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Sample records for volume viable tumor

  1. Viable tumor volume: Volume of interest within segmented metastatic lesions, a pilot study of proposed computed tomography response criteria for urothelial cancer

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    Folio, Les Roger, E-mail: Les.folio@nih.gov [Lead Radiologist for CT, NIH Radiology and Imaging Sciences, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Turkbey, Evrim B., E-mail: evrimbengi@yahoo.com [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Steinberg, Seth M., E-mail: steinbes@mail.nih.gov [Head, Biostatistics and Data Management Section, Office of the Clinical Director, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Room 2W334, MSC 9716, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Apolo, Andrea B. [Genitourinary Malignancies Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • It is clear that 2D axial measurements are incomplete assessments in metastatic disease; especially in light of evolving antiangiogenic therapies that can result in tumor necrosis. • Our pilot study demonstrates that taking volumetric density into account can better predict overall survival when compared to RECIST, volumetric size, MASS and Choi. • Although volumetric segmentation and further density analysis may not yet be feasible within routine workflows, the authors believe that technology advances may soon make this possible. - Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate the ability of new computed tomography (CT) response criteria for solid tumors such as urothelial cancer (VTV; viable tumor volume) to predict overall survival (OS) in patients with metastatic bladder cancer treated with cabozantinib. Materials and methods: We compared the relative capabilities of VTV, RECIST, MASS (morphology, attenuation, size, and structure), and Choi criteria, as well as volume measurements, to predict OS using serial follow-up contrast-enhanced CT exams in patients with metastatic urothelial carcinoma. Kaplan–Meier curves and 2-tailed log-rank tests compared OS based on early RECIST 1.1 response against each of the other criteria. A Cox proportional hazards model assessed response at follow-up exams as a time-varying covariate for OS. Results: We assessed 141 lesions in 55CT scans from 17 patients with urothelial metastasis, comparing VTV, RECIST, MASS, and Choi criteria, and volumetric measurements, for response assessment. Median follow-up was 4.5 months, range was 2–14 months. Only the VTV criteria demonstrated a statistical association with OS (p = 0.019; median OS 9.7 vs. 3.5 months). Conclusion: This pilot study suggests that VTV is a promising tool for assessing tumor response and predicting OS, using criteria that incorporate tumor volume and density in patients receiving antiangiogenic therapy for urothelial cancer. Larger studies are warranted to

  2. Estimation of Relative Blood Volume in Head and Neck Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ Introduction: The calculation of relative blood volume in head and neck tumor with MR imaging is anew approach that may provide additional hemodynamic information relevant to both untreated and treated tumors. This hemodynamic information is especially usefu l for the differentiation between viable tumor and postsurgical changes or rad iation induced scar, and is also beneficial for tumor staging and tumor biopsy.

  3. Mapping In Vivo Tumor Oxygenation within Viable Tumor by 19F-MRI and Multispectral Analysis

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    Yunzhou Shi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying oxygenation in viable tumor remains a major obstacle toward a better understanding of the tumor microenvironment and improving treatment strategies. Current techniques are often complicated by tumor heterogeneity. Herein, a novel in vivo approach that combines 19F magnetic resonance imaging (19F-MRIR1 mapping with diffusionbased multispectral (MS analysis is introduced. This approach restricts the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2 measurements to viable tumor, the tissue of therapeutic interest. The technique exhibited sufficient sensitivity to detect a breathing gas challenge in a xenograft tumor model, and the hypoxic region measured by MS 19F-MRI was strongly correlated with histologic estimates of hypoxia. This approach was then applied to address the effects of antivascular agents on tumor oxygenation, which is a research question that is still under debate. The technique was used to monitor longitudinal pO2 changes in response to an antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor (B20.4.1.1 and a selective dual phosphoinositide 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor (GDC-0980. GDC-0980 reduced viable tumor pO2 during a 3-day treatment period, and a significant reduction was also produced by B20.4.1.1. Overall, this method provides an unprecedented view of viable tumor pO2 and contributes to a greater understanding of the effects of antivascular therapies on the tumor's microenvironment.

  4. Predictors of viable germ cell tumor in postchemotherapeutic residual retroperitoneal masses

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    Khalid Al Othman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to identify predictors of viable germ cell tumor (GCT in postchemotherapeutic residual retroperitoneal masses. Materials and Methods: The pertinent clinical and pathologic data of 16 male patients who underwent postchemotherapeutic retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (PC-RPLND at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre between 1994 and 2005 were reviewed retrospectively. It was found that all patients received cisplatin-based chemotherapy for advanced testicular GCT. Results: Out of the 16 male patients, 2 (13%, 8 (50%, and 6 (37% had viable GCT, fibrosis, and teratoma, respectively. Ten (10 of the patients with prechemotherapeutic S1 tumor markers did not have viable GCT, and two of the six patients who had prechemotherapeutic S2 tumor markers have viable GCT. All tumor marker levels normalized after chemotherapy even in patients with viable GCT. Four patients had vascular invasion without viable GCT. Furthermore, four patients had more than 60% embryonal elements in the original pathology, but only 1 had viable GCT at PC-RPLND. Four of the five patients with immature teratoma had teratoma at PC-RPLND but no viable GCT; however, out of the four patients with mature teratoma, one had viable GCT and two had teratoma at PC-RPLND. Of the two patients with viable GCT, one had 100% embryonal cancer in the original pathology, prechemotherapeutic S2 tumor markers, history of orchiopexy, and no vascular invasion; the other patient had yolk sac tumor with 25% embryonal elements and 40% teratoma in the original pathology, and prechemotherapeutic S2 tumor markers. Conclusion: None of the clinical or pathological parameters showed a strong correlation with the presence of viable GCT in PC-RPLND. However, patients with ≥S2 may be at higher risk to have viable GCT. Further studies are needed to clarify this.

  5. 3D microfilter device for viable circulating tumor cell (CTC) enrichment from blood.

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    Zheng, Siyang; Lin, Henry K; Lu, Bo; Williams, Anthony; Datar, Ram; Cote, Richard J; Tai, Yu-Chong

    2011-02-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells has emerged as a promising minimally invasive diagnostic and prognostic tool for patients with metastatic cancers. We report a novel three dimensional microfilter device that can enrich viable circulating tumor cells from blood. This device consists of two layers of parylene membrane with pores and gap precisely defined with photolithography. The positions of the pores are shifted between the top and bottom membranes. The bottom membrane supports captured cells and minimize the stress concentration on cell membrane and sustain cell viability during filtration. Viable cell capture on device was investigated with scanning electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and immunofluorescent staining using model systems of cultured tumor cells spiked in blood or saline. The paper presents and validates this new 3D microfiltration concept for circulation tumor cell enrichment application. The device provides a highly valuable tool for assessing and characterizing viable enriched circulating tumor cells in both research and clinical settings.

  6. Glioma Surgical Aspirate: A Viable Source of Tumor Tissue for Experimental Research

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    Perry F. Bartlett

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain cancer research has been hampered by a paucity of viable clinical tissue of sufficient quality and quantity for experimental research. This has driven researchers to rely heavily on long term cultured cells which no longer represent the cancers from which they were derived. Resection of brain tumors, particularly at the interface between normal and tumorigenic tissue, can be carried out using an ultrasonic surgical aspirator (CUSA that deposits liquid (blood and irrigation fluid and resected tissue into a sterile bottle for disposal. To determine the utility of CUSA-derived glioma tissue for experimental research, we collected 48 CUSA specimen bottles from glioma patients and analyzed both the solid tissue fragments and dissociated tumor cells suspended in the liquid waste fraction. We investigated if these fractions would be useful for analyzing tumor heterogeneity, using IHC and multi-parameter flow cytometry; we also assessed culture generation and orthotopic xenograft potential. Both cell sources proved to be an abundant, highly viable source of live tumor cells for cytometric analysis, animal studies and in-vitro studies. Our findings demonstrate that CUSA tissue represents an abundant viable source to conduct experimental research and to carry out diagnostic analyses by flow cytometry or other molecular diagnostic procedures.

  7. Mobilization of Viable Tumor Cells Into the Circulation During Radiation Therapy

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    Martin, Olga A. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Molecular Radiation Biology Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Anderson, Robin L. [The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Metastasis Research Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Russell, Prudence A. [Department of Anatomical Pathology, St. Vincent Hospital, Fitzroy, VIC (Australia); Ashley Cox, R. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Ivashkevich, Alesia [Molecular Radiation Biology Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Laboratory of DNA Repair and Genomics, Centre for Innate Immunity and Infectious Disease, Monash Institute for Medical Research, Monash University, Clayton, VIC (Australia); Swierczak, Agnieszka; Doherty, Judy P. [Metastasis Research Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Jacobs, Daphne H.M. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Smith, Jai [Molecular Radiation Biology Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Siva, Shankar; Daly, Patricia E. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Ball, David L. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); and others

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To determine whether radiation therapy (RT) could mobilize viable tumor cells into the circulation of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: We enumerated circulating tumor cells (CTCs) by fluorescence microscopy of blood samples immunostained with conventional CTC markers. We measured their DNA damage levels using γ-H2AX, a biomarker for radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks, either by fluorescence-activated cell sorting or by immunofluorescence microscopy. Results: Twenty-seven RT-treated NSCLC patients had blood samples analyzed by 1 or more methods. We identified increased CTC numbers after commencement of RT in 7 of 9 patients treated with palliative RT, and in 4 of 8 patients treated with curative-intent RT. Circulating tumor cells were also identified, singly and in clumps in large numbers, during RT by cytopathologic examination (in all 5 cases studied). Elevated γ-H2AX signal in post-RT blood samples signified the presence of CTCs derived from irradiated tumors. Blood taken after the commencement of RT contained tumor cells that proliferated extensively in vitro (in all 6 cases studied). Circulating tumor cells formed γ-H2AX foci in response to ex vivo irradiation, providing further evidence of their viability. Conclusions: Our findings provide a rationale for the development of strategies to reduce the concentration of viable CTCs by modulating RT fractionation or by coadministering systemic therapies.

  8. Tumor Volumes and Prognosis in Laryngeal Cancer

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    Mohamad R. Issa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Tumor staging systems for laryngeal cancer (LC have been developed to assist in estimating prognosis after treatment and comparing treatment results across institutions. While the laryngeal TNM system has been shown to have prognostic information, varying cure rates in the literature have suggested concern about the accuracy and effectiveness of the T-classification in particular. To test the hypothesis that tumor volumes are more useful than T classification, we conducted a retrospective review of 78 patients with laryngeal cancer treated with radiation therapy at our institution. Using multivariable analysis, we demonstrate the significant prognostic value of anatomic volumes in patients with previously untreated laryngeal cancer. In this cohort, primary tumor volume (GTVP, composite nodal volumes (GTVN and composite total volume (GTVP + GTVN = GTVC had prognostic value in both univariate and multivariate cox model analysis. Interestingly, when anatomic volumes were measured from CT scans after a single cycle of induction chemotherapy, all significant prognosticating value for measured anatomic volumes was lost. Given the literature findings and the results of this study, the authors advocate the use of tumor anatomic volumes calculated from pretreatment scans to supplement the TNM staging system in subjects with untreated laryngeal cancer. The study found that tumor volume assessment after induction chemotherapy is not of prognostic significance.

  9. Tumor Volumes and Prognosis in Laryngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Mohamad R.; Samuels, Stuart E.; Bellile, Emily; Shalabi, Firas L.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Wolf, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Tumor staging systems for laryngeal cancer (LC) have been developed to assist in estimating prognosis after treatment and comparing treatment results across institutions. While the laryngeal TNM system has been shown to have prognostic information, varying cure rates in the literature have suggested concern about the accuracy and effectiveness of the T-classification in particular. To test the hypothesis that tumor volumes are more useful than T classification, we conducted a retrospective review of 78 patients with laryngeal cancer treated with radiation therapy at our institution. Using multivariable analysis, we demonstrate the significant prognostic value of anatomic volumes in patients with previously untreated laryngeal cancer. In this cohort, primary tumor volume (GTVP), composite nodal volumes (GTVN) and composite total volume (GTVP + GTVN = GTVC) had prognostic value in both univariate and multivariate cox model analysis. Interestingly, when anatomic volumes were measured from CT scans after a single cycle of induction chemotherapy, all significant prognosticating value for measured anatomic volumes was lost. Given the literature findings and the results of this study, the authors advocate the use of tumor anatomic volumes calculated from pretreatment scans to supplement the TNM staging system in subjects with untreated laryngeal cancer. The study found that tumor volume assessment after induction chemotherapy is not of prognostic significance. PMID:26569309

  10. Clinical validation of an ultra high-throughput spiral microfluidics for the detection and enrichment of viable circulating tumor cells.

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    Bee Luan Khoo

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are cancer cells that can be isolated via liquid biopsy from blood and can be phenotypically and genetically characterized to provide critical information for guiding cancer treatment. Current analysis of CTCs is hindered by the throughput, selectivity and specificity of devices or assays used in CTC detection and isolation.Here, we enriched and characterized putative CTCs from blood samples of patients with both advanced stage metastatic breast and lung cancers using a novel multiplexed spiral microfluidic chip. This system detected putative CTCs under high sensitivity (100%, n = 56 (Breast cancer samples: 12-1275 CTCs/ml; Lung cancer samples: 10-1535 CTCs/ml rapidly from clinically relevant blood volumes (7.5 ml under 5 min. Blood samples were completely separated into plasma, CTCs and PBMCs components and each fraction were characterized with immunophenotyping (Pan-cytokeratin/CD45, CD44/CD24, EpCAM, fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH (EML4-ALK or targeted somatic mutation analysis. We used an ultra-sensitive mass spectrometry based system to highlight the presence of an EGFR-activating mutation in both isolated CTCs and plasma cell-free DNA (cf-DNA, and demonstrate concordance with the original tumor-biopsy samples.We have clinically validated our multiplexed microfluidic chip for the ultra high-throughput, low-cost and label-free enrichment of CTCs. Retrieved cells were unlabeled and viable, enabling potential propagation and real-time downstream analysis using next generation sequencing (NGS or proteomic analysis.

  11. A novel microfluidic platform for size and deformability based separation and the subsequent molecular characterization of viable circulating tumor cells.

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    Hvichia, G E; Parveen, Z; Wagner, C; Janning, M; Quidde, J; Stein, A; Müller, V; Loges, S; Neves, R P L; Stoecklein, N H; Wikman, H; Riethdorf, S; Pantel, K; Gorges, T M

    2016-06-15

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) were introduced as biomarkers more than 10 years ago, but capture of viable CTCs at high purity from peripheral blood of cancer patients is still a major technical challenge. Here, we report a novel microfluidic platform designed for marker independent capture of CTCs. The Parsortix™ cell separation system provides size and deformability-based enrichment with automated staining for cell identification, and subsequent recovery (harvesting) of cells from the device. Using the Parsortix™ system, average cell capture inside the device ranged between 42% and 70%. Subsequent harvest of cells from the device ranged between 54% and 69% of cells captured. Most importantly, 99% of the isolated tumor cells were viable after processing in spiking experiments as well as after harvesting from patient samples and still functional for downstream molecular analysis as demonstrated by mRNA characterization and array-based comparative genomic hybridization. Analyzing clinical blood samples from metastatic (n = 20) and nonmetastatic (n = 6) cancer patients in parallel with CellSearch(®) system, we found that there was no statistically significant difference between the quantitative behavior of the two systems in this set of twenty six paired separations. In conclusion, the epitope independent Parsortix™ system enables the isolation of viable CTCs at a very high purity. Using this system, viable tumor cells are easily accessible and ready for molecular and functional analysis. The system's ability for enumeration and molecular characterization of EpCAM-negative CTCs will help to broaden research into the mechanisms of cancer as well as facilitating the use of CTCs as "liquid biopsies."

  12. Correlation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Tumor Volume with Histopathology

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    Turkbey, Baris; Mani, Haresh; Aras, Omer; Rastinehad, Ardeshir R.; Shah, Vijay; Bernardo, Marcelino; Pohida, Thomas; Daar, Dagane; Benjamin, Compton; McKinney, Yolanda L.; Linehan, W. Marston; Wood, Bradford J.; Merino, Maria J.; Choyke, Peter L.; Pinto, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The biology of prostate cancer may be influenced by the index lesion. The definition of index lesion volume is important for appropriate decision making, especially for image guided focal treatment. We determined the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging for determining index tumor volume compared with volumes derived from histopathology. Materials and Methods We evaluated 135 patients (mean age 59.3 years) with a mean prostate specific antigen of 6.74 ng/dl who underwent multiparametric 3T endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate and subsequent radical prostatectomy. Index tumor volume was determined prospectively and independently by magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology. The ellipsoid formula was applied to determine histopathology tumor volume, whereas manual tumor segmentation was used to determine magnetic resonance tumor volume. Histopathology tumor volume was correlated with age and prostate specific antigen whereas magnetic resonance tumor volume involved Pearson correlation and linear regression methods. In addition, the predictive power of magnetic resonance tumor volume, prostate specific antigen and age for estimating histopathology tumor volume (greater than 0.5 cm3) was assessed by ROC analysis. The same analysis was also conducted for the 1.15 shrinkage factor corrected histopathology data set. Results There was a positive correlation between histopathology tumor volume and magnetic resonance tumor volume (Pearson coefficient 0.633, p <0.0001), but a weak correlation between prostate specific antigen and histopathology tumor volume (Pearson coefficient 0.237, p=0.003). On linear regression analysis histopathology tumor volume and magnetic resonance tumor volume were correlated (r2=0.401, p <0.00001). On ROC analysis AUC values for magnetic resonance tumor volume, prostate specific antigen and age in estimating tumors larger than 0.5 cm3 at histopathology were 0.949 (p <0.0000001), 0.685 (p=0.001) and 0.627 (p=0

  13. [Isolation of viable human tumor cells and their characteristics during culturing in diffusion chambers].

