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Sample records for volumes ii iii

  1. DART II documentation. Volume III. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-10-01

    The DART II is a remote, interactive, microprocessor-based data acquistion system suitable for use with air monitors. This volume of DART II documentation contains the following appendixes: adjustment and calibration procedures; mother board signature list; schematic diagrams; device specification sheets; ROM program listing; 6800 microprocessor instruction list, octal listing; and cable lists. (RWR)

  2. DART II documentation. Volume III. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-05-23

    The DART II is a data acquisition system that can be used with air pollution monitoring equipment. This volume contains appendices that deal with the following topics: adjustment and calibration procedures (power supply adjustment procedure, ADC calibration procedure, analog multiplexer calibration procedure); mother board signature list; schematic diagrams; device specification sheets (microprocessor, asynchronous receiver/transmitter, analog-to-digital converter, arithmetic processing unit, 5-volt power supply, +- 15-volt power supply, 24-volt power supply, floppy disk formater/controller, random access static memory); ROM program listing; 6800 microprocessor instruction set, octal listing; and cable lists. (RR)

  3. Condylar volume and condylar area in class I, class II and class III young adult subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saccucci Matteo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim Aim of this study was to compare the volume and the shape of mandibular condyles in a Caucasian young adult population, with different skeletal pattern. Material and methods 200 Caucasian patients (15–30 years old, 95 male and 105 females were classified in three groups on the base of ANB angle: skeletal class I (65 patients, skeletal class II (70 patients and skeletal class III (65 patients. Left and right TMJs of each subject were evaluated independently with CBCT (Iluma. TMJ evaluation included: condylar volume; condylar area; morphological index (MI. Condylar volumes were calculated by using the Mimics software. The condylar volume, the area and the morphological index (MI were compared among the three groups, by using non-parametric tests. Results The Kruskal-Wallis test and the Mann Whitney test revealed that: no significant difference was observed in the whole sample between the right and the left condylar volume; subjects in skeletal class III showed a significantly higher condylar volume, respect to class I and class II subjects (p 3 in males and 663.5 ± 81.3 mm3 in females; p 2 in males and 389.76 ± 61.15 mm2 in females; p  Conclusion Skeletal class appeared to be associated to the mandibular condylar volume and to the mandibular condylar area in the Caucasian orthodontic population.

  4. Condylar volume and condylar area in class I, class II and class III young adult subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Saccucci Matteo; D’Attilio Michele; Rodolfino Daria; Festa Felice; Polimeni Antonella; Tecco Simona

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Aim Aim of this study was to compare the volume and the shape of mandibular condyles in a Caucasian young adult population, with different skeletal pattern. Material and methods 200 Caucasian patients (15–30 years old, 95 male and 105 females) were classified in three groups on the base of ANB angle: skeletal class I (65 patients), skeletal class II (70 patients) and skeletal class III (65 patients). Left and right TMJs of each subject were evaluated independently with CBCT (Iluma). ...

  5. Energy use in the marine transportation industry: Task II. Regulations and Tariffs. Final report, Volume III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-12-01

    The evaluation of the energy impacts of regulations and tariffs is structured around three sequential steps: identification of agencies and organizations that impact the commercial marine transportation industry; identification of existing or proposed regulations that were perceived to have a significant energy impact; and quantification of the energy impacts. Following the introductory chapter, Chapter II describes the regulatory structure of the commercial marine transportation industry and includes a description of the role of each organization and the legislative basis for their jurisdiction and an identification of major areas of regulation and those areas that have an energy impact. Chapters III through IX each address one of the 7 existing or proposed regulatory or legislative actions that have an energy impact. Energy impacts of the state of Washington's tanker regulations, of tanker segregated ballast requirements, of inland waterway user charges, of cargo pooling and service rationalization, of the availability of intermodal container transportation services, of capacity limitations at lock and dam 26 on the Mississippi River and the energy implications of the transportation alternatives available for the West Coast crude oil supplies are discussed. (MCW)

  6. Inside Out. Writings from the Prison Literacy Project. Volumes I-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prison Literacy Project, Philadelphia, PA.

    These two volumes contain writings designed for the new reader who is in prison. Written by both inmates and external volunteers, the material in these volumes includes poems, stories, and short essays that deal with subjects of interest to prison inmates. To help the new reader, easier-to-read pieces are presented first. Titles in volume I are as…

  7. How To Set Up Your Own Small Business. Volumes I-II and Overhead Transparencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallek, Max

    This two-volume textbook and collection of overhead transparency masters is intended for use in a course in setting up a small business. The following topics are covered in the first volume: getting off to a good start, doing market research, forecasting sales, financing a small business, understanding the different legal needs of different types…

  8. Education as Experimentation: A Planned Variation Model. Volume IIIA: Findings: Cohort II; Interim Findings: Cohort III. Volume IIIB: Appendices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Linda B.; And Others

    This segment of the national evaluation study of the Follow Through Planned Variation Model reviews the background of the study, describes 13 of the Follow Through models involved, and presents an analysis of the effects of these models on students. The analysis is based on data from 4 years of Follow Through participation by Cohort II children…

  9. Field Surveys, IOC Valleys. Volume III, Part II. Cultural Resources Survey, Pine and Wah Wah Valleys, Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    including horse, camel, mammoth, Ertm E-TR-48-III-II 20 musk ox, and certain species of bison, goat, and bear, which had previously inhabited the marsh and...34 - - -9,$.. 𔄃 Im I I I Si to * Location lype/Contents Affiliation 42B@644 rid e over cr ek - P/J depression, cleared areas, Fr elon (f4-5-18-92) ground

  10. A Review of the Definition and Measurement of Poverty: Volume I, Summary Review Paper; Volume II, Annotated Bibliography. The Measure of Poverty, Technical Paper III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster, Sharon; And Others

    This study reviews the existing literature on a series of issues associated with the defintion and measurement of poverty, and it consists of a summary report covering this research (Volume I), and an annotated bibliography (Volume II). Eleven specific issues were identified and reviewed in this study: (1) the historical definitions of poverty,…

  11. Artificial heart development program. Volume II. System support. Phase III summary report, July 1, 1973--September 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    Volume 2 covers major activities of the Artificial Heart Development program that supported the design, fabrication, and test of the system demonstration units. Section A.1.0 provides a listing beyond that of the body of the report on the components needed for an implantation. It also presents glove box sterilization calibration results and results of an extensive mock circulation calibration. Section A.2.0 provides detailed procedures for assembly, preparing for use, and the use of the system and major components. Section A.3.0 covers the component research and development activities undertaken to improve components of the existing system units and to prepare for a future prototype system. Section A.4.0 provides a listing of the top assembly drawings of the major systems variations fabricated and tested.

  12. Imprinting Hatchery Reared Salmon and Steelhead Trout for Homing, Volume II of III; Data Summaries, 1978-1983 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slatick, Emil; Ringe, R.R.; Zaugg, Waldo S. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Coastal Zone and Estuarine Studies Division, Seattle, WA)

    1988-02-02

    The main functions of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) aquaculture task biologists and contractual scientists involved in the 1978 homing studies were primarily a surveillance of fish physiology, disease, and relative survival during culture in marine net-pens, to determine if there were any unusual factors that might affect imprinting and homing behavior. The studies were conducted with little background knowledge of the implications of disease and physiology on imprinting and homing in salmonids. The health status or the stocks were quite variable as could be expected. The Dworshak and Wells Hatcheries steelhead suffered from some early stresses in seawater, probably osmoregulatory. The incidences of latent BKD in the Wells and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead and Kooskia Hatchery spring chinook salmon were extremely high, and how these will affect survival in the ocean is not known. Gill enzyme activity in the Dworshak and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead at release was low. Of the steelhead, survival in the Tucannon Hatchery stock will probably be the highest, with Dworshak Hatchery stock the lowest. This report contains the data for the narratives in Volume I.

  13. Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 3 (Appendices II, sections 2--3 and III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

    1998-08-01

    This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 3 contains the following appendix sections: Formation and destruction of nitrogen oxides in recovery boilers; Sintering and densification of recovery boiler deposits laboratory data and a rate model; and Experimental data on rates of particulate formation during char bed burning.

  14. Analysis and Approach to the Development of an Advanced Multimedia Instructional System. Volume II. Appendix III. Media Cost Data. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhode, William E.; And Others

    Basic cost estimates for selected instructional media are tabled in this document, Part II (Appendix III) of the report "Analysis and Approach to the Development of an Advanced Multimedia Instructional System" by William E. Rhode and others. Learning materials production costs are given for motion pictures, still visuals, videotapes, live…

  15. Silver(II) Oxide or Silver(I,III) Oxide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudela, David

    2008-01-01

    The often called silver peroxide and silver(II) oxide, AgO or Ag[subscript 2]O[subscript 2], is actually a mixed oxidation state silver(I,III) oxide. A thermochemical cycle, with lattice energies calculated within the "volume-based" thermodynamic approach, explain why the silver(I,III) oxide is more stable than the hypothetical silver(II) oxide.…

  16. Culture of Schools. Final Report. Volume III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Anthropological Association, Washington, DC.

    The third volume of this 4-volume report contains the last two speeches, on educational philosophy and the role of reason in society, from the Colloquium on the Culture of Schools held at the New School for Social Research (preceding speeches are in Vol. II, SP 003 901), reports on conferences on the culture of schools held in Pittsburgh and…

  17. Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-14

    This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume III contains supporting materials not included in Volumes I and II.

  18. 76 FR 60511 - Amendment of Marine Safety Manual, Volume III

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-29

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Amendment of Marine Safety Manual, Volume III AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice... Offshore Units. The policy is currently found in Chapter 16 of the Marine Safety Manual, Volume III. The... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Background and Purpose Chapter 16 of Volume III of the Marine Safety...

  19. Hanford spent nuclear fuel project recommended path forward, volume III: Alternatives and path forward evaluation supporting documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulton, J.C.

    1994-10-01

    Volume I of the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project - Recommended Path Forward constitutes an aggressive series of projects to construct and operate systems and facilities to safely retrieve, package, transport, process, and store K Basins fuel and sludge. Volume II provided a comparative evaluation of four Alternatives for the Path Forward and an evaluation for the Recommended Path Forward. Although Volume II contained extensive appendices, six supporting documents have been compiled in Volume III to provide additional background for Volume II.

  20. Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program. Volume III. Demonstration plant environmental analysis (Deliverable No. 27)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-08-01

    An Environmental Report on the Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division Industrial Fuel Demonstration Plant was prepared for submission to the US Department of Energy under Contract ET-77-C-01-2582. This document is Volume III of a three-volume Environmental Report. Volume I consists of the Summary, Introduction and the Description of the Proposed Action. Volume II consists of the Description of the Existing Environment. Volume III contains the Environmental Impacts of the Proposed Action, Mitigating Measures and Alternatives to the Proposed Action.

  1. Joule II - Programme. Clean coal technology R & D. 2nd phase. Volume III. Atmospheric combustion of pulverized coal and coal based blends for power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, K.R.G.; Minchener, A.J.; Pruschek, R.; Roberts, P.A. [eds.

    1998-12-31

    Topics covered in this Joule II clean coal technology publication include: coal preparation and blending; cocombustion of coal with biomass and wastes; flame modelling; NO{sub x} abatement by combustion control and staging; coal quality and NO{sub x} emissions; coal combustion properties; and fluidized bed combustion of coal. All papers have been abstracted separately.

  2. NNMSM type-II and -III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haba, Naoyuki [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Shimane University, Matsue, Shimane (Japan); Hokkaido University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Kaneta, Kunio [Hokkaido University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); University of Tokyo, Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Osaka University, Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan); Takahashi, Ryo [Hokkaido University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    We suggest two types of extension of the standard model, which are the so-called next to new minimal standard model type-II and -III. They can achieve gauge coupling unification as well as suitable dark matter abundance, small neutrino masses, baryon asymmetry of the universe, inflation, and dark energy. The gauge coupling unification can be realized by introducing two or three extra new fields, and they could explain charge quantization. We also show that there are regions in which the vacuum stability, coupling perturbativity, and correct dark matter abundance can be realized with current experimental data at the same time. (orig.)

  3. Heterotrimetallic coordination polymers: {Cu(II)Ln(III)Fe(III)} chains and {Ni(II)Ln(III)Fe(III)} layers: synthesis, crystal structures, and magnetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandru, Maria-Gabriela; Visinescu, Diana; Andruh, Marius; Marino, Nadia; Armentano, Donatella; Cano, Joan; Lloret, Francesc; Julve, Miguel

    2015-03-27

    The use of the [Fe(III) (AA)(CN)4](-) complex anion as metalloligand towards the preformed [Cu(II) (valpn)Ln(III)](3+) or [Ni(II) (valpn)Ln(III) ](3+) heterometallic complex cations (AA=2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) and 1,10-phenathroline (phen); H2 valpn=1,3-propanediyl-bis(2-iminomethylene-6-methoxyphenol)) allowed the preparation of two families of heterotrimetallic complexes: three isostructural 1D coordination polymers of general formula {[Cu(II) (valpn)Ln(III) (H2O)3 (μ-NC)2 Fe(III) (phen)(CN)2 {(μ-NC)Fe(III) (phen)(CN)3}]NO3 ⋅7 H2O}n (Ln=Gd (1), Tb (2), and Dy (3)) and the trinuclear complex [Cu(II) (valpn)La(III) (OH2 )3 (O2 NO)(μ-NC)Fe(III) (phen)(CN)3 ]⋅NO3 ⋅H2O⋅CH3 CN (4) were obtained with the [Cu(II) (valpn)Ln(III)](3+) assembling unit, whereas three isostructural heterotrimetallic 2D networks, {[Ni(II) (valpn)Ln(III) (ONO2 )2 (H2 O)(μ-NC)3 Fe(III) (bipy)(CN)]⋅2 H2 O⋅2 CH3 CN}n (Ln=Gd (5), Tb (6), and Dy (7)) resulted with the related [Ni(II) (valpn)Ln(III) ](3+) precursor. The crystal structure of compound 4 consists of discrete heterotrimetallic complex cations, [Cu(II) (valpn)La(III) (OH2)3 (O2 NO)(μ-NC)Fe(III) (phen)(CN)3 ](+), nitrate counterions, and non-coordinate water and acetonitrile molecules. The heteroleptic {Fe(III) (bipy)(CN)4} moiety in 5-7 acts as a tris-monodentate ligand towards three {Ni(II) (valpn)Ln(III)} binuclear nodes leading to heterotrimetallic 2D networks. The ferromagnetic interaction through the diphenoxo bridge in the Cu(II)-Ln(III) (1-3) and Ni(II)-Ln(III) (5-7) units, as well as through the single cyanide bridge between the Fe(III) and either Ni(II) (5-7) or Cu(II) (4) account for the overall ferromagnetic behavior observed in 1-7. DFT-type calculations were performed to substantiate the magnetic interactions in 1, 4, and 5. Interestingly, compound 6 exhibits slow relaxation of the magnetization with maxima of the out-of-phase ac signals below 4.0 K in the lack of a dc field, the values of the pre

  4. Minerals Yearbook, volume III, Area Reports—International

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2017-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industries and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Minerals Yearbook volumes follows:Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters about virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on survey methods, summary statistics for domestic nonfuel minerals, and trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries in the United States are also included.Volume II, Area Reports: Domestic, contains a chapter on the mineral industry of each of the 50 States and Puerto Rico and the Administered Islands. This volume also has chapters on survey methods and summary statistics of domestic nonfuel minerals.Volume III, Area Reports: International, is published as four separate reports. These regional reports contain the latest available minerals data on more than 180 foreign countries and discuss the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations and the United States. Each report begins with an overview of the region’s mineral industries during the year. It continues with individual country chapters that examine the mining, refining, processing, and use of minerals in each country of the region and how each country’s mineral industry relates to U.S. industry. Most chapters include production tables and industry structure tables, information about Government policies and programs that affect the country’s mineral industry, and an outlook section.The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the Minerals Yearbook are welcomed.

  5. An Independent Scientific Assessment of Well Stimulation in California Volume III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Jane C.S. [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Feinstein, Laura C. [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Foxall, William [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Houseworth, James [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Jordan, Preston [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lindsey, Nathaniel [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Maddalena, Randy [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); McKone, Thomas [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Stringfellow, William [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Ulrich, Craig [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Heberger, Matthew [Pacific Inst., Oakland, CA (United States); Shonkoff, Seth [PSE Healthy Energy, Berkeley, CA (United States); Brandt, Adam [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Ferrar, Kyle [The FracTracker Alliance, Oakland, CA (United States); Gautier, Donald [DonGautier LLC., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Phillips, Scott [California State Univ. Stanislaus, Turlock, CA (United States); Greenfield, Ben [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Jerrett, Michael L.B. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This study is issued in three volumes. Volume I, issued in January 2015, describes how well stimulation technologies work, how and where operators deploy these technologies for oil and gas production in California, and where they might enable production in the future. Volume II, issued in July 2015, discusses how well stimulation could affect water, atmosphere, seismic activity, wildlife and vegetation, and human health. Volume II reviews available data, and identifies knowledge gaps and alternative practices that could avoid or mitigate these possible impacts. Volume III, this volume, presents case studies that assess environmental issues and qualitative risks for specific geographic regions. The Summary Report summarizes key findings, conclusions and recommendations of all three volumes.

  6. LIQUID PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH (III & IV) DEMONSTRATION IN THE LAPORTE ALTERNATIVE FUELS DEVELOPMENT UNIT. Final Topical Report. Volume I/II: Main Report. Task 1: Engineering Modifications (Fischer-Tropsch III & IV Demonstration) and Task 2: AFDU Shakedown, Operations, Deactivation (Shut-Down) and Disposal (Fischer-Tropsch III & IV Demonstration).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharat L. Bhatt

    1999-06-01

    Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch technology was successfully demonstrated in DOE's Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) at LaPorte, Texas. Earlier work at LaPorte, with iron catalysts in 1992 and 1994, had established proof-of-concept status for the slurry phase process. The third campaign (Fischer-Tropsch III), in 1996, aimed at aggressively extending the operability of the slurry reactor using a proprietary cobalt catalyst. Due to an irreversible plugging of catalyst-wax separation filters as a result of unexpected catalyst fines generation, the operations had to be terminated after seven days on-stream. Following an extensive post-run investigation by the participants, the campaign was successfully completed in March-April 1998, with an improved proprietary cobalt catalyst. These runs were sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Air Products & Chemicals, Inc., and Shell Synthetic Fuels, Inc. (SSFI). A productivity of approximately 140 grams (gm) of hydrocarbons (HC)/ hour (hr)-liter (lit) of expanded slurry volume was achieved at reasonable system stability during the second trial (Fischer-Tropsch IV). The productivity ranged from 110-140 at various conditions during the 18 days of operations. The catalyst/wax filters performed well throughout the demonstration, producing a clean wax product. For the most part, only one of the four filter housings was needed for catalyst/wax filtration. The filter flux appeared to exceed the design flux. A combination of use of a stronger catalyst and some innovative filtration techniques were responsible for this success. There was no sign of catalyst particle attrition and very little erosion of the slurry pump was observed, in contrast to the Fischer-Tropsch III operations. The reactor operated hydrodynamically stable with uniform temperature profile and gas hold-ups. Nuclear density and differential pressure measurements indicated somewhat higher than expected gas hold-up (45 - 50 vol%) during Fischer

  7. Sequential (gemcitabine/vinorelbine and concurrent (gemcitabine radiochemotherapy with FDG-PET-based target volume definition in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: first results of a phase I/II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanzel Sven

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to determine the maximal tolerated dose (MTD of gemcitabine every two weeks concurrent to radiotherapy, administered during an aggressive program of sequential and simultaneous radiochemotherapy for locally advanced, unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and to evaluate the efficacy of this regime in a phase II study. Methods 33 patients with histologically confirmed NSCLC were enrolled in a combined radiochemotherapy protocol. 29 patients were assessable for evaluation of toxicity and tumor response. Treatment included two cycles of induction chemotherapy with gemcitabine (1200 mg/m2 and vinorelbine (30 mg/m2 at day 1, 8 and 22, 29 followed by concurrent radiotherapy (2.0 Gy/d; total dose 66.0 Gy and chemotherapy with gemcitabine every two weeks at day 43, 57 and 71. Radiotherapy planning included [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET based target volume definition. 10 patients were included in the phase I study with an initial gemcitabine dose of 300 mg/m2. The dose of gemcitabine was increased in steps of 100 mg/m2 until the MTD was realized. Results MTD was defined for the patient group receiving gemcitabine 500 mg/m2 due to grade 2 (next to grade 3 esophagitis in all patients resulting in a mean body weight loss of 5 kg (SD = 1.4 kg, representing 8% of the initial weight. These patients showed persisting dysphagia 3 to 4 weeks after completing radiotherapy. In accordance with expected complications as esophagitis, dysphagia and odynophagia, we defined the MTD at this dose level, although no dose limiting toxicity (DLT grade 3 was reached. In the phase I/II median follow-up was 15.7 months (4.1 to 42.6 months. The overall response rate after completion of therapy was 64%. The median overall survival was 19.9 (95% CI: [10.1; 29.7] months for all eligible patients. The median disease-free survival for all patients was 8.7 (95% CI: [2.7; 14.6] months. Conclusion

  8. ASDIR-II. Volume II. Program Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    34- - , *f,7J ,, .I .I).’ t•I r ojo o o I D - ý flo 1 1nt o - IV0C Kൈ.,4M %n -tI.,n aV 16ncc~’’ 4 1’ 1 ,m In %nOIN~CIN, t~tt & In, .)mrif4 ftj’.3N4).iiM...In 4.4 teat W 4.V . mI N )41 CD W4.4 ’( mal . I". CV ’. - C- .4 kq *W k, W i . C~ C L &j C11 t.4 t-JC IV . th- LZ %Pe W il IN . I’M VI. i l ~l I ) S P...4 -9 3 1a -4 - w-eq 4 - 4 - a. in 1`, mal 4.) 7, ;-riMrim- tfn ~n(l4 Sc~mn r I Al A’ X -’ t ;V N X XDl ;0I -M ’.C xci)At.x;7 ; u ,A )XU ,X;uxvA i a

  9. Survey of biomass gasification. Volume II. Principles of gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, T.B. (comp.)

    1979-07-01

    Biomass can be converted by gasification into a clean-burning gaseous fuel that can be used to retrofit existing gas/oil boilers, to power engines, to generate electricity, and as a base for synthesis of methanol, gasoline, ammonia, or methane. This survey describes biomass gasification, associated technologies, and issues in three volumes. Volume I contains the synopsis and executive summary, giving highlights of the findings of the other volumes. In Volume II the technical background necessary for understanding the science, engineering, and commercialization of biomass is presented. In Volume III the present status of gasification processes is described in detail, followed by chapters on economics, gas conditioning, fuel synthesis, the institutional role to be played by the federal government, and recommendations for future research and development.

  10. Reading Authentic Polish, Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczynski, Waldemar

    The second volume on reading authentic Polish is the continuation of a supplementary textbook to be used either in the classroom or in independent study. The materials included in it are unaltered authentic texts from Polish newspapers, magazines, and other mass media that provide exposure to the context and format of everyday reading matter. The…

  11. Cr(III,Mn(II,Fe(III,Co(II,Ni(II,Cu(II and Zn(II Complexes with Diisobutyldithiocarbamato Ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Tarique

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of sulphur and nitrogen containing dithiocarbamato ligand derived from diisobutylamine as well as its coordination compounds with 3d series transition metals is presented. These synthesized compounds were characterized on the basis of elemental analysis, conductometric measurements and IR spectral studies. The analytical data showed the stoichiometry 1:2 and 1:3 for the compounds of the types ML2 {M=Mn(II, Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II and Zn(II} and M'L3{M'=Cr(III and Fe(III} respectively. The conductometric measurements proved the non-electrolytic behaviour of all the compounds. The bidentate nature of dithiocarbamato moiety was confirmed on the basis of IR spectral data.

  12. Ways to Environmental Education, Volume III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Rodney F., Ed.; And Others

    Ten environmental education booklets presented in this document are the third volume of the environmental series developed by community groups around the Tallahassee Junior Museum and its Pioneer Farm. The first three booklets present an overview of the museum and of the various education programs and activities offered for students at the museum…

  13. Adsorption of chromium(III), mercury(II) and lead(II) ions onto 4-aminoantipyrine immobilized bentonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qihui; Chang, Xijun; Li, Dandan; Hu, Zheng; Li, Ruijun; He, Qun

    2011-02-28

    In this work, the immobilization of 4-aminoantipyrine onto bentonite was carried out and it was then used to investigate the adsorption behavior of Cr(III), Hg(II) and Pb(II) ions from aqueous solutions. The separation and preconcentration conditions of analytes were investigated, including effects of pH, the shaking time, the sample flow rate and volume, the elution condition and the interfering ions. Under optimum pH value (pH 4.0), the maximum static adsorption capacity of the sorbent was found to be 38.8, 52.9 and 55.5 mg g(-1) for Cr(III), Hg(II) and Pb(II), respectively. 2.0 mL of 2% thiourea in 1.0 M HCl solution effectively eluted the adsorbed metal ions. The detection limit (3σ) of this method defined by IUPAC was found to be 0.12, 0.09 and 0.23 ng mL(-1) for Cr(III), Hg(II) and Pb(II), respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was lower 3.0% (n=8). The developed method has been validated by analyzing certified reference materials and successfully applied to the determination of trace Cr(III), Hg(II) and Pb(II) in water samples with satisfactory results.

  14. Culture of Schools. Final Report. Volume II

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Anthropological Association, Washington, DC.

    Volume II of this 4-volume report contains the second half of a report on the Conference on the Culture of Schools held at Greystone, New York, (the first half of the conference report appears in Vol. I, SP 003 900), and the first part of a report on the Colloquium on the Culture of Schools held at the New School for Social Research in 1966. (The…

  15. Utility-based optimization of phase II/III programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Marietta; Kieser, Meinhard; Götte, Heiko; Schüler, Armin

    2016-01-30

    Phase II and phase III trials play a crucial role in drug development programs. They are costly and time consuming and, because of high failure rates in late development stages, at the same time risky investments. Commonly, sample size calculation of phase III is based on the treatment effect observed in phase II. Therefore, planning of phases II and III can be linked. The performance of the phase II/III program crucially depends on the allocation of the resources to phases II and III by appropriate choice of the sample size and the rule applied to decide whether to stop the program after phase II or to proceed. We present methods for a program-wise phase II/III planning that aim at determining optimal phase II sample sizes and go/no-go decisions in a time-to-event setting. Optimization is based on a utility function that takes into account (fixed and variable) costs of the drug development program and potential gains after successful launch. The proposed methods are illustrated by application to a variety of scenarios typically met in oncology drug development.

  16. Free radicals in biology. Volume III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pryor, W.A. (ed.)

    1977-01-01

    This volume covers topics ranging from radiation chemistry to biochemistry, biology, and medicine. This volume attempts to bridge the gap between chemical investigations and the medical applications and implications of free radical reactions. Chapter 1 provides a general introduction to the technique of radiation chemistry, the thermodynamics and kinetic factors that need be considered, the use of pulse radiolysis and flow techniques, and the application of these methods to free radicals of biological interest. Chapter 3 discusses the mechanisms of carbon tetrachloride toxicity. Chapter 4 reviews the morphological, histochemical, biochemical, and chemical nature of lipofuscin pigments. This chapter brings together the evidence that lipofuscin pigments arise from free radical pathology and that the formation of these pigments proves the presence of lipid peroxidation in vivo. Chapter 5 reviews the evidence for production of free (i.e., scavengeable) radicals from the reactions of selected enzymes with their substrates. Chapter 6 discusses one of the systems in which free radical damage is clearly important in vivo, both for man and animal, the damage caused to skin by sunlight. The evidence that free radical reactions can contribute to carcinogenesis dates from the earliest observations that ionizing radiation often produces higher incidences of tumors. A current working hypothesis is that chemical toxins cause damage to DNA and that the repair of this damge may incorporate viral genetic information into the host cell's chromosomes, producing cell transformation and cancer. The mechanism whereby chemical carcinogens become bound to DNA to produce point defects is discussed in Chapter 7.

  17. 50 CFR 23.4 - What are Appendices I, II, and III?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) CONVENTION ON INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN ENDANGERED SPECIES OF WILD FAUNA AND FLORA (CITES) Introduction § 23.4 What are Appendices I, II, and III? Species are listed by the Parties... volume and type of trade to ensure trade is legal and not detrimental to the survival of the......

  18. Site Environmental Report for 2007 Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lackner, Regina E; Baskin, David; Fox, Robert; Jelinski, John; Pauer, Ron; Thorson, Patrick; Wahl, Linnea; Wyrick, Steve

    2008-09-15

    The Site Environmental Report for 2007 is an integrated report on the environmental programs at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and satisfies the requirements of DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities.

  19. SAGE III aerosol extinction validation in the Arctic winter: comparisons with SAGE II and POAM III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. W. Thomason

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of SAGE III multiwavelength aerosol extinction coefficient measurements to infer PSC type is contingent on the robustness of both the extinction magnitude and its spectral variation. Past validation with SAGE II and other similar measurements has shown that the SAGE III extinction coefficient measurements are reliable though the comparisons have been greatly weighted toward measurements made at mid-latitudes. Some aerosol comparisons made in the Arctic winter as a part of SOLVE II suggested that SAGE III values, particularly at longer wavelengths, are too small with the implication that both the magnitude and the wavelength dependence are not reliable. Comparisons with POAM III have also suggested a similar discrepancy. Herein, we use SAGE II data as a common standard for comparison of SAGE III and POAM III measurements in the Arctic winters of 2002/2003 through 2004/2005. During the winter, SAGE II measurements are made infrequently at the same latitudes as these instruments. We have mitigated this problem through the use potential vorticity as a spatial coordinate and thus greatly increased the number of coincident events. We find that SAGE II and III extinction coefficient measurements show a high degree of compatibility at both 1020 nm and 450 nm except a 10–20% bias at both wavelengths. In addition, the 452 to 1020 nm extinction ratio shows a consistent bias of ~30% throughout the lower stratosphere. We also find that SAGE II and POAM III are on average consistent though the comparisons show a much higher variability and larger bias than SAGE II/III comparisons. In addition, we find that the two data sets are not well correlated below 18 km. Overall, we find both the extinction values and the spectral dependence from SAGE III are robust and we find no evidence of a significant defect within the Arctic vortex.

  20. SAGE III Aerosol Extinction Validation in the Arctic Winter: Comparisons with SAGE II and POAM III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, L. W.; Poole, L. R.; Randall, C. E.

    2007-01-01

    The use of SAGE III multiwavelength aerosol extinction coefficient measurements to infer PSC type is contingent on the robustness of both the extinction magnitude and its spectral variation. Past validation with SAGE II and other similar measurements has shown that the SAGE III extinction coefficient measurements are reliable though the comparisons have been greatly weighted toward measurements made at mid-latitudes. Some aerosol comparisons made in the Arctic winter as a part of SOLVE II suggested that SAGE III values, particularly at longer wavelengths, are too small with the implication that both the magnitude and the wavelength dependence are not reliable. Comparisons with POAM III have also suggested a similar discrepancy. Herein, we use SAGE II data as a common standard for comparison of SAGE III and POAM III measurements in the Arctic winters of 2002/2003 through 2004/2005. During the winter, SAGE II measurements are made infrequently at the same latitudes as these instruments. We have mitigated this problem through the use potential vorticity as a spatial coordinate and thus greatly increased the number of coincident events. We find that SAGE II and III extinction coefficient measurements show a high degree of compatibility at both 1020 nm and 450 nm except a 10-20% bias at both wavelengths. In addition, the 452 to 1020-nm extinction ratio shows a consistent bias of approx. 30% throughout the lower stratosphere. We also find that SAGE II and POAM III are on average consistent though the comparisons show a much higher variability and larger bias than SAGE II/III comparisons. In addition, we find that the two data sets are not well correlated below 18 km. Overall, we find both the extinction values and the spectral dependence from SAGE III are robust and we find no evidence of a significant defect within the Arctic vortex.

  1. Mechanical Behaviour of Materials Volume II Fracture Mechanics and Damage

    CERN Document Server

    François, Dominique; Zaoui, André

    2013-01-01

    Designing new structural materials, extending lifetimes and guarding against fracture in service are among the preoccupations of engineers, and to deal with these they need to have command of the mechanics of material behaviour. This ought to reflect in the training of students. In this respect, the first volume of this work deals with elastic, elastoplastic, elastoviscoplastic and viscoelastic behaviours; this second volume continues with fracture mechanics and damage, and with contact mechanics, friction and wear. As in Volume I, the treatment links the active mechanisms on the microscopic scale and the laws of macroscopic behaviour. Chapter I is an introduction to the various damage phenomena. Chapter II gives the essential of fracture mechanics. Chapter III is devoted to brittle fracture, chapter IV to ductile fracture and chapter V to the brittle-ductile transition. Chapter VI is a survey of fatigue damage. Chapter VII is devoted to hydogen embrittlement and to environment assisted cracking, chapter VIII...

  2. Occupational Survey Report. Volume III. Programming Specialty, AFS 511X1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    ROGRAMMING 1SPECIALTY _ ".T\\ I , , ~AFPT 90-511-413 q ’VOLUME III OF III ON -Y 1980’ ’ q -ppT edfor public releaw; is: OCCUPATIONAL ANALYSIS PROGRAM ,"’ USAF...i I..... i l HI I . .. I Ij. ASSISTANT PROGRAMMING NCOICs (GRP308) PERCENT MEMBERS RF,-.N i:\\I’IVF ’ASKS PERFORMING L BEl k k ,,it’FR PROGRkM.S 96...EAVE OR LIBERfY 79 SilON,,, K NCOM ING PERSONNEl. 79 ODIF + UPDATE FXISI’ING COMPUTER PROGRAMS 75 REVIEW ,RA. SPECIFICATIONS 75 PREPARE PFIAl IEi) FLOW

  3. Archform comparisons between skeletal class II and III malocclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wei; Wu, JiaQi; Jiang, JiuHui; Xu, TianMin; Li, CuiYing

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional research was to explore the relationship of the mandibular dental and basal bone archforms between severe Skeletal Class II (SC2) and Skeletal Class III (SC3) malocclusions. We also compared intercanine and intermolar widths in these two malocclusion types. Thirty-three virtual pretreatment mandibular models (Skeletal Class III group) and Thirty-five Skeletal Class II group pretreatment models were created with a laser scanning system. FA (the midpoint of the facial axis of the clinical crown)and WALA points (the most prominent point on the soft-tissue ridge)were employed to produce dental and basal bone archforms, respectively. Gained scatter diagrams of the samples were processed by nonlinear regression analysis via SPSS 17.0. The mandibular dental and basal bone intercanine and intermolar widths were significantly greater in the Skeletal Class III group compared to the Skeletal Class II group. In both groups, a moderate correlation existed between dental and basal bone arch widths in the canine region, and a high correlation existed between dental and basal bone arch widths in the molar region. The coefficient of correlation of the Skeletal Class III group was greater than the Skeletal Class II group. Fourth degree, even order power functions were used as best-fit functions to fit the scatter plots. The radius of curvature was larger in Skeletal Class III malocclusions compared to Skeletal Class II malocclusions (rWALA3>rWALA2>rFA3>rFA2). In conclusion, mandibular dental and basal intercanine and intermolar widths were significantly different between the two groups. Compared with Skeletal Class II subjects, the mandibular archform was more flat for Skeletal Class III subjects.

  4. The Porphyromonas gingivalis HmuY haemophore binds gallium(iii), zinc(ii), cobalt(iii), manganese(iii), nickel(ii), and copper(ii) protoporphyrin IX but in a manner different to iron(iii) protoporphyrin IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójtowicz, Halina; Bielecki, Marcin; Wojaczyński, Jacek; Olczak, Mariusz; Smalley, John W; Olczak, Teresa

    2013-04-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a major etiological agent of chronic periodontitis, acquires haem from host haemoproteins through a haem transporter HmuR and a haemophore HmuY. The aim of this study was to analyse the binding specificity of HmuY towards non-iron metalloporphyrins which may be employed as antimicrobials to treat periodontitis. HmuY binds gallium(iii), zinc(ii), cobalt(iii), manganese(iii), nickel(ii), and copper(ii) protoporphyrin IX but in a manner different to iron(iii) protoporphyrin IX which uses His(134) and His(166) as axial ligands. The metal ions in Ga(iii)PPIX and Zn(ii)PPIX can accept only His(166) as an axial ligand, whereas nickel(ii) and copper(ii) interact exclusively with His(134). Two forms of pentacoordinate manganese(iii) are present in the Mn(iii)PPIX-HmuY complex since the metal accepts either His(134) or His(166) as a single axial ligand. The cobalt ion is hexacoordinate in the Co(iii)PPIX-HmuY complex and binds His(134) and His(166) as axial ligands; however, some differences in their environments exist. Despite different coordination modes of the central metal ion, gallium(iii), zinc(ii), cobalt(iii), and manganese(iii) protoporphyrin IX bound to the HmuY haemophore cannot be displaced by excess haem. All of the metalloporphyrins examined bind to a P. gingivalis wild-type strain with higher ability compared to a mutant strain lacking a functional hmuY gene, thus corroborating binding of non-iron metalloporphyrins to purified HmuY protein. Our results further clarify the basis of metalloporphyrin acquisition by P. gingivalis and add to understanding of the interactions with porphyrin derivatives which exhibit antimicrobial activity against P. gingivalis.

  5. Selected methods for dissolved iron (II, III) and dissolved sulfide (-II) determinations in geothermal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivit, D.V.; Jenne, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    Dissolved sulfide (-II) and dissolved iron (II, III) were determined in geothermal well water samples collected at Cerro Prieto, Mexico. Most samples consisted of liquid and gas (two phases) at the instant of collection; and a subset of samples, referred to as ' flashed ' samples, consisted of pressurized steam samples which were allowed to condense. Sulfide was determined by sulfide specific ion electrode; Fe(II) and Fe(III) plus Fe(II) were determined spectrophotometrically. The precision and accuracy of the methods were evaluated for these high-silica waters with replicate analyses, spike recoveries, and an alternate method. Direct current (d.c.) argon plasma emission spectrometry was the alternate method used for Fe(III)-plus-Fe(II) analyses. Mean dissolved iron concentrations ranged from 20.2 to 834 micrograms/L (ug/L) as Fe(II) and 26.8 to 904 ug/L as Fe(III) plus Fe(II). Mean sulfide concentrations ranged from about 0.01 to 5.3 mg/L (S-II) Generally, higher S(-II) values and larger Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratios were found in the two-phase samples. These findings suggest that the ' flashed ' samples are at a less reduced state than the two-phase samples. (Author 's abstract)

  6. [Fe(II)LSCo(III)LS]2 ⇔ [Fe(III)LSCo(II)HS]2 photoinduced conversion in a cyanide-bridged heterobimetallic molecular square.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercurol, Julie; Li, Yanling; Pardo, Emilio; Risset, Olivia; Seuleiman, Mannan; Rousselière, Hélène; Lescouëzec, Rodrigue; Julve, Miguel

    2010-12-21

    The self-assembly of [Fe(III){B(pz)(4)}(CN)(3)](-) and [Co(II)(bik)(2)(S)(2)](2+) affords the diamagnetic cyanide-bridged [Fe(II)(LS)Co(III)(LS)](2) molecular square which is converted into the corresponding magnetic [Fe(III)(LS)Co(II)(HS)](2) species under light irradiation at relatively low temperatures.

  7. Rapid detection of S. mutans surface antigen I/II using a sensitive monoclonal anti-Ag I/II antibody by ELISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi-Ah; Jeon, Hyun-Soon; Shin, Se-Young; Baik, Byeong-Ju; Yang, Yeon-Mi; Lee, Kyung-Yeol; Kim, Jae-Gon

    2013-10-01

    The cell-surface protein antigen I/II (Ag I/II) is expressed in oral streptococci, which are known as the causative agent of a number of diseases including dental caries, endocarditis, gingivitis, and periodontal disease. Consequently, monoclonal antibodies (MAb) capable of recognizing the streptococcal Ag I/II protein could be a useful tool for the diagnosis and cure of these diseases. In this study, a previously generated monoclonal anti-Ag I/II antibody, ckAg I/II, was used to detect a small amount of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) surface antigen Ag I/II. The ckAg I/II was proved to be very sensitive and able to detect as little as 1 ng of recombinant Ag I/II protein within 5 min and Ag I/II in saliva within 10 min, as well as native Ag I/II in 20 μL of culture supernatant by ELISA. These results suggest that ckAg I/II can be used as a fast and efficient diagnostic tool to detect Ag I/II.

  8. Selective removal of cesium from aqueous solutions with nickel (II) hexacyanoferrate (III) functionalized agricultural residue–walnut shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Dahu, E-mail: dingdahu@gmail.com [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan); Lei, Zhongfang; Yang, Yingnan [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan); Feng, Chuanping [School of Water Resources and Environment, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Key Laboratory of Groundwater Circulation and Evolution, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang, Zhenya, E-mail: zhang.zhenya.fu@u.tsukuba.ac.jp [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Novel biosorbent for cesium removal was derived from agricultural residue. • It could remove cesium effectively from aqueous solution. • Large size of granules makes it easy to be separated from solutions. • The volume of used biosorbent could be significantly reduced after incineration. • Incinerated biosorbent has a low volume and a low cost final disposal. - Abstract: A novel nickel (II) hexacyanoferrate (III) functionalized agricultural residue-walnut shell (Ni{sup II}HCF{sup III}-WS) was developed to selectively remove cesium ion (Cs{sup +}) from aqueous solutions. This paper showed the first integral study on Cs{sup +} removal behavior and waste reduction analysis by using biomass adsorption material. The results indicated that the removal process was rapid and reached saturation within 2 h. As a special characteristic of Ni{sup II}HCF{sup III}-WS, acidic condition was preferred for Cs{sup +} removal, which was useful for extending the application scope of the prepared biomass material in treating acidic radioactive liquid waste. The newly developed Ni{sup II}HCF{sup III}-WS could selectively remove Cs{sup +} though the coexisting ions (Na{sup +} and K{sup +} in this study) exhibited negative effects. In addition, approximately 99.8% (in volume) of the liquid waste was reduced by using Ni{sup II}HCF{sup III}-WS and furthermore 91.9% (in volume) of the spent biomass material (Cs-Ni{sup II}HCF{sup III}-WS) was reduced after incineration (at 500 °C for 2 h). Due to its relatively high distribution coefficient and significant volume reduction, Ni{sup II}HCF{sup III}-WS is expected to be a promising material for Cs{sup +} removal in practice.

  9. Co(II)4, Co(II)7, and a Series of Co(II)2Ln(III) (Ln(III) = Nd(III), Sm(III), Gd(III), Tb(III), Dy(III)) Coordination Clusters: Search for Single Molecule Magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modak, Ritwik; Sikdar, Yeasin; Thuijs, Annaliese E; Christou, George; Goswami, Sanchita

    2016-10-03

    We report herein the syntheses and investigation of the magnetic properties of a Co(II)4 compound, a series of trinuclear Co(II)2Ln(III) (Ln(III) = Nd(III), Sm(III), Gd(III), Tb(III), Dy(III)) complexes, and a Co(II)7 complex. The homometallic Co(II)4 core was obtained from the reaction of Ln(NO3)3·xH2O/Co(NO3)2·6H2O/H2vab/Et3N in a 0.5:0.5:1:2 ratio in methanol. Variation in synthetic conditions was necessary to get the desired Co(II)-Ln(III) complexes. The Co(II)-Ln(III) assembly was synthesized from Ln(NO3)3·xH2O/Co(OAc)2·4H2O/H2vab/NaOMe in a 0.4:0.5:1:1 ratio in methanol. The isostructural Co(II)2Ln(III) complexes have a core structure with the general formula [Co2Ln(Hvab)4(NO3)](NO3)2·MeOH·H2O, (where H2vab = 2-[(2-hydroxymethyl-phenylimino)-methyl]-6-methoxy-phenol) with simultaneous crystallization of Co(II)7 complex in each reaction. The magnetic investigation of these complexes reveals that both homometallic complexes and four Co(II)-Ln(III) complexes (except Co(II)-Nd(III)) display behavior characteristic of single molecule magnets.

  10. Single-molecule magnet behavior and magnetocaloric effect in ferromagnetically coupled Ln(III)-Ni(II)-Ni(II)-Ln(III) (Ln(III) = Dy(III) and Gd(III)) linear complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseguer, Carlos; Titos-Padilla, Silvia; Hänninen, Mikko M; Navarrete, R; Mota, A J; Evangelisti, Marco; Ruiz, José; Colacio, Enrique

    2014-11-17

    New types of linear tetranuclear Ln(III)-Ni(II)-Ni(II)-Ln(III) (Ln(III) = Dy (1), Gd (2)) complexes have been prepared using the multidentate ligand N,N'-bis(3-methoxysalicylidene)-1,3-diaminobenzene, which has two sets of NO and OO' coordination pockets that are able to selectively accommodate Ni(II) and Ln(III) ions, respectively. The X-ray structure analysis reveals that the Ni(II) ions are bridged by phenylenediimine groups forming a 12-membered metallacycle in the central body of the complex, whereas the Ln(III) ions are located at both sides of the metallacycle and linked to the Ni(II) ions by diphenoxo bridging groups. Phenylenediimine and diphenoxo bridging groups transmit ferromagnetic exchange interactions between the two Ni(II) ions and between the Ni(II) and the Ln(III) ions, respectively. Complex 1 shows slow relaxation of the magnetization at zero field and a thermal energy barrier Ueff = 7.4 K with HDC = 1000 Oe, whereas complex 2 exhibits an S = 9 ground state and significant magnetocaloric effect (-ΔSm = 18.5 J kg(-1) K(-1) at T = 3 K and ΔB = 5 T).

  11. Maailmamajanduse konjunktuur : 2006. a. II ja III kv / B Pulver

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Pulver, B

    2006-01-01

    Lühiülevaade maailmamajanduse konjunktuurist 2006. aasta II ja III kvartalis on koostatud Müncheni Majandusuuringute Instituudi väljaande World Economic Survey nr 92 alusel. 2006. a. aprilli vaatlus näitas maailma majanduskliima paranemist. Tabelid: Ekspertide hinnangud aprillis 2006 (max=9); Arenenud riikide majandusindikaatorid; Konjunktuuribaromeetrite kindlustunde indikaatorid Euroopa Liidu maades

  12. Maailmamajanduse konjunktuur : 2006. a. II ja III kv / B Pulver

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Pulver, B

    2006-01-01

    Lühiülevaade maailmamajanduse konjunktuurist 2006. aasta II ja III kvartalis on koostatud Müncheni Majandusuuringute Instituudi väljaande World Economic Survey nr 92 alusel. 2006. a. aprilli vaatlus näitas maailma majanduskliima paranemist. Tabelid: Ekspertide hinnangud aprillis 2006 (max=9); Arenenud riikide majandusindikaatorid; Konjunktuuribaromeetrite kindlustunde indikaatorid Euroopa Liidu maades

  13. Articulación de fones en individuos clase esqueletal I,II y III Speech patterns in skeletal class I, II and III subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pía Villanueva

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: determinar los patrones de articulación de fones consonánticos en sujetos de habla española chilena clases I, II y III esqueletal; comparar las diferencias fonéticas que existan entre clases esqueletales. MÉTODOS: se seleccionaron 54 individuos que cumplían con los criterios de inclusión determinados mediante un examen clínico intraoral y a través del análisis de Ricketts, y se conformaron los grupos de estudio de pacientes clases esqueletales I, II y III. Se les realizó un examen fonoarticulatorio estandarizado para determinar los fones modificados y el patrón articulatorio compensatorio realizado. RESULTADOS: se observaron cambios en el punto de articulación de fones consonánticos en las tres clases esqueletales, con diferencias significativas en los grupos de fones anteriores y medios entre pacientes clases I y II, sólo en el grupo de los fones anteriores entre pacientes I y III. Entre pacientes clases II y III no se observaron diferencias significativas. Se reportan modificaciones y compensaciones cualitativamente distintas entre las clases esqueletales. CONCLUSIONES: en relación a pacientes clase I, los pacientes clase II o III, presentan distinto grado de modificación en el punto de articulación de fones consonánticos. Las diferencias observadas se relacionan con los patrones esqueletales propios de cada clase.PURPOSE: to determine the consonant phonemes articulation patterns in Chilean skeletal class I, II and III Spanish speakers and compare their phonetic differences. METHODS: fifty-four skeletal class I, II and III subjects were selected, based on intraoral clinical examination and Ricketts cephalometric analysis, constituting the study groups. A standardized phonoarticulatory test was applied to each patient to determine the modified phonemes and their compensatory patterns. RESULTS: the findings indicate changes in articulation in all three groups. Significant differences were found in anterior and medium

  14. Developing Successful Proposals in Women's Educational Equity, Volume I: The Guide = Desarrollo de propuestas exitosas relacionadas con la equidad educativa de la mujer, volumen I: La guia. Volume II: The Supplement. Volume III: The Swipe File. Volume IV: Workshop Training Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Walter R.; And Others

    Four volumes present materials and a training workshop on proposal writing. The materials aim to give people the skills and resources with which to translate their ideas into fully developed grant proposals for projects related to educational equity for women. However, the information is applicable to most other funding procedures. The first…

  15. An Independent Scientific Assessment of Well Stimulation in California Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Jane C.S. [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Feinstein, Laura C. [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Bachmann, Corinne E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Birkholzer, Jens T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Camarillo, Mary Kay [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Domen, Jeremy K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Foxall, William [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Houseworth, James [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Jin, Ling [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Jordan, Preston D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Maddalena, Randy L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); McKone, Thomas E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Millstein, Dev E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Reagan, Matthew T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sandelin, Whitney L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Stringfellow, William T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Varadharajan, Charuleka [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Cooley, Heather [Pacific Inst., Oakland, CA (United States); Donnelly, Kristina [Pacific Inst., Oakland, CA (United States); Heberger, Matthew G. [Pacific Inst., Oakland, CA (United States); Hays, Jake [PSE Healthy Energy, Berkeley, CA (United States); Shonkoff, Seth B.C. [PSE Healthy Energy, Berkeley, CA (United States); Brandt, Adam [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Englander, Jacob G. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Hamdoun, Amro [Univ. of California of San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Nicklisch, Sascha C.T. [Univ. of California of San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Harrison, Robert J. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Wettstein, Zachary S. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Banbury, Jenner [California State Univ. Stanislaus, Turlock, CA (United States); Cypher, Brian L. [California State Univ. Stanislaus, Turlock, CA (United States); Phillips, Scott E. [California State Univ. Stanislaus, Turlock, CA (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This study is issued in three volumes. Volume I, issued in January 2015, describes how well stimulation technologies work, how and where operators deploy these technologies for oil and gas production in California, and where they might enable production in the future. Volume II, the present volume, discusses how well stimulation could affect water, atmosphere, seismic activity, wildlife and vegetation, and human health. Volume II reviews available data, and identifies knowledge gaps and alternative practices that could avoid or mitigate these possible impacts. Volume III, also issued in July 2015, presents case studies that assess environmental issues and qualitative risks for specific geographic regions. A final Summary Report summarizes key findings, conclusions and recommendations of all three volumes.

  16. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report III, Volume 2. Specifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-01-01

    Report III, Volume 2 contains those specifications numbered K through Y, as follows: Specifications for Compressors (K); Specifications for Piping (L); Specifications for Structures (M); Specifications for Insulation (N); Specifications for Electrical (P); Specifications for Concrete (Q); Specifications for Civil (S); Specifications for Welding (W); Specifications for Painting (X); and Specifications for Special (Y). The standard specifications of Bechtel Petroleum Incorporated have been amended as necessary to reflect the specific requirements of the Breckinridge Project and the more stringent specifications of Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc. These standard specifications are available for the Initial Effort (Phase Zero) work performed by all contractors and subcontractors.

  17. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies to Streptococcus mutans antigenic determinants I/II, I, II, and III and their serotype specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R; Lehner, T; Beverley, P C

    1984-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (McAb) were developed to four protein components of Streptococcus mutans serotype c, some of which are significant in the protection against dental caries. The six McAb used in this investigation support the identities of streptococcal antigens (SA) I/II, I, II, and III. The specificities of these antigenic determinants were established both by direct binding and inhibition with the pure SA with a solid-phase radioassay. Whereas conventional antisera to S. mutans serotype c cross-react with serotypes c, e, and f (and g), McAb to serotype c-derived SA I/II react predominantly with serotype c and show some low-titer reactivity with serotype f. The slight cross-reactivity between S. mutants cells of serotypes c and f could be further differentiated by absorption of any of the three McAb to SA I/II with cells of serotype c. Parallel studies of McAb with cells of S. mutans and their ammonium sulfate-precipitated culture supernatants suggest that some SA determinants are retained predominantly on the cell surface, but others are readily shed into the culture medium, so that they are detected both on the cell surface and culture medium. Unlike polyclonal antibodies, McAb are capable of discriminating single antigenic determinants and can be applied to the study of shedding of antigens from microorganisms into the environment, such as the gut or gingival sulcus.

  18. Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggieri, Michael

    2006-07-07

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1A, ''Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting''. The ''Site Environmental Report for 2005'' summarizes Berkeley Lab's environmental management performance, presents environmental monitoring results, and describes significant programs for calendar year 2005. (Throughout this report, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is referred to as ''Berkeley Lab'', ''the Laboratory'', ''Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory'', and ''LBNL''.) The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains an overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities. This year's Volume I text body is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters. The report's structure has been reorganized this year, and it now includes a chapter devoted to environmental management system topics. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities. The ''Site Environmental Report'' is distributed by releasing it on the Web from the Berkeley Lab Environmental Services Group (ESG) home page, which is located at http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/esg/. Many of the documents cited in this report also are accessible from the ESG Web page. CD and printed copies of this Site Environmental Report are available upon request. The report follows the Laboratory's policy of using the International System of Units (SI), also known as the metric system of measurements. Whenever possible, results are also reported using the more conventional (non-SI) system of measurements, because the non-SI system is referenced by several current

  19. Conditionally unbiased estimation in phase II/III clinical trials with early stopping for futility

    OpenAIRE

    Kimani, Peter K.; Todd, Susan; Stallard, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    Seamless phase II/III clinical trials combine traditional phases II and III into a single trial that is conducted in two stages, with stage 1 used to answer phase II objectives such as treatment selection and stage 2 used for the confirmatory analysis, which is a phase III objective. Although seamless phase II/III clinical trials are efficient because the confirmatory analysis includes phase II data from stage 1, inference can pose statistical challenges. In this paper, we consider point esti...

  20. Magnetic interactions in CuII-LnIII cyclic tetranuclear complexes: is it possible to explain the occurrence of SMM behavior in CuII-TbIII and CuII-DyIII complexes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamatsu, Takefumi; Yabe, Kazuya; Towatari, Masaaki; Osa, Shutaro; Matsumoto, Naohide; Re, Nazzareno; Pochaba, Andrzej; Mrozinski, Jerzy; Gallani, Jean-Louis; Barla, Alessandro; Imperia, Paolo; Paulsen, Carley; Kappler, Jean-Paul

    2007-05-28

    An extensive series of tetranuclear CuII2LnIII2 complexes [CuIILLnIII(hfac)2]2 (with LnIII being all lanthanide(III) ions except for the radioactive PmIII) has been prepared in order to investigate the nature of the CuII-LnIII magnetic interactions and to try to answer the following question: What makes the CuII2TbIII2 and CuII2DyIII2 complexes single molecule magnets while the other complexes are not? All the complexes within this series possess a similar cyclic tetranuclear structure, in which the CuII and LnIII ions are arrayed alternately via bridges of ligand complex (CuIIL). Regular SQUID magnetometry measurements have been performed on the series. The temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibilities from 2 to 300 K and the field-dependent magnetizations from 0 to 5 T at 2 K have been measured for the CuII2LnIII2 and NiII2LnIII2 complexes, with the NiII2LnIII2 complex containing diamagnetic NiII ions being used as a reference for the evaluation of the CuII-LnIII magnetic interactions. These measurements have revealed that the interactions between CuII and LnIII ions are very weakly antiferromagnetic if Ln=Ce, Nd, Sm, Yb, ferromagnetic if Ln=Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and negligible if Ln=La, Eu, Pr, Lu. With the same goal of better understanding the evolution of the intramolecular magnetic interactions, X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) has also been measured on CuII2TbIII2, CuII2DyIII2, and NiII2TbIII2 complexes, either at the L- and M-edges of the metal ions or at the K-edge of the N and O atoms. Last, the CuII2TbIII2 complex exhibiting SMM behavior has received a closer examination of its low temperature magnetic properties down to 0.1 K. These particular measurements have revealed the unusual very slow setting-up of a 3D order below 0.6 K.

  1. Gene expression profiles in stages II and III colon cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Morten; Kirkeby, Lene T; Hansen, Raino;

    2012-01-01

    were retrieved from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) (n¿=¿111) in addition to a Danish data set (n¿=¿37). All patients had stages II and III colon cancers. A Prediction Analysis of Microarray classifier, based on the 128-gene signature and the original training set of stage I (n¿=¿65) and stage IV (n......¿=¿76) colon cancers, was reproduced. The stages II and III colon cancers were subsequently classified as either stage I-like (good prognosis) or stage IV-like (poor prognosis) and assessed by the 36 months cumulative incidence of relapse. RESULTS: In the GEO data set, results were reproducible in stage...... correctly predicted as stage IV-like, and the remaining patients were predicted as stage I-like and unclassifiable, respectively. Stage II patients could not be stratified. CONCLUSIONS: The 128-gene signature showed reproducibility in stage III colon cancer, but could not predict recurrence in stage II...

  2. Energy extension service pilot program evaluation report: the first year. Volume III: supplementary reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-09-01

    The appendices presented in this volume support and supplement Volume I of the Energy Extension Service Pilot Program Evaluation Report: The First Year. The appendices contain back-up data and detailed information on energy savings estimation and other analytic procedures. This volume also describes the data sources used for the evaluation. Appendix I presents the Btu estimation procedures used to calculate state-by-state energy savings. Appendix II contains details of the data sources used for the evaluation. Appendix III presents program activity data, budget, and cost per client analyses. Appendix IV, the Multivariate Analysis of EES Survey Data, provides the basis for the Integrating Statistical Analyses. Appendix V describes the rationale and exclusion rules for outlying data points. The final appendix presents program-by-program fuel costs and self-reported savings and investment.

  3. The Mid-Infrared [SIV]/[NeII] versus [NeIII]/[NeII] Correlation

    CERN Document Server

    Groves, Brent; Brandl, Bernhard

    2008-01-01

    The mid-infrared ratio [NeIII]15.6mum/[NeII]12.8mum is a strong diagnostic of the ionization state of emission line objects, due to its use of only strong neon emission lines only weakly affected by extinction. However this ratio is not available to ground-based telescopes as only a few spectroscopic windows are available in the MIR. To deal with this problem we aimed to verify if there exists a conversion law between ground-accessible, strong MIR line ratio [SIV]/[NeII] and the diagnostic [NeIII]/[NeII] ratio that can serve as a reference for future ground-based observations. We collated the [SIV]10.5mum, [NeII]12.8mum, [NeIII]15.6\\mum and [SIII]18.7mum emission line fluxes from a wide range of sources in the rich Spitzer and ISO archives, and compared the [NeIII]/[NeII], [SIV]/[SIII], and [SIV]/[NeII] ratios. We find a strong correlation between the [SIV]/[NeII] and [\

  4. Minerals Yearbook, volume II, Area Reports—Domestic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2017-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industries and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Minerals Yearbook volumes follows:Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters about virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on survey methods, summary statistics for domestic nonfuel minerals, and trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries in the United States are also included.Volume II, Area Reports: Domestic, contains a chapter on the mineral industry of each of the 50 States and Puerto Rico and the Administered Islands. This volume also has chapters on survey methods and summary statistics of domestic nonfuel minerals.Volume III, Area Reports: International, is published as four separate reports. These regional reports contain the latest available minerals data on more than 180 foreign countries and discuss the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations and the United States. Each report begins with an overview of the region’s mineral industries during the year. It continues with individual country chapters that examine the mining, refining, processing, and use of minerals in each country of the region and how each country’s mineral industry relates to U.S. industry. Most chapters include production tables and industry structure tables, information about Government policies and programs that affect the country’s mineral industry, and an outlook section.The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the Minerals Yearbook are welcomed.

  5. 40 CFR 144.28 - Requirements for Class I, II, and III wells authorized by rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... annular pressure; (iii) The results from ground-water monitoring wells prescribed in paragraph (g)(1)(iii... drinking water and the well bore is prohibited. (2) The owner or operator of a Class I, II or III injection... water. (ii) For Class II wells: (A) The owner or operator shall not exceed a maximum injection...

  6. The use of Agrobacterium tumefacients immobilized on Amberlite XAD-4 as a new biosorbent for the column preconcentration of iron(III), cobalt(II), manganese(II) and chromium(III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baytak, Sıtkı; Türker, A Rehber

    2005-02-28

    A microorganism Agrobacterium tumefacients as an immobilized cell on a solid support was presented as a new biosorbent for the enrichment of Fe(III), Co(II), Mn(II) and Cr(III) prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometric analysis. Amberlite XAD-4 was used as a support material for column preconcentration. Various parameters such as pH, amount of adsorbent, eluent type and volume, flow rate of sample solution, volume of sample solution and matrix interference effect on the retention of the metal ions have been studied. The optimum pH for the sorption of above mentioned metal ions were about 6, 8, 8 and 6, respectively. The loading capacity of adsorbent for Co(II) and Mn(II) were found to be 29 and 22mumolg(-1), respectively. The recoveries of Fe(III), Co(II), Mn(II) and Cr(III), under the optimum conditions were found to be 99 +/- 3, 99 +/- 2, 98 +/- 3 and 98 +/- 3%, respectively, at the 95% confidence level. The limit of detection was 3.6, 3.0, 2.8 and 3.6ngml(-1) for Fe(III), Co(II), Mn(II) and Cr (III), respectively, by applying a preconcentration factor of 25. The proposed enrichment method was applied for metal ion determination from water samples, alloy samples, infant foods and certified samples such as whey powder (IAEA-155) and aluminum alloy (NBS SRM 85b). The analytes were determined with a relative error lower than 10% in all samples.

  7. Zooplankton biomass (displacement and settled volume) data collected during the International Cooperative Investigations of the Tropical Atlantic EQUALANT I, EQUALANT II, and EQUALANT III projects from 1963-02-15 to 1964-07-09 (NODC Accession 0071432)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton biomass (displacement and settled volume) data collected during the International Cooperative Investigations of the Tropical Atlantic EQUALANT I,...

  8. Financial constraints in capacity planning: a national utility regulatory model (NUREG). Volume I of III: methodology. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-10-29

    This report develops and demonstrates the methodology for the National Utility Regulatory (NUREG) Model developed under contract number DEAC-01-79EI-10579. It is accompanied by two supporting volumes. Volume II is a user's guide for operation of the NUREG software. This includes description of the flow of software and data, as well as the formats of all user data files. Finally, Volume III is a software description guide. It briefly describes, and gives a listing of, each program used in NUREG.

  9. SrMnII2MnIII(PO43

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaleb Alhakmi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, strontium trimanganese tris(orthophosphate, was synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. Its structure is isotypic to that of the lead analogue PbMnII2MnIII(PO43. Two O atoms are in general positions, whereas all others atoms are in special positions. The Sr and one P atom exhibit mm2 symmetry, the MnII atom 2/m symmetry, the MnIII atom and the other P atom .2. symmetry and two O atoms are located on mirror planes. The three-dimensional network of the crystal structure is made up of two types of chains running parallel to [010]. One chain is linear and is composed of alternating MnIIIO6 octahedra and PO4 tetrahedra sharing vertices; the other chain has a zigzag arrangement and is built up from two edge-sharing MnIIO6 octahedra connected to PO4 tetrahedra by edges and vertices. The two types of chains are linked through PO4 tetrahedra, leading to the formation of channels parallel to [100] and [010] in which the SrII ions are located. They are surrounded by eight O atoms in the form of a slightly distorted bicapped trigonal prism.

  10. Biosorption kinetics of Cd (II, Cr (III and Pb (II in aqueous solutions by olive stone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Calero

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A by-product from olive oil production, olive stone, was investigated for the removal of Cd (II, Cr (III and Pb (II from aqueous solutions. The kinetics of biosorption are studied, analyzing the effect of the initial concentration of metal and temperature. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich and intraparticle diffusion models have been used to represent the kinetics of the process and obtain the main kinetic parameters. The results show that the pseudo-second order model is the one that best describes the biosorption of the three metal ions for all the range of experimental conditions investigated. For the three metal ions, the maximum biosoption capacity and the initial biosorption rate increase when the initial metal concentration rises. However, the kinetic constant decreases when the initial metal concentration increases. The temperature effect on biosorption capacity for Cd (II and Cr (III is less significant; however, for Pb (II the effect of temperature is more important, especially when temperature rises from 25 to 40ºC. The biosorption capacity at mmol/g of olive stone changes in the following order: Cr>Cd>Pb. Thus, for an initial concentration of 220 mg/ℓ, a maximum sorption capacity of 0.079 mmol/g for Cr (III, 0.065 mmol/g for Cd (II and 0.028 mmol/g for Pb (II has been obtained.

