WorldWideScience

Sample records for volumes 1-6 final

  1. Culture of Schools. Final Report. Volume IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Anthropological Association, Washington, DC.

    The final volume of this 4-volume report contains further selections from "Anthropological Perspectives on Education," a monograph to be published by Basic Books of New York. (Other selections are in Vol. III, SP 003 902.) Monograph selections appearing in this volume are: "Great Tradition, Little Tradition, and Formal Education;""Indians,…

  2. Culture of Schools. Final Report. Volume III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Anthropological Association, Washington, DC.

    The third volume of this 4-volume report contains the last two speeches, on educational philosophy and the role of reason in society, from the Colloquium on the Culture of Schools held at the New School for Social Research (preceding speeches are in Vol. II, SP 003 901), reports on conferences on the culture of schools held in Pittsburgh and…

  3. Culture of Schools. Final Report. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Anthropological Association, Washington, DC.

    The first volume of this 4-volume report presents the basic rationale for an anthropological and cross-cultural approach to education, abstracts of 14 research projects sponsored by the American Anthropological Association, a proposal for the establishment of a Research Center for Anthropology and Education to be coordinated by the Association, a…

  4. Slurry combustion. Volume 2: Appendices, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essenhigh, R. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1993-06-01

    Volume II contains the following appendices: coal analyses and slurryability characteristics; listings of programs used to call and file experimental data, and to reduce data in enthalpy and efficiency calculations; and tabulated data sets.

  5. Culture of Schools. Final Report. Volume II

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Anthropological Association, Washington, DC.

    Volume II of this 4-volume report contains the second half of a report on the Conference on the Culture of Schools held at Greystone, New York, (the first half of the conference report appears in Vol. I, SP 003 900), and the first part of a report on the Colloquium on the Culture of Schools held at the New School for Social Research in 1966. (The…

  6. Tank 241-AP-106, Grab samples, 6AP-98-1, 6AP-98-2 and 6AP-98-3 Analytical results for the final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FULLER, R.K.

    1999-02-23

    This document is the final report for tank 241-AP-106 grab samples. Three grab samples 6AP-98-1, 6AP-98-2 and 6AP-98-3 were taken from riser 1 of tank 241-AP-106 on May 28, 1998 and received by the 222-S Laboratory on May 28, 1998. Analyses were performed in accordance with the ''Compatability Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan'' (TSAP) (Sasaki, 1998) and the ''Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatability Program (DQO). The analytical results are presented in the data summary report. No notification limits were exceeded. The request for sample analysis received for AP-106 indicated that the samples were polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) suspects. The results of this analysis indicated that no PCBs were present at the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) regulated limit of 50 ppm. The results and raw data for the PCB analysis are included in this document.

  7. Optical properties of fly ash. Volume 2, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Self, S.A.

    1994-12-01

    Research performed under this contract was divided into four tasks under the following headings: Task 1, Characterization of fly ash; Task 2, Measurements of the optical constants of slags; Task 3, Calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions; and Task 4, Measurements of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. Tasks 1 and 4 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Sarbajit Ghosal, while Tasks 2 and 3 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Jon Ebert. Together their doctoral dissertations give a complete account of the work performed. This final report, issued in two volumes consists of an executive summary of the whole program followed by the dissertation of Ghosal and Ebert. Volume 2 contains the dissertation of Ebert which covers the measurements of the optical constants of slags, and calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. A list of publications and conference presentations resulting from the work is also included.

  8. Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 2, Sections 1-6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-04-01

    This (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains the analysis of programmatic alternatives, project alternatives, affected environment of alternative sites, environmental consequences, and environmental regulations and permit requirements.

  9. Science to support adaptive habitat management: Overton Bottoms North Unit, Big Muddy National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, Missouri [Volumes 1-6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Robert B.

    2006-01-01

    Extensive efforts are underway along the Lower Missouri River to rehabilitate ecosystem functions in the channel and flood plain. Considerable uncertainty inevitably accompanies ecosystem restoration efforts, indicating the benefits of an adaptive management approach in which management actions are treated as experiments, and results provide information to feed back into the management process. The Overton Bottoms North Unit of the Big Muddy National Fish and Wildlife Refuge is a part of the Missouri River Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Project. The dominant management action at the Overton Bottoms North Unit has been excavation of a side-channel chute to increase hydrologic connectivity and to enhance shallow, slow current-velocity habitat. The side-channel chute also promises to increase hydrologic gradients, and may serve to alter patterns of wetland inundation and vegetation community growth in undesired ways. The U.S. Geological Survey's Central Region Integrated Studies Program (CRISP) undertook interdisciplinary research at the Overton Bottoms North Unit in 2003 to address key areas of scientific uncertainty that were highly relevant to ongoing adaptive management of the site, and to the design of similar rehabilitation projects on the Lower Missouri River. This volume presents chapters documenting the surficial geologic, topographic, surface-water, and ground-water framework of the Overton Bottoms North Unit. Retrospective analysis of vegetation community trends over the last 10 years is used to evaluate vegetation responses to reconnection of the Overton Bottoms North Unit to the river channel. Quasi-experimental analysis of cottonwood growth rate variation along hydrologic gradients is used to evaluate sensitivity of terrestrial vegetation to development of aquatic habitats. The integrated, landscape-specific understanding derived from these studies illustrates the value of scientific information in design and management of rehabilitation projects.

  10. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant expansion: final environmental statement. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-09-01

    Volume 1 is comprised of chapters on: background and description; environmental impacts of add-on gaseous diffusion plant; unavoidable adverse environmental effects; alternatives; relationship between short-term uses and long-term productivity; relationship of program to land-use plans, policies, and controls; irreversible and irretrievable commitments of resources; cost-benefit analysis; and response to comment letters. (LK)

  11. MHD Advanced Power Train Phase I, Final Report, Volume 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. R. Jones

    1985-08-01

    This appendix provides additional data in support of the MHD/Steam Power Plant Analyses reported in report Volume 5. The data is in the form of 3PA/SUMARY computer code printouts. The order of presentation in all four cases is as follows: (1) Overall Performance; (2) Component/Subsystem Information; (3) Plant Cost Accounts Summary; and (4) Plant Costing Details and Cost of Electricity.

  12. Engineering development of advanced froth flotation. Volume 2, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferris, D.D.; Bencho, J.R.; Torak, E.R. [ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    This report is an account of findings related to the Engineering and Development of Advanced Froth Flotation project. The results from benchscale and proof-of-concept (POC) level testing are presented and the important results from this testing are used to refine a conceptual design and cost estimate for a 20 TPH Semi-Works Facility incorporating the final proposed technology.

  13. Highly Insulating Windows Volume Purchase Program Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-04-01

    This report documents the development, execution outcomes and lessons learned of the Highly Insulating Windows Volume Purchase (WVP) Program carried out over a three-year period from 2009 through 2012. The primary goals of the program were met: 1) reduce the incremental cost of highly insulating windows compared to ENERGY STAR windows; and 2) raise the public and potential buyers’ awareness of highly insulating windows and their benefits. A key outcome of the program is that the 2013 ENERGY STAR Most Efficient criteria for primary residential windows were adopted from the technical specifications set forth in the WVP program.

  14. OTEC SKSS preliminary designs. Volume IV. Appendixes. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ,

    1980-02-29

    This volume contains appendices to the Station Keeping Subsystem design study for the 40 MeW Modular Experiment OTEC platforms. Appendices presented include: detailed drag calculations; sample CALMS computer printouts for SPAR and BARGE static analyses; sample time domain computer printouts (Hydromechanics, Inc.) program; extreme value and fatigue load calculations; anchor design calculations; deployment calculations; bottom slope plots; time domain analysis report by Hydromechanics Inc.; detailed cost analysis; control systems study report by Sperry Systems Management; cost estimates for model basin tests; and hydrodynamic loading on the mooring cables. (WHK)

  15. Advanced Thermionic Technology Program: summary report. Volume 4. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-10-01

    This report summarizes the progress made by the Advanced Thermionic Technology Program during the past several years. This Program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, has had as its goal adapting thermionic devices to generate electricity in a terrestrial (i.e., combustion) environment. Volume 4 (Part E) is a highly technical discussion of the attempts made by the Program to push the state-of-the-art beyond the current generation of converters and is directed toward potential researchers engaged in this same task. These technical discussions are complemented with Appendices where appropriate.

  16. Initial Northwest Power Act Power Sales Contracts : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Environmental Analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-01-01

    This is volume 1 of the final environmental impact statement of the Bonneville Power Administration Information is included on the following: Purpose of and need for action; alternatives including the proposed action; affected environment; and environmental consequences.

  17. A Study of Number Conservation With Tasks Which Vary in Length, Area and Volume. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taranto, Maria; Mermelstein, Egon

    The objective of this study was an attempt to clarify the nature of number conservation with number conservation tasks using variations in length, area, and volume. According to Piagetian theory, conservation is attained successively for number, length, area, and, finally, volume. It was hypothesized that success on the number conservation tasks…

  18. Ceramic component development analysis -- Volume 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boss, D.E.

    1998-06-09

    The development of advanced filtration media for advanced fossil-fueled power generating systems is a critical step in meeting the performance and emissions requirements for these systems. While porous metal and ceramic candle-filters have been available for some time, the next generation of filters will include ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) (Techniweave/Westinghouse, Babcock and Wilcox (B and W), DuPont Lanxide Composites), intermetallic alloys (Pall Corporation), and alternate filter geometries (CeraMem Separations). The goal of this effort was to perform a cursory review of the manufacturing processes used by 5 companies developing advanced filters from the perspective of process repeatability and the ability for their processes to be scale-up to produce volumes. Given the brief nature of the on-site reviews, only an overview of the processes and systems could be obtained. Each of the 5 companies had developed some level of manufacturing and quality assurance documentation, with most of the companies leveraging the procedures from other products they manufacture. It was found that all of the filter manufacturers had a solid understanding of the product development path. Given that these filters are largely developmental, significant additional work is necessary to understand the process-performance relationships and projecting manufacturing costs.

  19. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Uranium sorption. Final Report - Volume 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waite, T.D.; Payne, T.E. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Davis, J.A. [United States Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Sekine, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1992-12-31

    In this volume, the results of studies of uranium sorption (adsorption and desorption) to both single, well-defined mineral phases, and to selected natural (Koongarra) substrates are reported. The single phases included the amorphous iron oxide ferrihydrite, crystalline silica and two naturally occurring kaolinites, KGa-1 and Nichika. The surface properties of these materials were rigorously defined, and adsorption studies were conducted over a range of solution pH, ionic strength, carbonate content, adsorbent and adsorbate concentrations, and in the presence of uranium complexants and (potentially) competing adsorbates (such as phosphate and fluoride). The results of these studies were modelled using the `surface complexation` approach, with a diffuse layer description of the electrical double layer. The impacts of mineral phase transformations (specifically the aging of amorphous ferrihydrite to more crystalline forms) on the uptake and desorption of uranium are also reported. The amount of data obtained in this study, with a number of experimental parameters being varied over a wide range, has enabled more confidence to be placed in the modelling results. The derived model for ferrihydrite adequately accounts for the effect on U sorption of a number of parameters, most notably pH, pCO{sub 2} and total U present. Few (if any) of the models previously proposed are adequate in this respect. While the modelling of the data for the natural substrates is not as advanced, the U sorption data on the natural substrates show similar features to the U sorption on the model substrates. This suggests that the insights obtained in the modelling of the data for ferrihydrite will be valuable in deriving a model for the more complex natural substrates 87 refs., 27 tabs., 56 figs.

  20. Alligator Rivers analogue project. Final Report. Volume 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains a description of the distribution of minerals and elements at Koongarra, including the distribution of radionuclides. The Koongarra orebody is situated 225 km east of Darwin in the Northern Territory of Australia. The zone of primary uranium mineralisation has been intersected by weathering conditions, and this has resulted in the formation of a secondary ore zone and dispersion fan in the weathered zone. The uranium distribution over the site was investigated to determine the extent and direction of uranium migration from the primary uranium mineralisation. The depth patterns of uranium concentration were also investigated to elucidate depths. The distribution of elements, rock and minerals, and how they may affect uranium mobility, or indicate interactions between uranium and solid phases, were considered. Multi-elemental analyses were carried out on many samples to provide basic concentration data about various geochemically significant elements, and to elucidate how the elements interact with one another, the solid substrate and the groundwater. This included the analysis of bulk rock samples, visually distinct sub-samples, different particle sizes and chemically defined phases. Similarly, mineralogical data supplied information on the substrate reacting with the groundwater. Extensive studies were undertaken to elucidate the form of uranium in the weathered zones. These involved optical and electron microscopy studies and auto-radiography. Spatial trends of uranium series disequilibria in bulk rock, secondary uranium minerals and different chemically defined phases were analysed. These give information about uranium deposition and leaching, the evolution of the dispersion fan, the roles and relative importance of different mineralogical phases and processes involved in the retardation of radionuclides. 157 refs., 31 tabs., 87 figs.

  1. Final Technical Report - Kotzebue Wind Power Project - Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rana Zucchi, Global Energy Concepts, LLC; Brad Reeve, Kotzebue Electric Association; DOE Project Officer - Doug Hooker

    2007-10-31

    The Kotzebue Wind Power Project is a joint undertaking of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); Kotzebue Electric Association (KEA); and the Alaska Energy Authority (AEA). The goal of the project is to develop, construct, and operate a wind power plant interconnected to a small isolated utility grid in an arctic climate in Northwest Alaska. The primary objective of KEA’s wind energy program is to bring more affordable electricity and jobs to remote Alaskan communities. DOE funding has allowed KEA to develop a multi-faceted approach to meet these objectives that includes wind project planning and development, technology transfer, and community outreach. The first wind turbines were installed in the summer of 1997 and the newest turbines were installed in the spring of 2007. The total installed capacity of the KEA wind power project is 1.16 MW with a total of 17 turbines rated between 65 kW and 100 kW. The operation of the wind power plant has resulted in a wind penetration on the utility system in excess of 35% during periods of low loads. This document and referenced attachments are presented as the final technical report for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant agreement DE-FG36-97GO10199. Interim deliverables previously submitted are also referenced within this document and where reasonable to do so, specific sections are incorporated in the report or attached as appendices.

  2. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Hydrogeological modelling. Final Report - Volume 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Townley, L.R.; Trefry, M.G.; Barr, A.D. [CSIRO Div of Water Resources, PO Wembley, WA (Australia); Braumiller, S. [Univ of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept of Hydrology and Water Resources; Kawanishi, M. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Abiko-Shi, Chiba-Ken (Japan)] [and others

    1992-12-31

    This volume describes hydrogeological modelling carried out as part of the Alligator Rivers Analogue Project. Hydrogeology has played a key integrating role in the Project, largely because water movement is believed to have controlled the evolution of the Koongarra uranium Orebody and therefore affects field observations of all types at all scales. Aquifer testing described uses the concept of transmissivity in its interpretation of aquifer response to pumping. The concept of an aquifer, a layer transmitting significant quantities of water in a mainly horizontal direction, seems hard to accept in an environment as heterogeneous as that at Koongarra. But modelling of aquifers both in one dimension and two dimensionally in plan has contributed significantly to our understanding of the site. A one-dimensional model with three layers (often described as a quasi two dimensional model) was applied to flow between the Fault and Koongarra Creek. Being a transient model, this model was able to show that reverse flows can indeed occur back towards the Fault, but only if there is distributed recharge over the orebody as well as a mechanism for the Fault, or a region near the Fault, to remove water from the simulated cross-section. The model also showed clearly that the response of the three-layered system, consisting of a highly weathered zone, a fractured transmissive zone and a less conductive lower schist zone, is governed mainly by the transmissivity and storage coefficient of the middle layer. The storage coefficient of the higher layer has little effect. A two-dimensional model in plan used a description of anisotropy to show that reverse flows can also occur even without a conducting Fault. Modelling of a three-dimensional region using discrete fractures showed that it is certainly possible to simulate systems like that observed at Koongarra, but that large amounts of data are probably needed to obtain realistic descriptions of the fracture networks. Inverse modelling

  3. A Description of Del Mod and Its Final Evaluation, Final Report, Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnell, Charlotte H.; Bolig, John R.

    This monograph presents an overview of five Del Mod System final reports, comments by the project director, financial structure of the Del Mod System, and descriptions of Del Mod Projects. The Del Mod System was concerned with changing the science and mathematics education programs in the state of Delaware. Between 1970 and 1976, Del Mod conducted…

  4. Development of a coal-fueled Internal Manifold Heat Exchanger (IMHEX{reg_sign}) molten carbonate fuel cell. Volumes 1--6, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    The design of a CGMCFC electric generation plant that will provide a cost of eletricity (COE) which is lower than that of current electric generation technologies and which is competitive with other long-range electric generating systems is presented. This effort is based upon the Internal Manifold Heat Exchanger (IMHEX) technology as developed by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT). The project was executed by selecting economic and performance objectives for alternative plant arrangements while considering process constraints identified during IMHEX fuel cell development activities at ICT. The four major subsystems of a coal-based MCFC power plant are coal gasification, gas purification, fuel cell power generation and the bottoming cycle. The design and method of operation of each subsystem can be varied, and, depending upon design choices, can have major impact on both the design of other subsystems and the resulting cost of electricity. The challenge of this project was to select, from a range of design parameters, those operating conditions that result in a preferred plant design. Computer modelling was thus used to perform sensitivity analyses of as many system variables as program resources and schedules would permit. In any systems analysis, it is imperative that the evaluation methodology be verifiable and comparable. The TAG Class I develops comparable (if imprecise) data on performance and costs for the alternative cases being studied. It identifies, from a range of options, those which merit more exacting scrutiny to be undertaken at the second level, TAG class II analysis.

  5. Assessment of control technology for stationary sources. Volume II: control technology data tables. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minicucci, D.; Herther, M.; Babb, L.; Kuby, W.

    1980-02-01

    This report, the Control Technology Data Tables, is the second volume of the three-volume final report for the contract. It presents in tabular format, qualitative descriptions of control options for the various sources and quantitative information on control technology cost, efficiency, reliability, energy consumption, other environmental impacts and application status. Also included is a code list which classifies the stationary sources examined by industry, process, and emission source.

  6. State In-Service Training for Correctional Personnel. Final Report. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, George W.

    This is part of the final report on a project that focused on the inservice training needs of correctional personnel in the Illinois penal system. Most of this volume is devoted to an overview of existing staff training for line personnel and parole agents; an assessment of unmet training needs; group discussion and other demonstration projects in…

  7. Initial Northwest Power Act Power Sales Contracts : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 4, Comments and Responses.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-01-01

    This volume of the Initial Northwest Power Act Power Sales Contracts Final Environmental Impact Statement (Final EIS) contains public comments addressing the Initial Northwest Power Act Power Sales Contracts Draft EIS, August 1990 and Bonneville Power Administration`s (BPA) responses. The Introduction provides information about the process BPA follows in addressing these comments. Part I contains a listing of the Alternative Actions evaluated in the Final EIS; Part II is organized by Alternatives and includes summaries of the comments and BPA responses; Part III provides copies of the original comments letters, and, for ease of identification, are coded in the margins according to the alternative(s) addressed.

  8. Impacts of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) development on recreation and tourism. Volume 2. Final report and case studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-04-01

    The final report for the project is comprised of five volumes. The volume presents the study conclusions, summarizes the methodology used (more detail is found in Volume 3), discusses four case study applications of the model, and contains profiles of coastal communities in an Appendix.

  9. Does Preinterventional Flat-Panel Computer Tomography Pooled Blood Volume Mapping Predict Final Infarct Volume After Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Cerebral Artery Occlusion?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Marlies, E-mail: marlies.wagner@kgu.de [Hospital of Goethe University, Institute of Neuroradiology (Germany); Kyriakou, Yiannis, E-mail: yiannis.kyriakou@siemens.com [Siemens AG, Health Care Sector (Germany); Mesnil de Rochemont, Richard du, E-mail: mesnil@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Hospital of Goethe University, Institute of Neuroradiology (Germany); Singer, Oliver C., E-mail: o.singer@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Hospital of Goethe University, Department of Neurology (Germany); Berkefeld, Joachim, E-mail: berkefeld@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Hospital of Goethe University, Institute of Neuroradiology (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    PurposeDecreased cerebral blood volume is known to be a predictor for final infarct volume in acute cerebral artery occlusion. To evaluate the predictability of final infarct volume in patients with acute occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) or the distal internal carotid artery (ICA) and successful endovascular recanalization, pooled blood volume (PBV) was measured using flat-panel detector computed tomography (FPD CT).Materials and MethodsTwenty patients with acute unilateral occlusion of the MCA or distal ACI without demarcated infarction, as proven by CT at admission, and successful Thrombolysis in cerebral infarction score (TICI 2b or 3) endovascular thrombectomy were included. Cerebral PBV maps were acquired from each patient immediately before endovascular thrombectomy. Twenty-four hours after recanalization, each patient underwent multislice CT to visualize final infarct volume. Extent of the areas of decreased PBV was compared with the final infarct volume proven by follow-up CT the next day.ResultsIn 15 of 20 patients, areas of distinct PBV decrease corresponded to final infarct volume. In 5 patients, areas of decreased PBV overestimated final extension of ischemia probably due to inappropriate timing of data acquisition and misery perfusion.ConclusionPBV mapping using FPD CT is a promising tool to predict areas of irrecoverable brain parenchyma in acute thromboembolic stroke. Further validation is necessary before routine use for decision making for interventional thrombectomy.

  10. Mod-5A wind turbine generator program design report. Volume 3: Final design and system description, book 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The design, development and analysis of the 7.3MW MOD-5A wind turbine generator is documented. The report is divided into four volumes: Volume 1 summarizes the entire MOD-5A program, Volume 2 discusses the conceptual and preliminary design phases, Volume 3 describes the final design of the MOD-5A, and Volume 4 contains the drawings and specifications developed for the final design. Volume 3, book 2 describes the performance and characteristics of the MOD-5A wind turbine generator in its final configuration. The subsystem for power generation, control, and instrumentation subsystems is described in detail. The manufacturing and construction plans, and the preparation of a potential site on Oahu, Hawaii, are documented. The quality assurance and safety plan, and analyses of failure modes and effects, and reliability, availability and maintainability are presented.

  11. Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments. Final report, Supplemental Volume 2. Sources and documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    This volume and its appendixes supplement the Advisory Committee`s final report by reporting how we went about looking for information concerning human radiation experiments and intentional releases, a description of what we found and where we found it, and a finding aid for the information that we collected. This volume begins with an overview of federal records, including general descriptions of the types of records that have been useful and how the federal government handles these records. This is followed by an agency-by-agency account of the discovery process and descriptions of the records reviewed, together with instructions on how to obtain further information from those agencies. There is also a description of other sources of information that have been important, including institutional records, print resources, and nonprint media and interviews. The third part contains brief accounts of ACHRE`s two major contemporary survey projects (these are described in greater detail in the final report and another supplemental volume) and other research activities. The final section describes how the ACHRE information-nation collections were managed and the records that ACHRE created in the course of its work; this constitutes a general finding aid for the materials deposited with the National Archives. The appendices provide brief references to federal records reviewed, descriptions of the accessions that comprise the ACHRE Research Document Collection, and descriptions of the documents selected for individual treatment. Also included are an account of the documentation available for ACHRE meetings, brief abstracts of the almost 4,000 experiments individually described by ACHRE staff, a full bibliography of secondary sources used, and other information.

  12. Advanced Supermarket Refrigeration - Heat Recovery Systems. Annex 26. Final report. Volume 2. Country reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-04-01

    Annex 26 has produced three deliverables: (1) Workshop (October 2000) proceedings Stockholm, Sweden, on CD-ROM (HPP-AN26-1); (2) Final report, Volume 1, Executive Summary, as report (HPP-AN26-2); and (3) Final report, Volume 2, Country reports (described in this record). Each of these reports, available from the HPC, provide valuable information for practitioners (designers, installers) and manufacturers of supermarket refrigeration systems. Annex 26 is the first international project under the IEA Heat Pump Programme that links refrigeration and heat pump technology. Recovering heat from advanced supermarket refrigeration systems for space and water heating purposes seems obvious and is beneficial for owners and operators. Because there are world-wide a great number of supermarkets that offer frozen and chilled food and further growth of this sector may be expected, the amount of energy used for refrigeration is enormous and will likely increase substantially in the near future. Annex 26 analysed several advanced supermarket refrigeration systems and came to remarkable conclusions as far as energy conservation and TEWI reduction is concerned. The conclusions justify that advanced supermarket systems with heat recovery should receive great attention and support. And there is still further research needed in several areas. The Annex also included a thorough system cost analyses and proposals for cost reductions are given.

  13. Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB) Program: Phase I, Volume I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    The Energy Economic Data Base Program, which deals with the development of cost data for nuclear and comparison electric power generating stations, provides periodic updates of technical and cost (capital, fuel, and operating and maintenance) information of significance to DOE. The information allows for evaluation and monitoring of US civilian nuclear power programs and provides a consistent means of evaluation the nuclear option against alternatives. Currently, the EEDB contains 6 nuclear electrical generating plant technical models and 5 comparison coal-fired electrical generating plant technical models. Each of these technical plant models is a complete conceptual design for a single unit, steam electric power generating station located on a standard, hypothetical Middletown site. A description of the site is provided in Appendix A-1 (Volume 2) for nuclear plants, and Appendix A-2 (Volume 2) for coal-fired plants. The EEDB also includes a conceptual design of a coal liquefaction plant for comparison purposes. Volume 1 provides a description of the current Data Base, as of September 30, 1978: gives assumptions and ground rules for the initial-cost update; summarizes the initial cost update, with cost results tabulated; details the initial update of the technical conceptual design, the capital cost, the quantities of commodities and their unit costs, and craft labor man hours and costs for each EEDB program model; and details the fuel-cycle-cost initial update and the operating- and maintenance-cost initial update. Finally, an extensive list of references and a glossary are presented.

  14. Lower Flathead System Fisheries Study, Executive Summary, Volume I, 1983-1987 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, David; DosSantos, Joseph M.

    1988-06-01

    This Executive Summary, Volume I, of the lower Flathead System Fisheries Study Final Report, was prepared to provide a study overview for persons who are not fisheries scientists. The contents provide an introduction to the study and its objectives, a short description of the study area, a discussion of the major findings and conclusions of the study, and the description of fisheries management alternatives available to managers of the lower Flathead system. Technical reports were prepared for those portions of the study dealing with the lower Flathead River and its tributaries, Volume II, and the South Bay of Flathead Lake, Volume III. The annual hydrographic regime of the Flathead system, consisting of upper rivers, lake and lower river, has been modified by the construction and operation of two major hydroelectric facilities, Hungry Horse Dam on the south fork Flathead River and Kerr Dam at the outlet of Flathead Lake. The modified hydrographic regime has resulted in significant impacts to kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) and several species of trout. Kerr Dam, closed in 1938, controls Flathead Lake levels between 878.7 m (2883 ft) and 881.8 m (2893 ft) and discharges into the lower Flathead River. Kerr Dam is a 63.4 m (208 ft) high concrete arch structure located 7.2 km (4.5 miles) downstream from the outlet of Flathead Lake. The facility is used by Montana Power Company primarily for system frequency load control with some use for low level base load. 77 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB) Program: Phase I, Volume I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    The Energy Economic Data Base Program, which deals with the development of cost data for nuclear and comparison electric power generating stations, provides periodic updates of technical and cost (capital, fuel, and operating and maintenance) information of significance to DOE. The information allows for evaluation and monitoring of US civilian nuclear power programs and provides a consistent means of evaluation the nuclear option against alternatives. Currently, the EEDB contains 6 nuclear electrical generating plant technical models and 5 comparison coal-fired electrical generating plant technical models. Each of these technical plant models is a complete conceptual design for a single unit, steam electric power generating station located on a standard, hypothetical Middletown site. A description of the site is provided in Appendix A-1 (Volume 2) for nuclear plants, and Appendix A-2 (Volume 2) for coal-fired plants. The EEDB also includes a conceptual design of a coal liquefaction plant for comparison purposes. Volume 1 provides a description of the current Data Base, as of September 30, 1978: gives assumptions and ground rules for the initial-cost update; summarizes the initial cost update, with cost results tabulated; details the initial update of the technical conceptual design, the capital cost, the quantities of commodities and their unit costs, and craft labor man hours and costs for each EEDB program model; and details the fuel-cycle-cost initial update and the operating- and maintenance-cost initial update. Finally, an extensive list of references and a glossary are presented.

  16. A Review of the Availability of Primary Scientific and Technical Documents within the United States, Volume I. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, James L.

    Volume I of this three-volume final report contains a summary of the objectives and results of a study conducted by Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS), a Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS), to determine the availability of the scientific and technical primary literature which the user identifies through the use of secondary services…

  17. Hot-gas cleanup system model development. Volume I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushimaru, K.; Bennett, A.; Bekowies, P.J.

    1982-11-01

    This two-volume report summarizes the state of the art in performance modeling of advanced high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) gas cleanup devices. Volume I contains the culmination of the research effort carried over the past 12 months and is a summary of research achievements. Volume II is the user's manual for the computer programs developed under the present research project. In this volume, Section 2 presents background information on pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion concepts, a description of the role of the advanced gas cleanup systems, and a list of advanced gas cleanup systems that are currently in development under DOE sponsorship. Section 3 describes the methodology for the software architecture that forms the basis of the well-disciplined and structured computer programs developed under the present project. Section 4 reviews the fundamental theories that are important in analyzing the cleanup performance of HTHP gas filters. Section 5 discusses the effect of alkali agents in HTHP gas cleanup. Section 6 evaluates the advanced HTHP gas cleanup models based on their mathematical integrity, availability of supporting data, and the likelihood of commercialization. As a result of the evaluation procedure detailed in Section 6, five performance models were chosen to be incorporated into the overall system simulation code, ASPEN. These five models (the electrocyclone, ceramic bag filter, moving granular bed filter, electrostatic granular bed filter, and electrostatic precipitator) are described in Section 7. The method of cost projection for these five models is discussed in Section 8. The supporting data and validation of the computer codes are presented in Section 9, and finally the conclusions and recommendations for the HTHP gas cleanup system model development are given in Section 10. 72 references, 19 figures, 25 tables.

  18. Final safety analysis report for the Galileo Mission: Volume 2, Book 2: Accident model document: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-12-15

    This section of the Accident Model Document (AMD) presents the appendices which describe the various analyses that have been conducted for use in the Galileo Final Safety Analysis Report II, Volume II. Included in these appendices are the approaches, techniques, conditions and assumptions used in the development of the analytical models plus the detailed results of the analyses. Also included in these appendices are summaries of the accidents and their associated probabilities and environment models taken from the Shuttle Data Book (NSTS-08116), plus summaries of the several segments of the recent GPHS safety test program. The information presented in these appendices is used in Section 3.0 of the AMD to develop the Failure/Abort Sequence Trees (FASTs) and to determine the fuel releases (source terms) resulting from the potential Space Shuttle/IUS accidents throughout the missions.

  19. Technical area status report for low-level mixed waste final waste forms. Volume 2, Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayberry, J.L.; Huebner, T.L. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ross, W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Nakaoka, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Schumacher, R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Cunnane, J.; Singh, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Darnell, R. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Greenhalgh, W. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-08-01

    This report presents information on low-level mixed waste forms.The descriptions of the low-level mixed waste (LLMW) streams that are considered by the Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) are given in Appendix A. This information was taken from descriptions generated by the Mixed Waste Treatment Program (MWTP). Appendix B provides a list of characteristic properties initially considered by the Final Waste Form (FWF) Working Group (WG). A description of facilities available to test the various FWFs discussed in Volume I of DOE/MWIP-3 are given in Appendix C. Appendix D provides a summary of numerous articles that were reviewed on testing of FWFS. Information that was collected by the tests on the characteristic properties considered in this report are documented in Appendix D. The articles reviewed are not a comprehensive list, but are provided to give an indication of the data that are available.

  20. Technical area status report for low-level mixed waste final waste forms. Volume 2, Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayberry, J.L.; Huebner, T.L. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ross, W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Nakaoka, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Schumacher, R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Cunnane, J.; Singh, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Darnell, R. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Greenhalgh, W. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-08-01

    This report presents information on low-level mixed waste forms.The descriptions of the low-level mixed waste (LLMW) streams that are considered by the Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) are given in Appendix A. This information was taken from descriptions generated by the Mixed Waste Treatment Program (MWTP). Appendix B provides a list of characteristic properties initially considered by the Final Waste Form (FWF) Working Group (WG). A description of facilities available to test the various FWFs discussed in Volume I of DOE/MWIP-3 are given in Appendix C. Appendix D provides a summary of numerous articles that were reviewed on testing of FWFS. Information that was collected by the tests on the characteristic properties considered in this report are documented in Appendix D. The articles reviewed are not a comprehensive list, but are provided to give an indication of the data that are available.

  1. Advanced Supermarket Refrigeration - Heat Recovery Systems. Annex 26. Final report. Volume 1. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, Van D. (ed.) [Oak Ridge National Laboratory ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2003-04-01

    Annex 26 has produced three deliverables: (1) Workshop (October 2000) proceedings Stockholm, Sweden, on CD-ROM (HPP-AN26-1); (2) Final report, described in this record; and (3) Final report, Volume 2, Country reports, on CD-ROM (HPP-AN26-3). Each of these reports, available from the HPC, provide valuable information for practitioners (designers, installers) and manufacturers of supermarket refrigeration systems. Annex 26 is the first international project under the IEA Heat Pump Programme that links refrigeration and heat pump technology. Recovering heat from advanced supermarket refrigeration systems for space and water heating purposes seems obvious and is beneficial for owners and operators. Because there are world-wide a great number of supermarkets that offer frozen and chilled food and further growth of this sector may be expected, the amount of energy used for refrigeration is enormous and will likely increase substantially in the near future. Annex 26 analysed several advanced supermarket refrigeration systems and came to remarkable conclusions as far as energy conservation and TEWI reduction is concerned. The conclusions justify that advanced supermarket systems with heat recovery should receive great attention and support. And there is still further research needed in several areas. The Annex also included a thorough system cost analyses and proposals for cost reductions are given.

  2. Dual axis radiographic hydrodynamic test facility. Final environmental impact statement, Volume 2: Public comments and responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    On May 12, 1995, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued the draft Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility Environmental Impact Statement (DARHT EIS) for review by the State of New Mexico, Indian Tribes, local governments, other Federal agencies, and the general public. DOE invited comments on the accuracy and adequacy of the draft EIS and any other matters pertaining to their environmental reviews. The formal comment period ran for 45 days, to June 26, 1995, although DOE indicated that late comments would be considered to the extent possible. As part of the public comment process, DOE held two public hearings in Los Alamos and Santa Fe, New Mexico, on May 31 and June 1, 1995. In addition, DOE made the draft classified supplement to the DARHT EIS available for review by appropriately cleared individuals with a need to know the classified information. Reviewers of the classified material included the State of New Mexico, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Defense, and certain Indian Tribes. Volume 2 of the final DARHT EIS contains three chapters. Chapter 1 includes a collective summary of the comments received and DOE`s response. Chapter 2 contains the full text of the public comments on the draft DARHT EIS received by DOE. Chapter 3 contains DOE`s responses to the public comments and an indication as to how the comments were considered in the final EIS.

  3. Financial constraints in capacity planning: a national utility regulatory model (NUREG). Volume I of III: methodology. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-10-29

    This report develops and demonstrates the methodology for the National Utility Regulatory (NUREG) Model developed under contract number DEAC-01-79EI-10579. It is accompanied by two supporting volumes. Volume II is a user's guide for operation of the NUREG software. This includes description of the flow of software and data, as well as the formats of all user data files. Finally, Volume III is a software description guide. It briefly describes, and gives a listing of, each program used in NUREG.

  4. National Utility Financial Statement model (NUFS). Volume III of III: software description. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-10-29

    This volume contains a description of the software comprising the National Utility Financial Statement Model (NUFS). This is the third of three volumes describing NUFS provided by ICF Incorporated under contract DEAC-01-79EI-10579. The three volumes are entitled: model overview and description, user's guide, and software guide.

  5. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE TRAINING AND SKILL REQUIREMENTS OF INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY MAINTENANCE WORKERS. VOLUME II. FINAL REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LYNN, FRANK

    THE APPENDIXES FOR "AN INVESTIGATION OF THE TRAINING AND SKILL REQUIREMENTS OF INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY MAINTENANCE WORKERS, FINAL REPORT, VOLUME I" (VT 004 006) INCLUDE (1) TWO LETTERS FROM PLANT ENGINEERS STRESSING THE IMPORTANCE OF TRAINING MACHINERY MAINTENANCE WORKERS, (2) A DESCRIPTION OF THE MAINTENANCE TRAINING SURVEY, A SAMPLE QUESTIONNAIRE,…

  6. Mod-5A wind turbine generator program design report. Volume 3: Final design and system description, book 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The design, development and analysis of the 7.3 MW MOD-5A wind turbine generator is documented. Volume 3, book 1 describes the performance and characteristics of the MOD-5A wind turbine generator in its final configuration. Each subsystem - the rotor, drivetrain, nacelle, tower and foundation is described in detail.

  7. Theoretical Model for Volume Fraction of UC, 235U Enrichment, and Effective Density of Final U 10Mo Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devaraj, Arun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); Prabhakaran, Ramprashad [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); Hu, Shenyang Y. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); McGarrah, Eric J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL)

    2016-04-12

    The purpose of this document is to provide a theoretical framework for (1) estimating uranium carbide (UC) volume fraction in a final alloy of uranium with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U 10Mo) as a function of final alloy carbon concentration, and (2) estimating effective 235U enrichment in the U 10Mo matrix after accounting for loss of 235U in forming UC. This report will also serve as a theoretical baseline for effective density of as-cast low-enriched U 10Mo alloy. Therefore, this report will serve as the baseline for quality control of final alloy carbon content

  8. Final Technical Progress Report; Closeout Certifications; CSSV Newsletter Volume I; CSSV Newsletter Volume II; CSSV Activity Journal; CSSV Final Financial Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houston, Johnny L [PI; Geter, Kerry [Division of Business and Finance

    2013-08-23

    This Project?s third year of implementation in 2007-2008, the final year, as designated by Elizabeth City State University (ECSU), in cooperation with the National Association of Mathematicians (NAM) Inc., in an effort to promote research and research training programs in computational science ? scientific visualization (CSSV). A major goal of the Project was to attract the energetic and productive faculty, graduate and upper division undergraduate students of diverse ethnicities to a program that investigates science and computational science issues of long-term interest to the Department of Energy (DoE) and the nation. The breadth and depth of computational science?scientific visualization and the magnitude of resources available are enormous for permitting a variety of research activities. ECSU?s Computational Science-Science Visualization Center will serve as a conduit for directing users to these enormous resources.

  9. [Inspection of gas cylinders in storage at TA-54, Area L]. Volume 1, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-06-23

    ERC sampled, analyzed, and recontainerized when necessary gas cylinders containing various chemicals in storage at Los Alamos TA-54 Area L. A vapor containment structure was erected. A total of 179 cylinders was processed; 39 were repackaged; and 55 were decommissioned. This report summarizes the operation; this is Volume 1 of five volumes.

  10. The Del Mod System: An External Evaluation, Final Report, Volume IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Donald W.; And Others

    This is one of five volumes prepared to describe various aspects of the Del Mod System. This volume deals with the evaluation of the Del Mod System. Included are the following: (1) Del Mod Responsive Evaluation; (2) Evaluation Outcomes; (3) Validation of the Del Mod Responsive Evaluation Process; and (4) Conclusions. Appendices include: (A)…

  11. Final Report - Advanced MEA's for Enhanced Operating Conditions, Amenable to High Volume Manufacture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debe, Mark K.

    2007-09-30

    This report summarizes the work completed under a 3M/DOE contract directed at advancing the key fuel cell (FC) components most critical for overcoming the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) performance, durability & cost barriers. This contract focused on the development of advanced ion exchange membranes & electrocatalysts for PEMFCs that will enable operation under ever more demanding automotive operating conditions & the use high volume compatible processes for their manufacture. Higher performing & more durable electrocatalysts must be developed for PEMFCs to meet the power density & lifetime hours required for FC vehicles. At the same time the amount of expensive Pt catalyst must be reduced to lower the MEA costs. While these two properties are met, the catalyst must be made resistant to multiple degradation mechanisms to reach necessary operating lifetimes. In this report, we present the work focused on the development of a completely new approach to PEMFC electrocatalyts, called nanostructured thin film (NSTF) catalysts. The carbon black supports are eliminated with this new approach which eliminates the carbon corrosion issue. The thin film nature of the catalyst significantly improves its robustness against dissolution & grain growth, preserving the surface area. Also, the activity of the NSTF for oxygen reduction is improved by over 500% compared to dispersed Pt catalyts. Finally, the process for fabricating the NSTF catalysts is consistent with high volume roll-good manufacturing & extremely flexible towards the introduction of new catalyst compositions & structures. This report documents the work done to develop new multi-element NSTF catalysts with properties that exceed pure Pt, that are optimized for use with the membranes discussed below, & advance the state-of-the-art towards meeting the DOE 2010 targets for PEMFC electrocatalysts. The work completed advances the understanding of the NSTF catalyst technology, identifies new NSTF

  12. Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume 2, Idaho, 1985 Annual and Final Reports.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hair, Don

    1986-09-01

    The individual reports in this volume have been separately abstracted for inclusion in the data base. The reports describe fish habitat enhancement projects on the Lochsa River, Eldorado and Camas Creeks, and the Clearwater River. (ACR)

  13. Conceptual design and systems analysis of photovoltaic systems. Volume II. Study results. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirpich, A.

    1977-03-19

    This investigation of terrestrial PV systems considered the technical and economic feasibility for systems in three size categories: a small system of about 12 kW peak output for on-site residential use; a large 1500 MW central power plant contributing to the bulk energy of a utility system power grid; and an intermediate size system of about 250 kW for use on public or commercial buildings. In each category, conceptual designs were developed, performance was analyzed for a range of climatic regions, economic analyses were performed, and assessments were made of pertinent institutional issues. The report consists of three volumes. Volume I contains a Study Summary of the major study results. This volume contains the detailed results pertaining to on-site residential photovoltaic systems, central power plant photovoltaic systems, and intermediate size systems applied to commercial and public buildings. Volume III contains supporting appendix material. (WHK)

  14. Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume I, Oregon, 1984 Final and Annual Reports.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Rod

    1986-02-01

    This volume contains reports on habitat improvement and fisheries enhancement projects conducted in the following subbasins: (1) Clackamas River; (2) Hood River; :(3) Deschutes River; (4) John Day River; (5) Umatilla River; and (6) Grande Ronde River. (ACR)

  15. 43 CFR 1.6 - Disciplinary proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Disciplinary proceedings. 1.6 Section 1.6 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior PRACTICES BEFORE THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR § 1.6 Disciplinary proceedings. (a) Disciplinary proceedings may be instituted against anyone...

  16. Analysis of airborne radiometric data. Volume 2. Description, listing, and operating instructions for the code DELPHI/MAZAS. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sperling, M.; Shreve, D.C.

    1978-12-01

    The computer code DELPHI is an interactive English language command system for the analysis of airborne radiometric data. The code includes modules for data reduction, data simulation, time filtering, data adjustment and graphical presentation of the results. DELPHI is implemented in FORTRAN on a DEC-10 computer. This volume gives a brief set of operations instructions, samples of the output obtained from hard copies of the display on a Tektronix terminal and finally a listing of the code.

  17. ASEAN--USAID Buildings Energy Conservation Project final report. Volume 2, Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, M.D.; Busch, J.F. [eds.

    1992-06-01

    This volume reports on research in the area of energy conservation technology applied to commercial buildings in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) region. Unlike Volume I of this series, this volume is a compilation of original technical papers prepared by different authors in the project. In this regard, this volume is much like a technical journal. The papers that follow report on research conducted by both US and ASEAN researchers. The authors representing Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, and Thailand, come from a range of positions in the energy arena, including government energy agencies, electric utilities, and universities. As such, they account for a wide range of perspectives on energy problems and the role that technology can play in solving them. This volume is about using energy more intelligently. In some cases, the effort is towards the use of more advanced technologies, such as low-emittance coatings on window glass, thermal energy storage, or cogeneration. In others, the emphasis is towards reclaiming traditional techniques for rendering energy services, but in new contexts such as lighting office buildings with natural light, or cooling buildings of all types with natural ventilation. Used in its broadest sense, the term ``technology`` encompasses all of the topics addressed in this volume. Along with the more customary associations of technology, such as advanced materials and equipment and the analysis of their performance, this volume treats design concepts and techniques, analysis of ``secondary`` impacts from applying technologies (i.e., unintended impacts, or impacts on parties not directly involved in the purchase and use of the technology), and the collection of primary data used for conducting technical analyses.

  18. Final Report - Advanced MEA's for Enhanced Operating Conditions, Amenable to High Volume Manufacture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debe, Mark K.

    2007-09-30

    This report summarizes the work completed under a 3M/DOE contract directed at advancing the key fuel cell (FC) components most critical for overcoming the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) performance, durability & cost barriers. This contract focused on the development of advanced ion exchange membranes & electrocatalysts for PEMFCs that will enable operation under ever more demanding automotive operating conditions & the use high volume compatible processes for their manufacture. Higher performing & more durable electrocatalysts must be developed for PEMFCs to meet the power density & lifetime hours required for FC vehicles. At the same time the amount of expensive Pt catalyst must be reduced to lower the MEA costs. While these two properties are met, the catalyst must be made resistant to multiple degradation mechanisms to reach necessary operating lifetimes. In this report, we present the work focused on the development of a completely new approach to PEMFC electrocatalyts, called nanostructured thin film (NSTF) catalysts. The carbon black supports are eliminated with this new approach which eliminates the carbon corrosion issue. The thin film nature of the catalyst significantly improves its robustness against dissolution & grain growth, preserving the surface area. Also, the activity of the NSTF for oxygen reduction is improved by over 500% compared to dispersed Pt catalyts. Finally, the process for fabricating the NSTF catalysts is consistent with high volume roll-good manufacturing & extremely flexible towards the introduction of new catalyst compositions & structures. This report documents the work done to develop new multi-element NSTF catalysts with properties that exceed pure Pt, that are optimized for use with the membranes discussed below, & advance the state-of-the-art towards meeting the DOE 2010 targets for PEMFC electrocatalysts. The work completed advances the understanding of the NSTF catalyst technology, identifies new NSTF

  19. Coal-water-slurry evaluation. Volume 1. Laboratory tests. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daley, R.D.; Farthing, G.A.; Vecci, S.J.

    1984-02-01

    This is the first of three volumes describing the multi-phase coal-water slurry (CWS) test program. This volume contains the guideline CWS specifications and suggested test procedures for CWS characterization. The guideline specifications are generic and are not boiler or site specific. The specifications address CWS solids content, viscosity, amount of material less than 200-mesh (75 microns), amount of material greater than 50-mesh (300 microns), volatile matter content, and sodium content of the ash. The suggested analytical test methods are summarized including special test modifications or comments as specifically related to CWSs. The detailed analytical test procedures for CWSs are also presented in appendix A. For completeness, detailed analytical test procedures for coal characterization are also provided in appendix B. This volume also includes an Executive Summary and description of the overall test program. 5 figures, 2 tables.

  20. Solar central receiver prototype heliostat CDRL item B. d. Final technical report, Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Easton, C. R.

    1978-08-01

    This is volume II of a two volume report which presents the results of a study to define a low-cost approach to the production, installation, and operation of heliostats for central receiver solar thermal power plants. Performance and cost analyses are presented, and critical R and D areas are identified. Also, computer printed work sheets are included for heliostat investment, maintenance equipment investment, initial spares investment, and first years operations and maintenance for 2,500, 25,000, 250,000, and 1,000,000 units per year production. (WHK)

  1. Low-rank coal research: Volume 3, Combustion research: Final report. [Great Plains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, M. D.; Hajicek, D. R.; Zobeck, B. J.; Kalmanovitch, D. P.; Potas, T. A.; Maas, D. J.; Malterer, T. J.; DeWall, R. A.; Miller, B. G.; Johnson, M. D.

    1987-04-01

    Volume III, Combustion Research, contains articles on fluidized bed combustion, advanced processes for low-rank coal slurry production, low-rank coal slurry combustion, heat engine utilization of low-rank coals, and Great Plains Gasification Plant. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  2. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) platform configuration and integration. Volume II. Conceptual design. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-06-01

    The purpose of this project is to evaluate six candidate hullforms as candidates for the OTEC commercial plant. This volume is a summary of the conceptual design including facility requirements, cost, schedule, and site sensitivity. Two OTEC commercial plant configurations are considered in this study: the ship and the semi-submersible. Engineering drawings are presented. (WHR)

  3. Inertial Fusion Energy reactor design studies: Prometheus-L, Prometheus-H. Volume 2, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waganer, L.M.; Driemeyer, D.E.; Lee, V.D.

    1992-03-01

    This report contains a review of design studies for Inertial Confinement reactor. This second of three volumes discussions is some detail the following: Objectives, requirements, and assumptions; rationale for design option selection; key technical issues and R&D requirements; and conceptual design selection and description.

  4. Alternative fuels for vehicles fleet demonstration program. Final report, volume 2: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The Alternative Fuels for Vehicles Fleet Demonstration Program (AFV-FDP) was a multiyear effort to collect technical data for use in determining the costs and benefits of alternative-fuel vehicles (AFVs) in typical applications in New York State. This report, Volume 2, includes 13 appendices to Volume 1 that expand upon issues raised therein. Volume 1 provides: (1) Information about the purpose and scope of the AFV-FDP; (2) A summary of AFV-FDP findings organized on the basis of vehicle type and fuel type; (3) A short review of the status of AFV technology development, including examples of companies in the State that are active in developing AFVs and AFV components; and (4) A brief overview of the status of AFV deployment in the State. Volume 3 provides expanded reporting of AFV-FDP technical details, including the complete texts of the brochure Garage Guidelines for Alternative Fuels and the technical report Fleet Experience Survey Report, plus an extensive glossary of AFV terminology. The appendices cover a wide range of issues including: emissions regulations in New York State; production and health effects of ozone; vehicle emissions and control systems; emissions from heavy-duty engines; reformulated gasoline; greenhouse gases; production and characteristics of alternative fuels; the Energy Policy Act of 1992; the Clean Fuel Fleet Program; garage design guidelines for alternative fuels; surveys of fleet managers using alternative fuels; taxes on conventional and alternative fuels; and zero-emission vehicle technology.

  5. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS). Final report. Volume 1-B. Commercial fusion electric plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donohue, M.L.; Price, M.E. (eds.)

    1984-07-01

    Volume 1-B contains the following chapters: (1) blanket and reflector; (2) central cell shield; (3) central cell structure; (4) heat transport and energy conversion; (5) tritium systems; (6) cryogenics; (7) maintenance; (8) safety; (9) radioactivity, activation, and waste disposal; (10) instrumentation and control; (11) balance of plant; (12) plant startup and operation; (13) plant availability; (14) plant construction; and (15) economic analysis.

  6. Statistical Comparisons of Pre and Post Del Mod Data, Final Report, Volume V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolig, John R.; Wall, Charles A.

    This is one of five volumes prepared to describe various aspects of the Del Mod System. This report attempts to compare baseline data gathered in 1970-71 to post experimental data gathered in 1975-76. Sections include analyses of achievement test scores, research conducted under the auspices of the Del Mod System, and a follow-up study of…

  7. Low-rank coal research: Volume 2, Advanced research and technology development: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, M.D.; Swanson, M.L.; Benson, S.A.; Radonovich, L.; Steadman, E.N.; Sweeny, P.G.; McCollor, D.P.; Kleesattel, D.; Grow, D.; Falcone, S.K.

    1987-04-01

    Volume II contains articles on advanced combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation; coal/char reactivity; liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, and fine particulate emissions. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  8. Wisconsin Elementary Teacher Education Project. Volume VI, Feasibility Study: Pricing and Economic Analysis Study. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison.

    This document is the second volume of the feasibility study report for the Wisconsin Elementary Teacher Education Project. It provides in part 1 data on program, planning and budgeting, including cost figures for preparing students in the present and new programs, marginal expenses, and costs for implementing the program on other campuses. Part 2…

  9. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS). Final report. Volume 1-A. Commercial fusion electric plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donohue, M.L.; Price, M.E. (eds.)

    1984-07-01

    Volume 1-A contains the following chapters: (1) plasma engineering, (2) magnets, (3) ecr heating systems, (4) anchor ion-cyclotron resonance heating system, (5) sloshing ion neutral beam, (6) end cell structure, (7) end plasma technology, (8) fueling, (9) startup ion cyclotron resonant heating systems, and (10) end cell radiation analysis. (MOW)

  10. Analysis and forecast of electrical distribution system materials. Final report. Volume III. Appendix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Love, C G

    1976-08-23

    These appendixes are referenced in Volume II of this report. They contain the detailed electrical distribution equipment requirements and input material requirements forecasts. Forecasts are given for three electric energy usage scenarios. Also included are data on worldwide reserves and demand for 30 raw materials required for the manufacture of electrical distribution equipment.

  11. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant expansion: final environmental statement. Volume 2. Appendices. [Appendices only

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liverman, James L.

    1977-09-01

    Volume 2 is comprised of appendices: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Existing Facilities; Ecology; Civic Involvement; Social Analysis; Population Projections; Toxicity of Air Pollutants to Biota at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant; and Assessment of Noise Effects of an Add-On to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. (LK)

  12. Assessment of control technology for stationary sources. Volume I: technical discussion. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minicucci, D.; Herther, M.; Babb, L.; Kuby, W.

    1980-02-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a reference document for use by the Air Resources Board, local air pollution control districts, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that describes technological options available for the control of emissions from stationary sources located in California. Control technologies were examined for 10 industry groups and six air pollutants. Volume I, Technical Discussion, includes an overall introduction to the project, descriptions of its major elements, background information for each industry group addressed, and the project bibliography. In Volume II, Control Technology Data Tables, qualitative descriptions of control options for the various sources and quantitative information on control technology cost, efficiency, reliability, energy consumption, other environmental impacts, and application status are presented in tabular format. Also included is a code list that classifies the stationary sources examined by industry, process and emission source.

  13. Economic evaluation of the annual cycle energy system (ACES). Final report. Volume III, appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    This volume consists of seven appendices related to ACES, the first three of which are concerned with computer programs. The appendices are entitled: (A) ACESIM: Residential Program Listing; (B) Typical Inputs and Outputs of ACESIM; (C) CACESS: Commercial Building Program Listing; (D) Typical Weather-Year Selection Requirements; (E) Building Characteristics; (F) List of Major Variables Used in the Computer Programs; and (G) Bibliography. 79 references.

  14. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-17

    Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC Test Program which may include land and floating test facilities. The document, Volume II - Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part A contains definitions, baseline revisions, test plans, and energy utilization sections.

  15. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS). Final report. Volume 2. Commercial fusion synfuels plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donohue, M.L.; Price, M.E. (eds.)

    1984-07-01

    Volume 2 contains the following chapters: (1) synfuels; (2) physics base and parameters for TMR; (3) high-temperature two-temperature-zone blanket system for synfuel application; (4) thermochemical hydrogen processes; (5) interfacing the sulfur-iodine cycle; (6) interfacing the reactor with the thermochemical process; (7) tritium control in the blanket system; (8) the sulfur trioxide fluidized-bed composer; (9) preliminary cost estimates; and (10) fuels beyond hydrogen. (MOW)

  16. Aguirre environmental studies, Jobos Bay, Puerto Rico. Volume 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-06-01

    The following appendices to volume I are presented: biomass of dominant microzooplankton; biomass of zooplankton in surface waters of Jobos Bay; comparison of zooplankton caught during day and night; variations in surface temperature and salinity at collection sites; distance, depth, and temperature related to dominant vegetation and sea grass; total biomass of Thalassia testudium; photosynthetic pigment diversity; invertebrate species and frequency of occurrence; distribution of macrobenthic organisms; species found on mangrove roots; distribution of fish species; and seasonal occurrence of fish species. (HLW)

  17. USAF Summer Research Program - 1993 Summer Research Extension Program Final Reports, Volume 1A, Armstrong Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-11-01

    Laboratory VOLUME 4A Report Title Report # Author’s University Report Author 1 Integrated Estimator/Guidance/ Autopilot for Homing Missiles Dr. S...Evaluation of Variable Structure Control for Missile Autopilots Dr. Mario Innocenti Using Reaction Aerospace Engineering Auburn University, Auburn, AL...is typically several Tesla (T), e.g., 6-10 T. With the existing technologies, superconductive magnets are feasible to reach such field strength. (With

  18. Final safety analysis report for the Galileo Mission: Volume 1, Reference design document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-05-01

    The Galileo mission uses nuclear power sources called Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) to provide the spacecraft's primary electrical power. Because these generators contain nuclear material, a Safety Analysis Report (SAR) is required. A preliminary SAR and an updated SAR were previously issued that provided an evolving status report on the safety analysis. As a result of the Challenger accident, the launch dates for both Galileo and Ulysses missions were later rescheduled for November 1989 and October 1990, respectively. The decision was made by agreement between the DOE and the NASA to have a revised safety evaluation and report (FSAR) prepared on the basis of these revised vehicle accidents and environments. The results of this latest revised safety evaluation are presented in this document (Galileo FSAR). Volume I, this document, provides the background design information required to understand the analyses presented in Volumes II and III. It contains descriptions of the RTGs, the Galileo spacecraft, the Space Shuttle, the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS), the trajectory and flight characteristics including flight contingency modes, and the launch site. There are two appendices in Volume I which provide detailed material properties for the RTG.