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    Semenova-Kobzar', R A; Iakhimovich, L V; Liul'kin, V D; Konovalenko, V F; Palivets, A Iu

    1987-01-01

    Methodical approaches for obtaining the viable tumour cells from solid human tumours are developed. Combination of the short-term enzymatic treatment of the tumour tissue pieces and their gradual rubbing through the metal sieve with the decreasing pore sizes permitted obtaining a large number of isolated tumour cells with the high percentage of viability.

  14. A viable circulating tumor cell isolation device with high retrieval efficiency using a reversibly deformable membrane barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoonji; Bu, Jiyoon; Cho, Young-Ho; Son, Il Tae; Kang, Sung-Bum

    2017-02-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) contain prognostic information of the tumor, since they shed from the primary tumor and invade into the bloodstream. Therefore, the viable isolation is necessary for a consequent analysis of CTCs. Here, we present a device for the viable isolation and efficient retrieval of CTCs using slanted slot filters, formed by a reversibly deformable membrane barrier. Conventional filters have difficulties in retrieving captured cells, since they easily clog the slots. Moreover, large stress concentration at the sharp edges of squared slots, causes cell lysis. In contrast, the present device shows over 94% of high retrieval efficiency, since the slots can be opened simply by relieving the pressure. Furthermore, the inflated membrane barrier naturally forms the slanted slots, thus reducing the cell damage. By using cancer cell lines, we verified that the present device successfully isolate targeted cells, even at an extremely low concentrations (~10 cells/0.1 ml). In the clinical study, 85.7% of patients initially showed CTC positive while the numbers generally decreased after the surgery. We have also proved that the number of CTCs were highly correlated with tumour invasiveness. Therefore, the present device has potential for use in cancer diagnosis, surgical validation, and invasiveness analysis.

  15. Tunable nanostructured coating for the capture and selective release of viable circulating tumor cells.

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    Reátegui, Eduardo; Aceto, Nicola; Lim, Eugene J; Sullivan, James P; Jensen, Anne E; Zeinali, Mahnaz; Martel, Joseph M; Aranyosi, Alexander J; Li, Wei; Castleberry, Steven; Bardia, Aditya; Sequist, Lecia V; Haber, Daniel A; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Hammond, Paula T; Toner, Mehmet; Stott, Shannon L

    2015-03-04

    A layer-by-layer gelatin nanocoating is presented for use as a tunable, dual response biomaterial for the capture and release of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from cancer patient blood. The entire nanocoating can be dissolved from the surface of microfluidic devices through biologically compatible temperature shifts. Alternatively, individual CTCs can be released through locally applied mechanical stress.

  16. Sensitive and Specific Biomimetic Lipid Coated Microfluidics to Isolate Viable Circulating Tumor Cells and Microemboli for Cancer Detection.

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    Jia-Yang Chen

    Full Text Available Here we presented a simple and effective membrane mimetic microfluidic device with antibody conjugated supported lipid bilayer (SLB "smart coating" to capture viable circulating tumor cells (CTCs and circulating tumor microemboli (CTM directly from whole blood of all stage clinical cancer patients. The non-covalently bound SLB was able to promote dynamic clustering of lipid-tethered antibodies to CTC antigens and minimized non-specific blood cells retention through its non-fouling nature. A gentle flow further flushed away loosely-bound blood cells to achieve high purity of CTCs, and a stream of air foam injected disintegrate the SLB assemblies to release intact and viable CTCs from the chip. Human blood spiked cancer cell line test showed the ~95% overall efficiency to recover both CTCs and CTMs. Live/dead assay showed that at least 86% of recovered cells maintain viability. By using 2 mL of peripheral blood, the CTCs and CTMs counts of 63 healthy and colorectal cancer donors were positively correlated with the cancer progression. In summary, a simple and effective strategy utilizing biomimetic principle was developed to retrieve viable CTCs for enumeration, molecular analysis, as well as ex vivo culture over weeks. Due to the high sensitivity and specificity, it is the first time to show the high detection rates and quantity of CTCs in non-metastatic cancer patients. This work offers the values in both early cancer detection and prognosis of CTC and provides an accurate non-invasive strategy for routine clinical investigation on CTCs.

  17. Tumor-selective replication herpes simplex virus-based technology significantly improves clinical detection and prognostication of viable circulating tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wen; Bao, Li; Yang, Shaoxing;

    2016-01-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells remains a significant challenge due to their vast physical and biological heterogeneity. We developed a cell-surface-marker-independent technology based on telomerase-specific, replication-selective oncolytic herpes-simplex-virus-1 that targets telomerase......Search, our method detected significantly higher positive rates in 40 NSCLC in all stages, including N0M0, N+M0 and M1, and was less affected by chemotherapy. This simple, robust and clinically-applicable technology detects viable CTCs from solid and hematopoietic malignancies in early to late stages...... blood samples from patients with 6 different solid organ carcinomas and lymphomas. Significantly, CTC-positive rates increased remarkably with tumor progression from N0M0, N+M0 to M1 in each of 5 tested cancers (lung, colon, liver, gastric and pancreatic cancer, and glioma). Among 21 non-small cell lung...

  18. Erratum to: Ungersma SE, Pacheco G, Ho C, Yee SF, Ross J, van Bruggen N, Peale FV Jr, Ross S, Carano RA. Vessel imaging with viable tumor analysis for quantification of tumor angiogenesis. Magn Reson Med 2010;63:1637–1647.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungersma, Sharon E; Pacheco, Glenn; Ho, Calvin; Yee, Sharon Fong; Ross, Jed; van Bruggen, Nicholas; Peale, Franklin V; Ross, Sarajane; Carano, Richard A D

    2011-03-01

    Imaging of tumor microvasculature has become an important tool for studying angiogenesis and monitoring antiangiogenic therapies. Ultrasmall paramagnetic iron oxide contrast agents for indirect imaging of vasculature offer a method for quantitative measurements of vascular biomarkers such as vessel size index, blood volume, and vessel density (Q). Here, this technique is validated with direct comparisons to ex vivo micro-computed tomography angiography and histologic vessel measurements, showing significant correlations between in vivo vascular MRI measurements and ex vivo structural vessel measurements. The sensitivity of the MRI vascular parameters is also demonstrated, in combination with a multispectral analysis technique for segmenting tumor tissue to restrict the analysis to viable tumor tissue and exclude regions of necrosis. It is shown that this viable tumor segmentation increases sensitivity for detection of significant effects on blood volume and Q by two antiangiogenic therapeutics [anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) and anti-neuropilin-1] on an HM7 colorectal tumor model. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor reduced blood volume by 36±3% (p<0.0001) and Q by 52±3% (p<0.0001) at 48 h post-treatment; the effects of anti-neuropilin-1 were roughly half as strong with a reduction in blood volume of 18±6% (p<0.05) and a reduction in Q of 33±5% (p<0.05) at 48 h post-treatment.

  19. Tumor Volume-Adapted Dosing in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors

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    Trakul, Nicholas; Chang, Christine N.; Harris, Jeremy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Chapman, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Rao, Aarti [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of California, Davis, School of Medicine, Davis, CA (United States); Shen, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine, Irvine, CA (United States); Quinlan-Davidson, Sean [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, McMaster University, Juravinski Cancer Centre, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Filion, Edith J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Departement de Medecine, Service de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Wakelee, Heather A.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios [Department of Medicine, Division of Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Whyte, Richard I. [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Division of General Thoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); and others

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Current stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) protocols for lung tumors prescribe a uniform dose regimen irrespective of tumor size. We report the outcomes of a lung tumor volume-adapted SABR dosing strategy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 111 patients with a total of 138 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated by SABR, including local control, regional control, distant metastasis, overall survival, and treatment toxicity. We also performed subset analysis on 83 patients with 97 tumors treated with a volume-adapted dosing strategy in which small tumors (gross tumor volume <12 mL) received single-fraction regimens with biologically effective doses (BED) <100 Gy (total dose, 18-25 Gy) (Group 1), and larger tumors (gross tumor volume {>=}12 mL) received multifraction regimens with BED {>=}100 Gy (total dose, 50-60 Gy in three to four fractions) (Group 2). Results: The median follow-up time was 13.5 months. Local control for Groups 1 and 2 was 91.4% and 92.5%, respectively (p = 0.24) at 12 months. For primary lung tumors only (excluding metastases), local control was 92.6% and 91.7%, respectively (p = 0.58). Regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival did not differ significantly between Groups 1 and 2. Rates of radiation pneumonitis, chest wall toxicity, and esophagitis were low in both groups, but all Grade 3 toxicities developed in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusion: A volume-adapted dosing approach for SABR of lung tumors seems to provide excellent local control for both small- and large-volume tumors and may reduce toxicity.

  20. Assessing prognosis and optimizing treatment in patients with postchemotherapy viable nonseminomatous germ-cell tumors (NSGCT): results of the sCR2 international study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fizazi, K.; Oldenburg, J.; Dunant, A.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to validate a prognostic index [surgical complete response 1 (sCR1)] in patients with postchemotherapy viable nonseminomatous germ-cell tumors (NSGCT). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data and specimens from 61 patients with normalized tumor markers and postchemoth......BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to validate a prognostic index [surgical complete response 1 (sCR1)] in patients with postchemotherapy viable nonseminomatous germ-cell tumors (NSGCT). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data and specimens from 61 patients with normalized tumor markers...... malignant cells, and a good International Germ Cell Consensus Classification group at presentation. Patients were assigned to one of three risk groups defined in sCR1: no risk factor (good risk), one risk factor (intermediate risk) and two to three risk factors (poor risk group). The 5-year PFS rate was 92......%, 78%, and 42%, respectively (P = 0.002) (as compared with 90%, 76%, and 41% in the original sCR1 study). The 5-year OS rate was 90%, 86%, and 52%, respectively (P = 0.009) (as compared with 100%, 83%, and 51% in the original sCR1 study). Postoperative chemotherapy did not appear to improve OS compared...

  1. A propidium monoazide-quantitative PCR method for the detection and quantification of viable Enterococcus faecalis in large-volume samples of marine waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, Khaled W; El-Fadel, Mutasem; Barbour, Elie K; Saikaly, Pascal E

    2014-10-01

    The development of rapid detection assays of cell viability is essential for monitoring the microbiological quality of water systems. Coupling propidium monoazide with quantitative PCR (PMA-qPCR) has been successfully applied in different studies for the detection and quantification of viable cells in small-volume samples (0.25-1.00 mL), but it has not been evaluated sufficiently in marine environments or in large-volume samples. In this study, we successfully integrated blue light-emitting diodes for photoactivating PMA and membrane filtration into the PMA-qPCR assay for the rapid detection and quantification of viable Enterococcus faecalis cells in 10-mL samples of marine waters. The assay was optimized in phosphate-buffered saline and seawater, reducing the qPCR signal of heat-killed E. faecalis cells by 4 log10 and 3 log10 units, respectively. Results suggest that high total dissolved solid concentration (32 g/L) in seawater can reduce PMA activity. Optimal PMA-qPCR standard curves with a 6-log dynamic range and detection limit of 10(2) cells/mL were generated for quantifying viable E. faecalis cells in marine waters. The developed assay was compared with the standard membrane filter (MF) method by quantifying viable E. faecalis cells in seawater samples exposed to solar radiation. The results of the developed PMA-qPCR assay did not match that of the standard MF method. This difference in the results reflects the different physiological states of E. faecalis cells in seawater. In conclusion, the developed assay is a rapid (∼5 h) method for the quantification of viable E. faecalis cells in marine recreational waters, which should be further improved and tested in different seawater settings.

  2. A propidium monoazide–quantitative PCR method for the detection and quantification of viable Enterococcus faecalis in large-volume samples of marine waters

    KAUST Repository

    Salam, Khaled W.

    2014-08-23

    The development of rapid detection assays of cell viability is essential for monitoring the microbiological quality of water systems. Coupling propidium monoazide with quantitative PCR (PMA-qPCR) has been successfully applied in different studies for the detection and quantification of viable cells in small-volume samples (0.25-1.00 mL), but it has not been evaluated sufficiently in marine environments or in large-volume samples. In this study, we successfully integrated blue light-emitting diodes for photoactivating PMA and membrane filtration into the PMA-qPCR assay for the rapid detection and quantification of viable Enterococcus faecalis cells in 10-mL samples of marine waters. The assay was optimized in phosphate-buffered saline and seawater, reducing the qPCR signal of heat-killed E. faecalis cells by 4 log10 and 3 log10 units, respectively. Results suggest that high total dissolved solid concentration (32 g/L) in seawater can reduce PMA activity. Optimal PMA-qPCR standard curves with a 6-log dynamic range and detection limit of 102 cells/mL were generated for quantifying viable E. faecalis cells in marine waters. The developed assay was compared with the standard membrane filter (MF) method by quantifying viable E. faecalis cells in seawater samples exposed to solar radiation. The results of the developed PMA-qPCR assay did not match that of the standard MF method. This difference in the results reflects the different physiological states of E. faecalis cells in seawater. In conclusion, the developed assay is a rapid (∼5 h) method for the quantification of viable E. faecalis cells in marine recreational waters, which should be further improved and tested in different seawater settings. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  3. Tumor volume as a prognostic factor for local control and overall survival in advanced larynx cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, A.J.; Lange, C.A.H.; de Bois, J.A.; van Werkhoven, E.; Hamming-Vrieze, O.; Hilgers, F.J.M.; van den Brekel, M.W.M.

    2015-01-01

    Keywords: Head and neck cancer; larynx cancer; organ preservation; total laryngectomy; imaging; tumor volume;prognosis; outcome Objectives/Hypothesis Tumor volume has been postulated to be an important prognostic factor for oncological outcome after radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. This postulate

  4. Freezing Nitrogen Ethanol Composite May be a Viable Approach for Cryotherapy of Human Giant Cell Tumor of Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Po-Kuei; Chen, Cheng-Fong; Wang, Jir-You; Chen, Paul Chih-Hsueh; Chang, Ming-Chau; Hung, Shih-Chieh; Chen, Wei-Ming

    2017-06-01

    Liquid nitrogen has been used as adjuvant cryotherapy for treating giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone. However, the liquid phase and ultrafreezing (-196° C) properties increase the risk of damage to the adjacent tissues and may lead to perioperative complications. A novel semisolid cryogen, freezing nitrogen ethanol composite, might mitigate these shortcomings because of less-extreme freezing. We therefore wished to evaluate freezing nitrogen ethanol composite as a coolant to determine its properties in tumor cryoablation. (1) Is freezing nitrogen ethanol composite-mediated freezing effective for tumor cryoablation in an ex vivo model, and if yes, is apoptosis involved in the tumor-killing mechanism? (2) Does freezing nitrogen ethanol composite treatment block neovascularization and neoplastic progression of the grafted GCTs and is it comparable to that of liquid nitrogen in an in vivo chicken model? (3) Can use of freezing nitrogen ethanol composite as an adjuvant to curettage result in successful short-term treatment, defined as absence of GCT recurrence at a minimum of 1 year in a small proof-of-concept clinical series? The cryogenic effect on bone tissue mediated by freezing nitrogen ethanol composite and liquid nitrogen was verified by thermal measurement in a time-course manner. Cryoablation on human GCT tissue was examined ex vivo for effect on morphologic features (cell shrinkage) and DNA fragmentation (apoptosis). The presumed mechanism was investigated by molecular analysis of apoptosis regulatory proteins including caspases 3, 8, and 9 and Bax/Bcl-2. Chicken chorioallantoic membrane was used as an in vivo model to evaluate the effects of freezing nitrogen ethanol composite and liquid nitrogen treatment on GCT-derived neovascularization and tumor neoplasm. A small group of patients with GCT of bone was treated by curettage and adjuvant freezing nitrogen ethanol composite cryotherapy in a proof-of-concept study. Tumor recurrence and perioperative

  5. Tumor-selective replication herpes simplex virus-based technology significantly improves clinical detection and prognostication of viable circulating tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wen; Bao, Li; Yang, Shaoxing

    2016-01-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells remains a significant challenge due to their vast physical and biological heterogeneity. We developed a cell-surface-marker-independent technology based on telomerase-specific, replication-selective oncolytic herpes-simplex-virus-1 that targets telomerase...

  6. Measurement of tumor volumes of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by computed tomography (CT). Correlation with several tumor markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoneshima, Manabu; Sawabu, Norio; Toya, Daishu

    1984-09-01

    Tumor volumes of HCC were measured by CT using planimeter and the clinical value of this measurement was evaluated by comparing several tumor markers. Tumor volumes measured by CT roughly agreed with those measured by angiography. In some cases, volumes from ultrasonography were smaller than those from CT and angiography. Tumor volumes measured by CT correlated significantly with the levels of ..cap alpha..-fetoprotein (AFP) but didn't relate to the presence of hepatoma specific ..gamma..-GTP isoenzyme (novel ..gamma..-GTP) nor to the values and positivities of LAI assay. In small HCCs (<=30 cm/sup 3/), the presence of novel ..gamma..-GTP and the levels of AFP were significantly lower than for larger tumors of HCC, but LAI assay wasn't lower. The non-tumorous volumes and the ratio of the non-tumorous volume to the whole liver volume didn't relate to the tests of liver function except for the presence of ascites.

  7. A simple, quantitative method using alginate gel to determine rat colonic tumor volume in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Amy A; Young, Lindsay B; Pleiman, Jennifer K; Konrath, Michael J; Marzella, Blake; Nonte, Michael; Cacciatore, Justin; Ford, Madeline R; Clipson, Linda; Amos-Landgraf, James M; Dove, William F

    2014-04-01

    Many studies of the response of colonic tumors to therapeutics use tumor multiplicity as the endpoint to determine the effectiveness of the agent. These studies can be greatly enhanced by accurate measurements of tumor volume. Here we present a quantitative method to easily and accurately determine colonic tumor volume. This approach uses a biocompatible alginate to create a negative mold of a tumor-bearing colon; this mold is then used to make positive casts of dental stone that replicate the shape of each original tumor. The weight of the dental stone cast correlates highly with the weight of the dissected tumors. After refinement of the technique, overall error in tumor volume was 16.9% ± 7.9% and includes error from both the alginate and dental stone procedures. Because this technique is limited to molding of tumors in the colon, we utilized the Apc(Pirc/+) rat, which has a propensity for developing colonic tumors that reflect the location of the majority of human intestinal tumors. We have successfully used the described method to determine tumor volumes ranging from 4 to 196 mm³. Alginate molding combined with dental stone casting is a facile method for determining tumor volume in vivo without costly equipment or knowledge of analytic software. This broadly accessible method creates the opportunity to objectively study colonic tumors over time in living animals in conjunction with other experiments and without transferring animals from the facility where they are maintained.

