group, HFD-sedentary mice gained significantly more body weight and exhibited metabolic disorders. Molecular studies revealed that HFD-sedentary mice had increased expression of inflammatory mediators and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB in the colons, which were associated with decreased expression and activity of PPAR-γ. Voluntary exercise markedly attenuated body weight gain, improved metabolic disorders, and normalized the expression of inflammatory mediators and activation of NF-κB in the colons in HFD-mice while having no effects in CON-animals. Moreover, voluntary exercise significantly increased expression and activity of PPAR-γ in the colons in both HFD- and CON-animals. However, all of these beneficial effects induced by voluntary exercise were abolished by GW9662, which inhibited expression and activity of PPAR-γ. The results suggest that decreased PPAR-γ activity in the colon of HFD-induced obesity may facilitate the inflammatory response and colon carcinogenesis. Voluntary exercise prevents colonic inflammation in HFD-induced obesity by up-regulating PPAR-γ activity. - Highlights: • Obesity down-regulates PPAR-γ in the colon. • Down-regulated colonic PPAR-γ may facilitate inflammatory

  9. Co-Activity during Maximum Voluntary Contraction: A Study of Four Lower-Extremity Muscles in Children with and without Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedroff, Kristina; Knutson, Loretta M.; Soderberg, Gary L.

    2008-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether children with cerebral palsy (CP) showed more co-activity than comparison children in non-prime mover muscles with regard to the prime mover during maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of four lower-extremity muscles. Fourteen children with spastic diplegic CP (10 males, four females; age…

  10. 42 CFR 137.205 - Will this voluntary uniform data set reporting activity be required of all Self-Governance Tribes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... resources, hardware, software, and technical assistance to the Self-Governance Tribes to facilitate data... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Will this voluntary uniform data set reporting activity be required of all Self-Governance Tribes entering into a compact with the IHS under Title V? 137...

  11. Impaired voluntary neuromuscular activation limits muscle power in mobility-limited older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background. Age-related alterations of neuromuscular activation may contribute to deficits in muscle power and mobility function. This study assesses whether impaired activation of the agonist quadriceps and antagonist hamstrings, including amplitude- and velocity-dependent characteristics of activa...

  12. Increased spinal reflex excitability is associated with enhanced central activation during voluntary lengthening contractions in human spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyosub E.; Corcos, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    This study of chronic incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) subjects investigated patterns of central motor drive (i.e., central activation) of the plantar flexors using interpolated twitches, and modulation of soleus H-reflexes during lengthening, isometric, and shortening muscle actions. In a recent study of the knee extensors, SCI subjects demonstrated greater central activation ratio (CAR) values during lengthening (i.e., eccentric) maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs), compared with during isometric or shortening (i.e., concentric) MVCs. In contrast, healthy controls demonstrated lower lengthening CAR values compared with their isometric and shortening CARs. For the present investigation, we hypothesized SCI subjects would again produce their highest CAR values during lengthening MVCs, and that these increases in central activation were partially attributable to greater efficacy of Ia-α motoneuron transmission during muscle lengthening following SCI. Results show SCI subjects produced higher CAR values during lengthening vs. isometric or shortening MVCs (all P reflex testing revealed normalized H-reflexes (maximal SOL H-reflex-to-maximal M-wave ratios) were greater for SCI than controls during passive (P = 0.023) and active (i.e., 75% MVC; P = 0.017) lengthening, suggesting facilitation of Ia transmission post-SCI. Additionally, measures of spinal reflex excitability (passive lengthening maximal SOL H-reflex-to-maximal M-wave ratio) in SCI were positively correlated with soleus electromyographic activity and CAR values during lengthening MVCs (both P < 0.05). The present study presents evidence that patterns of dynamic muscle activation are altered following SCI, and that greater central activation during lengthening contractions is partly due to enhanced efficacy of Ia-α motoneuron transmission. PMID:25972590

  13. Human Control Law and Brain Activity of Voluntary Motion by Utilizing a Balancing Task with an Inverted Pendulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Suzuki

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human characteristics concerning voluntary motion control are investigated, because this motion is fundamental for the machine operation and human-computer system. Using a force feedback haptic device and a balancing task of a virtual inverted pendulum, participants were trained in the task, and hand motion/force was measured, and brain activity was monitored. First, through brain analysis by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS and motion analysis of the pendulum, we identified a participant who was the most expert. Next, control characteristics of the most expert were investigated by considering the operational force and delay factor of a human. As a result, it was found that predictive control based on velocity information was used predominantly although a perception feedback control against the pendulum posture worked. And it was shown that an on-off intermittency control, which was a strategy for the skilled balancing, can be described well by a liner model involving two types of time shifts for the position and velocity. In addition, it was confirmed that the cortex activity for observation in an ocular motor control area and visual processing area was strong to enhance above-mentioned control strategies.

  14. Active learning of Pareto fronts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campigotto, Paolo; Passerini, Andrea; Battiti, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    This paper introduces the active learning of Pareto fronts (ALP) algorithm, a novel approach to recover the Pareto front of a multiobjective optimization problem. ALP casts the identification of the Pareto front into a supervised machine learning task. This approach enables an analytical model of the Pareto front to be built. The computational effort in generating the supervised information is reduced by an active learning strategy. In particular, the model is learned from a set of informative training objective vectors. The training objective vectors are approximated Pareto-optimal vectors obtained by solving different scalarized problem instances. The experimental results show that ALP achieves an accurate Pareto front approximation with a lower computational effort than state-of-the-art estimation of distribution algorithms and widely known genetic techniques.

  15. Active Learning for Player Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaker, Noor; Abou-Zleikha, Mohamed; Shaker, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Learning models of player behavior has been the focus of several studies. This work is motivated by better understanding of player behavior, a knowledge that can ultimately be employed to provide player-adapted or personalized content. In this paper, we propose the use of active learning for player...... experience modeling. We use a dataset from hundreds of players playing Infinite Mario Bros. as a case study and we employ the random forest method to learn mod- els of player experience through the active learning approach. The results obtained suggest that only part of the dataset (up to half the size...... of the full dataset) is necessary for the construction of accu- rate models that are as accurate as those constructed from the full dataset. This indicates the potential of the method and its benefits in cases when obtaining the data is expensive or time, storage or effort consuming. The results also indicate...

  16. Active Learning for Player Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaker, Noor; Abou-Zleikha, Mohamed; Shaker, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Learning models of player behavior has been the focus of several studies. This work is motivated by better understanding of player behavior, a knowledge that can ultimately be employed to provide player-adapted or personalized content. In this paper, we propose the use of active learning for player...... experience modeling. We use a dataset from hundreds of players playing Infinite Mario Bros. as a case study and we employ the random forest method to learn mod- els of player experience through the active learning approach. The results obtained suggest that only part of the dataset (up to half the size...... of the full dataset) is necessary for the construction of accu- rate models that are as accurate as those constructed from the full dataset. This indicates the potential of the method and its benefits in cases when obtaining the data is expensive or time, storage or effort consuming. The results also indicate...

  17. 76 FR 2124 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Voluntary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... an effective regulatory program for retail food establishments, establish basic quality control... illness and food defense preparedness and response, (6) compliance and enforcement, (7) industry and... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Agency Information Collection Activities;...

  18. Cerebellar brain inhibition in the target and surround muscles during voluntary tonic activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyakaew, Pattamon; Cho, Hyun Joo; Srivanitchapoom, Prachaya; Popa, Traian; Wu, Tianxia; Hallett, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Motor surround inhibition is the neural mechanism that selectively favours the contraction of target muscles and inhibits nearby muscles to prevent unwanted movements. This inhibition was previously reported at the onset of a movement, but not during a tonic contraction. Cerebellar brain inhibition (CBI) is reduced in active muscles during tonic activation; however, it has not been studied in the surround muscles. CBI was evaluated in the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) muscle as the target muscle, and the abductor digiti minimi, flexor carpi radialis and extensor carpi radialis muscles as surround muscles, during rest and tonic activation of the FDI muscle in 21 subjects. Cerebellar stimulation was performed under magnetic resonance imaging-guided neuronavigation targeting lobule VIII of the cerebellar hemisphere. Stimulus intensities for cerebellar stimulation were based on the resting motor cortex threshold (RMT) and adjusted for the depth difference between the cerebellar and motor cortices. We used 90-120% of the adjusted RMT as the conditioning stimulus intensity during rest. The intensity that generated the best CBI at rest in the FDI muscle was selected for use during tonic activation. During selective tonic activation of the FDI muscle, CBI was significantly reduced only for the FDI muscle, and not for the surround muscles. Unconditioned motor evoked potential sizes were increased in all muscles during FDI muscle tonic activation as compared with rest, despite background electromyography activity increasing only for the FDI muscle. Our study suggests that the cerebellum may play an important role in selective tonic finger movement by reducing its inhibition in the motor cortex only for the relevant agonist muscle.

  19. Alleviation of Motor Impairments in Patients with Cerebral Palsy: Acute Effects of Whole-body Vibration on Stretch Reflex Response, Voluntary Muscle Activation and Mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Krause

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionIndividuals suffering from cerebral palsy (CP often have involuntary, reflex-evoked muscle activity resulting in spastic hyperreflexia. Whole-body vibration (WBV has been demonstrated to reduce reflex activity in healthy subjects, but evidence in CP patients is still limited. Therefore, this study aimed to establish the acute neuromuscular and kinematic effects of WBV in subjects with spastic CP.Methods44 children with spastic CP were tested on neuromuscular activation and kinematics before and immediately after a 1-min bout of WBV (16–25 Hz, 1.5–3 mm. Assessment included (1 recordings of stretch reflex (SR activity of the triceps surae, (2 electromyography (EMG measurements of maximal voluntary muscle activation of lower limb muscles, and (3 neuromuscular activation during active range of motion (aROM. We recorded EMG of m. soleus (SOL, m. gastrocnemius medialis (GM, m. tibialis anterior, m. vastus medialis, m. rectus femoris, and m. biceps femoris. Angular excursion was recorded by goniometry of the ankle and knee joint.ResultsAfter WBV, (1 SOL SRs were decreased (p < 0.01 while (2 maximal voluntary activation (p < 0.05 and (3 angular excursion in the knee joint (p < 0.01 were significantly increased. No changes could be observed for GM SR amplitudes or ankle joint excursion. Neuromuscular coordination expressed by greater agonist–antagonist ratios during aROM was significantly enhanced (p < 0.05.DiscussionThe findings point toward acute neuromuscular and kinematic effects following one bout of WBV. Protocols demonstrate that pathological reflex responses are reduced (spinal level, while the execution of voluntary movement (supraspinal level is improved in regards to kinematic and neuromuscular control. This facilitation of muscle and joint control is probably due to a reduction of spasticity-associated spinal excitability in favor of giving access for greater supraspinal input during voluntary motor

  20. [Motor unit activities of human masseter muscle during sustained voluntary contractions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, T

    1990-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the motor unit activities of the human masseter muscle during sustained the bite force at a constant level. The electrical activities recorded with surface and inserted electrodes were studied, with the following results. 1. The masseter muscle had the changes of activities in two phases as a contraction progressed. 2. In the first phase, surface EMG activities decreased and discharge frequency of motor units also decreased. 3. In the second phase, surface EMG activities increased and discharge frequency of motor units also increased. 4. In the first phase, it was suggested that the bite force was maintained by an increase in the twitch tension produced by a motor unit and that there were no recruitment of additional motor units. 5. In the second phase, it was indicated that the bite force was maintained by the recruitment of new motor units and an increase in the discharge frequency of motor units to compensate a loss of force resulted from the contractile element fatigue.

  1. Induced Gamma-Band Activity During Voluntary Movement: EEG Analysis for Clinical Purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amo, Carlos; Del Castillo, Miguel Ortiz; Barea, Rafael; de Santiago, Luis; Martínez-Arribas, Alejandro; Amo-López, Pedro; Boquete, Luciano

    2016-10-01

    Propose a simplified method applicable in routine clinical practice that uses EEG to assess induced gamma-band activity (GBA) in the 30-90 Hz frequency range in cerebral motor areas. EEG recordings (25 healthy subjects) of cerebral activity (at rest, motor task). GBA was obtained as power spectral density (PSD). GBA - defined as the gamma index (Iγ) - was calculated using the basal GBA (γB) and motor GBA (γMOV) PSD values. The mean values of Iγ were (IγR (right hand) = 1.30, IγL (left hand) = 1.22). Manual laterality showed a correlation with Iγ. Iγ may provide a useful way of indirectly assessing operation of activated motor neuronal circuits. It could be applied to diagnosis of motor area pathologies and as follow up in rehabilitation processes. Likewise, Iγ could enable the assessment of motor capacity, physical training and manual laterality in sport medicine.

  2. Understanding Crowdsourcing: Effects of motivation and rewards on participation and performance in voluntary online activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.A.M. Borst (Irma)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractCompanies increasingly outsource activities to volunteers that they approach via an open call on the internet. The phenomenon is called ‘crowdsourcing’. For an effective use of crowdsourcing it is important to understand what motivated these online volunteers and what is the influence of

  3. Understanding Crowdsourcing: Effects of motivation and rewards on participation and performance in voluntary online activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.A.M. Borst (Irma)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractCompanies increasingly outsource activities to volunteers that they approach via an open call on the internet. The phenomenon is called ‘crowdsourcing’. For an effective use of crowdsourcing it is important to understand what motivated these online volunteers and what is the influence of

  4. Voluntary activation of the sympathetic nervous system and attenuation of the innate immune response in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kox, M.; Eijk, L.T.G.J. van; Zwaag, J.; Wildenberg, J. van den; Sweep, F.C.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Pickkers, P.

    2014-01-01

    Excessive or persistent proinflammatory cytokine production plays a central role in autoimmune diseases. Acute activation of the sympathetic nervous system attenuates the innate immune response. However, both the autonomic nervous system and innate immune system are regarded as systems that cannot b

  5. Voluntary activation of ankle muscles is accompanied by subcortical facilitation of their antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertsen, Svend Sparre; Zuur, Abraham T.; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2010-01-01

    Flexion and extension movements are organized reciprocally, so that extensor motoneurones in the spinal cord are inhibited when flexor muscles are active and vice versa. During and just prior to dorsiflexion of the ankle, soleus motoneurones are thus inhibited as evidenced by a depression...... MEPs were also facilitated (although to a lesser extent) at a similar time in relation to the onset of dorsiflexion. TA MEPs were facilitated 50 ms prior to onset of dorsiflexion and neither depressed nor facilitated prior to plantar flexion. No difference was found between the facilitation...

  6. Mouse genetic differences in voluntary wheel running, adult hippocampal neurogenesis and learning on the multi-strain-adapted plus water maze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Jennifer R; Rhodes, Justin S

    2015-03-01

    Moderate levels of aerobic exercise broadly enhance cognition throughout the lifespan. One hypothesized contributing mechanism is increased adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Recently, we measured the effects of voluntary wheel running on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in 12 different mouse strains, and found increased neurogenesis in all strains, ranging from 2- to 5-fold depending on the strain. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which increased neurogenesis from wheel running is associated with enhanced performance on the water maze for 5 of the 12 strains, chosen based on their levels of neurogenesis observed in the previous study (C57BL/6 J, 129S1/SvImJ, B6129SF1/J, DBA/2 J, and B6D2F1/J). Mice were housed with or without a running wheels for 30 days then tested for learning and memory on the plus water maze, adapted for multiple strains, and rotarod test of motor performance. The first 10 days, animals were injected with BrdU to label dividing cells. After behavioral testing animals were euthanized to measure adult hippocampal neurogenesis using standard methods. Levels of neurogenesis depended on strain but all mice had a similar increase in neurogenesis in response to exercise. All mice acquired the water maze but performance depended on strain. Exercise improved water maze performance in all strains to a similar degree. Rotarod performance depended on strain. Exercise improved rotarod performance only in DBA/2 J and B6D2F1/J mice. Taken together, results demonstrate that despite different levels of neurogenesis, memory performance and motor coordination in these mouse strains, all strains have the capacity to increase neurogenesis and improve learning on the water maze through voluntary wheel running.

  7. Adapting Active Learning in Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casale, Carolyn Frances

    2010-01-01

    Ethiopia is a developing country that has invested extensively in expanding its educational opportunities. In this expansion, there has been a drastic restructuring of its system of preparing teachers and teacher educators. Often, improving teacher quality is dependent on professional development that diversifies pedagogy (active learning). This…

  8. Oral Hygiene. Learning Activity Package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hime, Kirsten

    This learning activity package on oral hygiene is one of a series of 12 titles developed for use in health occupations education programs. Materials in the package include objectives, a list of materials needed, a list of definitions, information sheets, reviews (self evaluations) of portions of the content, and answers to reviews. These topics…

  9. Adult Learning Center Curriculum Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    City Univ. of New York, Bronx. Herbert H. Lehman Coll. Inst. for Literacy Studies.

    These curriculum materials were collected from teachers in the Lehman College Adult Learning Center (New York). They include various activities and resources, such as a series of questions about the aims of teaching adults, a list of sources for adult basic education (ABE) materials, poems, and autobiographical materials. Teaching suggestions and…

  10. Engaging Students' Learning Through Active Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Fitzsimons

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses a project carried out with thirty six final year undergraduate students, studying the Bachelor of Science in Business and Management and taking the module Small Business Management during the academic year 2012 and 2013 in Dublin Institute of Technology. The research had two separate objectives, 1 to engage in active learning by having students work on a consulting project in groups for a real life business and 2 to improve student learning. The Small Business Management previously had a group assignment that was to choose an article related to entrepreneurship and critic it and present it to the class. Anecdotally, from student feedback, it was felt that this process did not engage students and also did not contribute to the key competencies necessary in order to be an entrepreneur. The desire was for students on successful completion of this module to have better understood how business is conducted and equip them with core skills such as innovation, critical thinking, problem solving and decision making .Student buy in was achieved by getting the students to select their own groups and also work out between each group from a one page brief provided by the businesses which business they would like to work with. It was important for the businesses to also feel their time spent with students was worthwhile so they were presented with a report from the students at the end of the twelve weeks and invited into the College to hear the presentations from students. Students were asked to provide a reflection on their three key learning points from the assignment and to answer specific questions designed to understand what they learnt and how and their strengths and weaknesses. A survey was sent to the businesses that took part to understand their experiences. The results were positive with student engagement and learning rating very highly and feedback from the businesses demonstrated an appreciation of having a different

  11. 'Reaching the hard to reach' - lessons learned from the VCS (voluntary and community Sector. A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hancock Beverley

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The notion 'hard to reach' is a contested and ambiguous term that is commonly used within the spheres of social care and health, especially in discourse around health and social inequalities. There is a need to address health inequalities and to engage in services the marginalized and socially excluded sectors of society. Methods This paper describes a pilot study involving interviews with representatives from eight Voluntary and Community Sector (VCS organisations. The purpose of the study was to explore the notion of 'hard to reach' and perceptions of the barriers and facilitators to accessing services for 'hard to reach' groups from a voluntary and community sector perspective. Results The 'hard to reach' may include drug users, people living with HIV, people from sexual minority communities, asylum seekers, refugees, people from black and ethnic minority communities, and homeless people although defining the notion of the 'hard to reach' is not straight forward. It may be that certain groups resist engaging in treatment services and are deemed hard to reach by a particular service or from a societal stance. There are a number of potential barriers for people who may try and access services, including people having bad experiences in the past; location and opening times of services and how services are funded and managed. A number of areas of commonality are found in terms of how access to services for 'hard to reach' individuals and groups could be improved including: respectful treatment of service users, establishing trust with service users, offering service flexibility, partnership working with other organisations and harnessing service user involvement. Conclusions If health services are to engage with groups that are deemed 'hard to reach' and marginalised from mainstream health services, the experiences and practices for engagement from within the VCS may serve as useful lessons for service improvement for

  12. Comparative adaptations in oxidative and glycolytic muscle fibers in a low voluntary wheel running rat model performing three levels of physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Hayden W; Toedebusch, Ryan G; Ruegsegger, Greg; Mobley, C Brooks; Fox, Carlton D; McGinnis, Graham R; Quindry, John C; Booth, Frank W; Roberts, Michael D; Kavazis, Andreas N

    2015-11-01

    A unique polygenic model of rat physical activity has been recently developed where rats were selected for the trait of low voluntary wheel running. We utilized this model to identify differences in soleus and plantaris muscles of sedentary low voluntary wheel running rats and physically active low voluntary wheel running rats exposed to moderate amounts of treadmill training. Three groups of 28-day-old male Wistar rats were used: (1) rats without a running wheel (SEDENTARY, n = 7), (2) rats housed with a running wheel (WHEEL, n = 7), and (3) rats housed with a running wheel and exercised on the treadmill (5 days/week for 20 min/day at 15.0 m/min) (WHEEL + TREADMILL, n = 7). Animals were euthanized 5 weeks after the start of the experiment and the soleus and plantaris muscles were excised and used for analyses. Increases in skeletal muscle gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha and fibronectin type III domain-containing protein 5 in WHEEL + TREADMILL group were observed. Also, WHEEL + TREADMILL had higher protein levels of superoxide dismutase 2 and decreased levels of oxidative damage. Our data demonstrate that the addition of treadmill training induces beneficial muscular adaptations compared to animals with wheel access alone. Furthermore, our data expand our understanding of differential muscular adaptations in response to exercise in mitochondrial, antioxidant, and metabolic markers.

  13. Movement-related cortical activation with voluntary pinch task: simultaneous monitoring of near-infrared spectroscopy signals and movement-related cortical potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yosuke; Fukuda, Masafumi; Oishi, Makoto; Fujii, Yukihiko

    2012-07-01

    This study was designed to evaluate hemodynamic and electrophysiological motor cortex responses to voluntary finger pinching in humans, with simultaneous recording of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) signals and movement-related cortical potentials (MRCP). Six healthy, right-handed subjects performed 100 trials of voluntary right-thumb index-finger pinching with about a 10-second interval at their own pace. Throughout the session, 48 regions over the bilateral motor cortex were assessed by NIRS, while MRCP and electromyogram (EMG) were simultaneously monitored. MRCP started 1536+/-58 ms before EMG onset and peaked 127+/-24 ms after EMG onset. NIRS data showed bilateral prefrontal cortex at 0.5+/-0.1 s before EMG onset and bilateral dorsal premotor cortex activations at 0.6+/-0.1 s before EMG onset. The hand area of the sensorimotor cortex was activated left-dominantly, seen obviously peaked at 3.7+/-0.2 s after EMG onset. The comparison between MRCP and NIRS results raised the possibility that the vascular response to neural activity occurs within 4 s with a voluntary pinch task. These results indicate that our technique allows detailed study of the motor control. Our method is a promising strategy for event-related motor control and neurovascular coupling studies.

  14. Three-dimensional localization of SMA activity preceding voluntary movement. A study of electric and magnetic fields in a patient with infarction of the right supplementary motor area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, W; Cheyne, D; Kristeva, R; Beisteiner, R; Lindinger, G; Deecke, L

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies by magnetoencephalography (MEG) failed to consistently localize the activity of the supplementary motor area (SMA) prior to voluntary movements in healthy human subjects. Based on the assumption that the SMA of either hemisphere is active prior to voluntary movements, the negative findings of previous studies could be explained by the hypothesis that magnetic fields of current dipole sources in the two SMAs may cancel each other. The present MEG study was performed in a patient with a complete vascular lesion of the right SMA. In this case it was possible to consistently localize a current dipole source in the intact left SMA starting about 1200 msec prior to the initiation of voluntary movements of the right thumb. Starting at about 600 msec prior to movement onset the assumption of a current dipole source in the left primary motor cortex was needed to account for the observed fields. Measurements of brain potentials were consistent with MEG findings of activity of the left SMA starting about 1200 msec prior to movement onset.

  15. Voluntary Environmental Governance Arrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, J.

    2012-01-01

    Voluntary environmental governance arrangements have focal attention in studies on environmental policy, regulation and governance. The four major debates in the contemporary literature on voluntary environmental governance arrangements are studied. The literature falls short of sufficiently

  16. Voluntary Environmental Governance Arrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, J.

    2012-01-01

    Voluntary environmental governance arrangements have focal attention in studies on environmental policy, regulation and governance. The four major debates in the contemporary literature on voluntary environmental governance arrangements are studied. The literature falls short of sufficiently specify

  17. Voluntary Service System (VSS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Voluntary Service System (VSS) is a national-level application which replaced the site-based Voluntary Timekeeping System (VTK). VTK was used for many years at the...

  18. Stimulating Deep Learning Using Active Learning Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yew, Tee Meng; Dawood, Fauziah K. P.; a/p S. Narayansany, Kannaki; a/p Palaniappa Manickam, M. Kamala; Jen, Leong Siok; Hoay, Kuan Chin

    2016-01-01

    When students and teachers behave in ways that reinforce learning as a spectator sport, the result can often be a classroom and overall learning environment that is mostly limited to transmission of information and rote learning rather than deep approaches towards meaningful construction and application of knowledge. A group of college instructors…

  19. Connecting Family Learning and Active Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Mary

    2009-01-01

    In Ireland family learning and active citizenship has not been linked together until 2006. It was while the Clare Family Learning Project was involved in a family learning EU learning network project, that a suggestion to create a new partnership project linking both areas was made and FACE IT! was born (Families and Active Citizenship…

  20. Electromyographic Responses during Elbow Movement at Two Angles with Voluntary Contraction: Influences of Muscle Activity on Upper Arm Biceps Brachii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nizam Uddin Ahamed

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of Electromyography (EMG signals generated by individuals is part of human musculoskeletal system research and signals are always influenced by the electrode placement in the muscle. This characteristic is also obvious at Biceps Brachii (BB muscles during the movement of elbow at different angles. The purpose of this study was to monitor and determine the BB muscle function in 3 conditions: (i electrodes were placed at 3 locations on the BB, (ii elbow was fixed at the two angles (90° and 150° and (iii isometric contractions were performed to record EMG data. EMG data were obtained from six healthy subjects (n = 6, mean±SD age = 24.4±3.1 years, body mass = 68±6.3 kg, height = 164±4.1 cm, BMI = 21.2±2.3, right arm dominated. A Bluetooth-enabled laptop, wireless EMG sensors, digital dynamometer and angle meter were used for data recording. EMG data were calculated and analyzed by average value, standard deviation, Root Mean Square (RMS and highest peak of the signal during maximum voluntary contraction. All the dependent variables were calculated using repeated measures Analysis of Variance (ANOVA. The results from the research showed that (i according to the calculation of average RMS and the maximum peaks of EMG signals, there was a significant difference between 2 angles (p = 0.047, i.e., p<0.05, but no interaction at the same angles when overall average EMG and standard deviation value are considered and (ii majority of the outcomes showed that EMG activity is higher in the order of middle, upper and lower BB muscle. It is therefore important that electrical signals generated upon different electrode placements and angles on the BB muscle are used for biceps rehabilitation and other physiological measurements on upper arm.

  1. Maternal Voluntary Exercise during Pregnancy Enhances the Spatial Learning Acquisition but not the Retention of Memory in Rat Pups via a TrkB-mediated Mechanism: The Role of Hippocampal BDNF Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maziar M Akhavan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: The effect of maternal voluntary exercise on hippocampal BDNF level in rat offspring was studied. In addition, the possible role of hippocampal BDNF receptors in maternal exercise induced enhancement of learning in the rat pups was investigated.   Materials and Methods: Pregnant rats have been randomly assigned to sedentary control or voluntary exercise groups. Each of the exercising pregnant rats was given access to a cage that was equipped with a running wheel until the end of their pregnancy. On post natal day (PND 36, two groups consisted of 7 male rat pups in each group from sedentary or exercised mothers were sacrificed and the hippocampus was dissected for BDNF proteins level determination. Also, bilateral injection of K252a to the hippocampus was used to block the hippocampal BDNF action on PND59 in the rat pups. Results: Voluntary exercise during pregnancy significantly increased the level of BDNF protein in the hippocampus of the rat pups on PND36 compared to the control group (P=0.048. Inhibiting BDNF action abolished the exercise-induced improvement of learning acquisition in offspring in training trials (P=0.0001. No difference was observed in the platform location latency and the time spent in the target in the probe test between two groups. Conclusion : This study demonstrates that voluntary exercise during pregnancy via a TrkB-mediated mechanism enhances the spatial learning acquisition, however, not the retention of memory in the rat pups.

  2. ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC ACTIVITY OF THE VASTUS MEDIALIS OBLIQUE AND VASTUS LATERALIS DURING MAXIMUM VOLUNTARY ISOMETRICS IN DIFFERENT WEIGHT BEARING POSITIONS OF THE FOOT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreekar Kumar Reddy.R

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patellofemoral pain syndrome is a very common disorder. 90% of the general population has some degree of pathologic changes of the patellofemoral joint. Knowledge regarding the cause and prevention of patellofemoral pain syndrome is essential. Therefore the purpose of this study is intended to know whether different foot positions alter Vastus Medialis Oblique and Vastus Lateralis that leads to dysfunctions of knee joint. Method: 30 subjects are included in study and investigated foot in different foot positions are in neutral, pronated and supinated foot positions and performed maximum voluntary isometric contractions are recorded with electromyography. Results: EMG amplitudes (microvolts of VL and VMO at three different weight bearing positions of foot during maximum voluntary contraction analysis by using one-way Analysis of Variance. Mean amplitudes of foot positions in pronation shown significant difference while comparing with neutral and supination. Conclusion: The VMO and VL activity shows significant difference in the pronated foot weight bearing position compared to the neutral and supinated foot. Performing the maximum voluntary isometric contractions of VMO and VL with pronated foot elicited significantly higher EMG activity compared to Neutral or supinated weight bearing positions of foot. The results of this study also suggested that for patellofemoral pain which is caused by pronated foot can be treat with by using the soft foot orthoses

  3. IMPROVING CAUSE DETECTION SYSTEMS WITH ACTIVE LEARNING

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — IMPROVING CAUSE DETECTION SYSTEMS WITH ACTIVE LEARNING ISAAC PERSING AND VINCENT NG Abstract. Active learning has been successfully applied to many natural language...

  4. The biological control of voluntary exercise, spontaneous physical activity and daily energy expenditure in relation to obesity: human and rodent perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Theodore; Schutz, Heidi; Chappell, Mark A.; Keeney, Brooke K.; Meek, Thomas H.; Copes, Lynn E.; Acosta, Wendy; Drenowatz, Clemens; Maciel, Robert C.; van Dijk, Gertjan; Kotz, Catherine M.; Eisenmann, Joey C.

    2011-01-01

    Mammals expend energy in many ways, including basic cellular maintenance and repair, digestion, thermoregulation, locomotion, growth and reproduction. These processes can vary tremendously among species and individuals, potentially leading to large variation in daily energy expenditure (DEE). Locomotor energy costs can be substantial for large-bodied species and those with high-activity lifestyles. For humans in industrialized societies, locomotion necessary for daily activities is often relatively low, so it has been presumed that activity energy expenditure and DEE are lower than in our ancestors. Whether this is true and has contributed to a rise in obesity is controversial. In humans, much attention has centered on spontaneous physical activity (SPA) or non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT), the latter sometimes defined so broadly as to include all energy expended due to activity, exclusive of volitional exercise. Given that most people in Western societies engage in little voluntary exercise, increasing NEAT may be an effective way to maintain DEE and combat overweight and obesity. One way to promote NEAT is to decrease the amount of time spent on sedentary behaviours (e.g. watching television). The effects of voluntary exercise on other components of physical activity are highly variable in humans, partly as a function of age, and have rarely been studied in rodents. However, most rodent studies indicate that food consumption increases in the presence of wheels; therefore, other aspects of physical activity are not reduced enough to compensate for the energetic cost of wheel running. Most rodent studies also show negative effects of wheel access on body fat, especially in males. Sedentary behaviours per se have not been studied in rodents in relation to obesity. Several lines of evidence demonstrate the important role of dopamine, in addition to other neural signaling networks (e.g. the endocannabinoid system), in the control of voluntary exercise. A

  5. The biological control of voluntary exercise, spontaneous physical activity and daily energy expenditure in relation to obesity: human and rodent perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Theodore; Schutz, Heidi; Chappell, Mark A; Keeney, Brooke K; Meek, Thomas H; Copes, Lynn E; Acosta, Wendy; Drenowatz, Clemens; Maciel, Robert C; van Dijk, Gertjan; Kotz, Catherine M; Eisenmann, Joey C

    2011-01-15

    Mammals expend energy in many ways, including basic cellular maintenance and repair, digestion, thermoregulation, locomotion, growth and reproduction. These processes can vary tremendously among species and individuals, potentially leading to large variation in daily energy expenditure (DEE). Locomotor energy costs can be substantial for large-bodied species and those with high-activity lifestyles. For humans in industrialized societies, locomotion necessary for daily activities is often relatively low, so it has been presumed that activity energy expenditure and DEE are lower than in our ancestors. Whether this is true and has contributed to a rise in obesity is controversial. In humans, much attention has centered on spontaneous physical activity (SPA) or non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT), the latter sometimes defined so broadly as to include all energy expended due to activity, exclusive of volitional exercise. Given that most people in Western societies engage in little voluntary exercise, increasing NEAT may be an effective way to maintain DEE and combat overweight and obesity. One way to promote NEAT is to decrease the amount of time spent on sedentary behaviours (e.g. watching television). The effects of voluntary exercise on other components of physical activity are highly variable in humans, partly as a function of age, and have rarely been studied in rodents. However, most rodent studies indicate that food consumption increases in the presence of wheels; therefore, other aspects of physical activity are not reduced enough to compensate for the energetic cost of wheel running. Most rodent studies also show negative effects of wheel access on body fat, especially in males. Sedentary behaviours per se have not been studied in rodents in relation to obesity. Several lines of evidence demonstrate the important role of dopamine, in addition to other neural signaling networks (e.g. the endocannabinoid system), in the control of voluntary exercise. A

  6. Active Learning: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Marilyn

    The purposes of the first two parts of this literature review are to clarify the concept of active learning and discuss the use and value of active learning models. In Part I, the perspectives of five historical proponents of active learning, Rousseau, Pestalozzi, Dewey, Kilpatrick, and Piaget, are discussed. The views of four contemporary…

  7. Alleviation of Motor Impairments in Patients with Cerebral Palsy: Acute Effects of Whole-body Vibration on Stretch Reflex Response, Voluntary Muscle Activation and Mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Anne; Schönau, Eckhard; Gollhofer, Albert; Duran, Ibrahim; Ferrari-Malik, Anja; Freyler, Kathrin; Ritzmann, Ramona

    2017-01-01

    Individuals suffering from cerebral palsy (CP) often have involuntary, reflex-evoked muscle activity resulting in spastic hyperreflexia. Whole-body vibration (WBV) has been demonstrated to reduce reflex activity in healthy subjects, but evidence in CP patients is still limited. Therefore, this study aimed to establish the acute neuromuscular and kinematic effects of WBV in subjects with spastic CP. 44 children with spastic CP were tested on neuromuscular activation and kinematics before and immediately after a 1-min bout of WBV (16-25 Hz, 1.5-3 mm). Assessment included (1) recordings of stretch reflex (SR) activity of the triceps surae, (2) electromyography (EMG) measurements of maximal voluntary muscle activation of lower limb muscles, and (3) neuromuscular activation during active range of motion (aROM). We recorded EMG of m. soleus (SOL), m. gastrocnemius medialis (GM), m. tibialis anterior, m. vastus medialis, m. rectus femoris, and m. biceps femoris. Angular excursion was recorded by goniometry of the ankle and knee joint. After WBV, (1) SOL SRs were decreased (p control. This facilitation of muscle and joint control is probably due to a reduction of spasticity-associated spinal excitability in favor of giving access for greater supraspinal input during voluntary motor control.