  19. Tooele Army Depot Revised Final Site-Wide Ecological Risk Assessment. Volume IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-02-01

    SWERA/Rev Final I^)t/November 25, 1997 307 ’S a s ■c s v8 8 fcq I S «5 K § ’•C I w 3 2 i S a PB « s * •o et £■8 B _ 9 fS jf »n c... fcq u o o. S 2 3 rj OS z N X Q- u w TSK 0003/SWERA/Rev Final Rpt/November 25, 1997 358 in "* z z z § » Q Q Q S O § J2o D § Q §S3 O

  20. C-Band Airport Surface Communications System Standards Development. Phase II Final Report. Volume 2: Test Bed Performance Evaluation and Final AeroMACS Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Edward; Magner, James

    2011-01-01

    This report is provided as part of ITT s NASA Glenn Research Center Aerospace Communication Systems Technical Support (ACSTS) contract NNC05CA85C, Task 7: New ATM Requirements-Future Communications, C-Band and L-Band Communications Standard Development and was based on direction provided by FAA project-level agreements for New ATM Requirements-Future Communications. Task 7 included two subtasks. Subtask 7-1 addressed C-band (5091- to 5150-MHz) airport surface data communications standards development, systems engineering, test bed and prototype development, and tests and demonstrations to establish operational capability for the Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS). Subtask 7-2 focused on systems engineering and development support of the L-band digital aeronautical communications system (L-DACS). Subtask 7-1 consisted of two phases. Phase I included development of AeroMACS concepts of use, requirements, architecture, and initial high-level safety risk assessment. Phase II builds on Phase I results and is presented in two volumes. Volume I is devoted to concepts of use, system requirements, and architecture, including AeroMACS design considerations. Volume II (this document) describes an AeroMACS prototype evaluation and presents final AeroMACS recommendations. This report also describes airport categorization and channelization methodologies. The purposes of the airport categorization task were (1) to facilitate initial AeroMACS architecture designs and enable budgetary projections by creating a set of airport categories based on common airport characteristics and design objectives, and (2) to offer high-level guidance to potential AeroMACS technology and policy development sponsors and service providers. A channelization plan methodology was developed because a common global methodology is needed to assure seamless interoperability among diverse AeroMACS services potentially supplied by multiple service providers.

  1. Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 1, Cold checkout test report, Book 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 1 discusses the following topics: the background of the project; test program description; summary of tests and test results; problem evaluation; functional requirements confirmation; recommendations; and completed test documentation for tests performed in Phase 3.

  2. Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 1, Cold checkout test report, Book 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 2 discusses the following topics: Fuel Rod Extraction System Test Results and Analysis Reports and Clamping Table Test Results and Analysis Reports.

  3. Prototypical Rod Construction Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 1, Cold checkout test report, Book 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 3 discusses the following topics: Downender Test Results and Analysis Report; NFBC Canister Upender Test Results and Analysis Report; Fuel Assembly Handling Fixture Test Results and Analysis Report; and Fuel Canister Upender Test Results and Analysis Report.

  4. Outer Continental Shelf environmental-assessment program: final reports of principal investigators. Volume 25

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-10-01

    This compilation of includes final reports on the following subjects: ice edge ecosystems, primary productivity, nutrient cycling and organic matter transfer; analysis of Harrison Bay zooplankton samples; Beaufort Sea plankton studies, winter-spring studies in Stefansson Sound and off Narwhal Island; foodweb and nutrient dynamics in nearshore Beaufort Sea waters.

  5. Crown Zellerbach Well No. 2, Livingston Parish, Louisiana. Volume II. Well test data. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The following well test data are included: final report of field test data, IGT compiled data, ERMI raw data, Gas Producer's Associated tentative method of testing for hydrogen sulfide in natural gas using length of stain tubes, IGT combined sample log, report on reservoir fluids, well test analysis, sampling and chemical analysis procedures, and scale and corrosion evaluation. (MHR)

  6. Elementary Mathematics, Grades 1-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nederland Independent School District, TX.

    GRADES OR AGES: Grades 1-6. SUBJECT MATTER: Elementary math. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: Introductory material focuses on the philosophy and objectives of instructional material. The guide is divided into six units covering grades 1-6. Each unit presents the general goals, materials needed, minimum program, skills to be developed,…

  7. Modification to the Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Volume 1, Text, Attachments 1--6. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-01-01

    This document provides the modifications to the 1988 Remedial Action Plan (RAP) of the contaminated materials at the Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah. The text detailing the modifications and attachments 1 through 6 are provided with this document. The RAP was developed to serve a two-fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action. Pertinent information and data are included with reference given to the supporting documents.

  8. ASEAN-USAID buildings energy conservation project. Volume 1, Energy standards: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, M.D.; Busch, J.F. [eds.][Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Deringer, J.J. [Deringer Group, Riva, MD (United States)

    1992-06-01

    Mandatory or voluntary energy-efficiency standards for new or existing buildings can play an important role in a national program aimed at promoting energy conservation. Building codes and standards can provide a degree of control over design and building practices throughout the construction process, and encourage awareness of energy-conscious design. Studies in developed countries indicate that efficiency standards can produce energy reductions on the order of 20 to 40% or more. Within ASEAN, analyses of the savings potential from the proposed standards suggest that if implemented, these standards would produce savings over current new design practice of 19% to 24%. In this volume we provide an overview of the ASEAN-USAID project aimed at promulgating standards for energy efficiency in commercial buildings. The process of developing and implementing energy-efficiency standards for buildings can be subdivided into two key components: policy development; and technical and economic analysis. Each of these involves a number of steps and processes, as outlined in Figure 1-1. This volume describes the technical and economic analyses used to develop the proposed energy efficiency standards for four countries (Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines, and Indonesia), and to refine an energy standard existing in Singapore since 1979. Though oriented toward the ASEAN region, the analysis methods described here are applicable in a range of settings, provided appropriate modifications are made for local building construction, climatic, economic, and political conditions. Implementation issues are not specifically addressed here; rather this volume is oriented towards the analytical work needed to establish or revise an energy standard for buildings.

  9. Molten salt coal gasification process development unit. Phase 1. Volume 1. PDU operations. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohl, A.L.

    1980-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of a test program conducted on the Molten Salt Coal Gasification Process, which included the design, construction, and operation of a Process Development Unit. In this process, coal is gasified by contacting it with air in a turbulent pool of molten sodium carbonate. Sulfur and ash are retained in the melt, and a small stream is continuously removed from the gasifier for regeneration of sodium carbonate, removal of sulfur, and disposal of the ash. The process can handle a wide variety of feed materials, including highly caking coals, and produces a gas relatively free from tars and other impurities. The gasification step is carried out at approximately 1800/sup 0/F. The PDU was designed to process 1 ton per hour of coal at pressures up to 20 atm. It is a completely integrated facility including systems for feeding solids to the gasifier, regenerating sodium carbonate for reuse, and removing sulfur and ash in forms suitable for disposal. Five extended test runs were made. The observed product gas composition was quite close to that predicted on the basis of earlier small-scale tests and thermodynamic considerations. All plant systems were operated in an integrated manner during one of the runs. The principal problem encountered during the five test runs was maintaining a continuous flow of melt from the gasifier to the quench tank. Test data and discussions regarding plant equipment and process performance are presented. The program also included a commercial plant study which showed the process to be attractive for use in a combined-cycle, electric power plant. The report is presented in two volumes, Volume 1, PDU Operations, and Volume 2, Commercial Plant Study.

  10. Deep Drilling Basic Research: Volume 4 - System Description. Final Report, November 1988--August 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, E.E.; Maurer, W.C.; Hood, M.; Cooper, G.; Cook, N.

    1990-06-01

    The first section of this Volume will discuss the ''Conventional Drilling System''. Today's complex arrangement of numerous interacting systems has slowly evolved from the very simple cable tool rigs used in the late 1800s. Improvements to the conventional drilling rig have varied in size and impact over the years, but the majority of them have been evolutionary modifications. Each individual change or improvement of this type does not have significant impact on drilling efficiency and economics. However, the change is almost certain to succeed, and over time--as the number of evolutionary changes to the system begin to add up--improvements in efficiency and economics can be seen. Some modifications, defined and described in this Volume as Advanced Modifications, have more than just an evolutionary effect on the conventional drilling system. Although the distinction is subtle, there are several examples of incorporated advancements that have had significantly more impact on drilling procedures than would a truly evolutionary improvement. An example of an advanced modification occurred in the late 1970s with the introduction of Polycrystalline Diamond Compact (PDC) drill bits. PDC bits resulted in a fundamental advancement in drilling procedures that could not have been accomplished by an evolutionary improvement in materials metallurgy, for example. The last drilling techniques discussed in this Volume are the ''Novel Drilling Systems''. The extent to which some of these systems have been developed varies from actually being tested in the field, to being no more than a theoretical concept. However, they all have one thing in common--their methods of rock destruction are fundamentally different from conventional drilling techniques. When a novel drilling system is introduced, it is a revolutionary modification of accepted drilling procedures and will completely replace current techniques. The most prominent example of a

  11. Transport of solid commodities via freight pipeline: demand analysis methodology. Volume IV. First year final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, W.B.; Plaut, T.

    1976-07-01

    In order to determine the feasibility of intercity freight pipelines, it was necessary to determine whether sufficient traffic flows currently exist between various origins and destinations to justify consideration of a mode whose operating characteristics became competitive under conditions of high-traffic volume. An intercity origin/destination freight-flow matrix was developed for a large range of commodities from published sources. A high-freight traffic-density corridor between Chicago and New York and another between St. Louis and New York were studied. These corridors, which represented 18 cities, had single-direction flows of 16 million tons/year. If trans-shipment were allowed at each of the 18 cities, flows of up to 38 million tons/year were found in each direction. These figures did not include mineral or agricultural products. After determining that such pipeline-eligible freight-traffic volumes existed, the next step was to determine the ability of freight pipeline to penetrate such markets. Modal-split models were run on aggregate data from the 1967 Census of Transportation. Modal-split models were also run on disaggregate data specially collected for this study. The freight pipeline service characteristics were then substituted into both the aggregate and disaggregate models (truck vs. pipeline and then rail vs. pipeline) and estimates of pipeline penetration into particular STCC commodity groups were made. Based on these very preliminary results, it appears that freight pipeline has market penetration potential that is consistent with high-volume participation in the intercity freight market.

  12. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Geochemical modelling of secondary uranium ore formation. Final Report - Volume 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sverjensky, D. [The John Hopkins Univ, Dept of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Baltimore (United States); Bennett, D.G.; Read, D. [W.S. Atkins Science and Technology, Epsom Surrey, (United Kingdom)

    1992-12-31

    The purpose of the present study was to establish how the uranyl phosphate zone at the Koongarra site was formed. The overall approach taken in the present study employed theoretical chemical mass transfer calculations and models that permit investigation and reconstruction of the kinds of waters that could produce the uranyl phosphate zone. These calculations have used the geological and mineralogical data for the Koongarra weathered zone (Volumes 2, 8, and 9 of this series), to constrain the initial compositions and reactions undergone by groundwater during the formation of the uranyl phosphate zone. In carrying out these calculations the present-day analyses of Koongarra waters are used only as a guide to the possible initial composition of the fluids associated with the formation of the phosphate zone. Aqueous speciation, saturation state and chemical mass transfer calculations were carried out using the computer programs EQ3NR and EQ6 (Wolery, 1983; Wolery et al., 1984) and a thermodynamic database generated at The Johns Hopkins University over the last eight years which is tabulated in the Appendix 1 to Volume 12 of this series. Despite uncertainties in the thermodynamic characterisation of species, all the above calculations suggest that the uranyl phosphate zone at Koongarra has not formed from present-day groundwaters (Volume 12 of this series). The present-day groundwaters in the weathered zone (eg. at 13 m depth) appear to be undersaturated with respect to saleeite. Furthermore, as present-day groundwaters descend below the water table they rapidly lose their atmospheric oxygen imprint, as is typical of most groundwaters, and become even more reducing in character. Under these circumstances, the groundwaters become more undersaturated with respect to saleeite than the shallow groundwaters. Because much of the phosphate zone is currently below the water table, under saturated zone conditions, it is suggested in the present study that the uranyl phosphate

  13. Deep Drilling Basic Research: Volume 5 - System Evaluations. Final Report, November 1988--August 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1990-06-01

    This project is aimed at decreasing the costs and increasing the efficiency of drilling gas wells in excess of 15,000 feet. This volume presents a summary of an evaluation of various drilling techniques. Drilling solutions were compared quantitatively against typical penetration rates derived from conventional systems. A qualitative analysis measured the impact of a proposed system on the drilling industry. The evaluations determined that the best candidates f o r improving the speed and efficiency of drilling deep gas wells include: PDC/TSD bits, slim-hole drilling, roller-cone bits, downhole motors, top-driven systems, and coiled-tubing drilling.

  14. DOE plutonium disposition study: Pu consumption in ALWRs. Volume 2, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-15

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has contracted with Asea Brown Boveri-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) to provide information on the capability of ABB-CE`s System 80 + Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) to transform, through reactor burnup, 100 metric tonnes (MT) of weapons grade plutonium (Pu) into a form which is not readily useable in weapons. This information is being developed as part of DOE`s Plutonium Disposition Study, initiated by DOE in response to Congressional action. This document Volume 2, provides a discussion of: Plutonium Fuel Cycle; Technology Needs; Regulatory Considerations; Cost and Schedule Estimates; and Deployment Strategy.

  15. A Research Needs Assessment for waste plastics recycling: Volume 1, Executive summary. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    This first volume provides a summary of the entire project. The study utilized the talents of a large number of participants, including a significant number of peer reviewers from industrial companies, government agencies, and research institutes. in addition, an extensive analysis of relevant literature was carried out. In considering the attractiveness of recycling technologies that are alternatives to waste-to-energy combustion units, a systems approach was utilized. Collection of waste streams containing plastics, sortation, and reclamation of plastics and plastic mixtures, reprocessing or chemical conversion of the reclaimed polymers, and the applicability of the products to specific market segments have been analyzed in the study.

  16. Economic Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) study. Volume I. ERTG design. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1973-12-01

    The objectives of this study were: (1) to develop and evaluate an ERTG design for a high power, Curium-244 fueled system based on the tubular thermoelectric module technology; (2) to prepare a program plan for the development of a flight qualified ERTG; and (3) to estimate the costs associated with the production of one, ten and twenty flight qualified ERTG's. This volume presents the Reference Design ERTG approach, the results of the engineering trade studies leading to its selection, and the Second Generation ERTG Design proposed for development. (WHK)

  17. Second-generation heliostat development. Volume I. Sections 1. 0 to 3. 0. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-03-01

    The Northrup heliostat, the major component elements, and the rationale for the approach selected are described in detail. The performance evaluation is presented, including weight, deflections, stress levels, and, in the case of the drive unit, torque, speed, and efficiency performance. System studies are summarized, including wind loads and moments, mirror module trade studies, rack structure trades, drive unit trade studies, and stow position trade studies. The results of the electronic and mechanical tests are summarized. Included in Vol. I is a brief summary of the whole 4-volume report. (LEW)

  18. Hot-gas cleanup system model development. Volume II. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushimaru, K.; Bennett, A.; Bekowies, P.J.

    1982-11-01

    Under Contract to the Department of Energy (DOE) through the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), Flow Industries, Inc., has developed computer models to simulate the physical performance of five hot-gas cleanup devices for pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC), combined-cycle power plants. Separate cost models have also been developed to estimate the cost of each device. The work leading to the development of these models is described in Volume I of this report. This volume contains the user's manuals for both the physical and cost models. The manuals for the physical models are given first followed by those for the cost models. Each manual is a complete and separate document. The model names and devices and their respective subroutine names are: (1) Moving Granular Bed Filter by Combustion Power Company, USRCGB, QFCOST; (2) Ceramic Bag Filter by Acurex, USRACB, QDCOST; (3) Electrostatic Granular Bed Filter by General Electric, USRGGB, QACOST; (4) Electrostatic Precipitator by Research Cottrell, USRCEP, QECOST; and (5) Electrocyclone by General Electric, USRGCY, QBCOST.

  19. Capillary gas chromatographic analysis of nerve agents using large volume injections. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deinum, T.; Nieuwenhuy, C.

    1994-11-01

    The procedure developed at TNO-Prins Maurits Laboratory (TNO-PML) for the verification of intact organophosphorus chemical warfare agents in water samples was improved. The last step in this procedure, the laborious and non-reproducible transfer of an ethyl acetate extract onto a Tenax-adsorption tube followed by thermal desorption of the Tenax-tube, was replaced by large volume injection of the extract onto a capillary gas chromatographic system. The parameters controlling the injection of a large volume of an extract (200 ul) were investigated and optimized. As ethyl acetate caused severe problems, potential new solvents were evaluated. With the improved procedure, the nerve agents sarin, tabun, soman, diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) and VX could be determined in freshly prepared water samples at pg/ml (ppt) levels. The fate of the nerve agents under study in water at two pH`s (4.8 and 6) was investigated. For VX, the pH should be adjusted before extraction. Moreover, it is worthwhile to acidify water samples to diminish hydrolysis.

  20. Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power Systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Final report. Volume III. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-01

    The overall, long term objective of the Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power System is to identify, characterize, and ultimately demonstrate the viability and cost effectiveness of solar/fossil, steam Rankine cycle, hybrid power systems that: (1) consist of a combined solar central receiver energy source and a nonsolar energy source at a single, common site, (2) may operate in the base, intermediate, and peaking capacity modes, (3) produce the rated output independent of variations in solar insolation, (4) provide a significant savings (50% or more) in fuel consumpton, and (5) produce power at the minimum possible cost in mills/kWh. It is essential that these hybrid concepts be technically feasible and economically competitive with other systems in the near to mid-term time period (1985-1990) on a commercial scale. The program objective for Phase I is to identify and conceptually characterize solar/fossil steam Rankine cycle, commercial-scale, power plant systems that are economically viable and technically feasible. This volume contains appendices to the conceptual design and systems analysis studies gien in Volume II, Books 1 and 2. (WHK)

  1. Coal-water-slurry evaluation. Volume 2. Laboratory and combustion test results. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daley, R.D.; Farthing, G.A.; Vecci, S.J.

    1984-02-01

    This is the second of three volumes describing a multi-phase coal-water slurry (CWS) test program. This volume presents the results of laboratory, atomization, and combustion tests which were performed on six slurries and their parent coals. The objectives of these tests was to establish laboratory test procedures for evaluating CWS fuels, to investigate relationships between laboratory properties and CWS combustion and handling characteristics and to develop preliminary guidelines for CWS specifications. These tests showed that the preparation processes and chemical additives used by the slurry manufacturers had a significant effect on viscosity and atomization properties. The most important factor for good combustion performance was droplet size, but droplet size did not correlate with viscosity measured at low shear rates in the laboratory tests. It was also found that some slurries had greater fouling potential than their parent coals due to the use of sodium-containing additives. Tests were also conducted to determine whether the slurries could be transported and stored without coal settling. These tests showed that little settling occurred during either transportation or storage for at least three weeks. 98 figures, 27 tables.

  2. Preparation and development of land use energy consumption data sets. Volume 1, phase 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-20

    An analysis was made of the potential usefulness of land-use-related data, the availability of relevant information in the literature, and potential approaches for data collection. This volume describes the results of the analysis, while Volume II contains technical backup materials. Chapter 2 discusses the issue of community classification: questions of classification and aggregation have been the most significant technical issues faced on the project, since they strongly affect the accuracy and usefulness of any data that are developed. Chapter 3 is concerned with consistency of accounting, primarily in the measurement of energy use. Transportation patterns, energy-transmission losses, and energy embodied in materials and structure can all be assigned to various land uses in a number of ways, and it is important to perform the assignment in a way that is valuable for the policies being evaluated. Thus, Chapter 3 forms the structure for the dependent variables of the system: the various types and patterns of energy use, while Chapter 2 describes the structure of the independent variables, which are the land-use patterns described, plus other factors such as climate. Chapter 4 takes these two structures and presents computations of energy use for the various patterns of land uses, based on the literature, and Chapter 5 discusses the implications of these analyses for energy planning. This leads directly to Chapter 6, where recommendations are made regarding both data collection and use of existing data. (MCW)

  3. OTEC platform configuration and integration. Volume II. Technical concept. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-07-07

    The configuration, integration, and evaluation studies performed in the first phase of this contract resulted in a ranking of the most feasible platform candidates for commercial OTEC applications. On the basis of the results obtained from three individual contractors performing the same study, the Department of Energy made selections of two platform hulls for each contractor for conceptual designs. For Phase-II studies, M. Rosenblatt and Son, Inc. (MR and S) project team was given the SPAR and SPHERE platforms to perform not only conceptual designs for, but also cost and time schedules and sensitivity analyses. This is the second volume of a three-volume MR and S report, and it presents the results of conceptual designs for the two platforms, the facilities and equipment required for construction, deployment, and operation of these platforms, and cost estimates and time schedules. All conceptual design work is performed for the baseline site on West Coast of Florida. The cost differentials and other considerations involved with deploying the platforms in the New Orleans and Puerto Rico sites are also presented. As an end product of the complete study, the costs for the SPAR and the SPHERE platforms are reported both in terms of acquisition costs in 1978 dollars and life cycle costs in dollars per kilowatt.

  4. Human-system interface design review guideline -- Process and guidelines: Final report. Revision 1, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-06-01

    NUREG-0700, Revision 1, provides human factors engineering (HFE) guidance to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff for its: (1) review of the human system interface (HSI) design submittals prepared by licensees or applications for a license or design certification of commercial nuclear power plants, and (2) performance of HSI reviews that could be undertaken as part of an inspection or other type of regulatory review involving HSI design or incidents involving human performance. The guidance consists of a review process and HFE guidelines. The document describes those aspects of the HSI design review process that are important to the identification and resolution of human engineering discrepancies that could adversely affect plant safety. Guidance is provided that could be used by the staff to review an applicant`s HSI design review process or to guide the development of an HSI design review plan, e.g., as part of an inspection activity. The document also provides detailed HFE guidelines for the assessment of HSI design implementations. NUREG-0700, Revision 1, consists of three stand-alone volumes. Volume 1 consists of two major parts. Part 1 describes those aspects of the review process of the HSI design that are important to identifying and resolving human engineering discrepancies. Part 2 contains detailed guidelines for a human factors engineering review which identify criteria for assessing the implementation of an applicant`s or licensee`s HSI design.

  5. Proposed Owyhee resource management plan and final environmental impact statement, Volume 2

    OpenAIRE

    U.S. Bureau of Land Management

    1999-01-01

    Five alternatives are described and analyzed in the final Environmental Impact Statement. Alternative A is a continuation of current management. Alternative B was developed through BLM staff interpretation and analysis of information submitted by the Owyhee Country Commissioners with the assistance of the Owyhee County Natural Resources Committee. Alternative C was developed by the BLM lower Snake River District interdisciplinary planning team. Alternative D was developed through BLM staff in...

  6. Economic Feasibility and Market Readiness of Solar Technologies. Draft Final Report. Volume I.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flaim, Silvio J.; Buchanan, Deborah L.; Christmas, Susan; Fellhauer, Cheryl; Glenn, Barbara; Ketels, Peter A.; Levary, Arnon; Mourning, Pete; Steggerda, Paul; Trivedi, Harit; Witholder, Robert E.

    1978-09-01

    Systems descriptions, costs, technical and market readiness assessments are reported for ten solar technologies: solar heating and cooling of buildings (SHACOB), passive, agricultural and industrial process heat (A/IPH), biomass, ocean thermal (OTEC), wind (WECS), solar thermal electric, photovoltaics, satellite power station (SPS), and solar total energy systems (STES). Study objectives, scope, and methods. are presented. of Joint Task The cost and market analyses portion 5213/6103 will be used to make commercialization assessments in the conclusions of. the final report.

  7. USAF Summer Research Program - 1993 High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports, Volume 12, Armstrong Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Page No: 16- 1 Tullahoma High School Tullahoma, TN 37388-0000 Bowlby , Andrea Laboratory: PL/GP Mudge Way Vol-Page No: 13- 1 Bedford High School Bedford...Ingram Rd. San Antonio, TX 78238 Dr. John Taboada Mentor Final Report for: AFOSR Summer Research Program Armstrong Laboratory Sponsored by: Air Force...Photoelectric Aerosol Sensor (PAS) as well as with other methods for studies involving aerosols and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) (4-8). Dr. John

  8. Characterization of void volume VOC concentration in vented TRU waste drums. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liekhus, K.J.

    1995-08-01

    A test program has been conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to demonstrate that the concentration of volatile organic compounds within the innermost layer of confinement in a vented waste drum can be estimated using a model incorporating diffusion and permeation transport principles and limited waste drum sampling data. This final report summarizes the experimental measurements and model predictions for transuranic waste drums containing solidified sludges and solid waste.

  9. Characterization of voic volume VOC concentration in vented TRU waste drums. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liekhus, K.J.

    1994-12-01

    A test program has been conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to demonstrate that the concentration of volatile organic compounds within the innermost layer of confinement in a vented waste drum can be estimated using a model incorporating diffusion and permeation transport principles and limited waste drum sampling data. This final report summarizes the experimental measurements and model predictions for transuranic waste drums containing solidified sludges and solid waste.

  10. Technical area status report for low-level mixed waste final waste forms. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayberry, J.L.; DeWitt, L.M. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Darnell, R. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1993-08-01

    The Final Waste Forms (FWF) Technical Area Status Report (TASR) Working Group, the Vitrification Working Group (WG), and the Performance Standards Working Group were established as subgroups to the FWF Technical Support Group (TSG). The FWF TASR WG is comprised of technical representatives from most of the major DOE sites, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the EPA Office of Solid Waste, and the EPA`s Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory (RREL). The primary activity of the FWF TASR Working Group was to investigate and report on the current status of FWFs for LLNM in this TASR. The FWF TASR Working Group determined the current status of the development of various waste forms described above by reviewing selected articles and technical reports, summarizing data, and establishing an initial set of FWF characteristics to be used in evaluating candidate FWFS; these characteristics are summarized in Section 2. After an initial review of available information, the FWF TASR Working Group chose to study the following groups of final waste forms: hydraulic cement, sulfur polymer cement, glass, ceramic, and organic binders. The organic binders included polyethylene, bitumen, vinyl ester styrene, epoxy, and urea formaldehyde. Section 3 provides a description of each final waste form. Based on the literature review, the gaps and deficiencies in information were summarized, and conclusions and recommendations were established. The information and data presented in this TASR are intended to assist the FWF Production and Assessment TSG in evaluating the Technical Task Plans (TTPs) submitted to DOE EM-50, and thus provide DOE with the necessary information for their FWF decision-making process. This FWF TASR will also assist the DOE and the MWIP in establishing the most acceptable final waste forms for the various LLMW streams stored at DOE facilities.

  11. Horizontal oil well applications and oil recovery assessment. Volume 2: Applications overview, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deskins, W.G.; McDonald, W.J.; Knoll, R.G.; Springer, S.J.

    1995-03-01

    Horizontal technology has been applied in over 110 formations in the USA. Volume 1 of this study addresses the overall success of horizontal technology, especially in less-publicized formations, i.e., other than the Austin Chalk, Bakken, and Niobrara. Operators in the USA and Canada were surveyed on a formation-by-formation basis by means of a questionnaire. Response data were received describing horizontal well projects in 58 formations in the USA and 88 in Canada. Operators` responses were analyzed for trends in technical and economic success based on lithology (clastics and carbonates) and resource type (light oil, heavy oil, and gas). The potential impact of horizontal technology on reserves was also estimated. A forecast of horizontal drilling activity over the next decade was developed.

  12. Committee to evaluate Sandia`s risk expertise: Final report. Volume 1: Presentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudley, E.C.

    1998-05-01

    On July 1--2, 1997, Sandia National Laboratories hosted the External Committee to Evaluate Sandia`s Risk Expertise. Under the auspices of SIISRS (Sandia`s International Institute for Systematic Risk Studies), Sandia assembled a blue-ribbon panel of experts in the field of risk management to assess their risk programs labs-wide. Panelists were chosen not only for their own expertise, but also for their ability to add balance to the panel as a whole. Presentations were made to the committee on the risk activities at Sandia. In addition, a tour of Sandia`s research and development programs in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission was arranged. The panel attended a poster session featuring eight presentations and demonstrations for selected projects. Overviews and viewgraphs from the presentations are included in Volume 1 of this report. Presentations are related to weapons, nuclear power plants, transportation systems, architectural surety, environmental programs, and information systems.

  13. Industrial applications study. Volume V. Bibliography of relevant literature. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Harry L.; Hamel, Bernard B.; Karamchetty, Som; Steigelmann, William H.; Gajanana, Birur C.; Agarwal, Anil P.; Klock, Lawrence W.; Henderson, James M.; Calobrisi, Gary; Hedman, Bruce A.; Koluch, Michael; Biancardi, Frank; Bass, Robert; Landerman, Abraham; Peters, George; Limaye, Dilip; Price, Jeffrey; Farr, Janet

    1976-12-01

    This five-volume report represents an initial Phase O evaluation of waste heat recovery and utilization potential in the manufacturing portion of the industrial sector. The scope of this initial phase was limited to the two-digit SIC level and addressed the feasibility of obtaining in-depth energy information in the industrial sector. Within this phase, a successful methodology and approaches for data gathering and assessment are established. Using these approaches, energy use and waste heat profiles were developed at the 2-digit level; with this data, waste heat utilization technologies were evaluated. The first section of the bibliography lists extensive citations for all industries. The next section is composed of an extensive literature search with abstracts for industrial energy conservation. EPA publications on specific industries and general references conclude the publication. (MCW)

  14. DOE Plutonium Disposition Study: Pu consumption in ALWRs. Volume 1, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-15

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has contracted with Asea Brown Boveri-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) to provide information on the capability of ABB-CE`s System 80 + Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) to transform, through reactor burnup, 100 metric tonnes (MT) of weapons grade plutonium (Pu) into a form which is not readily useable in weapons. This information is being developed as part of DOE`s Plutonium Disposition Study, initiated by DOE in response to Congressional action. This document, Volume 1, presents a technical description of the various elements of the System 80 + Standard Plant Design upon which the Plutonium Disposition Study was based. The System 80 + Standard Design is fully developed and directly suited to meeting the mission objectives for plutonium disposal. The bass U0{sub 2} plant design is discussed here.

  15. Coal liquefaction: A research and development needs assessment: Final report, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, H.D.; Burke, F.P.; Chao, K.C.; Davis, B.H.; Gorbaty, M.L.; Klier, K.; Kruse, C.W.; Larsen, J.W.; Lumpkin, R.E.; McIlwain, M.E.; Wender, I.; Stewart, N.

    1989-03-01

    Volume II of this report on an assessment of research needs for coal liquefaction contains reviews of the five liquefaction technologies---direct, indirect, pyrolysis, coprocessing, and bioconversion. These reviews are not meant to be encyclopedic; several outstanding reviews of liquefaction have appeared in recent years and the reader is referred to these whenever applicable. Instead, these chapters contain reviews of selected topics that serve to support the panel's recommendations or to illustrate recent accomplishments, work in progress, or areas of major research interest. At the beginning of each of these chapters is a brief introduction and a summary of the most important research recommendations brought out during the panel discussions and supported by the material presented in the review. A review of liquefaction developments outside the US is included. 594 refs., 100 figs., 60 tabs.

  16. Proposed Tenaska Washington II Generation Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2: Public Involvement.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1994-01-01

    In regard to the proposed Tenaska Washington II Generation Project, the goal of the Bonneville Power Administration`s (BPA) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) public involvement process is to determine the issues to be examined and pertinent analyses to be conducted and to solicit comments on the content and quality of information presented in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS). Comments and questions are solicited from the public and government agencies during the scoping process and during the comment period and public hearing on the DEIS, to find out what is of most concern to them. The end product of the public involvement process is the Comment Report which follows in part of this volume on Public Involvement.

  17. Final Report, Volume 2, The Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Duplex Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Steven, W.; Lundin, Carl, D.

    2005-09-30

    The scope of testing cast Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) required testing to several ASTM specifications, while formulating and conducting industry round robin tests to verify and study the reproducibility of the results. ASTM E562 (Standard Test Method for Determining Volume Fraction by Systematic manual Point Count) and ASTM A923 (Standard Test Methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Wrought Duplex Austenitic/Ferritic Stainless Steels) were the specifications utilized in conducting this work. An ASTM E562 industry round robin, ASTM A923 applicability study, ASTM A923 industry round robin, and an ASTM A923 study of the effectiveness of existing foundry solution annealing procedures for producing cast DSS without intermetallic phases were implemented. In the ASTM E562 study, 5 samples were extracted from various cast austenitic and DSS in order to have varying amounts of ferrite. Each sample was metallographically prepared by UT and sent to each of 8 participants for volume fraction of ferrite measurements. Volume fraction of ferrite was measured using manual point count per ASTM E562. FN was measured from the Feritescope{reg_sign} and converted to volume fraction of ferrite. Results indicate that ASTM E562 is applicable to DSS and the results have excellent lab-to-lab reproducibility. Also, volume fraction of ferrite conversions from the FN measured by the Feritescope{reg_sign} were similar to volume fraction of ferrite measured per ASTM E562. In the ASTM A923 applicability to cast DSS study, 8 different heat treatments were performed on 3 lots of ASTM A890-4A (CD3MN) castings and 1 lot of 2205 wrought DSS. The heat treatments were selected to produce a wide range of cooling rates and hold times in order to study the suitability of ASTM A923 to the response of varying amounts on intermetallic phases [117]. The test parameters were identical to those used to develop ASTM A923 for wrought DSS. Charpy V-notch impact samples were extracted from the

  18. Final Report, Volume 2, The Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Duplex Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Steven, W.; Lundin, Carl, W.

    2005-09-30

    The scope of testing cast Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) required testing to several ASTM specifications, while formulating and conducting industry round robin tests to verify and study the reproducibility of the results. ASTM E562 (Standard Test Method for Determining Volume Fraction by Systematic manual Point Count) and ASTM A923 (Standard Test Methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Wrought Duplex Austenitic/Ferritic Stainless Steels) were the specifications utilized in conducting this work. An ASTM E562 industry round robin, ASTM A923 applicability study, ASTM A923 industry round robin, and an ASTM A923 study of the effectiveness of existing foundry solution annealing procedures for producing cast DSS without intermetallic phases were implemented. In the ASTM E562 study, 5 samples were extracted from various cast austenitic and DSS in order to have varying amounts of ferrite. Each sample was metallographically prepared by UT and sent to each of 8 participants for volume fraction of ferrite measurements. Volume fraction of ferrite was measured using manual point count per ASTM E562. FN was measured from the Feritescope® and converted to volume fraction of ferrite. Results indicate that ASTM E562 is applicable to DSS and the results have excellent lab-to-lab reproducibility. Also, volume fraction of ferrite conversions from the FN measured by the Feritescope® were similar to volume fraction of ferrite measured per ASTM E562. In the ASTM A923 applicability to cast DSS study, 8 different heat treatments were performed on 3 lots of ASTM A890-4A (CD3MN) castings and 1 lot of 2205 wrought DSS. The heat treatments were selected to produce a wide range of cooling rates and hold times in order to study the suitability of ASTM A923 to the response of varying amounts on intermetallic phases [117]. The test parameters were identical to those used to develop ASTM A923 for wrought DSS. Charpy V-notch impact samples were extracted from the castings and wrought

  19. Grid-connected ICES: preliminary feasibility analysis and evaluation. Volume 3. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-06-30

    Maps, charts, and drawings of the Demonstration Community for the grid-connected ICES project composed of the medical complex in New Orleans (HEAL) are presented in Appendix A. The physical profile of the existing buildings and site plans is included. Demand profiles for steam, electric, gas, etc. are presented in Appendix B with extensive tables and graphs. Air quality and noise pollution data are presented in Appendix C. Data on financing in Appendix D are presented and also texts and information on revenue bonds are given. The final appendix gives qualifications for personnel for HEAL; NOSPI; de Laureal Engineers, Inc.; and Orr-Schelen-Mayeron and Associates, Inc.

  20. Evaluation of solar radiation measurement systems: EPRI/NREL final test report. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoffel, T; Riordan, C; Bigger, J

    1992-11-01

    Measured solar radiation resource data are needed by electric utilities to evaluate the potential of renewable energy options like photovoltaics in their service territory. In this final test report, we document a cooperative project of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to compare available measurement system options for performing solar radiation resource assessments. We present the detailed results of a 6-month field comparison of thermopile-based pyranometer and pyrheliometer solar irradiance measurement systems with two different implementations of the rotating shadowband radiometer (RSR) concept installed at NREL`s Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) in Golden, Colorado.

  1. Solar/hydrogen systems for the 1985 to 2000 time frame. Volume I. Solar/hydrogen systems assessment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, R. W.; Tison, R. R.; Escher, W. J.D.; Hanson, J. A.

    1980-06-01

    The findings of a study of opportunities for commercialization of systems capable of producing hydrogen from solar energy are presented in two volumes. A compendium of monographs by specialists in the fields of solar energy conversion technologies, hydrogen production technologies and related technology descriptions from the general literature comprise Volume II. This data base was used to support an evaluation and selection process that identified four candidate solar/hydrogen systems best suited to commercialization within the next two decades. Volume I first reviews the background of the work and the methods used. Then an evaluation of the hydrogen product costs that might be achieved by the four selected candidate systems (photovoltaic/water electrolysis, thermal-heat engine/water electrolysis, wind energy/water electrolysis, small hydrogen/water electrolysis) is compared with the pricing structure and practices of the commodity gas market. Subsequently, product cost and market price match is noted to exist in the small user sector of the hydrogen marketplace. Barriers to and historical time lags in, commercialization of new technologies are then reviewed. Finally, recommendations for development and demonstration programs designed to accelerate the commercialization of the candidate systems are presented.

  2. Demonstration, testing, & evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Draft final report, Volume II: Appendices A to E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Saboto, W.

    1996-02-12

    This document is a draft final report for US DOE contract entitled, {open_quotes}Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,{close_quotes} Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report This document is Volume II, containing appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cu. yd. of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOCs and other organic chemicals boiling up to 120{degrees}to 130{degrees}C in the vadose zone. Although it may applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by low air flow.

  3. Demonstration, testing, and evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Final report, Volume 2, Appendices A to E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Sabato, W.

    1996-04-05

    This is a final report presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cubic yards of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. It was demonstrated that the mass flow rate of the volatile organic chemicals was enhanced in the recovered soil gas as a result of heating. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOC`s and other organic chemicals. Although it may be applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by air flow.

  4. Natural Propagation and Habitat improvement, Volume 2B, Washington, Similkameen River Habitat Inventory, 1983 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown Author

    1984-04-01

    During the summer low flow period, a habitat assessment of the Similkameen, Tulameen, Ashnola and Pasayten rivers in British Columbia and Washington State was conducted between August 10 and October 10, 1983. The biophysical survey assessed 400 km (250 mi) of stream at 77 stations. Fish sampling was conducted at each station to assess the resident fish populations and standing crop. Rainbow trout populations and standing crops were found to be very low. Large populations of mountain whitefish and bridgelip suckers were present in the manstem Similkameen River below Similkameen Falls. High densities of sculpins and longnose dace were found throughout the system except for sculpins above the falls, where none were captured. Approximately 961,000 m/sup 2/ (1,150,000 yd/sup 2/) of spawnable area for steelhead trout were estimated for the entire system which could accommodate 98,000 spawners. Nearly 367,000 m/sup 2/ (439,000 yd/sup 2/) of chinook salmon spawnable area was also estimated, capable of accommodating 55,000 chinook. Rearing area for steelhead trout smolts was estimated for the whole system at 1.8 million m/sup 2/ (2.2 million yd/sup 2/). Chinook salmon smolt rearing area was estimated at 700,000 m/sup 2/ (837,000 yd/sup 2/). Rearing area was found to be a limiting factor to anadromous production in a Similkameen River system. Smolt production from the system was estimated 610,000 steelhead trout and between 1.6 million and 4.8 million chinook salmon. No water quality, temperature or flow problems for anadromous salmonids were evident from the available data and the habitat inventory. In addition to an impassable falls on the Tulameen River at river mile 32.5, only two other areas of difficult passage exist in the system, Similkameen Falls (a series of chutes) and the steep, narrow lower section of the Ashnola River. 51 references, 18 figures, 25 tables.

  5. Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 4 (Appendix IV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

    1998-08-01

    This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 4 contains the following appendix sections: Radiative heat transfer properties for black liquor combustion -- Facilities and techniques and Spectral absorbance and emittance data; and Radiate heat transfer determination of the optical constants of ash samples from kraft recovery boilers -- Calculation procedure; Computation program; Density determination; Particle diameter determination; Optical constant data; and Uncertainty analysis.

  6. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands: Volume 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1997-11-26

    The program is composed of 20 projects, of which 17 are laboratory bench or laboratory pilot scale processes or computer process simulations that are performed in existing facilities on the University of Utah campus in north-east Salt Lake City. These tasks are: (1) coupled fluidized-bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; (2) water-based recovery of bitumen; (3) oil sand pyrolysis in a continuous rotary kiln reactor; (4) oil sand pyrolysis in a large diameter fluidized bed reactor; (5) oil sand pyrolysis in a small diameter fluidized bed reactor; (6) combustion of spent sand in a transport reactor; (7) recovery and upgrading of oil sand bitumen using solvent extraction methods; (8) fixed-bed hydrotreating of Uinta Basin bitumens and bitumen-derived hydrocarbon liquids; (9) ebullieted bed hydrotreating of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; (10) bitumen upgrading by hydropyrolysis; (11) evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high-energy jet fuels and other specialty products; (12) characterization of the bitumens and reservoir rocks from the Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (13) bitumen upgrading pilot plant recommendations; (14) liquid-solid separation and fine tailings thickening; (15) in-situ production of heavy oil from Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (16) oil sand research and development group analytical facility; and (17) process economics. This volume contains an executive summary and reports for five of these projects. 137 figs., 49 tabs.

  7. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands: Volume 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1997-11-26

    The program is composed of 20 projects, of which 17 are laboratory bench or laboratory pilot scale processes or computer process simulations that are performed in existing facilities on the University of Utah campus in north-east Salt Lake City. These tasks are: (1) coupled fluidized-bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; (2) water-based recovery of bitumen; (3) oil sand pyrolysis in a continuous rotary kiln reactor; (4) oil sand pyrolysis in a large diameter fluidized bed reactor; (5) oil sand pyrolysis in a small diameter fluidized bed reactor; (6) combustion of spent sand in a transport reactor; (7) recovery and upgrading of oil sand bitumen using solvent extraction methods; (8) fixed-bed hydrotreating of Uinta Basin bitumens and bitumen-derived hydrocarbon liquids; (9) ebullieted bed hydrotreating of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; (10) bitumen upgrading by hydropyrolysis; (11) evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high-energy jet fuels and other specialty products; (12) characterization of the bitumens and reservoir rocks from the Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (13) bitumen upgrading pilot plant recommendations; (14) liquid-solid separation and fine tailings thickening; (15) in-situ production of heavy oil from Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (16) oil sand research and development group analytical facility; and (17) process economics. This volume contains reports on nine of these projects, references, and a bibliography. 351 refs., 192 figs., 65 tabs.

  8. Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB) Program: Phase I, Volume II. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    This Volume II of Phase I of the Energy Economic Data Base Program contains appendices. Appendix A-1 provides the site and environmental data, derived from Appendix A of Guide for Economic Evaluation of Nuclear Reactor Plant Designs, USAEC Report NUS-531, modified to reflect current requirements. These data form the bases of the criteria used for designing the facility and for evaluating the routine and accidental release of radioactive liquids and gases to the environment. Appendix A-2 provides the site and environmental data as derived from Appendix A of NUS-531, and modified to reflect coal-plant siting, forming the bases of the criteria used for designing the facility and for evaluating the release of liquids and gases to the environment. A description of the topography of the hypothetical city, Middletown, is given. Appendix B provides an overall summary of the conclusions of NUS' work on all NUS tasks in support of the nuclear fuel-cycle work in Phase I. Appendix C-1 introduces the concepts involved and addresses methods of calculation of fixed charges applicable to investor-owned utilities, as used in the EEDB. Appendix C-2 consists of review and revision of each plant's fuel cycle and operating and maintenance costs in accordance with the EEDB update procedures. In Appendix D, NSSS Capital Costs for a Mature LMFBR Industry, much information is provided on plant description, cost estimate, comparison and discussion, drawings, and equipment list. (MCW)

  9. Hot-gas filter manufacturing assessments: Volume 5. Final report, April 15, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boss, D.E.

    1997-12-31

    The development of advanced filtration media for advanced fossil-fueled power generating systems is a critical step in meeting the performance and emissions requirements for these systems. While porous metal and ceramic candle-filters have been available for some time, the next generation of filters will include ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs), intermetallic alloys, and alternate filter geometries. The goal of this effort was to perform a cursory review of the manufacturing processes used by 5 companies developing advanced filters from the perspective of process repeatability and the ability for their processes to be scale-up to production volumes. It was found that all of the filter manufacturers had a solid understanding of the product development path. Given that these filters are largely developmental, significant additional work is necessary to understand the process-performance relationships and projecting manufacturing costs. While each organization had specific needs, some common among all of the filter manufacturers were access to performance testing of the filters to aide process/product development, a better understanding of the stresses the filters will see in service for use in structural design of the components, and a strong process sensitivity study to allow optimization of processing.

  10. Effect of burial depth on seismic signals. Volume I. Final report 1976-1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perl, N.; Thomas, F.J.; Trulio, J.; Woodie, W.L.

    1979-05-01

    This report discusses a calculational program aimed at improving the U.S. capability to verify a Threshold Test Ban Treaty (TTBT) by seismic means. The analysis emphasizes shallow bursts, examining both body-wave and surface-wave effects. Two-dimensional inelastic source calculations, using Applied Theory's AFTON program, were made on a representative set of 150 KT explosions. Simple elastic theory is reviewed, indicating the primary body wave from a buried explosion receives positive or negative reinforcement from the free-surface reflection. The more refined calculations, which include inelastic and gravitational effects, indicate a 'reflection' amplitude smaller than that calculated for the elastic case. More important, the reflected wave is relatively delayed in time, so that transitions between positive and negative reinforcement occur at shallower depths of burial. A surface-wave model is developed, based on Green's function. Many problems were encountered in modifying the AFTON source-data program to provide information that was accurate for long-period displacements, and to extrapolate calculations well beyond the reasonable truncation times for the program. Preliminary conclusions are made concerning the need for inelastic source calculations; depth-of-burial effects on signal generation; the resulting yield estimation; possible improved yield estimation procedures; and topographic effects. Volume I presents summaries of the body-wave and surface-wave calculations to date.

  11. Recovery Efficiency Test Project Phase 2 activity report, Volume 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of Phase II operations of the Recovery Efficiency Test Project is to enhance the natural production of the well and evaluate the relative improvement as a function of the type of stimulation conducted. Another purpose is to compare the stimulated production performance of the horizontal well with vertical wells in the field. The objectives considered for Phase II operations and plans were: (1) Develop a rationale for a systematic approach to designing stimulations for the well. (2) Conduct a series of stimulations designed to optimize the fluids, injection rates, proppant volumes and general approach to stimulating a horizontal well with similar geologic conditions. (3) Develop and test a method or methods for determining the geometry of stimulation-induced fractures. (4) Conduct tests and analyze the results to determine the efficiency of stimulation operations. The technical approach pursued in developing plans to accomplish three objectives was to: (1) Review the data needs for all objectives and obtain that data first. (2) Identify the operating geologic, geomechanical, and reservoir parameters that need additional clarification or definition. (3) Investigate existing models which could be used to plan or evaluate stimulation on the well and the reservoir. (4) Plan for analysis and verification of models and approaches.

  12. Feasibility evaluation solar heated textile process water. Volume II. Appendices. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hester, J. C.; Beard, J. N.; Robinson, G. F.; Harnett, R. M.

    1977-02-01

    The general objectives of this study are to determine the technical and economic feasibility of the use of solar energy for heating waters in the textile industry and to develop a plan for efforts beyond this feasibility study phase. Specific objectives include (1) determine the industry requirements for heated process water, (2) assess particular schemes and their economic impact, (3) study the total cost environment for solar water heating in this industry, and (4) recommend future experiments. This volume contains the appendices: (A) fiber distribution and end use data; (B) computer model description for textile plant energy balances; (C) computer model description to generate local solar potential; (D) computer model description for system synthesis and analysis; (E) computer model to determine pressure drop, flow distribution and plumbing components; (F) area requirement plots for various use rates, temperature levels, seasons, orientations and collector types for textile operations; (G) computer model description of economic variables for COSMO1 and COSMO2; (H) rate of return plots for various textile applications and energy cost scenerios; and (I) data base for efficiency curves for six collector types. (WHK)

  13. Final environmental impact statement. Management of commercially generated radioactive waste. Volume 2. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    This EIS analyzes the significant environmental impacts that could occur if various technologies for management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes from commercial nuclear power reactors were to be developed and implemented. This EIS will serve as the environmental input for the decision on which technology, or technologies, will be emphasized in further research and development activities in the commercial waste management program. The action proposed in this EIS is to (1) adopt a national strategy to develop mined geologic repositories for disposal of commercially generated high-level and transuranic radioactive waste (while continuing to examine subseabed and very deep hole disposal as potential backup technologies) and (2) conduct a R and D program to develop such facilities and the necessary technology to ensure the safe long-term containment and isolation of these wastes. The Department has considered in this statement: development of conventionally mined deep geologic repositories for disposal of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors and/or radioactive fuel reprocessing wastes; balanced development of several alternative disposal methods; and no waste disposal action. This volume contains appendices of supplementary data on waste management systems, geologic disposal, radiological standards, radiation dose calculation models, related health effects, baseline ecology, socio-economic conditions, hazard indices, comparison of defense and commercial wastes, design considerations, and wastes from thorium-based fuel cycle alternatives. (DMC)

  14. LIFAC sorbent injection desulfurization demonstration project. Final report, volume II: Project performance and economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    This publication discusses the demonstration of the LIFAC sorbent injection technology at Richmond Power and Light`s Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2, performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Program. LIFAC is a sorbent injection technology capable of removing 75 to 85 percent of a power plant`s SO{sub 2} emissions using limestone at calcium to sulfur molar ratios of between 2 and 2.5 to 1. The site of the demonstration is a coal-fired electric utility power plant located in Richmond, Indiana. The project is being conducted by LIFAC North America (LIFAC NA), a joint venture partnership of Tampella Power Corporation and ICF Kaiser Engineers, in cooperation with DOE, RP&L, and Research Institute (EPRI), the State of Indiana, and Black Beauty Coal Company. The purpose of Public Design Report Volume 2: Project Performance and Economics is to consolidate, for public use, the technical efficiency and economy of the LIFAC Process. The report has been prepared pursuant to the Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC22-90PC90548 between LIFAC NA and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  15. Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments. Supplemental Volume 2a, Sources and documentation appendices. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    This large document provides a catalog of the location of large numbers of reports pertaining to the charge of the Presidential Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Research and is arranged as a series of appendices. Titles of the appendices are Appendix A- Records at the Washington National Records Center Reviewed in Whole or Part by DoD Personnel or Advisory Committee Staff; Appendix B- Brief Descriptions of Records Accessions in the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments (ACHRE) Research Document Collection; Appendix C- Bibliography of Secondary Sources Used by ACHRE; Appendix D- Brief Descriptions of Human Radiation Experiments Identified by ACHRE, and Indexes; Appendix E- Documents Cited in the ACHRE Final Report and other Separately Described Materials from the ACHRE Document Collection; Appendix F- Schedule of Advisory Committee Meetings and Meeting Documentation; and Appendix G- Technology Note.

  16. Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-01-01

    Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723). DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 1500–1508), and DOE’s NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations: Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOE’s Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

  17. Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Volume1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-01-01

    Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723).DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 1500–1508), and DOE’s NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations:Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho;Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOE’s Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

  18. Alligator rivers analogue project. Final report; volume 1; summary of findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duerden, P.; Lever, D.A.; Sverjensky, D.A.; Townley, L.R

    1992-07-01

    The Koongarra uranium ore deposit is located in the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory of Australia. Many of the processes that have controlled the development of this natural system are relevant to the performance assessment of radioactive waste repositories. An agreement was reached in 1987 by a number of agencies concerned with radioactive waste disposal to set up the International Alligator Rivers Analogue Project (ARAP) to study relevant aspects of the hydrological and geochemical evolution of the site. The Project ran for five years. The aims of the study were: to contribute to the production of reliable and realistic models for radionuclide migration within geological environments relevant to the assessment of the safety of radioactive waste repositories; to develop methods of validation of models using a combination of laboratory and field data associated with the Koongarra uranium deposit; and to encourage maximum interaction between modellers and experimentalists in achieving these objectives. It was anticipated that the substantial databases generated in the field and laboratory studies would then be used to develop and test geochemical and radionuclide transport models. The findings from the technical studies are discussed in the context of assessments of the long-term performance of geological repositories for radioactive wastes, which are being undertaken in many countries. They are also considered in an integrated 'Scenario Development' approach, aimed to understand the formation of the ore deposit. Despite their inherent uncertainties, the findings provide a basis for assessing the way in which radionuclides will migrate in environments with a variety of geologic settings and over a range of different geologic timescales. This summary report, which highlights the work and findings of the Alligator Rivers Analogue Project is one of a series of 16 volumes.

  19. ASEAN-USAID Buildings Energy Conservation Project. Final report, Volume 3: Audits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewen, J.M.; Levine, M.D.; Busch, J.F. [eds.

    1992-06-01

    The auditing subproject of the ASEAN-USAID Buildings Energy Conservation Project has generated a great deal of auditing activity throughout the ASEAN region. Basic building characterisfic and energy consumption data were gathered for over 200 buildings and are presented in this volume. A large number of buildings were given more detailed audits and were modeled with either the ASEAM-2 computer program or the more complex DOE-2 program. These models were used to calculate the savings to be generated by conservabon measures. Specially audits were also conducted, including lighting and thermal comfort surveys. Many researchers in the ASEAN region were trained to perform energy audits in a series of training courses and seminars. The electricity intensifies of various types of ASEAN buildings have been calculated. A comparison to the electricity intensity of the US building stock tentatively concludes that ASEAN office buildings are comparable, first class hotels and retail stores are more ewctricity intensive than their US counterparts, and hospitals are less intensive. Philippine and Singapore lighting surveys indicate that illuminance levels in offices tend to be below the minimum accepted standard. Computer simulations of the energy use in various building types generally agree that for most ASEAN buildings, electricity consumption for air-conditioning (including fan power) consumes approximately 60% of total building electricity. A review of the many studies made during the Project to calculate the savings from energy conservation opportunities (ECOS) shows a median potential savings of approximately 10%, with some buildings saving as much as 50%. Singapore buildings, apparently as a result of previously implemented efficient energy-use practices, shows a lower potential for savings than the other ASEAN nations. Air-conditioning ECOs hold the greatest potential for savings.

  20. Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 2, Appendices A-C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

    1999-07-01

    In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west. The major deliverables for the project are listed. From August 1995 through October 1996, NW, GSMNP, and ORNL staff interacted with Federal Highway Administration staff to develop a conceptual design plan for Section 8B with the intent of protecting critical resources identified during the ER process to the extent possible. In addition, ORNL arranged for bioengineering experts to discuss techniques that might be employed on Section 8B with NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff during September 1996. For the purposes of this EN there are two basic alternatives under consideration: (1) a build alternative and (2) a no-build alternative. Within the build alternative are a number of options including constructing Section 8B with no interchanges, constricting Section 8B with an interchange at SR 416 or U.S. 321, constructing Section 8B with a spur road on Webb Mountain, and considering operation of Section 8B both before and after the operation of Section 8C. The no-build alternative is considered the no-action alternative and is not to construct Section 8B. This volume of the ER, which consists of Appendices A, B, and C, assesses the potential geologic impacts of the proposed Section 8B construction, presents the results of the Section 8B soil survey, and describes the water quality studies and analyses performed for the ER. The following summary sections provide information for geology, soils, and water quality.

  1. Anaerobic fermentation of agricultural residue: potential for improvement and implementation. Final report, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jewell, W. J.; Dell' orto, S.; Fanfoni, K. J.; Hayes, T. D.; Leuschner, A. P.; Sherman, D. F.

    1980-04-01

    Earlier studies have shown that although large quantities of agricultural residues are generated on small farms, it was difficult to economically justify use of conventional anaerobic digestion technology, such as used for sewage sludge digestion. A simple, unmixed, earthen-supported structure appeared to be capable of producing significant quantities of biogas at a cost that would make it competitive with many existing fuels. The goal of this study was to define and demonstrate a methane fermentation technology that could be practical and economically feasible on small farms. This study provides the first long term, large scale (reactor volumes of 34 m/sup 3/) parallel testing of the major theory, design, construction, and operation of a low cost approach to animal manure fermentation as compared to the more costly and complex designs. The main objectives were to define the lower limits for successful fermentor operation in terms of mixing, insulation, temperature, feed rate, and management requirements in a cold climate with both pilot scale and full scale fermentors. Over a period of four years, innovative fermentation processes for animal manures were developed from theoretical concept to successful full scale demonstration. Reactors were sized for 50 to 65 dairy animals, or for the one-family dairy size. The results show that a small farm biogas generation system that should be widely applicable and economically feasible was operated successfully for nearly two years. Although this low cost system out-performed the completely mixed unit throughout the study, perhaps the greatest advantage of this approach is its ease of modification, operation, and maintenance.

  2. Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume 2, Idaho, 1984 Final and Annual Reports.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hair, Don

    1986-01-01

    In 1984, and under the auspices of the Northwest Power Planning Council, the Clear-water National Forest and the Bonneville Power Administration entered into a contractual agreement to improve anadromous fish habitat in Lolo Creek. This was to be the second and final year of instream enhancement work in Lolo Creek, a major tributary to the Clearwater River. The project was again entitled Lolo Creek Habitat Improvement (No.84-6) which was scheduled from April 1, 1984, through March 31, 1985. Project costs were not to exceed $39,109. The following report is a description of the project objectives, methodology, results, and conclusions of this year's work, based on the knowledge and experience gained through 2 years of enhancement work. The primary objective was to partially mitigate the juvenile and adult anadromous fish losses accrued through hydroelectric development in the Columbia and Snake River systems by enhancing the spawning and rearing habitats of selected Clearwater River tributaries for spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead trout. The enhancement was designed to ameliorate the ''limiting production factors'' by the in-stream placement of habitat structures that would positively alter the pool-riffle structure and increase the quality of over-winter habitat.