  11. Hydroxo-bridged dicopper(II,III) and -(III,III) complexes: models for putative intermediates in oxidation catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvagar, Mohammad Reza; Solntsev, Pavlo V; Lim, Hyeongtaek; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O; Solomon, Edward I; Cramer, Christopher J; Tolman, William B

    2014-05-21

    A macrocyclic ligand (L(4-)) comprising two pyridine(dicarboxamide) donors was used to target reactive copper species relevant to proposed intermediates in catalytic hydrocarbon oxidations by particulate methane monooxygenase and heterogeneous zeolite systems. Treatment of LH4 with base and Cu(OAc)2·H2O yielded (Me4N)2[L2Cu4(μ4-O)] (1) or (Me4N)[LCu2(μ-OH)] (2), depending on conditions. Complex 2 was found to undergo two reversible 1-electron oxidations via cyclic voltammetry and low-temperature chemical reactions. On the basis of spectroscopy and theory, the oxidation products were identified as novel hydroxo-bridged mixed-valent Cu(II)Cu(III) and symmetric Cu(III)2 species, respectively, that provide the first precedence for such moieties as oxidation catalysis intermediates.

  12. Extraction and separation of Nd(III), Sm(III), Dy(III), Fe(III), Ni(II), and Cs(I) from concentrated chloride solutions with N,N,N',N'-tetra(2-ethylhexyl) diglycolamide as new extractant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E.A. Mowafy; D. Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of using N,N,N',N'-tetra(2-ethylhexyl)diglycolamide (TEHDGA) in 75 vol.% n-dodecane-25 vol.% n-octanol as agents for the extraction and separation of Nd(III), Sm(III), Dy(III), Fe(III), Ni(II), and Cs(I) from concentrated chlo-ride solution was investigated. Different extraction behaviors were obtained towards rare earth elements (REE) studied and Fe(III), Ni(II) and Cs(I). Efficient separation of Nd(III), Sm(III) and Dy(III) from Fe(III), Ni(II), and Cs(I) was achieved by TEHDGA, depending on the HCl, HNO3 or H2SO4 concentration. A systematic investigation was carried out on the detailed extraction prop-erties of Nd(III), Sm(III), and Dy(III) with TEHDGA from chloride media. The IR spectra of the extracted species were investi-gated.

  13. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies: types II, III, and IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Felicia B; Gold-von Simson, Gabrielle

    2007-10-03

    The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) encompass a number of inherited disorders that are associated with sensory dysfunction (depressed reflexes, altered pain and temperature perception) and varying degrees of autonomic dysfunction (gastroesophageal reflux, postural hypotention, excessive sweating). Subsequent to the numerical classification of four distinct forms of HSAN that was proposed by Dyck and Ohta, additional entities continue to be described, so that identification and classification are ongoing. As a group, the HSAN are rare diseases that affect both sexes. HSAN III is almost exclusive to individuals of Eastern European Jewish extraction, with incidence of 1 per 3600 live births. Several hundred cases with HSAN IV have been reported. The worldwide prevalence of HSAN type II is very low. This review focuses on the description of three of the disorders, HSAN II through IV, that are characterized by autosomal recessive inheritance and onset at birth. These three forms of HSAN have been the most intensively studied, especially familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome or HSAN III), which is often used as a prototype for comparison to the other HSAN. Each HSAN disorder is likely caused by different genetic errors that affect specific aspects of small fiber neurodevelopment, which result in variable phenotypic expression. As genetic tests are routinely used for diagnostic confirmation of HSAN III only, other means of differentiating between the disorders is necessary. Diagnosis is based on the clinical features, the degree of both sensory and autonomic dysfunction, and biochemical evaluations, with pathologic examinations serving to further confirm differences. Treatments for all these disorders are supportive.

  14. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies: types II, III, and IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axelrod Felicia B

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN encompass a number of inherited disorders that are associated with sensory dysfunction (depressed reflexes, altered pain and temperature perception and varying degrees of autonomic dysfunction (gastroesophageal reflux, postural hypotention, excessive sweating. Subsequent to the numerical classification of four distinct forms of HSAN that was proposed by Dyck and Ohta, additional entities continue to be described, so that identification and classification are ongoing. As a group, the HSAN are rare diseases that affect both sexes. HSAN III is almost exclusive to individuals of Eastern European Jewish extraction, with incidence of 1 per 3600 live births. Several hundred cases with HSAN IV have been reported. The worldwide prevalence of HSAN type II is very low. This review focuses on the description of three of the disorders, HSAN II through IV, that are characterized by autosomal recessive inheritance and onset at birth. These three forms of HSAN have been the most intensively studied, especially familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome or HSAN III, which is often used as a prototype for comparison to the other HSAN. Each HSAN disorder is likely caused by different genetic errors that affect specific aspects of small fiber neurodevelopment, which result in variable phenotypic expression. As genetic tests are routinely used for diagnostic confirmation of HSAN III only, other means of differentiating between the disorders is necessary. Diagnosis is based on the clinical features, the degree of both sensory and autonomic dysfunction, and biochemical evaluations, with pathologic examinations serving to further confirm differences. Treatments for all these disorders are supportive.

  15. 40 CFR 147.3108 - Plugging Class I, II, and III wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Plugging Class I, II, and III wells... Certain Oklahoma Indian Tribes § 147.3108 Plugging Class I, II, and III wells. In addition to the... well: (a) For Class I and III wells: (1) The well shall be filled with mud from the bottom of the...

  16. Sequential (gemcitabine/vinorelbine) and concurrent (gemcitabine) radiochemotherapy with FDG-PET-based target volume definition in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: first results of a phase I/II study

    OpenAIRE

    Stanzel Sven; Kaiser Hans J; Krohn Thomas; Reinartz Patrick; Pinkawa Michael; Piroth Marc; Gagel Bernd; Breuer Christian; Asadpour Branka; Schmachtenberg Axel; Eble Michael J

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of the study was to determine the maximal tolerated dose (MTD) of gemcitabine every two weeks concurrent to radiotherapy, administered during an aggressive program of sequential and simultaneous radiochemotherapy for locally advanced, unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to evaluate the efficacy of this regime in a phase II study. Methods 33 patients with histologically confirmed NSCLC were enrolled in a combined radiochemotherapy protocol. 29 patien...

  17. Planning manual for energy resource development on Indian lands. Volume III. Manpower and training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-03-01

    This volume addresses ways to bridge the gap between existing tribal skill levels and the skill levels required for higher-paying jobs in energy resource development projects. It addresses opportunities for technical, skilled, and semiskilled employment as well as professional positions, because it is important to have tribal participation at all levels of an operation. Section II, ''Energy-Related Employment Opportunities,'' covers three areas: (1) identification of energy-resource occupations; (2) description of these occupations; and (3) identification of skill requirements by type of occupation. Section III, ''Description of Training Programs,'' also covers three areas: (a) concept of a training-program model; (b) description of various training methods; and (c) an assessment of the cost of training, utilizing different programs. Section IV concentrates on development of a training program for target occupations, skills, and populations. Again this section covers three areas: (i) overview of the development of a skills training program; (ii) identification of target occupations, skills, and populations; and (iii) energy careers for younger tribal members.

  18. The Major Causes of Cost Growth in Defense Acquisition, Volume II: Main Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Acquisition Volume II: Main Body Gene Porter, Project Leader Brian Gladstone C. Vance Gordon Nicholas Karvonides R. Royce Kneece, Jr. Jay Mandelbaum...Main Body Gene Porter, Project Leader Brian Gladstone C. Vance Gordon Nicholas Karvonides R. Royce Kneece, Jr. Jay Mandelbaum William D. O’Neil iii...information to DoD management on the status of the most important acquisition programs. Since 1969 , Congress has required that the SARs for MDAPs be

  19. MODERN JAPANESE, A BASIC READER. VOLUME II, JAPANESE TEXTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HIBBETT, HOWARD; ITASAKA, GEN

    VOLUME II OF THIS INTRODUCTION TO WRITTEN JAPANESE CONTAINS 60 READING PASSAGES IN JAPANESE SCRIPT TO BE USED WITH THE VOCABULARY AND NOTES IN VOLUME I. THE READINGS ARE GRADED AND HAVE BEEN SELECTED TO REPRESENT GOOD MODERN JAPANESE USAGE. THE BEGINNING LESSONS ARE IN EASY INFORMAL STYLES AND ARE CONCERNED WITH THE JAPANESE LANGUAGE AND CULTURE.…

  20. Spectroscopic and thermal degradation behavior of Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes with thiopental sodium anesthesia drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refat, Moamen S.

    2013-04-01

    A new series of Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes have been synthesized with thiopental sodium anesthesia drug. The elemental analyses of the complexes are confined to stoichiometry of the formulas [M(TPL)3]ṡnH2O (M = Cr(III) or Fe(III); n = 6 or 5), [M(TPL)2(H2O)2]ṡnH2O (M = Mn(II), Co(II) or Ni(II); n = 0 or 4), and [M(TPL)2] (M = Cu(II) or Zn(II); n = 2 or 0) respectively, where TPL is thiopental chelating agent. Structures have been discussed and suggested upon elemental analyses, infrared, Raman, electronic, electron spin resonance, 1H NMR spectral data and magnetic studies. The X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) was performed of metal complexes. The XRD patterns indicate crystalline nature for the complexes. The measured low molar conductance values in dimethylsulfoxide indicate that the complexes are non-electrolyte nature. Spectroscopic discussion refer that coordination take place through three types: Cdbnd N (pyrimidine moiety) nitrogen and C2sbnd S (2-thiolate group) for Cr(III), Mn(II) and Fe(III), C6dbnd O (amido group) oxygen and C2sbnd S (2-thiolate group) for Co(II) and Ni(II), and Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions coordinated via Cdbnd N (pyrimidine moiety) nitrogen, C2dbnd S (2-thiolate group) and C6dbnd O (amido group) oxygen, respectively. The thermal behavior (TG/DTG/DTA) of the complexes was studied and kinetic parameters were determined by Horowitz-Metzger and Coats-Redfern methods. The thiopental and its complexes have been screened for their antimicrobial (G+ and G-) bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and fungi (Aspergillus flavus and Candida albicans) activities by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) method.

  1. Manda d'hajje I-II : [luuletused] / Uku Masing

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Masing, Uku, 1909-1985

    2001-01-01

    Tekst eesti ja inglise k. U. Masingu lühibiograafia eesti ja inglise k. lk. 75. Sisu: Manda d'hajje I-II ; "Lennata mõtles kord muinasmaa liblikas..." = "Once a fairyland butterfly thought it would fly..." ; "Sa oled mägi, mida kardavad me karjed..." = "You are the mountain that our herds fear..." ; "Ammu tõusnud koopast, sygavalt ja kaugelt..." = "Long since risen from a cave, deep and far away..." ; "Imelik, et Sinu silmad mind ei karda..." ; "Strange that Your eyes do not fear me..." ; "Ööl järveks laiud. Ja siis äkki tõusvad üles..." = "At night You grow into a lake. From its bed..." ; "Sinu keha tõuseb minu käsivartelt..." = "Your body rises from my arms to meet me..."

  2. Manda d'hajje I-II : [luuletused] / Uku Masing

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Masing, Uku, 1909-1985

    2001-01-01

    Tekst eesti ja inglise k. U. Masingu lühibiograafia eesti ja inglise k. lk. 75. Sisu: Manda d'hajje I-II ; "Lennata mõtles kord muinasmaa liblikas..." = "Once a fairyland butterfly thought it would fly..." ; "Sa oled mägi, mida kardavad me karjed..." = "You are the mountain that our herds fear..." ; "Ammu tõusnud koopast, sygavalt ja kaugelt..." = "Long since risen from a cave, deep and far away..." ; "Imelik, et Sinu silmad mind ei karda..." ; "Strange that Your eyes do not fear me..." ; "Ööl järveks laiud. Ja siis äkki tõusvad üles..." = "At night You grow into a lake. From its bed..." ; "Sinu keha tõuseb minu käsivartelt..." = "Your body rises from my arms to meet me..."

  3. Compensatory canine angulation in angle Class II and III patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Carlos Agner Busato

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurence of compensation in mesiodistal axial inclinations of canines in skeletal malocclusions patients. The sample consisted of 25 Angle Class II, division 1 malocclusion (group 1 and 19 Angle Class III malocclusion patients (group 2. After measurement of dental angulations through a method that associates plaster model photography and AutoCad software, comparisons between the groups were performed by T-test for independent samples. Results showed that there was no statistically significant difference (p < 0.05 between groups, when maxillary canine angulations were compared. Regarding the mandibular canines, there was a statistically significant difference in dental angulation, expressed by 3.2° for group 1 and 0.15° for group 2. An upright position tendency for mandibular canines was observed in the Angle Class III sample. This configures a pattern of compensatory coronary positioning, since the angulation of these teeth makes them occupy less space in the dental arch and consequently mandibular incisors can be in a more retracted position in the sagittal plane.

  4. Chitosan film loaded with silver nanoparticles-sorbent for solid phase extraction of Al(III), Cd(II), Cu(II), Co(II), Fe(III), Ni(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djerahov, Lubomir; Vasileva, Penka; Karadjova, Irina; Kurakalva, Rama Mohan; Aradhi, Keshav Krishna

    2016-08-20

    The present study describes the ecofriendly method for the preparation of chitosan film loaded with silver nanoparticles (CS-AgNPs) and application of this film as efficient sorbent for separation and enrichment of Al(III), Cd(II), Cu(II), Co(II), Fe(III), Ni(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II). The stable CS-AgNPs colloid was prepared by dispersing the AgNPs sol in chitosan solution at appropriate ratio and further used to obtain a cast film with very good stability under storage and good mechanical strength for easy handling in aqueous medium. The incorporation of AgNPs in the structure of CS film and interaction between the polymer matrix and nanoparticles were confirmed by UV-vis and FTIR spectroscopy. The homogeneously embedded AgNPs (average diameter 29nm, TEM analysis) were clearly observed throughout the film by SEM. The CS-AgNPs nanocomposite film shows high sorption activity toward trace metals under optimized chemical conditions. The results suggest that the CS-AgNPs nanocomposite film can be feasibly used as a novel sorbent material for solid-phase extraction of metal pollutants from surface waters.

  5. Photovoltaic module encapsulation design and materials selection. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuddihy, E.

    1984-06-01

    This is Volume II of Photovoltaic Module Encapsulation Design and Materials Selection: a periodically updated handbook of encapsulation technology, developed with the support of the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project (FSA), managed for the Department of Energy (DOE) by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Volume II describes FSA encapsulation technology developed between June 1, 1982, and January 1, 1984. Emphasis during this period shifted from materials development to demonstration of reliability and durability in an outdoor environment; the updated information in this volume reflects the developing technology base related to both reliability and encapsulation process improvements.

  6. Irritable bowel syndrome subtypes defined by Rome II and Rome III criteria are similar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Spencer D; Morris, Carolyn B; Hu, Yuming; Toner, Brenda B; Diamant, Nicholas; Whitehead, William E; Bangdiwala, Shrikant I; Drossman, Douglas A

    2009-03-01

    The implications of the Rome III recommendations to change the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) subtype criteria for stool pattern are unknown. (1) Determine the level of agreement between Rome II and Rome III subtypes and (2) compare the behaviors of Rome II and Rome III subtypes over time. Female patients (n=148) with Rome II defined IBS were prospectively tracked over 5 consecutive 3-month periods. At baseline, bowel habit reports on questionnaires were used to subclassify patients into Rome II and Rome III subtypes. Over the subsequent 15 months, bowel habit reports on diary cards were used to subclassify patients based on previously derived surrogate criteria into Rome II and Rome III IBS subtypes. The level of agreement between Rome II and Rome III subtype assignments was quite high (86.5%; kappa 0.79). The behavior of Rome II and Rome III subtypes over time was also similar in terms of subtype prevalence, subtype stability, and the proportion of subjects who met criteria for alternating irritable bowel syndrome. Rome II and Rome III IBS subtypes are in high agreement and behave similarly over time. Therefore, studies that used Rome II subtype criteria and studies that will use Rome III criteria will define comparable populations.

  7. Mn(II) Oxidation by the Multicopper Oxidase Complex Mnx: A Coordinated Two-Stage Mn(II)/(III) and Mn(III)/(IV) Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatova, Alexandra V; Romano, Christine A; Tao, Lizhi; Stich, Troy A; Casey, William H; Britt, R David; Tebo, Bradley M; Spiro, Thomas G

    2017-08-23

    The bacterial manganese oxidase MnxG of the Mnx protein complex is unique among multicopper oxidases (MCOs) in carrying out a two-electron metal oxidation, converting Mn(II) to MnO2 nanoparticles. The reaction occurs in two stages: Mn(II) → Mn(III) and Mn(III) → MnO2. In a companion study , we show that the electron transfer from Mn(II) to the low-potential type 1 Cu of MnxG requires an activation step, likely forming a hydroxide bridge at a dinuclear Mn(II) site. Here we study the second oxidation step, using pyrophosphate (PP) as a Mn(III) trap. PP chelates Mn(III) produced by the enzyme and subsequently allows it to become a substrate for the second stage of the reaction. EPR spectroscopy confirms the presence of Mn(III) bound to the enzyme. The Mn(III) oxidation step does not involve direct electron transfer to the enzyme from Mn(III), which is shown by kinetic measurements to be excluded from the Mn(II) binding site. Instead, Mn(III) is proposed to disproportionate at an adjacent polynuclear site, thereby allowing indirect oxidation to Mn(IV) and recycling of Mn(II). PP plays a multifaceted role, slowing the reaction by complexing both Mn(II) and Mn(III) in solution, and also inhibiting catalysis, likely through binding at or near the active site. An overall mechanism for Mnx-catalyzed MnO2 production from Mn(II) is presented.

  8. Blanket comparison and selection study. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-10-01

    This volume contains extensive data for the following chapters: (1) solid breeder tritium recovery, (2) solid breeder blanket designs, (3) alternate blanket concept screening, and (4) safety analysis. The following appendices are also included: (1) blanket design guidelines, (2) power conversion systems, (3) helium-cooled, vanadium alloy structure blanket design, (4) high wall loading study, and (5) molten salt safety studies. (MOW)

  9. Bibliography of Utah radioactive occurrences. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doelling, H.H. (comp.)

    1983-07-01

    The references in this bibliography were assembled by reviewing published bibliographies of Utah geology, unpublished reports of the US Geological Survey and the Department of Energy, and various university theses. Each of the listings is cross-referenced by location and subject matter. This report is published in two volumes.

  10. Comparative overview of RNA polymerase II and III transcription cycles, with focus on RNA polymerase III termination and reinitiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimbasseri, Aneeshkumar G; Rijal, Keshab; Maraia, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotes, RNA polymerase (RNAP) III transcribes hundreds of genes for tRNAs and 5S rRNA, among others, which share similar promoters and stable transcription initiation complexes (TIC), which support rapid RNAP III recycling. In contrast, RNAP II transcribes a large number of genes with highly variable promoters and interacting factors, which exert fine regulatory control over TIC lability and modifications of RNAP II at different transitional points in the transcription cycle. We review data that illustrate a relatively smooth continuity of RNAP III initiation-elongation-termination and reinitiation toward its function to produce high levels of tRNAs and other RNAs that support growth and development.

  11. Oxidation of Dodecanoate Intercalated Iron(II)–Iron(III) Layered Double Hydroxide to Form 2D Iron(III) (Hydr)oxide Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Li‐Zhi; Ayala‐Luis, Karina B.; Fang, Liping;

    2013-01-01

    A planar trioctahedral iron(II)–iron(III) hydroxide (green rust, GR) intercalated with dodecanoate (GRC12) has been oxidized by dioxygen to produce the corresponding planar iron(III) (hydr)oxide. The formulae of GRC12 and the final iron(III) product (oxGRC12) were determined to be FeII2.00FeIII1...

  12. Preconcentration of Pb(II), Cr(III), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Cd(II) ions in environmental samples by membrane filtration prior to their flame atomic absorption spectrometric determinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Divrikli, Umit [Pamukkale University, Faculty of Arts and Science, Department of Chemistry, 20020 Denizli (Turkey)]. E-mail: udivrikli@pamukkale.edu.tr; Kartal, Aslihan Arslan [Pamukkale University, Faculty of Arts and Science, Department of Chemistry, 20020 Denizli (Turkey); Soylak, Mustafa [Erciyes University, Faculty of Arts and Science, Department of Chemistry, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Elci, Latif [Pamukkale University, Faculty of Arts and Science, Department of Chemistry, 20020 Denizli (Turkey)

    2007-07-16

    A method for separation-preconcentration of Pb(II), Cr(III), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Cd(II) ions by membrane filtration has been described. The method based on the collection of analyte metal ions on a cellulose nitrate membrane filter and determination of analytes by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The method was optimized for several parameters including of pH, matrix effects and sample volume. The recoveries of analytes were generally in the range of 93-100%. The detection limits by 3 sigma for analyte ions were 0.02 {mu}g L{sup -1} for Pb(II), 0.3 {mu}g L{sup -1} for Cr(III), 3.1 {mu}g L{sup -1} for Cu(II), 7.8 {mu}g L{sup -1} for Ni(II) and 0.9 {mu}g L{sup -1} for Cd(II). The proposed method was applied to the determination of lead, chromium, copper, nickel and cadmium in tap waters and RM 8704 Buffalo River Sediment standard reference material with satisfactory results. The relative standard deviations of the determinations were below 10%.

  13. Adsorption of copper (II), chromium (III), nickel (II) and lead (II) ions from aqueous solutions by meranti sawdust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafatullah, M; Sulaiman, O; Hashim, R; Ahmad, A

    2009-10-30

    The present study proposed the use of meranti sawdust in the removal of Cu(II), Cr(III), Ni(II) and Pb(II) ions from synthetic aqueous solutions. Batch adsorption studies showed that meranti sawdust was able to adsorb Cu(II), Cr(III), Ni(II) and Pb(II) ions from aqueous solutions in the concentration range 1-200mg/L. The adsorption was favoured with maximum adsorption at pH 6, whereas the adsorption starts at pH 1 for all metal ions. The effects of contact time, initial concentration of metal ions, adsorbent dosage and temperature have been reported. The applicability of Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm was tried for the system to completely understand the adsorption isotherm processes. The adsorption kinetics tested with pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models yielded high R(2) values from 0.850 to 0.932 and from 0.991 to 0.999, respectively. The meranti sawdust was found to be cost effective and has good efficiency to remove these toxic metal ions from aqueous solution.

  14. Minerals Yearbook, volume III, Area Reports—International—Latin America and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2017-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industries and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Minerals Yearbook volumes follows:Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters about virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on survey methods, summary statistics for domestic nonfuel minerals, and trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries in the United States are also included.Volume II, Area Reports: Domestic, contains a chapter on the mineral industry of each of the 50 States and Puerto Rico and the Administered Islands. This volume also has chapters on survey methods and summary statistics of domestic nonfuel minerals.Volume III, Area Reports: International, is published as four separate reports. These regional reports contain the latest available minerals data on more than 180 foreign countries and discuss the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations and the United States. Each report begins with an overview of the region’s mineral industries during the year. It continues with individual country chapters that examine the mining, refining, processing, and use of minerals in each country of the region and how each country’s mineral industry relates to U.S. industry. Most chapters include production tables and industry structure tables, information about Government policies and programs that affect the country’s mineral industry, and an outlook section.The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the Minerals Yearbook are welcomed.

  15. Minerals Yearbook, volume III, Area Reports—International—Europe and Central Eurasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geological Survey, U.S.

    2017-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industries and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Minerals Yearbook volumes follows:Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters about virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on survey methods, summary statistics for domestic nonfuel minerals, and trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries in the United States are also included.Volume II, Area Reports: Domestic, contains a chapter on the mineral industry of each of the 50 States and Puerto Rico and the Administered Islands. This volume also has chapters on survey methods and summary statistics of domestic nonfuel minerals.Volume III, Area Reports: International, is published as four separate reports. These regional reports contain the latest available minerals data on more than 180 foreign countries and discuss the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations and the United States. Each report begins with an overview of the region’s mineral industries during the year. It continues with individual country chapters that examine the mining, refining, processing, and use of minerals in each country of the region and how each country’s mineral industry relates to U.S. industry. Most chapters include production tables and industry structure tables, information about Government policies and programs that affect the country’s mineral industry, and an outlook section.The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the Minerals Yearbook are welcomed.

  16. Minerals Yearbook, volume III, Area Reports—International—Africa and the Middle East

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2017-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industries and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Minerals Yearbook volumes follows:Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters about virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on survey methods, summary statistics for domestic nonfuel minerals, and trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries in the United States are also included.Volume II, Area Reports: Domestic, contains a chapter on the mineral industry of each of the 50 States and Puerto Rico and the Administered Islands. This volume also has chapters on survey methods and summary statistics of domestic nonfuel minerals.Volume III, Area Reports: International, is published as four separate reports. These regional reports contain the latest available minerals data on more than 180 foreign countries and discuss the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations and the United States. Each report begins with an overview of the region’s mineral industries during the year. It continues with individual country chapters that examine the mining, refining, processing, and use of minerals in each country of the region and how each country’s mineral industry relates to U.S. industry. Most chapters include production tables and industry structure tables, information about Government policies and programs that affect the country’s mineral industry, and an outlook section.The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the Minerals Yearbook are welcomed.

  17. Preliminary CALS Phase II Architecture. Volume 19

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-03

    IDEF ICAM Definition Languages 5 IDEFO ICAM Definition Language: Activity Modeling IDEFIX ICAM Definition Language: Data Modeling 3 IDS Integrated Design...level. At the Conceptual Description level, data are defined by an integrated semantic data model, such as those produced using the IDEFIX modeling...Architecture with the dominate focus on the data dictionary for the IWSDB, represented by an IDEFIX semantic data model. It is at this level that CALS Phase II

  18. International Photovoltaic Program Plan. Volume II. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costello, D.; Koontz, R.; Posner, D.; Heiferling, P.; Carpenter, P.; Forman, S.; Perelman, L.

    1979-12-01

    This second volume of a two-part report on the International Photovoltaic Program Plan contains appendices summarizing the results of analyses conducted in preparation of the plan. These analyses include compilations of relevant statutes and existing Federal programs; strategies designed to expand the use of photovoltaics abroad; information on the domestic photovoltaic plan and its impact on the proposed international plan; perspectives on foreign competition; industry views on the international photovoltaic market and ideas about how US government actions could affect this market; international financing issues; and information on issues affecting foreign policy and developing countries.

  19. Draft Strategic Laboratory Missions Plan. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This volume described in detail the Department`s research and technology development activities and their funding at the Department`s laboratories. It includes 166 Mission Activity Profiles, organized by major mission area, with each representing a discrete budget function called a Budget and Reporting (B & R) Code. The activities profiled here encompass the total research and technology development funding of the laboratories from the Department. Each profile includes a description of the activity and shows how the funding for that activity is distributed among the DOE laboratories as well as universities and industry. The profiles also indicate the principal laboratories for each activity, as well as which other laboratories are involved. The information in this volume is at the core of the Strategic Laboratory Mission Plan. It enables a reader to follow funds from the Department`s appropriation to a specific activity description and to specific R & D performing institutions. This information will enable the Department, along with the Laboratory Operations Board and Congress, to review the distribution of R & D performers chosen to execute the Department`s missions.

  20. National Aviation Fuel Scenario Analysis Program (NAFSAP). Volume I. Model Description. Volume II. User Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    TESI CHART NATIONAI RUREAt (F ANDA[)Rt 1V4 A NATIONAL. AVIATION ~ FUEL SCENARIO.. ANALYSIS PROGRAM 49!! VOLUM I: MODEL DESCRIA~v 4<C VOLUME II: tr)ER...executes post processor which translates results of the graphics program to machine readable code used by the pen plotter) cr (depressing the carriage

  1. Industrial Maintenance, Volume III. Post Secondary Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Raymond H.; And Others

    This volume is the fourth of four volumes that comprise a curriculum guide for a postsecondary industrial maintenance program. It contains three sections and appendixes. Section 4 provides suggested methods of structuring the curriculum. Suggested ways of recording and documenting student progress are presented in section 5. Section 6 contains…

  2. Calix[4]arene supported clusters: a dimer of [Mn(III)Mn(II)] dimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Stephanie M; McIntosh, Ruaraidh D; Beavers, Christine M;

    2011-01-01

    Phosphinate ligands allow for the transformation of a calix[4]arene supported [Mn(III)(2)Mn(II)(2)] tetramer cluster motif into an unusual [Mn(III)Mn(II)](2) dimer of dimers; the clusters self-assemble in the crystal to form bi-layer arrays reminiscent of the typical packing of calixarene solvates....

  3. Immunobiology of natural killer cells. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotzova, E.; Herberman, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides a review of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated immunity in humans and experimental animal system. Topics for the volume include: In vivo activities of NK cells against primary and metastatic tumors in experimental animals; involvement of NK cells in human malignant disease; impaired NK cell profile in leukemia patients; in vivo modulation of NK activity in cancer patients; implications of aberrant NK cell activity in nonmalignant, chronic diseases; NK cell role in regulation of the growth and functions of hemopoietic and lymphoid cells; NK cells active against viral, bacterial, protozoan, and fungal infections; cytokine secretion and noncytotoxic functions of human large granular lymphocytes; augmentation of NK activity; regulation of NK cell activity by suppressor cells; NK cell cloning technology and characteristics of NK cell clones; comparison of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and NK activity, and index.

  4. Introduction to "Global Tsunami Science: Past and Future, Volume II"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, Alexander B.; Fritz, Hermann M.; Tanioka, Yuichiro; Geist, Eric L.

    2017-08-01

    Twenty-two papers on the study of tsunamis are included in Volume II of the PAGEOPH topical issue "Global Tsunami Science: Past and Future". Volume I of this topical issue was published as PAGEOPH, vol. 173, No. 12, 2016 (Eds., E. L. Geist, H. M. Fritz, A. B. Rabinovich, and Y. Tanioka). Three papers in Volume II focus on details of the 2011 and 2016 tsunami-generating earthquakes offshore of Tohoku, Japan. The next six papers describe important case studies and observations of recent and historical events. Four papers related to tsunami hazard assessment are followed by three papers on tsunami hydrodynamics and numerical modelling. Three papers discuss problems of tsunami warning and real-time forecasting. The final set of three papers importantly investigates tsunamis generated by non-seismic sources: volcanic explosions, landslides, and meteorological disturbances. Collectively, this volume highlights contemporary trends in global tsunami research, both fundamental and applied toward hazard assessment and mitigation.

  5. Identification of type II and III DDR2 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richters, André; Nguyen, Hoang D; Phan, Trang; Simard, Jeffrey R; Grütter, Christian; Engel, Julian; Rauh, Daniel

    2014-05-22

    Discoidin domain-containing receptors (DDRs) exhibit a unique mechanism of action among the receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) because their catalytic activity is induced by extracellular collagen binding. Moreover, they are essential components in the assimilation of extracellular signals. Recently, DDRs were reported to be significantly linked to tumor progression in breast cancer by facilitating the processes of invasion, migration, and metastasis. Here, we report the successful development of a fluorescence-based, direct binding assay for the detection of type II and III DFG-out binders for DDR2. Using sequence alignments and homology modeling, we designed a DDR2 construct appropriate for fluorescent labeling. Successful assay development was validated by sensitive detection of a reference DFG-out binder. Subsequent downscaling led to convenient application to high-throughput screening formats. Screening of a representative compound library identified high-affinity DDR2 ligands validated by orthogonal activity-based assays, and a subset of identified compounds was further investigated with respect to DDR1 inhibition.

  6. Synthesis, spectroscopic, thermal and anticancer studies of metal-antibiotic chelations: Ca(II), Fe(III), Pd(II) and Au(III) chloramphenicol complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khodir, Fatima A. I.; Refat, Moamen S.

    2016-09-01

    Four Ca(II), Fe(III), Pd(II) and Au(III) complexes of chloramphenicol drug have been synthesized and well characterized using elemental analyses, (infrared, electronic, and 1H-NMR) spectra, magnetic susceptibility measurement, and thermal analyses. Infrared spectral data show that the chloramphenicol drug coordinated to Ca(II), Pd(II) and Au(III) metal ions through two hydroxyl groups with 1:1 or 1:2 M ratios, but Fe(III) ions chelated towards chloramphenicol drug via the oxygen and nitrogen atoms of amide group with 1:2 ratio based on presence of keto↔enol form. The X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques were used to identify the nano-size particles of both iron(III) and gold(III) chloramphenicol complexes. The antimicrobial assessments of the chloramphenicol complexes were scanned and collected the results against of some kind of bacteria and fungi. The cytotoxic activity of the gold(III) complex was tested against the human colon carcinoma (HCT-116) and human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG-2) tumor cell lines.

  7. National Utility Financial Statement model (NUFS). Volume III of III: software description. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-10-29

    This volume contains a description of the software comprising the National Utility Financial Statement Model (NUFS). This is the third of three volumes describing NUFS provided by ICF Incorporated under contract DEAC-01-79EI-10579. The three volumes are entitled: model overview and description, user's guide, and software guide.

  8. The Oropharyngeal Airway in Young Adults with Skeletal Class II and Class III Deformities: A 3-D Morphometric Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasas Shri Nalaka Jayaratne

    Full Text Available 1 To determine the accuracy and reliability of an automated anthropometric measurement software for the oropharyngeal airway and 2 To compare the anthropometric dimensions of the oropharyngeal airway in skeletal class II and III deformity patients.Cone-beam CT (CBCT scans of 62 patients with skeletal class II or III deformities were used for this study. Volumetric, linear and surface area measurements retroglossal (RG and retropalatal (RP compartments of the oropharyngeal airway was measured with the 3dMDVultus software. Accuracy of automated anthropometric pharyngeal airway measurements was assessed using an airway phantom.The software was found to be reasonably accurate for measuring dimensions of air passages. The total oropharyngeal volume was significantly greater in the skeletal class III deformity group (16.7 ± 9.04 mm3 compared with class II subjects (11.87 ± 4.01 mm3. The average surface area of both the RG and RP compartments were significantly larger in the class III deformity group. The most constricted area in the RG and RP airway was significantly larger in individuals with skeletal class III deformity. The anterior-posterior (AP length of this constriction was significantly greater in skeletal class III individuals in both compartments, whereas the width of the constriction was not significantly different between the two groups in both compartments. The RP compartment was larger but less uniform than the RG compartment in both skeletal deformities.Significant differences were observed in morphological characteristics of the oropharyngeal airway in individuals with skeletal class II and III deformities. This information may be valuable for surgeons in orthognathic treatment planning, especially for mandibular setback surgery that might compromise the oropharyngeal patency.

  9. Photoinduced energy- and electron-transfer processes in dinuclear Ru(II)-Os(II), Ru(II)-Os(III), and Ru(III)-Os(II) trisbipyridine complexes containing a shape-persistent macrocyclic spacer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturi, Margherita; Marchioni, Filippo; Ferrer Ribera, Belén; Balzani, Vincenzo; Opris, Dorina M; Schlüter, A Dieter

    2006-01-16

    The PF6- salt of the dinuclear [(bpy)2Ru(1)Os(bpy)2]4+ complex, where 1 is a phenylacetylene macrocycle which incorporates two 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) chelating units in opposite sites of its shape-persistent structure, was prepared. In acetonitrile solution, the Ru- and Os-based units display their characteristic absorption spectra and electrochemical properties as in the parent homodinuclear compounds. The luminescence spectrum, however, shows that the emission band of the Ru(II) unit is almost completely quenched with concomitant sensitization of the emission of the Os(II) unit. Electronic energy transfer from the Ru(II) to the Os(II) unit takes place by two distinct processes (k(en) = 2.0x10(8) and 2.2x10(7) s(-1) at 298 K). Oxidation of the Os(II) unit of [(bpy)2Ru(1)Os(bpy)2]4+ by Ce(IV) or nitric acid leads quantitatively to the [(bpy)2Ru(II)(1)Os(III)(bpy)2]5+ complex which exhibits a bpy-to-Os(III) charge-transfer band at 720 nm (epsilon(max) = 250 M(-1) cm(-1)). Light excitation of the Ru(II) unit of [(bpy)2Ru(II)(1)Os(III)(bpy)2]5+ is followed by electron transfer from the Ru(II) to the Os(III) unit (k(el,f) = 1.6x10(8) and 2.7x10(7) s(-1)), resulting in the transient formation of the [(bpy)2Ru(III)(1)Os(II)(bpy)2]5+ complex. The latter species relaxes to the [(bpy)2Ru(II)(1)Os(III)(bpy)2]5+ one by back electron transfer (k(el,b) = 9.1x10(7) and 1.2x10(7) s(-1)). The biexponential decays of the [(bpy)2*Ru(II)(1)Os(II)(bpy)2]4+, [(bpy)2*Ru(II)(1)Os(III)(bpy)2]5+, and [(bpy)2Ru(III)(1)Os(II)(bpy)2]5+ species are related to the presence of two conformers, as expected because of the steric hindrance between hydrogen atoms of the pyridine and phenyl rings. Comparison of the results obtained with those previously reported for other Ru-Os polypyridine complexes shows that the macrocyclic ligand 1 is a relatively poor conducting bridge.

  10. Augmented Fish Health Monitoring; Volume II of II, Completion Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michak, Patty

    1991-12-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) initiated the Augmented Fish Health Monitoring project in 1986. This project was a five year interagency project involving fish rearing agencies in the Columbia Basin. Participating agencies included: Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). This is the final data report for the Augmented Fish Health Monitoring project. Data collected and sampling results for 1990 and 1991 are presented within this report. An evaluation of this project can be found in Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, Volume 1, Completion Report.'' May, 1991. Pathogen detection methods remained the same from methods described in Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, Annual Report 1989,'' May, 1990. From January 1, 1990 to June 30, 1991 fish health monitoring sampling was conducted. In 1990 21 returning adult stocks were sampled. Juvenile pre-release exams were completed on 20 yearling releases, and 13 sub-yearling releases in 1990. In 1991 17 yearling releases and 11 sub-yearling releases were examined. Midterm sampling was completed on 19 stocks in 1990. Organosomatic analysis was performed at release on index station stocks; Cowlitz spring and fall chinook, Lewis river early coho and Lyons Ferry fall chinook.

  11. Ternary biosorption studies of Cd(II), Cr(III) and Ni(II) on shelled Moringa oleifera seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Parul; Kumari, Pushpa; Srivastava, M M; Srivastava, Shalini

    2007-01-01

    Competitive biosorption of Cd(II), Cr(III) and Ni(II) on unmodified shelled Moringa oleifera seeds (SMOS) present in ternary mixture were compared with the single metal solution. The extent of adsorption capacity of the ternary metal ions tested on unmodified SMOS was low (10-20%) as compared to single metal ions. SMOS removed the target metal ions in the selectivity order of Cd(II) > Cr(III) > Ni(II). Sorption equilibria, calculated from adsorption data, explained favorable performance of biosorption system. Regeneration of exhausted biomass was also attempted for several cycles with a view to restore the sorbent to its original state.

  12. Phase transitions in Group III-V and II-VI semiconductors at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, S. C.; Liu, C. Y.; Spain, I. L.; Skelton, E. F.

    1979-01-01

    The structures and transition pressures of Group III-V and II-VI semiconductors and of a pseudobinary system (Ga/x/In/1-x/Sb) have been investigated. Results indicate that GaP, InSb, GaSb, GaAs and possible AlP assume Metallic structures at high pressures; a tetragonal, beta-Sn-like structure is adopted by only InSb and GaSb. The rocksalt phase is preferred in InP, InAs, AlSb, ZnO and ZnS. The model of Van Vechten (1973) gives transition pressures which are in good agreement with measured values, but must be refined to account for the occurrence of the ionic rocksalt structure in some compounds. In addition, discrepancies between the theoretical scaling values for volume changes at the semiconductor-to-metal transitions are observed.

  13. Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research. Volumes III [and] IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, John C., Ed.

    Two volumes of a handbook on theory and research in higher education are presented. The 11 papers included in Volume III are as follows: "Qualitative Research Methods in Higher Education" (R. Crowson); "Bricks and Mortar: Architecture and the Study of Higher Education" (J. Thelin and J. Yankovich); "Enrollment Demand Models and Their Policy Uses…

  14. An Evaluation of the Nutrition Services for the Elderly. Volume III. Descriptive Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM.

    This document is part of a five-volume nationwide study of Nutrition Services operations and elderly citizens participating in congregate dining and home delivery services authorized by Title III-C of the Older Americans' Act. A descriptive report is contained in this volume, which presents non-selective and preliminary analysis of the data base…

  15. Listening to PS II: enthalpy, entropy, and volume changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Harvey J M; Mauzerall, David

    2011-01-01

    Photosystem II, located in the thylakoid membranes of green plants, algae, and cyanobacteria, uses sunlight to split water into protons, electrons, and a dioxygen molecule. The mechanism of its electron transfers and oxygen evolution including the structure of the protein and rates of the S-state cycle has been extensively investigated. Substantial progress has been made; however, the thermodynamics of PS II electron transfer and of the oxygen cycle are poorly understood. Recent progress in thermodynamic measurements in photosynthesis provides novel insights on the enthalpic and entropic contribution to electron transfer in proteins. In this review the thermodynamic parameters including quantum yield, enthalpy, entropy, and volume changes of PS II photochemistry determined by photoacoustics and other laser techniques are summarized and evaluated. Light-driven volume changes via electrostriction are directly related to the photoreaction in PS II and thus can be a useful measurement of PS II activity and function. The enthalpy changes of the reactions observed can be directly measured by photoacoustics. The apparent reaction entropy can also be estimated when the free energy is known. Dissecting the free energy of a photoreaction into enthalpic and entropic components provides critical information about mechanisms of PS II function. Potential limitations and future direction of the study of the thermodynamics of PS II electron transfer and oxygen evolution are presented.

  16. National Environmental Policy Act compliance guide. Volume II (reference book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    This document (Volume II of the National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Guide) contains current copies of regulations and guidance from the Council on Environmental Quality, the Department of Energy, the Department of State, and the Environmental Protection Agency, related to compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA).

  17. Tokamak experimental power reactor conceptual design. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-08-01

    Volume II contains the following appendices: (1) summary of EPR design parameters, (2) impurity control, (3) plasma computational models, (4) structural support system, (5) materials considerations for the primary energy conversion system, (6) magnetics, (7) neutronics penetration analysis, (8) first wall stress analysis, (9) enrichment of isotopes of hydrogen by cryogenic distillation, and (10) noncircular plasma considerations. (MOW)

  18. Spectral and thermodynamic properties of Ag(I), Au(III), Cd(II), Co(II), Fe(III), Hg(II), Mn(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), U(IV), and Zn(II) binding by methanobactin from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dong W; Do, Young S; Zea, Corbin J; McEllistrem, Marcus T; Lee, Sung-W; Semrau, Jeremy D; Pohl, Nicola L; Kisting, Clint J; Scardino, Lori L; Hartsel, Scott C; Boyd, Eric S; Geesey, Gill G; Riedel, Theran P; Shafe, Peter H; Kranski, Kim A; Tritsch, John R; Antholine, William E; DiSpirito, Alan A

    2006-12-01

    Methanobactin (mb) is a novel chromopeptide that appears to function as the extracellular component of a copper acquisition system in methanotrophic bacteria. To examine this potential physiological role, and to distinguish it from iron binding siderophores, the spectral (UV-visible absorption, circular dichroism, fluorescence, and X-ray photoelectron) and thermodynamic properties of metal binding by mb were examined. In the absence of Cu(II) or Cu(I), mb will bind Ag(I), Au(III), Co(II), Cd(II), Fe(III), Hg(II), Mn(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), U(VI), or Zn(II), but not Ba(II), Ca(II), La(II), Mg(II), and Sr(II). The results suggest metals such as Ag(I), Au(III), Hg(II), Pb(II) and possibly U(VI) are bound by a mechanism similar to Cu, whereas the coordination of Co(II), Cd(II), Fe(III), Mn(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) by mb differs from Cu(II). Consistent with its role as a copper-binding compound or chalkophore, the binding constants of all the metals examined were less than those observed with Cu(II) and copper displaced other metals except Ag(I) and Au(III) bound to mb. However, the binding of different metals by mb suggests that methanotrophic activity also may play a role in either the solubilization or immobilization of many metals in situ.

  19. Study on Effect of Gd (III) Speciation on Ca (II) Speciation in Human Blood Plasma by Computer Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Ca (II) speciation and effect of Gd (III) speciation on Ca (II) speciation in human blood plasma were studied by computer simulation. [CaHCO3]+ is a predominant compound species of Ca (II). Gd (III) can compete with Ca (II) for biological molecules. The presence of Gd (III) results in a increase of concentration of free Ca (II) and a decrease of concentration of Ca (II) compounds.

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of 2-imino-3–(2-Hydroxylphenyl-1-Thiazolidin-4-one Substituted Ammine Complexes of Cr(III, Co(III, Ni(II and Cu(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abadi Hadush

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Mixed ligand complexes of Cr(III, Co(III, Ni(II and Cu(II synthesized by partial substitution of 2-imino-3–(2-hydroxylphenyl-1-thiazolidin-4-one in respective ammine complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, conductance and magnetic measurements, infrared and uv-visible spectroscopy. Cr(III, Co(III and Ni(II complexes were octahedral whereas Cu(II complex was square planar.

  1. Workpapers in English as a Second Language, [Volume III].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracy, Maryruth, Ed.

    This volume contains the 1969 working papers on subjects related to teaching English as a second language (TESL) and abstracts of Masters Theses completed by students studying TESL. Several articles discuss teaching and learning a second language and practical considerations in second language learning such as reading and writing skills, the use…

  2. Council on Anthropology and Education Newsletter. Volume III, Number 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, John Ed.

    General information on format, included, materials, broad concerns, objectives, and availability of the newsletter are described in Volume I, ED 048 049. This issue focuses on ethnology, offering two papers presented at the American Anthropological Association symposiums. The lead paper presents a psycho-cultural developmental approach to the…

  3. Albanian: Basic Course. Volume III, Lessons 27-36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defense Language Inst., Monterey, CA.

    This third of ten volumes of audiolingual classroom instruction in Albanian for adult students treats Albanian grammar, syntax, and usage in a series of exercises consisting of grammar perception drills, grammar analysis, translation exercises, readings, question-and-answer exercises, and dialogues illustrating specific grammatical features. A…

  4. HYDRA-II: A hydrothermal analysis computer code: Volume 3, Verification/validation assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCann, R.A.; Lowery, P.S.

    1987-10-01

    HYDRA-II is a hydrothermal computer code capable of three-dimensional analysis of coupled conduction, convection, and thermal radiation problems. This code is especially appropriate for simulating the steady-state performance of spent fuel storage systems. The code has been evaluated for this application for the US Department of Energy's Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program. HYDRA-II provides a finite difference solution in cartesian coordinates to the equations governing the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. A cylindrical coordinate system may also be used to enclose the cartesian coordinate system. This exterior coordinate system is useful for modeling cylindrical cask bodies. The difference equations for conservation of momentum are enhanced by the incorporation of directional porosities and permeabilities that aid in modeling solid structures whose dimensions may be smaller than the computational mesh. The equation for conservation of energy permits modeling of orthotropic physical properties and film resistances. Several automated procedures are available to model radiation transfer within enclosures and from fuel rod to fuel rod. The documentation of HYDRA-II is presented in three separate volumes. Volume I - Equations and Numerics describes the basic differential equations, illustrates how the difference equations are formulated, and gives the solution procedures employed. Volume II - User's Manual contains code flow charts, discusses the code structure, provides detailed instructions for preparing an input file, and illustrates the operation of the code by means of a model problem. This volume, Volume III - Verification/Validation Assessments, provides a comparison between the analytical solution and the numerical simulation for problems with a known solution. This volume also documents comparisons between the results of simulations of single- and multiassembly storage systems and actual experimental data. 11 refs., 55 figs., 13 tabs.

  5. Using phase II data for the analysis of phase III studies: An application in rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandel, Simon; Neuenschwander, Beat; Röver, Christian; Friede, Tim

    2017-06-01

    Clinical research and drug development in orphan diseases are challenging, since large-scale randomized studies are difficult to conduct. Formally synthesizing the evidence is therefore of great value, yet this is rarely done in the drug-approval process. Phase III designs that make better use of phase II data can facilitate drug development in orphan diseases. A Bayesian meta-analytic approach is used to inform the phase III study with phase II data. It is particularly attractive, since uncertainty of between-trial heterogeneity can be dealt with probabilistically, which is critical if the number of studies is small. Furthermore, it allows quantifying and discounting the phase II data through the predictive distribution relevant for phase III. A phase III design is proposed which uses the phase II data and considers approval based on a phase III interim analysis. The design is illustrated with a non-inferiority case study from a Food and Drug Administration approval in herpetic keratitis (an orphan disease). Design operating characteristics are compared to those of a traditional design, which ignores the phase II data. An analysis of the phase II data reveals good but insufficient evidence for non-inferiority, highlighting the need for a phase III study. For the phase III study supported by phase II data, the interim analysis is based on half of the patients. For this design, the meta-analytic interim results are conclusive and would justify approval. In contrast, based on the phase III data only, interim results are inconclusive and require further evidence. To accelerate drug development for orphan diseases, innovative study designs and appropriate methodology are needed. Taking advantage of randomized phase II data when analyzing phase III studies looks promising because the evidence from phase II supports informed decision-making. The implementation of the Bayesian design is straightforward with public software such as R.

  6. Simultaneous regulation of antenna size and photosystem I/II stoichiometry in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ting; Ito, Hisashi; Tanaka, Ayumi

    2016-11-01

    The photosystem I/II ratio increased when antenna size was enlarged by transient induction of CAO in chlorophyll b -less mutants, thus indicating simultaneous regulation of antenna size and photosystem I/II stoichiometry. Regulation of antenna size and photosystem I/II stoichiometry is an indispensable strategy for plants to acclimate to changes to light environments. When plants grown in high-light conditions are transferred to low-light conditions, the peripheral antennae of photosystems are enlarged. A change in the photosystem I/II ratio is also observed under the same light conditions. However, our knowledge of the correlation between antenna size modulation and variation in photosystem I/II stoichiometry remains limited. In this study, chlorophyll a oxygenase was transiently induced in Arabidopsis thaliana chlorophyll b-less mutants, ch1-1, to alter the antenna size without changing environmental conditions. In addition to the accumulation of chlorophyll b, the levels of the peripheral antenna complexes of both photosystems gradually increased, and these were assembled to the core antenna of both photosystems. However, the antenna size of photosystem II was greater than that of photosystem I. Immunoblot analysis of core antenna proteins showed that the number of photosystem I increased, but not that of photosystem II, resulting in an increase in the photosystem I/II ratio. These results clearly indicate that antenna size adjustment was coupled with changes in photosystem I/II stoichiometry. Based on these results, the physiological importance of simultaneous regulation of antenna size and photosystem I/II stoichiometry is discussed in relation to acclimation to light conditions.

  7. Interplay between polymerase II- and polymerase III-assisted expression of overlapping genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukoszek, Radoslaw; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Ignatova, Zoya

    2013-11-15

    Up to 15% of the genes in different genomes overlap. This architecture, although beneficial for the genome size, represents an obstacle for simultaneous transcription of both genes. Here we analyze the interference between RNA-polymerase II (Pol II) and RNA-polymerase III (Pol III) when transcribing their target genes encoded on opposing strands within the same DNA fragment in Arabidopsis thaliana. The expression of a Pol II-dependent protein-coding gene negatively correlated with the transcription of a Pol III-dependent, tRNA-coding gene set. We suggest that the architecture of the overlapping genes introduces an additional layer of control of gene expression.

  8. Amide I'-II' 2D IR spectroscopy provides enhanced protein secondary structural sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deflores, Lauren P; Ganim, Ziad; Nicodemus, Rebecca A; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2009-03-11

    We demonstrate how multimode 2D IR spectroscopy of the protein amide I' and II' vibrations can be used to distinguish protein secondary structure. Polarization-dependent amide I'-II' 2D IR experiments on poly-l-lysine in the beta-sheet, alpha-helix, and random coil conformations show that a combination of amide I' and II' diagonal and cross peaks can effectively distinguish between secondary structural content, where amide I' infrared spectroscopy alone cannot. The enhanced sensitivity arises from frequency and amplitude correlations between amide II' and amide I' spectra that reflect the symmetry of secondary structures. 2D IR surfaces are used to parametrize an excitonic model for the amide I'-II' manifold suitable to predict protein amide I'-II' spectra. This model reveals that the dominant vibrational interaction contributing to this sensitivity is a combination of negative amide II'-II' through-bond coupling and amide I'-II' coupling within the peptide unit. The empirically determined amide II'-II' couplings do not significantly vary with secondary structure: -8.5 cm(-1) for the beta sheet, -8.7 cm(-1) for the alpha helix, and -5 cm(-1) for the coil.

  9. Cardiac resynchronization induces major structural and functional reverse remodeling in patients with New York Heart Association class I/II heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    St John Sutton, Martin; Ghio, Stefano; Plappert, Ted;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) improves LV structure, function, and clinical outcomes in New York Heart Association class III/IV heart failure with prolonged QRS. It is not known whether patients with New York Heart Association class I/II systolic heart failure exhibit left...... ventricular (LV) reverse remodeling with CRT or whether reverse remodeling is modified by the cause of heart failure. METHODS AND RESULTS: Six hundred ten patients with New York Heart Association class I/II heart failure, QRS duration > or =120 ms, LV end-diastolic dimension > or =55 mm, and LV ejection...... reduction in LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volume indexes and a 3-fold greater increase in LV ejection fraction in patients with nonischemic causes of heart failure. CONCLUSIONS: CRT in patients with New York Heart Association I/II resulted in major structural and functional reverse remodeling at 1 year...

  10. Biosorption of copper(II), lead(II), iron(III) and cobalt(II) on Bacillus sphaericus-loaded Diaion SP-850 resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzen, Mustafa; Uluozlu, Ozgur Dogan; Usta, Canan; Soylak, Mustafa

    2007-01-09

    The biosorption of copper(II), lead(II), iron(III) and cobalt(II) on Bacillus sphaericus-loaded Diaion SP-850 resin for preconcentration-separation of them have been investigated. The sorbed analytes on biosorbent were eluted by using 1 mol L(-1) HCl and analytes were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The influences of analytical parameters including amounts of pH, B. sphaericus, sample volume etc. on the quantitative recoveries of analytes were investigated. The effects of alkaline, earth alkaline ions and some metal ions on the retentions of the analytes on the biosorbent were also examined. Separation and preconcentration of Cu, Pb, Fe and Co ions from real samples was achieved quantitatively. The detection limits by 3 sigma for analyte ions were in the range of 0.20-0.75 microg L(-1) for aqueous samples and in the range of 2.5-9.4 ng g(-1) for solid samples. The validation of the procedure was performed by the analysis of the certified standard reference materials (NRCC-SLRS 4 Riverine Water, SRM 2711 Montana soil and GBW 07605 Tea). The presented method was applied to the determination of analyte ions in green tea, black tea, cultivated mushroom, boiled wheat, rice and soil samples with successfully results.

  11. The spatial-temporal interaction in the LTP induction between layer IV to layer II/III and layer II/III to layer II/III connections in rats' visual cortex during the development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Da-Ke; Zhang, Chao; Gu, Yu; Zhang, She-Hong; Shi, Jian; Chen, Xian-Hua

    2017-03-20

    During the early developmental period, long-term potentiation (LTP) can be induced in both vertical and horizontal connections in the rat visual cortex. However, the temporal difference in LTP change between the two pathways during animal development remains unclear. In this study, LTP in vertical (from layer IV to layer II/III) and horizontal (from layer II/III to layer II/III) synaptic connections were recorded in brain slices from the same rats, and the developmental changes of LTP in both directions were compared within the animals' eye-opening period. The results showed that the LTP amplitudes declined to unobservable levels on P16 in the horizontal connections and on P20 in the vertical synaptic connections. Meanwhile, V-LTP (LTP induced in the vertical direction) was always stronger than H-LTP (LTP induced in the horizontal direction) under the same conditions of pairing stimulus (PS). Next, H-LTP and V-LTP were induced from the same neuron in layer II/III to determine the spatiotemporal interactions between layer II/III horizontal inputs and ascending synaptic inputs during the maturation of rat visual cortex. The data show that the weak PS, which failed to induce H-LTP alone, was able to induce H-LTP effectively while V-LTP was performed on P10. Our results suggest that V-LTP can strengthen H-LTP induction in the visual cortex during the early developmental period. In contrast, the regulatory effect of H-LTP on V-LTP was much weaker.

  12. [Cr(III)8M(II)6](12+) Coordination Cubes (M(II)=Cu, Co).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Sergio; O'Connor, Helen M; Pineda, Eufemio Moreno; Pedersen, Kasper S; Nichol, Gary S; Mønsted, Ole; Weihe, Høgni; Piligkos, Stergios; McInnes, Eric J L; Lusby, Paul J; Brechin, Euan K

    2015-06-01

    [Cr(III)8M(II)6](12+) (M(II) =Cu, Co) coordination cubes were constructed from a simple [Cr(III) L3 ] metalloligand and a "naked" M(II) salt. The flexibility in the design proffers the potential to tune the physical properties, as all the constituent parts of the cage can be changed without structural alteration. Computational techniques (known in theoretical nuclear physics as statistical spectroscopy) in tandem with EPR spectroscopy are used to interpret the magnetic behavior.

  13. Combustor Design Criteria Validation. Volume III. User’s Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-02-01

    plenum annulus is condut .- ted based upon the qeneralized one-dimensional continuous flow- analysis approach of Shapiro . The analysis considers the...time. it was shown by the authors that a good correlation with the burning rate data could be obtained by taking thermal con- ductivity and CD as a...calculated using the coefficient given in Equation 39. II h - 2 K (l+0.3Pr 3Re2 H- ) (39)D~ m2 -K) where k is the thermal conductivity of fuel vapor

  14. Extragenic accumulation of RNA polymerase II enhances transcription by RNA polymerase III.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imke Listerman

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent genomic data indicate that RNA polymerase II (Pol II function extends beyond conventional transcription of primarily protein-coding genes. Among the five snRNAs required for pre-mRNA splicing, only the U6 snRNA is synthesized by RNA polymerase III (Pol III. Here we address the question of how Pol II coordinates the expression of spliceosome components, including U6. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP and high-resolution mapping by PCR to localize both Pol II and Pol III to snRNA gene regions. We report the surprising finding that Pol II is highly concentrated approximately 300 bp upstream of all five active human U6 genes in vivo. The U6 snRNA, an essential component of the spliceosome, is synthesized by Pol III, whereas all other spliceosomal snRNAs are Pol II transcripts. Accordingly, U6 transcripts were terminated in a Pol III-specific manner, and Pol III localized to the transcribed gene regions. However, synthesis of both U6 and U2 snRNAs was alpha-amanitin-sensitive, indicating a requirement for Pol II activity in the expression of both snRNAs. Moreover, both Pol II and histone tail acetylation marks were lost from U6 promoters upon alpha-amanitin treatment. The results indicate that Pol II is concentrated at specific genomic regions from which it can regulate Pol III activity by a general mechanism. Consequently, Pol II coordinates expression of all RNA and protein components of the spliceosome.

  15. Ferromagnetic coupling and spin canting behaviour in heterobimetallic Re(IV)M(II/III) (M = Co(II/III), Ni(II)) species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Lillo, José; Armentano, Donatella; De Munno, Giovanni; Julve, Miguel; Lloret, Francesc; Faus, Juan

    2013-02-01

    Three novel heterobimetallic Re(IV) compounds of formulae [ReBr(4)(μ-ox)M(4,7-Cl(2)phen)(2)]·CH(3)CN·CH(3)NO(2) [M = Co(II) (1) and Ni(II) (2)] and [ReBr(4)(ox)](3)[Co(III)(5,6-dmphen)(3)](2)·CH(3)CN·2CH(3)NO(2)·4H(2)O (3) [ox = oxalate, 4,7-Cl(2)phen = 4,7-dichloro-1,10-phenanthroline and 5,6-dmphen = 5,6-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline] have been synthesised and the structures of 1 and 3 determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 is an oxalato-bridged Re(IV)Co(II) heterodinuclear complex where the [ReBr(4)(ox)](2-) unit acts as a bidentate ligand towards the [Co(4,7-Cl(2)phen)(2)](2+) entity, the separation between Re(IV) and Co(II) across the oxalate being 5.482(1) Å. Compound 3 is an ionic salt whose structure is made up of [Re(IV)Br(4)(ox)](2-) anions and [Co(III)(5,6-dmphen)(3)](3+) cations plus acetonitrile, nitromethane and water as solvent molecules. The magnetic properties of 1-3 were investigated in the temperature range 1.9-300 K. Relatively large ferromagnetic interactions between Re(IV) and M(II) through the bis(bidentate) oxalato occur in 1 and 2 [J(ReM) = +11.0 (1) and +12.2 cm(-1) (2), the Hamiltonian being defined as Ĥ = -J(ReM)Ŝ(Re)·Ŝ(M)] which are explained on the basis of orbital symmetry considerations. A behaviour typical of a magnetically diluted Re(IV) complex with a large and positive value of zero-field splitting for the ground level (D(Re) = +43 cm(-1)) is observed for 3 in the high temperature range, whereas it exhibits spin canting in the low temperature domain as well as magnetic ordering below ca. 4.8 K.

  16. Treatment of groundwater containing Mn(II), Fe(II), As(III) and Sb(III) by bioaugmented quartz-sand filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yaohui; Chang, Yangyang; Liang, Jinsong; Chen, Chen; Qu, Jiuhui

    2016-12-01

    High concentrations of iron (Fe(II)) and manganese (Mn(II)) often occur simultaneously in groundwater. Previously, we demonstrated that Fe(II) and Mn(II) could be oxidized to biogenic Fe-Mn oxides (BFMO) via aeration and microbial oxidation, and the formed BFMO could further oxidize and adsorb other pollutants (e.g., arsenic (As(III)) and antimony (Sb(III))). To apply this finding to groundwater remediation, we established four quartz-sand columns for treating groundwater containing Fe(II), Mn(II), As(III), and Sb(III). A Mn-oxidizing bacterium (Pseudomonas sp. QJX-1) was inoculated into two parallel bioaugmented columns. Long-term treatment (120 d) showed that bioaugmentation accelerated the formation of Fe-Mn oxides, resulting in an increase in As and Sb removal. The bioaugmented columns also exhibited higher overall treatment effect and anti-shock load capacity than that of the non-bioaugmented columns. To clarify the causal relationship between the microbial community and treatment effect, we compared the biomass of active bacteria (reverse-transcribed real-time PCR), bacterial community composition (Miseq 16S rRNA sequencing) and community function (metagenomic sequencing) between the bioaugmented and non-bioaugmented columns. Results indicated that the QJX1 strain grew steadily and attached onto the filter material surface in the bioaugmented columns. In general, the inoculated strain did not significantly alter the composition of the indigenous bacterial community, but did improve the relative abundances of xenobiotic metabolism genes and Mn oxidation gene. Thus, bioaugmentation intensified microbial degradation/utilization for the direct removal of pollutants and increased the formation of Fe-Mn oxides for the indirect removal of pollutants. Our study provides an alternative method for the treatment of groundwater containing high Fe(II), Mn(II) and As/Sb. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison of WHO Mark III and HRP II ELISA for in vitro sensitivity of Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusion: The HRP II ELISA assay showed a reliable sensitivity in comparison to WHO Mark III micro-test complemented with distinguishing features such as high specificity, ease of performance, and notable consistency.

  18. Cathodic stripping voltammetry of nickel: sonoelectrochemical exploitation of the Ni(III)/Ni(II) couple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, James; Vaughan, D Huw; Stirling, David; Nei, Lembit; Compton, Richard G

    2002-07-19

    The exploitation of the Ni(III)/Ni(II) transition as a means of quantifying the concentration of nickel within industrial samples was assessed. The methodology relies upon the reagentless electrodeposition of Ni onto a glassy carbon electrode and the subsequent oxidative conversion of the metallic layer to Ni(III). The analytical signal is derived from a cathodic stripping protocol in which the reduction of the Ni(III) layer to Ni(II) is monitored through the use of square wave voltammetry. The procedure was refined through the introduction of an ultrasonic source which served to both enhance the deposition of nickel and to remove the nickel hydroxide layer that results from the measurement process. A well-defined stripping peak was observed at +0.7 V (vs. Agmid R:AgCl) with the response found to be linear over the range 50 nM to 1 muM (based on a 30 s deposition time). Other metal ions such as Cu(II), Mn(II), Cr(III), Pb(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Fe(III) and Co(II) did not interfere with the response when present in hundred fold excess. The viability of the technique was evaluated through the determination of nickel within a commercial copper nickel alloy and validated through an independent comparison with a standard ICP-AES protocol.