  8. Learning activism, acting with phronesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yew-Jin

    2015-12-01

    The article "Socio-political development of private school children mobilising for disadvantaged others" by Darren Hoeg, Natalie Lemelin, and Lawrence Bencze described a language-learning curriculum that drew on elements of Socioscientific issues and Science, Technology, Society and Environment. Results showed that with a number of enabling factors acting in concert, learning about and engagement in practical action for social justice and equity are possible. An alternative but highly compatible framework is now introduced—phronetic social research—as an action-oriented, wisdom-seeking research stance for the social sciences. By so doing, it is hoped that forms of phronetic social research can gain wider currency among those that promote activism as one of many valued outcomes of an education in science.

  9. RELATIONS OF SELF-APPRAISAL AND MOOD CHANGES WITH VOLUNTARY PHYSICAL ACTIVITY CHANGES IN AFRICAN AMERICAN PREADOLESCENTS IN AN AFTER-SCHOOL CARE INTERVENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J. Annesi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing prevalence of overweight in preadolescents that predicts physical problems over the lifespan. Physical inactivity has been implicated as an associated factor, with African American youth being at an increased risk. Based on social cognitive theory, and proposed correlates of physical activity in youth, changes over 12 weeks in measures of self-appraisal (general self, physical appearance, physical self-concept, exercise barriers self-efficacy and mood (tension, vigor, and their relations with voluntary physical activity changes, were assessed within an after-school care physical activity intervention. Participants were volunteers recruited from children already registered for a 12-week segment of YMCA after-school care. The treatment group consisted of 146 African American preadolescents with the control group comprised of 123 African American preadolescents who were scheduled to receive the program during the next sequence that it was offered. Results indicated the intervention group reported significantly more positive self-appraisals, reduced tension, and enhanced vigor. Bivariate and multiple regression analyses indicated that when each of the 4 self-appraisal and 2 mood factors were simultaneously entered into a regression equation, 36% of the variance in voluntary physical activity was explained. Findings support the treatment's association with theoretically based correlates of physical activity in the present sample, and suggest directions for physical activity interventions for youth

  10. Effects of voluntary wheel exercise on spatial learning and memory and Notch signal pathway of mice%自主跑轮运动对小鼠空间学习记忆及Notch信号通路的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宪亮; 徐波; 陆乐; 何标; 余锋; 季浏

    2014-01-01

    the mice in group C;in Western blot test, the expression of NICD in hippocampus of the mice in group R increased significantly;in RT-PCR test, the mRNA expression levels of Jagged-1, Notch-1, PS-1 and Hes-1 in hippocampus of the mice in group R increased significantly as compared with those of the mice in group C. The said findings indicated that 8-week voluntary wheel exercise activated Notch signal pathway, en-hanced the spatial learning and memory ability of hippocampus.

  11. Research on Mobile Learning Activities Applying Tablets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurilovas, Eugenijus; Juskeviciene, Anita; Bireniene, Virginija

    2015-01-01

    The paper aims to present current research on mobile learning activities in Lithuania while implementing flagship EU-funded CCL project on application of tablet computers in education. In the paper, the quality of modern mobile learning activities based on learning personalisation, problem solving, collaboration, and flipped class methods is…

  12. Incorporating active learning in psychiatry education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sonia; McLean, Loyola; Nash, Louise; Trigwell, Keith

    2017-06-01

    We aim to summarise the active learning literature in higher education and consider its relevance for postgraduate psychiatry trainees, to inform the development of a new Formal Education Course (FEC): the Master of Medicine (Psychiatry) at the University of Sydney. We undertook a literature search on 'active learning', 'flipped classroom', 'problem-based learning' and 'psychiatry education'. The effectiveness of active learning pedagogy in higher education is well supported by evidence; however, there have been few psychiatry-specific studies. A new 'flipped classroom' format was developed for the Master of Medicine (Psychiatry). Postgraduate psychiatry training is an active learning environment; the pedagogical approach to FECs requires further evaluation.

  13. Qualitative Research on Experience of Nursing Students Participating in Voluntary Activities of the Nursing Room%护生参与老人院志愿活动体会的质性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    矫非桐; 温馨靓; 姜秀丽; 王春艳

    2016-01-01

    Objective To deeply know the experience and make clear the significance of nursing students participating in voluntary activities of the nursing room. Methods The in-depth interviewees were determined by the purposive sampling method, and the interviewees were interviewed according to the interview outline by the semi-structured interview method, and the interview data were analyzed by the cluster analysis method, and the feel of nursing students participating in volun-tary activities of the nursing room was known from many dimensions. Results Three topics were refined including service experience, effect and harvest of service and awareness of nursing humanistic care. Conclusion The nursing students partic-ipating in voluntary activities of the nursing room not only cultivates the idea of them but also improves the professional learning ability of them, at the same time, it reveals that establishing and ensuring the long-term social practice activities needs the deeply consideration.%目的:深入了解护生老人院服务体验,明确护生参与老人院志愿活动的意义。方法采用目的抽样法确定深入访谈对象,采用半结构式访谈方法根据访谈提纲对访谈对象进行访谈,通过类属分析法分析访谈资料,多维度了解老人院护理服务的感受。结果结果提炼出3个主题:服务体验;服务的影响和收获;对护理人文关怀的认识。结论护生参加老人院社会实践活动,既培养了学生的思想教育也提高了专业学习和能力,同时也揭示了要建立并保障长期的社会实践活动还需展开深入的思考。

  14. Modelling Typical Online Language Learning Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoro, Carlos; Hampel, Regine; Stickler, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the methods and results of a four-year-long research project focusing on the language learning activity of individual learners using online tasks conducted at the University of Guanajuato (Mexico) in 2009-2013. An activity-theoretical model (Blin, 2010; Engeström, 1987) of the typical language learning activity was used to…

  15. Learning Activities of Disadvantaged Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisel, Marsel A.

    1986-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate how 132 poor, urban, elderly black persons engage in formal and informal learning activities and the relation of such activities to educational histories and current life satisfaction. Findings show that the population is involved in purposeful learning activities and is motivated to pursue educational interests.…

  16. Kinaesthetic Learning Activities and Learning about Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, A. J.; Etkina, Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    Kinaesthetic learning activities (KLAs) can be a valuable pedagogical tool for physics instructors. They have been shown to increase engagement, encourage participation and improve learning outcomes. This paper details several KLAs developed at Rutgers University for inclusion in an instructional unit about semiconductors, p-n junctions and solar…

  17. Kinaesthetic Learning Activities and Learning about Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, A. J.; Etkina, Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    Kinaesthetic learning activities (KLAs) can be a valuable pedagogical tool for physics instructors. They have been shown to increase engagement, encourage participation and improve learning outcomes. This paper details several KLAs developed at Rutgers University for inclusion in an instructional unit about semiconductors, p-n junctions and solar…

  18. Active learning of linear interatomic potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Podryabinkin, Evgeny V

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces an active learning approach to the fitting of machine learning interatomic potentials. Our approach is based on the D-optimality criterion for selecting atomic configurations on which the potential is fitted. It is shown that the potentials fitted with this approach have improved transferability. Moreover, the proposed active learning approach is highly efficient in training potentials on the fly, ensuring that no extrapolation is attempted.

  19. The use of EMG biofeedback for learning of selective activation of intra-muscular parts within the serratus anterior muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtermann, A; Mork, P J; Andersen, L L

    2010-01-01

    Motor control and learning possibilities of scapular muscles are of clinical interest for restoring scapular muscle balance in patients with neck and shoulder disorders. The aim of the study was to investigate whether selective voluntary activation of intra-muscular parts within the serratus...... anterior can be learned with electromyographical (EMG) biofeedback, and whether the lower serratus anterior and the lower trapezius muscle comprise the lower scapula rotation force couple by synergistic activation. Nine healthy males practiced selective activation of intra-muscular parts within...... to selectively activate the lower serratus anterior, and two subjects learned to selectively activate the upper serratus anterior. During selective activation of the lower serratus anterior, the activity of this muscle part was 14.4+/-10.3 times higher than the upper serratus anterior activity (P

  20. Active teaching methods, studying responses and learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hans Peter; Vigild, Martin Etchells; Thomsen, Erik Vilain;

    2010-01-01

    Students’ study strategies when exposed to activating teaching methods are measured, analysed and compared to study strategies in more traditional lecture-based teaching. The resulting learning outcome is discussed.......Students’ study strategies when exposed to activating teaching methods are measured, analysed and compared to study strategies in more traditional lecture-based teaching. The resulting learning outcome is discussed....

  1. Active teaching methods, studying responses and learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hans Peter; Vigild, Martin Etchells; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    2010-01-01

    Students’ study strategies when exposed to activating teaching methods are measured, analysed and compared to study strategies in more traditional lecture-based teaching. The resulting learning outcome is discussed.......Students’ study strategies when exposed to activating teaching methods are measured, analysed and compared to study strategies in more traditional lecture-based teaching. The resulting learning outcome is discussed....

  2. Educators, Learners and Active Learning Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Liam

    2004-01-01

    Picking up from a previous publication in IJLE, the primary objective of this article is to engage in a critical analysis of the concept and practice of 'active' (including 'participatory') learning as well as the usefulness to educators of 'active learning methodologies'. Through a review of relevant literature and research, highlighting problems…

  3. Active Ageing, Active Learning: Policy and Provision in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the relationship between ageing and learning, previous literature having confirmed that participation in continued learning in old age contributes to good health, satisfaction with life, independence and self-esteem. Realizing that learning is vital to active ageing, the Hong Kong government has implemented policies and…

  4. Doing physical activity – not learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens-Ole

    2017-01-01

    to Annerstedt’s (2008) analysis of PE, it seems crucial that if physical activities in schools should contribute to at least well-being and learning, the teaching content (the doing) and strategies must prioritize and engaging pupils in the inherent qualities of physical education (Kretchmar, 2000). References......Introduction In recent years there have been a raising critique concerning PE as a subject which is more concerned with keeping pupils physically active than insuring that they learn something (Annerstedt, 2008). In Denmark, this issue has been actualized in a new sense. In 2014, a new school...... reform with 45 minutes of daily physical activity was introduced to enhance the pupils’ health, well-being and learning capabilities. Instead of focusing on learning bodily skills, physical activities has become an instrument to improve learning in the academic subjects. Physical activities...

  5. Combined application of neuromuscular electrical stimulation and voluntary muscular contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillard, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    Electromyostimulation (EMS) and voluntary muscle contraction (VC) constitute different modes of muscle activation and induce different acute physiological effects on the neuromuscular system. Long-term application of each mode of muscle activation can produce different muscle adaptations. It seems theoretically possible to completely or partially cumulate the muscle adaptations induced by each mode of muscle activation applied separately. This work consisted of examining the literature concerning the muscle adaptations induced by long-term application of the combined technique (CT) [i.e. EMS is combined with VC - non-simultaneously] compared with VC and/or EMS alone in healthy subjects and/or athletes and in post-operative knee-injured subjects. In general, CT induced greater muscular adaptations than VC whether in sports training or rehabilitation. This efficiency would be due to the fact that CT can facilitate cumulative effects of training completely or partially induced by VC and EMS practiced alone. CT also provides a greater improvement of the performance of complex dynamic movements than VC. However, EMS cannot improve coordination between different agonistic and antagonistic muscles and thus does not facilitate learning the specific coordination of complex movements. Hence, EMS should be combined with specific sport training to generate neuromuscular adaptations, but also allow the adjustment of motor control during a voluntary movement. Likewise, in a therapeutic context, CT was particularly efficient to accelerate recovery of muscle contractility during a rehabilitation programme. Strength loss and atrophy inherent in a traumatism and/or a surgical operation would be more efficiently compensated with CT than with VC. Furthermore, CT also restored more functional abilities than VC. Finally, in a rehabilitation context, EMS is complementary to voluntary exercise because in the early phase of rehabilitation it elicits a strength increase, which is necessary

  6. Learning models of activities involving interacting objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manfredotti, Cristina; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Hamilton, Howard J.;

    2013-01-01

    We propose the LEMAIO multi-layer framework, which makes use of hierarchical abstraction to learn models for activities involving multiple interacting objects from time sequences of data concerning the individual objects. Experiments in the sea navigation domain yielded learned models that were...... then successfully applied to activity recognition, activity simulation and multi-target tracking. Our method compares favourably with respect to previously reported results using Hidden Markov Models and Relational Particle Filtering....

  7. Exploring the beliefs underlying attitudes to active voluntary euthanasia in a sample of Australian medical practitioners and nurses: a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Katherine M; Wise, Susi E; Young, Ross McD; Hyde, Melissa K

    A qualitative study explored beliefs about active voluntary euthanasia (AVE) in a sample (N = 18) of medical practitioners and nurses from Australia, where AVE is not currently legal. Four behaviors relating to AVE emerged during the interviews: requesting euthanasia for oneself, legalizing AVE, administering AVE to patients if it were legalized, and discussing AVE with patients if they request it. Using thematic analysis, interviews were analyzed for beliefs related to advantages and disadvantages of performing these AVE behaviors. Medical practitioners and nurses identified a number of similar benefits for performing the AVE-related behaviors, both for themselves personally and as health professionals. Benefits also included a consideration of the positive impact for patients, their families, and the health care system. Disadvantages across behaviors focused on the potential conflict between those parties involved in the decision making process, as well as conflict between one's own personal and professional values.

  8. [The Influence of the Functioning of Brain Regulatory Systems onto the Voluntary Regulation of Cognitive Performance in Children. Report 2. Neuropsychological and Electrophysiological Assessment of Brain Regulatory Functions in Children Aged 10-12 with Learning Difficulties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenova, O A; Machinskaya, R I

    2015-01-01

    A total number of 172 children aged 10-12 were electrophysiologically and neuropsychologically assessed in order to analyze the influence of the functioning of brain regulatory systems onto the voluntary regulation of cognitive performance during the preteen years. EEG patterns associated with the nonoptimal functioning of brain regulatory systems, particularly fronto-thalamic, limbic and fronto-striatal structures were significantly more often observed in children with learning and behavioral difficulties, as compared to the control group. Neuropsychological assessment showed that the nonoptimal functioning of different brain regulatory systems specifically affect the voluntary regulation of cognitive performance. Children with EEG patterns of fronto-thalamic nonoptimal functioning demonstrated poor voluntary regulation such as impulsiveness and difficulties in continuing the same algorithms. Children with EEG patterns of limbic nonoptimal functioning showed a less pronounced executive dysfunction manifested only in poor switching between program units within a task. Children with EEG patterns of fronto-striatal nonoptimal functioning struggled with such executive dysfunctions as motor and tactile perseverations and emotional-motivational deviations such as poor motivation and communicative skills.

  9. The Activity Theory Approach to Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritva Engeström

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the author offers a practical view of the theory-grounded research on education action. She draws on studies carried out at the Center for Research on Activity, Development and Learning (CRADLE at the University of Helsinki in Finland. In its work, the Center draws on cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT and is well-known for the theory of Expansive Learning and its more practical application called Developmental Work Research (DWR. These approaches are widely used to understand professional learning and have served as a theoreticaland methodological foundation for studies examining change and professional development in various human activities.

  10. Control of heart rate variability by cardiac parasympathetic nerve activity during voluntary static exercise in humans with tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Makoto; Matsukawa, Kanji; Nakamoto, Tomoko; Tsuchimochi, Hirotsugu; Sakaguchi, Akihiro; Kawaguchi, Kotaro; Onari, Kiyoshi

    2007-11-01

    Heart rate (HR) is controlled solely by via cardiac parasympathetic outflow in tetraplegic individuals, who lack supraspinal control of sympathetic outflows and circulating catecholamines but have intact vagal pathways. A high-frequency component (HF; at 0.15-0.40 Hz) of the power spectrum of HR variability and its relative value against total power (HF/Total) were assessed using a wavelet transform to identify cardiac parasympathetic outflow. The relative contribution of cardiac parasympathetic and sympathetic outflows to controlling HR was estimated by comparing the HF/Total-HR relationship between age-matched tetraplegic and normal men. Six tetraplegic men with complete cervical spinal cord injury performed static arm exercise at 35% of the maximal voluntary contraction until exhaustion. Although resting cardiac output and arterial blood pressure were lower in tetraplegic than normal subjects, HR, HF, and HF/Total were not statistically different between the two groups. When tetraplegic subjects developed the same force during exercise as normal subjects, HF and HF/Total decreased to 67-90% of the preexercise control and gradually recovered 1.5 min after exercise. The amount and time course of the changes in HF/Total during and after exercise coincided well between both groups. In contrast, the increase in HR at the start of exercise was blunted in tetraplegic compared with normal subjects, and the HR recovery following exercise was also delayed. It is likely that, although the withdrawal response of cardiac parasympathetic outflow is preserved in tetraplegic subjects, sympathetic decentralization impairs the rapid acceleration of HR at the onset of exercise and the rapid deceleration following exercise.

  11. Learning models of activities involving interacting objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manfredotti, Cristina; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Hamilton, Howard J.;

    2013-01-01

    We propose the LEMAIO multi-layer framework, which makes use of hierarchical abstraction to learn models for activities involving multiple interacting objects from time sequences of data concerning the individual objects. Experiments in the sea navigation domain yielded learned models that were...

  12. Child Development: An Active Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Laura E.; Munsch, Joyce

    2010-01-01

    Within each chapter of this innovative topical text, the authors engage students by demonstrating the wide range of real-world applications of psychological research connected to child development. In particular, the distinctive Active Learning features incorporated throughout the book foster a dynamic and personal learning process for students.…

  13. Active Affective Learning for Accelerated Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Robert B.

    This paper provides the groundwork for Active Affective Learning and teaching adapted to the needs of the disadvantaged, at-risk students served by the Accelerated Schools Movement. One of the "golden rules" for the practice of Accelerated Learning, according to psychiatrist Georgi Lozanov, has been to maintain an "up-beat" classroom presentation…

  14. Learning models of activities involving interacting objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manfredotti, Cristina; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Hamilton, Howard J.

    2013-01-01

    We propose the LEMAIO multi-layer framework, which makes use of hierarchical abstraction to learn models for activities involving multiple interacting objects from time sequences of data concerning the individual objects. Experiments in the sea navigation domain yielded learned models that were t...

  15. Child Development: An Active Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Laura E.; Munsch, Joyce

    2010-01-01

    Within each chapter of this innovative topical text, the authors engage students by demonstrating the wide range of real-world applications of psychological research connected to child development. In particular, the distinctive Active Learning features incorporated throughout the book foster a dynamic and personal learning process for students.…

  16. Active Learning in Applied Ethics Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisin, Tom

    1995-01-01

    Describes an active learning strategy used in a college ethics course to direct students into exploring multiple perspectives in case studies. The technique expands on collaborative learning methods by adding role-playing and reflective writing. The technique has been successful in a journalism ethics course and is adaptable to any field in which…

  17. Differential effects of low-intensity motor cortical stimulation on the inspiratory activity in scalene muscles during voluntary and involuntary breathing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nicolas Caesar; Taylor, Janet L; Murray, Nicholas P S

    2011-01-01

    To assess the cortical contribution to breathing, low-intensity transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was delivered over the motor cortex in 10 subjects during: (i) voluntary static inspiratory efforts, (ii) hypocapnic voluntary ventilation (end-tidal CO(2), 2.7±0.4% mean±SD), and (iii) hyperca...

  18. Metalinguistic Activity in Learning to Write

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camps, Anna; Milian, Marta

    1999-01-01

    The volume presents empirical research on metalinguistic activity in the process of learning and teaching of writing. Contributions from educational psychologists, researchers in language education, and cognitive psychologists from different countries will address the incidence of metalinguistic act

  19. Activating teaching methods, studying responses and learning

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Hans Peter; Vigild, Martin E.; Thomsen, Erik; Szabo, Peter; Horsewell, Andy

    2009-01-01

    Students’ study strategies when exposed to activating teaching methods are measured, analysed and compared to study strategies in more traditional lecture-based teaching. The resulting learning outcome is discussed. Peer Reviewed

  20. Metalinguistic Activity in Learning to Write

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camps, Anna; Milian, Marta

    1999-01-01

    The volume presents empirical research on metalinguistic activity in the process of learning and teaching of writing. Contributions from educational psychologists, researchers in language education, and cognitive psychologists from different countries will address the incidence of metalinguistic act

  1. Learning Activities in a Sociable Smart City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Ringas

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We present our approach on how smart city technologies may enhance the learning process. We have developed the CLIO urban computing system, which invites people to share personal memories and interact the collective city memory. Various educational scenarios and activities were performed exploiting CLIO; in this paper we present the methodology we followed and the experience we gained. Learning has always been the cognitive process of acquiring skills or knowledge, while teachers are often eager to experiment with novel technological means and methods; our aim was to explore the effect that urban computing could have to the learning process. We applied our methodology in the city of Corfu inviting schools to engage their students in learning through the collective city memory while exploiting urban computing. Results from our experience demonstrate the potential of exploiting urban computing in the learning process and the benefits of learning out of the classroom.

  2. Dopamine, reward learning, and active inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eFitzgerald

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Temporal difference learning models propose phasic dopamine signalling encodes reward prediction errors that drive learning. This is supported by studies where optogenetic stimulation of dopamine neurons can stand in lieu of actual reward. Nevertheless, a large body of data also shows that dopamine is not necessary for learning, and that dopamine depletion primarily affects task performance. We offer a resolution to this paradox based on an hypothesis that dopamine encodes the precision of beliefs about alternative actions, and thus controls the outcome-sensitivity of behaviour. We extend an active inference scheme for solving Markov decision processes to include learning, and show that simulated dopamine dynamics strongly resemble those actually observed during instrumental conditioning. Furthermore, simulated dopamine depletion impairs performance but spares learning, while simulated excitation of dopamine neurons drives reward learning, through aberrant inference about outcome states. Our formal approach provides a novel and parsimonious reconciliation of apparently divergent experimental findings.

  3. People with Learning Disabilities and "Active Ageing"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Liam; Boxall, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    Background: People (with and without learning disabilities) are living longer. Demographic ageing creates challenges and the leading policy response to these challenges is "active ageing". "Active" does not just refer to the ability to be physically and economically active, but also includes ongoing social and civic engagement…

  4. People with Learning Disabilities and "Active Ageing"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Liam; Boxall, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    Background: People (with and without learning disabilities) are living longer. Demographic ageing creates challenges and the leading policy response to these challenges is "active ageing". "Active" does not just refer to the ability to be physically and economically active, but also includes ongoing social and civic engagement…

  5. Active Learning in Large Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gørtz, Inge Li

    2011-01-01

    the lectures in the course. The main idea is to use inductive, case-based learning, with many small exercises/ discussions during the lectures. We describe a framework for the lectures, that most lectures in the class were based on. The framework contains the conceive, design, and implement stage from the CDIO...

  6. TECHNOLOGIES OF INITIATING STUDENTS INTO INDEPENDENT (SELF-GUIDED ACTIVITY IN SUPPLEMENTARY DISTANCE LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina V. Abakumova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The research in question investigates the technologies of initiating independent activity within the framework of distance learning and their psychological aspects. The authors’ classification of educational technologies of initiating students into independent cognitive activity is presented. Such technologies utilize various psychological mechanisms of exciting students’ cognitive interest, intensifying cognitive processes, developing independent activity skills, and, as a result, increase motivation for independent activity and learning on the whole. These include such types of technologies as developmental technologies, interactive technologies, technologies of information transfer, technologies of meaning-making initiation. The research of the attitude of distance learning educators to independent activity of students and the content of the academic courses were done at Moodle-based education programs. The findings show the differences in retention rate among distance learning educators whose competence in terms of initiating students into independent (self-guided activity varies. It’s emphasized that interactive lectures, videoconferences, audio-visual aids, interactive seminars, glossaries, interactive tests are considered the most efficient technologies in initiating students into independent (self-guided activity. The obtained results have made it possible to stress the developmental effect of distance learning technologies and the technologies of initiating students into independent (self-guided activity in various psychic spheres of students: cognitive, individual, emotional. We mention the changes in motivational sphere of students and their meaning-making activity. In the course of correct development of distance learning we notice the development of voluntary and nonvoluntary cognitive activity. A student starts actively participating in educational process, he becomes the creator of his own world.

  7. Effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation during voluntary and non-voluntary stepping movements in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solopova, I A; Selionov, V A; Kazennikov, O V; Ivanenko, Y P

    2014-09-05

    Here, we compared motor evoked potentials (MEP) in response to transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex and the H-reflex during voluntary and vibration-induced air-stepping movements in humans. Both the MEPs (in mm biceps femoris, rectus femoris and tibialis anterior) and H-reflex (in m soleus) were significantly smaller during vibration-induced cyclic leg movements at matched amplitudes of angular motion and muscle activity. These findings highlight differences between voluntary and non-voluntary activation of the spinal pattern generator circuitry in humans, presumably due to an extra facilitatory effect of voluntary control/triggering of stepping on spinal motoneurons and interneurons. The results support the idea of active engagement of supraspinal motor areas in developing central pattern generator-modulating therapies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Teachers' Everyday Professional Development: Mapping Informal Learning Activities, Antecedents, and Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyndt, Eva; Gijbels, David; Grosemans, Ilke; Donche, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Although a lot is known about teacher development by means of formal learning activities, research on teachers' everyday learning is limited. In the current systematic review, we analyzed 74 studies focusing on teachers' informal learning to identify teachers' learning activities, antecedents for informal learning, and learning outcomes. In…

  9. Students’ mathematical learning in modelling activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Tinne Hoff; Blomhøj, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Ten years of experience with analyses of students’ learning in a modelling course for first year university students, led us to see modelling as a didactical activity with the dual goal of developing students’ modelling competency and enhancing their conceptual learning of mathematical concepts...... involved. We argue that progress in students’ conceptual learning needs to be conceptualised separately from that of progress in their modelling competency. Findings are that modelling activities open a window to the students’ images of the mathematical concepts involved; that modelling activities can...... create and help overcome hidden cognitive conflicts in students’ understanding; that reflections within modelling can play an important role for the students’ learning of mathematics. These findings are illustrated with a modelling project concerning the world population....

  10. Active Learning for Developing Personalized Treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Kun; Murphy, Susan A

    2012-01-01

    The personalization of treatment via bio-markers and other risk categories has drawn increasing interest among clinical scientists. Personalized treatment strategies can be learned using data from clinical trials, but such trials are very costly to run. This paper explores the use of active learning techniques to design more efficient trials, addressing issues such as whom to recruit, at what point in the trial, and which treatment to assign, throughout the duration of the trial. We propose a minimax bandit model with two different optimization criteria, and discuss the computational challenges and issues pertaining to this approach. We evaluate our active learning policies using both simulated data, and data modeled after a clinical trial for treating depressed individuals, and contrast our methods with other plausible active learning policies.

  11. Rethinking voluntary euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyles, Byron J; Costreie, Sorin

    2013-12-01

    Our goal in this article is to explicate the way, and the extent to which, euthanasia can be voluntary from both the perspective of the patient and the perspective of the health care providers involved in the patient's care. More significantly, we aim to challenge the way in which those engaged in ongoing philosophical debates regarding the morality of euthanasia draw distinctions between voluntary, involuntary, and nonvoluntary euthanasia on the grounds that drawing the distinctions in the traditional manner (1) fails to reflect what is important from the patient's perspective and (2) fails to reflect the significance of health care providers' interests, including their autonomy and integrity.

  12. Manifold Regularized Experimental Design for Active Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lining; Shum, Hubert P H; Shao, Ling

    2016-12-02

    Various machine learning and data mining tasks in classification require abundant data samples to be labeled for training. Conventional active learning methods aim at labeling the most informative samples for alleviating the labor of the user. Many previous studies in active learning select one sample after another in a greedy manner. However, this is not very effective because the classification models has to be retrained for each newly labeled sample. Moreover, many popular active learning approaches utilize the most uncertain samples by leveraging the classification hyperplane of the classifier, which is not appropriate since the classification hyperplane is inaccurate when the training data are small-sized. The problem of insufficient training data in real-world systems limits the potential applications of these approaches. This paper presents a novel method of active learning called manifold regularized experimental design (MRED), which can label multiple informative samples at one time for training. In addition, MRED gives an explicit geometric explanation for the selected samples to be labeled by the user. Different from existing active learning methods, our method avoids the intrinsic problems caused by insufficiently labeled samples in real-world applications. Various experiments on synthetic datasets, the Yale face database and the Corel image database have been carried out to show how MRED outperforms existing methods.

  13. Actively learning object names across ambiguous situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachergis, George; Yu, Chen; Shiffrin, Richard M

    2013-01-01

    Previous research shows that people can use the co-occurrence of words and objects in ambiguous situations (i.e., containing multiple words and objects) to learn word meanings during a brief passive training period (Yu & Smith, 2007). However, learners in the world are not completely passive but can affect how their environment is structured by moving their heads, eyes, and even objects. These actions can indicate attention to a language teacher, who may then be more likely to name the attended objects. Using a novel active learning paradigm in which learners choose which four objects they would like to see named on each successive trial, this study asks whether active learning is superior to passive learning in a cross-situational word learning context. Finding that learners perform better in active learning, we investigate the strategies and discover that most learners use immediate repetition to disambiguate pairings. Unexpectedly, we find that learners who repeat only one pair per trial--an easy way to infer this pair-perform worse than those who repeat multiple pairs per trial. Using a working memory extension to an associative model of word learning with uncertainty and familiarity biases, we investigate individual differences that correlate with these assorted strategies. Copyright © 2013 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  14. Theoretical Foundations of Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    on the rate of convergence of the loss of an estimator, as a function of the number of labeled examples observed [e.g., Benedek and Itai, 1988...classes. In a personal communication, John Lang - ford reported that he and Rui Castro determined such improvements are in fact achieved by A2 for the...1537, 2005. 2.8 G. Benedek and A. Itai. Learnability by fixed distributions. In Proc. of the First Workshop on Computational Learning Theory, pages 80

  15. Moving from voluntary euthanasia to non-voluntary euthanasia: equality and compassion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaraskekara, Kumar; Bagaric, Mirko

    2004-09-01

    The recent Dutch law legalising active voluntary euthanasia will reignite the euthanasia debate. An illuminating method for evaluating the moral status of a practice is to follow the implications of the practice to its logical conclusion. The argument for compassion is one of the central arguments in favour of voluntary active euthanasia. This argument applies perhaps even more forcefully in relation to incompetent patients. If active voluntary euthanasia is legalised, arguments based on compassion and equality will be directed towards legalising active non-voluntary euthanasia in order to make accelerated termination of death available also to the incompetent. The removal of discrimination against the incompetent has the potential to become as potent a catch-cry as the right to die. However, the legalisation of non-voluntary euthanasia is undesirable. A review of the relevant authorities reveals that there is no coherent and workable "best interests" test which can be invoked to decide whether an incompetent patient is better off dead. This provides a strong reason for not stepping onto the slippery path of permitting active voluntary euthanasia.

  16. Quantum Speedup for Active Learning Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Davide Paparo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Can quantum mechanics help us build intelligent learning agents? A defining signature of intelligent behavior is the capacity to learn from experience. However, a major bottleneck for agents to learn in real-life situations is the size and complexity of the corresponding task environment. Even in a moderately realistic environment, it may simply take too long to rationally respond to a given situation. If the environment is impatient, allowing only a certain time for a response, an agent may then be unable to cope with the situation and to learn at all. Here, we show that quantum physics can help and provide a quadratic speedup for active learning as a genuine problem of artificial intelligence. This result will be particularly relevant for applications involving complex task environments.

  17. Learning, Learning Analytics, Activity Visualisation and Open learner Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bull, Susan; Kickmeier-Rust, Michael; Vatrapu, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    This paper draws on visualisation approaches in learning analytics, considering how classroom visualisations can come together in practice. We suggest an open learner model in situations where many tools and activity visualisations produce more visual information than can be readily interpreted....