  3. Development of flame retardant PV module encapsulants: Volume 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galica, J.P.

    1998-06-01

    This Phase 1 final report covers the work performed by Springborn Testing and Research, Inc., for the period October 1, 1997 to June 30, 1998 under the Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement Number DE-FC36-97GO10255, entitled Development of Flame Retardant PV Module Encapsulants. While use of roof-mounted arrays has always been an attractive means of deploying PV, only within recent years have such building integrated concepts (BIPV) found renewed interest among module makers and end-users. Prior to building integrated and rooftop applications, flammability requirements for modules have not been a great industry concern. However, with growing interest in BIPV and the requirement for building code requirements for commercial and industrial structures, flammability issues have become a barrier to entry for many module constructions into this potentially huge domestic market for PV. The overall goal of the 3 phase PV BONUS two project is to develop and commercialize a line of fire retardant encapsulation materials to serve the emerging building integrated and building mounted PV market. The objectives of the Phase 1 effort are limited to concept development and business planning activities.

  4. Seismic hazard methodology for the Central and Eastern United States. Volume 1: methodology. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, R.K.; Veneziano, D.; Toro, G.; O' Hara, T.; Drake, L.; Patwardhan, A.; Kulkarni, R.; Kenney, R.; Winkler, R.; Coppersmith, K.

    1986-07-01

    A methodology to estimate the hazard of earthquake ground motion at a site has been developed. The methodology consists of systematic procedures to characterize earthquake sources, the seismicity parameters of those sources, and functions for the attenuation of seismic energy, incorporating multiple input interpretations by earth scientists. Uncertainties reflecting permissible alternative inperpretations are quantified by use of probability logic trees and are propagated through the hazard results. The methodology is flexible and permits, for example, interpretations of seismic sources that are consistent with earth-science practice in the need to depict complexity and to accommodate alternative hypotheses. This flexibility is achieved by means of a tectonic framework interpretation from which alternative seismic sources are derived. To estimate rates of earthquake recurrence, maximum use is made of the historical earthquake database in establishing a uniform measure of earthquake size, in identifying independent events, and in detemining the completeness of the earthquake record in time, space, and magnitude. Procedures developed as part of the methodology permit relaxation of the usual assumption of homogeneous seismicity within a source and provide unbiased estimates of recurrence parameters. The methodology incorporates the Poisson-exponential earthquake recurrence model and an extensive assessment of its applicability is provided. Finally, the methodology includes procedures to aggregate hazard results from a number of separate input interpretations to obtain a best-estimate value of hazard, together with its uncertainty, at a site.

  5. Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 3, Appendix D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

    1999-07-01

    In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west. The major deliverables for the project are listed. From August 1995 through October 1996, NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff interacted with Federal Highway Administration staff to develop a conceptual design plan for Section 8B with the intent of protecting critical resources identified during the ER process to the extent possible. In addition, ORNL arranged for bioengineering experts to discuss techniques that might be employed on Section 8B with NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff during September 1996. For the purposes of this ER, there are two basic alternatives under consideration: (1) a build alternative and (2) a no-build alternative. Within the build alternative are a number of options including constructing Section 8B with no interchanges, constructing Section 8B with an interchange at SR416 or U.S. 321, constructing Section 8B with a spur road on Webb Mountain, and considering operation of Section 8B both before and after the operation of Section 8C. The no-build alternative is considered the no-action alternative and is not to construct Section 8B. This volume of the ER inventories the fishes and benthic macroinvertebrates inhabiting the aquatic ecosystems potentially affected by the proposed construction of Section 8B. Stream biological surveys were completed at 31 stream sites during the Fall of 1994. The sampling strategy for both invertebrates and fish was to survey the different taxa from all available habitats. For benthic invertebrates, a standardized qualitative manual collection technique was employed for all 31 stations. For fish

  6. Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 4, Appendices E-I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

    1999-07-01

    In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west. The major deliverables for the project are listed. From August 1995 through October 1996, NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff interacted with Federal Highway Administration staff to develop a conceptual design plan for Section 8B with the intent of protecting critical, resources identified during the ER process to the extent possible. In addition, ORNL arranged for bioengineering experts to discuss techniques that might be employed on Section 8B with NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff during September 1996. For the purposes of this ER, there are two basic alternatives under consideration: (1) a build alternative and (2) a no-build alternative. Within the build alternative are a number of options including constructing Section 8B with no interchanges, constructing Section 8B with an interchange at SR 416 or U.S. 321, constructing Section 8B with a spur road on Webb Mountain, and considering operation of Section 8B both before and after the operation of Section 8C. The no-build alternative is considered the no-action alternative and is not to construct Section 8B. This volume of the ER consists of Appendices E through I (all ecological survey reports), which are summarized individually in the sections that follow. The following conclusions result from the completion of these surveys and the ER impact analysis: (1) Forest clearing should be limited as much as possible; (2) Disturbed areas should be replanted with native trees; (3) Drainages should be bridged rather than leveled with cut and fill; (4) For areas of steep slopes and potential erosion

  7. Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 6, Appendix N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

    1999-07-01

    In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west. The major deliverables for the project are listed. From August 1995 through October 1996, NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff interacted with Federal Highway Administration staff to develop a conceptual design plan for Section 8B with the intent of protecting critical resources identified during the ER process to the extent possible. In addition, ORNL arranged for bioengineering experts to discuss techniques that might be employed on Section 8B with NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff during September 1996. For the purposes of this ER, there are two basic alternatives under consideration: (1) a build alternative and (2) a no-build alternative. Within the build alternative are a number of options including constructing Section 8B with no interchanges, constructing Section 8B with an interchange at SR 416 or U.S. 321, constructing Section 8B with a spur road on Webb Mountain, and considering operation of Section 8B both before and after the operation of Section 8C. The no-build alternative is considered the no-action alternative and is not to construct Section 8B. This volume of the ER documents the results of the architectural, historical, and cultural resources assessment for the entire Section 8B ROW that was completed in May 1995 to document the architectural, historical, and cultural resources located within the project area. The assessment included evaluation of the potential for cultural (i.e., rural historic) landscapes in the area of the ROW. The assessment showed that one National Register-listed property is located 0.3 mile south of the ROW

  8. Final report from VFL Technologies for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils. LEFPC appendices. Volume 5. Appendix V-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    This final report from VFL Technologies for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils dated September 1994 contains LEFPC Appendices, Volume 5, Appendix V - D. This appendix includes the final verification run data package (PAH, TCLP herbicides, TCLP pesticides).

  9. Revised data book for evaluation of combustion and gasification models: Final report, Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, K.R.; Rasband, M.W.; Smoot, L.D.

    1987-10-01

    During the previous contract (DE-AC21-81MC16518) a major task was to identify, collect and publish detailed experimental data for evaluation of comprehensive gasification/combustion codes. A review of the literature was completed and prospective data were identified for inclusion in this data book in five categories of increasing complexity: (1) non-reacting, gaseous flows (58 cases); (2) non-reacting, particle-laden flows (43 cases); (3) gaseous combustion (34 cases); (4) pulverized coal combustion (57 cases); (5) entrained coal gasification (6 cases). Selection of these data was based on a set of criteria which included data completeness, availability of detailed, digital profiles for several properties (e.g., species concentrations, velocity, temperature) and data accuracy. From these 198 cases, which were referenced in the final report (Vol. III), the data base was reduced to a total of 35 sets of data from 8 laboratories, with at least 3 cases in each category above. For these 35 cases, the measured data, together with geometrical dimensions and test conditions were documented in a uniform tabular format. These data were also stored on a magnetic tape for distribution. During this follow-on contract (DE-AC21-85MC22059), the accuracy of the data was checked and several additional corrections were made. The format for reporting the data (Appendix B) was simplified. Also, a review of additional data sets available from the Combustion Laboratory and other sources was completed. In all, 213 cases from 52 investigators at 18 laboratories were considered and 37 cases are included in this data book from 22 different investigations at 8 independent laboratories. 81 refs.

  10. Final cost reduction study for the Geysers Recharge Alternative. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether or not cost reduction opportunities exist for the Geysers Recharge Alternative as defined in the Santa Rosa Subregional Long-Term Wastewater Project EIR/EIS. The City of Santa Rosa has been directed to have a plan for reclaimed water disposal in place by 1999 which will meet future capacity needs under all weather conditions. A Draft EIR/EIS released in July 1996 and a Final EIR certified in June 1997 examine four primary alternatives plus the No Action Alternative. Two of the primary alternatives involve agricultural irrigation with reclaimed water, either in western or southern Sonoma County. Another involves increased discharge of reclaimed water into the Russian River. The fourth involves using reclaimed water to replenish the geothermal reservoir at the Geysers. The addition of this water source would enable the Geysers operators to produce more steam from the geothermal area and thereby prolong the life and economic production level of the steamfield and the geothermal power plants supplied by the steamfield. This study provides additional refined cost estimates for new scenarios which utilize an alternative pipeline alignment and a range of reclaimed water flows, which deliver less water to the Geysers than proposed in the EIR/EIS (by distributing flow to other project components). Also, electrical power rates were revised to reflect the recent changes in costs associated with deregulation of the power industry. In addition, this report provides information on sources of potential public and private funding available and future environmental documentation required if the cost reduction scenarios were to be selected by the City as part of their preferred alternative.

  11. Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System, Phase I and Phase II. Volume IV. Field activities. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, C.

    1984-01-01

    This volume describes those activities which took place at the Sperry DOE Gravity Head plant site at the East Mesa Geothermal Reservoir near Holtville, California between February 1980, when site preparation was begun, and November 1982, when production well 87-6 was permanently abandoned. Construction activities were terminated in July 1981 following the liner collapse in well 87-6. Large amounts of program time manpower, materials, and funds had been diverted in a nine-month struggle to salvage the production well. Once these efforts proved futile, there was no rationale for continuing with the site work unless and until sufficient funding to duplicate well 87-6 was obtained. Activities reported here include: plant construction and pre-operational calibration and testing, drilling and completion of well 87-6, final repair effort on well 87-6, abandonment of well 87-6, and performance evaluation of well 87.6. (MHR)

  12. Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 1, Cold checkout test report, Book 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 4 discusses the following topics: Rod Compaction/Loading System Test Results and Analysis Report; Waste Collection System Test Results and Analysis Report; Waste Container Transfer Fixture Test Results and Analysis Report; Staging and Cutting Table Test Results and Analysis Report; and Upper Cutting System Test Results and Analysis Report.

  13. A transient, Hex-Z nodal code corrected by discontinuity factors. Volume 1: The transient nodal code; Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shatilla, Y.A.M.; Henry, A.F.

    1993-12-31

    This document constitutes Volume 1 of the Final Report of a three-year study supported by the special Research Grant Program for Nuclear Energy Research set up by the US Department of Energy. The original motivation for the work was to provide a fast and accurate computer program for the analysis of transients in heavy water or graphite-moderated reactors being considered as candidates for the New Production Reactor. Thus, part of the funding was by way of pass-through money from the Savannah River Laboratory. With this intent in mind, a three-dimensional (Hex-Z), general-energy-group transient, nodal code was created, programmed, and tested. In order to improve accuracy, correction terms, called {open_quotes}discontinuity factors,{close_quotes} were incorporated into the nodal equations. Ideal values of these factors force the nodal equations to provide node-integrated reaction rates and leakage rates across nodal surfaces that match exactly those edited from a more exact reference calculation. Since the exact reference solution is needed to compute the ideal discontinuity factors, the fact that they result in exact nodal equations would be of little practical interest were it not that approximate discontinuity factors, found at a greatly reduced cost, often yield very accurate results. For example, for light-water reactors, discontinuity factors found from two-dimensional, fine-mesh, multigroup transport solutions for two-dimensional cuts of a fuel assembly provide very accurate predictions of three-dimensional, full-core power distributions. The present document (volume 1) deals primarily with the specification, programming and testing of the three-dimensional, Hex-Z computer program. The program solves both the static (eigenvalue) and transient, general-energy-group, nodal equations corrected by user-supplied discontinuity factors.

  14. SRC burn test in 700-hp oil-designed boiler. Volume 1. Integrated report. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-09-01

    This burn test program was conducted during the period of August 1982 to February 1983 to demonstrate that Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) products can displace petroleum as a boiler fuel in oil- and gas-designed boilers. The test program was performed at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). Three forms of SRC (pulverized SRC, a solution of SRC dissolved in process-derived distillates, and a slurry of SRC and water) and No. 6 Fuel Oil were evaluated in the 700-hp (30 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hour) watertube, oil-designed boiler facility at PETC. The test program was managed by the International Coal Refining Company (ICRC) and sponsored by the Department of Energy. Other organizations were involved as necessary to provide the expertise required to execute the test program. This final report represents an integrated overview of the test program conducted at PETC. More detailed information with preliminary data can be obtained from separate reports prepared by PETC, Southern Research Institute, Wheelabrator-Frye, Babcock and Wilcox, and Combustion Engineering. These are presented as Annex Volumes A-F. 25 references, 41 figures, 15 tables.

  15. LIFAC demonstration at Richmond Power and Light Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2. Final report, Volume 1 - public design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    This report discusses the demonstration of LIFAC sorbent injection technology at Richmond Power and Light`s (RP&L) Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2 under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Program. LIFAC is a sorbent injection technology capable of removing 75 to 85 percent of a power plant`s SO{sub 2} emissions using limestone at calcium to sulfur molar ratios of between 2 and 2.5. The site of the demonstration is a coal-fired electric utility power plant located in Richmond, Indiana. The project is being conducted by LIFAC North American (LIFAC NA), a joint venture partnership of Tampella Power Corporation and ICF Kaiser Engineers, in cooperation with DOE, RP&L, and several other organizations including the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the State of Indiana, and Black Beauty Coal Company. The purpose of Final Report Volume 1: Public Design is to consolidate, for public use, all design and cost information regarding the LIFAC Desulfurization Facility at the completion of construction and startup.

  16. Performance Evaluation of Advanced Retrofit Roof Technologies Using Field-Test Data Phase Three Final Report, Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Kaushik [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Childs, Phillip W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Atchley, Jerald Allen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This article presents some miscellaneous data from two low-slope and two steep-slope experimental roofs. The low-slope roofs were designed to compare the performance of various roof coatings exposed to natural weatherization. The steep-slope roofs contained different combinations of phase change material, rigid insulation, low emittance surface and above-sheathing ventilation, with standing-seam metal panels on top. The steep-slope roofs were constructed on a series of adjacent attics separated at the gables using thick foam insulation. This article describes phase three (3) of a study that began in 2009 to evaluate the energy benefits of a sustainable re-roofing technology utilizing standing-seam metal roofing panels combined with energy efficient features like above-sheathing-ventilation (ASV), phase change material (PCM) and rigid insulation board. The data from phases 1 and 2 have been previously published and reported [Kosny et al., 2011; Biswas et al., 2011; Biswas and Childs, 2012; Kosny et al., 2012]. Based on previous data analyses and discussions within the research group, additional test roofs were installed in May 2012, to test new configurations and further investigate different components of the dynamic insulation systems. Some experimental data from phase 3 testing from May 2012 to December 2013 and some EnergyPlus modeling results have been reported in volumes 1 and 3, respectively, of the final report [Biswas et al., 2014; Biswas and Bhandari, 2014].

  17. Electric and Magnetic Fields (EMF) RAPID Program Engineering Project 8: FINAL REPORT, Evaluation of Field Reduction Technologies, Volume 1 (Report) and Volume 2 (Appendices)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Commonwealth Associates, Inc.; IIT Research Institute

    1997-08-01

    This draft report consists of two volumes. Volume 1, the main body, contains an introducto~ sectionj an overview of magnetic fields sectio~ and field reduction technology evaluation section. Magnetic field reduction methods are evalpated for transmission lines, distribution Iines,sulxtations, building wiring applkmd machinery, and transportation systems. The evaluation considers effectiveness, co% and other ftiors. Volume 2 contains five appendices, Append~ A presents magnetic field shielding information. Appendices B and C present design assumptions and magnetic field plots for transmission and distribution lines, respectively. Appendices D and E present cost estimate details for transmission and distribution limes, respectively.

  18. Computer-Based Testing System. Project STEEL. A Special Project To Develop and Implement a Computer-Based Special Teacher Education and Evaluation Laboratory. Volume III. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Theodore W.; And Others

    The document is part of the final report on Project STEEL (Special Teacher Education and Evaluation Laboratory) intended to extend the utilization of technology in the training of preservice special education teachers. This volume focuses on the third of four project objectives, the development and implementation of a computer-based testing…

  19. Application analysis of solar total energy systems to the residential sector. Volume IV, market penetration. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    This volume first describes the residential consumption of energy in each of the 11 STES regions by fuel type and end-use category. The current and projected costs and availability of fossil fuels and electricity for the STES regions are reported. Projections are made concerning residential building construction and the potential market for residential STES. The effects of STES ownership options, institutional constraints, and possible government actions on market penetration potential were considered. Capital costs for two types of STES were determined, those based on organic Rankine cycle (ORC) heat engines and those based on flat plate, water-cooled photovoltaic arrays. Both types of systems utilized parabolic trough collectors. The capital cost differential between conventional and STE systems was calculated on an incremental cost per dwelling unit for comparison with projected fuel savings in the market penetration analysis. The market penetration analysis was planned in two phases, a preliminary analysis of each of the geographical regions for each of the STE systems considered; and a final, more precise analysis of those regions and systems showing promise of significant market penetration. However, the preliminary analysis revealed no geographical regions in which any of the STES considered promised to be competitive with conventional energy systems using utility services at the prices projected for future energy supplies in the residential market. Because no promising situations were found, the analysis was directed toward an examination of the parameters involved in an effort to identify those factors which make a residential STES less attractive than similar systems in the commercial and industrial areas. Results are reported. (WHK)

  20. A Grammatico-Semantic Exploration of the Problems of Sentence Formation and Interpretation in the Classroom, Volume 1. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Donald R.; Zidonis, Frank J.

    In the introduction to this volume of a two volume document (See also TE 002 131.) written for curriculum developers, Donald Bateman identifies the recent periods in the development of linguistic thought and methodology, and presents language curriculum development as the continuing exploration of the processes of evolving linguistic structures.…

  1. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume I, Part 2. Final report, September 1986--September 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. [and others

    1995-09-01

    This report describes work pertaining to the development of models for coal gasification and combustion processes. This volume, volume 1, part 2, contains research progress in the areas of large particle oxidation at high temperatures, large particle, thick-bed submodels, sulfur oxide/nitrogen oxides submodels, and comprehensive model development and evaluation.

  2. Conceptual design of advanced central receiver power systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Volume 4. Commercial and pilot plant cost data. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-03-01

    This volume of the advanced central receiver final report presents the cost data using the cost breakdown structure identified in the preliminary specification. Cost summaries are presented in the following sections for the 100-MWe and 281-MWe commercial plant and a 10-MWe pilot plant. Cost substantiation data for this volume are presented in the appendices. Other cost summary data include Nth plant data for the 100-MWe and 281-MWe commercial plants, and a summary for the alternative concept air-rock storage system. The main description of the plant costing technique occurs as part of Section II for the 100-MWe baseline concept.

  3. Conceptual design of advanced central receiver power systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Volume 4. Commercial and pilot plant cost data. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-03-01

    This volume of the advanced central receiver final report presents the cost data using the cost breakdown structure identified in the preliminary specification. Cost summaries are presented in the following sections for the 100-MWe and 281-MWe commercial plant and a 10-MWe pilot plant. Cost substantiation data for this volume are presented in the appendices. Other cost summary data include Nth plant data for the 100-MWe and 281-MWe commercial plants, and a summary for the alternative concept air-rock storage system. The main description of the plant costing technique occurs as part of Section II for the 100-MWe baseline concept.

  4. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP), Slick Rock, Colorado, Revision 1. Volume 1, Calculations, Final design for construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    Volume one contains calculations for: embankment design--embankment material properties; Union Carbide site--bedrock contours; vicinity properties--origin of contamination; North Continent and Union Carbide sites contaminated materials--excavation quantities; and demolition debris--quantity estimate.

  5. Final EIS for the Proposed Homeporting of Additional Surface Ships at Naval Station, Mayport, FL. Volume 1. Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-21

    and the native population’s transition from nomadic, big game subsistence/settlement patterns to a more sedentary lifestyle residing along the...Dental Clinic, Chapel, Child Development Center, and NAVSTA Mayport Family Housing. Final EIS for the Proposed Homeporting of Additional Surface Ships...for the more coastal lifestyle (Brockington & Associates 1998, Hardy Heck Moore Inc. 2001). The Late Archaic sub-period underwent another climate

  6. TVA coal-gasification commercial demonstration plant project. Volume 5. Plant based on Koppers-Totzek gasifier. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-11-01

    This volume presents a technical description of a coal gasification plant, based on Koppers-Totzek gasifiers, producing a medium Btu fuel gas product. Foster Wheeler carried out a conceptual design and cost estimate of a nominal 20,000 TPSD plant based on TVA design criteria and information supplied by Krupp-Koppers concerning the Koppers-Totzek coal gasification process. Technical description of the design is given in this volume.

  7. Coal conversion and biomass conversion: Volume 1: Final report on USAID (Agency for International Development)/GOI (Government of India) Alternate Energy Resources and Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, A.; Saluja, J.

    1987-06-30

    The United States Agency for International Development (AID), in joint collaboration with the Government of India (GOI), supported a research and development program in Alternate Energy Resources during the period March 1983 to June 1987. The primary emphasis of this program was to develop new and advanced coal and biomass conversion technologies for the efficient utilization of coal and biomass feedstocks in India. This final ''summary'' report is divided into two volumes. This Report, Volume I, covers the program overview and coal projects and Volume II summarizes the accomplishments of the biomass projects. The six projects selected in the area of coal were: Evaluation of the Freeboard Performance in a Fluidized-Bed Combustor; Scale-up of AFBC boilers; Rheology, Stability and Combustion of Coal-Water Slurries; Beneficiation of Fine Coal in Dense Medium Cyclones; Hot Gas Cleanup and Separation; and Cold Gas Cleanup and Separation.

  8. Methodologies for Assessing the Cumulative Environmental Effects of Hydroelectric Development of Fish and Wildlife in the Columbia River Basin, Volume 1, Recommendations, 1987 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stull, Elizabeth Ann

    1987-07-01

    This volume is the first of a two-part set addressing methods for assessing the cumulative effects of hydropower development on fish and wildlife in the Columbia River Basin. Species and habitats potentially affected by cumulative impacts are identified for the basin, and the most significant effects of hydropower development are presented. Then, current methods for measuring and assessing single-project effects are reviewed, followed by a review of methodologies with potential for use in assessing the cumulative effects associated with multiple projects. Finally, two new approaches for cumulative effects assessment are discussed in detail. Overall, this report identifies and reviews the concepts, factors, and methods necessary for understanding and conducting a cumulative effects assessment in the Columbia River Basin. Volume 2 will present a detailed procedural handbook for performing a cumulative assessment using the integrated tabular methodology introduced in this volume. 308 refs., 18 figs., 10 tabs.

  9. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP), Slick Rock, Colorado, Revision 1, Volume 3. Calculations, Final design for construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    Volume three contains calculations for: site hydrology--rainfall intensity, duration, and frequency relations; site hydrology-- probable maximum precipitation; erosion protection--rock quality evaluation; erosion protection--embankment top and side slope; erosion protection--embankment toe apron; erosion protection-- gradations and layer thicknesses; Union Carbide site--temporary drainage ditch design; Union Carbide site--retention basin sediment volume; Union Carbide site--retention basin sizing; Burro Canyon site temporary drainage--temporary drainage facilities; and Union Carbide site temporary drainage--water balance.

  10. Solar/hydrogen systems technologies. Volume II (Part 1 of 2). Solar/hydrogen systems assessment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escher, W. J.D.; Foster, R. W.; Tison, R. R.; Hanson, J. A.

    1980-06-02

    Volume II of the Solar/Hydrogen Systems Assessment contract report (2 volumes) is basically a technological source book. Relying heavily on expert contributions, it comprehensively reviews constituent technologies from which can be assembled a wide range of specific solar/hydrogen systems. Covered here are both direct and indirect solar energy conversion technologies; respectively, those that utilize solar radiant energy input directly and immediately, and those that absorb energy from a physical intermediary, previously energized by the sun. Solar-operated hydrogen energy production technologies are also covered in the report. The single most prominent of these is water electrolysis. Utilization of solar-produced hydrogen is outside the scope of the volume. However, the important hydrogen delivery step is treated under the delivery sub-steps of hydrogen transmission, distribution and storage. An exemplary use of the presented information is in the synthesis and analysis of those solar/hydrogen system candidates documented in the report's Volume I. Morever, it is intended that broad use be made of this technology information in the implementation of future solar/hydrogen systems. Such systems, configured on either a distributed or a central-plant basis, or both, may well be of major significance in effecting an ultimate transition to renewable energy systems.

  11. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP), Slick Rock, Colorado, Revision 1. Volume 2, Calculations, Final design for construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    Volume two contains calculations for: embankment design--slope stability analysis; embankment design--excavation stability; embankment design--settlement and cover cracking analysis; radon barrier design--statistical analysis of ra-226 concentrations for North Continent and Union Carbide sites; radon barrier design--RAECOM input data; radon barrier design--design thickness; and cover design--frost penetration depth.

  12. Solar/hydrogen systems technologies. Volume II (Part 2 of 2). Solar/hydrogen systems assessment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escher, W. J.D.; Foster, R. W.; Tison, R. R.; Hanson, J. A.

    1980-06-02

    Volume II of the Solar/Hydrogen Systems Assessment contract report (2 volumes) is basically a technological source book. Relying heavily on expert contributions, it comprehensively reviews constituent technologies from which can be assembled a wide range of specific solar/hydrogen systems. Covered here are both direct and indirect solar energy conversion technologies; respectively, those that utilize solar radiant energy input directly and immediately, and those that absorb energy from a physical intermediary, previously energized by the sun. Solar-operated hydrogen energy production technologies are also covered in the report. The single most prominent of these is water electrolysis. Utilization of solar-produced hydrogen is outside the scope of the volume. However, the important hydrogen delivery step is treated under the delivery sub-steps of hydrogen transmission, distribution and storage. An exemplary use of the presented information is in the synthesis and analysis of those solar/hydrogen system candidates documented in the report's Volume I. Moreover, it is intended that broad use be made of this technology information in the implementation of future solar/hydrogen systems. Such systems, configured on either a distributed or a central-plant basis, or both, may well be a major significance in effecting an ultimate transition to renewable energy systems.

  13. Final report on the EURAMET.M.FF-K4.2.2014 volume comparison at 100 μL—calibration of micropipettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Elsa; Matus, Michael; Metaxiotou, Zoe; Tudor, Maria; Lenard, Elzbieta; Buker, Oliver; Wennergren, Per; Piluri, Erinda; Miteva, Mariana; Vicarova, Martina; Vospĕlová, Alena; Turnsek, Urska; Micic, Ljiljana; Grue, Lise-Lote; Mihailovic, Mirjana; Sarevska, Anastazija

    2017-01-01

    During the EURAMET TC-F meeting of 2014 and following the finalization of CCM.FF-K4.2.2011 comparison, it was agreed to start a Regional Key Comparison (KC) on volume measurements using two 100 μL micropipettes (piston pipettes) allowing the participating laboratories to assess the agreement of their results and uncertainties. Two 100 μL micropipettes were tested by 15 participants. One participant was not a member or associate member of the BIPM and was be removed from this report. The comparison started in July 2015 and ended in March 2016. The Volume and Flow Laboratory of the Portuguese Institute for Quality (IPQ) was the pilot laboratory and performed the initial and final measurements of the micropipettes. The micropipettes showed a stable volume during the whole comparison, which was confirmed by the results from the pilot laboratory. The original results of all participant NMIs were corrected to the standard atmospheric pressure in order to compare results under the same calibration conditions, and the contribution of the 'process-related handling contribution' was added to the uncertainty budget of each participant. In general the declared CMCs are in accordance with the KCDB. For the micropipette 354828Z, two laboratories had inconsistent results. For micropipette 354853Z, three laboratories had inconsistent results. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  14. Dragline roller track improvement. Volume I. Evaluation of low hardness dragline track materials in rolling contact. Final report, September 30, 1976-July 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunfee, J.; Leonard, L.; Rumbarger, J.

    1980-01-01

    The Franklin Research Center (FRC), a Division of the Franklin Institute, was contracted by the Bureau of Mines to improve walking dragline roller tracks. The contract was subsequently transferred to the Department of Energy. The period from September 1977 to September 1978 covered laboratory rolling contact rig tests to evaluate typical low hardness dragline track materials. The results of this work are covered by DOE/ET/9121-1 Final Report, Volume I. The period from September 1978 to July 1980 covered field measurements of dragline roller circle loadings. The results of this work are covered by DOE/ET/9121-2 Final Report, Volume II. The laboratory rolling contact rig test results indicate that forged vacuum degassed air melt steel materials are recommended over air-melt cast materials for rollers and tracks. The steels tested exhibited good freedom from sensitivity to stress raisers like brinell marks and small holes or discontinuities (Volume I). The largest unknown in a recommended method for life testing roller tracks is the condition of the upper rotating frame structure and the lower tub supporting structure.

  15. Advanced thermal-energy-storage concept-definition study for solar Brayton power plants. Final technical report, Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    The detailed results are presented of a technical and economic assessment of phase change and thermochemical energy storage systems in a solar power plant employing a high temperature Brayton cycle thermal engine with helium as the heat transport fluid. The assessment included an examination of the storage system operation, efficiency, power plant interaction, design, materials, safety, maintenance, environmental impact, system life, and economics. These considerations are implemented in the conceptual design of three baseline storage systems and their components for use in a solar power plant module of 50 megawatt electrical power output. Rationale is provided to support the configuration, operation and material choices. A preliminary assessment of the technology development and experimental test program requirements are also included. The report is contained in four separate volumes. This volume is the technical report.

  16. West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine-disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume III. Biological oceanography. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.)

    1983-02-01

    The Department of Energy's Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program began discharging brine into the Gulf of Mexico from its West Hackberry site near Cameron, Louisiana in May 1981. The brine originates from underground salt domes being leached with water from the Intracoastal Waterway, making available vast underground storage caverns for crude oil. The effects of brine discharge on aquatic organisms are presented in this volume. The topics covered are: benthos; nekton; phytoplankton; zooplankton; and data management.

  17. Volume and accessibility of entrained (solution) methane in deep geopressured reservoirs - tertiary formations of the Texas Gulf Coast. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory, A.R.; Dodge, M.M.; Posey, J.S.; Morton, R.A.

    1980-10-01

    The objective of this project was to appraise the total volume of in-place methane dissolved in formation waters of deep sandstone reservoirs of the onshore Texas Gulf Coast within the stratigraphic section extending from the base of significant hydrocarbon production (8000 ft)* to the deepest significant sandstone occurrence. The area of investigation is about 50,000 mi/sup 2/. Factors that determine the total methane resource are reservoir bulk volume, porosity, and methane solubility; the latter is controlled by the temperature, pressure, and salinity of formation waters. Regional assessment of the volume and the distribution of potential sandstone reservoirs was made from a data base of 880 electrical well logs, from which a grid of 24 dip cross sections and 4 strike cross sections was constructed. Solution methane content in each of nine formations or divisions of formations was determined for each subdivision. The distribution of solution methane in the Gulf Coast was described on the basis of five reservoir models. Each model was characterized by depositional environment, reservoir continuity, porosity, permeability, and methane solubility.

  18. Human-system interface design review guideline -- Reviewer`s checklist: Final report. Revision 1, Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    NUREG-0700, Revision 1, provides human factors engineering (HFE) guidance to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff for its: (1) review of the human system interface (HSI) design submittals prepared by licensees or applications for a license or design certification of commercial nuclear power plants, and (2) performance of HSI reviews that could be undertaken as part of an inspection or other type of regulatory review involving HSI design or incidents involving human performance. The guidance consists of a review process and HFE guidelines. The document describes those aspects of the HSI design review process that are important to the identification and resolution of human engineering discrepancies that could adversely affect plant safety. Guidance is provided that could be used by the staff to review an applicant`s HSI design review process or to guide the development of an HSI design review plan, e.g., as part of an inspection activity. The document also provides detailed HFE guidelines for the assessment of HSI design implementations. NUREG-0700, Revision 1, consists of three stand-alone volumes. Volume 2 is a complete set of the guidelines contained in Volume 1, Part 2, but in a checklist format that can be used by reviewers to assemble sets of individual guidelines for use in specific design reviews. The checklist provides space for reviewers to enter guidelines evaluations and comments.

  19. Final proceedings of the second solar heating and cooling commercial demonstration program contractors' review. Volume 1. Summary and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    The Second Solar Heating and Cooling Commercial Demonstration Program Contractors' Review was attended by over 300 representatives from demonstration projects, the Department of Energy (DOE), other Federal agencies, and Government contractors. This volume presents a thorough study of the 140 project papers printed in the three-volume proceedings. A comprehensive table describing the 140 sites is included. This table presents a description of the sites not only in terms of equipment and performance, but also those regarding their problems, successes, and other experiences. The panel discussions on demonstration projects, the National Solar Data Program and the Commercial Demonstration Program are summarized and analyzed. The results of a special survey of Commercial Demonstration Program contractors are presented. Finally, the results of a polling of Review participants on the effectiveness of the meeting are detailed. (WHK)

  20. Medicare program; physician fee schedule update for calendar year 1996 and physician volume performance standard rates of increase for federal fiscal year 1996--HCFA. Final notice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-12-08

    This final notice announces the calendar year 1996 updates to the Medicare physician fee schedule and the Federal fiscal year 1996 volume performance standard rates of increase for expenditures for physicians' services under the Medicare Supplementary Medical Insurance (Part B) program as required by sections 1848 (d) and (f), respectively, of the Social Security Act. The fee schedule update for calendar year 1996 is 3.8 percent for surgical services, -2.3 percent for primary care services, and 0.4 percent for other nonsurgical services. While it does not affect payment for any particular service, there was a 0.8 percent increase in the update for all physicians' services for 1996. The physician volume performance standard rates of increase for Federal fiscal year 1996 are -0.5 percent for surgical services, 9.3 percent for primary care services, 0.6 percent for other nonsurgical services, and a weighted average of 1.8 percent for all physicians' services. In our July 26, 1995 proposed rule concerning revisions to payment policies under the Medicare physician fee schedule for calendar year 1996, we proposed using category-specific volume and intensity growth allowances in calculating the default Medicare Volume Performance Standard (MVPS). We received 20 comments on this proposal. Since this proposal is related to the MVPS and this notice deals with MVPS issues, we are responding to those comments in this notice instead of in the final rule for the fee schedule entitled "Medicare Program; Revisions to Payment Policies and Adjustments to the Relative Value Units Under the Physician Fee Schedule for Calendar Year 1996" published elsewhere in this Federal Register issue.

  1. 14 CFR Sec. 1-6 - Accounting entities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Accounting entities. Sec. 1-6 Section 1-6... REGULATIONS UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS AND REPORTS FOR LARGE CERTIFICATED AIR CARRIERS General Accounting Provisions Sec. 1-6 Accounting entities. (a) Separate accounting records shall be maintained for each air...

  2. Application analysis of solar total energy systems to the residential sector. Volume II, energy requirements. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    This project analyzed the application of solar total energy systems to appropriate segments of the residential sector and determined their market penetration potential. This volume covers the work done on energy requirements definition and includes the following: (1) identification of the single-family and multi-family market segments; (2) regionalization of the United States; (3) electrical and thermal load requirements, including time-dependent profiles; (4) effect of conservation measures on energy requirements; and (5) verification of simulated load data with real data.

  3. Solar central receiver hybrid power system, Phase I. Volume 3. Appendices. Final technical report, October 1978-August 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-09-01

    A design study for a central receiver/fossil fuel hybrid power system using molten salts for heat transfer and heat storage is presented. This volume contains the appendices: (A) parametric salt piping data; (B) sample heat exchanger calculations; (C) salt chemistry and salt/materials compatibility evaluation; (D) heliostat field coordinates; (E) data lists; (F) STEAEC program input data; (G) hybrid receiver design drawings; (H) hybrid receiver absorber tube thermal math model; (I) piping stress analysis; (J) 100-MWe 18-hour storage solar central receiver hybrid power system capital cost worksheets; and (K) 500-MWe 18-hour solar central receiver hybrid power system cost breakdown. (WHK)

  4. Analysis of the permitting processes associated with exploration of Federal OCS leases. Final report. Volume II. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-11-01

    Under contract to the Office of Leasing Policy Development (LPDO), Jack Faucett Associates is currently undertaking the description and analysis of the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) regulatory process to determine the nature of time delays that affect OCS production of oil and gas. This report represents the results of the first phase of research under this contract, the description and analysis of regulatory activity associated with exploration activities on the Federal OCS. Volume 1 contains the following three sections: (1) study results; (2) Federal regulatory activities during exploration of Federal OCS leases which involved the US Geological Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, US Coast Guard, Corps of Engineers, and National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration; and (3) state regulatory activities during exploration of Federal OCS leases of Alaska, California, Louisiana, Massachusetts, New Jersey, North Carolina and Texas. Volume II contains appendices of US Geological Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, Coast Guard, Corps of Engineers, the Coastal Zone Management Act, and Alaska. The major causes of delay in the regulatory process governing exploration was summarized in four broad categories: (1) the long and tedious process associated with the Environmental Protection Agency's implementation of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit; (2) thelack of mandated time periods for the completion of individual activities in the permitting process; (3) the lack of overall coordination of OCS exploratory regulation; and (4) the inexperience of states, the Federal government and industry relating to the appropriate level of regulation for first-time lease sale areas.

  5. Transport of solid commodities via freight pipeline: cost estimating methodology. Volume III, parts A and B. First year final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, J.A.; Morlok, E.K.; Gimm, K.K.; Zandi, I.

    1976-07-01

    In order to examine the feasibility of an intercity freight pipeline, it was necessary to develop cost equations for various competing transportation modes. This volume presents cost-estimating equations for rail carload, trailer-on-flatcar, truck, and freight pipeline. Section A presents mathematical equations that approximate the fully allocated and variable costs contained in the ICC cost tables for rail carload, trailer-on-flatcar (TOFC) and truck common-carrier intercity freight movements. These equations were developed to enable the user to approximate the ICC costs quickly and easily. They should find use in initial studies of costs where exact values are not needed, such as in consideration of rate changes, studies of profitability, and in general inter-modal comparisons. Section B discusses the development of a set of engineering cost equations for pneumo-capsule pipelines. The development was based on an analysis of system components and can readily be extended to other types of pipeline. The model was developed for the purpose of a feasibility study. It employs a limited number of generalized parameters and its use is recommended when sufficient detailed and specific engineering information is lacking. These models were used in the comparison of modes presented in Volume I and hence no conclusions regarding relative costs or service of the modes are presented here. The primary conclusion is that the estimates of costs resulting from these models is subject to considerable uncertainty.

  6. Initial Northwest Power Act Power Sales Contracts : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2, Appendices A--L.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-01-01

    This report consists of appendices A-L of the final environmental impact statement for the Bonneville Power Administration. The appendices provide information on the following: Ninth circuit Court opinion in Forelaws on Board v. Johnson; guide to Northwest Power act contracts; guide to hydro operations; glossary; affected environment supporting documentation; environmental impacts of generic resource types; information on models used; technical information on analysis; public involvement activities; bibliography; Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act; and biological assessment. (CBS)

  7. Initial Northwest Power Act Power Sales Contracts : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 3, Appendix M, Contract Copies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-01-01

    This report, is part of the final environmental impact statement of the Bonneville Power Administration, consists of an appendix of contract copies related to the following: Detailed Index to Generic Utility Power Sales Contracts, Text of Generic Utility Contract, Detailed Index to Generic DSI Power Sales Contracts, Text of Generic DSI Contract, Text of Residential Purchase and Sale Agreement (Residential Exchange), and Detailed Index to General Contract Provisions -- GCP Form PSC-2 (Incorporated into all three types of contracts as an Exhibit).

  8. Commercialization of air conditioning heat pump/water heater. Final technical report, Volume 2: Appendix A through E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-30

    This is the final technical report on a commercialization project for an air conditioning heat pump water heater. The objective of the project was to produce a saleable system which would be economically competitive with natural gas and cost effective with regard to initial cost versus annual operating costs. The development and commercialization of the system is described. Compiled data included in numerous figures, tables and graphs.

  9. Final report on the Background Soil Characterization Project at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2: Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    The Background Soil Characterization Project (BSCP) will provide background concentration levels of selected metals organic compounds, and radionuclides in soils from uncontaminated on-site areas at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and off-site in the western part of Roane County and the eastern part of Anderson County. The BSCP will establish a database, recommend how to use the data for contaminated site assessment, and provide estimates of the potential human health and environmental risks associated with the background level concentrations of potentially hazardous constituents. This volume contains the data from the Background Soil Characterization Project. When available, the following validation qualifiers are used in the appendixes. When validation qualifiers are not available, the corresponding contract laboratory data qualifiers appearing on the next page are used.

  10. Final Environmental Impact Statement. Disposal and Reuse of George Air Force Base, California. Volume 2. Public Comments and Responses, Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    evening, end thenk you for the 14 the extent that it cen, In terms of the economic opprtun - is Opportunity to address you. Iau speaking in my capacity...will result in safe sit*s MA will met threat .. "ater Quality, the health Ni safety of the puhlic mswov the Onviremt.Finally. go haee as eceegmc... threat to Public bealth and the cleanup &actiond on a aites-pecific basis. No are also concerned environment. This listing is boed" on actual Wnd potential

  11. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Application of scenario development method in evaluation of the Koongarra Analogue. Final Report - Volume 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skagius, K. [Kemakta Consultants co., Stockholm (Sweden); Wingefors, S. [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1992-12-31

    The study of natural analogues has been established as one of the most important methods for validation of concepts and models applied for the assessment of long-term performance of repositories for nuclear waste. The objectives of such studies range from detailed investigations of processes and features on a small scale to attempts of explaining the evolution of whole sites. For studies of specific processes it may well be as important to consider the larger scale settings as boundary conditions. This appreciation of context and an integrated view may be as important for evaluation of most natural analogues as for performance assessments. This is more evident the more the evaluation depends on a knowledge about the evolution of the natural analogue. The attempted formulation of scenarios of the Koongarra Analogue has been based on the external conditions and external features. A rapid weathering of the host rock, i.e. the chlorite schist, is assumed to have started around the onset of the Pleistocene Ice Age (ca 1.6 Ma BP). The eventual oxidation and mobilization of the uranium ore could then have occurred under unsaturated or saturated conditions. This leads to the following major scenarios: (1) Uranyl Phosphates formed under unsaturated conditions, with a periodical evolution of the dispersion fan in conjunction with alternating dry (glacial) and wet (interglacial) periods during the Pleistocene Ice Age; (2) Uranyl Phosphates formed under unsaturated conditions as a single event, taking place either early or late during the Pleistocene Ice Age; (3)Uranyl Phosphates formed under saturated conditions, in conjunction with periods of higher and lower flow due to the climatic cycling. Although the original objectives may not have been fully achieved, this work is believed to contribute to a better understanding of the Koongarra Analogue as well as to give a basis for further scenario work

  12. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) platform configuration and integration. Final report. Volume I. Systems requirements and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-06-01

    Studies leading to the development of two 400 MW Offshore Thermal Energy Conversion Commercial Plants are presented. This volume includes a summary of three tasks: task IIA--systems evaluation and requirements; task IIB--evaluation plan; task III--technology review; and task IV--systems integration evaluation. Task IIA includes the definition of top level requirements and an assessment of factors critical to the selection of hull configuration and size, quantification of payload requirements and characteristics, and sensitivity of system characteristics to site selection. Task IIB includes development of a methodology for systematically evaluating the candidate hullforms, based on interrelationships and priorities developed during task IIA. Task III includes the assessment of current technology and identification of deficiencies in relation to OTEC requirements and the development of plans to correct such deficiencies. Task IV involves the formal evaluation of the six candidate hullforms in relation to sit and plant capacity to quantify cost/size/capability relationships, leading to selection of an optimum commercial plant. (WHK)

  13. Final environmental information volume for the coke oven gas cleaning project at the Bethlehem Steel Corporation Sparrows Point Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-04-24

    Bethelehem Steel Corporation (BSC) is planning to conduct a demonstration project involving an integrated system that can be retrofitted into coke oven gas handling systems to address a variety of environmental and operational factors in a more cost-effective manner. Successful application of this technology to existing US coke plants could: (1) reduce emissions of sulfur dioxide, cyanide, and volatile organic compounds (including benzene) (2) reduce the cost and handling of processing feed chemicals, (3) disposal costs of nuisance by-products and (4) increase reliability and reduce operation/maintenance requirements for coke oven gas desulfurization systems. The proposed system will remove sulfur from the coke oven gas in the form of hydrogen sulfide using the ammonia indigenous to the gas as the primary reactive chemical. Ammonia and hydrogen cyanide are also removed in this process. The hydrogen sulfide removed from the coke oven gas in routed to a modified Claus plant for conversion to a saleable sulfur by-product. Ammonia and hydrogen cyanide will be catalytically converted to hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. The tail gas from the sulfur recovery unit is recycled to the coke oven gas stream, upstream of the new gas cleaning system. The proposed demonstration project will be installed at the existing coke oven facilities at BSC's Sparrows Point Plant. This volume describes the proposed actions and the resulting environmental impacts. 21 refs., 19 figs., 9 tabs.

  14. Imprinting Hatchery Reared Salmon and Steelhead Trout for Homing, Volume II of III; Data Summaries, 1978-1983 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slatick, Emil; Ringe, R.R.; Zaugg, Waldo S. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Coastal Zone and Estuarine Studies Division, Seattle, WA)

    1988-02-02

    The main functions of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) aquaculture task biologists and contractual scientists involved in the 1978 homing studies were primarily a surveillance of fish physiology, disease, and relative survival during culture in marine net-pens, to determine if there were any unusual factors that might affect imprinting and homing behavior. The studies were conducted with little background knowledge of the implications of disease and physiology on imprinting and homing in salmonids. The health status or the stocks were quite variable as could be expected. The Dworshak and Wells Hatcheries steelhead suffered from some early stresses in seawater, probably osmoregulatory. The incidences of latent BKD in the Wells and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead and Kooskia Hatchery spring chinook salmon were extremely high, and how these will affect survival in the ocean is not known. Gill enzyme activity in the Dworshak and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead at release was low. Of the steelhead, survival in the Tucannon Hatchery stock will probably be the highest, with Dworshak Hatchery stock the lowest. This report contains the data for the narratives in Volume I.

  15. Assessment of research needs for advanced heterogeneous catalysts for energy applications. Final report: Volume 2, Topic reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, G.A.

    1994-04-01

    This report assesses the direction, technical content, and priority of research needs judged to provide the best chance of yielding new and improved heterogeneous catalysts for energy-related applications over the period of 5-20 years. It addresses issues of energy conservation, alternate fuels and feedstocks, and the economics and applications that could alleviate pollution from energy processes. Recommended goals are defined in 3 research thrusts: catalytic science, environmental protection by catalysis, and industrial catalytic applications. This study was conducted by an 11-member panel of experts from industry and academia, including one each from Japan and Europe. This volume first presents an in-depth overview of the role of catalysis in future energy technology in chapter 1; then current catalytic research is critically reviewed and research recommended in 8 topic chapters: catalyst preparation (design and synthesis), catalyst characterization (structure/function), catalyst performance testing, reaction kinetics/reactor design, catalysis for industrial chemicals, catalysis for electrical applications (clean fuels, pollution remediation), catalysis for control of exhaust emissions, and catalysts for liquid transportation fuels from petroleum, coal, residual oil, and biomass.

  16. Fort Hood Solar Total Energy Project. Volume II. Preliminary design. Part 1. System criteria and design description. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None,

    1979-01-01

    This volume documents the preliminary design developed for the Solar Total Energy System to be installed at Fort Hood, Texas. Current system, subsystem, and component designs are described and additional studies which support selection among significant design alternatives are presented. Overall system requirements which form the system design basis are presented. These include program objectives; performance and output load requirements; industrial, statutory, and regulatory standards; and site interface requirements. Material in this section will continue to be issued separately in the Systems Requirements Document and maintained current through revision throughout future phases of the project. Overall system design and detailed subsystem design descriptions are provided. Consideration of operation and maintenance is reflected in discussion of each subsystem design as well as in an integrated overall discussion. Included are the solar collector subsystem; the thermal storage subsystem, the power conversion sybsystem (including electrical generation and distribution); the heating/cooling and domestic hot water subsystems; overall instrumentation and control; and the STES building and physical plant. The design of several subsystems has progressed beyond the preliminary stage; descriptions for such subsystems are therefore provided in more detail than others to provide complete documentation of the work performed. In some cases, preliminary design parameters require specific verificaton in the definitive design phase and are identified in the text. Subsystem descriptions will continue to be issued and revised separately to maintain accuracy during future phases of the project. (WHK)

  17. Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 2 (Appendices I, section 5 and II, section 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

    1998-08-01

    This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 2 contains the last section of Appendix I, Radiative heat transfer in kraft recovery boilers, and the first section of Appendix II, The effect of temperature and residence time on the distribution of carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen between gaseous and condensed phase products from low temperature pyrolysis of kraft black liquor.

  18. Commercial applications of solar total energy systems. Volume 4. Appendices. Final report. [Solar Total Energy System Evaluation Program (STESEP) code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boobar, M.G.; McFarland, B.L.; Nalbandian, S.J.; Willcox, W.W.; French, E.P.; Smith, K.E.

    1978-07-01

    A methodology has been developed by Atomics International under contract to the Department of Energy to define the applicability of solar total energy systems (STES) to the commercial sector (e.g., retail stores, shopping centers, offices, etc.) in the United States. Candidate STES concepts were selected to provide on-site power generation capability, as well as thermal energy for both heating and cooling applications. Each concept was evaluated on the basis of its cost effectiveness (i.e., as compared to other concepts) and its ability to ultimately penetrate and capture a significant segment of this market, thereby resulting in a saving of fossil fuel resources. This volume contains the appendices. Topics include deterministic insolation model computer code; building energy usage data; computer simulation programs for building energy demand analysis; model buildings for STES evaluation; Solar Total Energy System Evaluation Program (STESEP) computer code; transient simulation of STES concept; solar data tape analysis; program listings and sample output for use with TRNSYS; transient simulation, and financial parameters sensitivities. (WHK)

  19. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the uranium mill tailings remedial action ground water project. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-10-01

    Volume II of the programmatic environmental impact statement (PElS) is a comment and response document; it is the collection of the comments received on the draft PElS. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) response to each comment is provided after each comment. If the comment resulted in a change to the PElS, the affected section number of the PElS is provided in the response. Comments 1 through 259 were received at public hearings. The name of the hearing at which the comment was received is listed after each comment. Comments were recorded on flip charts and by notetakers. DOE representatives were present to hear the comments and respond to them. The DOE's written response is provided after each comment. Comments 260 through 576 were received in writing at the hearings, and from various federal, tribal, and state agencies and from individuals during the public comment period. Copies of the written comments follow the comments and responses.

  20. Petroleum solvent mortality study of Oklahoma dry cleaners. Volume 2. Final report, 1 January 1986-31 March 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asal, N.R.; Coleman, R.L.; Petrone, R.L.; Owen, W.; Walsworth, S.

    1988-06-30

    The association between exposures to the primary petroleum solvents used in commercial dry-cleaning processes and various causes of death was investigated. Each commercial dry-cleaning establishment in Oklahoma was classified according to the solvent or solvents in use from 1941 to 1983, based on data from the State Dry Cleaners Board. A cohort with known solvent exposures was identified. The proportionate mortality ratios and standardized mortality ratios were determined for all major causes of death. Nearly 59% were white males, with an average exposure of 10.5 years. No excess in overall cancer mortality was found. Significant excesses were noted for mental, psychoneurotic, and personality disorders due to alcoholism; genitourinary system due to acute nephritis, chronic nephritis, and renal sclerosis; bone and organ movement due to arthritis and spondylitis. An excess in cancers of the respiratory system was identified with excesses in mortality due to trachea, bronchus, and lung cancer among those dying at age 65 or older. A 45% excess in proportionate mortality due to pancreatic cancer was found. Only on analysis of petroleum-solvent exposure to white males was an excess found for kidney cancer. Moderately increased incidents of skin and bone cancer were found. Volume 1 is also available.

  1. Final environmental impact statement. Management of commercially generated radioactive waste. Volume 3. Public comments hearing board report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    This EIS analyzes the significant environmental impacts that could occur if various technologies for management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes from commercial nuclear power reactors were to be developed and implemented. This EIS will serve as the environmental input for the decision on which technology, or technologies, will be emphasized in further research and development activities in the commercial waste management program. The action proposed in this EIS is to (1) adopt a national strategy to develop mined geologic repositories for disposal of commercially generated high-level and transuranic radioactive waste (while continuing to examine subseabed and very deep hole disposal as potential backup technologies) and (2) conduct a R and D program to develop such facilities and the necessary technology to ensure the safe long-term containment and isolation of these wastes. The Department has considered in this statement: development of conventionally mined deep geologic repositories for disposal of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors and/or radioactive fuel reprocessing wastes; balanced development of several alternative disposal methods; and no waste disposal action. This volume contains written public comments and hearing board responses and reports offered on the draft statement.

  2. Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 3 (Appendices II, sections 2--3 and III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

    1998-08-01

    This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 3 contains the following appendix sections: Formation and destruction of nitrogen oxides in recovery boilers; Sintering and densification of recovery boiler deposits laboratory data and a rate model; and Experimental data on rates of particulate formation during char bed burning.

  3. Mixed strategies for energy conservation and alternative energy utilization (solar) in buildings. Final report. Volume III. Appendixes. [10 appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-06-01

    This appendix summarizes building characteristics used to determine heating and cooling loads for each of the five building types in each of the four regions. For the selected five buildings, the following data are attached: new and existing construction characteristics; new and existing construction thermal resistance; floor plan and elevation; people load schedule; lighting load schedule; appliance load schedule; ventilation schedule; and hot water use schedule. For the five building types (single family, apartment buildings, commercial buildings, office buildings, and schools), data are compiled in 10 appendices. These are Building Characteristics; Alternate Energy Sources and Energy Conservation Techniques Description, Costs, Fuel Price Scenarios; Life Cycle Cost Model; Simulation Models; Solar Heating/Cooling System; Condensed Weather; Single and Multi-Family Dwelling Characteristics and Energy Conservation Techniques; Mixed Strategies for Energy Conservation and Alternative Energy Utilization in Buildings. An extensive bibliography is given in the final appendix. (MCW)

  4. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the uranium mill tailings remedial action ground water project. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-10-01

    This programmatic environmental impact statement (PElS) was prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). This PElS provides an analysis of the potential impacts of the alternatives and ground water compliance strategies as well as potential cumulative impacts. On November 8, 1978, Congress enacted the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law, codified at 42 USC §7901 et seq. Congress found that uranium mill tailings " ... may pose a potential and significant radiation health hazard to the public, and that every reasonable effort should be made to provide for stabilization, disposal, and control in a safe, and environmentally sound manner of such tailings in order to prevent or minimize other environmental hazards from such tailings." Congress authorized the Secretary of Energy to designate inactive uranium processing sites for remedial action by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Congress also directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to set the standards to be followed by the DOE for this process of stabilization, disposal, and control. On January 5, 1983, EPA published standards (40 CFR Part 192) for the disposal and cleanup of residual radioactive materials. On September 3, 1985, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit set aside and remanded to EPA the ground water provisions of the standards. The EPA proposed new standards to replace remanded sections and changed other sections of 40 CFR Part 192. These proposed standards were published in the Federal Register on September 24, 1987 (52 FR 36000). Section 108 of the UMTRCA requires that DOE comply with EPA's proposed standards in the absence of final standards. The Ground Water Project was planned under the proposed standards. On January 11, 1995, EPA published the final rule, with which the DOE must now comply. The PElS and the Ground Water Project are

  5. Conceptual design of advanced central receiver power systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Volume 1. Executive summary. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-01

    The conceptual design of an advanced central receiver power system using liquid sodium as a heat transport medium has been completed by a team consisting of the Energy Systems Group (prime contractor), McDonnell Douglas, Stearns-Roger, The University of Houston, and Salt River Project. The purpose of this study was to determine the technical and economic advantages of this concept for commercial-scale power plants. This final report covers all tasks of the project. These tasks were as follows: (1) review and analysis of preliminary specification; (2) parametric analysis; (3) select commercial configuration; (4) commercial plant conceptual design; (5) assessment of commercial plant; (6) advanced central receiver power system development plan; (7) program plan; (8) reports and data; (9) program management; and (10) safety analysis. A programmatic overview of the accomplishments of this program is given. The 100-MW conceptual commercial plant, the 281-MW optimum plant, and the 10-MW pilot plant are described. (WHK)

  6. 49 CFR 172.525 - EXPLOSIVES 1.6 placard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false EXPLOSIVES 1.6 placard. 172.525 Section 172.525... SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.525 EXPLOSIVES 1.6 placard. (a) Except for size and color the EXPLOSIVES 1... subpart, the background color on the EXPLOSIVES 1.6 placard must be orange. The “*” shall be replaced...