  19. Comparing acquired angioedema with hereditary angioedema (types I/II): findings from the Icatibant Outcome Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, H J; Zanichelli, A; Caballero, T; Bouillet, L; Aberer, W; Maurer, M; Fain, O; Fabien, V; Andresen, I

    2017-04-01

    Icatibant is used to treat acute hereditary angioedema with C1 inhibitor deficiency types I/II (C1-INH-HAE types I/II) and has shown promise in angioedema due to acquired C1 inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-AAE). Data from the Icatibant Outcome Survey (IOS) were analysed to evaluate the effectiveness of icatibant in the treatment of patients with C1-INH-AAE and compare disease characteristics with those with C1-INH-HAE types I/II. Key medical history (including prior occurrence of attacks) was recorded upon IOS enrolment. Thereafter, data were recorded retrospectively at approximately 6-month intervals during patient follow-up visits. In the icatibant-treated population, 16 patients with C1-INH-AAE had 287 attacks and 415 patients with C1-INH-HAE types I/II had 2245 attacks. Patients with C1-INH-AAE versus C1-INH-HAE types I/II were more often male (69 versus 42%; P = 0·035) and had a significantly later mean (95% confidence interval) age of symptom onset [57·9 (51·33-64·53) versus 14·0 (12·70-15·26) years]. Time from symptom onset to diagnosis was significantly shorter in patients with C1-INH-AAE versus C1-INH-HAE types I/II (mean 12·3 months versus 118·1 months; P = 0·006). Patients with C1-INH-AAE showed a trend for higher occurrence of attacks involving the face (35 versus 21% of attacks; P = 0·064). Overall, angioedema attacks were more severe in patients with C1-INH-HAE types I/II versus C1-INH-AAE (61 versus 40% of attacks were classified as severe to very severe; P types I/II, respectively. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  20. Immunochemical studies of Lolium perenne (rye grass) pollen allergens, Lol p I, II, and III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, A A; Kihara, T K; Marsh, D G

    1987-12-15

    It was reported earlier that human immune responses to three perennial rye grass (Lolium perenne) pollen allergens, Lol p I, II, and III, are associated with histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR3. Rye-allergic people are often concordantly sensitive to all three of these allergens. Since earlier studies suggested that these antigens are non-cross-reactive, their immunologic relatedness by double antibody radioimmunoassay (DARIA) was studied in order to understand further the immunochemical basis for the concordant recognition of the three allergens. Direct binding DARIA studies were performed with human sera from 189 allergic subjects. Inhibition DARIA studies were carried out with 17 human sera from grass-allergic patients who were on grass immunotherapy, one goat anti-serum, and six rabbit antisera. None of the sera detected any significant degree of two-way cross-reactivity between Lol p I and II, or between Lol p I and III. However, the degree of two-way cross-reactivity between Lol p II and III exhibited by individual human and animal antisera varied between undetectable and 100%. In general, the degree of cross-reactivity between Lol p II and III was higher among human sera than among animal sera. Taken together with earlier findings that antibody responses to Lol p I, II and III are associated with HLA-HDR3, and that most Lol p II and III responders are also Lol p I responders, but not vice versa, our present results suggest the following: the HLA-DR3-encoded Ia molecule recognizes a similar immunodominant Ia recognition site (agretope) shared between Lol p I and Lol p II and/or III; in addition, Lol p I appears to contain unique Ia recognition site(s) not present in Lol p II and III. However, further epitope analyses are required to investigate these possibilities.

  1. Oral Impacts on Quality of Life in Adult Patients with Class I, II and III Malocclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Javed, Omair; Bernabé, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the social impact of malocclusion on quality of life between adult patients with Angle Class I, II and III malocclusion.MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 222 adult patients (139, 42 and 41 with Angle Class I, II and III malocclusion, respectively) were recruited voluntarily from those attending the Orthodontic Clinic of Khyber College of Dentistry in Pesh awar, Pakistan. Participants were asked to complete the Urdu version of the short form of the Oral Health Impact Profil...

  2. Using phase II data for the analysis of phase III studies: an application in rare diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Wandel, Simon; Neuenschwander, Beat; Friede, Tim; Röver, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Clinical research and drug development in orphan diseases is challenging, since large-scale randomized studies are difficult to conduct. Formally synthesizing the evidence is therefore of great value, yet this is rarely done in the drug approval process. Phase III designs that make better use of phase II data can facilitate drug development in orphan diseases. A Bayesian meta-analytic approach is used to inform the phase III study with phase II data. It is particularly attractive, since uncer...

  3. S-1 project. Volume II. Hardware. 1979 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    This volume includes highlights of the design of the Mark IIA uniprocessor (SMI-2), and the SCALD II user's manual. SCALD (structured computer-aided logic design system) cuts the cost and time required to design logic by letting the logic designer express ideas as naturally as possible, and by eliminating as many errors as possible - through consistency checking, simulation, and timing verification - before the hardware is built. (GHT)

  4. A Molecular Predictor Reassesses Classification of Human Grade II/III Gliomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Rème

    Full Text Available Diffuse gliomas are incurable brain tumors divided in 3 WHO grades (II; III; IV based on histological criteria. Grade II/III gliomas are clinically very heterogeneous and their prognosis somewhat unpredictable, preventing definition of appropriate treatment. On a cohort of 65 grade II/III glioma patients, a QPCR-based approach allowed selection of a biologically relevant gene list from which a gene signature significantly correlated to overall survival was extracted. This signature clustered the training cohort into two classes of low and high risk of progression and death, and similarly clustered two external independent test cohorts of 104 and 73 grade II/III patients. A 22-gene class predictor of the training clusters optimally distinguished poor from good prognosis patients (median survival of 13-20 months versus over 6 years in the validation cohorts. This classification was stronger at predicting outcome than the WHO grade II/III classification (P≤2.8E-10 versus 0.018. When compared to other prognosis factors (histological subtype and genetic abnormalities in a multivariate analysis, the 22-gene predictor remained significantly associated with overall survival. Early prediction of high risk patients (3% of WHO grade II, and low risk patients (29% of WHO grade III in clinical routine will allow the development of more appropriate follow-up and treatments.

  5. Synthesis and Structural Studies of Cr(III, Mn(II and Fe(III Complexes of N(2-Benzimidazolylacetylacetohydrazone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. H. Anuradha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The ligand N(2-benzimidazolylacetylacetohydrazone (BAAH have been synthesized and characterized. Coordination complexes of Cr(III, Mn(II and Fe(III have been synthesized with the ligand BAAH. These complexes were characterized on the basis of analytical, conductance, thermal, magnetic data and infrared and electronic spectral data. The ligand BAAH is behaving as a neutral tridentate NNO donar employing two azomethine nitrogens (ring and side chain and carbonyl oxygen. The ligand and it's metal complexes were tested for anti microbial activity on the gram positive S. Aureus, E. coli and Proteus.

  6. Tetranuclear {Co(II)2Co(III)2}, Octanuclear {Co(II)4Co(III)4}, and Hexanuclear {Co(III)3Dy(III)3} Pivalate Clusters: Synthesis, Magnetic Characterization, and Theoretical Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, Ioana; Kravtsov, Victor Ch; Ostrovsky, Serghei M; Reu, Oleg S; Krämer, Karl; Decurtins, Silvio; Liu, Shi-Xia; Klokishner, Sophia I; Baca, Svetlana G

    2017-03-06

    New tetranuclear and octanuclear mixed-valent cobalt(II/III) pivalate clusters, namely, [NaCo4(O2CCMe3)6(HO2CCMe3)2(teaH)2(N3)]·2H2O (in two polymorphic modifications, 1 and 1a) and [Co8(O2CCMe3)10(teaH)4(N3)](Me3CCO2)·MeCN·H2O (2) have been synthesized by ultrasonic treatment of a dinuclear cobalt(II) pivalate precursor with sodium azide and triethanolamine (teaH3) ligand in acetonitrile. The use of Dy(NO3)3·6H2O in a similar reaction led to the precipitation of a tetranuclear [NaCo4(O2CCMe3)4(teaH)2(N3)(NO3)2(H2O)2]·H2O (3) cluster and a heterometallic hexanuclear [Co3Dy3(OH)4(O2CCMe3)6(teaH)3(H2O)3](NO3)2·H2O (4) cluster. Single-crystal X-ray analysis showed that 1 (1a) and 3 consist of a tetranuclear pivalate/teaH3 mixed-ligand cluster [Co(II)2Co(III)2(O2CCMe3)4(teaH)2(N3)](+) decorated with sodium pivalates [Na(O2CCMe3)2(HO2CCMe3)2](-) (1 or 1a) or sodium nitrates [Na(NO3)2](-) (3) to form a square-pyramidal assembly. In 2, the cationic [Co8(O2CCMe3)10(teaH)4(N3)](+) cluster comprises a mixed-valent {Co(II)4Co(III)4} core encapsulated by an azide, 4 teaH(2-) alcoholamine ligands, and 10 bridging pivalates. Remarkably, in this core, the μ4-N3(-) ligand joins all four Co(II) atoms. The heterometallic hexanuclear compound 4 consists of a cationic [Co(III)3Dy(III)3(OH)4(O2CCMe3)6(teaH)3(H2O)3](2+) cluster, two NO3(-) anions, and a crystallization water molecule. The arrangement of metal atoms in 4 can be approximated as the assembly of a smaller equilateral triangle defined by three Dy sites with a Dy···Dy distance of 3.9 Å and a larger triangle formed by Co sites [Co···Co, 6.1-6.2 Å]. The interpretation of the magnetic properties of clusters 2-4 was performed in the framework of theoretical models, taking into account the structural peculiarities of clusters and their energy spectra. The behavior of clusters 2 and 3 containing Co(II) ions with orbitally nondegenerate ground states is determined by the zero-field splitting of these states and

  7. SERS and DFT investigation of 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol and its metal complexes with Al(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, László; Herman, Krisztian; Mircescu, Nicoleta E.; Fălămaş, Alexandra; Leopold, Loredana F.; Leopold, Nicolae; Buzumurgă, Claudia; Chiş, Vasile

    The development of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) as a prospective analytical methodology for detection of metal ions was shown in recent years by several studies on metal complexes. In this work, 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN) and its Al(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) complexes were studied by FTIR, FT-Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopies. Molecular geometry optimization, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) distribution and vibrational frequencies calculations were performed using the hybrid B3LYP exchange-correlation functional for the PAN molecule and its bidentate complexes. The calculated MEP distributions indicated the atoms with highest electronegativity, the adsorption to the silver surface occurring through these atoms. Based on experimental and theoretical data we were able to identify unique and representative features, useful for the identification of each PAN-metal complex.

  8. Rome II versus Rome III classification of functional gastrointestinal disorders in pediatric chronic abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baber, Kari F; Anderson, Julia; Puzanovova, Martina; Walker, Lynn S

    2008-09-01

    The updated Rome III criteria for pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) include new FGID categories and changes to the Rome II criteria for various FGIDs. To our knowledge, the implications of these revisions for patient classification have not been identified. The purpose of this study was to compare classification results using Rome II versus Rome III criteria for FGIDs associated with chronic abdominal pain. Participants were 368 pediatric patients whose subspecialty evaluations for chronic abdominal pain yielded no evidence of organic disease. The children's gastrointestinal symptoms were assessed with the parent-report version of the Questionnaire on Pediatric Gastrointestinal Symptoms (QPGS). More patients met the criteria for a pediatric pain-related FGID according to the Rome III criteria (86.6%) than the Rome II criteria (68.0%). In comparison with the results from the Rome II criteria, the Rome III criteria classified a greater percentage of children as meeting criteria for Abdominal Migraine (23.1% vs 5.7%) and Functional Abdominal Pain (11.4% vs 2.7%). Irritable Bowel Syndrome was the most common diagnosis according to both Rome II (44.0%) and Rome III (45.1%). Changes to the Rome criteria make the Rome III criteria more inclusive, allowing classification of 86.6% of pediatric patients with medically unexplained chronic abdominal pain.

  9. Apolipoprotein C-II and C-III metabolism in a kindred of familial hypobetalipoproteinemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malmendier, C.L.; Delcroix, C.; Lontie, J.F.; Dubois, D.Y. (Research Foundation on Atherosclerosis, Brussels (Belgium))

    1991-01-01

    Three affected members of a kindred with asymptomatic hypobetalipoproteinemia (HBL) showed low levels of triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, and apolipoproteins (apo) B, C-II, and C-III. Turnover of iodine-labeled apo C-II and apo C-III associated in vitro to plasma lipoproteins was studied after intravenous injection. Radioactivity in plasma and lipoproteins (95% recovered in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) density range) and in 24-hour urine samples was observed for 16 days. A parallelism of the slowest slopes of plasma decay curves was observed between apo C-II and apo C-III, indicating a partial common catabolic route. Urine/plasma radioactivity ratio (U/P) varied with time, suggesting heterogeneity of metabolic pathways. A new compartmental model using the SAAM program was built, not only fitting simultaneously plasma and urine data, but also taking into account the partial common metabolism of lipoprotein particles (LP) containing apo C-II and apo C-III. The low apo C-II and C-III plasma concentrations observed in HBL compared with normal resulted from both an increased catabolism and a reduced synthesis, these changes being more marked for apo C-III. The modifications in the rate constants of the different pathways calculated from the new model are in favor of an increased direct removal of particles following the fast pathway, likely in the very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) density range.

  10. Congruence of the MCMI-II and MCMI-III in cocaine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, D B; Festinger, D S; Kirby, K C; Rubenstein, D F; Platt, J J

    1998-08-01

    This study compared the MCMI-II and MCMI-III among 40 urban, poor, cocaine abusers in outpatient treatment. The mean group profiles had strikingly similar relative elevations on the Antisocial, Narcissistic, Aggressive-Sadistic, Alcohol Dependence, and Drug Dependence scales. However, the MCMI-III group profile was significantly lower in magnitude compared with the MCMI-II. Interval and rank-order correlations were moderate to low for most scales, and 90% of participants produced discrepant 2-point codetypes between the 2 tests. These results suggest that clinicians working in substance abuse settings should perhaps adjust MCMI-III profile elevations upward on most scales (particularly on the personality disorder scales) when comparing results to extant normative data and should use caution when referencing MCMI/MCMI-II interpretive manuals for descriptive correlates of MCMI-III scales and codetypes.

  11. Octanuclear [Ni(II)₄Ln(III)₄] complexes. Synthesis, crystal structures and magnetocaloric properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasatoiu, Traian D; Ghirri, Alberto; Madalan, Augustin M; Affronte, Marco; Andruh, Marius

    2014-06-28

    Two original heterooctanuclear [Ni(II)4Ln(III)4] complexes (Ln(III) = Sm(III), Gd(III)) have been obtained starting from the [Ni(II)(valpn)(H2O)2] mononuclear precursor [H2valpn = 1,3-propanediylbis(2-iminomethylene-6-methoxy-phenol)] and the corresponding lanthanide nitrates, in the presence of azide anions, through slow capture of atmospheric CO2. Three weak and competitive exchange interactions, J(GdGd), J(GdNi), J(NiNi), make the ground state of this magnetic system degenerate at cryogenic temperature and zero field. This, along with the high spin of Gd(III), lead to a significant magnetocaloric effect spread in the temperature range 1 to 20 K (ΔSm[0-7 T, 3.5 K] = 19 J kg(-1) K(-1)).

  12. Spiral Dinuclear Complexes of Tetradentate N(4) Diazine Ligands with Mn(II), Fe(II), Fe(III), Co(III), and Ni(II) Salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiqiang; Thompson, Laurence K.; Miller, David O.; Clase, Howard J.; Howard, Judith A. K.; Goeta, Andrés E.

    1998-07-13

    A series of dinuclear complexes of the tetradentate dipyridyl-diazine ligand PAHAP with Mn(II), Fe(II), Fe(III), Co(III), and Ni(II) salts is reported in which three ligands wrap themselves around the six-coordinate metal centers in a rare spiral-like fashion. A similar Fe(II) complex is found for the dipyrazinyl-diazine ligand PZHPZ. The ligands are severely twisted with dihedral angles between the metal chelate ring mean planes on each ligand in the range 50-70 degrees, values close to the expected twist angle for orthogonality between the bridging nitrogen atom p orbitals. Full structures are reported for the dinuclear complexes [Mn(2)(PAHAP)(3)](ClO(4))(4).5H(2)O (1), [Fe(2)(PAHAP)(3)](NO(3))(4).3H(2)O (2), [Fe(2)(PZHPZ)(3)](NO(3))(4).5H(2)O (5), [Co(2)(PAHAP)(3)](NO(3))(6).5H(2)O (6), and [Ni(2)(PAHAP)(3)][Ni(H(2)O)(6)](NO(3))(6).4.5H(2)O (7). Other derivatives [Fe(2)(PAHAP)(3)](ClO(4))(4).4H(2)O (3), [Fe(2)(PAHAP)(3)](ClO(4))(6).4.5H(2)O (4), [Ni(2)(PAHAP)(3)](ClO(4))(4).5H(2)O (8), and [Fe(PHAAP-H)(H(2)O)(2)(NO(3))](NO(3))(2) (9) are also reported. Complex 1 crystallized in the monoclinic system, space group C2/c, with a = 13.4086(2) Å, b = 32.0249(1) Å, c = 14.3132(2) Å, alpha = 90 degrees, beta = 115.635(1) degrees, gamma = 90 degrees, and Z = 4. Complex 2 crystallized in the cubic system, space group Pa&thremacr;, with a = b = c = 21.0024(1) Å, alpha = beta = gamma = 90 degrees, and Z = 8. Complex 5 crystallized in the monoclinic system, space group P2/n, with a = 14.039(3) Å, b = 11.335(6) Å, c = 14.6517(15) Å, beta = 96.852(11) degrees, and Z = 1. Complex 6 crystallized in the trigonal system, space group R&thremacr;c(h), with a = b = 17.386(2) Å, c = 32.15(2) Å, alpha = beta = 90 degrees, gamma = 120 degrees, and Z = 4. Complex 7 crystallized in the trigonal system, space group R&thremacr;c, with a = b = 17.3737(3) Å, c = 33.235(6) Å, alpha = beta = 90 degrees, gamma = 120 degrees, and Z = 27. Weak ferromagnetic coupling was observed for 1

  13. Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control. Volume III: Inspection Procedures for Specific Industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisburd, Melvin I.

    The Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control, Volume III, explains in detail the following: inspection procedures for specific sources, kraft pulp mills, animal rendering, steel mill furnaces, coking operations, petroleum refineries, chemical plants, non-ferrous smelting and refining, foundries, cement plants, aluminum…

  14. Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control. Volume III: Inspection Procedures for Specific Industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisburd, Melvin I.

    The Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control, Volume III, explains in detail the following: inspection procedures for specific sources, kraft pulp mills, animal rendering, steel mill furnaces, coking operations, petroleum refineries, chemical plants, non-ferrous smelting and refining, foundries, cement plants, aluminum…

  15. Technical Reports (Part I). End of Project Report, 1968-1971, Volume III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western Nevada Regional Education Center, Lovelock.

    The pamphlets included in this volume are technical reports prepared as outgrowths of the Student Information Systems of the Western Nevada Regional Education Center (WN-REC) funded by a Title III (Elementary and Secondary Education Act) grant. These reports describe methods of interpreting the printouts from the Student Information System;…

  16. Influence of Arsenic (III, Cadmium (II, Chromium (VI, Mercury (II, and Lead (II Ions on Human Triple Negative Breast Cancer (HCC1806 Cell Cytotoxicity and Cell Viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsdale F. Mehari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The hazardous consequences of heavy metal ions (HMIs on human health necessitate the immediate need to probe fundamentally the interactions and cytotoxic effects of HMIs on humans. This study investigated the influence of five toxic HMIs (arsenic (As (III, cadmium (Cd (II, chromium (Cr (VI, mercury (Hg (II, and lead (Pb (II on human TNBC (HCC 1806 cell viability using optical microscopy, trypan blue dye-exclusion assays, and flow cytometry. The TNBC cells were exposed to varying concentrations of HMIs for 24 and 48 hours. We evaluated the influence of the concentrations and duration of HMIs exposure on TNBC cell viability. Light microscopy, cell viability assays, revealed that after 48-hour treatment of TNBC cells with 1 x 10-5 M of As (III, Cd (II, Hg (II, Cr (IV, and Pb (II resulted in cell viabilities of 23%, 34%, 35%, 56%, 91% respectively, suggesting that As (III has the greatest cytotoxicity (77% cell death while Pb (II showed the least (9% cell death. Furthermore, flow cytometry revealed that while Pb (II, As (III and Cr (IV had significant increases in cell death, Hg (II caused a G1 arrest. Together, this study revealed that HMIs cause a differential cytotoxic effect on TNBC cells and suggest that they may have very different genotoxic targets and implications in their mutagenic potential.

  17. THE ADSORPTION OF Pb(II AND Cr(III BY POLYPROPYLCALIX[4]ARENE POLYMER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryadi Budi Utomo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A research has been conducted to investigate the adsorption behavior of Pb(II and Cr(III onto polypropylcalix[4]arene polymer. The polypropylcalix[4]arene polymer was synthesized in the presence of H2SO4 catalyst and chloroform under N2 condition for 5 h using 25-allyloxy-26,27,28-trihydroxycalyx[4]arene as the precursor. The Polymer was obtained as yellow crystal with melting point of  288-290 °C and its relative molecular weight was 44.810 g.mol-1. The application of polypropylcalix[4]arene for trapping heavy metal cations and its adsorption model were examined by stirring the suspension of the calixarene in the sample solutions for various pH, time, and concentration of Pb(II and Cr(III solution. Effect of pH on batch experiments for the mentioned ions indicated that the optimum pH for metal binding were 5 for lead(II and chromium(III. The adsorption model of metal ions on polypropylcalix[4]arene followed both the pseudo second order adsorption of Ho's and Langmuir isotherm adsorption kinetics models with rate constant (k were 6.81 x 101 min-1 for Pb(II and 2.64 x 10-2 min-1 for Cr(III. The adsorption equilibrium constant, K, were 5.84 x 105 L.mol-1 for Pb(II and 4.66 x 105 L.mol-1 for Cr(III. The maximum adsorption capacity of polypropylcalix[4]arene to Pb(II and Cr(III were 16.31 and 18.14 mg.g-1 with adsorption energy of 32.90 and 32.34 kJ.mol-1, respectively.   Keywords: polypropylcalix[4]arene, adsorption, Pb(II, and Cr(III

  18. Neurologic abnormalities in mouse models of the lysosomal storage disorders mucolipidosis II and mucolipidosis III γ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel A Idol

    Full Text Available UDP-GlcNAc:lysosomal enzyme N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase is an α2β2γ2 hexameric enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of the mannose 6-phosphate targeting signal on lysosomal hydrolases. Mutations in the α/β subunit precursor gene cause the severe lysosomal storage disorder mucolipidosis II (ML II or the more moderate mucolipidosis III alpha/beta (ML III α/β, while mutations in the γ subunit gene cause the mildest disorder, mucolipidosis III gamma (ML III γ. Here we report neurologic consequences of mouse models of ML II and ML III γ. The ML II mice have a total loss of acid hydrolase phosphorylation, which results in depletion of acid hydrolases in mesenchymal-derived cells. The ML III γ mice retain partial phosphorylation. However, in both cases, total brain extracts have normal or near normal activity of many acid hydrolases reflecting mannose 6-phosphate-independent lysosomal targeting pathways. While behavioral deficits occur in both models, the onset of these changes occurs sooner and the severity is greater in the ML II mice. The ML II mice undergo progressive neurodegeneration with neuronal loss, astrocytosis, microgliosis and Purkinje cell depletion which was evident at 4 months whereas ML III γ mice have only mild to moderate astrocytosis and microgliosis at 12 months. Both models accumulate the ganglioside GM2, but only ML II mice accumulate fucosylated glycans. We conclude that in spite of active mannose 6-phosphate-independent targeting pathways in the brain, there are cell types that require at least partial phosphorylation function to avoid lysosomal dysfunction and the associated neurodegeneration and behavioral impairments.

  19. Phase I/II adaptive design for drug combination oncology trials

    OpenAIRE

    Wages, Nolan A.; Conaway, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Existing statistical methodology on dose finding for combination chemotherapies has focused on toxicity considerations alone in finding a maximum tolerated dose combination to recommend for further testing of efficacy in a phase II setting. Recently, there has been increasing interest in integrating phase I and phase II trials in order to facilitate drug development. In this article, we propose a new adaptive phase I/II method for dual-agent combinations that takes into account both toxicity ...

  20. Recovery of Navy distillate fuel from reclaimed product. Volume II. Literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkman, D.W.; Whisman, M.L.

    1984-11-01

    In an effort to assist the Navy to better utilize its waste hydrocarbons, NIPER, with support from the US Department of Energy, is conducting research designed to ultimately develop a practical technique for converting Reclaimed Product (RP) into specification Naval Distillate Fuel (F-76). This first phase of the project was focused on reviewing the literature and available information from equipment manufacturers. The literature survey has been carefully culled for methodology applicable to the conversion of RP into diesel fuel suitable for Navy use. Based upon the results of this study, a second phase has been developed and outlined in which experiments will be performed to determine the most practical recycling technologies. It is realized that the final selection of one particular technology may be site-specific due to vast differences in RP volume and available facilities. A final phase, if funded, would involve full-scale testing of one of the recommended techniques at a refueling depot. The Phase I investigations are published in two volumes. Volume 1, Technical Discussion, includes the narrative and Appendices I and II. Appendix III, a detailed Literature Review, includes both a narrative portion and an annotated bibliography containing about 800 references and abstracts. This appendix, because of its volume, has been published separately as Volume 2.

  1. Crack tip fields in elastic-plastic and mixed mode I+II+III conditions, finite elements simulations and modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Fremy,

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the analysis of the load path effect on I+II+III mixed mode fatigue crack propagation in a 316L stainless steel. Experiments were conducted in mode I+II and in mode I+II+III. The same maximum, minimum and mean values of the stress intensity factors were used for each loading path in the experiments. The main result of this set of experiments is that very different crack growth rates and crack paths are observed for load paths that are however considered as equivalent in most fatigue criteria. The experiments conducted in mode I+II and in mode I+II+III, also allowed to show that the addition of mode III loading steps to a mode I+II loading sequence is increasing the fatigue crack growth rate, even when the crack path is not significantly modified.

  2. Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-14

    This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume II contains the proceedings for the Short Course on Seismic Base Isolation held in Berkeley, California, August 10-14, 1992.

  3. DSM-5 section III personality traits and section II personality disorders in a Flemish community sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiaens, Tim; Smits, Dirk; De Hert, Marc; Vanwalleghem, Dominique; Claes, Laurence

    2016-04-30

    The Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5; Krueger et al., 2012) is a dimensional self-report questionnaire designed to measure personality pathology according to the criterion B of the DSM-5 Section III personality model. In the current issue of DSM, this dimensional Section III personality model co-exists with the Section II categorical personality model derived from DSM-IV-TR. Therefore, investigation of the inter-relatedness of both models across populations and languages is warranted. In this study, we first examined the factor structure and reliability of the PID-5 in a Flemish community sample (N=509) by means of exploratory structural equation modeling and alpha coefficients. Next, we investigated the predictive ability of section III personality traits in relation to section II personality disorders through correlations and stepwise regression analyses. Results revealed a five factor solution for the PID-5, with adequate reliability of the facet scales. The variance in Section II personality disorders could be predicted by their theoretically comprising Section III personality traits, but additional Section III personality traits augmented this prediction. Based on current results, we discuss the Section II personality disorder conceptualization and the Section III personality disorder operationalization.

  4. Moessbauer study of iron(II) and iron(III) complexes of some nitrogen-, oxygen- and sulphur donor ligands, reduction of iron(III) by the mercaptide group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawhney, G.L.; Baijal, J.S. (Delhi Univ. (India). Dept. of Physics and Astrophysics); Chandra, S. (Zakir Hussain College, Ajmeri Gate, Delhi (India). Dept. of Chemistry); Pandeya, K.B. (Delhi Univ. (India). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1981-01-01

    Complex formation reactions of iron(II) and iron(III) with semicarbazones and thiosemicarbazones of pyruvic acid and phenyl pyruvic acid have been studied by magnetic measurements and Moessbauer spectroscopy. With iron(II), all the ligands form hexa-coordinated octahedral complexes of the type Fe(ligand-H/sub 2/). With iron(III) semicarbazones, complexes of the composition (Fe(ligand-H)/sub 2/)(OH) are formed. Thiosemicarbazones first reduce iron(III) to iron(II) and then form iron(II) complexes of the type Fe(ligand-H)/sub 2/.

  5. Spectroscopic, thermal and biological studies of coordination compounds of sulfasalazine drug: Mn(II), Hg(II), Cr(III), ZrO(II), VO(II) and Y(III) transition metal complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M G Abd El-Wahed; M S Refat; S M El-Megharbel

    2009-04-01

    The complexations of sulfasalazine (H3Suz) with some of transition metals have been investigated. Three types of complexes, [Mn(HSuz)-2(H2O)4].2H2O, [M(HSuz)-2(H2O)2].H2O (M = Hg(II), ZrO(II) and VO(II), = 4, 8 and 6, respectively) and [M(HSuz)-2(Cl)(H2O)3].H2O (M = Cr(III) and Y(III), = 5 and 6, respectively) were obtained and characterized by physicochemical and spectroscopic methods. The IR spectra of the complexes suggest that the sulfasalazine behaves as a monoanionic bidentate ligand. The thermal decomposition of the complexes as well as thermodynamic parameters ( *}, *, * and *) were estimated using Coats–Redfern and Horowitz–Metzger equations. In vitro antimicrobial activities of the H3Suz and the complexes were tested.

  6. Looking for Population III stars with He II line intensity mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Visbal, Eli; Bryan, Greg L

    2015-01-01

    Constraining the properties of Population III (Pop III) stars will be very challenging because they reside in small galaxies at high redshift which will be difficult to detect even with future instruments such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). In this paper, we suggest that intensity mapping may be a promising method to study Pop III stars. Intensity mapping is a technique proposed to measure large-scale fluctuations of galaxy line emission in three dimensions without resolving individual sources. This technique is well suited for observing many faint galaxies because it can measure their cumulative emission even if they cannot be directly detected. We focus on intensity mapping of He II recombination lines, and in particular He II 1640 \\AA{}. These lines are much stronger in Pop III stars than Pop II stars because the harder spectra of Pop III stars are expected to produce many He II ionizing photons. Measuring the He II 1640 \\AA{} intensity mapping signal, along with the signals from other lines suc...

  7. Photochemical Formation of Fe(II) in the Aqueous Solutions of Fe(III)- Dicarboxylates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, K.; Arakaki, T.

    2007-12-01

    Although there have been many studies reporting the photochemical formation of Fe(II) in various aqueous-phase such as rain, cloud waters, seawater and aerosols, the detailed formation mechanisms are not well understood. To better understand the mechanisms of Fe(II) formation, we attempted to determine the molar absorptivity and the quantum yield of Fe(II) photoformation for individual Fe(III)-dicarboxylate species. The concentrations of Fe(II) and total dissolved Fe were measured by a Ferrozine-HPLC method. The Visual MINTEQ computer program was used to calculate the equilibrium concentrations of chemical species in the solutions of Fe(III)-dicarboxylate complexes. The molar absorptivity and the product of the quantum yield and the molar absorptivity of Fe(III)- dicarboxylate complex can be analysed by UV-VIS spectrophotometer and photochemical experiments, and these experimental data were combined with the calculated equilibrium Fe(III) speciation to determine individual molar absorptivity and quantum yield of Fe(II) photoformation for a specific Fe(III)-dicarboxylate complex. Preliminary results, using an oxalate whose quantum yield has been previously reported, indicate that this approach gives lower quantum yield values in air saturated solutions than previously reported.

  8. Reductive dehalogenation by layered iron(II)-iron(III) hydroxides and related iron(II) containing solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Weizhao

    In the present PhD project, novel synthesis and modifications of layered Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxides (green rusts, GRs) were investigated with focus on improved dehalogenation of carbon tetrachloride by using modified green rusts and/or altered reaction conditions. The Ph.D. project has comprised: 1...

  9. Characterization of the internal calcium(II) binding sites in dissolved insulin hexamer using europium(III) fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alameda, G K; Evelhoch, J L; Sudmeier, J L; Birge, R R

    1985-03-26

    The fluorescence of Eu(III) is used to study the nature of the Ca(II) binding sites in the central cavity of the two-zinc(II) insulin hexamer. The dependence of the Eu(III) fluorescence lifetime upon Eu(III) stoichiometry indicates that there are three identical Eu(III) binding sites present in the two-zinc(II) insulin hexamer in solution. Addition of excess Ca(II) causes a decrease in the Eu(III) fluorescence intensity, confirming that Ca(II) competes for the observed Eu(III) sites. The solvent dependence of the Eu(III) fluorescence lifetime (H2O vs. D2O) indicates that four OH groups are coordinated to each Eu(III) in the hexamer. Substitution of Co(II) for Zn(II) causes a decrease in the Eu(III) fluorescence lifetime. Calculations based on Förster energy-transfer theory predict that the Co(II) [or Zn(II) in vivo] and Eu(III) [or Ca(II) in vivo] binding sites are separated by 9.6 +/- 0.5 A. Variation of the metal stoichiometries indicates that all three Eu(III) [or Ca(II) in vivo] sites are equidistant from the Zn(II) sites. We conclude that these sites are identical with the three central Zn(II) sites present in insulin hexamer crystals soaked in excess Zn(II) [Emdin, S. O., Dodson, G., Cutfield, J. M., & Cutfield, S. M. (1980) Diabetologia 19, 174-182] and suggest that these central sites are occupied by Ca(II) in vivo.

  10. 25 CFR 522.10 - Individually owned class II and class III gaming operations other than those operating on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Individually owned class II and class III gaming... GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR APPROVAL OF CLASS II AND CLASS III ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS SUBMISSION OF GAMING ORDINANCE OR RESOLUTION § 522.10 Individually owned class II and class...

  11. Role of radiotherapy in grade II and III meningiomas; Place de la radiotherapie dans les meningiomes de grades II et III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nouni, K.; Hassouni, K.; Kebdani, T.; Elkacemi, H.; Benjaafer, N.; Elgueddari, B. [Institut national d' oncologie, Rabat (Morocco)

    2010-10-15

    Grade II and III meningiomas are rare tumours. They are not much studied and raise problems when taking them into care due to their aggressiveness and relapses. Based on 19 cases observed between 2000 and 2007, the authors report and discuss epidemiologic, clinic, and above all therapeutic and evolutional aspects. They state that radiotherapy is to be performed whatever the quality of the exeresis is, in order to reduce relapse risks. Short communication

  12. Adsorption Study of Pb(II, Cd(II, Hg(II And Cr(III Onto Calix[4]Resorcinarene Derivative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chairil Anwar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the removal of several heavy metal ions of Pb(II, Cd(II, Hg(II and Cr(III from aqueous medium via sorption process onto calix[4]resorcinarene derivative was investigated. The used adsorbent was highly oxygenated calix[4]resorcinarene namely C-4-hydroxyphenylcalix[4]resorcinarene. Several adsorption parameters were studied including pH, adsorbent dosage, interaction time as well as the kinetic studies. While the maximum removals of Pb(II, Cd(II and Hg(II were observed in pH 5, the removal of Cr(III reached the maximum value at pH 6. The optimum adsorbent dosages for Pb(II, Hg(II and Cr(III were 0.025 g, whereas that for Cd(II was 0.05 g. The kinetic data were evaluated by using three kinetic models of first order model of Santosa, pseudo-first order of Lagergren and pseudo-second order of Ho. The results showed that the adsorption of these metal ions could be well described with Ho's pseudo-first order model.

  13. Syntheses, structures, and magnetic properties of acetato- and diphenolato-bridged 3d-4f binuclear complexes [M(3-MeOsaltn)(MeOH)x(ac)Ln(hfac)2] (M = Zn(II), Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II); Ln = La(III), Gd(III), Tb(III), Dy(III); 3-MeOsaltn = N,N'-bis(3-methoxy-2-oxybenzylidene)-1,3-propanediaminato; ac = acetato; hfac = hexafluoroacetylacetonato; x = 0 or 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towatari, Masaaki; Nishi, Koshiro; Fujinami, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Naohide; Sunatsuki, Yukinari; Kojima, Masaaki; Mochida, Naotaka; Ishida, Takayuki; Re, Nazzareno; Mrozinski, Jerzy

    2013-05-20

    A series of 3d-4f binuclear complexes, [M(3-MeOsaltn)(MeOH)x(ac)Ln(hfac)2] (x = 0 for M = Cu(II), Zn(II); x = 1 for M = Co(II), Ni(II); Ln = Gd(III), Tb(III), Dy(III), La(III)), have been synthesized and characterized, where 3-MeOsaltn, ac, and hfac denote N,N'-bis(3-methoxy-2-oxybenzylidene)-1,3-propanediaminato, acetato, and hexafluoroacetylacetonato, respectively. The X-ray analyses demonstrated that all the complexes have an acetato- and diphenolato-bridged M(II)-Ln(III) binuclear structure. The Cu(II)-Ln(III) and Zn(II)-Ln(III) complexes are crystallized in an isomorphous triclinic space group P1, where the Cu(II) or Zn(II) ion has square pyramidal coordination geometry with N2O2 donor atoms of 3-MeOsaltn at the equatorial coordination sites and one oxygen atom of the bridging acetato ion at the axial site. The Co(II)-Ln(III) and Ni(II)-Ln(III) complexes are crystallized in an isomorphous monoclinic space group P2(1)/c, where the Co(II) or Ni(II) ion at the high-spin state has an octahedral coordination environment with N2O2 donor atoms of 3-MeOsaltn at the equatorial sites, and one oxygen atom of the bridged acetato and a methanol oxygen atom at the two axial sites. Each Ln(III) ion for all the complexes is coordinated by four oxygen atoms of two phenolato and two methoxy oxygen atoms of "ligand-complex" M(3-MeOsaltn), four oxygen atoms of two hfac(-), and one oxygen atom of the bridging acetato ion; thus, the coordination number is nine. The temperature dependent magnetic susceptibilities from 1.9 to 300 K and the field-dependent magnetization up to 5 T at 1.9 K were measured. Due to the important orbital contributions of the Ln(III) (Tb(III), Dy(III)) and to a lesser extent the M(II) (Ni(II), Co(II)) components, the magnetic interaction between M(II) and Ln(III) ions were investigated by an empirical approach based on a comparison of the magnetic properties of the M(II)-Ln(III), Zn(II)-Ln(III), and M(II)-La(III) complexes. The differences of χ(M)T and M

  14. Adsorption of some transition metal ions (Cu(II), Fe(III), Cr(III) and Au(III)) onto lignite-based activated carbons modified by oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paunka St. Vassileva; Albena K. Detcheva [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry

    2010-03-15

    The main purpose of the present work was to study the adsorption of some transition metal ions from aqueous solution via a novel porous material obtained from Bulgarian lignite (Chukurovo deposit) and its oxidized modifications. The adsorption of Cu(II), Fe(III), Cr(III) and Au(III) ions was investigated using batch methods to study solutions with different concentrations and acidities. It was found that the adsorption process was affected significantly by the pH value of the aqueous solution. Treatment of the equilibrium data using the linear Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich models allowed the maximum adsorption capacities to be calculated. The uptake of Au(III) ions was almost 100% for the three adsorbents investigated, being greater than 300 mg/l and independent of the pH over the pH range studied. The initial activated carbon proved to be the most suitable for the selective adsorption of Au(III) ions from aqueous solutions in the presence of other transition metal ions, while its oxidized modification Ch-P exhibited an enhanced adsorption efficiency towards transition metals.

  15. Adsorption of Some Transition Metal Ions (Cu(II), Fe(III), Cr(III) and Au(III)) onto lignite-based activated carbons modified by oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vassileva, P.S.; Detcheva, A.K. [Bulgarian Academy of Science, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2010-07-01

    The main purpose of the present work was to study the adsorption of some transition metal ions from aqueous solution via a novel porous material obtained from Bulgarian lignite (Chukurovo deposit) and its oxidized modifications. The adsorption of Cu(II), Fe(III), Cr(III) and Au(III) ions was investigated using batch methods to study solutions with different concentrations and acidities. It was found that the adsorption process was affected significantly by the pH value of the aqueous solution. Treatment of the equilibrium data using the linear Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich models allowed the maximum adsorption capacities to be calculated. The uptake of Au(III) ions was almost 100% for the three adsorbents investigated, being greater than 300 mg/l and independent of the pH over the pH range studied. The initial activated carbon proved to be the most suitable for the selective adsorption of Au(III) ions from aqueous solutions in the presence of other transition metal ions, while its oxidized modification Ch-P exhibited an enhanced adsorption efficiency towards transition metals.

  16. Tartrazine modified activated carbon for the removal of Pb(II), Cd(II) and Cr(III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monser, Lotfi; Adhoum, Nafaâ

    2009-01-15

    A two in one attempt for the removal of tartrazine and metal ions on activated carbon has been developed. The method was based on the modification of activated carbon with tartrazine then its application for the removal of Pb(II), Cd(II) and Cr(III) ions at different pH values. Tartrazine adsorption data were modelled using both Langmuir and Freundlich classical adsorption isotherms. The adsorption capacities qm were 121.3, 67 and 56.7mgg(-1) at initial pH values of 1.0, 6.0 and 10, respectively. The adsorption of tartrazine onto activated carbon followed second-order kinetic model. The equilibrium time was found to be 240min at pH 1.0 and 120min at pH 10 for 500mgL(-1) tartrazine concentration. A maximum removal of 85% was obtained after 1h of contact time. The presence of tartrazine as modifier enhances attractive electrostatic interactions between metal ions and carbon surface. The adsorption capacity for Pb(II), Cd(II) and Cr(III) ions has been improved with respect to non-modified carbon reaching a maximum of 140%. The adsorption capacity was found to be a pH dependent for both modified and non-modified carbon with a greater adsorption at higher pH values except for Cr(III). The enhancement percent of Pb(II), Cd(II) and Cr(III) at different pH values was varied from 28% to 140% with respect to non-modified carbon. The amount of metal ions adsorbed using static regime was 11-40% higher than that with dynamic mode. The difference between adsorption capacities could be attributed to the applied flow rate.

  17. Functional defecation disorders in children: comparing the Rome II with the Rome III criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgers, Rosa; Levin, Alon D; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G W; Benninga, Marc A

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of pediatric functional defecation disorders (FDD) using the Rome III criteria and to compare these data with those obtained using Rome II criteria. A chart review was performed in patients referred to a tertiary outpatient clinic with symptoms of constipation and/or fecal incontinence. All patients received a standardized bowel questionnaire and physical examination, including rectal examination. The prevalence of pediatric FDD according to both Rome criteria sets was assessed. Patients with FDD (n = 336; 61% boys, mean age 6.3 ± 3.5 SD) were studied: 39% had a defecation frequency ≤ 2/wk, 75% had fecal incontinence, 75% displayed retentive posturing, 60% had pain during defecation, 49% passed large diameter stools, and 49% had a palpable rectal fecal mass. According to the Rome III criteria, 87% had functional constipation (FC) compared with only 34% fulfilling criteria for either FC or functional fecal retention based on the Rome II definitions (P criteria for functional nonretentive fecal incontinence according to both the Rome II and Rome III criteria. The pediatric Rome III criteria for FC are less restrictive than the Rome II criteria. The Rome III criteria are an important step forward in the definition and recognition of FDD in children. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dodecanuclear [Cu(II)6Gd(III)6] nanoclusters as magnetic refrigerants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinca, Alina S; Ghirri, Alberto; Madalan, Augustin M; Affronte, Marco; Andruh, Marius

    2012-04-02

    A novel dodecanuclear complex, [{(HL)(L)(DMF)Cu(II)Gd(III)(DMF)(H(2)O)}(6)]·6DMF (1; DMF = N,N-dimethylformamide), has been obtained using the ligand resulting from the condensation of 3-formylsalicylic acid with hydroxylamine (H(3)L). The exchange interaction between the phenoxo-bridged Cu(II) and Gd(III) ions is weak ferromagnetic (J = +1.01 cm(-1)). The combination of a high-spin ground state with small anisotropy leads to a significant magnetocaloric effect [-ΔS(m)(0-7 T) = 23.5 J K g(-1) K(-1) at ∼2 K].

  19. Electrochemical studies of DNA interaction and antimicrobial activities of MnII, FeIII, CoII and NiII Schiff base tetraazamacrocyclic complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anuj; Vashistha, Vinod Kumar; Tevatia, Prashant; Singh, Randhir

    2017-04-01

    Tetraazamacrocyclic complexes of MnII, FeIII, CoII and NiII have been synthesized by template method. These tetraazamacrocycles have been analyzed with various techniques like molar conductance, IR, UV-vis, mass spectral and cyclic voltammetric studies. On the basis of all these studies, octahedral geometry has been assigned to these tetraazamacrocyclic complexes. The DNA binding properties of these macrocyclic complexes have been investigated by electronic absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra, cyclic voltammetric and differential pulse voltammetric studies. The cyclic voltammetric data showed that ipc and ipa were effectively decreased in the presence of calf thymus DNA, which is a strong evidence for the interaction of these macrocyclic complexes with the calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA). The heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant found in the order: KCoII > KNiII > KMnII which indicates that CoII macrocyclic complex has formed a strong intercalated intermediate. The Stern-Volmer quenching constant (KSV) and voltammetric binding constant were found in the order KSV(CoII) > KSV(NiII) > KSV(MnII) and K+(CoII) > K+(NiII) > K+(MnII) which shows that CoII macrocyclic complex exhibits the high interaction affinity towards ct-DNA by the intercalation binding. Biological studies of the macrocyclic complexes compared with the standard drug like Gentamycin, have shown antibacterial activities against E. coli, P. aeruginosa, B. cereus, S. aureus and antifungal activity against C. albicans.

  20. Analysis and forecast of electrical distribution system materials. Final report. Volume III. Appendix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Love, C G

    1976-08-23

    These appendixes are referenced in Volume II of this report. They contain the detailed electrical distribution equipment requirements and input material requirements forecasts. Forecasts are given for three electric energy usage scenarios. Also included are data on worldwide reserves and demand for 30 raw materials required for the manufacture of electrical distribution equipment.

  1. Samarium(III) as luminescent probe for copper(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiménez, José A., E-mail: jose.jimenez@unf.edu

    2015-05-15

    Lanthanide-based luminescent sensing of copper(II) is currently an active area of research given the need for determining trace amounts of the analyte in environmental and biological matrices. Moreover, the increasing interest of Cu-doped materials for a variety of applications (e.g. luminescent and plasmonic) calls for appropriate measures for the assessment of residual Cu{sup 2+} in the solid state. In this work, Sm{sup 3+} ions are investigated as luminescent probes for Cu{sup 2+} within a glass matrix as model system based on Sm{sup 3+}→Cu{sup 2+} energy transfer. The Cu{sup 2+} concentration dependence of the Sm{sup 3+} emission quenching and decay rates of the {sup 4}G{sub 5/2} excited state allow for establishing calibration curves useful for determining Cu{sup 2+}. The luminescence-based approaches are employed for estimating residual Cu{sup 2+} in a Cu{sup +}/Sm{sup 3+} co-doped glass as ‘unknown’, the results being compared with the spectrophotometric method based on Cu{sup 2+} absorption in the visible. Remarkably, the approaches appeared in good agreement. Thus, the present work demonstrates the potential of Sm{sup 3+} ions for optical sensing of copper(II), opening research avenues extending from materials to liquid phase systems with relevance to biological and environmental sciences. - Highlights: • Sm{sup 3+}→Cu{sup 2+} energy transfer investigated in glass as model matrix in context of analytical applications. • Sm{sup 3+} photoluminescence and emission decay dynamics correlated with Cu{sup 2+} concentration. • Potential of Sm{sup 3+} ions for optical sensing of Cu{sup 2+} demonstrated.

  2. Evaluation of lymph node numbers for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bumpers Harvey L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although evaluation of at least 12 lymph nodes (LNs is recommended as the minimum number of nodes required for accurate staging of colon cancer patients, there is disagreement on what constitutes an adequate identification of such LNs. Methods To evaluate the minimum number of LNs for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer, 490 patients were categorized into groups based on 1-6, 7-11, 12-19, and ≥ 20 LNs collected. Results For patients with Stage II or III disease, examination of 12 LNs was not significantly associated with recurrence or mortality. For Stage II (HR = 0.33; 95% CI, 0.12-0.91, but not for Stage III patients (HR = 1.59; 95% CI, 0.54-4.64, examination of ≥20 LNs was associated with a reduced risk of recurrence within 2 years. However, examination of ≥20 LNs had a 55% (Stage II, HR = 0.45; 95% CI, 0.23-0.87 and a 31% (Stage III, HR = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.38-1.26 decreased risk of mortality, respectively. For each six additional LNs examined from Stage III patients, there was a 19% increased probability of finding a positive LN (parameter estimate = 0.18510, p Conclusions Thus, the 12 LN cut-off point cannot be supported as requisite in determining adequate staging of colon cancer based on current data. However, a minimum of 6 LNs should be examined for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer patients.

  3. Alterations of thoraco-abdominal volumes and asynchronies in patients with spinal muscle atrophy type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoMauro, Antonella; Romei, Marianna; Priori, Rita; Laviola, Marianna; D'Angelo, Maria Grazia; Aliverti, Andrea

    2014-06-15

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is characterized by degeneration of motor neurons resulting in muscle weakness. For the mild type III form, a sub-classification into type IIIA and IIIB, based on age of motor impairment, was recently proposed. To investigate if SMA IIIA (more severe) and IIIB differ also in terms of respiratory function, thoracoabdominal kinematics was measured during quiet breathing, inspiration preceding cough and inspiratory capacity on 5 type IIIA and 9 type IIIB patients. Four patients with SMA II (more severe than types III) and 19 healthy controls were also studied. Rib cage motion was similar in SMA IIIB and controls. Conversely, in SMA IIIA and SMA II it was significantly reduced and sometime paradoxical during quiet breathing in supine position. Our results suggest that in SMA IIIA intercostal muscles are weakened and the diaphragm is preserved similarly to SMA II, while in SMA IIIB the action of all inspiratory muscles is maintained. Sub-classification of type III seems feasible also for respiratory function.

  4. Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program. Volume II. Commercial plant design (Deliverable Nos. 15 and 16)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    This report presents a Conceptual Design and Evaluation of Commercial Plant report in four volumes as follows: I - Executive Summary, II - Commercial Plant Design, III - Economic Analyses, IV - Demonstration Plant Recommendations. Volume II presents the commercial plant design and various design bases and design analyses. The discussion of design bases includes definition of plant external and internal considerations. The basis is described for process configuration selection of both process units and support facilities. Overall plant characteristics presented include a summary of utilities/chemicals/catalysts, a plant block flow diagram, and a key plot plan. Each process unit and support facility is described. Several different types of process analyses are presented. A synopsis of environmental impact is presented. Engineering requirements, including design considerations and materials of construction, are summarized. Important features such as safety, startup, control, and maintenance are highlighted. The last section of the report includes plant implementation considerations that would have to be considered by potential owners including siting, coal and water supply, product and by-product characteristics and uses, overall schedule, procurement, construction, and spare parts and maintenance philosophy.

  5. The simple class II and class III corrector: three case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spary, David John; Little, Rachel Ann

    2015-03-01

    This article illustrates three case reports which describe a very simple appliance that is used to correct both class II and class III buccal segments. A class I molar relationship is achieved within 2-6 months. Hundreds of cases have been treated with these appliances over a number of years at Queen's Hospital, Burton upon Trent with great success.

  6. Phase I/II Pilot Study of Mixed Chimerism to Treat Inherited Metabolic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-30

    Hurler Syndrome (MPS I); Hurler-Scheie Syndrome With Early Neurologic Involvement and/or Sensitization to Enzyme Replacement Therapy (ERT); Hunter Syndrome (MPS II); Sanfilippo Syndrome (MPS III); Krabbe Disease (Globoid Leukodystrophy); Metachromatic Leukodystrophy (MLD); Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD and AMN); Sandhoff Disease; Tay Sachs Disease; Pelizaeus Merzbacher (PMD); Niemann-Pick Disease; Alpha-mannosidosis

  7. Photoconductivity of Polymer Composite Films Containing an Mn(III)/Cu(II) Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidenko, N. A.; Kokozay, V. N.; Petrusenko, S. R.; Stetsyuk, O. N.; Studzinsky, S. L.; Davidenko, I. I.

    2013-11-01

    We have studied the optical, photoelectric and dielectric properties of polymer composite films based on polyvinyl butyral with additives of a mixed-metal Mn(III)/Cu(II) complex. We observed high photoconductivity of the films obtained in the region of absorption by the complex. The slow photocurrent rise and relaxation kinetics are connected with the low mobility of the photogenerated charge carriers.

  8. Expression of metallothionein-I, -II, and -III in Alzheimer disease and animal models of neuroinflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hidalgo, Juan; Penkowa, Milena; Espejo, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    In recent years it has become increasingly clear that the metallothionein (MT) family of proteins is important in neurobiology. MT-I and MT-II are normally dramatically up-regulated by neuroinflammation. Results for MT-III are less clear. MTs could also be relevant in human neuropathology. In Alz...

  9. Renal Tubular Mitochondrial Abnormalities in Complex II/III Respiratory Chain Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Joel; Ashoor, Isa; Craver, Randall

    2017-06-01

    Defects in the respiratory chain may present with a wide spectrum of clinical signs and symptoms. In this "Images in Pathology" discussion we correlate the clinical, histologic, and ultrastructural findings in a 12-year-old male with a complex II/III respiratory chain deficiency and kidney dysfunction.

  10. Complexation Effect on Redox Potential of Iron(III)-Iron(II) Couple: A Simple Potentiometric Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Masood Ahmad; Syed, Raashid Maqsood; Khan, Badruddin

    2011-01-01

    A titration curve with multiple inflection points results when a mixture of two or more reducing agents with sufficiently different reduction potentials are titrated. In this experiment iron(II) complexes are combined into a mixture of reducing agents and are oxidized to the corresponding iron(III) complexes. As all of the complexes involve the…

  11. Risk of recurrence in patients with colon cancer stage II and III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bockelman, C.; Engelmann, Bodil E.; Kaprio, T.;

    2015-01-01

    Background. Adjuvant chemotherapy is established routine therapy for colon cancer (CC) patients with radically resected stage III and 'high-risk' stage II disease. The decision on recommending adjuvant chemotherapy, however, is based on data from older patient cohorts not reflecting improvements...

  12. Interaction forces between salivary proteins and Streptococcus mutans with and without antigen I/II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, C.P.; Belt-Gritter, van de B.; Dijkstra, R.J.B.; Norde, W.; Mei, van der H.C.; Busscher, H.J.

    2007-01-01

    The antigen I/II family of surface proteins is expressed by oral streptococci, including Streptococcus mutans, and mediates specific binding to, among others, salivary films. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction forces between salivary proteins and S. mutans with (LT11) and witho

  13. Glycine buffered synthesis of layered iron(II)-iron(III) hydroxides (green rusts)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Weizhao; Huang, Lizhi; Pedersen, Emil Bjerglund;

    2016-01-01

    Layered Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxides (green rusts, GRs) are efficient reducing agents against oxidizing contaminants such as chromate, nitrate, selenite, and nitroaromatic compounds and chlorinated solvents. In this study, we adopted a buffered precipitation approach where glycine (GLY) was used in ...

  14. Interaction forces between salivary proteins and Streptococcus mutans with and without antigen I/II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Chun-Ping; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Dijkstra, Rene J. B.; Norde, Willem; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2007-01-01

    The antigen I/II family of surface proteins is expressed by oral streptococci, including Streptococcus mutans, and mediates specific binding to, among others, salivary films. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction forces between salivary proteins and S. mutans with (LT11) and

  15. [A comparison between Rome III and Rome II criteria in diagnosing irritable bowel syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, An-jiang; Liao, Xian-hua; Hu, Pin-jin; Liu, Si-chun; Xiong, Li-shou; Chen, Min-hu

    2007-08-01

    To determine the degree of agreement of Rome III and Rome II criteria in diagnosing irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and to compare the clinical difference between the patients diagnosed with these two criteria. 3014 patients in the gastrointestinal outpatient department were enrolled consecutively and interviewed face to face with a standard questionnaire. (1) 480 patients were diagnosed as IBS with Rome III criteria. The overall detection rate was 15.9% (480/3014). The proportion of IBS subtypes was as follows: IBS with constipation 27.9% (134/480), IBS with diarrhea 32.7% (157/480), Mixed IBS 6.7% (32/480), Unsubtyped IBS 32.7% (157/480). No difference was observed between different sex and age groups; with Rome II criteria, 558 patients were diagnosed with a detection rate of 18.5% (558/3014). The proportion of IBS subtypes was as follows: constipation predominant IBS 33.2% (185/558), diarrhea predominant IBS 38.2% (213/558), others 28.7% (160/558). The detection rate was higher in female patients (P = 0.002), but there was no difference between different age groups. The detection rate of Rome III criteria was lower than that of Rome II criteria (P = 0.008). There was a good accordance between these two criteria in the diagnosis of IBS (P Rome III criteria complained more severe abdominal symptoms (P = 0.04) and abnormal bowel habit (P Rome II criteria. (3) According to Rome III criteria, the severity of bowel habit was different among the four subtypes (C-IBS, M-IBS > D-IBS > U-IBS, P Rome II and Rome III criteria in diagnosing IBS. Compared to Rome II criteria, Rome III criteria has a lower detection rate. It is more practical in the clinical practice with clear definition of symptom frequency and easy way of subtyping IBS. The patients diagnosed with Rome III criteria had more severe symptoms and higher healthcare seeking rate, they are more suitable for clinical trial.

  16. MIXED-METAL COMPLEXES OF MIXED-VALENT DINUCLEAR RUTHENIUM(II,III CARBOXYLATE AND TETRACYANIDONICKELATE(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Mikuriya

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Mixed-metal chain complexes constructed from lantern-type dinuclear ruthenium(II,III carboxylate unit and tetracyanidonickelate(II, (PPh4n[Ru2(O2CCH34Ni(CN4]n•nH2O (1 and (PPh4n[Ru2{O2CC(CH33}4]3n[Ni(CN4]2n•2nH2O (2, where very weak antiferromagnetic interaction is operating, were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis and IR and UV-vis spectroscopies and temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibilities (4.5—300K.

  17. Condutividade da Polianilina e Poliacrilonitrila Dopadas com Fe(II e Fe(III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonis Fornazier Filho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we report O estudo da interação de íons Fe(II com a polianilina foi feito através da obtenção deste polímero na forma de salthe studies on Polyaniline Emeraldine (PANI-ES and Polyacrilonitrile (PAN doped with salt of Fe (II and Fe(III. We used the techniques of conductivity measurements with aplicação de pressão.application of pressure.  The results showed that conductivity of PANI-ES increase with pressure of range of 1.73 MPa until 20.0 MPa and PAN also increase with maximum of 6.0 mPa except to samples PAN-2-TT-FeIII and PAN-2-TTAA-FeIII.

  18. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewig, H. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Powers, D. A.; Hewson, John C.; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wright, A. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Phillips, J.; Zeyen, R. (Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Clement, B. (IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Garner, Frank (Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA); Walters, Leon (Advanced Reactor Concepts, Los Alamos, NM); Wright, Steve; Ott, Larry J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Denning, Richard (Ohio State University, Columbus, OH); Ohshima, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Ohno, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Miyhara, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Yacout, Abdellatif (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Farmer, M. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wade, D. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Grandy, C. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Schmidt, R.; Cahalen, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Olivier, Tara Jean; Budnitz, R. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Tobita, Yoshiharu (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Serre, Frederic (Centre d' %C3%94etudes nucl%C3%94eaires de Cadarache, Cea, France); Natesan, Ken (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Carbajo, Juan J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Jeong, Hae-Yong (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Corradini, Michael (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI); Thomas, Justin (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wei, Tom (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Flanagan, George F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Bari, R. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Porter D. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Lambert, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Hayes, S. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Sackett, J. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Denman, Matthew R.

    2012-05-01

    Expert panels comprised of subject matter experts identified at the U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, LBL, and BNL), universities (University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University), international agencies (IRSN, CEA, JAEA, KAERI, and JRC-IE) and private consultation companies (Radiation Effects Consulting) were assembled to perform a gap analysis for sodium fast reactor licensing. Expert-opinion elicitation was performed to qualitatively assess the current state of sodium fast reactor technologies. Five independent gap analyses were performed resulting in the following topical reports: (1) Accident Initiators and Sequences (i.e., Initiators/Sequences Technology Gap Analysis), (2) Sodium Technology Phenomena (i.e., Advanced Burner Reactor Sodium Technology Gap Analysis), (3) Fuels and Materials (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Fuels and Materials: Research Needs), (4) Source Term Characterization (i.e., Advanced Sodium Fast Reactor Accident Source Terms: Research Needs), and (5) Computer Codes and Models (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Gaps Analysis of Computer Codes and Models for Accident Analysis and Reactor Safety). Volume II of the Sodium Research Plan consolidates the five gap analysis reports produced by each expert panel, wherein the importance of the identified phenomena and necessities of further experimental research and code development were addressed. The findings from these five reports comprised the basis for the analysis in Sodium Fast Reactor Research Plan Volume I.

  19. Savannah River Site Approved Site Treatment Plan, 2001 Annual Update (Volumes I and II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, B.

    2001-04-30

    The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume I) identifies project activity scheduled milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions. Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume II) and is provided for information.

  20. Esophagus or stomach? The seventh TNM classification for Siewert type II/III junctional adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Shinichi; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Aoyama, Toru; Hayashi, Tsutomu; Yamada, Takanobu; Tsuchida, Kazuhito; Cho, Haruhiko; Oshima, Takashi; Yukawa, Norio; Rino, Yasushi; Masuda, Munetaka; Tsuburaya, Akira

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify whether TNM-EC or TNM-GC is better for classifying patients with AEG types II/III. The patients who had AEG types II/III and received D1 or more radical lymphadenectomy were selected. The patients were staged both by seventh edition of TNM-EC and TNM-GC. The distribution of the patients, the hazard ratio (HR) of each stage, and the separation of the survival were compared. A total of 163 patients were enrolled in this study. TNM-EC and TNM-GC classified 25 (20 and 5) and 32 (20 and 12) patients to stage I (IA and IB), 15 (4 and 11), and 33 (11 and 22) to stage II (IIA and IIB), 88 (24, 3, and 61) and 63 (14, 26, and 23) to stage III (IIIA, IIIB, and IIIC), and 35 and 35 to stage IV, respectively. The distribution of the patients was substantially deviated to stage IIIC in TNM-EC but was almost even in TNM-GC. A stepwise increase of HR was observed in TNM-GC, but not in TNM-EC. The survival curves between stages II and III were significantly separated in TNM-GC (P = 0.019), but not in TNM-EC (P = 0.204). The 5-year survival rates of stages IIIA, IIIB, and IIIC were 69.0, 100, and 38.9% in TNM-EC and were 52.0, 43.4, and 33.9% in TNM-GC, respectively. TNM-GC is better for classifying patients with AEG types II/III than TNM-EC is. These results could impact the next TNM revision for AEG.

  1. Use of Rome II versus Rome III criteria for diagnosis of functional constipation in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osatakul, Seksit; Puetpaiboon, Areeruk

    2014-02-01

    There has been no study to evaluate the use of the Rome III criteria for diagnosis of constipation in the unselected young pediatric population. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the use of the Rome II and Rome III criteria for diagnosis of constipation in a group of unselected young Thai children. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 3010 healthy children aged 4 months-5 years who attended a well-baby clinic. Data concerning bowel habits and behavioral components of defecation of the children were obtained by interviewing the parents. Presence of a large fecal mass in the rectum of children with possible constipation was evaluated by abdominal palpation. Seventy-one children (2.4%) were found to have constipation, based on at least one of the two sets of criteria, at the time of interview. The prevalence of constipation as defined according to the Rome II and Rome III criteria for functional constipation (FC) was 1.9% and 1.6%, respectively. The majority of constipated children (47.9%) met the diagnostic criteria of both the Rome II and Rome III for FC, followed by the Rome II criteria for FC alone (32.4%) and the Rome III criteria for FC alone (18.3%). Twenty-one children (0.7%) whose parents reported defecation difficulties did not fulfill any diagnostic criteria for constipation. The prevalence of FC in young Thai children is low. For unselected young children, the Rome II criteria for FC are still appropriate for diagnosis of FC. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2013 Japan Pediatric Society.

  2. Probability of success for phase III after exploratory biomarker analysis in phase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götte, Heiko; Kirchner, Marietta; Sailer, Martin Oliver

    2017-02-23

    The probability of success or average power describes the potential of a future trial by weighting the power with a probability distribution of the treatment effect. The treatment effect estimate from a previous trial can be used to define such a distribution. During the development of targeted therapies, it is common practice to look for predictive biomarkers. The consequence is that the trial population for phase III is often selected on the basis of the most extreme result from phase II biomarker subgroup analyses. In such a case, there is a tendency to overestimate the treatment effect. We investigate whether the overestimation of the treatment effect estimate from phase II is transformed into a positive bias for the probability of success for phase III. We simulate a phase II/III development program for targeted therapies. This simulation allows to investigate selection probabilities and allows to compare the estimated with the true probability of success. We consider the estimated probability of success with and without subgroup selection. Depending on the true treatment effects, there is a negative bias without selection because of the weighting by the phase II distribution. In comparison, selection increases the estimated probability of success. Thus, selection does not lead to a bias in probability of success if underestimation due to the phase II distribution and overestimation due to selection cancel each other out. We recommend to perform similar simulations in practice to get the necessary information about the risk and chances associated with such subgroup selection designs.

  3. Meting van DSM-III persoonlijkheidspathologie : betrouwbaarheid en validiteit van de SIDP-R en as II van de DSM-III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, Willem van den

    1989-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and psychometric evaluation of the Structured Interview for DSM-III Personality Disorders Revised Version (SIDP-R) and some explorations regarding the validity of the taxonomic structure and predictive validity of DSM-III Axis II ... Zie: Summary

  4. Meting van DSM-III persoonlijkheidspathologie : betrouwbaarheid en validiteit van de SIDP-R en as II van de DSM-III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, Willem van den

    1989-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and psychometric evaluation of the Structured Interview for DSM-III Personality Disorders Revised Version (SIDP-R) and some explorations regarding the validity of the taxonomic structure and predictive validity of DSM-III Axis II ... Zie: Summary

  5. Biochemical and genetic studies in cystinuria: observations on double heterozygotes of genotype I/II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Claude L.; Thompson, Margaret W.; Jackson, Sanford H.; Sass-Kortsak, Andrew

    1971-01-01

    10 families with cystinuria were investigated by measuring: (a) quantitative 24 hr urinary excretion of amino acids by column chromatography; (b) endogenous renal clearances of amino acids and creatinine; (c) intestinal uptake of 34C-labeled L-cystine, L-lysine, and L-arginine using jejunal mucosal biopsies; (d) oral cystine loading tests. All four of these were studied in the probands and the first two in a large number of the family members. 49 members of 8 families were found to have a regular genetic pattern as described previously by Harris, Rosenberg, and their coworkers. Clinical or biochemical differences between the homozygotes type I (recessive cystinuria) and homozygotes type II (incompletely recessive cystinuria) have not been found. Both types excreted similarly excessive amounts of cystine, lysine, arginine, and ornithine, and had high endogenous renal clearances for these four amino acids. Some homozygotes of both types had a cystine clearance higher than the glomerular filtration rate. Jejunal mucosa from both types of homozygotes exhibited near complete inability to concentrate cystine and lysine in vitro. This was also documented in vivo with oral cystine loads. The heterozygotes type I were phenotypically normal with respect to the above four measurements. The heterozygotes type II showed moderate but definite abnormalities in their urinary excretion and their renal clearances of dibasic amino acids. Of the four amino acids concerned, cystine was the most reliable marker to differentiate between the heterozygotes type II and the homozygous normals. In this study, type III cystinuria, as described by Rosenberg, was not encountered. In two additional families, double heterozygotes of genotype I/II were found. The disease affecting these is clinically and biochemically less severe than that affecting homozygotes of either type I or type II. With respect to the four parameters used in this study, the double heterozygotes type I/II have results which

  6. 40 CFR 144.21 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells. 144.21 Section 144.21 Protection of Environment... hydrocarbon storage) and III wells. (a) An existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon... decision; or (9) For Class II wells (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage), five years...