  18. Active learning in optics and photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemela, Joseph J.

    2016-09-01

    Active learning in optics and photonics (ALOP) is a program of the International Basic Sciences Program at UNESCO, in collaboration with the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) and supported by SPIE, which is designed to help teachers in the developing world attract and retain students in the physical sciences. Using optics and photonics, it naturally attracts the interest of students and can be implemented using relatively low cost technologies, so that it can be more easily reproduced locally. The active learning methodology is student-centered, meaning the teachers give up the role of lecturer in favor of guiding and facilitating a learning process in which students engage in hands-on activities and active peer-peer discussions, and is shown to effectively enhance basic conceptual understanding of physics.

  19. Grooming. Instructor's Packet. Learning Activity Package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Pamela

    This instructor's packet accompanies the learning activity package (LAP) on grooming. Contents included in the packet are a time sheet, suggested uses for the LAP, an instruction sheet, final LAP reviews, a final LAP review answer key, suggested activities, an additional resources list, and student completion cards to issue to students as an…

  20. Karyotype Analysis Activity: A Constructivist Learning Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Noveera T.

    2015-01-01

    This classroom activity is based on a constructivist learning design and engages students in physically constructing a karyotype of three mock patients. Students then diagnose the chromosomal aneuploidy based on the karyotype, list the symptoms associated with the disorder, and discuss the implications of the diagnosis. This activity is targeted…

  1. Oral Hygiene. Instructor's Packet. Learning Activity Package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hime, Kirsten

    This instructor's packet accompanies the learning activity package (LAP) on oral hygiene. Contents included in the packet are a time sheet, suggested uses for the LAP, an instruction sheet, final LAP reviews, a final LAP review answer key, suggested activities, additional resources (student handouts), student performance checklists for both…

  2. How should we measure online learning activity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim O'Riordan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The proliferation of Web-based learning objects makes finding and evaluating resources a considerable hurdle for learners to overcome. While established learning analytics methods provide feedback that can aid learner evaluation of learning resources, the adequacy and reliability of these methods is questioned. Because engagement with online learning is different from other Web activity, it is important to establish pedagogically relevant measures that can aid the development of distinct, automated analysis systems. Content analysis is often used to examine online discussion in educational settings, but these instruments are rarely compared with each other which leads to uncertainty regarding their validity and reliability. In this study, participation in Massive Open Online Course (MOOC comment forums was evaluated using four different analytical approaches: the Digital Artefacts for Learning Engagement (DiAL-e framework, Bloom's Taxonomy, Structure of Observed Learning Outcomes (SOLO and Community of Inquiry (CoI. Results from this study indicate that different approaches to measuring cognitive activity are closely correlated and are distinct from typical interaction measures. This suggests that computational approaches to pedagogical analysis may provide useful insights into learning processes.

  3. Sequence learning in differentially activated dendrites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert

    2003-01-01

    . It is proposed that the neural machinery required in such a learning/retrieval mechanism could involve the NMDA receptor, in conjunction with the ability of dendrites to maintain differentially activated regions. In particular, it is suggested that such a parcellation of the dendrite allows the neuron...... to participate in multiple sequences, which can be learned without suffering from the 'wash-out' of synaptic efficacy associated with superimposition of training patterns. This is a biologically plausible solution to the stability-plasticity dilemma of learning in neural networks....

  4. Active and passive contributions to spatial learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrastil, Elizabeth R; Warren, William H

    2012-02-01

    It seems intuitively obvious that active exploration of a new environment will lead to better spatial learning than will passive exposure. However, the literature on this issue is decidedly mixed-in part, because the concept itself is not well defined. We identify five potential components of active spatial learning and review the evidence regarding their role in the acquisition of landmark, route, and survey knowledge. We find that (1) idiothetic information in walking contributes to metric survey knowledge, (2) there is little evidence as yet that decision making during exploration contributes to route or survey knowledge, (3) attention to place-action associations and relevant spatial relations contributes to route and survey knowledge, although landmarks and boundaries appear to be learned without effort, (4) route and survey information are differentially encoded in subunits of working memory, and (5) there is preliminary evidence that mental manipulation of such properties facilitates spatial learning. Idiothetic information appears to be necessary to reveal the influence of attention and, possibly, decision making in survey learning, which may explain the mixed results in desktop virtual reality. Thus, there is indeed an active advantage in spatial learning, which manifests itself in the task-dependent acquisition of route and survey knowledge.

  5. Activating Teaching for Quality Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2013-01-01

    Activating teaching is an educational concept which is based on active participation of students in the study process. It is becoming an alternative to more typical approach where the teacher will just lecture and the students will take notes. The study described in this paper considers student...... activating teaching methods focusing on those based on knowledge dissemination. The practical aspects of the implemented teaching method are considered, and employed assessment methods and tools are discussed....

  6. Effect of tongue position on masseter and temporalis electromyographic activity during swallowing and maximal voluntary clenching: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés, C; Astaburuaga, F; Falace, D; Ramirez, V; Manns, A

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure and compare the tonic electromyographic (EMG) activity of the temporalis and masseter muscles following placement of the tongue either on the palate or in the floor of the mouth during swallowing and maximal voluntary clenching (MVC). Thirty healthy dental students with natural dentition and bilateral molar support, between the ages of 18 and 22, with no prior history of oro-facial injury, or current or past pain in the jaw, mouth or tongue participated in the study. Tonic masseter and temporalis EMG activities were recorded using surface electrodes. Subjects were instructed to passively place the tongue either on the anterior hard palate or in the floor of the mouth during swallowing and MVC. At each tongue position, the resulting EMG was recorded. During swallowing, no significant difference in EMG activity was found either for the masseter (P-value = 0.1592) or the temporalis (P-value = 0.0546) muscles, regardless of the tongue position. During MVC, there was a statistically significant difference for both the masseter (P-value = 0.0016) and the temporalis (P-value = 0.0277) muscles with lower levels recorded with the tongue in the floor of the mouth. This study found that in normal, pain-free subjects, placing the tongue in the floor of the mouth significantly reduces masticatory muscle activity during MVC. Thus, it may be considered as a possible therapeutic option to decrease masticatory muscle activity; however, further research is needed in patients with oro-facial pain.

  7. An environment for studying collaborative learning activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meletis Margaritis

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Studies of collaborative learning activities often involve analyses of dialogue and interaction as well as analyses of tasks and actors’ roles through ethnographic and other field experiments. Adequate analysis tools can facilitate these studies. In this paper, we discuss key requirements of interaction and collaboration analysis tools. We indicate how these requirements lead to the design of new analysis environments. These environments support annotation and analysis of various kinds of collected data in order to study collaborative learning activities. An important characteristic of these tools is their support for a structure of annotations of various levels of abstraction, through which an activity can be interpreted and presented. This can serve as a tool for reflection and interpretation as well as for facilitation of research in collaborative learning.

  8. 青年志愿活动促进大学生心理健康教育%Youth voluntary activities to promote college students' mental health education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王颖群; 徐秉锋; 刘甜

    2016-01-01

    大学生参与青年志愿活动有利于促进其个体心理及群体心理的形成与发展。同时,青年志愿活动为大学生提供了与其他志愿者及社会各界人士交流的机会,进而提升了大学生的人际交往能力及团队意识,促进其综合素质的发展,并且在志愿活动的参与过程中找到了成长的方向。可见,青年志愿活动在促进大学生心理健康教育方面具有重要的指导意义。本文简要概述了新时期大学生心理健康教育的现状,着重分析了青年志愿活动促进大学生心理健康教育的有效措施。%College students' participation in youth voluntary activities is conducive to the formation and development of individual psychology and group psychology. At the same time, the youth volunteer activities provide colege students opportunities to communicate with other volunteers and social people from al walks of life, so as to improve the colege students interpersonal skils and team work spirit, promote the development of the comprehensive quality, and in the participation of volunteer activities found the direction of growth. Obviously, the youth volunteer activity has the important instruction significance in promoting the university student psychologicaly healthy education. This paper briefly outlines the current situation of colege students' mental health education in the new period, and emphaticaly analyzes the effective measures to promote colege students' mental health education.

  9. Active learning techniques for librarians practical examples

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    A practical work outlining the theory and practice of using active learning techniques in library settings. It explains the theory of active learning and argues for its importance in our teaching and is illustrated using a large number of examples of techniques that can be easily transferred and used in teaching library and information skills to a range of learners within all library sectors. These practical examples recognise that for most of us involved in teaching library and information skills the one off session is the norm, so we need techniques that allow us to quickly grab and hold our

  10. Active Learning in Engineering Education: A (Re)Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Rui M.; Andersson, Pernille Hammar; Saalman, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    The informal network "Active Learning in Engineering Education" (ALE) has been promoting Active Learning since 2001. ALE creates opportunity for practitioners and researchers of engineering education to collaboratively learn how to foster learning of engineering students. The activities in ALE are centred on the vision that learners…

  11. Astronomy Learning Activities for Tablets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilachowski, Catherine A.; Morris, Frank

    2015-08-01

    Four web-based tools allow students to manipulate astronomical data to learn concepts in astronomy. The tools are HTML5, CSS3, Javascript-based applications that provide access to the content on iPad and Android tablets. The first tool “Three Color” allows students to combine monochrome astronomical images taken through different color filters or in different wavelength regions into a single color image. The second tool “Star Clusters” allows students to compare images of stars in clusters with a pre-defined template of colors and sizes in order to produce color-magnitude diagrams to determine cluster ages. The third tool adapts Travis Rector’s “NovaSearch” to allow students to examine images of the central regions of the Andromeda Galaxy to find novae. After students find a nova, they are able to measure the time over which the nova fades away. A fourth tool, Proper Pair, allows students to interact with Hipparcos data to evaluate close double stars are physical binaries or chance superpositions. Further information and access to these web-based tools are available at www.astro.indiana.edu/ala/.

  12. The number of active motor units and their firing rates in voluntary contraction of human brachialis muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanosue, K; Yoshida, M; Akazawa, K; Fujii, K

    1979-01-01

    To make clear the control mechanism of force generation in human muscle, the electrical activity of the brachialis muscle was studied at various levels of contraction force by recording single motor unit discharges as well as mass electromyograms (EMGs). The firing rate of motor units increased with force along an S-shaped curve. At low levels of force, motor units increased their firing rates steeply with force. At intermediate levels of force, each motor unit increased its firing rate linearly with force at lower rates. As the maximum of force was approached, the firing rate increased very steeply, reaching as high as 50 Hz or more. By applying a new method of statistical processing to mass EMGs, the number of active motor units and the size of action potential were estimated at each level of force. The number of active motor units increased monotonously with muscle force. Motor units recruited at high levels of force had larger amplitudes of action potentials than those recruited at lower levels. Calculations were made to determine how the relative contribution to an increase in muscle force is varied between recruitment and the increase in firing rate. The contribution of recruitment gradually decreased with the increase in force. Up to about 70% of the maximum force, recruitment is the major mechanism for increasing the force of contraction.

  13. The cost of demand creation activities and voluntary medical male circumcision targeting school-going adolescents in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Gavin; Strauss, Michael; Asfaw, Elias

    2017-01-01

    Voluntary medical male circumcision is an integral part of the South African government's response to the HIV and AIDS epidemic. However, there remains a limited body of economic analysis on the cost of VMMC programming, and the demand creation activities used to mobilize males, especially among adolescent boys in school. This study addresses this gap by presenting the costs of a VMMC program which adopted two demand creation strategies targeting school-going males in South Africa. Cost data was collected from a VMMC program in the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa. A retrospective, micro-costing ingredient approach was applied to identify, measure and value resources of two demand creation strategies targeting young males. The program circumcised 4987 young males between May 2011 and February 2013, at a cost of $127.68 per circumcision. Demand creation activities accounted for 32% of the total cost, HCT contributing 10% with the medical circumcision procedure accounting for 58% of the total cost. Using the first demand creation strategy, 2168 circumcisions were performed at a cost of $149.57 per circumcision. Following this first strategy, a second demand creation strategy was adopted which saw the cost fall to $110.85 per circumcision. More young males were recruited following the second strategy with clinic services more efficiently utilized. Whilst the cost per circumcision of demand activities rose slightly between the first ($39.94) and second ($41.65) strategy, there was a substantial reduction in the cost of the circumcision procedure; $90.01 under the first strategy falling to $60.60 following the adoption of the second demand creation strategy. Ensuring the optimal use of clinic facilities was the primary driver in reducing the cost per circumcision. This VMMC program has illustrated the value of evaluating progress and instituting changes to attain better cost efficiencies. This adjustment resulted in a substantial reduction in the cost per

  14. Using Oceanography to Support Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byfield, V.

    2012-04-01

    Teachers are always on the lookout for material to give their brightest students, in order to keep them occupied, stimulated and challenged, while the teacher gets on with helping the rest. They are also looking for material that can inspire and enthuse those who think that school is 'just boring!' Oceanography, well presented, has the capacity to do both. As a relatively young science, oceanography is not a core curriculum subject (possibly an advantage), but it draws on the traditional sciences of biology, chemistry, physic and geology, and can provide wonderful examples for teaching concepts in school sciences. It can also give good reasons for learning science, maths and technology. Exciting expeditions (research cruises) to far-flung places; opportunities to explore new worlds, a different angle on topical debates such as climate change, pollution, or conservation can bring a new life to old subjects. Access to 'real' data from satellites or Argo floats can be used to develop analytical and problem solving skills. The challenge is to make all this available in a form that can easily be used by teachers and students to enhance the learning experience. We learn by doing. Active teaching methods require students to develop their own concepts of what they are learning. This stimulates new neural connections in the brain - the physical manifestation of learning. There is a large body of evidence to show that active learning is much better remembered and understood. Active learning develops thinking skills through analysis, problem solving, and evaluation. It helps learners to use their knowledge in realistic and useful ways, and see its importance and relevance. Most importantly, properly used, active learning is fun. This paper presents experiences from a number of education outreach projects that have involved the National Oceanography Centre in Southampton, UK. All contain some element of active learning - from quizzes and puzzles to analysis of real data from

  15. Transfer active learning by querying committee

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao SHAO; Feng TAO; Rui XU

    2014-01-01

    In real applications of inductive learning for classifi cation, labeled instances are often defi cient, and labeling them by an oracle is often expensive and time-consuming. Active learning on a single task aims to select only informative unlabeled instances for querying to improve the classifi cation accuracy while decreasing the querying cost. However, an inevitable problem in active learning is that the informative measures for selecting queries are commonly based on the initial hypotheses sampled from only a few labeled instances. In such a circumstance, the initial hypotheses are not reliable and may deviate from the true distribution underlying the target task. Consequently, the informative measures will possibly select irrelevant instances. A promising way to compensate this problem is to borrow useful knowledge from other sources with abundant labeled information, which is called transfer learning. However, a signifi cant challenge in transfer learning is how to measure the similarity between the source and the target tasks. One needs to be aware of different distributions or label assignments from unrelated source tasks;otherwise, they will lead to degenerated performance while transferring. Also, how to design an effective strategy to avoid selecting irrelevant samples to query is still an open question. To tackle these issues, we propose a hybrid algorithm for active learning with the help of transfer learning by adopting a divergence measure to alleviate the negative transfer caused by distribution differences. To avoid querying irrelevant instances, we also present an adaptive strategy which could eliminate unnecessary instances in the input space and models in the model space. Extensive experiments on both the synthetic and the real data sets show that the proposed algorithm is able to query fewer instances with a higher accuracy and that it converges faster than the state-of-the-art methods.

  16. Teaching engineering with autonomous learning activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Otero

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes several activities that encourage self-learning in engineering courses. For each activity, the context and the pedagogical issues addressed are described emphasizing strengths and weaknesses. Specifically, this work describes and implements five activities, which are: questionnaires, conceptual maps, videos, jigsaw and projects. These activities are applied in seven different knowledge fields and are conducted individually or in group depending on the nature of the subject and of the activity. Furthermore, this paper shows how the same activity can be applied in subjects of different years and how the implementation level changes, depending on the course in which it is conducted. The activities proposed have been introduced in engineering courses, but they can also be applied in any other knowledge field. Finally, the paper proposes four rubrics to assess three of the proposed activities (videos, jigsaw and project, being two of them for the project activity.

  17. Signs of learning in kinaesthetic science activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper; Johannsen, Bjørn Friis

    to couple an embodied experience of physics with the language of physics through dialogue. We propose that kinaesthetic learning is a way of integrating a bodily experience into a formal system of signs, in this case, force and motion in physics, but ask: to a teacher or researcher, what signs exist......The study addresses how students use communicative signs (e.g., speech and gesture) to shape and develop cognitive schemas during a bodily exploration of force and motion in a physics teaching-learning activity. We see ‘the experiential gestalt of causation’ as a cognitive element that may be used......?”). The analysis is conducted by searching the data to find episodes that illustrate student activity which can serve as a sign of the object that the ‘experiential gestalt of causation’ is employed in the construction of the intended learning outcome. In essence, we study a chaotic but authentic teaching...

  18. Active Learning: The Dewey, Piaget, Vygotsky, and Constructivist Theory Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardjono Pardjono

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Active Learning Approach has long been implemented in Indonesian schools, and until now the implementation of Active Learning Approach remains to be suggested to improve the quality of learning process in Indonesian classrooms. However, the constraint is still on the definition of active learning itself. This article discusses the nature of Active Learning from the perspectives of four theories: Dewey's theory of progressive education, Piaget's theory of assimilation and accommodation, Vygotsky's theory of social context and zone of proximal development, and theory of constructivism. The discussion involves the nature of knowledge, learning, and teaching including the roles of teachers in active learning based on the four theories

  19. Conditioning Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops Truncatus Gilli) for Voluntary Diving Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-31

    heartrate (EKG) to validate "voluntary" nature of dive EXAMINE ACTIVE DIVING CONDITIONS (open Ocean Mewwmenr) dive profiles using TDR respiration... heartrate electrodes Open Ocean Experiments ’wear instrument package (TDR) perform voluntary dive up to 200 meters readily present tail flukes for

  20. Learning Activity Package, Algebra-Trigonometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Bill

    A series of ten teacher-prepared Learning Activity Packages (LAPs) in advanced algebra and trigonometry, the units cover logic; absolute value, inequalities, exponents, and complex numbers; functions; higher degree equations and the derivative; the trigonometric function; graphs and applications of the trigonometric functions; sequences and…

  1. Active Learning Strategies in Physics Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamustafaoglu, Orhan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine physics teachers' opinions about student-centered activities applicable in physics teaching and learning in context. A case study approach was used in this research. First, semi-structured interviews were carried out with 6 physics teachers. Then, a questionnaire was developed based on the data obtained…

  2. Accounting for Sustainability: An Active Learning Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusc, Joanna; van Veen-Dirks, Paula

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Sustainability is one of the newer topics in the accounting courses taught in university teaching programs. The active learning assignment as described in this paper was developed for use in an accounting course in an undergraduate program. The aim was to enhance teaching about sustainability within such a course. The purpose of this…

  3. World War II Memorial Learning Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennessee State Dept. of Education, Nashville.

    These learning activities can help students get the most out of a visit to the Tennessee World War II Memorial, a group of ten pylons located in Nashville (Tennessee). Each pylon contains informational text about the events of World War II. The ten pylons are listed as: (1) "Pylon E-1--Terror: America Enters the War against Fascism, June…

  4. Teaching Research Methodology through Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundahl, Brad W.

    2008-01-01

    To complement traditional learning activities in a masters-level research methodology course, social work students worked on a formal research project which involved: designing the study, constructing measures, selecting a sampling strategy, collecting data, reducing and analyzing data, and finally interpreting and communicating the results. The…

  5. Active Learning in the Physics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naron, Carol

    Many students enter physics classes filled with misconceptions about physics concepts. Students tend to retain these misconceptions into their adult lives, even after physics instruction. Constructivist researchers have found that students gain understanding through their experiences. Researchers have also found that active learning practices increase conceptual understanding of introductory physics students. This project study sought to examine whether incorporating active learning practices in an advanced placement physics classroom increased conceptual understanding as measured by the force concept inventory (FCI). Physics students at the study site were given the FCI as both a pre- and posttest. Test data were analyzed using two different methods---a repeated-measures t test and the Hake gain method. The results of this research project showed that test score gains were statistically significant, as measured by the t test. The Hake gain results indicated a low (22.5%) gain for the class. The resulting project was a curriculum plan for teaching the mechanics portion of Advanced Placement (AP) physics B as well as several active learning classroom practices supported by the research. This project will allow AP physics teachers an opportunity to improve their curricular practices. Locally, the results of this project study showed that research participants gained understanding of physics concepts. Social change may occur as teachers implement active learning strategies, thus creating improved student understanding of physics concepts.

  6. Active Learning Strategies and Vocabulary Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Using a quantitative method of data collection, this research explored the question: Do active learning strategies used in grades 5 and 6 affect student vocabulary achievement in a positive or negative direction? In their research, Wolfe (2001), Headley, et al., (1995), Freiberg, et al., (1992), and Brunner (2009) emphasize the importance of…

  7. Active Learning via Student Karaoke Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Gary D.; Richards, Travis

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated students' perceptions and reactions to an active learning Karaoke Video project in both a large (104 student) undergraduate class in Natural History of Georgia and a small graduate seminar in Fish Ecology. Undergraduate responses were evaluated with both questionnaires and triangulation interviews and graduate student responses…

  8. Cashier/Checker Learning Activity Packets (LAPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    Twenty-four learning activity packets (LAPs) are provided for six areas of instruction in a cashier/checker program. Section A, Orientation, contains an LAP on exploring the job of cashier-checker. Section B, Operations, has nine LAPs, including those on operating the cash register, issuing trading stamps, and completing the cash register balance…

  9. Measuring Active Learning to Predict Course Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, John E.; Ku, Heng-Yu

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated whether active learning within computer-based training courses can be measured and whether it serves as a predictor of learner-perceived course quality. A major corporation participated in this research, providing access to internal employee training courses, training representatives, and historical course evaluation data.…

  10. Active Citizenship, Education and Service Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdwell, Jonathan; Scott, Ralph; Horley, Edward

    2013-01-01

    This article explores how active citizenship can be encouraged through education and community action. It proposes that service learning and a renewed focus on voluntarism can both promote social cohesion between different ethnic and cultural groups while also fostering among the population a greater understanding of and commitment to civic…

  11. The Surgical Scrub. Learning Activity Package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, Lillian

    This learning activity package on the surgical scrub is one of a series of 12 titles developed for use in health occupations education programs. Materials in the package include objectives, a list of materials needed, a list of definitions, information sheets, reviews (self evaluations) of portions of the content, and answers to reviews. These…

  12. Accounting for Sustainability: An Active Learning Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusc, Joanna; van Veen-Dirks, Paula

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Sustainability is one of the newer topics in the accounting courses taught in university teaching programs. The active learning assignment as described in this paper was developed for use in an accounting course in an undergraduate program. The aim was to enhance teaching about sustainability within such a course. The purpose of this…

  13. Windowed active sampling for reliable neural learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barakova, E.I; Spaanenburg, L

    1998-01-01

    The composition of the example set has a major impact on the quality of neural learning. The popular approach is focused on extensive pre-processing to bridge the representation gap between process measurement and neural presentation. In contrast, windowed active sampling attempts to solve these pro

  14. Cascading Crater Detection with Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, W. I.; Stepinski, T. F.; Mu, Y.; Ding, W.

    2011-03-01

    Our strategy for automatic crater detection consists of employing a cascading AdaBoost classifier for identification of craters in images, and using the SOM as an active learning tool to minimize the number of image examples that need to be labeled by an analyst.

  15. Active Learning outside the Classroom: Implementation and Outcomes of Peer-Led Team-Learning Workshops in Introductory Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudish, Philip; Shores, Robin; McClung, Alex; Smulyan, Lisa; Vallen, Elizabeth A.; Siwicki, Kathleen K.

    2016-01-01

    Study group meetings (SGMs) are voluntary-attendance peer-led team-learning workshops that supplement introductory biology lectures at a selective liberal arts college. While supporting all students' engagement with lecture material, specific aims are to improve the success of underrepresented minority (URM) students and those with weaker…

  16. Voluntary Running Depreciates the Requirement of Ca[superscript 2+]-Stimulated cAMP Signaling in Synaptic Potentiation and Memory Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fei; Zhang, Ming; Ding, Qi; Sethna, Ferzin; Yan, Lily; Moon, Changjong; Yang, Miyoung; Wang, Hongbing

    2016-01-01

    Mental health and cognitive functions are influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Although having active lifestyle with physical exercise improves learning and memory, how it interacts with the specific key molecular regulators of synaptic plasticity is largely unknown. Here, we examined the effects of voluntary running on long-term…

  17. The double-loop feedback for active learning with understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hans Peter

    2004-01-01

    Learning is an active process, and in engineering education authentic projects is often used to activate the students and promote learning. However, it is not all activity that leads to deep learning; and in a rapid changing society deep understanding is necessary for life-long learning. Empirical...... findings at DTU question the direct link between high activity and a deep approach to learning. Active learning is important to obtain engineering competencies, but active learning requires more than activity. Feedback and reflection is crucial to the learning process, since new knowledge is built...... on the student’s existing understanding. A model for an active learning process with a double-loop feedback is suggested - the first loop gives the student experience through experimentation, the second conceptual understanding through reflection. Students often miss the second loop, so it is important...

  18. The double-loop feedback for active learning with understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hans Peter

    2004-01-01

    on the student’s existing understanding. A model for an active learning process with a double-loop feedback is suggested - the first loop gives the student experience through experimentation, the second conceptual understanding through reflection. Students often miss the second loop, so it is important......Learning is an active process, and in engineering education authentic projects is often used to activate the students and promote learning. However, it is not all activity that leads to deep learning; and in a rapid changing society deep understanding is necessary for life-long learning. Empirical...... findings at DTU question the direct link between high activity and a deep approach to learning. Active learning is important to obtain engineering competencies, but active learning requires more than activity. Feedback and reflection is crucial to the learning process, since new knowledge is built...

  19. Voluntary work organization in higher educational establishment: theory and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Polatayko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses basic questions of voluntary work formation in higher educational establishment, its conceptual and legislative basis, defines basic directions of students agencies activities and forms of their participation in higher educational establishment activities.

  20. An active learning approach to Bloom's Taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Fred K; Bonica, Mark

    2014-01-01

    As educators strive toward improving student learning outcomes, many find it difficult to instill their students with a deep understanding of the material the instructors share. One challenge lies in how to provide the material with a meaningful and engaging method that maximizes student understanding and synthesis. By following a simple strategy involving Active Learning across the 3 primary domains of Bloom's Taxonomy (cognitive, affective, and psychomotor), instructors can dramatically improve the quality of the lesson and help students retain and understand the information. By applying our strategy, instructors can engage their students at a deeper level and may even find themselves enjoying the process more.

  1. Active Learning Environment with Lenses in Geometric Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tural, Güner

    2015-01-01

    Geometric optics is one of the difficult topics for students within physics discipline. Students learn better via student-centered active learning environments than the teacher-centered learning environments. So this study aimed to present a guide for middle school teachers to teach lenses in geometric optics via active learning environment…

  2. Active Learning Environment with Lenses in Geometric Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tural, Güner

    2015-01-01

    Geometric optics is one of the difficult topics for students within physics discipline. Students learn better via student-centered active learning environments than the teacher-centered learning environments. So this study aimed to present a guide for middle school teachers to teach lenses in geometric optics via active learning environment…

  3. The Validation of the Active Learning in Health Professions Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammer, Rebecca; Schreiner, Laurie; Kim, Young K.; Denial, Aurora

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for an assessment tool for evaluating the effectiveness of active learning strategies such as problem-based learning in promoting deep learning and clinical reasoning skills within the dual environments of didactic and clinical settings in health professions education. The Active Learning in Health Professions Scale (ALPHS)…

  4. Incorporation of Socio-scientific Content into Active Learning Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, D. B.; Lewis, J. E.; Anderson, K.; Latch, D.; Sutheimer, S.; Webster, G.; Moog, R.

    2014-12-01

    Active learning has gained increasing support as an effective pedagogical technique to improve student learning. One way to promote active learning in the classroom is the use of in-class activities in place of lecturing. As part of an NSF-funded project, a set of in-class activities have been created that use climate change topics to teach chemistry content. These activities use the Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) methodology. In this pedagogical approach a set of models and a series of critical thinking questions are used to guide students through the introduction to or application of course content. Students complete the activities in their groups, with the faculty member as a facilitator of learning. Through assigned group roles and intentionally designed activity structure, process skills, such as teamwork, communication, and information processing, are developed during completion of the activity. Each of these climate change activities contains a socio-scientific component, e.g., social, ethical and economic data. In one activity, greenhouse gases are used to explain the concept of dipole moment. Data about natural and anthropogenic production rates, global warming potential and atmospheric lifetimes for a list of greenhouse gases are presented. The students are asked to identify which greenhouse gas they would regulate, with a corresponding explanation for their choice. They are also asked to identify the disadvantages of regulating the gas they chose in the previous question. In another activity, where carbon sequestration is used to demonstrate the utility of a phase diagram, students use economic and environmental data to choose the best location for sequestration. Too often discussions about climate change (both in and outside the classroom) consist of purely emotional responses. These activities force students to use data to support their arguments and hypothesize about what other data could be used in the corresponding discussion to

  5. A retrospective health policy analysis of the development and implementation of the voluntary health insurance system in Lebanon: learning from failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jardali, Fadi; Bou-Karroum, Lama; Ataya, Nour; El-Ghali, Hana Addam; Hammoud, Rawan

    2014-12-01

    Public policymaking is complex and suffers from limited uptake of research evidence, particularly in the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR). In-depth case studies examining health policymaking in the EMR are lacking. This retrospective policy analysis aims at generating insights about how policies are being made, identifying factors influencing policymaking and assessing to what extent evidence is used in this process by using the Lebanese Voluntary Health Insurance policy as a case study. The study examined the policymaking process through a policy tracing technique that covered a period of 12 years. The study employed a qualitative research design using a case study approach and was conducted in two phases over the course of two years. Data was collected using multiple sources including: 1) a comprehensive and chronological media review; 2) twenty-two key informant interviews with policymakers, stakeholders, and journalists; and 3) a document review of legislations, minutes of meetings, actuarial studies, and official documents. Data was analyzed and validated using thematic analysis. Findings showed that the voluntary health insurance policy was a political decision taken by the government to tackle an urgent political problem. Evidence was not used to guide policy development and implementation and policy implementers and other stakeholders were not involved in policy development. Factors influencing policymaking were political interests, sectarianism, urgency, and values of policymakers. Barriers to the use of evidence were lack of policy-relevant research evidence, political context, personal interests, and resource constraints. Findings suggest that policymakers should be made more aware of the important role of evidence in informing public policymaking and the need for building capacity to develop, implement and evaluate policies. Study findings are likely to matter in light of the changes that are unfolding in some Arab countries and the looming

  6. Voluntary Management Earnings Forecasts and Discretionary Accruals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramlich, Jeffrey; Sørensen, Ole Vagn

    2004-01-01

    This paper seeks to determine whether Danish managers exercise discretionary accruals to reach earnings forecast targets they voluntarily specify in conjunction with initial public offerings (IPOs). Because the Danish accounting and legal environment is more permissive than the US, we use Denmark...... as a natural laboratory for learning how business would occur without strict rules, enforcement and sanctions. Danish managers often volunteer pro forma financial statements for results that are expected to occur subsequent to the IPO. We examine a sample of 58 Danish firms that issue voluntary management...... earnings forecasts in connection with IPOs that occur between 1984 and 1996. The evidence we uncover strongly suggests that pre-managed earnings are adjusted toward these targets. In contrast with Kasznik's (1999 Kasznik, R. (1999). On the association between voluntary disclosure and earnings management...

  7. Scalable active learning for multiclass image classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Ajay J; Porikli, Fatih; Papanikolopoulos, Nikolaos P

    2012-11-01

    Machine learning techniques for computer vision applications like object recognition, scene classification, etc., require a large number of training samples for satisfactory performance. Especially when classification is to be performed over many categories, providing enough training samples for each category is infeasible. This paper describes new ideas in multiclass active learning to deal with the training bottleneck, making it easier to train large multiclass image classification systems. First, we propose a new interaction modality for training which requires only yes-no type binary feedback instead of a precise category label. The modality is especially powerful in the presence of hundreds of categories. For the proposed modality, we develop a Value-of-Information (VOI) algorithm that chooses informative queries while also considering user annotation cost. Second, we propose an active selection measure that works with many categories and is extremely fast to compute. This measure is employed to perform a fast seed search before computing VOI, resulting in an algorithm that scales linearly with dataset size. Third, we use locality sensitive hashing to provide a very fast approximation to active learning, which gives sublinear time scaling, allowing application to very large datasets. The approximation provides up to two orders of magnitude speedups with little loss in accuracy. Thorough empirical evaluation of classification accuracy, noise sensitivity, imbalanced data, and computational performance on a diverse set of image datasets demonstrates the strengths of the proposed algorithms.

  8. Changing University Students' Alternative Conceptions of Optics by Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadžibegovic, Zalkida; Sliško, Josip

    2013-01-01

    Active learning is individual and group participation in effective activities such as in-class observing, writing, experimenting, discussion, solving problems, and talking about to-be-learned topics. Some instructors believe that active learning is impossible, or at least extremely difficult to achieve in large lecture sessions. Nevertheless, the…

  9. MASS MEDIA AND ENGLISH LEARNING ACTIVITY IN BLITAR INDONESIA

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul Aziz

    2016-01-01

    This study is intended to know how English teachers in MTsN Selorejo, Blitar employ variety of English learning sources and implement English learning activity relevant to student’s learning preference in order to create joyful and conducive atmosphere of English learning activity to achieve the learning target better. The researcher uses qualitative method to conduct the study. The researcher analyzes the qualitative data from interview and observation in order to describe the phenomena. The...