  7. Application analysis of solar total energy systems to the residential sector. Volume III, conceptual design. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    The objective of the work described in this volume was to conceptualize suitable designs for solar total energy systems for the following residential market segments: single-family detached homes, single-family attached units (townhouses), low-rise apartments, and high-rise apartments. Conceptual designs for the total energy systems are based on parabolic trough collectors in conjunction with a 100 kWe organic Rankine cycle heat engine or a flat-plate, water-cooled photovoltaic array. The ORC-based systems are designed to operate as either independent (stand alone) systems that burn fossil fuel for backup electricity or as systems that purchase electricity from a utility grid for electrical backup. The ORC designs are classified as (1) a high temperature system designed to operate at 600/sup 0/F and (2) a low temperature system designed to operate at 300/sup 0/F. The 600/sup 0/F ORC system that purchases grid electricity as backup utilizes the thermal tracking principle and the 300/sup 0/F ORC system tracks the combined thermal and electrical loads. Reject heat from the condenser supplies thermal energy for heating and cooling. All of the ORC systems utilize fossil fuel boilers to supply backup thermal energy to both the primary (electrical generating) cycle and the secondary (thermal) cycle. Space heating is supplied by a central hot water (hydronic) system and a central absorption chiller supplies the space cooling loads. A central hot water system supplies domestic hot water. The photovoltaic system uses a central electrical vapor compression air conditioning system for space cooling, with space heating and domestic hot water provided by reject heat from the water-cooled array. All of the systems incorporate low temperature thermal storage (based on water as the storage medium) and lead--acid battery storage for electricity; in addition, the 600/sup 0/F ORC system uses a therminol-rock high temperature storage for the primary cycle. (WHK)

  8. A hierarchy of dynamic plume models incorporating uncertainty: Volume 4, Second-order closure integrated puff: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sykes, R.I.; Lewellen, W.S.; Parker, S.F.; Henn, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    The Second Order Closure Integrated Puff Model (SCIPUFF) is the intermediate resolution member of a hierarchy of models. It simulates the expected values of plume concentration downwind of a fossil-fueled power plant stack, along with an estimate of the variation around this value. To represent the turbulent atmosphere surrounding the plume compatibly with available meteorological data, a second order closure sub-model is used. SCIPUFF represents the plume by a series of Gaussian puffs, typically 10 seconds apart; plume growth is calculated by a random walk phase combined with plume expansion calculated from the volume integrals of the equations used in the Stack Exhaust Model (SEM), the highest resolution model. Meteorological uncertainty is accounted for by means of extra dispersion terms. SCIPUFF was tested against more than 250 hours of plume data including both a level site and a moderately complex terrain site; approximately 200 samplers were used. Model predictions were evaluated by comparing the measured ground level concentration distribution to that simulated by the model. Further, the simulated and actual distributions of deviations between simulated or observed and expected values were compared. The predicted distributions were close to the measured ones. The overall results from SCIPUFF were similar to those from the lowest resolution model, SCIMP. The advantage of SCIPUFF is its flexibility for including future improvements. When combined with a suitable mesoscale model, SCIPUFF may be able to simulate plume dispersion beyond the 50 km limit of other available models. The ability to cover a wide range of time and space scales in a single calculation is another valuable feature. 3 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Individual plant examination program: Perspectives on reactor safety and plant performance. Parts 2--5: Final report; Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    This report provides perspectives gained by reviewing 75 Individual Plant Examination (IPE) submittals pertaining to 108 nuclear power plant units. IPEs are probabilistic analyses that estimate the core damage frequency (CDF) and containment performance for accidents initiated by internal events. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviewed the IPE submittals with the objective of gaining perspectives in three major areas: (1) improvements made to individual plants as a result of their IPEs and the collective results of the IPE program, (2) plant-specific design and operational features and modeling assumptions that significantly affect the estimates of CDF and containment performance, and (3) strengths and weaknesses of the models and methods used in the IPEs. These perspectives are gained by assessing the core damage and containment performance results, including overall CDF, accident sequences, dominant contributions to component failure and human error, and containment failure modes. Methods, data, boundary conditions, and assumptions used in the IPEs are considered in understanding the differences and similarities observed among the various types of plants. This report is divided into three volumes containing six parts. Part 1 is a summary report of the key perspectives gained in each of the areas identified above, with a discussion of the NRC`s overall conclusions and observations. Part 2 discusses key perspectives regarding the impact of the IPE Program on reactor safety. Part 3 discusses perspectives gained from the IPE results regarding CDF, containment performance, and human actions. Part 4 discusses perspectives regarding the IPE models and methods. Part 5 discusses additional IPE perspectives. Part 6 contains Appendices A, B and C which provide the references of the information from the IPEs, updated PRA results, and public comments on draft NUREG-1560 respectively.

  10. Final Report, Volume 4, The Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel (2507 Wrought Equivalent)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, W.

    2005-09-30

    carried out between the ferrite content, hardness values and the type of fracture. SEM was also carried out on the corrosion samples in order to see the difference on the surface after corrosion analysis has been carried out. Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy was carried out on the material acquired from Foundry D in order to determine the variation in the amount of the chemical composition of various elements when the material is subjected to different heat treatment schedules. X-Ray analysis was also carried out in order to verify whether it is possible to identify the different phases present in the material. Volume percentage of ferrite was also calculated from X-Ray diffraction and compared with the Feritscope® and ASTM E562 Manual Point Count data in order to determine whether X-Ray Diffraction is a suitable method for carrying out qualitative analysis of different phases present. From the various tests that were conducted, it was concluded that since ASTM A923 Methods adequately identifies the presence of intermetallic phases in A890 5A grade Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel A890 5A can be directly included in ASTM A923. Correlation was determined between all the ASTM A923 Test Methods A, B and C and Test Method B were identified as the best method for detecting the presence of detrimental intermetallic phases. The micrographs from the A890-4A grade (now in ASTM A923) were identified as applicable for the A890-5A grade to compare and detect the presence of intermetallic phases. Using these micrographs one can verify whether an A890-5A sample has an unaffected, affected or a possibly affected structure. It was also observed that when compared to the A890-4A grade A890-5A grade is more sensitive to heat treatment. From the ferrite and hardness measurement a correlation was developed between toughness, volume percentage ferrite and hardness of the material. From SEM and EDS the type of intermetallic phase present and its chemical composition was determined. The best

  11. Final Report, Volume 4, The Develpoment of Qualification Standards forCast Super Duplex Stainless Steel (2507 Wrought Equivalent)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, D.

    2005-09-30

    was carried out between the ferrite content, hardness values and the type of fracture. SEM was also carried out on the corrosion samples in order to see the difference on the surface after corrosion analysis has been carried out. Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy was carried out on the material acquired from Foundry D in order to determine the variation in the amount of the chemical composition of various elements when the material is subjected to different heat treatment schedules. X-Ray analysis was also carried out in order to verify whether it is possible to identify the different phases present in the material. Volume percentage of ferrite was also calculated from X-Ray diffraction and compared with the Feritscope{reg_sign} and ASTM E562 Manual Point Count data in order to determine whether X-Ray Diffraction is a suitable method for carrying out qualitative analysis of different phases present. From the various tests that were conducted, it was concluded that since ASTM A923 Methods adequately identifies the presence of intermetallic phases in A890-5A grade Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel A890-5A can be directly included in ASTM A923. Correlation was determined between all the ASTM A923 Test Methods A, B and C and Test Method B were identified as the best method for detecting the presence of detrimental intermetallic phases. The micrographs from the A890-4A grade (now in ASTM A923) were identified as applicable for the A890-5A grade to compare and detect the presence of intermetallic phases. Using these micrographs one can verify whether an A890-5A sample has an unaffected, affected or a possibly affected structure. It was also observed that when compared to the A890-4A grade A890-5A grade is more sensitive to heat treatment. From the ferrite and hardness measurement a correlation was developed between toughness, volume percentage ferrite and hardness of the material. From SEM and EDS the type of intermetallic phase present and its chemical composition was

  12. Final Report, Volume 4, The Develpoment of Qualification Standards forCast Super Duplex Stainless Steel (2507 Wrought Equivalent)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, D.

    2005-09-30

    was carried out between the ferrite content, hardness values and the type of fracture. SEM was also carried out on the corrosion samples in order to see the difference on the surface after corrosion analysis has been carried out. Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy was carried out on the material acquired from Foundry D in order to determine the variation in the amount of the chemical composition of various elements when the material is subjected to different heat treatment schedules. X-Ray analysis was also carried out in order to verify whether it is possible to identify the different phases present in the material. Volume percentage of ferrite was also calculated from X-Ray diffraction and compared with the Feritscope{reg_sign} and ASTM E562 Manual Point Count data in order to determine whether X-Ray Diffraction is a suitable method for carrying out qualitative analysis of different phases present. From the various tests that were conducted, it was concluded that since ASTM A923 Methods adequately identifies the presence of intermetallic phases in A890-5A grade Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel A890-5A can be directly included in ASTM A923. Correlation was determined between all the ASTM A923 Test Methods A, B and C and Test Method B were identified as the best method for detecting the presence of detrimental intermetallic phases. The micrographs from the A890-4A grade (now in ASTM A923) were identified as applicable for the A890-5A grade to compare and detect the presence of intermetallic phases. Using these micrographs one can verify whether an A890-5A sample has an unaffected, affected or a possibly affected structure. It was also observed that when compared to the A890-4A grade A890-5A grade is more sensitive to heat treatment. From the ferrite and hardness measurement a correlation was developed between toughness, volume percentage ferrite and hardness of the material. From SEM and EDS the type of intermetallic phase present and its chemical composition was

  13. Final Report, Volume 4, The Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel (2507 Wrought Equivalent)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, W.

    2005-09-30

    carried out between the ferrite content, hardness values and the type of fracture. SEM was also carried out on the corrosion samples in order to see the difference on the surface after corrosion analysis has been carried out. Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy was carried out on the material acquired from Foundry D in order to determine the variation in the amount of the chemical composition of various elements when the material is subjected to different heat treatment schedules. X-Ray analysis was also carried out in order to verify whether it is possible to identify the different phases present in the material. Volume percentage of ferrite was also calculated from X-Ray diffraction and compared with the Feritscope® and ASTM E562 Manual Point Count data in order to determine whether X-Ray Diffraction is a suitable method for carrying out qualitative analysis of different phases present. From the various tests that were conducted, it was concluded that since ASTM A923 Methods adequately identifies the presence of intermetallic phases in A890 5A grade Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel A890 5A can be directly included in ASTM A923. Correlation was determined between all the ASTM A923 Test Methods A, B and C and Test Method B were identified as the best method for detecting the presence of detrimental intermetallic phases. The micrographs from the A890-4A grade (now in ASTM A923) were identified as applicable for the A890-5A grade to compare and detect the presence of intermetallic phases. Using these micrographs one can verify whether an A890-5A sample has an unaffected, affected or a possibly affected structure. It was also observed that when compared to the A890-4A grade A890-5A grade is more sensitive to heat treatment. From the ferrite and hardness measurement a correlation was developed between toughness, volume percentage ferrite and hardness of the material. From SEM and EDS the type of intermetallic phase present and its chemical composition was determined. The best

  14. Economic assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization processes. Final report. Volume 2. Appendices G, H, and I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bierman, G. R.; May, E. H.; Mirabelli, R. E.; Pow, C. N.; Scardino, C.; Wan, E. I.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents the results of a project sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The purpose of the study was to perform an economic and market assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes for application to coal-fired electric utility plants. The time period considered in the study is 1981 through 1990, and costs are reported in 1980 dollars. The task was divided into the following four subtasks: (1) determine the factors affecting FGD cost evaluations; (2) select FGD processes to be cost-analyzed; (3) define the future electric utility FGD system market; and (4) perform cost analyses for the selected FGD processes. The study was initiated in September 1979, and separate reports were prepared for the first two subtasks. The results of the latter two subtasks appear only in this final report, since the end-date of those subtasks coincided with the end-date of the overall task. The Subtask 1 report, Criteria and Methods for Performing FGD Cost Evaluation, was completed in October 1980. A slightly modified and condensed version of that report appears as Appendix B to this report. The Subtask 2 report, FGD Candidate Process Selection, was completed in January 1981, and the principal outputs of that subtask appear in Appendices C and D to this report.

  15. Osiris and SOMBRERO inertial confinement fusion power plant designs. Volume 2, Designs, assessments, and comparisons, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, W.R.; Bieri, R.L.; Monsler, M.J.

    1992-03-01

    The primary objective of the of the IFE Reactor Design Studies was to provide the Office of Fusion Energy with an evaluation of the potential of inertial fusion for electric power production. The term reactor studies is somewhat of a misnomer since these studies included the conceptual design and analysis of all aspects of the IFE power plants: the chambers, heat transport and power conversion systems, other balance of plant facilities, target systems (including the target production, injection, and tracking systems), and the two drivers. The scope of the IFE Reactor Design Studies was quite ambitious. The majority of our effort was spent on the conceptual design of two IFE electric power plants, one using an induction linac heavy ion beam (HIB) driver and the other using a Krypton Fluoride (KrF) laser driver. After the two point designs were developed, they were assessed in terms of their (1) environmental and safety aspects; (2) reliability, availability, and maintainability; (3) technical issues and technology development requirements; and (4) economics. Finally, we compared the design features and the results of the assessments for the two designs.

  16. Users guide to simulation with 9DGEM on the EIA/EDS computer. Volume IV. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorosh, P.A.; Hudson, E.A.; Parrish, J.E.

    1981-03-01

    DGEM has been assembled on the EIA/EDS system with ease of use a primary consideration. A JCL command procedure for running DGEM simulations is provided to the user. User input requirements are limited to a reasonably simple set of instructions which are handled completely by the command procedure provided. In addition, instructions for compiling and linking the Fortran codes are provided should the user desire to alter DGEM. Each of these procedures, user input requirements, and examples are given. The first section describes the simulation requirements for DGEM. The second section includes an example of the input runstream, the execute instructions, and a sample output. The third section specifies the use of the new technology sectors of the model. The fourth and fifth sections cover the use of the energy investment option and some applications of the investment linkages. The sixth section explains the way in which the program is altered and a new executable module is created. Finally, the last section describes certain deviations from the original DGEM documentation which have facilitated the use of DGEM on the EIA EDS system.

  17. Intelligent Mobile Sensor System for drum inspection and monitoring -- Volume 1. Final report, October 1, 1993--April 22, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The objective of the Intelligent Mobile Sensor System (IMSS) project is to develop an operational system for monitoring and inspection activities for waste storage facility operations at several DOE sites. Specifically, the product of this effort is a robotic device with enhanced intelligence and maneuverability capable of conducting routine inspection of stored waste drums. The device is capable of operating in the narrow free aisle space between rows of stacked drums. The system has an integrated sensor suite for problem-drum detection, and is linked to a site database both for inspection planning and for data correlation, updating, and report generation. The system is capable of departing on an assigned mission, collecting required data, recording which portions of its mission had to be aborted or modified due to environmental constraints, and reporting back when the mission is complete. Successful identification of more than 96% of drum defects has been demonstrated in a high fidelity waste storage facility mockup. Identified anomalies included rust spots, rust streaks, areas of corrosion, dents, and tilted drums. All drums were positively identified and correlated with the site database. This development effort is separated into three phases of which phase two is now complete. The first phase demonstrated an integrated system (maturity level IVa) for monitoring and inspection activities for waste storage facility operations. The second phase demonstrated a prototype system appropriate for operational use in an actual storage facility. The prototype provides an integrated design that considers operational requirements, hardware costs, maintenance, safety, and robustness. The final phase will demonstrate commercial viability using the prototype vehicle in a pilot waste operations and inspection project. This report summarizes the design and evaluation of the new IMSS Phase 2 system and vehicle.

  18. Intelligent Mobile Sensor System for drum inspection and monitoring -- Volume 2. Final report, October 1, 1993--April 22, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The objective of the Intelligent Mobile Sensor System (IMSS) project was to develop an operational system for monitoring and inspection activities for waste storage facility operations at several DOE sites. Specifically, the product of this effort was a robotic device with enhanced intelligence and maneuverability capable of conducting routine inspection of stored waste drums. The system has an integrated sensor suite for problem-drum detection, and creates and maintains a site database both for inspection planning and for data correlation, updating, and report generation. The system is capable of departing on an assigned mission, collecting required data, recording which portions of its mission had to be aborted or modified due to environmental constraints, and reporting back when the mission is complete. Successful identification of more than 96% of drum defects has been demonstrated in a high fidelity waste storage facility mockup. Identified anomalies included rust spots, rust streaks, areas of corrosion, dents, and tilted drums. All drums were positively identified and correlated with the site database. This development effort was separated into three phases of which phase three is now complete. The first phase demonstrated an integrated system (maturity level IVa) for monitoring and inspection activities for waste storage facility operations. The second phase demonstrated a prototype system appropriate for operational use in an actual storage facility. The prototype employed an integrated design that considered operational requirements, hardware costs, maintenance, safety, and robustness. The final phase has demonstrated the commercial viability of the vehicle in operating waste storage facilities at Fernald, Ohio and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). This report summarizes the system upgrades performed in phase 3 and the evaluation of the IMSS Phase 3 system and vehicle.

  19. Environmental impacts of ocean disposal of CO{sub 2}. Final report volume 1, September 1994--August 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, E.E.; Herzog, H.J.

    1996-12-01

    One option to reduce atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels is to capture and sequester power plant CO{sub 2}. Commercial CO{sub 2} capture technology, though expensive, exists today. However, the ability to dispose of large quantities of CO{sub 2} is highly uncertain. The deep ocean is one of only a few possible CO{sub 2} disposal options and is a prime candidate because the deep ocean is vast and highly unsaturated in CO{sub 2}. Ocean disposal of CO{sub 2} will only make sense if the environmental impacts to the ocean are significantly less than the avoided impacts of atmospheric release. In this project, we examined these ocean impacts through a multi-disciplinary effort designed to summarize the current state of knowledge. In the process, we have developed a comprehensive method to assess the impacts of pH changes on passive marine organisms. This final report addresses the following six topics: CO{sub 2} loadings and scenarios, impacts of CO{sub 2} transport, near-field perturbations, far-field perturbations, environmental impacts of CO{sub 2} release, and policy and legal implications of CO{sub 2} release. While there are several important environmental impacts of ocean disposal of CO{sub 2}, the acidification around the release point may be the most important. However, the size and severity of the impacted area varies substantially with the injection scenario. We have quantified the impacts of various injection scenarios relative to each other through mortality measures. Based on available data, it appears possible to inject CO{sub 2} into the deep ocean in such a way as to yield negligible environmental impacts.

  20. Environmental impacts of ocean disposal of CO{sub 2}. Final report volume 2, September 1994--August 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzog, H.J.; Adams, E.E. [eds.

    1996-12-01

    One option to reduce atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels is to capture and sequester power plant CO{sub 2}. Commercial CO{sub 2} capture technology, though expensive, exists today. However, the ability to dispose of large quantities of CO{sub 2} is highly uncertain. The deep ocean is one of only a few possible CO{sub 2} disposal options (others are depleted oil and gas wells or deep, confined aquifers) and is a prime candidate because the deep ocean is vast and highly unsaturated in CO{sub 2}. Technically, the term `disposal` is really a misnomer because the atmosphere and ocean eventually equilibrate on a time scale of 1000 years regardless of where the CO{sub 2} is originally discharged. However, peak atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations expected to occur in the next few centuries could be significantly reduced by ocean disposal. The magnitude of this reduction will depend upon the quantity of CO{sub 2} injected in the ocean, as well as the depth and location of injection. Ocean disposal of CO{sub 2} will only make sense if the environmental impacts to the ocean are significantly less than the avoided impacts of atmospheric release. In this project, we examined these ocean impacts through a multi-disciplinary effort designed to summarize the current state of knowledge. In the process, we have developed a comprehensive method to assess the impacts of pH changes on passive marine organisms. This final report addresses the following six topics: CO{sub 2} loadings and scenarios, impacts of CO{sub 2} transport, near-field perturbations, far-field perturbations, environmental impacts of CO{sub 2} release, and policy and legal implications of CO{sub 2} release.

  1. Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of eastern oil shales. Volume 2, Task 3, Testing of process improvement concepts: Final report, September 1987--May 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    This final report, Volume 2, on ``Process Improvement Concepts`` presents the results of work conducted by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), and the Ohio State University (OSU) to develop three novel approaches for desulfurization that have shown good potential with coal and could be cost-effective for oil shales. These are (1) In-Bed Sulfur Capture using different sorbents (IGT), (2) Electrostatic Desulfurization (IIT), and (3) Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification (OSU and IGT). Results of work on electroseparation of shale oil and fines conducted by IIT is included in this report, as well as work conducted by IGT to evaluate the restricted pipe discharge system. The work was conducted as part of the overall program on ``Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting of Eastern Oil Shales.``

  2. Experience in the Development of the CMS Inner Tracker Analog Optohybrid Circuits: Project, Qualification, Volume Production, Quality Assurance and Final Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Ricci, Daniel; Bilei, Gian Mario; Casinini, F; Postolache, Vasile

    2005-01-01

    The Tracker system of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Experiment, will employ approximately 40,000 analog fibre-optic data and control links. The optical readout system is responsible for converting and transmitting the electrical signals coming out from the front-end to the outside counting room. Concerning the inner part of the Tracker, about 3,600 Analog Optohybrid circuits are involved in this tasks. These circuits have been designed and successfully produced in Italy under the responsibility of INFN Perugia CMS group completing the volume production phase by February 2005. Environmental features, reliability and performances of these circuits have been extensively tested and qualified. This paper reviews the most relevant steps of the manufacturing and quality assurance process: from prototypes to mass-production for the final CMS use.

  3. Final report on BIPM/CIPM key comparison CCM.FF-K4.2.2011: Volume comparison at 100 µL—Calibration of micropipettes (piston pipettes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Elsa; Arias, Roberto; Jintao, Wang

    2013-01-01

    Five fixed micropipettes of 100 µl were tested by eight different National Metrology Institutes from different Regional Metrology Organizations between July 2011 and June 2012. The micropipettes had a stable volume, during the whole comparison, with a maximum standard deviation of 0.06 µl. After a careful analysis of the original results it was decided to make corrections to the standard atmospheric pressure in order to compare results under the same calibration conditions. These corrections led to a decrease of variability within the laboratories. It was also decided to include the stability of the standard and the method variability, determined by the pilot laboratory, in the uncertainty budget of each laboratory. The corrected results (volume and uncertainty) are consistent and overlap with the key comparison reference values for the micropipettes 354828Z, 354853Z and 354864Z. For the other two micropipettes only one result is not consistent with the reference value. Most results also overlap with those of the other laboratories di,j pressure condition and temperature (for example 101.325 kPa and 20 ºC) and this information should be stated in the calibration certificate of the micropipette. Also the standard uncertainty of the method variability and reproducibility values should always be included in the uncertainty budget (around 0.1%) to lead to more realistic uncertainty values. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  4. C-Band Airport Surface Communications System Standards Development. Phase II Final Report. Volume 1: Concepts of Use, Initial System Requirements, Architecture, and AeroMACS Design Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Edward; Isaacs, James; Henriksen, Steve; Zelkin, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    This report is provided as part of ITT s NASA Glenn Research Center Aerospace Communication Systems Technical Support (ACSTS) contract NNC05CA85C, Task 7: New ATM Requirements-Future Communications, C-Band and L-Band Communications Standard Development and was based on direction provided by FAA project-level agreements for New ATM Requirements-Future Communications. Task 7 included two subtasks. Subtask 7-1 addressed C-band (5091- to 5150-MHz) airport surface data communications standards development, systems engineering, test bed and prototype development, and tests and demonstrations to establish operational capability for the Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS). Subtask 7-2 focused on systems engineering and development support of the L-band digital aeronautical communications system (L-DACS). Subtask 7-1 consisted of two phases. Phase I included development of AeroMACS concepts of use, requirements, architecture, and initial high-level safety risk assessment. Phase II builds on Phase I results and is presented in two volumes. Volume I (this document) is devoted to concepts of use, system requirements, and architecture, including AeroMACS design considerations. Volume II describes an AeroMACS prototype evaluation and presents final AeroMACS recommendations. This report also describes airport categorization and channelization methodologies. The purposes of the airport categorization task were (1) to facilitate initial AeroMACS architecture designs and enable budgetary projections by creating a set of airport categories based on common airport characteristics and design objectives, and (2) to offer high-level guidance to potential AeroMACS technology and policy development sponsors and service providers. A channelization plan methodology was developed because a common global methodology is needed to assure seamless interoperability among diverse AeroMACS services potentially supplied by multiple service providers.

  5. Physician fee schedule update for calendar year 1995 and physician volume performance standard rates of increase for federal fiscal year 1995--HCFA. Final notice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-12-08

    This final notice announces the calendar year (CY) 1995 updates to the Medicare physician fee schedule and the Federal fiscal year (FY) 1995 volume performance standard rates of increase for expenditures for physicians' services under the Medicare Supplementary Medical Insurance (Part B) program as required by sections 1848(d) and (f), respectively, of the Social Security Act. The fee schedule update for CY 1995 is 12.2 percent for surgical services, 7.9 percent for primary care services, and 5.2 percent for other nonsurgical services. While it does not affect payment, there was a 7.7 percent increase in the update for all physicians' services for 1995. The physician volume performance standard rates of increase for Federal FY 1995 are 9.2 percent for surgical services, 13.8 percent for primary care services, 4.4 percent for other nonsurgical services, and a weighted average of 7.5 percent for all physicians' services. In our December 2, 1993 notice announcing the CY 1994 update to the Medicare physician fee schedule and FY 1994 volume performance standard rates of increase, we invited public comment on the update indicators for surgical and nonsurgical procedures that were new or revised in 1994. There were no public comments on those indicators. We have decided not to establish a public comment period for the codes that are new and revised in 1995 since, although these codes are initially classified as surgical or nonsurgical based on the clinical judgment of our medical staff, that classification ultimately rests on charge data that we use when they become available to determine whether the codes classified as surgical meet the criteria specified in our December 1993 notice.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Medicare program; physician fee schedule update for calendar year 1997 and physician volume performance standard rates of increase for Federal fiscal year 1997--HCFA. Final notice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-11-22

    This final notice announces the calendar year 1997 updates to the Medicare physician fee schedule and the Federal fiscal year 1997 volume performance standard rates of increase for expenditures for physicians' services under the Medicare Supplementary Medical Insurance (Part B) program as required by sections 1848 (d) and, (f), respectively, of the Social Security Act. The fee schedule updates for calendar year 1997 are 1.9 percent for surgical services, 2.5 percent for primary care services, and -0.8 percent for other nonsurgical services. While it does not affect payment for any particular service, there was a 0.6 percent increase in the update for all physicians' services for 1997. The physician volume performance standard rates of increase for Federal fiscal year 1997 are -3.7 percent for surgical services, 4.5 percent for primary care services, -0.5 percent for other nonsurgical services, and a weighted average of -0.3 percent for all physicians' services.

  7. VT Lidar Slope (1.6 meter) - 2008 - West Franklin

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Missisquoi Lower 2008 1.6m and related SLOPE datasets. Created using ArcGIS "SLOPE"...

  8. VT Lidar DSM (1.6 meter) - 2008 - West Franklin

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Missisquoi Lower 2008 1.6m and related Digital Surface Model (DSM) data. This metadata...

  9. VT Lidar Slope (1.6 meter) - 2012 - Addison County

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Addison County 2012 1.6m and related SLOPE datasets. Created using ArcGIS "SLOPE"...

  10. VT Lidar Aspect (1.6 meter) - 2012 - Addison County

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Addison County 2012 1.6m and related ASPECT datasets. This metadata complies with the...

  11. VT Lidar Slope (1.6 meter) - 2010 - Missisquoi Upper

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Missisquoi Upper 2010 1.6m and related SLOPE datasets. Created using ArcGIS "SLOPE"...

  12. VT Lidar Hillshade (1.6 meter) - 2008 - West Franklin

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Missisquoi Lower 2008 1.6m and related "HILLSHADE" raster data. HILLSHADE data is for...

  13. VT Lidar DSM (1.6 meter) - 2012 - Addison

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Addison County 2012 1.6m and related Digital Surface Model (DSM) data. This metadata...

  14. VT Lidar Hillshade (1.6 meter) - 2012 - Addison

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Addison County 2012 1.6m and related "HILLSHADE" raster data. HILLSHADE data is for...

  15. Analysis of the economic potential of solar thermal energy to provide industrial process heat. Final report, Volume I. [In-depth analysis of 78 industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-02-07

    The process heat data base assembled as the result of this survey includes specific process applications from 78 four-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) groups. These applications account for the consumption of 9.81 quadrillion Btu in 1974, about 59 percent of the 16.6 quadrillion Btu estimated to have been used for all process heat in 1974. About 7/sup 1///sub 2/ percent of industrial process heat is used below 212/sup 0/F (100/sup 0/C), and 28 percent below 550/sup 0/F (288/sup 0/C). In this study, the quantitative assessment of the potential of solar thermal energy systems to provide industrial process heat indicates that solar energy has a maximum potential to provide 0.6 quadrillion Btu per year in 1985, and 7.3 quadrillion Btu per year in 2000, in economic competition with the projected costs of conventional fossil fuels for applications having a maximum required temperature of 550/sup 0/ (288/sup 0/C). A wide variety of collector types were compared for performance and cost characteristics. Performance calculations were carried out for a baseline solar system providing hot water in representative cities in six geographical regions within the U.S. Specific industries that should have significant potential for solar process heat for a variety of reasons include food, textiles, chemicals, and primary metals. Lumber and wood products, and paper and allied products also appear to have significant potential. However, good potential applications for solar process heat can be found across the board throughout industry. Finally, an assessment of nontechnical issues that may influence the use of solar process heat in industry showed that the most important issues are the establishment of solar rights, standardization and certification for solar components and systems, and resolution of certain labor-related issues. (Volume 1 of 3 volumes.)

  16. SIM.M.FF-S7: Final report on SIM/ANDIMET supplementary comparison for volume of liquids at 100 mL and 100 μL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, S.; Maldonado, J. M.; Vega, M. C.; Santalla, E.; Sica, A.; Cantero, D.; Salazar, M.; Morales, A.; Solano, P.; Rodríguez, L. D.

    2016-01-01

    A SIM/ANDIMET comparison for liquid volume using two 100 mL pycnometers and two 100 μL piston pipettes was performed between January 2012 and October 2013. The National Metrology Institute (NMI) of Bolivia was the coordinating laboratory and the Mexican NMI provided technical assistance. The participating labs were IBMETRO (Bolivia), INM (Colombia), INEN (Ecuador), INDECOPI (Peru), LACOMET (Costa Rica), LATU (Uruguay), INTN (Paraguay), and CENAM (Mexico). Based on measurements made by CENAM at the beginning and end of the comparison, the transfer standards were stable during the comparison within 0.0001 mL for the 100 mL pycnometers and 0.03 μL for the 100 μL pipettes. For 100 mL, six of the eight participants agreed within ± 0.003 % and had standardized degrees of equivalence (EN) less than 1. Two participants (INEN and INM) had EN values greater than 1. For the 100 μL pipettes, the results were corrected for the influence of altitude and seven of the eight participants agreed within ± 0.3 %. Results from INEN and some from INM and IBMETRO had EN values greater than 1 for the 100 μL pipettes. Uncertainties recommended by Guideline DKD-R 8-1 for micropipettes were included. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  17. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the System 80{sup +} design (Docket No. 52-002). Volume 2, Chapters 15--22 and appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This final safety evaluation report (FSER) documents the technical review of the System 80+ standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the system 80+ design was submitted by Combustion Engineering, Inc., now Asea Brown Boveri-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR {section} 52.45. System 80+ is a pressurized water reactor with a rated power of 3914 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 3992 MWt at which accidents are analyzed. Many features of the System 80+ are similar to those of ABB-CE`s System 80 design from which it evolved. Unique features of the System 80+ design include: a large spherical, steel containment; an in-containment refueling water storage tank; a reactor cavity flooding system, hydrogen ignitors and a safety depressurization system for severe accident mitigation; a combustion gas turbine for an alternate ac source; and an advanced digitally based control room. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that ABB-CE`s application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the System 80+ standard design. This document, Volume 2, contains Chapters 15 through 22 and Appendices A through E.

  18. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the System 80{sup +} design (Docket No. 52-002). Volume 1, Chapters 1--14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This final safety evaluation report (FSER) documents the technical review of the System 80+ standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the System 80+ design was submitted by Combustion Engineering, Inc., now Asea Brown Boveri-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR {section} 52.45. System 80+ is a pressurized water reactor with a rated power of 3914 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 3992 MWt at which accidents are analyzed. Many features of the System 80+ are similar to those of Abb-CE`s System 80 design from which it evolved. Unique features of the System 80+ design included: a large spherical, steel containment; an in-containment refueling water storage tank; a reactor cavity flooding system, hydrogen ignitors, and a safety depressurization system for severe accident mitigation; a combustion gas turbine for an alternate ac source; and an advanced digitally based control room. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that ABB-CE`s application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the System 80+ standard design. This document, Volume 1, contains Chapters 1 through 14 of this report.

  19. Distribution and abundance of cetaceans in the north-central and western Gulf of Mexico. Final report. Volume 1. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.W.; Fargion, G.S.

    1996-05-24

    The purpose of the study was to determine the distribution and abundance of cetaceans in areas potentially affected by future oil and gas activities along the continental slope of the north-central and western Gulf of Mexico. This 3.75 year project commenced 1 October 1991 and finished 15 July 1995. The study area was bounded by the Florida-Alabama border, the Texas-Mexico border, and the 100 m and 2,000 m isobaths. Cetacean distribution and abundance were determined from seasonal aerial and shipboard visual surveys and shipboard acoustic surveys. In addition, hydrographic data were collected in situ and by satellite remote sensing to characterize cetacean habitat. Finally, tagging and tracking of sperm whales using satellite telemetry was attempted. This volume summarizes the results of the study. Cetaceans were observed throughout the study area during all four seasons. Nineteen species were identified, including two species (melon-headed whales and Fraser`s dolphins) previously thought to be rare in the Gulf. Pantropical spotted dolphins, bottlenose dolphins, clymene dolphins, striped dolphins, Atlantic spotted dolphins, and melon-headed whales were the most common small cetaceans and the sperm whale was the most common large cetacean. The mean annual abundance for all cetaceans was estimated to be 19,198. Although the study area had complex and dynamic oceanography, bottom depth was the only environmental variable which correlated to cetacean distribution.

  20. Distribution and abundance of cetaceans in the north-central and western Gulf of Mexico. Final report. Volume 2. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.W.; Fargion, G.S.

    1996-05-24

    The purpose of the study was to determine the distribution and abundance of cetaceans in areas potentially affected by future oil and gas activities along the continental slope of the north-central and western Gulf of Mexico. This 3.75 year project commenced 1 October 1991 and finished 15 July 1995. The study area was bounded by the Florida-Alabama border, the Texas-Mexico border, and the 100 m and 2,000 m isobaths. Cetacean distribution and abundance were determined from seasonal aerial and shipboard visual surveys and shipboard acoustic surveys. In addition, hydrographic data were collected in situ and by satellite remote sensing to characterize cetacean habitat. Finally, tagging and tracking of sperm whales using satellite telemetry was attempted. This volume summarizes the results of the study. Cetaceans were observed throughout the study area during all four seasons. Nineteen species were identified, including two species (melon-headed whales and Fraser`s dolphins) previously thought to be rare in the Gulf. Pantropical spotted dolphins, bottlenose dolphins, clymene dolphins, striped dolphins, Atlantic spotted dolphins, and melon-headed whales were the most common small cetaceans and the sperm whale was the most common large cetacean. The mean annual abundance for all cetaceans was estimated to be 19,198. Although the study area had complex and dynamic oceanography, bottom depth was the only environmental variable which correlated to cetacean distribution.

  1. Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development-I. Preliminary design report. Volume 3. Appendixes D, E, and F. Phase I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-18

    The conceptual design of a 40 to 50 MW closed cycle ammonia OTEC commercial plant, the preliminary design of a 10 MW OTEC module analogous to the 50 MW module, and the preliminary design of heat exchanger test articles (evaporator and condenser) representative of the 50 MW heat exchangers for testing in OTEC-1 are presented. This volume includes the appendices: D) system equipment (hardware breakdown structure; 10-MW hardware listing; list of support and maintenance equipment, tools and spare parts; sacrificial anodes; M.A.N. brush; and Alclad 3004 data); E) heat exchanger supporting data (analyses/configuration, contract tooling, manufacturing plan, specification, and evaporator ammonia liquid distribution system); and F) rotating machinery (performance characteristics, radial inflow turbine; item descriptions; weight calculation-rotor; producibility analysis; long lead-time items; spares; support equipment; non recurring costs; performance characteristics-axial flow turbine; Worthington pump data; and American M.A.N. Corporation data). Also included is attachment 1 to the phase I final report which presents details of the system modeling; design, materials considerations, and systems analysis of the baseline module; system cost analysis; and supporting data. (WHK)

  2. Extraterrestrial processing and manufacturing of large space systems, volume 1, chapters 1-6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. H.; Smith, D. B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Space program scenarios for production of large space structures from lunar materials are defined. The concept of the space manufacturing facility (SMF) is presented. The manufacturing processes and equipment for the SMF are defined and the conceptual layouts are described for the production of solar cells and arrays, structures and joints, conduits, waveguides, RF equipment radiators, wire cables, and converters. A 'reference' SMF was designed and its operation requirements are described.

  3. Diagnosis of bone and joint disorders. Second edition. Volumes 1-6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resnick, D.; Niwayama, G.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 98 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Plain Film Radiography: Routine and Specialized Techniques and Projections; Plain Film Radiography: Sources of Diagnostic Errors; Magnification Radiography, Xeroradiography; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; and Rheumatoid Arthritis and the Seronegative Spondyloarthropathies: Radiographic and Pathologic Concepts.

  4. Sixth Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Conference: Exposition Topical Areas 1-6. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhim (Compiler)

    2002-01-01

    The Sixth Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Conference provides the scientific community the opportunity to view the current scope of the Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Program, current research opportunities, and plans for the near future. The conference focuses not only on fundamental research but also on applications of this knowledge towards enabling future space exploration missions. A whole session dedicated to biological fluid physics shows increased emphasis that the program has placed on interdisciplinary research. The conference includes invited plenary talks, technical paper presentations, poster presentations, and exhibits. This CP (conference proceeding) is a compilation of the abstracts, presentations, and posters presented at the conference.

  5. Structure of Toxoplasma gondii fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucher, Lauren E.; Bosch, Jürgen, E-mail: jbosch@jhu.edu [Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)

    2014-08-29

    The structure of T. gondii fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase, a glycolytic enzyme and structural component of the invasion machinery, was determined to a resolution of 2.0 Å. The apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii must invade host cells to continue its lifecycle. It invades different cell types using an actomyosin motor that is connected to extracellular adhesins via the bridging protein fructose-1,6-@@bisphosphate aldolase. During invasion, aldolase serves in the role of a structural bridging protein, as opposed to its normal enzymatic role in the glycolysis pathway. Crystal structures of the homologous Plasmodium falciparum fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase have been described previously. Here, T. gondii fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase has been crystallized in space group P22{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with the biologically relevant tetramer in the asymmetric unit, and the structure has been determined via molecular replacement to a resolution of 2.0 Å. An analysis of the quality of the model and of the differences between the four chains in the asymmetric unit and a comparison between the T. gondii and P. falciparum aldolase structures is presented.

  6. Microcomputer-Based Assessment of Preservice Special Education Teachers. Project STEEL. A Special Project To Develop and Implement a Computer-Based Special Teacher Education and Evaluation Laboratory. Volume I. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Theodore W.; And Others

    The document is part of the final report on Project STEEL (Special Teacher Education and Evaluation Laboratory) intended to extend the utilization of technology in the training of preservice special education teachers. This volume focuses on the first of four project objectives, the development and implementation of a microcomputer-based…

  7. Computer-Based Information Management System. Project STEEL. A Special Project To Develop and Implement a Computer-Based Special Teacher Education and Evaluation Laboratory. Volume IV. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Theodore W.; And Others

    The document is part of the final report on Project STEEL (Special Teacher Education and Evaluation Laboratory) intended to extend the utilization of technology in the training of preservice special education teachers. This volume focuses on the fourth of four project objectives, the development and preliminary evaluation of a computer-based…

  8. Special Education Teacher Computer Literacy Training. Project STEEL. A Special Project To Develop and Implement a Computer-Based Special Teacher Education and Evaluation Laboratory. Volume II. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Theodore W.; And Others

    The document is part of the final report on Project STEEL (Special Teacher Education and Evaluation Laboratory) intended to extend the utilization of technology in the training of preservice special education teachers. This volume focuses on the second of four project objectives, the development of a special education teacher computer literacy…

  9. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT). Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers: Volume 3, Appendices O--T. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    Volume 3 contains the following appendices: Appendix O, Second Series-Manual APH Tests; Appendix P, Third Series-Manual APH Tests; Appendix Q, ABB Analysis of Air Preheaters-Final Report; Appendix R, ABB Corrosion Analysis Study; Appendix S, SRI Waste Stream Impacts Study; and Appendix T, Economic Evaluation.

  10. Final Environmental Impact Statement for the construction and operation of Claiborne Enrichment Center, Homer, Louisiana (Docket No. 70-3-70). Volume 2, Public comments and NRC response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeitoun, A. [Science Applications International Corp., Germantown, MD (United States)

    1994-08-01

    The Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) (Volume 1), was prepared by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in accordance with regulation 10 CFR Part 51, which implements the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), to assess the potential environmental impacts for licensing the construction and operation of a proposed gaseous centrifuge enrichment facility to be built in Claiborne Parish, Louisiana by Louisiana Energy Services, L.P. (LES). The proposed facility would have a production capacity of about 866 metric tons annually of up to 5 weight percent enriched UF{sub 6}, using a proven centrifuge technology. Included in the assessment are co on, both normal operations and potential accidents (internal and external events), and the eventual decontamination and decommissioning of the site. In order to help assure that releases from the operation of the facility and potential impacts on the public are as low as reasonably achievable, an environmental monitoring program was developed by LES to detect significant changes in the background levels of uranium around the site. Other issues addressed include the purpose and need for the facility, the alternatives to the proposed action, potential disposition of the tails, the site selection process, and environmental justice. The NRC staff concludes that the facility can be constructed and operated with small and acceptable impacts on the public and the environment, and proposes to issue a license to the applicant, Louisiana Energy Services, to authorize construction and operation of the proposed facility. The letters in this Appendix have been divided into three sections. Section One contains letters to which the NRC responded by addressing specific comments. Section Two contains the letters that concerned the communities of Forest Grove and Center Springs. Section Three is composed of letters that required no response. These letters were generally in support of the facility.

  11. Coating experiment with 1.6-m vacuum evaporation chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Yukiko; Hayashi, Saeko S.; Noguchi, Takeshi; Kanzawa, Tomio; Sasaki, Goro; Torii, Yasuo; Yutani, Masami; Ishikawa, Tsuyoshi

    1998-08-01

    We have conducted a series of coating experiments using the newly installed 1.6 m evaporation chamber at the Advanced Technology Center (ATC) of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. The main task of this chamber is to re-aluminize the 1.6 m mirror of the Infrared Simulator at the ATC. The design concept of the 1.6 m chamber is basically the same with the 8.3 m coating facility for Subaru Telescope. Therefore, we could utilize this chamber to evaluate the fundamental performance of the larger chamber. The extensive coating experiments were done in the spring, autumn of 1996, and autumn of 1997. Reduction of the number of the filaments has lead to the increase in their size, which caused difficulty in the annealing process. Attempts are focused on securing the sufficient metal loads on the filaments. Then the filaments are fired to measure the spray pattern of a single filament exposure, or the uniformity pattern resulted from the full setup of filament arrays. Using small slide glasses, the important parameters of the resultant reflecting film that are the thickness, the uniformity of the thickness, and the spectroscopic reflectance are measured. The absolute value of the reflectivity is estimated to be around 91% immediately after opening the chamber. In order to cover a wide range of observing wavelengths for the Infrared Simulator, and eventually for the optical-IR Subaru Telescope, it is necessary to seek after a higher evaporation rate with these chambers.

  12. Fructose-1,6-diphosphatase deficiency: a treatable neurometabolic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamate, Mahesh; Jambagi, Milind; Gowda, Prashanth; Sonoli, Smita

    2014-09-22

    Fructose-1,6-diphosphatase (FDPase) deficiency is usually considered an inborn error of fructose metabolism, however, strictly speaking it is a defect of gluconeogenesis. The disorder is manifested by the appearance of hypoglycaemia, ketosis and lactic acidosis (neonatally or later during fasting or induced by fructose) and may also be life-threatening. FDPase deficiency can be suspected using simple bedside tests such as glucometer random blood sugar, Benedict's test, Rothera's test and Seliwanoff's test. We report our experience with two cases of FDPase deficiency and review the relevant literature. We also describe the fructosuria in these cases during the crises period, which has not been stressed in the literature.

  13. Solar production of industrial process steam ranging in temperature from 300/sup 0/F to 550/sup 0/F (Phase I). Volume 2. Appendices. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-30

    This volume contains the following appendices: (1) equipment requisitions, (2) instrument list, (3) mechanical subcontract requisition, (4) electrical subcontract requisition, (5) site preparation and subcontract requisition, (6) building subcontract requisition, and (7) job specifications. (MOW)

  14. Industrial Sector Technology Use Model (ISTUM): industrial energy use in the United States, 1974-2000. Volume 3. Appendix on service and fuel demands. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-10-01

    This book is the third volume of the ISTUM report. The first volume of the report describes the primary model logic and the model's data inputs. The second volume lists and evaluates the results of one model run. This and the fourth volume give supplementary information in two sets of model data - the energy consumption base and technology descriptions. Chapter III of Vol. I, Book 1 describes the ISTUM demand base and explains how that demand base was developed. This volume serves as a set of appendices to that chapter. The chapter on demands in Vol. I describes the assumptions and methodology used in constructing the ISTUM demand base; this volume simply lists tables of data from that demand base. This book divides the demand tables into two appendices. Appendix III-1 contains detailed tables on ISTUM fuel-consumption estimates, service-demand forecasts, and size and load-factor distributions. Appendix III-2 contains tables detailing ISTUM allocations of each industry's fuel consumption to service sectors. The tables show how the ECDB was used to develop the ISTUM demand base.

  15. CS1.6黄金体验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阿海

    2003-01-01

    之前推出的1.5版本经过了一个较稳定的阶段之后,《反思精英》(CS)制作小组Valve在今年将发布1.6正式版。随着CS1.6版测试版本的放出,我们终于体验到了“进化”的魅力,经过一段时间的测试、比较,现将新版本中值得注意的改动做一总结。

  16. Comparative ranking of 0. 1 to 10 MW(e) solar thermal electric power systems. Volume I. Summary of results. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kowalik, J.S.; Kriz, T.A.

    1980-08-01

    This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1 to 10 MW(e), operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW(e), a range that is attractive to industrial and other non-utility applications. This volume summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 10 MW(e). Volume II presents data on performance and cost and ranking methodology.

  17. Industrial Sector Technology Use Model (ISTUM): industrial energy use in the United States, 1974-2000. Volume 4. Technology appendix. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-10-01

    Volume IV of the ISTUM documentation gives information on the individual technology specifications, but relates closely with Chapter II of Volume I. The emphasis in that chapter is on providing an overview of where each technology fits into the general-model logic. Volume IV presents the actual cost structure and specification of every technology modeled in ISTUM. The first chapter presents a general overview of the ISTUM technology data base. It includes an explanation of the data base printouts and how the separate-cost building blocks are combined to derive an aggregate-technology cost. The remaining chapters are devoted to documenting the specific-technology cost specifications. Technologies included are: conventional technologies (boiler and non-boiler conventional technologies); fossil-energy technologies (atmospheric fluidized bed combustion, low Btu coal and medium Btu coal gasification); cogeneration (steam, machine drive, and electrolytic service sectors); and solar and geothermal technologies (solar steam, solar space heat, and geothermal steam technologies), and conservation technologies.

  18. District heating and cooling systems for communities through power plant retrofit distribution network, Phase 2. Final report, March 1, 1980-January 31, 1984. Volume 5, Appendix A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-31

    This volume contains the backup data for the portion of the load and service assessment in Section 2, Volume II of this report. This includes: locations of industrial and commercial establishments, locations of high rise buildings, data from the Newark (Essex County) Directory of Business, data from the Hudson County Industrial Directory, data from the N. J. Department of Energy Inventory of Public Buildings, data on commercial and industrial establishments and new developments in the Hackensack Meadowlands, data on urban redevelopment and Operation Breakthrough, and list of streets in the potential district heating areas of Newark/Harrison and Jersey City/Hoboken.

  19. All-printed diode operating at 1.6 GHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, Negar; Robertsson, Mats; Cooper, Philip; Wang, Xin; Svensson, Magnus; Andersson Ersman, Peter; Norberg, Petronella; Nilsson, Marie; Nilsson, David; Liu, Xianjie; Hesselbom, Hjalmar; Akesso, Laurent; Fahlman, Mats; Crispin, Xavier; Engquist, Isak; Berggren, Magnus; Gustafsson, Göran

    2014-08-19

    Printed electronics are considered for wireless electronic tags and sensors within the future Internet-of-things (IoT) concept. As a consequence of the low charge carrier mobility of present printable organic and inorganic semiconductors, the operational frequency of printed rectifiers is not high enough to enable direct communication and powering between mobile phones and printed e-tags. Here, we report an all-printed diode operating up to 1.6 GHz. The device, based on two stacked layers of Si and NbSi2 particles, is manufactured on a flexible substrate at low temperature and in ambient atmosphere. The high charge carrier mobility of the Si microparticles allows device operation to occur in the charge injection-limited regime. The asymmetry of the oxide layers in the resulting device stack leads to rectification of tunneling current. Printed diodes were combined with antennas and electrochromic displays to form an all-printed e-tag. The harvested signal from a Global System for Mobile Communications mobile phone was used to update the display. Our findings demonstrate a new communication pathway for printed electronics within IoT applications.

  20. Efficient 1.6 Micron Laser Source for Methane DIAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, Timothy; Burnham, Ralph; Nehrir, Amin R.; Ismail, Syed; Hair, Johnathan W.

    2013-01-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas and on a per molecule basis has a warming influence 72 times that of carbon dioxide over a 20 year horizon. Therefore, it is important to look at near term radiative effects due to methane to develop mitigation strategies to counteract global warming trends via ground and airborne based measurements systems. These systems require the development of a time-resolved DIAL capability using a narrow-line laser source allowing observation of atmospheric methane on local, regional and global scales. In this work, a demonstrated and efficient nonlinear conversion scheme meeting the performance requirements of a deployable methane DIAL system is presented. By combining a single frequency 1064 nm pump source and a seeded KTP OPO more than 5 mJ of 1.6 µm pulse energy is generated with conversion efficiencies in excess of 20%. Even without active cavity control instrument limited linewidths (50 pm) were achieved with an estimated spectral purity of 95%. Tunable operation over 400 pm (limited by the tuning range of the seed laser) was also demonstrated. This source demonstrated the critical needs for a methane DIAL system motivating additional development of the technology.

  1. The impact of protocluster environments at z = 1.6

    CERN Document Server

    Hatch, N A; Muldrew, S I; Hartley, W G; Almaini, O; Conselice, C J; Simpson, C J

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the effects of dense environments on galaxy evolution by examining how the properties of galaxies in the z = 1.6 protocluster Cl 0218.3-0510 depend on their location. We determine galaxy properties using spectral energy distribution fitting to 14-band photometry, including data at three wavelengths that tightly bracket the Balmer and 4000A breaks of the protocluster galaxies. We find that two-thirds of the protocluster galaxies, which lie between several compact groups, are indistinguishable from field galaxies. The other third, which reside within the groups, differ significantly from the intergroup galaxies in both colour and specific star formation rate. We find that the fraction of red galaxies within the massive protocluster groups is twice that of the intergroup region. These excess red galaxies are due to enhanced fractions of both passive galaxies (1.7 times that of the intergroup region) and dusty star-forming galaxies (3 times that of the intergroup region). We infer that some protocl...

  2. District heating and cooling systems for communities through power plant retrofit distribution network. Phase 2. Final report, 1 March 1980-31 January 1984. Volume VII. Appendix C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-31

    This volume contains: Hudson No. 2 Limited Retrofit Cost Estimates provided by Stone and Webster Engineering Corp. (SWEC); backup data and basis of estimate for SWEC Heater Plant and Gas Turbine Plant (Kearny No. 12) cost estimates; and Appendices - Analysis of Relevant Tax Laws.

  3. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant: Niles Station Boiler No. 2. Volume 1, Sampling/results/special topics: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This study was one of a group of assessments of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants, conducted for US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE-PETC) during 1993. The motivation for those assessments was the mandate in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments that a study be made of emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from electrical utilities. The results of this study will be used by the US Environmental Protection Agency to evaluate whether regulation of HAPs emissions from utilities is warranted. This report is organized in two volumes. Volume 1: Sampling/Results/Special Topics describes the sampling effort conducted as the basis for this study, presents the concentration data on toxic chemicals in the several power plant streams, and reports the results of evaluations and calculations conducted with those data. The Special Topics section of Volume 1 reports on issues such as comparison of sampling methods and vapor/particle distributions of toxic chemicals. Volume 2: Appendices include field sampling data sheets, quality assurance results, and uncertainty calculations. The chemicals measured at Niles Boiler No. 2 were the following: five major and 16 trace elements, including mercury, chromium, cadmium, lead, selenium, arsenic, beryllium, and nickel; acids and corresponding anions (HCl, HF, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate); ammonia and cyanide; elemental carbon; radionuclides; volatile organic compounds (VOC); semivolatile compounds (SVOC) including polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and polychlorinated dioxins and furans; and aldehydes.

  4. Remedial actions at the former Climax Uranium Company, Uranium Mill site, Grand Junction, Mesa County, Colorado. Volume 2, Appendices: Final environmental impact statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1986-12-01

    This volume contains Appendix F--hydrology report, and Appendix G--flood plain and wetland assessment. Contents of the hydrology report include: surface water; ground water; potentially affected hydrogeologic environment-processing site; potentially affected hydrogeologic environment-Cheney reservoir site; potentially affected hydrogeologic environment-Two Road site; and conclusions-ground water.

  5. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing an ESP/wet FGD system. Final report, Volume 2 of 2 - appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This volume contains the appendices for a coal-fired power plant toxic emissions study. Included are Process data log sheets from Coal Creek, Auditing information, Sampling protocol, Field sampling data sheets, Quality assurance/quality control, Analytical protocol, and Uncertainty analyses.

  6. Mirror Fusion Test Facility-B (MFTF-B) axicell configuration: NbTi magnet system. Manufacturing/producibility final report. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritschel, A.J.; White, W.L.

    1985-05-01

    This Final MFTF-B Manufacturing/Producibility Report covers facilities, tooling plan, manufacturing sequence, schedule and performance, producibility, and lessons learned for the solenoid, axicell, and transition coils, as well as a deactivation plan, conclusions, references, and appendices.

  7. A study of fiber volume fraction effects in notched unidirectional SCS-6/Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn composite. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covey, Steven J.

    1993-01-01

    Notched unidirectional SCS-6/Ti-15-3 composite of three different fiber volume fractions (vf = 0.15, 0.37, and 0.41) was investigated for various room temperature microstructural and material properties including: fatigue crack initiation, fatigue crack growth, and fracture toughness. While the matrix hardness is similar for all fiber volume fractions, the fiber/matrix interfacial shear strength and matrix residual stress increases with fiber volume fraction. The composite fatigue crack initiation stress is shown to be matrix controlled and occurs when the net maximum matrix stress approaches the endurance limit stress of the matrix. A model is presented which includes residual stresses and presents the composite initiation stress as a function of fiber volume fraction. This model predicts a maximum composite initiation stress at vf approximately 0.15 which agrees with the experimental data. The applied composite stress levels were increased as necessary for continued crack growth. The applied Delta(K) values at crack arrest increase with fiber volume fraction by an amount better approximated using an energy based formulation rather than when scaled linear with modulus. After crack arrest, the crack growth rate exponents for vf37 and vf41 were much lower and toughness much higher, when compared to the unreinforced matrix, because of the bridged region which parades with the propagating fatigue crack. However, the vf15 material exhibited a higher crack growth rate exponent and lower toughness than the unreinforced matrix because once the bridged fibers nearest the crack mouth broke, the stress redistribution broke all bridged fibers, leaving an unbridged crack. Degraded, unbridged behavior is modeled using the residual stress state in the matrix ahead of the crack tip. Plastic zone sizes were directly measured using a metallographic technique and allow prediction of an effective matrix stress intensity which agrees with the fiber pressure model if residual stresses

  8. Efeitos de diferentes volumes correntes e da pressão expiratória final positiva sobre a troca gasosa na fístula broncopleural experimental Effects of different tidal volumes and positive end expiratory pressure on gas exchange in experimental bronchopleural fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Gabriela Cavicchia Toneloto

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O presente estudo foi desenhado para identificar o efeito da pressão expiratória final positiva (PEEP e o volume corrente pulmonar ideal para ventilar animais com fístula broncopleural produzida cirurgicamente, com o intuito de reduzir a vazão da fístula sem afetar a troca gasosa. MÉTODOS: Avaliação hemodinâmica e respiratória da troca gasosa foi obtida em cinco porcos jovens, saudáveis, da linhagem Large White, ventilados mecanicamente no modo ventilatório volume controlado com FiO2 de 0.4 e relação inspiração:expiração em torno de 1:2, com freqüência respiratória mantida em 22 cpm. A fístula broncopleural foi produzida pela ressecção da língula. Um sistema de drenagem a selo d'água foi instalado e o tórax foi hermeticamente fechado. A troca gasosa e o débito da fístula broncopleural foram medidos com animais ventilados sequencialmente com volumes correntes de 4 ml/kg, 7 ml/kg e 10 ml/Kg alternando zero de pressão expiratória final positiva (ZEEP e PEEP de 10 cmH2O, sempre na mesma ordem. RESULTADOS: Esses dados são atribuídos à ventilação alveolar reduzida e às anormalidades da ventilação/perfusão que foram atenuadas com volumes correntes mais altos. PEEP aumentou o vazamento de ar pela fístula, mesmo com baixos volumes, de 2.0 ± 2,8mL para 31 ± 20,7mL (p= 0,006 e diminuiu a ventilação alveolar em todos os volumes correntes. A ventilação alveolar melhorou com altos volumes correntes, mas aumentou o débito da fístula (4 ml/kg - 2,0 ± 2,8mL e 10 mL/kg - 80,2 ± 43,9mL; p=0,001. Baixos volumes correntes resultaram em hipercapnia (ZEEP - 83,7± 6,9 mmHg e com PEEP 10 -93 ± 10,1mmHg e diminuição significativa da saturação de oxigênio arterial, em torno de 84%. CONCLUSÃO: O volume corrente de 7 ml/kg com ZEEP foi considerado o melhor volume corrente, visto que, apesar da hipercapnia moderada, a saturação de oxigênio arterial é sustentada em torno de 90%. A ventilação alveolar

  9. Applied research on energy storage and conversion for photovoltaic and wind energy systems. Volume II. Photovoltaic systems with energy storage. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    This volume of the General Electric study was directed at an evaluation of those energy storage technologies deemed best suited for use in conjunction with a photovoltaic energy conversion system in utility, residential and intermediate applications. Break-even cost goals are developed for several storage technologies in each application. These break-even costs are then compared with cost projections presented in Volume I of this report to show technologies and time frames of potential economic viability. The form of the presentation allows the reader to use more accurate storage system cost data as they become available. The report summarizes the investigations performed and presents the results, conclusions and recommendations pertaining to use of energy storage with photovoltaic energy conversion systems. Candidate storage concepts studied include (1) above ground and underground pumped hydro, (2) underground compressed air, (3) electric batteries, (4) flywheels, and (5) hydrogen production and storage. (WHK)

  10. Line-focus solar central power system, Phase I. Final report, 29 September 1978 to 30 April 1980. Volume III. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slemmons, A J

    1980-04-01

    The conceptual design, parametric analysis, cost and performance analysis, and commercial assessment of a 100-MWe line-focus solar central receiver power plant are reported. This volume contains the appendices: (a) methods of determination of molten salt heat-transfer coefficients and tube-wall temperatures, (b) inputs for STEAEC programs, (c) description of system analysis computer program, (d) receiver analysis program, and (e) heliostat production plan and design methodology. (WHK)

  11. Staff Working Papers of the Drug Law Evaluation Project. A Companion Volume to the Final Report of the Joint Committee of New York Drug Law Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978

    The papers in this volume were prepared as part of an evaluation of the effects of the strict 1973 New York State drug laws. The first paper explores the effects of the laws on heroin use. It analyzes the trends of various indicators of heroin use in New York State over a period of several years. In order to isolate movements unique to New York,…

  12. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing an ESP/Wet FGD system. Volume 1, Sampling, results, and special topics: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This was one of a group of assessments of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants, conducted for DOE-PETC in 1993 as mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act. It is organized into 2 volumes; Volume 1 describes the sampling effort, presents the concentration data on toxic chemicals in several power plant streams, and reports the results of evaluations and calculations. The study involved solid, liquid, and gaseous samples from input, output, and process streams at Coal Creek Station Unit No. 1, Underwood, North Dakota (1100 MW mine-mouth plant burning lignite from the Falkirk mine located adjacent to the plant). This plant had an electrostatic precipitator and a wet scrubber flue gas desulfurization unit. Measurements were conducted on June 21--24, 26, and 27, 1993; chemicals measured were 6 major and 16 trace elements (including Hg, Cr, Cd, Pb, Se, As, Be, Ni), acids and corresponding anions (HCl, HF, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate), ammonia and cyanide, elemental C, radionuclides, VOCs, semivolatiles (incl. PAH, polychlorinated dioxins, furans), and aldehydes. Volume 2: Appendices includes process data log sheets, field sampling data sheets, uncertainty calculations, and quality assurance results.