  7. Crystal-field spectra of 3d super n impurities in II-VI and III-V compound semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J. W.; Baranowski, J. M.; Pearson, G. L.

    1967-01-01

    Impurity crystal-field spectra in II-VI and III- V compound semiconductors used to predict unexplored systems spectra impurity crystal-field spectra in II-VI and III-V compound semiconductors used to predict unexplored systems spectra

  8. Online spectrophotometric determination of Fe(II) and Fe(III) by flow injection combined with low pressure ion chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shujuan; Li, Nan; Zhang, Xinshen; Yang, Dongjing; Jiang, Heimei

    2015-03-01

    A simple and new low pressure ion chromatography combined with flow injection spectrophotometric procedure for determining Fe(II) and Fe(III) was established. It is based on the selective adsorption of low pressure ion chromatography column to Fe(II) and Fe(III), the online reduction reaction of Fe(III) and the reaction of Fe(II) in sodium acetate with phenanthroline, resulting in an intense orange complex with a suitable absorption at 515 nm. Various chemical (such as the concentration of colour reagent, eluant and reductive agent) and instrumental parameters (reaction coil length, reductive coil length and wavelength) were studied and were optimized. Under the optimum conditions calibration graph of Fe(II)/Fe(III) was linear in the Fe(II)/Fe(III) range of 0.040-1.0 mg/L. The detection limit of Fe(III) and Fe(II) was respectively 3.09 and 1.55 μg/L, the relative standard deviation (n = 10) of Fe(II) and Fe(III) 1.89% and 1.90% for 0.5 mg/L of Fe(II) and Fe(III) respectively. About 2.5 samples in 1 h can be analyzed. The interfering effects of various chemical species were studied. The method was successfully applied in the determination of water samples.

  9. Calorimetric comparison of the interactions between salivary proteins and Streptococcus mutans with and without antigen I/II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, C.P.; Belt-Gritter, van de B.; Busscher, H.J.; Mei, van der H.C.; Norde, W.

    2007-01-01

    Antigen I/II can be found on streptococcal cell surfaces and is involved in their interaction with salivary proteins. In this paper, we determine the adsorption enthalpies of salivary proteins to Streptococcus mutans LT11 and S. mutans IB03987 with and without antigen I/II, respectively, using isoth

  10. Calorimetric comparison of the interactions between salivary proteins and Streptococcus mutans with and without antigen I/II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Chun-Ping; Belt-Gritter, van de Betsy; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Norde, Willem

    2007-01-01

    Antigen I/II can be found on streptococcal cell surfaces and is involved in their interaction with salivary proteins. In this paper, we determine the adsorption enthalpies of salivary proteins to Streptococcus mutans LT 11 and S. mutans IB03987 with and without antigen I/II, respectively, using isot

  11. Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Patients With Progressive, Refractory, or Recurrent Stage II or Stage III Testicular or Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Ovarian Dysgerminoma; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Testicular Seminoma

  12. Calorimetric comparison of the interactions between salivary proteins and Streptococcus mutans with and without antigen I/II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Chun-Ping; Belt-Gritter, van de Betsy; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Norde, Willem

    2007-01-01

    Antigen I/II can be found on streptococcal cell surfaces and is involved in their interaction with salivary proteins. In this paper, we determine the adsorption enthalpies of salivary proteins to Streptococcus mutans LT 11 and S. mutans IB03987 with and without antigen I/II, respectively, using

  13. Calorimetric comparison of the interactions between salivary proteins and Streptococcus mutans with and without antigen I/II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, C.P.; Belt-Gritter, van de B.; Busscher, H.J.; Mei, van der H.C.; Norde, W.

    2007-01-01

    Antigen I/II can be found on streptococcal cell surfaces and is involved in their interaction with salivary proteins. In this paper, we determine the adsorption enthalpies of salivary proteins to Streptococcus mutans LT11 and S. mutans IB03987 with and without antigen I/II, respectively, using

  14. The African Experience. Volume I: Syllabus Lectures; Volume II: Bibliographic References; Volume IIIA: Introductory Essays; Volume IIIB: Introductory Essays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paden, John N.; Soja, Edward W.

    In response to demands for more and better teaching about Africa in American higher education, the US Office of Education requested that the Program of African Studies at Northwestern University generate a set of teaching materials which could be used in introductory undergraduate courses. Included in these volumes, these materials provide…

  15. Cardiac function in types II and III spinal muscular atrophy: should we change standards of care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Flaviana; Pane, Marika; D'Amico, Adele; Messina, Sonia; Delogu, Angelica Bibiana; Soraru, Gianni; Pera, Maria Carmela; Mongini, Tiziana; Politano, Luisa; Baranello, Giovanni; Vita, Gianluca; Tiziano, Francesco Danilo; Morandi, Lucia; Bertini, Enrico; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2015-02-01

    In the last years, there has been increasing evidence of cardiac involvement in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Autonomic dysfunction has been reported in animal models and in several patients with types I and III SMA, these findings raising the question whether heart rate should be routinely investigated in all SMA patients. The aim of our study was to detect possible signs of autonomic dysfunction and, more generally, of cardiac involvement in types II and III SMA. We retrospectively reviewed 24-hour electrocardiography (ECG) in 157 types II and III SMA patients (age range, 2-74 years). Of them, 82 also had echocardiography. None of the patients had signs of bradycardia, atrial fibrillation, or the other previously reported rhythm disturbances regardless of the age at examination or the type of SMA. Echocardiography was also normal. There were no signs of congenital cardiac defects with the exception of one patient with a history of ventricular septal defects. Our results suggest that cardiac abnormalities are not common in type II and type III SMA. These findings provide no evidence to support a more accurate cardiac surveillance or changes in the existing standards of care. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Aluminium substitution in iron(II III)-layered double hydroxides: Formation and cationic order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruby, Christian; Abdelmoula, Mustapha; Aissa, Rabha; Medjahdi, Ghouti; Brunelli, Michela; François, Michel

    2008-09-01

    The formation and the modifications of the structural properties of an aluminium-substituted iron(II-III)-layered double hydroxide (LDH) of formula Fe4IIFe(2-6y)IIIAl6yIII (OH) 12 SO 4, 8H 2O are followed by pH titration curves, Mössbauer spectroscopy and high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction using synchrotron radiation. Rietveld refinements allow to build a structural model for hydroxysulphate green rust, GR(SO 42-), i.e. y=0, in which a bilayer of sulphate anions points to the Fe 3+ species. A cationic order is proposed to occur in both GR(SO 42-) and aluminium-substituted hydroxysulphate green rust when yhydroxides. Adsorption of more soluble Al III species onto the initially formed ferric oxyhydroxide may be responsible for this slowdown of crystal growth. Therefore, the insertion of low aluminium amount ( y˜0.01) could be an interesting way for increasing the surface reactivity of iron(II-III) LDH that maintains constant the quantity of the reactive Fe II species of the material.

  17. Platinum(II), palladium(II), rhodium(III) and lead(II) voltammetric determination in sites differently influenced by vehicle traffic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melucci, Dora; Locatelli, Clinio

    2007-01-01

    The present work reports analytical results relevant to voltammetric determination of Pt(II), Pd(II), Rh(III) [Platinum Group Metals (PGMs)] and Pb(II) in superficial water sampled in sites differently influenced by vehicle traffic, especially considering their temporal behaviour. For all the elements, in addition to detection limits, precision, expressed as relative standard deviation (s(r) %) and accuracy, expressed as percentage recovery (R %) are also reported. In all cases they show to be good, being the former lower than 6% and the latter in the range 94-105%. A critical comparison with spectroscopic measurements is also discussed.

  18. Outcome of Gartland type II and type III supracondylar fractures treated by Blount′s technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Gheldere Antoine

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : According to some orthopedic surgeons, almost all supracondylar humerus fractures should be treated operatively by reduction and pinning. While according to others, closed reduction and immobolization should be used for Gartland type II and some type III fractures. However, the limit of this technique remains unclear. We present 74 patients with displaced extension-type supracondylar fractures treated by closed reduction and immobilization with a collar sling fixed to a cast around the wrist. The purpose of the study is to give a more precise limitation of this technique. Materials and Methods : Retrospective data acquisition of 74 patients with a Gartland type II or type III fractures treated by closed reduction and immobilization (Blount′s technique between January 2004 and December 2007 was done. The mean age was 6.3 years (range, 2-11. The mean time of follow-up was 6.5 months (range, 3-25. All open injuries and complex elbow fracture dislocations or T-condylar fractures were excluded from the study. All patients were evaluated with standardized anteroposterior and true lateral x-rays of the elbow, and Flynn criteria were used for functional assessment. Results : Gartland type II fractures had 94% good or excellent final results. Gartland type III fractures had 73% good or excellent final result. The Gartland type III outcome depended on the displacement. The fractures remained stable in 88% for the posterior displacement, and 58% for the posteromedial displacement. These displacements were mild. However, for the posterolaterally displaced fractures, only 36% were stable; 36% had a mild displacement and 27% had a major displacement. Conclusion : Pure posterior displacement is more stable than posteromedial displacement which is more stable than posterolaterally displaced fractures. This study suggests that Gartland type II and pure posterior or posteromedial displaced Gartland type III fractures can be treated by closed

  19. Coordination Modes of a Schiff Base Derived from Substituted 2-Aminothiazole with Chromium(III, Manganese(II, Iron(II, Cobalt(II, Nickel(II and Copper(II Metal Ions: Synthesis, Spectroscopic and Antimicrobial Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambit Thakar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal complexes of Cr(III, Mn(II, Fe(II, Co(II, Ni(II and Cu(II metal ions with general stoichiometry [ML2.2H2O] and [ML3], where M= Mn(II, Cr(III, Fe(II, Co(II, Ni(II and Cu(II, L= Schiff base derived from the condensation of 2-amino-4(4’-phenyl/methylphenyl-5-methyl-thiazole with 4-acetyl-1(3-chloro phenyl-3-methyl-2-pyrazoline-5-ones, have been synthesized and structurally characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance measurements, magnetic susceptibility measurements and spectral techniques like IR, UV, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and Mass Spectra. All the complexes were found to be octahedral geometry. The ligand and its complexes have been screened for their antifungal and antibacterial activities against three fungi, i.e. Alternaria brassicae, Aspergillus niger and Fesarium oxysporum and two bacteria, i.e. Xanthomonas compestris and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  20. Memoir and Scientific Correspondence of the Late Sir George Gabriel Stokes, Bart. 2 Volume Paperback Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, George Gabriel; Larmor, Joseph

    2010-06-01

    Volume 1: Preface; Part I. Personal and Biographical; Part II. General Scientific Career; Part IIIa. Special Scientific Correspondence; Appendix; Index. Volume 2: Part. III. Special Scientific Correspondence; Index.

  1. Sorption of samarium in iron (II) and (III) phosphates in aqueous systems; Sorcion de samario en fosfatos de hierro (II) y (III) en sistemas acuosos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz F, J.C

    2006-07-01

    The radioactive residues that are stored in the radioactive confinements its need to stay isolated of the environment while the radioactivity levels be noxious. An important mechanism by which the radioactive residues can to reach the environment, it is the migration of these through the underground water. That it makes necessary the investigation of reactive materials that interacting with those radionuclides and that its are able to remove them from the watery resources. The synthesis and characterization of materials that can be useful in Environmental Chemistry are very important because its characteristics are exposed and its behavior in chemical phenomena as the sorption watery medium is necessary to use it in the environmental protection. In this work it was carried out the sorption study of the samarium III ion in the iron (II) and (III) phosphate; obtaining the sorption isotherms in function of pH, of the phosphate mass and of the concentration of the samarium ion using UV-visible spectroscopy to determine the removal percentage. The developed experiments show that as much the ferrous phosphate as the ferric phosphate present a great affinity by the samarium III, for what it use like reactive material in contention walls can be very viable because it sorption capacity has overcome 90% to pH values similar to those of the underground and also mentioning that the form to obtain these materials is very economic and simple. (Author)

  2. Probing the magnetic and magnetothermal properties of M(II)-Ln(III) complexes (where M(II) = Ni or Zn; Ln(III) = La or Pr or Gd).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Naushad; Das, Chinmoy; Vaidya, Shefali; Srivastava, Anant Kumar; Langley, Stuart K; Murray, Keith S; Shanmugam, Maheswaran

    2014-12-14

    We establish the coordination potential of the Schiff base ligand (2-methoxy-6-[(E)-2'-hydroxymethyl-phenyliminomethyl]-phenolate (H2L)) via the isolation of various M(II)-Ln(III) complexes (where M(II) = Ni or Zn and Ln(III) = La or Pr or Gd). Single crystals of these five complexes were isolated and their solid state structures were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Structural determination revealed molecular formulae of [NiGd(HL)2(NO3)3] (1), [NiPr(HL)2(NO3)3] (2) and [Ni2La(HL)4(NO3)](NO3)2 (3), [Zn2Gd(HL)4(NO3)](NO3)2 (4), and [Zn2Pr(HL)4(NO3)](NO3)2 (5). Complexes and were found to be neutral heterometallic dinuclear compounds, whereas 3-5 were found to be linear heterometallic trinuclear cationic complexes. Direct current (dc) magnetic susceptibility and magnetization measurements conclusively revealed that complexes 1 and 4 possess a spin ground state of S = 9/2 and 7/2 respectively. Empirically calculated ΔχMT derived from the variable temperature susceptibility data for all complexes undoubtedly indicates that the Ni(II) ion is coupled ferromagnetically with the Gd(III) ion, and antiferromagnetically with the Pr(III) ion in 1 and 2 respectively. The extent of the exchange interaction for was estimated by fitting the magnetic susceptibility data using the parameters (g = 2.028, S = 9/2, J = 1.31 cm(-1) and zJ = +0.007), supporting the phenomenon observed in an empirical approach. Similarly using a HDVV Hamiltonian, the magnetic data of 3 and 4 were fitted, yielding parameters g = 2.177, D = 3.133 cm(-1), J = -0.978 cm(-1), (for 3) and g = 1.985, D = 0.508 cm(-1) (for 4). The maximum change in magnetic entropy (-ΔSm) estimated from the isothermal magnetization data for was found to be 5.7 J kg(-1) K(-1) (ΔB = 7 Tesla) at 7.0 K, which is larger than the -ΔSm value extracted from 4 of 3.5 J kg(-1) K(-1) (ΔB = 7 Tesla) at 15.8 K, revealing the importance of the exchange interaction in increasing the overall ground state of a molecule for

  3. Dentin phosphoprotein gene locus is not associated with dentinogenesis imperfecta types II and III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDougall, M.; Zeichner-David, M.; Davis, A.; Slavkin, H. (Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States)); Murray, J. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City (United States)); Crall, M. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) is an autosomal dominant inherited dental disease which affects dentin production and mineralization. Genetic linkage studies have been performed on several multigeneration informative kindreds. These studies determined linkage between DGI types II and III and group-specific component (vitamin D-binding protein). This gene locus has been localized to the long arm of human chromosome 4 in the region 4q11-q21. Although this disease has been mapped to chromosome 4, the defective gene product is yet to be determined. Biochemical studies have suggested abnormal levels of dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) associated with DGI type II. This highly acidic protein is the major noncollagenous component of dentin, being solely expressed by the ectomesenchymal derived odontoblast cells of the tooth. The purpose of the present study was to establish whether DPP is associated with DGI types II and III, by using molecular biology techniques. The results indicated that DPP is not localized to any region of human chromosome 4, thus suggesting that the DPP gene is not directly associated with DGI type II or DGI type III. The data do not exclude the possibility that other proteins associated with DPP posttranslational modifications might be responsible for this genetic disease.

  4. Thiol redox requirements and substrate specificities of recombinant cytochrome c assembly systems II and III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard-Fogal, Cynthia L; San Francisco, Brian; Frawley, Elaine R; Kranz, Robert G

    2012-06-01

    The reconstitution of biosynthetic pathways from heterologous hosts can help define the minimal genetic requirements for pathway function and facilitate detailed mechanistic studies. Each of the three pathways for the assembly of cytochrome c in nature (called systems I, II, and III) has been shown to function recombinantly in Escherichia coli, covalently attaching heme to the cysteine residues of a CXXCH motif of a c-type cytochrome. However, recombinant systems I (CcmABCDEFGH) and II (CcsBA) function in the E. coli periplasm, while recombinant system III (CCHL) attaches heme to its cognate receptor in the cytoplasm of E. coli, which makes direct comparisons between the three systems difficult. Here we show that the human CCHL (with a secretion signal) attaches heme to the human cytochrome c (with a signal sequence) in the E. coli periplasm, which is bioenergetically (p-side) analogous to the mitochondrial intermembrane space. The human CCHL is specific for the human cytochrome c, whereas recombinant system II can attach heme to multiple non-cognate c-type cytochromes (possessing the CXXCH motif.) We also show that the recombinant periplasmic systems II and III use components of the natural E. coli periplasmic DsbC/DsbD thiol-reduction pathway. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biogenesis/Assembly of Respiratory Enzyme Complexes.

  5. An Investigation of Craniocervical Posture in Class II & Class III Skeletal Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. HoseinZadeh-Nik

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Craniocervical Posture is a factor in the development and function of Craniofacial Structure. Previous studies of different samples have demonstrated associations between craniocervical posture and craniofacial morphology.Purpose: This study aimed lo examine whether any significant association is evident or not between craniocervical posture and the occurrence of Class il & Class III skeletal malocclusions.Materials and Methods: A sample of 76 subjects with Class II & Class III skeletal malocclusion aged 9-i 1 and>18 years were selected. None of them had received orthodontic treatment. Lateral cephalometric radiographs were taken in natural head position (NHP, and craniocervical and craniohorizental angels were traced and determined for analysis of craniocervical posture. Results: According to the craniocervical posture, most class II skeletal patients have flexed heads and class MI skeletal patients have extended heads, as a result malocclusion in these patients seems to become more severe. With increase in age. class II skeletal patients have more flexed their heads and malocclusion become more severe, while with increase in age in class ill skeletal patients, their heads become extended and once again malocclusion thought lo be more severe. In class II skeletal patients, craniocervical posture has a significant correlation with the vertical growth pattern, but shows little correlation with the horizontal growth pattern. In class 111 skeletal patients, craniocervical posture shows no correlation to any of the vertical & horizontal growth patterns, of course the mean of vertical angles is less in these patients and probably in order to make these relation significant in Class III skeletal patients there is need for more samples, in class II & class III skeletal patients, the amount of Na.prep-point A and pog-Na.prep with craniocervical posture shows a significant correlation. Conclusion: Consideration of craniocervical

  6. World Energy Data System (WENDS). Volume III. Country data, LY-PO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-06-01

    The World Energy Data System contains organized data on those countries and international organizations that may have critical impact on the world energy scene. Included in this volume, Vol. III, are Libya, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Poland, and Portugal. The following topics are covered for most of the countries: economic, demographic, and educational profiles; energy policy; indigenous energy resources and uses; forecasts, demand, exports, imports of energy supplies; environmental considerations of energy supplies; power production facilities; energy industries; commercial applications of energy; research and development activities of energy; and international activities.

  7. FDG PET evaluation of early axillary lymph node response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in stage II and III breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau, Caroline [Comprehensive Cancer Center Rene Gauducheau, IRCNA, Nuclear Medicine Department, Saint Herblain (France); Nantes University, INSERM UMR 892, Cancer Research Center CRCNA, Nantes (France); Centre Rene Gauducheau, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Saint Herblain Cedex (France); Devillers, Anne [Eugene Marquis Cancer Center, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rennes (France); Campone, Mario [Comprehensive Cancer Center Rene Gauducheau, Medical Oncology Department, Saint Herblain (France); Campion, Loic [Comprehensive Cancer Center Rene Gauducheau, Statistic Department, Saint Herblain (France); Ferrer, Ludovic [Comprehensive Cancer Center Rene Gauducheau, Medical Physics Department, Saint Herblain (France); Sagan, Christine [University Hospital, Pathology Department, Nantes (France); Ricaud, Myriam [Comprehensive Cancer Center Rene Gauducheau, Radiology Department, Saint Herblain (France); Bridji, Boumediene [Comprehensive Cancer Center Rene Gauducheau, IRCNA, Nuclear Medicine Department, Saint Herblain (France); Kraeber-Bodere, Francoise [Comprehensive Cancer Center Rene Gauducheau, IRCNA, Nuclear Medicine Department, Saint Herblain (France); Nantes University, INSERM UMR 892, Cancer Research Center CRCNA, Nantes (France)

    2011-06-15

    Regional axillary lymph node status has remained the single most independent variable to predict prognosis both in terms of disease recurrence and survival. This study aimed to prospectively assess sequential [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) findings as early predictors of axillary lymph node response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in stage II and III breast cancer patients. Images were acquired with a PET/CT scanner in 52 patients after administration of FDG (5 MBq/kg) at baseline and after the first, second, third and sixth course of chemotherapy before surgery. Clinical examination and ultrasound (US) were used to assess the size of axillary nodes. Decrease in the standardized uptake value (SUV) with PET corrected or not for partial volume effects was compared to the pathological response. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of axillary node staging was higher with PET (75, 87 and 80%) than with US (50, 83 and 65%), and even more so when PET images were corrected for partial volume effects (86, 83 and 84%). While FDG uptake did not vary much in non-responders, as confirmed by histopathological analysis, it markedly decreased to baseline levels in responders (p < 10{sup -5}). Fifty per cent of baseline SUV was considered the best cutoff value to distinguish responders from non-responders. The sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value and accuracy of FDG PET after one course of chemotherapy were, respectively, 96, 75, 95 and 84%. The pathological status of regional axillary lymph nodes in stage II and III breast cancer patients could be accurately predicted after one course of neoadjuvant chemotherapy based on FDG PET images. (orig.)

  8. Effect of oxidation rate and Fe(II) state on microbial nitrate-dependent Fe(III) mineral formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senko, John M; Dewers, Thomas A; Krumholz, Lee R

    2005-11-01

    A nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium was isolated and used to evaluate whether Fe(II) chemical form or oxidation rate had an effect on the mineralogy of biogenic Fe(III) (hydr)oxides resulting from nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation. The isolate (designated FW33AN) had 99% 16S rRNA sequence similarity to Klebsiella oxytoca. FW33AN produced Fe(III) (hydr)oxides by oxidation of soluble Fe(II) [Fe(II)sol] or FeS under nitrate-reducing conditions. Based on X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Fe(III) (hydr)oxide produced by oxidation of FeS was shown to be amorphous, while oxidation of Fe(II)sol yielded goethite. The rate of Fe(II) oxidation was then manipulated by incubating various cell concentrations of FW33AN with Fe(II)sol and nitrate. Characterization of products revealed that as Fe(II) oxidation rates slowed, a stronger goethite signal was observed by XRD and a larger proportion of Fe(III) was in the crystalline fraction. Since the mineralogy of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides may control the extent of subsequent Fe(III) reduction, the variables we identify here may have an effect on the biogeochemical cycling of Fe in anoxic ecosystems.

  9. Spitzer observations of extragalactic H II regions III: NGC 6822 and the hot star, H II region connection

    CERN Document Server

    Rubin, Robert H; Colgan, Sean W J; Dufour, Reginald J; Kader, Justin; McNabb, Ian A; Pauldrach, Adalbert W A; Weber, Johann A

    2016-01-01

    Using the short-high module of the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope, we have measured the [S IV] 10.51, [Ne II] 12.81, [Ne III] 15.56, and [S III] 18.71-micron emission lines in 9 H II regions in the dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 6822. These lines arise from the dominant ionization states of the elements neon (Ne$^{++}$, Ne$^+$) and sulphur (S$^{3+}$, S$^{++}$), thereby allowing an analysis of the neon to sulphur abundance ratio as well as the ionic abundance ratios Ne$^+$/Ne$^{++}$ and S$^{3+}$/S$^{++}$. By extending our studies of H II regions in M83 and M33 to the lower metallicity NGC 6822, we increase the reliability of the estimated Ne/S ratio. We find that the Ne/S ratio appears to be fairly universal, with not much variation about the ratio found for NGC 6822: the median (average) Ne/S ratio equals 11.6 (12.2$\\pm$0.8). This value is in contrast to Asplund et al.'s currently best estimated value for the Sun: Ne/S = 6.5. In addition, we continue to test the predicted ionizing spectral e...

  10. Regulatory Fe(II/III) heme: the reconstruction of a molecule's biography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühl, Toni; Imhof, Diana

    2014-09-22

    More than 20 years of research on heme as a temporary effector molecule of proteins have revealed its widespread impact on virtually all primary functions in the human organism. As our understanding of this influence is still growing, a comprehensive overview of compiled data will give fresh impetus for creativity and developing new strategies in heme-related research. From known data concerning heme-regulated proteins and their involvement in the development of diseases, we provide concise information of Fe(II/III) heme as a regulator and the availability of "regulatory heme". The latter is dependent on the balance between free and bound Fe(II/III) heme, here termed "hemeostasis". Imbalance of this system can lead to the development of diseases that were not always attributed to this small molecule. Diseases such as cancer or Alzheimer's disease highlight the reawakened interest in heme, whose function was previously believed to be completely understood.

  11. Safety/relief valve quencher loads: evaluation for BWR Mark II and III containments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, T.M.

    1982-10-01

    Boiling water reactor (BWR) plants are equipped with safety/relief valves (SRVs) to protect the reactor from overpressurization. Plant operational transients, such as turbine trips, will actuate the SRV. Once the SRV opens, the air column within the partially submerged discharge line is compressed by the high-pressure steam released from the reactor. The compressed air discharged into the suppression pool produces high-pressure bubbles. Oscillatory expansion and contraction of these bubbles create hydrodynamic loads on the containment structures, piping, and equipment inside containment. This report presents the results of the staff's evaluation of SRV loads. The evaluation, however, is limited to the quencher devices used in Mark II and III containments. With respect to Mark I containments, the SRV acceptance criteria are presented in NUREG-0661 issued July 1980. The staff acceptance criteria for SRV loads for Mark II and III containments are presented in this report.

  12. Electron impact excitation of the Ne II and Ne III fine structure levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Loch, S. D.; Pindzola, M. S.; Cumbee, R.; Stancil, P. C.; Ballance, C. P.; McLaughlin, B. M.

    2016-05-01

    Electron impact excitation cross sections and rate coefficients of the low lying levels of the Ne II and Ne III ions are of great interest in cool molecular environments including young stellar objects, photodissociation regions, active galactic nuclei, and X-ray dominated regions. We have carried out details computations for cross sections and rate coefficients using the Dirac R-matrix codes (DARC), the Breit-Pauli R-matrix codes (BP) and the Intermediate Coupling Frame Transformation (ICFT) codes, for both Ne II and Ne III. We also compare our results with previous calculations. We are primarily interested in rate coefficients in the temperature range below 1000 K, and the focus is on obtaining the most accurate rate coefficients for those temperatures. We present both a recommended set of effective collision strengths and an indication of the uncertainties on these values. Work at Auburn University and UGA partly supported by NASA Grant NNX15AE47G.

  13. Phase I-II study of isotopic immunoglobulin therapy for primary liver cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ettinger, D.S.; Order, S.E.; Wharam, M.D.; Parker, M.K.; Klein, J.L.; Leichner, P.K.

    1982-02-01

    A phase I-II study of isotopic immunoglobulin therapy was performed in 18 patients with primary liver cancer; 14 were evaluable for toxicity. The patients received a dose of 37-157 millicuries of 131I-labeled antibody. The dose-limiting factor appears to be hematologic toxicity, especially thrombocytopenia. An objective antitumor effect was seen in six of nine patients who were evaluable for response. Present results suggest that further clinical studies with isotopic immunoglobulin are indicated.

  14. Separation of americium (III) and strontium (II) using TEHDGA and 18-crown-6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinharoy, Prithwish; Khan, Pasupati Nath; Nair, Deepika; Jagasia, Poonam; Dhami, P.S.; Kaushik, C.P.; Banerjee, Kalyan [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Nuclear Recycle Group; Anitha, M. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Rare Earth Development Section; Sharma, J.N. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Process Development Div.

    2017-06-01

    This work describes extraction of Am(III) and Sr(II) together with tetra(2-ethylhexyl) diglycolamide (TEHDGA) and selective back-extraction of strontium with a strontium complexant, 18-crown-6, leading to their separation from each other. 0.3 M TEHDGA+5% isodecyl alcohol/n-dodecane was used to extract Am(III) and Sr(II) from 4 M nitric acid into organic phase with very high D (D{sub Am}=1000, D{sub Sr}=22) and 0.1 M 18-crown-6 dissolved in 4 M nitric acid is used for selective stripping of Sr(II) from loaded extract phase. Am(III) left in the extract phase was then stripped with 0.01 M nitric acid. Stripping of Sr(II) was found to increase with increase in 18-crown-6 concentration, at 0.1 M 18-crown-6 dissolved in 4 M nitric acid, 83% of the loaded strontium (D{sub Sr}=0.20) was back-extracted in a single contact while loss of Am(III) was 0.8% (D{sub Am}=122.45). Stoichiometry limit of 1:1 was observed between strontium and 18-crown-6. Strontium was precipitated and separated from the complexant by Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. This process was tested with simulated solution of high level waste and found suitable for quantitative recovery of strontium with high purity.

  15. Dose-Escalated Robotic SBRT for Stage I-II Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Robert eMeier

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is the precise external delivery of very high-dose radiotherapy to targets in the body, with treatment completed in one to five fractions. SBRT should be an ideal approach for organ-confined prostate cancer because (I) dose escalation should yield improved rates of cancer control; (II) the unique radiobiology of prostate cancer favors hypofractionation and (III) the conformal nature of SBRT minimizes high-dose radiation delivery to immediately a...

  16. Química de complexos de (etilenodiaminatetraacetatorutenato(III/II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rein Francisca N.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a survey of general aspects involved in the coordination chemistry of low-valent (mainly +III,+II, low-spin (d p5,d p6 ruthenium ions with ethylenediamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetate (edta and their substituted derivatives. The topics covered herein include structure, reactivity, kinetics, thermodynamics, electrochemistry and spectroscopy. The contributions from either our research group or the literature over the last three decades are focused in this review.

  17. EFFECTS CLASS OBESE I, II, III HOUSEWIFES ON THE SYSTEM CARDIO-RESPIRATORY CAPACITY

    OpenAIRE

    Zerf Mohammed; Mokkedes Moulay Idriss; Attouti Nouredine; Bengoua Ali,

    2016-01-01

    The goals of this study are to find ways to determine the risks cardiovascular and respiratory capacity in class obese I, II, III housewife based on them adaptation to effort. Since obesity has reached epidemic as levels in cholesterol fractions, and triglyceride as risk factors of metabolic health track into adulthood which confirmed that the body physical fitness has a significant modifying effect on other risk factors as cardiovascular disease. Our role is to expose the impact of the class...

  18. The Differences in Prevalence and Sociodemographic Characteristics of Irritable Bowel Syndrome According to Rome II and Rome III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong Won; Lee, Oh Young; Shim, Sung Gon; Jun, Dae Won; Lee, Kang Nyeong; Kim, Hye Young; Lee, Hang Lak; Yoon, Byung Chul; Choi, Ho Soon

    2010-04-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most frequently observed disorders by primary care and practitioners. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of IBS using the Rome II and III criteria in the general Korean population and also to compare sociodemographic differences between subjects diagnosed by these criteria. Telephone interview surveys were performed with a total of 1,009 individuals in Korea, 15 years of age or older. The questionnaire, based on the Rome II and III criteria, was validated. Among the 1,009 subjects, the prevalence of IBS was 8.0% under the Rome II criteria (81 subjects; 6.4%, male; 9.6%, female), and 9.0% (91 subjects; 7.0%, male; 11.0%, female) under the Rome III criteria. The accordance rate of Rome II and III was 73.5%. Both groups showed highest frequency in the age of 30s (13.9% vs. 15.3% respectively). Female subjects showed a higher prevalence than male subjects under Rome III (91 subjects; 11.0% in female, 7.0% in male; p Rome II criteria. Many patients older than 50 years were added when analyzed under the Rome III criteria, but not under the Rome II criteria (p = 0.017). The Rome III criteria were less restrictive and showed good agreement with the Rome II criteria. The prevalence of IBS was increased in young women.

  19. Phase II proof-of-concept study of pazopanib monotherapy in treatment-naive patients with stage I/II resectable non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altorki, Nasser; Lane, Maureen E; Bauer, Thomas; Lee, Paul C; Guarino, Michael J; Pass, Harvey; Felip, Enriqueta; Peylan-Ramu, Nili; Gurpide, Alfonso; Grannis, Frederic W; Mitchell, John D; Tachdjian, Sabrina; Swann, R Suzanne; Huff, Anne; Roychowdhury, Debasish F; Reeves, Anthony; Ottesen, Lone H; Yankelevitz, David F

    2010-07-01

    Patients with early-stage, resectable, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are at risk for recurrent disease, and 5-year survival rates do not exceed 75%. Angiogenesis inhibitors have shown clinical activity in patients with late-stage NSCLC, raising the possibility that targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway in earlier-stage disease may be beneficial. This proof-of-concept study examined safety and efficacy of short-term, preoperative pazopanib monotherapy in patients with operable stage I/II NSCLC. Patients scheduled for resection received oral pazopanib 800 mg/d for 2 to 6 weeks preoperatively. Tumor response was measured by high-resolution computed tomography, permitting estimation of change in tumor volume and diameter. Gene-expression profiling was performed on 77 pre- and post-treatment lung samples from 34 patients. Of 35 patients enrolled, 33 (94%) had clinical stage I NSCLC and two (6%) had clinical stage II NSCLC. Median treatment duration was 16 days (range, 3 to 29 days). Thirty patients (86%) achieved tumor-volume reduction after pazopanib treatment. Two patients achieved tumor-volume reduction > or = 50%, and three patients had partial response according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. Pazopanib was generally well tolerated. The most common adverse events included grade 2 hypertension, diarrhea, and fatigue. One patient developed pulmonary embolism 11 days after surgery. Several pazopanib target genes and other angiogenic factors were dysregulated post-treatment. Short-duration pazopanib was generally well tolerated and demonstrated single-agent activity in patients with early-stage NSCLC. Several target genes were dysregulated after pazopanib treatment, validating target-specific response and indicating a persistent pazopanib effect on lung cancer tissue. Further clinical evaluation of pazopanib in NSCLC is planned.

  20. Type-II/III DCT/DST algorithms with reduced number of arithmetic operations

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, Xuancheng

    2007-01-01

    We present algorithms for the discrete cosine transform (DCT) and discrete sine transform (DST), of types II and III, that achieve a lower count of real multiplications and additions than previously published algorithms, without sacrificing numerical accuracy. Asymptotically, the operation count is reduced from ~ 2N log_2 N to ~ (17/9) N log_2 N for a power-of-two transform size N. Furthermore, we show that a further N multiplications may be saved by a certain rescaling of the inputs or outputs, generalizing a well-known technique for N=8 by Arai et al. These results are derived by considering the DCT to be a special case of a DFT of length 4N, with certain symmetries, and then pruning redundant operations from a recent improved fast Fourier transform algorithm (based on a recursive rescaling of the conjugate-pair split radix algorithm). The improved algorithms for DCT-III, DST-II, and DST-III follow immediately from the improved count for the DCT-II.

  1. CTEQ-TEA PDFs and HERA run I+II Combined Data

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, Tie-Jiun; Gao, Jun; Guzzi, Marco; Huston, Joey; Nadolsky, Pavel; Pumplin, Jon; Schmidt, Carl; Stump, Daniel; Yuan, C -P

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the impact of the recent HERA run I+II combination of inclusive deep inelastic scattering cross-section data on the CT14 global analysis of PDFs. New PDFs at NLO and NNLO, called CT14$_{\\textrm{HERA2}}$, are obtained by a refit of the CT14 data ensembles, in which the HERA run I combined measurements are replaced by the new HERA run I+II combination. The CT14 functional parametrization of PDFs is flexible enough to allow good descriptions of different flavor combinations, so we use the same parametrization for CT14$_{\\textrm{HERA2}}$ but with an additional shape parameter for describing the strange quark PDF. We find that the HERA I+II data can be fit reasonably well, and both CT14 and CT14$_{\\textrm{HERA2}}$ PDFs can describe equally well the non-HERA data included in our global analysis. Because the CT14 and CT14$_{\\textrm{HERA2}}$ PDFs agree well within the PDF errors, we continue to recommend CT14 PDFs for the analysis of LHC Run 2 experiments.

  2. Decontamination and decommissioning project status of the TRIGA Mark-II and III reactors in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paik, S. T.; Park, S. K.; Chung, K. W.; Chung, U. S.; Jung, K. J. [TRIGA Research Reactor D and D Project Team, Korea Atomic Energy Research Insitutute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-07-01

    The decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) project of the TRIGA Mark-II and Mark-III was started in January 1997, after their shutdown in 1995 due to their life and the operation of a new research reactor, HANARO, at the KAERI site in Taejon. Preparation of the decommissioning plan and environmental impact assessment, and setting up of licensing procedure and documentation for the project were performed in 1997. At the end of 1997, Hyundai Engineering Company (HEC) was selected as the main contractor to do design and licensing documentation for the D and D of both reactors. British Nuclear Fuels Plc. (BNFL) was the technical assisting partner to Heck. Licensing documents were submitted to the Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) at the end of 1998. And the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) is reviewing the documents. Practical work of the D and D will start at the end of 1999 upon the government issues the license. In the meantime, July 1998, all spent fuels from the TRIGA Mark-II and III were safely transported to the US. The foremost part of the D and D work will be the TRIGA Mark-III reactor hall that will be used as a temporary storage of radioactive waste produced during the D and D work, and followed by the TRIGA Mark-II and auxiliary facilities. This paper summarizes the current status and future plans for the D and D work. (author)

  3. Candida orthopsilosis and Candida metapsilosis spp. nov. to replace Candida parapsilosis groups II and III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavanti, Arianna; Davidson, Amanda D; Gow, Neil A R; Maiden, Martin C J; Odds, Frank C

    2005-01-01

    Two new species, Candida orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis, are proposed to replace the existing designations of C. parapsilosis groups II and III, respectively. The species C. parapsilosis is retained for group I isolates. Attempts to construct a multilocus sequence typing scheme to differentiate individual strains of C. parapsilosis instead revealed fixed DNA sequence differences between pairs of subgroups in four genes: COX3, L1A1, SADH, and SYA1. PCR amplicons for sequencing were obtained for these four plus a further seven genes from 21 group I isolates. For nine group II isolates, PCR products were obtained from only 5 of the 11 genes, and for two group III isolates PCR products were obtained from a different set of 5 genes. Three of the PCR products from group II and III isolates differed in size from the group I products. Cluster analysis of sequence polymorphisms from COX3, SADH, and SYA1, which were common to the three groups, consistently separated the isolates into three distinct sets. All of these differences, together with DNA sequence similarities orthopsilosis suggest that the former species may have evolved very recently from the latter.

  4. Type II and Type III Radio Bursts and their Correlation with Solar Energetic Proton Events

    CERN Document Server

    Winter, L M

    2015-01-01

    Using the Wind/WAVES radio observations from 2010-2013, we present an analysis of the 123 decametric-hectometric (DH) type II solar radio bursts during this period, the associated type III burst properties, and their correlation with solar energetic proton (SEP) properties determined from analysis of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) observations. We present a useful catalog of the type II burst, type III burst, Langmuir wave, and proton flux properties for these 123 events, which we employ to develop a statistical relationship between the radio properties and peak proton flux that can be used to forecast SEP events. We find that all SEP events with a peak > 10 MeV flux above 15 pfu are associated with a type II burst and virtually all SEP events, 92%, are also associated with a type III radio burst. Based on a principal component analysis, the radio burst properties that are most highly correlated with the occurrence of gradual SEP events and account for the most variance in the ra...

  5. Generic tags for Mn(ii) and Gd(iii) spin labels for distance measurements in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yin; Gong, Yan-Jun; Litvinov, Aleksei; Liu, Hong-Kai; Yang, Feng; Su, Xun-Cheng; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2017-09-28

    High-affinity chelating tags for Gd(iii) and Mn(ii) ions that provide valuable high-resolution distance restraints for biomolecules were used as spin labels for double electron-electron resonance (DEER) measurements. The availability of a generic tag that can bind both metal ions and provide a narrow and predictable distance distribution for both ions is attractive owing to their different EPR-related characteristics. Herein we introduced two paramagnetic tags, 4PSPyMTA and 4PSPyNPDA, which are conjugated to cysteine residues through a stable thioether bond, forming a short and, depending on the metal ion coordination mode, a rigid tether with the protein. These tags exhibit high affinity for both Mn(ii) and Gd(iii) ions. The DEER performance of the 4PSPyMTA and 4PSPyNPDA tags, in complex with Gd(iii) or Mn(ii), was evaluated for three double cysteine mutants of ubiquitin, and the Gd(iii)-Gd(iii) and Mn(ii)-Mn(ii) distance distributions they generated were compared. All three Gd(iii) complexes of the ubiquitin-PyMTA and ubiquitin-PyNPDA conjugates produced similar and expected distance distributions. In contrast, significant variations in the maxima and widths of the distance distributions were observed for the Mn(ii) analogs. Furthermore, whereas PyNPDA-Gd(iii) and PyNPDA-Mn(ii) delivered similar distance distributions, appreciable differences were observed for two mutants with PyMTA, with the Mn(ii) analog exhibiting a broader distance distribution and shorter distances. ELDOR (electron-electron double resonance)-detected NMR measurements revealed some distribution in the Mn(ii) coordination environment for the protein conjugates of both tags but not for the free tags. The broader distance distributions generated by 4PSPyMTA-Mn(ii), as compared with Gd(iii), were attributed to the distributed location of the Mn(ii) ion within the PyMTA chelate owing to its smaller size and lower coordination number that leave the pyridine nitrogen uncoordinated. Accordingly, in

  6. The development and validation of a CT-based radiomics signature for the preoperative discrimination of stage I-II and stage III-IV colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lan; Chen, Xin; Ma, Zelan; Dong, Di; Tian, Jie; Liang, Changhong; Liu, Zaiyi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigative the predictive ability of radiomics signature for preoperative staging (I-IIvs.III-IV) of primary colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods This study consisted of 494 consecutive patients (training dataset: n=286; validation cohort, n=208) with stage I–IV CRC. A radiomics signature was generated using LASSO logistic regression model. Association between radiomics signature and CRC staging was explored. The classification performance of the radiomics signature was explored with respect to the receiver operating characteristics(ROC) curve. Results The 16-feature-based radiomics signature was an independent predictor for staging of CRC, which could successfully categorize CRC into stage I-II and III-IV (p <0.0001) in training and validation dataset. The median of radiomics signature of stage III-IV was higher than stage I-II in the training and validation dataset. As for the classification performance of the radiomics signature in CRC staging, the AUC was 0.792(95%CI:0.741-0.853) with sensitivity of 0.629 and specificity of 0.874. The signature in the validation dataset obtained an AUC of 0.708(95%CI:0.698-0.718) with sensitivity of 0.611 and specificity of 0.680. Conclusions A radiomics signature was developed and validated to be a significant predictor for discrimination of stage I-II from III-IV CRC, which may serve as a complementary tool for the preoperative tumor staging in CRC. PMID:27120787

  7. Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program. Conceptual design and evaluation of commercial plant. Volume III. Economic analyses (Deliverable Nos. 15 and 16)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-01-01

    This report presents the results of Task I of Phase I in the form of a Conceptual Design and Evaluation of Commercial Plant report. The report is presented in four volumes as follows: I - Executive Summary, II - Commercial Plant Design, III - Economic Analyses, IV - Demonstration Plant Recommendations. Volume III presents the economic analyses for the commercial plant and the supporting data. General cost and financing factors used in the analyses are tabulated. Three financing modes are considered. The product gas cost calculation procedure is identified and appendices present computer inputs and sample computer outputs for the MLGW, Utility, and Industry Base Cases. The results of the base case cost analyses for plant fenceline gas costs are as follows: Municipal Utility, (e.g. MLGW), $3.76/MM Btu; Investor Owned Utility, (25% equity), $4.48/MM Btu; and Investor Case, (100% equity), $5.21/MM Btu. The results of 47 IFG product cost sensitivity cases involving a dozen sensitivity variables are presented. Plant half size, coal cost, plant investment, and return on equity (industrial) are the most important sensitivity variables. Volume III also presents a summary discussion of the socioeconomic impact of the plant and a discussion of possible commercial incentives for development of IFG plants.

  8. Removal of copper (II), iron (III) and lead (II) ions from Mono ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EJIRO

    The adsorption of Pb (II) was found to be maximum (94%±3.2) at pH 5, temperature of 100°C, metal ion concentration of ... Key words: Metal ions, adsorption, simulated effluent, coconut husk. INTRODUCTION ..... activated carbon and zeolite.

  9. Cobalt(II), nickel(II) and copper(II) complexes of a hexadentate pyridine amide ligand. Effect of donor atom (ether vs. thioether) on coordination geometry, spin-state of cobalt and M(III)-M(II) redox potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sharmila; Das, Partha Pratim; Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Mukherjee, Rabindranath

    2011-10-28

    Using an acyclic hexadentate pyridine amide ligand, containing a -OCH(2)CH(2)O- spacer between two pyridine-2-carboxamide units (1,4-bis[o-(pyrydine-2-carboxamidophenyl)]-1,4-dioxabutane (H(2)L(9)), in its deprotonated form), four new complexes, [Co(II)(L(9))] (1) and its one-electron oxidized counterpart [Co(III)(L(9))][NO(3)]·2H(2)O (2), [Ni(II)(L(9))] (3) and [Cu(II)(L(9))] (4), have been synthesized. Structural analyses revealed that the Co(II) centre in 1 and the Ni(II) centre in 3 are six-coordinate, utilizing all the available donor sites and the Cu(II) centre in 4 is effectively five-coordinated (one of the ether O atoms does not participate in coordination). The structural parameters associated with the change in the metal coordination environment have been compared with corresponding complexes of thioether-containing hexadentate ligands. The μ(eff) values at 298 K of 1-4 correspond to S = 3/2, S = 0, S = 1 and S = 1/2, respectively. Absorption spectra for all the complexes have been investigated. EPR spectral properties of the copper(II) complex 4 have been investigated, simulated and analyzed. Cyclic voltammetric experiments in CH(2)Cl(2) reveal quasireversible Co(III)-Co(II), Ni(III)-Ni(II) and Cu(II)-Cu(I) redox processes. In going from ether O to thioether S coordination, the effect of the metal coordination environment on the redox potential values of Co(III)-Co(II) (here the effect of spin-state as well), Ni(III)-Ni(II) and Cu(II)-Cu(I) processes have been systematically analyzed.

  10. Adsorption of Ni(II, Cu(II and Fe(III from Aqueous Solutions Using Activated Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Edwin Vasu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An activated carbon was tested for its ability to remove transition metal ions from aqueous solutions. Physical, Chemical and liquid-phase adsorption characterizations of the carbon were done following standard procedures. Studies on the removal of Ni(II, Cu(II and Fe(III ions were attempted by varying adsorbate dose, pH of the metal ion solution and time in batch mode. The equilibrium adsorption data were fitted with Freundlich, Langmuir and Redlich-Peterson isotherms and the isotherm constants were evaluated. Time variation studies indicate that adsorptions follow pseudo-second order kinetics. pH was found to have a significant role to play in the adsorption. The processes were endothermic and the thermodynamic parameters were evaluated. Desorption studies indicate that ion-exchange mechanism is operating.

  11. Preparation and XPS studies of macromolecule mixed-valent Cu(I, II) and Fe(II, III) complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Bo [Institute of Energy Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' An 710062 (China)]. E-mail: wangbo@snnu.edu.cn; Gao Fengqin [Institute of Energy Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' An 710062 (China); Department of Chemistry, Xianyang Normal University, Xianyang (China); Ma Hongzhu [Institute of Energy Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' An 710062 (China)

    2007-06-01

    A new macromolecule ligand and its mixed-valent Cu(I, II) and Fe(II, III) complexes have been prepared by using ethylenediamine as core and maleic anhydride as branched units and characterized by UV-vis, FT-IR, thermal analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The data obtained from these studies suggested that the coordinate bonds of N {sup {yields}} M, Cl {sup {yields}} M, Ph-OH {sup {yields}} M and H{sub 2}O {sup {yields}} M have been formed and possible binding models are proposed for these complexes. The thermal analysis (TG-DTG) reveals that these complexes possess thermal stable property below 800 deg. C.

  12. An Evaluation of the Nutrition Services for the Elderly. Volume II. Analytic Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM.

    This document is part of a five-volume nationwide study of Nutrition Service operations and elderly citizens participating in congregate dining and home delivery services authorized by Title III-C of the Older Americans' Act. This volume contains the analytic report, which presents the major findings of the evaluation. Chapter 1 gives a report…

  13. From a Dy(III) single molecule magnet (SMM) to a ferromagnetic [Mn(II)Dy(III)Mn(II)] trinuclear complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhunia, Asamanjoy; Gamer, Michael T; Ungur, Liviu; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Powell, Annie K; Lan, Yanhua; Roesky, Peter W; Menges, Fabian; Riehn, Christoph; Niedner-Schatteburg, Gereon

    2012-09-17

    The Schiff base compound 2,2'-{[(2-aminoethyl)imino]bis[2,1-ethanediyl-nitriloethylidyne]}bis-2-hydroxy-benzoic acid (H(4)L) as a proligand was prepared in situ. This proligand has three potential coordination pockets which make it possible to accommodate from one to three metal ions allowing for the possible formation of mono-, di-, and trinuclear complexes. Reaction of in situ prepared H(4)L with Dy(NO(3))(3)·5H(2)O resulted in the formation of a mononuclear complex [Dy(H(3)L)(2)](NO(3))·(EtOH)·8(H(2)O) (1), which shows SMM behavior. In contrast, reaction of in situ prepared H(4)L with Mn(ClO(4))(2)·6H(2)O and Dy(NO(3))(3)·5H(2)O in the presence of a base resulted in a trinuclear mixed 3d-4f complex (NHEt(3))(2)[Dy{Mn(L)}(2)](ClO(4))·2(H(2)O) (2). At low temperatures, compound 2 is a weak ferromagnet. Thus, the SMM behavior of compound 1 can be switched off by incorporating two Mn(II) ions in close proximity either side of the Dy(III). This quenching behavior is ascribed to the presence of the weak ferromagnetic interactions between the Mn(II) and Dy(III) ions, which at T > 2 K act as a fluctuating field causing the reversal of magnetization on the dysprosium ion. Mass spectrometric ion signals related to compounds 1 and 2 were both detected in positive and negative ion modes via electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) reactions with ND(3) were performed in a FT-ICR Penning-trap mass spectrometer.

  14. Carbonato-bridged Ni(II)2Ln(III)2 (Ln(III) = Gd(III), Tb(III), Dy(III)) complexes generated by atmospheric CO2 fixation and their single-molecule-magnet behavior: [(μ4-CO3)2{Ni(II)(3-MeOsaltn)(MeOH or H2O)Ln(III)(NO3)}2]·solvent [3-MeOsaltn = N,N'-bis(3-methoxy-2-oxybenzylidene)-1,3-propanediaminato].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Soichiro; Fujinami, Takeshi; Nishi, Koshiro; Matsumoto, Naohide; Mochida, Naotaka; Ishida, Takayuki; Sunatsuki, Yukinari; Re, Nazzareno

    2013-06-17

    Atmospheric CO2 fixation of [Ni(II)(3-MeOsaltn)(H2O)2]·2.5H2O [3-MeOsaltn = N,N'-bis(3-methoxy-2-oxybenzylidene)-1,3-propanediaminato], Ln(III)(NO3)3·6H2O, and triethylamine occurred in methanol/acetone, giving a first series of carbonato-bridged Ni(II)2Ln(III)2 complexes [(μ4-CO3)2{Ni(II)(3-MeOsaltn)(MeOH)Ln(III)(NO3)}2] (1Gd, 1Tb, and 1Dy). When the reaction was carried out in acetonitrile/water, it gave a second series of complexes [(μ4-CO3)2{Ni(II)(3-MeOsaltn)(H2O)Ln(III)(NO3)}2]·2CH3CN·2H2O (2Gd, 2Tb, and 2Dy). For both series, each Ni(II)2Ln(III)2 structure can be described as two di-μ-phenoxo-bridged Ni(II)Ln(III) binuclear units bridged by two carbonato CO3(2-) units to form a carbonato-bridged (μ4-CO3)2{Ni(II)2Ln(III)2} structure. The high-spin Ni(II) ion has octahedral coordination geometry, and the Ln(III) ion is coordinated by O9 donor atoms from Ni(II)(3-MeOsaltn), bidentate NO3(-), and one and two oxygen atoms of two CO3(2-) ions. The NO3(-) ion for the first series roughly lie on Ln-O(methoxy) bonds and are tilted toward the outside, while for the second series, the two oxygen atoms roughly lie on one of the Ln-O(phenoxy) bonds due to the intramolecular hydrogen bond. The temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibilities indicated a ferromagnetic interaction between the Ni(II) and Ln(III) ions (Ln(III) = Gd(III), Tb(III), Dy(III)) for all of the complexes, with a distinctly different magnetic behavior between the two series in the lowest-temperature region due to the Ln(III)-Ln(III) magnetic interaction and/or different magnetic anisotropies of the Tb(III) or Dy(III) ion. Alternating-current susceptibility measurements under the 0 and 1000 Oe direct-current (dc) bias fields showed no magnetic relaxation for the Ni(II)2Gd(III)2 complexes but exhibited an out-of-phase signal for Ni(II)2Tb(III)2 and Ni(II)2Dy(III)2, indicative of slow relaxation of magnetization. The energy barriers, Δ/kB, for the spin flipping were estimated from the Arrhenius

  15. Inability of positive phase II clinical trials of investigational treatments to subsequently predict positive phase III clinical trials in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Jacob J; Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Patel, Akash J; Cachia, David; Liu, Diane; Park, Minjeong; Yuan, Ying; A Kent, Thomas; de Groot, John F

    2017-07-31

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults, but effective therapies are lacking. With the scarcity of positive phase III trials, which are increasing in cost, we examined the ability of positive phase II trials to predict statistically significant improvement in clinical outcomes of phase III trials. A PubMed search was conducted to identify phase III clinical trials performed in the past 25 years for patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent glioblastoma. Trials were excluded if they did not examine an investigational chemotherapy or agent, if they were stopped early owing to toxicity, if they lacked prior phase II studies, or if a prior phase II study was negative. Seven phase III clinical trials in newly diagnosed glioblastoma and 4 phase III clinical trials in recurrent glioblastoma met the inclusion criteria. Only 1 (9%) phase III study documented an improvement in overall survival and changed the standard of care. The high failure rate of phase III trials demonstrates the urgent need to increase the reliability of phase II trials of treatments for glioblastoma. Strategies such as the use of adaptive trial designs, Bayesian statistics, biomarkers, volumetric imaging, and mathematical modeling warrant testing. Additionally, it is critical to increase our expectations of phase II trials so that positive findings increase the probability that a phase III trial will be successful.

  16. Heterogeneous reduction of PuO₂ with Fe(II): importance of the Fe(III) reaction product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felmy, Andrew R; Moore, Dean A; Rosso, Kevin M; Qafoku, Odeta; Rai, Dhanpat; Buck, Edgar C; Ilton, Eugene S

    2011-05-01

    Heterogeneous reduction of actinides in higher, more soluble oxidation states to lower, more insoluble oxidation states by reductants such as Fe(II) has been the subject of intensive study for more than two decades. However, Fe(II)-induced reduction of sparingly soluble Pu(IV) to the more soluble lower oxidation state Pu(III) has been much less studied, even though such reactions can potentially increase the mobility of Pu in the subsurface. Thermodynamic calculations are presented that show how differences in the free energy of various possible solid-phase Fe(III) reaction products can greatly influence aqueous Pu(III) concentrations resulting from reduction of PuO₂(am) by Fe(II). We present the first experimental evidence that reduction of PuO₂(am) to Pu(III) by Fe(II) was enhanced when the Fe(III) mineral goethite was spiked into the reaction. The effect of goethite on reduction of Pu(IV) was demonstrated by measuring the time dependence of total aqueous Pu concentration, its oxidation state, and system pe/pH. We also re-evaluated established protocols for determining Pu(III) {[Pu(III) + Pu(IV)] - Pu(IV)} by using thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) in toluene extractions; the study showed that it is important to eliminate dissolved oxygen from the TTA solutions for accurate determinations. More broadly, this study highlights the importance of the Fe(III) reaction product in actinide reduction rate and extent by Fe(II).

  17. Explorations of new phases in the Ga(III)/In(III)-Cu(II)-Se(IV)-O system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fang; Lin, Qi-Pu; Yi, Fei-Yan; Mao, Jiang-Gao

    2009-07-20

    Four new gallium(III)/indium(III), copper(II), selenium(IV) oxides, namely, Ga(2)Cu(SeO(3))(4) (1), Ga(2)CuO(SeO(3))(3) (2), and M(2)Cu(3)(SeO(3))(6) (M = Ga 3, In 4), have been synthesized by hydrothermal or high-temperature solid-state reactions. The structure of Ga(2)Cu(SeO(3))(4) (1) features a 2D layer of corner-sharing GaO(6) and CuO(6) octahedra with the SeO(3) groups hanging on both sides of the 2D layer. Ga(2)CuO(SeO(3))(3) (2) features a pillared layered structure in which the 1D Cu(SeO(3))(3)(4-) chains act as the pillars between 2D layers formed by corner- and edge-sharing GaO(n) (n = 4, 5) polyhedra. Although the chemical compositions of M(2)Cu(3)(SeO(3))(6) (M = Ga 3, In 4) are comparable, they belong to two different structural types. Ga(2)Cu(3)(SeO(3))(6) (3) exhibits a pillared layered structure built by [Ga(2)Cu(3)(SeO(3))(4)](4+) thick layers with Se(3)O(3)(2-) groups as pillars. The structure of In(2)Cu(3)(SeO(3))(6) (4) features a 3D network composed of [In(2)(SeO(3))(2)](2+) layers and [Cu(3)(SeO(3))(4)](2-) layers interconnected through Se-O-Cu and In-O-Cu bridges, exhibiting 8-MR helical tunnels along the a-axis. Results of magnetic property measurements indicate that there are considerable antiferromagnetic interactions between copper(II) centers in Ga(2)CuO(SeO(3))(3) (2) and M(2)Cu(3)(SeO(3))(6) (M = Ga 3, In 4). Interestingly, Ga(2)Cu(3)(SeO(3))(6) (3) behaves as a weak ferromagnet below the critical temperature of T(c) = 15 K. Further magnetic studies indicate that the compound is a canted antiferromagnet with a large canting angle of about 7.1 degrees.

  18. Synthesis, investigation and spectroscopic characterization of piroxicam ternary complexes of Fe(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) with glycine and DL-phenylalanine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Gehad G.; El-Gamel, Nadia E. A.

    2004-11-01

    The ternary piroxicam (Pir; 4-hydroxy-2-methyl- N-(2-pyridyl)-2H-1,2-benzothiazine-3-carboxamide 1,1-dioxide) complexes of Fe(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) with various amino acids (AA) such as glycine (Gly) or DL-phenylalanine (PhA) were prepared and characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance, IR, UV-Vis, magnetic moment, diffuse reflectance and X-ray powder diffraction. The UV-Vis spectra of Pir and the effect of metal chelation on the different interligand transitions are discussed in detailed manner. IR and UV-Vis spectra confirm that Pir behaves as a neutral bidentate ligand coordinated to the metal ions via the pyridine- N and carbonyl group of the amide moiety. Gly molecule acted as a uninegatively monodentate ligand and coordinate to the metal ions through its carboxylic group, in addition PhA acted as a uninegatively bidentate ligand and coordinate to the metal ions through its carboxylic and amino groups. All the chelates have octahedral geometrical structures while Cu(II)- and Zn(II)-ternary chelates with PhA have square planar geometrical structures. The molar conductance data reveal that most of these chelates are non electrolytes, while Fe(III)-Pir-Gly, Co(II)-, Ni(II)-, Cu(II)- and Zn(II)-Pir-PhA cheletes were 1:1 electrolytes. X-ray powder diffraction is used as a new tool to estimate the crystallinity of chelates as well as to elucidate their geometrical structures.

  19. Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Strategic Target System. Volume II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-01

    mm 110 Deranken, Marchelle 111 Guerra, Raquel mm 112 Kolder, Teri mim 113 Nakahara, Joyce m<-- 115 Gulliksen, Gary mm 116 Byrd, Jaime <mlm 117...1:| ii iis 13J 111 :W : ::::I| ill 497 Alvarez , Patrick mfm 499 Granda, Chia mim 501 Hilbonson, M. 1 iii 502 Damron, Mark H. 111 504 Stayton

  20. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen, p53 and micro vessel density: Grade II vs. Grade III astrocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malhan Priya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Histological classification and grading are prime procedures in the management of patients with astrocytoma, providing vital data for therapeutic decision making and prognostication. However, it has limitations in assessing biological tumor behavior. This can be overcome by using newer immunohistochemical techniques. This study was carried out to compare proliferative indices using proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, extent of p53 expression and micro vessel morphometric parameters in patients with low grade and anaplastic astrocytoma. Twenty-five patients, each of grade II and grade III astrocytoma were evaluated using monoclonal antibodies to PCNA, p53 protein and factor VIII related antigen. PCNA, p53-labeling indices were calculated along with micro vessel morphometric analysis using Biovis Image plus Software. Patients with grade III astrocytoma had higher PCNA and p53 labeling indices as compared with grade II astrocytoma (29.14 plus/minus 9.87% vs. 16.84 plus/minus 6.57%, p 0.001; 18.18 plus/minus 6.14% vs. 6.14 plus/minus 7.23%, p 0.001, respectively. Micro vessel percentage area of patients with grade III astrocytoma was also (4.26 plus/minus 3.70 vs. 1.05 plus/minus 0.56, p 0.001, higher along with other micro vessel morphometric parameters. Discordance between histology and one or more IHC parameters was seen in 5/25 (20% of patients with grade III astrocytoma and 9/25 (36% of patients with grade II disease. PCNA and p53 labeling indices were positively correlated with Pearson′s correlation, p less than 0.001 for both. Increased proliferative fraction, genetic alterations and neovascularization mark biological aggressiveness in astrocytoma. Immunohistochemical evaluation scores over meet the challenge of accurate prognostication of this potentially fatal malignancy.

  1. IgE and IgG cross-reactivity among Lol p I and Lol p II/III. Identification of the C-termini of Lol p I, II, and III as cross-reactive structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ree, R; van Leeuwen, W A; van den Berg, M; Weller, H H; Aalberse, R C

    1994-04-01

    In this study, the homologous C-termini of Lol p I, Lol p II, and Lol p III were shown to contain cross-reactive B-cell epitopes. This was demonstrated by inhibition studies with purified Lol p I, II, and III and synthetic peptides of their C-termini. It was ruled out that the observed cross-reactivity was caused by cross-contamination of the purified allergens. Both human IgE and IgG bound to the C-terminus of Lol p I. These antibodies were cross-reactive with Lol p II and, more specifically, with its C-terminus. Within a small panel of allergic patients, no cross-reactivity with Lol p III was found. A hyperimmune polyclonal rabbit antiserum against Lol p I also recognized the Lol p I C-terminus. As for human antibodies, cross-reactivity with Lol p II and its C-terminus was demonstrated. Cross-reactivity with Lol p III was demonstrated with C-terminal peptides, but not with native Lol p III. A polyclonal rabbit antiserum against Lol p II bound to the C-terminal peptides of both Lol p II and III. This binding was inhibited with Lol p I, confirming that cross-reactive structures exist not only on the C-termini of Lol p II and Lol p I, but also of Lol p III and Lol p I. The existence of cross-reactivity between Lol p I and Lol p II and III possibly contributes to the frequently observed cosensitization for these allergens in grass-pollen-allergic patients.

  2. Tetrachloroethene degradation by reducing-agent enhanced Fe(II)/Fe(III) catalyzed percarbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Z.; Brusseau, M. L.; Lu, S.; Gu, X.; Yan, N.; Qiu, Z.; Sui, Q.