  10. Active Learning in the Era of Big Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamieson, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Davis, IV, Warren L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Active learning methods automatically adapt data collection by selecting the most informative samples in order to accelerate machine learning. Because of this, real-world testing and comparing active learning algorithms requires collecting new datasets (adaptively), rather than simply applying algorithms to benchmark datasets, as is the norm in (passive) machine learning research. To facilitate the development, testing and deployment of active learning for real applications, we have built an open-source software system for large-scale active learning research and experimentation. The system, called NEXT, provides a unique platform for realworld, reproducible active learning research. This paper details the challenges of building the system and demonstrates its capabilities with several experiments. The results show how experimentation can help expose strengths and weaknesses of active learning algorithms, in sometimes unexpected and enlightening ways.

  11. Voluntary Simplicity: A Lifestyle Option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestle, Ruth E.

    This guide provides practical ideas for incorporating the concept of voluntary simplicity into home economics classes. Discussed in the first chapter are the need to study voluntary simplicity, its potential contributions to home economics, and techniques and a questionnaire for measuring student attitudes toward the concept. The remaining…

  12. Operant Variability and Voluntary Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuringer, Allen; Jensen, Greg

    2010-01-01

    A behavior-based theory identified 2 characteristics of voluntary acts. The first, extensively explored in operant-conditioning experiments, is that voluntary responses produce the reinforcers that control them. This bidirectional relationship--in which reinforcer depends on response and response on reinforcer--demonstrates the functional nature…

  13. Learning through reciprocal peer coaching; an analysis of activity sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwart, R.C.; Wubbels, T.; Bolhuis, S.; Bergen, Th.C.M.

    2008-01-01

    Just what and how eight experienced teachers in four coaching dyads learned during a 1-year reciprocal peer coaching trajectory was examined in the present study. The learning processes were mapped by providing a detailed description of reported learning activities, reported learning outcomes, and t

  14. Understanding Fatty Acid Metabolism through an Active Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardilha, M.; Schrader, M.; da Cruz e Silva, O. A. B.; da Cruz e Silva, E. F.

    2010-01-01

    A multi-method active learning approach (MALA) was implemented in the Medical Biochemistry teaching unit of the Biomedical Sciences degree at the University of Aveiro, using problem-based learning as the main learning approach. In this type of learning strategy, students are involved beyond the mere exercise of being taught by listening. Less…

  15. Understanding Fatty Acid Metabolism through an Active Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardilha, M.; Schrader, M.; da Cruz e Silva, O. A. B.; da Cruz e Silva, E. F.

    2010-01-01

    A multi-method active learning approach (MALA) was implemented in the Medical Biochemistry teaching unit of the Biomedical Sciences degree at the University of Aveiro, using problem-based learning as the main learning approach. In this type of learning strategy, students are involved beyond the mere exercise of being taught by listening. Less…

  16. Toward voluntary parenthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarr, S

    2000-06-01

    David Lykken's proposal to license married parents for child rearing, and to deny the same opportunity to single and inept parents, springs from his deep concern for millions of youngsters cruelly subjected to abusive and neglectful rearing circumstances. Children from such inadequate homes grow up to have high rates of school failure, criminality, and drug addiction. The problem is clear, but Lykken's remedies of mandated marriage and parental licensure are unacceptable in U.S. society, where our reproductive rights are fortunately protected by our Constitution. As a devoted proponent of reproductive rights, I propose a legally and morally acceptable proposal to the same end. Increasing women's effective control of reproduction and moving toward entirely voluntary parenthood will accomplish the same goals without compromising our civil liberties.

  17. Active Learning in Engineering Education: a (re)introduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lima, Rui M.; Andersson, Pernille Hammar; Saalman, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    The informal network ‘Active Learning in Engineering Education’ (ALE) has been promoting Active Learning since 2001. ALE creates opportunity for practitioners and researchers of engineering education to collaboratively learn how to foster learning of engineering students. The activities in ALE...... are centred on the vision that learners construct their knowledge based on meaningful activities and knowledge. In 2014, the steering committee of the ALE network reinforced the need to discuss the meaning of Active Learning and that was the base for this proposal for a special issue. More than 40 submissions...

  18. Teaching-Learning Activity Modeling Based on Data Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyungrog Kim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies are currently being carried out on personalized services based on data analysis to find and provide valuable information about information overload. Furthermore, the number of studies on data analysis of teaching-learning activities for personalized services in the field of teaching-learning is increasing, too. This paper proposes a learning style recency-frequency-durability (LS-RFD model for quantified analysis on the level of activities of learners, to provide the elements of teaching-learning activities according to the learning style of the learner among various parameters for personalized service. This is to measure preferences as to teaching-learning activity according to recency, frequency and durability of such activities. Based on the results, user characteristics can be classified into groups for teaching-learning activity by categorizing the level of preference and activity of the learner.

  19. Active learning not associated with student learning in a random sample of college biology courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, T M; Leonard, M J; Colgrove, C A; Kalinowski, S T

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that adding active learning to traditional college science lectures substantially improves student learning. However, this research predominantly studied courses taught by science education researchers, who are likely to have exceptional teaching expertise. The present study investigated introductory biology courses randomly selected from a list of prominent colleges and universities to include instructors representing a broader population. We examined the relationship between active learning and student learning in the subject area of natural selection. We found no association between student learning gains and the use of active-learning instruction. Although active learning has the potential to substantially improve student learning, this research suggests that active learning, as used by typical college biology instructors, is not associated with greater learning gains. We contend that most instructors lack the rich and nuanced understanding of teaching and learning that science education researchers have developed. Therefore, active learning as designed and implemented by typical college biology instructors may superficially resemble active learning used by education researchers, but lacks the constructivist elements necessary for improving learning.

  20. STEM learning activity among home-educating families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Jennifer

    2011-12-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning was studied among families in a group of home-educators in the Pacific Northwest. Ethnographic methods recorded learning activity (video, audio, fieldnotes, and artifacts) which was analyzed using a unique combination of Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) and Mediated Action (MA), enabling analysis of activity at multiple levels. Findings indicate that STEM learning activity is family-led, guided by parents' values and goals for learning, and negotiated with children to account for learner interests and differences, and available resources. Families' STEM education practice is dynamic, evolves, and influenced by larger societal STEM learning activity. Parents actively seek support and resources for STEM learning within their home-school community, working individually and collectively to share their funds of knowledge. Home-schoolers also access a wide variety of free-choice learning resources: web-based materials, museums, libraries, and community education opportunities (e.g. afterschool, weekend and summer programs, science clubs and classes, etc.). A lesson-heuristic, grounded in Mediated Action, represents and analyzes home STEM learning activity in terms of tensions between parental goals, roles, and lesson structure. One tension observed was between 'academic' goals or school-like activity and 'lifelong' goals or everyday learning activity. Theoretical and experiential learning was found in both activity, though parents with academic goals tended to focus more on theoretical learning and those with lifelong learning goals tended to be more experiential. Examples of the National Research Council's science learning strands (NRC, 2009) were observed in the STEM practices of all these families. Findings contribute to the small but growing body of empirical CHAT research in science education, specifically to the empirical base of family STEM learning practices at home. It also fills a

  1. Enhancing Learning Outcomes through Application Driven Activities in Marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemann, Nicole; Sutton-Brady, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces an activity used in class to allow students to apply previously acquired information to a hands-on task. As the authors have previously shown active learning is a way to effectively facilitate and improve students' learning outcomes. As a result to improve learning outcomes we have overtime developed a series of learning…

  2. Telling Active Learning Pedagogies Apart: From Theory to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Kelsey Hood

    2017-01-01

    Designing learning environments to incorporate active learning pedagogies is difficult as definitions are often contested and intertwined. This article seeks to determine whether classification of active learning pedagogies (i.e., project-based, problem-based, inquiry-based, case-based, and discovery-based), through theoretical and practical…

  3. Active Discriminative Dictionary Learning for Weather Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caixia Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Weather recognition based on outdoor images is a brand-new and challenging subject, which is widely required in many fields. This paper presents a novel framework for recognizing different weather conditions. Compared with other algorithms, the proposed method possesses the following advantages. Firstly, our method extracts both visual appearance features of the sky region and physical characteristics features of the nonsky region in images. Thus, the extracted features are more comprehensive than some of the existing methods in which only the features of sky region are considered. Secondly, unlike other methods which used the traditional classifiers (e.g., SVM and K-NN, we use discriminative dictionary learning as the classification model for weather, which could address the limitations of previous works. Moreover, the active learning procedure is introduced into dictionary learning to avoid requiring a large number of labeled samples to train the classification model for achieving good performance of weather recognition. Experiments and comparisons are performed on two datasets to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  4. Improving Post-graduate Students Learning Activities through Lesson Study in Learning Forest-Prototype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhfahroyin Muhfahroyin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Improving learning quality in 21st can not be separated from contextual learning and student-centered learning paradigm. The contextual lesson study program conducted in learning-forest prototype to build a learning community. The objectives of this research were to improve learning activities of postgraduate students in Biology Education department and to build a learning community. The implementation of lesson study was conducted in the Biology Learning Innovation subject for postgraduate students while practicing to observe open lesson in the undergraduate students which used learning forest-prototype. The postgraduate students took roles as planner, observer, and reflector in the plan, do (open lesson, and see (reflection activities. The implementation was done in three cycles in even semester of academic year 2015/2016. Students learned collaboratively and contextually. The postgraduate students’ learning activities were observed by six observers from lecturer colleagues. The research results showed that the students were able to implement planning, open lesson, and reflection properly. The average of student’s learning activity grade was 91.11% from all of students, with the grade averages for planning, open lesson, and reflection activities were 88.89%, 93.33%, and 91.11% respectively. The implementation of this lesson study in the learning forest-prototype can be done in other relevant subjects to strengthen learning activities.

  5. The Impacts of Team Learning on the Development of a Learning Organisation: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao-Hua; Su, Kun-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Generalisability of a learning organisation (LO) for cross-cultural applications is doubtful. Some cultural values may be opposed to the nature in a LO which calls for voluntary participation in learning activities by all employees. The study reveals a dynamic analysis of a LO with the sense of the difficulties organisations typically face and how…

  6. Active Affordance Learning in Continuous State and Action Spaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, C.; Hindriks, K.V.; Babuska, R.

    2014-01-01

    Learning object affordances and manipulation skills is essential for developing cognitive service robots. We propose an active affordance learning approach in continuous state and action spaces without manual discretization of states or exploratory motor primitives. During exploration in the action

  7. Getting To Know You: Activities for Learning Names.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Debra J.

    1998-01-01

    Learning names is vital to the enjoyment and productivity of a group. Presents four games to help campers learn each others' names. Sidebar presents three additional teambuilding activities and ice breakers. (TD)

  8. Voluntary reaction time and long-latency reflex modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgaard, Christopher J; Franks, Ian M; Maslovat, Dana; Chin, Laurence; Chua, Romeo

    2015-12-01

    Stretching a muscle of the upper limb elicits short (M1) and long-latency (M2) reflexes. When the participant is instructed to actively compensate for a perturbation, M1 is usually unaffected and M2 increases in size and is followed by the voluntary response. It remains unclear if the observed increase in M2 is due to instruction-dependent gain modulation of the contributing reflex mechanism(s) or results from voluntary response superposition. The difficulty in delineating between these alternatives is due to the overlap between the voluntary response and the end of M2. The present study manipulated response accuracy and complexity to delay onset of the voluntary response and observed the corresponding influence on electromyographic activity during the M2 period. In all active conditions, M2 was larger compared with a passive condition where participants did not respond to the perturbation; moreover, these changes in M2 began early in the appearance of the response (∼ 50 ms), too early to be accounted for by voluntary overlap. Voluntary response latency influenced the latter portion of M2, with the largest activity seen when accuracy of limb position was not specified. However, when participants aimed for targets of different sizes or performed movements of various complexities, reaction time differences did not influence M2 period activity, suggesting voluntary activity was sufficiently delayed. Collectively, our results show that while a perturbation applied to the upper limbs can trigger a voluntary response at short latency (reflex gain modulation remains an important contributor to EMG changes during the M2 period. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Analyzing voluntary medical incident reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yang; Richardson, James; Zhijian, Luan; Alafaireet, Patricia; Yoo, Illhoi

    2008-11-06

    Voluntary medical incident reports lacking consistency and accuracy impede the ultimate use of the reports for patient safety research. To improve this, two coders examined harm score usage in a voluntary medical incident reporting system where the harm scores were selected from a predefined list by different reporters. The two coders inter-rater agreement percent was 82%. The major categories and reviewed harm score jointly demonstrate that this process is critical and necessary in preparing the voluntary reports for further content and semantics analysis.

  10. Lifeguard Final Exam—Encouraging the Use of Active Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Griswold, Elise N.; Daniel J. Klionsky

    2015-01-01

    To anyone familiar with the extensive literature on teaching and learning, there is little question that active learning is more effective than passive learning. Thus, we are not directing this letter to that particular audience. Instead, we are attempting to address the question of the best way to convince instructors who have not tried to incorporate elements of active learning into their courses to make such an attempt. There are numerous examples where it becomes immediately clear that ac...

  11. Benefits of voluntary industry standards: The triumph of experience over regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Leary, J.T. [National Mining Association, Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Voluntary international standards for mining machinery may gradually replace many national regulations. The days of establishing voluntary standards nation by nation, inhibiting the important flow of international trade, could be numbered. This does not mean that nations will cease domestic regulatory activities within their boundaries, but rulemaking will pay considerable attention to voluntary international standards and will likely strive for compatibility with voluntary international standards. International standards setting bodies are developing standards for machine safety. When these standards are complete and adopted, some nations will require machinery to comport with them. International commerce in products that do not conform to these voluntary international standards may be discouraged.

  12. Signs of learning in kinaesthetic science activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper; Johannsen, Bjørn Friis

    to couple an embodied experience of physics with the language of physics through dialogue. We propose that kinaesthetic learning is a way of integrating a bodily experience into a formal system of signs, in this case, force and motion in physics, but ask: to a teacher or researcher, what signs exist...... that students use bodily explorations to construct meaning and understanding from kinaesthetic learning that is relevant to school physics? To answer the question, we employ a semiotics perspective to analyse data from a 1-hour lesson for 8-9th graders which introduced students to kinaesthetic activities, where...... they used rope to pull each other in a linear and circular motion. The activity was centered on questions that guided their kinaesthetic inquiry which related to force and velocity (e.g. “do you always move in the same direction as you are pulled?”) and Newton’s third law (e.g. “who pulls the most...

  13. Mastering group leadership. An active learning experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheick, Dawn M

    2002-09-01

    Leading therapeutic groups is an underused but viable treatment role for nurses in all specialty areas. A dynamic psychoeducational group model provides structure as nurses invest and collaboratively participate to actively learn the group leader role. this article highlights the sequencing of instruction of group theory and skills with examples from a baccalaureate nursing curriculum. Samples from student journals reveal their growing assimilation of the group leader role as learners actively participated in groups, collaborated, and reflected on their learning. Examples of creatively adapted group exercises, as well as selected nursing group leader interventions, demonstrate group leadership as a skill that can increase nurses' repertoire of therapeutic responses. Therapeutic groups are both exciting and cost-effective treatment strategies for use with mentally ill clients. The skills of an accomplished group leader are transferable from within the psychiatric population to working with families, bereavement groups, and other client populations, ranging from people with diabetes to survivors of catastrophic crises. Group leadership ability complements the management and negotiation skills needed in professional nursing roles. When students and staff nurses grow in group leadership expertise, clients in various settings will be better served with this currently underused treatment option.

  14. Patterns of Field Learning Activities and Their Relation to Learning Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mingun; Fortune, Anne E.

    2013-01-01

    Field practicum is an active learning process. This study explores the different learning stages or processes students experience during their field practicum. First-year master's of social work students in field practica were asked how much they had engaged in educational learning activities such as observation, working independently,…

  15. Active-Learning versus Teacher-Centered Instruction for Learning Acids and Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesen, Burcin Acar; Tarhan, Leman

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: Active-learning as a student-centered learning process has begun to take more interest in constructing scientific knowledge. For this reason, this study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of active-learning implementation on high-school students' understanding of "acids and bases". Sample: The sample of this…

  16. Cooperative activity and its potential for learning in tertiary education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cirila Peklaj

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A learning situation can be structured in different ways, as an individual, competitive, or cooperative activity. Each of these structures can be used for different purposes and can lead to different learning outcomes. This paper focuses on cooperative activity and its potential for learning in tertiary education. After defining cooperative activity (or, in a broader sense, learning in interaction and introducing the CAMS theoretical framework to analyse cooperative activity, the main discussion focuses on the theoretical reasons for the usefulness of group learning and on the research of effects of cooperative learning on cognitive (metacognitive, affective-motivational and social processes in university students. The key elements that should be established for successful cooperation are also discussed. At the end, a new direction in using cooperative activity in learning—computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL, which emerged with rapid technology development in the last two decades—is presented and discussed.

  17. On-line and Mobil Learning Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, S. A.; Whittaker, T. M.; Jasmin, T.; Mooney, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    Introductory college-level science courses for non-majors are critical gateways to imparting not only discipline-specific information, but also the basics of the scientific method and how science influences society. They are also indispensable for student success to degree. On-line, web-based homework (whether on computers or mobile devices) is a rapidly growing use of the Internet and is becoming a major component of instruction in science, replacing delayed feedback from a few major exams. Web delivery and grading of traditional textbook-type questions is equally effective as having students write them out for hand grading, as measured by student performance on conceptual and problem solving exams. During this presentation we will demonstrate some of the interactive on-line activities used to teach concepts and how scientists approach problem solving, and how these activities have impacted student learning. Evaluation of the activities, including formative and summative, will be discussed and provide evidence that these interactive activities significantly enhance understanding of introductory meteorological concepts in a college-level science course. More advanced interactive activities are also used in our courses for department majors, some of these will be discussed and demonstrated. Bring your mobile devices to play along! Here is an example on teaching contouring: http://profhorn.aos.wisc.edu/wxwise/contour/index.html

  18. The challenges of adopting voluntary health, safety and environment measures for manufactured nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steffen Foss; Tickner, J.

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the use of voluntary environmental programs in the United States in the past, and applies the lessons learned from these experiences to the regulation of nanomaterials. The authors found that the key elements of any voluntary environmental program should be incentives...

  19. The Notion of Voluntary Unemployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standing, Guy

    1981-01-01

    Considers the distinction between voluntary and involuntary unemployment by analyzing six behavioral characteristics attributed to groups of workers suspected of indulging in the former, and the labor market mechanisms supposedly encouraging them. (Author/CT)

  20. Changes in spatial memory and BDNF expression to concurrent dietary restriction and voluntary exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabour, Omar F; Alzoubi, Karem H; Alomari, Mahmoud A; Alzubi, Mohammad A

    2010-05-01

    Substantial data suggest that cognitive function can be influenced by many lifestyle activities associated with changes in energy metabolism such as exercise and diet. In the current study, we investigated the combined effects of voluntary exercise (access to running wheels) and dietary restriction (every other day fasting, EODF) on spatial memory formation and on the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus of Wistar male rats. Spatial learning and memory formation was assessed using the radial arm water maze (RAWM) paradigm, while BDNF protein was measured using ELISA test. Voluntary exercise and/or EODF were instituted for 6 weeks. Voluntary exercise alone significantly enhanced short-term, intermediate-term, and long-term memory formation, and increased BDNF protein levels in the hippocampus. EODF enhanced mean running wheel activity by approximately twofold. However, EODF did not modulate the effects of exercise on memory formation and expression of BDNF. In addition, EODF alone had no effect on memory and BDNF protein in the hippocampus. In conclusion, results of this study indicate that exercise enhanced while EODF had neutral effect on both spatial memory formation and hippocampus BDNF levels.

  1. Learning by Doing: Twenty Successful Active Learning Exercises for Information Systems Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alanah Mitchell

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: This paper provides a review of previously published work related to active learning in information systems (IS courses. Background: There are a rising number of strategies in higher education that offer promise in regards to getting students’ attention and helping them learn, such as flipped classrooms and offering courses online. These learning strategies are part of the pedagogical technique known as active learning. Active learning is a strategy that became popular in the early 1990s and has proven itself as a valid tool for helping students to be engaged with learning. Methodology: This work follows a systematic method for identifying and coding previous research based on an aspect of interest. The authors identified and assessed research through a search of ABI/Inform scholarly journal abstracts and keywords, as well as additional research databases, using the search terms “active learning” and “information systems” from 2000 through June 2016. Contribution: This synthesis of active learning exercises provides guidance for information technology faculty looking to implement active learning strategies in their classroom by demonstrating how IS faculty might begin to introduce more active learning techniques in their teaching as well as by presenting a sample teaching agenda for a class that uses a mix of active and passive learning techniques to engage student learning. Findings: Twenty successful types of active learning exercises in IS courses are presented. Recommendations for Practitioners\t: This paper offers a “how to” resource of successful active learning strategies for IS faculty interested in implementing active learning in the classroom. Recommendation for Researchers: This work provides an example of a systematic literature review as a means to assess successful implementations of active learning in IS. Impact on Society: An updated definition of active learning is presented as well as a meaningful

  2. Active Learning by Play Dough Modeling in the Medical Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herur, Anita; Kolagi, Sanjeev; Chinagudi, Surekharani; Manjula, R.; Patil, Shailaja

    2011-01-01

    Active learning produces meaningful learning, improves attitudes toward learning, and increases knowledge and retention, but is still not fully institutionalized in the undergraduate sciences. A few studies have compared the effectiveness of PowerPoint presentations, student seminars, quizzes, and use of CD-ROMs with blackboard teaching and…

  3. An Experimental Method for the Active Learning of Greedy Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez-Iturbide, J. Angel

    2013-01-01

    Greedy algorithms constitute an apparently simple algorithm design technique, but its learning goals are not simple to achieve.We present a didacticmethod aimed at promoting active learning of greedy algorithms. The method is focused on the concept of selection function, and is based on explicit learning goals. It mainly consists of an…

  4. Performance in Physiology Evaluation: Possible Improvement by Active Learning Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montrezor, Luís H.

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation process is complex and extremely important in the teaching/learning process. Evaluations are constantly employed in the classroom to assist students in the learning process and to help teachers improve the teaching process. The use of active methodologies encourages students to participate in the learning process, encourages…

  5. Performance in Physiology Evaluation: Possible Improvement by Active Learning Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montrezor, Luís H.

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation process is complex and extremely important in the teaching/learning process. Evaluations are constantly employed in the classroom to assist students in the learning process and to help teachers improve the teaching process. The use of active methodologies encourages students to participate in the learning process, encourages…

  6. Active Learning by Play Dough Modeling in the Medical Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herur, Anita; Kolagi, Sanjeev; Chinagudi, Surekharani; Manjula, R.; Patil, Shailaja

    2011-01-01

    Active learning produces meaningful learning, improves attitudes toward learning, and increases knowledge and retention, but is still not fully institutionalized in the undergraduate sciences. A few studies have compared the effectiveness of PowerPoint presentations, student seminars, quizzes, and use of CD-ROMs with blackboard teaching and…

  7. An Experimental Method for the Active Learning of Greedy Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez-Iturbide, J. Angel

    2013-01-01

    Greedy algorithms constitute an apparently simple algorithm design technique, but its learning goals are not simple to achieve.We present a didacticmethod aimed at promoting active learning of greedy algorithms. The method is focused on the concept of selection function, and is based on explicit learning goals. It mainly consists of an…

  8. Pedagogical Distance: Explaining Misalignment in Student-Driven Online Learning Activities Using Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westberry, Nicola; Franken, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an Activity Theory analysis of two online student-driven interactive learning activities to interrogate assumptions that such groups can effectively learn in the absence of the teacher. Such an analysis conceptualises learning tasks as constructed objects that drive pedagogical activity. The analysis shows a disconnect between…

  9. The spinal reflex cannot be perceptually separated from voluntary movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Arko; Haggard, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Both voluntary and involuntary movements activate sensors in the muscles, skin, tendon and joints. As limb movement can result from a mixture of spinal reflexes and voluntary motor commands, the cortical centres underlying conscious proprioception might either aggregate or separate the sensory inputs generated by voluntary movements from those generated by involuntary movements such as spinal reflexes. We addressed whether healthy volunteers could perceive the contribution of a spinal reflex during movements that combined both reflexive and voluntary contributions. Volunteers reported the reflexive contribution in leg movements that were partly driven by the knee-jerk reflex induced by a patellar tendon tap and partly by voluntary motor control. In one condition, participants were instructed to kick back in response to a tendon tap. The results were compared to reflexes in a resting baseline condition without voluntary movement. In a further condition, participants were instructed to kick forwards after a tap. Volunteers reported the perceived reflex contribution by repositioning the leg to the perceived maximum displacement to which the reflex moved the leg after each tendon tap. In the resting baseline condition, the reflex was accurately perceived. We found a near-unity slope of linear regressions of perceived on actual reflexive displacement. Both the slope value and the quality of regression fit in individual volunteers were significantly reduced when volunteers were instructed to generate voluntary backward kicks as soon as they detected the tap. In the kick forward condition, kinematic analysis showed continuity of reflex and voluntary movements, but the reflex contribution could be estimated from electromyography (EMG) recording on each trial. Again, participants' judgements of reflexes showed a poor relation to reflex EMG, in contrast to the baseline condition. In sum, we show that reflexes can be accurately perceived from afferent information. However

  10. Sharing the learning activity using intelligent CAD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duffy, S. M.; Duffy, Alex

    1996-01-01

    In this paper the need for Intelligent Computer Aided Design (Int.CAD) to jointly support design and learning assistance is introduced. The paper focuses on presenting and exploring the possibility of realizing ''learning'' assistance in Int.CAD by introducing a new concept called Shared Learning....... Shared Learning is proposed to empower CAD tools with more useful learning capabilities than that currently available and thereby provide a stronger interaction of learning between a designer and a computer. ''Controlled'' computational learning is proposed as a means whereby the Shared Learning concept...... can be realized. The viability of this new concept is explored by using a system called PERSPECT. PERSPECT is a preliminary numerical design tool aimed at supporting the effective utilization of numerical experiential knowledge in design. After a detailed discussion of PERSPECT's numerical design...

  11. Sharing the learning activity using intelligent CAD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duffy, S. M.; Duffy, Alex

    1996-01-01

    In this paper the need for Intelligent Computer Aided Design (Int.CAD) to jointly support design and learning assistance is introduced. The paper focuses on presenting and exploring the possibility of realizing ''learning'' assistance in Int.CAD by introducing a new concept called Shared Learning...

  12. Enhancing voluntary imitation through attention and motor imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bek, Judith; Poliakoff, Ellen; Marshall, Hannah; Trueman, Sophie; Gowen, Emma

    2016-07-01

    Action observation activates brain areas involved in performing the same action and has been shown to increase motor learning, with potential implications for neurorehabilitation. Recent work indicates that the effects of action observation on movement can be increased by motor imagery or by directing attention to observed actions. In voluntary imitation, activation of the motor system during action observation is already increased. We therefore explored whether imitation could be further enhanced by imagery or attention. Healthy participants observed and then immediately imitated videos of human hand movement sequences, while movement kinematics were recorded. Two blocks of trials were completed, and after the first block participants were instructed to imagine performing the observed movement (Imagery group, N = 18) or attend closely to the characteristics of the movement (Attention group, N = 15), or received no further instructions (Control group, N = 17). Kinematics of the imitated movements were modulated by instructions, with both Imagery and Attention groups being closer in duration, peak velocity and amplitude to the observed model compared with controls. These findings show that both attention and motor imagery can increase the accuracy of imitation and have implications for motor learning and rehabilitation. Future work is required to understand the mechanisms by which these two strategies influence imitation accuracy.

  13. Enhancing students' learning in problem based learning: validation of a self-assessment scale for active learning and critical thinking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoiriyah, U.; Roberts, C.; Jorm, C.; Vleuten, C.P. van der

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Problem based learning (PBL) is a powerful learning activity but fidelity to intended models may slip and student engagement wane, negatively impacting learning processes, and outcomes. One potential solution to solve this degradation is by encouraging self-assessment in the PBL

  14. Enhancing students' learning in problem based learning: validation of a self-assessment scale for active learning and critical thinking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoiriyah, U.; Roberts, C.; Jorm, C.; Vleuten, C.P. van der

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Problem based learning (PBL) is a powerful learning activity but fidelity to intended models may slip and student engagement wane, negatively impacting learning processes, and outcomes. One potential solution to solve this degradation is by encouraging self-assessment in the PBL tutorial

  15. Teachers' Attitudes toward the Implementation of Student Active Learning Approach in Teaching Learning Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mas'ud Yusuf

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to obtain an empirical evidence concerning the attitudes of teachers of elementary schools in Pekalongan Sub District, East Lampung District toward the implementation of the student active learning (CBSA approach in teaching-learning activities. The data were collected through questionnaire and observation, and were analyzed by t-test. The results indicated that there were significant differences in attitudes between young teachers and old ones, between teachers with a bachelor's degree and those without the degree, and between teachers with less teaching experience and those with more teaching experience. Additionally, there were no significant differences in teachers' attitudes in terms of sex and training experience

  16. Exposure to activity based anorexia impairs contextual learning in weight-restored rats without affecting spatial learning, taste, anxiety, or dietary-fat preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma, Gretha J.; Treesukosol, Yada; Cordner, Zachary A.; Kastelein, Anneke; Choi, Pique; Moran, Timothy H.; Tamashiro, Kellie L.

    2016-01-01

    Relapse rates are high amongst cases of Anorexia Nervosa (AN) suggesting that some alterations induced by AN may remain after weight restoration. Objective To study the consequences of AN without confounds of environmental variability, a rodent model of activity based anorexia (ABA) can be employed. We hypothesized that exposure to ABA during adolescence may have long-term consequences in taste function, cognition, and anxiety-like behavior after weight restoration. Methods To test this hypothesis we exposed adolescent female rats to ABA (1.5 hrs food access, combined with voluntary running wheel access) and compared their behavior to that of control rats after weight restoration was achieved. The rats were tested for learning /memory, anxiety, food preference and taste in a set of behavioral tests performed during the light period. Results Our data show that ABA exposure leads to reduced performance during the novel object recognition task, a test for contextual learning, without altering performance in the novel place recognition task or the Barnes maze, both tasks that test spatial learning. Furthermore, we do not observe alterations in unconditioned lick responses to sucrose nor quinine (described by humans as “sweet” and “bitter” respectively). Nor did we find alterations in anxiety-like behavior during an elevated plus maze or an open field test. Finally, preference for a diet high in fat was not altered. Discussion Overall our data suggest that ABA exposure during adolescence impairs contextual learning in adulthood without altering spatial leaning, taste, anxiety, or fat preference. PMID:26711541

  17. Examining factors affecting beginning teachers’ transfer of learning of ICT-enhanced learning activities in their teaching practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, Joke; Agyei, Douglas; McBride, Ron; Searson, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This study examined 100 beginning teachers’ transfer of learning in utilizing Information Communication Technology-enhanced activity-based learning activities. The beginning teachers had participated in a professional development program characterized by ‘learning technology by collaborative design’

  18. Examining factors affecting beginning teachers' transfer of learning of ICT-enhanced learning activities in their teaching practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agyei, D.D.; Voogt, J.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined 100 beginning teachers’ transfer of learning when utilising Information Communication Technology-enhanced activity-based learning activities. The beginning teachers had participated in a professional development program that was characterised by ‘learning technology by

  19. Examining factors affecting beginning teachers’ transfer of learning of ICT-enhanced learning activities in their teaching practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, Joke; Agyei, Douglas; McBride, Ron; Searson, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This study examined 100 beginning teachers’ transfer of learning in utilizing Information Communication Technology-enhanced activity-based learning activities. The beginning teachers had participated in a professional development program characterized by ‘learning technology by collaborative design’

  20. Experiential Learning and Learning Environments: The Case of Active Listening Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta-Wong, Juan Enrique; Schoech, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Social work education research frequently has suggested an interaction between teaching techniques and learning environments. However, this interaction has never been tested. This study compared virtual and face-to-face learning environments and included active listening concepts to test whether the effectiveness of learning environments depends…

  1. Multiliteracies and Active Learning in CLIL--The Development of Learn Web2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenzi, I.; Zerr, S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of LearnWeb2.0, a search and collaboration environment for supporting searching, organizing, and sharing distributed resources, and our pedagogical setup based on the multiliteracies approach. In LearnWeb2.0, collaborative and active learning is supported through project-focused search and aggregation, with…

  2. Students´ Perspectives on eLearning Activities in Person-Centered, Blended Learning Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselberger, David; Motsching, Renate

    2016-01-01

    Blended or hybrid learning has become a frequent practice in higher education. In this article our primary research interest was to find out how students perceived eLearning activities in blended learning courses based on the person-centered paradigm. Through analyzing the content of a series of semi-structured interviews we found out that…

  3. Student teachers’ beliefs about learning and teaching and their participation in career-long learning activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Siebrich; Jansen, Ellen P. W. A.; Helms-Lorenz, Michelle; van de Grift, Willem

    2014-01-01

    Career-long teacher learning is essential to the teaching profession because it is strongly connected with teacher quality and practices. Student teachers in the first stage of their career-long learning continuum, however, vary in the extent to which they participate in learning activities. This st

  4. Designing for Inquiry-Based Learning with the Learning Activity Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, P.; Aiyegbayo, O.; Little, S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between practitioners' pedagogical purposes, values and practices in designing for inquiry-based learning in higher education, and the affordances of the Learning Activity Management System (LAMS) as a tool for creating learning designs in this context. Using a qualitative research methodology, variation was…

  5. Advancing the M-Learning Research Agenda for Active, Experiential Learning: Four Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Laurel Evelyn; Litchfield, Andrew; Lawrence, Elaine; Raban, Ryszard; Leijdekkers, Peter

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on an m-learning research agenda instituted at our university in order to explore how mobile technology can enhance active, experiential learning. Details of the implementation and results of four areas of m-learning are presented: mobile supported fieldwork, fostering interactivity in large lectures with mobile technology,…

  6. Orchestration Framework for Learning Activities in Augmented Reality Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Ibáñez, María Blanca; Delgado Kloos, Carlos; Di Serio, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Proceedings of: Across Spaces11 Workshop in conjunction with the EC-TEL2011, Palermo, Italy, September 21, 2011 In this paper we show how Augmented Reality (AR) technology restricted to the use of mobiles or PCs, can be used to develop learning activities with the minimun level of orchestation required by meaningful learning sequences. We use Popcode as programming language to deploy orchestrated learning activities specified with an AR framework. Publicado

  7. Designing Scientific Academic Conferences as a Learning Environment: How to Stimulate Active Learning at Academic Conferences?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verbeke, Johan

    2015-01-01

    architecture, arts and design) and on the way knowledge sharing and knowledge development was stimulated at these events. These conferences included less traditional conference designs, collective learning and explicit sharing of understanding between participants. Results: Collaboration in small groups...... as well as moments of collective learning. Organizers are recommended to adopt an explicit conference design. Constructivist content: Following a constructivist approach to learning environments, this paper stresses the importance of scheduling moments of active and collective learning and knowledge...