  13. Comparative ranking of 0. 1-10 MW/sub e/ solar thermal electric power systems. Volume II. Supporting data. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kriz, T.A.

    1980-07-01

    This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1-10 MW/sub e/, operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW/sub e/, a range that is attractive to industrial and other nonutility applications. Volume I summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 1.0 MW/sub e/. Volume II presents data on the performance and cost and ranking methodology.

  14. Research investigations in oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, and advanced fuels research: Volume 1 -- Base program. Final report, October 1986--September 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, V.E.

    1994-05-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted in five principal areas: oil shale, tar sand, underground coal gasification, advanced process technology, and advanced fuels research. In subsequent years, underground coal gasification was broadened to be coal research, under which several research activities were conducted that related to coal processing. The most significant change occurred in 1989 when the agreement was redefined as a Base Program and a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP). Investigations were conducted under the Base Program to determine the physical and chemical properties of materials suitable for conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels, to test and evaluate processes and innovative concepts for such conversions, to monitor and determine environmental impacts related to development of commercial-sized operations, and to evaluate methods for mitigation of potential environmental impacts. This report is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 consists of 28 summaries that describe the principal research efforts conducted under the Base Program in five topic areas. Volume 2 describes tasks performed within the JSRP. Research conducted under this agreement has resulted in technology transfer of a variety of energy-related research information. A listing of related publications and presentations is given at the end of each research topic summary. More specific and detailed information is provided in the topical reports referenced in the related publications listings.

  15. Turbine fuels from tar sands bitumen and heavy oil. Volume 1. Phase 3. Pilot plant testing, final design, and economics. Final report, 1 June 1985-31 March 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talbot, A.F.; Carson, T.C.; Magill, L.G.; Swesey, J.R.

    1987-08-01

    Pilot-plant-scale demonstration of an upgrading/refining scheme to convert bitumen or heavy crude oil into high yields of specification-quality aviation turbine fuel was performed. An atmospheric residue from San Ardo (California) crude was converted under hydrovisbreaking conditions to synthetic crude for further refining. Naphtha cuts from the straight run and synthetic crude were combined, catalytically hydrotreated, then hydrocracked. Products from these operations were combined to produce two prototype specification fuels (JP-4 and JP-8) as well as two heavier, variable-quality fuels. An engineering design (Volume II) was developed for a 50,000 BPSD grass-roots refinery, from the pilot-plant operations. Capital investment and operating costs were estimated, and fuel manufacturing costs projected. Conclusions and recommendations for further work are included.

  16. Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development: I. Preliminary design report. Phase I. Volume 5. Appendixes H, I, J, and K. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-18

    The conceptual design of a 40 to 50 MW closed cycle ammonia OTEC commercial plant, the preliminary design of a 10 MW OTEC module analogous to the 50 MW module, and the preliminary design of heat exchanger test articles (evaporator and condenser) representative of the 50 MW heat exchangers for testing in OTEC-1 are presented. This volume of the report includes the following appendices: H) conceptual design description of the electrical systems; I) control and instrumentation; J) OTEC power module assembly; and K) cost estimates for each of the cost components. (WHK)

  17. Remedial investigation report. Alpena combat readiness training center Alpena County Regional Airport, Michigan Air National Guard, Alpena, Michigan. Volume 3. Appendices A - I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    Remedial Investigation Report of Sites 1-9 at Alpens CRTC,. Alpena MI. Volume III Appendicies A-I. A remedial investigation was performed on 9 sites at the Alpena CRTC to determine the extent of contamination at the sites. The sites involved in this investigation include: Site 1 POL Storage Area; Site 2 Motor Pool Area; Site 3 Former Garage; Site 4 Third Fire Training Area; Site 5 Second Fire Training Area; Site 3 Former Landfill; Site 7 First Fire Training Area; Site 8 Former Hanger 9; Site 10 Hazardous Waste Storage Area. Soil and groundwater contamination above state action levels was found at the sites An FS has been initiated.

  18. Industrial Sector Technology Use Model (ISTUM): industrial energy use in the United States, 1974-2000. Volume 1. Primary model documentation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohn, Roger E.; Herod, J. Steven; Andrews, Gwen L.; Budzik, Philip M.; Eissenstat, Richard S.; Grossmann, John R.; Reiner, Gary M.; Roschke, Thomas E.; Shulman, Michael J.; Toppen, Timothy R.; Veno, William R.; Violette, Daniel M.; Smolinski, Michael D.; Habel, Deborah; Cook, Alvin E.

    1979-10-01

    ISTUM is designed to predict the commercial market penetration of various energy technologies in the industrial sector out to the year 2000. It is a refinement and further development of Market Oriented Program Planning Study task force in 1977. ISTUM assesses the comparative economic competitiveness of each technology and competes over 100 energy technologies - conventionals, fossil/energy, conservation, cogeneration, solar, and geothermal. A broad overview of the model, the solution of the model, and an in-depth discussion of strength and limitations of the model are provided in Volume I. (MCW)

  19. NURE aerial gamma-ray and magnetic reconnaissance survey of portions of New Mexico, Arizona and Texas. Volume II. New Mexico-Las Cruces NI 13-10 Quadrangle. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-09-01

    The results of a high-sensitivity, aerial gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey of the Las Cruces two degree quadrangle, New Mexico, are presented. Instrumentation and methods are described in Volume 1 of this final report. The work was done by Carson Helicopters, Inc., and International Exploration, Inc. The work was performed for the US Department of Energy - National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. Analysis of this radiometric data yielded 192 statistically significant eU anomalies. Of this number, thirty-nine were considered to be of sufficient strength to warrant further investigation.

  20. SRC burn test in 700-hp oil-designed boiler. Volume 2. Engineering evaluation report. Final technical report. [Oil-fired boiler to solvent-refined coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-12-01

    Volume 2 of this report gives the results of an engineering evaluation study and economic analysis of converting an existing 560-MW residual (No. 6) oil-fired unit to burn solvent refined coal (SRC) fuel forms. Volume 1 represents an integrated overview of the test program conducted at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. Three SRC forms (pulverized SRC, a solution of SRC dissolved in process-derived distillates, and a slurry of SRC and water) were examined. The scope of modifications necessary to convert the unit to each of the three SRC fuel forms was identified and a capital cost of the necessary modifications estimated. A fuel conversion feasibility study of the boiler was performed wherein boiler modifications and performance effects of each fuel on the boiler were identified. An economic analysis of the capital and operating fuel expenses of conversion of the unit was performed. It was determined that conversion of the unit to any one of the three SRC fuel forms was feasible where appropriate modifications were made. It also was determined that the conversion of the unit can be economically attractive if SRC fuel forms can be manufactured and sold at prices discounted somewhat from the price of No. 16 Fuel Oil. As expected, greater discounts are required for the pulverized SRC and the slurry than for the solution of SRC dissolved in process-derived distillates.

  1. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado. Volume 2, Appendices D and E: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    This appendix assesses the present conditions and data gathered about the two inactive uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado, and the designated disposal site six miles north of Rifle in the area of Estes Gulch. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP). The data characterize conditions at the mill, tailings, and disposal site so that the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) may complete final designs for the remedial actions.

  2. Installation restoration program remedial investigation report. Volume 1. Sections 1-3. Alpena combat readiness training center, Alpena County Regional Airport, Michigan National Guard, Alpena, Michigan. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    This report is Volume 1, Sections 1-3 of the Remedial Investigation Report of Sites 1-9 at Alpens CRTC, Alpena MI. A remedial investigation was performed on 9 sites at the Alpena CRTC to determine the extent of contamination at the sites. The sites involved in this investigation include: Site 1, POL Storage Area; Site 2, Motor Pool Area; Site 3, Former Garage; Site 4, Third Fire Training Area; Site 5, Second Fire Training Area; Site 6, Former Landfill; Site 7, First Fire Training Area; Site 8, Former Hanger 9; and Site 9, Hazardous Waste Storage Area. Soil and groundwater contamination above state action levels was found at the sites. An FS has been initiated.

  3. New Concepts in Fish Ladder Design, Volume III of IV, Assessment of Fishway Development and Design, 1982-1983 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Patrick D.; Orsborn, John F.

    1985-08-01

    This volume covers the broad, though relatively short, historical basis for this project. The historical developments of certain design features, criteria and research activities are traced. Current design practices are summarized based on the results of an international survey and interviews with agency personnel and consultants. The fluid mechanics and hydraulics of fishway systems are discussed. Fishways (or fishpasses) can be classified in two ways: (1) on the basis of the method of water control (chutes, steps (ladders), or slots); and (2) on the basis of the degree and type of water control. This degree of control ranges from a natural waterfall to a totally artificial environment at a hatchery. Systematic procedures for analyzing fishways based on their configuration, species, and hydraulics are presented. Discussions of fish capabilities, energy expenditure, attraction flow, stress and other factors are included.

  4. Techniques for mapping the types, volumes, and distribution of clays in petroleum reservoirs and for determining their effects on oil production. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, B.

    1993-05-01

    This report presents the results of correlation of log signatures with information on distribution of the types and volumes of clays in sandstone pore spaces determined from detailed CT-scan, XRD, SEM, and thin section analyses of core samples from three sandstone reservoirs. The log signatures are then analyzed to determine if suitable mathematical/statistical parameter(s) could be calculated from the logs to determine their effects on permeability and oil production. The variability measures obtained from power spectral analysis of permeability and wireline log data in clayey formations have been correlated with oil production from two oil fields. Compared with the conventional measures of permeability variations like the Dykstra-Parsons coefficients, the new measure appears to correlate better with oil production.

  5. West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine-disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume II. Physical and chemical oceanography. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.)

    1983-02-01

    This project centers around the Strategic Petroleum Site (SPR) known as the West Hackberry salt dome which is located in southwestern Louisiana, and which is designed to store 241 million barrels of crude oil. Oil storage caverns are formed by injecting water into salt deposits, and pumping out the resulting brine. Studies described in this report were designed as follow-on studies to three months of pre-discharge characterization work, and include data collected during the first year of brine leaching operations. The objectives were to: (1) characterize the environment in terms of physical, chemical and biological attributes; (2) determine if significant adverse changes in ecosystem productivity and stability of the biological community are occurring as a result of brine discharge; and (3) determine the magnitude of any change observed. Contents of Volume II include: introduction; physical oceanography; estuarine hydrology and hydrography; analysis of discharge plume; and water and sediment quality.

  6. Applied research on energy storage and conversion for photovoltaic and wind energy systems. Volume III. Wind conversion systems with energy storage. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    The variability of energy output inherent in wind energy conversion systems (WECS) has led to the investigation of energy storage as a means of managing the available energy when immediate, direct use is not possible or desirable. This portion of the General Electric study was directed at an evaluation of those energy storage technologies deemed best suited for use in conjunction with a wind energy conversion system in utility, residential and intermediate applications. Break-even cost goals are developed for several storage technologies in each application. These break-even costs are then compared with cost projections presented in Volume I of this report to show technologies and time frames of potential economic viability. The report summarizes the investigations performed and presents the results, conclusions and recommendations pertaining to use of energy storage with wind energy conversion systems.

  7. Problem definition study on techniques and methodologies for evaluating the chemical and toxicological properties of combustion products of gun systems, Volume 1: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, R.H.; Pal, B.C.; Lock, S.; Ramsey, R.S.; Jenkins, R.A.; Griest, W.H.; Guerin, M.R.

    1988-03-01

    Gun exhaust is a complex mixture of both organic and inorganic chemical species. Similar to other mixtures, it has both vapor and particulate phases. This report contains information concerning the chemical characterization of gun exhaust and offers recommendations for its chemical and toxicological investigation. Propellent compositions used in munitions are all nitrocellulose based but are categorized by the inclusion of the other major ingredients (i.e., single-based propellants contain nitrocellulose only, double-base propellants contain nitrocellulose and nitroglycerin, and triple-base propellants contain nitrocellulose, nitroguanidine, and nitroglycerin). The principal decomposition products present in gun exhaust are carbon monoxide, hydrogen, carbon dixiode, water, and nitrogen (approximately 99% by volume). A number of minor products have been reported to be present in gun exhaust including nitrogen oxides, ammonia, inorganic particulates (e.g., lead and copper), and polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons (of unknown origin). 233 refs., 19 figs., 19 tabs.

  8. Sweet Lake geopressured-geothermal project, Magma Gulf-Technadril/DOE Amoco fee. Volume III. Final report. Annual report, February 1982-March 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durham, C.O. Jr.; O' Brien, F.D.; Rodgers, R.W. (eds.)

    1985-01-01

    This report presents the results of the testing of Sand 3 (15,245 to 15,280 feet in depth) which occurred from November 1983 to March 1984 and evaluates these new data in comparison to results from the testing of Sand 5 (15,385 to 15,415 feet in depth) which occurred from June 1981 to February 1982. It also describes the reworking of the production and salt water disposal wells preparatory to the Sand 3 testing as well as the plug and abandon procedures requested to terminate the project. The volume contains two parts: Part 1 includes the text and accompanying plates, figures and tables; Part 2 consists of the appendixes including auxiliary reports and tabulations.

  9. West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine-disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume IV. Bibliography and supporting data for physical oceanography. Final report. [421 references

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.)

    1983-02-01

    This project centers around the Strategic Petroleum Site (SPR) known as the West Hackberry salt dome which is located in southwestern Louisiana and which is designed to store 241 million barrels of crude oil. Oil storage caverns are formed by injecting water into salt deposits, and pumping out the resulting brine. Studies described in this report were designed as follow-on studies to three months of pre-discharge characterization work, and include data collected during the first year of brine leaching operations. The objectives were to: (1) characterize the environment in terms of physical, chemical and biological attributes; (2) determine if significant adverse changes in ecosystem productivity and stability of the biological community are occurring as a result of brine discharge; and (3) determine the magnitude of any change observed. Volume IV contains the following: bibliography; appendices for supporting data for physical oceanography, and summary of the physical oceanography along the western Louisiana coast.

  10. Criteria for the development and use of the methodology for environmentally-acceptable fossil energy site evaluation and selection. Volume 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckstein, L.; Northrop, G.; Scott, R.

    1980-02-01

    This report serves as a companion document to the report, Volume 1: Environmentally-Acceptable Fossil Energy Site Evaluation and Selection: Methodology and Users Guide, in which a methodology was developed which allows the siting of fossil fuel conversion facilities in areas with the least environmental impact. The methodology, known as SELECS (Site Evaluation for Energy Conversion Systems) does not replace a site specific environmental assessment, or an environmental impact statement (EIS), but does enhance the value of an EIS by thinning down the number of options to a manageable level, by doing this in an objective, open and selective manner, and by providing preliminary assessment and procedures which can be utilized during the research and writing of the actual impact statement.

  11. Applied research on energy storage and conversion for photovoltaic and wind energy systems. Volume I. Study summary and concept screening. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    This study was directed at a review of storage technologies, and particularly those which might be best suited for use in conjunction with wind and photovoltaics. The potential ''worth'' added by incorporating storage was extensively analyzed for both wind and photovoltaics. Energy storage concepts studied include (1) above ground pumped hydro storage, (2) underground pumped hydro storage, (3) thermal storage-oil, (4) thermal storage-steam, (5) underground compressed air storage, (6) pneumatic storage, (7) lead-acid batteries, (8) advanced batteries, (9) inertial storage (flywheel), (10) hydrogen generation and storage, and (11) superconducting magnetic energy storage. The investigations performed and the major results, conclusions, and recommendations are presented in this volume. (WHK)

  12. Continuous emission monitoring for industrial boilers, General Motors Corporation, Assembly Division, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume I. System configuration and results of the operational test period. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huckabee, D.; Diamond, S.; Porter, T.; McGlew, P.

    1980-06-01

    The objective of this program was to continuously monitor sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) removal efficiencies of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system installed an industrial boiler for 30 days. The data will be used to substantiate the applicability of extractive monitors to industrial boilers and to aid in formulating New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for industrial boilers. The monitoring program was conducted at the General Motors Corporation, Assembly Division, located in St. Louis, Missouri, during the period of December 27, 1979 through March 8, 1980. Sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) and oxygen (O/sub 2/) concentrations were measured on a dry basis concurrently at both the inlet and outlet of the FGD system controlling the exhaust from one coal-fired boiler. Before commencing the monitoring program the analyzers were subjected to draft Performance Specification Tests (PST) delineated in 40 CFR 60 Appendix B, PST 2 and 3 proposed revisions, October 10, 1979. Throughout the 30-day program, abbreviated accuracy tests were conducted for both SO/sub 2/ and O/sub 2/ monitors and complete accuracy tests were conducted at the conclusion of the program. During the 30-day program, three simultaneous Method 5 particulate tests were conducted at the scrubber inlet and outlet. Component failure and electrical problems delayed the start date for monitoring from January 1, 1980 until February 3, 1980. Once these problems were rectified, the conditioning period was completed and the 30 days of data collection was begun. The report is contained in three volumes. Volume I is a compilation of the following: description of the combustion unit; description of the FGD system; description of monitoring data and process data acquisition, and data reduction; description of the monitoring program; description of the PSTs; results and conclusion of the PST and particulate tests; and quality assurance procedures.

  13. Remedial actions at the former Vitro Rare Metals plant site, Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania. Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume II. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-07-01

    This report provides a summary of the conceptual design and other information necessary to understand the proposed remedial action at the expanded Canonsburg, Pennsylvania site. This design constitutes the current approach to stabilizing the radioactively contaminated materials in place in a manner that would fully protect the public health and environment. This summary is intended to provide sufficient detail for the reader to understand the proposed remedial action and the anticipated environmental impacts. The site conceptual design has been developed using available data. In some cases, elements of the design have not been developed fully and will be made final during the detailed design process.

  14. Space transfer concepts and analysis for exploration missions. Implementation plan and element description document (draft final). Volume 4: Solar electric propulsion vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-01

    This document presents the solar electric propulsion (SEP) concept design developed as part of the Space Transfer Concepts and Analysis for Exploration Missions (STCAEM) study. The evolution of the SEP concept is described along with the requirements, guidelines and assumptions for the design. Operating modes and options are defined and a systems description of the vehicle is presented. Artificial gravity configuration options and space and ground support systems are discussed. Finally, an implementation plan is presented which addresses technology needs, schedules, facilities, and costs.

  15. Space transfer concepts and analysis for exploration missions. Implementation plan and element description document (draft final). Volume 3: Nuclear thermal rocket vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    This document presents the nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) concept design developed in support of the Space Transfer Concepts and Analysis for Exploration Missions (STCAEM) study. The evolution of the NTR concept is described along with the requirements, guidelines and assumptions for the design. Operating modes and options are defined and a systems description of the vehicle is presented. Artificial gravity configuration options and space and ground support systems are discussed. Finally, an implementation plan is presented which addresses technology needs, schedules, facilities and costs.

  16. Gulf of Mexico Sales 147 and 150: Central and Western planning areas. Final environmental impact statement, Volume 1: Sections 1 through 4.C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    This Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) covers the proposed 1994 Gulf of Mexico OCS oil and gas lease sales [Central Gulf of Mexico Sale 147 (March 1994) and Western Gulf of Mexico Sale 150 (August 1994)]. This document includes the purpose and background of the proposed actions, the alternatives, the descriptions of the affected environment, and the potential environmental impacts of the proposed actions and alternatives. Proposed mitigating measures and their effects are analyzed, in addition to potential cumulative impacts resulting from proposed activities.

  17. Complexes of Peptide Blockers with Kv1.6 Pore Domain: Molecular Modeling and Studies with KcsA-Kv1.6 Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekrasova, O V; Volyntseva, A D; Kudryashova, K S; Novoseletsky, V N; Lyapina, E A; Illarionova, A V; Yakimov, S A; Korolkova, Yu V; Shaitan, K V; Kirpichnikov, M P; Feofanov, A V

    2016-09-17

    Potassium voltage-gated Kv1.6 channel, which is distributed primarily in neurons of central and peripheral nervous systems, is of significant physiological importance. To date, several high-affinity Kv1.6-channel blockers are known, but the lack of selective ones among them hampers the studies of tissue localization and functioning of Kv1.6 channels. Here we present an approach to advanced understanding of interactions of peptide toxin blockers with a Kv1.6 pore. It combines molecular modeling studies and an application of a new bioengineering system based on a KcsA-Kv1.6 hybrid channel for the quantitative fluorescent analysis of blocker-channel interactions. Using this system we demonstrate that peptide toxins agitoxin 2, kaliotoxin1 and OSK1 have similar high affinity to the extracellular vestibule of the K(+)-conducting pore of Kv1.6, hetlaxin is a low-affinity ligand, whereas margatoxin and scyllatoxin do not bind to Kv1.6 pore. Binding of toxins to Kv1.6 pore has considerable inverse dependence on the ionic strength. Model structures of KcsA-Kv1.6 and Kv1.6 complexes with agitoxin 2, kaliotoxin 1 and OSK1 were obtained using homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulation. Interaction interfaces, which are formed by 15-19 toxin residues and 10 channel residues, are described and compared. Specific sites of Kv1.6 pore recognition are identified for targeting of peptide blockers. Analysis of interactions between agitoxin 2 derivatives with point mutations (S7K, S11G, L19S, R31G) and KcsA-Kv1.6 confirms reliability of the calculated complex structure.

  18. District heating and cooling systems for communities through power plant retrofit distribution network, Phase 2. Final report, 1 March 1980-31 January 1984. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-31

    This volume begins with an Introduction summarizing the history, methodology and scope of the study, the project team members and the private and public groups consulted in the course of the study. The Load and Service Area Assessment follows, including: a compilation and analysis of existing statistical thermal load data from census data, industrial directories, PSE and G records and other sources; an analysis of responses to a detailed, 4-page thermal load questionnaire; data on public buildings and fuel and energy use provided by the New Jersey Dept. of Energy; and results of other customer surveys conducted by PSE and G. A discussion of institutional questions follows. The general topic of rates is then discussed, including a draft hypothetical Tariff for Thermal Services. Financial considerations are discussed including a report identifying alternative ownership/financing options for district heating systems and the tax implications of these options. Four of these options were then selected by PSE and G and a financial (cash-flow) analysis done (by the PSE and G System Planning Dept.) in comparison with a conventional heating alternative. Year-by-year cost of heat ($/10/sup 6/ Btu) was calculated and tabulated, and the various options compared.

  19. Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 1 (Main text and Appendix I, sections 1--4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

    1998-08-01

    This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 1 contains the main body of the report and the first 4 sections of Appendix 1: Modeling of black liquor recovery boilers -- summary report; Flow and heat transfer modeling in the upper furnace of a kraft recovery boiler; Numerical simulation of black liquor combustion; and Investigation of turbulence models and prediction of swirling flows for kraft recovery furnaces.

  20. Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power Systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Final report. Volume II, Book 1. Conceptual design, Sections 1 through 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-01

    The overall, long-term objective of the Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power System program is to identify, characterize, and ultimately demonstrate the viability and cost effectiveness of solar/fossil, steam Rankine cycle, hybrid power systems that: (1) consist of a combined solar central receiver energy source and a nonsolar energy source at a single, common site, (2) may operate in the base, intermediate, and peaking capacity modes, (3) produce the rated output independent of variations in solar insolation, (4) provide a significant savings (50% or more) in fuel consumption, and (5) produce power at the minimum possible cost in mills/kWh. It is essential that these hybrid concepts be technically feasible and economically competitive with other systems in the near to mid-term time period (1985-1990) on a commercial scale. The program objective for Phase I is to identify and conceptually characterize solar/fossil steam Rankine cycle, commercial-scale, power plant systems that are economically viable and technically feasible. This volume presents in detail the market analysis, parametric analysis, and the selection process for the preferred system. (WHK)

  1. Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power Systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Final report. Volume II, Book 2. Conceptual design, Sections 5 and 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-01

    The overall, long-term objective of the Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power System program is to identify, characterize, and ultimately demonstrate the viability and cost effectiveness of solar/fossil, steam Rankine cycle, hybrid power systems that: (1) consist of a combined solar central receiver energy source and a nonsolar energy source at a single, common site, (2) may operate in the base, intermediate, and peaking capacity modes, (3) produce the rated output independent of variations in solar insolation, (4) provide a significant savings (50% or more) in fuel consumption, and (5) produce power at the minimum possible cost in mills/kWh. It is essential that these hybrid concepts be technically feasible and economically competitive with other systems in the near to mid-term time period (1985-1990) on a commercial scale. The program objective for Phase I is to identify and conceptually characterize solar/fossil steam Rankine cycle, commercial-scale, power plant systems that are economically viable and technically feasible. This volume contains the detailed conceptual design and cost/performance estimates and an assessment of the commercial scale solar central receiver hybrid power system. (WHK)

  2. A process for containment removal and waste volume reduction to remediate groundwater containing certain radionuclides, toxic metals and organics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, L.P.; Killey, D.R.W.; Vijayan, S.; Wong, P.C.F. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.

    1992-09-01

    A project to remove groundwater contaminants by an improved treatment process was performed during 1990 October--1992 March by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the United States Department of Energy, managed by Argonne National Laboratory. The goal was to generate high-quality effluent while minimizing secondary waste volume. Two effluent target levels, within an order of magnitude, or less than the US Drinking Water Limit, were set to judge the process effectiveness. The program employed mixed waste feeds containing cadmium, uranium, lead, iron, calcium, strontium-85-90, cesium-137, benzene and trichlorethylene in simulated and actual groundwater and soil leachate solutions. A combination of process steps consisting of sequential chemical conditioning, cross-flow microfiltration and dewatering by low temperature-evaporation, or filter pressing were effective for the treatment of mixed waste having diverse physico-chemical properties. A simplified single-stage version of the process was implemented to treat ground and surface waters contaminated with strontium-90 at the Chalk River Laboratories site. Effluent targets and project goals were met successfully.

  3. Final Safety Analysis Addenda to Hazards Summary Report, Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II): upgrading of plant protection system. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, N. L.; Keeton, J. M.; Sackett, J. I. [comps.

    1980-06-01

    This report is the second in a series of compilations of the formal Final Safety Analysis Addenda (FSAA`s) to the EBR-II Hazard Summary Report and Addendum. Sections 2 and 3 are edited versions of the original FSAA`s prepared in support of certain modifications to the reactor-shutdown-system portion of the EBR-II plant-protection system. Section 4 is an edited version of the original FSAA prepared in support of certain modifications to a system classified as an engineered safety feature. These sections describe the pre- and postmodification system, the rationale for the modification, and required supporting safety analysis. Section 5 provides an updated description and analysis of the EBR-II emergency power system. Section 6 summarizes all significant modifications to the EBR-II plant-protection system to date.

  4. Hombre, bienaventuranza y Dios en Suma Teológica l-ll, qq. 1-6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadne Pérez Treviño

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the Aquinas' proposal on Summa Theologica I-II, qq-1-6, where he studies how should the final end of the man be and concludes that it should be transcendental in a certain way, but immanent in another and that God is the immanent end; then, he studies the way in which man will get it and he finds out that it requires unity in three ways: unity between body and soul, intelligence and will, and finally, between the man, who is well disposed to contemplation and contemplation itself.

  5. District heating and cooling systems for communities through power plant retrofit distribution network. Volume 3. Final report, September 1, 1978-May 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-10-01

    This final report of Phase I of the study presents Task 4, Technical Review and Assessment. The most-promising district-heating concept identified in the Phase I study for the Public Service Electric and Gas Company, Newark, New Jersey, is a hot-water system in which steam is extracted from an existing turbine and used to drive a new, small backpressure turbine-generator. The backpressure turbine provides heat for district heating and simultaneously provides additional electric-generating capacity to partially offset the capacity lost due to the steam extraction. This approach is the most-economical way to retrofit the stations studied for district heating while minimizing electric-capacity loss. Nine fossil-fuel-fired stations within the PSE and G system were evaluated for possibly supplying heat for district heating and cooling in cogeneration operations, but only three were selected to supply the district-heating steam. They are Essex, Hudson, and Bergen. Plant retrofit, thermal distribution schemes, consumer-conversion scheme, and consumer-metering system are discussed. Extensive technical information is provided in 16 appendices, additional tables, figures, and drawings. (MCW)

  6. Distribution and abundance of cetaceans in the north-central and western Gulf of Mexico. Final report. Volume 3. Appendix C. Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.W.; Fargion, G.S.

    1996-05-24

    The purpose of the study was to determine the distribution and abundance of cetaceans in areas potentially affected by future oil and gas activities along the continental slope of the north-central and western Gulf of Mexico. This 3.75 year project commenced 1 October 1991 and finished 15 July 1995. The study area was bounded by the Florida-Alabama border, the Texas-Mexico border, and the 100 m and 2,000 m isobaths. Cetacean distribution and abundance were determined from seasonal aerial and shipboard visual surveys and shipboard acoustic surveys. In addition, hydrographic data were collected in situ and by satellite remote sensing to characterize cetacean habitat. Finally, tagging and tracking of sperm whales using satellite telemetry was attempted. Appendix C Part 2 contains the hydrogrpahic data collected during TIO Cruises 5-7. Cetaceans were observed throughout the study area during all four seasons. Nineteen species were identified, including two species (melon-headed whales and Fraser`s dolphins) previously thought to be rare in the Gulf. Pantropical spotted dolphins, bottlenose dolphins, clymene dolphins, striped dolphins, Atlantic spotted dolphins, and melon-headed whales were the most common small cetaceans and the sperm whale was the most common large cetacean. The mean annual abundance for all cetaceans was estimated to be 19,198. Although the study area had complex and dynamic oceanography, bottom depth was the only environmental variable which correlated to cetacean distribution.

  7. Distribution and abundance of cetaceans in the north-central and western Gulf of Mexico. Final report. Volume 3. Appendix C. Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.W.; Fargion, G.S.

    1996-05-24

    The purpose of the study was to determine the distribution and abundance of cetaceans in areas potentially affected by future oil and gas activities along the continental slope of the north-central and western Gulf of Mexico. This 3.75 year project commenced 1 October 1991 and finished 15 July 1995. The study area was bounded by the Florida-Alabama border, the Texas-Mexico border, and the 100 m and 2,000 m isobaths. Cetacean distribution and abundance were determined from seasonal aerial and shipboard visual surveys and shipboard acoustic surveys. In addition, hydrographic data were collected in situ and by satellite remote sensing to characterize cetacean habitat. Finally, tagging and tracking of sperm whales using satellite telemetry was attempted. Appendix C Part 1 contains the hydrographic data collected during TIO Cruises 1-4. Cetaceans were observed throughout the study area during all four seasons. Nineteen species were identified, including two species (melon-headed whales and Fraser`s dolphins) previously thought to be rare in the Gulf. Pantropical spotted dolphins, bottlenose dolphins, clymene dolphins, striped dolphins, Atlantic spotted dolphins, and melon-headed whales were the most common small cetaceans and the sperm whale was the most common large cetacean. The mean annual abundance for all cetaceans was estimated to be 19,198. Although the study area had complex and dynamic oceanography, bottom depth was the only environmental variable which correlated to cetacean distribution.

  8. Distribution and abundance of cetaceans in the north-central and western Gulf of Mexico. Final report. Volume 3. Appendix B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-24

    The purpose of the study was to determine the distribution and abundance of cetaceans in areas potentially affected by future oil and gas activities along the continental slope of the north-central and western Gulf of Mexico. This 3.75 year project commenced 1 October 1991 and finished 15 July 1995. The study area was bounded by the Florida-Alabama border, the Texas-Mexico border, and the 100 m and 2,000 m isobaths. Cetacean distribution and abundance were determined from seasonal aerial and shipboard visual surveys and shipboard acoustic surveys. In addition, hydrographic data were collected in situ and by satellite remote sensing to characterize cetacean habitat. Finally, tagging and tracking of sperm whales using satellite telemetry was attempted. Appendix B contains the hydrographic data collected during all four NMFS-SEFSC cruises. Cetaceans were observed throughout the study area during all four seasons. Nineteen species were identified, including two species (melon-headed whales and Fraser`s dolphins) previously thought to be rare in the Gulf. Pantropical spotted dolphins, bottlenose dolphins, clymene dolphins, striped dolphins, Atlantic spotted dolphins, and melon-headed whales were the most common small cetaceans and the sperm whale was the most common large cetacean. The mean annual abundance for all cetaceans was estimated to be 19,198. Although the study area had complex and dynamic oceanography, bottom depth was the only environmental variable which correlated to cetacean distribution.

  9. Thermal and fluid mixing in a 1/2-scale test facility. Volume 1. Facility and test design report. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, F.X.; Valenzuela, J.A.

    1985-07-01

    This report describes the test facility and program designed to measure fluid mixing and heat transfer in a 1/2-scale model of the cold leg downcomer and lower plenum of a pressurized water reactor under conditions of interest to the issue of pressurized thermal shock. Several cold leg assemblies are modeled and the downcomer arrangement can be altered to match vendor-specific configurations. The facility can be operated to model flow rates based on Froude number of the injected flow in the cold leg and with steady or transient inlet boundary conditions. Extensive instrumentation is provided to measure flow rates, temperatures and pressure at the facility boundaries and for detailed measurements of temperature, velocity and heat transfer data in the cold leg and downcomer models. The test data are monitored and recorded by a computer data acquisition system that is also used for post-test data reduction and plotting. The planned test matrix includes 75 tests with variations in cold leg and downcomer geometries, loop and HPI flow rates, cold leg Froude number and loop to HPI density difference. Test results will be reported in a series of quick look and final report.

  10. HST 1.6μm Imaging Survey of Orion Protostars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Joseph J.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Fischer, William J.; Kounkel, Marina; Poteet, Charles A.; Furlan, Elise; Stutz, Amelia Marie; Puravankara, Manoj; Tobin, John J.; Nagy, Zsofia; Watson, Dan M.; Herschel Orion Protostar Survey

    2017-01-01

    We present near-infrared 1.6μm HST NICMOS and/or WFC3 images of 244 protostars in the Orion A & B molecular clouds, the largest sample of protostars imaged in a single cloud complex to date. These protostars are part of the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS), a multi-observatory program which obtained 1-870μm photometry, spectroscopy, imaging of 319 protostars in the Orion clouds. The HST images resolve structures illuminated in scattered light from the central protostar, including disks, cavities, and shadows cast in envelopes by disks, with better than 100 AU spatial resolution. We classify all the protostars into five morphological classes: non-detections, point sources, bipolar cavities, unipolar cavities and irregular sources. Sixteen of the bipolar sources show disks in absorption, revealing a minimum spatial extent of the disks. The resolved cavities allow us to directly measure the clearing of the envelopes by bipolar outflows. We map cavities for 30 of these sources by applying a custom edge detection technique to both the scattered light images and radiative transfer models with known cavity geometries. We constrain the shape of the cavities and estimate the fractional volumes of the collapsing cores dispersed by the outflows. Contrary to previous results, we do not find evidence that outflow cavities grow in volume as protostars evolve from Class 0 to flat spectrum sources. These results indicate that feedback by outflow clearing is not the primary agent for dissipating envelopes and halting accretion, and cannot explain the 30-40% star formation efficiency estimated for molecular cores.

  11. Distribution and abundance of cetaceans in the north-central and western Gulf of Mexico. Final report. Volume 3. Appendix A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.W.; Fargion, G.S.

    1996-05-24

    The purpose of the study was to determine the distribution and abundance of cetaceans in areas potentially affected by future oil and gas activities along the continental slope of the north-central and western Gulf of Mexico. This 3.75 year project commenced 1 October 1991 and finished 15 July 1995. The study area was bounded by the Florida-Alabama border, the Texas-Mexico border, and the 100 m and 2,000 m isobaths. Cetacean distribution and abundance were determined from seasonal aerial and shipboard visual surveys and shipboard acoustic surveys. In addition, hydrographic data were collected in situ and by satellite remote sensing to characterize cetacean habitat. Finally, tagging and tracking of sperm whales using satellite telemetry was attempted. Appendix A contains: the cetacean, trutle, and bird sighting data from all shipboard and aerial visual surveys; contact data from the shipboard acoustic survey; and the cetacean environmental profiles. Cetaceans were observed throughout the study area during all four seasons. Nineteen species were identified, including two species (melon-headed whales and Fraser`s dolphins) previously thought to be rare in the Gulf. Pantropical spotted dolphins, bottlenose dolphins, clymene dolphins, striped dolphins, Atlantic spotted dolphins, and melon-headed whales were the most common small cetaceans and the sperm whale was the most common large cetacean. The mean annual abundance for all cetaceans was estimated to be 19,198. Although the study area had complex and dynamic oceanography, bottom depth was the only environmental variable which correlated to cetacean distribution.

  12. Remedial actions at the former Climax Uranium Company, Uranium Mill site, Grand Junction, Mesa County, Colorado. Volume 1, Text: Final environmental impact statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1986-12-01

    This statement evaluates and compares the environmental impacts associated with the remedial actions of the residual radioactive materials remaining at the inactive uranium processing site and associated vicinity properties at Grand Junction, Mesa County, Colorado. This statement is also intended to aid the BLM in amending their management framework plans and final resource management plan, as well as assisting in compliance with the withdrawal application as appropriate. The site is a 114-acre tract of private and state owned land which contains approximately 3.1 million cubic yards of tailings and associated contaminated soils. The vicinity properties are homes, businesses, public buildings, and vacant lots which may have been contaminated during construction by the use of tailings as building material. An estimated 3465 vicinity properties would be cleaned up during remedial action of the tailings pile. The tailings were produced by the former Climax Uranium Company which processed uranium ore, which it sold to the US Atomic Energy Commission from 1951 to 1966 and to private sources from 1966 to 1970. This statement evaluates six alternatives for stabilization and disposal of the tailings and other contaminated materials: (1) No action. (2) Stabilization at the Grand Junction site. (3) Disposal at the Cheney Reservoir site with truck transport. (4) Disposal at the Cheney Reservoir site with train and truck transport. (5) Disposal at the Two Road site with truck transport. (6) Disposal at the Two Road site with train and truck transport. All of the alternatives except no action include remedial action at an estimated 3465 vicinity properties. Alternative 3 is DOE`s preferred alternative.

  13. Osteoblast biocompatibility of novel chitosan crosslinker, hexamethylene-1,6-diaminocarboxysulfonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beringer, Laura T; Kiechel, Marjorie A; Komiya, Yuko; Donius, Amalie E; Habas, Raymond; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Schauer, Caroline L

    2015-09-01

    Chitosan is a naturally occurring polysaccharide, which has proven to be an attractive candidate for bone tissue engineering, due to its ability to promote osteoblast mineralization. Electrospinning has become a well-established cell scaffold processing technique, as it produces a high surface area to volume fibrous material that can mimic the three dimensionality of the extracellular matrix of a cell. In this study, we have investigated the osteoblast response to two different chemically crosslinked (hexamethylene-1,6-diaminocarboxysulfonate (HDACS) and genipin) electrospun chitosan scaffolds and their film counterparts in order to determine how material chemistry influences cellular behavior in conjunction with material topology. In addition, material properties of each fiber scaffold such as porosity and tensile strength were considered. MLO-A5 osteoblast cells grown on chitosan-HDACS scaffolds were found to display a more organized cellular network, along with significantly more filopodia extensions, compared to those grown on chitosan-genipin scaffolds. After 2 days of growth on chitosan-HDACS fibers, a higher level of alkaline phosphatase expression in MLO-A5 cells was reported compared to that of either chitosan-genipin fibers or films. These results indicate that not only chemistry, but also surface topology is an important effecter of cellular behavior. Ultimately, chitosan-HDACS fiber scaffolds provided an adequate substrate for osteoblast attachment and proliferation.

  14. Status and Habitat Requirements of the White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam Volume II; Supplemental Papers and Data Documentation, 1986-1992 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beamesderfer, Raymond C.; Nigro, Anthony A. [Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Clackamas, OR (US)

    1995-01-01

    This is the final report for research on white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus from 1986--92 and conducted by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF). Findings are presented as a series of papers, each detailing objectives, methods, results, and conclusions for a portion of this research. This volume includes supplemental papers which provide background information needed to support results of the primary investigations addressed in Volume 1. This study addresses measure 903(e)(1) of the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1987 Fish and Wildlife Program that calls for ''research to determine the impact of development and operation of the hydropower system on sturgeon in the Columbia River Basin.'' Study objectives correspond to those of the ''White Sturgeon Research Program Implementation Plan'' developed by BPA and approved by the Northwest Power Planning Council in 1985. Work was conducted on the Columbia River from McNary Dam to the estuary.

  15. Fabrication of large-volume, low-cost ceramic lanthanum halide scintillators for gamma ray detection : final report for DHS/DNDO/TRDD project TA-01-SL01.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Ottley, Leigh Anna M.; Yang, Pin; Chen, Ching-Fong; Sanchez, Margaret R.; Bell, Nelson Simmons

    2008-10-01

    This project uses advanced ceramic processes to fabricate large, optical-quality, polycrystalline lanthanum halide scintillators to replace small single crystals produced by the conventional Bridgman growth method. The new approach not only removes the size constraint imposed by the growth method, but also offers the potential advantages of both reducing manufacturing cost and increasing production rate. The project goal is to fabricate dense lanthanum halide ceramics with a preferred crystal orientation by applying texture engineering and solid-state conversion to reduce the thermal mechanical stress in the ceramic and minimize scintillation light scattering at grain boundaries. Ultimately, this method could deliver the sought-after high sensitivity and <3% energy resolution at 662 keV of lanthanum halide scintillators and unleash their full potential for advanced gamma ray detection, enabling rapid identification of radioactive materials in a variety of practical applications. This report documents processing details from powder synthesis, seed particle growth, to final densification and texture development of cerium doped lanthanum bromide (LaBr{sub 3}:Ce{sup +3}) ceramics. This investigation demonstrated that: (1) A rapid, flexible, cost efficient synthesis method of anhydrous lanthanum halides and their solid solutions was developed. Several batches of ultrafine LaBr{sub 3}:Ce{sup +3} powder, free of oxyhalide, were produced by a rigorously controlled process. (2) Micron size ({approx} 5 {micro}m), platelet shape LaBr{sub 3} seed particles of high purity can be synthesized by a vapor phase transport process. (3) High aspect-ratio seed particles can be effectively aligned in the shear direction in the ceramic matrix, using a rotational shear-forming process. (4) Small size, highly translucent LaBr{sub 3} (0.25-inch diameter, 0.08-inch thick) samples were successfully fabricated by the equal channel angular consolidation process. (5) Large size, high density

  16. 1,6-庚二炔类化合物的合成%Synthesis of 1,6-Heptadiyne Compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘影; 冯永华; 戚剑锋; 张辰

    2011-01-01

    溴丙炔与含活性亚甲基的丙二酸酯反应,合成了14个4-取代-1,6-庚二炔类化合物,其结构经1H NMR确证;4-二苯基磷酰基-4-乙酯基-1,6-庚二炔未见文献报道,其结构经1H NMR,13C NMR,IR和HR-MS表征.%Fourteen 4-substituted-1,6-heptadiyne compounds were synthesized by the reaction be tween propagyl bromide and malonic ester with active methylene. The structures were confirmed by 1H NMR. The structure of 4-diphenylphosphoryl-4-ethoxycarbonyl-1,6-heptadiyne (new compound) was characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR, IR and HR-MS.

  17. On the LiCo{sub 2/3}Ni{sub 1/6}Mn{sub 1/6}O{sub 2} positive electrode material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, Abdelfattah [ECME, FST Marrakech, University Cadi Ayyad, BP549, Av. A. Khattabi, Marrakech (Morocco); Saadoune, Ismael, E-mail: saadoune1@yahoo.f [ECME, FST Marrakech, University Cadi Ayyad, BP549, Av. A. Khattabi, Marrakech (Morocco); Amarilla, Jose Manuel [Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, c/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Hakkou, Rachid [ECME, FST Marrakech, University Cadi Ayyad, BP549, Av. A. Khattabi, Marrakech (Morocco)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: LiCo{sub 2/3}Ni{sub 1/6}Mn{sub 1/6}O{sub 2} layered oxide, prepared by the combustion method, consists of particles with homogenous distribution. Rietveld refinement shows that the crystal structure of this cathode material presents no Li/Ni mixing. The best cycling performances were recorded when the upper cut off is fixed at 4.5 V corresponding to a solid solution domain. - Abstract: LiCo{sub 2/3}Ni{sub 1/6}Mn{sub 1/6}O{sub 2} layered oxide was synthesized by the combustion method that led to a crystalline phase with good homogeneity and low particles size. The structural properties of the prepared positive electrode material were investigated by performing XRD Rietveld refinement. Practically no Li/Ni mixing was detected evidencing that the studied compound adopts almost an ideal {alpha}-NaFeO{sub 2} type structure. The Li||LiCo{sub 2/3}Ni{sub 1/6}Mn{sub 1/6}O{sub 2} cell showed a discharge capacity of 199 mAh g{sup -1} when cycled in the 2.7-4.6 V potential range while the best cycling performances were recorded when the upper cut off is fixed at 4.5 V. Structural changes in Li{sub x}Co{sub 2/3}Ni{sub 1/6}Mn{sub 1/6}O{sub 2} with lithium electrochemical de-intercalation were studied using X-ray diffraction. This study clearly shows the existence of a solid solution domain in the 0.1 < x < 1.0 composition range while for x = 0.1, a new phase appears explaining the decrease of the electrochemical performance when the cell is cycled at high upper cut off voltage.

  18. Synthesis and properties of polycyclic quinones condensed with 1,6-methano[10]annulene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeyasu Kuroda et al

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Two types of polycyclic quinones condensed with 1,6-methano[10]annulenes as type A: 1,6-methanonaphtho[2,3-c][10]annulene-7,12-dione 5a, and type B: 1,6-methanonaphtho[2,3-c][10]annulene-5,14-dione 18, bis(1,6-methano[10]annuleno[3,4-b; 3,4-g]anthracene-10,21-dione 20, 1,6-methanoanthraceno[2,3-c][10]annulene-5,16-dione 22, 1,6-methanotetraceno[2,3-c][10]annulene-6,17-dione 23, and 1,6-methano phenanthreno[2,3-c][10]annulene-5,6-dione 24 have been synthesized. The acene derivative 6 corresponding to that of 5a was synthesized by the reduction of quinone 5a. The physical, spectral, and chemical properties of these new compounds have been investigated.

  19. Final Environmental Impact Statement for Proposed Implementation of the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Final Recommendations and Associated Actions for the 104th Fighter Wing, Massachusetts Air National Guard at Westfield-Barnes Airport, Westfield, Massachusetts. Volume 1: Executive Summary through Chapter 9.0, and Volume 2: Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    1978). European diseases were introduced as early as 1500 AD, reducing indigenous populations by as much as 90 percent (State of Massachusetts 2006...for the Massachusetts National Guard EIS Westfield-Barnes Airport, Westfield Massachusetts Final – October 2007 Marek , Kevin. 2006. ANG/CEVP...risk factors in the development of hypertension, cardiovascular disease , and other nervous disorders, have never been proven to occur as chronic

  20. Slurry combustion. Volume 1, Text: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essenhigh, R. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1993-06-21

    The project described in this Report was to investigate the possibility of using sorbent added to coal-water fuel (CWF) mixtures as a means of reducing SOX emissions when burning Ohio coal. The results are significantly encouraging, with SOX concentrations reduced by amounts ranging from 25% to 65%, depending on the sorbent type and the firing conditions, where one major condition identified was the residence time in the flame gases. With the sorbent-loaded slurrys, the trend generally showed increasing SO{sub 2} capture with increasing sorbent loading. There were significant differences between the two different mixture formulations, however: The calcite/No. 8-seam mixture showed significantly higher SO{sub 2} capture at all times (ranging from 45% to 65%) than did the dolomite/No. 5 seam mixture (ranging from 25% to 45%). If the successes so far achieved are not to be wasted, advantage should be taken of these encouraging results by extending the work at both the present scale to determine the other unknown factors controlling sorption efficiency, and at larger scale to start implementation in commercial systems.

  1. Genetic Inventory Task Final Report. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; LaDuc, Myron T.; Vaishampayan, Parag

    2012-01-01

    Contaminant terrestrial microbiota could profoundly impact the scientific integrity of extraterrestrial life-detection experiments. It is therefore important to know what organisms persist on spacecraft surfaces so that their presence can be eliminated or discriminated from authentic extraterrestrial biosignatures. Although there is a growing understanding of the biodiversity associated with spacecraft and cleanroom surfaces, it remains challenging to assess the risk of these microbes confounding life-detection or sample-return experiments. A key challenge is to provide a comprehensive inventory of microbes present on spacecraft surfaces. To assess the phylogenetic breadth of microorganisms on spacecraft and associated surfaces, the Genetic Inventory team used three technologies: conventional cloning techniques, PhyloChip DNA microarrays, and 454 tag-encoded pyrosequencing, together with a methodology to systematically collect, process, and archive nucleic acids. These three analysis methods yielded considerably different results: Traditional approaches provided the least comprehensive assessment of microbial diversity, while PhyloChip and pyrosequencing illuminated more diverse microbial populations. The overall results stress the importance of selecting sample collection and processing approaches based on the desired target and required level of detection. The DNA archive generated in this study can be made available to future researchers as genetic-inventory-oriented technologies further mature.

  2. One-pot Synthesis of 14-Aryl-1,6,7,1 4-tetrahydrodibenzo-[a,i]acridine-1,6-dione in Ionic Liquid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yuling; XU Xiaoping; SHI Daqing; JI Shunjun

    2009-01-01

    14-Aryl-1,6,7,14-tetrahydrodibenzo[a,i]acridine-l,6-diones have been synthesized in ionic liquid [bmim]BF4 (bmim=1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium) at room temperature.Particularly valuable features of this method include high yields of products,recyclable reaction media,broad substrate scope,short reaction time and operational simplicity.

  3. Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. Final technical report, Volume 2 - hydrogenative and hydrothermal pretreatments and spectroscopic characterization using pyrolysis-GC-MS, CPMAS {sup 13}C NMR and FT-IR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chunshan Song; Hatcher, P.G.; Saini, A.K.; Wenzel, K.A.

    1998-01-01

    It has been indicated by DOE COLIRN panel that low-temperature catalytic pretreatment is a promising approach to the development of an improved liquefaction process. This work is a fundamental study on effects of pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. The main objectives of this project are to study the coal structural changes induced by low-temperature catalytic and thermal pretreatments by using spectroscopic techniques; and to clarify the pretreatment-induced changes in reactivity or convertibility of coals. As the second volume of the final report, here we summarize our work on spectroscopic characterization of four raw coals including two subbituminous coals and two bituminous coals, tetrahydrofuran (THF)-extracted but unreacted coals, the coals (THF-insoluble parts) that have been thermally pretreated. in the absence of any solvents and in the presence of either a hydrogen-donor solvent or a non-donor solvent, and the coals (THF-insoluble parts) that have been catalytically pretreated in the presence of a dispersed Mo sulfide catalyst in the absence of any solvents and in the presence of either a hydrogen-donor solvent or a non-donor solvent.

  4. Saccharomyces pastorianus as cell factory to improve production of fructose 1,6-diphosphate using novel fermentation strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Schiraldi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic phosphorylation of glucose with inorganic phosphate, mediated by permeabilized yeast cells, is one of the methods commonly used to manufacture fructose 1,6-diphosphate, a compound of pharmaceutical interest. This process requires high concentrations of yeast active biomass, that is the catalyst of bioconversion of glucose and inorganic phosphate into fructose 1,6-diphosphate. In this study we firstly describe the high cell density production of a brewer's Saccharomyces strain (Saccharomyces pastorianus DSM 6581, focusing on the optimization of medium composition and exploiting fed-batch strategies and novel technologies based on membrane bioreactors. In fed-batch fermentation an appropriate exponential feed profile was set up to maintain the glucose concentration in the bioreactor below 0.9 g·L-1, thus yielding reproducibly 58 g dry weight biomass per liter in 80 h fermentation, improving eight-fold batch processes output. In addition a higher final biomass density was reached when implementing a microfiltration strategy (70 g dry weight biomass, that led to a productivity of 2.1 gcdw·L-1·h-1, 2.4-fold the fed-batch one. Successively, this biomass was opportunely permeabilized and proved capable of catalyzing the bioconversion of glucose into fructose 1,6-diphosphate. Acting on critical parameters of the bioconversion (substrates molar ratio, catalyst concentration and permeabilization agent, fructose 1,6-diphosphate was produced, after 3 h of process, at 56.3 ± 1 g·L-1 with a yield of 80% of the theoretical value.

  5. Innovation and Change in American Education. Kensington Revisited: A Fifteen Year Follow-Up of an Innovative Elementary School and Its Faculty. Volume II--Milford's Recent History: The School District as Contemporary Context of the Kensington School. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Louis M.; And Others

    This second volume of a six-volume study updates and concludes the description of the historical development of a school district code-named "Milford," presented in volume I. Board minutes remain the primary source of data with increasing amounts of information from public documents, interviews, and observation of meetings. Following a brief…

  6. Organic-acid-assisted fabrication of low-cost Li-rich cathode material (Li[Li1/6Fe1/6Ni1/6Mn1/2]O2) for lithium-ion battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Taolin; Chen, Shi; Li, Li; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Wu, Huiming; Wu, Tianpin; Sun, Cheng-Jun; Chen, Renjie; Wu, Feng; Lu, Jun; Amine, Khalil

    2014-12-24

    A novel Li-rich cathode Li[Li1/6Fe1/6Ni1/6Mn1/2]O2 (0.4Li2MnO3-0.6LiFe1/3Ni1/3Mn1/3O2) was synthesized by a sol-gel method, which uses citric acid (SC), tartaric acid (ST), or adipic acid (SA) as a chelating agent. The structural, morphological, and electrochemical properties of the prepared samples were characterized by various methods. X-ray diffraction showed that single-phase materials are formed mainly with typical α-NaFeO2 layered structure (R3̅m), and the SC sample has the lowest Li/Ni cation disorder. The morphological study indicated homogeneous primary particles in good distribution size (100 nm) with small aggregates. The Fe, Ni, and Mn valences were determined by X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis. In coin cell tests, the initial reversible discharge capacity of an SA electrode was 289.7 mAh g(-1) at the 0.1C rate in the 1.5-4.8 V voltage range, while an SC electrode showed a better cycling stability with relatively high capacity retention. At the 2C rate, the SC electrode can deliver a discharge capacity of 150 mAh g(-1) after 50 cycles. Differential capacity vs voltage curves were employed to further investigate the electrochemical reactions and the structural change process during cycling. This low-cost, Fe-based compound prepared by the sol-gel method has the potential to be used as the high capacity cathode material for Li-ion batteries.