  8. Double-echo perfusion-weighted MR imaging: basic concepts and application in brain tumors for the assessment of tumor blood volume and vascular permeability

    OpenAIRE

    Uematsu, Hidemasa; Maeda, Masayuki

    2006-01-01

    Perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging using contrast agents plays a key role in characterizing tumors of the brain. We have shown that double-echo perfusion-weighted MR imaging (DEPWI) is potentially useful in assessing brain tumors. Quantitative indices, such as tumor blood volume, are obtained using DEPWI, which allows correction of underestimation of tumor blood volume due to leakage of contrast agents from tumor vessels, in addition to simultaneous acquisition of tumor vessel...

  9. Tumor Volume Reduction Rate After Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy as a Prognostic Factor in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeo, Seung-Gu [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Yong, E-mail: radiopiakim@hanmail.net [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sun Young; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Byung Chang; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Kim, Min Ju [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic significance of tumor volume reduction rate (TVRR) after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: In total, 430 primary LARC (cT3-4) patients who were treated with preoperative CRT and curative radical surgery between May 2002 and March 2008 were analyzed retrospectively. Pre- and post-CRT tumor volumes were measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest MR volumetry. Tumor volume reduction rate was determined using the equation TVRR (%) = (pre-CRT tumor volume - post-CRT tumor volume) Multiplication-Sign 100/pre-CRT tumor volume. The median follow-up period was 64 months (range, 27-99 months) for survivors. Endpoints were disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results: The median TVRR was 70.2% (mean, 64.7% {+-} 22.6%; range, 0-100%). Downstaging (ypT0-2N0M0) occurred in 183 patients (42.6%). The 5-year DFS and OS rates were 77.7% and 86.3%, respectively. In the analysis that included pre-CRT and post-CRT tumor volumes and TVRR as continuous variables, only TVRR was an independent prognostic factor. Tumor volume reduction rate was categorized according to a cutoff value of 45% and included with clinicopathologic factors in the multivariate analysis; ypN status, circumferential resection margin, and TVRR were significant prognostic factors for both DFS and OS. Conclusions: Tumor volume reduction rate was a significant prognostic factor in LARC patients receiving preoperative CRT. Tumor volume reduction rate data may be useful for tailoring surgery and postoperative adjuvant therapy after preoperative CRT.

  10. A region growing method for tumor volume segmentation on PET images for rectal and anal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Ellen; Betler, James; Parda, David; Reitz, Bodo; Kirichenko, Alexander; Mohammadi, Seyed; Miften, Moyed

    2009-10-01

    The application of automated segmentation methods for tumor delineation on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) images presents an opportunity to reduce the interobserver variability in radiotherapy (RT) treatment planning. In this work, three segmentation methods were evaluated and compared for rectal and anal cancer patients: (i) Percentage of the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV% max), (ii) fixed SUV cutoff of 2.5 (SUV2.5), and (iii) mathematical technique based on a confidence connected region growing (CCRG) method. A phantom study was performed to determine the SUV% max threshold value and found to be 43%, SUV43% max. The CCRG method is an iterative scheme that relies on the use of statistics from a specified region in the tumor. The scheme is initialized by a subregion of pixels surrounding the maximum intensity pixel. The mean and standard deviation of this region are measured and the pixels connected to the region are included or not based on the criterion that they are greater than a value derived from the mean and standard deviation. The mean and standard deviation of this new region are then measured and the process repeats. FDG-PET-CT imaging studies for 18 patients who received RT were used to evaluate the segmentation methods. A PET avid (PETavid) region was manually segmented for each patient and the volume was then used to compare the calculated volumes along with the absolute mean difference and range for all methods. For the SUV43% max method, the volumes were always smaller than the PETavid volume by a mean of 56% and a range of 21%-79%. The volumes from the SUV2.5 method were either smaller or larger than the PETavid volume by a mean of 37% and a range of 2%-130%. The CCRG approach provided the best results with a mean difference of 9% and a range of 1%-27%. Results show that the CCRG technique can be used in the segmentation of tumor volumes on FDG-PET images, thus providing treatment planners with a clinically

  11. Prognostic value of tumor volume for patients with advanced lung cancer treated with chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chung-Feng Jeffrey; Ke, Bo-Han; Wu, Nain-Ying; Kuo, Joseph; Hsu, Hsian-He

    2017-06-01

    We aim to develop a reference system utilizing computed tomography to calculate changes in tumor volume of lung cancer patients after chemotherapy to assist physicians in clinical treatment and evaluation. Image processing techniques were used to analyze the computed tomography of lung cancer, locate the tumor, and calculate the tumor volume. The medical indicator was then evaluated and analyzed. We examined the correlation between reduced tumor volume and survival duration of 88 patients after chemotherapy at Tri-Service General Hospital, Taiwan. The innovative survival prediction index was obtained by four statistical methods: receiver operating characteristic curve, Youden index, Kaplan-Meier method, and log rank test. From the image processing techniques, tumor volume from each patient were obtained within an average of 7.25 seconds. The proposed method was shown to achieve rapid positioning of lung tumors and volume reconstruction with an estimation error of 1.92% when calibrated with an irregularly shaped stone. In medical indicator evaluation and analysis, the area below the receiver operating characteristic curve is greater than 0.8, indicating good predictability of the medical index used herein. The Youden index spotted the best cut-off point of volume, and the correlation between the volume's cut-off point and survival time was confirmed again by Kaplan-Meier and log rank test. The p-values were all less than 0.05, presenting a high degree of correlation between the two, indicating that this medical indicator is highly reliable. The proposed techniques can automatically find the location of tumors in the lung, reconstruct the volume, and calculate changes in volume before and after treatment, thus obtaining an innovative survival prediction index. This will help facilitate early and accurate predictions of disease outcomes during the course of therapy, and categorize patient stratification into risk groups for more efficient therapies. Copyright © 2017

  12. Iterative volume morphing and learning for mobile tumor based on 4DCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Songan; Wu, Huanmei; Sandison, George; Fang, Shiaofen

    2017-02-01

    During image-guided cancer radiation treatment, three-dimensional (3D) tumor volumetric information is important for treatment success. However, it is typically not feasible to image a patient’s 3D tumor continuously in real time during treatment due to concern over excessive patient radiation dose. We present a new iterative morphing algorithm to predict the real-time 3D tumor volume based on time-resolved computed tomography (4DCT) acquired before treatment. An offline iterative learning process has been designed to derive a target volumetric deformation function from one breathing phase to another. Real-time volumetric prediction is performed to derive the target 3D volume during treatment delivery. The proposed iterative deformable approach for tumor volume morphing and prediction based on 4DCT is innovative because it makes three major contributions: (1) a novel approach to landmark selection on 3D tumor surfaces using a minimum bounding box; (2) an iterative morphing algorithm to generate the 3D tumor volume using mapped landmarks; and (3) an online tumor volume prediction strategy based on previously trained deformation functions utilizing 4DCT. The experimental performance showed that the maximum morphing deviations are 0.27% and 1.25% for original patient data and artificially generated data, which is promising. This newly developed algorithm and implementation will have important applications for treatment planning, dose calculation and treatment validation in cancer radiation treatment.

  13. Double-echo perfusion-weighted MR imaging: basic concepts and application in brain tumors for the assessment of tumor blood volume and vascular permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uematsu, Hidemasa [University of Fukui, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Fukui (Japan); Maeda, Masayuki [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Mie (Japan)

    2006-01-01

    Perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging using contrast agents plays a key role in characterizing tumors of the brain. We have shown that double-echo perfusion-weighted MR imaging (DEPWI) is potentially useful in assessing brain tumors. Quantitative indices, such as tumor blood volume, are obtained using DEPWI, which allows correction of underestimation of tumor blood volume due to leakage of contrast agents from tumor vessels, in addition to simultaneous acquisition of tumor vessel permeability. This article describes basic concepts of DEPWI and demonstrates clinical applications in brain tumors. (orig.)

  14. Stochastic modeling of the tumor volume assessment and growth patterns in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sãftoiu, Adrian; Ciurea, Tudorel; Gorunescu, Florin; Rogoveanu, Ion; Georgescu, Claudia

    2004-06-01

    The growth pattern of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) arising from cirrhosis is variable and depends on the degree of differentiation and vascularization. Because growth is not constant in the natural history of HCC, prediction of subsequent growth rate based on tumor volume doubling time and correlation with histological and ultrasonographical characteristics at the moment of initial diagnosis are usually unreliable. The aim of our study was to assess the growth patterns of HCC with the aid of stochastic modeling. Thus, we included in our study 27 patients with histologically proven HCC, which had multiple (more than three)follow-up ultrasound studies in a six months interval. The patients did not receive any treatment during the observation period. HCC was visualized by computer aided ultrasound imaging, obtaining both the primary size quantification and the edge-detection enhancement. By a bi-cubic B-spline interpolation of points on the edges (3-D Bezier approximation) we approximated the surfaces shapes, and using the hit or miss Monte Carlo method we accurately estimate the tumor volume. Starting from the previous tumor volumes time series recorded during the first six months of evolution we applied both a linear, exponential and logarithmic smoothing to forecast the future size of the HCC tumor in the next six months. Our conclusion was that a dynamic forecasting model of HCC volumes could be very accurate for the assessment of tumor volume doubling time usually obtained by two discrete volume measurements of the tumor.

  15. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwangzoo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. Materials and Methods We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Results Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Conclusion Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary. PMID:27592514

  16. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwang Zoo [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary.

  17. Indication of lower neck irradiation in nasopharyngeal carcinoma without nodal metastasis: the potential impact of tumor volume

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Jie; ZHOU Jia-yin; Vincent FH CHONG; James BK Khoo

    2013-01-01

    Background Elective radiation of lower neck is controversial for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) without lymph node metastasis (N0 disease).Tumor volume is an important prognostic indicator.The objective of this study is to explore the potential impact of tumor volume on the indication of the lower neck irradiation for N0-NPC,by a qualitative evaluation of the relationship between tumor volume and nodal metastasis.Methods Magnetic resonance (MR) images of 99 consecutive patients with NPC who underwent treatment were retrospectively reviewed.Primary tumor volumes of NPC were semi-automatically measured,nodal metastases were N-classified and neck level involvements were examined.Distributions of tumor volumes among N-category-based groups and distributions of N-categories among tumor volume-based groups were analyzed,respectively.Results The numbers of patients with N0 to N3 disease were 12,39,32,and 16,respectively.The volumes of primary tumor were from 3.3 to 89.6 ml,with a median of 17.1 ml.For patients with nodal metastasis,tumor volume did not increase significantly with the advancing of N-category (P >0.05).No significant difference was found for the distribution of N1,N2,and N3 categories among tumor volume-based groups (P >0.05).Nevertheless patients with nodal metastasis had significantly larger tumor volumes than those without metastasis (P <0.05).Patients with larger tumor volumes were associated with an increased incidence of nodal metastasis.Conclusions Certain positive correlations existed between tumor volume and the presence of nodal metastasis.The tumor volume (>10 ml) is a potential indicator for the lower neck irradiation for N0-NPC.

  18. Immobilized surfactant-nanotube complexes support selectin-mediated capture of viable circulating tumor cells in the absence of capture antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Michael J; Castellanos, Carlos A; King, Michael R

    2015-10-01

    The metastatic spread of tumor cells from the primary site to anatomically distant organs leads to a poor patient prognosis. Increasing evidence has linked adhesive interactions between circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and endothelial cells to metastatic dissemination. Microscale biomimetic flow devices hold promise as a diagnostic tool to isolate CTCs and develop metastatic therapies, utilizing E-selectin (ES) to trigger the initial rolling adhesion of tumor cells under flow. To trigger firm adhesion and capture under flow, such devices also typically require antibodies against biomarkers thought to be expressed on CTCs. This approach is challenged by the fact that CTCs are now known to exhibit heterogeneous expression of conventional biomarkers. Here, we describe surfactant-nanotube complexes to enhance ES-mediated capture and isolation of tumor cells without the use of capture antibodies. While the majority of tumor cells exhibited weaker rolling adhesion on halloysite nanotubes (HNT) coated with ES, HNT functionalization with the sodium dodecanoate (NaL) surfactant induced a switch to firm cellular adhesion under flow. Conversely, surfactant-nanotube complexes significantly reduced the number of primary human leukocytes captured via ES-mediated adhesion under flow. The switch in tumor cell adhesion was exploited to capture and isolate tumor cells in the absence of EpCAM antibodies, commonly utilized as the gold standard for CTC isolation. Additionally, HNT-NaL complexes were shown to capture tumor cells with low to negligible EpCAM expression, that are not efficiently captured using conventional approaches.

  19. Survival with concurrent temozolomide and radiotherapy in pediatric brainstem glioma with relation to the tumor volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shachi Jain Taran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brainstem gliomas account for approximately 25% of all posterior fossa tumors. In pediatric age group, it constitutes about 10% of all brain tumors. Brainstem glioma is an aggressive and lethal type of malignancy with poor outcome despite all treatments. Aim: We studied the incidence and treatment outcome in pediatric patients with brainstem glioma depending on their tumor volume presenting in our institution in last 5 years. Brain tumors comprised 2.95% of all cancers and brainstem gliomas were 8% of all brain tumors. Materials and Methods: Nine pediatric patients were included in this analysis, who were treated with localized external radiotherapy 54–59.4 Gy along with temozolomide 75 mg/m2 during the whole course of radiotherapy. Results: The median survival in all these patients was 20 months and the overall 2 years survival is 44.4% (4/9. The median survival of patients with primary disease volume <40cc is 26 months whereas when the volume is more than 40cc the median survival is 13.5 months as calculated by Chi-square test. Conclusion: As this study includes a small number of patients with unknown histology and treated on the basis of magnetic resonance imaging findings, no definite opinion can be given as some patients may have a low-grade tumor. More studies are required to establish the relation of size of the tumor with survival.

  20. Gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) for radiation therapy of benign skull base tumours; Volume tumoral macroscopique (GTV) et volume-cible anatomoclinique (CTV) dans la radiotherapie des tumeurs benignes de la base du crane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maire, J.P. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Bordeaux, Hopital Saint Andre, Service d' Oncologie Radiotherapie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Liguoro, D.; San Galli, F. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Bordeaux, Hopital Saint Andre, Service de Neurochirurgie A, 33 - Bordeaux (France)

    2001-10-01

    Skull base tumours represent a out 35 to 40% of all intracranial tumours. There are now many reports in the literature confirming the fact that about 80 to 90% of such tumours are controlled with fractionated radiotherapy. Stereotactic and 3-dimensional treatment planning techniques increase local control and central nervous system tolerance. Definition of the gross tumor volume (GTV) is generally easy with currently available medical imaging systems and computers for 3-dimensional dosimetry. The definition of the clinical target volume (CTV) is more difficult to appreciate: it is defined from the CTV plus a margin, which depends on the histology and anterior therapeutic history of the tumour. It is important to take into account the visible tumour and its possible extension pathways (adjacent bone, holes at the base of skull) and/or an anatomic region (sella turcica + adjacent cavernous sinus). It is necessary to evaluate these volumes with CT Scan and MRI to appreciate tumor extension in a 3-dimensional approach, in order to reduce the risk of marginal recurrences. The aim of this paper is to discuss volume definition as a function of tumour site and tumour type to be irradiated. (authors)

  1. Lung Volume Reduction After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy of Lung Tumors: Potential Application to Emphysema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binkley, Michael S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Shrager, Joseph B. [Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Leung, Ann N. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Popat, Rita [Department of Health Research and Policy, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Trakul, Nicholas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Atwood, Todd F.; Chaudhuri, Aadel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Maxim, Peter G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian, E-mail: Diehn@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W., E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) improves dyspnea and other outcomes in selected patients with severe emphysema, but many have excessive surgical risk for LVRS. We analyzed the dose-volume relationship for lobar volume reduction after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) of lung tumors, hypothesizing that SABR could achieve therapeutic volume reduction if applied in emphysema. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified patients treated from 2007 to 2011 who had SABR for 1 lung tumor, pre-SABR pulmonary function testing, and ≥6 months computed tomographic (CT) imaging follow-up. We contoured the treated lobe and untreated adjacent lobe(s) on CT before and after SABR and calculated their volume changes relative to the contoured total (bilateral) lung volume (TLV). We correlated lobar volume reduction with the volume receiving high biologically effective doses (BED, α/β = 3). Results: 27 patients met the inclusion criteria, with a median CT follow-up time of 14 months. There was no grade ≥3 toxicity. The median volume reduction of the treated lobe was 4.4% of TLV (range, −0.4%-10.8%); the median expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe was 2.6% of TLV (range, −3.9%-11.6%). The volume reduction of the treated lobe was positively correlated with the volume receiving BED ≥60 Gy (r{sup 2}=0.45, P=.0001). This persisted in subgroups determined by high versus low pre-SABR forced expiratory volume in 1 second, treated lobe CT emphysema score, number of fractions, follow-up CT time, central versus peripheral location, and upper versus lower lobe location, with no significant differences in effect size between subgroups. Volume expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe(s) was positively correlated with volume reduction of the treated lobe (r{sup 2}=0.47, P<.0001). Conclusions: We identified a dose-volume response for treated lobe volume reduction and adjacent lobe compensatory expansion after lung tumor SABR, consistent across