  8. Do optional activities matter in virtual learning environments?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruipérez-Valiente, José A.; Muñoz-Merino, Pedro J.; Delgado Kloos, Carlos; Niemann, Katja; Scheffel, Maren

    2014-01-01

    Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) provide students with activi-ties to improve their learning (e.g., reading texts, watching videos or solving exercises). But VLEs usually also provide optional activities (e.g., changing an avatar profile or setting goals). Some of these have a connection with th

  9. E-Collaboration Technologies in Teaching/Learning Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zascerinska, Jelena; Ahrens, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    A proper use of e-collaboration technologies in the teaching/learning process is provided by varied cooperative networks, which penetrate teachers' and students' activity more thoroughly with the availability of broadband services. However, the successful use of e-collaboration technologies in teaching/learning activity within a multicultural…

  10. Tractor Mechanics: Learning Activity Packages 1-19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    Learning activity packages are presented for teaching tractor mechanics. The first of two sections deals with miscellaneous tasks and contains learning activity packages on cleaning the tractor and receiving new tractor parts. Section 2 is concerned with maintaining and servicing the electrical system, and it includes the following learning…

  11. Engaging Students in Large Health Classes with Active Learning Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Steven; Combs, Sue; Huelskamp, Amelia; Hritz, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    Creative K-12 health teachers can engage students in large classes by utilizing active learning strategies. Active learning involves engaging students in higher-order tasks, such as analysis and synthesis, which is a crucial element of the movement toward what is commonly called "learner-centered" teaching. Health education teachers who…

  12. Using active learning in lecture: best of "both worlds".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oermann, Marilyn H

    2004-01-01

    Many creative teaching strategies have been developed in recent years in nursing and other fields to promote active learning. These strategies foster development of problem solving, critical thinking, and communication skills, and they encourage students to work collaboratively with peers. However, in nurse educators' rush to embrace active learning, lecture has been viewed negatively by some faculty. Rather than positioning active learning against lecture, another approach is to integrate active learning within lecture, gaining the benefits of both methods. An integrated approach also takes into consideration the situation of teaching large groups of students. This article examines benefits of an integrated approach to teaching and presents strategies for active learning intended for use with lecture.

  13. Mapping Learning Outcomes and Assignment Tasks for SPIDER Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyn Brodie

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Modern engineering programs have to address rapidly changing technical content and have to enable students to develop transferable skills such as critical evaluation, communication skills and lifelong learning. This paper introduces a combined learning and assessment activity that provides students with opportunities to develop and practice their soft skills, but also extends their theoretical knowledge base. Key tasks included self directed inquiry, oral and written communication as well as peer assessment. To facilitate the SPIDER activities (Select, Prepare and Investigate, Discuss, Evaluate, Reflect, a software tool has been implemented in the learning management system Moodle. Evidence shows increased student engagement and better learning outcomes for both transferable as well as technical skills. The study focuses on generalising the relationship between learning outcomes and assignment tasks as well as activities that drive these tasks. Trail results inform the approach. Staff evaluations and their views of assignments and intended learning outcomes also supported this analysis.

  14. 上海市老年人参与志愿者活动现状及趋势探析*%Current Situation and Trend Analysis of Participation of Elders in Voluntary Activities in Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹前

    2013-01-01

    通过问卷调查、抽样分析、统计整理等方法,对上海市部分老年志愿者进行调查和访问,分析和综合了上海老年人对志愿者活动的信息获取情况、活动参与状况、影响活动因素等,阐述了老年人参与志愿者活动的发展趋势。在此基础上,对老年人志愿者活动提出了改进建议:转变思想,将老年人作为积极的社会人力资源;加强宣传,扩大老年人志愿者活动的传播渠道;出台政策,使老年人志愿者活动有章可循;提升内涵,确保老年人志愿者活动的有序进行;立足社区,为老年人志愿者活动提供场地等。%Through questionnaire survey,sampling analysis,acquisition of information,statistical processing and other methods,we carried on the investigation to partial elders who participate voluntary activities in Shanghai,and analyzed and synthesized the information access, activity participation and impact factors for elders’participation in voluntary activities.On this basis,this paper tries to put forward the im-provement proposal to the old age volunteer activity such as transformation of thoughts,expansion of publicizing,and policy formulation, etc.

  15. The Planning Illusion: Does Active Planning of a Learning Route Support Learning as Well as Learners Think It Does?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonestroo, Wilco J.; de Jong, Ton

    2012-01-01

    Is actively planning one's learning route through a learning domain beneficial for learning? Moreover, can learners accurately judge the extent to which planning has been beneficial for them? This study examined the effects of active planning on learning. Participants received a tool in which they created a learning route themselves before…

  16. Active Inference and Learning in the Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friston, Karl; Herreros, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    This letter offers a computational account of Pavlovian conditioning in the cerebellum based on active inference and predictive coding. Using eyeblink conditioning as a canonical paradigm, we formulate a minimal generative model that can account for spontaneous blinking, startle responses, and (delay or trace) conditioning. We then establish the face validity of the model using simulated responses to unconditioned and conditioned stimuli to reproduce the sorts of behavior that are observed empirically. The scheme's anatomical validity is then addressed by associating variables in the predictive coding scheme with nuclei and neuronal populations to match the (extrinsic and intrinsic) connectivity of the cerebellar (eyeblink conditioning) system. Finally, we try to establish predictive validity by reproducing selective failures of delay conditioning, trace conditioning, and extinction using (simulated and reversible) focal lesions. Although rather metaphorical, the ensuing scheme can account for a remarkable range of anatomical and neurophysiological aspects of cerebellar circuitry-and the specificity of lesion-deficit mappings that have been established experimentally. From a computational perspective, this work shows how conditioning or learning can be formulated in terms of minimizing variational free energy (or maximizing Bayesian model evidence) using exactly the same principles that underlie predictive coding in perception.

  17. Reconstructing Causal Biological Networks through Active Learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunghoon Cho

    Full Text Available Reverse-engineering of biological networks is a central problem in systems biology. The use of intervention data, such as gene knockouts or knockdowns, is typically used for teasing apart causal relationships among genes. Under time or resource constraints, one needs to carefully choose which intervention experiments to carry out. Previous approaches for selecting most informative interventions have largely been focused on discrete Bayesian networks. However, continuous Bayesian networks are of great practical interest, especially in the study of complex biological systems and their quantitative properties. In this work, we present an efficient, information-theoretic active learning algorithm for Gaussian Bayesian networks (GBNs, which serve as important models for gene regulatory networks. In addition to providing linear-algebraic insights unique to GBNs, leading to significant runtime improvements, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our method on data simulated with GBNs and the DREAM4 network inference challenge data sets. Our method generally leads to faster recovery of underlying network structure and faster convergence to final distribution of confidence scores over candidate graph structures using the full data, in comparison to random selection of intervention experiments.

  18. Project Based Learning Activities in Engineering Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Faustino Andrade

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the author reports examples of his involvement in different teaching/learning methodologies during his five years of the Integrated Master Degree in Mechanical Engineering at the Faculty of Engineering of University of Porto. The aim is to explain how useful those experiences have been, allowing him to explore many techno-scientific activities within his engineering education while student as well as other transferable skills and later, up to the present, as a professional in academic environment. The author wishes to underline the excellent opportunity he had to practice reflection processes as an essential methodology of his engineering education.

  19. Learning Design--Creative Design to Visualise Learning Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toetenel, Lisette; Rienties, Bart

    2016-01-01

    The focus on quality improvements by institutions for better online and blended teaching can be delivered in different ways. This article reports on the implementation of this process and the approaches taken first, in terms of the design of new learning materials, and second, when reviewing the existing curriculum. The study aims to ascertain…

  20. Voluntary self-touch increases body ownership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki eHara

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Experimental manipulations of body ownership have indicated that multisensory integration is central to forming bodily self-representation. Voluntary self-touch is a unique multisensory situation involving corresponding motor, tactile and proprioceptive signals. Yet, even though self-touch is frequent in everyday life, its contribution to the formation of body ownership is not well understood. Here we investigated the role of voluntary self-touch in body ownership using a novel adaptation of the rubber hand illusion (RHI, in which a robotic system and virtual reality allowed participants self-touch of real and virtual hands. In the first experiment, active and passive self-touch were applied in the absence of visual feedback. In the second experiment, we tested the role of visual feedback in this bodily illusion. Finally, in the third experiment, we compared active and passive self-touch to the classical RHI in which the touch is administered by the experimenter. We hypothesized that active self-touch would increase ownership over the virtual hand through the addition of motor signals strengthening the bodily illusion. The results indicated that active self-touch elicited stronger illusory ownership compared to passive self-touch and sensory only stimulation, and indicate an important role of active self-touch in the formation of bodily self.

  1. Psychological and Pedagogic Conditions of Activating Creative Activity in Students for Successful Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abykanova, Bakytgul; Bilyalova, Zhupar; Makhatova, Valentina; Idrissov, Salamat; Nugumanov, Samal

    2016-01-01

    Creative activity of a pedagogic process subject depends on the pedagogue's position, on his faith in the abilities to learn successfully, on encouragement of achievements, stimulating the initiative and activity. Successful learning by activating creative activity is possible with the presence of respectful attitude towards the pedagogic process…

  2. An Activity Theory View on Learning Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosvold, Reidar; Bjuland, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    Learning study has been used by many to develop exemplary teaching in school, and this approach has recently been adopted for use in kindergarten as well. When using such approaches in different settings than they were intended for, several challenges potentially arise. This article discusses the implementation of a learning study approach in a…

  3. Learning Choices, Older Australians and Active Ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulton-Lewis, Gillian M.; Buys, Laurie

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the findings of qualitative, semistructured interviews conducted with 40 older Australian participants who either did or did not engage in organized learning. Phenomenology was used to guide the interviews and analysis to explore the lived learning experiences and perspectives of these older people. Their experiences of…

  4. Active Learning of Classification Models with Likert-Scale Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yanbing; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2017-01-01

    Annotation of classification data by humans can be a time-consuming and tedious process. Finding ways of reducing the annotation effort is critical for building the classification models in practice and for applying them to a variety of classification tasks. In this paper, we develop a new active learning framework that combines two strategies to reduce the annotation effort. First, it relies on label uncertainty information obtained from the human in terms of the Likert-scale feedback. Second, it uses active learning to annotate examples with the greatest expected change. We propose a Bayesian approach to calculate the expectation and an incremental SVM solver to reduce the time complexity of the solvers. We show the combination of our active learning strategy and the Likert-scale feedback can learn classification models more rapidly and with a smaller number of labeled instances than methods that rely on either Likert-scale labels or active learning alone.

  5. Telling Active Learning Pedagogies Apart: from theory to practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey Hood Cattaneo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Designing learning environments to incorporate active learning pedagogies is difficult as definitions are often contested and intertwined. This article seeks to determine whether classification of active learning pedagogies (i.e., project-based, problem-based, inquiry-based, case-based, and discovery-based, through theoretical and practical lenses, could function as a useful tool for researchers and practitioners in comparing pedagogies. This article classified five active learning pedagogies based on six constructivist elements. The comparison was completed through a comparative analysis and a content analysis informed by a systematic literature review. The findings were that learner-centeredness is a primary goal of all pedagogies; however, there is a strong dissonance between each pedagogy’s theoretical underpinnings and implementation realities. This dissonance complicates differentiating active learning pedagogies and classification as a comparative tool has proved to have limited usefulness.

  6. Feasibility of Active Machine Learning for Multiclass Compound Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Tobias; Flachsenberg, Florian; von Luxburg, Ulrike; Rarey, Matthias

    2016-01-25

    A common task in the hit-to-lead process is classifying sets of compounds into multiple, usually structural classes, which build the groundwork for subsequent SAR studies. Machine learning techniques can be used to automate this process by learning classification models from training compounds of each class. Gathering class information for compounds can be cost-intensive as the required data needs to be provided by human experts or experiments. This paper studies whether active machine learning can be used to reduce the required number of training compounds. Active learning is a machine learning method which processes class label data in an iterative fashion. It has gained much attention in a broad range of application areas. In this paper, an active learning method for multiclass compound classification is proposed. This method selects informative training compounds so as to optimally support the learning progress. The combination with human feedback leads to a semiautomated interactive multiclass classification procedure. This method was investigated empirically on 15 compound classification tasks containing 86-2870 compounds in 3-38 classes. The empirical results show that active learning can solve these classification tasks using 10-80% of the data which would be necessary for standard learning techniques.

  7. Lifelong learning for active ageing in nordic museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Tine; Grut, Sara

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we develop a framework that demonstrates how older adults need to develop diverse capabilities in relation to their educational life course through engagements in Nordic museums, archives and street art activities. We discuss how European museums have taken up UNESCO’s approach...... to lifelong learning as a way to conceptualise activities for older adults’ in museums, as we emphasise an approach to adult education for active ageing articulated as ‘lifelong learning for active ageing’. To illustrate this framing, we outline a number of activities taken from publications, cultural sites...... and conferences in which we have been involved over the last decade in the context of the Nordic Centre of Heritage Learning and Creativity in Östersund, Sweden. We argue that lifelong learning for active ageing in cultural heritage institutions can contribute to the development of older adults’ civic...

  8. Effect of voluntary exercise on BDNF/TrkB gene expression and alcohol intake.

    OpenAIRE

    Jonsson, Josefine

    2012-01-01

    Voluntary wheel running is rewarding and believed to activate the same brain reward system as in alcohol and drug addiction. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a well-known growth factor widely expressed in the brain, is modulated by both voluntary exercise and alcohol consumption. The aim of this study was to evaluate how voluntary exercise affects the expression levels of BDNF and its receptor TrkB in brain regions involved in positive and negative reinforcement. Additionally we want...

  9. Voluntary euthanasia: a utilitarian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Peter

    2003-10-01

    Belgium legalised voluntary euthanasia in 2002, thus ending the long isolation of the Netherlands as the only country in which doctors could openly give lethal injections to patients who have requested help in dying. Meanwhile in Oregon, in the United States, doctors may prescribe drugs for terminally ill patients, who can use them to end their life--if they are able to swallow and digest them. But despite President Bush's oft-repeated statements that his philosophy is to 'trust individuals to make the right decisions' and his opposition to 'distant bureaucracies', his administration is doing its best to prevent Oregonians acting in accordance with a law that its voters have twice ratified. The situation regarding voluntary euthanasia around the world is therefore very much in flux. This essay reviews ethical arguments regarding voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide from a utilitarian perspective. I shall begin by asking why it is normally wrong to kill an innocent person, and whether these reasons apply to aiding a person who, when rational and competent, asks to be killed or given the means to commit suicide. Then I shall consider more specific utilitarian arguments for and against permitting voluntary euthanasia.

  10. Social Cohesion and Voluntary Associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuser, Brian L.

    2005-01-01

    Voluntary organizations exert great influence over how social norms and ethical codes are guided into action. As such, they have a significant impact on societal levels of social cohesion. Although social capital involves generalized trust becoming manifest as spontaneous sociability, social cohesion is determined by how that sociability is…

  11. Voluntary Incentive Early Retirement Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Dialogues, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Arrangements in educational institutions for voluntary early retirement programs are discussed. Retirement at any age can be a profound and stressful lifetime change; and it can also represent a welcome transition into newly satisfying and rewarding opportunities. The focus is on: mandatory retirement (exceptions and the new meaning of "early");…

  12. Voluntary disclosure: Evidence from UK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.S. Zourarakis (Nicolaos)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThis paper investigates the voluntary disclosure of Intellectual Capital (IC) of British firms and provides some evidence on an unexplored area of the literature; that of the association of Corporate Governance (CG) with IC disclosure. Inconsistent with expectations, the results show tha

  13. Technology transfer and technological learning through CERN's procurement activity

    CERN Document Server

    Autio, Erkko; Hameri, Ari-Pekka; CERN. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    This report analyses the technological learning and innovation benefits derived from CERN's procurement activity during the period 1997-2001. The base population of our study, the technology-intensive suppliers to CERN, consisted of 629 companies out of 6806 companies during the same period, representing 1197 MCHF in procurement. The main findings from the study can be summarized as follows: the various learning and innovation benefits (e.g., technological learning, organizational capability development, market learning) tend to occur together. Learning and innovation benefits appear to be regulated by the quality of the supplier's relationship with CERN: the greater the amount of social capital built into the relationship, the greater the learning and innovation benefits. Regardless of relationship quality, virtually all suppliers derived significant marketing reference benefits from CERN. Many corollary benefits are associated with procurement activity. As an example, as many as 38% of the respondents devel...

  14. Principles of Language Learning Activity Design Based on Constructivism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于玉星

    2010-01-01

    <正>This essay introduces constructivism and its four key theories in learning and explores its applications in language learning activity design.Following the theoretical background analysis,it proposes three principles concerning English language teaching activity design,namely interactive thinking principle,I + 1 principle and authentic communication principle.This paper also provides some practical teaching activities such as supporting examples of how these three principles can work in language teaching.

  15. Facilitating Learning in Large Lecture Classes: Testing the “Teaching Team” Approach to Peer Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Stanger-Hall, Kathrin F.; Lang, Sarah; Maas, Martha

    2010-01-01

    We tested the effect of voluntary peer-facilitated study groups on student learning in large introductory biology lecture classes. The peer facilitators (preceptors) were trained as part of a Teaching Team (faculty, graduate assistants, and preceptors) by faculty and Learning Center staff. Each preceptor offered one weekly study group to all students in the class. All individual study groups were similar in that they applied active-learning strategies to the class material, but they differed ...

  16. Moments of movement: active learning and practice development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewing, Jan

    2010-01-01

    As our understanding of practice development becomes more sophisticated, we enhance our understanding of how the facilitation of learning in and from practice, can be more effectively achieved. This paper outlines an approach for enabling and maximizing learning within practice development known as 'Active Learning'. It considers how, given establishing a learning culture is a prerequisite for the sustainability of PD within organisations, practice developers can do more to maximize learning for practitioners and other stakeholders. Active Learning requires that more attention be given by organisations committed to PD, at a corporate and strategic level for how learning strategies are developed in the workplace. Specifically, a move away from a heavy reliance on training may be required. Practice development facilitators also need to review: how they organise and offer learning, so that learning strategies are consistent with the vision, aims and processes of PD; have skills in the planning, delivery and evaluation of learning as part of their role and influence others who provide more traditional methods of training and education.

  17. Voluntary sterilization in Serbia: Unmet need?

    OpenAIRE

    Rašević Mirjana M.

    2002-01-01

    Is voluntary sterilization as a birth control method accepted in Serbia? This is certainly a question that is being imposed for research, regardless of the fact that voluntary sterilization is neither accessible nor promoted. Most importantly because there is no understanding in the social nor political sphere for legalization of voluntary sterilization as a form of birth control, apart from the clear necessity for this, first, step. They are: the recognition that voluntary sterilization is a...

  18. Using active learning methodologies in physical chemistry in CLIL contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Recatalá

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the main objectives of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA is to promote a change toward a student-centred education model. This fact has led to the implementation of novel methodologies based on active learning, aimed at engaging students’ interest. This implementation has been usually accompanied by significant changes in both the teaching and learning processes in European universities. Furthermore, teaching a subject through the medium of a foreign language has also been gaining attention over the past few years. More specifically, this approach commonly known as Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL has been employed for the simultaneous learning of content and English in a number of European countries. In this contribution we report on the active learning methods implemented in a Physical Chemistry course, as well as the efforts devoted to Content and English Language Integration in this subject. This research analyses a series of factors that can contribute to the global learning and teaching experience when both active learning and CLIL are implemented in the Physical Chemistry classroom. Some examples of them include changes in attitudes towards the subject, engagement and motivation during the course, perception of English learning, and in general, students’ satisfaction with the learning process.

  19. Medical Student Perspectives of Active Learning: A Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walling, Anne; Istas, Kathryn; Bonaminio, Giulia A; Paolo, Anthony M; Fontes, Joseph D; Davis, Nancy; Berardo, Benito A

    2017-01-01

    Phenomenon: Medical student perspectives were sought about active learning, including concerns, challenges, perceived advantages and disadvantages, and appropriate role in the educational process. Focus groups were conducted with students from all years and campuses of a large U.S. state medical school. Students had considerable experience with active learning prior to medical school and conveyed accurate understanding of the concept and its major strategies. They appreciated the potential of active learning to deepen and broaden learning and its value for long-term professional development but had significant concerns about the efficiency of the process, the clarity of expectations provided, and the importance of receiving preparatory materials. Most significantly, active learning experiences were perceived as disconnected from grading and even as impeding preparation for school and national examinations. Insights: Medical students understand the concepts of active learning and have considerable experience in several formats prior to medical school. They are generally supportive of active learning concepts but frustrated by perceived inefficiencies and lack of contribution to the urgencies of achieving optimal grades and passing United States Medical Licensing Examinations, especially Step 1.

  20. INTEGRATING ACTIVE LEARNING IN A COLLEGE SPEAKING CLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pryla Rochmahwati

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Active learning strategies provide a wide variety of activities which can be integrated in a College EFL Class especially on Speaking 1 Course at Ponorogo Islamic State College. They provide many benefits, such as giving the students’ chances to apply various ways in order to comprehend the material. Also, they emphasize the significance of the learner’s involvement in the learning process. Active Learning strategies are considered appropriate to give students the same amount of chance in practicing their speaking skill and to pay attention in creating a learning situation. Some active learning strategies including the advantages and their application procedures are intended to help learners achieve the objective of Speaking1 course are presented in the article. Lecturers may, however, find that some just do not fit their style of teaching or that others would work well in their speaking class or with modifications. On the other hand, there are some obstacles that occur during theimplementation of active learning, namely disinterested students and time pressures. Keywords: active learning, speaking

  1. 22 CFR 513.210 - Voluntary exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Voluntary exclusion. 513.210 Section 513.210... GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Effect of Action § 513.210 Voluntary exclusion. Persons who accept voluntary exclusions under § 513.315 are excluded in accordance with the terms of...

  2. Enhancing learning in geosciences and water engineering via lab activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valyrakis, Manousos; Cheng, Ming

    2016-04-01

    This study focuses on the utilisation of lab based activities to enhance the learning experience of engineering students studying Water Engineering and Geosciences. In particular, the use of modern highly visual and tangible presentation techniques within an appropriate laboratory based space are used to introduce undergraduate students to advanced engineering concepts. A specific lab activity, namely "Flood-City", is presented as a case study to enhance the active engagement rate, improve the learning experience of the students and better achieve the intended learning objectives of the course within a broad context of the engineering and geosciences curriculum. Such activities, have been used over the last few years from the Water Engineering group @ Glasgow, with success for outreach purposes (e.g. Glasgow Science Festival and demos at the Glasgow Science Centre and Kelvingrove museum). The activity involves a specific setup of the demonstration flume in a sand-box configuration, with elements and activities designed so as to gamely the overall learning activity. Social media platforms can also be used effectively to the same goals, particularly in cases were the students already engage in these online media. To assess the effectiveness of this activity a purpose designed questionnaire is offered to the students. Specifically, the questionnaire covers several aspects that may affect student learning, performance and satisfaction, such as students' motivation, factors to effective learning (also assessed by follow-up quizzes), and methods of communication and assessment. The results, analysed to assess the effectiveness of the learning activity as the students perceive it, offer a promising potential for the use of such activities in outreach and learning.

  3. An active learning organisation: teaching projects in electrical engineering education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christensen, H.-P.; Vos, Henk; de Graaff, E.; Lemoult, B.

    2004-01-01

    The introduction of active learning in engineering education is often started by enthusiastic teachers or change agents. They usually encounter resistance from stakeholders such as colleagues, department boards or students. For a successful introduction these stakeholders all have to learn what

  4. Enhanced Memory as a Common Effect of Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markant, Douglas B.; Ruggeri, Azzurra; Gureckis, Todd M.; Xu, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Despite widespread consensus among educators that "active learning" leads to better outcomes than comparatively passive forms of instruction, it is often unclear why these benefits arise. In this article, we review research showing that the opportunity to control the information experienced while learning leads to improved memory…

  5. Enhanced Memory as a Common Effect of Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markant, Douglas B.; Ruggeri, Azzurra; Gureckis, Todd M.; Xu, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Despite widespread consensus among educators that "active learning" leads to better outcomes than comparatively passive forms of instruction, it is often unclear why these benefits arise. In this article, we review research showing that the opportunity to control the information experienced while learning leads to improved memory…

  6. An active role for machine learning in drug development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the complexity of biological systems, cutting-edge machine-learning methods will be critical for future drug development. In particular, machine-vision methods to extract detailed information from imaging assays and active-learning methods to guide experimentation will be required to overcome the dimensionality problem in drug development. PMID:21587249

  7. Creating Activating Events for Transformative Learning in a Prison Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, Cheryl H.; Woods, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we interpreted, in light of Mezirow's theory of transformative learning, interviews with 13 educators regarding their work with marginalized adult learners in prisons in the northeastern United States. Transformative learning may have been aided by the educators' response to unplanned activating events, humor, and respect, and…

  8. Promoting Technology-Assisted Active Learning in Computer Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jinzhu; Hargis, Jace

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes specific active learning strategies for teaching computer science, integrating both instructional technologies and non-technology-based strategies shown to be effective in the literature. The theoretical learning components addressed include an intentional method to help students build metacognitive abilities, as well as…

  9. Priming voluntary autobiographical memories: Implications for the organisation of autobiographical memory and voluntary recall processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, John H; Clevinger, Amanda M

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to show that voluntary autobiographical memories could be primed by the prior activation of autobiographical memories. Three experiments demonstrated voluntary memory priming with three different approaches. In Experiment 1 primed participants were asked to recall memories from their elementary school years. In a subsequent memory task primed participants were asked to recall memories from any time period, and they produced significantly more memories from their elementary school years than unprimed participants. In Experiment 2 primed participants were asked to recall what they were doing when they had heard various news events occurring between 1998 and 2005. Subsequently these participants produced significantly more memories from this time period than unprimed participants. In Experiment 3 primed participants were asked to recall memories from their teenage years. Subsequently these participants were able to recall more memories from ages 13-15 than unprimed participants, where both had only 1 second to produce a memory. We argue that the results support the notion that episodic memories can activate one another and that some of them are organised according to lifetime periods. We further argue that the results have implications for the reminiscence bump and voluntary recall of the past.

  10. Changing University Students’ Alternative Conceptions of Optics by Active Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zalkida Hadžibegović

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Active learning is individual and group participation in effective activities such as in-class observing, writing, experimenting, discussion, solving problems, and talking about to-be-learned topics. Some instructors believe that active learning is impossible, or at least extremely difficult to achieve in large lecture sessions. Nevertheless, the truly impressive implementation results of theSCALE-UP learning environment suggest that such beliefs are false (Beichner et al., 2000. In this study, we present a design of an active learning environment with positive effect on students. The design is based on the following elements: (1 helping students to learn from interactive lecture experiment; (2 guiding students to use justified explanation and prediction after observing and exploring a phenomenon; (3 developing a conceptual question sequencedesigned for use in an interactive lecture with students answering questions in worksheets by writing and drawing; (4 evaluating students’ conceptual change and gains by questions related to light reflection, refraction, and image formation in an exam held a week after the active learning session. Data were collected from 95 science freshmen with different secondary school backgrounds. They participated in geometrical optics classes organized for collecting research results during and after only one active learning session.The results have showed that around 60% of the students changed their initial alternative conceptions of vision and of image formation. It was also found that a large group of university students is likely to be engaged in active learning, shifting from a passive role they usually play during teacher’s lectures.

  11. Combining traditional anatomy lectures with e-learning activities: how do students perceive their learning experience?

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate how students perceived their learning experience when combining traditional anatomy lectures with preparatory e-learning activities that consisted of fill-in-the-blank assignments, videos, and multiple-choice quizzes. Methods A qualitative study was conducted to explore changes in study behaviour and perception of learning. Three group interviews with students were conducted and thematically analysed. Results Data was categorized into fo...

  12. Active Learning to Improve Fifth Grade Mathematics Achievement in Banten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andri Suherman

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Teaching for active learning is a pedagogical technique that has been actively promoted in Indonesian education through government reform efforts and international development assistance projects for decades. Recently, elementary schools in Banten province received training in active learning instructional strategies from the USAID-funded project, Decentralized Basic Education 2. Post-training evaluations conducted by lecturers from the University of Sultan Ageng Tirtayasa (UNTIRTA: Universitas Sultan Ageng Tirtayasa suggested that teachers were successfully employing active learning strategies in some subjects, but not mathematics. In order to understand the difficulties teachers were having in teaching for active learning in mathematics, and to assist them in using active learning strategies, a team of lecturers from UNTIRTA designed and carried out an action research project to train teachers in an elementary school in the city of Cilegon to use a technique called Magic Fingers in teaching Grade 5 multiplication. During the course of the project the research team discovered that teachers were having problems transferring knowledge gained from training in one context and subject to other school subjects and contexts. Key Words: Mathematics, Teaching for Active Learning, Indonesia, Banten

  13. Physical Activity and Wellness: Applied Learning through Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Lynn Hunt; Franzidis, Alexia

    2015-01-01

    This article describes how two university professors teamed up to initiate a university-sponsored physical activity and wellness expo in an effort to promote an authentic and transformative learning experience for preservice students.

  14. A Unified Active Learning Framework for Biomedical Relation Extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Tao Zhang; Min-Lie Huang; Xiao-Yan Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Supervised machine learning methods have been employed with great success in the task of biomedical relation extraction.However,existing methods are not practical enough,since manual construction of large training data is very expensive.Therefore,active learning is urgently needed for designing practical relation extraction methods with little human effort.In this paper,we describe a unified active learning framework.Particularly,our framework systematically addresses some practical issues during active learning process,including a strategy for selecting informative data,a data diversity selection algorithm,an active feature acquisition method,and an informative feature selection algorithm,in order to meet the challenges due to the immense amount of complex and diverse biomedical text.The framework is evaluated on protein-protein interaction (PPI) extraction and is shown to achieve promising results with a significant reduction in editorial effort and labeling time.

  15. Teachers' Perceptions and Practices of Active Learning in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Teachers' Perceptions and Practices of Active Learning in Haramaya University, ... Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal ... method, lack of students' interest, shortage of time, lack of instructional material and large class size. Finally ...

  16. Lessons learned during active epidemiological surveillance of Ebola ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lessons learned during active epidemiological surveillance of Ebola And Marburg Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Epidemics in Africa. ... During epidemics in rural settings, outbreak investigations have shown multiple introductions of the virus into ...

  17. Physical Activity and Wellness: Applied Learning through Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Lynn Hunt; Franzidis, Alexia

    2015-01-01

    This article describes how two university professors teamed up to initiate a university-sponsored physical activity and wellness expo in an effort to promote an authentic and transformative learning experience for preservice students.

  18. Voluntary exercise improves performance of a discrimination task through effects on the striatal dopamine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Meghan C.; Stansfield, Katherine J.; Green, John T.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that voluntary exercise facilitates discrimination learning in a modified T-maze. There is evidence implicating the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) as the substrate for this task. The present experiments examined whether changes in DLS dopamine receptors might underlie the exercise-associated facilitation. Infusing a D1R antagonist into the DLS prior to discrimination learning facilitated the performance of nonexercising rats but not exercising rats. Infusing a D2R antagonist impaired the performance of exercising rats but not nonexercising rats. Exercise-associated facilitation of this task may rely on an exercise-induced decrease in D1R and increase in D2R activation in the DLS. PMID:24934332

  19. Learning Microbiology Through Cooperation: Designing Cooperative Learning Activities that Promote Interdependence, Interaction, and Accountability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine E. Trempy

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A microbiology course and its corresponding learning activities have been structured according to the Cooperative Learning Model. This course, The World According to Microbes, integrates science, math, engineering, and technology (SMET majors and non-SMET majors into teams of students charged with problem solving activities that are microbial in origin. In this study we describe development of learning activities that utilize key components of Cooperative Learning—positive interdependence, promotive interaction, individual accountability, teamwork skills, and group processing. Assessments and evaluations over an 8-year period demonstrate high retention of key concepts in microbiology and high student satisfaction with the course.

  20. International Voluntary Renewable Energy Markets (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, J.

    2012-06-01

    This presentation provides an overview of international voluntary renewable energy markets, with a focus on the United States and Europe. The voluntary renewable energy market is the market in which consumers and institutions purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs on a voluntary basis. In 2010, the U.S. voluntary market was estimated at 35 terawatt-hours (TWh) compared to 300 TWh in the European market, though key differences exist. On a customer basis, Australia has historically had the largest number of customers, pricing for voluntary certificates remains low, at less than $1 megawatt-hour, though prices depend on technology.

  1. A STUDY OF STUDENTS’ LEARNING STYLES AND EXPERIMENTAL ACTIVITIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    This article reports a study using a self-reporting questionnaire adapted from Reid (1987) toexamine the preferred learning styles of the students majoring in English in Hubei Three Gorges Univer-sity Humanities’ College,Hubei,China.Based on the results the study generated,activities were createdthat could reflect the students’ learning style preferences.These activities were effective in motivatingour students and developing productive language skills.