  7. Acetato(N-[(E-1-(6-methyl-2-pyridylmethylidene]-2-{2-[(E-1-(6-methyl-2-pyridylmethylideneamino]phenethyl}anilinenickel(II perchlorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-In Lee

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In the title complex, [Ni(CH3COO(C28H26N4]ClO4, the NiII atom is coordinated by two imine N atoms and two pyridine N atoms of the N-[(E-1-(6-methyl-2-pyridylmethylidene]-2-(2-[(E-1-(6-methyl-2-pyridylmethylideneamino]phenethylaniline donor ligand and two O atoms of the acetate ion in a distorted octahedral coordination. The average Ni—N and Ni—O bond lengths are 2.131 (13 and 2.098 (11 Å, respectively. An intramolecular N—H...O interaction occurs. Relatively weak intermolecular C—H...O interactions between the ligands and the ClO4− ions result in a chain extending along the b axis.

  8. Ford Duratec - 1.6 l Ti-VCT engine; Der neue Ford-Duratec - 1,6-l-Ti-VCT-Motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufeld, H.; Koelsch, U.; Rechs, M.; Ruhland, H.; Springer, K.M. [Ford-Werke AG, Koeln (Germany)

    2005-03-01

    A new variable cam timing variant of the 1.6 l Duratec gasoline engine known from Fiesta and Focus has further enhanced efficiency compared to the base engine. This Ti-VCT engine (Twin Independent Variable Cam Timing) offers less consumption as well as improved torque characteristics and peak power. This report leads through the design of the new engine. Furthermore the thermodynamical development of this concept is introduced. (orig.)

  9. α1, 6-fucosyltransferase and tumor: recent progress%α-1,6岩藻糖基转移酶与肿瘤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    季君; 高春芳

    2011-01-01

    Core fucose glycosylation catalyzed by α1, 6-fucosetransferase(Fut8) is an important way for protein posttranslational modification and functional regulation; it directly influences a series of biological characteristics of cells and is always seen under some pathological conditions. This paper reviews the recent studies on the regulation, biological function of Fut8 and its relationship with different kinds of tumors.%由α-1,6岩藻糖基转移酶(α1,6-fucosyltransferase,Fut8)催化的核心岩藻糖基化是糖蛋白重要的翻译后修饰和功能调控方式,直接影响细胞一系列生物学特性,而这种糖基化的异常改变往往是疾病状态的特点.本文就Fut8的表达调控特征、生物学功能及其与各种肿瘤的关系研究进展作一综述.

  10. Volume Entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Astuti, Valerio; Rovelli, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Building on a technical result by Brunnemann and Rideout on the spectrum of the Volume operator in Loop Quantum Gravity, we show that the dimension of the space of the quadrivalent states --with finite-volume individual nodes-- describing a region with total volume smaller than $V$, has \\emph{finite} dimension, bounded by $V \\log V$. This allows us to introduce the notion of "volume entropy": the von Neumann entropy associated to the measurement of volume.

  11. VT Lidar nDSM (1.6 meter) - 2008 - West Franklin

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Missisquoi Lower 2008 1.6m and related "normalized" Digital Surface Model (nDSM)....

  12. VT Lidar DSM (1.6 meter) - 2010 - East Franklin/West Orleans

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Missisquoi Upper 2010 1.6m and related Digital Surface Model (DSM) data. This metadata...

  13. VT Lidar Hydro-flattened DEM (1.6 meter) - 2008 - West Franklin

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Missisquoi Lower 2008 1.6m and Digital Elevation Model (DEM) datasets of various...

  14. VT Lidar nDSM (1.6 meter) - 2012 - Addison County

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Addison County 2012 1.6m and related "normalized" Digital Surface Model (nDSM). Created...

  15. VT Lidar Hydro-flattened DEM (1.6 meter) - 2010 - East Franklin/West Orleans

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Missisquoi Upper 2010 1.6m and Digital Elevation Model (DEM) datasets of various...

  16. Bacteriophage endolysin Lyt μ1/6: characterization of the C-terminal binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tišáková, Lenka; Vidová, Barbora; Farkašovská, Jarmila; Godány, Andrej

    2014-01-01

    The gene product of orf50 from actinophage μ1/6 of Streptomyces aureofaciens is a putative endolysin, Lyt μ1/6. It has a two-domain modular structure, consisting of an N-terminal catalytic and a C-terminal cell wall binding domain (CBD). Comparative analysis of Streptomyces phage endolysins revealed that they all have a modular structure and contain functional C-terminal domains with conserved amino acids, probably associated with their binding function. A blast analysis of Lyt μ1/6 in conjunction with secondary and tertiary structure prediction disclosed the presence of a PG_binding_1 domain within the CBD. The sequence of the C-terminal domain of lyt μ1/6 and truncated forms of it were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The ability of these CBD variants fused to GFP to bind to the surface of S. aureofaciens NMU was shown by specific binding assays.

  17. Graphene Functionalization by 1,6-Diaminohexane and Silver Nanoparticles for Water Disinfection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abdelhalim, Abdelsattar O. E; Galal, Ahmed; Hussein, Mohamed Z; El Sayed, Ibrahim E.-T

    2016-01-01

      Reduced graphene (G) was prepared by chemically reducing graphene oxide (GO). For the first time, the resulting G was functionalized by 1,6-diaminohexane and decorated with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs...

  18. VT Lidar Hydro-flattened DEM (1.6 meter) - 2012 - Addison

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Addison County 2012 1.6m and Digital Elevation Model (DEM) datasets of various...

  19. Synthesis of 14-aryl-1,6,7,14-tetrahydrodibenzo [a,i]acridine-1,6-diones in PEG 600%PEG600反应介质中合成14-芳基-1,6,7,14-四氢二苯并[a,i]吖啶-1,6-二酮

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁一川; 史亚南; 杜百祥; 李玉玲

    2013-01-01

    在室温条件下以PEG 600为反应介质,三组分一锅法高效地合成了14-芳基-1,6,7,14-四氢二苯并[a,i]吖啶-1,6-二酮.该方法具有反应时间短、产率高、污染小、操作简单等优点.作为反应介质的PEG可以回收使用.%A facile one pot synthesis of 14-aryl-1,6,7,14-tetrahydrodibenzo[a,i]acridine-1,6-diones is accomplished via a three-component reaction in PEG 600 at room temperature.This method has the advantage of short reaction time,good yields,less pollution and simple reaction conditions.The PEG can be recovered and reused.

  20. VT Lidar Hillshade (1.6 meter) - 2010 - East Franklin/West Orleans

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Missisquoi Upper 2010 1.6m and related "HILLSHADE" raster data. HILLSHADE data is for...

  1. Towards the Amplituhedron Volume

    CERN Document Server

    Ferro, Livia; Orta, Andrea; Parisi, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    It has been recently conjectured that scattering amplitudes in planar N=4 super Yang-Mills are given by the volume of the (dual) amplituhedron. In this paper we show some interesting connections between the tree-level amplituhedron and a special class of differential equations. In particular we demonstrate how the amplituhedron volume for NMHV amplitudes is determined by these differential equations. The new formulation allows for a straightforward geometric description, without any reference to triangulations. Finally we discuss possible implications for volumes related to generic N^kMHV amplitudes.

  2. Dietary Beta-1,3/1,6-Glucans Reduce Clinical Signs of Canine Atopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Beynen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: There was evidence that beta-1,3/1,6-glucans modulate inflammatory activity. In an open, non-controlled trial, purified beta-1,3/1,6-glucans were found to improve the clinical signs of dogs with undefined chronic skin disorders. Given the design of that study, further work was required on the efficacy of beta-1,3/1,6-glucans in the treatment of canine atopy. Approach: The influence of a purified preparation of beta-1,3/1,6-glucans (MacroGard® on canine atopy was assessed in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Privately owned dogs were used and the clinical signs of atopic dermatitis were evaluated by the owners. For a period of 8 weeks, the dogs daily received a complete dry food without (n = 16 or with 800 ppm beta-1,3/1,6-glucans (n = 15. During the trial, all dogs were treated three times with the use of a flea remedy in order to exclude any influence of flea-bite allergy. To assess the severity of atopic dermatitis, the clinical signs scored were itching, redness, scaling, thickening and stripping of skin. Results: For all five clinical signs, the group-mean improvement, expressed as change of severity score over time, was greater in the test group than in the controls. Within each group, the changes for the five clinical signs were added up to arrive at an overall index of improvement of atopic dermatitis. The extra improvement caused by the ingestion of beta-1,3/1,6-glucans was 63%. The difference between the pooled group-mean changes of the scores for the control and test dogs was statistically significant (PConclusion: Beta-1,3/1,6-glucans can be considered safe and it is put forward that a dose of 800 ppm in a dry food is beneficial for dogs with atopic dermatitis.

  3. Heterogeneous synthesis of dimethylhexane-1,6-dicarbamate from 1,6-hexanediamine and methyl carbonate in methanol over a CeO2 catalyst☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Cao; Huiquan Li; Xintao Li; Liguo Wang; Ganyu Zhu; Qing Tang

    2015-01-01

    The efficient synthesis of dimethylhexane-1,6-dicarbamate (HDC) from 1,6-hexanediamine (HDA) and methyl carbonate over a series of heterogeneous catalysts (e.g., MgO, Fe2O3, Mo2O3, and CeO2) was investigated. The reaction pathway was confirmed as an alcoholysis reaction through a series of designed experiments. Under optimized conditions, 100%HDA conversion with 83.1%HDCtotal and 16.9%polyurea was obtained using a one-step with high temperature procedure with CeO2 as the catalyst. A new two-step with variable temperature technol-ogy was developed based on the reaction pathway to reduce the polyurea yield. Using the proposed method, the HDCtotal yield reached 95.2%, whereas the polyurea yield decreased to 4.8%. The CeO2 catalyst showed high stability and did not exhibit any observable decrease in the HDC yield or any structural changes after four recycling periods. © 2014 The Chemical Industry and Engineering Society of China, and Chemical Industry Press. Al rights reserved.

  4. Innovation and Change in American Education. Kensington Revisited: A Fifteen Year Follow-Up of an Innovative Elementary School and Its Faculty. Volume I--Chronicling the Milford School District: An Historical Context of the Kensington School. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Louis M.; And Others

    This first volume of a six-volume study details the historical context of a particular school district (code-named "Milford") in order to examine the genesis and evolution of American education. The study's key research documents were the district school board's official minutes; additional modes of inquiry included participant observation,…

  5. AMP makes native snake muscle fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase to an alkaline enzyme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵辅昆; 徐松琴; 杜立林; 许根俊

    2000-01-01

    A substance in the crude preparation of NADP+ has been found, which activates snake muscle fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase at pH 9.2 and inhibits the enzyme at pH 7.5. After isolation and extensive characterization, the substance has been determined to be AMP. The activation depends on the concentrations of Mg2+ and could be observed only at concentrations above 1 mmol/L. In the presence of AMP, snake muscle fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase resembles an alkaline enzyme. Kinetic studies indicate that AMP and Mg2+ competitively regulate the activity of the enzyme. AMP releases the inhibition of Mg2+ at high concentration at alkaline pH. It has been reported that fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase with a pH optimum in the alkaline region is caused by limited proteolysis. AMP is also able to make fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase to be an alkaline enzyme. This finding indicates that proteolysis may not be the only reason for shift of the optimum pH of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase to alkaline side and it may imply some significanc

  6. Earthquake simulator tests and associated study of an 1/6-scale nine-story RC model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Jingjiang; Wang Tao; Qi Hu

    2007-01-01

    Earthquake simulator tests of a 1/6-scale nine-story reinforced concrete frame-wall model are described in the paper. The test results and associated numerical simulation are summarized and discussed. Based on the test data,a relationship between maximum inter-story drift and damage state is established. Equations of variation of structural characteristics (natural frequency and equivalent stiffness) with overall drifts are derived by data fitting, which can be used to estimate structural damage state if structural characteristics can be measured. A comparison of the analytical and experimental results show that both the commonly used equivalent beam and fiber element models can simulate the nonlinear seismic response of structures very well. Finally, conclusions associated with seismic design and damage evaluation of RC structures are presented.

  7. Graphene Functionalization by 1,6-Diaminohexane and Silver Nanoparticles for Water Disinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelsattar O. E. Abdelhalim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reduced graphene (G was prepared by chemically reducing graphene oxide (GO. For the first time, the resulting G was functionalized by 1,6-diaminohexane and decorated with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs. The resulting G and modified G were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, infrared (FTIR spectroscopies, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM. The 1,6-diaminohexane-graphene structure was ascertained from the NMR and FTIR data. AgNPs were identified with various sizes within the graphene matrix. The resulting hybrid material was used as an effective antimicrobial contact catalyst for disinfecting water from Total Coliform and Fecal Coliform bacteria. A triple action in this respect was achieved from graphene, 1,6-diaminohexane, and AgNPs without observed release of silver that causes toxicity.

  8. 1,6-二磷酸果糖对蓝氏贾第鞭毛虫滋养体形态学的影响%Effect of fructose 1,6-biphosphate on morphology of Giardia lamblia trophozoites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯宪敏; 鞠晓红; 王月华; 朱枫; 藏秋雨; 时文艳; 卢思奇

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of fructose 1,6-biphosphate ( FBP ) on the morphology of Giarida lamblia trophozoites. Methods Fructose 1,6-diphosphate was added into each cultural tube with the final concentration of 30 ng/μ1 immediately for group A and 4 hours later for group B after the inoculation at concentration of 0. 5 × 10 /ml. The adherence, activity and morphology of trophozoites were detected under the inverted microscope at 24 h, 48 h, 72 h and 96 h after drug administration, respectively. Trophozoites in each group were collected at those time points. The concentrations of trophozoites were calculated and the growth curves were constructed. Meanwhile, a group cultured normally was set as a control( group C ). Results Compared with group C, morphology of the trophozoites changed significantly with activity and adherence of trophozoites decreasing at the time point of 48 h after exposing to FBP. No adherent trophozoites were found after 72 h. All the trophozoites died after 96 h. The growth curve showed that the growth of trophozoites was considerably depressed after 24 h exposing to FBP. Half of the trophozoites died after 48 h and no alive ones were detected after 96 h. The difference were statistically significant between group A, B and C ( P < 0. 01 ). Conclusions Over accumulation of fructose 1, 6-biphosphate can induce the morphology damage and death of Giardia lamblia trophozoites. But, further study of the mechanism should be performed.%目的 探讨1,6-二磷酸果糖对体外培养的蓝氏贾第鞭毛虫(贾第虫)滋养体形态学的影响.方法 按0.5 × 106/ml的贾第虫滋养体浓度接种于4 ml培养瓶,接种后即时(A组)或接种后4 h(B组)加入1,6-二磷酸果糖,终浓度30 ng/μl.分别于药物作用后24、48、72和96 h以倒置显微镜观察虫体的贴壁情况、活力和形态变化;收集各组、各时段虫体,计数虫体滋养体浓度并绘制虫体生长曲线;同时,设立正常培养

  9. Genotoxic Potential of 1.6 GHz Wireless Communication Signal: In vivo Two-Year Bioassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayalaxmi, Vijay (University of Texas at San Antonio); Sasser, Lyle B.(SELF-EMPLOYED CONSULTANTS); Morris, J E.(GENERAL ELECTRIC CO.); Wilson, Bary W.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Anderson, Larry E.(SELF-EMPLOYED CONSULTANTS)

    2003-04-01

    Timed-pregnant Fischer 344 rats (from nineteenth day of gestation) and their nursing offspring (until weaning) were exposed to a far-field 1.6 GHz Iridium wireless communication signal for 2 h/day, 5 days/week. Far-field whole-body exposures were conducted with a field intensity of 0.43 mW/cm 2 and whole-body average specific absorption rate (SAR) of 0.036 to 0.077 W/kg (0.10 to 0.22 W/kg in the brain). This was followed by chronic, head-only exposures of male and female offspring to a near-field 1.6 GHz signal for 2 h/day, 5 days/week, over 2 years. Near-field exposures were conducted at an SAR of 0.16 or 1.6 W/kg in the brain. Concurrent sham-exposed and cage control rats were also included in the study. At the end of 2 years, all rats were necropsied. Bone marrow smears were examined for the extent of genotoxicity, assessed from the presence of micronuclei in polychromatic erythrocytes. The results indicated that the incidence of micronuclei/ 2000 polychromatic erythrocytes were not significantly different between 1.6 GHz-exposed, sham-exposed and cage control rats. The group mean frequencies were 5.6 6 1.8 (130 rats exposed to 1.6 GHz at 0.16 W/kg SAR), 5.4 6 1.5 (135 rats exposed to 1.6 GHz at 1.6 W/kg SAR), 5.6 6 1.7 (119 sham-exposed rats), and 5.8 6 1.8 (100 cage control rats). In contrast, positive control rats treated with mitomycin C exhibited significantly elevated incidence of micronuclei/2000 polychromatic erythrocytes in bone marrow cells; the mean frequency was 38.2 6 7.0 (five rats). Thus there was no evidence for excess genotoxicity in rats that were chronically exposed to 1.6 GHz compared to sham-exposed and cage controls.

  10. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurney, Kevin R

    2015-01-12

    This document constitutes the final report under DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649. The organization of this document is as follows: first, I will review the original scope of the proposed research. Second, I will present the current draft of a paper nearing submission to Nature Climate Change on the initial results of this funded effort. Finally, I will present the last phase of the research under this grant which has supported a Ph.D. student. To that end, I will present the graduate student’s proposed research, a portion of which is completed and reflected in the paper nearing submission. This final work phase will be completed in the next 12 months. This final workphase will likely result in 1-2 additional publications and we consider the results (as exemplified by the current paper) high quality. The continuing results will acknowledge the funding provided by DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649.

  11. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeTar, Carleton [P.I.

    2012-12-10

    This document constitutes the Final Report for award DE-FC02-06ER41446 as required by the Office of Science. It summarizes accomplishments and provides copies of scientific publications with significant contribution from this award.

  12. Technical support for the Ohio Clean Coal Technology Program. Volume 2, Baseline of knowledge concerning process modification opportunities, research needs, by-product market potential, and regulatory requirements: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olfenbuttel, R.; Clark, S.; Helper, E.; Hinchee, R.; Kuntz, C.; Means, J.; Oxley, J.; Paisley, M.; Rogers, C.; Sheppard, W.; Smolak, L. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1989-08-28

    This report was prepared for the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) under Grant Agreement No. CDO/R-88-LR1 and comprises two volumes. Volume 1 presents data on the chemical, physical, and leaching characteristics of by-products from a wide variety of clean coal combustion processes. Volume 2 consists of a discussion of (a) process modification waste minimization opportunities and stabilization considerations; (b) research and development needs and issues relating to clean coal combustion technologies and by-products; (c) the market potential for reusing or recycling by-product materials; and (d) regulatory considerations relating to by-product disposal or reuse.

  13. Mictrostructured sensor systems for chemical gas analysis - 'MISCHGAS'. Vol. 1: Reports 1 - 6. Final report; Mikrostrukturierte Sensorsysteme fuer die chemische Gasanalyse - 'MISCHGAS'. Bd. 1: Teilberichte 1 - 6. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    The project MISCHGAS was aimed at low-power microstructured multisensor systems for analyses of complex gas mixtures. This comprised 1. the development of the sensor chip (sensor layout, sandwich sensor systems, ultrathin carrier materials, and sol-gel technologies), 2. investigation of atomistic and electrical sensor mechanism, 3. design and construction (glues, materials, noble metal free contact systems), 4. generation and reading of the sensor signal, 5. investigation of the analytical properties of the sensors, 6. user-oriented specialised gas analysis systems. [German] Ziel des Projektes MISCHGAS sind leistungsarme, mikrostrukturierte, multisensor-geeignete Systeme fuer die Analyse sowohl einzelner als auch mehrerer Kompoenten komplexer Gasgemische. Dazu wurden die notwendigen Teilbereiche: technologische Entwicklungen des Sensorchips, Klaerung atomistischer sowie elektrischer Sensormechanismen, Aufbau und Verbindungstechnik, Generierung und Auslesung des Sensorsignals, Ermittlung der analytischen Eigenschaften der Sensoren, anwenderorientierte spezialisierte Gasmesssysteme von den Verbundpartnern bearbeitet. Hauptpunkte neuer technologischer Entwicklungen waren Sensorlayout, Sensorschichtsysteme sowie ultraduenne Traegermaterialien ueber die 'porous silicon sacrificial layer'-Technik sowie Sol-Gel-Technologien. Damit konnten leistungsarme Traeger hergestellt werden. Materialien waren SnO{sub 2} und V{sub 2}O{sub 5}. Der Einfluss von Pt auf die Sensorreaktion konnte beschrieben werden. Das Verstaendnis phaenomenologischer Zusammenhaenge von Sensormechanismen und deren physikalisch-chemisch-analytischer Erfassung sowie der festkoerperphysikalischen Beschreibung wurde deutlich verbessert. Technologie und Prozesstechnik wurden auf Gesichtspunkte wie Qualitaetssicherung, und Transferierbarkeit ausgerichtet. Weitere Arbeitsbereiche sind die Gehaeuseentwicklung und Fixierung im Gehaeuse. In der AVT gab es Fortschritte bei Kleber und Aufbauhilfsstoffen sowie edelmetallfreien Kontaktsystemen. Fuer technische Einsatzbedingungen wurden entsprechende Filter weiterentwickelt. Weitere Fortschritte gab es im Bereich Sensormesstechnik. Alle Verbundpartner wurden mit den jeweils aktuellen technologischen Sensorqualitaeten fuer ihre Qualifizierungsmessungen versorgt. Durch eine Standardisierung des Messprotokolls wurde eine Vergleichbarkeit der Qualifizierungsergebnisse ermoeglicht. Um die Aussagefaehigkeit der Sensoren weiter auszunutzen, wurde der Thermopulsbetrieb als Messmethode ausgebaut. Dies ermoeglicht es u.a., die temperaturabhaengige Empfindlichkeit eines Sensors zu nutzen und kann einen Beitrag zur Verringerung der Leistungsaufnahme des Sensors leisten. Abhaengig vom Anwendungsfall evaluierten Verbundpartner in Pilotsystemen die technologischen Entwicklungen. Dies gilt insbesondere fuer die Bereiche Brandfrueherkennung und Rauchgaserkennung. (orig.)

  14. Disordered organic electronic materials based on non-benzenoid 1,6-methano[10]annulene rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, John D; Streifel, Benjamin C; Peart, Patricia A

    2014-10-07

    Conjugated polymers and small molecules including the nonplanar aromatic 1,6-methano[10]annulene ring structure along with aromatic subunits, such as diketopyrrolopyrrole, and 2,1,3-benzothiadiazole, substituted with alkyl chains in a "Tail In," "Tail Out," or "No Tail" regiochemistry are disclosed.

  15. 1,6-Diaminoperylene bisimide with a highly twisted perylene core

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CHE-WEI CHANG; FANG-YUN CHIEN; JIUN-WEI HU; HSING-YANG TSAI; KEW-YU CHEN

    2017-02-01

    1,6-Diaminoperylene bisimide (1) was synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-raydiffraction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the structure of 1,6-disubstituted perylene bisimide has been reported. The crystal belongs to triclinic, space group P-1, with a = 10.3966(10), b = 15.3398(16), c = 16.8495(17) Å, α = 79.490(4)◦, β = 87.055(3)◦, γ = 79.423(3)◦, and Z = 2. Compound1 possesses two intramolecular C–H· · ·N hydrogen bonds, which generate two S(6) ring motifs. The central perylene core of 1 is twisted with dihedral angles of 19.48(2)◦ and 19.50(2)◦; this twist configuration induces the axial chirality in this family of perylene bisimide chromophores. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations also show that the core twist angles of 1,6-diaminoperylene bisimide are larger than those of 1,7-diaminoperylene bisimide, which may account for the fact that the 1,7-regioisomer has a more extended effective conjugation length than the 1,6-regioisomer.

  16. [Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase--marker of damage to proximal renal tubules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepka, Alina; Szajda, Sławomir D; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2008-02-01

    Pathological processes disturbing function of renal proximal tubules, increase activity of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBP-1) in urine. FBP-1 is cytosolic enzyme which occured mainly in cells of proximal renal tubules, and to small extent in cells of pars recta. After damage to the cell membrane FBP-1 is more rapidly excreted to the urine, than enzymes residing in other cell organelles. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase was isolated from rabbit muscle in 1943 by Gomori, and from spinach in 1958 by Racker i Schröder. Highest activity of FBP-1 was found in liver and kidneys, lesser in ileum, leucocytes, muscles and brain. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase is one of four key enzymes of gluconeogenesis performing synthesis of glucose from non sugar substrates. FBP-1 catalyses hydrolysis of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate in cytoplasm of the cell. There are many reports on properties and significance of FBP-1 in plant and animal tissues, but only few reports on activity of this enzyme in urine. Reason for little interest in determination of FBP-1 activity in urine, is relative instability of this enzyme in urine.

  17. Plant-wide assessment summary: $1.6 million in savings identified in Augusta Newsprint assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2003-08-01

    Augusta Newsprint and its partners conducted a systematic plant-wide assessment (PWA) to identify energy- and cost-saving opportunities at the company's plant in Augusta, Georgia. The assessment team identified $1.6 million in potential annual savings.

  18. Modification of Rhizopus lactate dehydrogenase for improved resistance to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhizopus oryzae is frequently used for fermentative production of lactic acid. We determined that one of the key enzymes, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), involved in synthesis of lactic acid by R. oryzae was significantly inhibited by fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) at physiological concentrations. Thi...

  19. Development of an advanced, continuous mild gasification process for the production of co-products (Tasks 2, 3, and 4.1 to 4.6), Volume 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, R.A.; Gissy, J.L.; Onischak, M.; Babu, S.P.; Carty, R.H. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Duthie, R.G. [Bechtel Group, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Wootten, J.M. [Peabody Holding Co., Inc., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1991-09-01

    Volume 2 contains information on the following topics: (1) Mild Gasification Technology Development: Process Research Unit Tests Using Slipstream Sampling; (2) Bench-Scale Char Upgrading Study; (3) Mild Gasification Technology Development: System Integration Studies. (VC)

  20. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado. Volume 5, Addenda D6--D8 to Appendix D: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-02-01

    This volume contains appendices D6 through D8 containing laboratory test data: from MK-F investigation, 1987, Old Rifle and New Rifle sites; on bentonite amended radon barrier material; and from MK-F investigation, 1987, riprap tests.

  1. Magnetic entropy change and magnetic phase transition of LaFe11.4Al1.6Cx(x=0-0.8)compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Jing; Zhang Hong-Wei; Zhang Li-Gang; Dong Qiao-Yan; Wang Ru-Wu

    2006-01-01

    The unit cell volume and phase transition temperature of LaFe11.4Al1.6Cx compounds have been studied.The magnetic entropy change,refrigerant capacity and the type of magnetic phase transition are investigated in detail for LaFe11.4Al1.6Cx with x=0.1.All the LaFe11.4Al1.6Cx(x=0-0.8)compounds have the cubic NaZn13-type structure.The addition of carbon atoms brings about a considerable increase in the lattice parameter.The bulk expansion results in the change of phase transition temperature(Tc).Tc increases from 187 K to 269 K with x varying from 0.1 to 0.8.Meanwhile an increase in the lattice parameter can also cause a change of the magnetic ground state from antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic.Large magnetic entropy change |△S| is found over a large temperature range around Tc and the refrigerant capacity is about 322J/kg for LaFe11.4Al1.6C0.1.The magnetic phase transition belongs in weakly first-order one for x=0.1.

  2. 1,6-二氯二苯并-对-二噁英的合成与表征%Synthesis and characterization of 1,6-dichlorodibenzyl para-dioxin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李敬; 张学良; 郝双红; 孙家隆

    2011-01-01

    As a kind of special fat-soluble organic compounds with high toxicity, dioxin is severely harmful to environment and human health.Besides, 1,6-dichloro-dibenzyl para-dioxin as a precursor of dioxin often exists in some pesticides, and its content in pesticides usually needs to be monitored before putting into use.Thus pyrocatechol was chlorinated with sulfonyl chloride yielding intermediate 4-chloro-pyrocatechol; then 4-chloro-pyrocatechol was allowed to react with 2,6-dichloro-nitrobenzene to give the title compound.The purity of the recrystalized final product was determined by means of high performance liquid chromatography and its structure was confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR and 13C NMR) spectroscopy.Results indicate that the target product has a purity of 99.76%.%二噁英是一类毒性极大的特殊脂溶性有机化合物,严重污染环境和危害人类健康.1,6-二氯二苯并-对-二噁英是一种二噁英的前驱体,常作为杂质存在于某些农药产品中,在农药使用前需检测其含量.为此,采用磺酰氯氯化邻苯二酚得到中间产物4-氯邻苯二酚,再将中间产物与2,6-二氯硝基苯反应得到1,6-二氯二苯并-对-二噁英.利用高效液相色谱分析了产物的纯度,并通过气相色谱、核磁共振谱(1H NMR和13C NMR)对合成的目标物进行了表征.结果表明,目标产物柱层析品的纯度为99.76%.

  3. Final Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Brohus, Henrik; Nielsen, Peter V.

    This final report for the Hybrid Ventilation Centre at Aalborg University describes the activities and research achievement in the project period from August 2001 to August 2006. The report summarises the work performed and the results achieved with reference to articles and reports published...

  4. ADAM low- and medium-resolution spectrograph for 1.6-m AZT-33IK telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Afanasiev, V L; Amirkhanyan, V R; Moiseev, A V

    2016-01-01

    We describe the design of a low- and medium-resolution spectrograph ( R=300-1300) developed at the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences (SAO RAS) for the 1.6-m AZT-33IK telescope of Sayan Observatory of the Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences. We report the results of laboratory measurements of the parameters of the instrument and tests performed on the SAO RAS 1-m Zeiss-1000 telescope. We measured the total quantum efficiency of the "spectrograph + telescope + detector" system on AZT-33IK telescope, which at its maximum reaches 56%. Such a hight transparency of the spectrograph allows it to be used with the 1.6-m telescope to determine the types and redshifts of objects with magnitudes m_AB~20-21, that was confirmed by actual observations.

  5. A New Method of Crystallization of Octahydro Trisodium Salt of Fructose-1,6-diphosphate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    应汉杰; 欧阳平凯

    2002-01-01

    In order to overcome the elementary heterogeneous nucleation while octahydro trisodium salt of fructose-1,6-diphosphate(FDPNaa.8 H2O) is crystallized with ethanol precipitation at low temperature, a new crystallizationmethod with alcohol precipitation combined with salt precipitation has been presented. The ethanol-sodium ac-etate system for crystallization of salt of fructose-1,6-diphosphate is based on the mechanism of crystallization ofFDPNa3.8 H2O in the ethanol-low temperature system. It is found that crystal size may be controlled by regulatingtemperature or pH value of solution in the crystallization process, and the crystal yield increases to 95% from 78%which obtained in the ethanol-low temperature system.

  6. A spectroscopic study of a z=1.6 galaxy overdensity with GMASS

    CERN Document Server

    Kurk, Jaron; Zamorani, Gianni; Halliday, Claire; Mignoli, Marco; Pozzetti, Lucia; Daddi, Emanuele; Rosati, Piero; Dickinson, Marc; Bolzonella, Micol; Cassata, Paolo; Renzini, Alvio; Franceschini, Alberto; Rodighiero, Giulia; Berta, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    The Galaxy Mass Assembly ultra-deep Spectroscopic Survey samples a part of the CDFS to unprecedented depth. The resulting distribution of 150 z>1.4 redshifts reveals a significant peak at z=1.6, part of a larger overdensity found at this redshift. The 42 spectroscopic members of this structure, called Cl 0332-2742, form an overdensity in redshift of a factor 11+/-3 and have a velocity dispersion of 450 km/s. We derive a total mass for Cl 0332-2742 of ~7x10^14 Msol. The colours of its early-type galaxies are consistent with a theoretical red sequence of galaxies with stars formed at z=3.0. In addition, there are more massive, passive and older, but less star forming galaxies in CL 0332-2742 than in the field. We conclude that this structure is a cluster under assembly at z=1.6.

  7. 1,1′-{(Hexane-1,6-diylbis[(azaniumylylidenemethanylylidene]}bis(naphthalen-2-olate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Ouari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The whole molecule of the title Schiff base compound, C28H28N2O2, is generated by inversion symmetry. It is formed from two units of ortho-hydroxynaphthaldehyde bridged with 1,6-diaminohexane. The N atoms are protonated and, thus, the structure is a bis-zwitterionic compound in the solid state. The zwitterion shows strong intramolecular N—H...O hydrogen bonds between the iminium N and the naphthalenolate O atoms.

  8. Stabilizing the urinary activity of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase with EDTA and mercaptoethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepka, Alina; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Zalewska, Anna; Płudowski, Paweł; Zwierz-Gugała, Dorota; Zalewska-Szajda, Beata; Borzym-Kluczyk, Małgorzata; Kryśkiewicz, Edyta; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2009-09-01

    The study aim was to establish conditions for stabilization the activity of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBP-1) in stored urine. The FBP-1 was determined by the method Kepka et. al in a collected fraction of purified urine. EDTA and mercaptoethanol stabilized FBP-1 activity in stored urine. At optimal conditions urine may be stored up to 7 days at a temperature of 4 degrees C.

  9. Sub-two-cycle light pulses at 1.6 microm from an optical parametric amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brida, D; Cirmi, G; Manzoni, C; Bonora, S; Villoresi, P; De Silvestri, S; Cerullo, G

    2008-04-01

    We generate ultrabroadband pulses, spanning the 1200-2100 nm wavelength range, from an 800 nm pumped optical parametric amplifier (OPA) working at degeneracy. We compress the microjoule-level energy pulses to nearly transform-limited 8.5 fs duration by an adaptive system employing a deformable mirror. To our knowledge, these are the shortest light pulses generated at 1.6 microm.

  10. Synthesis, antifungal activity, and QSAR studies of 1,6-dihydropyrimidine derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirag Rami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A practical synthesis of pyrimidinone would be very helpful for chemists because pyrimidinone is found in many bioactive natural products and exhibits a wide range of biological properties. The biological significance of pyrimidine derivatives has led us to the synthesis of substituted pyrimidine. Materials and Methods: With the aim of developing potential antimicrobials, new series of 5-cyano-6-oxo-1,6-dihydro-pyrimidine derivatives namely 2-(5-cyano-6-oxo-4-substituted (aryl-1,6-dihydropyrimidin-2-ylthio-N-substituted (phenyl acetamide (C1-C41 were synthesized and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, mass analysis, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1 H NMR. All the compounds were screened for their antifungal activity against Candida albicans (MTCC, 227. Results and Discussion: Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR studies of a series of 1,6-dihydro-pyrimidine were carried out to study various structural requirements for fungal inhibition. Various lipophilic, electronic, geometric, and spatial descriptors were correlated with antifungal activity using genetic function approximation. Developed models were found predictive as indicated by their square of predictive regression values (r 2pred and their internal and external cross-validation. Study reveals that CHI_3_C, Molecular_SurfaceArea, and Jurs_DPSA_1 contributed significantly to the activity along with some electronic, geometric, and quantum mechanical descriptors. Conclusion: A careful analysis of the antifungal activity data of synthesized compounds revealed that electron withdrawing substitution on N-phenyl acetamide ring of 1,6-dihydropyrimidine moiety possess good activity.

  11. Fragrance material review on 2-cyclohexyl-1,6-heptadien-3-one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scognamiglio, J; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2013-12-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of 2-cyclohexyl-1,6-heptadien-3-one when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. 2-Cyclohexyl-1,6-heptadien-3-one is a member of the fragrance structural group Alkyl Cyclic Ketones. These fragrances can be described as being composed of an alkyl, R1, and various substituted and bicyclic saturated or unsaturated cyclic hydrocarbons, R2, in which one of the rings may include up to 12 carbons. Alternatively, R2 may be a carbon bridge of C2-C4 carbon chain length between the ketone and cyclic hydrocarbon. This review contains a detailed summary of all published and unpublished toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for 2-cyclohexyl-1,6-heptadien-3-one were evaluated then summarized and includes physical properties, acute toxicity, skin irritation, mucous membrane (eye) irritation, skin sensitization, phototoxicity, photoallergy, repeated dose, and genotoxicity data. A safety assessment of the entire Alkyl Cyclic Ketones will be published simultaneously with this document; please refer to Belsito et al., 2013 for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all Alkyl Cyclic Ketones in fragrances. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. File list: Oth.Emb.05.AllAg.1-6h_embryos [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.05.AllAg.1-6h_embryos dm3 TFs and others Embryo 1-6h embryos SRX033315,SRX0...26864 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Emb.05.AllAg.1-6h_embryos.bed ...

  13. File list: Unc.Emb.20.AllAg.1-6h_embryos [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Emb.20.AllAg.1-6h_embryos dm3 Unclassified Embryo 1-6h embryos SRX026866,SRX026...865,SRX033316,SRX033317 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Unc.Emb.20.AllAg.1-6h_embryos.bed ...

  14. Catalytic enantioselective 1,6-conjugate additions of propargyl and allyl groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanke; Li, Xiben; Torker, Sebastian; Shi, Ying; Shen, Xiao; Hoveyda, Amir H.

    2016-09-01

    Conjugate (or 1,4-) additions of carbanionic species to α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds are vital to research in organic and medicinal chemistry, and there are several chiral catalysts that facilitate the catalytic enantioselective additions of nucleophiles to enoates. Nonetheless, catalytic enantioselective 1,6-conjugate additions are uncommon, and ones that incorporate readily functionalizable moieties, such as propargyl or allyl groups, into acyclic α,β,γ,δ-doubly unsaturated acceptors are unknown. Chemical transformations that could generate a new bond at the C6 position of a dienoate are particularly desirable because the resulting products could then be subjected to further modifications. However, such reactions, especially when dienoates contain two equally substituted olefins, are scarce and are confined to reactions promoted by a phosphine-copper catalyst (with an alkyl Grignard reagent, dialkylzinc or trialkylaluminium compounds), a diene-iridium catalyst (with arylboroxines), or a bisphosphine-cobalt catalyst (with monosilyl-acetylenes). 1,6-Conjugate additions are otherwise limited to substrates where there is full substitution at the C4 position. It is unclear why certain catalysts favour bond formation at C6, and—although there are a small number of catalytic enantioselective conjugate allyl additions—related 1,6-additions and processes involving a propargyl unit are non-existent. Here we show that an easily accessible organocopper catalyst can promote 1,6-conjugate additions of propargyl and 2-boryl-substituted allyl groups to acyclic dienoates with high selectivity. A commercially available allenyl-boron compound or a monosubstituted allene may be used. Products can be obtained in up to 83 per cent yield, >98:2 diastereomeric ratio (for allyl additions) and 99:1 enantiomeric ratio. We elucidate the mechanistic details, including the origins of high site selectivity (1,6- versus 1,4-) and enantioselectivity as a function of the catalyst

  15. Glassy nature of stripe ordering in La1.6-xNd0.4SrxCuO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquada, J. M.; Ichikawa, N.; Uchida, S.

    1999-06-01

    We present the results of neutron-scattering studies on various aspects of crystalline and magnetic structure in single crystals of La1.6-xNd0.4SrxCuO4 with x=0.12 and 0.15. In particular, we have reexamined the degree of stripe order in an x=0.12 sample. Measurements of the width for an elastic magnetic peak show that it saturates at a finite value below 30 K, corresponding to a spin-spin correlation length of 200 Å . A model calculation indicates that the differing widths of magnetic and (previously reported) charge-order peaks, together with the lack of commensurability, can be consistently explained by disorder in the stripe spacing. Above 30 K (i.e., above the point at which a recent muon spin-rotation study has found a loss of static magnetic order), the width of the nominally elastic signal begins to increase. Interpreting the signal as critical scattering from slowly fluctuating spins, the temperature dependence of the width is consistent with renormalized classical behavior of a two-dimensional anisotropic Heisenberg antiferromagnet. Inelastic scattering measurements show that incommensurate spin excitations survive at and above 50 K, where the elastic signal is negligible. Given that the stripe order is believed to be pinned by the low-temperature tetragonal (LTT) crystal structure, we have also investigated the transition near 70 K from the low-temperature orthorhombic (LTO) structure. We show that our x=0.12 crystal passes through an intervening less-orthorhombic phase, before reaching the LTT at ~40 K, whereas the x=0.15 crystal goes directly from LTO to LTT, with coexistence of the two phases over a range of ~7 K. Sharp Bragg peaks in the LTT phase of the x=0.15 crystal indicate a domain size of >~1000 Å , with no obvious evidence for LTO domains; hence, the coexistence of stripe order and superconductivity in this sample cannot be explained by a mixture of crystalline phases. Finally, we present scattering evidence for small LTT-like domains in the

  16. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinis, Panos [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-07

    This is the final report for the work conducted at the University of Minnesota (during the period 12/01/12-09/18/14) by PI Panos Stinis as part of the "Collaboratory on Mathematics for Mesoscopic Modeling of Materials" (CM4). CM4 is a multi-institution DOE-funded project whose aim is to conduct basic and applied research in the emerging field of mesoscopic modeling of materials.

  17. Evaluation and combined geophysical interpretations of NURE and related geoscience data in the Van Horn, Pecos, Marfa, Fort Stockton, Presidido, and Emory Peak quadrangles, Texas. Volume 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, G.R.; Hinze, W.J.; Aiken, C.L.V.; Goodell, P.C.; Roy, R.F.; Pingitore, N.E.

    1981-09-01

    This report (two volumes) is the culmination of a two-year study of the six Trans-Pecos Texas quadrangles (Van Horn, Pecos, Marfa, Fort Stockton, Presidio, and Emory Park) surveyed as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. Volume I contains a discussion of the aeromagnetic, gravity and geochemical data, their processing, and their analysis. The geologic history and setting of the Trans-Pecos are discussed along with the uranium potential of the region. Uranium anomalies and occurrences characteristic of numerous different NURE classes are present in the study area, and information is presented on 33 drill holes into these targets. Volume II is a folio of maps reduced to a scale of 1:500,000. Geologic maps for each of the six quadrangles are included and the geophysical maps have been prepared to be overlays for the goelogic maps. In addition to the geologic maps, residual aeromagnetic anomaly, complete Bouguer gravity anomaly, flight line index, gravity station index, and anomaly interpretative maps were prepared for each quadrangle. A large suite of digitally processed maps of gravity and aeromagnetic data were prepared and are included in Volume II.

  18. Volumes of chain links

    CERN Document Server

    Kaiser, James; Rollins, Clint

    2011-01-01

    Agol has conjectured that minimally twisted n-chain links are the smallest volume hyperbolic manifolds with n cusps, for n at most 10. In his thesis, Venzke mentions that these cannot be smallest volume for n at least 11, but does not provide a proof. In this paper, we give a proof of Venzke's statement. The proof for n at least 60 is completely rigorous. The proof for n between 11 and 59 uses a computer calculation, and can be made rigorous for manifolds of small enough complexity, using methods of Moser and Milley. Finally, we prove that the n-chain link with 2m or 2m+1 half-twists cannot be the minimal volume hyperbolic manifold with n cusps, provided n is at least 60 or |m| is at least 8, and we give computational data indicating this remains true for smaller n and |m|.

  19. Petroleum supply annual 1994. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-22

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1994 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1994, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Below is a description of each section in Volume 1 of the PSA.

  20. Petroleum supply annual 1993. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1993 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1993, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Below is a description of each section in Volume 1 of the PSA.

  1. Interventions by Mothers of 1-6 Year Old Children after Home Accidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belkis Karatas

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The purpose of the research was to determine the interventions after home accidents by women with a child between 1-6 years old.INSTRUMENT AND METHODS: The research was conducted as a descriptive study in the neighborhoods served by Çukurova Health Clinic affiliated with Mersin province center municipality. Using a simple random sampling method 100 women were taken into the sample by numbering the 1-6 year old child monitoring records. Data were collected on a questionnaire. Percentage distribution and Chi square test were used in the analysis of data obtained in the research.FINDINGS: The children of 66.0% of the women had had at least one home accident and the most frequent of the accidents was falling (66.7% followed by burns (43.9%. The majority of women, following their child's fall (61.4% applied a wound ointment and took the child to a health care facility and following a burn to their child 44.8% of the women used a cold application and took the child to a health care facility. The overwhelming majority of the women learned about first aid for childhood accidents from the people close to them, such as a relative or neighbor. There was no statistically significant difference between the women's sociodemographic characteristics and frequency of home accidents and the kind of first aid used for home accidents (P>0.05. RESULTS: The frequency of accidents in the homes of children between 1-6 years was high, and the majority of the first aid treatments administered by women following an accident was correct. Although the percentage was small some of the women did use inappropriate procedures.Keywords: Accident, injury, home accidents, childhood accidents

  2. Interventions by Mothers of 1-6 Year Old Children after Home Accidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belkis Karatas

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The purpose of the research was to determine the interventions after home accidents by women with a child between 1-6 years old.INSTRUMENT AND METHODS: The research was conducted as a descriptive study in the neighborhoods served by Çukurova Health Clinic affiliated with Mersin province center municipality. Using a simple random sampling method 100 women were taken into the sample by numbering the 1-6 year old child monitoring records. Data were collected on a questionnaire. Percentage distribution and Chi square test were used in the analysis of data obtained in the research.FINDINGS: The children of 66.0% of the women had had at least one home accident and the most frequent of the accidents was falling (66.7% followed by burns (43.9%. The majority of women, following their child's fall (61.4% applied a wound ointment and took the child to a health care facility and following a burn to their child 44.8% of the women used a cold application and took the child to a health care facility. The overwhelming majority of the women learned about first aid for childhood accidents from the people close to them, such as a relative or neighbor. There was no statistically significant difference between the women's sociodemographic characteristics and frequency of home accidents and the kind of first aid used for home accidents (P>0.05. RESULTS: The frequency of accidents in the homes of children between 1-6 years was high, and the majority of the first aid treatments administered by women following an accident was correct. Although the percentage was small some of the women did use inappropriate procedures.Keywords: Accident, injury, home accidents, childhood accidents 

  3. Instanton Corrections of 1/6 BPS Wilson Loops in ABJM Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Okuyama, Kazumi

    2016-01-01

    We study instanton corrections to the vacuum expectation value (VEV) of 1/6 BPS Wilson loops in ABJM theory from the Fermi gas approach. We mainly consider Wilson loops in the fundamental representation and winding Wilson loops, but we also initiate the study of Wilson loops with two boundaries. We find that the membrane instanton corrections to the Wilson loop VEV are determined by the refined topological string in the Nekrasov-Shatashvili limit, and the pole cancellation mechanism between membrane instantons and worldsheet instantons works also in the Wilson loop VEVs as in the case of the partition functions.

  4. Enzymatic production of fructose 1,6-diphosphate using crude cell extract of Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widjaja, A; Yasuda, M; Ogino, H; Nakajima, H; Ishikawa, H

    1999-01-01

    The enzymatic production of fructose 1,6-diphosphate (FDP) from glucose was performed in a batch reactor and a semibatch reactor using the crude cell extract of Bacillus stearothermophilus which contains all four enzymes required for the synthesis. The experimental results of the yield and the time courses of FDP production obtained using various enzyme concentrations were in good agreement with the theoretical predictions calculated based on the differential equations including the rate equations of the four enzymes, which were determined using the purified enzymes of B. stearothermophilus.

  5. Vibrational spectra of (BaF2)n (n=1-6) clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ratnesh K.; Waters, Kevin; Nigam, Sandeep; Pandey, Ravindra; Pandey, Avinash C.

    2016-05-01

    The vibrational properties of alkaline-earth metal fluoride clusters (BaF2)n (n=1-6) are investigated in the framework of density functional theory. The calculated Raman and Infrared (IR) spectra reveals shift in Raman and IR peak position towards lower frequency region with the increase in the cluster size. Further the calculated spectra have been compared with the experimental vibrational spectra of bulk BaF2 crystal. Even though the smaller size cluster lacks translational symmetry, the structural and vibrational characteristic of (BaF2)5-6 are nearer to bulk counterpart.

  6. Adsorption Behavior of CH2 and CH3 on Metal Clusters Cun (n=1-6)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-hui Cheng; Ming-xing Jin; Zhan Hu; Fei-fei Hu; Da-jun Ding

    2008-01-01

    Using density functional theory with generalized gradient approximation and hybrid functional, we studied the properties of energy, charge population, and vibration of CH2 and CH3 adsorbed on Cun (n=1-6)clusters. The results show that the DFT calculation with the hybrid functional matches the experimental results better in both cases. The calculation results indicate that the adsorption of CH2 is stronger than that of CH3. During adsorption, the charges transfer from Cu to CH2 or CH3. The obtained vibrational frequencies for different modes of CH2 and CH3 adsorbed on Cun agree well with the experimental results for the adsorption on Cu(111) surface.

  7. 1.6 GHz VLBI Observations of SN 1979C: almost-free expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Marcaide, J M; Pérez-Torres, M A; Alberdi, A; Guirado, J C; Ros, E; Weiler, K W

    2009-01-01

    We report on 1.6 GHz Very-Long-Baseline-Interferometry (VLBI) observations of supernova SN 1979C made on 18 November 2002. We derive a model-dependent supernova size. We also present a reanalysis of VLBI observations made by us on June 1999 and by other authors on February 2005. We conclude that, contrary to our earlier claim of strong deceleration in the expansion, SN 1979C has been undergoing almost-free expansion ($m = 0.91\\pm0.09$; $R \\propto t^m$) for over 25 years.

  8. Design and Measurement of Dipole Magnets for CSNS 1.6GeV RCS

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Qing; Kang, Wen; Deng, Chang-dong; Chen, Wan

    2016-01-01

    The Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) in Chinese Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) accelerates proton beam from 80Mev to 1.6GeV at a repetition rate of 25Hz. All dipole magnets of RCS are operated at AC with biased DC. Aiming at the properties of these dipole magnets, we take some methods to improve magnetic field quality in the good region and reduce eddy currents in the iron core . In this paper, we would present the process of the magnet design and temperature rise calculation. At the same time, the field measurement results and temperature test of the prototype magnet are also described and discussed.

  9. Superconductivity of Bi1.6Pbo.4Sr2Ca3Cu4O12

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Atilla Coskun; Ahmet Ekicibil; Bekir Ozgelik

    2002-01-01

    The superconducting ceramics Bi1.6Pbo.4Sr2Ca3Cu4O12 have been prepared by the melt-casting method. A zero resistance temperature at 60 K has been observed. It has been found that the superconducting phase temperature Tc increases with increasing sintering temperature. The effect of Pb content on the superconductivity of the ceramic has been studied. The microstructure of the samplehas been investigated by scanning electron microscopy. Phase analysis has been carried out by x-ray diffraction patterns and energy dispersive analysis through x-ray spectroscopy.

  10. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R Paul Drake

    2004-01-12

    OAK-B135 This is the final report from the project Hydrodynamics by High-Energy-Density Plasma Flow and Hydrodynamics and Radiation Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications. This project supported a group at the University of Michigan in the invention, design, performance, and analysis of experiments using high-energy-density research facilities. The experiments explored compressible nonlinear hydrodynamics, in particular at decelerating interfaces, and the radiation hydrodynamics of strong shock waves. It has application to supernovae, astrophysical jets, shock-cloud interactions, and radiative shock waves.

  11. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2017-02-07

    This is the final report of our research program on electronic transport experiments on Topological Insulator (TI) devices, funded by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences. TIbased electronic devices are attractive as platforms for spintronic applications, and for detection of emergent properties such as Majorana excitations , electron-hole condensates , and the topological magneto-electric effect . Most theoretical proposals envision geometries consisting of a planar TI device integrated with materials of distinctly different physical phases (such as ferromagnets and superconductors). Experimental realization of physics tied to the surface states is a challenge due to the ubiquitous presence of bulk carriers in most TI compounds as well as degradation during device fabrication.

  12. Variation in radiotherapy target volume definition, dose to organs at risk and clinical target volumes using anatomic (computed tomography) versus combined anatomic and molecular imaging (positron emission tomography/computed tomography): intensity-modulated radiotherapy delivered using a tomotherapy Hi Art machine: final results of the VortigERN study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, S; Frew, J; Mott, J; McCallum, H; Stevenson, P; Maxwell, R; Wilsdon, J; Kelly, C G

    2012-12-01

    Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) is the current standard for delineating tumours of the head and neck for radiotherapy. Although metabolic imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) has been used in recent years, the studies were non-confirmatory in establishing its routine role in radiotherapy planning in the modern era. This study explored the difference in gross tumour volume and clinical target volume definitions for the primary and nodal volumes when FDG PET/CT was used as compared with CECT in oropharyngeal cancer cases. Twenty patients with oropharyngeal cancers had a PET/CT scan in the treatment position after consent. Target volumes were defined on CECT scans by a consultant clinical oncologist who was blind to the PET scans. After obtaining inputs from a radiologist, another set of target volumes were outlined on the PET/CT data set. The gross and clinical target volumes as defined on the two data sets were then analysed. The hypothesis of more accurate target delineation, preventing geographical miss and comparative overlap volumes between CECT and PET/CT, was explored. The study also analysed the volumes of intersection and analysed whether there was any TNM stage migration when PET/CT was used as compared with CECT for planning. In 17 of 20 patients, the TNM stage was not altered when adding FDG PET information to CT. PET information prevented geographical miss in two patients and identified distant metastases in one case. PET/CT gross tumour volumes were smaller than CECT volumes (mean ± standard deviation: 25.16 cm(3) ± 35.8 versus 36.56 cm(3) ± 44.14; P 0.86) were not statistically different. Similarity and discordance coefficients were calculated and are reported. PET/CT as compared with CECT could provide more clinically relevant information and prevent geographical miss when used for radiotherapy planning for advanced oropharyngeal tumours. Also, PET/CT provided a smaller better-defined target volume when compared with CECT

  13. Petroleum supply annual 1995: Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The {ital Petroleum Supply Annual} contains information on supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. It reflects data collected from the petroleum industry during 1995 through monthly surveys, and it is divided into 2 volumes. This volume contains three sections: summary statistics, detailed statistics, and selected refinery statistics, each with final annual data. (The other volume contains final statistics for each month and replaces data previously published in the {ital Petroleum Supply Monthly}).

  14. MINIMARS conceptual design: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.D. (ed.)

    1986-09-01

    This volume contains the following sections: (1) fueling systems; (2) blanket; (3) alternative blanket concepts; (4) halo scraper/direct converter system study and final conceptual design; (5) heat-transport and power-conversion systems; (6) tritium systems; (7) minimars air detritiation system; (8) appropriate radiological safety design criteria; and (9) cost estimate. (MOW)

  15. MINIMARS conceptual design: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.D. (ed.)

    1986-09-01

    This volume contains the following sections: (1) fueling systems; (2) blanket; (3) alternative blanket concepts; (4) halo scraper/direct converter system study and final conceptual design; (5) heat-transport and power-conversion systems; (6) tritium systems; (7) minimars air detritiation system; (8) appropriate radiological safety design criteria; and (9) cost estimate. (MOW)

  16. Improvement in elastic properties of CuAl{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 1.6}O{sub 4} spinel ferrite by rapid thermal cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modi, K. B., E-mail: kunalbmodi2003@yahoo.com; Shah, S. J., E-mail: kunalbmodi2003@yahoo.com; Pathak, T. K., E-mail: kunalbmodi2003@yahoo.com; Vasoya, N. H., E-mail: kunalbmodi2003@yahoo.com; Lakhani, V. K., E-mail: kunalbmodi2003@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Saurashtra University, Rajkot-360005 (India); Yahya, A. K. [School of Physics and Materials Studies, University Technology MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-04-24

    The elastic properties of spinel ferrite composition, CuAl{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 1.6}O{sub 4}, quenched from final sintering temperature of 1373 K to liquid nitrogen temperature (∼ 80K) have been studied by means of X-ray powder diffractometry and pulse echo-overlap technique (9 MHz) at 300 K. The magnitude of elastic constants is found to enhance by 15% compared to slowly-cooled counterpart. The observed mechanical strengthening has been discussed in the light of compressive stress on the surface, with tensile stresses at interior regions and corresponding changes in structural parameters. The B{sub o}/G{sub o} ratio indicates the brittle nature of CuAl{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 1.6}O{sub 4}.

  17. Community energy systems and the law of public utilities. Volume thirty-eight. Oklahoma. Final report of a study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of integrated community energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.

    1981-01-01

    A detailed description is given of the laws and programs of the State of Oklahoma governing the regulation of public energy utilities, the siting of energy generating and transmission facilities, the municipal franchising of public energy utilities, and the prescription of rates to be charged by utilities including attendant problems of cost allocations, rate base and operating expense determinations, and rate of return allowances. These laws and programs are analyzed to identify impediments which they may present to the implementation of Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). This report is one of fifty-one separate volumes which describe such regulatory programs at the Federal level and in each state as background to the report entitled Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities, Volume One: An Overview. This report also contains a summary of a strategy described in Volume One: An Overview for overcoming these impediments by working within the existing regulatory framework and by making changes in the regulatory programs to enhance the likelihood of ICES implementation.

  18. Research investigations in oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, and advanced fuels research: Volume 2 -- Jointly sponsored research program. Final report, October 1986--September 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, V.E.

    1994-09-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted in five principal areas: oil shale, tar sand, underground coal gasification, advanced process technology, and advanced fuels research. In subsequent years, underground coal gasification was broadened to be coal research, under which several research activities were conducted that related to coal processing. The most significant change occurred in 1989 when the agreement was redefined as a Base Program and a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP). Investigations were conducted under the Base Program to determine the physical and chemical properties of materials suitable for conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels, to test and evaluate processes and innovative concepts for such conversions, to monitor and determine environmental impacts related to development of commercial-sized operations, and to evaluate methods for mitigation of potential environmental impacts. This report is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 consists of 28 summaries that describe the principal research efforts conducted under the Base Program in five topic areas. Volume 2 describes tasks performed within the JSRP. Research conducted under this agreement has resulted in technology transfer of a variety of energy-related research information. A listing of related publications and presentations is given at the end of each research topic summary. More specific and detailed information is provided in the topical reports referenced in the related publications listings.