  2. SU-E-I-84: Accuracy Comparison of Multi-Modality Image-Based Volumes of Rodent Solid Tumors Using In-Air Micro-CT Image Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y [University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, KS (United States); Fullerton, G; Goins, B [University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Tumor volume is considered as a better predictor for therapy response monitoring and tumor staging over Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) or World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. In this study, the accuracy of subcutaneous rodent tumor volumes using preclinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and ultrasound (US) equipment and with an external caliper was compared using in-air micro-CT image volume of excised tumors determined as reference tumor volume in our prior study. Methods: MR, US and micro-CT images of subcutaneous SCC4 head and neck tumor xenografts were acquired 4, 6, 9, 11 and 13 days after tumor cell inoculation. Before MR and US scans, caliper measurements were made. After tumors were excised, in-air micro-CT imaging and ex vivo caliper measurements were performed. Tumor volumes were calculated using formula V = (π/6)*a*b*c where a, b and c are the maximum diameters in three perpendicular dimensions determined by the three image modalities and caliper, and compared with reference tumor volume by linear regression analysis as well as Bland-Altman plots. A one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) test was also performed to compare volumes among caliper measurements. Results: The correlation coefficients (R2) of the regression lines for tumor volumes measured by the three imaging modalities and caliper were 0.9939, 0.9669, 0.9806, 0.9274, 0.9619 and 0.9819 for MRI, US and micro-CT, caliperbeforeMRI, caliperbeforeUS and ex vivo caliper respectively. In Bland-Altman plots, the average of tumor volume difference from reference tumor volume (bias) was significant for caliper and micro- CT, but not for MRI and US. Comparison of caliper measurements showed a significant difference (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Using the in-air micro-CT image volume, tumor volume measured by MRI was the most accurate among the three imaging modalities. In vivo caliper volume measurements showed unreliability while ex

  3. Tumor-to-breast volume ratio as measured on MRI: a possible predictor of breast-conserving surgery versus mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faermann, Renata; Sperber, Fani; Schneebaum, Schlomo; Barsuk, Daphna

    2014-02-01

    The surgical approach to breast cancer changed dramatically in the past 20 years. The surgical objective today is to remove the tumor, ensuring negative margins and good cosmetic results, and preserving the breast when possible. Magnetic resonance imaging of the breast has become an essential imaging tool prior to surgery, diagnosing additional tumors and assessing tumor extent. Tumor-to-breast volume ratio, an important predictor of breast conservation, can be measured with MRI and may change the surgical decision. To measure the tumor-to-breast volume ratio using MRI in order to assess whether there is a correlation between this ratio and the type of surgery selected (breast-conserving or mastectomy). The volumes of the tumor and the breast and the tumor-to-breast volume ratio were retrospectively calculated using preoperative breast MRI in 76 patients who underwent breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy. Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) was performed in 64 patients and mastectomy in 12. The average tumor-to-breast volume ratio was 0.06 (6%) in the lumpectomy group and 0.30 (30%) in the mastectomy group (P < 0.0001). The tumor-to-breast volume ratio correlated with the type of surgery. As measured on MRI, this ratio is an accurate means of determining the type of surgery best suited for a given patient. It is recommended that MRI-determined tumor-to-breast volume ratio become part of the surgical planning protocol for patients diagnosed with breast cancer.

  4. Tumor volume as a prognostic factor for local control and overall survival in advanced larynx cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, A.J.; Lange, C.A.H.; de Bois, J.A.; van Werkhoven, E.; Hamming-Vrieze, O.; Hilgers, F.J.M.; van den Brekel, M.W.M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Tumor volume has been postulated to be an important prognostic factor for oncological outcome after radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. This postulate was retrospectively investigated in a consecutively treated cohort of T3-T4 larynx cancer patients. Study Design Retrospective c

  5. Audiovisual biofeedback guided breath-hold improves lung tumor position reproducibility and volume consistency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Lee, PhD

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback can be used to improve the reproducibility and consistency of breath-hold lung tumor position and volume, respectively. These results may provide a pathway to achieve more accurate lung cancer radiation treatment in addition to improving various medical imaging and treatments by using breath-hold procedures.

  6. This is the full PDF of Rare Tumors 2009, volume 1, issue 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    the Editors

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This is the full PDF of Rare Tumors 2009, volume 1, issue 1. This file is a low-resolution one (about 6.5 Mb: if you would like a high-definition version (about 96 Mb, you can download it here.

  7. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: improving target volume delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H.; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-02-01

    Glioblastoma differ from many other tumors in the sense that they grow infiltratively into the brain tissue instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In current clinical practice, a uniform margin, typically two centimeters, is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease that is not directly assessable through imaging. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth, which arises from different factors: anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain. The target volume for radiotherapy planning can be defined as an isoline of the simulated tumor cell density. This paper analyzes the model with respect to implications for target volume definition and identifies its most critical components. A retrospective study involving ten glioblastoma patients treated at our institution has been performed. To illustrate the main findings of the study, a detailed case study is presented for a glioblastoma located close to the falx. In this situation, the falx represents a boundary for migrating tumor cells, whereas the corpus callosum provides a route for the tumor to spread to the contralateral hemisphere. We further discuss the sensitivity of the model with respect to the input parameters. Correct segmentation of the brain appears to be the most

  8. A Gaussian mixture model for definition of lung tumor volumes in positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristophanous, Michalis; Penney, Bill C; Martel, Mary K; Pelizzari, Charles A

    2007-11-01

    The increased interest in 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in radiation treatment planning in the past five years necessitated the independent and accurate segmentation of gross tumor volume (GTV) from FDG-PET scans. In some studies the radiation oncologist contours the GTV based on a computed tomography scan, while incorporating pertinent data from the PET images. Alternatively, a simple threshold, typically 40% of the maximum intensity, has been employed to differentiate tumor from normal tissue, while other researchers have developed algorithms to aid the PET based GTV definition. None of these methods, however, results in reliable PET tumor segmentation that can be used for more sophisticated treatment plans. For this reason, we developed a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) based segmentation technique on selected PET tumor regions from non-small cell lung cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using a GMM-based tumor volume definition in a robust, reliable and reproducible way. A GMM relies on the idea that any distribution, in our case a distribution of image intensities, can be expressed as a mixture of Gaussian densities representing different classes. According to our implementation, each class belongs to one of three regions in the image; the background (B), the uncertain (U) and the target (T), and from these regions we can obtain the tumor volume. User interaction in the implementation is required, but is limited to the initialization of the model parameters and the selection of an "analysis region" to which the modeling is restricted. The segmentation was developed on three and tested on another four clinical cases to ensure robustness against differences observed in the clinic. It also compared favorably with thresholding at 40% of the maximum intensity and a threshold determination function based on tumor to background image intensities proposed in a recent paper. The parts of the

  9. Automated lung tumor segmentation for whole body PET volume based on novel downhill region growing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballangan, Cherry; Wang, Xiuying; Eberl, Stefan; Fulham, Michael; Feng, Dagan

    2010-03-01

    We propose an automated lung tumor segmentation method for whole body PET images based on a novel downhill region growing (DRG) technique, which regards homogeneous tumor hotspots as 3D monotonically decreasing functions. The method has three major steps: thoracic slice extraction with K-means clustering of the slice features; hotspot segmentation with DRG; and decision tree analysis based hotspot classification. To overcome the common problem of leakage into adjacent hotspots in automated lung tumor segmentation, DRG employs the tumors' SUV monotonicity features. DRG also uses gradient magnitude of tumors' SUV to improve tumor boundary definition. We used 14 PET volumes from patients with primary NSCLC for validation. The thoracic region extraction step achieved good and consistent results for all patients despite marked differences in size and shape of the lungs and the presence of large tumors. The DRG technique was able to avoid the problem of leakage into adjacent hotspots and produced a volumetric overlap fraction of 0.61 +/- 0.13 which outperformed four other methods where the overlap fraction varied from 0.40 +/- 0.24 to 0.59 +/- 0.14. Of the 18 tumors in 14 NSCLC studies, 15 lesions were classified correctly, 2 were false negative and 15 were false positive.

  10. SU-F-207-06: CT-Based Assessment of Tumor Volume in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qayyum, F; Armato, S; Straus, C; Husain, A; Vigneswaran, W; Kindler, H [The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the potential utility of computed tomography (CT) scans in the assessment of physical tumor bulk in malignant pleural mesothelioma patients. Methods: Twenty-eight patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma were used for this study. A CT scan was acquired for each patient prior to surgical resection of the tumor (median time between scan and surgery: 27 days). After surgery, the ex-vivo tumor volume was measured by a pathologist using a water displacement method. Separately, a radiologist identified and outlined the tumor boundary on each CT section that demonstrated tumor. These outlines then were analyzed to determine the total volume of disease present, the number of sections with outlines, and the mean volume of disease per outlined section. Subsets of the initial patient cohort were defined based on these parameters, i.e. cases with at least 30 sections of disease with a mean disease volume of at least 3mL per section. For each subset, the R- squared correlation between CT-based tumor volume and physical ex-vivo tumor volume was calculated. Results: The full cohort of 28 patients yielded a modest correlation between CT-based tumor volume and the ex-vivo tumor volume with an R-squared value of 0.66. In general, as the mean tumor volume per section increased, the correlation of CT-based volume with the physical tumor volume improved substantially. For example, when cases with at least 40 CT sections presenting a mean of at least 2mL of disease per section were evaluated (n=20) the R-squared correlation increased to 0.79. Conclusion: While image-based volumetry for mesothelioma may not generally capture physical tumor volume as accurately as one might expect, there exists a set of conditions in which CT-based volume is highly correlated with the physical tumor volume. SGA receives royalties and licensing fees through the University of Chicago for computer-aided diagnosis technology.

  11. Assessing and accounting for the impact of respiratory motion on FDG uptake and viable volume for liver lesions in free-breathing PET using respiration-suspended PET images as reference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guang, E-mail: lig2@mskcc.org; Schmidtlein, C. Ross; Humm, John L. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Burger, Irene A. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Zurich, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Ridge, Carole A.; Solomon, Stephen B. [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To assess and account for the impact of respiratory motion on the variability of activity and volume determination of liver tumor in positron emission tomography (PET) through a comparison between free-breathing (FB) and respiration-suspended (RS) PET images. Methods: As part of a PET/computed tomography (CT) guided percutaneous liver ablation procedure performed on a PET/CT scanner, a patient's breathing is suspended on a ventilator, allowing the acquisition of a near-motionless PET and CT reference images of the liver. In this study, baseline RS and FB PET/CT images of 20 patients undergoing thermal ablation were acquired. The RS PET provides near-motionless reference in a human study, and thereby allows a quantitative evaluation of the effect of respiratory motion on PET images obtained under FB conditions. Two methods were applied to calculate tumor activity and volume: (1) threshold-based segmentation (TBS), estimating the total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and the segmented volume and (2) histogram-based estimation (HBE), yielding the background-subtracted lesion (BSL) activity and associated volume. The TBS method employs 50% of the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) as the threshold for tumors with SUV{sub max} ≥ 2× SUV{sub liver-bkg}, and tumor activity above this threshold yields TLG{sub 50%}. The HBE method determines local PET background based on a Gaussian fit of the low SUV peak in a SUV-volume histogram, which is generated within a user-defined and optimized volume of interest containing both local background and lesion uptakes. Voxels with PET intensity above the fitted background were considered to have originated from the tumor and used to calculate the BSL activity and its associated lesion volume. Results: Respiratory motion caused SUV{sub max} to decrease from RS to FB by −15% ± 11% (p = 0.01). Using TBS method, there was also a decrease in SUV{sub mean} (−18% ± 9%, p = 0.01), but an increase in TLG{sub 50%} (18

  12. Noninvasive Evaluation of Microscopic Tumor Extensions Using Standardized Uptake Value and Metabolic Tumor Volume in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng Xue; Sun Xindong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Shandong University, Jinan (China); Mu Dianbin [Department of Pathology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Shandong University, Jinan (China); Xing Ligang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Shandong University, Jinan (China); Ma Li [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Shandong University, Jinan (China); Zhang Baijiang [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Shandong University, Jinan (China); Zhao Shuqiang; Yang Guoren [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Shandong University, Jinan (China); Kong Fengming [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Yu Jinming, E-mail: yujinmingsd@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Shandong University, Jinan (China)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate whether maximal microscopic extensions (MEmax) correlate with maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) at 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) images in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Thirty-nine patients with Stage I-IIIA NSCLC underwent surgery after FDG-PET/CT scanning. SUVmax and MTV were calculated on the PET/CT images. The maximum linear distance from the tumor margin to the farthest extent of the tumor in every dimension was measured at the tumor section. The correlations among MEmax, SUVmax, MTV and other clinical pathologic parameters were analyzed. Results: MEmax for all patients had a significant correlation with SUVmax (r = 0.777, p = 0.008) and MTV (r = 0.724, p < 0.001). When expressed in terms of the probability of covering ME with respect to a given margin, we suggested that margins of 1.93 mm, 3.90 mm, and 9.60 mm for SUVmax {<=}5, 5-10, and >10 added to the gross tumor volume would be adequate to cover 95% of ME. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that tumors with high SUVmax and MTV have more MEmax and would therefore require more margin expansion from gross tumor volume to clinical target volume. FDG-PET/CT, especially for SUVmax, is promising and effective and merits additional study in noninvasive delimiting of the clinical target volume margin for NSCLC.

  13. Radical prostatectomy and positive surgical margins: tumor volume and Gleason score predicts cancer outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Roca, Ricardo L.R. Felts de, E-mail: Ricardo@delarocaurologia.com.br [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fonseca, Francisco Paula da, E-mail: fpf@uol.com.br [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Divisao de Urologia. Dept. de Cirurgia Pelvica; Cunha, Isabela Werneck da; Bezerra, Stephania Martins, E-mail: iwerneck@gmail.com, E-mail: stephaniab@gmail.com [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Patologia

    2013-07-01

    Introduction: positive surgical margins (PSMs) are common adverse factors to predict the outcome of a patient submitted to radical prostatectomy (PR). However, not all of these men will follow with biochemical (BCR) or clinical (CR) recurrence. Relationship between PSMs with these recurrent events has to be correlated with other clinicopathological findings in order to recognize more aggressive tumors in order to recommend complementary treatment to these selected patients. Materials and methods: we retrospectively reviewed the outcome of 228 patients submitted to open retropubic RP between March 1991 and June 2008, where 161 had and 67 did not have PSMs. Minimum follow-up time was considered 2 years after surgery. BCR was considered when PSA {>=} 0.2 ng/ml. CR was determined when clinical evidence of tumor appeared. Chi-square test was used to correlate clinical and pathologic variables with PSMs. The estimated 5-year risk of BCR and CR in presence of PSMs was determined using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared to log-rank tests. Results: from the total of 228 patients, 161 (71%) had PSMs, while 67 (29%) had negative surgical margins (NSMs). Prostatic circumferential margin was the most common (43.4%) site. Univariate analysis showed statistically significant (p < 0.001) associations between the presence of PSMs and BCR, but not with CR (p = 0.06). Among 161 patients with PSMs, 61 (37.8%) presented BCR, while 100 (62.8%) did not. Predicting progression-free survival for 5 years, BCR was correlated with pathological stage; Gleason score; pre-treatment PSA; tumor volume in specimen; capsular and perineural invasion; presence and number of PSMs. RC correlated only with angiolymphatic invasion and Gleason score. Considering univariate analyses the clinicopathological factors predicting BCR for 5 years, results statistically significant links with prostate weight; pre-treatment PSA; Gleason score; pathological stage; tumor volume; PSMs; capsular and perineural

  14. Artifacts in conventional computed tomography (CT) and free breathing four-dimensional CT induce uncertainty in gross tumor volume determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Gitte Fredberg; Nygaard, Ditte Eklund; Af Rosenschöld, Per Munck;

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Artifacts impacting the imaged tumor volume can be seen in conventional three-dimensional CT (3DCT) scans for planning of lung cancer radiotherapy but can be reduced with the use of respiration-correlated imaging, i.e., 4DCT or breathhold CT (BHCT) scans. The aim of this study...... was to compare delineated gross tumor volume (GTV) sizes in 3DCT, 4DCT, and BHCT scans of patients with lung tumors. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A total of 36 patients with 46 tumors referred for stereotactic radiotherapy of lung tumors were included. All patients underwent positron emission tomography (PET)/CT, 4DCT......, and BHCT scans. GTVs in all CT scans of individual patients were delineated during one session by a single physician to minimize systematic delineation uncertainty. The GTV size from the BHCT was considered the closest to true tumor volume and was chosen as the reference. The reference GTV size...