  2. Active Learning of Markov Decision Processes for System Verification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yingke; Nielsen, Thomas Dyhre

    2012-01-01

    of input/output observations. While alleviating the problem of manually constructing a system model, the collection/generation of observed system behaviors can also prove demanding. Consequently we seek to minimize the amount of data required. In this paper we propose an algorithm for learning...... deterministic Markov decision processes from data by actively guiding the selection of input actions. The algorithm is empirically analyzed by learning system models of slot machines, and it is demonstrated that the proposed active learning procedure can significantly reduce the amount of data required...... demanding process, and this shortcoming has motivated the development of algorithms for automatically learning system models from observed system behaviors. Recently, algorithms have been proposed for learning Markov decision process representations of reactive systems based on alternating sequences...

  3. Create Effective Activities for Students to Learn English Literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩建萍; 谷婷婷; 田颖慧

    2013-01-01

    Rather than only learning English grammar and some other language knowledge about English, learning English litera⁃ture is another effective way for students to learn English since they can not only learn the native English by reading some English literature but also get familiar with different cultures and background knowledge of English countries. As an English teacher, the main job in the literature class is to design effective activities for students in order to let them comprehend texts that they read and improve their critical thinking. This paper is tend to discuss some activities, including pre-reading, reading and post-reading ac⁃tivities, which was used in my literature class and how they help the students learn English and improve their critical thinking.

  4. Active Learning: 101 Strategies To Teach Any Subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Mel

    This book contains specific, practical strategies that can be used for almost any subject matters to promote active learning. It brings together in one source a comprehensive collection of instructional strategies, with ways to get students to be active from the beginning through activities that build teamwork and get students thinking about the…

  5. Active Learning: 101 Strategies To Teach Any Subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Mel

    This book contains specific, practical strategies that can be used for almost any subject matters to promote active learning. It brings together in one source a comprehensive collection of instructional strategies, with ways to get students to be active from the beginning through activities that build teamwork and get students thinking about the…

  6. Integrative Student Learning: An Effective Team Learning Activity in a Learner-Centered Paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Karimi, RPh, PhD

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: An Integrative Student Learning (ISL activity was developed with the intent to enhance the dynamic of student teamwork and enhance student learning by fostering critical-thinking skills, self-directed learning skills, and active learning. Case Study: The ISL activity consists of three portions: teambuilding, teamwork, and a facilitator driven “closing the loop” feedback discussion. For teambuilding, a set of clue sheets or manufacturer‘s drug containers were distributed among student pairs who applied their pharmaceutical knowledge to identify two more student pairs with similar clues or drugs, thus building a team of six. For teamwork, each team completed online exams, composed of integrated pharmaceutical science questions with clinical correlates, using only selected online library resources. For the feedback discussion, facilitators evaluated student impressions, opened a discussion about the ISL activity, and provided feedback to teams’ impressions and questions. This study describes three different ISL activities developed and implemented over three days with first year pharmacy students. Facilitators’ interactions with students and three surveys indicated a majority of students preferred ISL over traditional team activities and over 90% agreed ISL activities promoted active learning, critical-thinking, self-directed learning, teamwork, and student confidence in online library searches. Conclusions: The ISL activity has proven to be an effective learning activity that promotes teamwork and integration of didactic pharmaceutical sciences to enhance student learning of didactic materials and confidence in searching online library resources. It was found that all of this can be accomplished in a short amount of class time with a very reasonable amount of preparation.

  7. Using the Learning Activities Survey to Examine Transformative Learning Experiences in Two Graduate Teacher Preparation Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruana, Vicki; Woodrow, Kelli; Pérez, Luis

    2015-01-01

    The Learning Activities Survey (LAS) detected whether, and to what extent, a perspective transformation occurred during two graduate courses in teacher preparation. The LAS examined the types of learning identified as contributing to their transformative experiences. This study examined pre-service teachers' critical reflection of the course…

  8. Forum: The Lecture and Student Learning. Lecture and Active Learning as a Dialectical Tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallin, Irwin

    2017-01-01

    Lecture remains a valuable tool in the student learning toolbox--one that at its best helps students unpack what they read for class, place course material in context, and see how a subject matter expert solves problems. It may be useful to think of lecture and active learning as a dialectical tension satisfied by the interactive lecture. Just as…

  9. Semi-automatic video semantic annotation based on active learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yan; Hua, Xian-Sheng; Dai, Li-Rong; Wang, Ren-Hua

    2005-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel semi-automatic annotation scheme for home videos based on active learning. It is well-known that there is a large gap between semantics and low-level features. To narrow down this gap, relevance feedback has been introduced in a number of literatures. Furthermore, to accelerate the convergence to the optimal result, several active learning schemes, in which the most informative samples are chosen to be annotated, have been proposed in literature instead of randomly selecting samples. In this paper, a representative active learning method is proposed, which local consistency of video content is effectively taken into consideration. The main idea is to exploit the global and local statistical characteristics of videos, and the temporal relationship between shots. The global model is trained on a smaller pre-labeled video dataset, and the local information is obtained online in the process of active learning, and will be used to adjust the initial global model adaptively. The experiment results show that the proposed active learning scheme has significantly improved the annotation performance compared with random selecting and common active learning method.

  10. Cognitive Neurostimulation: Learning to Volitionally Sustain Ventral Tegmental Area Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacInnes, Jeff J; Dickerson, Kathryn C; Chen, Nan-kuei; Adcock, R Alison

    2016-03-16

    Activation of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and mesolimbic networks is essential to motivation, performance, and learning. Humans routinely attempt to motivate themselves, with unclear efficacy or impact on VTA networks. Using fMRI, we found untrained participants' motivational strategies failed to consistently activate VTA. After real-time VTA neurofeedback training, however, participants volitionally induced VTA activation without external aids, relative to baseline, Pre-test, and control groups. VTA self-activation was accompanied by increased mesolimbic network connectivity. Among two comparison groups (no neurofeedback, false neurofeedback) and an alternate neurofeedback group (nucleus accumbens), none sustained activation in target regions of interest nor increased VTA functional connectivity. The results comprise two novel demonstrations: learning and generalization after VTA neurofeedback training and the ability to sustain VTA activation without external reward or reward cues. These findings suggest theoretical alignment of ideas about motivation and midbrain physiology and the potential for generalizable interventions to improve performance and learning.

  11. Mature students learning statistics: The activity theory perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Sue

    1993-09-01

    The concept of approach "stresses relationships between intention, process and outcome within a specified context as described by an individual" (Schmeck, 1988, p. 10). This paper explores the approaches to learning of a group of mature students from the theoretical perspective of activity theory in order to gain an insight into some of the ways statistics is learned. In this framework, learning, regarded as goal-directed behaviour, is analysed by exploring the socio-historical factors relating to students' self regulation of their cognitive activities. The material is derived from questionnaires and interviews with five students, and focuses on the students' own interpretations of the contexts affecting their approaches.

  12. The planning illusion: Does active planning of a learning route support learning as well as learners think it does?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonestroo, W.J.; Jong, de T.

    2012-01-01

    Is actively planning one’s learning route through a learning domain beneficial for learning? Moreover, can learners accurately judge the extent to which planning has been beneficial for them? This study examined the effects of active planning on learning. Participants received a tool in which they c

  13. Active learning increases student performance in science, engineering, and mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Scott; Eddy, Sarah L; McDonough, Miles; Smith, Michelle K; Okoroafor, Nnadozie; Jordt, Hannah; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2014-06-10

    To test the hypothesis that lecturing maximizes learning and course performance, we metaanalyzed 225 studies that reported data on examination scores or failure rates when comparing student performance in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses under traditional lecturing versus active learning. The effect sizes indicate that on average, student performance on examinations and concept inventories increased by 0.47 SDs under active learning (n = 158 studies), and that the odds ratio for failing was 1.95 under traditional lecturing (n = 67 studies). These results indicate that average examination scores improved by about 6% in active learning sections, and that students in classes with traditional lecturing were 1.5 times more likely to fail than were students in classes with active learning. Heterogeneity analyses indicated that both results hold across the STEM disciplines, that active learning increases scores on concept inventories more than on course examinations, and that active learning appears effective across all class sizes--although the greatest effects are in small (n ≤ 50) classes. Trim and fill analyses and fail-safe n calculations suggest that the results are not due to publication bias. The results also appear robust to variation in the methodological rigor of the included studies, based on the quality of controls over student quality and instructor identity. This is the largest and most comprehensive metaanalysis of undergraduate STEM education published to date. The results raise questions about the continued use of traditional lecturing as a control in research studies, and support active learning as the preferred, empirically validated teaching practice in regular classrooms.

  14. Active learning increases student performance in science, engineering, and mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Scott; Eddy, Sarah L.; McDonough, Miles; Smith, Michelle K.; Okoroafor, Nnadozie; Jordt, Hannah; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2014-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that lecturing maximizes learning and course performance, we metaanalyzed 225 studies that reported data on examination scores or failure rates when comparing student performance in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses under traditional lecturing versus active learning. The effect sizes indicate that on average, student performance on examinations and concept inventories increased by 0.47 SDs under active learning (n = 158 studies), and that the odds ratio for failing was 1.95 under traditional lecturing (n = 67 studies). These results indicate that average examination scores improved by about 6% in active learning sections, and that students in classes with traditional lecturing were 1.5 times more likely to fail than were students in classes with active learning. Heterogeneity analyses indicated that both results hold across the STEM disciplines, that active learning increases scores on concept inventories more than on course examinations, and that active learning appears effective across all class sizes—although the greatest effects are in small (n ≤ 50) classes. Trim and fill analyses and fail-safe n calculations suggest that the results are not due to publication bias. The results also appear robust to variation in the methodological rigor of the included studies, based on the quality of controls over student quality and instructor identity. This is the largest and most comprehensive metaanalysis of undergraduate STEM education published to date. The results raise questions about the continued use of traditional lecturing as a control in research studies, and support active learning as the preferred, empirically validated teaching practice in regular classrooms. PMID:24821756

  15. Collaborative Reflection activities with DynaLearn

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Or-Bach, R.; Bredeweg, B.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of collaborative reflection. The reflection is anchored in a specially designed task related to several earlier students' assignments that dealt with the construction of scientific qualitative models using DynaLearn. Video analysis was used to explore the

  16. Aligning Learning Activities with Instructional Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurvitch, Rachel; Metzler, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Model-based instruction has been increasingly used in physical education for the past two decades. Metzler (2011) identified eight instructional models that are commonly used in physical education today. Each model is designed to promote certain kinds of learning outcomes for students and to address different combinations of the national…

  17. Research and Teaching: Instructor Use of Group Active Learning in an Introductory Biology Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Anna Jo; Schussler, Elisabeth E.

    2016-01-01

    Active learning (or learner-centered) pedagogies have been shown to enhance student learning in introductory biology courses. Student collaboration has also been shown to enhance student learning and may be a critical part of effective active learning practices. This study focused on documenting the use of individual active learning and group…

  18. NDRC Released the Interim Measures on Voluntary Emission Reductions of GHG Trading and Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    National Development and Reform Commission issued the Interim Measures on Voluntary Emission Reduction of GHG Trading and Management (hereafter referred to as" Interim Measures") on June, 13th, 2012, which is formulated to encourage project-based voluntary emission reductions and ensure the proper operation of trading activities.

  19. 49 CFR 27.11 - Remedial action, voluntary action and compliance planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Remedial action, voluntary action and compliance....11 Remedial action, voluntary action and compliance planning. (a) Remedial action. (1) If the... activity in violation of this part, the recipient shall take such remedial action as the...

  20. Active teaching-learning methodologies: medical students' views of problem-based learning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Costa, José Roberto Bittencourt; Romano, Valéria Ferreira; Costa, Rosane Rodrigues; Gomes, Andréia Patrícia; Siqueira-Batista, Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    ...). In accordance to the new paradigm for medical training, the Centro Universitário Serra dos Órgãos (UNIFESO) established a teaching plan in 2005 using active methodologies, specifically problem-based learning...

  1. Active Learning and Engagement with the Wireless Indoor Location Device (WILD) Learning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldwin, M.; Samson, P. J.; Ojeda, L.; Miller, T.; Yu, J.

    2016-12-01

    The Wireless Indoor Location Device (WILD) Learning System being developed at the University of Michigan and the Education Technology company A2 Motus LLC provides a unique platform for social learning by allowing students to become active participants in live simulations of complex systems, like hurricane formation. The WILD Learning System enables teachers to engage students in kinesthetic activities that explore complex models from a wide variety of STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math) disciplines. The system provides students' location, orientation and motion within the classroom and assigns each student different parameters depending on the activity. For example, students learning about hurricanes could be assigned atmospheric pressure levels and asked to arrange themselves around the room to simulate a hurricane. The Wild Learning System software then takes the students' pressure readings and locations and projects their locations overlaid onto a real-time generated simulated pressure weather map enabling the observation of how their arrangement influences the pressure structure. The teacher then could have the students orient themselves in the direction they think the resulting wind field will be based on the pressure contours as the system can show an arrow originating from each of the students position in the direction that they are facing. The system also could incorporate a student response-type system for the instructor to then directly question students about other concepts and record their response to both the kinesthetic activity and other formative assessment questions. The WILD Learning System consists of a sensor package for each student in the class, beacons to enable precise localization of the students, software to calculate student location information, and educational software for a variety of activities. In addition, a software development kit (SDK) is under development that would allow others to create additional learning

  2. The voluntary control of facial action units in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, Pierre; Perron, Mélanie; Beaupré, Martin

    2010-04-01

    We investigated adults' voluntary control of 20 facial action units theoretically associated with 6 basic emotions (happiness, fear, anger, surprise, sadness, and disgust). Twenty young adults were shown video excerpts of facial action units and asked to reproduce them as accurately as possible. Facial Action Coding System (FACS; Ekman & Friesen, 1978a) coding of the facial productions showed that young adults succeeded in activating 18 of the 20 target actions units, although they often coactivated other action units. Voluntary control was clearly better for some action units than for others, with a pattern of differences between action units consistent with previous work in children and adolescents. Copyright 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  3. Redefining RECs: Additionality in the voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillenwater, Michael Wayne

    In the United States, electricity consumers are told that they can "buy" electricity from renewable energy projects, versus fossil fuel-fired facilities, through participation in a voluntary green power program. The marketing messages communicate to consumers that their participation and premium payments for a green label will cause additional renewable energy generation and thereby allow them to claim they consume electricity that is absent pollution as well as reduce pollutant emissions. Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) and wind energy are the basis for the majority of the voluntary green power market in the United States. This dissertation addresses the question: Do project developers respond to the voluntary REC market in the United States by altering their decisions to invest in wind turbines? This question is investigated by modeling and probabilistically quantifying the effect of the voluntary REC market on a representative wind power investor in the United States using data from formal expert elicitations of active participants in the industry. It is further explored by comparing the distribution of a sample of wind power projects supplying the voluntary green power market in the United States against an economic viability model that incorporates geographic factors. This dissertation contributes the first quantitative analysis of the effect of the voluntary REC market on project investment. It is found that 1) RECs should be not treated as equivalent to emission offset credits, 2) there is no clearly credible role for voluntary market RECs in emissions trading markets without dramatic restructuring of one or both markets and the environmental commodities they trade, and 3) the use of RECs in entity-level GHG emissions accounting (i.e., "carbon footprinting") leads to double counting of emissions and therefore is not justified. The impotence of the voluntary REC market was, at least in part, due to the small magnitude of the REC price signal and lack of

  4. A Nap But Not Rest or Activity Consolidates Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Stefan; Klann, Juliane; Schattka, Kerstin I.; Bauhoff, Sonja; Borcherding, Gesa; Nosbüsch, Nicole; Struth, Linda; Binkofski, Ferdinand C.; Werner, Cornelius J.

    2017-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that a period of sleep after a motor learning task is a relevant factor for memory consolidation. However, it is yet open whether this also holds true for language-related learning. Therefore, the present study compared the short- and long-term effects of a daytime nap, rest, or an activity task after vocabulary learning on learning outcome. Thirty healthy subjects were divided into three treatment groups. Each group received a pseudo-word learning task in which pictures of monsters were associated with unique pseudo-word names. At the end of the learning block a first test was administered. Then, one group went for a 90-min nap, one for a waking rest period, and one for a resting session with interfering activity at the end during which a new set of monster names was to be learned. After this block, all groups performed a first re-test of the names that they initially learned. On the morning of the following day, a second re-test was administered to all groups. The nap group showed significant improvement from test to re-test and a stable performance onto the second re-test. In contrast, the rest and the interference groups showed decline in performance from test to re-test, with persistently low performance at re-test 2. The 3 (GROUP) × 3 (TIME) ANOVA revealed a significant interaction, indicating that the type of activity (nap/rest/interfering action) after initial learning actually had an influence on the memory outcome. These data are discussed with respect to translation to clinical settings with suggestions for improvement of intervention outcome after speech-language therapy if it is followed by a nap rather than interfering activity. PMID:28559856

  5. A Nap But Not Rest or Activity Consolidates Language Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Heim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that a period of sleep after a motor learning task is a relevant factor for memory consolidation. However, it is yet open whether this also holds true for language-related learning. Therefore, the present study compared the short- and long-term effects of a daytime nap, rest, or an activity task after vocabulary learning on learning outcome. Thirty healthy subjects were divided into three treatment groups. Each group received a pseudo-word learning task in which pictures of monsters were associated with unique pseudo-word names. At the end of the learning block a first test was administered. Then, one group went for a 90-min nap, one for a waking rest period, and one for a resting session with interfering activity at the end during which a new set of monster names was to be learned. After this block, all groups performed a first re-test of the names that they initially learned. On the morning of the following day, a second re-test was administered to all groups. The nap group showed significant improvement from test to re-test and a stable performance onto the second re-test. In contrast, the rest and the interference groups showed decline in performance from test to re-test, with persistently low performance at re-test 2. The 3 (GROUP × 3 (TIME ANOVA revealed a significant interaction, indicating that the type of activity (nap/rest/interfering action after initial learning actually had an influence on the memory outcome. These data are discussed with respect to translation to clinical settings with suggestions for improvement of intervention outcome after speech-language therapy if it is followed by a nap rather than interfering activity.

  6. Using evaluation strategically to promote active learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Münster, Marie

    they get them too late. The students have formerly been assessed through two group reports (each 25% of final grade) and an individual oral examination (50% of final grade). The students work a lot and learn a lot through working with the reports, but it is also very time consuming to write them as well...... for discussions and organising the course with group work allows for plenty of that. Furthermore, as group work is how many companies organise work today – the ability to cooperate well in groups is assessed to be an important competence for engineering students to achieve. The course is taught using...... as to grade them. For this purpose it was decided to change one report into a poster including a 15 minute group oral presentation. The oral examination allows for individual assessment of the students, for assessment of conceptual understanding and for learning during the examination. This type of evaluation...

  7. Colors of Competence in Competition: A Guide for Active Learning in Competitive Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Eve; Rasmussen, Jennifer F.

    2013-01-01

    The idea of actively involving children in the learning process can be beneficial for both teacher and student on a number of levels. Allowing students in physical education class to make choices has been incorporated into elementary-age teaching successfully. As a way to invite students to become more active participants in their learning,…

  8. APAs Constraints to Voluntary Movements: The Case for Limb Movements Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldissera, Fausto G.; Tesio, Luigi

    2017-01-01

    When rhythmically moving two limbs in either the same or in opposite directions, one coupling mode meets constraints that are absent in the other mode. Isodirectional (ISO) flexion-extensions of the ipsilateral hand and foot can be easily performed with either the hand prone or supine. Instead, antidirectional (ANTI) movements require attentive effort and irresistibly tend to reverse into ISO when frequency increases. Experimental evidence indicates that the direction dependent easy-difficult dichotomy is caused by interference of the anticipatory postural commands associated to movements of one limb with voluntary commands to the other limb. Excitability of the resting wrist muscles is subliminally modulated at the period of ipsilateral foot oscillations, being phase-opposite in the antagonists and distributed so as to facilitate ISO and obstacle ANTI coupling of the hand (either prone or supine) with the foot. Modulation is driven by cortical signals dispatched to the forearm simultaneously with the voluntary commands moving the foot. If right foot oscillations are performed when standing on the left foot with the right hand touching a fixed support, the subliminal excitability modulation is replaced by overt contractions of forearm muscles conforming the APAs features. This suggests that during hand-foot ANTI coupling the voluntary commands to forearm muscles are contrasted by APAs commands of opposite sign linked to foot oscillations. Correlation between the easy-difficult dichotomy and the APAs distribution is also found in coupled adduction-abduction of the arms or hands in the transverse plane and in coupled flexion-extension of the arms in the parasagittal plane. In all these movements, APAs commands linked to the movement of each limb reach the motor pathways to the contralateral muscles homologous to the prime movers and can interfere during coupling with their voluntary activation. APAs are also generated in postural muscles of trunk and lower limbs and

  9. Combining traditional anatomy lectures with e-learning activities: how do students perceive their learning experience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochner, Lukas; Wieser, Heike; Waldboth, Simone; Mischo-Kelling, Maria

    2016-02-21

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how students perceived their learning experience when combining traditional anatomy lectures with preparatory e-learning activities that consisted of fill-in-the-blank assignments, videos, and multiple-choice quizzes. A qualitative study was conducted to explore changes in study behaviour and perception of learning. Three group interviews with students were conducted and thematically analysed. Data was categorized into four themes: 1. Approaching the course material, 2. Understanding the material, 3. Consolidating the material, and 4. Perceived learning outcome. Students appreciated the clear structure of the course, and reported that online activities encouraged them towards a first engagement with the material. They felt that they were more active during in-class sessions, described self-study before the end-of-term exam as easier, and believed that contents would remain in their memories for a longer time. By adjusting already existing resources, lectures can be combined fairly easily and cost-effectively with preparatory e-learning activities. The creation of online components promote well-structured courses, can help minimize 'student passivity' as a characteristic element of lectures, and can support students in distributing their studies throughout the term, thus suggesting enhanced learning. Further research work should be designed to confirm the afore-mentioned findings through objective measurements of student learning outcomes.

  10. Voluntary Truck and Bus Fuel-Economy-Program marketing plan. Final technical report, September 29, 1980-January 29, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-01-01

    The aim of the program is to improve the utilization of fuel by commercial trucks and buses by updating and implementing specific approaches for educating and monitoring the trucking industry on methods and means of conserving fuels. The following outlines the marketing plan projects: increase use of program logo by voluntary program members and others; solicit trade publication membership and support; brief Congressional delegations on fuel conservation efforts; increase voluntary program presence before trade groups; increase voluntary program presence at truck and trade shows; create a voluntary program display for use at trade shows and in other areas; review voluntary program graphics; increase voluntary program membership; and produce placemats carrying fuel conservation messages; produce a special edition of Fuel Economy News, emphasizing the driver's involvement in fuel conservation; produce posters carrying voluntary program fuel conservation message. Project objectives, activities, and results for each project are summarized.

  11. Semantic-gap-oriented active learning for multilabel image annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jinhui; Zha, Zheng-Jun; Tao, Dacheng; Chua, Tat-Seng

    2012-04-01

    User interaction is an effective way to handle the semantic gap problem in image annotation. To minimize user effort in the interactions, many active learning methods were proposed. These methods treat the semantic concepts individually or correlatively. However, they still neglect the key motivation of user feedback: to tackle the semantic gap. The size of the semantic gap of each concept is an important factor that affects the performance of user feedback. User should pay more efforts to the concepts with large semantic gaps, and vice versa. In this paper, we propose a semantic-gap-oriented active learning method, which incorporates the semantic gap measure into the information-minimization-based sample selection strategy. The basic learning model used in the active learning framework is an extended multilabel version of the sparse-graph-based semisupervised learning method that incorporates the semantic correlation. Extensive experiments conducted on two benchmark image data sets demonstrated the importance of bringing the semantic gap measure into the active learning process.

  12. Reward and reinforcement activity in the nucleus accumbens during learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Thomas Gale

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The nucleus accumbens core (NAcc has been implicated in learning associations between sensory cues and profitable motor responses. However, the precise mechanisms that underlie these functions remain unclear. We recorded single-neuron activity from the NAcc of primates trained to perform a visual-motor associative learning task. During learning, we found two distinct classes of NAcc neurons. The first class demonstrated progressive increases in firing rates at the go-cue, feedback/tone and reward epochs of the task, as novel associations were learned. This suggests that these neurons may play a role in the exploitation of rewarding behaviors. In contrast, the second class exhibited attenuated firing rates, but only at the reward epoch of the task. These findings suggest that some NAcc neurons play a role in reward-based reinforcement during learning.

  13. Tractor Mechanics. Maintaining and Servicing the Engine, Learning Activity Packages 78-89; Lubricating the Tractor, Learning Activity Packages 90-94; Painting the Tractor, Learning Activity Packages 95-96.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    This series of learning activity packages focuses on three areas of tractor mechanics: (1) maintaining and servicing the engine, (2) lubricating the tractor, and (3) painting the tractor. Each of the nineteen illustrated learning activity packages follows a typical format: introduction, directions, objectives, learning activities, tools and…

  14. Chronic Knee Injuries Impair the Voluntary Activation of Quadriceps Femoris%陈旧性膝关节运动损伤者股四头肌随意动员能力下降

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐刚; 黄力平; 周石; 王昭君; 李猛; 敖铭; 王聪; 赵美苓; 梁军

    2012-01-01

    目的:观察陈旧性膝关节运动损伤股四头肌随意动员能力的变化.方法:60名天津体育学院学生,自愿参加测试,根据其是否有陈旧性膝关节运动损伤分为2组,损伤组(有训练史)30人,对照组(无训练史)30人.应用股四头肌随意动员能力评定系统测定分析股四头肌最大随意等长肌力(MVC)、随意动员能力(MA)和力量上升速率(RFD).结果:对照组两侧股四头肌MVC、MA和RFD无显著差异(P>0.05),损伤组两侧股四头肌MVC无显著性差异(P>0.05).对照组右侧股四头肌MVC、RFD值显著低于损伤组未损伤侧(P<0.05,P< 0.01),损伤组膝关节损伤侧MA、RFD值显著低于未损伤侧(P< 0.05,P< 0.01).结论:即使陈旧性膝关节运动损伤者股四头肌肌肉力量已恢复到未损伤侧水平,其随意动员能力和力量上升速率依然较低,膝关节神经肌肉控制仍较差,这可能是影响陈旧性膝关节运动损伤功能状态的主要因素之一.股四头肌随意动员能力评价系统可检测这一变化.%Objective To determine whether voluntary activation of quadriceps femoris persons with chronic knee injuries is impaired. Methods Thirty participants with knee injuries and thirty healthy participants voluntarily participated in the study. Muscle strength in maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) .muscle activation (MA),and the rate of force development (RFD) in isometric knee extension were assessed for both legs using a custom-built dynamometer. Independent-Samples T test was used to compare the mean values between the two groups or/and both legs. Results No significant differences were found in the measured variables between the two legs in the healthy control group. There was no significant difference in the MVC between legs in the injury group(P>0.05). The MVC and RFD of the right leg in the control group were lower than the uninjured left side in the injury group (P<0.05,P< 0.01). The MA and RFD of the injured side in

  15. Cluster analysis of activity-time series in motor learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Daniela; Nielsen, Finn Å; Futiger, Sally A

    2002-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of learning focus on brain areas where the activity changes as a function of time. To circumvent the difficult problem of model selection, we used a data-driven analytic tool, cluster analysis, which extracts representative temporal and spatial patterns from the voxel-time se...... practice-related activity in a fronto-parieto-cerebellar network, in agreement with previous studies of motor learning. These voxels were separated from a group of voxels showing an unspecific time-effect and another group of voxels, whose activation was an artifact from smoothing...

  16. An Empirical Evaluation of Private Landowner Participation in Voluntary Forest Conservation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauneckis, Derek; York, Abigail M.

    2009-09-01

    The use of voluntary programs targeting resource conservation on private land has become increasingly prevalent in environmental policy. Voluntary programs potentially offer significant benefits over regulatory and market-based approaches. This article examines the factors affecting landowner participation in voluntary forest conservation programs using a combination of parcel-level GIS and remotely sensed data and semi-structured interviews of landowners in Monroe County, Indiana. A logistic regression model is applied to determine the probability of participation based on landowner education, membership in other non-forest voluntary programs, dominant land use activity, parcel size, distance from urban center, land resource portfolios, and forest cover. Both land use activity and the spatial configuration of a landholder’s resource portfolio are found to be statistically significant with important implications for the design and implementation of voluntary programs.

  17. An empirical evaluation of private landowner participation in voluntary forest conservation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauneckis, Derek; York, Abigail M

    2009-09-01

    The use of voluntary programs targeting resource conservation on private land has become increasingly prevalent in environmental policy. Voluntary programs potentially offer significant benefits over regulatory and market-based approaches. This article examines the factors affecting landowner participation in voluntary forest conservation programs using a combination of parcel-level GIS and remotely sensed data and semi-structured interviews of landowners in Monroe County, Indiana. A logistic regression model is applied to determine the probability of participation based on landowner education, membership in other non-forest voluntary programs, dominant land use activity, parcel size, distance from urban center, land resource portfolios, and forest cover. Both land use activity and the spatial configuration of a landholder's resource portfolio are found to be statistically significant with important implications for the design and implementation of voluntary programs.

  18. "Group Intelligence": An Active Learning Exploration of Diversity in Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Christopher J.; Salaita, Meisa K.; Hughes, Catherine H.; Lynn, David G.; Fristoe, Adam; Fristoe, Ariel; Grover, Martha A.

    2017-01-01

    "Group Intelligence" is an active learning, inquiry-based activity that introduces prebiotic chemistry, emergent complexity, and diversity's importance to adaptability across scales. Students explore the molecular emergence of order and function through theatrical exercises and games. Through 20 min of audio instruction and a discussion…

  19. Community Service-Learning and Cultural-Historical Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alison

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the potential of cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT), to provide new insights into community service-learning (CSL) in higher education. While CSL literature acknowledges the influences of John Dewey and Paolo Freire, discussion of the potential contribution of cultural-historical activity theory, rooted in the work of…

  20. Project-Based Language Learning: An Activity Theory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbes, Marina; Carson, Lorna

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of project-based language learning (PBLL) in a university language programme. Learner reflections of project work were analysed through Activity Theory, where tool-mediated activity is understood as the central unit of analysis for human interaction. Data were categorised according to the components of human…

  1. Marketing Feud: An Active Learning Game of (Mis)Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schee, Brian A. Vander

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the results of implementing an active learning activity in the principles of marketing course adapted from the television show "Family Feud". The objectives of the Marketing Feud game include increasing awareness of marketing misperceptions, clarifying marketing misunderstandings, encouraging class participation, and building…

  2. Promoting Learning through Active Interaction. Project PLAI. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Deborah; Haney, Michele

    This final report describes the activities and outcomes of Promoting Learning through Active Interactions, a research-to-practice 4-year project that developed, implemented, and validated a five-module curriculum with 25 infants (ages 6-30 months) who are deaf-blind, their parents, and early interventionists. The project had the following…

  3. The Surgical Scrub. Instructor's Packet. Learning Activity Package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, Lillian

    This instructor's packet accompanies the learning activity package (LAP) on the surgical scrub. Contents included in the packet are a time sheet, suggested uses for the LAP, an instruction sheet, final LAP reviews, a final LAP review answer key, a student performance checklist, suggested activities, an additional resources list, and student…

  4. Active Learning Strategies for Introductory Light and Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokoloff, David R.

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that traditional approaches are ineffective in teaching physics concepts, including light and optics concepts. A major focus of the work of the Activity Based Physics Group has been on the development of active learning curricula like RealTime Physics (RTP) labs and Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs). Among…

  5. Re"modeling" College Algebra: An Active Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon, D.; Pinzon, K.; Stackpole, M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss active learning in College Algebra at Georgia Gwinnett College. This approach has been used in more than 20 sections of College Algebra taught by the authors in the past four semesters. Students work in small, structured groups on guided inquiry activities after watching 15-20 minutes of videos before class. We discuss a…

  6. Constructivist Learning Environment During Virtual and Real Laboratory Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Widodo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory activities and constructivism are two notions that have been playing significant roles in science education. Despite common beliefs about the importance of laboratory activities, reviews reported inconsistent results about the effectiveness of laboratory activities. Since laboratory activities can be expensive and take more time, there is an effort to introduce virtual laboratory activities. This study aims at exploring the learning environment created by a virtual laboratory and a real laboratory. A quasi experimental study was conducted at two grade ten classes at a state high school in Bandung, Indonesia. Data were collected using a questionnaire called Constructivist Learning Environment Survey (CLES before and after the laboratory activities. The results show that both types of laboratories can create constructivist learning environments. Each type of laboratory activity, however, may be stronger in improving certain aspects compared to the other. While a virtual laboratory is stronger in improving critical voice and personal relevance, real laboratory activities promote aspects of personal relevance, uncertainty and student negotiation. This study suggests that instead of setting one type of laboratory against the other, lessons and follow up studies should focus on how to combine both types of laboratories to support better learning.

  7. Marketing Feud: An Active Learning Game of (Mis)Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schee, Brian A. Vander

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the results of implementing an active learning activity in the principles of marketing course adapted from the television show "Family Feud". The objectives of the Marketing Feud game include increasing awareness of marketing misperceptions, clarifying marketing misunderstandings, encouraging class participation, and building…

  8. [Flipped classroom as a strategy to enhance active learning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Noriyuki

    2015-03-01

    This paper reviews the introduction of a flipped class for fourth grade dentistry students, and analyzes the characteristics of the learning method. In fiscal 2013 and 2014, a series of ten three-hour units for removable partial prosthodontics were completed with the flipped class method; a lecture video of approximately 60 minutes was made by the teacher (author) and uploaded to the university's e-learning website one week before each class. Students were instructed to prepare for the class by watching the streaming video on their PC, tablet, or smartphone. In the flipped class, students were not given a lecture, but were asked to solve short questions displayed on screen, to make a short presentation about a part of the video lecture, and to discuss a critical question related to the main subject of the day. An additional team-based learning (TBL) session with individual and group answers was implemented. The average individual scores were considerably higher in the last two years, when the flipped method was implemented, than in the three previous years when conventional lectures were used. The following learning concepts were discussed: the role of the flipped method as an active learning strategy, the efficacy of lecture videos and short questions, students' participation in the class discussion, present-day value of the method, cooperation with TBL, the significance of active learning in relation with the students' learning ability, and the potential increase in the preparation time and workload for students.