  19. Nutrition Status Of Children (1-6 Years In Slums Of Ghaziabad City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garg S.K

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Research question : What are the nutritional problems of pre- school children in slums? Objectives: (i To assess the nutritional status of the children . (ii To find out the nutritional deficiency disorders in them (iii To study their dietary intake. Study design: Cross- sectional. Setting : Slums of Ghaziabad city. Participants :771 children (1-6 years. Study Variables : Age, sex, caste, ICDS beneficiary status, weight, nutritional deficiency disorders, dietary intake and supplementary nutrition. Statistical analysis : Simple proportions and Chi- square test. Results : A majority (58.2 % of children were having under nutrition of varying grades irrespective of their sex and caste but influenced by their age and ICDS beneficiary status. Anaemia, xerophthalmia and goitre were present in 14.7%, 1.6% and 0.6 % children respectively. Average daily dietary intake of energy & nutrients were lower than the recommended daily allowances (RDA. Conclusion: Regular nutritional supplementation along with adequate nutrition education would reduce the nutritional deficiency disorders among children.

  20. Identification and characterization of cytosolic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase in Euglena gracilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Takahisa; Kimura, Ayako; Sakuyama, Harumi; Tamoi, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shigeoka, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Euglena gracilis has the ability to accumulate a storage polysaccharide, a β-1,3-glucan known as paramylon, under aerobic conditions. Under anaerobic conditions, E. gracilis cells degrade paramylon and synthesize wax esters. Cytosolic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) appears to be a key enzyme in gluconeogenesis and position branch point of carbon partitioning between paramylon and wax ester biosynthesis. We herein identified and characterized cytosolic FBPase from E. gracilis. The Km and Vmax values of EgFBPaseIII were 16.5 ± 1.6 μM and 30.4 ± 7.2 μmol min(-1) mg protein(-1), respectively. The activity of EgFBPaseIII was not regulated by AMP or reversible redox modulation. No significant differences were observed in the production of paramylon in transiently suppressed EgFBPaseIII gene expression cells by RNAi (KD-EgFBPaseIII); nevertheless, FBPase activity was markedly decreased in KD-EgFBPaseIII cells. On the other hand, the growth of KD-EgFBPaseIII cells was slightly higher than that of control cells.

  1. K 1-6: an asymmetric planetary nebula with a binary central star

    CERN Document Server

    Frew, David J; Fitzgerald, Michael; Parker, Quentin; Danaia, Lena; McKinnon, David; Guerrero, Martín A; Hedberg, John; Hollow, Robert; An, Yvonne; Bor, Shu Han; Colman, Isabel; Graham-White, Claire; Li, Qing Wen; Mai, Juliette; Papadakis, Katerina; Picone-Murray, Julia; Hoang, Melanie Vo; Yean, Vivian

    2010-01-01

    We present new imaging data and archival multiwavelength observations of the little studied emission nebula K 1-6 and its central star. Narrow-band images in H-alpha (+ [NII]) and [OIII] taken with the Faulkes Telescope North reveal a stratified, asymmetric, elliptical nebula surrounding a central star which has the colours of a late G- or early K-type subgiant or giant. GALEX ultraviolet images reveal a very hot subdwarf or white dwarf coincident in position with this star. The cooler, optically dominant star is strongly variable with a period of 21.312 +/- 0.008 days, and is possibly a high amplitude member of the RS CVn class, although an FK Com classification is also possible. Archival ROSAT data provide good evidence that the cool star has an active corona. We conclude that K 1-6 is most likely an old bona fide planetary nebula at a distance of ~1.0 kpc, interacting with the interstellar medium, and containing a binary or ternary central star. The observations and data analyses reported in this paper wer...

  2. 2004 Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism Gordon Conference - August 1-6, 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph A. Krzycki

    2005-09-15

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on 2004 Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism Gordon Conference - August 1-6, 2004 was held at Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, MA from August 1-6, 2004. The Conference was well-attended with 117 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. In designing the formal speakers program, emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate lively discussion about the key issues in the field today. Time for formal presentations was limited in the interest of group discussions. In order that more scientists could communicate their most recent results, poster presentation time was scheduled. Attached is a copy of the formal schedule and speaker program and the poster program. In addition to these formal interactions, 'free time' was scheduled to allow informal discussions. Such discussions are fostering new collaborations and joint efforts in the field.

  3. Evaluation of the geologic relations and seismotectonic stability of the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada Nuclear Waste Site Investigation (NNWSI); Final report, January 1, 1987--June 30, 1988: Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-10-01

    This report provides a summary of progress for the project ``Evaluation of the Geologic Relations and Seismotectonic Stability of the Yucca Mountain Area, Nevada Nuclear Waste Site Investigation (NNWSI)`` for the eighteen month period of January 1, 1987 to June 10, 1988. This final report was preceded by the final report for the initial six month period, July 1, 1986 to December 31, 1986 (submitted on January 25, 1987, and revised in June 1987.) Quaternary Tectonics, Geochemical, Mineral Deposits, Vulcanic Geology, Seismology, Tectonics, Neotectonics, Remote Sensing, Geotechnical Assessments, Geotechnical Rock Mass Assessments, Basinal Studies, and Strong Ground Motion.

  4. Project IRMA: Development and Demonstration of a Computer-Assisted Citizen Information Resource System to Enable Urban Residents to make Use of available Public Services. Final Report. Volume II, Appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Rae; Eastman, Danielson J.

    The Information and Referral Manual (IRMA) project is an ongoing comprehensive urban services information system that produces and maintains directories of city agency services and functions for New York City. Contained in this document are the appendices to the final report for the project. It includes: 1) the administrative order that initiated…

  5. Making a Difference in the Lives of Infants and Toddlers and Their Families: The Impacts of Early Head Start. Volumes I-III: Final Technical Report [and] Appendixes [and] Local Contributions to Understanding the Programs and Their Impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, John M.; Kisker, Ellen Eliason; Ross, Christine M.; Schochet, Peter Z.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Paulsell, Diane; Boller, Kimberly; Constantine, Jill; Vogel, Cheri; Fuligni, Alison Sidle; Brady-Smith, Christy

    Early Head Start was designed in 1994 as a 2-generation program to enhance children's development and health, strengthen family and community partnerships, and support the staff delivering new services to low-income families with pregnant women, infants, or toddlers. This document contains the final technical report, appendixes, and local…

  6. High-Volume Transanal Surgery with CPH34 HV for the Treatment of III-IV Degree Haemorrhoids: Final Short-Term Results of an Italian Multicenter Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Reboa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical chart of 621 patients with III-IV haemorrhoids undergoing Stapled Hemorrhoidopexy (SH with CPH34 HV in 2012–2014 was consecutively reviewed to assess its safety and efficacy after at least 12 months of follow-up. Mean volume of prolapsectomy was significantly higher (13.0 mL; SD, 1.4 in larger prolapse (9.3 mL; SD, 1.2 (p<0.001. Residual or recurrent haemorrhoids occurred in 11 of 621 patients (1.8% and in 12 of 581 patients (1.9%, respectively. Relapse was correlated with higher preoperative Constipation Scoring System (CSS (p=0.000, Pescatori’s degree (p=0.000, Goligher’s grade (p=0.003, prolapse exceeding half of the length of the Circular Anal Dilator (CAD (p=0.000, and higher volume of prolapsectomy (p=0.000. At regression analysis, only the preoperative CSS, Pescatori’s degree, Goligher’s grade, and volume of resection were significantly predictive of relapse. A high level of satisfaction (VAS = 8.6; SD, 1.0 coupled with a reduction of 12-month CSS (Δ preoperative CSS/12 mo CSS = 3.4, SD, 2.0; p<0.001 was observed. The wider prolapsectomy achievable with CPH34 HV determined an overall 3.7% relapse rate in patients with high prevalence of large internal rectal prolapse, coupled with high satisfaction index, significant reduction of CSS, and very low complication rates.

  7. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing the SNOX innovative clean coal technology demonstration. Volume 1, Sampling/results/special topics: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This study was one of a group of assessments of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants, conducted for DOE during 1993. The motivation for those assessments was the mandate in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments that a study be made of emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from electric utilities. The report is organized in two volumes. Volume 1: Sampling describes the sampling effort conducted as the basis for this study; Results presents the concentration data on HAPs in the several power plant streams, and reports the results of evaluations and calculations conducted with those data; and Special Topics report on issues such as comparison of sampling methods and vapor/solid distributions of HAPs. Volume 2: Appendices include quality assurance/quality control results, uncertainty analysis for emission factors, and data sheets. This study involved measurements of a variety of substances in solid, liquid, and gaseous samples from input, output, and process streams at the Innovative Clean Coal Technology Demonstration (ICCT) of the Wet Sulfuric Acid-Selective Catalytic Reduction (SNOX) process. The SNOX demonstration is being conducted at Ohio Edison`s Niles Boiler No. 2 which uses cyclone burners to burn bituminous coal. A 35 megawatt slipstream of flue gas from the boiler is used to demonstrate SNOX. The substances measured at the SNOX process were the following: 1. Five major and 16 trace elements, including mercury, chromium, cadmium, lead, selenium, arsenic, beryllium, and nickel; 2. Acids and corresponding anions (HCl, HF, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate); 3. Ammonia and cyanide; 4. Elemental carbon; 5. Radionuclides; 6. Volatile organic compounds (VOC); 7. Semi-volatile compounds (SVOC) including polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH); and 8. Aldehydes.

  8. Hemodynamic effects of fructose 1,6-diphosphate in patients with normal and impaired left ventricular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markov, A K; Brumley, M A; Figueroa, A; Skelton, T N; Lehan, P H

    1997-05-01

    We compared the short-term hemodynamic effects of intravenous fructose 1,6-diphosphate (FDP) administration in patients with coronary artery disease. Hemodynamic measurements were performed before and after administration of FDP in two groups of patients: those with impaired left ventricular (LV) function, elevated LV end-diastolic pressures (LVEDP > or =12 mm Hg, n = 30), and those with normal LV function (LVEDP <12 mm Hg, n = 17). In those with impaired LV function, FDP induced a decrease in LVEDP from 22 +/- 1.31 to 16.73 +/- 1.46 mm Hg (p< 0.0001). The cardiac index increased (2.50 +/- 0.11 to 2.81 +/- 0.13 L/m2 [p < 0.0001]), as did the LV stroke work index (31.7 +/- 2.04 to 40.3 +/- 2.67 gm x m x m2 [p < 0.0001]). FDP induced no significant change in heart rate and mean aortic pressure. Pulmonary pressure and resistance declined (p<0.002 and p< 0.0001, respectively). Systemic vascular resistance decreased because of increased cardiac output and unchanged arterial pressure (p < 0.001). In those patients with normal baseline LVEDP (5.06 +/- 0.27 mm Hg), FDP decreased heart rate (p< 0.0001) and systemic and pulmonary resistance (p < 0.03 and p < 0.004, respectively), whereas LVEDP and mean aortic and pulmonary pressures remained unchanged. FDP moderately increased cardiac output (p < 0.05), stroke volume index, and LV stroke work index (p< 0.002 and p< 0.003, respectively). The observed improvement in LV function in those patients with elevated LV filling pressures is thought to be a result of an increased energy production by the Embden-Meyerhoff pathway and to act as a positive inotrope.

  9. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David W. Mazyck; Angela Lindner; CY Wu, Rick Sheahan, Ashok Jain

    2007-06-30

    Forest products provide essential resources for human civilization, including energy and materials. In processing forest products, however, unwanted byproducts, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) are generated. The goal of this study was to develop a cost effective and reliable air pollution control system to reduce VOC and HAP emissions from pulp, paper and paperboard mills and solid wood product facilities. Specifically, this work focused on the removal of VOCs and HAPs from high volume low concentration (HVLC) gases, particularly methanol since it is the largest HAP constituent in these gases. Three technologies were developed and tested at the bench-scale: (1) A novel composite material of activated carbon coated with a photocatalyst titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) (referred to as TiO{sub 2}-coated activated carbon or TiO{sub 2}/AC), (2) a novel silica gel impregnated with nanosized TiO{sub 2} (referred to as silica-titania composites or STC), and (3) biofiltration. A pilot-scale reactor was also fabricated and tested for methanol removal using the TiO{sub 2}/AC and STC. The technical feasibility of removing methanol with TiO{sub 2}/AC was studied using a composite synthesized via a spay desiccation method. The removal of methanol consists of two consecutive operation steps: removal of methanol using fixed-bed activated carbon adsorption and regeneration of spent activated carbon using in-situ photocatalytic oxidation. Regeneration using photocatalytic oxidation employed irradiation of the TiO{sub 2} catalyst with low-energy ultraviolet (UV) light. Results of this technical feasibility study showed that photocatalytic oxidation can be used to regenerate a spent TiO{sub 2}/AC adsorbent. A TiO{sub 2}/AC adsorbent was then developed using a dry impregnation method, which performed better than the TiO{sub 2}/AC synthesized using the spray desiccation method. The enhanced performance was likely a result of the better

  10. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT). Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers: Volume 2, Appendices A--N. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    Volume 2 contains the following appendices: Appendix A, Example Material Safety Data Sheet; Appendix B, Initial Site Characterization Test Results; Appendix C, Testing Proposal, Southern Research Institute; Appendix D, Example Laboratory Catalyst Test Protocol; Appendix E, Detailed Coal Analysis Data; Appendix F, Standard Methods-QA/QC Document; Appendix G, Task No. 1 Commissioning Tests; Appendix H, Task No. 2 Commissioning Tests; Appendix I, First Parametric Sequence Spreadsheets; Appendix J, Second Parametric Sequence Spreadsheets; Appendix K, Third Parametric Sequence Spreadsheets; Appendix L, Fourth Parametric Sequence Spreadsheets; Appendix M, Fifth Parametric Sequence Spreadsheets; and Appendix N, First Series-Manual APH Tests.

  11. Synthesis and cytotoxic activity of carboxamide derivatives of benzo[b][1,6]naphthyridines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deady, Leslie W; Rodemann, Thomas; Zhuang, Li; Baguley, Bruce C; Denny, William A

    2003-03-13

    The reaction of 4-dimethylaminomethylene-6-methyl-4H-pyrano[4,3-b]quinoline-1,3-dione with a range of primary amines gave rise to a series of 2-substituted 6-methyl-1-oxo-1,2-dihydrobenzo[b][1,6]naphthyridine-4-carboxylic acids. The derived 4-N-[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl]carboxamides were tested for growth inhibitory properties against murine P388 leukemia, Lewis lung carcinoma (LLTC), and human Jurkat leukemia cell lines. Most compounds were potent cytotoxins, with some having IC(50) values less than 10 nM. Five were tested in vivo against subcutaneous colon 38 tumors in mice, and a single dose (3.9 mg/kg) proved to be curative for the 2-methyl and 2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl) derivatives in this refractory model.

  12. Magnetic refrigeration down to 1.6 K for the future circular collider e$^+$e$^-$

    CERN Document Server

    Tkaczuk, Jakub; Millet, Francois; Rousset, Bernard; Duval, Jean Marc

    2017-01-01

    High-field superconducting rf cavities of the future circular collider e+e− may require a kW-range superfluid helium refrigeration down to 1.6 K. Magnetic refrigeration operating below 4.2 K can be an alternative to the compression/expansion helium refrigeration. A significant difference between this application and previous magnetic refrigerator studies is its large cooling power, up to 103 times larger than the other designs. Principles of magnetic refrigeration are described and various technical solutions are compared. A numerical model for the static magnetic refrigerator is presented, validated, and adapted to the needs of the positron-electron version of the future circular collider. A preliminary design of magnetic refrigerator suitable for low temperature, kW-range cooling is studied.

  13. TRANSLOCACION NUCLEAR DE LA ISOFORMA HEPATICA DE FRUCTOSA 1,6-BISFOSFATASA

    OpenAIRE

    BERTINAT, ROMINA PAOLA

    2010-01-01

    El hígado cumple una función clave en la homeostasis de la glucosa. Gluconeogénesis es la vía metabólica encargada de la producción endógena de glucosa y es regulada a nivel de 3 enzimas que catalizan reacciones irreversibles, entre ellas fructosa 1,6-bisfosfatasa (FBPasa), cuya actividad es modulada por los inhibidores AMP y f2,6Pz. Glucosa e insulina inducen la concentración nuclear de FBPasa en hepatocitos aislados de rata; sin embargo, FBPasa de hígado de rata poseé 25 residuos extra en s...

  14. Survey of the occurrence of 1,6-hexanediol diglycidyl ether in food contact materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This project is a survey of the occurence of 1,6-hexanediol diglycidyl ether (HDDGE) specifically in food contact material on the Danish market This survey clarifies that HDDGE is listed on an inventory for possible use in printing inks food contact materials, but that is not used by European...... producers and importers. The substance is not allowed for use in plastic materials for food contact. One Danish company reported a possible use of HDDGE in coating of drinking tanks and pipelines. This is the only use of HDDGE confirmed in relation to food contact materials in Denmark. The project...... is following up on a previous survey under the Danish EPA’s LOUS-review (Environmental Project no. 1472)....

  15. Concept Development of a Mach 1.6 High-Speed Civil Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Elwood W.; Fenbert, James W.; Ozoroski, Lori P.; Geiselhart, Karl A.

    1999-01-01

    A high-speed civil transport configuration with a Mach number of 1.6 was developed as part of the NASA High-Speed Research Program to serve as a baseline for assessing advanced technologies required for an aircraft with a service entry date of 2005. This configuration offered more favorable solutions to environmental concerns than configurations with higher Mach numbers. The Mach 1.6 configuration was designed for a 6500 n.mi. mission with a 250-passenger payload. The baseline configuration has a wing area of 8732 square feet a takeoff gross weight of 591570 lb, and four 41000-lb advanced turbine bypass engines defined by NASA. These engines have axisymmetric mixer-ejector nozzles that are assumed to yield 20 dB of noise suppression during takeoff, which is assumed to satisfy, the FAR Stage III noise requirements. Any substantial reduction in this assumed level of suppression would require oversizing the engines to meet community noise regulations and would severly impact the gross weight of the aircraft at takeoff. These engines yield a ratio of takeoff thrust to weight of 0.277 and a takeoff wing loading of 67.8 lb/square feet that results in a rotation speed of 169 knots. The approach velocity of the sized configuration at the end of the mission is 131 knots. The baseline configuration was resized with an engine having a projected life of 9000 hr for hot rotating parts and 18000 hr for the rest of the engine, as required for commercial use on an aircraft with a service entry date of 2005. Results show an increase in vehicle takeoff gross weight of approximately 58700 lb. This report presents the details of the configuration development, mass properties, aerodynamic design, propulsion system and integration, mission performance, and sizing.

  16. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, Robert C. [Texas A& M University; Kamon, Teruki [Texas A& M University; Toback, David [Texas A& M University; Safonov, Alexei [Texas A& M University; Dutta, Bhaskar [Texas A& M University; Dimitri, Nanopoulos [Texas A& M University; Pope, Christopher [Texas A& M University; White, James [Texas A& M University

    2013-11-18

    Overview The High Energy Physics Group at Texas A&M University is submitting this final report for our grant number DE-FG02-95ER40917. This grant has supported our wide range of research activities for over a decade. The reports contained here summarize the latest work done by our research team. Task A (Collider Physics Program): CMS & CDF Profs. T. Kamon, A. Safonov, and D. Toback co-lead the Texas A&M (TAMU) collider program focusing on CDF and CMS experiments. Task D: Particle Physics Theory Our particle physics theory task is the combined effort of Profs. B. Dutta, D. Nanopoulos, and C. Pope. Task E (Underground Physics): LUX & NEXT Profs. R. Webb and J. White(deceased) lead the Xenon-based underground research program consisting of two main thrusts: the first, participation in the LUX two-phase xenon dark matter search experiment and the second, detector R&D primarily aimed at developing future detectors for underground physics (e.g. NEXT and LZ).

  17. Volume and Surface-Enhanced Volume Negative Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Stockli, M P

    2013-01-01

    H- volume sources and, especially, caesiated H- volume sources are important ion sources for generating high-intensity proton beams, which then in turn generate large quantities of other particles. This chapter discusses the physics and technology of the volume production and the caesium-enhanced (surface) production of H- ions. Starting with Bacal's discovery of the H- volume production, the chapter briefly recounts the development of some H- sources, which capitalized on this process to significantly increase the production of H- beams. Another significant increase was achieved in the 1990s by adding caesiated surfaces to supplement the volume-produced ions with surface-produced ions, as illustrated with other H- sources. Finally, the focus turns to some of the experience gained when such a source was successfully ramped up in H- output and in duty factor to support the generation of 1 MW proton beams for the Spallation Neutron Source.

  18. Blending of hydrogen in natural gas distribution systems. Volume II. Combustion tests of blends in burners and appliances. Final report, June 1, 1976--August 30, 1977. [8, 11, 14, 20, 22, 25, and 31% hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-10-01

    The emerging ''hydrogen economy'' is a strong contender as one method to supplement or extend the domestic natural gas supply. This volume of the subject study ''Blending Hydrogen in Natural Gas Distribution Systems'' describes combustion studies to determine the maximum amount of hydrogen that can be blended in natural gas and utilized satisfactorily in typical appliances with no adjustment or conversion. Eleven pilot burners and twenty-three main burners typical of those in current use were operated on hydrogen-natural gas mixtures containing approximately 8, 11, 14, 20, 22, 25, and 31 percent, by volume, hydrogen. The eleven pilot burners and thirteen main burners were tested outside the appliance they were a part of. Ten main burners were tested in their respective appliances. Performance of the various burners tested are as follows: (1) Gas blends containing more than 6 to 11% hydrogen are the limiting mixtures for target type pilot burners. (2) Gas blends containing more than 20 to 22% hyrogen are the limiting mixtures for main burners operating in the open. (3) Gas blends containing more than 22 to 25% hydrogen are the limiting mixtures for main burners tested in appliances. (4) Modification of the orifice in target pilots or increasing the supply pressure to a minimum of 7 inches water column will permit the use of gas blends with 20% hydrogen.

  19. Renormalized Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gover, A. Rod; Waldron, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    We develop a universal distributional calculus for regulated volumes of metrics that are suitably singular along hypersurfaces. When the hypersurface is a conformal infinity we give simple integrated distribution expressions for the divergences and anomaly of the regulated volume functional valid for any choice of regulator. For closed hypersurfaces or conformally compact geometries, methods from a previously developed boundary calculus for conformally compact manifolds can be applied to give explicit holographic formulæ for the divergences and anomaly expressed as hypersurface integrals over local quantities (the method also extends to non-closed hypersurfaces). The resulting anomaly does not depend on any particular choice of regulator, while the regulator dependence of the divergences is precisely captured by these formulæ. Conformal hypersurface invariants can be studied by demanding that the singular metric obey, smoothly and formally to a suitable order, a Yamabe type problem with boundary data along the conformal infinity. We prove that the volume anomaly for these singular Yamabe solutions is a conformally invariant integral of a local Q-curvature that generalizes the Branson Q-curvature by including data of the embedding. In each dimension this canonically defines a higher dimensional generalization of the Willmore energy/rigid string action. Recently, Graham proved that the first variation of the volume anomaly recovers the density obstructing smooth solutions to this singular Yamabe problem; we give a new proof of this result employing our boundary calculus. Physical applications of our results include studies of quantum corrections to entanglement entropies.

  20. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David W. Mazyck; Angela Lindner; CY Wu, Rick Sheahan, Ashok Jain

    2007-06-30

    Forest products provide essential resources for human civilization, including energy and materials. In processing forest products, however, unwanted byproducts, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) are generated. The goal of this study was to develop a cost effective and reliable air pollution control system to reduce VOC and HAP emissions from pulp, paper and paperboard mills and solid wood product facilities. Specifically, this work focused on the removal of VOCs and HAPs from high volume low concentration (HVLC) gases, particularly methanol since it is the largest HAP constituent in these gases. Three technologies were developed and tested at the bench-scale: (1) A novel composite material of activated carbon coated with a photocatalyst titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) (referred to as TiO{sub 2}-coated activated carbon or TiO{sub 2}/AC), (2) a novel silica gel impregnated with nanosized TiO{sub 2} (referred to as silica-titania composites or STC), and (3) biofiltration. A pilot-scale reactor was also fabricated and tested for methanol removal using the TiO{sub 2}/AC and STC. The technical feasibility of removing methanol with TiO{sub 2}/AC was studied using a composite synthesized via a spay desiccation method. The removal of methanol consists of two consecutive operation steps: removal of methanol using fixed-bed activated carbon adsorption and regeneration of spent activated carbon using in-situ photocatalytic oxidation. Regeneration using photocatalytic oxidation employed irradiation of the TiO{sub 2} catalyst with low-energy ultraviolet (UV) light. Results of this technical feasibility study showed that photocatalytic oxidation can be used to regenerate a spent TiO{sub 2}/AC adsorbent. A TiO{sub 2}/AC adsorbent was then developed using a dry impregnation method, which performed better than the TiO{sub 2}/AC synthesized using the spray desiccation method. The enhanced performance was likely a result of the better

  1. Rice OsGL1-6 is involved in leaf cuticular wax accumulation and drought resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyan Zhou

    Full Text Available Cuticular wax is a class of organic compounds that comprises the outermost layer of plant surfaces. Plant cuticular wax, the last barrier of self-defense, plays an important role in plant growth and development. The OsGL1-6 gene, a member of the fatty aldehyde decarbonylase gene family, is highly homologous to Arabidopsis CER1, which is involved in cuticular wax biosynthesis. However, whether OsGL1-6 participates in cuticular wax biosynthesis remains unknown. In this study, an OsGL1-6 antisense-RNA vector driven by its own promoter was constructed and introduced into the rice variety Zhonghua11 by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation to obtain several independent transgenic plants with decreased OsGL1-6 expression. These OsGL1-6 antisense-RNA transgenic plants showed droopy leaves at the booting stage, significantly decreased leaf cuticular wax deposition, thinner cuticle membrane, increased chlorophyll leaching and water loss rates, and enhanced drought sensitivity. The OsGL1-6 gene was constitutively expressed in all examined organs and was very highly expressed in leaf epidermal cells and vascular bundles. The transient expression of OsGL1-6-GFP fusion indicated that OsGL1-6 is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the wax composition using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed a significantly reduced total cuticular wax load on the leaf blades of the OsGL1-6 antisense-RNA transgenic plants as well as markedly decreased alkane and aldehyde contents. Their primary alcohol contents increased significantly compared with those in the wild type plants, suggesting that OsGL1-6 is associated with the decarbonylation pathways in wax biosynthesis. We propose that OsGL1-6 is involved in the accumulation of leaf cuticular wax and directly impacts drought resistance in rice.

  2. Installation restoration program. Remedial investigation report. Volume 2. Sections 4-6. Alpena Combat Readiness Training Center, Alpena County Regional Airport, Michigan Air National Guard, Alpena, Michigan. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    This report is Volume II, Sections 4-6 of the Remedial Investigation Report of Sites 1-9 at Alpens CRTC Alpena Ml. A remedial investigation was performed on 9 sites at the Alpena CRTC to determine the extent of contamination at the sites. The sites involved ill this investigation include: Site 1, POL Storage Area; Site 2, Motor Pool Area; Site 3, Former Garage; Site 4, Third Fire Training Area; Site 5, Second Fire Training Area; Site 6, Former Landfill; Site 7, First Fire Training Area; Site 8, Former Hanger 9; and Site 9, Hazardous Waste Storage Area. Soil and groundwater contamination above state action levels was found at the sites. An FS has been initiated.

  3. Installation restoration program. Remedial investigation report. Volume 5. Appendices P-W. Alpena Combat Readiness Training Center, Alpena County Regional Airport, Michigan Air National Guard, Alpena, Michigan. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    This report is Volume V, Appendices P-W of the Remedial Investigation Report of Sites 1-9 at Alpens CRTC Alpena MI. A remedial investigation was performed on 9 sites at the Alpena CRTC to determine the extent of contamination at the sites. The sites involved in this investigation include: Site 1, POL Storage Area; Site 2, Motor Pool Area; Site 3, Former Garage; Site 4, Third Fire Training Area; Site 5, Second Fire Training Area; Site 6, Former Landfill; Site 7, First Fire Training Area; Site 8, Former Hanger 9; and Site 9, Hazardous Waste Storage Area. Soil and groundwater contamination above state action levels was found at the sites. An FS has been initiated.

  4. Integration of thermal and food processing residuals into a system for commercial culture of freshwater shrimp. (power plant waste heat utilization in aquaculture). Volume II. Final report Jul 74--Oct 76

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eble, A.F.

    1977-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that all life-cycle stages of the tropical freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, can be cultured successfully using waste-heat effluents of the Mercer Generating Station, Trenton, N.J. Further, high-density culture of the prawn is possible and practical. Rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) culture has also been successfully demonstrated utilizing the waste-heat discharges of an electric generating station. Efficient systems have been designed for intensive annual two-crop production. Postlarval prawns are grown in indoor heated nurseries in early spring, and placed in outdoor ponds in mid-May at sizes of 5 to 6cm and harvested in late October as 11 to 12cm adults. Experiments culturing the American eel (Anguilla rostrata) in waste-heat discharge waters of the generating system have been successful. Presented in Volume 2 is the research work conducted in this study. (Portions of this document are not fully legible)

  5. Feasibility studies for the development of petroleum areas-integrated exploitation project of the fields in the area north of Santa Cruz. Volume 1. Text. Export trade information (Final)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-03-01

    The report, generated by Scientific Software-Intercomp, Inc. for Yacimientos Petroliferos Fiscales Bolivianos, documents the results of a feasibility study which addressed the viability of developing petroleum areas in Bolivia. The primary objective of the project was to describe the reservoirs that have been discovered and their reserves, describe which would be the best alternatives for development of these reservoirs, and to determine the best alternatives for development of all the reserves together. The report, volume 1 of 4, contains the main text which discusses: Objectives and Scope; Deliverables; Geology (Well Logs, Core Data, Dipmeters, Mudlogs, Database and Data Availability Problems, Procedure, Mapping, Results, Stratigraphic Considerations); and Petrophysics (Objectives, Database Preparation, Core Data Analysis, Log Normalization, Parameter Selection, Log Processing and Results, Reservoir Summation, Conclusions and Recommendations, Production Engineering, Reservoir Engineering and Simulation, Pipeline and Facilities Design, Economics).

  6. Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. Final technical report, Volume 1 - effects of solvents, catalysts and temperature conditions on conversion and structural changes of low-rank coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lili [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Schobert, Harold H. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Song, Chunshan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The main objectives of this project were to study the effects of low-temperature pretreatments on coal structure and their impacts on subsequent liquefaction. The effects of pretreatment temperatures, catalyst type, coal rank, and influence of solvent were examined. Specific objectives were to identify the basic changes in coal structure induced by catalytic and thermal pretreatments, and to determine the reactivity of the catalytically and thermally treated coals for liquefaction. In the original project management plan it was indicated that six coals would be used for the study. These were to include two each of bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite rank. For convenience in executing the experimental work, two parallel efforts were conducted. The first involved the two lignites and one subbituminous coal; and the second, the two bituminous coals and the remaining subbituminous coal. This Volume presents the results of the first portion of the work, studies on two lignites and one subbituminous coal. The remaining work accomplished under this project will be described and discussed in Volume 2 of this report. The objective of this portion of the project was to determine and compare the effects of solvents, catalysts and reaction conditions on coal liquefaction. Specifically, the improvements of reaction conversion, product distribution, as well as the structural changes in the coals and coal-derived products were examined. This study targeted at promoting hydrogenation of the coal-derived radicals, generated during thermal cleavage of chemical bonds, by using a good hydrogen donor-solvent and an effective catalyst. Attempts were also made in efforts to match the formation and hydrogenation of the free radicals and thus to prevent retrogressive reaction.

  7. 1/6TH SCALE STRIP EFFLUENT FEED TANK-MIXING RESULTS USING MCU SOLVENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, E

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this task was to determine if mixing was an issue for the entrainment and dispersion of the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) solvent in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Strip Effluent Feed Tank (SEFT). The MCU strip effluent stream containing the Cs removed during salt processing will be transferred to the DWPF for immobilization in HLW glass. In lab-scale DWPF chemical process cell testing, mixing of the solvent in the dilute nitric acid solution proved problematic, and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to perform scaled SEFT mixing tests to evaluate whether the problem was symptomatic of the lab-scale set-up or of the solvent. The solvent levels tested were 228 and 235 ppm, which represented levels near the estimated DWPF solvent limit of 239 ppm in 0.001M HNO{sub 3} solution. The 239 ppm limit was calculated by Norato in X-CLC-S-00141. The general approach for the mixing investigation was to: (1) Investigate the use of fluorescent dyes to aid in observing the mixing behavior. Evaluate and compare the physical properties of the fluorescent dyed MCU solvents to the baseline Oak Ridge CSSX solvent. Based on the data, use the dyed MCU solvent that best approximates the physical properties. (2) Use approximately a 1/6th linear scale of the SEFT to replicate the internal configuration for DWPF mixing. (3) Determine agitator speed(s) for scaled testing based on the DWPF SEFT mixing speed. (4) Perform mixing tests using the 1/6th SEFT and determine any mixing issues (entrainment/dispersion, accumulation, adhesion) through visual observations and by pulling samples to assess uniformity. The mixing tests used MCU solvent fabricated at SRNL blended with Risk Reactor DFSB-K43 fluorescent dye. This dyed SRNL MCU solvent had equivalent physical properties important to mixing as compared to the Oak Ridge baseline solvent, blended easily with the MCU solvent, and provided an excellent visual aid.

  8. A genetically anchored physical framework for Theobroma cacao cv. Matina 1-6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuhn David N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The fermented dried seeds of Theobroma cacao (cacao tree are the main ingredient in chocolate. World cocoa production was estimated to be 3 million tons in 2010 with an annual estimated average growth rate of 2.2%. The cacao bean production industry is currently under threat from a rise in fungal diseases including black pod, frosty pod, and witches' broom. In order to address these issues, genome-sequencing efforts have been initiated recently to facilitate identification of genetic markers and genes that could be utilized to accelerate the release of robust T. cacao cultivars. However, problems inherent with assembly and resolution of distal regions of complex eukaryotic genomes, such as gaps, chimeric joins, and unresolvable repeat-induced compressions, have been unavoidably encountered with the sequencing strategies selected. Results Here, we describe the construction of a BAC-based integrated genetic-physical map of the T. cacao cultivar Matina 1-6 which is designed to augment and enhance these sequencing efforts. Three BAC libraries, each comprised of 10× coverage, were constructed and fingerprinted. 230 genetic markers from a high-resolution genetic recombination map and 96 Arabidopsis-derived conserved ortholog set (COS II markers were anchored using pooled overgo hybridization. A dense tile path consisting of 29,383 BACs was selected and end-sequenced. The physical map consists of 154 contigs and 4,268 singletons. Forty-nine contigs are genetically anchored and ordered to chromosomes for a total span of 307.2 Mbp. The unanchored contigs (105 span 67.4 Mbp and therefore the estimated genome size of T. cacao is 374.6 Mbp. A comparative analysis with A. thaliana, V. vinifera, and P. trichocarpa suggests that comparisons of the genome assemblies of these distantly related species could provide insights into genome structure, evolutionary history, conservation of functional sites, and improvements in physical map

  9. A genetically anchored physical framework for Theobroma cacao cv. Matina 1-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saski, Christopher A; Feltus, Frank A; Staton, Margaret E; Blackmon, Barbara P; Ficklin, Stephen P; Kuhn, David N; Schnell, Raymond J; Shapiro, Howard; Motamayor, Juan Carlos

    2011-08-16

    The fermented dried seeds of Theobroma cacao (cacao tree) are the main ingredient in chocolate. World cocoa production was estimated to be 3 million tons in 2010 with an annual estimated average growth rate of 2.2%. The cacao bean production industry is currently under threat from a rise in fungal diseases including black pod, frosty pod, and witches' broom. In order to address these issues, genome-sequencing efforts have been initiated recently to facilitate identification of genetic markers and genes that could be utilized to accelerate the release of robust T. cacao cultivars. However, problems inherent with assembly and resolution of distal regions of complex eukaryotic genomes, such as gaps, chimeric joins, and unresolvable repeat-induced compressions, have been unavoidably encountered with the sequencing strategies selected. Here, we describe the construction of a BAC-based integrated genetic-physical map of the T. cacao cultivar Matina 1-6 which is designed to augment and enhance these sequencing efforts. Three BAC libraries, each comprised of 10× coverage, were constructed and fingerprinted. 230 genetic markers from a high-resolution genetic recombination map and 96 Arabidopsis-derived conserved ortholog set (COS) II markers were anchored using pooled overgo hybridization. A dense tile path consisting of 29,383 BACs was selected and end-sequenced. The physical map consists of 154 contigs and 4,268 singletons. Forty-nine contigs are genetically anchored and ordered to chromosomes for a total span of 307.2 Mbp. The unanchored contigs (105) span 67.4 Mbp and therefore the estimated genome size of T. cacao is 374.6 Mbp. A comparative analysis with A. thaliana, V. vinifera, and P. trichocarpa suggests that comparisons of the genome assemblies of these distantly related species could provide insights into genome structure, evolutionary history, conservation of functional sites, and improvements in physical map assembly. A comparison between the two T. cacao

  10. Petroleum supply annual, 1997. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1997 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1997, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. 16 figs., 48 tabs.

  11. Petroleum supply annual 1998: Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-01

    The ``Petroleum Supply Annual`` (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1998 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1998, and replaces data previously published in the PSA. The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. 16 figs., 59 tabs.

  12. A Photometrically Detected Forming Cluster of Galaxies at Redshift 1.6 in the GOODS Field

    CERN Document Server

    Castellano, M; Trevese, D; Grazian, A; Pentericci, L; Fiore, F; Fontana, A; Giallongo, E; Santini, P; Cristiani, S; Nonino, M; Vanzella, E

    2007-01-01

    We report the discovery of a localized overdensity at z~1.6 in the GOODS-South Field, presumably a poor cluster in the process of formation. The three-dimensional galaxy density has been estimated on the basis of well calibrated photometric redshifts from the multiband photometric GOODS-MUSIC catalog using the (2+1)D technique. The density peak is embedded in the larger scale overdensity of galaxies known to exist at z=1.61 in the area. The properties of the member galaxies are compared to those of the surrounding field and we found that the two populations are significantly different supporting the reality of the structure. The reddest galaxies, once evolved according to their best fit models, have colors consistent with the red sequence of lower redshift clusters. The estimated M_200 total mass of the cluster is in the range 1.3 x 10^14 - 5.7x 10^14 Msun, depending on the assumed bias factor b. An upper limit for the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity, based on the 1Ms Chandra observations, is L_X=0.5 x 10^43 erg s^...

  13. Microwave Emission of Supra-arcade Structure associated with M1.6 Limb Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Sujin; Shibasaki, Kiyoto; Reznikova, Veronika

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated a supra-arcade structure, associated with an M1.6 flare, which occurred on the south-east limb on 4th of November 2010. It is observed in microwaves at 17 GHz with the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH), soft X-rays in the range of 8-20 keV with the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), and EUV with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). As reported by Reeves & Golub (2011), the supra-arcade structure is observed predominantly in the AIA 131 {\\AA} channel, which contains a hot 11 MK component from Fe XIX (Boerner et al. 2011). While this hot flare plasma lasts over the decay phase of the flare, it shows some interesting characteristics in microwaves and soft X-rays: 1) In the supra-arcade structure, the brightness temperature (TB) of the microwave emission increases gradually up to 2\\times10^4 K, and 2) two soft X-ray sources appear: one cospatial with the supra-arcade structure and another above the post-flare arcade...

  14. Di-Isocyanate Crosslinked Aerogels with 1, 6-Bis (Trimethoxysilyl) Hexane Incorporated in Silica Backbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivod, Stephanie L.; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Nguyen, Baochau N.; Quade, Derek; Randall, Jason; Perry, Renee

    2008-01-01

    Silica aerogels are desirable materials for many applications that take advantage of their light weight and low thermal conductivity. Addition of a conformal polymer coating which bonds with the amine decorated surface of the silica network improves the strength of the aerogels by as much as 200 times. Even with vast improvement in strength they still tend to undergo brittle failure due to the rigid silica backbone. We hope to increase the flexibility and elastic recovery of the silica based aerogel by altering the silica back-bone by incorporation of more flexible hexane links. To this end, we investigated the use of 1,6-bis(trimethoxysilyl)hexane (BTMSH), a polysilsesquioxane precursor3, as an additional co-reactant to prepare silica gels which were subsequently cross-linked with di-isocyanate. Previously, this approach of adding flexibility by BTMSH incorporation was demonstrated with styrene cross-linked aerogels. In our study, we varied silane concentration, mol % of silicon from BTMSH and di-isocyanate concentration by weight percent to attempt to optimize both the flexibility and the strength of the aerogels.

  15. Osteoblast biocompatibility of pre-mineralized, hexamethylene-1,6-diaminocarboxysulphonate crosslinked chitosan fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiechel, Marjorie A.; Beringer, Laura T.; Donius, Amalie E.; Komiya, Yuko; Habas, Raymond; Wegst, Ulrike G. K.; Schauer, Caroline L.

    2015-01-01

    Biopolymer-ceramic composites are thought to be particularly promising materials for bone tissue engineering as they more closely mimic natural bone. Here, we demonstrate the fabrication by electrospinning of fibrous chitosan-hydroxyapatite composite scaffolds with low (1 wt%) and high (10 wt%) mineral contents. Scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and unidirectional tensile testing were performed to determine fiber surface morphology, elemental composition, and tensile Young’s modulus (E) and ultimate tensile strength (σUTS), respectively. EDS scans of the scaffolds indicated that the fibers, crosslinked with either hexamethylene-1,6-diaminocarboxysulfonate (HDACS) or genipin, have a crystalline hydroxyapatite mineral content at 10 wt% additive. Moreover, FESEM micrographs showed that all electrospun fibers have diameters (122 – 249 nm), which fall within the range of those of fibrous collagen found in the extracellular matrix of bone. Young’s modulus and ultimate tensile strength of the various crosslinked composite compositions were in the range of 116 – 329 MPa and 2 – 15 MPa, respectively. Osteocytes seeded onto the mineralized fibers were able to demonstrate good biocompatibility enhancing the potential use for this material in future bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:25771925

  16. Osteoblast biocompatibility of premineralized, hexamethylene-1,6-diaminocarboxysulfonate crosslinked chitosan fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiechel, Marjorie A; Beringer, Laura T; Donius, Amalie E; Komiya, Yuko; Habas, Raymond; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Schauer, Caroline L

    2015-10-01

    Biopolymer-ceramic composites are thought to be particularly promising materials for bone tissue engineering as they more closely mimic natural bone. Here, we demonstrate the fabrication by electrospinning of fibrous chitosan-hydroxyapatite composite scaffolds with low (1 wt %) and high (10 wt %) mineral contents. Scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and unidirectional tensile testing were performed to determine fiber surface morphology, elemental composition, and tensile Young's modulus (E) and ultimate tensile strength (σUTS ), respectively. EDS scans of the scaffolds indicated that the fibers, crosslinked with either hexamethylene-1,6-diaminocarboxysulfonate (HDACS) or genipin, have a crystalline hydroxyapatite mineral content at 10 wt % additive. Moreover, FESEM micrographs showed that all electrospun fibers have diameters (122-249 nm), which fall within the range of those of fibrous collagen found in the extracellular matrix of bone. Young's modulus and ultimate tensile strength of the various crosslinked composite compositions were in the range of 116-329 MPa and 2-15 MPa, respectively. Osteocytes seeded onto the mineralized fibers were able to demonstrate good biocompatibility enhancing the potential use for this material in future bone tissue engineering applications.

  17. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase mediates cellular responses to DNA damage and aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitanovic, Ana [Institut fuer Pharmazie und Molekulare Biotechnologie, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 364, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Woelfl, Stefan [Institut fuer Pharmazie und Molekulare Biotechnologie, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 364, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)]. E-mail: wolfl@uni-hd.de

    2006-02-22

    Response to DNA damage, lack of nutrients and other stress conditions is an essential property of living systems. The coordinate response includes DNA damage repair, activation of alternate biochemical pathways, adjustment of cellular proliferation and cell cycle progression as well as drastic measures like cellular suicide which prevents proliferation of severely damaged cells. Investigating the transcriptional response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to low doses of the alkylating agent methylmethane sulfonate (MMS) we observed induction of genes involved in glucose metabolism. RT-PCR analysis showed that the expression of the key enzyme in gluconeogenesis fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBP1) was clearly up-regulated by MMS in glucose-rich medium. Interestingly, deletion of FBP1 led to reduced sensitivity to MMS, but not to other DNA-damaging agents, such as 4-NQO or phleomycin. Reintroduction of FBP1 in the knockout restored the wild-type phenotype while overexpression increased MMS sensitivity of wild-type, shortened life span and increased induction of RNR2 after treatment with MMS. Deletion of FBP1 reduced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in response to MMS treatment and in untreated aged cells, and increased the amount of cells able to propagate and to form colonies, but had no influence on the genotoxic effect of MMS. Our results indicate that FBP1 influences the connection between DNA damage, aging and oxidative stress through either direct signalling or an intricate adaptation in energy metabolism.0.

  18. The 1.6 Å resolution structure of a FRET-optimized Cerulean fluorescent protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, Jennifer L.; Kim, Hanseong [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1604 (United States); Markwardt, Michele L. [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201-1559 (United States); Chen, Liqing; Fromme, Raimund [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1604 (United States); Rizzo, Mark A. [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201-1559 (United States); Wachter, Rebekka M., E-mail: rwachter@asu.edu [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1604 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The high resolution X-ray structure of the cyan fluorescent protein mCerulean3 demonstrates that different combinations of correlated residue substitutions can provide near optimum quantum yield values for fluorescence. Genetically encoded cyan fluorescent proteins (CFPs) bearing a tryptophan-derived chromophore are commonly used as energy-donor probes in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments useful in live cell-imaging applications. In recent years, significant effort has been expended on eliminating the structural and excited-state heterogeneity of these proteins, which has been linked to undesirable photophysical properties. Recently, mCerulean3, a descendant of enhanced CFP, was introduced as an optimized FRET donor protein with a superior quantum yield of 0.87. Here, the 1.6 Å resolution X-ray structure of mCerulean3 is reported. The chromophore is shown to adopt a planar trans configuration at low pH values, indicating that the acid-induced isomerization of Cerulean has been eliminated. β-Strand 7 appears to be well ordered in a single conformation, indicating a loss of conformational heterogeneity in the vicinity of the chromophore. Although the side chains of Ile146 and Leu167 appear to exist in two rotamer states, they are found to be well packed against the indole group of the chromophore. The Ser65 reversion mutation allows improved side-chain packing of Leu220. A structural comparison with mTurquoise2 is presented and additional engineering strategies are discussed.

  19. Cloning and expression analysis of the chloroplast fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase gene from Pyropia haitanensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Haidong; CHEN Changsheng; XU Yan; JI Dehua; XIE Chaotian

    2014-01-01

    Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) is one of the key enzymes in Calvin circle and starch biosynthesis. In this study, the full-length of cpFBPase gene from Pyropia haitanensis was cloned by using rapid amplifica-tion of cDNA ends (RACE) technology. The nucleotide sequence of PhcpFBPase consists of 1 400 bp, includ-ing a 5′untranslated region (UTR) of 92 bp, a 3′ UTR of 69 bp, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 1 236 bp, which can be translated into a 412-amino-acid putative peptides with a molecular weight of 44.3 kDa and a theoretical pI of 5.23. Multiple sequence alignment indicated that the protein belonged to the chloroplast FBPase enzyme. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the protein assembled with the cpFBPase of a thermal tolerant unicellular red micro-algae Galdieria sulphuraria. Expression patterns analyzed by qRT-PCR re-vealed that the expression of PhcpFBPase gene in the thallus phage was 7-fold higher than in the conchocelis phage, which suggested the different mechanisms of inorganic carbon utilization among the different life phages of P. haitanensis. And the different response modes of PhcpFBPase mRNA levels to high temperature and desiccation stress indicated that PhcpFBPase played an important role in responsing to abiotic stress.

  20. Orbital responses to methyl sites in CnH2n+2 (n=1-6)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Ze-Jin; Cheng Xin-Lu; Zhu Zheng-He; Yang Xiang-Dong

    2012-01-01

    Orbital responses to methyl sites in CnH2n+2 (n =1-6) are studied by B3LYP/TZVP based on the most stable geometries using the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ method.Vertical ionization energies are produced using the SAOP/et-pVQZ model for the complete valence space.The highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) investigations indicate the pelectron profiles in methane,ethane,propane,and n-butane.By increasing the number of carbon-carbon bonds in lower momentum regions,the s,p-hybridized orbitals are built and display strong exchange and correlation interactions in lower momentum space (P (≤) 0.50 a.u.).Meanwhile,the relative intensities of the isomers in lower momentum space show the strong bonding number dependence of the carbon-carbon bonds,meaning that more electrons have contributed to orbital construction.The study of representative valence orbital momentum distribution further confirms that the structural changes lead to evident electronic rearrangement over the whole valence space.An analysis based on the isomers reveals that the valence orbitals are isomer-dependent and the valence ionization energy experiences an apparent shift in the inner valence space.However,such shifts are greatly reduced in the outer valence space.Meanwhile,the opposite energy shift trend is found in the intermediate valence space.

  1. KMTNET: A Network of 1.6 m Wide-Field Optical Telescopes Installed at Three Southern Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Lee; Lee, Chung-Uk; Park, Byeong-Gon; Kim, Dong-Jin; Cha, Sang-Mok; Lee, Yongseok; Han, Cheongho; Chun, Moo-Young; Yuk, Insoo

    2016-02-01

    The Korea Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet) is a wide-field photometric system installed by the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI). Here, we present the overall technical specifications of the KMTNet observation system, test observation results, data transfer and image processing procedure, and finally, the KMTNet science programs. The system consists of three 1.6 m wide-field optical telescopes equipped with mosaic CCD cameras of 18k by 18k pixels. Each telescope provides a 2.0 by 2.0 square degree field of view. We have finished installing all three telescopes and cameras sequentially at the Cerro-Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile, the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) in South Africa, and the Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) in Australia. This network of telescopes, which is spread over three different continents at a similar latitude of about -30 degrees, enables 24-hour continuous monitoring of targets observable in the Southern Hemisphere. The test observations showed good image quality that meets the seeing requirement of less than 1.0 arcsec in I-band. All of the observation data are transferred to the KMTNet data center at KASI via the international network communication and are processed with the KMTNet data pipeline. The primary scientific goal of the KMTNet is to discover numerous extrasolar planets toward the Galactic bulge by using the gravitational microlensing technique, especially earth-mass planets in the habitable zone. During the non-bulge season, the system is used for wide-field photometric survey science on supernovae, asteroids, and external galaxies.

  2. KMTNet: a network of 1.6-m wide field optical telescopes installed at three southern observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-Uk; Kim, Seung-Lee; Cha, Sang-Mok; Lee, Yongseok; Kim, Dong-Jin; Park, Byeong-Gon; Lee, Dong-Joo; Koo, Jae-Rim; Hong, Kyeongsoo; Lee, Jae Woo; Ryu, Yoon-Hyun; Lim, Beomdu; Lim, Jin-Sun; Gho, Seung-Won; Kim, Min-Jun

    2015-08-01

    Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) have installed three identical 1.6-m telescopes, called Korea Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet), which cover 2 x 2 degree field of view with the plate scale of 0.4 arcsec/pixel at three observatories - CTIO, SSO and SAAO in southern hemisphere. The uniqueness of the system is the uninterupted 24-hour monitoring with a wide field optics in southern hemisphere. The telescope adopts prime focus using a parabolic mirror and four spherical flattening lenses. The structural design and driving systems are modified from the degin of 2MASS telescope. The one piece filter-shutter assembly has a sliding shutter and four 310-mm square filters. Each observation system produces a 680MB size image file at site and the images are transfered to KASI data center using the Global Ring Network for Advanced Application Development (GLORIAD) network with the band width of 50Mbps in average. The main science goal of the KMTNet is to discover Earth like extra solar planet using the microlensing technique during bulge season, and 50% of the total observation time is allocated for the science program solely. The other telescope times are allocated for pre-selected seven science programs during non-bulge season. From the test observation, we verify that the most important two requirements are satisfied: 10 arcsec in RMS for the pointing accuracy and 1 arcsec of delivered image quality in I-band. In this presentation, we introduce finally installed system at each observatory and its observational performance obtained from the test observation.

  3. IDENTIFICATION OF OUTFLOWS AND CANDIDATE DUAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN SDSS QUASARS AT z = 0.8-1.6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrows, R. Scott; Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg; Kennefick, Julia; Kennefick, Daniel; Berrier, Joel C. [Arkansas Center for Space and Planetary Sciences, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Comerford, Julia M., E-mail: rbarrows@uark.edu [Astronomy Department, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2013-06-01

    We present a sample of 131 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey at redshifts 0.8 < z < 1.6 with double peaks in either of the high-ionization narrow emission lines [Ne V] {lambda}3426 or [Ne III] {lambda}3869. These sources were selected with the intention of identifying high-redshift analogs of the z < 0.8 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with double-peaked [O III] {lambda}5007 lines, which might represent AGN outflows or dual AGNs. Lines of high ionization potential are believed to originate in the inner, highly photoionized portion of the narrow line region, and we exploit this assumption to investigate the possible kinematic origins of the double-peaked lines. For comparison, we measure the [Ne V] {lambda}3426 and [Ne III] {lambda}3869 double peaks in low-redshift (z < 0.8) [O III]-selected sources. We find that [Ne V] {lambda}3426 and [Ne III] {lambda}3869 show a correlation between line splitting and line width similar to that of [O III] {lambda}5007 in other studies, and the velocity splittings are correlated with the quasar Eddington ratio. These results suggest an outflow origin for at least a subset of the double peaks, allowing us to study the high-ionization gas kinematics around quasars. However, we find that a non-negligible fraction of our sample show no evidence for an ionization stratification. For these sources, the outflow scenario is less compelling, leaving the dual AGN scenario as a viable possibility. Finally, we find that our sample shows an anti-correlation between the velocity-offset ratio and luminosity ratio of the components, which is a potential dynamical argument for the presence of dual AGNs. Therefore, this study serves as a first attempt at extending the selection of candidate dual AGNs to higher redshifts.

  4. Engineering Foundation Conference: Advances in optics for biotechnology, medicine, and surgery, Kona Surf Resort and Conference Center, Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, August 1-6, 1999. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yodh, Arjun; Sevick-Muraca, Eva; Benaron, David

    2001-09-01

    The intent of the conference was to gather a group of cross-disciplinary investigators from universities, medical schools, national laboratories, industry, and government in order to highlight future applications and technology of the optical sciences in biotechnology, medicine, and surgery. The session chairs brought new participants and speakers to the conference who were not regular attendees of the OSA and SPIE conferences. Attendees included a good number of graduate and post-doctoral students who tended to join the more senior members in organized and spontaneous afternoon activities. A critique of the conference is given which discusses things that worked well and things that could have been better, focusing on costs, funding, and speaker cancellations. Sessions were held on the following topics: Photodynamic therapy: fundamental and clinical studies; Frontiers in spectroscopy; Photon migration; Advances in tissue microscopy, dyes and reporters; Advances in cell microscopy: spectroscopy and micromanipulation; Laser-tissue interactions: therapeutic interventions; and Optics for biotechnology. Along with the program and participant lists, nearly 50 poster presentations are included.

  5. Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis DaCoTa. Deliverable 1.6: Final Report of WP1 – road safety policy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muhlrad, N. Papadimitriou, E. & Yannis, G.

    2015-01-01

    The ‘Policy’ Work Package of DaCoTA was designed to fill in the gap in knowledge on road safety policy making processes, their institutional framework and the data, methods and technical tools needed to base policy formulation and adoption on scientifically-established evidence. More specifically, i

  6. White River Falls Fish Passage Project, Tygh Valley, Oregon : Final Technical Report, Volume III, Appendix B, Fisheries Report; Appendix C, Engineering Alternative Evaluation; Appendix D, Benefit/Cost Analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oregon. Dept. of Fish and Wildlife; Mount Hood National Forest (Or.)

    1985-06-01

    Studies were conducted to describe current habitat conditions in the White River basin above White River Falls and to evaluate the potential to produce anadromous fish. An inventory of spawning and rearing habitats, irrigation diversions, and enhancement opportunities for anadromous fish in the White River drainage was conducted. Survival of juvenile fish at White River Falls was estimated by releasing juvenile chinook and steelhead above the falls during high and low flow periods and recapturing them below the falls in 1983 and 1984. Four alternatives to provide upstream passage for adult salmon and steelhead were developd to a predesign level. The cost of adult passage and the estimated run size of anadromous fish were used to determine the benefit/cost of the preferred alternative. Possible effects of the introduction of anadromous fish on resident fish and on nearby Oak Springs Hatchery were evaluated. This included an inventory of resident species, a genetic study of native rainbow, and the identification of fish diseases in the basin. This volume contains appendices of habitat survey data, potential production, resident fish population data, upstream passage designs, and benefit/cost calculations. (ACR)

  7. West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume V. Supporting data for estuarine hydrology, discharge plume analysis, chemical oceanography, biological oceanography, and data management. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.)

    1983-02-01

    This project centers around the Strategic Petroleum Site (SPR) known as the West Hackberry salt dome which located in southwestern Louisiana, and which is designed to store 241 million barrels of crude oil. Oil storage caverns are formed by injecting water into salt deposits, and pumping out the resulting brine. Studies described in this report were designed as follow-on studies to three months of pre-discharge characterization work, and include data collected during the first year of brine leaching operations. The objectives were to: (1) characterize the environment in terms of physical, chemical and biological attributes; (2) determine if significant adverse changes in ecosystem productivity and stability of the biological community are occurring as a result of brine discharge; and (3) determine the magnitude of any change observed. Volume V contains appendices for the following: supporting data for estuarine hydrology and hydrography; supporting data analysis of discharge plume; supporting data for water and sediment chemistry; CTD/DO and pH profiles during biological monitoring; supporting data for nekton; and supporting data for data management.