  15. Intravitreal bevacizumab combined with plaque brachytherapy reduces melanoma tumor volume and enhances resolution of exudative detachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houston SK

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Samuel K Houston,1 Nisha V Shah,1 Christina Decatur,1 Marcela Lonngi,1 William Feuer,1 Arnold M Markoe,2 Timothy G Murray1–31Department of Ophthalmology, 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, 3Murray Ocular Oncology and Retina, Miami, FL, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate intravitreal bevacizumab as an adjuvant treatment to plaque brachytherapy in the treatment of choroidal melanoma.Methods: This was a retrospective, consecutive study of 124 patients treated from 2007 to 2009 for choroidal melanoma with plaque brachytherapy. Patients were treated with I-125 plaque brachytherapy with 2 mm margins and 85 Gy to the tumor apex. Consecutive patients were injected intravitreally with 2.5 mg/0.1 mL bevacizumab at a site away from the primary tumor and immediately following plaque removal. Choroidal melanomas were observed using indirect ophthalmoscopy, wide-angle photography, and ultrasound. The main outcome measures were tumor volume, resolution of exudative retinal detachment, and visual acuity.Results: One hundred and twenty-four patients met our inclusion criteria and were included in the analysis. The mean patient age was 65.7 years, and the mean apical tumor height was 4.0 ± 2.7 mm and basal diameter was 12.7 ± 3.0 mm. Mean follow-up was 24 months. Prior to treatment, 100% of tumors had exudative retinal detachment, and pretreatment visual acuity was 20/55 (median 20/40. Tumor control was 100%, metastasis was 0% at last follow-up, and 89.8% had complete resolution of exudative retinal detachment, with a mean time to resolution of 3.36 months. At one month, 43% had complete resolution of exudative retinal detachment, which increased to 73% at 4 months. Visual acuity was 20/62 (median 20/40 at 4 months, with stabilization to 20/57 (median 20/40 at 8 months, 20/56 (median 20/30 at 12 months, and 20/68 (median 20/50 at 24 months. Tumor

  16. Prognostic role of tumor volume for radiotherapy outcome in patient with T2 laryngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutkowski, T.; Wygoda, A.; Skladowski, K.; Rutkowski, R.; Maciejewski, B. [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice (Poland). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Hejduk, B. [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice (Poland). Dept. of Radiodiagnostic; Kolosza, Z. [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice (Poland). Dept. of Epidemiology

    2013-10-15

    Background and purpose: Tumor volume (TV) is recognized as a prognostic factor of treatment outcome for head and neck tumors but is not routinely included in the treatment decision-making process. The purpose of the study was to define its prognostic role for patients with T2 laryngeal cancer. Material and methods: TV of 160 patients who underwent RT between 2002 and 2006 for T2 laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma were reviewed. The tumor was located in the glottis and epiglottis in 82 (51 %) and 78 (49 %) patients, respectively. TV was manually contoured on pretreatment, planning, contrast-enhanced CT scans and the volumetric measurement (cm{sup 3}) was calculated by the volume algorithm. Results: The median TV value was 2.01 cm{sup 3} (range 0.15-21.68 cm{sup 3}). The median TV was significantly lower in patients with glottic tumors (p < 0.0001), N0 (p < 0.001), or well histopatologically differentiated tumors (p = 0.01). A significant correlation between TV, hemoglobin concentration (p < 0.01), and total dose (TD; p < 0.001) was observed. On univariate analyses, TV influenced local control (LC; p = 0.02) and overall survival (OS, p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, both age (HR 1.038, p = 0.03) and TV (HR = 1.075, p = 0.01) remained significantly related to LC and OS (age: HR 1.038, p = 0.005; TV: HR 1.097, p = 0.0001). Conclusion: Large TV worsen prognosis of patients with T2 laryngeal cancer. A large TV is more common for supraglottic, poorly differentiated tumors and may suggest higher risk of nodal spread. The routine estimation of TV prior to therapy may be essential in order to select the best treatment option for patients with T2 laryngeal cancer. (orig.)

  17. Volume change determination of metastatic lung tumors in CT images using 3-D template matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosini, Robert D.; Wang, Peng; O'Dell, Walter G.

    2009-02-01

    The ability of a clinician to properly detect changes in the size of lung nodules over time is a vital element to both the diagnosis of malignant growths and the monitoring of the response of cancerous lesions to therapy. We have developed a novel metastasis sizing algorithm based on 3-D template matching with spherical tumor appearance models that were created to match the expected geometry of the tumors of interest while accounting for potential spatial offsets of nodules in the slice thickness direction. The spherical template that best-fits the overall volume of each lung metastasis was determined through the optimization of the 3-D normalized cross-correlation coefficients (NCCC) calculated between the templates and the nodules. A total of 17 different lung metastases were extracted manually from real patient CT datasets and reconstructed in 3-D using spherical harmonics equations to generate simulated nodules for testing our algorithm. Each metastasis 3-D shape was then subjected to 10%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 90% scaling of its volume to allow for 5 possible volume change combinations relative to the original size per each reconstructed nodule and inserted back into CT datasets with appropriate blurring and noise addition. When plotted against the true volume change, the nodule volume changes calculated by our algorithm for these 85 data points exhibited a high degree of accuracy (slope = 0.9817, R2 = 0.9957). Our results demonstrate that the 3-D template matching method can be an effective, fast, and accurate tool for automated sizing of metastatic tumors.

  18. Tumor radio-sensitivity assessment by means of volume data and magnetic resonance indices measured on prostate tumor bearing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfatto, Antonella; White, Derek A; Mason, Ralph P; Zhang, Zhang; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Baroni, Guido; Cerveri, Pietro

    2016-03-01

    Radiation therapy is one of the most common treatments in the fight against prostate cancer, since it is used to control the tumor (early stages), to slow its progression, and even to control pain (metastasis). Although many factors (e.g., tumor oxygenation) are known to influence treatment efficacy, radiotherapy doses and fractionation schedules are often prescribed according to the principle "one-fits-all," with little personalization. Therefore, the authors aim at predicting the outcome of radiation therapy a priori starting from morphologic and functional information to move a step forward in the treatment customization. The authors propose a two-step protocol to predict the effects of radiation therapy on individual basis. First, one macroscopic mathematical model of tumor evolution was trained on tumor volume progression, measured by caliper, of eighteen Dunning R3327-AT1 bearing rats. Nine rats inhaled 100% O2 during irradiation (oxy), while the others were allowed to breathe air. Second, a supervised learning of the weight and biases of two feedforward neural networks was performed to predict the radio-sensitivity (target) from the initial volume and oxygenation-related information (inputs) for each rat group (air and oxygen breathing). To this purpose, four MRI-based indices related to blood and tissue oxygenation were computed, namely, the variation of signal intensity ΔSI in interleaved blood oxygen level dependent and tissue oxygen level dependent (IBT) sequences as well as changes in longitudinal ΔR1 and transverse ΔR2(*) relaxation rates. An inverse correlation of the radio-sensitivity parameter, assessed by the model, was found with respect the ΔR2(*) (-0.65) for the oxy group. A further subdivision according to positive and negative values of ΔR2(*) showed a larger average radio-sensitivity for the oxy rats with ΔR2(*)<0 and a significant difference in the two distributions (p < 0.05). Finally, a leave-one-out procedure yielded a radio

  19. Tumorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prause, J.U.; Heegaard, S.

    2005-01-01

    oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer......oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer...

  20. Impact of initial tumor volume on radiotherapy outcome in patients with T2 glottic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutkowski, T. [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and the Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Gliwice (Poland)

    2014-05-15

    The aim of this study was to quantify the impact of initial tumor volume (TV) on radiotherapy (RT) outcome in patients with T2 glottic cancer. Initial TV was calculated for 115 consecutive patients with T2 glottic cancer who had been treated with definitive RT alone at a single institution. The results showed strong correlations of TV with 3-year local tumor control (LTC) and disease-free survival (DFS). For TV ≤ 0.7 cm{sup 3}, 3-year LTC was 83 %; for TV 0.7-3.6 cm{sup 3} this was 70 % and for TV 3.6-17 cm{sup 3} 44 %. Analysis of total dose vs. initial TV showed that larger T2 glottic tumors with a TV of around 5 cm{sup 3} (2-2.5 cm in diameter with 10{sup 10} cancer cells) need an extra 6.5 Gy to achieve similar 3-year LTC rates as for small tumors with a TV of 0.5 cm{sup 3} (∝1 cm in diameter with 10{sup 9} cancer cells). Although classification of tumors according to TV cannot replace TNM staging in daily practice, it could represent a valuable numerical supplement for planning the optimal dose fractionation scheme for individual patients. (orig.)

  1. Improved Perfusion MR Imaging Assessment of Intracerebral Tumor Blood Volume and Antiangiogenic Therapy Efficacy in a Rat Model with Ferumoxytol

    OpenAIRE

    Gahramanov, Seymur; Muldoon, Leslie L; Li, Xin; Neuwelt, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    Our findings suggest that, at perfusion MR imaging, more consistent estimations of relative cerebral blood volume are provided with ferumoxytol than with gadolinium-based contrast agents regardless of the permeability of the tumor vasculature.

  2. Post-Radiation Metabolic Tumor Volume Predicts Outcome in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, James D; La, Trang H.; Chu, Karen; Quon, Andrew; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Maxim, Peter G.; Graves, Edward E.; Loo, Billy W.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To explore the prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume measured on post-radiation 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials Forty-seven head-and-neck cancer patients who received pre- and post-treatment PET/CT imaging along with definitive chemoradiotherapy were included in this study. PET/CT parameters evaluated include the maximum standardized uptake value, metabolic tumor volume (MTV2.0-MTV4.0; where MTV2.0 refers to the volume above an SUV threshold of 2.0), and integrated tumor volume. Kaplan-Meier and Cox-regression models were used to test for association between PET endpoints and disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results Multiple post-radiation PET endpoints correlated significantly with outcome, however the most robust predictor of disease progression and death was MTV2.0. An increase in MTV2.0 of 21cm3 (difference between 75th and 25th percentile) was associated with an increased risk of disease progression (hazard ratio [HR]=2.5, p=0.0001) and death (HR=2.0, p=0.003). In patients with non-nasopharyngeal carcinoma (non-NPC) histology (n=34), MTV2.0<18cm3 and MTV2.0≥18cm3 yielded 2-year DFS rates of 100% and 63%, respectively (p=0.006) and 2-year OS rates of 100% and 81%, respectively (p=0.009). There was no correlation between MTV2.0 and DFS or OS with NPC histology (n=13). On multivariate analysis only post-radiation MTV2.0 was predictive of DFS (HR=2.47, p=0.0001) and OS (HR=1.98, p=0.003). Conclusions Post-radiation metabolic tumor volume is an adverse prognostic factor in head-and-neck cancer. Biomarkers such as MTV are important for risk stratification, and will be valuable in the future with risk-adapted therapies. PMID:20646870

  3. The importance of tumor volume in the prognosis of patients with glioblastoma. Comparison of computerized volumetry and geometric models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iliadis, Georgios; Misailidou, Despina [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, ' ' Papageorgiou' ' General Hospital, Thessaloniki (Greece); Selviaridis, Panagiotis; Chatzisotiriou, Athanasios [Dept. of Neurosurgery, ' ' AHEPA' ' Hospital, Aristotle Univ. of Thessaloniki, School of Medicine (Greece); Kalogera-Fountzila, Anna [Dept. of Radiology, ' ' AHEPA' ' Hospital, Aristotle Univ. of Thessaloniki, School of Medicine (Greece); Fragkoulidi, Anna; Fountzilas, George [Dept. of Medical Oncology, ' ' Papageorgiou' ' General Hospital, Aristotle Univ. of Thessaloniki, School of Medicine (Greece); Baltas, Dimos; Tselis, Nikolaos; Zamboglou, Nikolaos [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    Background and purpose: the importance of tumor volume as a prognostic factor in high-grade gliomas is highly controversial and there are numerous methods estimating this parameter. In this study, a computer-based application was used in order to assess tumor volume from hard copies and a survival analysis was conducted in order to evaluate the prognostic significance of preoperative volumetric data in patients harboring glioblastomas. Patients and methods: 50 patients suffering from glioblastoma were analyzed retrospectively. Tumor volume was determined by the various geometric models as well as by an own specialized software (Volumio). Age, performance status, type of excision, and tumor location were also included in the multivariate analysis. Results: the spheroid and rectangular models overestimated tumor volume, while the ellipsoid model offered the best approximation. Volume failed to attain any statistical significance in prognosis, while age and performance status confirmed their importance in progression-free and overall survival of patients. Conclusion: geometric models provide a rough approximation of tumor volume and should not be used, as accurate determination of size is of paramount importance in order to draw safe conclusions in oncology. Although the significance of volumetry was not disclosed, further studies are definitely required. (orig.)

  4. Comparison of tumor volumes derived from glucose metabolic rate maps and SUV maps in dynamic 18F-FDG PET.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, E.P.; Philippens, M.E.P.; Kienhorst, L.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Corstens, F.H.M.; Geus-Oei, L.F. de; Oyen, W.J.G.

    2008-01-01

    Tumor delineation using noninvasive medical imaging modalities is important to determine the target volume in radiation treatment planning and to evaluate treatment response. It is expected that combined use of CT and functional information from 18F-FDG PET will improve tumor delineation. However, u

  5. TU-F-CAMPUS-T-05: Dose Escalation to Biological Tumor Volumes of Prostate Cancer Patients Using Gold Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jermoumi, M; Ngwa, W [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, Medical Physics Program, University of Massachusetts Lowell (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Insitute, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical, Boston, MA (United States); Sajo, E [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, Medical Physics Program, University of Massachusetts Lowell (United States); Houari, K [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Insitute, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Studies have shown that radiation boosting could help reduce prostate cancer (PCa) recurrence. Biological tumor volumes (BTV) are a high priority for such radiation boosting. The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential of radiation boosting of real patient BTVs using gold nanoparticles (GNP) released from gold-loaded brachytherapy spacers (GBS) during brachytherapy. Methods: The BTVs of 12 patients having prostate adenocarcinoma identified with positron emission tomography (PET) and CT scanner using C-11 labeled tracer [11C]acetate were investigated. The initial GNP concentration and time to achieve a dose enhancement effect (DEF) of 2 was simulated using the freely downloadable software RAID APP. The investigations were carried out for low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy sources (BTS) described in AAPM Task Group report 43: Cs-131, I-125, and Pd-103. In first case, we used 7 mg/g and 18 mg/g of GNP initial concentrations to estimate the time needed for released GNP to achieve a DEF of 2 for the different BTS, and compare with clinically relevant treatment times. In second case, we calculated the initial concentration of GNPs needed to achieve a DEF of 2 during the time the BTS would typically deliver 50%, 70% and 90% of the total dose. Results: For an initial concentration of 18 mg/g, when using Cs-131, and Pd-103, a DEF of 2 could only be achieved for BTV of 3.3 cm3 and 1 cm3 respectively. Meanwhile a DEF of 2 could be achieved for all 12 BTVs when using I-125. To achieve a DEF of 2 for all patients using Cs-131 and Pd-103, much higher initial concentrations would have to be used than have been typically employed in pre-clinical studies. Conclusion: The I-125 is the most viable BTS that can be employed with GBS to guide dose painting treatment planning for localized PCa.

  6. Estimates of nuclear volume in plaque and tumor-stage mycosis fungoides. A new prognostic indicator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, B; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Thestrup-Pedersen, K

    1994-01-01

    It is well documented that mycosis fungoides (MF), a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, has a variable clinical course. Unbiased stereological estimates of three-dimensional volume-weighted mean nuclear size (nucl vV) of mycosis cells were obtained in a retrospective study of 18 patients with a total of 34...... biopsies of cutaneous plaque and tumor-stage MF. The value of nucl vV in the first sampled biopsy, as well as the average and highest values, were determined in biopsies from each patient. The patients were divided into two groups, either above or below the group median. There was a strong positive...

  7. Stereological estimates of nuclear volume and other quantitative variables in supratentorial brain tumors. Practical technique and use in prognostic evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Braendgaard, H; Chistiansen, A O

    1991-01-01

    the practical technique. The continuous variables were correlated with the subjective, qualitative WHO classification of brain tumors, and the prognostic value of the parameters was assessed. Well differentiated astrocytomas (n = 14) had smaller estimates of the volume-weighted mean nuclear volume and mean...

  8. Automatic segmentation of tumor-laden lung volumes from the LIDC database

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Walter G.

    2012-03-01

    The segmentation of the lung parenchyma is often a critical pre-processing step prior to application of computer-aided detection of lung nodules. Segmentation of the lung volume can dramatically decrease computation time and reduce the number of false positive detections by excluding from consideration extra-pulmonary tissue. However, while many algorithms are capable of adequately segmenting the healthy lung, none have been demonstrated to work reliably well on tumor-laden lungs. Of particular challenge is to preserve tumorous masses attached to the chest wall, mediastinum or major vessels. In this role, lung volume segmentation comprises an important computational step that can adversely affect the performance of the overall CAD algorithm. An automated lung volume segmentation algorithm has been developed with the goals to maximally exclude extra-pulmonary tissue while retaining all true nodules. The algorithm comprises a series of tasks including intensity thresholding, 2-D and 3-D morphological operations, 2-D and 3-D floodfilling, and snake-based clipping of nodules attached to the chest wall. It features the ability to (1) exclude trachea and bowels, (2) snip large attached nodules using snakes, (3) snip small attached nodules using dilation, (4) preserve large masses fully internal to lung volume, (5) account for basal aspects of the lung where in a 2-D slice the lower sections appear to be disconnected from main lung, and (6) achieve separation of the right and left hemi-lungs. The algorithm was developed and trained to on the first 100 datasets of the LIDC image database.