    2015-12-01

    This project investigated the effect of reducing agents on the degradation of tetrachloroethene(PCE) by Fe(II)/Fe(III) catalyzed sodium percarbonate (SPC). SPC possesses similar function as liquid H2O2, such that free H2O2 is released into solution when percarbonate is mixed with water. The addition of reducing agents, including hydroxylamine hydrochloride, sodium sulfite, ascorbic acid and sodium ascorbate, accelerated the Fe(III)/Fe(II) redoxcycle, leading to a relatively steady Fe(II) concentration and higher production of free radicals. This, in turn, resulted in enhanced PCE oxidation by SPC, with almost complete PCE removal obtained for appropriate Fe and SPC concentrations.The results of chemical probe tests, using nitrobenzene and carbon tetrachloride, demonstrated that HO● was the predominant radical in the system and that O2●-played a minor role. This was further confirmed by the results of electron paramagnetic resonance measurements and salicylic acid hydroxylationanalysis by high performance liquid chromatography(HPLC). PCE degradation decreased significantly with the addition of isopropanol, a strong HO● scavenger, supporting the hypothesis that HO● was primarily responsible for PCE degradation. It should be noted that the release of Cl- was slightly delayed in the first 20 mins, indicating that intermediate products were produced. However, gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis did not detect any chlorinated organic compound except PCE, indicating these intermediates were quickly degraded, which resulted in the complete conversion of PCE to CO2. In conclusion, the use of reducing agents to enhance Fe(II)/Fe(III) catalyzed SPC oxidation appears to be a promising approach for the rapid degradation of organic contaminants in groundwater.

  3. Single-molecule magnet behavior in heterometallic M(II)-Mn(III)(2)-M(II) tetramers (M(II) = Cu, Ni) containing Mn(III) salen-type dinuclear core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachi-Terajima, Chihiro; Miyasaka, Hitoshi; Saitoh, Ayumi; Shirakawa, Naoki; Yamashita, Masahiro; Clérac, Rodolphe

    2007-07-23

    The linear-type heterometallic tetramers, [Mn(III)(2)(5-MeOsaltmen)(2)M(II)(2)(L)(2)](CF(3)SO(3))(2) x 2H(2)O (MII = Cu, 1a; Ni, 2a), where 5-MeOsaltmen(2-) = N,N'-(1,1,2,2-tetramethylethylene) bis(5-methoxysalicylideneiminate), and H(2)L = 3-{2-[(2-hydroxy-benzylidene)-amino]-2-methyl-propylimino}-butan-2-one oxime, have been synthesized and characterized from structural and magnetic points of view. These two compounds are isostructural and crystallize in the same monoclinic P2(1)/n space group. The structure has a [M(II)-NO-Mn(III)-(O)(2)-Mn(III)-ON-M(II)] skeleton, where -NO- is a linking oximato group derived from the non-symmetrical Schiff-base complex [M(II)(L)] and -(O)(2)- is a biphenolato bridge in the out-of-plane [Mn(2)(5-MeOsaltmen)(2)](2+) dimer. The solvent-free compounds, 1b and 2b, have also been prepared by drying of the parent compounds, 1a and 2a, respectively, at 100 degrees C under dried nitrogen. After this treatment, the crystallinity is preserved, and 1b and 2b crystallize in a monoclinic P2(1)/c space group without significant changes in their structures in comparison to 1a and 2a. Magnetic measurements on 1a and 1b revealed antiferromagnetic Mn(III)---Cu(II) interactions via the oximato group and weak ferromagnetic Mn(III)---Mn(III) interactions via the biphenolato bridge leading to an S(T) = 3 ground state. On the other hand, the diamagnetic nature of the square planar Ni(II) center generates an S(T) = 4 ground state for 2a and 2b. At low temperature, these solvated (a) and desolvated (b) compounds display single-molecule magnet behavior modulated by their spin ground state.

  4. Synthesis, structural and magnetic characterisation of iron(II/III), cobalt(II) and copper(II) cluster complexes of the polytopic ligand: N-(2-pyridyl)-3-carboxypropanamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Mark E; Hawes, Chris S; Ferguson, Alan; Polson, Matthew I J; Chilton, Nicholas F; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Murray, Keith S; Kruger, Paul E

    2013-10-07

    Herein we describe the synthesis, structural and magnetic characterisation of three transition metal cluster complexes that feature the polytopic ligand N-(2-pyridyl)-3-carboxypropanamide (H2L): [Fe3(III)Fe2(II)(HL)6(O)(H2O)3][ClO4]5·3MeCN·4H2O, 1, [Co8(HL)8(O)(OH)4(MeOH)3(H2O)]-[ClO4]3·5MeOH·2H2O, 2, and [Cu6(L(ox))4(MeOH)(H2O)3]·MeOH, 3. Complex 1 is a mixed valence penta-nuclear iron cluster containing the archetypal {Fe3(III)O} triangular basic carboxylate cluster at its core, with two Fe(II) ions above and below the core coordinated to three bidentate pyridyl-amide groups. The structure of the octanuclear Co(II) complex, 2, is based upon a central Co4 square with the remaining four Co(II) centres at the 'wing-tips' of the complex. The cluster core is replete with bridging oxide, hydroxide and carboxylate groups. Cluster 3 contains an oxidised derivative of the ligand, L(ox), generated in situ through hydroxylation of an α-carbon atom. This hexanuclear cluster has a 'barrel-like' core and contains Cu(II) ions in both square planar and square-based pyramidal geometries. Bridging between Cu(II) centres is furnished by alkoxide and carboxylate groups. Magnetic studies on 1-3 reveals dominant antiferro-magnetic interactions for 1 and 2, leading to small non-zero spin ground states, while 3 shows ferro-magnetic exchange between the Cu(II) centres to give an S = 3 spin ground state.

  5. Direct and simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of Fe (III and Ni (II using salicylaldehyde acetoacetic acid hydrazone – Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Srilalitha

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A rapid, simple and sensitive spectrophotometric method has been developed for determination of Fe (III and Ni (II using salicylaldehyde acetoacetic acid hydrazone (SAAH as a chromophoric reagent. The linear calibration ranges were obtained in each case. The proposed method is applied for the simultaneous determination of Fe (III and Ni (II utilizing their first order spectra. The method is based on the zero crossing measurement of first derivative amplitudes. The first derivative amplitudes at 525 nm and 395 nm obey Beer's law in the concentration range 0.054-0.270 μg/mL and 0.112-0.561 μg/mL for Fe (III and Ni (II respectively. A large number of foreign ions do not interfere in the present method. The method is used for the determination of micro amounts of Fe (III and Ni (II in alloy steels and in synthetic mixtures.

  6. Multi-Rate Digital Control Systems with Simulation Applications. Volume II. Computer Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    34 ~AFWAL-TR-80-31 01 • • Volume II L IL MULTI-RATE DIGITAL CONTROL SYSTEMS WITH SIMULATiON APPLICATIONS Volume II: Computer Algorithms DENNIS G. J...29 Ma -8 - Volume II. Computer Algorithms ~ / ’+ 44MWLxkQT N Uwe ~~ 4 ~jjskYIF336l5-79-C-369~ 9. PER~rORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS IPROG AMEL...additional options. The analytical basis for the computer algorithms is discussed in Ref. 12. However, to provide a complete description of the program, some

  7. Assessing Inter-Model Continuity Between the Section II and Section III Conceptualizations of Borderline Personality Disorder in DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Chloe M; Simms, Leonard J

    2017-03-02

    DSM-5 includes 2 competing models of borderline personality disorder (BPD) in Sections II and III. Empirical comparisons between these models are required to understand and improve intermodel continuity. We compared Section III BPD traits to Section II BPD criteria assessed via semistructured interviews in 455 current/recent psychiatric patients using correlation and regression analyses, and also evaluated the incremental predictive power of other Section III traits. In addition, we tested the hypothesis that self-harm would incrementally predict BPD Criterion 5 over the Section III traits. Results supported Section III BPD traits as an adequate representation of traditional BPD symptomatology, although modifications that would increase intermodel continuity were identified. Finally, we found support for the incremental validity of suspiciousness, anhedonia, perceptual dysregulation, and self-harm, suggesting possible gaps in the Section III PD trait definitions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Impulsivity-related traits and their relation to DSM-5 section II and III personality disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Few, Lauren R; Lynam, Donald R; Miller, Joshua D

    2015-07-01

    Difficulties with impulse control are considered a core feature of personality disorders (PDs) as assessed by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th edition [DSM-5]; American Psychiatric Association, 2013). Despite this, there has been relatively little examination of the manner in which DSM-5 PDs are characterized by multidimensional models of impulsivity that parse this broad umbrella construct into smaller, more unidimensional constructs. Using the UPPS model and measure of impulsivity (Whiteside & Lynam, 2001), the relations between 4 impulsivity-related traits and interview-rated scores on both DSM-5 Section II and III PDs and PD traits were examined in a community sample of individuals currently receiving psychological or psychiatric care (N = 106). As expected, the UPPS traits manifested correlations with the new Section III trait model that were generally consistent with the assertion that this new DSM-5 trait model reflects a pathological variant of the Five-Factor Model (FFM; e.g., UPPS traits associated with FFM conscientiousness were most strongly related to DSM-5 disinhibition traits). Overall, the UPPS traits accounted best for variance in DSM-5 Section II and III Cluster B PDs, consistent with these PDs being characterized, in part, by emotionally and cognitively based forms of impulsivity.

  9. Proceedings of the symposium to review Volume III of the Annual Report to Congress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alt, F.; Norland, D.

    1979-01-01

    This report is a transcript of the proceedings of a two-day Symposium, held in the Fall of 1979 at the University of Maryland in order to independently review the 1978 Energy Information Administration (EIA) Annual Report to Congress (ARC), Volume III. Participants included energy forecasting experts from the academic community and the private sector; other Federal, State, and local government energy experts; and Office of Applied Analysis, EIA, staff members. The Symposium and its transcript are a critique of the underlying 1978 ARC assumptions, methodologies, and energy system projections. Discussions cover the short-, mid-, and long-term periods, national and international forecasts, source and consuming sectors and projected economic impacts. 27 figures, 22 tables.

  10. 30 CFR 57.22101 - Smoking (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Smoking (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines). 57.22101 Section 57.22101 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Smoking (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines). Persons shall not smoke or carry smoking materials, matches,...

  11. Structural and Functional Variation within the Alanine-Rich Repetitive Domain of Streptococcal Antigen I/II

    OpenAIRE

    Demuth, Donald R; Irvine, Douglas C.

    2002-01-01

    Members of the antigen I/II family of cell surface proteins are highly conserved, multifunctional adhesins that mediate interactions of oral streptococci with other oral bacteria, with cell matrix proteins (e.g., type I collagen), and with salivary glycoproteins, e.g., gp340. The interaction of gp340 (formerly designated salivary agglutinin) with Streptococcus mutans requires an alanine-rich repetitive domain (A region) of antigen I/II that is highly conserved in all members of this family of...

  12. Spontaneous Tl(I)-to-Tl(III) oxidation in dynamic heterobimetallic Hg(II)/Tl(I) porphyrin complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndoyom, Victoria; Fusaro, Luca; Roisnel, Thierry; Le Gac, Stéphane; Boitrel, Bernard

    2016-01-11

    Strapped heterobimetallic Hg(II)/Tl(I) porphyrin complexes, with both metal ions bridged by the N-core in a dynamic way, undergo spontaneous Tl(I)-to-Tl(III) oxidation leading to a mono-Tl(III) complex and a mixed valence Tl(I)/Tl(III) bimetallic complex. It provides a new opportunity to tune metal ion translocations in bimetallic porphyrin systems.

  13. Biologically relevant mono- and di-nuclear manganese II/III/IV complexes of mononegative pentadentate ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baffert, Carole; Collomb, Marie-Nöelle; Deronzier, Alain

    2003-01-01

    were characterised by UV-visible spectroscopy, ESI mass spectrometry and cyclic voltammetry. In addition, III-IV and II-III species were electrochemically generated. Thus the new mononegative pentadentate ligand systems display significant flexibility in the range of Mn oxidation states and species...

  14. 40 CFR 147.1653 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1653 Section 147.1653 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  15. 40 CFR 147.1953 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1953 Section 147.1953 Protection of... enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection...

  16. 40 CFR 147.1453 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1453 Section 147.1453 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  17. 40 CFR 147.103 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.103 Section 147.103 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  18. 40 CFR 147.1353 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1353 Section 147.1353 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  19. 40 CFR 147.1153 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1153 Section 147.1153 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  20. 40 CFR 147.2153 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.2153 Section 147.2153 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  1. 40 CFR 147.903 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.903 Section 147.903 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  2. 40 CFR 147.303 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.303 Section 147.303 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  3. 40 CFR 147.253 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.253 Section 147.253 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  4. Tuning through-bond Fe(III)/Fe(II) coupling by solvent manipulation of a central ruthenium redox couple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Chen; Chen, Wei-Tin; Tai, Joe; Su, Denny; Huang, Sheng-Yi; Lin, Ingrid; Lin, Ju-Ling; Lee, Mandy M; Chiou, Mong Feng; Liu, Yen-Hsiang; Kwan, Ken-Shin; Chen, Yuan-Jang; Chen, Hsing-Yin

    2009-03-02

    The relationships between the intervalence energy (E(IT)) and the free energy difference (DeltaG) that exists between the minima of redox isomers (Fe(II)-Ru(III)/Fe(III)-Ru(II)) for various heterobimetallic complexes [(R-Fcpy)Ru(NH(3))(5)](2+/3+) (R = H, ethyl, Br, actyl; Fcpy = (4-pyridyl)ferrocenyl; Ru(NH(3))(5) = pentaam(m)ineruthenium) were examined. The changes in DeltaG for the complexes in various solvents were due to the effects of both solvent donicity and the substituents. The intervalence energy versus DeltaG, DeltaG approximately FDeltaE(1/2) (DeltaE(1/2) = E(1/2)(Fe(III/II)) - E(1/2)(Ru(III/II))), plots for the complexes in various solvents suggest a nuclear reorganization energy (lambda) of approximately 6000 cm(-1) (Chen et al. Inorg. Chem. 2000, 39, 189). For [(R-Fcpy)Ru(NH(3))(5)](2+) and [(et-Fcpy)Ru(NH(3))(4)(py)](2+) (Ru(NH(3))(4) = trans-tetraam(m)ineruthenium; py = pyridine) in various solvents, the E(1/2)(Ru(III/II)) of rutheniumam(m)ine typically was less than the E(1/2)(Fe(III/II)) of the ferrocenyl moiety. However, the low-donicity solvents resulted in relatively large values of E(1/2)(Ru(III/II)) for [(et-Fcpy)Ru(NH(3))(4)(py)](2+/3+/4+). Under our unique solvent conditions, a dramatic end-to-end interaction was observed for the trimetal cation, [(et-Fcpy)(2)Ru(NH(3))(4)](4+), in which the [(et-Fcpy)(2)Ru(NH(3))(4)](4+) included a central trans-tetraam(m)ineruthenium(III) and a terminal Fe(II)/Fe(III) pair. In general, results of electrochemical studies of [(et-Fcpy)(2)Ru(NH(3))(4)](2+) indicated both solvent-tunable E(1/2)(Ru(III/II)) (1 e(-)) and solvent-insensitive E(1/2)(Fe(III/II)) (2 e(-)) redox centers. However, in nitriles, two E(1/2)(Fe(III/II)) peaks were found with DeltaE(1/2)(Fe(III/II) - Fe(III/II)) ranging between 83 and 108 mV at a terminal metal-to-metal distance of up to 15.6 A. Furthermore, the bridging dpi orbital of the ruthenium center mediated efficient end-to-end interaction between the combinations of the terminal

  5. Industrial Maintenance, Volume II-B. Post Secondary Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Raymond H.; And Others

    This volume is the third of four volumes that comprise a curriculum guide for a postsecondary industrial maintenance program. It contains part of section 3 of the guide which contains the unit guides for 10 of the 12 duties included in the course. Each of the 247 tasks included in these 10 duties is presented on a separate page and contains the…

  6. Industrial Maintenance, Volume II-A. Post Secondary Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Raymond H.; And Others

    This volume is the second of four volumes that comprise a curriculum guide for a postsecondary industrial maintenance program. It contains part of section 3 of the guide which contains the unit guides for two of the 12 duties included in the course. Each of the 197 tasks included in these two duties is presented on a separate page and contains the…

  7. Heavy Duty Mechanics Apprenticeship Training, Module One. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, Leslie A.; Abercrombie, Richard, Ed.

    This training manual, the second of two volumes, comprises the final three blocks in a nine-block in-service training course for apprentices working in heavy duty mechanics. Addressed in the individual blocks included in this volume are engines, basic electricity, and winches. Each block contains a section on parts theory that gives the purpose,…

  8. La Experiencia Mexicana (The Mexican Experience). Volumes I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finer, Neal B.

    Designed to be used as part of a comprehensive social studies program on Mexican culture, this two-volume manual, written in Spanish, offers an instructional package on Mexican culture, stressing an art-architecture perspective, which can be used at the secondary, college and adult levels. The teacher's guide, Volume I, includes a discussion of a…

  9. On the ortho-positronium quenching reactions promoted by Fe(II), Fe(III), Co(III), Ni(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) cyanocomplexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantola Lazzarini, Anna L.; Lazzarini, Ennio

    The o-Ps quenching reactions promoted in aqueous solutions by the following six cyanocomplexes: [Fe(CN) 6] 4-; [Co(CN) 6] 3-; [Zn(CN) 4] 2-; [Cd(CN) 6] 2-; [Fe(CN) 6] 3-; [Ni(CN) 4] 2- were investigated. The first four reactions probably consist in o-Ps addition across the CN bond, their rate constants at room temperature, Tr, being ⩽(0.04±0.02) × 10 9 M -1 s -1, i.e. almost at the limit of experimental errors. The rate constant of the fifth reaction, in o-Ps oxydation, at Tr is (20.3±0.4) × 10 9 M -1 s -1. The [Ni(CN) 4] 2-k value at Tr, is (0.27±0.01) × 10 9 M -1 s -1, i.e. 100 times less than the rate constants of o-Ps oxydation, but 10 times larger than those of the o-Ps addition across the CN bond. The [Ni(CN) 4] 2- reaction probably results in formation of the following positronido complex: [Ni(CN) 4Ps] 2-. However, it is worth noting that the existence of such a complex is only indirectly deduced. In fact it arises from comparison of the [Ni(CN) 4] 2- rate constant with those of the Fe(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Co(III) cyanocomplexes, which, like the Ni(II) cyanocomplex, do not promote o-Ps oxydation or spin exchange reactions.

  10. Benzocaine polymorphism: pressure-temperature phase diagram involving forms II and III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gana, Inès; Barrio, Maria; Do, Bernard; Tamarit, Josep-Lluís; Céolin, René; Rietveld, Ivo B

    2013-11-18

    Understanding the phase behavior of an active pharmaceutical ingredient in a drug formulation is required to avoid the occurrence of sudden phase changes resulting in decrease of bioavailability in a marketed product. Benzocaine is known to possess three crystalline polymorphs, but their stability hierarchy has so far not been determined. A topological method and direct calorimetric measurements under pressure have been used to construct the topological pressure-temperature diagram of the phase relationships between the solid phases II and III, the liquid, and the vapor phase. In the process, the transition temperature between solid phases III and II and its enthalpy change have been determined. Solid phase II, which has the highest melting point, is the more stable phase under ambient conditions in this phase diagram. Surprisingly, solid phase I has not been observed during the study, even though the scarce literature data on its thermal behavior appear to indicate that it might be the most stable one of the three solid phases.

  11. Antigen I/II encoded by integrative and conjugative elements of Streptococcus agalactiae and role in biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuzeville, Sarah; Dramsi, Shaynoor; Madec, Jean-Yves; Haenni, Marisa; Payot, Sophie

    2015-11-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (i.e. Group B streptococcus, GBS) is a major human and animal pathogen. Genes encoding putative surface proteins and in particular an antigen I/II have been identified on Integrative and Conjugative Elements (ICEs) found in GBS. Antigens I/II are multimodal adhesins promoting colonization of the oral cavity by streptococci such as Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus mutans. The prevalence and diversity of antigens I/II in GBS were studied by a bioinformatic analysis. It revealed that antigens I/II, which are acquired by horizontal transfer via ICEs, exhibit diversity and are widespread in GBS, in particular in the serotype Ia/ST23 invasive strains. This study aimed at characterizing the impact on GBS biology of proteins encoded by a previously characterized ICE of S. agalactiae (ICE_515_tRNA(Lys)). The production and surface exposition of the antigen I/II encoded by this ICE was examined using RT-PCR and immunoblotting experiments. Surface proteins of ICE_515_tRNA(Lys) were found to contribute to GBS biofilm formation and to fibrinogen binding. Contribution of antigen I/II encoded by SAL_2056 to biofilm formation was also demonstrated. These results highlight the potential for ICEs to spread microbial adhesins between species.

  12. Microwave Synthesis and Antimicrobial Activity of some Copper (II, Cobalt (II, Nickel (II and Chromium (III Complexes with Schiff Base 2, 6-Pyridinedi carboxaldehyde-Thiosemicarbazone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.Mohammed.Fakruddin Ali Ahmed

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Some novel Schiff base metal complexes of Cr(III, Co(II, Ni(II andCu(II derived from 2, 6-pyridinedicarboxaldehyde-Thiosemicarbazone(PDCTC was synthesized by conventional as well as microwavemethods. This compound wascharacterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, Mass, molar conductanceand magneticsusceptibilitymeasurements analyses. Analytical data revealed that all the complexesexhibited 1:1 (metal: ligand ratio with a coordination number of six.The IR data showed that the ligand coordinates with the metal ions in ahexa-dentate manner. The solid state electricalconductivity of the metal complexes was also measured. Solid state electricalconductivity studies reflected a semi-conducting nature of the complexes. The Schiff base and metal complexes displayed good activity againstthe Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, the Gram-negative bacteriaEscherichia coli and the fungi AspergillusnigerandCandida albicans. The antimicrobialresults also indicated that the metal complexes displayed betterantimicrobial activity as compared to the Schiff bases.

  13. Mn(II)/Mn(III) and Fe(III) binding capability of two Aspergillus fumigatus siderophores, desferricrocin and N', N″, N‴-triacetylfusarinine C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Etelka; Szabó, Orsolya; Parajdi-Losonczi, Péter L; Balla, György; Pócsi, István

    2014-10-01

    Manganese(II) and manganese(III) complexes of the exocyclic desferricrocin (H3DFCR) and endocyclic triacetylfusarinine C (H3TAF) in solution have been studied by using pH-potentiometry, UV-Vis spectrophotometry, relaxometry and cyclic voltammetry. A comparison between the present results and the corresponding ones for the open-chain analogues, desferrioxamine B (DFB) and desferricoprogen (DFC), shows (i) The dissociation processes of H3DFCR occur in the expected pH-range (pH7-10.5), but hydrogen bonding is assumed to be responsible for a quite low proton dissociation constant (pK=4.18) of H3TAF and also an unusually high one (10.59). (ii) Moderate stability complexes with 1:1 Mn(II) to ligand ratio are formed with all four siderophores. (iii) The coordination of the three hydroxamates of a siderophore takes place in stepwise processes, except the case of desferricrocin, with which, large-extent overlapping of the processes occurs. (iv) Out of the four tris-chelated [ML] type complexes, the complex of DFCR is the most compact, as it is indicated by the relaxivity values. (v) Following the stoichiometric oxidation of the Mn(II)-siderophore complexes at pH≥9, tris-chelated Mn(III) complexes are formed. To make a comparison between the stability of the Mn(III) and the corresponding Fe(III) complexes of DFCR and TAF, the determination of the stability of the Fe(III) complexes under our condition has also been performed, by using UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Comparable stability of the corresponding complexes was found. (vi) Correlation study of the stability constants resulted in estimation of the constant of the Mn(III) monohydroxo complex, for which there was no data in the literature under our conditions.

  14. Diversity of the Germination Apparatus in Clostridium botulinum Groups I, II, III, and IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunt, Jason; van Vliet, Arnoud H. M.; van den Bos, Fédor; Carter, Andrew T.; Peck, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a highly dangerous pathogen that forms very resistant endospores that are ubiquitous in the environment, and which, under favorable conditions germinate to produce vegetative cells that multiply and form the exceptionally potent botulinum neurotoxin. To improve the control of botulinum neurotoxin-forming clostridia, it is important to understand the mechanisms involved in spore germination. Here we present models for spore germination in C. botulinum based on comparative genomics analyses, with C. botulinum Groups I and III sharing similar pathways, which differ from those proposed for C. botulinum Groups II and IV. All spores germinate in response to amino acids interacting with a germinant receptor, with four types of germinant receptor identified [encoded by various combinations of gerA, gerB, and gerC genes (gerX)]. There are three gene clusters with an ABC-like configuration; ABC [gerX1], ABABCB [gerX2] and ACxBBB [gerX4], and a single CA-B [gerX3] gene cluster. Subtypes have been identified for most germinant receptor types, and the individual GerX subunits of each cluster show similar grouping in phylogenetic trees. C. botulinum Group I contained the largest variety of gerX subtypes, with three gerX1, three gerX2, and one gerX3 subtypes, while C. botulinum Group III contained two gerX1 types and one gerX4. C. botulinum Groups II and IV contained a single germinant receptor, gerX3 and gerX1, respectively. It is likely that all four C. botulinum Groups include a SpoVA channel involved in dipicolinic acid release. The cortex-lytic enzymes present in C. botulinum Groups I and III appear to be CwlJ and SleB, while in C. botulinum Groups II and IV, SleC appears to be important. PMID:27840626

  15. Diversity of the Germination Apparatus in Clostridium botulinum Groups I, II, III and IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Brunt

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium botulinum is a highly dangerous pathogen that forms very resistant endospores that are ubiquitous in the environment, and which, under favourable conditions germinate to produce vegetative cells that multiply and form the exceptionally potent botulinum neurotoxin. To improve the control of botulinum neurotoxin-forming clostridia, it is important to understand the mechanisms involved in spore germination. Here we present models for spore germination in C. botulinum based on comparative genomics analyses, with C. botulinum Groups I and III sharing similar pathways, which differ from those proposed for C. botulinum Groups II and IV. All spores germinate in response to amino acids interacting with a germinant receptor, with four types of germinant receptor identified (encoded by various combinations of gerA, gerB and gerC genes (gerX. There are three gene clusters with an ABC-like configuration; ABC gerX1, ABABCB gerX2 and ACxBBB gerX4, and a single CA-B gerX3 gene cluster. Subtypes have been identified for most germinant receptors types, and the individual GerX subunits of each cluster show similar grouping in phylogenetic trees. C. botulinum Group I contained the largest variety of gerX subtypes, with three gerX1, three gerX2 and one gerX3 subtypes, while C. botulinum Group III contained two gerX1 types and one gerX4. C. botulinum Groups II and IV contained a single germinant receptor, gerX3 and gerX1, respectively. It is likely that all four C. botulinum Groups include a SpoVA channel involved in DPA release. The cortex lytic enzymes present in C. botulinum Groups I and III appear to be CwlJ and SleB, while in C. botulinum Groups II and IV, SleC appears to be important.

  16. Comparative genomics and transcriptomics of lineages I, II, and III strains of Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen that causes infections with a high-mortality rate and has served as an invaluable model for intracellular parasitism. Here, we report complete genome sequences for two L. monocytogenes strains belonging to serotype 4a (L99) and 4b (CLIP80459), and transcriptomes of representative strains from lineages I, II, and III, thereby permitting in-depth comparison of genome- and transcriptome -based data from three lineages of L. monocytogenes. Lineage III, represented by the 4a L99 genome is known to contain strains less virulent for humans. Results The genome analysis of the weakly pathogenic L99 serotype 4a provides extensive evidence of virulence gene decay, including loss of several important surface proteins. The 4b CLIP80459 genome, unlike the previously sequenced 4b F2365 genome harbours an intact inlB invasion gene. These lineage I strains are characterized by the lack of prophage genes, as they share only a single prophage locus with other L. monocytogenes genomes 1/2a EGD-e and 4a L99. Comparative transcriptome analysis during intracellular growth uncovered adaptive expression level differences in lineages I, II and III of Listeria, notable amongst which was a strong intracellular induction of flagellar genes in strain 4a L99 compared to the other lineages. Furthermore, extensive differences between strains are manifest at levels of metabolic flux control and phosphorylated sugar uptake. Intriguingly, prophage gene expression was found to be a hallmark of intracellular gene expression. Deletion mutants in the single shared prophage locus of lineage II strain EGD-e 1/2a, the lma operon, revealed severe attenuation of virulence in a murine infection model. Conclusion Comparative genomics and transcriptome analysis of L. monocytogenes strains from three lineages implicate prophage genes in intracellular adaptation and indicate that gene loss and decay may have led to the emergence of attenuated lineages

  17. Initial characterization of an immunotoxin constructed from domains II and III of cholera exotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarnovsky, Robert; Tendler, Tara; Makowski, Matheusz; Kiley, Maureen; Antignani, Antonella; Traini, Roberta; Zhang, Jingli; Hassan, Raffit; FitzGerald, David J

    2010-05-01

    Immunotoxins are antibody-toxin fusion proteins under development as cancer therapeutics. In early clinical trials, immunotoxins constructed with domains II and III of Pseudomonas exotoxin (termed PE38), have produced a high rate of complete remissions in Hairy Cell Leukemia and objective responses in other malignancies. Cholera exotoxin (also known as cholix toxin) has a very similar three-dimensional structure to Pseudomonas exotoxin (PE) and when domains II and III of each are compared at the primary sequence level, they are 36% identical and 50% similar. Here we report on the construction and activity of an immunotoxin made with domains II and III of cholera exotoxin (here termed CET40). In cell viability assays, the CET40 immunotoxin was equipotent to tenfold less active compared to a PE-based immunotoxin made with the same single-chain Fv. A major limitation of toxin-based immunotoxins is the development of neutralizing antibodies to the toxin portion of the immunotoxin. Because of structure and sequence similarities, we evaluated a CET40 immunotoxin for the presence of PE-related epitopes. In western blots, three-of-three anti-PE antibody preparations failed to react with the CET40 immunotoxin. More importantly, in neutralization studies neither these antibodies nor those from patients with neutralizing titers to PE38, neutralized the CET40-immunotoxin. We propose that the use of modular components such as antibody Fvs and toxin domains will allow a greater flexibility in how these agents are designed and deployed including the sequential administration of a second immunotoxin after patients have developed neutralizing antibodies to the first.

  18. Comparative genomics and transcriptomics of lineages I, II, and III strains of Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hain Torsten

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen that causes infections with a high-mortality rate and has served as an invaluable model for intracellular parasitism. Here, we report complete genome sequences for two L. monocytogenes strains belonging to serotype 4a (L99 and 4b (CLIP80459, and transcriptomes of representative strains from lineages I, II, and III, thereby permitting in-depth comparison of genome- and transcriptome -based data from three lineages of L. monocytogenes. Lineage III, represented by the 4a L99 genome is known to contain strains less virulent for humans. Results The genome analysis of the weakly pathogenic L99 serotype 4a provides extensive evidence of virulence gene decay, including loss of several important surface proteins. The 4b CLIP80459 genome, unlike the previously sequenced 4b F2365 genome harbours an intact inlB invasion gene. These lineage I strains are characterized by the lack of prophage genes, as they share only a single prophage locus with other L. monocytogenes genomes 1/2a EGD-e and 4a L99. Comparative transcriptome analysis during intracellular growth uncovered adaptive expression level differences in lineages I, II and III of Listeria, notable amongst which was a strong intracellular induction of flagellar genes in strain 4a L99 compared to the other lineages. Furthermore, extensive differences between strains are manifest at levels of metabolic flux control and phosphorylated sugar uptake. Intriguingly, prophage gene expression was found to be a hallmark of intracellular gene expression. Deletion mutants in the single shared prophage locus of lineage II strain EGD-e 1/2a, the lma operon, revealed severe attenuation of virulence in a murine infection model. Conclusion Comparative genomics and transcriptome analysis of L. monocytogenes strains from three lineages implicate prophage genes in intracellular adaptation and indicate that gene loss and decay may have led to the emergence

  19. Preliminary feasibility study on storage of radioactive wastes in Columbia River basalts. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ,

    1976-11-01

    Volume II comprises four appendices: analytical data and sample locations for basalt flow type localities; Analytical data and sample locations for measured field sections in Yakima basalts; core hole lithology and analytical data; and geophysical logs. (LK)

  20. Portafolio Practicum II/III 2011-2012. Grado en Enfermería

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    El documento incluye información sobre los aspectos básicos previos al inicio de las prácticas clínicas: documentos a consultar, recomendaciones, normas, cómo usar el portafolio-cuaderno de prácticas y un listado con las actuaciones a realizar durante el periodo de prácticas clínicas correspondiente al Practicum II y III. También incluye actividades a realizar y reflexiones sobre lo aprendido. Los Estudiantes registran en el portafolio cuantitativa y cualitativamente la implementación de dich...

  1. Synthesis and biological activity of acetates of copper (II and iron (III for the control of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssica V. Nardeli

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to the synthesis of basic acetates of Cu (II and Fe(III against larvae of Aedes aegypti and Gram negative and Gram positive. The transition metal ions Cu (II and Fe (III have bactericidal activity and are toxic to Aedes aegypti larvae in the eggs and larval stages of initial, precludes the eggs hatch and slow reproductive cycle of the insect. The theme investigates the importance of carboxyl groups in complex formation, transport and cellular internalization of the toxic ions. It is known that the bactericide or insecticide activity is due to metal ions and Cu (IIor Fe (III.

  2. Manganese(III)-containing Wells-Dawson sandwich-type polyoxometalates: comparison with their manganese(II) counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrini, Mounim; Mbomekallé, Israël M; Dolbecq, Anne; Marrot, Jérôme; Berthet, Patrick; Ntienoue, Joseline; Sécheresse, Francis; Vigneron, Jacky; Etcheberry, Arnaud

    2011-07-18

    We present the synthesis and structural characterization, assessed by various techniques (FTIR, TGA, UV-vis, elemental analysis, single-crystal X-ray diffraction for three compounds, magnetic susceptibility, and electrochemistry) of five manganese-containing Wells-Dawson sandwich-type (WDST) complexes. The dimanganese(II)-containing complex, [Na(2)(H(2)O)(2)Mn(II)(2)(As(2)W(15)O(56))(2)](18-) (1), was obtained by reaction of MnCl(2) with 1 equiv of [As(2)W(15)O(56)](12-) in acetate medium (pH 4.7). Oxidation of 1 by Na(2)S(2)O(8) in aqueous solution led to the dimanganese(III) complex [Na(2)(H(2)O)(2)Mn(III)(2)(As(2)W(15)O(56))(2)](16-) (2), while its trimanganese(II) homologue, [Na(H(2)O)(2)Mn(II)(H(2)O)Mn(II)(2)(As(2)W(15)O(56))(2)](17-) (3), was obtained by addition of ca. 1 equiv of MnCl(2) to a solution of 1 in 1 M NaCl. The trimanganese(III) and tetramanganese(III) counterparts, [Mn(III)(H(2)O)Mn(III)(2)(As(2)W(15)O(56))(2)](15-) (4) and [Mn(III)(2)(H(2)O)(2)Mn(III)(2)(As(2)W(15)O(56))(2)](12-) (6), are, respectively, obtained by oxidation of aqueous solutions of 3 and [Mn(II)(2)(H(2)O)(2)Mn(II)(2)(As(2)W(15)O(56))(2)](16-) (5) by Na(2)S(2)O(8). Single-crystal X-ray analyses were carried out on 2, 3, and 4. BVS calculations and XPS confirmed that the oxidation state of Mn centers is +II for complexes 1, 3, and 5 and +III for 2, 4, and 6. A complete comparative electrochemical study was carried out on the six compounds cited above, and it was possible to observe the distinct redox steps Mn(IV/III) and Mn(III/II). Magnetization measurements, as a function of temperature, confirm the presence of antiferromagnetic interactions between the Mn ions in these compounds in all cases with the exception of compound 2.

  3. Atlas of Ohio Aquatic Insects: Volume II, Plecoptera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, Scott A.; Armitage, Brian J.; Baumann, Richard W.; Clark, Shawn M.; Bolton, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background We provide volume II of a distributional atlas of aquatic insects for the eastern USA state of Ohio. This treatment of stoneflies (Plecoptera) is companion to Armitage et al. (2011) on caddisflies (Trichoptera). We build on a recent analysis of Ohio stonefly diversity patterns based on large drainages (DeWalt et al. 2012), but add 3717 new records to the data set. We base most analyses on the United States Geological Survey Hierarchical Unit Code eight (HUC8) drainage scale. In addition to distributional maps for each species, we provide analyses of species richness versus HUC8 drainage area and the number of unique locations in a HUC8 drainage, species richness versus Ohio counties, analyze adult presence phenology throughout the year, and demonstrate stream size range affiliation for each species. New information This work is based on a total of 7797 specimen records gathered from 21 regional museums, agency data, personal collections, and from the literature Table 1. To our knowledge this is the largest stonefly data set available for a similarly sized geopolitical area anywhere in the world. These data are made available as a Darwin Core Archive supported by the Pensoft Integrated Publishing Toolkit (DeWalt et al. 2016b). All known published papers reporting stoneflies from Ohio are detailed in Suppl. material 1. We recovered 102 species from Ohio, including all nine Nearctic families Table 2​. Two species were removed from the DeWalt et al. (2012) list and two new state records added. Perlidae (32 spp.) was most speciose, compared to the low diversity Pteronarcyidae (2 spp.) and Peltoperlidae (1 sp.). The richest HUC8 drainages occurred in northeastern, south-central, and southern regions of the state where drainages were heavily forested, had the highest slopes, and were contained within or adjacent to the unglaciated Allegheny and Appalachian Plateaus. Species poor drainages occurred mainly in the northwestern region where Wisconsinan

  4. Study of solute-solvent interaction of chlorosubstituted pyrazoles with Cu (II) and Tb (III) and dioxane-water at various temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramteke, Avinash A.; Chavan, Sugam P.

    2016-05-01

    The solute-solvent interactions of complexes of chloro substituted pyrazole with Cu (II) and Tb (III) metal ions as a function of temperature has been studied by measuring density and ultrasonic velocity at different temperatures. The values of density and ultrasonic velocity have been used to determine the adiabatic compressibility βs, apparent molal volume ϕv, apparent adiabatic compressibility ϕk, intermolecular free length Lf, relative association RA and acoustic impendence Z. The obtained results from the acoustic parameters show the significant interaction between the complex and solvent.

  5. Intermolecular forces and enthalpies in the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans and antigen I/II deficient mutant to laminin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, H.J.; Belt-Gritter, van de B.; Dijkstra, R.J.B.; Norde, W.; Mei, van der H.C.

    2007-01-01

    The antigen I/II family of surface proteins is expressed by most oral streptococci, including Streptococcus mutans, and mediates specific adhesion to, among other things, salivary films and extracellular matrix proteins. In this study we showed that antigen I/II-deficient S. mutans isogenic mutant I

  6. Mechanisms in Ruthenium(II) photochemistry and Iron(III) catalyzed oxidations : Photochemical, Electrochemical and Spectroscopic studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unjaroen, Duenpen

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, photochemical, electrochemical and spectroscopic studies of Ru(II), Fe(II), and Fe(III) complexes are described. The overall goal in this studies was to understanding process that occur during oxidation catalysis and photo irradiation and especially the changes in the structure that

  7. Preparation of cellulose II and III{sub I} films by allomorphic conversion of bacterial cellulose I pellicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria-Tischer, Paula C.S., E-mail: paula.tischer@pq.cnpq.br [BioPol, Departamento de Química, UFPR, Cx. Postal 19081, 81531-980 Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Université Grenoble Alpes, Centre de Recherches sur les Macromolécules Végétales (CERMAV), F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, CERMAV, F-38000 Grenoble (France); UMR 5628 (LMGP), CNRS and Grenoble Institute of Technology, 3 Parvis Louis Néel, F-38016 Grenoble Cedex 1 (France); Tischer, Cesar A. [BioPol, Departamento de Química, UFPR, Cx. Postal 19081, 81531-980 Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Université Grenoble Alpes, Centre de Recherches sur les Macromolécules Végétales (CERMAV), F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, CERMAV, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CIME Nanotech, 3 Parvis Louis Néel, F-38016 Grenoble Cedex 1 (France); Heux, Laurent [Université Grenoble Alpes, Centre de Recherches sur les Macromolécules Végétales (CERMAV), F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, CERMAV, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Le Denmat, Simon; Picart, Catherine [UMR 5628 (LMGP), CNRS and Grenoble Institute of Technology, 3 Parvis Louis Néel, F-38016 Grenoble Cedex 1 (France); Sierakowski, Maria-R. [BioPol, Departamento de Química, UFPR, Cx. Postal 19081, 81531-980 Curitiba, PR (Brazil); and others

    2015-06-01

    The structural changes resulting from the conversion of native cellulose I (Cel I) into allomorphs II (Cel II) and III{sub I} (Cel III{sub I}) have usually been studied using powder samples from plant or algal cellulose. In this work, the conversion of Cel I into Cel II and Cel III{sub I} was performed on bacterial cellulose films without any mechanical disruption. The surface texture of the films was observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the morphology of the constituting cellulose ribbons, by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The structural changes were characterized using solid-state NMR spectroscopy as well as X-ray and electron diffraction. The allomorphic change into Cel II and Cel III{sub I} resulted in films with different crystallinity, roughness and hydrophobic/hydrophilicity surface and the films remained intact during all process of allomorphic conversion. - Highlights: • Description of a method to modify the allomorphic structure of bacterial cellulose films • Preparation of films with specific morphologies and hydrophobic/hydrophilic surface characters • First report on cellulose III films from bacterial cellulose under swelling conditions • Detailed characterization of cellulose II and III films with complementary techniques • Development of films with specific properties as potential support for cells, enzymes, and drugs.

  8. A new mixed-valence lead(II manganese(II/III phosphate(V: PbMnII2MnIII(PO43

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaleb Alhakmi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, lead trimanganese tris(orthophosphate, has been synthesized by hydrothermal methods. In this structure, only two O atoms are in general positions and all others atoms are in the special positions of the Imma space group. Indeed, the atoms in the Wyckoff positions are namely: Pb1 and P1 on 4e (mm2; Mn1 on 4b (2/m; Mn2 and P2 on 8g (2; O1 on 8h (m; O2 on 8i (m. The crystal structure can be viewed as a three-dimensional network of corner- and edge-sharing PO4 tetrahedra and MnO6 octahedra, building two types of chains running along the b axis. The first is an infinite linear chain, formed by alternating MnIIIO6 octahedra and PO4 tetrahedra which share one vertex. The second chain is built up from two adjacent edge-sharing octahedra (MnII2O10 dimers whose ends are linked to two PO4 tetrahedra by a common edge. These chains are linked together by common vertices of polyhedra in such a way as to form porous layers parallel to (001. These sheets are bonded by the first linear chains, leading to the appearance of two types of tunnels, one propagating along the a axis and the other along b. The PbII ions are located within the intersections of the tunnels with eight neighbouring O atoms in form of a trigonal prism that is capped by two O atoms on one side. The three-dimensional framework of this structure is compared with similar phosphates such as Ag2Co3(HPO4(PO42 and Ag2Ni3(HPO4(PO42.

  9. Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 1, Rev. 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    The condensed version of the TRUPACT-II Contact Handled Transuranic Waste Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) contains essential material required by TRUPACT-II users, plus additional contents (payload) information previously submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. All or part of the following sections, which are not required by users of the TRUPACT-II, are deleted from the condensed version: (i) structural analysis, (ii) thermal analysis, (iii) containment analysis, (iv) criticality analysis, (v) shielding analysis, and (vi) hypothetical accident test results.

  10. A Curriculum Activities Guide to Water Pollution and Environmental Studies, Volume II - Appendices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershey, John T., Ed.; And Others

    This publication, Volume II of a two volume set of water pollution studies, contains seven appendices which support the studies. Appendix 1, Water Quality Parameters, consolidates the technical aspects of water quality including chemical, biological, computer program, and equipment information. Appendix 2, Implementation, outlines techniques…

  11. Human Rehabilitation Techniques. Disability Analyses: Chronic Disease Disabilities. Volume II, Part C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigelman, C.; And Others

    Volume II, Section C of a six-volume final report (which covers the findings of a research project on policy and technology related to rehabilitation of disabled individuals) presents a review of literature on six types of chronic disease disabilities--rheumatoid arthritis, coronary heart disease, emphysema, carcinoma of the colon/rectum, kidney…

  12. Human Rehabilitation Techniques. Disability Analyses: Behavioral Disabilities. Volume II, Part B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigelman, C.; And Others

    Volume II, Section B of a six-volume final report (which covers the findings of a research project on policy and technology related to rehabilitation of disabled individuals) presents a review of literature on three types of behavior disabilities--epilepsy, mental retardation, and schizophrenia. Individual chapters on each disability cover the…

  13. A Curriculum Activities Guide to Water Pollution and Environmental Studies, Volume II - Appendices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershey, John T., Ed.; And Others

    This publication, Volume II of a two volume set of water pollution studies, contains seven appendices which support the studies. Appendix 1, Water Quality Parameters, consolidates the technical aspects of water quality including chemical, biological, computer program, and equipment information. Appendix 2, Implementation, outlines techniques…

  14. Application of Bayesian hierarchical models for phase I/II clinical trials in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yada, Shinjo; Hamada, Chikuma

    2017-03-01

    Treatment during cancer clinical trials sometimes involves the combination of multiple drugs. In addition, in recent years there has been a trend toward phase I/II trials in which a phase I and a phase II trial are combined into a single trial to accelerate drug development. Methods for the seamless combination of phases I and II parts are currently under investigation. In the phase II part, adaptive randomization on the basis of patient efficacy outcomes allocates more patients to the dose combinations considered to have higher efficacy. Patient toxicity outcomes are used for determining admissibility to each dose combination and are not used for selection of the dose combination itself. In cases where the objective is not to find the optimum dose combination solely for efficacy but regarding both toxicity and efficacy, the need exists to allocate patients to dose combinations with consideration of the balance of existing trade-offs between toxicity and efficacy. We propose a Bayesian hierarchical model and an adaptive randomization with consideration for the relationship with toxicity and efficacy. Using the toxicity and efficacy outcomes of patients, the Bayesian hierarchical model is used to estimate the toxicity probability and efficacy probability in each of the dose combinations. Here, we use Bayesian moving-reference adaptive randomization on the basis of desirability computed from the obtained estimator. Computer simulations suggest that the proposed method will likely recommend a higher percentage of target dose combinations than a previously proposed method.

  15. Adenanthin targets peroxiredoxin I/II to kill hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, J-K; Huang, Y; He, W; Yan, Z-W; Fan, L; Liu, M-H; Xiao, W-L; Sun, H-D; Chen, G-Q

    2014-09-04

    Adenanthin, a natural diterpenoid isolated from the leaves of Isodon adenanthus, has recently been reported to induce leukemic cell differentiation by targeting peroxiredoxins (Prx) I and II. On the other hand, increasing lines of evidence propose that these Prx proteins would become potential targets to screen drugs for the prevention and treatment of solid tumors. Therefore, it is of significance to explore the potential activities of adenanthin on solid tumor cells. Here, we demonstrate that Prx I protein is essential for the survival of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, and adenanthin can kill these malignant liver cells in vitro and xenografts. We also show that the cell death-inducing activity of adenanthin on HCC cells is mediated by the increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Furthermore, the silencing of Prx I or Prx II significantly enhances the cytotoxic activity of adenanthin on HCC, whereas the ectopic expression of Prx I and Prx II but not their mutants of adenanthin-bound cysteines can rescue adenanthin-induced cytotoxicity in Prxs-silenced HCC cells. Taken together, our results propose that adenanthin targets Prx I/II to kill HCC cells and its therapeutic significance warrants to be further explored in HCC patients.

  16. Biosorption of Cr(III), Cr(VI), Cu(II) ions by intact cells of Spirulina platensis

    OpenAIRE

    Gelagutashvili, E.; Bagdavadze, N.; Rcheulishvili, A.

    2017-01-01

    The absorption characteristics of Cr(III), Cr(VI), Cu(II) ions on intact living cells Spirulina platensis (pH9.6) were studied by using a UV-VIS spectrophotometer. Also biosorption of these ions with cyanobacteria Spirulina platensis were studied using equilibrium dialysis and atomic absorption analysis.It was shown, that the absorption intensity of Spirulina platensis decreases, when Cr(III), Cr(VI), Cu(II) ions are added. Significant difference between the absorption intensity for Cu(II) Sp...

  17. Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP), Volumes I and II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D`Amelio, J.

    1994-08-30

    Site Treatment Plans (STP) are required for facilities at which the DOE generates or stores mixed waste. This Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP) the second step in a three-phase process, identifies the currently preferred options for treating mixed waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS) or for developing treatment technologies where technologies do not exist or need modification. The DSTP reflects site-specific preferred options, developed with the state`s input and based on existing available information. To the extent possible, the DSTP identifies specific treatment facilities for treating the mixed waste and proposes schedules. Where the selection of specific treatment facilities is not possible, schedules for alternative activities such as waste characterization and technology assessment are provided. All schedule and cost information presented is preliminary and is subject to change. The DSTP is comprised of two volumes: this Compliance Plan Volume and the Background Volume. This Compliance Plan Volume proposes overall schedules with target dates for achieving compliance with the land disposal restrictions (LDR) of RCRA and procedures for converting the target dates into milestones to be enforced under the Order. The more detailed discussion of the options contained in the Background Volume is provided for informational purposes only.

  18. A modified varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Gaohong; Vandemeulebroecke, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Conventionally, adaptive phase II/III clinical trials are carried out with a strict two-stage design. Recently, a varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design has been developed. In this design, following the first stage, an intermediate stage can be adaptively added to obtain more data, so that a more informative decision can be made. Therefore, the number of further investigational stages is determined based upon data accumulated to the interim analysis. This design considers two plausible study endpoints, with one of them initially designated as the primary endpoint. Based on interim results, another endpoint can be switched as the primary endpoint. However, in many therapeutic areas, the primary study endpoint is well established. Therefore, we modify this design to consider one study endpoint only so that it may be more readily applicable in real clinical trial designs. Our simulations show that, the same as the original design, this modified design controls the Type I error rate, and the design parameters such as the threshold probability for the two-stage setting and the alpha allocation ratio in the two-stage setting versus the three-stage setting have a great impact on the design characteristics. However, this modified design requires a larger sample size for the initial stage, and the probability of futility becomes much higher when the threshold probability for the two-stage setting gets smaller. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Dose-Escalated Robotic SBRT for Stage I-II Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eMeier

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT is the precise external delivery of very high-dose radiotherapy to targets in the body, with treatment completed in one to five fractions. SBRT should be an ideal approach for organ-confined prostate cancer because (I dose escalation should yield improved rates of cancer control; (II the unique radiobiology of prostate cancer favors hypofractionation and (III the conformal nature of SBRT minimizes high-dose radiation delivery to immediately adjacent organs, potentially reducing complications. This approach is also more convenient for patients, and is cheaper than intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. Several external beam platforms are capable of delivering SBRT for early-stage prostate cancer, although most of the mature reported series have employed a robotic non-coplanar platform (i.e., CyberKnife. Several large studies report 5-year biochemical relapse rates which compare favorably to IMRT. Rates of late GU toxicity are similar to those seen with IMRT, and rates of late rectal toxicity may be less than with IMRT and low dose rate (LDR brachytherapy. Patient-reported quality of life (QOL outcomes appear similar to IMRT in the urinary domain. Bowel QOL may be less adversely affected by SBRT than with other radiation modalities. After five years of follow-up, SBRT delivered on a robotic platform is yielding outcomes at least as favorable as IMRT, and may be considered appropriate therapy for stage I-II prostate cancer.

  20. Dose-Escalated Robotic SBRT for Stage I-II Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is the precise external delivery of very high-dose radiotherapy to targets in the body, with treatment completed in one to five fractions. SBRT should be an ideal approach for organ-confined prostate cancer because (I) dose-escalation should yield improved rates of cancer control; (II) the unique radiobiology of prostate cancer favors hypofractionation; and (III) the conformal nature of SBRT minimizes high-dose radiation delivery to immediately adjacent organs, potentially reducing complications. This approach is also more convenient for patients, and is cheaper than intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Several external beam platforms are capable of delivering SBRT for early-stage prostate cancer, although most of the mature reported series have employed a robotic non-coplanar platform (i.e., CyberKnife). Several large studies report 5-year biochemical relapse rates which compare favorably to IMRT. Rates of late GU toxicity are similar to those seen with IMRT, and rates of late rectal toxicity may be less than with IMRT and low-dose rate brachytherapy. Patient-reported quality of life (QOL) outcomes appear similar to IMRT in the urinary domain. Bowel QOL may be less adversely affected by SBRT than with other radiation modalities. After 5 years of follow-up, SBRT delivered on a robotic platform is yielding outcomes at least as favorable as IMRT, and may be considered appropriate therapy for stage I-II prostate cancer.

  1. A quantitative infection assay for human type I, II, and III interferon antiviral activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Upon virus infection, cells secrete a diverse group of antiviral molecules that signal proximal cells to enter into an antiviral state, slowing or preventing viral spread. These paracrine signaling molecules can work synergistically, so measurement of any one antiviral molecule does not reflect the total antiviral activity of the system. Results We have developed an antiviral assay based on replication inhibition of an engineered fluorescent vesicular stomatitis virus reporter strain on A549 human lung epithelial cells. Our assay provides a quantitative functional readout of human type I, II, and III interferon activities, and it provides better sensitivity, intra-, and inter-assay reproducibility than the traditional crystal violet based assay. Further, it eliminates cell fixation, rinsing, and staining steps, and is inexpensive to implement. Conclusions A dsRed2-strain of vesicular stomatitis virus that is sensitive to type I, II, and III interferons was used to develop a convenient and sensitive assay for interferon antiviral activity. We demonstrate use of the assay to quantify the kinetics of paracrine antiviral signaling from human prostate cancer (PC3) cells in response to viral infection. The assay is applicable to high-throughput screening for anti-viral compounds as well as basic studies of cellular antiviral signaling. PMID:23829314

  2. Prevalence of Sarcopenic Obesity in Adults with Class II/III Obesity Using Different Diagnostic Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlene A. Johnson Stoklossa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective. Sarcopenic obesity (SO is a hidden condition of reduced lean soft tissue (LST in context of excess adiposity. SO is most commonly reported in older adults and both its risk and prevalence increase with age. A variety of body composition indices and cut points have been used to define this condition, leading to conflicting prevalence and risk prediction. Here, we investigate variability in the prevalence of SO in an adult sample of individuals with class II/III obesity (BMI ≥ 35 kg/m2 using different diagnostic criteria. Methods. SO definitions were identified from a literature review of studies using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA to assess LST. Demographics, anthropometrics, and body composition (by DXA were measured in n=120, 86% female (46.9 ± 11.1 years. Results. LST was extremely variable in individuals, even with similar body sizes, and observed across the age spectrum. The prevalence of SO ranged from 0 to 84.5% in females and 0 to 100% in males, depending upon the definition applied, with higher prevalence among definitions accounting for measures of body size or fat mass. Conclusion. SO is present, yet variable, in adults with class II/III obesity. Accounting for body mass or fat mass may identify a higher number of individuals with SO, although risk prediction remains to be studied.

  3. Intraovarian transplantation of stage I-II follicles results in viable zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csenki, Zsolt; Zaucker, Andreas; Kovács, Balázs; Hadzhiev, Yavor; Hegyi, Arpád; Lefler, Katalin-Kinga; Müller, Tamás; Kovács, Robert; Urbányi, Béla; Váradi, László; Müller, Ferenc

    2010-01-01

    Maternal gene products drive early embryogenesis almost exclusively until the mid blastula transition (MBT) in many animal models including fish. However, the maternal contribution to embryogenesis does not stop at MBT, but continues to be an essential regulator of key developmental processes. The extent to which maternal effects contribute to embryonic and larval development is hard to estimate due to the technical difficulty of interfering with maternal gene products by conventional forward and reverse genetic tools. Therefore, novel methods to manipulate maternal factors in oocytes need to be developed. Here, we provide a proof of principle protocol for transplanting stage I-II zebrafish follicles into recipient mothers where donor stage I oocytes can develop to stage IV in 2 weeks and in 3 weeks they develop into mature eggs and produce viable offspring. Moreover, we show that simple microinjection of stage I-II follicles with RNA results in reporter gene expression in oocytes and paves the way for developing tools for interfering with maternal gene activity. This early stage oocyte transplantation protocol provides a means to study cellular and molecular aspects of oocyte development in the zebrafish.

  4. DNA damage and repair kinetics of the Alternaria mycotoxins alternariol, altertoxin II and stemphyltoxin III in cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Stefanie C; Sauter, Friederike; Pfeiffer, Erika; Metzler, Manfred; Hartwig, Andrea; Köberle, Beate

    2016-03-01

    The Alternaria mycotoxins alternariol (AOH) and altertoxin II (ATX II) have previously been shown to elicit mutagenic and genotoxic effects in bacterial and mammalian cells, although with vastly different activities. For example, ATX II was about 50 times more mutagenic than AOH. We now report that stemphyltoxin III (STTX III) is also highly mutagenic. The more pronounced effects of the perylene quinones ATX II and STTX III at lower concentrations compared to the dibenzo-α-pyrone AOH indicate a marked dependence of the genotoxic potential on the chemical structure and furthermore suggest that the underlying modes of action may be different. We have now further investigated the type of DNA damage induced by AOH, ATX II and STTX III, as well as the repair kinetics and their dependence on the status of nucleotide excision repair (NER). DNA double strand breaks induced by AOH due to poisoning of topoisomerase IIα were completely repaired in less than 2h. Under cell-free conditions, inhibition of topoisomerase IIα could also be measured for ATX II and STTX III at low concentrations, but the perylene quinones were catalytic inhibitors rather than topoisomerase poisons and did not induce DSBs. DNA strand breaks induced by ATX II and STTX III were more persistent and not completely repaired within 24h. A dependence of the repair rate on the NER status could only be demonstrated for STTX III, resulting in an accumulation of DNA damage in NER-deficient cells. Together with the finding that the DNA glycosylase formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg), but not T4 endonuclease V, is able to generate additional DNA strand breaks measurable by the alkaline unwinding assay, we conclude that the genotoxicity of the perylene quinones with an epoxide group is probably caused by the formation of DNA adducts which may be converted to Fpg sensitive sites.

  5. Triglyceride-rich lipoprotein metabolism in women: roles of apoC-II and apoC-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Esther M; Chan, Dick C; Hodson, Leanne; Adiels, Martin; Boren, Jan; Karpe, Fredrik; Fielding, Barbara A; Watts, Gerald F; Barrett, P Hugh R

    2016-08-01

    Experimental data suggest that apolipoprotein (apo) C-II and C-III regulate triglyceride-rich lipoprotein (TRL) metabolism, but there are limited studies in humans. We investigated the metabolic associations of TRLs with apoC-II and apoC-III concentrations and kinetics in women. The kinetics of plasma apoC-II, apoC-III and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) apoB-100 and triglycerides were measured in the postabsorptive state using stable isotopic techniques and compartmental modelling in 60 women with wide-ranging body mass index (19·5-32·9 kg/m(2) ). Plasma apoC-II and apoC-III concentrations were positively associated with the concentrations of plasma triglycerides, VLDL1 - and VLDL2 -apoB-100 and triglyceride (all P triglyceride concentration and VLDL1 triglyceride PR, while apoC-II fractional catabolic rate (FCR) was positively associated with VLDL1 triglyceride FCR (all P triglyceride kinetics. ApoC-III PR, but not FCR, was positively associated with VLDL1 triglyceride, and VLDL2 -apoB-100 and triglyceride concentrations (all P triglyceride kinetics. In multivariable analysis, including homoeostasis model assessment score, menopausal status and obesity, apoC-II concentration was significantly associated with plasma triglyceride, VLDL1 -apoB-100 and VLDL1 triglyceride concentrations and PR. Using the same multivariable analysis, apoC-III was significantly associated with plasma triglyceride and VLDL1 - and VLDL2 -apoB-100 and triglyceride concentrations and FCR. In women, plasma apoC-II and apoC-III concentrations are regulated by their respective PR and are significant, independent determinants of the kinetics and plasma concentrations of TRLs. © 2016 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  6. Study for Teaching Behavioral Sciences in Schools of Medicine, Volume III: Behavioral Science Perspectives in Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Sociological Association, Washington, DC. Medical Sociology Council.

    Volume III of a study of teaching behavioral sciences in medical school presents perspectives on medical behavioral science from the viewpoints of the several behavioral disciplines (anthropology, psychology, sociology, political science, economics, behavioral biology and medical education). In addition, there is a discussion of translating…

  7. Preparation and surface photoelectric properties of Fe(II/III) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jing; Xu, Xiao-Ting; Li, Dan; Han, Xiao; Li, Lei; Chi, Yu-Xian; Niu, Shu-Yun; Zhang, Guang-Ning

    2013-05-01

    Four Fe(II/III) supramolecules, {[Fe(Hpdc)2(H2O)2]·2H2O} (1), [Fe(HImbc)2(H2O)2] (2), [Fe(phen)2(CN)2]·CH3CH2OH·2H2O (3), K[Fe(tp)2]·SO4 (4) (H2pdc = 2,5-Pyridinedicarboxylic acid, H2Imbc = 4,5-Imidazoledicarboxylic acid, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, tp- = poly(pyrazolyl)borate), were synthesized by hydrothermal and room temperature stirring methods. They were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, surface photovoltage spectroscopy (SPS), field-induced surface photovoltage spectroscopy (FISPS), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), UV-Vis absorption spectra (UV-Vis), infrared spectra (IR) and element analysis. The structural analyses indicate that complex (1) is a supramolecule with 2D structure connected by hydrogen bonds. Complex (2) is a supramolecule with hydrogen-bonded 3D structure. Complexes (3) and (4) are both 1D supramolecules connected by hydrogen bonds. The electronic state of central metal Fe(II) ions in complexes (1) and (2) is d6 with FeN2O4 coordination mode, lying in weaker distorted octahedral field. The electronic state of Fe(II) ion in complex (3) is d6 with Fe(CN)2N4 mode in the strong distorted octahedral field. The electronic state of Fe(III) ion in complex (4) is d5 with FeN6 mode, lying in the strong octahedral field. The micro-environment of Fe(II/III) ions in the four complexes is further investigated by EPR. The SPS of four complexes all exhibit photovoltage responses in the range of 300-700 nm. This indicates that they all possess certain photoelectric conversion capability. The effects of component, structure, type of ligands of the complexes, valence state and coordination micro-environment of the central metal ions on the SPS were discussed. Furthermore, the SPS and UV-Vis absorption spectra were interrelated.

  8. Subcritical crack growth under mode I, II, and III loading for Coconino sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Tae Young

    In systems subjected to long-term loading, subcritical crack growth is the principal mechanism causing the time-dependent deformation and failure of rocks. Subcritical crack growth is environmentally-assisted crack growth, which can allow cracks to grow over a long period of time at stresses far smaller than their failure strength and at tectonic strain rates. The characteristics of subcritical crack growth can be described by a relationship between the stress intensity factor and the crack velocity. This study presents the results of studies conducted to validate the constant stress-rate test for determining subcritical crack growth parameters in Coconino sandstone, compared with the conventional testing method, the double torsion test. The results of the constant stress-rate test are in good agreement with the results of double torsion test. More importantly, the stress-rate tests can determine the parameter A with a much smaller standard deviation than the double torsion test. Thus the constant stress-rate test seems to be both a valid and preferred test method for determining the subcritical crack growth parameters in rocks. We investigated statistical aspects of the constant stress-rate test. The effects of the number of tests conducted on the subcritical crack growth parameters were examined and minimum specimen numbers were determined. The mean and standard deviation of the subcritical crack growth parameters were obtained by randomly selecting subsets from the original strength data. In addition, the distribution form of the subcritical crack growth parameters and the relation between the parameter n and A were determined. We extended the constant stress-rate test technique to modes II and III subcritical crack growth in rocks. The experimental results of the modes I, II and III tests show that the values of the subcritical crack growth parameters are similar to each other. The subcritical crack growth parameter n value for Coconino sandstone has the range

  9. Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power Systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Final report. Volume III. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-01

    The overall, long term objective of the Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power System is to identify, characterize, and ultimately demonstrate the viability and cost effectiveness of solar/fossil, steam Rankine cycle, hybrid power systems that: (1) consist of a combined solar central receiver energy source and a nonsolar energy source at a single, common site, (2) may operate in the base, intermediate, and peaking capacity modes, (3) produce the rated output independent of variations in solar insolation, (4) provide a significant savings (50% or more) in fuel consumpton, and (5) produce power at the minimum possible cost in mills/kWh. It is essential that these hybrid concepts be technically feasible and economically competitive with other systems in the near to mid-term time period (1985-1990) on a commercial scale. The program objective for Phase I is to identify and conceptually characterize solar/fossil steam Rankine cycle, commercial-scale, power plant systems that are economically viable and technically feasible. This volume contains appendices to the conceptual design and systems analysis studies gien in Volume II, Books 1 and 2. (WHK)

  10. Consolidation of Military Pay and Personnel Functions (Copper). Volume II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-05-01

    as in any system, the commander and staff must perform their roles in providing information in a timely and accurate manner. a. Concepts pertaining to...feminine genders . Exceptions to this use of the words "he" or "his" will be so noted. 8. RECOMMENDED CHANGES AND COMMENTS. Users of this manual are...II-lO-Aq3 S NO CAH TR TION NCL IN 0’ SECTION 2 co P ? PAGE YES YES II-10-A43 MAKE CORRECTIONS LOG IN OTL SEPARATE DOCUMENTS Orl, OTL DOCUMENTS ORIG

  11. MANUAL: BIOVENTING PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE VOLUME II. BIOVENTING DESIGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    The results from bioventing research and development efforts and from the pilot-scale bioventing systems have been used to produce this two-volume manual. Although this design manual has been written based on extensive experience with petroleum hydrocarbons (and thus, many exampl...