  9. Spontaneous brain activity predicts learning ability of foreign sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Sanjuán, Ana; González, Julio; Palomar-García, María-Ángeles; Rodríguez-Pujadas, Aina; Sebastián-Gallés, Núria; Deco, Gustavo; Ávila, César

    2013-05-29

    Can learning capacity of the human brain be predicted from initial spontaneous functional connectivity (FC) between brain areas involved in a task? We combined task-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) before and after training with a Hindi dental-retroflex nonnative contrast. Previous fMRI results were replicated, demonstrating that this learning recruited the left insula/frontal operculum and the left superior parietal lobe, among other areas of the brain. Crucially, resting-state FC (rs-FC) between these two areas at pretraining predicted individual differences in learning outcomes after distributed (Experiment 1) and intensive training (Experiment 2). Furthermore, this rs-FC was reduced at posttraining, a change that may also account for learning. Finally, resting-state network analyses showed that the mechanism underlying this reduction of rs-FC was mainly a transfer in intrinsic activity of the left frontal operculum/anterior insula from the left frontoparietal network to the salience network. Thus, rs-FC may contribute to predict learning ability and to understand how learning modifies the functioning of the brain. The discovery of this correspondence between initial spontaneous brain activity in task-related areas and posttraining performance opens new avenues to find predictors of learning capacities in the brain using task-related fMRI and rs-fMRI combined.

  10. Presence in a Collaborative Science Learning Activity in Second Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrellis, Ioannis; Papachristos, Nikiforos; Natsis, Antonios

    2012-01-01

    Multi-user virtual environments (MUVEs) are surrounded by hype regarding their impact on and potential in education. Many issues regarding the educational affordances of MUVEs and the learning experience of users are still under research. Presence is an important phenomenon users experience when...... interacting with and via virtual environments and seems to play an important role in learning. This chapter presents empirical data gathered from an exploratory study regarding a problem-based physics learning activity in Second Life (SL). Our aim is to gain knowledge and experience about the sense...

  11. Learning shapes spontaneous activity itinerating over memorized states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoki Kurikawa

    Full Text Available Learning is a process that helps create neural dynamical systems so that an appropriate output pattern is generated for a given input. Often, such a memory is considered to be included in one of the attractors in neural dynamical systems, depending on the initial neural state specified by an input. Neither neural activities observed in the absence of inputs nor changes caused in the neural activity when an input is provided were studied extensively in the past. However, recent experimental studies have reported existence of structured spontaneous neural activity and its changes when an input is provided. With this background, we propose that memory recall occurs when the spontaneous neural activity changes to an appropriate output activity upon the application of an input, and this phenomenon is known as bifurcation in the dynamical systems theory. We introduce a reinforcement-learning-based layered neural network model with two synaptic time scales; in this network, I/O relations are successively memorized when the difference between the time scales is appropriate. After the learning process is complete, the neural dynamics are shaped so that it changes appropriately with each input. As the number of memorized patterns is increased, the generated spontaneous neural activity after learning shows itineration over the previously learned output patterns. This theoretical finding also shows remarkable agreement with recent experimental reports, where spontaneous neural activity in the visual cortex without stimuli itinerate over evoked patterns by previously applied signals. Our results suggest that itinerant spontaneous activity can be a natural outcome of successive learning of several patterns, and it facilitates bifurcation of the network when an input is provided.

  12. THE EFFECTS OF THE ACTIVE LEARNING MODEL ON STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müge TAÇMAN

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this research was to determine the effects of the active learning model onstudents. The subjects were 40 teacher candidates from computer and teaching technology department who were enrolled inthe course of “New Instructional Methods” at Near East University in TRNC. A queationnaires were used to collect the data.The data was analyzed by using frequencies and percentile techniques. The finding revealed that there was a positive effect ofavtive learning atmosphere on students.

  13. Hedonic value of intentional action provides reinforcement for voluntary generation but not voluntary inhibition of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Jim; Haggard, Patrick

    2013-12-01

    Intentional inhibition refers to stopping oneself from performing an action at the last moment, a vital component of self-control. It has been suggested that intentional inhibition is associated with negative hedonic value, perhaps due to the frustration of cancelling an intended action. Here we investigate hedonic implications of the free choice to act or inhibit. Participants gave aesthetic ratings of arbitrary visual stimuli that immediately followed voluntary decisions to act or to inhibit action. We found that participants for whom decisions to act produced a strong positive hedonic value for the immediately following visual stimulus made more choices to act than those with weaker hedonic value for action. This finding is consistent with reinforcement learning of action decisions. However, participants who experienced inhibition as generating more positive hedonic value did not choose to inhibit more than other participants. Thus, voluntary inhibition of action did not act as reinforcement for future inhibitory behaviour. Our finding that inhibition of action lacks motivational capacity may explain why self-control is both difficult and limited.

  14. Active Learning of Nondeterministic Finite State Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warawoot Pacharoen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of learning nondeterministic finite state machines (NFSMs from systems where their internal structures are implicit and nondeterministic. Recently, an algorithm for inferring observable NFSMs (ONFSMs, which are the potentially learnable subclass of NFSMs, has been proposed based on the hypothesis that the complete testing assumption is satisfied. According to this assumption, with an input sequence (query, the complete set of all possible output sequences is given by the so-called Teacher, so the number of times for asking the same query is not taken into account in the algorithm. In this paper, we propose LNM*, a refined ONFSM learning algorithm that considers the amount for repeating the same query as one parameter. Unlike the previous work, our approach does not require all possible output sequences in one answer. Instead, it tries to observe the possible output sequences by asking the same query many times to the Teacher. We have proved that LNM* can infer the corresponding ONFSMs of the unknown systems when the number of tries for the same query is adequate to guarantee the complete testing assumption. Moreover, the proof shows that our algorithm will eventually terminate no matter whether the assumption is fulfilled or not. We also present the theoretical time complexity analysis of LNM*. In addition, experimental results demonstrate the practical efficiency of our approach.

  15. Selection and inhibition mechanisms for human voluntary action decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaxiang; Hughes, Laura E; Rowe, James B

    2012-10-15

    One can choose between action alternatives that have no apparent difference in their outcomes. Such voluntary action decisions are associated with widespread frontal-parietal activation, and a tendency to inhibit the repetition of a previous action. However, the mechanism of initiating voluntary actions and the functions of different brain regions during this process remains largely unknown. Here, we combine computational modeling and functional magnetic resonance imaging to test the selection and inhibition mechanisms that mediate trial-to-trial voluntary action decisions. We fitted an optimized accumulator model to behavioral responses in a finger-tapping task in which participants were instructed to make chosen actions or specified actions. Model parameters derived from each individual were then applied to estimate the expected accumulated metabolic activity (EAA) engaged in every single trial. The EAA was associated with blood oxygenation level-dependent responses in a decision work that was maximal in the supplementary motor area and the caudal anterior cingulate cortex, consistent with a competitive accumulation-to-threshold mechanism for action decision by these regions. Furthermore, specific inhibition of the previous action's accumulator was related to the suppression of response repetition. This action-specific inhibition correlated with the activity of the right inferior frontal gyrus, when the option to repeat existed. Our findings suggest that human voluntary action decisions are mediated by complementary processes of intentional selection and inhibition.

  16. Active learning approach in Moodle for the organization of student’s self-study practice-based learning activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanova Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays e-learning tools and delivery methods have been constantly expanding. Employs use e-learning to train their employees more often and often. New and experienced employees have the opportunity to improve upon their knowledge base and expand their skill sets. At home, individuals are granted the access to the programs that provided them with the ability to earn online degrees and enrich their lives through the expanded knowledge. The paper focuses on the analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of e- learning. The ways of applying on-line training used by employers are demonstrated. The experience of implementing active methods of e-learning is described as well as the conclusion about the possibility of their application is made. The paper also presents the results of the survey conducted among TPU teacher and students concerning the advisability of e-learning usage.

  17. Performance in physiology evaluation: possible improvement by active learning strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montrezor, Luís H

    2016-12-01

    The evaluation process is complex and extremely important in the teaching/learning process. Evaluations are constantly employed in the classroom to assist students in the learning process and to help teachers improve the teaching process. The use of active methodologies encourages students to participate in the learning process, encourages interaction with their peers, and stimulates thinking about physiological mechanisms. This study examined the performance of medical students on physiology over four semesters with and without active engagement methodologies. Four activities were used: a puzzle, a board game, a debate, and a video. The results show that engaging in activities with active methodologies before a physiology cognitive monitoring test significantly improved student performance compared with not performing the activities. We integrate the use of these methodologies with classic lectures, and this integration appears to improve the teaching/learning process in the discipline of physiology and improves the integration of physiology with cardiology and neurology. In addition, students enjoy the activities and perform better on their evaluations when they use them. Copyright © 2016 The American Physiological Society.

  18. Final voluntary release assessment/corrective action report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-12

    The US Department of Energy, Carlsbad Area Office (DOE-CAO) has completed a voluntary release assessment sampling program at selected Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This Voluntary Release Assessment/Corrective Action (RA/CA) report has been prepared for final submittal to the Environmental protection Agency (EPA) Region 6, Hazardous Waste Management Division and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) Hazardous and Radioactive Materials Bureau to describe the results of voluntary release assessment sampling and proposed corrective actions at the SWMU sites. The Voluntary RA/CA Program is intended to be the first phase in implementing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) and corrective action process at the WIPP. Data generated as part of this sampling program are intended to update the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) for the WIPP (Assessment of Solid Waste Management Units at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant), NMED/DOE/AIP 94/1. This Final Voluntary RA/CA Report documents the results of release assessment sampling at 11 SWMUs identified in the RFA. With this submittal, DOE formally requests a No Further Action determination for these SWMUs. Additionally, this report provides information to support DOE`s request for No Further Action at the Brinderson and Construction landfill SWMUs, and to support DOE`s request for approval of proposed corrective actions at three other SWMUs (the Badger Unit Drill Pad, the Cotton Baby Drill Pad, and the DOE-1 Drill Pad). This information is provided to document the results of the Voluntary RA/CA activities submitted to the EPA and NMED in August 1995.

  19. Reforming pathology teaching in medical college by peer-assisted learning and student-oriented interest building activities: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Sumit; Sood, Neena; Chaudhary, Anurag

    2017-01-01

    Peer-assisted learning (PAL) is a teaching-learning method in which students act as peer teachers and help other students to learn while also themselves learning by teaching. PAL through modified interest building activities (MIBAs) is seldom tried in teaching pathology in medical colleges. This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness of peer teaching using MIBA, obtain feedback from students, and compare different activities with each other and with traditional teaching-learning methods. An interventional pilot study was conducted in 2 months on the 2nd MBBS undergraduates learning pathology at a medical college in North India. Students acted as peer teachers and performed different MIBAs including role plays, demonstration of pathogenesis through props, student-led seminars such as PowerPoint teaching, blackboard teaching, multiple choice question seminars, case-based learning (CBL) exercises, and quizzes before teaching sessions. Feedback was obtained through structured questionnaires on a 5-point Likert scale. Paired t-test was used to compare traditional teaching with MIBAs, and Friedman test was used to compare among different MIBAs. Students found ease of understanding and the interaction and involvement of students as the most important benefits of PAL. MIBAs increased voluntary participation, coordination, teamwork, shared responsibility, and group dynamics among students. Quiz sessions followed by PowerPoint seminars and prop demonstrations received highest mean scores from students on most of the parameters. Quizzes, blackboard teaching, prop activities, and CBL helped students understand topics better and generated interest. Learners advocated for making MIBAs and PAL compulsory for future students. PAL complemented by MIBAs may be adopted to make teaching-learning more interesting and effective through the active involvement and participation of students.

  20. Embedding responses in spontaneous neural activity shaped through sequential learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoki Kurikawa

    Full Text Available Recent experimental measurements have demonstrated that spontaneous neural activity in the absence of explicit external stimuli has remarkable spatiotemporal structure. This spontaneous activity has also been shown to play a key role in the response to external stimuli. To better understand this role, we proposed a viewpoint, "memories-as-bifurcations," that differs from the traditional "memories-as-attractors" viewpoint. Memory recall from the memories-as-bifurcations viewpoint occurs when the spontaneous neural activity is changed to an appropriate output activity upon application of an input, known as a bifurcation in dynamical systems theory, wherein the input modifies the flow structure of the neural dynamics. Learning, then, is a process that helps create neural dynamical systems such that a target output pattern is generated as an attractor upon a given input. Based on this novel viewpoint, we introduce in this paper an associative memory model with a sequential learning process. Using a simple hebbian-type learning, the model is able to memorize a large number of input/output mappings. The neural dynamics shaped through the learning exhibit different bifurcations to make the requested targets stable upon an increase in the input, and the neural activity in the absence of input shows chaotic dynamics with occasional approaches to the memorized target patterns. These results suggest that these dynamics facilitate the bifurcations to each target attractor upon application of the corresponding input, which thus increases the capacity for learning. This theoretical finding about the behavior of the spontaneous neural activity is consistent with recent experimental observations in which the neural activity without stimuli wanders among patterns evoked by previously applied signals. In addition, the neural networks shaped by learning properly reflect the correlations of input and target-output patterns in a similar manner to those designed in

  1. 'We make them feel special': The experiences of voluntary sector workers supporting asylum seeking and refugee women during pregnancy and early motherhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaam, Marie-Clare; Kingdon, Carol; Thomson, Gill; Finlayson, Kenneth; Downe, Soo

    2016-03-01

    BACKGROUND OR CONTEXT: refugee and asylum seekers are over represented in maternal death data. Many asylum seeking and refugee women access maternity care infrequently, or not at all. Little is known about the role of voluntary sector workers in supporting pregnant refugees and asylum seekers. to explore the experiences of voluntary sector workers supporting asylum seeking and refugee women during pregnancy and early motherhood. a qualitative descriptive study. individual and focus group interviews in three large urban centres in North West England, United Kingdom. two main themes emerged. 'Literally through hell and back' reflected the experiences of suffering, abuse and loss recounted to the volunteers by many of the women they work with. ׳Bridging the unacknowledged gap' related to the invisible processes undertaken by the workers as they enable the women they work with to over come their marginalised position. This included the difficulties of transience, and lack of enculturation, and to support them in accessing maternity care. voluntary sector workers supporting asylum seeking and refugee women strongly identified with the extreme suffering experienced by many of the women they work with. Through this contact, they become acutely aware of the gaps in provision for such women, and developed unique and innovative approaches to bridge this gap. These findings highlight the need for maternity health system to actively collaborate with, and learn from, voluntary agencies working in this field to improve the support offered to asylum seeking and refugee women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Five Experiential Learning Activities in Addictions Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Jane A.; Hof, Kiphany R.; McGriff, Deborah; Morris, Lay-nah Blue

    2012-01-01

    This article describes five creative experiential classroom activities used in teaching addictions. The activities were integrated into the classroom curriculum and were processed weekly in focused dialogue. Student reflections throughout the article add depth to the meaning gained from the experience of the change process. The students' feedback…

  3. Active teaching methods, studying responses and learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hans Peter; Vigild, Martin Etchells; Thomsen, Erik Vilain;

    Students’ study strategies when exposed to activating teaching methods are measured, analysed and compared to study strategies in more traditional lecture-based teaching.......Students’ study strategies when exposed to activating teaching methods are measured, analysed and compared to study strategies in more traditional lecture-based teaching....

  4. Active teaching methods, studying responses and learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hans Peter; Vigild, Martin Etchells; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    Students’ study strategies when exposed to activating teaching methods are measured, analysed and compared to study strategies in more traditional lecture-based teaching.......Students’ study strategies when exposed to activating teaching methods are measured, analysed and compared to study strategies in more traditional lecture-based teaching....

  5. Active Learning? Not with My Syllabus!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    We describe an approach to teaching probability that minimizes the amount of class time spent on the topic while also providing a meaningful (dice-rolling) activity to get students engaged. The activity, which has a surprising outcome, illustrates the basic ideas of informal probability and how probability is used in statistical inference.…

  6. Active Learning? Not with My Syllabus!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    We describe an approach to teaching probability that minimizes the amount of class time spent on the topic while also providing a meaningful (dice-rolling) activity to get students engaged. The activity, which has a surprising outcome, illustrates the basic ideas of informal probability and how probability is used in statistical inference.…

  7. Developing a Mobile Learning Management System for Outdoors Nature Science Activities Based on 5E Learning Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ah-Fur; Lai, Horng-Yih; Chuang, Wei-Hsiang; Wu, Zih-Heng

    2015-01-01

    Traditional outdoor learning activities such as inquiry-based learning in nature science encounter many dilemmas. Due to prompt development of mobile computing and widespread of mobile devices, mobile learning becomes a big trend on education. The main purpose of this study is to develop a mobile-learning management system for overcoming the…

  8. A Preliminary Investigation of Self-Directed Learning Activities in a Non-Formal Blended Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwier, Richard A.; Morrison, Dirk; Daniel, Ben K.

    2009-01-01

    This research considers how professional participants in a non-formal self-directed learning environment (NFSDL) made use of self-directed learning activities in a blended face-to-face and on line learning professional development course. The learning environment for the study was a professional development seminar on teaching in higher education…

  9. The Effect of Outdoor Learning Activities on the Development of Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Günseli; Özyilmaz Akamca, Güzin

    2017-01-01

    Learning ought to be supported by both in class activities and outdoor activities contributing to structuring knowledge. Outdoor activities allow children to actively participate and to learn by doing. Learning requires a lot of work and activities. These activities, which provide primary experiences, help children to change theoretical knowledge…

  10. 78 FR 49382 - Voluntary Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    ... English, reading, writing, speaking, mathematics, and computer skills that are essential to successful job... education advisor: Education Services Specialist, Education Services Officer (ESO), Voluntary...

  11. Near-Optimal Bayesian Active Learning with Noisy Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Golovin, Daniel; Ray, Debajyoti

    2010-01-01

    We tackle the fundamental problem of Bayesian active learning with noise, where we need to adaptively select from a number of expensive tests in order to identify an unknown hypothesis sampled from a known prior distribution. In the case of noise-free observations, a greedy algorithm called generalized binary search (GBS) is known to perform near-optimally. We show that if the observations are noisy, perhaps surprisingly, GBS can perform very poorly. We develop EC2, a novel, greedy active learning algorithm and prove that it is competitive with the optimal policy, thus obtaining the first competitiveness guarantees for Bayesian active learning with noisy observations. Our bounds rely on a recently discovered diminishing returns property called adaptive submodularity, generalizing the classical notion of submodular set functions to adaptive policies. Our results hold even if the tests have non-uniform cost and their noise is correlated. We also propose EffECXtive, a particularly fast approximation of EC2, and ...

  12. Writing Assignments that Promote Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2014-12-01

    Encourage students to write a detailed, analytical report correlating classroom discussions to an important historical event or a current event. Motivate students interview an expert from industry on a topic that was discussed in class. Ask the students to submit a report with supporting sketches, drawings, circuit diagrams and graphs. Propose that the students generate a complete a set of reading responses pertaining to an assigned topic. Require each student to bring in one comment or one question about an assigned reading. The assignment should be a recent publication in an appropriate journal. Have the students conduct a web search on an assigned topic. Ask them to generate a set of ideas that can relate to classroom discussions. Provide the students with a study guide. The study guide should provide about 10 or 15 short topics. Quiz the students on one or two of the topics. Encourage the students to design or develop some creative real-world examples based on a chapter discussed or a topic of interest. Require that students originate, develop, support and defend a viewpoint using a specifically assigned material. Make the students practice using or utilizing a set of new technical terms they have encountered in an assigned chapter. Have students develop original examples explaining the different terms. Ask the students to select one important terminology from the previous classroom discussions. Encourage the students to explain why they selected that particular word. Ask them to talk about the importance of the terminology from the point of view of their educational objectives and future career. Angelo, T. A. (1991). Ten easy pieces: Assessing higher learning in four dimensions. In T. A. Angelo (Ed.), Classroom research: Early lessons from success (pp. 17-31). New Directions for Teaching and Learning, No. 46. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

  13. 自主运动后BALB/c和C57BL/6小鼠学习记忆行为学指标的分析比较%Learning and memory abilities between BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice after voluntary movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘雪芹; 李睿; 崔佳彬; 陆利; 赵云鹤

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice are two inbred strains, but after voluntary movement, there is no report on how to scientifical y reasonably select behavioral experiment methods and indicators and to evaluate the learning and memory abilities of mice. OBJECTIVE: To analyze and compare the behavioral indicators between BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice fol owing voluntary wheel running, to explore the effect of exercise on learning and memory, and to provide a reference for selecting reasonable behavioral indicators. METHODS: 2.5-month-old BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into control and voluntary wheel running groups. Independent running wheel movement of mice was recorded with VitalView system. 4 weeks later, newborn neurons were labeled via DCX immunofluorescence. Spatial learning, memory and exploration abilities were compared through new arm test, new object recognition test and Morris water maze test. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: (1) The mean spontaneous activity of BALB/c mice daily was 2.56 fold of that of C57BL/6 mice during wheel running (P   目的:分析比较自主运动后 BALB/c 和 C57BL/6小鼠与学习记忆相关的行为学指标差异,为探讨运动对学习记忆能力的影响,并选择合理的行为学指标提供参考。  方法:将2.5月龄 BALB/c 和 C57BL/6小鼠分别随机分为对照组和跑轮运动组,应用 VitalView 软件记录小鼠自主跑轮运动。跑轮运动4周后,通过 DCX 免疫荧光染色检测海马新生神经元;新异臂探索实验、新物体识别实验和水迷宫实验分析比较小鼠空间学习记忆和探索能力。  结果与结论:①BALB/c 小鼠平均每天运动量约是 C57BL/6小鼠的2.56倍(P <0.001)。②跑轮运动后两种品系小鼠海马 DCX 阳性细胞数较对照组增多。③跑轮运动后两种品系小鼠探索新异臂和新物体的次数、围绕新异臂和新物体探索的时间和距离均较对照组增高(P <0.001),其中 BALB/c

  14. Tractor Mechanics. Maintaining and Servicing the Cooling System, Learning Activity Packages 34-40; Maintaining and Servicing Hydraulic Systems, Learning Activity Packages 41-48.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    This series of learning activity packages focuses on two areas of tractor mechanics: (1) maintaining and servicing the cooling system and (2) maintaining and servicing hydraulic systems. Each of the fifteen illustrated learning activity packages follows a typical format: introduction, directions, objectives, learning activities, tools and…

  15. Dynamics of Voluntary Cough Maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naire, Shailesh

    2008-11-01

    Voluntary cough maneuvers are characterized by transient peak expiratory flows (PEF) exceeding the maximum expiratory flow-volume (MEFV) curve. In some cases, these flows can be well in excess of the MEFV, generally referred to as supramaximal flows. Understanding the flow-structure interaction involved in these maneuvers is the main goal of this work. We present a simple theoretical model for investigating the dynamics of voluntary cough and forced expiratory maneuvers. The core modeling idea is based on a 1-D model of high Reynolds number flow through flexible-walled tubes. The model incorporates key ingredients involved in these maneuvers: the expiratory effort generated by the abdominal and expiratory muscles, the glottis and the flexibility and compliance of the lung airways. Variations in these allow investigation of the expiratory flows generated by a variety of single cough maneuvers. The model successfully reproduces PEF which is shown to depend on the cough generation protocol, the glottis reopening time and the compliance of the airways. The particular highlight is in simulating supramaximal PEF for very compliant tubes. The flow-structure interaction mechanisms behind these are discussed. The wave speed theory of flow limitation is used to characterize the PEF. Existing hypotheses of the origin of PEF, from cough and forced expiration experiments, are also tested using this model.

  16. From Tootsie Rolls to Composites: Assessing a Spectrum of Active Learning Activities in Engineering Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    evaluate the ALPs. In addition, students’ personality types using Myers-Briggs Personality inventory21,22,23, learning styles using the Felder -Soloman’s...ALPs favor one MBTI type over another. Ideally, the use of the ALPs would span the MBTI types without preference. 3.2. Felder -Soloman’s Index...of Learning Styles Felders - Soloman’s Index of Learning Styles24 are composed of four dimensions (active/reflective, sensing/intuitive, visual

  17. High-frequency TRNS reduces BOLD activity during visuomotor learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Saiote

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS and transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS consist in the application of electrical current of small intensity through the scalp, able to modulate perceptual and motor learning, probably by changing brain excitability. We investigated the effects of these transcranial electrical stimulation techniques in the early and later stages of visuomotor learning, as well as associated brain activity changes using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. We applied anodal and cathodal tDCS, low-frequency and high-frequency tRNS (lf-tRNS, 0.1-100 Hz; hf-tRNS 101-640 Hz, respectively and sham stimulation over the primary motor cortex (M1 during the first 10 minutes of a visuomotor learning paradigm and measured performance changes for 20 minutes after stimulation ceased. Functional imaging scans were acquired throughout the whole experiment. Cathodal tDCS and hf-tRNS showed a tendency to improve and lf-tRNS to hinder early learning during stimulation, an effect that remained for 20 minutes after cessation of stimulation in the late learning phase. Motor learning-related activity decreased in several regions as reported previously, however, there was no significant modulation of brain activity by tDCS. In opposition to this, hf-tRNS was associated with reduced motor task-related-activity bilaterally in the frontal cortex and precuneous, probably due to interaction with ongoing neuronal oscillations. This result highlights the potential of lf-tRNS and hf-tRNS to differentially modulate visuomotor learning and advances our knowledge on neuroplasticity induction approaches combined with functional imaging methods.

  18. Prototype-based active learning for lemmatization

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Daelemans, W

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available with the prototype-based active classification (PBAC) approach of Cebron & Berthold (2009), researchers investigate whether the basic PBAC assumption rings true for linguistic data. The NLP task, it addresses lemmatization, the reduction of inflected word forms...

  19. Collaborative activities for improving the quality of science teaching and learning and learning to teach science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Kenneth

    2012-03-01

    I have been involved in research on collaborative activities for improving the quality of teaching and learning high school science. Initially the collaborative activities we researched involved the uses of coteaching and cogenerative dialogue in urban middle and high schools in Philadelphia and New York (currently I have active research sites in New York and Brisbane, Australia). The research not only transformed practices but also produced theories that informed the development of additional collaborative activities and served as interventions for research and creation of heuristics for professional development programs and teacher certification courses. The presentation describes a collage of collaborative approaches to teaching and learning science, including coteaching, cogenerative dialogue, radical listening, critical reflection, and mindful action. For each activity in the collage I provide theoretical frameworks and empirical support, ongoing research, and priorities for the road ahead. I also address methodologies used in the research, illustrating how teachers and students collaborated as researchers in multilevel investigations of teaching and learning and learning to teach that included ethnography, video analysis, and sophisticated analyses of the voice, facial expression of emotion, eye gaze, and movement of the body during classroom interactions. I trace the evolution of studies of face-to-face interactions in science classes to the current focus on emotions and physiological aspects of teaching and learning (e.g., pulse rate, pulse strength, breathing patterns) that relate to science participation and achievement.

  20. Traditionally taught students learn; actively engaged students remember

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Scott V.; Sayre, Eleanor C.; Clark, Jessica W.

    2014-08-01

    A common narrative in physics education research is that students taught in lecture-based classes learn less than those taught with activity-based reformed methods. We show this narrative is simplistic and misses important dynamics of student learning. In particular, we find students of both methods show equal short-term learning gains on a conceptual question dealing with electric potential. For traditionally taught students, this learning rapidly decays on a time scale of weeks, vanishing by the time of the typical end-of-term post-test. For students in reform-based classes, however, the knowledge is retained and may even be enhanced by subsequent instruction. This difference explains the many previous pre- and post-test studies that have found minimal learning gains in lecture-based courses. Our findings suggest a more nuanced model of student learning, one that is sensitive to time-dependent effects such as forgetting and interference. In addition, the findings suggest that lecture-based courses, by incorporating aspects designed to reinforce student understanding of previously covered topics, might approach the long-term learning found in research-based pedagogies.

  1. Support of active ageing through P2P learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Baschiera

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Personal development throughout the course of life is at the core of several important policy documents that have shaped European cooperation in economic, social and educational sciences over the last decade. The paradigm of Lifelong Learning implies learning at any age of life and underlines the importance of achieving continuous knowledge and self-care. Pedagogy has started taking into account the age of older adults only in recent years. The European project we are going to illustrate sought to test how well peer to peer learning can be useful to define new training and learning models for older adults. The HiHtaST (Hand in Hand to a Social Tomorrow project provides an example of peer to peer learning among older adults. We provided training for adult learners to teach IT among other older adults as a means for social inclusion in five European countries. Each country had 20 learners / trainers who had other older students in turn. Multiple choice questionnaires and focus groups were used to collect data. The project was run in the theoretical framework of active ageing, considering the paradigm of Vygotsky’s zone of proximal development and co-construction of knowledge. The project results showed that adults can acquire knowledge in peer to peer group situations with no drop-outs especially when learning real and practical tasks, which suggests that peer to peer learning works better than a frontal class in formal as well as non-formal or informal situations

  2. Musical Peddy-Paper: A Collaborative Learning Activity Suported by Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, José Duarte Cardoso; Figueiredo, Mauro Jorge Guerreiro; Amante, Lúcia da Graça Cruz Domingues; Gomes, Cristina Maria Cardoso

    2014-01-01

    Gaming activities are an integral part of the human learning process, in particular for children. Game-based learning focuses on motivation and children's engagement towards learning. Educational game-based activities are becoming effective strategies to enhance the learning process. This paper presents an educational activity focusing to merge…

  3. Enhancing students' learning in problem based learning: validation of a self-assessment scale for active learning and critical thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoiriyah, Umatul; Roberts, Chris; Jorm, Christine; Van der Vleuten, C P M

    2015-08-26

    Problem based learning (PBL) is a powerful learning activity but fidelity to intended models may slip and student engagement wane, negatively impacting learning processes, and outcomes. One potential solution to solve this degradation is by encouraging self-assessment in the PBL tutorial. Self-assessment is a central component of the self-regulation of student learning behaviours. There are few measures to investigate self-assessment relevant to PBL processes. We developed a Self-assessment Scale on Active Learning and Critical Thinking (SSACT) to address this gap. We wished to demonstrated evidence of its validity in the context of PBL by exploring its internal structure. We used a mixed methods approach to scale development. We developed scale items from a qualitative investigation, literature review, and consideration of previous existing tools used for study of the PBL process. Expert review panels evaluated its content; a process of validation subsequently reduced the pool of items. We used structural equation modelling to undertake a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) of the SSACT and coefficient alpha. The 14 item SSACT consisted of two domains "active learning" and "critical thinking." The factorial validity of SSACT was evidenced by all items loading significantly on their expected factors, a good model fit for the data, and good stability across two independent samples. Each subscale had good internal reliability (>0.8) and strongly correlated with each other. The SSACT has sufficient evidence of its validity to support its use in the PBL process to encourage students to self-assess. The implementation of the SSACT may assist students to improve the quality of their learning in achieving PBL goals such as critical thinking and self-directed learning.

  4. The Impact of Peer Review on Creative Self-Efficacy and Learning Performance in Web 2.0 Learning Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen-Chung; Lu, Kuan-Hsien; Wu, Leon Yufeng; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have pointed out the significant contrast between the creative nature of Web 2.0 learning activities and the structured learning in school. This study proposes an approach to leveraging Web 2.0 learning activities and classroom teaching to help students develop both specific knowledge and creativity based on Csikzentmihalyi's system…

  5. The Impact of Peer Review on Creative Self-Efficacy and Learning Performance in Web 2.0 Learning Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen-Chung; Lu, Kuan-Hsien; Wu, Leon Yufeng; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have pointed out the significant contrast between the creative nature of Web 2.0 learning activities and the structured learning in school. This study proposes an approach to leveraging Web 2.0 learning activities and classroom teaching to help students develop both specific knowledge and creativity based on Csikzentmihalyi's system…

  6. Online activities to optimize in person learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzer, Tim

    Students' unprecedented access to content on the web is providing a unique opportunity to transform the role lectures in education, moving the focus from content delivery to helping students synthesize the content into knowledge. We have introduced a variety of activities to facilitate this transformation at the University of Illinois, including web-based preflight assessments of student understanding before lecture, peer instruction (clickers) to assess and facilitate student understanding during lecture, and web-based multimedia pre-lectures designed to provide students with content before lecture. In this talk I will discuss the pedagogical motivation for introducing these activities, and the impact they have had at the University of Illinois. .

  7. Google classroom as a tool for active learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaharanee, Izwan Nizal Mohd; Jamil, Jastini Mohd; Rodzi, Sarah Syamimi Mohamad

    2016-08-01

    As the world is being developed with the new technologies, discovering and manipulating new ideas and concepts of online education are changing rapidly. In response to these changes, many states, institutions, and organizations have been working on strategic plans to implement online education. At the same time, misconceptions and myths related to the difficulty of teaching and learning online, technologies available to support online instruction, the support and compensation needed for high-quality instructors, and the needs of online students create challenges for such vision statements and planning documents. This paper provides analysis and evaluation of the effectiveness of Google Classroom's active learning activities for data mining subject under the Decision Sciences program. Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) has been employed to measure the effectiveness of the learning activities. A total of 100 valid unduplicated responses from students who enrolled data mining subject were used in this study. The results indicated that majority of the students satisfy with the Google Classroom's tool that were introduced in the class. Results of data analyzed showed that all ratios are above averages. In particular, comparative performance is good in the areas of ease of access, perceived usefulness, communication and interaction, instruction delivery and students' satisfaction towards the Google Classroom's active learning activities.