  9. Validation that Metabolic Tumor Volume Predicts Outcome in Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chad; Murphy, James D.; Khong, Brian; La, Trang H.; Kong, Christina; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Iagaru, Andrei H.; Graves, Edward E.; Loo, Billy W.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We have previously reported that metabolic tumor volume (MTV) obtained from pre-treatment FDG PET/CT predicted outcome in patients with head-and-neck cancer (HNC). The purpose of this study is to validate these results on an independent dataset, determine if the primary tumor or nodal MTV drives this correlation, and explore the interaction with p16INK4a status as a surrogate marker for HPV. Methods and Materials The validation dataset in this study included 83 patients with squamous cell HNC who had a FDG PET/CT scan prior to definitive radiotherapy. MTV and SUVmax were calculated for the primary tumor, involved nodes, and the combination of both. The primary endpoint was to validate that MTV predicted progression-free survival and overall survival. Secondary analyses included determining the prognostic utility of primary tumor versus nodal MTV. Results Similar to our prior findings, an increase in total MTV of 17 cm3 (difference between 75th and 25th percentile) was associated with a 2.1 fold increase in the risk of disease progression (p=0.0002), and a 2.0 fold increase in the risk of death (p=0.0048). SUVmax was not associated with either outcome. Primary tumor MTV predicted progression-free (HR=1.94; p<0.0001) and overall (HR=1.57; p<0.0001) survival, whereas nodal MTV did not. In addition, MTV predicted progression-free (HR=4.23; p<0.0001) and overall (HR=3.21; p=0.0029) survival in patients with p16INK4a positive oropharyngeal cancer. Conclusions This study validates our previous findings that MTV independently predicts outcomes in HNC. MTV should be considered as a potential risk stratifying biomarker in future studies of HNC. PMID:22270174

  10. The effects of somatostatin analogue therapy on pituitary tumor volume in patients with acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colao, Annamaria; Auriemma, Renata S; Pivonello, Rosario

    2016-04-01

    In nearly all cases, acromegaly is caused by excess GH from a pituitary adenoma, resulting in elevated circulating levels of GH and, subsequently, IGF-1. Treatment goals are to eliminate morbidity and restore the increased mortality to normal rates. Therapeutic strategies aim to minimize tumor mass and normalize GH and IGF-1 levels. Somatostatin analogues are the medical treatment of choice in acromegaly, as first-line or post-surgical therapy, and have proven efficacy in pituitary tumor volume reduction (TVR). Here we review the effects of somatostatin analogue therapy on pituitary tumor volume in patients with acromegaly. TVR with somatostatin analogues may be mediated by direct anti-proliferative effects via activation of somatostatin receptors, or by indirect effects, such as angiogenesis inhibition, and is more pronounced when they are administered as first-line therapy. Various studies of first-line treatment with octreotide LAR have shown significant TVR in ≥73% of patients. First-line treatment with lanreotide Autogel has shown evidence of TVR, although more studies are needed. In a recent randomized, double-blind, 12-month trial in 358 medical-treatment-naïve acromegaly patients, significant TVR was achieved by 81% of patients administered pasireotide LAR and 77% administered octreotide LAR. Pre-operative somatostatin analogue therapy may also induce TVR and improve post-operative disease control compared with surgery alone. TVR is progressive with prolonged treatment, and decreased IGF-1 levels may be its best predictor, followed by age and degree of GH decrease. However, TVR does not always correlate with degree of biochemical control. Somatostatin analogues (first- or second-line treatment) are the mainstay of medical therapy and, as first-line medical therapy, are associated with significant pituitary TVR in most patients.

  11. Tumor classification using perfusion volume fractions in breast DCE-MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Ho; Kim, Jong Hyo; Park, Jeong Seon; Park, Sang Joon; Jung, Yun Sub; Song, Jung Joo; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2008-03-01

    This study was designed to classify contrast enhancement curves using both three-time-points (3TP) method and clustering approach at full-time points, and to introduce a novel evaluation method using perfusion volume fractions for differentiation of malignant and benign lesions. DCE-MRI was applied to 24 lesions (12 malignant, 12 benign). After region growing segmentation for each lesion, hole-filling and 3D morphological erosion and dilation were performed for extracting final lesion volume. 3TP method and k-means clustering at full-time points were applied for classifying kinetic curves into six classes. Intratumoral volume fraction for each class was calculated. ROC and linear discriminant analyses were performed with distributions of the volume fractions for each class, pairwise and whole classes, respectively. The best performance in each class showed accuracy (ACC), 84.7% (sensitivity (SE), 100%; specificity (SP), 66.7% to a single class) to 3TP method, whereas ACC, 73.6% (SE, 41.7%; SP, 100% to a single class) to k-means clustering. The best performance in pairwise classes showed ACC, 75% (SE, 83.3%; SP, 66.7% to four class pairs and SE, 58.3%; SP, 91.7% to a single class pair) to 3TP method and ACC, 75% (SE, 75%; SP, 75% to a single class pair and SE, 66.7%; SP, 83.3% to three class pairs) to k-means clustering. The performance in whole classes showed ACC, 75% (SE, 83.3%; SP, 66.7%) to 3TP method and ACC, 75% (SE, 91.7%; 58.3%) to k-means clustering. The results indicate that tumor classification using perfusion volume fractions is helpful in selecting meaningful kinetic patterns for differentiation of malignant and benign lesions, and that two different classification methods are complementary to each other.

  12. Accurate tracking of tumor volume change during radiotherapy by CT-CBCT registration with intensity correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seyoun; Robinson, Adam; Quon, Harry; Kiess, Ana P.; Shen, Colette; Wong, John; Plishker, William; Shekhar, Raj; Lee, Junghoon

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a CT-CBCT registration method to accurately predict the tumor volume change based on daily cone-beam CTs (CBCTs) during radiotherapy. CBCT is commonly used to reduce patient setup error during radiotherapy, but its poor image quality impedes accurate monitoring of anatomical changes. Although physician's contours drawn on the planning CT can be automatically propagated to daily CBCTs by deformable image registration (DIR), artifacts in CBCT often cause undesirable errors. To improve the accuracy of the registration-based segmentation, we developed a DIR method that iteratively corrects CBCT intensities by local histogram matching. Three popular DIR algorithms (B-spline, demons, and optical flow) with the intensity correction were implemented on a graphics processing unit for efficient computation. We evaluated their performances on six head and neck (HN) cancer cases. For each case, four trained scientists manually contoured the nodal gross tumor volume (GTV) on the planning CT and every other fraction CBCTs to which the propagated GTV contours by DIR were compared. The performance was also compared with commercial image registration software based on conventional mutual information (MI), VelocityAI (Varian Medical Systems Inc.). The volume differences (mean±std in cc) between the average of the manual segmentations and automatic segmentations are 3.70+/-2.30 (B-spline), 1.25+/-1.78 (demons), 0.93+/-1.14 (optical flow), and 4.39+/-3.86 (VelocityAI). The proposed method significantly reduced the estimation error by 9% (B-spline), 38% (demons), and 51% (optical flow) over the results using VelocityAI. Although demonstrated only on HN nodal GTVs, the results imply that the proposed method can produce improved segmentation of other critical structures over conventional methods.

  13. Automated localization and segmentation of lung tumor from PET-CT thorax volumes based on image feature analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hui; Wang, Xiuying; Feng, Dagan

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography - computed tomography (PET-CT) plays an essential role in early tumor detection, diagnosis, staging and treatment. Automated and more accurate lung tumor detection and delineation from PET-CT is challenging. In this paper, on the basis of quantitative analysis of contrast feature of PET volume in SUV (standardized uptake value), our method firstly automatically localized the lung tumor. Then based on analysing the surrounding CT features of the initial tumor definition, our decision strategy determines the tumor segmentation from CT or from PET. The algorithm has been validated on 20 PET-CT studies involving non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Experimental results demonstrated that our method was able to segment the tumor when adjacent to mediastinum or chest wall, and the algorithm outperformed the other five lung segmentation methods in terms of overlapping measure.

  14. Evaluation of potential internal target volume of liver tumors using cine-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akino, Yuichi; Oh, Ryoong-Jin; Masai, Norihisa; Shiomi, Hiroya; Inoue, Toshihiko

    2014-11-01

    Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) is widely used for evaluating moving tumors, including lung and liver cancers. For patients with unstable respiration, however, the 4DCT may not visualize tumor motion properly. High-speed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences (cine-MRI) permit direct visualization of respiratory motion of liver tumors without considering radiation dose exposure to patients. Here, the authors demonstrated a technique for evaluating internal target volume (ITV) with consideration of respiratory variation using cine-MRI. The authors retrospectively evaluated six patients who received stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to hepatocellular carcinoma. Before acquiring planning CT, sagittal and coronal cine-MRI images were acquired for 30 s with a frame rate of 2 frames/s. The patient immobilization was conducted under the same condition as SBRT. Planning CT images were then acquired within 15 min from cine-MRI image acquisitions, followed by a 4DCT scan. To calculate tumor motion, the motion vectors between two continuous frames of cine-MRI images were calculated for each frame using the pyramidal Lucas-Kanade method. The target contour was delineated on one frame, and each vertex of the contour was shifted and copied onto the following frame using neighboring motion vectors. 3D trajectory data were generated with the centroid of the contours on sagittal and coronal images. To evaluate the accuracy of the tracking method, the motion of clearly visible blood vessel was analyzed with the motion tracking and manual detection techniques. The target volume delineated on the 50% (end-exhale) phase of 4DCT was translated with the trajectory data, and the distribution of the occupancy probability of target volume was calculated as potential ITV (ITV Potential). The concordance between ITV Potential and ITV estimated with 4DCT (ITV 4DCT) was evaluated using the Dice's similarity coefficient (DSC). The distance between blood vessel positions

  15. Evaluation of potential internal target volume of liver tumors using cine-MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akino, Yuichi, E-mail: akino@radonc.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka 5650871, Japan and Miyakojima IGRT Clinic, Miyakojima-ku, Osaka 5340021 (Japan); Oh, Ryoong-Jin; Masai, Norihisa; Shiomi, Hiroya; Inoue, Toshihiko [Miyakojima IGRT Clinic, Miyakojima-ku, Osaka 5340021 (Japan)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) is widely used for evaluating moving tumors, including lung and liver cancers. For patients with unstable respiration, however, the 4DCT may not visualize tumor motion properly. High-speed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences (cine-MRI) permit direct visualization of respiratory motion of liver tumors without considering radiation dose exposure to patients. Here, the authors demonstrated a technique for evaluating internal target volume (ITV) with consideration of respiratory variation using cine-MRI. Methods: The authors retrospectively evaluated six patients who received stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to hepatocellular carcinoma. Before acquiring planning CT, sagittal and coronal cine-MRI images were acquired for 30 s with a frame rate of 2 frames/s. The patient immobilization was conducted under the same condition as SBRT. Planning CT images were then acquired within 15 min from cine-MRI image acquisitions, followed by a 4DCT scan. To calculate tumor motion, the motion vectors between two continuous frames of cine-MRI images were calculated for each frame using the pyramidal Lucas–Kanade method. The target contour was delineated on one frame, and each vertex of the contour was shifted and copied onto the following frame using neighboring motion vectors. 3D trajectory data were generated with the centroid of the contours on sagittal and coronal images. To evaluate the accuracy of the tracking method, the motion of clearly visible blood vessel was analyzed with the motion tracking and manual detection techniques. The target volume delineated on the 50% (end-exhale) phase of 4DCT was translated with the trajectory data, and the distribution of the occupancy probability of target volume was calculated as potential ITV (ITV {sub Potential}). The concordance between ITV {sub Potential} and ITV estimated with 4DCT (ITV {sub 4DCT}) was evaluated using the Dice’s similarity coefficient (DSC). Results

  16. Ecosystem Viable Yields

    CERN Document Server

    De Lara, Michel; Oliveros-Ramos, Ricardo; Tam, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The World Summit on Sustainable Development (Johannesburg, 2002) encouraged the application of the ecosystem approach by 2010. However, at the same Summit, the signatory States undertook to restore and exploit their stocks at maximum sustainable yield (MSY), a concept and practice without ecosystemic dimension, since MSY is computed species by species, on the basis of a monospecific model. Acknowledging this gap, we propose a definition of "ecosystem viable yields" (EVY) as yields compatible i) with biological viability levels for all time and ii) with an ecosystem dynamics. To the difference of MSY, this notion is not based on equilibrium, but on viability theory, which offers advantages for robustness. For a generic class of multispecies models with harvesting, we provide explicit expressions for the EVY. We apply our approach to the anchovy--hake couple in the Peruvian upwelling ecosystem between the years 1971 and 1981.

  17. Prognostic implications of tumor volume response and COX-2 expression change during radiotherapy in cervical cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Jae Myoung; Park, Won; Huh, Seung Jae; Cho, Eun Yoon; Choi, Yoon La; Bae, Duk Soo; Kim, Byoung Gie [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    The relationship between treatment outcomes, alteration of the expression of biological markers, and tumor volume response during radiotherapy (RT) in patients with uterine cervical cancer was analyzed. Twenty patients with cervical squamous cell carcinoma received definitive RT with (n = 17) or without (n = 3) concurrent chemotherapy. Tumor volumes were measured by three serial magnetic resonance imaging scans at pre-, mid-, and post-RT. Two serial punch biopsies were performed at pre- and mid-RT, and immunohistochemical staining for cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and epidermal growth factor receptor was performed. The median follow-up duration was 60 months. The median tumor volume response at mid-RT (V2R) was 0.396 (range, 0.136 to 0.983). At mid-RT, an interval increase in the distribution of immunoreactivity for COX-2 was observed in 8 patients, and 6 of them showed poor mid-RT tumor volume response (V2R {>=} 0.4). Four (20%) patients experienced disease progression after 10 to 12 months (median, 11 months). All 4 patients had poor mid-RT tumor volume response (p = 0.0867) and 3 of them had an interval increase in COX-2 expression. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) decreased in patients with V2R {>=} 0.4 (p 0.0291 for both). An interval increase in COX-2 expression at mid-RT was also associated with a decreased survival (p = 0.1878 and 0.1845 for OS and PFS, respectively). Poor tumor volume response and an interval increase in COX-2 expression at mid-RT decreased survival outcomes in patients with uterine cervical cancer.

  18. Validation that Metabolic Tumor Volume Predicts Outcome in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Chad; Murphy, James D.; Khong, Brian; La, Trang H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Kong, Christina [Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Fischbein, Nancy J. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Colevas, A. Dimitrios [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Iagaru, Andrei H. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Graves, Edward E.; Loo, Billy W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu, E-mail: qle@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: We have previously reported that metabolic tumor volume (MTV) obtained from pretreatment {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxydeglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)/ computed tomography (CT) predicted outcome in patients with head-and-neck cancer (HNC). The purpose of this study was to validate these results on an independent dataset, determine whether the primary tumor or nodal MTV drives this correlation, and explore the interaction with p16{sup INK4a} status as a surrogate marker for human papillomavirus (HPV). Methods and Materials: The validation dataset in this study included 83 patients with squamous cell HNC who had a FDG PET/CT scan before receiving definitive radiotherapy. MTV and maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) were calculated for the primary tumor, the involved nodes, and the combination of both. The primary endpoint was to validate that MTV predicted progression-free survival and overall survival. Secondary analyses included determining the prognostic utility of primary tumor vs. nodal MTV. Results: Similarly to our prior findings, an increase in total MTV of 17 cm{sup 3} (difference between the 75th and 25th percentiles) was associated with a 2.1-fold increase in the risk of disease progression (p = 0.0002) and a 2.0-fold increase in the risk of death (p = 0.0048). SUV{sub max} was not associated with either outcome. Primary tumor MTV predicted progression-free (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.94; p < 0.0001) and overall (HR = 1.57; p < 0.0001) survival, whereas nodal MTV did not. In addition, MTV predicted progression-free (HR = 4.23; p < 0.0001) and overall (HR = 3.21; p = 0.0029) survival in patients with p16{sup INK4a}-positive oropharyngeal cancer. Conclusions: This study validates our previous findings that MTV independently predicts outcomes in HNC. MTV should be considered as a potential risk-stratifying biomarker in future studies of HNC.

  19. Comparing Gross Tumor Volume of Delineation between CT and MRI for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANGXi; HUGuoqing; QIUHong; CUIWei

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the accuracy between CT and MRI in delineating gross tumor volume (GTV) of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in making radiotherapy plan. Methods: The clinical data of 39 cases pathologically proven as nasopharyngeal carcinoma selected from April 2003 to September 2004 were retrospectively analyzed. All were subjected to CT and MR examination one week before treatment.CT scanning was performed with GE Light speed 16, and axial scan was parallel to the OM line routinely from soft palate to the suprasellar cistern. MR scanning was performed by GE Signa super-conducting magnetic resonance imaging system (1.5 Tesla). The standard quadrature head coil was used. Routine axial, sagittal and coronal image with SE sequence were obtained, and FLAIR was used in 10 of 21 cases.Scanned field ranged from the soft palate to the suprasellar cistern. Part of all cases underwent enhanced scanned with Ultravist in CT group or/and GD-DTPA in MR group. All data were analyzed by using the paired-samples t test. Results: The media primary tumor volume (cm3) in CT group and MR group was 32.49±19.91, 29.06±18.75, respectively, and the difference between the two groups were significant (t=5.268, P=0.000). There was significant difference between the two groups in early stage (T1+T2) and advanced stage (T3+T4) by Fuzhou Staging System (t=5.677, P=0.000; t=3.310, P=0.005, respectively).There was significant difference in stage T1, T2, T3 (P=0.005, P=0.001, P=0.004, respectively), and not in stage T4 (P=0.146) between the two groups. Conclusion: MR was more accurate than CT in delineating GTV of NPC, so, is more valuable in making radiotherapy plan.

  20. Implementation of image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) for patients with uterine cervix cancer: a tumor volume kinetics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Lucas Castro; Stuart, Silvia Radwanski; Guimarães, Roger Guilherme Rodrigues; Ramos, Clarissa Cerchi Angotti; de Paula, Lucas Assad; de Sales, Camila Pessoa; Chen, André Tsin Chih; Blasbalg, Roberto; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate tumor shrinking kinetics in order to implement image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) for the treatment of patients with cervix cancer. Material and methods This study has prospectively evaluated tumor shrinking kinetics of thirteen patients with uterine cervix cancer treated with combined chemoradiation. Four high dose rate brachytherapy fractions were delivered during the course of pelvic external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exams were acquired at diagnosis (D), first (B1), and third (B3) brachytherapy fractions. Target volumes (GTV and HR-CTV) were calculated by both the ellipsoid formula (VE) and MRI contouring (VC), which were defined by a consensus between at least two radiation oncologists and a pelvic expert radiologist. Results Most enrolled patients had squamous cell carcinoma and FIGO stage IIB disease, and initiated brachytherapy after the third week of pelvic external beam radiation. Gross tumor volume volume reduction from diagnostic MRI to B1 represented 61.9% and 75.2% of the initial volume, when measured by VE and VC, respectively. Only a modest volume reduction (15-20%) was observed from B1 to B3. Conclusions The most expressive tumor shrinking occurred in the first three weeks of oncological treatment and was in accordance with gynecological examination. These findings may help in IGBT implementation. PMID:27648083

  1. A Novel Technique for Endovascular Removal of Large Volume Right Atrial Tumor Thrombus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickel, Barbara, E-mail: nickel.ba@gmail.com [US Teleradiology and Quantum Medical Radiology Group (United States); McClure, Timothy, E-mail: tmcclure@gmail.com; Moriarty, John, E-mail: jmoriarty@mednet.ucla.edu [UCLA Medical Center, Department of Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Venous thromboembolic disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in the setting of large volume pulmonary embolism. Thrombolytic therapy has been shown to be a successful treatment modality; however, its use somewhat limited due to the risk of hemorrhage and potential for distal embolization in the setting of large mobile thrombi. In patients where either thrombolysis is contraindicated or unsuccessful, and conventional therapies prove inadequate, surgical thrombectomy may be considered. We present a case of percutaneous endovascular extraction of a large mobile mass extending from the inferior vena cava into the right atrium using the Angiovac device, a venovenous bypass system designed for high-volume aspiration of undesired endovascular material. Standard endovascular methods for removal of cancer-associated thrombus, such as catheter-directed lysis, maceration, and exclusion, may prove inadequate in the setting of underlying tumor thrombus. Where conventional endovascular methods either fail or are unsuitable, endovascular thrombectomy with the Angiovac device may be a useful and safe minimally invasive alternative to open resection.