  12. Environmental law and climate change : Volumes I & II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuuren, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Two volume set that brings together 54 of the most influential and important scientific journal articles in the field of climate law, thematically grouped together as follows: introducing climate law, theories and approaches, climate change mitigation, climate change adaptation, climate justice, lia

  13. An Annotated Bibliography on Refugee Mental Health. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Susan C.; And Others

    The second volume of this annotated bibliography contains primarily materials in published scientific literature on refugee mental health. References have been grouped into five major sections. Section 1, Understanding Refugees in Context, provides important background material in five categories: cultural and related information about different…

  14. Albanian: Basic Course. Volume II, Lessons 17-26.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defense Language Inst., Monterey, CA.

    This second of ten volumes of audiolingual classroom instruction in Albanian for adult students treats Albanian grammar, syntax, and usage in a series of exercises consisting of grammar perception drills, grammar analysis, readings, question-and-answer exercises, and dialogues illustrating specific grammatical features. A vocabulary list is…

  15. Functional gastrointestinal disorders in eating disorder patients: altered distribution and predictors using ROME III compared to ROME II criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojie; Luscombe, Georgina M; Boyd, Catherine; Kellow, John; Abraham, Suzanne

    2014-11-21

    To compare the prevalence of Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) using ROME III and ROME II and to describe predictors of FGIDs among eating disorder (ED) patients. Two similar cohorts of female ED inpatients, aged 17-50 years, with no organic gastrointestinal or systemic disorders, completed either the ROME III (n = 100) or the ROME II (n = 160) questionnaire on admission for ED treatment. The two ROME cohorts were compared on continuous demographic variables (e.g., age, BMI) using Student's t-tests, and on categorical variables (e.g., ED diagnosis) using χ(2)-tests. The relationship between ED diagnostic subtypes and FGID categories was explored using χ(2)-tests. Age, BMI, and psychological and behavioural predictors of the common (prevalence greater than 20%) ROME III FGIDs were tested using logistic regression analyses. The criteria for at least one FGID were fulfilled by 83% of the ROME III cohort, and 94% of the ROME II cohort. There were no significant differences in age, BMI, lowest ever BMI, ED diagnostic subtypes or ED-related quality of life (QOL) scores between ROME II and ROME III cohorts. The most prevalent FGIDs using ROME III were postprandial distress syndrome (PDS) (45%) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) (41%), followed by unspecified functional bowel disorders (U-FBD) (24%), and functional heartburn (FH) (22%). There was a 29% or 46% increase (depending on presence or absence of cyclic vomiting) in functional gastroduodenal disorders because of the introduction of PDS in ROME III compared to ROME II. There was a 35% decrease in functional bowel disorders (FBD) in Rome III (excluding U-FBD) compared to ROME II. The most significant predictor of PDS was starvation (P = 0.008). The predictor of FH (P = 0.021) and U-FBD (P = 0.007) was somatisation, and of IBS laxative use (P = 0.025). Age and BMI were not significant predictors. The addition of the 6-mo duration of symptoms requirement for a diagnosis in ROME III added precision to many

  16. Spectroscopic characterization of the competitive binding of Eu(III), Ca(II), and Cu(II) to a sedimentary originated humic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marang, L.; Reiller, P.E. [CEA Saclay, Nucl Energy Div, DPC SECR, Lab Speciat Radionucleides and Mol, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Marang, L.; Benedetti, M.F. [Univ Paris 07, Lab Geochim Eaux, IPGP UMR CNRS 7154, F-75205 Paris 13 (France); Eidner, S.; Kumke, M.U. [Univ Potsdam, Inst Chem, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    The competition between REE, alkaline earth and d-transition metals for organic matter binding sites is still an open field of research; particularly, the mechanisms governing these phenomena need to be characterized in more detail. In this study, we examine spectroscopically the mechanisms of competitive binding of Eu(III)/Cu(II) and Eu(III)/Ca(II) pair to Gorleben humic acid (HA), as previously proposed in the framework of the NICA-Donnan model. The evolution of time-resolved laser induced luminescence spectra of humic-complexed Eu(Ill) showed two strikingly different environments for a comparable bound proportion for Cu(II) and Ca(II). Cu(II) seems to compete more effectively with Eu(III) inducing its release into the Donnan phase, and into the bulk solution as free Eu{sup 3+}. This is evidenced both by the shapes of the spectra and by the decrease in the luminescence decay times. In contrast with that, Ca(II) induces a modification of the HA structure, which enhances the luminescence of humic-bound Eu(III), and causes a minor modification of the chemical environment of the complexed rare earth ion. (authors)

  17. Exonuclease III and the catalase hydroperoxidase II in Escherichia coli are both regulated by the katF gene product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sak, B.D.; Eisenstark, A.; Touati, D.

    1989-05-01

    The levels of both exonuclease III (exo III, product of xthA) and hydroperoxidase II (HP-II, product of katE) activity in Escherichia coli were influenced by a functional katF gene. The katF gene product is also necessary for synthesis of HP-II. Mutations in either katF or xthA, but not katE, result in sensitivity to H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and near-UV (300-400 nm) radiation. Exo III, encoded by the xthA locus, recognizes and removes nucleoside 5'-monophosphates near apurinic and apyrimidinic sites in damaged DNA. Extracts of katF mutant strains had little detectable exo III activity. When a katF+ plasmid was introduced into the katF mutant, exo III activity exceeded wild-type levels. We propose that the katF gene is a trans-acting positive regulator of exo III and HP-II enzymes, both of which are involved in cellular recovery from oxidative damage.

  18. Heterogeneous Reduction of PuO2 with Fe(II): Importance of the Fe(III) Reaction Product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Moore, Dean A.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Qafoku, Odeta; Rai, Dhanpat; Buck, Edgar C.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2011-05-01

    Abstract Heterogeneous reduction of actinides in higher and more soluble oxidation states to lower more insoluble oxidation states by reductants such as Fe(II) has been the subject of intensive study for more than two decades. However, Fe(II)-induced reduction of sparingly soluble Pu(IV) to the more soluble lower oxidation state Pu(III) has been much less studied even though such reactions can potentially increase the mobility of Pu in the subsurface. Thermodynamic calculations are presented that show how differences in the free energy of various possible solid-phase Fe(III) reaction products can greatly influence aqueous Pu(III) concentrations resulting from reduction of PuO2(am) by Fe(II). We present the first experimental evidence that reduction of PuO2(am) to Pu(III) by Fe(II) was enhanced when the Fe(III) mineral goethite was spiked into the reaction. The effect of goethite on reduction of Pu(IV) was demonstrated by measuring the time-dependence of total aqueous Pu concentration, its oxidation state, and system pe/pH. We also re-evaluated established protocols for determining Pu(III) [(Pu(III) + Pu(IV)) - Pu(IV)] by using thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) in toluene extractions; the study showed that it is important to eliminate dissolved oxygen from the TTA solutions for accurate determinations. More broadly, this study highlights the importance of the Fe(III) reaction product in actinide reduction rate and extent by Fe(II).

  19. Effects of Cu(II on the Adsorption Behaviors of Cr(III and Cr(VI onto Kaolin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanjuan Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of Cr(III or Cr(VI in the absence and presence of Cu(II onto kaolin was investigated under pH 2.0–7.0. Results indicated that the adsorption rate was not necessarily proportional to the adsorption capacity. The solutions’ pH values played a key role in kaolin zeta potential (ζ, especially the hydrolysis behavior and saturation index of heavy metal ions. In the presence of Cu(II, qmixCr(III reached the maximum adsorption capacity of 0.73 mg·g−1 at pH 6.0, while the maximum adsorption capacity for the mixed Cr(VI and Cu(II system (qmixCr(VI was observed at pH 2.0 (0.38 mg·g−1. Comparing the adsorption behaviors and mechanisms, we found that kaolin prefers to adsorb hydrolyzed products of Cr(III instead of Cr3+ ion, while adsorption sites of kaolin surface were occupied primarily by Cu(II through surface complexation, leading to Cu(II inhibited Cr(VI adsorption. Moreover, Cr(III and Cr(VI removal efficiency had a positive correlation with distribution coefficient Kd. Cr(III and Cr(VI removal efficiency had a positive correlation with distribution coefficient Kd and that of adsorption affinities of Cr(III or Cr(VI on kaolin was found to be Kd Cr(III Kd Cr(VI-Cu(II.

  20. Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction coupled with Fe(II)EDTA oxidation by a nitrate- and Fe(III)-reducing bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiyang; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Jiti; Chen, Mingxiang; Wang, Xiaojun; Shi, Zhuang

    2013-06-01

    The nitrate- and Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Paracoccus versutus LYM was characterized in terms of its ability to perform Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction coupled with Fe(II)EDTA oxidation (NO-dependent Fe(II)EDTA oxidation, NDFO). It experienced a single anaerobic FeEDTA redox cycling through NDFO and dissimilatory Fe(III)EDTA reduction in FeEDTA culture. The increase in the Fe(II)EDTA concentration contributed to the ascending Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction rate. The amount of glucose controlled the rate and extent of Fe(II) oxidation during NDFO. Without glucose addition, Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction rate was at a rather slow rate even in presence of relatively sufficient Fe(II)EDTA. Unlike aqueous Fe(2+) and solid-phase Fe(II), Fe(II)EDTA could prevent cells from encrustations. These findings suggested the occurrence of NDFO preferred being beneficial via a mixotrophic physiology in the presence of an organic cosubstrate to being out of consideration for metabolic strategy.

  1. Technical Reports (Part II). End of Project Report, 1968-1971, Volume IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western Nevada Regional Education Center, Lovelock.

    The pamphlets included in this volume are technical reports prepared as outgrowths of the Student Information System of the Western Nevada Regional Education Center funded by a Title III grant under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. These reports demonstrate the use of the stored data; methods of interpreting the printouts from…

  2. Systems Book for a Student Information System. End of Project Report, 1968-1971, Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western Nevada Regional Education Center, Lovelock.

    The necessary handbooks for use of the Student Information System (SIS), developed and tested by the Western Nevada Regional Education Center under a 1968-71 Title III (Elementary and Secondary Education Act) grant, are presented in this volume. As noted, the purpose of the SIS is to supply data and information to persons or organizations who make…

  3. Comparative electrochemical study of some cobalt(III and cobalt(II complexes with azamacrocycles and b-diketonato ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. BABIC-SAMARDZIJA

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical properties of eight mixed-ligand cobalt(III and cobalt(II complexes of the general formulas [CoIII(Raccyclam](ClO42 (1–(4 and [Co2II(Ractpmc](ClO43 (5–(8 were studied. The substances were investigated in aqueous NaClO4 solution and non-aqueous LiClO4/CH3CN solution by cyclic voltammetry at a glassy carbon electrode. In aqueous solution, cyclam and Rac ligands being soluble in water undergo anodic oxidation. Coordination to Co(III in complexes 1–4, stabilizes these ligands but reversible peaks in catohodic region indicate the redox reaction CoIII/CoII ion. In the case of the binuclear Co(II complexes 5–8, peaks recorded on the CVs represent oxidation of the bridged Rac ligand. The complexes examined influence the cathodic reaction of hydrogen evolution in aqueous solutions by shifting its potential to more negative values and its current is increased. In non-aqueous solution the CVs of the ligands show irreversible anodic peaks for cyclam, tpmc and for the Rac ligands soluble in acetonitrile. The absence of any peaks in the case of the investigated complexes 1–4 indicates that coordination to Co(III stabilizes both the cyclam and Rac ligands. Cyclic voltammograms of the complexes 5–8 show oxidation processes of the Rac ligand and Co(II ions but the absence of a highly anodic peak of the coordinated macrocycle tpmc shows its stabilization. Contrary to in aqueous solution, the redox reaction Co(III/Co(II does not occur in acetonitrate indicating a higher stability of the complexes 1–4 in this media in comparison with the binuclear cobalt(II-tpmc complexes 5–8.

  4. As(III) removal and speciation of Fe (Oxyhydr)oxides during simultaneous oxidation of As(III) and Fe(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xu; Song, Jia; Li, Yi-Liang; Jia, Shao-Yi; Wang, Wen-Hui; Huang, Fu-Gen; Wu, Song-Hai

    2016-03-01

    Abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) is an important pathway in the formation of Fe (oxyhydr)oxides. However, how can As(III) affect the oxidation rate of Fe(II) and the speciation of Fe (oxyhydr)oxides, and what's the extent of the newly formed Fe (oxyhydr)oxides on the removal of aqueous arsenic are still poorly understood. Oxidation of Fe(II) under neutral pH conditions was therefore investigated under different molar ratios of As:Fe. Our results suggest that co-existence of aqueous As(III) significantly slows down the oxidation rate of Fe(II). Speciation of Fe (oxyhydr)oxides is dependent on pH and As:Fe ratios. At pH 6.0, formation of lepidocrocite and goethite is apparently inhibited at low As:Fe ratios, and ferric arsenate is favored at high As:Fe ratios. At pH 7.0, lepidocrocite gradually degenerates with the increasing As:Fe ratios. At pH 8.0, arsenite significantly inhibits the development of magnetite and favors a formation of lepidocrocite. XPS analysis further reveals that more than half of As(III) is oxidized to As(V) at pH 6.0 and 7.0, whereas at pH 8.0, the rapid oxidation of Fe(II) as well as the rapid formation of Fe (oxyhydr)oxides facilitate a rapid removal of dissolved As(III) before its further oxidation to As(V). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. TÜRKİYE’DE BASEL I, II ve III KURALLARINA UYUM SÜRECİ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezgi ASLAN KÜLAHİ

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available TÜRKİYE’DE BASEL I, I VE III KURALLARINA UYUM SÜRECİÖzet: Bu çalışma, Basel Kriterleri çerçevesinde Türk Bankacılık Sektörü’nde yapılan çalışmaları değerlendirerek sektörün Basel Kriterleri’ne uyum sürecinde hangi aşamada olduğunu incelemek amacıyla yapılmıştır. Çalışmada; Türkiye’de Basel I ve II Kriterleri’ne geçiş süreci: Basel I ve II’ye yönelik yapılan hazırlık çalışmaları , Basel Kriterleri’ne uyum kapsamında Türk Bankacılık Mevzuatı’nda yapılan yasal düzenlemeler ve BDDK tarafından gerçekleştirilen yerel sayısal etki çalışmaları incelenmiş, sektörün Basel II Kriterleri’ne uyum kabiliyeti değerlendirilmiştir. Ayrıca, çalışmada henüz nihaî şekli verilmeyen Basel III Kriterleri’nin Türk Bankacılık Sektörü’ne muhtemel etkileri ele alınmıştır. Türkiye bankacılık kesimi Haziran 2012 itibariyle Basel II kurallarını sorunsuz bir şekilde uygulamayı başarmıştır. Halihazırda dünya genelinde nihai şekli verilmeye çalışılan ve bazı yönlerden ciddi eleştirilere maruz kalan Basel III kurallarına uyum konusunda da Türkiye Bankacılık Kesiminin mevcut verilerin analizinden hareketle bir sıkıntısı olmayacağı anlaşılmaktadır. Diğer taraftan; Türkiye’nin uluslararası kurallara intibak konusunda finansal kesimde göstermiş olduğu söz konusu uyum kabiliyetinin, genel olarak sürdürülebilir büyüme, ekonomik kalkınma ve ülkenin yapısal dönüşümü açısından daha olumlu sonuçlar vermesi, Türkiye ekonomisinin diğer yapısal sorunları ve başlıca makro ekonomik istikrarsızlıklarının çözümüne bağlı olduğu değerlendirilmektedir.COMPLIANCE PROCESS FOR BASEL I, II AND III RULES IN TURKEYAbstract: Considering the preparations undertaken so far by the Turkish Banking sector, this study aims to determine the level of preparedness of Turkish Banks for Basel Criteria. In this study the transition

  6. Delayed fixation of displaced type II and III pediatric femoral neck fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Md

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Time from injury to fixation of femoral neck fractures has been postulated as a vital determinant for rate of complications; however, no prospective study is available in the English literature. Delay, unfortunately, is inevitable in developing countries. The aim of the present study is to retrospectively review the outcome after delayed fixation of displaced type II and III femoral neck fractures in children. Materials and Methods: Using a standard assessment chart, we retrospectively reviewed medical records of all pediatric patients having femoral neck fractures presenting to our institution from June 1999 to May 2006. Inclusion criteria were children between 5 and 15 years of age sustaining displaced Delbet type II and III femoral neck fractures having a complete follow-up of at least 2 years. Patients with known metabolic disease, poliomyelitis or cerebral palsy, were excluded from the study. After application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, 22 patients having 22 fractures (13 type II and 9 type III were studied. Surgery could be performed after a mean delay of 11.22 days (ranging from 2 to 21 days. Closed reduction was achieved in 14 cases and 8 cases required open reduction through anterolateral approach. Result: Osteonecrosis was noted in eight patients (36.37% who included two of nine patients (22.22% operated in the first week, three of eight patients (37.51% operated in the second week, and three of five patients (60% operated in the third week of injury. Nonunion was seen in four (18.18% cases, and two of them were associated with failure of implants. One was treated by valgus osteotomy and the other by Meyer′s procedure. Fractures united in both children but the latter developed avascular necrosis. Functional results, as assessed using Ratliff′s criteria, were good in 14 (63.63%, fair in 2 (9%, and poor in 6 (27.27% patients. Conclusion: Delay in fixation, type of fracture, and ability to achieve and maintain

  7. Quantitative Indicators for Defense Analysis. Volume II. Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-01

    34*"WTOiw«* piB ^ r- ••’ ’ ’■’.WH""" - "«.JH QUAURANT II Hot War JIoL ]War land i Cold I |Criscs War iThreaten ed - Crisis 1...34The Political Analysis of Negotiations," World Politics 26. 3 (April). ^(1971) The Politics of Trade Negotiations Between Africa and the EEC

  8. A thermally stable gold(III) hydride: synthesis, reactivity, and reductive condensation as a route to gold(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roşca, Dragoş-Adrian; Smith, Dan A; Hughes, David L; Bochmann, Manfred

    2012-10-15

    Going for gold: The first thermally stable gold(III) hydride [(C N C)*AuH] is presented. It undergoes regioselective insertions with allenes to give gold(III) vinyl complexes, and reductive condensation with [(C N C)*AuOH] to the air-stable Au(II) product, [(C N C)*(2)Au(2)], with a short nonbridged gold-gold bond.

  9. Oxygen isotope indicators of selenate reaction with Fe(II) and Fe(III) hydroxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenger, Alexandra E P; Larese-Casanova, Philip

    2013-06-18

    Selenate (SeO(4)(2-)) reduction to elemental selenium is an important Se immobilization process in subsurface environments that could be mediated by Fe(II)-rich minerals or selenate-respiring microorganisms. We report the kinetic isotope effects for (18)O within selenate during abiotic reactions with iron-bearing hydroxides within laboratory experiments. Selenate was reduced to Se(0) by a green rust (chloride interlayer type) and ferrous hydroxide, the two known environmentally relevant mineral reductants for selenate. Reaction kinetics are described by a rapid, low-fractionating uptake step caused by diffusive exchange between selenate and chloride followed by a slower, high-fractionating reduction step caused by electron transfer from structural Fe(II). The dual-phase kinetics cannot be described with the traditional Rayleigh fractionation model; however, well after the initial uptake step, the extent of selenate reaction is well correlated with δ(18)O values in accordance with the Rayleigh model. Selenate-(18)O enrichment (εO) was nearly identical for reaction with chloride green rust (22.7 ± 2.2‰) and ferrous hydroxide (22.1 ± 1.1‰) which suggests a common reduction mechanism by structural Fe(II). The minor enrichment due to anion exchange alone (1.4 ± 0.2‰) was confirmed using iowaite, a nonredox active Mg(II)-Fe(III) layered double hydroxide. Our εO results may contribute to Se isotope forensics to identify selenate reduction within field sites and to possibly distinguish between abiotic and biotic reduction processes.

  10. Topics in Optical Materials and Device Research - II. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    34Thermochemical Calculations on the LPCVD of Si3N4 and Si02", Solid State Technology, July 1980 pp.63- 68 . (27) C.E. Ryan, "Recommendations for Low...NY (1968). 5) Marcuse , D., "Theory of Dielectric Optical Waveguides", Academic Press, NY (1974). 6) Marcuse , D., J. Opt. Soc. Am. 66, 216 (1976). 25...34 (Plenum, N.Y., 1979); M.D. Rourke, this volume. 2) M. Sodha and A. Ghatak, "Inhomogeneous Optical Waveguides" (Plenum, N.Y., 1977) Chap. 8.3. 3) D. Marcuse

  11. Study of Stability Constants of Fe (Iii And Mn (Ii with Chloramphenicol by Paper Electrophoretic Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Singh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Stabilty constant of binary complexes of Fe(III and Mn(II with medicinally important ligand chloramphenicol antibiotics in solution were determined by paper electrophoretic technique. Stability constant of the complexes were determined at 25°C temperature and 0.1M (HClO4 ionic strength. Our study is based upon the migration of a spot of metal ions on a paper strip at different pH against mobility gives information about the binary complexes and permits to calculate their stability constant. The stability constant data revealed that chloramphenicol may be used as chelating agent in chelation for medical treatment of metal overload or poisoning.

  12. Cancer Cell Mitochondria Targeting by Pancratistatin Analogs is Dependent on Functional Complex II and III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dennis; Pignanelli, Christopher; Tarade, Daniel; Gilbert, Tyler; Noel, Megan; Mansour, Fadi; Adams, Scott; Dowhayko, Alexander; Stokes, Kyle; Vshyvenko, Sergey; Hudlicky, Tomas; McNulty, James; Pandey, Siyaram

    2017-01-01

    Enhanced mitochondrial stability and decreased dependence on oxidative phosphorylation confer an acquired resistance to apoptosis in cancer cells, but may present opportunities for therapeutic intervention. The compound pancratistatin (PST) has been shown to selectively induce apoptosis in cancer cells. However, its low availability in nature has hindered its clinical advancement. We synthesized PST analogs and a medium-throughput screen was completed. Analogs SVTH-7, -6, and -5 demonstrated potent anti-cancer activity greater than PST and several standard chemotherapeutics. They disrupted mitochondrial function, activated the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, and reduced growth of tumor xenografts in vivo. Interestingly, the pro-apoptotic effects of SVTH-7 on cancer cells and mitochondria were abrogated with the inhibition of mitochondrial complex II and III, suggesting mitochondrial or metabolic vulnerabilities may be exploited by this analog. This work provides a scaffold for characterizing distinct mitochondrial and metabolic features of cancer cells and reveals several lead compounds with high therapeutic potential. PMID:28220885

  13. Dipole model analysis of the new HERA I+II data

    CERN Document Server

    Luszczak, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    We use the dipole model to analyze the inclusive DIS cross section data, obtained from the HERA I+II measurements \\cite{Abramowicz:2015mha}. We show that these combined data are very well described within the dipole model framework, which is complemented with a valence quark structure functions. Our motivation is to investigate the gluon density with the BGK dipole model \\cite{BGK} as an alternative to the PDF approach. BGK dipole model uses for evolution the DGLAP mechanism in the $kt$ factorization scheme (in contrast to the collinear factorization for PDFs). We confirm our results from the previous paper \\cite{Luszczak:2013rxa} with old HERA data \\cite{HERA2010}. In addition we also performed a first, preliminary investigation of saturation. The analysis was done in the xFitter framework \\cite{xFitter,xFitter2,xFitter3,xFitter4,xFitter5}.}

  14. Role of Natural Organic Matter in Regulating the Partitioning of Fe(II, III) in Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, L.; Chen, M.; Roberts, K.; Santschi, P. H.

    2008-12-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential micronutrient and plays an important role in controlling ocean productivity and carbon cycling. Fe has been shown to be mostly complexed with dissolved organic matter in seawater. However, the interaction of Fe with natural organic matter and how the quality and quantity of organic matter affect the chemical speciation of Fe in seawater remain poorly understood. Controlled laboratory experiments have been conducted to examine the partitioning of Fe(II, III) between dissolved, colloidal and particulate phases using radiotracers, model organic compounds, and ultrafiltration. In natural seawater, Fe is mostly partitioned in the colloidal and particulate phases, resulting in a logKd value of 7.3 and a logKc of 6.1, respectively. On average, about 25% of dissolved Fe-55 was found in the complexation of Fe with DOM could depress the bioavailability of Fe in seawater, the resultant Fe reduction may significantly enhance its solubility and bioavailability to marine organisms.

  15. Integrated safety analysis of rolapitant with coadministered drugs from phase II/III trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbour, S; Smit, T.; Wang, X

    2017-01-01

    for treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) and treatment-emergent serious adverse events (TESAEs) during cycle 1 were pooled across the four studies and summarized in the overall population and by concomitant use/non-use of CYP2D6 or BCRP substrate drugs. Results: In the integrated safety population, 828...... cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4, but it does inhibit CYP2D6 and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). To analyze potential drug-drug interactions between rolapitant and concomitant medications, this integrated safety analysis of four double-blind, randomized phase II or III studies of rolapitant examined...... the safety of rolapitant as part of an antiemetic triple-drug regimen in patients receiving emetogenic chemotherapy, including those administered concomitant medications that are substrates of CYP2D6 or BCRP, such as ondansetron, docetaxel, or irinotecan....

  16. Nonisovalent Si-III-V and Si-II-VI alloys: Covalent, ionic, and mixed phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Joongoo; Park, Ji-Sang; Stradins, Pauls; Wei, Su-Huai

    2017-07-01

    Nonequilibrium growth of Si-III-V or Si-II-VI alloys is a promising approach to obtaining optically more active Si-based materials. We propose a new class of nonisovalent Si2AlP (or Si2ZnS) alloys in which the Al-P (or Zn-S) atomic chains are as densely packed as possible in the host Si matrix. As a hybrid of the lattice-matched parent phases, Si2AlP (or Si2ZnS) provides an ideal material system with tunable local chemical orders around Si atoms within the same composition and structural motif. Here, using first-principles hybrid functional calculations, we discuss how the local chemical orders affect the electronic and optical properties of the nonisovalent alloys.

  17. Biosorption of binary mixtures of Cr(III and Cu(II ions by Sargassum sp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva E.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of two metal ions, Cr(III and Cu(II, in single-component and binary systems by Sargassum sp., a brown alga, was studied. Equilibrium batch sorption studies were carried out at 30ºC and pH 3.5. Kinetic tests were done for a binary mixture (chromium + copper for a contact time of 72 hours to guarantee that equilibrium was reached. The monocomponent equilibrium data obtained were analyzed using the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The binary equilibrium data obtained were described using four Langmuir-type and Freundlich isotherms. The F-test showed a statistically significant fit for all binary isotherm models. The parameters for isotherms of the Langmuir-type were used to determine the affinity of one metal for the biosorbent in the presence of another metal. The chromium ion showed a greater affinity for Sargassum sp. than the copper ion.

  18. Partial Paschen-Back splitting of Si ii and Si iii lines in magnetic CP stars†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalack, Viktor; Landstreet, John

    2014-08-01

    A number of prominent spectral lines in the spectra of magnetic A and B main sequence stars are produced by closely spaced doublets or triplets. Depending on the strength and orientation of magnetic field, the PPB magnetic splitting can result in the Stokes I profiles of a spectral line that differ significantly from those predicted by the theory of Zeeman effect. Such lines should be treated using the theory of the partial Paschen-Back (PPB) effect. To estimate the error introduced by the use of the Zeeman approximation, numerical simulations have been performed for Si ii and Si iii lines assuming an oblique rotator model. The analysis indicates that for high precision studies of some spectral lines the PPB approach should be used if the field strength at the magnetic poles is B p > 6-10 kG and V sin i effect.

  19. The role of technology in reducing health care costs. Phase II and phase III.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cilke, John F.; Parks, Raymond C.; Funkhouser, Donald Ray; Tebo, Michael A.; Murphy, Martin D.; Hightower, Marion Michael; Gallagher, Linda K.; Craft, Richard Layne, II; Garcia, Rudy John

    2004-04-01

    In Phase I of this project, reported in SAND97-1922, Sandia National Laboratories applied a systems approach to identifying innovative biomedical technologies with the potential to reduce U.S. health care delivery costs while maintaining care quality. The effort provided roadmaps for the development and integration of technology to meet perceived care delivery requirements and an economic analysis model for development of care pathway costs for two conditions: coronary artery disease (CAD) and benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Phases II and III of this project, which are presented in this report, were directed at detailing the parameters of telemedicine that influence care delivery costs and quality. These results were used to identify and field test the communication, interoperability, and security capabilities needed for cost-effective, secure, and reliable health care via telemedicine.

  20. The effect of laparoscopic surgery in stage II and III right-sided colon cancer: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kye Bong-Hyeon

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This retrospective study compared the clinicopathological results among three groups divided by time sequence to evaluate the impact of introducing laparoscopic surgery on long-term oncological outcomes for right-sided colon cancer. Methods From April 1986 to December 2006, 200 patients who underwent elective surgery with stage II and III right-sided colon cancer were analyzed. The period for group I referred back to the time when laparoscopic approach had not yet been introduced. The period for group II was designated as the time when first laparoscopic approach for right colectomy was carried out until we overcame its learning curve. The period for group III was the period after overcoming this learning curve. Results When groups I and II, and groups II and III were compared, overall survival (OS did not differ significantly whereas disease-free survival (DFS in groups I and III were statistically higher than in group II (P = 0.042 and P = 0.050. In group III, laparoscopic surgery had a tendency to provide better long-term OS ( P = 0.2036 and DFS ( P = 0.2356 than open surgery. Also, the incidence of local recurrence in group III (2.6% was significantly lower than that in groups II (7.4% and I (12.1% ( P = 0.013. Conclusions Institutions should standardize their techniques and then provide fellowship training for newcomers of laparoscopic colon cancer surgery. This technique once mastered will become the gold standard approach to colon surgery as it is both safe and feasible considering the oncological and technical aspects.

  1. A family of acetato-diphenoxo triply bridged dimetallic Zn(II)Ln(III) complexes: SMM behavior and luminescent properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarzabal, Itziar; Artetxe, Beñat; Rodríguez-Diéguez, Antonio; García, JoséÁngel; Seco, José Manuel; Colacio, Enrique

    2016-06-21

    Eleven dimetallic Zn(II)-Ln(III) complexes of the general formula [Zn(µ-L)(µ-OAc)Ln(NO3)2]·CH3CN (Ln(III) = Pr (1), Nd (2), Sm (3), Eu (4), Gd (5), Tb (6), Dy (7), Ho (8), Er (9), Tm (10), Yb (11)) have been prepared in a one-pot reaction from the compartmental ligand N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-bis(2-hydroxy-3-formyl-5-bromo-benzyl)ethylenediamine (H2L). In all these complexes, the Zn(II) ions occupy the internal N2O2 site whereas the Ln(III) ions show preference for the O4 external site. Both metallic ions are bridged by an acetate bridge, giving rise to triple mixed diphenoxido/acetate bridged Zn(II)Ln(III) compounds. The Nd, Dy, Er and Yb complexes exhibit field induced single-ion magnet (SIM) behaviour, with Ueff values ranging from 14.12 to 41.55 K. The Er complex shows two relaxation processes, but only the second relaxation process with an energy barrier of 21.0 K has been characterized. The chromophoric L(2-) ligand is able to act as an "antenna" group, sensitizing the near-infrared (NIR) Nd(III) and Yb(III)-based luminescence in complexes 2 and 11 and therefore, both compounds can be considered as magneto-luminescent materials. In addition, the Sm(III), Eu(III) and Tb(III) derivatives exhibit characteristic emissions in the visible region.

  2. Photodynamic therapy of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grades II and III with Photolon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istomin, Y P; Lapzevich, T P; Chalau, V N; Shliakhtsin, S V; Trukhachova, T V

    2010-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to test in clinics a previously developed novel organ-saving approach for the treatment of CIN using PDT with the photosensitizer Photolon applied in women of a childbearing age with CIN II and III. A total number of 112 patients aged 35.2+/-1.6 with morphologically proven diagnosis of CIN II and III were enrolled into the study. All 112 patients had been observed at least during 1-year follow-up period after PDT. Among them 53 patients (44.1%) were subjected to a dynamic observation for less than 2 years; 29 patients (24.1%) were under the observation for less than 3 years; 13 patients (10.8%) - for 3-4 years and 17 women - for more than 4 years. A complete response represented by the complete regression of neoplastic lesions, which was proved by the results of morphological examinations, was revealed in 104 (92.8%) of treated women. In 3 months after treatment a complete eradication of the HPV infection was proven by PCR-analysis in 47 (53.4%) from 88 patients who have been infected with HPV of a highly oncogenic strains before PDT. PDT with Photolon is an alternative approach for the treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia which can be recommended for women of childbearing age. The simplicity of the procedure as well as its' high therapeutic efficacy defines the reasonability of its' introduction into the clinical practice as a new organ-saving method for the treatment of patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

  3. Self-esteem in adolescents with Angle Class I, II and III malocclusion in a Peruvian sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florián-Vargas, Karla; Honores, Marcos J Carruitero; Bernabé, Eduardo; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    To compare self-esteem scores in 12 to 16-year-old adolescents with different Angle malocclusion types in a Peruvian sample. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 276 adolescents (159, 52 and 65 with Angle Class I, II and III malocclusions, respectively) from Trujillo, Peru. Participants were asked to complete the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) and were also clinically examined, so as to have Angle malocclusion classification determined. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to compare RSES scores among adolescents with Class I, II and III malocclusions, with participants' demographic factors being controlled. Mean RSES scores for adolescents with Class I, II and III malocclusions were 20.47 ± 3.96, 21.96 ± 3.27 and 21.26 ± 4.81, respectively. The ANCOVA test showed that adolescents with Class II malocclusion had a significantly higher RSES score than those with Class I malocclusion, but there were no differences between other malocclusion groups. Supplemental analysis suggested that only those with Class II, Division 2 malocclusion might have greater self-esteem when compared to adolescents with Class I malocclusion. This study shows that, in general, self-esteem did not vary according to adolescents' malocclusion in the sample studied. Surprisingly, only adolescents with Class II malocclusion, particularly Class II, Division 2, reported better self-esteem than those with Class I malocclusion. A more detailed analysis assessing the impact of anterior occlusal features should be conducted.

  4. Isolation of four new CoII/CoIII and NiII complexes with a pentadentate Schiff base ligand: syntheses, structural descriptions and magnetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sambuddha; Nandy, Madhusudan; Sen, Soma; Mandal, Sandip; Rosair, Georgina M; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Gómez García, Carlos J; Clemente-Juan, Juan M; Zangrando, Ennio; Guidolin, Nicol; Mitra, Samiran

    2011-02-28

    In this paper we report the temperature and pH dependent syntheses and systematic characterization of four new Co(II)/Co(III) and Ni(II) complexes with a pentadentate Schiff base ligand H(3)L obtained by condensing 1,3,-diaminopropan-2-ol with 2-hydroxyacetophenone in 1:2 molar ratio. The room temperature syntheses involving Co(II) and Ni(II) nitrates and the ligand H(3)L lead to the isolation of the dinuclear species [Co(2)L(2)(H(2)O)] (1), and the mononuclear complex [Ni(LH)] (3), respectively, whereas refluxing at basic pH leads to the tetranuclear complexes, [Co(II)(2)Co(III)(2)L(2)(μ(3)-OMe)(2)(NO(3))(H(2)O)(2)]NO(3)·2(H(2)O) (2), and [Ni(4)L(2)(μ(3)-OMe)(2)(H(2)O)(2)]·2H(2)O (4). 1 is found to be a simple mono alkoxo-bridged Co(III) dinuclear species, whereas 2 and 4 are both rhomb-like tetrameric complexes with double oxo bridges and μ(3)-methoxo bridges, derived from the methanol solvent, in an open dicubane arrangement. Moreover 2 shows six coordinate ordered Co(II) and Co(III) ions and 4 has both six- and five-coordinate Ni(II) centers. Compound 3 is assigned a tentative mononuclear structure based on IR, UV-Vis spectroscopic, (1)H-NMR and ESI mass study results and is supposed to have one Ni(II) center coordinated with a ligand fragment in square planar geometry. The variable temperature magnetic susceptibility study for 2 and 4 is performed which indicate for both 2 and 4 the presence of intracluster dominant ferromagnetic interactions.

  5. Biosorption of Ni(II), Cr(III), and Co(II) from Solutions Using Acalypha hispida Leaf: Kinetics, Equilibrium, and Thermodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Adesola Babarinde; J. Oyebamiji Babalola; John Adegoke; Osundeko, Adebola O.; Susan Olasehinde; Adetayo Omodehin; Emmanuel Nurhe

    2013-01-01

    Biosorption studies were conducted to study the removal of Ni(II), Cr(III), and Co(II) from aqueous solution of Acalypha hispida leaf. The FTIR spectral characteristics of Acalypha hispida leaf revealed the presence of ioniazable groups that could participate in the binding of metal ions in solution. The kinetic, equilibrium, and thermodynamic studies of the biosorption of the metal ions were investigated using various physicochemical parameters; each parameter was found to affect the biosorp...

  6. Celdas galvánicas. Montaje y comprobación de la celda constituida por los pares Fe(III)/Fe(II)y Cu(II)/Cu.

    OpenAIRE

    Milla González, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Se dispone de disoluciones de sulfato de cobre(II), sulfato de hierro(II) y nitrato de Fe(III), de un potenciómetro, un puente salino y electrodos de Cu y de grafito. Con las disoluciones citadas, montar una celda galvánica y medir su potencial. Son posibles todas las combinaciones tanto en el compartimento anódico como en el catódico.

  7. Spectrophotometric Study of Stability Constants of Cr(III, Ni(II and Cu(II Complexes with a Schiff’s Base in Different Solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel Leka Lere

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Complexation of Cr(III, Ni(II and Cu(II with para-dimethylaminoanil of ortho-hydroxyphenylglyoxal Schiff’s base in methanol, ethanol and acetone solvents has been studied spectrophotometrically at room temperature (298K. The stoichiometry and stability of the complexes were determined using mole-ratio method. Stability data shows solvent-wise stability order as methanol > ethanol > acetone.

  8. Rheumatic disease in a Philippine village. II: a WHO-ILAR-APLAR COPCORD study, phases II and III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigley, R; Manahan, L; Muirden, K D; Caragay, R; Pinfold, B; Couchman, K G; Valkenburg, H A

    1991-01-01

    Many difficulties were encountered in a population survey of rheumatic complaints in a remote village area in the Philippines affecting the reliability of estimates of population prevalence. In phase I, a simple questionnaire identified 269 adults out of 950 who had rheumatic symptoms. In Phase II, 234 or 87% of positive respondents were requestioned using a more detailed pro forma. There were 196 with peripheral joint pain, 67 with neck pain and 137 with back pain. One third attributed their symptoms to work and 127 subjects had to stop work because of their complaints. Disability, including an inability to carry loads, affected nearly 1.8% of the population. Questions designed to detect rheumatoid arthritis and gout were not satisfactorily answered. Of those with complaints, 82% indicated that they still required help for their symptoms. In phase III, 166 subjects were medically examined. Osteoarthritis of the knee was found in 25 and 17 had Heberden's nodes. There were 16 with epicondylitis; 16 had rotator cuff pain and 35 had levator scapulae insertion pain. Three of these and three others had neck or shoulder swellings related to carrying loads on poles. Definite rheumatoid arthritis was diagnosed in two subjects and gout in five. No case of ankylosing spondylitis was identified. Thus, rheumatic complaints were common in this rural community and were frequently severe enough to cause disability and loss of time from work. Health worker education is required on how to handle these problems.

  9. Tuning the chromaticity of the emission color of the copolymers containing Eu(III), Tb(III), Be(II) ions based on colorimetric principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aiqin; Yang, Yamin; Zhai, Guangmei; Jia, Husheng; Xu, Bingshe

    2016-02-01

    In this work, a method of tuning the chromaticity of the emission color of the copolymers containing Eu(III), Tb(III), Be(II) ions based on colorimetric principle was proposed. The technological route from coordination to copolymerization was employed to obtain the white light macromolecular phosphor. The three primary color monomers have been synthesized and their Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates are respectively (0.540, 0.314), (0.231, 0.463), and (0.161, 0.054). The molar feed ratios of the three primary color monomers were calculated from the CIE coordinates based on colorimetric principle. Serial copolymers have been synthesized by free radical copolymerization of the three primary color monomers and methyl methacrylate. The quantum efficiency of the copolymers was higher than that of the complex monomers. The complexes were directly boned to the polymer chain, in which the energy transfer was reduced significantly compared to the doped-polymers. The experimental values of copolymers' CIE coordinates were located in the white light region in good agreement with theoretical values. The results indicate that the chromaticity of the emission color of the copolymers containing Eu(III), Tb(III), Be(II) ions could be tuned by theoretical calculation based on colorimetric principle.

  10. Macrophage markers in serum and tumor have prognostic impact in American Joint Committee on Cancer stage I/II melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T.O.; Schmidt, H.; Moller, H.J.;

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the prognostic role of soluble CD163 (sCD163) in serum and macrophage infiltration in primary melanomas from patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage I/II melanoma. The scavenger receptor CD163 is associated with anti-inflammatory macrophages, and it is s......PURPOSE: To evaluate the prognostic role of soluble CD163 (sCD163) in serum and macrophage infiltration in primary melanomas from patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage I/II melanoma. The scavenger receptor CD163 is associated with anti-inflammatory macrophages...

  11. Adsorption of iron(III), cobalt(II), and nickel(II) on activated carbon derived from Xanthoceras Sorbifolia Bunge hull: mechanisms, kinetics and influencing parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaotao; Hao, Yinan; Wang, Ximing; Chen, Zhangjing

    2017-04-01

    Xanthoceras Sorbifolia Bunge hull activated carbon (XSA) was prepared and characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. The ability of XSA as an adsorbent was investigated for the removal of the iron group ions Fe(III), Co(II), and Ni(II) from aqueous solution. Optimum adsorption parameters were determined based on the initial concentrations of the iron group ions, pH, adsorption temperature, and adsorption time in adsorption studies. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacities were 241.13 mg/g for Fe(III), 126.05 mg/g for Co(II), and 187.96 mg/g for Ni(II), respectively. Adsorption kinetics and isotherms showed that the adsorption process best fitted the nonlinear pseudo-second-order and Langmuir models, and the affinity of the ions for XSA decreased as follows: Fe(III) > Ni(II) > Co(II). Regeneration studies indicated that XSA could be used after several consecutive adsorption/desorption cycles using HNO3. Fourier transform infrared and EDX spectra revealed the chemical adsorption value of XSA as an adsorbent for removing iron group ions from aqueous solutions.

  12. Construct validity of the Bender-Gestalt II: comparison with Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Scott L; Allen, Ryan; Choca, James P

    2006-02-01

    This study investigated the relationships of visuomotor constructs as measured by the Bender-Gestalt II with the subtests of the WISC-III. A factor analysis included the standardized Copy and Recall scores of the Bender-Gestalt II and subtest scores of the WISC-III. The Copy score was predicted to load on measures of visual and spatial thinking and the Recall score on a short-term memory factor. The results of a principal components analysis suggest a four-factor solution with the Bender-Gestalt II Copy score loading on a visual and spatial thinking factor primarily with WISC-III Perceptual Organization subtests. The Recall score loaded on a visual and spatial thinking factor as well as a short-term memory factor with the WISC-III Digit Span subtest. The results suggest the Bender-Gestalt II Copy subtest shared commonality with the visual and spatial tasks given the similarity in the visuomotor demands of each test and was less influenced by processing speed or cultural knowledge than other tests on the visual and spatial thinking factor. Also, results suggest Bender-Gestalt II Recall measures elements of both visual and spatial thinking as well as aspects of short-term memory and memory retrieval. Clinical guidelines for co-administration and underlying processing demands are discussed.

  13. Commingled uranium-tailings study. Volume II. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-06-30

    Public Law 96-540, Section 213, directs the Secretary of Energy to develop a plan for a cooperative program to provide assistance in the stabilization and management of defense-related uranium mill tailings commingled with other tailings. In developing the plan, the Secretary is further directed to: (1) establish the amount and condition of tailings generated under federal contracts; (2) examine appropriate methodologies for establishing the extent of federal assistance; and (3) consult with the owners and operators of each site. This technical report summarizes US Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor activities in pursuit of items (1), (2), and (3) above. Recommendations regarding policy and a cooperative plan for federal assistance are under separate cover as Volume I.

  14. Heptanuclear Co(II)5Co(III)2 Cluster as Efficient Water Oxidation Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jia-Heng; Guo, Ling-Yu; Su, Hai-Feng; Gao, Xiang; Wu, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Wen-Guang; Tung, Chen-Ho; Sun, Di

    2017-02-06

    Inspired by the transition-metal-oxo cubical Mn4CaO5 in photosystem II, we herein report a disc-like heptanuclear mixed-valent cobalt cluster, [Co(II)5Co(III)2(mdea)4(N3)2(CH3CN)6(OH)2(H2O)2·4ClO4] (1, H2mdea = N-methyldiethanolamine), for photocatalytic oxygen evolution. The topology of the Co7 core resembles a small piece of cobaltate protected by terminal H2O, N3(-), CH3CN, and multidentate N-methyldiethanolamine at the periphery. Under the optimal photocatalytic conditions, 1 exhibits water oxidation activity with a turnover number (TON) of 210 and a turnover frequency (TOFinitial) of 0.23 s(-1). Importantly, electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was used to not only identify the possible main active species in the water oxidation reaction but also monitor the evolutions of oxidation states of cobalt during the photocatalytic reactions. These results shed light on the design concept of new water oxidation catalysts and mechanism-related issues such as the key active intermediate and oxidation state evolution in the oxygen evolution process. The magnetic properties of 1 were also discussed in detail.

  15. Type I/II cytokines, JAKs, and new strategies for treating autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Daniella M; Bonelli, Michael; Gadina, Massimo; O'Shea, John J

    2016-01-01

    Cytokines are major drivers of autoimmunity, and biologic agents targeting cytokines have revolutionized the treatment of immune-mediated diseases. Despite the effectiveness of these drugs, they do not induce complete remission in all patients, prompting the development of alternative strategies - including targeting of intracellular signal transduction pathways downstream of cytokines. Many cytokines that bind type I and type II cytokine receptors are critical regulators of immune-mediated diseases and employ the Janus kinase (JAK) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway to exert their effect. Pharmacological inhibition of JAKs blocks the actions of type I/II cytokines, and within the past 3 years therapeutic JAK inhibitors, or Jakinibs, have become available to rheumatologists. Jakinibs have proven effective for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory diseases. Adverse effects of these agents are largely related to their mode of action and include infections and hyperlipidemia. Jakinibs are currently being investigated for a number of new indications, and second-generation selective Jakinibs are being developed and tested. Targeting STATs could be a future avenue for the treatment of rheumatologic diseases, although substantial challenges remain. Nonetheless, the ability to therapeutically target intracellular signalling pathways has already created a new paradigm for the treatment of rheumatologic disease.

  16. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF COAL-FIRED HIGH PERFORMANCE POWER SYSTEMS PHASE II AND III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-30

    This report presents work carried out under contract DE-AC22-95PC95144 "Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High Performance Systems Phase II and III." The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: à thermal efficiency (HHV) >47%; à NOx, SOx, and particulates <10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard); à coal providing >65% of heat input; à all solid wastes benign; à cost of electricity <90% of present plants. Phase I, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase I also included preliminary R&D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase II, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: à Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; à Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  17. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume III - Groundwater Recharge and Discharge Data Documentation Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-10-01

    Volume III of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the data covering groundwater recharge and discharge. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  18. Technical and economic assessment of fluidized bed augmented compressed air energy storage system. Volume III. Preconceptual design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giramonti, A.J.; Lessard, R.D.; Merrick, D.; Hobson, M.J.

    1981-09-01

    A technical and economic assessment of fluidized bed combustion augmented compressed air energy storage systems is presented. The results of this assessment effort are presented in three volumes. Volume III - Preconceptual Design contains the system analysis which led to the identification of a preferred component configuration for a fluidized bed combustion augmented compressed air energy storage system, the results of the effort which transformed the preferred configuration into preconceptual power plant design, and an introductory evaluation of the performance of the power plant system during part-load operation and while load following.

  19. Synthesis, structural, spectral, thermal and antimicrobial studies of palladium(II), platinum(II), ruthenium(III) and iridium(III) complexes derived from N,N,N,N-tetradentate macrocyclic ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Soni; Kumar, Sumit; Chandra, Sulekh

    2011-05-01

    Palladium(II), platinum(II), ruthenium(III) and iridium(III) complexes of general stoichiometry [PdL]Cl(2), [PtL]Cl(2), [Ru(L)Cl(2)]Cl and [Ir(L)Cl(2)]Cl are synthesized with a tetradentate macrocyclic ligand, derived from 2,6-diaminopyridine with 3-ethyl 2,4-pentanedione. Ligand was characterized on the basis of elemental analyses, IR, mass, and (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectral studies. All the complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance measurements, magnetic susceptibility measurements, IR, mass, electronic spectral techniques and thermal studies. The value of magnetic moments indicates that all the complexes are diamagnetic except Ru(III) complex which shows magnetic moments corresponding its one unpaired electron. The macrocyclic ligand and all its metal complexes were also evaluated in vitro against some plant pathogenic fungi and bacteria to assess their biocidal properties.

  20. Research Papers Sponsored by the Commission on Private Philanthropy and Public Needs. Volume II: Philanthropic Fields of Interest, Part II-Additional Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of the Treasury, Washington, DC.

    Twelve papers discuss future changes and trends in philanthropic giving and activities. The report is Volume II, Part II of a five volume series examining the relationship between nonprofit institutions and their donors. The opening paper reviews the needs for better definition of the government's role in contracting and grant making, and for…

  1. Separation and isolation of human apolipoproteins C-II, C-III0, C-III1, and C-III2 by chromatofocusing on the Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, M W; Strong, W L

    1987-09-01

    Chromatofocusing, which separates proteins based on differences in isoelectric point, has been used on the Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography (FPLC) system (Pharmacia) to separate the C apolipoproteins from human very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). Using a Mono P column (Pharmacia), a pH gradient between pH 6.2 and pH 4.0 was generated using buffers containing 6 M urea, at a flow rate of 0.5 ml/min. Typically, runs took approximately 45 min. Chromatofocusing of delipidated whole VLDL produced sharp, well-resolved peaks for the C apolipoproteins. However, as determined by analytical isoelectric focusing (IEF), the apolipoprotein E isoforms were not separated from apoC-II, and they contaminated the other apoC species to a variable extent. In addition, apoC-II was not resolved from apoC-III0. Preliminary precipitation of VLDL with acetone prior to delipidation removed both apolipoproteins E and B. Using a start buffer of 25 mM histidine, pH 6.2, and a 1:30 dilution of the polybuffer exchanger (eluting buffer), apoC-II, C-III0, C-III1, and C-III2 were well resolved in run-times of approximately 60 min. The C apoproteins proved to be pure by analytical IEF and immunoassay with monospecific antisera against apoC-II and C-III. Recovery was over 90% of the protein chromatographed. In addition, a variant of apoC-II present in VLDL of a hypertriglyceridemic subject was clearly resolved from the other C apolipoproteins. This technique is superior to conventional methodology in terms of its time saving and high resolution. The application of this technique to the study of C apolipoprotein variants and C apolipoprotein specific radioactivity determinations is possible.

  2. A photometric survey for Lyalpha-HeII dual emitters: Searching for Population III stars in high-redshift galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Nagao, Tohru; Maiolino, Roberto; Grady, Celestine; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Ly, Chun; Malkan, Matthew; Motohara, Kentaro; Murayama, Takashi; Schaerer, Daniel; Shioya, Yasuhiro; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki

    2008-01-01

    We present a new photometric search for high-z galaxies hosting Population III (PopIII) stars based on deep intermediate-band imaging observations obtained in the Subaru Deep Field (SDF), by using Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope. By combining our new data with the existing broad-band and narrow-band data, we searched for galaxies which emit strongly both in Ly_alpha and in HeII 1640 (``dual emitters'') that are promising candidates for PopIII-hosting galaxies, at 3.93 2 Msun/yr was found by our photometric search in 4.03 x 10^5 Mpc^3 in the SDF. This result disfavors low feedback models for PopIII star clusters, and implies an upper-limit of the PopIII SFR density of SFRD_PopIII < 5 x 10^-6 Msun/yr/Mpc^3. This new selection method to search for PopIII-hosting galaxies should be useful in future narrow-band surveys to achieve the first observational detection of PopIII-hosting galaxies at high redshifts.

  3. Conceptual design and systems analysis of photovoltaic systems. Volume II. Study results. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirpich, A.

    1977-03-19

    This investigation of terrestrial PV systems considered the technical and economic feasibility for systems in three size categories: a small system of about 12 kW peak output for on-site residential use; a large 1500 MW central power plant contributing to the bulk energy of a utility system power grid; and an intermediate size system of about 250 kW for use on public or commercial buildings. In each category, conceptual designs were developed, performance was analyzed for a range of climatic regions, economic analyses were performed, and assessments were made of pertinent institutional issues. The report consists of three volumes. Volume I contains a Study Summary of the major study results. This volume contains the detailed results pertaining to on-site residential photovoltaic systems, central power plant photovoltaic systems, and intermediate size systems applied to commercial and public buildings. Volume III contains supporting appendix material. (WHK)

  4. Comparing the utility of DSM-5 Section II and III antisocial personality disorder diagnostic approaches for capturing psychopathic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Few, Lauren R; Lynam, Donald R; Maples, Jessica L; MacKillop, James; Miller, Joshua D

    2015-01-01

    The current study compares the 2 diagnostic approaches (Section II vs. Section III) included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders-5 (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013) for diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) in terms of their relations with psychopathic traits and externalizing behaviors (EBs). The Section III approach to ASPD, which is more explicitly trait-based than the Section II approach, also includes a psychopathy specifier (PS) that was created with the goal of making the diagnosis of ASPD more congruent with psychopathy. In a community sample of individuals currently receiving mental health treatment (N = 106), ratings of the 2 DSM-5 diagnostic approaches were compared in relation to measures of psychopathy, as well as indices of EBs. Both DSM-5 ASPD approaches were significantly related to the psychopathy scores, although the Section III approach accounted for almost twice the amount of variance when compared with the Section II approach. Relatively little of this predictive advantage, however, was due to the PS, as these traits manifested little evidence of incremental validity in relation to existing psychopathy measures and EBs, with the exception of a measure of fearless dominance. Overall, the DSM-5 Section III diagnostic approach for ASPD is more convergent with the construct of psychopathy, from which ASPD was originally derived. These improvements, however, are due primarily to the new trait-based focus in the Section III ASPD diagnosis rather than the assessment of personality dysfunction or the inclusion of additional "psychopathy-specific" traits.

  5. Removal of Cr(III), Ni(II) and Cu(II) by poly(gamma-glutamic acid) from Bacillus subtilis NX-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jun; Xu, Hong; Wang, Jun; Jiang, Min; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2007-01-01

    Poly(gamma-glutamic acid) (gamma-PGA) derived from Bacillus subtilis NX-2 was investigated as a sorbent for heavy metal ions in batch adsorption experiments. The results showed that the heavy metal adsorption capacity of gamma-PGA enhanced with the increase of pH, in the following order: Cr(III) > Cu(II) > Ni(II), within the pH range 3-5. The Langmuir sorption model effectively described the metal sorption of y-PGA through the experiments of isotherm sorption, and it was deduced that the affinity of gamma-PGA for metals was following the sequence: Cr(III) > Cu(II) > Ni(II). Gamma-PGA was also used to trap trace amounts of heavy metals from the electroplating wastewater, which were difficult to be entirely removed by the traditional hydroxide precipitation method. The results showed that Cr(III) and Ni(II) in the electroplating effluent decreased from 3.07 and 9.46 mg/l to 0.15 and 1.01 mg/l, respectively, and the treated solutions reached the effluent standard. Therefore, gamma-PGA is satisfactory as a well biosorbent for the removal of heavy metals. The adsorption mechanism of gamma-PGA binding heavy metals was also studied using HyperChem simulation and FT-IR.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of Ni(II, Cu(II and Co(III complexes with polyamine-containing macrocycles bearing an aminoethyl pendant arm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. SIDDIQI

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Reaction of [M(ppn2]X2 (where M = Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II and ppn = 1,3-diaminopropane with formaldehyde and ethylenediamine in methanol results in the ready formation of a 16-membered macrocyclic complex. The complexes were characterized by elemental anlysis, IR, EPR, electronic spectral data, magnetic moments and conductance measurements. The Cu(II, Ni(II and Co(III complexes are coordinated axially with both pendant groups of the hexadentate macrocycle. These pendant donors are attached to the macrocycle by a carbon chain. The electrical conductivities of the Cu(II and Ni(II chelates indicated them to be 1:2 electrolytes whilst those of Co(III is a 1:3 electrolyte in DMSO. The EPR spectrum of the copper complex exhibited G at 3.66, which indicates a considerable exchange interaction in the complex. Spectroscopic evidence suggests that in all of the complexes the metal ion is in an octahedral environment.

  7. Fe(III)EDTA and Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction by a sulfate reducing bacterium in NO and SO₂ scrubbing liquor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingxiang; Zhou, Jiti; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Xiaojun; Shi, Zhuang; Wang, Xiaowei

    2015-03-01

    A viable process concept, based on NO and SO2 absorption into an alkaline Fe(II)EDTA (EDTA: ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) solution in a scrubber combined with biological reduction of the absorbed SO2 utilizing sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and regeneration of the scrubbing liquor in a single bioreactor, was developed. The SRB, Desulfovibrio sp. CMX, was used and its sulfate reduction performances in FeEDTA solutions and Fe(II)EDTA-NO had been investigated. In this study, the detailed regeneration process of Fe(II)EDTA solution, which contained Fe(III)EDTA and Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction processes in presence of D. sp. CMX and sulfate, was evaluated. Fe(III)EDTA and Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction processes were primarily biological, even if Fe(III)EDTA and Fe(II)EDTA-NO could also be chemically convert to Fe(II)EDTA by biogenic sulfide. Regardless presence or absence of sulfate, more than 87 % Fe(III)EDTA and 98 % Fe(II)EDTA-NO were reduced in 46 h, respectively. Sulfate and Fe(III)EDTA had no affection on Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction. Sulfate enhanced final Fe(III)EDTA reduction. Effect of Fe(III)EDTA on Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction rate was more obvious than effect of sulfate on Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction rate before 8 h. To overcome toxicity of Fe(II)EDTA-NO on SRB, Fe(II)EDTA-NO was reduced first and the reduction of Fe(III)EDTA and sulfate occurred after 2 h. First-order Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction rate and zero-order Fe(III)EDTA reduction rate were detected respectively before 8 h.

  8. Composition and anion ordering in some Fe II-III hydroxysalt green rusts (carbonate, oxalate, methanoate): The fougerite mineral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Génin, Jean-Marie R.; Ruby, Christian

    2008-03-01

    Main features of Fe II-III hydroxysalts (green rusts) are obtained from XRD. Moreover, Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed that several Fe II sites exist. The structure is classified in green rusts one and two (GR1 and GR2) according to the stacking sequence of Fe(OH) 2 brucite-like layers depending on the shape and type of anions inserted within interlayers. Long range order as determined for hydroxysulphate GR2(SO 42-) is extended to distributions of cations and anions within GR1s even though these are not observed by XRD. Abundances of Fe II and Fe III environments within GR1s that intercalate carbonate, oxalate and methanoate (formate) are found for compositions [Fe 6IIFe 2III(OH) 16] 2+·[CO 32-·5H 2O] 2-, [Fe 4IIFe 2III(OH) 12] 2+·[CO 32-·3H 2O] 2-, [Fe 6IIFe 2III(OH) 16] 2+·[C 2O 42-·4H 2O] 2- and [Fe 5IIFe 2III(OH) 14] 2+·[2HCOO -·3H 2O] 2-, which correspond to orders α, β and γ where the cation distances are (2 × a0), (√3 × a0) or a mixture of both, with a ferric molar ratio x = {[Fe III]/[Fe total]} = 1/4, 1/3 and 2/7, respectively. Anion distributions within interlayers are devised and long range orders in other layered double hydroxides could questionably be extended from these models. The formula [Fe 6II(1- x) Fe 6 xIIIO 12H 2(7-3 x) ] 2+·[CO 32-·3H 2O] 2- for the fougerite mineral, which is the oxyhydroxycarbonate obtained by deprotonation of Fe II-III hydroxycarbonate [Fe 4IIFe 2III(OH) 12] 2+·[CO 32-·3H 2O] 2- where x ∈ [1/3,2/3] is confirmed.

  9. Identification of sodium channel isoforms that mediate action potential firing in lamina I/II spinal cord neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Paula L

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Voltage-gated sodium channels play key roles in acute and chronic pain processing. The molecular, biophysical, and pharmacological properties of sodium channel currents have been extensively studied for peripheral nociceptors while the properties of sodium channel currents in dorsal horn spinal cord neurons remain incompletely understood. Thus far, investigations into the roles of sodium channel function in nociceptive signaling have primarily focused on recombinant channels or peripheral nociceptors. Here, we utilize recordings from lamina I/II neurons withdrawn from the surface of spinal cord slices to systematically determine the functional properties of sodium channels expressed within the superficial dorsal horn. Results Sodium channel currents within lamina I/II neurons exhibited relatively hyperpolarized voltage-dependent properties and fast kinetics of both inactivation and recovery from inactivation, enabling small changes in neuronal membrane potentials to have large effects on intrinsic excitability. By combining biophysical and pharmacological channel properties with quantitative real-time PCR results, we demonstrate that functional sodium channel currents within lamina I/II neurons are predominantly composed of the NaV1.2 and NaV1.3 isoforms. Conclusions Overall, lamina I/II neurons express a unique combination of functional sodium channels that are highly divergent from the sodium channel isoforms found within peripheral nociceptors, creating potentially complementary or distinct ion channel targets for future pain therapeutics.

  10. The Rome II and Rome III criteria identify the same subtype-populations in irritable bowel syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsbro, A L; Simrén, M; Bytzer, P

    2012-01-01

    For comparing trials using different classifications for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) subtypes, it is important to know whether these identify the same sub-populations. Our aim was to determine the agreement between Rome II and Rome III subtypes, and to explore whether agreement depends...

  11. Adjuvant 5FU plus levamisole in colonic or rectal cancer: improved survival in stage II and III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taal, B G; Van Tinteren, H; Zoetmulder, F A

    2001-11-16

    Based on the first favourable results of adjuvant therapy of 5FU plus levamisole in Dukes C colonic cancer in 1990, we conducted a prospective trial. 1029 patients were randomised to receive one year 5FU plus levamisole or no further treatment following curative surgery for stage II or III colon (n = 730) or rectal cancer (n = 299). 45% were in stage II and 55% in stage III. With a median follow-up of 4 years and 9 months a significant reduction in odds of death (25%, SD 9%, P = 0.007) was observed for those with adjuvant treatment (65% at 5 year) compared to the observation group (55%). Improved relative survival was present in stage III (56% vs 44%), and in stage II patients (78% vs 70%). In rectal cancer a non-significant difference in disease-free or overall survival was observed. Distant metastases developed in 76%, while local recurrence alone occurred in 14%. An early start of adjuvant treatment (5FU plus levamisole was 69%. Severe toxicity did not occur. In conclusion, one year 5FU plus levamisole was of benefit in stage II and III colonic cancer; in rectal cancer a significant positive effect could not be demonstrated.

  12. A comparative study for the ion exchange of Fe(III) and Zn(II) on zeolite NaY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostroski, Indianara C; Barros, Maria A S D; Silva, Edson A; Dantas, João H; Arroyo, Pedro A; Lima, Oswaldo C M

    2009-01-30

    The uptake capacity of Fe(III) and Zn(II) ions in NaY zeolite was investigated. Experiments were carried out in a fixed bed column at 30 degrees C, pH 3.5 and 4.5 for Fe(III) and Zn(II), respectively, and an average particle size of 0.180 mm. In order to minimize the diffusional resistances the influence of flow rate on the breakthrough curves at feed concentrations of 1.56 meq/L for Fe(III) and 0.844 meq/L for Zn(II) was investigated. Flow rate of the minimal resistance in the bed according to mass transfer parameter were 2.0 mL/min for iron and 8.0 mL/min for zinc ions. Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models have been used to represent the column equilibrium data. The iron dynamic isotherm was successfully modeled by the Langmuir equation and this mathematical model described well the experimental breakthrough curves for feed concentrations from 0.1 up to 3.5 meq/L. The zinc dynamic isotherm was successfully modeled by the Freundlich equation. This equilibrium model was applied to mathematical model. Experimental breakthrough curves could be predicted. Experiments were also carried out in a batch reactor to investigate the kinetics adsorption of the ions Fe(III) and Zn(II). Langmuir kinetic model fit well both experimental data.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of dinuclear complexes containing the Fe(III)-F...(H2O)M(II) motif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghiladi, M; Jensen, K.B.; Jiang, Jianzhong;

    1999-01-01

    The dinucleating phenolate-hinged ligand 4-tert-butyl-2,6-bis[bis(2-pyridylmethyl)aminomethyl]phenolate(bpb p) has been used to prepare a series of Fe(III)M(II) complexes containing independent species at the exogenous binding sites. These sites are occupied by fluoride and water ligands and show...