  8. Cardboard Activity Is "Loaded" with Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author presents an activity that uses simple paperboard from the back of a pad of paper to illustrate some basic construction principles as students experiment with conducting load tests. The author describes the steps in conducting a load test as well as adding a strut support system. The important lesson here is that…

  9. Successful Application of Active Learning Techniques to Introductory Microbiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Hoffman

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available While the traditional lecture format may be a successful way to teach microbiology to both medical and nursing students, it was not an effective means of learning for many prenursing and preprofessional students enrolled in either of the introductory microbiology courses at Ashland Community College, an open enrollment institution. The structure of both Medical Microbiology and Principles of Microbiology was redesigned to allow students to address the material in an active manner. Daily quizzes, student group discussions, scrapbooks, lab project presentations and papers, and extra credit projects were all added in order to allow students maximum exposure to the course material in a manner compatible with various methods of learning. Student knowledge, course evaluations, and student success rates have all improved with the active learning format.

  10. A Conceptual Framework for Organizing Active Learning Experiences in Biology Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Joel; Belland, Brian R.

    2012-08-01

    Introductory biology courses form a cornerstone of undergraduate instruction. However, the predominantly used lecture approach fails to produce higher-order biology learning. Research shows that active learning strategies can increase student learning, yet few biology instructors use all identified active learning strategies. In this paper, we present a framework to design biology instruction that incorporates all active learning strategies. We review active learning research in undergraduate biology courses, present a framework for organizing active learning strategies, and provide clear implications and future research for designing instruction in introductory undergraduate biology courses.

  11. Introduction of active learning method in learning physiology by MBBS students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilkar, Suhail Ahmad; Lone, Shabiruddin; Lone, Riyaz Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Context: Active learning has received considerable attention over the past several years, often presented or perceived as a radical change from traditional instruction methods. Current research on learning indicates that using a variety of teaching strategies in the classroom increases student participation and learning. Aim and Objectives: To introduce active learning methodology, i.e., “jigsaw technique” in undergraduate medical education and assess the student and faculty response to it. Subjects and Methods: This study was carried out in the Department of Physiology in a Medical College of North India. A topic was chosen and taught using one of the active learning methods (ALMs), i.e., jigsaw technique. An instrument (questionnaire) was developed in English through an extensive review of literature and was properly validated. The students were asked to give their response on a five-point Likert scale. The feedback was kept anonymous. Faculty also provided their feedback in a separately provided feedback proforma. The data were collected, compiled, and analyzed. Results: Of 150 students of MBBS-first year batch 2014, 142 participated in this study along with 14 faculty members of the Physiology Department. The majority of the students (>90%) did welcome the introduction of ALM and strongly recommended the use of such methods in teaching many more topics in future. 100% faculty members were of the opinion that many more topics shall be taken up using ALMs. Conclusion: This study establishes the fact that both the medical students and faculty want a change from the traditional way of passive, teacher-centric learning, to the more active teaching-learning techniques. PMID:27563585

  12. Active-learning versus teacher-centered instruction for learning acids and bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar Sesen, Burcin; Tarhan, Leman

    2011-07-01

    Background and purpose: Active-learning as a student-centered learning process has begun to take more interest in constructing scientific knowledge. For this reason, this study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of active-learning implementation on high-school students' understanding of 'acids and bases'. Sample The sample of this study was 45 high-school students (average age 17 years) from two different classes, which were randomly assigned to the experimental (n = 21) and control groups (n = 25), in a high school in Turkey. Design and methods A pre-test consisting of 25 items was applied to both experimental and control groups before the treatment in order to identify student prerequisite knowledge about their proficiency for learning 'acids and bases'. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was conducted to compare the pre-test scores for groups and no significant difference was found between experimental (ME = 40.14) and control groups (MC = 41.92) in terms of mean scores (F 1,43 = 2.66, p > 0.05). The experimental group was taught using an active-learning curriculum developed by the authors and the control group was taught using traditional course content based on teacher-centered instruction. After the implementation, 'Acids and Bases Achievement Test' scores were collected for both groups. Results ANOVA results showed that students' 'Acids and Bases Achievement Test' post-test scores differed significantly in terms of groups (F 1,43 = 102.53; p test and individual interview results, it was found that high-school students in the experimental group had fewer misconceptions and understood the concepts more meaningfully than students in control group. Conclusion The study revealed that active-learning implementation is more effective at improving students' learning achievement and preventing misconceptions.

  13. Active-learning strategies: the use of a game to reinforce learning in nursing education. A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boctor, Lisa

    2013-03-01

    The majority of nursing students are kinesthetic learners, preferring a hands-on, active approach to education. Research shows that active-learning strategies can increase student learning and satisfaction. This study looks at the use of one active-learning strategy, a Jeopardy-style game, 'Nursopardy', to reinforce Fundamentals of Nursing material, aiding in students' preparation for a standardized final exam. The game was created keeping students varied learning styles and the NCLEX blueprint in mind. The blueprint was used to create 5 categories, with 26 total questions. Student survey results, using a five-point Likert scale showed that they did find this learning method enjoyable and beneficial to learning. More research is recommended regarding learning outcomes, when using active-learning strategies, such as games. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. 75 FR 47504 - Voluntary Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ... America. TTT helps relieve teacher shortages, especially in math, science, special education, and other... of the Secretary 32 CFR Part 68 RIN 0790-AI50 Voluntary Education Programs AGENCY: Office of the... for the operation of voluntary education programs within DoD. Included are: Procedures for Service...

  15. Pedagogical Aspects of Voluntary School Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mária Jármai, Erzsébet; Palányi, Ildikó Zsupanekné

    2015-01-01

    The economic importance of voluntary work has been exceedingly appreciated in the last few decades. This is not surprising at all, because it is highly profitable according to the related estimated data. There are 115,9 million people doing voluntary work only in Europe, which means that they would create the world's 7th biggest economy with EUR…

  16. 14 CFR 234.7 - Voluntary reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Voluntary reporting. 234.7 Section 234.7 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS AIRLINE SERVICE QUALITY PERFORMANCE REPORTS § 234.7 Voluntary reporting. (a) In addition to the...

  17. Changing Dynamics in the Voluntary Market (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, J.

    2014-12-01

    Voluntary green power markets are those in which consumers and institutions voluntarily purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs. This presentation, presented at the Renewable Energy Markets Conference in December 2014, outlines the voluntary market in 2013, including community choice aggregation and community solar.

  18. 12 CFR 546.4 - Voluntary dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Voluntary dissolution. 546.4 Section 546.4... ASSOCIATIONS-MERGER, DISSOLUTION, REORGANIZATION, AND CONVERSION § 546.4 Voluntary dissolution. A Federal savings association's board of directors may propose a plan for dissolution of the association. The plan...

  19. Efficient exploration through active learning for value function approximation in reinforcement learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Takayuki; Hachiya, Hirotaka; Sugiyama, Masashi

    2010-06-01

    Appropriately designing sampling policies is highly important for obtaining better control policies in reinforcement learning. In this paper, we first show that the least-squares policy iteration (LSPI) framework allows us to employ statistical active learning methods for linear regression. Then we propose a design method of good sampling policies for efficient exploration, which is particularly useful when the sampling cost of immediate rewards is high. The effectiveness of the proposed method, which we call active policy iteration (API), is demonstrated through simulations with a batting robot.

  20. Creating Student Engagement: The Kickstarter Active Learning Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzon, Elliott

    2017-01-01

    Students can become disengaged from marketing material if they cannot see the direct application. Marketing material needs to be applied to a meaningful business task to engage and motivate students. This article introduces the Kickstarter Active Learning Project--an innovative semester-long project in which students create a Kickstarter…

  1. Blog Construction as an Effective Tool in Biochemistry Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubas Rolim, Estêvão; Martins de Oliveira, Julia; Dalvi, Luana T.; Moreira, Daniel C.; Garcia Caldas, Natasha; Fernandes Lobo, Felipe; André Polli, Démerson; Campos, Élida G.; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2017-01-01

    To boost active learning in undergraduate students, they were given the task of preparing blogs on topics of clinical biochemistry. This "experiment" lasted for 12 teaching-semesters (from 2008 to 2013), and included a survey on the blogs' usefulness at the end of each semester. The survey (applied in the 2008-2010 period) used a…

  2. Introducing Sustainability into Business Education Contexts Using Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacVaugh, Jason; Norton, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore how active learning may help address the legitimacy and practicability issues inherent in introducing education for sustainability into business-related degree programs. Design/methodology/approach: The focus of this study is the experience of the authors in the development and implementation of…

  3. Physical activity during learning inside and outside the classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Does learning outside the classroom (LOtC) in urban nature or cultural contexts one day per week contribute to raising children’s physical activity (PA) in lower secondary school? Methods: PA was measured on 7 consecutive days using GT3x+ accelerometers. Overall, 44 girls and 40 boys...

  4. Do Active-Learning Strategies Improve Students' Critical Thinking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Larry P.; Crow, Mary L.

    2014-01-01

    Improving students' ability to recognize work-related problems and apply effective strategies and solutions to fundamental challenges in the field is at the crux of a good college preparation. This paper attempts to investigate if active-learning strategies improve students' critical thinking ability in this regard. Participants were pre-service…

  5. An Active Learning Exercise for Introducing Agent-Based Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinder, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in agent-based modeling as a method of systems analysis and optimization indicate that students in business analytics need an introduction to the terminology, concepts, and framework of agent-based modeling. This article presents an active learning exercise for MBA students in business analytics that demonstrates agent-based…

  6. Learning Activity Package, Algebra 124, LAPs 46-55.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Bill

    A series of 10 teacher-prepared Learning Activity Packages (LAPs) in advanced algebra and trigonometry, these units cover absolute value, inequalities, exponents, radicals, and complex numbers; functions; higher degree equations and the derivative; the trigonometric functions; graphs and applications of the trigonometric functions; sequences and…

  7. Learning by Doing: An Empirical Study of Active Teaching Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackathorn, Jana; Solomon, Erin D.; Blankmeyer, Kate L.; Tennial, Rachel E.; Garczynski, Amy M.

    2011-01-01

    The current study sought to examine the effectiveness of four teaching techniques (lecture, demonstrations, discussions, and in-class activities) in the classroom. As each technique offers different benefits to the instructor and students, each technique was expected to aid in a different depth of learning. The current findings indicated that each…

  8. Critical Facilities for Active Participation in Learning Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, Hans; Tattersall, Colin; Burgos, Daniel; Brouns, Francis; Kurvers, Hub; Koper, Rob

    2005-01-01

    Please use the following citation: Hummel, H. G. K., Tattersall, C., Burgos, D., Brouns, F. M. R., Kurvers, H. J., & Koper, E. J. R. (2006). Critical facilities for active participation in learning networks. Int. J. Web Based Communities, 2, 1, 81-99. This article is an extended version (with

  9. Promoting Active Learning: The Use of Computational Software Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Tom

    The increased emphasis on active learning in essentially all disciplines is proving beneficial in terms of a student's depth of learning, retention, and completion of challenging courses. Formats labeled flipped, hybrid and blended facilitate face-to-face active learning. To be effective, students need to absorb a significant fraction of the course material prior to class, e.g., using online lectures and reading assignments. Getting students to assimilate and at least partially understand this material prior to class can be extremely difficult. As an aid to achieving this preparation as well as enhancing depth of understanding, we find the use of software programs such as Mathematica®or MatLab®, very helpful. We have written several Mathematica®applications and student exercises for use in a blended format two semester E&M course. Formats include tutorials, simulations, graded and non-graded quizzes, walk-through problems, exploration and interpretation exercises, and numerical solutions of complex problems. A good portion of this activity involves student-written code. We will discuss the efficacy of these applications, their role in promoting active learning, and the range of possible uses of this basic scheme in other classes.

  10. Bingo!: An Engaging Activity for Learning Physiological Terms in Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanags, Thea; George, Amanda M.; Grace, Diana M.; Brown, Patricia M.

    2012-01-01

    Brain Bingo is a tutorial activity for helping undergraduate psychology students learn complex physiological terms. In two experiments, the authors tested pretest and posttest knowledge, and in Experiment 2, the authors tested retention after 5 weeks. In Experiment 1 (n = 41), the experimental group (Brain Bingo) recalled more terms than the…

  11. Teachers' Purposeful Design of Effective Technology Learning Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, John Andrew Kerlin

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore how exemplary teachers design learning activities that incorporate the use of technology. Teachers at three schools in a school district in Southern California were solicited for a survey regarding their use of technology in the classroom. Based on the surveys, high and low technology implementers were…

  12. ARLearn: Learning activities and interaction in augmented reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ternier, Stefaan; Tabuenca, Bernardo; Specht, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Ternier, S., Tabuenca, B., & Specht, M. (2012). ARLearn: Learning activities and interaction in augmented reality. In M. Specht, J. Multisilta, & M. Sharples (Eds.), Proceedings of the Mobile Augmented Reality for Education Workshop (pp. 10-13). October, 16-17, 2012, Helsinki, Finland.

  13. The Intercollegiate Ethics Bowl: An Active Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces the Intercollegiate Ethics Bowl (IEB) as a means of promoting active learning in the realm of marketing ethics. The cases discussed in the competition are based on current ethical issues and require students to provide a coherent analysis of what are generally complex, ambiguous, and highly viewpoint dependent issues. The…

  14. Developing capability through peer-assisted learning activities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Developing capability through peer-assisted learning activities among 4th-year medical ... M van Rooyen, A Reinbrech-Schütte, J.F.M. Hugo, T.S. Marcus ... the rotation reflective reports (RRRs) and CHW data from semi-structured interviews.

  15. Using an Active-Learning Approach to Teach Epigenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon-Berlingeri, Migdalisel

    2010-01-01

    Epigenetics involves heritable changes in gene expression that do not involve alterations in the DNA sequence. I developed an active-learning approach to convey this topic to students in a college genetics course. I posted a brief summary of the topic before class to stimulate exchange in cooperative groups. During class, we discussed the…

  16. ARLearn: Learning activities and interaction in augmented reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ternier, Stefaan; Tabuenca, Bernardo; Specht, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Ternier, S., Tabuenca, B., & Specht, M. (2012). ARLearn: Learning activities and interaction in augmented reality. In M. Specht, J. Multisilta, & M. Sharples (Eds.), Proceedings of the Mobile Augmented Reality for Education Workshop (pp. 10-13). October, 16-17, 2012, Helsinki, Finland.

  17. Learning Literacy and Content Through Video Activities in Primary Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heitink, Maaike; Fisser, Petra; McKenney, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Heitink, M., Fisser, P., & McKenney, S. (2012). Learning Literacy and Content Through Video Activities in Primary Education. In P. Resta (Ed.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2012 (pp. 1363-1369). Chesapeake, VA: AACE.

  18. Research and Practice of Active Learning in Engineering Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, de Erik; Saunders-Smits, Gillian; Nieweg, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Since 2001, the international network Active Learning in Engineering education (ALE) organized a series of international workshops on innovation of engineering education. The papers in this book are selected to reflect the state of the art, based on contributions to the 2005 ALE workshop in Holland.

  19. Engaging Elementary Preservice Teachers with Active Learning Teaching Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olgun, Ozlem Sila

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of active learning on preservice teachers' dignity, energy, self-management, community, and awareness (DESCA) abilities, attitudes toward teaching, and attitudes toward science. Third year preservice teachers (n = 77) from two different classes were involved in the study. One intact…

  20. Using an Active-Learning Approach to Teach Epigenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon-Berlingeri, Migdalisel

    2010-01-01

    Epigenetics involves heritable changes in gene expression that do not involve alterations in the DNA sequence. I developed an active-learning approach to convey this topic to students in a college genetics course. I posted a brief summary of the topic before class to stimulate exchange in cooperative groups. During class, we discussed the…

  1. The Shoebox activity: a powerful tool for learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hobley, Janet

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This article explores an activity that has been used in many different training contexts from Initial Teacher Training (ITT, Advanced Learning Coach (ALC training through to different ‘in–house’ training sessions and explains how it has been adapted by other teachers for their own contexts and how the learners themselves experience it. The activity is explained in practice and then linked to the theory of reflective practice to show how it can support and extend learners’ thinking about themselves, their different roles and their individual teaching. Different perspectives have been drawn on as reflections on the activity and the work includes both tutor and learner comments about undertaking the activity. Their contributions together with personal reflections show the power of the idea from a simple icebreaker to something more profound that contributes to personal development and learning.

  2. Between voluntary agreement and legislation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gwozdz, Wencke; Hedegaard, Liselotte; Reisch, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    Voluntary agreements and self-imposed standards are broadly applied to restrict the influence food advertising exerts on children’s food choices – yet their effects are unknown. The current project will therefore investigate whether and, if yes, how the Danish Code for Responsible Food Marketing...... Communication towards Children (hereafter: CODE) – with its dependence on a supportive institutional environment and acceptance of as well as dynamics between involved key stakeholders like consumers, political actors and firms – contributes to fighting the obesity pandemic.Thus, we explore within this article...... what information about the process of implementing the CODE as well as about the evolved dynamics between key stakeholders is already available. Here, the recently published report of the PolMark project sheds light on the dynamics between the key stakeholders in relation to the current Danish...

  3. Peers as resources for learning: a situated learning approach to adapted physical activity in rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standal, Øyvind F; Jespersen, Ejgil

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the learning that takes place when people with disabilities interact in a rehabilitation context. Data were generated through in-depth interviews and close observations in a 2 (1/2) week-long rehabilitation program, where the participants learned both wheelchair skills and adapted physical activities. The findings from the qualitative data analysis are discussed in the context of situated learning (Lave & Wenger, 1991; Wenger, 1998). The results indicate that peer learning extends beyond skills and techniques, to include ways for the participants to make sense of their situations as wheelchair users. Also, it was found that the community of practice established between the participants represented a critical corrective to instructions provided by rehabilitation professionals.

  4. 牙尖交错位最大紧咬时胸锁乳突肌与咬肌肌电研究%Electromyographic activity of the masseter and sternocleidomastoid muscle during maximal voluntary clenching in intercuspal position

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭少雄; 李宝勇; 张渊; 刘璐; 邓琪; 王美青

    2015-01-01

    Objective :To investigate the relationship between occlusal force level and the surface electro‐myography(SEMG) activity of sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM )versus masseter muscle(MM ) during maximal voluntary clenching (MVC) in intercuspal position(ICP) .Methods :T‐Scan III system and BioEMG III system were used to record SEMG activity of the SCM and of the MM simultaneously .Recordings which were obtained from 25 healthy young adult during MVC were analyzed in different occlusal force levels .Normalized SEMG value was ratio of SEMG values of different occlusal force levels to MVC .Results :There was no difference between bite force , SEMG value of left side and right side in ICP‐MVC .Ratios of sternocleidomastoid(SCM ) to masseter muscle activity range from (9 .13 ± 4 .77)% to(10 .23 ± 6 .47)% .In normalized SEMG value of the MM and SCM ,which increased before 75% ‐MVC ,and decreased after 75% ‐ICP(P< 0 .05) .Conclusion :The results confirmed that a lower SEMG activity of SCM is similar to MM when the highest level of bite force achieved during MVC in ICP .%目的:以咬肌(Masseter muscle ,MM )为对照,研究牙尖交错位最大紧咬过程中咬合力和胸锁乳突肌(Sternocleidomastoid muscle ,SCM )肌电之间的关系。方法:采用 T‐scanIII 咬合记录仪和 BioEMG III 肌电图仪,同步记录25名健康受试者 SCM 和 MM 的肌电值,分析不同咬合力水平下肌电值与自主最大紧咬(Maximal voluntary clenching ,MVC)时肌电值的比值的变化。结果:M VC 时,咬合力、SCM 及 MM 肌电值双侧之间无明显差异,SCM 肌电幅值约为 MM 的(9.13±4.77)%~(10.23±6.47)%,SCM 及 MM 的肌电比值在达到最大咬合力的75%之前均呈逐渐增高趋势,但从该水平至 MVC 时均显著下降(P< 0.05)。结论:在自主最大紧咬过程中 SCM 表现出与 MM 同步的先升高后降低的肌电变化规律。

  5. Examining factors affecting beginning teachers' transfer of learning of ICT-enhanced learning activities in their teaching practice

    OpenAIRE

    Agyei, D.D.; Voogt, J.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined 100 beginning teachers’ transfer of learning when utilising Information Communication Technology-enhanced activity-based learning activities. The beginning teachers had participated in a professional development program that was characterised by ‘learning technology by collaborative design’ in their final year of their pre-service preparation program. Transfer of learning was proposed as characteristic of (i) the professional development program,(ii) beginning teachers and...

  6. Mobilising voluntary contributions in public urban regeneration – a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jacob Norvig; Jensen, Jesper Ole; Agger, Annika

    Research on volunteerism indicates that one third of all adults in Denmark regularly contribute with voluntary labour in social relief work, community-based organizations, non-governmental organizations, or otherwise. In this paper we ask if and how urban regeneration might benefit from the appar...... of voluntary labour and voluntary associations in publicly subsidised urban regeneration. Empirical data will be collected through in-depth case studies in selected communities in both metropolitan neighbourhoods and smaller market towns....... to community development, urban policy, etc. In addition to this, the paper presents results from a survey exploring the extent and character of volunteerism in a number of integrated urban regeneration projects. The paper proposes a systematic overview of experiences with voluntary inputs and engagement...... in relation to public policy arenas and activities, particularly within urban policy and the community development fields. A categorization is proposed as regards different ways and models of civic engagement and major challenges are outlined. The paper is first step of a research project exploring potential...

  7. Voluntary exercise during extinction of auditory fear conditioning reduces the relapse of fear associated with potentiated activity of striatal direct pathway neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mika, Agnieszka; Bouchet, Courtney A; Bunker, Preston; Hellwinkel, Justin E; Spence, Katie G; Day, Heidi E W; Campeau, Serge; Fleshner, Monika; Greenwood, Benjamin N

    2015-11-01

    Relapse of previously extinguished fear presents a significant, pervasive obstacle to the successful long-term treatment of anxiety and trauma-related disorders. Thus, identification of a novel means to enhance fear extinction to stand the passage of time and generalize across contexts is of the utmost importance. Acute bouts of exercise can be used as inexpensive, noninvasive treatment strategies to reduce anxiety, and have been shown to enhance memory for extinction when performed in close temporal proximity to the extinction session. However, it is unclear whether acute exercise can be used to prevent relapse of fear, and the neural mechanisms underlying this potential effect are unknown. The current study therefore examined whether acute exercise during extinction of auditory fear can protect against the later relapse of fear. Male F344 rats lacking an extended history of wheel running were conditioned to fear a tone CS and subsequently extinguished within either a freely mobile running wheel, a locked wheel, or a control context lacking a wheel. Rats exposed to fear extinction within a freely mobile wheel ran during fear extinction, and demonstrated reduced fear as well as attenuated corticosterone levels during re-exposure to the extinguished CS during the relapse test in a novel context 1week later. Examination of cfos mRNA patterns elicited by re-exposure to the extinguished CS during the relapse test revealed that acute exercise during extinction decreased activation of brain circuits classically involved in driving fear expression and interestingly, increased activity within neurons of the direct striatal pathway involved in reward signaling. These data suggest that exercise during extinction reduces relapse through a mechanism involving the direct pathway of the striatum. It is suggested that a positive affective state could become associated with the CS during exercise during extinction, thus resulting in a relapse-resistant extinction memory.

  8. Design for learning: deconstructing virtual patient activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellaway, Rachel H; Davies, David

    2011-01-01

    Digital technologies are used in almost every aspect of contemporary health professional education (HPE) but our understanding of their true potential as instructional tools rather than administrative tools has not significantly advanced in the last decade. One notable exception to this has been the rise of the 'virtual patient' as an educational intervention in HPE. This article attempts to deconstruct the virtual patient concept by developing a model of virtual patients as artifacts with intrinsic encoded properties and emergent constructed properties that build on the core concept of 'activity'.

  9. Effective, Active Learning Strategies for the Oceanography Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmochowski, J. E.; Marinov, I.

    2014-12-01

    A decline in enrollment in STEM fields at the university level has prompted extensive research on alternative ways of teaching and learning science. Inquiry-based learning as well as the related "flipped" or "active" lectures, and similar teaching methods and philosophies have been proposed as more effective ways to disseminate knowledge in science classes than the traditional lecture. We will provide a synopsis of our experiences in implementing some of these practices into our Introductory Oceanography, Global Climate Change, and Ocean Atmosphere Dynamics undergraduate courses at the University of Pennsylvania, with both smaller and larger enrollments. By implementing tools such as at-home modules; computer labs; incorporation of current research; pre- and post-lecture quizzes; reflective, qualitative writing assignments; peer review; and a variety of in-class learning strategies, we aim to increase the science literacy of the student population and help students gain a more comprehensive knowledge of the topic, enhance their critical thinking skills, and correct misconceptions. While implementing these teaching techniques with college students is not without complications, we argue that a blended class that flexibly and creatively accounts for class size and science level improves the learning experience and the acquired knowledge. We will present examples of student assignments and activities as well as describe the lessons we have learned, and propose ideas for moving forward to best utilize innovative teaching tools in order to increase science literacy in oceanography and other climate-related courses.

  10. Exploring Privacy Management on Facebook: Motivations and Perceived Consequences of Voluntary Disclosure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Waters, Susan; Ackerman, James

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the perceived motivations and consequences of voluntary disclosure of Facebook active users using a survey administered to college students in a public‐speaking course. College...

  11. A candidate syntenic genetic locus is associated with voluntary exercise levels in mice and humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kostrzewa, E.; Brandys, M. K.; van Lith, H. A.; Kas, M. J H

    2015-01-01

    Individual levels of physical activity, and especially of voluntary physical exercise, highly contribute to the susceptibility for developing metabolic, cardiovascular diseases, and potentially to psychiatric disorders. Here, we applied a cross-species approach to explore a candidate genetic region

  12. MRI-detectable changes in mouse brain structure induced by voluntary exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Lindsay S; Steadman, Patrick E; Jones, Carly E; Laliberté, Christine L; Dazai, Jun; Lerch, Jason P; Stefanovic, Bojana; Sled, John G

    2015-06-01

    Physical exercise, besides improving cognitive and mental health, is known to cause structural changes in the brain. Understanding the structural changes that occur with exercise as well as the neuroanatomical correlates of a predisposition for exercise is important for understanding human health. This study used high-resolution 3D MR imaging, in combination with deformation-based morphometry, to investigate the macroscopic changes in brain structure that occur in healthy adult mice following four weeks of voluntary exercise. We found that exercise induced changes in multiple brain structures that are involved in motor function and learning and memory including the hippocampus, dentate gyrus, stratum granulosum of the dentate gyrus, cingulate cortex, olivary complex, inferior cerebellar peduncle and regions of the cerebellum. In addition, a number of brain structures, including the hippocampus, striatum and pons, when measured on MRI prior to the start of exercise were highly predictive of subsequent exercise activity. Exercise tended to normalize these pre-existing differences between mice.

  13. Hilar GABAergic interneuron activity controls spatial learning and memory retrieval.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaisa Andrews-Zwilling

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although extensive research has demonstrated the importance of excitatory granule neurons in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in normal learning and memory and in the pathogenesis of amnesia in Alzheimer's disease (AD, the role of hilar GABAergic inhibitory interneurons, which control the granule neuron activity, remains unclear. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We explored the function of hilar GABAergic interneurons in spatial learning and memory by inhibiting their activity through Cre-dependent viral expression of enhanced halorhodopsin (eNpHR3.0--a light-driven chloride pump. Hilar GABAergic interneuron-specific expression of eNpHR3.0 was achieved by bilaterally injecting adeno-associated virus containing a double-floxed inverted open-reading frame encoding eNpHR3.0 into the hilus of the dentate gyrus of mice expressing Cre recombinase under the control of an enhancer specific for GABAergic interneurons. In vitro and in vivo illumination with a yellow laser elicited inhibition of hilar GABAergic interneurons and consequent activation of dentate granule neurons, without affecting pyramidal neurons in the CA3 and CA1 regions of the hippocampus. We found that optogenetic inhibition of hilar GABAergic interneuron activity impaired spatial learning and memory retrieval, without affecting memory retention, as determined in the Morris water maze test. Importantly, optogenetic inhibition of hilar GABAergic interneuron activity did not alter short-term working memory, motor coordination, or exploratory activity. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings establish a critical role for hilar GABAergic interneuron activity in controlling spatial learning and memory retrieval and provide evidence for the potential contribution of GABAergic interneuron impairment to the pathogenesis of amnesia in AD.

  14. Teach them to Fly: Strategies for Encouraging Active Online Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Hardin, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Teach them to Fly: Strategies for Encouraging Active Online Learning Karen HARDIN Cameron University Lawton, OK, USA PROBLEM One of the hot topics in education in the past 10 years has been the shift of the role of the educator. Whereas, he has traditionally been the owner and deliverer of the knowledge (Sage on the stage), now his role is shifting to a guide and facilitator (guide by the side). The purpose is to give the students ownership in their own learning process. As tec...

  15. Raping and making love are different concepts: so are killing and voluntary euthanasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, J.

    1988-01-01

    The distinction between 'kill' and 'help to die' is argued by analogy with the distinction between 'rape' and 'make love to'. The difference is the consent of the receiver of the act, therefore 'kill' is the wrong word for an act of active voluntary euthanasia. The argument that doctors must not be allowed by law to perform active voluntary euthanasia because this would recognise an infringement of the sanctity of life ('the red light principle') is countered by comparing such doctors with th...

  16. Active Learning Works! Until It Doesn't: Measuring the Effectiveness of Activity-Based Learning Exercises on Information Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    This study served to investigate how information literacy instruction can alleviate information anxiety in online learners. While there has been much research to demonstrate that hands-on or activity-based learning is beneficial in reducing library anxiety, those studies have not been conducted for the online classroom. Using a required,…

  17. Anticipatory control of center of mass and joint stability during voluntary arm movement from a standing posture: interplay between active and passive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patla, Aftab E; Ishac, Milad G; Winter, David A

    2002-04-01

    Anticipatory control of upright posture is the focus of this study that combines experimental and modeling work. Individuals were asked to raise or lower their arms from two initial postures such that the final posture of the arm was at 90 degrees with respect to the body. Holding different weights in the hand varied the magnitude of perturbation to postural stability generated by the arm movement. Whole body kinematics and ground reaction forces were measured. Inverse dynamic analysis was used to determine the internal joint moments at the shoulder, hip, knee and ankle, and reaction forces at the shoulder. Center of mass (COM) of the arm, posture (rest of the body without the arms) and whole body (net COM) were also determined. Changes in joint moment at the hip, knee and ankle revealed a significant effect of the direction of movement. The polarities of the joint moment response were appropriate for joint stabilization. Net COM change showed a systematic effect of the direction of movement even though the arm COM was displaced by the same amount and in the same direction for both arm raising and lowering conditions. In order to determine the effects of the passive forces and moments on the posture COM, the body was modeled as an inverted pendulum. The model was customized for each participant; the relevant model parameters were estimated from data obtained from each trial. The ankle joint stiffness and viscosity were adjusted to ensure postural equilibrium prior to arm movement. Joint reactive forces and moments generated by the arm movements were applied at the shoulder level of this inverted pendulum; these were the only inputs and no active control was included. The posture COM profile from the model simulation was calculated. Results show that simulated posture COM profile and measured posture COM profile are identical for about 200 ms following the onset of arm movement and then they deviate. Therefore, the initial control of COM is passive in nature and the

  18. Cluster analysis of activity-time series in motor learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Daniela; Nielsen, Finn Årup; Frutiger, Sally A.

    2002-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of learning focus on brain areas where the activity changes as a function of time. To circumvent the difficult problem of model selection, we used a data-driven analytic tool, cluster analysis, which extracts representative temporal and spatial patterns from the voxel......-time series. The optimal number of clusters was chosen using a cross-validated likelihood method, which highlights the clustering pattern that generalizes best over the subjects. Data were acquired with PET at different time points during practice of a visuomotor task. The results from cluster analysis show...... practice-related activity in a fronto-parieto-cerebellar network, in agreement with previous studies of motor learning. These voxels were separated from a group of voxels showing an unspecific time-effect and another group of voxels, whose activation was an artifact from smoothing. Hum. Brain Mapping 15...

  19. Cluster analysis of activity-time series in motor learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Daniela; Nielsen, Finn Å; Futiger, Sally A

    2002-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of learning focus on brain areas where the activity changes as a function of time. To circumvent the difficult problem of model selection, we used a data-driven analytic tool, cluster analysis, which extracts representative temporal and spatial patterns from the voxel......-time series. The optimal number of clusters was chosen using a cross-validated likelihood method, which highlights the clustering pattern that generalizes best over the subjects. Data were acquired with PET at different time points during practice of a visuomotor task. The results from cluster analysis show...... practice-related activity in a fronto-parieto-cerebellar network, in agreement with previous studies of motor learning. These voxels were separated from a group of voxels showing an unspecific time-effect and another group of voxels, whose activation was an artifact from smoothing...

  20. Cluster analysis of activity-time series in motor learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Daniela; Nielsen, Finn Å; Futiger, Sally A

    2002-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of learning focus on brain areas where the activity changes as a function of time. To circumvent the difficult problem of model selection, we used a data-driven analytic tool, cluster analysis, which extracts representative temporal and spatial patterns from the voxel......-time series. The optimal number of clusters was chosen using a cross-validated likelihood method, which highlights the clustering pattern that generalizes best over the subjects. Data were acquired with PET at different time points during practice of a visuomotor task. The results from cluster analysis show...... practice-related activity in a fronto-parieto-cerebellar network, in agreement with previous studies of motor learning. These voxels were separated from a group of voxels showing an unspecific time-effect and another group of voxels, whose activation was an artifact from smoothing...