  2. The Viable Violinist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawking, Michael

    2016-06-01

    In the aftermath of the Kermit Gosnell trial and Giubilini and Minerva's article 'After-birth abortion', abortion-rights advocates have been pressured to provide an account of the moral difference between abortion, particularly late-term abortion, and infanticide. In response, some scholars have defended a moral distinction by appealing to an argument developed by Judith Jarvis Thomson in A defense of abortion. However, once Thomson's analogy is refined to account for the morally relevant features of late-term pregnancy, rather than distinguishing between late-term abortion and infanticide, it reinforces their moral similarity. This is because late-term abortion requires more than detachment - it requires an act of feticide to ensure the death of the viable fetus. As such, a Thomsonian account cannot be deployed successfully as a response to Giubilini and Minerva. Those wishing to defend late-term abortion while rejecting the permissibility of infanticide will need to provide an alternative account of the difference, or else accept Giubilini and Minerva's conclusion.

  3. Impact of Plasma Epstein-Barr Virus-DNA and Tumor Volume on Prognosis of Locally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective study aims to examine the association of plasma Epstein-Barr virus- (EBV- DNA levels with the tumor volume and prognosis in patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. A total of 165 patients with newly diagnosed locally advanced NPC were identified from September 2011 to July 2012. EBV-DNA was detected using fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification. The tumor volume was calculated by the systematic summation method of computer software. The median copy number of plasma EBV-DNA before treatment was 3790 copies/mL. The median gross tumor volume of the primary nasopharyngeal tumor (GTVnx, the lymph node lesions (GTVnd, and the total GTV before treatment were 72.46, 23.26, and 106.25 cm3, respectively; the EBV-DNA levels were significantly correlated with the GTVnd and the total GTV (P<0.01. The 2-year overall survival (OS rates in patients with positive and negative pretreatment plasma EBV-DNA were 100% and 98.4% (P=1.000, and the disease-free survival (DFS rates were 94.4% and 80.8% (P=0.044, respectively. These results indicate that high pretreatment plasma EBV-DNA levels in patients with locally advanced NPC are associated with the degree of lymph node metastasis, tumor burden, and poor prognosis.

  4. Functional Response of Tumor Vasculature to PaCO2: Determination of Total and Microvascular Blood Volume by MRI

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    Scott D. Packard

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify differences in functional activity, we compared the reactivity of glioma vasculature and the native cerebral vasculature to both dilate and constrict in response to altered PaCO2. Gliomas were generated by unilateral implantation of U87MGdEGFR human glioma tumor cells into the striatum of adult female athymic rats. Relative changes in total and microvascular cerebral blood volume were determined by steady state contrast agent-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for transitions from normocarbia to hypercarbia and hypocarbia. Although hypercarbia induced a significant increase in both total and microvascular blood volume in normal brain and glioma, reactivity of glioma vasculature was significantly blunted in comparison to normal striatum; glioma total CBV increased by 0.6±0.1%/mm Hg CO2 whereas normal striatum increased by 1.5±0.2%/mm Hg CO2, (P < .0001, group t-test. Reactivity of microvascular blood volume was also significantly blunted. In contrast, hypocarbia decreased both total and microvascular blood volumes more in glioma than in normal striatum. These results indicate that cerebral blood vessels derived by tumor-directed angiogenesis do retain reactivity to CO2. Furthermore, reduced reactivity of tumor vessels to a single physiological perturbation, such as hypercarbia, should not be construed as a generalized reduction of functional activity of the tumor vascular bed.

  5. Diagnostic performance of whole brain volume perfusion CT in intra-axial brain tumors: Preoperative classification accuracy and histopathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xyda, Argyro, E-mail: argyro.xyda@med.uni-goettingen.de [Department of Neuroradiology, Georg-August University, University Hospital of Goettingen, Robert-Koch Strasse 40, 37075 Goettingen (Germany); Department of Radialogy, University Hospital of Heraklion, Voutes, 71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Haberland, Ulrike, E-mail: ulrike.haberland@siemens.com [Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, Computed Tomography, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Klotz, Ernst, E-mail: ernst.klotz@siemens.com [Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, Computed Tomography, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Jung, Klaus, E-mail: kjung1@uni-goettingen.de [Department of Medical Statistics, Georg-August University, Humboldtallee 32, 37073 Goettingen (Germany); Bock, Hans Christoph, E-mail: cbock@gmx.de [Department of Neurosurgery, Johannes Gutenberg University Hospital of Mainz, Langenbeckstraße 1, 55101 Mainz (Germany); Schramm, Ramona, E-mail: ramona.schramm@med.uni-goettingen.de [Department of Neuroradiology, Georg-August University, University Hospital of Goettingen, Robert-Koch Strasse 40, 37075 Goettingen (Germany); Knauth, Michael, E-mail: michael.knauth@med.uni-goettingen.de [Department of Neuroradiology, Georg-August University, University Hospital of Goettingen, Robert-Koch Strasse 40, 37075 Goettingen (Germany); Schramm, Peter, E-mail: p.schramm@med.uni-goettingen.de [Department of Neuroradiology, Georg-August University, University Hospital of Goettingen, Robert-Koch Strasse 40, 37075 Goettingen (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Background: To evaluate the preoperative diagnostic power and classification accuracy of perfusion parameters derived from whole brain volume perfusion CT (VPCT) in patients with cerebral tumors. Methods: Sixty-three patients (31 male, 32 female; mean age 55.6 ± 13.9 years), with MRI findings suspected of cerebral lesions, underwent VPCT. Two readers independently evaluated VPCT data. Volumes of interest (VOIs) were marked circumscript around the tumor according to maximum intensity projection volumes, and then mapped automatically onto the cerebral blood volume (CBV), flow (CBF) and permeability Ktrans perfusion datasets. A second VOI was placed in the contra lateral cortex, as control. Correlations among perfusion values, tumor grade, cerebral hemisphere and VOIs were evaluated. Moreover, the diagnostic power of VPCT parameters, by means of positive and negative predictive value, was analyzed. Results: Our cohort included 32 high-grade gliomas WHO III/IV, 18 low-grade I/II, 6 primary cerebral lymphomas, 4 metastases and 3 tumor-like lesions. Ktrans demonstrated the highest sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value, with a cut-off point of 2.21 mL/100 mL/min, for both the comparisons between high-grade versus low-grade and low-grade versus primary cerebral lymphomas. However, for the differentiation between high-grade and primary cerebral lymphomas, CBF and CBV proved to have 100% specificity and 100% positive predictive value, identifying preoperatively all the histopathologically proven high-grade gliomas. Conclusion: Volumetric perfusion data enable the hemodynamic assessment of the entire tumor extent and provide a method of preoperative differentiation among intra-axial cerebral tumors with promising diagnostic accuracy.

  6. Estimation of Tumor Volumes by 11C-MeAIB and 18F-FDG PET in an Orthotopic Glioblastoma Rat Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halle, Bo; Thisgaard, Helge; Hvidsten, Svend

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Brain tumor volume assessment is a major challenge. Molecular imaging using PET may be a promising option because it reflects the biologically active cells. We compared the agreement between PET- and histology-derived tumor volumes in an orthotopic glioblastoma rat model with a noninf...

  7. Preoperative determination of prostate cancer tumor volume: analysis through biopsy fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto A. Antunes

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Preoperative determination of prostate cancer (PCa tumor volume (TV is still a big challenge. We have assessed variables obtained in prostatic biopsy aiming at determining which is the best method to predict the TV in radical prostatectomy (RP specimens. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Biopsy findings of 162 men with PCa submitted to radical prostatectomy were revised. Preoperative characteristics, such as PSA, the percentage of positive fragments (PPF, the total percentage of cancer in the biopsy (TPC, the maximum percentage of cancer in a fragment (MPC, the presence of perineural invasion (PNI and the Gleason score were correlated with postoperative surgical findings through an univariate analysis of a linear regression model. RESULTS: The TV correlated significantly to the PPF, TPC, MPC, PSA and to the presence of PNI (p < 0.001. However, the Pearson correlation analysis test showed an R2 of only 24%, 12%, 17% and 9% for the PPF, TPC, MPC, and PSA respectively. The combination of the PPF with the PSA and the PNI analysis showed to be a better model to predict the TV (R2 of 32.3%. The TV could be determined through the formula: Volume = 1.108 + 0.203 x PSA + 0.066 x PPF + 2.193 x PNI. CONCLUSIONS: The PPF seems to be better than the TPC and the MPC to predict the TV in the surgical specimen. Due to the weak correlation between those variables and the TV, the PSA and the presence of PNI should be used together.

  8. Tumor volume in subcutaneous mouse xenografts measured by microCT is more accurate and reproducible than determined by 18F-FDG-microPET or external caliper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mette Munk; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjaer; Binderup, Tina;

    2008-01-01

    and reproducible measures of tumor size in mice compared with caliper measurements. Furthermore, we evaluated the accuracy of tumor volume determined from 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET. METHODS: Subcutaneously implanted human breast adenocarcinoma cells in NMRI nude mice served as tumor model. Tumor volume...... systematic bias compared to reference volume. Coefficients of variation for intra-observer variation were 7% and 14% for microCT and caliper measurements, respectively. Regression coefficients between observers were 0.97 for microCT and 0.91 for caliper measurements. CONCLUSION: MicroCT was more accurate...

  9. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: Improving target volume delineation

    CERN Document Server

    Unkelbach, Jan; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma are known to infiltrate the brain parenchyma instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In clinical practice, a uniform margin is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth: Anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain...

  10. Chemically Modified Plastic Tube for High Volume Removal and Collection of Circulating Tumor Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Gaitas

    Full Text Available In this preliminary effort, we use a commercially available and chemically modified tube to selectively capture circulating tumor cells (CTCs from the blood stream by immobilizing human anti-EpCAM antibodies on the tube's interior surface. We describe the requisite and critical steps required to modify a tube into a cancer cell-capturing device. Using these simple modifications, we were able to capture or entrap about 85% of cancer cells from suspension and 44% of cancer cells from spiked whole blood. We also found that the percentage of cells captured was dependent on the tube's length and also the number of cancer cells present. It is our strong belief that with the utilization of appropriate tube lengths and procedures, we can ensure capture and removal of nearly the entire CTC population in whole blood. Importantly after a patient's entire blood volume has circulated through the tube, the tube can then be trypsinized to release the captured live CTCs for further analysis and testing.

  11. Study of 320-slice dynamic volume CT perfusion in different pathologic types of kidney tumor: preliminary results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Chen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate microcirculatory differences between pathologic types of kidney tumor using 320-slice dynamic volume CT perfusion. METHODS: Perfusion imaging with 320-slice dynamic volume CT was prospectively performed in 85 patients with pathologically proven clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC (n = 66, papillary RCC (n = 7, chromophobe RCC (n = 5, angiomyolipoma (AML with minimal fat (n = 7, or RCC (n = 78. Equivalent blood volume (Equiv BV, permeability surface-area product (PS; clearance/unit volume = permeability, and blood flow (BF of tumor and normal renal cortex were measured and analyzed. Effective radiation dose was calculated. RESULTS: There was a significant difference in all three parameters between tumor and normal renal cortex (P<0.001. Equiv BV was significantly different between RCC and AML with minimal fat (P = 0.038 and between clear cell RCC and AML with minimal fat (P<0.001. Mean Equiv BV and BF were significantly higher in clear cell RCC than in papillary RCC (P<0.001 for both and mean Equiv BV was higher in clear cell RCC than in chromophobe RCC (P<0.001. The effective radiation dose of the CT perfusion protocol was 18.5 mSv. CONCLUSION: Perfusion imaging using 320-slice dynamic volume CT can be used to evaluate hemodynamic features of the whole kidney and kidney tumors, which may be useful in the differential diagnosis of these four pathologic types of kidney tumor.

  12. Comparison of imaging-based gross tumor volume and pathological volume determined by whole-mount serial sections in primary cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ying Zhang,1,* Jing Hu,1,* Jianping Li,1 Ning Wang,1 Weiwei Li,1 Yongchun Zhou,1 Junyue Liu,1 Lichun Wei,1 Mei Shi,1 Shengjun Wang,2 Jing Wang,2 Xia Li,3 Wanling Ma4 1Department of Radiation Oncology, 2Department of Nuclear Medicine, 3Department of Pathology, 4Department of Radiology, Xijing Hospital, Xi'an, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workObjective: To investigate the accuracy of imaging-based gross tumor volume (GTV compared with pathological volume in cervical cancer.Methods: Ten patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage I–II cervical cancer were eligible for investigation and underwent surgery in this study. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET/computed tomography (CT scans were taken the day before surgery. The GTVs under MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT (GTV-MRI, GTV-PET, GTV-CT were calculated automatically by Eclipse treatment-planning systems. Specimens of excised uterine cervix and cervical cancer were consecutively sliced and divided into whole-mount serial sections. The tumor border of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections was outlined under a microscope by an experienced pathologist. GTV through pathological image (GTV-path was calculated with Adobe Photoshop.Results: The GTVs (average ± standard deviation delineated and calculated under CT, MRI, PET, and histopathological sections were 19.41 ± 11.96 cm3, 12.66 ± 10.53 cm3, 11.07 ± 9.44 cm3, and 10.79 ± 8.71 cm3, respectively. The volume of GTV-CT or GTV-MR was bigger than GTV-path, and the difference was statistically significant (P 0.05. Spearman correlation analysis showed that GTV-CT, GTV-MRI, and GTV-PET were significantly correlated with GTV-path (P < 0.01. There was no significant difference in the lesion coverage factor among the three modalities.Conclusion: The present study showed that GTV defined under 40% of maximum standardized

  13. A comparison study between gross tumor volumes defined by preoperative magnetic resonance imaging, postoperative specimens, and tumor bed for radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aiping; Li, Jianbin; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yongsheng; Mu, Dianbin; Chen, Zhaoqiu; Shao, Qian; Li, Fengxiang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The identification and contouring of target volume is important for breast-conserving therapy. The aim of the study was to compare preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), postoperative pathology, excised specimens’ (ES) size, and tumor bed (TB) delineation as methods for determining the gross tumor volume (GTV) for radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Methods: Thirty-three patients with breast cancer who underwent preoperative MRI and radiotherapy after BCS were enrolled. The GTVs determined by MRI, pathology, and the ES were defined as GTVMRI, GTVPAT, and GTVES, respectively. GTVMRI+1 was defined as a 1.0-cm margin around the GTVMRI. The radiation oncologist delineated GTV of the TB (GTVTB) using planning computed tomography according to ≥5 surgical clips placed in the lumpectomy cavity (LC). Results: The median GTVMRI, GTVMRI+1, GTVPAT, GTVES, and GTVTB were 0.97 cm3 (range, 0.01–6.88), 12.58 cm3 (range, 3.90–34.13), 0.97 cm3 (range, 0.01–6.36), 15.46 cm3 (range, 1.15–70.69), and 19.24 cm3 (range, 4.72–54.33), respectively. There were no significant differences between GTVMRI and GTVPAT, GTVMRI+1 and GTVES, GTVES and GTVTB (P = 0.188, 0.070, and 0.264, respectively). GTVMRI is positively related with GTVPAT. However, neither GTVES nor GTVTB correlated with GTVMRI (P = 0.071 and 0.378, respectively). Furthermore, neither GTVES nor GTVTB correlated with GTVMRI+1 (P = 0.068 and 0.375, respectively). Conclusion: When ≥5 surgical clips were placed in the LC for BCS, the volume of TB was consistent with the volume of ES. Neither the volume of TB nor the volume of ES correlated significantly with the volume of tumor defined by preoperative MRI. PMID:28079816

  14. Dose-volume histogram parameters and local tumor control in magnetic resonance image-guided cervical cancer brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C A; Lang, Stefan; Kirisits, Christian; Fidarova, Elena F; Berger, Daniel; Georg, Petra; Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard

    2009-09-01

    To investigate the value of dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters for predicting local control in magnetic resonance (MR) image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) for patients with cervical cancer. Our study population consists of 141 patients with cervical cancer (Stages IB-IVA) treated with 45-50 Gy external beam radiotherapy plus four times 7 Gy IGBT with or without cisplatin. Gross tumor volume (GTV), high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and intermediate-risk clinical target volume (IRCTV) were contoured, and DVH parameters (minimum dose delivered to 90% of the volume of interest [D90] and D100) were assessed. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy (EQD2) by applying the linear quadratic model (alpha/beta = 10 Gy). Groups were defined for patients with or without local recurrence (LR) in the true pelvis for tumor size at diagnosis (GTV at diagnosis [GTVD] of 2-5 cm (Group 1) or greater than 5 cm (Group 2) and for tumor size response at IGBT (HRCTV) of 2-5 cm (Group 2a) or greater than 5 cm (Group 2b). Eighteen LRs were observed. The most important DVH parameters correlated with LR were the D90 and D100 for HRCTV. Mean D90 and D100 values for HRCTV were 86 +/- 16 and 65 +/- 10 Gy, respectively. The D90 for HRCTV greater than 87 Gy resulted in an LR incidence of 4% (3 of 68) compared with 20% (15 of 73) for D90 less than 87 Gy. The effect was most pronounced in the tumor group (Group 2b). We showed an increase in local control in IGBT in patients with cervical cancer with the dose delivered, which can be expressed by the D90 and D100 for HRCTV. Local control rates greater than 95% can be achieved if the D90 (EQD2) for HRCTV is 87 Gy or greater.