  14. The opposite effects of Cu(II) and Fe(III) on the assembly of glucagon amyloid fibrils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Xingfei; Tan, Juhua; Zheng, Lifei; Pillai, Saju; Li, Bin; Xu, Peng; Zhang, Bobo; Zhang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    A few transition metal ions are strongly implicated as co-factors in modulating the aggregation of amyloid peptides, which is believed to be a key factor in regulating the cytotoxicity of peptides. In this paper, we explored the effects of Cu(II) and Fe(III) on the aggregation/fibrillation of

  15. 2-Mercaptobenzoxazole pentacyanoferrate(II/III complexes: UV-Visible, Mössbauer, electron paramagnetic resonance, electrochemistry and molecular modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Juciane B

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available 2-Mercaptobenzoxazole pentacyanoferrate(II/III complexes, [FeII/III(CN5(bzoxs]3-/2- , were prepared in MeOH/H2O 75:25% solutions and characterized by spectroscopic UV-Vis, Mössbauer, electron paramagnetic resonance (epr and electrochemical-cyclic voltammetry- techniques. UV-Vis and epr spectra along with the electrochemical behavior suggested the coordination of the multi-functional N,S,O- donor ligand, bzoxs, to iron(III through the sulfur atom. The crystal field parameters, DqL and Dt, calculated for the iron(II complex, in addition to the reversible redox process FeIII-bzoxs + e- -> FeII-bzoxs also pointed to coordination via the sulfur atom. The results were compared with the chemical properties of pentacyanoferrate complexes containing other monodentate N-, S- and O-donor ligands. Ab initio calculations revealed the composition of the frontier orbitals of bzoxs and are in agreement with the mode of coordination proposed from the experimental data.

  16. Synthesis and Crystal Structures of Ni(II)/(III) and Zn(II) Complexes with Schiff Base Ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Bon Kweon [Catholic Univ., of Daegu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Coordination polymers are of great interest due to their intriguing structural motifs and potential applications in optical, electronic, magnetic, and porous materials. The most commonly used strategy for designing such materials relies on the utilization of multidentate N- or Odonor ligands which have the capacity to bridge between metal centers to form polymeric structures. The Schiff bases with N,O,S donor atoms are an useful source as they are readily available and easily form stable complexes with most transition metal ions. Schiff bases are also important intermediates in synthesis of some bioactive compounds and are potent anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anticancer and antiviral compounds. In this work, the Schiff bases, Hapb and Hbpb, derived from 2-acetylpyridene or 2-benzoylpyridine and benzhydrazide were taken as trifunctional (N,N,O) monobasic ligand (Scheme 1). This ligand is of important because the π-delocalization of charge and the configurational flexibility of their molecular chain can give rise to a great variety of coordination modes. Although many metal.Schiff base complexes have been reported, the 1D, 2D, and 3D networks of coordination polymers linked through the bridging of ligands such as dicyanamide, N(CN){sub 2}{sup -} as coligand have been little published. In the process of working to extend the dimensionality of the metal-Schiff base complexes using benzilic acid as a bridging ligand, we obtained three simple metal (II)/(III) complexes of acetylpyridine/2-benzoyl pyridine based benzhydrazide ligand. Therefore, we report here the synthesis and crystal structures of the complexes.

  17. Electrochemical co-detection of As(III), Hg(II) and Pb(II) on a bismuth modified exfoliated graphite electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafa, Potlako J; Idris, Azeez O; Mabuba, Nonhlangabezo; Arotiba, Omotayo A

    2016-06-01

    The applicability of a bismuth modified exfoliated graphite (EG) electrode for the co-detection of heavy metal ions -As(III), Hg(II) and Pb(II)-in water samples using square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) is reported. Bismuth nanoparticles were deposited on an EG electrode potentiostatically at -1000mV for 300s to form EG-Bi electrode. The Bi modified EG electrode was characterised in 5mM ferrocene and used to as an electrochemical sensor for Pb(II) and Hg(II) individually in 0.1M acetate buffer solution (pH 5) with detection limits (LODs) of 0.83μgL(-1)., 0.46μgL(-1) and limit of quantification of 2.8μgL(-1) and 1.5μgL(-1) respectively. Simultaneous detection of Pb(II), As(III) and Hg(II) was also performed with LODs of 0.053μgL(-1), 0.014μgL(-1), 0.081μgL(-1) and LOQs of 0.18μgL(-1), 0.047μgL(-1) and 0.27μgL(-1) for Pb(II), As(III) and Hg(II) respectively. All the detections were performed under optimised experimental conditions. The stability of the EG-Bi sensor was tested and the electrode was applied to environmental samples. The results found with this method were comparable with those obtained with inductively coupled plasma - optical emission spectrometric technique.

  18. Design of Studies for Development of BPA Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Accounting Policy Phase II, Volume II, 1985-1988 Technical Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneese, Allen V.

    1988-08-01

    The incremental costs of corrective measures to lessen the environmental impacts of the hydroelectric system are expected to increase and difficult questions to arise about the costs, effectiveness, and justification of alternative measures and their systemwide implications. The BPA anticipate this situation by launching a forward-looking research program aimed at providing methodological tools and data suitable for estimating the productivity and cost implications of mitigation alternatives in a timely manner with state-of-the-art accuracy. Resources for the Future (RFF) agreed at the request of the BPA to develop a research program which would provide an analytical system designed to assist the BPA Administrator and other interested and responsible parties in evaluating the ecological and economic aspects of alternative protection, enhancement, and mitigation measures. While this progression from an ecological understanding to cost-effectiveness analyses is straightforward in concept, the complexities of the Columbia River system make the development of analytical methods far from simple in practice. The Phase 2 final report outlines the technical issues involved in developing an analytical system and proposes a program of research to address these issues. The report is presented in the Summary Report (Volume 1), and the present volume which consists of three technical reports: Part I, Modeling the Salmon and Steelhead Fisheries of the Columbia River Basin; Part II, Models for Cost-Effectiveness Analysis; and Part III, Ocean Fisheries Harvest Management.

  19. CS-27IDH1/2 MUTATIONS INFLUENCE ZEB1 EXPRESSION IN GRADES II AND III GLIOMAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvick, Cody; Zhang, Chao; Montgomery, Blake; Lee, Michaela; Yang, Chunzhang; Wang, Herui; Merrill, Marsha; Heiss, John; Ray-Chaudhury, Abhik; Zhuang, Zhengping

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a cell program that crucially regulates polarity and enhances invasion in normal epithelia and carcinomas. It has been recently demonstrated that EMT-promoting transcription factors (EMT-TFs) also govern cell invasion in glioblastoma, but the role of these proteins in lower-grade gliomas has not yet been investigated. We investigated the impact of EMT-TF expression on overall survival in World Health Organization (WHO) grades II and III gliomas using the National Cancer Institute Repository for Molecular Brain Neoplasis Data (REMBRANDT) and Cancer Genome Atlas Network Lower-Grade Glioma (CGAN LGG) datasets. Surprisingly, while expression of EMT-promoting transcription factors were generally associated with a decrease in overall survival, high ZEB1 expression was associated with an increase in overall survival in both datasets (log-rank test on all grade II and III gliomas: for REMBRANDT, median overall survival (OS) 54.2 months ZEB1-high vs. 19.6 months ZEB1-low, p = 0.0016; for CGAN, median OS 134.3 months ZEB1-high vs. 63.6 months ZEB1-low, p = 0.0038). Mutations in the genes coding for Isocitrate Dehydrogenases 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) are found in 85-90% of grades II and III gliomas and confer a favorable prognosis in these tumors. Using the CGAN LGG dataset, we found that ZEB1 is upregulated in IDH1/2-mutant versus IDH1/2-wild type tumors (unpaired t-test on all grade II and III gliomas: t = 10.292, p < 0.0001). Moreover, IDH1/2-mutant gliomas express lower levels of genes that are suppressed by ZEB1 including MIR200B and MIR200C (unpaired t-test on all grade II and III gliomas: p < 0.0001 for both targets). We further validated these findings in an independent set of 37 grade II and III gliomas using quantitative real-time PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry. These findings reveal that ZEB1 not only has an unexpected prognostic significance in grades II and III gliomas but also may play an important role in IDH1

  20. Expression of transforming growth factor-beta receptors types II and III within various cells in the rat periodontium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, J; Symons, A L; Bartold, P M

    1999-02-01

    This study reports the immunohistochemical localization of TGF-beta receptor type II (T beta R-II) and type III (T beta R-III) in cells of the forming periodontal ligament (PDL) in rat first molar roots. Mandibular periodontium was obtained from 3, 6 and 12-wk-old rats. This represented tissue from the initial, pre-mature and post-mature stages of root and periodontal development, respectively. Mandibular bone chips and molar roots were used to isolate osteoblasts, fibroblasts and cementoblasts. Cells were obtained using a 2-step trypsinization and explant technique, and cultured in Dulbecco's modification of Eagle's medium (DMEM) under routine cell culture conditions. Cells were cultured on coverslips for the purpose of detecting TGF-beta receptors, and compared with whole tissue sections using the same detection method. Cells which stained positively for T beta R-II and T beta R-III on both paraffin sections and cultured cell slides were counted. Both receptors were expressed in the various periodontal tissue compartments. PDL fibroblasts, cementoblasts and osteoblasts were stained positively for T beta R-II and T beta R-III. Endothelial cells were noted to be positive for T beta R-II only. T beta R-II was more widely distributed in cells than T beta R-III, but T beta R-III was extensively localized in the extracellular matrix. Both receptors were expressed on the cell membrane and also localized in the cytoplasm. The findings for paraffin sections were consistent with the immunohistochemical staining of cultured cells. The percentage of cells which stained positively for T beta R-II was greater (approximately 85%) than that for T beta R-III (approximately 60%) in all major types of the PDL cells on both paraffin sections and cultured cell slides. Extensive location of TGF-beta receptors in both cells and extracellular matrix suggests that several binding sites are available for TGF-beta s to interact with target cells during development and following maturation

  1. Ca(II, Zn(II and Au(III sulfamethoxazole sulfa-drug complexes: Synthesis, spectroscopic and anticancer evaluation studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima A.I. Al-Khodir

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Herein in this article, three new Ca(II, Zn(II and Au(III complexes of sulfamethoxazole (SZ (sulfa-drug have been synthesized for the first time. The sulfa-drugs have a great attentions because of their therapeutic applications against bacterial infections. The SZ complexes were discussed with the help of elemental analyses, molar conductance and spectroscopic instruments e.g. IR, 1H-NMR, and electronic spectra. Investigations of the infrared spectra of the SZ and their metal complexes indicated the vibrations due to the sulfonamido (SO2 and –NH and isoxazole (C=N groups are shifted with respect to the free molecule in line with their coordination to the metal. In case of calcium(II an zinc(II complexes, the coordination site of SZ are the sulfonyl oxygen and SO2-NH sulfonamide nitrogen, but in gold(III complex, the gold metal ions coordinates through the sulfonyl oxygen and isoxazole nitrogen. These complexes are formulated as: [Ca(SZ(Cl2].8H2O (1, [Zn(SZ(Cl2].2H2O (2 and [Au(SZ(Cl2].Cl (3. The molar conductance data reveals that both Ca(II and Zn(II complexes are non-electrolyte but gold(III complex is electrolyte. The morphological nano structures of SZ complexes were checked using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscope (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The gold(III complex was recorded good anticancer behavior against Human colon carcinoma (HCT-116 cells and human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG-2 cells.

  2. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy versus cystectomy in management of stages II, and III urinary bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Osman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This phase III trial was de - signed to compare the survival benefit, surgical respectability, and toxicities among patients treated by neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radical cystectomy (arm A, with those treated by radical cystectomy (arm B in the management of stage II, III urinary bladder cancer. Patients and Methods: For inclusion, patients should have pathologically proven urothelial carcinoma in urinary bladder, clinical stages from T2N0M0 to T4aN0M0, patient age less than 65 years, and performance state ≤ 2. Additionally, patients should have adequate hematological, renal, and liver functions. Arm A patients underwent 3 cycles of neoadjuvant cisplatin and gemcitabine followed by radical cystectomy, while arm B patients underwent radical cystectomy directly. Results: Thirty patients had been enrolled in each arm between September 2009 and April 2014 in 3 educational institutes in Egypt. The 3 year OS (overall survival for arm A, and B were 60% and 50% respectively. The median OS for arm A was 36+ months and that for arm B was 32.5 months. The 3 year progression-free survival (PFS for arm A, and B were 57% and 43% respectively. The median PFS for arm A was 36+ months and for arm B was 28 months. A subgroup analysis was performed to correlate between 3 year OS and predetermined prognostic factors including age, tumor size, pathological stage, and the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The later was performed only in arm A. Both treatment arms were tolerated well with mild toxicities profiles. Conclusion: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy achieved better survival, surgical respectability, with nearly equivalent toxicities when compared with radical cystectomy.

  3. The Rome II and Rome III criteria identify the same subtype-populations in irritable bowel syndrome: agreement depends on the method used for symptom report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engsbro, A L; Simrén, M; Bytzer, P

    2012-07-01

    For comparing trials using different classifications for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) subtypes, it is important to know whether these identify the same sub-populations. Our aim was to determine the agreement between Rome II and Rome III subtypes, and to explore whether agreement depends on the symptom reporting method. Rome II IBS patients from two identical, randomized placebo-controlled trials of probiotics were included. Retrospective subtypes were based on the Rome II questionnaire. Prospective subtypes were based on diary cards for 2 weeks of run-in. Agreement was determined between: (i) retrospective Rome II and Rome III, (ii) prospective Rome II and Rome III, (iii) retrospective Rome II and prospectively Rome III, (iv) retrospective and prospective Rome II, and (v) retrospective and prospective Rome III. A total of 126 patients, 72% women, mean age 46 ± 15 years, were included. The agreement between subtypes using the same symptom reporting method was: (i) 90.3% (κ = 0.85) for retrospective subtypes, and (ii) 84% (κ = 0.76) for prospective subtypes. The agreement between subtypes using different symptom reporting methods was, (iii) 49% (κ = 0.23) for retrospective Rome II and prospective Rome III, (iv) 51% (κ = 0.26) for Rome II subtypes, and (v) 41% (κ = 0.25) for Rome III subtypes. Agreement between Rome II and Rome III subtypes is good to very good when using the same symptom reporting method. When mixing methods, agreement is only fair even within the same classification. This has implications for comparison of trials using different symptom reporting methods for subtyping. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Proceedings of the 1995 U.S. DOE hydrogen program review. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The 1995 US DOE Hydrogen Program Review was held April 18-21, 1995 in Coral Gables, FL. Volume II of the Proceedings contains 8 papers presented under the subject of hydrogen storage and 17 papers presented on hydrogen production. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  5. Proceedings of the 1984 DOE nuclear reactor and facility safety conference. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    This report is a collection of papers on reactor safety. The report takes the form of proceedings from the 1984 DOE Nuclear Reactor and Facility Safety Conference, Volume II of two. These proceedings cover Safety, Accidents, Training, Task/Job Analysis, Robotics and the Engineering Aspects of Man/Safety interfaces.

  6. Long Maximal Incremental Tests Accurately Assess Aerobic Fitness in Class II and III Obese Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzi, Stefano; Codecasa, Franco; Cornacchia, Mauro; Maestrini, Sabrina; Capodaglio, Paolo; Brunani, Amelia; Fanari, Paolo; Salvadori, Alberto; Malatesta, Davide

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare two different maximal incremental tests with different time durations [a maximal incremental ramp test with a short time duration (8-12 min) (STest) and a maximal incremental test with a longer time duration (20-25 min) (LTest)] to investigate whether an LTest accurately assesses aerobic fitness in class II and III obese men. Twenty obese men (BMI≥35 kg.m-2) without secondary pathologies (mean±SE; 36.7±1.9 yr; 41.8±0.7 kg*m-2) completed an STest (warm-up: 40 W; increment: 20 W*min-1) and an LTest [warm-up: 20% of the peak power output (PPO) reached during the STest; increment: 10% PPO every 5 min until 70% PPO was reached or until the respiratory exchange ratio reached 1.0, followed by 15 W.min-1 until exhaustion] on a cycle-ergometer to assess the peak oxygen uptake V˙O2peak and peak heart rate (HRpeak) of each test. There were no significant differences in V˙O2peak (STest: 3.1±0.1 L*min-1; LTest: 3.0±0.1 L*min-1) and HRpeak (STest: 174±4 bpm; LTest: 173±4 bpm) between the two tests. Bland-Altman plot analyses showed good agreement and Pearson product-moment and intra-class correlation coefficients showed a strong correlation between V˙O2peak (r=0.81 for both; p≤0.001) and HRpeak (r=0.95 for both; p≤0.001) during both tests. V˙O2peak and HRpeak assessments were not compromised by test duration in class II and III obese men. Therefore, we suggest that the LTest is a feasible test that accurately assesses aerobic fitness and may allow for the exercise intensity prescription and individualization that will lead to improved therapeutic approaches in treating obesity and severe obesity. PMID:25875746

  7. Long maximal incremental tests accurately assess aerobic fitness in class II and III obese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzi, Stefano; Codecasa, Franco; Cornacchia, Mauro; Maestrini, Sabrina; Capodaglio, Paolo; Brunani, Amelia; Fanari, Paolo; Salvadori, Alberto; Malatesta, Davide

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare two different maximal incremental tests with different time durations [a maximal incremental ramp test with a short time duration (8-12 min) (STest) and a maximal incremental test with a longer time duration (20-25 min) (LTest)] to investigate whether an LTest accurately assesses aerobic fitness in class II and III obese men. Twenty obese men (BMI≥35 kg.m-2) without secondary pathologies (mean±SE; 36.7±1.9 yr; 41.8±0.7 kg*m-2) completed an STest (warm-up: 40 W; increment: 20 W*min-1) and an LTest [warm-up: 20% of the peak power output (PPO) reached during the STest; increment: 10% PPO every 5 min until 70% PPO was reached or until the respiratory exchange ratio reached 1.0, followed by 15 W.min-1 until exhaustion] on a cycle-ergometer to assess the peak oxygen uptake [Formula: see text] and peak heart rate (HRpeak) of each test. There were no significant differences in [Formula: see text] (STest: 3.1±0.1 L*min-1; LTest: 3.0±0.1 L*min-1) and HRpeak (STest: 174±4 bpm; LTest: 173±4 bpm) between the two tests. Bland-Altman plot analyses showed good agreement and Pearson product-moment and intra-class correlation coefficients showed a strong correlation between [Formula: see text] (r=0.81 for both; p≤0.001) and HRpeak (r=0.95 for both; p≤0.001) during both tests. [Formula: see text] and HRpeak assessments were not compromised by test duration in class II and III obese men. Therefore, we suggest that the LTest is a feasible test that accurately assesses aerobic fitness and may allow for the exercise intensity prescription and individualization that will lead to improved therapeutic approaches in treating obesity and severe obesity.

  8. Long maximal incremental tests accurately assess aerobic fitness in class II and III obese men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Lanzi

    Full Text Available This study aimed to compare two different maximal incremental tests with different time durations [a maximal incremental ramp test with a short time duration (8-12 min (STest and a maximal incremental test with a longer time duration (20-25 min (LTest] to investigate whether an LTest accurately assesses aerobic fitness in class II and III obese men. Twenty obese men (BMI≥35 kg.m-2 without secondary pathologies (mean±SE; 36.7±1.9 yr; 41.8±0.7 kg*m-2 completed an STest (warm-up: 40 W; increment: 20 W*min-1 and an LTest [warm-up: 20% of the peak power output (PPO reached during the STest; increment: 10% PPO every 5 min until 70% PPO was reached or until the respiratory exchange ratio reached 1.0, followed by 15 W.min-1 until exhaustion] on a cycle-ergometer to assess the peak oxygen uptake [Formula: see text] and peak heart rate (HRpeak of each test. There were no significant differences in [Formula: see text] (STest: 3.1±0.1 L*min-1; LTest: 3.0±0.1 L*min-1 and HRpeak (STest: 174±4 bpm; LTest: 173±4 bpm between the two tests. Bland-Altman plot analyses showed good agreement and Pearson product-moment and intra-class correlation coefficients showed a strong correlation between [Formula: see text] (r=0.81 for both; p≤0.001 and HRpeak (r=0.95 for both; p≤0.001 during both tests. [Formula: see text] and HRpeak assessments were not compromised by test duration in class II and III obese men. Therefore, we suggest that the LTest is a feasible test that accurately assesses aerobic fitness and may allow for the exercise intensity prescription and individualization that will lead to improved therapeutic approaches in treating obesity and severe obesity.

  9. NOVEL CONCEPTS FOR THE COMPRESSION OF LARGE VOLUMES OF CARBON DIOXIDE-PHASE III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, J. Jeffrey; Allison, Timothy; Evans, Neal; Moreland, Brian; Hernandez, Augusto; Day, Meera; Ridens, Brandon

    2014-06-30

    In the effort to reduce the release of CO2 greenhouse gases to the atmosphere, sequestration of CO2 from Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Oxy-Fuel power plants is being pursued. This approach, however, requires significant compression power to boost the pressure to typical pipeline levels. The penalty can be as high as 8-12% on a typical IGCC plant. The goal of this research is to reduce this penalty through novel compression concepts and integration with existing IGCC processes. The primary objective of the study of novel CO2 compression concepts is to reliably boost the pressure of CO2 to pipeline pressures with the minimal amount of energy required. Fundamental thermodynamics were studied to explore pressure rise in both liquid and gaseous states. For gaseous compression, the project investigated novel methods to compress CO2 while removing the heat of compression internal to the compressor. The highpressure ratio, due to the delivery pressure of the CO2 for enhanced oil recovery, results in significant heat of compression. Since less energy is required to boost the pressure of a cooler gas stream, both upstream and inter-stage cooling is desirable. While isothermal compression has been utilized in some services, it has not been optimized for the IGCC environment. Phase I of this project determined the optimum compressor configuration and developed technology concepts for internal heat removal. Other compression options using liquefied CO2 and cryogenic pumping were explored as well. Preliminary analysis indicated up to a 35% reduction in power is possible with the new concepts being considered. In the Phase II program, two experimental test rigs were developed to investigate the two concepts further. A new pump loop facility was constructed to qualify a cryogenic turbopump for use on liquid CO2. Also, an internally cooled compressor diaphragm was developed and tested in a closed loop compressor facility using CO2. Both test programs

  10. Emission Spectroscopy as a Probe into Photoinduced Intramolecular Electron Transfer in Polyazine Bridged Ru(II,Rh(III Supramolecular Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen J. Brewer

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy are valuable tools to probe photochemical processes of metal-ligand, coordination complexes. Ru(II polyazine light absorbers are efficient light harvesters absorbing in the UV and visible with emissive 3MLCT excited states known to undergo excited state energy and electron transfer. Changes in emission intensity, energy or band-shape, as well as excited state lifetime, provide insight into excited state dynamics. Photophysical processes such as intramolecular electron transfer between electron donor and electron acceptor sub-units may be investigated using these methods. This review investigates the use of steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy to measure excited state intramolecular electron transfer in polyazine bridged Ru(II,Rh(III supramolecular complexes. Intramolecular electron transfer in these systems provides for conversion of the emissive 3MLCT (metal-to-ligand charge transfer excited state to a non-emissive, but potentially photoreactive, 3MMCT (metal-to-metal charge transfer excited state. The details of the photophysics of Ru(II,Rh(III and Ru(II,Rh(III,Ru(II systems as probed by steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy will be highlighted.

  11. Synthesis, structures, and magnetic properties of tetranuclear CuII-LnIII complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costes, Jean-Pierre; Auchel, Magali; Dahan, Françoise; Peyrou, Viviane; Shova, Sergiu; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang

    2006-03-06

    The copper(II)-gadolinium(III) and copper(II)-terbium(III) complexes studied in this report derive from disymmetric trianionic ligands abbreviated H3Li (i = 4-6). These ligands are obtained through reaction of different aldehydes with "half-units" having an amide function, the latter resulting from the monocondensation of different diamines with phenyl 2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoate. Upon deprotonation, the Li ligands (i = 4-10) possess an inner N2O2 coordination site with one amido, one imine, and two phenoxo functions, an outer O2O2 or O2O coordination site, and an amido oxygen atom positioned out of these two sites. The trianionic character of such ligands yields original anionic complexes in the presence of copper(II) or nickel(II) ions, with a 1/1 L/M stoichiometry. The crystal and molecular structures of four complexes, two 3d (1, 5) and two 3d-4f (12, 13) complexes, have been determined. Complex 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic space group C2/c: a = 27.528(2) A, b = 7.0944(7) A, c = 22.914(2) A, beta = 92.130(6) degrees , V = 4471.9(7) A(3), Z = 8 for C(21.5)H(27)CuKN(2)O(6.5). Complex 5 crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/n (No. 14): a = 11.0760(9) A, b = 21.454(2) A, c = 15.336(1) A, beta = 101.474(1) degrees , V = 3571.5(5) A(3), Z = 4. Complex 12 crystallizes in the triclinic space group P (No. 2): a = 8.682(2) A, b = 11.848(2) A, c = 11.928(2) A, alpha = 81.77(3) degrees , beta = 89.17(3) degrees , gamma = 85.49(3) degrees , V = 1210.6(4) A(3), Z = 2 for C20H22CuN5O11Tb. Complex 13 belongs to the monoclinic space group C2/c: a = 25.475(5)A, b = 12.934(3)A, c = 15.023(3) A, beta = 91.06(3) degrees , V = 4949.02A3, Z = 8 for C21H25CuN4O12Tb. The structural determinations confirm that the dinuclear entities involved in 12 and 13 are disposed in a head-to-tail arrangement to give tetranuclear complexes in which the copper and lanthanide ions are positioned at the vertexes of a rectangle. In the [Cu-Gd]2 species, there are two different

  12. Synthesis, characterization, and biological activity of platinum II, III, and IV pivaloamidine complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinisi, Marilù; Gandin, Valentina; Saltarella, Teresa; Intini, Francesco P; Pacifico, Concetta; Marzano, Christine; Natile, Giovanni

    2014-10-01

    Imino ligands have proven to be able to activate the trans geometry of platinum(II) complexes towards antitumor activity. These ligands, like aromatic N-donor heterocycles, have a planar shape but, different from the latter, have still an H atom on the coordinating nitrogen which can be involved in H-bond formation. Three classes of imino ligands have been extensively investigated: iminoethers (HN=C(R)OR'), ketimines (HN=CRR'), and amidines (HN=C(R)NR'R″). The promising efficacy of the platinum compounds with amidines (activity comparable to that of cisplatin for cis complexes and much greater than that of transplatin for trans complexes) prompted us to extend the investigation to amidine complexes with a bulkier organic residue (R = t-Bu). The tert-butyl group can confer greater affinity for lipophilic environments, thus potentiating the cellular uptake of the compound. In the present study we describe the synthesis and characterization of pivaloamidine complexes of platinum(II), (cis and trans-[PtCl2(NH3){Z-HN=C(t-Bu)NH2}] and cis and trans-[PtCl2{Z-HN=C(t-Bu)NH2}2]), platinum(III) ([Pt2Cl4{HN=C(t-Bu)NH}2(NH3)2]), and platinum(IV) (trans-[PtCl4(NH3){Z-HN=C(t-Bu)NH2}] and trans-[PtCl4{Z-HN=C(t-Bu)NH2}2]). The cytotoxicity of all new Pt complexes was tested toward a panel of cultured cancer cell lines, including cisplatin and multidrug resistant variants. In addition, cellular uptake and DNA binding, perturbations of cell cycle progression, induction of apoptosis, and p53 activation were investigated for the most promising compound trans-[PtCl2(NH3){Z-HN=C(t-Bu)NH2}]. Remarkably, the latter complex was able to overcome both acquired and intrinsic cisplatin resistance.

  13. Rh(III)- and Zn(II)-Catalyzed Synthesis of Quinazoline N-Oxides via C-H Amidation-Cyclization of Oximes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Wang, Fen; Yang, Xifa; Zhou, Xukai; Li, Xingwei

    2016-12-02

    Quinazoline N-oxides have been prepared from simple ketoximes and 1,4,2-dioxazol-5-ones via Rh(III)-catalyzed C-H activation-amidation of the ketoximes and subsequent Zn(II)-catalyzed cyclization. The substrate scope and functional group compatibility were examined. The reaction features relay catalysis by Rh(III) and Zn(II).

  14. Mechanochemical synthesis and intercalation of Ca(II)Fe(III)-layered double hydroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferencz, Zs.; Szabados, M.; Varga, G.; Csendes, Z. [Department of Organic Chemistry, University of Szeged, Dóm tér 8, Szeged H-6720 (Hungary); Materials and Solution Structure Research Group, Institute of Chemistry, University of Szeged, Aradi Vértanúk tere 1, Szeged H-6720 (Hungary); Kukovecz, Á. [Department of Applied and Environmental Chemistry, University of Szeged, Rerrich Béla tér 1, Szeged H-6720 (Hungary); MTA-SZTE “Lendület” Porous Nanocomposites Research Group, Rerrich Béla tér 1, Szeged H-6720 (Hungary); Kónya, Z. [Department of Applied and Environmental Chemistry, University of Szeged, Rerrich Béla tér 1, Szeged H-6720 (Hungary); MTA-SZTE Reaction Kinetics and Surface Chemistry Research Group, Rerrich Béla tér 1, Szeged H-6720 (Hungary); Carlson, S. [MAX IV Laboratory, Ole Römers väg 1, Lund SE-223 63 (Sweden); Sipos, P. [Materials and Solution Structure Research Group, Institute of Chemistry, University of Szeged, Aradi Vértanúk tere 1, Szeged H-6720 (Hungary); Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Szeged, Dóm tér 7, Szeged H-6720 (Hungary); and others

    2016-01-15

    A mechanochemical method (grinding the components without added water – dry grinding, followed by further grinding in the presence of minute amount of water or NaOH solution – wet grinding) was used in this work for the preparation and intercalation of CaFe-layered double hydroxides (LDHs). Both the pristine LDHs and the amino acid anion (cystinate and tyrosinate) intercalated varieties were prepared by the two-step grinding procedure in a mixer mill. By systematically changing the conditions of the preparation method, a set of parameters could be determined, which led to the formation of close to phase-pure LDH. The optimisation procedure was also applied for the intercalation processes of the amino acid anions. The resulting materials were structurally characterised by a range of methods (X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive analysis, thermogravimetry, X-ray absorption and infra-red spectroscopies). It was proven that this simple mechanochemical procedure was able to produce complex organic–inorganic nanocomposites: LDHs intercalated with amino acid anions. - Graphical abstract: Amino acid anion-Ca(II)Fe(III)-LDHs were successfully prepared by a two-step milling procedure. - Highlights: • Synthesis of pristine and amino acid intercalated CaFe-LDHs by two-step milling. • Identifying the optimum synthesis and intercalation parameters. • Characterisation of the samples with a range of instrumental methods.

  15. Intensified Adjuvant Treatment of Prostate Carcinoma: Feasibility Analysis of a Phase I/II Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantini, Giovanna; Fersino, Sergio; Frascino, Vincenzo; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Fionda, Bruno; Luzi, Stefano; Balducci, Mario; De Belvis, Antonio; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To perform a preliminary feasibility acute and late toxicity evaluation of an intensified and modulated adjuvant treatment in prostate cancer (PCa) patients after radical prostatectomy. Material and Methods. A phase I/II has been designed. Eligible patients were 79 years old or younger, with an ECOG of 0–2, previously untreated, histologically proven prostate adenocarcinoma with no distant metastases, pT2–4 N0-1, and with at least one of the following risk factors: capsular perforation, positive surgical margins, and seminal vesicle invasion. All patients received a minimum dose on tumor bed of 64.8 Gy, or higher dose (70.2 Gy; 85.4%), according to the pathological stage, pelvic lymph nodes irradiation (57.7%), and/or hormonal therapy (69.1%). Results. 123 patients were enrolled and completed the planned treatment, with good tolerance. Median follow-up was 50.6 months. Grade 3 acute toxicity was only 2.4% and 3.3% for genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) tract, respectively. No patient had late grade 3 GI toxicity, and the GU grade 3 toxicity incidence was 5.8% at 5 years. 5-year BDSF was 90.2%. Conclusions. A modulated and intensified adjuvant treatment in PCa was feasible in this trial. A further period of observation can provide a complete assessment of late toxicity and confirm the BDSF positive results. PMID:25093169

  16. Bifunctional redox flow battery - 2. V(III)/V(II)-L-cystine(O{sub 2}) system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Y.H.; Xun, Y. [Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Beijing 100083 (China); Cheng, J.; Yang, Y.S. [Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing Science and Technology University, Beijing 100083 (China); Ma, P.H. [Full Cell R and D Center, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, Liaoning 116023 (China)

    2008-08-20

    A new bifunctional redox flow battery (BRFB) system, V(III)/V(II) - L-cystine(O{sub 2}), was systematically investigated by using different separators. It is shown that during charge, water transfer is significantly restricted with increasing the concentration of HBr when the Nafion 115 cation exchange membrane is employed. The same result can be obtained when the gas diffusion layer (GDL) hot-pressed separator is used. The organic electro-synthesis is directly correlated with the crossover of vanadium. When employing the anion exchange membrane, the electro-synthesis efficiency is over 96% due to a minimal crossover of vanadium. When the GDL hot-pressed separator is applied, the crossover of vanadium and water transfer are noticeably prevented and the electro-synthesis efficiency of over 99% is obtained. Those impurities such as vanadium ions and bromine can be eliminated through the purification of organic electro-synthesized products. The purified product is identified to be L-cysteic acid by IR spectrum. The BRFB shows a favorable discharge performance at a current density of 20 mA cm{sup -2}. Best discharge performance is achieved by using the GDL hot-pressed separator. The coulombic efficiency of 87% and energy efficiency of about 58% can be obtained. The cause of major energy losses is mainly associated with the cross-contamination of anodic and cathodic active electrolytes. (author)

  17. The first 3-D LaIII-SrII heterometallic complex: Synthesis, structure and luminescent properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Zhiwei; Ran, Jingwen; Li, Tao; Chen, Yanmei

    2016-10-01

    The first 3-D LaIII-SrII heterometallic complex, namely [La2Sr(pda)4(H2O)4]n·6nH2O (1, H2pda = pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid), has been successfully synthesized under solvothermal conditions. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that complex 1 features a 3-D porous framework and displays a new topology. The crystal structure can be simplified to a 4,6-connected 3-D network with Schläfli symbol of {34·42·88·9}2{34·42}. The crystals also have been characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, elemental analysis, thermal analysis, and IR spectroscopy. The infrared spectral analysis indicates that complex 1 is a carboxylate coordinated compound, several water molecules exist in the compound. The thermal study shows that there are ten water molecules in the crystal structure. The luminescent property has also been investigated. It shows a blue-purple fluorescence emission.

  18. Biomarker-Guided Adaptive Trial Designs in Phase II and Phase III: A Methodological Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranta Antoniou

    Full Text Available Personalized medicine is a growing area of research which aims to tailor the treatment given to a patient according to one or more personal characteristics. These characteristics can be demographic such as age or gender, or biological such as a genetic or other biomarker. Prior to utilizing a patient's biomarker information in clinical practice, robust testing in terms of analytical validity, clinical validity and clinical utility is necessary. A number of clinical trial designs have been proposed for testing a biomarker's clinical utility, including Phase II and Phase III clinical trials which aim to test the effectiveness of a biomarker-guided approach to treatment; these designs can be broadly classified into adaptive and non-adaptive. While adaptive designs allow planned modifications based on accumulating information during a trial, non-adaptive designs are typically simpler but less flexible.We have undertaken a comprehensive review of biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs proposed in the past decade. We have identified eight distinct biomarker-guided adaptive designs and nine variations from 107 studies. Substantial variability has been observed in terms of how trial designs are described and particularly in the terminology used by different authors. We have graphically displayed the current biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs and summarised the characteristics of each design.Our in-depth overview provides future researchers with clarity in definition, methodology and terminology for biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs.

  19. Facile formation and redox of benzoxazole-2-thiolate-bridged dinuclear Pt(II/III) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Jiang, Lu; Liu, Zhi-Pan; Gan, C R Raymond; Liu, Zhaolin; Zhang, Xin-Hai; Zhao, Jin; Hor, T S Andy

    2012-10-28

    Reaction of [Pt(L)(μ-Cl)](2) (L = ppy (2-phenylpyridine) or bzq (benzo[h]quinoline)) with 2-mercaptobenzoxazole (NOSH) and NaOAc in THF at r.t. yields the dinuclear Pt(II) d(8)-d(8) complexes [Pt(2)L(2)(μ-NOS-κN,S)(2)] (L = ppy, 1; L = bzq, 2) and the Pt(III) d(7)-d(7) complexes [Pt(2)(ppy)(2)(μ-NOS-κN,S)(2)(NOS-κS)(2)] (L = ppy, 3; L = bzq, 4) in one pot. The C,N-cyclometalated ligand is chelating whereas the N,S-donating benzoxazole-2-thiolates doubly bridge the two metal centers. The Pt···Pt separations of 3.0204(3) and 2.9726(8) Å in 1 and 2 contract to 2.685(1) Å in 3 and 2.6923(3) Å in 4, respectively, when two S-bound thiolate ligands coordinate trans- to the Pt···Pt axis. However, cyclometalation is preserved and there is minimum perturbation of the bridging ligands. Complexes 3 and 4 can be also obtained by oxidative addition of the thiolate ligand. In the presence of NaBH(4), 3 and 4 can be reduced to 1 and 2, respectively. At r.t., 1 and 2 exhibit intense orange-red luminescence at 625 nm and 631 nm, respectively. The electrochemical properties of 1-4 have been also discussed.

  20. [Cognitive disorders and adult grade II and III gliomas: analysis of a series of 15 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Rhun, E; Delbeuck, X; Devos, P; Pasquier, F; Dubois, F

    2009-06-01

    Correlated with better follow-up of gliomas, cognitive disorders are increasingly studied. The aim of this study was to describe the cognitive disorders presented by these patients at baseline, before any treatment, and to evaluate the relations between cognitive disorders and return to work. A detailed neuropsychological evaluation was administrated to 15 newly diagnosed patients with a grade II or III glial tumor before any treatment. Patients also completed the quality of life and depression scales. All patients in our study presented with at least one failed cognitive domain during the detailed examination, while the scores on the MMSE scale were within the norm. The most deteriorated functions were divided attention and episodic verbal and nonverbal memory. Moreover, a significant link was found between the number of failed cognitive functions and quality of life. Cognitive disorders are frequent with glial tumors and impact patients' quality of life. Simple tests of global cognitive status are not sufficient to detect cognitive difficulties in these patients. Consequently, detailed and adapted neuropsychological assessment is necessary, especially to detect deteriorated problems with memory, divided attention, or processing speed in this population.

  1. Intensified Adjuvant Treatment of Prostate Carcinoma: Feasibility Analysis of a Phase I/II Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Mantini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To perform a preliminary feasibility acute and late toxicity evaluation of an intensified and modulated adjuvant treatment in prostate cancer (PCa patients after radical prostatectomy. Material and Methods. A phase I/II has been designed. Eligible patients were 79 years old or younger, with an ECOG of 0–2, previously untreated, histologically proven prostate adenocarcinoma with no distant metastases, pT2–4 N0-1, and with at least one of the following risk factors: capsular perforation, positive surgical margins, and seminal vesicle invasion. All patients received a minimum dose on tumor bed of 64.8 Gy, or higher dose (70.2 Gy; 85.4%, according to the pathological stage, pelvic lymph nodes irradiation (57.7%, and/or hormonal therapy (69.1%. Results. 123 patients were enrolled and completed the planned treatment, with good tolerance. Median follow-up was 50.6 months. Grade 3 acute toxicity was only 2.4% and 3.3% for genitourinary (GU and gastrointestinal (GI tract, respectively. No patient had late grade 3 GI toxicity, and the GU grade 3 toxicity incidence was 5.8% at 5 years. 5-year BDSF was 90.2%. Conclusions. A modulated and intensified adjuvant treatment in PCa was feasible in this trial. A further period of observation can provide a complete assessment of late toxicity and confirm the BDSF positive results.

  2. REVIEW OF THE NEGOTIATION OF THE MODEL PROTOCOL ADDITIONAL TO THE AGREEMENT(S) BETWEEN STATE(S) AND THE INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY FOR THE APPLICATION OF SAFEGUARDS, INFCIRC/540 (Corrected) VOLUME II/III IAEA COMMITTEE 24, Major Issues Underlying the Model Additional Protocol (1996-1997).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, M.D.; Saum-Manning, L.; Houck, F.

    2010-01-01

    Volume I of this Review traces the origins of the Model Additional Protocol. It covers the period from 1991, when events in Iraq triggered an intensive review of the safeguards system, until 1996, when the IAEA Board of Governors established Committee 24 to negotiate a new protocol to safeguards agreement. The period from 1991-1996 set the stage for this negotiation and shaped its outcome in important ways. During this 5-year period, many proposals for strengthening safeguards were suggested and reviewed. Some proposals were dropped, for example, the suggestion by the IAEA Secretariat to verify certain imports, and others were refined. A rough consensus was established about the directions in which the international community wanted to go, and this was reflected in the draft of an additional protocol that was submitted to the IAEA Board of Governors on May 6, 1996 in document GOV/2863, Strengthening the Effectiveness and Improving the Efficiency of the Safeguards System - Proposals For Implementation Under Complementary Legal Authority, A Report by the Director General. This document ended with a recommendation that, 'the Board, through an appropriate mechanism, finalize the required legal instrument taking as a basis the draft protocol proposed by the Secretariat and the explanation of the measures contained in this document.'

  3. Human Retroviruses and AIDS. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences: I--II; III--V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, G.; Korber, B. [eds.] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wain-Hobson, S. [ed.] [Laboratory of Molecular Retrovirology, Pasteur Inst.; Smith, R.F. [ed.] [Baylor Coll. of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Pharmacology; Pavlakis, G.N. [ed.] [National Cancer Inst., Frederick, MD (United States). Cancer Research Facility

    1993-12-31

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (I) HIV and SIV Nucleotide Sequences; (II) Amino Acid Sequences; (III) Analyses; (IV) Related Sequences; and (V) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated at least twice in each year, which accounts for the modes of binding and pagination in the compendium.

  4. Crystal structure of the coordination polymer [FeIII2{PtII(CN4}3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksym Seredyuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The title complex, poly[dodeca-μ-cyanido-diiron(IIItriplatinum(II], [FeIII2{PtII(CN4}3], has a three-dimensional polymeric structure. It is built-up from square-planar [PtII(CN4]2− anions (point group symmetry 2/m bridging cationic [FeIIIPtII(CN4]+∞ layers extending in the bc plane. The FeII atoms of the layers are located on inversion centres and exhibit an octahedral coordination sphere defined by six N atoms of cyanide ligands, while the PtII atoms are located on twofold rotation axes and are surrounded by four C atoms of the cyanide ligands in a square-planar coordination. The geometrical preferences of the two cations for octahedral and square-planar coordination, respectively, lead to a corrugated organisation of the layers. The distance between neighbouring [FeIIIPtII(CN4]+∞ layers corresponds to the length a/2 = 8.0070 (3 Å, and the separation between two neighbouring PtII atoms of the bridging [PtII(CN4]2− groups corresponds to the length of the c axis [7.5720 (2 Å]. The structure is porous with accessible voids of 390 Å3 per unit cell.

  5. Genetic and expression studies of SMN2 gene in Russian patients with spinal muscular atrophy type II and III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiöth Helgi B

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA type I, II and III is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in the survival motor neuron gene (SMN1. SMN2 is a centromeric copy gene that has been characterized as a major modifier of SMA severity. SMA type I patients have one or two SMN2 copies while most SMA type II patients carry three SMN2 copies and SMA III patients have three or four SMN2 copies. The SMN1 gene produces a full-length transcript (FL-SMN while SMN2 is only able to produce a small portion of the FL-SMN because of a splice mutation which results in the production of abnormal SMNΔ7 mRNA. Methods In this study we performed quantification of the SMN2 gene copy number in Russian patients affected by SMA type II and III (42 and 19 patients, respectively by means of real-time PCR. Moreover, we present two families consisting of asymptomatic carriers of a homozygous absence of the SMN1 gene. We also developed a novel RT-qPCR-based assay to determine the FL-SMN/SMNΔ7 mRNA ratio as SMA biomarker. Results Comparison of the SMN2 copy number and clinical features revealed a significant correlation between mild clinical phenotype (SMA type III and presence of four copies of the SMN2 gene. In both asymptomatic cases we found an increased number of SMN2 copies in the healthy carriers and a biallelic SMN1 absence. Furthermore, the novel assay revealed a difference between SMA patients and healthy controls. Conclusions We suggest that the SMN2 gene copy quantification in SMA patients could be used as a prognostic tool for discrimination between the SMA type II and SMA type III diagnoses, whereas the FL-SMN/SMNΔ7 mRNA ratio could be a useful biomarker for detecting changes during SMA pharmacotherapy.

  6. Diagnosis of functional constipation: agreement between Rome III and Rome II criteria and evaluation for the practicality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Hai Wei; Fang, Xiu Cai; Zhu, Li Ming; Xu, Tao; Fei, Gui Jun; Wang, Zhi Feng; Chang, Min; Wang, Li Ying; Sun, Xiao Hong; Ke, Mei Yun

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the agreement between Rome III and Rome II criteria for diagnosing functional constipation (FC) and to evaluate the accuracy of each constipation symptom for FC diagnosis. Patients with chronic constipation underwent rigorous biochemical and endoscopic/imaging tests to exclude organic and metabolic diseases. The questionnaires including general information, constipation symptoms, and the most troublesome constipation symptoms were completed in a face-to-face survey. The accuracy of constipation symptoms for FC diagnosis was examined using the likelihood ratio. Among 184 patients (43 males and 141 females) with chronic constipation, 166 (90.2%) met Rome II criteria and 174 (94.6%) met Rome III criteria for FC, while 166 met both criteria. There was a good diagnostic agreement between the two sets of criteria, with a kappa value of 0.69 and the overall agreement rate was 95.7% (P Rome III criteria, the most accurate symptom for FC diagnosis was sensation of anorectal blockage, followed by straining during defecation and infrequent bowel movements. The most troublesome symptoms reported by patients were lumpy or hard stools, straining during defecation, sensation of incomplete evacuation. More patients indicated that 'the symptoms in the past 3 months' was better than 'those within the past one year' to reflect their constipation (36.7% vs 6.0%, P Rome III and Rome II criteria for FC diagnosis. Rome III criteria are more practical than Rome II criteria for Chinese patients. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Digestive Diseases published by Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Phosphorescent Chemosensor Based on Iridium(III) Complex for the Selective Detection of Cu(II) Ion in Aqueous Acetonitrile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyebin; Li, Yinan; Hyun, Myungho [Pusan National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    Iridium(III) complex 1 containing two cyclo-metalating 2-phenylpyridine (ppy) ligands and one 2,2'-bipyridine ligand tethered with two DPA moieties by a methylene linker was prepared. Iridium(III) complex 1 was found to form 1:2 complex selectively with Cu(II) ion with the Stern-Volmer constant of 5.8 Χ 10{sup 4} M{sup -1}. Cu(II) ion has two sides. In one side, Cu(II) ion is an important cofactor in nearly 20 metalloenzymes and an essential micronutrient for all living systems. But, in other side, Cu(II) ion is one of significant metal pollutants and toxic to living cells if present in slightly high concentrations, causing neurodegenerative diseases such as Menkes and Wilson's disease. In this instance, the selective detection of Cu(II) ion in environment and in living systems is very important. Consequently, various fluorescent chemosensors for the highly sensitive and selective detection of Cu (II) ion have been developed.

  8. Self-esteem in adolescents with Angle Class I, II and III malocclusion in a Peruvian sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Florián-Vargas

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To compare self-esteem scores in 12 to 16-year-old adolescents with different Angle malocclusion types in a Peruvian sample. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 276 adolescents (159, 52 and 65 with Angle Class I, II and III malocclusions, respectively from Trujillo, Peru. Participants were asked to complete the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES and were also clinically examined, so as to have Angle malocclusion classification determined. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA was used to compare RSES scores among adolescents with Class I, II and III malocclusions, with participants' demographic factors being controlled. Results: Mean RSES scores for adolescents with Class I, II and III malocclusions were 20.47 ± 3.96, 21.96 ± 3.27 and 21.26 ± 4.81, respectively. The ANCOVA test showed that adolescents with Class II malocclusion had a significantly higher RSES score than those with Class I malocclusion, but there were no differences between other malocclusion groups. Supplemental analysis suggested that only those with Class II, Division 2 malocclusion might have greater self-esteem when compared to adolescents with Class I malocclusion. Conclusion: This study shows that, in general, self-esteem did not vary according to adolescents' malocclusion in the sample studied. Surprisingly, only adolescents with Class II malocclusion, particularly Class II, Division 2, reported better self-esteem than those with Class I malocclusion. A more detailed analysis assessing the impact of anterior occlusal features should be conducted.

  9. Molar Absorptivity and Concentration-Dependent Quantum Yield of Fe(II) Photo-Formation for the Aqueous Solutions of Fe(III)-Dicarboxylate Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitomi, Y.; Arakaki, T.

    2009-12-01

    Redox cycles of iron in the aquatic environment affect formation of reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals, which in turn determines lifetimes of many organic compounds. Although aqueous Fe(III)-dicarboxylate complexes are considered to be important sources of photo-formed Fe(II), molar absorptivity and quantum yield of Fe(II) formation for individual species are not well understood. We initiated a study to characterize Fe(II) photo-formation from Fe(III)-dicarboxylates with the concentration ranges that are relevant to the natural aquatic environment. The Visual MINTEQ computer program was used to calculate the equilibrium concentrations of individual Fe(III)-dicarboxylate species. The molar absorptivity of Fe(III)-dicarboxylate species was obtained by UV-VIS spectrophotometer, and the product of the quantum yield and the molar absorptivity of Fe(III)-dicarboxylate species were obtained from photochemical experiments. These experimental data were combined with the calculated equilibrium Fe(III)-dicarboxylate concentrations to determine individual molar absorptivity and quantum yield of Fe(II) photo-formation for a specific Fe(III)-dicarboxylate species. We used initial concentrations of less than 10 micromolar Fe(III) to study the photochemical formation of Fe(II). Dicarboxylate compounds studied include oxalate, malonate, succinate, malate, and phthalate. We report molar absorptivity and concentration-dependent quantum yields of Fe(II) photo-formation of individual Fe(III)-dicarboxylates.

  10. Mn(II,III) oxidation and MnO2 mineralization by an expressed bacterial multicopper oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Cristina N.; Soldatova, Alexandra V.; Lee, Sung-Woo; Spiro, Thomas G.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2013-07-01

    Reactive Mn(IV) oxide minerals are ubiquitous in the environment and control the bioavailability and distribution of many toxic and essential elements and organic compounds. Their formation is thought to be dependent on microbial enzymes, because spontaneous Mn(II) to Mn(IV) oxidation is slow. Several species of marine Bacillus spores oxidize Mn(II) on their exosporium, the outermost layer of the spore, encrusting them with Mn(IV) oxides. Molecular studies have identified the mnx (Mn oxidation) genes, including mnxG, encoding a putative multicopper oxidase (MCO), as responsible for this two-electron oxidation, a surprising finding because MCOs only catalyze single-electron transfer reactions. Characterization of the enzymatic mechanism has been hindered by the lack of purified protein. By purifying active protein from the mnxDEFG expression construct, we found that the resulting enzyme is a blue (absorption maximum 590 nm) complex containing MnxE, MnxF, and MnxG proteins. Further, by analyzing the Mn(II)- and (III)-oxidizing activity in the presence of a Mn(III) chelator, pyrophosphate, we found that the complex facilitates both electron transfers from Mn(II) to Mn(III) and from Mn(III) to Mn(IV). X-ray absorption spectroscopy of the Mn mineral product confirmed its similarity to Mn(IV) oxides generated by whole spores. Our results demonstrate that Mn oxidation from soluble Mn(II) to Mn(IV) oxides is a two-step reaction catalyzed by an MCO-containing complex. With the purification of active Mn oxidase, we will be able to uncover its mechanism, broadening our understanding of Mn mineral formation and the bioinorganic capabilities of MCOs.

  11. Capillary electrophoresis method for speciation of iron (II) and iron (III) in pharmaceuticals by dual precapillary complexation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotti, Roberto; Fiori, Jessica; Liverani, Lino; Spelta, Franco

    2015-07-20

    Pharmaceutical iron sucrose is an iron (III) replacement for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease. The drug product (injection) is a colloidal solution of ferric hydroxide in complex with sucrose, containing 20 mg/mL elemental iron; according to United States pharmacopoeia (USP), the limit of iron (II) is 0.4% w/v. A selective CE method for the simultaneous determination of iron (III) and its potential impurity iron (II), was developed by applying a dual precapillary complexation. In particular, 1,10-phenanthroline and 1,2-diaminocyclohexanetetraacetic acid were used for complexation of iron (II) and iron (III), respectively. Sample preparation was optimized to achieve mineralization of pharmaceuticals using HCl 6 M, by avoiding perturbation of the oxidation status of both iron species. Simple CZE conditions, involving a 60 mM (pH 9.3) tetraborate buffer at the constant voltage of 25 KV and 25°C, allowed fast separation of iron (II) and iron (III) complexes that were detected at 265 nm. Sensitivity for iron (II) determination was found to be 4.80 μM (LOQ) corresponding to 0.15% w/w with respect to the total iron test level. The method was validated by following International Conference on Harmonization guidelines for specificity, linearity, precision, accuracy, and robustness and it was applied to real pharmaceutical samples. The obtained results suggested that the method can be a useful alternative to the official USP and British pharmacopoeia polarographic method.

  12. Novel concepts for the compression of large volumes of carbon dioxide-phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, J. Jeffrey [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Allison, Timothy C. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Evans, Neal D. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Moreland, Brian [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Hernandez, Augusto J. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Day, Meera [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Ridens, Brandon L. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2014-06-30

    In the effort to reduce the release of CO2 greenhouse gases to the atmosphere, sequestration of CO2 from Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Oxy-Fuel power plants is being pursued. This approach, however, requires significant compression power to boost the pressure to typical pipeline levels. The penalty can be as high as 8-12% on a typical IGCC plant. The goal of this research is to reduce this penalty through novel compression concepts and integration with existing IGCC processes. The primary objective of the study of novel CO2 compression concepts is to reliably boost the pressure of CO2 to pipeline pressures with the minimal amount of energy required. Fundamental thermodynamics were studied to explore pressure rise in both liquid and gaseous states. For gaseous compression, the project investigated novel methods to compress CO2 while removing the heat of compression internal to the compressor. The highpressure ratio, due to the delivery pressure of the CO2 for enhanced oil recovery, results in significant heat of compression. Since less energy is required to boost the pressure of a cooler gas stream, both upstream and inter-stage cooling is desirable. While isothermal compression has been utilized in some services, it has not been optimized for the IGCC environment. Phase I of this project determined the optimum compressor configuration and developed technology concepts for internal heat removal. Other compression options using liquefied CO2 and cryogenic pumping were explored as well. Preliminary analysis indicated up to a 35% reduction in power is possible with the new concepts being considered. In the Phase II program, two experimental test rigs were developed to investigate the two concepts further. A new pump loop facility was constructed to qualify a cryogenic turbopump for use on liquid CO2 . Also, an internally cooled compressor diaphragm was developed

  13. Subseabed disposal program annual report, January-December 1980. Volume II. Appendices (principal investigator progress reports). Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinga, K.R. (ed.)

    1981-07-01

    Volume II of the sixth annual report describing the progress and evaluating the status of the Subseabed Disposal Program contains the appendices referred to in Volume I, Summary and Status. Because of the length of Volume II, it has been split into two parts for publication purposes. Part 1 contains Appendices A-Q; Part 2 contains Appendices R-MM. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each appendix for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  14. HYDRA-II: A hydrothermal analysis computer code: Volume 2, User's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCann, R.A.; Lowery, P.S.; Lessor, D.L.

    1987-09-01

    HYDRA-II is a hydrothermal computer code capable of three-dimensional analysis of coupled conduction, convection, and thermal radiation problems. This code is especially appropriate for simulating the steady-state performance of spent fuel storage systems. The code has been evaluated for this application for the US Department of Energy's Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program. HYDRA-II provides a finite-difference solution in cartesian coordinates to the equations governing the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. A cylindrical coordinate system may also be used to enclose the cartesian coordinate system. This exterior coordinate system is useful for modeling cylindrical cask bodies. The difference equations for conservation of momentum incorporate directional porosities and permeabilities that are available to model solid structures whose dimensions may be smaller than the computational mesh. The equation for conservation of energy permits modeling of orthotropic physical properties and film resistances. Several automated methods are available to model radiation transfer within enclosures and from fuel rod to fuel rod. The documentation of HYDRA-II is presented in three separate volumes. Volume 1 - Equations and Numerics describes the basic differential equations, illustrates how the difference equations are formulated, and gives the solution procedures employed. This volume, Volume 2 - User's Manual, contains code flow charts, discusses the code structure, provides detailed instructions for preparing an input file, and illustrates the operation of the code by means of a sample problem. The final volume, Volume 3 - Verification/Validation Assessments, provides a comparison between the analytical solution and the numerical simulation for problems with a known solution. 6 refs.

  15. Post-renal-transplant hypertension. Urine volume, free water clearance and plasma concentrations of arginine vasopressin, angiotensin II and aldosterone before and after oral water loading in hypertensive and normotensive renal transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, E B; Danielsen, H; Knudsen, F; Nielsen, A H; Jensen, T; Kornerup, H J; Madsen, M

    1986-09-01

    Urine volume (V), free water clearance (CH2O) and plasma concentrations of arginine vasopressin (AVP), angiotensin II (A II) and aldosterone (Aldo) were determined before and three times during the first 5 h after an oral water load of 20 ml/kg body wt in 19 patients with post-renal-transplant hypertension (group I), in 13 normotensive renal transplant recipients (group II) and in 20 control subjects (group III). Both V and CH2O increased significantly in all groups, but considerably less in groups I and II than in group III. When CH2O was related to glomerular filtration rate no differences existed between patients and control subjects. Basal AVP was the same in groups I (3.3 pmol/l, median) and II (3.0 pmol/l), but significantly (p less than 0.01) higher than in group III (1.9 pmol/l). Basal A II was significantly (p less than 0.01) elevated in group I (18 pmol/l) when compared to both groups II (10 pmol/l) and III (11 pmol/l), and the level was independent of the presence of native kidneys. Basal Aldo was the same in all groups. During loading, AVP was reduced in all groups, A II was almost unchanged, and Aldo was increased in groups I and II and reduced in group III depending on alterations in serum potassium. Thus urinary diluting ability is reduced in renal transplant recipients due to a reduced glomerular filtration rate. The enhanced A II in hypertensive renal transplant recipients gives further evidence for the point of view that hypertension is angiotensin-dependent in most of these patients.

  16. Synthesis and Characterization of Heteronuclear Copper(II-Lanthanide(III Complexes of N,N′-1,3-Propylenebis(Salicylaldiminato Where Lanthanide(III = Gd or Eu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longjam Jaideva Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Three complexes, namely, [Cu(salbn] (1, [Cu(salbnGd(NO33·H2O] (2, and [Cu(salbnEu(NO33·H2O] (3 where salbn = N,N′-1,3-propylenebis (salicylaldiminato have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, ICP-AES, IR, UV, NMR, MS, EDX, powder XRD, and EPR spectroscopies. The EDX results suggest the presence of two different metal ions in heteronuclear complexes (2 and (3. The ligand(salbn, complex (1, and complex (3 crystallize in triclinic system while complex (2 crystallizes in monoclinic system. The EPR studies suggest that [Cu(salbn] complex is tetragonally coordinated monomeric copper(II complex with unpaired electron in the dx2-y2 orbital and spectral features that are the characteristics of axial symmetry while complex (2 in DMF solution at liquid nitrogen temperature exhibits an anisotropic broad signal around g ~ 2.03 which may suggest a weak magnetic spin-exchange interaction between Gd(III and Cu(II ions. The fluorescence intensity of Eu(III decreased markedly in the complex (3.

  17. Are zinc-bound metallothionein isoforms (I+II and III) involved in impaired thymulin production and thymic involution during ageing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocchegiani, Eugenio; Giacconi, Robertina; Cipriano, Catia; Muti, Elisa; Gasparini, Nazzarena; Malavolta, Marco

    2004-11-12

    BACKGROUND: With advancing age, thymic efficiency shows progressive decline due to thymic involution allowing impaired cell-mediated immunity and the appearance of age-related diseases. The intrinsic cause of thymic involution is still undefined. Chronic inflammation and high glucocorticoids (GCs) may be involved. However, transgenic mice, with increased GC sensitivity and over expression of GC receptors, display delayed age-associated thymic involution. This fact suggests that other substances may affect thymic involution. Among them, both isoforms of metallothioneins (MTs) I+II and III are the major candidates because their increments leads to organ atrophy in constant stress and are induced by IL-6, which increases in ageing. Enhanced MTs in ageing allows constant sequester of zinc ions and no subsequent zinc release leading to low zinc ion bioavailability for thymic efficiency. This sequester is very limited in very old age. Thus, we have investigated the MTmRNA (I+II and III) in the thymus from young, old and very old mice. METHODS: MTmRNA and IL-6mRNA (RT-PCR) in the thymus from different donors were tested. Concomitantly, TECs proliferation, zinc ion bioavailability (ratio total thymulin/active thymulin), thymulin activity and corticosterone were tested from different donors. RESULTS: Both isoforms of MTmRNA and IL-6mRNA increase in old thymus coupled with low zinc ion bioavailability, reduced TECs proliferation, impaired thymulin activity and enhanced plasma corticosterone in comparison with young. Conversely, although the thymus is involuted in very old mice because of no changes in thymus weight in comparison to old mice, reduced MTmRNA, especially MT-I+II isoforms, and low IL6mRNA occur. Concomitantly, good zinc ion bioavailability, maintained TECs proliferation, satisfactory thymulin activity and reduced corticosterone are observed in very old mice. CONCLUSIONS: The concomitant increments by high IL-6 of both MT isoforms in the thymus from old mice may

  18. Are zinc-bound metallothionein isoforms (I+II and III involved in impaired thymulin production and thymic involution during ageing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cipriano Catia

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With advancing age, thymic efficiency shows progressive decline due to thymic involution allowing impaired cell-mediated immunity and the appearance of age-related diseases. The intrinsic cause of thymic involution is still undefined. Chronic inflammation and high glucocorticoids (GCs may be involved. However, transgenic mice, with increased GC sensitivity and over expression of GC receptors, display delayed age-associated thymic involution. This fact suggests that other substances may affect thymic involution. Among them, both isoforms of metallothioneins (MTs I+II and III are the major candidates because their increments leads to organ atrophy in constant stress and are induced by IL-6, which increases in ageing. Enhanced MTs in ageing allows constant sequester of zinc ions and no subsequent zinc release leading to low zinc ion bioavailability for thymic efficiency. This sequester is very limited in very old age. Thus, we have investigated the MTmRNA (I+II and III in the thymus from young, old and very old mice. Methods MTmRNA and IL-6mRNA (RT-PCR in the thymus from different donors were tested. Concomitantly, TECs proliferation, zinc ion bioavailability (ratio total thymulin/active thymulin, thymulin activity and corticosterone were tested from different donors. Results Both isoforms of MTmRNA and IL-6mRNA increase in old thymus coupled with low zinc ion bioavailability, reduced TECs proliferation, impaired thymulin activity and enhanced plasma corticosterone in comparison with young. Conversely, although the thymus is involuted in very old mice because of no changes in thymus weight in comparison to old mice, reduced MTmRNA, especially MT-I+II isoforms, and low IL6mRNA occur. Concomitantly, good zinc ion bioavailability, maintained TECs proliferation, satisfactory thymulin activity and reduced corticosterone are observed in very old mice. Conclusions The concomitant increments by high IL-6 of both MT isoforms in the

  19. Physician refer thyself: is Stark II, phase III the final voyage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; McMahon, Erin Brisbay

    2007-11-01

    , the Stark I prohibition on self-referrals by physicians expanded to include 10 additional healthcare services known as designated health services or DHS. The 1993 expansion of Stark I was enacted in 1995 as Stark II. In 2007, CMS adopted Phase III of the regulations interpreting Stark II. Phase III made multiple changes and clarified many previous issues, and it becomes effective December 4, 2007. While it is mandatory to obtain expert legal advice and this manuscript in no way provides the extensive navigation required through the maze of Stark laws and other anti-kickback statutes, it is incumbent on interventionalists in all settings of practice to have appropriate knowledge of the Stark laws and exceptions and of the anti-kickback statute and safe harbors. Penalties for violating the Stark laws are severe, including fines of up to dollars 15,000 per service and the economic threat of exclusion from participation in federal healthcare programs, which may result in exclusion of any type of healthcare program and loss of privileges at hospitals and surgery centers. This manuscript reviews physician practices in general, physician payments, and self-referral patterns in particular, the evolution of the Stark law and regulations and its implications for physician practices. This article is not, and should not be, construed as legal advice or an opinion on specific situations.

  20. Temozolomide combined with irradiation as postoperative treatment of primary glioblastoma multiforme. Phase I/II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, S.E.; Gutwein, S.; Schulz-Ertner, D.; Thilmann, C.; Wannenmacher, M.M.; Debus, J. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Kampen, M. van [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Nordwestkrankenhaus Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Edler, L. [Central Unit Biostatistics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2005-06-01

    Background and purpose: the role of radiochemotherapy in the treatment of primary glioblastoma multiforme is still discussed controversially. To evaluate the feasibility and toxicity of irradiation and concomitant administration of 50 mg/m{sup 2} temozolomide in patients with primary malignant glioma, this phase I/II study was conducted. Patients and methods: 53 patients with histologically confirmed WHO grade IV malignant glioma were enrolled into the study. All patients were treated with radiation therapy up to a total dose of 60 Gy using conventional fractionation of 5 x 2.0 Gy/week. Temozolomide was administered orally each therapy day at a dose of 50 mg/m{sup 2}. Results: prior to radiochemotherapy, complete resection (n = 14), subtotal resection (n = 22) or a biopsy (n = 17) of the tumor was performed. The median time interval between surgery and radiochemotherapy was 21 days. Treatment-related toxicity was very mild. Acute toxicity > grade 2 was observed in one patient who developed grade 4 hemotoxicity. Minor side effects of chemotherapy included nausea and vomiting. No severe late effects were observed. Median progression-free and overall survival were 8 and 19 months, respectively. The overall survival rate was 72% at 1 and 26% at 2 years. Age and extent of surgery significantly influenced survival. Conclusion: the combination of temozolomide plus radiation therapy is feasible and safe in terms of toxicity. Overall survival times were relatively long compared to survival times reported for radiotherapy alone. The application of 50 mg/m{sup 2} of temozolomide can be performed throughout the whole time course without interruption due to side effects and might largely contribute to the prolonged overall survival. Further evaluation is warranted as to which dose of temozolomide is optimal with regard to tumor response and toxicity. (orig.)