  8. T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well, Cameron Parish, Louisiana. Geopressured-geothermal well report, Volume II. Well workover and production testing, February 1982-October 1985. Final report. Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    The T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well was the fourth in a series of wells in the DOE Design Wells Program that were drilled into deep, large geopressured-geothermal brine aquifers in order to provide basic data with which to determine the technological and economic viability of producing energy from these unconventional resources. This brine production well was spudded on May 27, 1981 and drilling operations were completed on November 2, 1981 after using 160 days of rig time. The well was drilled to a total depth of 16,510 feet. The target sands lie at a depth of 14,412 to 15,860 feet in the Fleming Formation of the lower Miocene. This report covers well production testing operations and necessary well workover operations during the February 1982 to October 1985 period. The primary goals of the well testing program were: (1) to determine reservoir size, shape, volume, drive mechanisms, and other reservoir parameters, (2) to determine and demonstrate the technological and economic viability of producing energy from a geopressured-geothermal brine aquifer through long-term production testing, and (3) to determine problem areas associated with such long-term production, and to develop solutions therefor.

  9. Food consumption and nutrient intake in Finnish 1-6-year-old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyttälä, Pipsa; Erkkola, Maijaliisa; Kronberg-Kippilä, Carina; Tapanainen, Heli; Veijola, Riitta; Simell, Olli; Knip, Mikael; Virtanen, Suvi M

    2010-06-01

    To study food consumption and nutrient intake in Finnish children aged 1-6 years and to assess the effect of age and sex on food consumption and nutrient intake. Cross-sectional samples of children participating in the Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention (DIPP) birth cohort study in Finland. The study population comprised healthy children recruited in the nutrition study within the DIPP study in 1998-2003. Three-day food records (2535 in total) from 1-, 2-, 3-, 4- and 6-year-old children were kept between the years 2003 and 2005. The energy-adjusted consumption of fruits and berries, cereal products, infant formulas and meat dishes was higher and the consumption of vegetables, salads, breads, dairy products, fat spreads, drinks, sweets and sugar was lower among 1-year-old children than older age groups (P for all <0.05). The mean daily energy intake increased with age and was higher among boys than girls in all age groups, except among the 2-year-olds (P for all <0.05). The diet of the 2-6-year-old children contained too much saturated fat and sucrose, and too little PUFA compared with the current Nordic Nutrition Recommendations. The intakes of most vitamins and minerals met the recommendations. However, the intakes of vitamin D, E and iron fell below the recommended levels. The nutrient density of the diet decreased after the age of 1 year at the time that the children adapted to the regular family diet. In order to improve the diet of young children, it is essential to evaluate the diet of the whole family.

  10. Experimental results from pressure testing a 1:6-scale nuclear power plant containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horschel, D.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the testing of a 1:6-scale, reinforced-concrete containment building at Sandia National Laboratories, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The scale-model, Light Water Reactor (LWR) containment building was designed and built to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) code by United Engineers and Constructors, Inc., and was instrumented with over 1200 transducers to prepare for the test. The containment model was tested to failure to determine its response to static internal overpressurization. As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s program on containment integrity, the test results will be used to assess the capability of analytical methods to predict the performance of containments under severe-accident loads. The scaled dimensions of the cylindrical wall and hemispherical dome were typical of a full-size containment. Other typical features included in the heavily reinforced model were equipment hatches, personnel air locks, several small piping penetrations, and a ihin steel liner that was attached to the concrete by headed studs. In addition to the transducers attached to the model, an acoustic detection system and several video and still cameras were used during testing to gather data and to aid in the conduct of the test. The model and its instrumentation are briefly discussed, and is followed by the testing procedures and measured response of the containment model. A summary discussion is included to aid in understanding the significance of the test as it applies to real world reinforced concrete containment structures. The data gathered during SIT and overpressure testing are included as an appendix.

  11. Fructose 1,6-Bisphosphate Aldolase, a Novel Immunogenic Surface Protein on Listeria Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceição, Fabricio Rochedo; Hust, Michael; Mendonça, Karla Sequeira; Moreira, Ângela Nunes; França, Rodrigo Correa; da Silva, Wladimir Padilha; Aleixo, José Antonio G.

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous food-borne pathogen, and its presence in food or production facilities highlights the importance of surveillance. Increased understanding of the surface exposed antigens on Listeria would provide potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets. In the present work, using mass spectrometry and genetic cloning, we show that fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (FBA) class II in Listeria species is the antigen target of the previously described mAb-3F8. Western and dot blot assays confirmed that the mAb-3F8 could distinguish all tested Listeria species from close-related bacteria. Localization studies indicated that FBA is present in every fraction of Listeria cells, including supernatant and the cell wall, setting Listeria spp. as one of the few bacteria described to have this protein on their cell surface. Epitope mapping using ORFeome display and a peptide membrane revealed a 14-amino acid peptide as the potential mAb-3F8 epitope. The target epitope in FBA allowed distinguishing Listeria spp. from closely-related bacteria, and was identified as part of the active site in the dimeric enzyme. However, its function in cell surface seems not to be host cell adhesion-related. Western and dot blot assays further demonstrated that mAb-3F8 together with anti-InlA mAb-2D12 could differentiate pathogenic from non-pathogenic Listeria isolated from artificially contaminated cheese. In summary, we report FBA as a novel immunogenic surface target useful for the detection of Listeria genus. PMID:27489951

  12. Irradiation damage induced on polyethylene terephtalate by 1.6 MeV deuteron ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdesselam, M. [USTHB, Faculte de Physique, B.P. 32, El Alia, 16111 BEZ Algiers (Algeria); Djebara, M. [USTHB, Faculte de Physique, B.P. 32, El Alia, 16111 BEZ Algiers (Algeria)], E-mail: matjbara@yahoo.com; Chami, A.C. [USTHB, Faculte de Physique, B.P. 32, El Alia, 16111 BEZ Algiers (Algeria); Siad, M. [DPN, CNRA, 02 Bd Frantz Fanon, B.P. 399, Alger-gare (Algeria)

    2008-09-15

    The irradiation damage caused on polyethylene terephtalate (Mylar, PET) samples by 1.6 MeV deuteron ions has been measured using simultaneously the nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and the transmission energy loss (TEL) techniques. The irradiation was carried out at normal incidence relative to the target surface with the irradiation beam being used as the analysis beam. The evolution of the overall damage during irradiation was evaluated by measuring the variation of the energy loss of the deuteron beam passing through the target. For this purpose, a solid state Si detector placed at a forward angle of 30 deg. relative to the incident beam direction was used. The NRA spectra recorded by a second Si detector located backward at 150 deg. allowed the evaluation of the carbon and the oxygen depletion. The beam spot size was circular in shape and 1 mm in diameter and the beam current was set at 5 nA. The ion fluence was increased up to the value of 2.5 x 10{sup 16} deuterons/cm{sup 2}. It was observed that the target energy loss decreased steadily as the fluence increased and levelled off at high fluence. The {sup 16}O(d,p{sub 0}){sup 17}O, {sup 16}O(d,p{sub 1}){sup 17}O{sup *} and {sup 12}C(d,p{sub 0}){sup 13}C reactions were used for monitoring the evolution of the oxygen and carbon content as a function of the deuteron fluence. A monotonic decrease of the oxygen content with the increase of ion fluence was observed. At the highest fluence the oxygen depletion reached a value of about 75%. For carbon, a weak depletion was observed at fluence ranging from 2.5 x 10{sup 15} d/cm{sup 2} to 1.0 x 10{sup 16} d/cm{sup 2} followed by a levelling-off with a total loss around 20%.

  13. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference pressurized Water Reactor Power Station. Volume 2, Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Appendices, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; McDuffie, P.N.

    1995-11-01

    With the issuance of the final Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1998), owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to provide some of the needed bases documentation. This report contains the results of a review and reevaluation of the 1978 PNL decommissioning study of the Trojan nuclear power plant (NUREG/CR-0130), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the nuclear power plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5--7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool, prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a ``green field`` condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities.

  14. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference pressurized Water Reactor Power Station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure, Volume 1, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; McDuffie, P.N. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    With the issuance of the final Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1988), owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to provide some of the needed bases documentation. This report contains the results of a review and reevaluation of the {prime}978 PNL decommissioning study of the Trojan nuclear power plant (NUREG/CR-0130), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the nuclear power plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5--7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool, prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a ``green field`` condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities.

  15. Human fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase gene (FBP1): Exon-intron organization, localization to chromosome bands 9q22.2-q22.3, and mutation screening in subjects with fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Maghrabi, M.R.; Jiang, W. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-10

    Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11) is a key regulatory enzyme of gluconeogenesis that catalyzes the hydrolysis of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate to generate fructose-6-phosphate and inorganic phosphate. Deficiency of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase is associated with fasting hypoglycemia and metabolic acidosis because of impaired gluconeogenesis. We have cloned and characterized the human liver fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase gene (FBP1). FBP1, localized to chromosome bands 9q22.2-q22.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization, consists of seven exons that span > 31 kb, and the six introns are in the same position as in the rat gene. FBP1 was screened for mutations in two subjects with fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase deficiency. Four nucleotide substitutions were identified, two of which were silent mutations in the codons for Ala-216 (GCT {yields} GCC) and Gly-319 (GGG {yields} GGA). The other substitutions were in intron 3, a C {yields} T substitution 7 nucleotides downstream from the splice donor site, and in the promoter region, an A {yields} T substitution 188 nucleotides upstream from the start of transcription. These nucleotide substitutions were also found in normal unaffected subjects and thus are not the cause of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase deficiency in the two subjects studied. The molecular basis of hepatic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase deficiency in these subjects remains undetermined but could result from unidentified mutations in the promoter that decrease expression or from mutations in another gene that indirectly lead to decreased fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase activity. 18 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Production development and utilization of Zimmer Station wet FGD by-products. Final report. Volume 6, Field study conducted in fulfillment of Phase 3 titled. Use of FGD by-product gypsum enriched with magnesium hydroxide as a soil amendment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigham, J. M. [Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States). Ohio Agricultural Research Development Center; Soto, U. I. [Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States). Ohio Agricultural Research Development Center; Stehouwer, R. C. [Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States). Ohio Agricultural Research Development Center; Yibirin, H. [Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States). Ohio Agricultural Research Development Center

    1999-04-30

    A variety of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technologies have been developed to meet environmental restrictions imposed by the federal Clean Air Act and its amendments. These technologies include wet scrubber systems that dramatically reduce sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions. Although such systems are effective, they also produce large volumes of sludge that must be dewatered, stabilized, and disposed of in landfills. Disposal is an expensive and environmentally questionable process for which suitable alternatives are needed. Wet scrubbing of flue gases with magnesium (Mg)-enhanced lime has the potential to become a leading FGD technology. When combined with aforced oxidation system, the wet sludges resulting from this process can be modified and refined to produce gypsum (CaS04∙2H2O) and magnesium hydroxide [Mg(OH)2] of sufficient purity for beneficial re-use in the construction (wallboard) and pharmaceutical industries. The pilot plant at the CINERGY Zimmer Station near Cincinnati can also produce gypsum by-products formulated to contain varying amounts of Mg(OH)2- Such materials may have value to the agriculture, forestry, and lawn-care industries as soil "conditioners", liming agents, and nutritional supplements capable of supplying calcium (Ca), Mg, and sulfur (S) for plant growth. This report describes three field studies designed to evaluate by-product gypsum and Mg-gypsum from the Zimmer Station power plant as amendments for improving the quality of mine spoils and agricultural soils that were unproductive because of phytotoxic levels of dissolved aluminum (Al) and low pH. The technical literature suggests that gypsum may be more effective than agricultural limestone for ameliorating Al toxicity below the immediate zone of application. Such considerations are important for deep-rooted plant species that attempt to utilize water and nutrients occurring at depth in the spoil/soil.

  17. Cosmology Without Finality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahootian, F.

    2009-12-01

    The rapid convergence of advancing sensor technology, computational power, and knowledge discovery techniques over the past decade has brought unprecedented volumes of astronomical data together with unprecedented capabilities of data assimilation and analysis. A key result is that a new, data-driven "observational-inductive'' framework for scientific inquiry is taking shape and proving viable. The anticipated rise in data flow and processing power will have profound effects, e.g., confirmations and disconfirmations of existing theoretical claims both for and against the big bang model. But beyond enabling new discoveries can new data-driven frameworks of scientific inquiry reshape the epistemic ideals of science? The history of physics offers a comparison. The Bohr-Einstein debate over the "completeness'' of quantum mechanics centered on a question of ideals: what counts as science? We briefly examine lessons from that episode and pose questions about their applicability to cosmology. If the history of 20th century physics is any indication, the abandonment of absolutes (e.g., space, time, simultaneity, continuity, determinacy) can produce fundamental changes in understanding. The classical ideal of science, operative in both physics and cosmology, descends from the European Enlightenment. This ideal has for over 200 years guided science to seek the ultimate order of nature, to pursue the absolute theory, the "theory of everything.'' But now that we have new models of scientific inquiry powered by new technologies and driven more by data than by theory, it is time, finally, to relinquish dreams of a "final'' theory.

  18. The crystal structure of 1,6-dithiapyrene(DTP)-7,7,8,8-tetracyano-p-quinodimethane(TCNQ)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Niels; Rindorf, G.; Jacobsen, C. S.;

    1985-01-01

    The crystal structure of the charge-transfer complex between 1,6-dithiapyrene (DTP) and 7,7,8,8-tetracyano-p-quino-dimethane (TCNQ) is reported. The structure correlates well with the observed physical properties......The crystal structure of the charge-transfer complex between 1,6-dithiapyrene (DTP) and 7,7,8,8-tetracyano-p-quino-dimethane (TCNQ) is reported. The structure correlates well with the observed physical properties...

  19. The crystal structure of 1,6-dithiapyrene(DTP)-7,7,8,8-tetracyano-p-quinodimethane(TCNQ)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Niels; Rindorf, G.; Jacobsen, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    The crystal structure of the charge-transfer complex between 1,6-dithiapyrene (DTP) and 7,7,8,8-tetracyano-p-quino-dimethane (TCNQ) is reported. The structure correlates well with the observed physical properties......The crystal structure of the charge-transfer complex between 1,6-dithiapyrene (DTP) and 7,7,8,8-tetracyano-p-quino-dimethane (TCNQ) is reported. The structure correlates well with the observed physical properties...

  20. Sparse PDF Volumes for Consistent Multi-Resolution Volume Rendering

    KAUST Repository

    Sicat, Ronell Barrera

    2014-12-31

    This paper presents a new multi-resolution volume representation called sparse pdf volumes, which enables consistent multi-resolution volume rendering based on probability density functions (pdfs) of voxel neighborhoods. These pdfs are defined in the 4D domain jointly comprising the 3D volume and its 1D intensity range. Crucially, the computation of sparse pdf volumes exploits data coherence in 4D, resulting in a sparse representation with surprisingly low storage requirements. At run time, we dynamically apply transfer functions to the pdfs using simple and fast convolutions. Whereas standard low-pass filtering and down-sampling incur visible differences between resolution levels, the use of pdfs facilitates consistent results independent of the resolution level used. We describe the efficient out-of-core computation of large-scale sparse pdf volumes, using a novel iterative simplification procedure of a mixture of 4D Gaussians. Finally, our data structure is optimized to facilitate interactive multi-resolution volume rendering on GPUs.

  1. Sparse PDF Volumes for Consistent Multi-Resolution Volume Rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicat, Ronell; Krüger, Jens; Möller, Torsten; Hadwiger, Markus

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a new multi-resolution volume representation called sparse pdf volumes, which enables consistent multi-resolution volume rendering based on probability density functions (pdfs) of voxel neighborhoods. These pdfs are defined in the 4D domain jointly comprising the 3D volume and its 1D intensity range. Crucially, the computation of sparse pdf volumes exploits data coherence in 4D, resulting in a sparse representation with surprisingly low storage requirements. At run time, we dynamically apply transfer functions to the pdfs using simple and fast convolutions. Whereas standard low-pass filtering and down-sampling incur visible differences between resolution levels, the use of pdfs facilitates consistent results independent of the resolution level used. We describe the efficient out-of-core computation of large-scale sparse pdf volumes, using a novel iterative simplification procedure of a mixture of 4D Gaussians. Finally, our data structure is optimized to facilitate interactive multi-resolution volume rendering on GPUs.

  2. Analysis of the site-specific integration system of the Streptomyces aureofaciens phage μ1/6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkašovská, Jarmila; Godány, Andrej

    2012-03-01

    The bacteriophage μ1/6 integrates its DNA into the chromosome of tetracycline producing strains of Streptomyces aureofaciens by a site-specific recombination process. A bioinformatic analysis of the μ1/6 genome revealed that orf5 encodes a putative integrase, a basic protein of 416 amino acids. The μ1/6 integrase was found to belong to the integrase family of site-specific tyrosine recombinases. The phage attachment site (attP) was localized downstream of the int gene. The attachment junctions (attL and attR) were determined, allowing identification of the bacterial attachment site (attB). All attachment sites shared a 46-bp common core sequence within which a site-specific recombination occurs. This core sequence comprises the 3' end of a putative tRNA(Thr) gene (anticodon TGT) which is completely restored in attL after integration of the phage into the host genome. An integration vector containing μ1/6 int-attP region was inserted stably into the S. aureofaciens B96, S. lividans TK24, and S. coelicolor A3. The μ1/6 integrase was shown to be functional in vivo in heterologous Escherichia coli without any other factors encoded by Streptomyces. In vitro recombination assay using purified μ1/6 integrase demonstrated its ability to catalyze integrative recombination in the presence of a crude extract of E. coli cells.

  3. Altered Hepa1-6 cells by dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-treatment induce anti-tumor immunity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhengyu; Zhang, Hongxia; Wang, Ye; Yu, Bin; Wang, Chen; Liu, Changcheng; Lu, Juan; Chen, Fei; Wang, Minjun; Yu, Xinlu; Lin, Jiahao; Pan, Xinghua; Wang, Pin; Zhu, Haiying

    2016-02-23

    Cancer immunotherapy is the use of the immune system to treat cancer. Our current research proposed an optional strategy of activating immune system involving in cancer immunotherapy. When being treated with 2% DMSO in culture medium, Hepa1-6 cells showed depressed proliferation with no significant apoptosis or decreased viability. D-hep cells, Hepa1-6 cells treated with DMSO for 7 days, could restore to the higher proliferation rate in DMSO-free medium, but alteration of gene expression profile was irreversible. Interestingly, tumors from D-hep cells, not Hepa1-6 cells, regressed in wild-type C57BL/6 mice whereas D-hep cells exhibited similar tumorigenesis as Hep1-6 cells in immunodeficient mice. As expected, additional Hepa1-6 cells failed to form tumors in the D-hep-C57 mice in which D-hep cells were eliminated. Further research confirmed that D-hep-C57 mice established anti-tumor immunity against Hepa1-6 cells. Our research proposed viable tumor cells with altered biological features by DMSO-treatment could induce anti-tumor immunity in vivo.

  4. Amyloid precursor protein modulates Nav1.6 sodium channel currents through a Go-coupled JNK pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shao; Wang, Xi; Ma, Quan-Hong; Yang, Wu-lin; Zhang, Xiao-Gang; Dawe, Gavin S.; Xiao, Zhi-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP), commonly associated with Alzheimer’s disease, also marks axonal degeneration. In the recent studies, we demonstrated that APP aggregated at nodes of Ranvier (NORs) in myelinated central nervous system (CNS) axons and interacted with Nav1.6. However, the physiological function of APP remains unknown. In this study, we described reduced sodium current densities in APP knockout hippocampal neurons. Coexpression of APP or its intracellular domains containing a VTPEER motif with Nav1.6 sodium channels in Xenopus oocytes resulted in an increase in peak sodium currents, which was enhanced by constitutively active Go mutant and blocked by a dominant negative mutant. JNK and CDK5 inhibitor attenuated increases in Nav1.6 sodium currents induced by overexpression of APP. Nav1.6 sodium currents were increased by APPT668E (mutant Thr to Glu) and decreased by T668A (mutant Thr to ALa) mutant, respectively. The cell surface expression of Nav1.6 sodium channels in the white matter of spinal cord and the spinal conduction velocity is decreased in APP, p35 and JNK3 knockout mice. Therefore, APP modulates Nav1.6 sodium channels through a Go-coupled JNK pathway, which is dependent on phosphorylation of APP at Thr668. PMID:28008944

  5. Elevated levels of serum antibodies against alpha-1, 6-glucan in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Dai; Xiao-Ming Gao

    2011-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate whether levels of anti-alpha-1,6-glucan antibodies in human sera correlate with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).Serum samples were collected from patients with SLE (n =30),RA (n =30) and healthy adult volunteers.IgG,IgA and IgM levels against alpha-1,6-glucan were measured using enzyme linked immunosorbent assays.Anti-alpha-1,6-glucan IgG prevalence was raised in patients with active SLE (73.3%)and RA (60%) compared with healthy controls (13.3%).Strong correlation between anti-alpha-1,6-glucan-IgG levels and anti-perinuclear factor (r =0.642; p< 0.05) in RA patients or anti-nuclear antibodies (r =0.675; p < 0.05)in SLE patients was observed.No significant differences in anti-alpha-1,6-glucan-lgA or-lgM levels were noted between different groups.We conclude that anti-alpha1,6-glucan-lgG levels were significantly elevated in patients with SLE or RA and positively correlated with disease activity.

  6. 1,6-二磷酸果糖治疗小儿病毒性心肌炎临床疗效观察%Clinical effect of Fructose-1, 6-diphosphate on pedo-viral myocarditis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭妍妍

    2010-01-01

    目的 观察1,6-二磷酸果糖治疗小儿病毒性心肌炎的临床效果.方法 将122例病毒性心肌炎的患儿随机抽签分治疗组60例及对照组62例,治疗组应用1,6-二磷酸果糖,对照组应用能量合剂.结果 治疗组总有效52例(86.7%),优于对照组42例(67.7%);治疗组合并早搏的患儿减少早搏总有效16例(88.9%),优于对照组19例(70.4%),2组差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 1,6-二磷酸果糖治疗小儿病毒性心肌炎有明显疗效,值得临床应用.%Objectives To investigate the curative effect of Fructose-1, 6-diphosphate on pedo-viral myo-carditis. Methods Sixty patients in the treatment group had Fructose-1, 6-diphosphate and conventional therapy.62 patients in the control group were only treated with conventional therapy. Results The total effective rate of treatment group(86.7%) was higher than that of control group(67.7%). Fructose-1,6-diphosphate increased the effective rate, decreased the myo-creatase and improved the clinical symptoms. Conclusions Fructose-1, 6-diphosphate is effective for treating pedo-viral myocarditis.

  7. N,N'-(Hexane-1,6-diylbis(4-methyl-N-(oxiran-2-ylmethylbenzenesulfonamide: Synthesis via cyclodextrin mediated N-alkylation in aqueous solution and further Prilezhaev epoxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Fischer

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available N-alkylation of N,N'-(hexane-1,6-diylbis(4-methylbenzenesulfonamide with allyl bromide and subsequent Prilezhaev reaction with m-chloroperbenzoic acid to give N,N'-(hexane-1,6-diylbis(4-methyl-N-(oxiran-2-ylmethylbenzenesulfonamide is described. This twofold alkylation was performed in aqueous solution, whereby α-, and randomly methylated β-cyclodextrin were used as adequate phase transfer catalysts and the cyclodextrin–guest complexes were characterized by 1H NMR and 2D NMR ROESY spectroscopy. Finally, the curing properties of the diepoxide with lysine-based α-amino-ε-caprolactam were analyzed by rheological measurements.

  8. Volume of a doubly truncated hyperbolic tetrahedron

    CERN Document Server

    Kolpakov, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The present paper regards the volume function of a doubly truncated hyperbolic tetrahedron. Starting from the previous results of J. Murakami, U. Yano and A. Ushijima, we have developed a unified approach to expressing the volume in different geometric cases by dilogarithm functions and to treat properly the many analytic strata of the latter. Finally, several numeric examples are given.

  9. Renormalized Volume

    CERN Document Server

    Gover, A Rod

    2016-01-01

    For any conformally compact manifold with hypersurface boundary we define a canonical renormalized volume functional and compute an explicit, holographic formula for the corresponding anomaly. For the special case of asymptotically Einstein manifolds, our method recovers the known results. The anomaly does not depend on any particular choice of regulator, but the coefficients of divergences do. We give explicit formulae for these divergences valid for any choice of regulating hypersurface; these should be relevant to recent studies of quantum corrections to entanglement entropies. The anomaly is expressed as a conformally invariant integral of a local Q-curvature that generalizes the Branson Q-curvature by including data of the embedding. In each dimension this canonically defines a higher dimensional generalization of the Willmore energy/rigid string action. We show that the variation of these energy functionals is exactly the obstruction to solving a singular Yamabe type problem with boundary data along the...

  10. Hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces as tools for the construction of a herringbone pattern in the crystal structure of hexane-1,6-diaminium hexane-1,6-diyl bis-(hydrogen phospho-nate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Guido J; van Megen, Martin; Frank, Walter

    2017-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title salt, [H3N(CH2)6NH3][(HO)O2P(CH2)6PO2(OH)], consists of one half of a hexane-1,6-diaminium dication and one half of a hexane-1,6-diyl bis-(hydrogen phospho-nate) dianion. Both are located around different centres of inversion (Wyckoff sites: 2a and 2d) of the space group P21/c. The shape of the hexane-1,6-diaminium cation is best described as a double hook. Both aminium groups as well as the two attached CH2 groups are turned out from the plane of the central four C atoms. In contrast, all six C atoms of the dianion are almost in a plane. The hydrogen phospho-nate (-PO3H) groups of the anions and the aminium groups of the cations form two-dimensional O-H⋯ and O-H⋯N hydrogen-bonded networks parallel to the ac plane, built up from ten-membered and twelve-membered ring motifs with graph-set descriptors R3(3)(10) and R5(4)(12), respectively. These networks are linked by the alkyl-ene chains of the anions and cations. The resulting three-dimensional network shows a herringbone pattern, which resembles the parent structures 1,6-di-amino-hexane and hexane-1,6-di-phospho-nic acid.

  11. Task 1.6 - mixed waste. Topical report, April 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    For fifty years, the United States was involved in a nuclear arms race of immense proportions. During the majority of this period, the push was always to design new weapons, produce more weapons, and increase the size of the arsenal, maintaining an advantage over the opposition in order to protect U.S. interests. Now that the {open_quotes}Cold War{close_quotes} is over, we are faced with the imposing tasks of dismantling, cleaning up, and remediating the wide variety of problems created by this arms race. An overview of the current status of the total remediation effort within the DOE is presented in the DOE publication {open_quotes}ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT 1995{close_quotes} (EM 1995). Not all radioactive waste is the same though; therefore, a system was devised to categorize the different types of radioactive waste. These categories are as follows: spent fuel; high-level waste; transuranic waste; low-level waste; mixed waste; and uranium-mill tailings. Mixed waste is defined to be material contaminated with any of these categories of radioactive material plus an organic or heavy metal component. However, for this discussion, {open_quotes}mixed waste{close_quote} will pertain only to low-level mixed waste which consists of low-level radioactive waste mixed with organic solvents and or heavy metals. The area of {open_quotes}mixed-waste characterization, treatment, and disposal{close_quotes} is listed on page 6 of the EM 1995 publication as one of five focus areas for technological development, and while no more important than the others, it has become an area of critical concern for DOE. Lacking adequate technologies for treatment and disposal, the DOE stockpiled large quantities of mixed waste during the 1970s and 1980s. Legislative changes and the need for regulatory compliance have now made it expedient to develop methods of achieving final disposition for this stockpiled mixed waste.

  12. 由啤酒废酵母发酵提取1,6-二磷酸果糖的研究%Study on Preparation and Purification of Fructose-1, 6-Diphosphate with Brewer's Yeast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱玉强

    2006-01-01

    探讨了由啤酒废酵母发酵提取1,6-二磷酸果糖(FDP)的工艺.正交试验结果表明,发酵液中氯化镁的浓度、酸度是1,6-二磷酸果糖生产最主要的影响因素.最佳发酵参数为:发酵温度37℃,葡萄糖浓度为0.5mol/L,磷酸盐浓度0.4mol/L,酸度6.5,有机溶剂的加量约6%.1,6-二磷酸果糖在发酵液中的得率最高可达69.8mg/mL.

  13. 3μm - 1.6μm Double Resonance Spectroscopy of CH_4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, George; Belaas, Erik; Yang, Shaoyue; Lehmann, Kevin

    2016-06-01

    The Near-IR Spectrum of CH_4 is dense with many overlapping bands that perturb each other by vibrational and ro-vibrational interactions. Assignments of the individual lines are needed in order to simulate the spectrum as a function of pressure and temperature, as needed in the search for CH_4 in extrasolar planets. Both the group at the University College, London^1 and that at the University of Reins^2 have produced theoretical spectra that allows simulation up to the high temperatures expected on ``Hot Jupiters''. The accuracy of these theoretical spectra need to be further tested. Because CH_4 is a light spherical top, assignment of its perturbed spectra is a formable challenge as none of the lines allowed in the rigid rotor approximation have ground vibrational state combination differences. We are using IR-IR double resonance to observe modulation in the strength of near-IR absorption caused by a modulation of a 3 μm OPO beam that is tuned to a particular transition in the C-H stretching fundamental of CH_4. This produces V-type double resonance transitions (which share the lower state with the pump transition), which provides firm assignments for lines normally observed in absorption in the near-IR. We also observe sequential double resonance which reveals transitions that have a known rotational level of the ν_3 fundamental as the lower state and reaches final states in the 9000 cm-1 spectral region. These are states of A, E, F_1 vibrational symmetries which are forbidden in transitions from the ground vibrational state. These 3 level double resonance transitions are Doppler Free and have a linewidth of ˜10 MHz due to a combination of near-IR laser jitter and power broadening of the mid-IR transition. We also observed many 4-level double resonance transitions that we have tentatively assigned as arising from the ν_4 fundamental level. These are distinguished from the 3-level double resonance transitions by they being Doppler broadened and having a large

  14. Profiling of core fucosylated N-glycans using a novel bacterial lectin that specifically recognizes α1,6 fucosylated chitobiose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainauskas, Saulius; Duke, Rebecca M.; McFarland, James; McClung, Colleen; Ruse, Cristian; Taron, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    A novel fucose-binding lectin (SL2-1) from the bacterium Streptomyces rapamycinicus was identified by analysis of metagenomic DNA sequences. SL2-1 belongs to a new group of bacterial fucose-specific lectins that have no similarity to known bacterial fucose-binding proteins, but are related to certain eukaryotic fucose-binding lectins. The 17 kDa protein was expressed recombinantly in E. coli and purified by affinity chromatography. Glycan microarray analysis with fluorescently labeled recombinant SL2-1 demonstrated its ability to bind to core α1-6 fucosylated N-glycans, but not to core α1-3 fucosylated N-glycans, or other α1-2, α1-3 and α1-4 fucosylated oligosaccharides. The minimal high affinity binding epitope of SL2-1 was α1-6 fucosylated di-n-acetylchitobiose. The recombinant lectin was efficient in detection of N-glycan core fucosylation using lectin blotting and lectin ELISA assays. Finally, a workflow using SL2-1 for selective and quantitative profiling of core fucosylated N-glycans using UPLC-HILIC-FLR analysis was established. The approach was validated for selective capture and analysis of core fucosylated N-glycans present in complex glycan mixtures derived from mammalian serum IgG. PMID:27678371

  15. A Study of the Behavior and Micromechanical Modelling of Granular Soil. Volume 1. A Constitutive Relation for Granular Materials Based on the Contact Law Between Two Spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-22

    hypoelasticity , plasticity, and viscoplasticity. Despite the large number of models there has been no consensus within the research community on the best...AD-A238 091 FosR-- C)1 0 19 IIIIII1IIII111 11111111l A STUDY OF THE BEHAVIOR AND MICROMECHANICAL MODELLING OF GRANULAR SOIL VOLUME I A CONSTITUTIVE...COVERED IMay 22, 1991 Final 1/6/ 89-5/15/91 4 TITLE AND SUBTITILI S. FUNDING NUMIEgRS A Study of the Behavior and Micromechanical Modelling of Grant

  16. A Study of the Behavior and Micromechanical Modelling of Granular Soil. Volume 3. A Numerical Investigation of the Behavior of Granular Media Using Nonlinear Discrete Element Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-22

    Eisenberg 1987). Among other formulations, the existing models are based on the theories of elasticity, hypoelasticity , plasticity and viscoplasticity...AD-A238 158 AFOSR4R. 91 069.1 A STUDY OF THE BEHAVIOR AND MICROMECHANICAL MODELLING OF GRANULAR SOIL DTIC VOLUME mI ELECTIE A NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION...Final 1/6/ 9-5/15/91 4. nU AN SUS"Ll5. FUNDING NUMBERS A Study of the Behavior and Micromechanical Modelling of Grant AFOSR-89-0350 Granular Soil PR

  17. Verification of the sputter-generated 32SFn- (n = 1-6) anions by accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mane, R. G.; Surendran, P.; Kumar, Sanjay; Nair, J. P.; Yadav, M. L.; Hemalatha, M.; Thomas, R. G.; Mahata, K.; Kailas, S.; Gupta, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we have performed systematic Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) measurements at our ion source test set up and have demonstrated that gas phase 32SFn- (n = 1-6) anions for all size 'n' can be readily generated from a variety of surfaces undergoing Cs+ ion sputtering in the presence of high purity SF6 gas by employing the gas spray-cesium sputter technique. In our SIMS measurements, the isotopic yield ratio 34SFn-/32SFn- (n = 1-6) was found to be close to its natural abundance but not for all size 'n'. In order to gain further insight into the constituents of these molecular anions, ultra sensitive Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) measurements were conducted with the most abundant 32SFn- (n = 1-6) anions, at BARC-TIFR 14 UD Pelletron accelerator. The results from these measurements are discussed in this paper.

  18. 1-Methoxypyrene and 1,6-dimethoxypyrene: two novel metabolites in fungal metabolism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunder, T; Marr, J; Kremer, S; Sterner, O; Anke, H

    1997-05-01

    The metabolism of pyrene by Penicillium glabrum strain TW 9424, a strain isolated from a site contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was investigated in submerged cultures. The metabolites formed were identified as 1-hydroxypyrene, 1,6- and 1, 8-dihydroxypyrene, 1,6- and 1,8-pyrenequinone, and 1-pyrenyl sulfate. In addition, two new metabolites were isolated and identified by UV, 1H nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectroscopy as 1-methoxypyrene and 1,6-dimethoxypyrene. Experiments with [methyl-3H]S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) revealed that SAM is the coenzyme that provides the methyl group for the methyltransferase involved. To our knowledge, this is the first time that methoxylated metabolites of PAHs have been isolated from fungal cultures.

  19. ITER Blanket First Wall (WBS 1.6{sub 1}A)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Bong Guen; Kim, H. G.; Kim, J. H. (and others)

    2008-03-15

    International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project is the international collaboration one for the commercialization of nuclear fusion energy through the technical and engineering verification. In ITER project, we plan to procure the blanket systems which has the risk of technology and cost when it is newly developed. We are developing the manufacturing process and joining technology for the ITER blanket to complete the procurement with qualified blanket system. To evaluate the soundness of manufacturing process, specimen and mock-up tests are being prepared. Finally, we can obtain the key technology of nuclear fusion reactor especially on the blanket design, joining and manufacturing technology through the present project and these technologies will help the construction of Korea fusion DEMO reactor and the development of commercial nuclear fusion reactor in Korea. In 1st year, through the fabrication of the Cu/SS and Be/Cu joint specimen, fabrication procedure such as material preparation, canning, degassing, HIP (Hot Isostatic Pressing), PHHT (Post HIP heat treatment) was established. The optimized HIP conditions (1050 .deg. C, 150 MPa, 2 hr for Cu/SS and 580 - 620 .deg. C, 100-150 MPa, 2 hr for Be/Cu) were developed through the investigation on joint specimen fabricated with the various HIP conditions; the destructive tests of joint and NDT such as UT (10 MHz, 0.25 inch D, flat type) and ECT. Several mock-ups were fabricated for confirming the joint integrity and NDT. specimens fabricated with these mock-ups were used in mechanical tests including microstructure observation. The mock-ups were used in the HHF test after the developed NDT. In 2nd year, PHHT of Cu was investigated in order to recover its mechanical properties, and the pre-qualification mock-up were fabricated against the Qualification Program and sent to RF for HHF testing in TSEFEY. FW fabrication and joining procedure were documented in the form of the TSD. Qualification mock

  20. Sialylated β1, 6 branched N-glycans modulate the adhesion, invasion and metastasis of hepatocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao; Zhao, Yujie; Wang, Liping; Chen, Xixi; Su, Zhen; Zhang, Han; Yuan, Qingmin; Wang, Shujing

    2016-12-01

    The mouse hepatocarcinoma cell lines Hca-F and Hca-P have been derived from hepatocarcinoma in mice and metastasize only to the lymph node. Hca-F cells displayed greater lymphatic metastasis ability than Hca-P cells. When the two cell lines were compared for cell surface sialylated β1,6 branched N-glycans by flow cytometry using L-PHA and SNA, Hca-F cells were found to express significantly higher levels. To explore the effect of increased sialylated β1,6 branched N-glycans on hepatocarcinoma progression, we inhibit their expression in Hca-F cells by using swainsonine treatment and RNA interference. We found that swainsonine treatment or GnT-V-shRNA transfection significantly inhibited the formation of β1,6 branched N-glycans, and partially inhibited the expression of α2,6 sialic acids. Knockdown of sialylated β1,6 branched N-glycans significantly attenuated the invasive and metastatic capability both in vitro and in vivo. Blockade of α2,6 sialic acid expression on Hca-F cell surface by the treatment with neuraminidase caused reduction in cellular adherence to lymph node. In addition, knockdown of sialylated β1,6 branched N-glycans could decrease the expression of Notch1, NICD1, NICD2 and HES1 in Hca-F cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that increased sialylated β1,6 branched N-glycans may contribute to hepatocarcinoma progression by altering the adhesive, invasive and metastatic ability to lymph node via Notch signaling pathway.

  1. Sodium channel SCN8A (Nav1.6: properties and de novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathy and intellectual disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janelle Elizabeth O'Brien

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The sodium channel Nav1.6, encoded by the gene SCN8A, is one of the major voltage-gated channels in human brain. The sequences of sodium channels have been highly conserved during evolution, and minor changes in biophysical properties can have a major impact in vivo. Insight into the role of Nav1.6 has come from analysis of spontaneous and induced mutations of mouse Scn8a during the past 18 years. Only within the past year has the role of SCN8A in human disease become apparent from whole exome and genome sequences of patients with sporadic disease. Unique features of Nav1.6 include its contribution to persistent current, resurgent current, repetitive neuronal firing, and subcellular localization at the axon initial segment and nodes of Ranvier. Loss of Nav1.6 activity results in reduced neuronal excitability, while gain-of-function mutations can increase neuronal excitability. Mouse Scn8a (med mutants exhibit movement disorders including ataxia, tremor and dystonia. Thus far, more than ten human de novo mutations have been identified in patients with two types of disorders, epileptic encephalopathy and intellectual disability. We review these human mutations as well as the unique features of Nav1.6 that contribute to its role in determining neuronal excitability in vivo. A supplemental figure illustrating the positions of amino acid residues within the 4 domains and 24 transmembrane segments of Nav1.6 is provided to facilitate the location of novel mutations within the channel protein.

  2. Structure of a Class I Tagatose-1,6-bisphosphate Aldolase - Investigation into an Apparent Loss of Stereospecificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LowKam, C.; Liotard, B; Sygusch, J

    2010-01-01

    Tagatose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase from Streptococcus pyogenes is a class I aldolase that exhibits a remarkable lack of chiral discrimination with respect to the configuration of hydroxyl groups at both C3 and C4 positions. The enzyme catalyzes the reversible cleavage of four diastereoisomers (fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), psicose 1,6-bisphosphate, sorbose 1,6-bisphosphate, and tagatose 1,6-bisphosphate) to dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) and d-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate with high catalytic efficiency. To investigate its enzymatic mechanism, high resolution crystal structures were determined of both native enzyme and native enzyme in complex with dihydroxyacetone-P. The electron density map revealed a ({alpha}/{beta}){sub 8} fold in each dimeric subunit. Flash-cooled crystals of native enzyme soaked with dihydroxyacetone phosphate trapped a covalent intermediate with carbanionic character at Lys{sup 205}, different from the enamine mesomer bound in stereospecific class I FBP aldolase. Structural analysis indicates extensive active site conservation with respect to class I FBP aldolases, including conserved conformational responses to DHAP binding and conserved stereospecific proton transfer at the DHAP C3 carbon mediated by a proximal water molecule. Exchange reactions with tritiated water and tritium-labeled DHAP at C3 hydrogen were carried out in both solution and crystalline state to assess stereochemical control at C3. The kinetic studies show labeling at both pro-R and pro-S C3 positions of DHAP yet detritiation only at the C3 pro-S-labeled position. Detritiation of the C3 pro-R label was not detected and is consistent with preferential cis-trans isomerism about the C2-C3 bond in the carbanion as the mechanism responsible for C3 epimerization in tagatose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase.

  3. 3,4-Dihydroxy-1,6-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)hexa-2,4-diene-1,6-dione, its 4-methylphenyl analogue, and a potassium salt of 2-hydroxy-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-4-oxobut-2-enoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Luke; Turnbull, Mark M; Wikaira, Jan L

    2013-11-01

    Reaction of 4-methoxyacetophenone with diethyl oxalate under basic conditions produced 3,4-dihydroxy-1,6-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)hexa-2,4-diene-1,6-dione, C20H18O6, (1). The molecules lie across a crystallographic inversion centre and intramolecular hydrogen bonding, similar to acetylacetone, is observed, confirming that the molecule is in the di-enol-dione tautomeric form. Additional O-H...O hydrogen bonds link the molecules into chains parallel to the b axis. The structure is compared with that of redetermined 4-methylphenyl compound 3,4-dihydroxy-1,6-bis(4-methylphenyl)hexa-2,4-diene-1,6-dione, C20H18O4, (2), which crystallizes in a similar fashion. The salt, catena-poly[[μ2-2-hydroxy-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-4-oxobut-2-enoato-κ(3)O(1),O(2):O(4)][μ2-2-hydroxy-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-4-oxobut-2-enoic acid-κ(2)O(1):O(4)]potassium], [K(C11H9O5)(C11H10O5)]n, (3), was isolated as a by-product of the synthesis of (1). The two organic species are linked by a strong hydrogen bond between the carboxylic acid and carboxylate groups. They are further stabilized and linked into a double-chain structure via the seven-coordinate potassium ion.

  4. Synthesis with Nitriles: Synthesis of Some New Mercaptopyridazine, Mercaptopyridazino[1,6-a]quinazoline and Thiophene Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam A. Al-Sheikh

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available 2-(1-(4-Bromophenyl-2-thiocyanatoethylidenemalononitrile (3 undergoes azo coupling with diazotized aromatic amines to afford arylhydrazone derivatives, which are readily cyclized to afford the corresponding 3(2H-pyridazinimine derivatives upon reflux in aqueous NaOH. Under similar condition an o-cyanoarylhydrazone derivative was cyclized into 6H-pyridazino[1,6-a]quinazolin-6-imine, which in turn was easily transformed into 6H-pyridazino[1,6-a]quinazolin-6-one on reflux in ethanolic/HCl. Compound 3 afforded substituted 5-acetylthiophene derivatives upon reflux in AcOH/HCl mixtures.

  5. Three-transition cascade erbium laser at 1.7, 2.7, and 1.6 µm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollnau, Markus; Ghisler, C.; Lüthy, W.; Weber, H.P.; Schneider, J.; Unrau, U.B.

    1997-01-01

    We report on an upconversion cascade laser in an erbium-doped ZBLAN fiber emitting simultaneously on the three transitions 4S3/2 -> 4I9/2 at 1.7 um, 4I11/2 -> 4I13/2 at 2.7 um, and 4I13/2 -> 4I15/2 at 1.6 um. At moderate pump powers, the laser transition at 1.6 um supports 2.7-um lasing and permits

  6. Hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces as tools for the construction of a herringbone pattern in the crystal structure of hexane-1,6-diaminium hexane-1,6-diyl bis­(hydrogen phospho­nate)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Guido J.; van Megen, Martin; Frank, Walter

    2017-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title salt, [H3N(CH2)6NH3][(HO)O2P(CH2)6PO2(OH)], consists of one half of a hexane-1,6-diaminium dication and one half of a hexane-1,6-diyl bis­(hydrogen phospho­nate) dianion. Both are located around different centres of inversion (Wyckoff sites: 2a and 2d) of the space group P21/c. The shape of the hexane-1,6-diaminium cation is best described as a double hook. Both aminium groups as well as the two attached CH2 groups are turned out from the plane of the central four C atoms. In contrast, all six C atoms of the dianion are almost in a plane. The hydrogen phospho­nate (–PO3H) groups of the anions and the aminium groups of the cations form two-dimensional O—H⋯ and O—H⋯N hydrogen-bonded networks parallel to the ac plane, built up from ten-membered and twelve-membered ring motifs with graph-set descriptors R 3 3(10) and R 5 4(12), respectively. These networks are linked by the alkyl­ene chains of the anions and cations. The resulting three-dimensional network shows a herringbone pattern, which resembles the parent structures 1,6-di­amino­hexane and hexane-1,6-di­phospho­nic acid. PMID:28083141

  7. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander Fridman

    2005-06-01

    This DOE project DE-FC36-04GO14052 ''Plasma Pilot Plant Test for Treating VOC Emissions from Wood Products Plants'' was conducted by Drexel University in cooperation with Georgia-Pacific (G-P) and Kurchatov Institute (KI). The objective of this project was to test the Plasma Pilot Plant capabilities in wood industry. The final goal of the project was to replace the current state-of-the-art, regenerative thermal oxidation (RTO) technology by Low-Temperature Plasma Technology (LTPT) in paper and wood industry for Volatile Organic Components (VOC) destruction in High Volume Low Concentration (HVLC) vent emissions. MetPro Corporation joined the team as an industrial partner from the environmental control business and a potential leader for commercialization. Concurrent Technology Corporation (CTC) has a separate contract with DOE for this technology evaluation. They prepared questionnaires for comparison of this technology and RTO, and made this comparison. These data are presented in this report along with the description of the technology itself. Experiments with the pilot plant were performed with average plasma power up to 3.6 kW. Different design of the laboratory and pilot plant pulsed coronas, as well as different analytical methods revealed many new peculiarities of the VOC abatement process. The work reported herein describes the experimental results for the VOCs removal efficiency with respect to energy consumption, residence time, water effect and initial concentration.

  8. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain Co1-6, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium of Calendula officinalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; Spanberger, Nora; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-13

    The genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain Co1-6, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) with broad-spectrum antagonistic activities against plant pathogenic fungi, bacteria and nematodes, consists of a single 3.9 Mb circular chromosome. The genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol and PGP properties.

  9. Intermolecular gold-catalyzed diastereo- and enantioselective [2+2+3] cycloadditions of 1,6-enynes with nitrones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawade, Sagar Ashok; Bhunia, Sabyasachi; Liu, Rai-Shung

    2012-07-27

    Going for gold: The title reaction has been developed and demonstrates a wide substrate scope with respect to the 1,6-enynes and nitrones (see scheme; DCE = 1,2-dichloroethane, Tf = trifluoromethanesulfonyl). The results for the enantioselective versions are also presented.

  10. Aberrant epilepsy-associated mutant Nav1.6 sodium channel activity can be targeted with cannabidiol

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Reesha R.; Barbosa, Cindy; Brustovetsky, Tatiana; Brustovetsky, Nickolay; Cummins, Theodore R.

    2016-01-01

    Resurgent sodium currents arise from channel reopening during repolarisation, and are predicted to increase neuronal excitability. Patel et al. show that epilepsy-associated mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.6, but not Nav1.1, upregulate resurgent currents. Cannabidiol preferentially targets these currents, suggesting a strategy for reducing neuronal hyperexcitability associated with epilepsy.

  11. Preferential targeting of Nav1.6 voltage-gated Na+ Channels to the axon initial segment during development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth J Akin

    Full Text Available During axonal maturation, voltage-gated sodium (Nav channels accumulate at the axon initial segment (AIS at high concentrations. This localization is necessary for the efficient initiation of action potentials. The mechanisms underlying channel trafficking to the AIS during axonal development have remained elusive due to a lack of Nav reagents suitable for high resolution imaging of channels located specifically on the cell surface. Using an optical pulse-chase approach in combination with a novel Nav1.6 construct containing an extracellular biotinylation domain we demonstrate that Nav1.6 channels are preferentially inserted into the AIS membrane during neuronal development via direct vesicular trafficking. Single-molecule tracking illustrates that axonal channels are immediately immobilized following delivery, while channels delivered to the soma are often mobile. Neither a Nav1.6 channel lacking the ankyrin-binding motif nor a chimeric Kv2.1 channel containing the Nav ankyrinG-binding domain show preferential AIS insertion. Together these data support a model where ankyrinG-binding is required for preferential Nav1.6 insertion into the AIS plasma membrane. In contrast, ankyrinG-binding alone does not confer the preferential delivery of proteins to the AIS.

  12. The pion-kaon scattering amplitude constrained with forward dispersion relations up to 1.6 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Pelaez, J R

    2016-01-01

    In this work we provide simple and precise parameterizations of the existing $\\pi K$ scattering data from threshold up to 1.6 GeV, which are constrained to satisfy forward dispersion relations as well as three additional threshold sum rules. We also provide phenomenological values of the threshold parameters and of the resonance poles that appear in elastic scattering.

  13. A Gain-of-Function Mutation in Nav1.6 in a Case of Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Brian S; Zhao, Peng; Dib-Hajj, Fadia B; Morisset, Valerie; Tate, Simon; Waxman, Stephen G; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a debilitating pain disorder characterized by episodic unilateral facial pain along the territory of branches of the trigeminal nerve. Human pain disorders, but not TN, have been linked to gain-of-function mutations in peripheral voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV1.7, NaV1.8 and NaV1.9). Gain-of-function mutations in NaV1.6, which is expressed in myelinated and unmyelinated central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system neurons and supports neuronal high-frequency firing, have been linked to epilepsy but not to pain. Here, we describe an individual who presented with evoked and spontaneous paroxysmal unilateral facial pain and carried a diagnosis of TN. Magnetic resonance imaging showed unilateral neurovascular compression, consistent with pain in areas innervated by the second branch of the trigeminal nerve. Genetic analysis as part of a phase 2 clinical study in patients with TN conducted by Convergence Pharmaceuticals Ltd revealed a previously undescribed de novo missense mutation in NaV1.6 (c.A406G; p.Met136Val). Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings show that the Met136Val mutation significantly increases peak current density (1.5-fold) and resurgent current (1.6-fold) without altering gating properties. Current-clamp studies in trigeminal ganglia (TRG) neurons showed that Met136Val increased the fraction of high-firing neurons, lowered the current threshold and increased the frequency of evoked action potentials in response to graded stimuli. Our results demonstrate a novel NaV1.6 mutation in TN, and show that this mutation potentiates transient and resurgent sodium currents and leads to increased excitability in TRG neurons. We suggest that this gain-of-function NaV1.6 mutation may exacerbate the pathophysiology of vascular compression and contribute to TN. PMID:27496104

  14. Heat pipe central solar receiver. Volume I. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bienert, W. B.; Wolf, D. A.

    1979-04-01

    The objective of this project was the conceptual design of a Central Solar Receiver Gas Turbine Plant which utilizes a high temperature heat pipe receiver. Technical and economic feasibility of such a plant was to be determined and preliminary overall cost estimates obtained. The second objective was the development of the necessary heat pipe technology to meet the requirements of this receiver. A heat pipe receiver is ideally suited for heating gases to high temperatures. The heat pipes are essentially loss free thermal diffusers which accept a high solar flux and transform it to a lower flux which is compatible with heat transferred to gases. The high flux capability reduces receiver heating surface, thereby reducing receiver heat losses. An open recuperative air cycle with a turbine inlet temperature of 816/sup 0/C (1500/sup 0/F) was chosen as the baseline design. This results in peak metal temperatures of about 870/sup 0/C (1600/sup 0/F). The receiver consists of nine modular panels which form the semicircular backwall of a cavity. Gas enters the panels at the bottom and exits from the top. Each panel carries 637 liquid metal heat pipes which are mounted at right angle to the gas flow. The evaporators of the heat pipes protrude from the flux absorbing front surface of the panels, and the finned condensors traverse the gas stream. Capital cost estimates were made for a 10 MW(e) pilot plant. The total projected costs, in mid-1978 dollars, range from $1,947 to $2,002 per electrical kilowatt. On the same basis, the cost of a water/steam solar plant is approximately 50% higher.

  15. Photovoltaic venture analysis. Final report. Volume I. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costello, D.; Posner, D.; Schiffel, D.; Doane, J.; Bishop, C.

    1978-07-01

    The objective of the study, government programs under investigation, and a brief review of the approach are presented. Potential markets for photovoltaic systems relevant to the study are described. The response of the photovoltaic supply industry is then considered. A model which integrates the supply and demand characteristics of photovoltaics over time was developed. This model also calculates the economic benefits associated with various government subsidy programs. Results are derived under alternative possible supply, demand, and macroeconomic conditions. A probabilistic analysis of the costs and benefits of a $380 million federal photovoltaic procurement initiative, as well as certain alternative strategies, is summarized. Conclusions and recommendations based on the analysis are presented.

  16. Solar Central Receiver Prototype Heliostat. Volume I. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-06-01

    The objective of this project was to support the Solar Central Receiver Power Plant research, development and demonstration effort by: (1) Establishment of a heliostat design, with associated manufacturing, assembly, installation and maintenance approaches, that, in quantity production will yield significant reductions in capital and operating costs over an assumed 30 year plant lifetime as compared with existing designs; and (2) Identification of needs for near term and future research and development in heliostat concept, materials, manufacture, installation, maintenance, and other areas, where successful accomplishment and application would offer significant payoffs in the further reduction of the cost of electrical energy from solar central receiver power plants. The prototype heliostat design is presented in detail; and manufacturing, installation, and maintenance procedures described. (WHK)

  17. Task force on compliance and enforcement. Final report. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-03-01

    Recommendations for measures to strengthen the FEA enforcement program in the area of petroleum price regulation are presented. Results of task force efforts are presented in report and recommendations sections concerned with pending cases, compliance program organization, enforcement powers, compliance strategy, and audit staffing and techniques. (JRD)

  18. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Radionuclide transport. Final Report - Volume 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golian, C. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Lever, D.A.; Baker, A.J.; Connell, L.D. [AEA Decommissioning and Radwaste, Harwell (United Kingdom); Bennett, D.G.; Read, D. [WS Atkins Science and Technology Epsom Surrey (United Kingdom); Lindgreen, M.; Pers, K.; Skagius, K. [Kemakta Consultants co., Stockholm (Sweden); Murakami, T.; Ohnuki, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura, IBARAKI (Japan)

    1992-12-31

    The Koongarra orebody and its associated dispersion fan are examined as a geological analogue for the transport of radionuclides from waste repositories. The aim is to build a consistent picture of the transport that has been taking place in the orebody and the important processes controlling the retardation of uranium series isotopes and to test models of radionuclide transport. A particularly distinctive feature of the Koongarra system is the strong seasonal dependence of the groundwater flow. However, the Koongarra system is similar to a radioactive waste disposal system in that mobilization of uranium is taking place as a result of the infiltration of groundwaters that are in gross chemical disequilibrium with the mineralogy of the primary ore body. There are considerable differences between the Koongarra uranium orebody and a radioactive waste repository, particularly a deep waste repository. The Koongarra system is shallow, affected by seasonal hydrogeological changes as well as climatic variations on a longer timescale and transport is taking place in a zone of active weathering. Some of these features make the Koongarra system harder to characterise than a deep repository. However, there are nevertheless many analogies between the processes occurring at Koongarra and those occurring around a deep or shallow waste repository. The difficulties encountered because of the heterogeneity of the Koongarra weathered zone mirror those to be addressed in assessing radionuclide transport in repository systems. The {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios in rock samples from the dispersion fan decrease in the direction of groundwater transport, whereas in many other systems it has been reported that {sup 234}U is preferentially mobile relative to {sup 238}U (Osmond and Cowart, 1982; Osmond et al., 1983). As most uranium resides in the rock rather than in the groundwater, the net recoil flux of uranium daughter radionuclides is usually from the rock to the groundwater, thus leading to ({sup 234}U/{sup 238}U){sub r} less than one. Other models explain the observations by invoking the presence of a phase in which {sup 234}Th is irreversibly fixed

  19. Photovoltaic venture analysis. Final report. Volume III. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costello, D.; Posner, D.; Schiffel, D.; Doane, J.; Bishop, C.

    1978-07-01

    This appendix contains a brief summary of a detailed description of alternative future energy scenarios which provide an overall backdrop for the photovoltaic venture analysis. Also included is a summary of a photovoltaic market/demand workshop, a summary of a photovoltaic supply workshop which used cross-impact analysis, and a report on photovoltaic array and system prices in 1982 and 1986. The results of a sectorial demand analysis for photovoltaic power systems used in the residential sector (single family homes), the service, commercial, and institutional sector (schools), and in the central power sector are presented. An analysis of photovoltaics in the electric utility market is given, and a report on the industrialization of photovoltaic systems is included. A DOE information memorandum regarding ''A Strategy for a Multi-Year Procurement Initiative on Photovoltaics (ACTS No. ET-002)'' is also included. (WHK)

  20. ATBUJET VOLUME 7 NO. 1 Final.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enforcement on Building Construction Projects in Nigeria. N. A. Anigbogu and E. B. ... The main aim of the study was to assess the quality of materials specifications in Nigeria and their effect on .... new projects on virgin plots of land. Clauses ...