  1. Operative Treatment of Fifth Metatarsal Jones Fractures (Zones II and III) in the NBA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Martin; DeSandis, Bridget; Allen, Answorth; Levitsky, Matthew; O'Malley, Quinn; Williams, Riley

    2016-05-01

    Proximal fractures of the fifth metatarsal (zone II and III) are common in the elite athlete and can be difficult to treat because of a tendency toward delayed union, nonunion, or refracture. The purpose of this case series was to report our experience in treating 10 NBA players, determine the healing rate, return to play, refracture rate, and role of foot type in these athletes. The records of 10 professional basketball players were retrospectively reviewed. Seven athletes underwent standard percutaneous internal fixation with bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC) whereas the other 3 had open bone grafting primarily in addition to fixation and BMAC. Radiographic features evaluated included fourth-fifth intermetatarsal, fifth metatarsal lateral deviation, calcaneal pitch, and metatarsus adductus angles. Radiographic healing was observed at an overall average of 7.5 weeks and return to play was 9.8 weeks. Three athletes experienced refractures. There were no significant differences in clinical features or radiographic measurements except that the refracture group had the highest metatatarsus adductus angles. Most athletes were pes planus and 9 of 10 had a bony prominence under the fifth metatarsal styloid. This is the largest published series of operatively treated professional basketball players who exemplify a specific patient population at high risk for fifth metatarsal fracture. These players were large and possessed a unique foot type that seemed to be associated with increased risk of fifth metatarsal fracture and refracture. This foot type had forefoot metatarsus adductus and a fifth metatarsal that was curved with a prominent base. We continue to use standard internal fixation with bone marrow aspirate but advocate additional prophylactic open bone grafting in patients with high fourth-to-fifth intermetatarsal, fifth metatarsal lateral deviation, and metatarsus adductus angles as well as prominent fifth metatarsal styloids in order to improve fracture

  2. Type I, II, and III Interferons: Regulating Immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travar, Maja; Petkovic, Miroslav; Verhaz, Antonija

    2016-02-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are cytokines released by host cells in response to the presence of pathogens or tumor cells. The aim of this review was to present the previously known and new findings about the role of interferons type I and II, and recently discovered type III in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) infection control. Infection of various cell types with M. tuberculosis induce both IFN-α and IFN-β synthesis. The majority of the studies support the findings that IFN type I actually promotes infection with M. tuberculosis. It has been well establish that IFN-γ has protective function against M. tuberculosis and the other mycobacteria and that the primary source of this cytokine are CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Recently, it has been shown that also the innate lymphocytes, γδ T cells, natural killer (NK) T cells, and NK cells can also be the source of IFN-γ in response to mycobacterial infection. Several studies have shown that CD4(+) T cells protect mice against M. tuberculosis independently of IFN-γ. The balance between IFN-γ and different cytokines such as IL-10 and other Th2 cell cytokines is likely to influence disease outcome. Type I IFN appears to be detrimental through at least three separate, but overlapping, type I IFN-mediated mechanisms: induction of excessive apoptosis, specific suppression of Th1 and IFN-γ responses, and dampening of the immune response by strong IL-10 induction. Recently it has been found that M. tuberculosis infection in A549 lung epithelial cells stimulate up-regulation of IFN-λ genes in vitro. IFN-λs also have a role in modulation of Th1/Th2 response. IFN-λs are not essential for M. tuberculosis infection control, but can give some contribution in immune response to this pathogen.

  3. tert-Butyl hydroperoxide oxygenation of organic sulfides catalyzed by diruthenium(II,III) tetracarboxylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Leslie; Barker Paredes, Julia E; Cao, Zhi; Ren, Tong

    2013-11-04

    Diruthenium(II,III) carboxylates Ru2(esp)2Cl (1a), [Ru2(esp)2(H2O)2]BF4 (1b), and Ru2(OAc)4Cl (2) efficiently catalyze the oxygenation of organic sulfides. As noted in a previous work, 1a is active in oxygenation of organic sulfides with tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) in CH3CN. Reported herein in detail is the oxygenation activity of 1a, 1b, and 2, with the latter being highly selective in oxo-transfer to organic sulfides using TBHP under ambient conditions. Solvent-free oxidation reactions were achieved through dissolving 1a or 1b directly into the substrate with 2 equiv of TBHP, yielding TOF up to 2056 h(-1) with 1b. Also examined are the rate dependence on both catalyst and oxidant concentration for reactions with catalysts 1a and 2. Ru2(OAc)4Cl may be kinetically saturated with TBHP; however, Ru2(esp)2Cl does not display saturation kinetics. By use of a series of para-substituted thioanisoles, linear free-energy relationships were established for both 1a and 2, where the reactivity constants (ρ) are negative and that of 1a is about half that of 2. Given these reactivity data, two plausible reaction pathways were suggested. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation for the model compound Ru2(OAc)4Cl·TBHP, with TBHP on the open axial site, revealed elongation of the O-O bond of TBHP upon coordination.

  4. Validated Competing Event Model for the Stage I-II Endometrial Cancer Population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmona, Ruben; Gulaya, Sachin; Murphy, James D. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Rose, Brent S. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wu, John; Noticewala, Sonal [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); McHale, Michael T. [Department of Reproductive Medicine, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Yashar, Catheryn M. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Vaida, Florin [Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, University of California San Diego Medical Center, San Diego, California (United States); Mell, Loren K., E-mail: lmell@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose/Objectives(s): Early-stage endometrial cancer patients are at higher risk of noncancer mortality than of cancer mortality. Competing event models incorporating comorbidity could help identify women most likely to benefit from treatment intensification. Methods and Materials: 67,397 women with stage I-II endometrioid adenocarcinoma after total hysterectomy diagnosed from 1988 to 2009 were identified in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) and linked SEER-Medicare databases. Using demographic and clinical information, including comorbidity, we sought to develop and validate a risk score to predict the incidence of competing mortality. Results: In the validation cohort, increasing competing mortality risk score was associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality (subdistribution hazard ratio [SDHR], 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60-2.30) and decreased risk of endometrial cancer mortality (SDHR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.55-0.78). Controlling for other variables, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) = 1 (SDHR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.45-1.82) and CCI >1 (SDHR, 3.31; 95% CI, 2.74-4.01) were associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality. The 10-year cumulative incidences of competing mortality within low-, medium-, and high-risk strata were 27.3% (95% CI, 25.2%-29.4%), 34.6% (95% CI, 32.5%-36.7%), and 50.3% (95% CI, 48.2%-52.6%), respectively. With increasing competing mortality risk score, we observed a significant decline in omega (ω), indicating a diminishing likelihood of benefit from treatment intensification. Conclusion: Comorbidity and other factors influence the risk of competing mortality among patients with early-stage endometrial cancer. Competing event models could improve our ability to identify patients likely to benefit from treatment intensification.

  5. Advanced Residual Strength Degradation Rate Modeling for Advanced Composite Structures. Volume III. Appendixes for Tasks II and III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    Wald - Wolfowitz 0 1 ) test which determines whether two samples come from populations having identical cumulative distribution functions was performed...Performance of the Wald - Wolfowitz test on the 32-ply panels having the lowest (S) and highest (P) means yields the following array for the combined 38 data...there is reason to believe samples mli~t no, be from the same population. Based on these three tesi, Wald - Wolfowitz , F-test and T-test the statement

  6. AIR QUALITY CRITERIA FOR PARTICULATE MATTER, VOLUMES I-III, (EXTERNAL REVIEW DRAFT, 1995)

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is no abstract available for these documents. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the Technical Information Staff at the number listed above.Air Quality Criteria for Particulate Matter, Volume I, Extern...

  7. Field Surveys, IOC Valleys. Volume III, Part I. Cultural Resources Survey, Dry Lake Valley, Nevada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    Artemisia nova) but also include cliffrose (Cowania mexicana ) and broom snakeweed (Gutierrezia sarothreae) as dominant species. Other species include... CULTURA Ale ~~REOUC SURVEYa AREASczCAvE L CU 11U CUUI 3-2 E-TR-48-III-I 69 was used because it is considered intensive by the Bureau of Land Management and

  8. Photoionization cross sections of O II, O III, O IV, and O V: benchmarking R-matrix theory and experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Nahar, S N

    2003-01-01

    For crucial tests between theory and experiment, ab initio close coupling calculations are carried out for photoionization of O II, O III, O IV, O V. The relativistic fine structure and resonance effects are studied using the R-matrix and its relativistic variant the Breit Pauli R-matrix (BPRM) approximation. Detailed comparison is made with high resolution experimental measurements carried out in three different set-ups: Advanced Light Source at Berkeley, and synchrotron radiation experiments at University of Aarhus and University of Paris-Sud. The comparisons illustrate physical effects in photoionization such as (i) fine structure, (ii) resolution, and (iii) metastable components. Photoionization cross sections sigma{PI} of the ground and a few low lying excited states of these ions obtained in the experimental spectrum include combined features of these states. Theoretically calculated resonances need to be resolved with extremely fine energy mesh for precise comparison. In addition, prominent resonant fe...

  9. Cohesive energy of zincblende (A$^{III}$ B$^{V}$ and A$^{II}$B$^{VI}$) structured solids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A S Verma; B K Sarkar; V K Jindal

    2010-05-01

    In this paper we present an expression relating the cohesive energy (coh in kcal/mol) of A$^{III}$B$^{V}$ and A$^{II}$ B$^{VI}$ semiconductors with the product of ionic charges ($Z_{1}Z_{2}$) and nearest-neighbour distance d (Å). The cohesive energy values of these solids exhibit a linear relationship when plotted on a log–log scale against the nearest-neighbour distance (Å), but fall on different straight lines according to the ionic charge product of the solids. A good agreement has been found between the experimental and calculated values of the cohesive energy of A$^{III}$B$^{V}$ and A$^{II}$B$^{VI}$ semiconductors.

  10. Selection of Chelated Fe (III)/Fe (II) Catalytic Oxidation Agents for Desulfurization Based on Iron Complexation Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Ying; Liu Youzhi; Qi Guisheng; Guo Huidong; Zhu Zhengfeng

    2014-01-01

    Optimization of factors inlfuencing the experiments on reactions involving 8 different chelating agents and sol-uble Fe (III)/Fe (II) salts was carried out to yield chelated iron complexes. A combination of optimized inlfuencing factors has resulted in a Fe chelating capacity of the iron-based desulfurization solution to be equal to 6.83-13.56 g/L at a redox potential of 0.185-0.3. The desulfurization performance of Fe (III)/Fe (II) chelating agents was investigated on a simulated sulfur-containing industrial gas composed of H2S and N2 in a cross-lfow rotating packed bed. Test results have revealed that the proposed iron-based desulfurization solution showed a sulfur removal efifciency of over 99%along with a Fe chelating capacity exceeding 1.35 g/L. This desulfurization technology which has practical application prospect is currently in the phase of commercial scale-up study.

  11. Redox cycling of Fe(II) and Fe(III) in magnetite by Fe-metabolizing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, James M.; Klueglein, Nicole; Pearce, Carolyn; Rosso, Kevin M.; Appel, Erwin; Kappler, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    Microorganisms are a primary control on the redox-induced cycling of iron in the environment. Despite the ability of bacteria to grow using both Fe(II) and Fe(III) bound in solid-phase iron minerals, it is currently unknown whether changing environmental conditions enable the sharing of electrons in mixed-valent iron oxides between bacteria with different metabolisms. We show through magnetic and spectroscopic measurements that the phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE-1 oxidizes magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles using light energy. This process is reversible in co-cultures by the anaerobic Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens. These results demonstrate that Fe ions bound in the highly crystalline mineral magnetite are bioavailable as electron sinks and electron sources under varying environmental conditions, effectively rendering magnetite a naturally occurring battery.

  12. Proceedings of the International Conference on the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME) (11th, Montreal, Canada, July 19-25, 1987). Volumes I-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Jacques C., Ed.; And Others

    The Proceedings of PME-XI has been published in three separate volumes because of the large total of 161 individual conference papers reported. Volume I contains four plenary papers, all on the subject of "constructivism," and 44 commented papers arranged under 4 themes. Volume II contains 56 papers (39 commented; 17 uncommented)…

  13. ICPP calcined solids storage facility closure study. Volume III: Engineering design files

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The following information was calculated to support cost estimates and radiation exposure calculations for closure activities at the Calcined Solids Storage Facility (CSSF). Within the estimate, volumes were calculated to determine the required amount of grout to be used during closure activities. The remaining calcine on the bin walls, supports, piping, and floor was also calculated to approximate the remaining residual calcine volumes at different stages of the removal process. The estimates for remaining calcine and vault void volume are higher than what would actually be experienced in the field, but are necessary for bounding purposes. The residual calcine in the bins may be higher than was is experienced in the field as it was assumed that the entire bin volume is full of calcine before removal activities commence. The vault void volumes are higher as the vault roof beam volumes were neglected. The estimations that follow should be considered rough order of magnitude, due to the time constraints as dictated by the project`s scope of work. Should more accurate numbers be required, a new analysis would be necessary.

  14. Simulation model for wind energy storage systems. Volume II. Operation manual. [SIMWEST code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, A.W.; Edsinger, R.W.; Burroughs, J.D.

    1977-08-01

    The effort developed a comprehensive computer program for the modeling of wind energy/storage systems utilizing any combination of five types of storage (pumped hydro, battery, thermal, flywheel and pneumatic). An acronym for the program is SIMWEST (Simulation Model for Wind Energy Storage). The level of detail of SIMWEST is consistent with a role of evaluating the economic feasibility as well as the general performance of wind energy systems. The software package consists of two basic programs and a library of system, environmental, and load components. Volume II, the SIMWEST operation manual, describes the usage of the SIMWEST program, the design of the library components, and a number of simple example simulations intended to familiarize the user with the program's operation. Volume II also contains a listing of each SIMWEST library subroutine.

  15. Energy extension service pilot program evaluation report: the first year. Volume II: pilot state reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    Volume II of the Energy Extension Service Evaluation presents a discussion of the operations of the ten EES pilot-state programs during the period from October 1, 1977 through September 30, 1978. Each of the ten pilot states - Alabama, Connecticut, Michigan, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming - received a grant of approximately $1.1 million to develop and implement a 19-month program beginning on October 1, 1977. Volume II provides a case-study description of the operations of the pilot program in each state, with special attention given to the two programs selected in each state for more detailed study and survey research. Some survey data and analysis are presented for the emphasis programs.

  16. A comparative reappraisal of the Rome II and Rome III diagnostic criteria: are we getting closer to the 'true' prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperber, Ami D; Shvartzman, Pesach; Friger, Michael; Fich, Alex

    2007-06-01

    Revisions of the diagnostic criteria for irritable bowel syndrome have led to varying prevalence estimates. The Rome III criteria require a lower symptom frequency than Rome II (at least 10% of the time for Rome III, compared with at least 25% of the time for Rome II). In an epidemiological survey of a representative sample of Israeli adults using Rome II, we reported the prevalence for irritable bowel syndrome as 2.9%. The official Rome II integrative questionnaire, used for that study, enables a close approximation of Rome III rates, facilitating a retrospective comparison of these criteria. A representative sample of 1000 adults was interviewed with a validated Hebrew version of the official Rome II integrative questionnaire. The data were re-evaluated retrospectively to compare the Rome II results with a close approximation of the new Rome III criteria. The prevalence rates for irritable bowel syndrome were 2.9 and 11.4%, respectively, for Rome II and Rome III. The corresponding consultation rates were 57.1 and 41.7%, indicating that the more strict Rome II criteria may select out a group of patients with more severe disease or greater psychosocial problems. Women made up 71.4% of irritable bowel syndrome by Rome II and 62.5% by Rome III. In the present retrospective study, the prevalence rate for irritable bowel syndrome in our population is significantly higher by Rome III compared with Rome II. Rome III may more closely reflect the socioeconomic burden of irritable bowel syndrome compared with the overly strict Rome II. Prospective comparative studies should be conducted to confirm these results.

  17. Fe(II) sorption on pyrophyllite: Effect of structural Fe(III) (impurity) in pyrophyllite on nature of layered double hydroxide (LDH) secondary mineral formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starcher, Autumn N.; Li, Wei; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Elzinga, Evert J.; Sparks, Donald L.

    2016-11-01

    Fe(II)-Al(III)-LDH (layered double hydroxide) phases have been shown to form from reactions of aqueous Fe(II) with Fe-free Al-bearing minerals (phyllosilicate/clays and Al-oxides). To our knowledge, the effect of small amounts of structural Fe(III) impurities in “neutral” clays on such reactions, however, were not studied. In this study to understand the role of structural Fe(III) impurity in clays, laboratory batch studies with pyrophyllite (10 g/L), an Al-bearing phyllosilicate, containing small amounts of structural Fe(III) impurities and 0.8 mM and 3 mM Fe(II) (both natural and enriched in 57Fe) were carried out at pH 7.5 under anaerobic conditions (4% H2 – 96% N2 atmosphere). Samples were taken up to 4 weeks for analysis by Fe-X-ray absorption spectroscopy and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. In addition to the precipitation of Fe(II)-Al(III)-LDH phases as observed in earlier studies with pure minerals (no Fe(III) impurities in the minerals), the analyses indicated formation of small amounts of Fe(III) containing solid(s), most probably hybrid a Fe(II)-Al(III)/Fe(III)-LDH phase. The mechanism of Fe(II) oxidation was not apparent but most likely was due to interfacial electron transfer from the sorbed Fe(II) to the structural Fe(III) and/or surface-sorption-induced electron-transfer from the sorbed Fe(II) to the clay lattice. Increase in the Fe(II)/Al ratio of the LDH with reaction time further indicated the complex nature of the samples. This research provides evidence for the formation of both Fe(II)-Al(III)-LDH and Fe(II)-Fe(III)/Al(III)-LDH-like phases during reactions of Fe(II) in systems that mimic the natural environments. Better understanding Fe phase formation in complex laboratory studies will improve models of natural redox systems.

  18. Phase I/II study of azacitidine and capecitabine/oxaliplatin (CAPOX) in refractory CIMP-high metastatic colorectal cancer: evaluation of circulating methylated vimentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overman, Michael J.; Morris, Van; Moinova, Helen; Manyam, Ganiraju; Ensor, Joe; Lee, Michael S.; Eng, Cathy; Kee, Bryan; Fogelman, David; Shroff, Rachna T.; LaFramboise, Thomas; Mazard, Thibault; Feng, Tian; Hamilton, Stanley; Broom, Bradley; Lutterbaugh, James; Issa, Jean-Pierre; Markowitz, Sanford D.; Kopetz, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands (CIMP) has been strongly implicated in chemotherapy resistance and is implicated in the pathogenesis of a subset of colorectal cancers (CRCs) termed CIMP-high. Experimental Design This phase I/II study in CRC (phase II portion restricted to CIMP-high CRC), treated fluoropyrimidine/oxaliplatin refractory patients with azacitidine (75 mg/m2/day subcutaneously D1-5) and CAPOX (capecitibine and oxaliplatin) every three weeks. Results Twenty-six patients (pts) were enrolled in this study: 15 pts (12 treated at MTD) in phase I and 11 pts in phase II. No dose limiting toxicities were observed. A total of 14 pts were CIMP-high. No responses were seen. CIMP-high status did not correlate with efficacy endpoints [stable disease (SD) or progression-free survival (PFS)] or baseline vimentin methylation level. Changes in vimentin methylation over time did not correlate with efficacy outcomes. Baseline methylated vimentin correlated with tumor volume (P<0.001) and higher levels of baseline methylation correlated with the obtainment of stable disease (P=0.04). Conclusions Azacitidine and CAPOX were well tolerated with high rates of stable disease in CIMP-high pts, but no objective responses. Serum methylated vimentin may be associated with benefit from a regimen including a hypomethylation agent, although this study is not able to separate a potential prognostic or predictive role for the biomarker. PMID:27542211

  19. Role of Surgery in Stages II and III Pediatric Abdominal Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: A 5-Years Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Salem, Mohamed A.; Hamza, Hesham M.; Sayd, Heba A.; Ali, Amany M.

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) are the most common extra nodal presentation of pediatric NHL. Our aim is to assess the role of surgery as a risk factor and to evaluate the impact of risk-adjusted systemic chemotherapy on survival of patients with stages II and III disease. This study included 35 pediatric patients with abdominal NHL treated over five years at South Egypt Cancer Institute (SECI), Assiut University, between January 2005 and January 2010. The data of every patient include...

  20. Outcome of patients with stage II and III nonseminomatous germ cell tumors: Results of a single center

    OpenAIRE

    Ataergin S; Ozet A; Arpaci F; Kilic S; Beyzadeoglu M; Komurcu S

    2007-01-01

    Background: The prognostic factors in nonseminomatous germ cell tumors have been mainly derived from the analysis of stage I tumors. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate some prognostic factors and the outcome of patients with stage II and III nonseminomatous germ cell tumors according to risk groups treated between 1993 and 2002. Settings and Design: Patients were retrospectively classified as good, intermediate and poor risk groups according to International Germ Cell Cancer Con...

  1. Self-esteem in adolescents with Angle Class I, II and III malocclusion in a Peruvian sample

    OpenAIRE

    Karla Florián-Vargas; Marcos J. Carruitero Honores; Eduardo Bernabé; Carlos Flores-Mir

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare self-esteem scores in 12 to 16-year-old adolescents with different Angle malocclusion types in a Peruvian sample.MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 276 adolescents (159, 52 and 65 with Angle Class I, II and III malocclusions, respectively) from Trujillo, Peru. Participants were asked to complete the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) and were also clinically examined, so as to have Angle malocclusion classification determined. Anal...

  2. Ion exchange equilibria in simultaneous extraction of platinum(II, IV) and rhodium(III) from hydrochloric solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mel'nikov, A. M.; Kononova, O. N.; Pavlenko, N. I.; Krylov, A. S.

    2012-06-01

    Regularities of sorption extraction of platinum(II, IV) and rhodium(III) by anion exchangers of various physical and chemical structure in the presence of hydrochloric media were studied. It is established that AM-2B, Purolite A 500, and Purolite S 985 ionites adsorb complex anions of platinum metals employing mixed mechanism. A high affinity of the studied anionites for the studied complex anions of platinum and rhodium is established.

  3. Diagnosis of functional constipation: Agreement between Rome III and Rome II criteria and evaluation for the practicality

    OpenAIRE

    Xin, Hai Wei; Fang, Xiu Cai; Zhu, Li Ming; Xu, Tao; Fei, Gui Jun; Wang, Zhi Feng; Chang, Min; Wang, Li Ying; Sun, Xiao Hong; Ke, Mei Yun

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the agreement between Rome III and Rome II criteria for diagnosing functional constipation (FC) and to evaluate the accuracy of each constipation symptom for FC diagnosis. Methods Patients with chronic constipation underwent rigorous biochemical and endoscopic/imaging tests to exclude organic and metabolic diseases. The questionnaires including general information, constipation symptoms, and the most troublesome constipation symptoms were completed in a face-to-face s...

  4. The Differences in Prevalence and Sociodemographic Characteristics of Irritable Bowel Syndrome According to Rome II and Rome III

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Dong Won; Lee, Oh Young; Shim, Sung Gon; Jun, Dae Won; Lee, Kang Nyeong; Kim, Hye Young; Lee, Hang Lak; Yoon, Byung Chul; Choi, Ho Soon

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most frequently observed disorders by primary care and practitioners. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of IBS using the Rome II and III criteria in the general Korean population and also to compare sociodemographic differences between subjects diagnosed by these criteria. Methods Telephone interview surveys were performed with a total of 1,009 individuals in Korea, 15 years of age or older. The questionnaire, bas...

  5. Preparation and studies of Co(II) and Co(III)-substituted barium ferrite prepared by sol-gel method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teh, Geok Bee [Department of Bioscience and Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, 53300 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)]. E-mail: tehgb@mail.utar.edu.my; Nagalingam, Saravanan [Department of Bioscience and Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, 53300 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Jefferson, David A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom)

    2007-01-15

    The sol-gel preparative method was employed to synthesise Co(II) and Co(III)-substituted barium ferrite. This method was attempted to achieve higher homogeneity of the final product. Samples of substituted ferrites were characterised by various experimental techniques including high resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, magnetometry and thermal gravimetric analysis. The microstructural changes induced by such substitution are also discussed.

  6. CS-27IDH1/2 MUTATIONS INFLUENCE ZEB1 EXPRESSION IN GRADES II AND III GLIOMAS

    OpenAIRE

    Nesvick, Cody; Zhang, Chao; Montgomery, Blake; Lee, Michaela; Yang, Chunzhang; Wang, Herui; Merrill, Marsha; Heiss, John; Ray-Chaudhury, Abhik; Zhuang, Zhengping

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a cell program that crucially regulates polarity and enhances invasion in normal epithelia and carcinomas. It has been recently demonstrated that EMT-promoting transcription factors (EMT-TFs) also govern cell invasion in glioblastoma, but the role of these proteins in lower-grade gliomas has not yet been investigated. We investigated the impact of EMT-TF expression on overall survival in World Health Organization (WHO) grades II and III gliomas using...

  7. Comparative adsorption of Fe(III) and Cd(II) ions on glutaraldehyde crosslinked chitosan–coated cristobalite

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmi; Fathurrahmi; Irwansyah; Arie Purnaratrie

    2015-01-01

    In this study, chitosan was crosslinked with glutaraldehyde and coated on the surface of cristobalite through a dip and phase inversion process. The adsorbent was used in batch experiments to evaluate the adsorption of Fe(III) and Cd(II) ions. A maximum adsorption capacity was observed at a glutaraldehyde concentration in sorbent preparation of 1% (w/w). The equilibrium adsorption quantity was determined to be a function of the solution pH, initial concentration and agitation period. Langmuir...

  8. Concurrent Occurrence of Type II and Type III Endoleak of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Stent Graft: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyoung Su; Hong, Seong Sook; Kim, Jung Hoon; Kim, Yong Jae; Goo, Dong Erk; Kwon, Kui Hyang; Choi, Deuk Lin [Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    Endoleak is an important complication following stent grafts for abdominal aortic aneurysms. Here we describe ultrasonography findings in an 86-year-old man including doppler ultrasonography and CT scan in an unusual and interesting case of the concurrent occurrence of a type II endoleak that originated from the left accessory renal artery and a type III endoleak due to shaft fracture of the stent

  9. Results of site validation experiments. Volume II. Supporting documents 5 through 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    Volume II contains the following supporting documents: Summary of Geologic Mapping of Underground Investigations; Logging of Vertical Coreholes - ''Double Box'' Area and Exploratory Drift; WIPP High Precision Gravity Survey; Basic Data Reports for Drillholes, Brine Content of Facility Internal Strata; Mineralogical Content of Facility Interval Strata; Location and Characterization of Interbedded Materials; Characterization of Aquifers at Shaft Locations; and Permeability of Facility Interval Strate.

  10. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-17

    Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC Test Program which may include land and floating test facilities. The document, Volume II - Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part A contains definitions, baseline revisions, test plans, and energy utilization sections.

  11. Generation of a Mn(IV)-Peroxo or Mn(III)-Oxo-Mn(III) Species upon Oxygenation of Mono- and Binuclear Thiolate-Ligated Mn(II) Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chien-Ming; Wu, Wun-Yan; Chiang, Ming-Hsi; Bohle, D Scott; Lee, Gene-Hsiang

    2017-09-05

    A thiolate-bridged binuclear complex [PPN]2[(Mn(II)((TMS)PS3))2] (1, PPN = bis(triphenylphosphine)iminium and (TMS)PS3H3 = (2,2',2″-trimercapto-3,3',3″-tris(trimethylsilyl)triphenylphosphine)), prepared from the reaction of MnCl2/[PPN]Cl and Li3[(TMS)PS3], converts into a mononuclear complex [PPN][Mn(II)((TMS)PS3)(DABCO)] (2) in the presence of excess amounts of DABCO (DABCO = 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane). Variable temperature studies of solution containing 1 and DABCO by UV-vis spectroscopy indicate that 1 and 2 exist in significant amounts in equilibrium and mononuclear 2 is favored at low temperature. Treatment of 1 or 2 with the monomeric O2-side-on-bound [PPN][Mn(IV)(O2)((TMS)PS3)] (3) produces the mono-oxo-bridged dimer [PPN]2[(Mn(III)((TMS)PS3))2(μ-O)] (4). The electrochemistry of 1 and 2 reveals anodic peak(s) for a Mn(III/)Mn(II) redox couple at shifted potentials against Fc/Fc(+), indicating that both complexes can be oxidized by dioxygen. The O2 activation mediated by 1 and 2 is investigated in both solution and the solid state. Microcrystals of 2 rapidly react with air or dry O2 to generate the Mn(IV)-peroxo 3 in high yield, revealing a solid-to-solid transformation and two-electron reduction of O2. Oxygenation of 1 or 2 in solution, however, is affected by diffusion and transient concentration of dioxygen in the two different substrates, leading to generation of 3 and 4 in variable ratios.

  12. Mid-Infrared [NeII] and [NeIII] Emission Line Profiles in Starbursts and AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsonyan, A. L.

    2016-09-01

    Line profiles and velocities of the [CII] 157μm line observed with the Herschel PACS instrument are compared to high resolution [NeII] 12.81μm and [NeIII] 15.55μm emission lines observed with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS). We are analysing spectra of at least 400 galaxies having both IRS high resolution and Herschel PACS [CII] line profiles that are available from the public archives. The goal of the work is the comparison of emission line velocity profiles and fluxes to locate and understand differences in the origins of [CII] compared to the mid-infrared Neon lines. Line velocities and widths are carefully measured, and errors are analyzed to determine if there is any kinematic evidence for [CII] arising from clouds not visible in the mid-infrared emission lines. This will give an answer to two questions: 1. Is there evidence that [CII] is more diffuse, distributed throughout galaxies, than the mid infrared starburst indicators [NeII] and [NeIII]?; 2. Is there evidence for specific, very dusty clouds of [CII] with so much extinction that the [CII] can be seen but the [NeII] and [NeIII] is not seen?

  13. Theoretical insight into photo-induced intramolecular electron transfer in heterodinuclear Ru(II)–Co(III) complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Yang; Lu, Xiaoqing, E-mail: luxq@upc.edu.cn; Li, Ke; Zhao, Zigang; Shi, Xiaofan; Jin, Dongliang; Zhu, Houyu; Yang, Guangwu; Guo, Wenyue, E-mail: wyguo@upc.edu.cn

    2015-07-15

    Photo-induced intramolecular electron transfer (IET) of a series of heterodinuclear Ru(II)–Co(III) complexes has been theoretically investigated by density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT). The Ru(II)–Co(III) complexes display Ru → Co metal-to-metal electron transfer (MMET) in the visible region. The photosensitivity involving spectral response range and absorption intensity, and IET rate, are improved by introducing (Z)-N-(1H-isoindol-1-ylidene)-2H-isoindol-1-amine as donor ligands. The Ru → Co IET rate in the newly designed complexes shows at least one order of magnitude larger than that in [(bpy){sub 2}-Ru(pytp)Co(tren)]{sup 5+}. These superior performances indicate that heterodinuclear Ru(II)–Co(III) complexes could be promising as the effective ligand release carriers for the selective cancer treatment. - Highlights: • Photo-induced intramolecular electron transfer of heterodinuclear Ru–Co complex. • New donors improve the spectral range and intensity in the visible region. • Fine-tuned donors boost the Ru → Co IET rate at least one order of magnitude.

  14. [Analysis of prognostic factors after radical resection in 628 patients with stage II or III colon cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Qiong; Yang, Lin; Zhou, Ai-ping; Sun, Yong-kun; Song, Yan; DU, Feng; Wang, Jin-wan

    2013-03-01

    To analyze the clinicopathologic factors related to recurrence and metastasis of stage II or III colon cancer after radical resection. The clinical and pathological data of 628 patients with stage II or III colon cancer after radical resection from Jan. 2005 to Dec. 2008 in our hospital were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. The overall recurrence and metastasis rate was 28.5% (179/628). The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 70.3% and 5-year overall survival (OS) rate was 78.5%. Univariate analysis showed that age, smoking intensity, depth of tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, gross classification, histological differentiation, blood vessel tumor embolus, tumor gross pathology, multiple primary tumors, preoperative and postoperative serum concentration of CEA and CA19-9, and the regimen of adjuvant chemotherapy were correlated to recurrence and metastasis of colon cancer after radical resection. Multivariate analysis showed that regional lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, the regimen of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy, and preoperative serum concentration of CEA and CA19-9 were independent factors affecting the prognosis of colon cancer patients. Regional lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, elevated preoperative serum concentration of CEA and CA19-9, the regimen of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with single fluorouracil type drug are independent risk factors of recurrence and metastasis in patients with stage II-III colon cancer after radical resection.

  15. Improved lymph node harvest from resected colon cancer specimens did not cause upstaging from TNM stage II to III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storli, Kristian; Søndenaa, Karl; Furnes, Bjørg; Leh, Sabine; Nesvik, Idunn; Bru, Tore; Gudlaugsson, Einar; Bukholm, Ida; Norheim-Andersen, Solveig; Eide, Geir

    2011-12-01

    The number of lymph nodes retrieved and examined from a resected colon cancer specimen may be crucial for correct staging. We examined if efforts to increase the lymph node harvest to more than 12 lymph nodes per specimen would upstage some patients from TNM stage II to III. Three hospitals compared results from 2000 with those of 2007 in 421 resected patients with stage II and III colon cancer. Hospital A endeavored to improve the surgical procedure while the pathologists enhanced the quality of lymph node sampling. Hospital B did not make any marked changes, while hospital C introduced the GEWF lymph node solvent (glacial acetic acid, ethanol, distilled water, and formaldehyde) in their pathology method. In 2000, 12 or more lymph nodes were harvested in 39.6, 45.0, and 21.1% of the specimens from the three hospitals, while the figures for 2007 were 85.7, 42.0, and 90.3%, respectively. The significant increase in lymph node harvest in two of the hospitals in 2007 compared to 2000 (p TNM stage II to III.

  16. Novel complexes of Co(III) and Ni(II) containing peptide ligands: Synthesis, DNA binding and photonuclease activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhamani, C. N.; Bhojya Naik, H. S.; Girija, D.; Sangeetha Gowda, K. R.; Giridhar, M.; Arvinda, T.

    2014-01-01

    The new cobalt(III) and nickel(II) complexes of the type [M(L)2(H2O)2]n+ (where M = Co(III) or Ni(II) ion, n = 3 for Co and 2 for Ni, L = peptides Fmoc. Ala-val-OH (F-AVOH), Fmoc-Phe-Leu-Ome (F-PLOMe) and Z-Ala-Phe-COsbnd NH2 (Z-APCONH2)) were synthesized and structurally characterized by FTIR, 1H NMR, elemental analysis and electronic spectral data. An octahedral geometry has been proposed for all the synthesized Co(III) and Ni(II) metal complexes. The binding property of the complexes with CT-DNA was studied by absorption spectral analysis, followed by viscosity measurement and thermal denaturation studies. Detailed analysis revealed that the metal complexes intercalates into the DNA base stack as intercalator. The photo induced cleavage studies shows that the complexes possess photonuclease property against pUC19 DNA under UV-Visible irradiation.

  17. Mucolipidosis types II and III and non-syndromic stuttering are associated with different variants in the same genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, M Hashim; Domingues, Carlos E F; Webster, Ronald; Sainz, Eduardo; Paris, Emily; Rahn, Rachel; Gutierrez, Joanne; Chow, Ho Ming; Mundorff, Jennifer; Kang, Chang-Soo; Riaz, Naveeda; Basra, Muhammad A R; Khan, Shaheen; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Moretti-Ferreira, Danilo; Braun, Allen; Drayna, Dennis

    2016-04-01

    Homozygous mutations in GNPTAB and GNPTG are classically associated with mucolipidosis II (ML II) alpha/beta and mucolipidosis III (ML III) alpha/beta/gamma, which are rare lysosomal storage disorders characterized by multiple pathologies. Recently, variants in GNPTAB, GNPTG, and the functionally related NAGPA gene have been associated with non-syndromic persistent stuttering. In a worldwide sample of 1013 unrelated individuals with non-syndromic persistent stuttering we found 164 individuals who carried a rare non-synonymous coding variant in one of these three genes. We compared the frequency of these variants with those in population-matched controls and genomic databases, and their location with those reported in mucolipidosis. Stuttering subjects displayed an excess of non-synonymous coding variants compared to controls and individuals in the 1000 Genomes and Exome Sequencing Project databases. We identified a total of 81 different variants in our stuttering cases. Virtually all of these were missense substitutions, only one of which has been previously reported in mucolipidosis, a disease frequently associated with complete loss-of-function mutations. We hypothesize that rare non-synonymous coding variants in GNPTAB, GNPTG, and NAGPA may account for as much as 16% of persistent stuttering cases, and that variants in GNPTAB and GNPTG are at different sites and may in general, cause less severe effects on protein function than those in ML II alpha/beta and ML III alpha/beta/gamma.

  18. Novel complexes of Co(III) and Ni(II) containing peptide ligands: synthesis, DNA binding and photonuclease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhamani, C N; Bhojya Naik, H S; Girija, D; Sangeetha Gowda, K R; Giridhar, M; Arvinda, T

    2014-01-24

    The new cobalt(III) and nickel(II) complexes of the type [M(L)2(H2O)2](n)(+) (where M = Co(III) or Ni(II) ion, n = 3 for Co and 2 for Ni, L = peptides Fmoc. Ala-val-OH (F-AVOH), Fmoc-Phe-Leu-Ome (F-PLOMe) and Z-Ala-Phe-CONH2 (Z-APCONH2)) were synthesized and structurally characterized by FTIR, (1)H NMR, elemental analysis and electronic spectral data. An octahedral geometry has been proposed for all the synthesized Co(III) and Ni(II) metal complexes. The binding property of the complexes with CT-DNA was studied by absorption spectral analysis, followed by viscosity measurement and thermal denaturation studies. Detailed analysis revealed that the metal complexes intercalates into the DNA base stack as intercalator. The photo induced cleavage studies shows that the complexes possess photonuclease property against pUC19 DNA under UV-Visible irradiation.

  19. Organization of layers II-III connections in human visual cortex revealed by in vitro injections of biocytin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenan-Vaknin, G; Ouaknine, G E; Razon, N; Malach, R

    1992-10-30

    In the search for cortical mechanisms subserving psychological phenomena, a better understanding of human cortical circuitry is crucial. In this report we describe aspects of intrinsic connectivity of supragranular layers in human visual cortex, revealed by extracellular injections of the anterograde tracer biocytin in vitro. Human cortical slices were obtained from visual association cortex in the posterior-medial portion of the dorsal bank of the occipital lobe, removed during neurosurgical tumor ablations. Small iontophoretic injections of biocytin into layers II-III revealed intense Golgi-like staining of axonal projections emanating from the injection sites. Vertically descending axons are grouped in bundles 20 microns in diameter which are spaced 15 microns apart. Some of these axons enter the white matter and send long oblique and horizontal collaterals. The main horizontal spread of the axons could be observed in layers II-III and V. The bulk of projections extends to a distance of 1.5 mm in layers II-III and 1.1 mm in layer V. Few individual axons could be observed at greater distances. In contrast, layer IV is almost devoid of horizontal connections, forming a clear gap between supra- and infragranular layers. Axon collaterals in the infragranular layers project mostly in a descending oblique direction with long horizontal collaterals in lower layer VI.

  20. Stability hierarchy between Piracetam forms I, II, and III from experimental pressure-temperature diagrams and topological inferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscani, Siro; Céolin, René; Minassian, Léon Ter; Barrio, Maria; Veglio, Nestor; Tamarit, Josep-Lluis; Louër, Daniel; Rietveld, Ivo B

    2016-01-30

    The trimorphism of the active pharmaceutical ingredient piracetam is a famous case of polymorphism that has been frequently revisited by many researchers. The phase relationships between forms I, II, and III were ambiguous because they seemed to depend on the heating rate of the DSC and on the history of the samples or they have not been observed at all (equilibrium II-III). In the present paper, piezo-thermal analysis and high-pressure differential thermal analysis have been used to elucidate the positions of the different solid-solid and solid-liquid equilibria. The phase diagram, involving the three solid phases, the liquid phase and the vapor phase, has been constructed. It has been shown that form III is the high-pressure, low-temperature form and the stable form at room temperature. Form II is stable under intermediary conditions and form I is the low pressure, high temperature form, which possesses a stable melting point. The present paper demonstrates the strength of the topological approach based on the Clapeyron equation and the alternation rule when combined with high-pressure measurements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Electron transfer and atom exchange between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) in clays. Role in U and Hg(II) transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherer, Michelle [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2016-08-31

    During this project, we investigated Fe electron transfer and atom exchange between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) in clay minerals. We used selective chemical extractions, enriched Fe isotope tracer experiments, computational molecular modeling, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Our findings indicate that structural Fe(III) in clay minerals is reduced by aqueous Fe(II) and that electron transfer occurs when Fe(II) is sorbed to either basal planes and edge OH-groups of clay mineral. Findings from highly enriched isotope experiments suggest that up to 30 % of the Fe atoms in the structure of some clay minerals exhanges with aqueous Fe(II). First principles calculations using a small polaron hopping approach suggest surprisingly fast electron mobility at room temperature in a nontronite clay mineral and are consistent with temperature dependent Mössbauer data Fast electron mobility suggests that electrons may be able to conduct through the mineral fast enough to enable exchange of Fe between the aqueous phase and clay mineral structure. over the time periods we observed. Our findings suggest that Fe in clay minerals is not as stable as previously thought.

  2. Preferential Protection of Domains II and III of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa Toxin by Brush Border Membrane Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed-Rehan A. Hussain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Título español: Protección preferencial de los dominios II y III de la toxina Cry1Aa de Bacillus thuringiensis en Vesículas de Membrana de Borde de Cepillo Abstract The surface exposed Leucine 371 on loop 2 of domain II, in Cry1Aa toxin, was mutated to Lysine to generate the trypsin-sensitive mutant, L371K. Upon trypsin digestion L371K is cleaved into approximately 37 and 26 kDa fragments. These are separable on SDS-PAGE, but remain as a single molecule of 65 kDa upon purification by liquid chromatography. The larger fragment is domain I and a portion of domain II (amino acid residues 1 to 371. The smaller 26-kDa polypeptide is the remainder of domain II and domain III (amino acids 372 to 609. When the mutant toxin was treated with high dose of M. sexta gut juice both fragments were degraded. However, when incubated with M. sexta BBMV, the 26 kDa fragment (domains II and III was preferentially protected from gut juice proteases. As previously reported, wild type Cry1Aa toxin was also protected against degradation by gut juice proteases when incubated with M. sexta BBMV. On the contrary, when mouse BBMV was added to the reaction mixture neither Cry1Aa nor L371K toxins showed resistance to M. sexta gut juice proteases and were degraded. Since the whole Cry1Aa toxin and most of the domain II and domain III of L371K are protected from proteases in the presence of BBMV of the target insect, we suggest that the insertion of the toxin into the membrane is complex and involves all three domains. Key words: Bacillus thuringiensis, site directed mutagenesis,  -endotoxin. Resumen La superficie de la toxina Cry1Aa, en el asa 2 del dominio II contiene expuesta la leucina 371, la cual fue modificada a lisina produciendo una mutante sensible a la tripsina, L371K. Esta mutante produce dos fragmentos de 37 y 26 kDa por acción de la tripsina que son separables por SDS-PAGE, pero que a la purificación por cromatografía líquida se mantienen como una sola

  3. Could semiquantitative FDG analysis add information to the prognosis in patients with stage II/III breast cancer undergoing neoadjuvant treatment?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evangelista, Laura; Cervino, Anna Rita [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV - IRCCS, Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine Unit, Padua (Italy); Ghiotto, Cristina; Guarneri, Valentina; Conte, Pierfranco [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV - IRCCS, Medical Oncology 2 Unit, Padua (Italy); Saibene, Tania; Michieletto, Silvia; Fernando, Bozza [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV - IRCCS, Breast Unit, Padua (Italy); Orvieto, Enrico [University Hospital of Padua, Department of Pathology, Padua (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    We investigated whether maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), metabolic tumour volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and whole-body (WB) SUVmax, WB MTV and WB TLG measured by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT could improve prognostic stratification in patients with stage II/III breast cancer (BC). We prospectively enrolled 99 consecutive women (median age 50 years, range 27 - 77 years) with pathologically proven stage II/III BC who underwent pretreatment FDG PET/CT. WB SUVmax, WB MTV and WB TLG were measured in all malignant lesions. Survival was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional hazards models were constructed to test for relationships among WB SUVmax, WB MTV, WB TLG, and overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS), after adjustment for age, and histopathological and immunohistochemical features (oestrogen/progesterone and HER2 expression, proliferation index and grade). The median values of WB SUVmax, WB MTV and WB TLG were 16.2 (range 1.5 - 33.1), 14 cm{sup 3} (range 0.03 - 708.6 cm{sup 3}) and 62.5 (0.06 - 3869.4), respectively. All WB semiquantitative values were higher in patients with higher TNM stage, although not significantly (all p > 0.05). The median follow-up for surviving patients was 30 months, with a range of 13 - 45 months. Both PFS and OS of patients with low WB SUVmax, WB MTV and WB TLG were longer than that of patients with high WB values for progression, although not statistically significant. However, stratifying the patients in accordance with the stage of disease, both PFS and OS were significantly lower in patients with high WB TLG and stage III than in patients with stage II (p < 0.05). In multivariate analyses, WB MTV and WB TLG were independent prognostic factors for PFS (hazard ratio 1.004, 95 % confidence interval 1.002 - 1.006, p < 0.001, and hazard ratio 1.001, 95 % confidence interval 1.000 - 1.001, p = 0.011, respectively). The addition of WB TLG to clinical data may provide a more detailed

  4. Compact high order finite volume method on unstructured grids III: Variational reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Ren, Yu-Xin; Pan, Jianhua; Li, Wanai

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a variational reconstruction for the high order finite volume method in solving the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations on arbitrary unstructured grids. In the variational reconstruction, an interfacial jump integration is defined to measure the jumps of the reconstruction polynomial and its spatial derivatives on each cell interface. The system of linear equations to determine the reconstruction polynomials is derived by minimizing the total interfacial jump integration in the computational domain using the variational method. On each control volume, the derived equations are implicit relations between the coefficients of the reconstruction polynomials defined on a compact stencil involving only the current cell and its direct face-neighbors. The reconstruction and time integration coupled iteration method proposed in our previous paper is used to achieve high computational efficiency. A problem-independent shock detector and the WBAP limiter are used to suppress non-physical oscillations in the simulation of flow with discontinuities. The advantages of the finite volume method using the variational reconstruction over the compact least-squares finite volume method proposed in our previous papers are higher accuracy, higher computational efficiency, more flexible boundary treatment and non-singularity of the reconstruction matrix. A number of numerical test cases are solved to verify the accuracy, efficiency and shock-capturing capability of the finite volume method using the variational reconstruction.

  5. Proceedings of the sixth international conference on fluidized bed combustion. Volume III. Technical sessions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-08-01

    The Sixth International Conference on Fluidized Bed Combustion was held April 9-11, 1980, at the Atlanta Hilton, Atlanta, Georgia. It was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the Electric Power Research Institute, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Tennessee Valley Authority. Forty-five papers from Vol. III of the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. Two papers had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  6. Spectroscopic evidence for Fe(II)-Fe(III) electron transfer at clay mineral edge and basal sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Anke; Olson, Tyler L; Scherer, Michelle M

    2013-07-02

    Despite the importance of Fe redox cycling in clay minerals, the mechanism and location of electron transfer remain unclear. More specifically, there is some controversy whether electron transfer can occur through both basal and edge surfaces. Here we used Mössbauer spectroscopy combined with selective chemical extractions to study electron transfer from Fe(II) sorbed to basal planes and edge OH-groups of clay mineral NAu-1. Fe(II) sorbed predominantly to basal planes at pH values below 6.0 and to edge OH-groups at pH value 7.5. Significant electron transfer occurred from edge OH-group bound Fe(II) at pH 7.5, whereas electron transfer from basal plane-sorbed Fe(II) to structural Fe(III) in clay mineral NAu-1 at pH 4.0 and 6.0 occurred but to a much lower extent than from edge-bound Fe(II). Mössbauer hyperfine parameters for Fe(II)-reacted NAu-1 at pH 7.5 were consistent with structural Fe(II), whereas values found at pH 4.0 and 6.0 were indicative of binding environments similar to basal plane-sorbed Fe(II). Reference experiments with Fe-free synthetic montmorillonite SYn-1 provided supporting evidence for the assignment of the hyperfine parameters to Fe(II) bound to basal planes and edge OH-groups. Our findings demonstrate that electron transfer to structural Fe in clay minerals can occur from Fe(II) sorbed to both basal planes and edge OH-groups. These findings require us to reassess the mechanisms of abiotic and microbial Fe reduction in clay minerals as well as the importance of Fe-bearing clay minerals as a renewable source of redox equivalents in subsurface environments.

  7. Recent regulatory experience of low-Btu coal gasification. Volume III. Supporting case studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackerman, E.; Hart, D.; Lethi, M.; Park, W.; Rifkin, S.

    1980-02-01

    The MITRE Corporation conducted a five-month study for the Office of Resource Applications in the Department of Energy on the regulatory requirements of low-Btu coal gasification. During this study, MITRE interviewed representatives of five current low-Btu coal gasification projects and regulatory agencies in five states. From these interviews, MITRE has sought the experience of current low-Btu coal gasification users in order to recommend actions to improve the regulatory process. This report is the third of three volumes. It contains the results of interviews conducted for each of the case studies. Volume 1 of the report contains the analysis of the case studies and recommendations to potential industrial users of low-Btu coal gasification. Volume 2 contains recommendations to regulatory agencies.

  8. Dose-Response Relationship between Radiation Dose and Loco-regional Control in Patients with Stage II-III Esophageal Cancer Treated with Definitive Chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Suh, Yang-Gun; Lee, Yong Chan; Lee, Sang Kil; Shin, Sung Kwan; Cho, Byung Chul; Lee, Chang Geol

    2017-07-01

    The correlation between radiation dose and loco-regional control (LRC) was evaluated in patients with stage II-III esophageal cancer treated with definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Medical records of 236 stage II-III esophageal cancer patients treated with definitive CRT at Yonsei Cancer Center between 1994 and 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Among these, 120 received a radiation dose of 60 Gy) is associated with increased LRC, PFS, and OS in patients with stage II-III esophageal cancer treated with definitive CRT.

  9. Intervalence charge transfer transition in mixed valence complexes synthesised from RuIII(edta)- and FeII(CN)5-cores

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H C Bajaj; Atindra D Shukla; Amitava Das

    2002-08-01

    Intervalence charge transfer properties were studied for a set of mixed valence complexes incorporating Ru(III) and Fe(II)-centres linked by various saturated and unsaturated bridging ligands (BL). Studies reveal that degree of ground state electronic interaction and coupling between Ru(III) and Fe(II)-centres can be attenuated by changing the nature of the bridging ligand. Further, inclusion of the bridging ligand with interrupted -electron system in a -CD cavity initiate an optical electron transfer from Fe(II) to Ru(III) which is otherwise not observed.

  10. Recensione a "Collodi. Edizione Nazionale delle Opere di Carlo Lorenzini. Volume III"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pina Paone

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Si presenta il terzo volume della collana Collodi, Edizione Nazionale delle Opere di Carlo Lorenzini, Giunti, Firenze, 2012, con Prefazione di Mario Vargas Llosa e Introduzione di Daniela Marcheschi. Il volume contiene il famosissimo Le Avventure di Pinocchio, sintesi del percorso artistico dello scrittore toscano ed espressione più compiuta della sua abilità e consapevolezza narrativa. La recensione ripercorrerà i tratti dell’opera, inserendola nel generale e più ampio contesto dell’attività letteraria di Collodi.

  11. A study on the use of nano/micro structured goethite and hematite as adsorbents for the removal of Cr(III, Co(II, Cu(II, Ni(II, and Zn(II metal ions from aqueous solutions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Hafez

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous adsorbents for the removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions are in various stages of research. The main goal for most of this research is to develop low-cost and environmentally friendly materials for the removal of heavy metals from contaminated groundwater, surface water, and drinking water. Materials that have ion exchange sites are expected to be able to efficiently remove heavy metals from water. Iron oxides, especially in the micro/nano structured forms, are good candidates for the removal of toxic heavymetal ions from water due to their structural properties. In the present work the efficiency of synthesized micro/nano particles of goethite and hematite for the removal of Cr(III, Co(II , Cu(II, Ni(II and Zn(II ions from water was compared. The absorbent capability of goethite as a function of pH, contact time, and initialmetal ion concentration was studied. The results showed that maximum absorption for all metal ions using goethite occurred at a pH=5.3, which was a common trend for all metal ions. At this pH and after one hour contact time goethite was able to adsorb about 100% of the Cu ions (50mg/g, 85% (42.5 mg/g of the Ni ions, 70% (35mg/g of the Cr and Co ions and 60% (30 mg/g of Zn ions from the solutions. Whereas and under the same conditions hematite was able to adsorb 20% (10mg/g of the Cu ions, 85% (42.5mg/g of the Ni ions, 95% (47.5mg/g of the Cr ions, 80% (40mg/g of the Zn ions, and 70% (35mg/g of the Co ions. Both oxides are equally efficient for the removal of Co(II and Ni(II from water. However, goethite is a much more efficient candidate than hematite for the removal of Cu(II,while hematite is more efficient adsorbent for Zn(II and Cr(III. The adsorption affinity of the five metallic cations to goethite is Cu > Ni > Co ~ Cr > Zn, whereas the adsorption affinity of the cations to hematite is Cr > Ni > Zn > Co > Cu. Under the conditions used in the batch experiments (mass of goethite 2g/l maximumadsorption of

  12. Secretarial Science. Curriculum Guides for Two-Year Postsecondary Programs. Volume III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Carolina State Dept. of Community Colleges, Raleigh.

    The third of three volumes in a postsecondary secretarial science curriculum, this manual contains course syllabi for thirteen secretarial science technical courses. Course titles include Shorthand 1-3; Shorthand Dictation and Transcription, 1-3; Terminology and Vocabulary: Business, Legal, Medical; Typewriting, 1-5; and Word Processing. Each…

  13. Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research: Phase II- Volume III-Truss Braced Wing Aeroelastic Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Marty K.; Allen, Timothy J.; Droney, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    This Test Report summarizes the Truss Braced Wing (TBW) Aeroelastic Test (Task 3.1) work accomplished by the Boeing Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) team, which includes the time period of February 2012 through June 2014. The team consisted of Boeing Research and Technology, Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Virginia Tech, and NextGen Aeronautics. The model was fabricated by NextGen Aeronautics and designed to meet dynamically scaled requirements from the sized full scale TBW FEM. The test of the dynamically scaled SUGAR TBW half model was broken up into open loop testing in December 2013 and closed loop testing from January 2014 to April 2014. Results showed the flutter mechanism to primarily be a coalescence of 2nd bending mode and 1st torsion mode around 10 Hz, as predicted by analysis. Results also showed significant change in flutter speed as angle of attack was varied. This nonlinear behavior can be explained by including preload and large displacement changes to the structural stiffness and mass matrices in the flutter analysis. Control laws derived from both test system ID and FEM19 state space models were successful in suppressing flutter. The control laws were robust and suppressed flutter for a variety of Mach, dynamic pressures, and angle of attacks investigated.

  14. 1999 Annual Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater Correction - Action Report (Volumes I, II, and III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, J.

    2000-06-14

    This Corrective Action Report (CAR) for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) is being prepared to comply with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit Number SC1 890 008 989, dated October 31, 1999. This CAR compiles and presents all groundwater sampling and monitoring activities that are conducted at the MWMF. As set forth in previous agreements with South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), all groundwater associated with the Burial Ground Complex (BGC) (comprised of the MWMF, Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility, and Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground) will be addressed under this RCRA Permit. This CAR is the first to be written for the MWMF and presents monitoring activities and results as an outcome of Interim Status and limited Permitted Status activities. All 1999 groundwater monitoring activities were conducted while the MWMF was operated during Interim Status. Changes to the groundwater monitoring program were made upon receipt of the RCRA Permit, where feasible. During 1999, 152 single-screened and six multi-screened groundwater monitoring wells at the BGC monitored groundwater quality in the uppermost aquifer as required by the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR), settlement agreements 87-52-SW and 91-51-SW, and RCRA Permit SC1 890 008 989. However, overall compliance with the recently issued RCRA Permit could not be implemented until the year 2000 due to the effective date of the RCRA Permit and scheduling of groundwater monitoring activities. Changes have been made to the groundwater monitoring network to meet Permit requirements for all 2000 sampling events.

  15. Deformation of a Roman Aqueduct (II-III Century A.D.) near Rome, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montone, P.; Florindo, F.; Marra, F.

    2002-12-01

    Along the modern trace of the Tiburtina road, approximately 20 km north-east of the city of Rome, recent archaeological diggings have brought to light a system of aqueduct galleries constructed by roman engineers (II-III century A.D). Two narrow water channels (A and B) of this aqueduct system were strongly deformed by tectonic movement that occurred subsequent to their construction. The archaeological site falls inside the Acque Albule basin (AAB): a travertine plateau, upper Pleistocene in age with a medium thickness of approximately 60 m. The AAB has been interpreted as a rhomb-shaped pull-apart basin (7 km long, 4 km wide) created by strike-slip faulting within a N-S shear zone that crosses the Rome area. Its evolution is attributed to Middle-Upper Pleistocene times. The principal N-S water channel (A) evidences both brittle (extensive) and ductile (compressive) deformations, whereas the shorter channel (B) to the south-west reveals predominantly ductile deformations associated with compression. A detailed survey of the A channel indicates a segmented course along the length of the entire structure, with orientations ranging between N10°E and N10°W, and with one section oriented at N35°W. The smaller B channel situated to the south-west of the principal excavation indicates that deformation can be linked to transverse compression resulting in a restriction and rotation of the structure. The geometry of the deformation pattern and the brittle structures affecting the surrounding rock, the presence of sections deformed in a ductile manner, the segmentation of the two channels into tracts rotated in different directions, the narrowing of an internal section of the B channel orientated N15°W, are all elements compatible with strike-slip tectonics. To provide additional quantitative support for these observations, 3 sites (35 samples) were drilled, for paleomagnetic and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility analyses, in the "Pozzolane Rosse" Formation (457

  16. Kinetic measurements and quantum chemical calculations on low spin Ni(II)/(III) macrocyclic complexes in aqueous and sulphato medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anuradha Sankaran; E J Padma Malar; Venkatapuram Ramanujam Vijayaraghavan

    2015-07-01

    Cu(II) ion catalyzed kinetics of oxidation of H2O2 by [NiIIIL2] (L2 = 1,8-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-1,3,6,8,10,13-hexaazacyclotetradecane) was studied in aqueous acidic medium in the presence of sulphate ion. The rate of oxidation of H2O2 by [NiIIIL2] is faster than that by [NiIIIL1] (L1 = 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclote-tradecane) in sulphate medium. DFT calculations at BP86/def2-TZVP level lead to different modes of bonding between [NiL]II/III and water ligands (L = L1 and L2). In aqueous medium, two water molecules interact with [NiL]II through weak hydrogen bonds with L and are tilted by ∼23° from the vertical axis forming the dihydrate [NiL]2+.2H2O. However, there is coordinate bond formation between [NiL1]III and two water molecules in aqueous medium and an aqua and a sulphato ligand in sulphate medium leading to the octahedral complexes [NiL1(H2O)2]3+ and [NiL1(SO4)(H2O)]+. In the analogous [NiL2]III, the water molecules are bound by hydrogen bonds resulting in [NiL2]3+.2H2O and [NiL2(SO4)]+.H2O. As the sulphato complex [NiL2(SO4)]+.H2O is less stable than [NiL1(SO4)(H2O)]+ in view of the weak H-bonding interactions in the former it can react faster. Thus the difference in the mode of bonding between Ni(III) and the water ligand can explain the rate of oxidation of H2O2 by [NiIIIL] complexes.

  17. Adjuvant systemic chemotherapy for stages II and III colon cancer after complete resection: a clinical practice guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, B.M.; Cosby, R.; Quereshy, F.; Jonker, D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Updated practice guidelines on adjuvant chemotherapy for completely resected colon cancer are lacking. In 2008, Cancer Care Ontario’s Program in Evidence-Based Care developed a guideline on adjuvant therapy for stages ii and iii colon cancer. With newer regimens being assessed in this patient population and older agents being either abandoned because of non-effectiveness or replaced by agents that are more efficacious, a full update of the original guideline was undertaken. Methods Literature searches (January 1987 to August 2015) of medline, embase, and the Cochrane Library were conducted; in addition, abstracts from the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the European Society for Medical Oncology, and the European Cancer Congress were reviewed (the latter for January 2007 to August 2015). A practice guideline was drafted that was then scrutinized by internal and external reviewers whose comments were incorporated into the final guideline. Results Twenty-six unique reports of eighteen randomized controlled trials and thirteen unique reports of twelve meta-analyses or pooled analyses were included in the evidence base. The 5 recommendations developed included 3 for stage ii colon cancer and 2 for stage iii colon cancer. Conclusions Patients with completely resected stage iii colon cancer should be offered adjuvant 5-fluorouracil (5fu)–based chemotherapy with or without oxaliplatin (based on definitive data for improvements in survival and disease-free survival). Patients with resected stage ii colon cancer without “high-risk” features should not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. For patients with “high-risk” features, 5fu-based chemotherapy with or without oxaliplatin should be offered, although no clinical trials have been conducted to conclusively demonstrate the same benefits seen in stage iii colon cancer. PMID:28050138

  18. Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 3. The Hanna II, Phase I field test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

    1985-08-01

    This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project, and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Hanna II, Phase I was conducted during the spring and summer of 1975, at a site about 700 feet up dip (to the southwest) of the Hanna I test. The test was conducted in two stages - Phase IA and IB. Phase IA consisted of linking and gasification operations between Wells 1 and 3 and Phase IB of linking from the 1-3 gasification zone to Well 2, followed by a short period of gasification from Well 2 to Well 3 over a broad range of air injection rates, in order to determine system turndown capabilities and response times. This report covers: (1) site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facilities description; (4) pre-operational testing; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 7 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs.

  19. Fe(III) hydroxide nucleation and growth on quartz in the presence of Cu(II), Pb(II), and Cr(III): metal hydrolysis and adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chong; Hu, Yandi

    2015-01-06

    Fe(III) hydroxide nanoparticles are an essential carrier for aqueous heavy metals. Particularly, iron hydroxide precipitation on mineral surfaces can immobilize aqueous heavy metals. Here, we used grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) to quantify nucleation and growth of iron hydroxide on quartz in 0.1 mM Fe(NO3)3 solution in the presence of Na(+), Cu(2+), Pb(2+), or Cr(3+) at pH = 3.7 ± 0.1. In 30 min, the average radii of gyration (R(g)) of particles on quartz grew from around 2 to 6 nm in the presence of Na(+) and Cu(2+). Interestingly, the particle sizes remained 3.3 ± 0.3 nm in the presence of Pb(2+), and few particles formed in the presence of Cr(3+). Quartz crystal microbalance dissipation (QCM-D) measurements showed that only Cr(3+) adsorbed onto quartz, while Cu(2+) and Pb(2+) did not. Cr(3+) adsorption changed the surface charge of quartz from negative to positive, thus inhibiting the precipitation of positively charged iron hydroxide on quartz. Masses and compositions of the precipitates were also quantified. This study provided new insights on interactions among quartz, iron hydroxide, and metal ions. Such information is helpful not only for environmental remediation but also for the doping design of iron oxide catalysts.

  20. Ultraviolet C II and Si III Transit Spectroscopy and Modeling of the Evaporating Atmosphere of GJ436b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parke Loyd, R. O.; Koskinen, T. T.; France, Kevin; Schneider, Christian; Redfield, Seth

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen gas evaporating from the atmosphere of the hot-Neptune GJ436b absorbs over 50% of the stellar Lyα emission during transit. Given the planet’s atmospheric composition and energy-limited escape rate, this hydrogen outflow is expected to entrain heavier atoms such as C and O. We searched for C and Si in the escaping atmosphere of GJ436b using far-ultraviolet Hubble Space Telescope COS G130M observations made during the planet’s extended H i transit. These observations show no transit absorption in the C ii 1334,1335 Å and Si iii 1206 Å lines integrated over [‑100, 100] km s‑1, imposing 95% (2σ) upper limits of 14% (C ii) and 60% (Si iii) depth on the transit of an opaque disk and 22% (C ii) and 49% (Si iii) depth on an extended highly asymmetric transit similar to that of H i Lyα. C+ is likely present in the outflow according to a simulation we carried out using a spherically symmetric photochemical-hydrodynamical model. This simulation predicts an ∼2% transit over the integrated bandpass, consistent with the data. At line center, we predict the C ii transit depth to be as high as 19%. Our model predicts a neutral hydrogen escape rate of 1.6× {10}9 g s‑1 (3.1× {10}9 g s‑1 for all species) for an upper atmosphere composed of hydrogen and helium.