  15. Primary Tumor Volume Is an Important Predictor of Clinical Outcomes Among Patients With Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck Treated With Definitive Chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strongin, Anna; Yovino, Susannah [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Taylor, Rodney; Wolf, Jeffrey [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Cullen, Kevin; Zimrin, Ann [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Strome, Scott [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Regine, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Suntharalingam, Mohan, E-mail: msuntha@umm.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The tumor volume has been established as a significant predictor of outcomes among patients with head-and-neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy alone. The present study attempted to add to the existing data on tumor volume as a prognostic factor among patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 78 patients who had undergone definitive chemoradiotherapy for Stage III-IV squamous cell cancer of the hypopharynx, oropharynx, and larynx were identified. The primary tumor volumes were calculated from the treatment planning computed tomography scans, and these were correlated to the survival and tumor control data obtained from the retrospective analysis. Results: The interval to progression correlated with the primary tumor volume (p = .007). The critical cutoff point for the tumor volume was identified as 35 cm{sup 3}, and patients with a tumor volume <35 cm{sup 3} had a significantly better prognosis than those with a tumor volume >35 cm{sup 3} at 5 years (43% vs. 71%, p = .010). Longer survival was also correlated with smaller primary tumor volumes (p = .022). Similarly, patients with a primary tumor volume <35 cm{sup 3} had a better prognosis in terms of both progression-free survival (61% vs. 33%, p = .004) and overall survival (84% vs. 41%, p = < .001). On multivariate analysis, the primary tumor volume was the best predictor of recurrence (hazard ratio 4.7, 95% confidence interval 1.9-11.6; p = .001) and survival (hazard ratio 10.0, 95% confidence interval 2.9-35.1; p = < .001). In contrast, the T stage and N stage were not significant factors. Analysis of variance revealed that tumors with locoregional failure were on average 21.6 cm{sup 3} larger than tumors without locoregional failure (p = .028) and 27.1-cm{sup 3} larger than tumors that recurred as distant metastases (p = .020). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that the primary tumor volume is a significant prognostic factor in patients with advanced cancer

  16. Method of tumor volume evaluation using magnetic resonance imaging for outcome prediction in cervical cancer treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hun Jung; Kim, Woo Chul [Inha University Hospital, Inha University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    To evaluate the patterns of tumor shape and to compare tumor volume derived from simple diameter-based ellipsoid measurement with that derived from tracing the entire tumor contour using region of interest (ROI)-based 3D volumetry with respect to the prediction outcome in cervical cancer patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 98 patients with cervical cancer (stage IB-IIIB). The tumor shape was classified into two categories: ellipsoid and non-ellipsoid shape. ROI-based volumetry was derived from each magnetic resonance slice on the work station. For the diameter-based surrogate 'ellipsoid volume,' the three orthogonal diameters were measured to calculate volume as an ellipsoid. The more than half of tumor (55.1%) had a non-ellipsoid configuration. The predictions for outcome were consistent between two volume groups, with overall survival of 93.6% and 87.7% for small tumor (<20 mL), 62.9% and 69.1% for intermediate-size tumor (20-39 mL), and 14.5% and 16.7% for large tumors ({>=}40 mL) using ROI and diameter based measurement, respectively. Disease-free survival was 93.8% and 90.6% for small tumor, 54.3% and 62.7% for intermediate-size tumor, and 13.7% and 10.3% for large tumor using ROI and diameter based method, respectively. Differences in outcome between size groups were statistically significant, and the differences in outcome predicted by the tumor volume by two different methods. Our data suggested that large numbers of cervical cancers are not ellipsoid. However, simple diameter-based tumor volume measurement appears to be useful in comparison with ROI-based volumetry for predicting outcome in cervical cancer patients.

  17. Tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008479 Preliminary study of MR elastography in brain tumors. XU Lei(徐磊), et al.Neurosci Imaging Center, Beijing Tiantan Hosp, Capital Med Univ, Beijing 100050.Chin J Radiol 2008;42(6):605-608. Objective To investigate the potential values of magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) for evaluating the brain tumor consistency in vivo. Methods Fourteen patients with known solid brain tumor (5 male, 9 female; age range: 16-63 years)

  18. Tumor volume in subcutaneous mouse xenografts measured by microCT is more accurate and reproducible than determined by 18F-FDG-microPET or external caliper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jørgensen Jesper

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In animal studies tumor size is used to assess responses to anticancer therapy. Current standard for volumetric measurement of xenografted tumors is by external caliper, a method often affected by error. The aim of the present study was to evaluate if microCT gives more accurate and reproducible measures of tumor size in mice compared with caliper measurements. Furthermore, we evaluated the accuracy of tumor volume determined from 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG PET. Methods Subcutaneously implanted human breast adenocarcinoma cells in NMRI nude mice served as tumor model. Tumor volume (n = 20 was determined in vivo by external caliper, microCT and 18F-FDG-PET and subsequently reference volume was determined ex vivo. Intra-observer reproducibility of the microCT and caliper methods were determined by acquiring 10 repeated volume measurements. Volumes of a group of tumors (n = 10 were determined independently by two observers to assess inter-observer variation. Results Tumor volume measured by microCT, PET and caliper all correlated with reference volume. No significant bias of microCT measurements compared with the reference was found, whereas both PET and caliper had systematic bias compared to reference volume. Coefficients of variation for intra-observer variation were 7% and 14% for microCT and caliper measurements, respectively. Regression coefficients between observers were 0.97 for microCT and 0.91 for caliper measurements. Conclusion MicroCT was more accurate than both caliper and 18F-FDG-PET for in vivo volumetric measurements of subcutaneous tumors in mice.18F-FDG-PET was considered unsuitable for determination of tumor size. External caliper were inaccurate and encumbered with a significant and size dependent bias. MicroCT was also the most reproducible of the methods.

  19. Background-Based Delineation of Internal Tumor Volumes on Static Positron Emission Tomography in a Phantom Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    yangchun chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Considering the fact that the standardized uptake value (SUV of a normal lung tissue is expressed as x±SD, x+3×SD could be considered as the threshold value to outline the internal tumor volume (ITV of a lung neoplasm. Methods: Three hollow models were filled with 55.0 kBq/mL fluorine18- fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG to represent tumors. The models were fixed to a barrel filled with 5.9 kBq/mL 18F-FDG to characterize normal lung tissues as a phantom. The PET/CT images of the phantom were acquired at rest. Then, the barrel was moved periodically to simulate breathing while acquiring PET/CT data. Volume recovery coefficient (VRC was applied to evaluate the accuracy of ITVs. For statistical analysis, paired t-test and analysis of variance were applied. Results: The VRCs ranged from 0.74 to 0.98 and significantly varied among gross tumor volumes for delineating ITV (P0.05, whereas VRC decreased with increasing distance in three-dimensional PET scans (P

  20. A comparison of least squares and conditional maximum likelihood estimators under volume endpoint censoring in tumor growth experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy Choudhury, Kingshuk; O'Sullivan, Finbarr; Kasman, Ian; Plowman, Greg D

    2012-12-20

    Measurements in tumor growth experiments are stopped once the tumor volume exceeds a preset threshold: a mechanism we term volume endpoint censoring. We argue that this type of censoring is informative. Further, least squares (LS) parameter estimates are shown to suffer a bias in a general parametric model for tumor growth with an independent and identically distributed measurement error, both theoretically and in simulation experiments. In a linear growth model, the magnitude of bias in the LS growth rate estimate increases with the growth rate and the standard deviation of measurement error. We propose a conditional maximum likelihood estimation procedure, which is shown both theoretically and in simulation experiments to yield approximately unbiased parameter estimates in linear and quadratic growth models. Both LS and maximum likelihood estimators have similar variance characteristics. In simulation studies, these properties appear to extend to the case of moderately dependent measurement error. The methodology is illustrated by application to a tumor growth study for an ovarian cancer cell line.

  1. Kidney volume correlates with tumor diameter in renal cell carcinoma and is associated with histological poor prognostic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Brian D; Finn, Stephen P

    2014-02-01

    We aimed to correlate kidney volume (KV) in renal cell carcinoma nephrectomy specimens with tumor diameter (TD), macroscopic growth pattern, and histological features associated with poor prognosis. Histopathology reports, macroscopic specimen photographs, and selected glass slides were retrospectively reviewed. KV was approximated to the volume of an ellipsoid. A total of 273 specimens were identified with median KV 245 cm(3). Kidneys larger than this contained larger tumors (7.5 vs 4.5 cm). KV was significantly greater in tumors of high grade, involving perinephric fat, exhibiting venous invasion, and involving renal sinus. There was a robust linear correlation between KV and TD (r = 0.602) and a weaker correlation between kidney diameter (KD) and TD (r = 0.53). In pT1 tumors, KV (r = 0.40) also correlated better with TD than did KD (r = 0.27). By multiple regression analysis, both TD and venous invasion independently predicted both KD (R (2) = 38.27%) and KV (R (2) = 51.97%). KV and KD correlate well with TD and histopathological features of aggressiveness, although KD correlates better overall and in the pT1 subset.

  2. SU-E-J-78: Internal Target Volume Delineation for Lung Tumors in Patients Treated with Robotic Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Descovich, M; Pinnaduwage, D; Kirby, N; Gottschalk, A; Yom, S; Pouliot, J; Braunstein, S [UC San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare different approaches for Internal Target Volume (ITV) delineation for patients treated with fiducial-free robotic radiosurgery for primary and metastatic lung tumors. Methods: Ten patients undergoing Lung-Optimized Treatment (LOT) for robotic radiosurgery were imaged with inhale and exhale breath-hold CT scans and 8-phase 4DCT scan. We evaluated the differences in internal target volume (ITV) delineated using three approaches: 1) maximum intensity projection (MIP) images reconstructed from 4DCT scan (ITV-MIP); 2) linear interpolation of Gross Tumor Volumes (GTV) segmented on inhale and exhale breath-hold scans (ITV-BH); 3) linear interpolation of GTV segmented on inhale and exhale phases of 4DCT scan (ITV-2Phase). All contours were independently generated by the same radiation oncologist using lung window settings. Patients had ITV-MIP volumes ranging from 1.5 to 146.9 cc (mean 36.8 cc) located in various parts of the lung. Volume overlap and matching index (MI) were calculated and compared. The MI between two volumes was defined as the ratio of their intersection to their union. MI of 1 indicates the volumes are identical; MI of 0 indicates that there is no overlap. Results: The three approaches generated very different results. The average (SD) MI for ITV-MIP and ITV-BH was 0.52 (0.24); for ITV-MIP and ITV-2Phase it was 0.69 (0.13); and for ITV-BH and ITV-2Phase was 0.57 (0.21), (ANOVA, p=0.16). Relative to the ITV-MIP, the percentage of volume overlap was 72% (26%) and 90% (7%) for ITV-BH and ITV-2Phase, respectively (t-test, p=0.05). Conclusion: Differences between ITV-BH and ITV-MIP are due to inconsistent lung filling at breath-hold and nonlinear tumor motion. Therefore, methods to check breath-hold scanning against regular patient breathing patterns should be developed. Whenever possible, ITV-BH generated by the LOT workflow should be verified by 4DCT data.

  3. MR IMAGING ASSESSMENT OF IRREGULAR SHRINKAGE OF TUMOR MORPHOLOGY AND VOLUME IN CERVICAL CANCER DURING RADIATION THERAPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wen-bin李文彬; LI Ming-hua 李明华; CUI Xue-e 崔雪娥; William T. C. Yuh; Nina A. Mayr

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical significance of the morphological and volume changes in cervical cancer during an ongoing course of radiation therapy (RT) using MR imaging. Methods: Serial MR imaging examinations were performed in 60 advanced cervical cancer patients. MR imaging was obtained at the start of RT, at 20-25 Gy (2-2.5 weeks of RT), at 45-50 Gy (4-5 weeks of RT), and 1-2 month post-RT. Tumor morphology was classified qualitatively as well-defined (round/oval with a well-demarcated smooth margin) vs. lobulated vs. irregular and tumor volume was assessed in each serial MR examination independently by ROI volumetry and diameter volumetry. ROI volumetry was traced on the computer workstation with a trackball in each sagittal T2-weighted image and calculated by the summation of all tumor areas in each slice and multiplication by the slice profile. Diameter volumetry was to measure the largest three orthogonal tumor diameters in each orthogonal measurement plane and calculate as an ellipsoid formula (V=d1 x d2 x d3 x π/6). Serial tumor volume was compared between the two measurement methods. Results: The proportion of lobulated and irregular tumors increased early during RT and declined lately post-RT (68% pre-RT, 80% at 2-2.5 weeks of RT, 72% at 4-5 weeks of RT, 33% post-RT). Accordingly, ROI volumetry and diameter volumetry correlated well pre-RT (r1=0.89) and post-RT (r4=0.80), but poorly during RT (r2 = 0.17 at 2-2.5 weeks of RT, r3 = 0.69 at 4-5 weeks of RT). Conclusions: Cervical cancers regress in a non-uniform fashion during RT and undergo increasingly irregular shrinkage. Measurement with ROI volumetry techniques, which can optimally measure irregular volumes, provides better assessment of radiation response during treatment than diameter volumetry.

  4. Stroke volume variation and pleth variability index to predict fluid responsiveness during resection of primary retroperitoneal tumors in Hans Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Q; Mi, W D; Zhang, H

    2012-02-01

    Respiration variation in arterial pulse pressure (ΔPP) and pulse oximetry plethysmographic waveform amplitude (ΔPOP) are accurate predictors of fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients. We hypothesized that stroke volume variation (SVV) and pleth variability index (PVI) can predict fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients during major surgical procedures in Hans Chinese. This prospective study consisted of fifty-five Hans Chinese patients undergoing resection of primary retroperitoneal tumors (PRPT). During the surgical procedures, hemodynamic data [central venous pressure (CVP), cardiac index (CI), stroke volume index (SVI), SVV, and PVI] were recorded before and after volume expansion (VE) (8 ml•kg-1 of 6% hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4). Fluid responsiveness was defined as an increase in SVI ≥ 10% after VE. Four patients were excluded from analysis for arrhythmia or obvious hemorrhage during VE. Baseline SVV correlated well with baseline PVI and the changes in SVV was correlated with the changes in PVI (p Chinese.

  5. Semiautomatic technique for defining the internal gross tumor volume of lung tumors close to liver/spleen cupola by 4D-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancosu, Pietro; Sghedoni, Roberto; Bettinardi, Valentino; Aquilina, Mark Anthony; Navarria, Piera; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Di Muzio, Nadia; Cozzi, Luca; Scorsetti, Marta [Department of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Rozzano, 20089 Milano (Italy); Department of Medical Physics, Arcispedale S. Maria Nuova, Reggio, 42100 Emilia (Italy); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Scientific Institute H. S. Raffaele, 20089 Milan (Italy); Department of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, 20089 Rozzano, Milano (Italy); Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 20133 Milan (Italy); Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 20133 Milan (Italy); Medical Physics Unit, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, 6504 Bellinzona (Switzerland); Department of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, 20089 Rozzano, Milano (Italy)

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: It has been shown that in cases of lung tumors close to the liver cupola, the four dimensional (4D)-CT postprocessing maximum intensity projection (MIP) algorithm does not fully recover the radiotherapy internal gross tumor volume (IGTV). In this work, a semiautomatic technique was evaluated by which the residual IGTV that was not included into the IGTV by MIP algorithm was actually added. Methods: A moving phantom and five selected patients were considered. The various IGTVs produced by the semiautomatic approach were compared to those generated by 4D-CT manual contouring. Results: In all cases, the radiation oncologist qualitatively concurred with the semiautomatic IGTV. A quantitative difference in volume of 2.6% was found in the phantom study, whereas a mean difference of 0.1{+-}4.6% was obtained in the patient studies. Conclusions: A semiautomatic technique to include the residual part of IGTV covered by liver/spleen cupola when using MIP algorithm was validated on phantom and on selected patients, revealing the possibility of defining the IGTV for patients with lesions located near liver/spleen cupola by performing only the contours on the MIP series.

  6. Effect of tumor volume on the enhancement pattern of parathyroid adenoma on parathyroid four-dimensional CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Kyoung [Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Department of Radiology, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Tae Jin; Kim, Ji-hoon; Kang, Koung Mi; Choi, Seung Hong; Sohn, Chul-Ho [Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyu Eun; Kim, Su-jin [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Jae-Kyung [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The purpose of this study is to assess the effect of tumor volume on the enhancement pattern of parathyroid adenoma (PTA) on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). We analyzed the enhancement patterns of PTA on four-phase 4D-CT in 44 patients. Dependency of the changes of Hounsfield unit values (ΔHU) on the tumor volumes and clinical characteristics was evaluated using linear regression analyses. In addition, an unpaired t test was used to compare ΔHU of PTAs between PTA volume ≥1 cm{sup 3} and <1 cm{sup 3}, thyroid gland, and lymph node. PTA volume based on CT was the strongest factor on the ΔHU{sub Pre} {sub to} {sub Arterial} and ΔHU{sub Arterial} {sub to} {sub Venous} and ΔHU{sub Arterial} {sub to} {sub Delayed} (R {sup 2} = 0.34, 0.25, and 0.32, respectively, P < 0.001 for both). PTA ≥1 cm {sup 3} had statistically significant greater enhancement between the unenhanced phase and the arterial phase than PTA <1 cm {sup 3} (mean values ± standard deviations (SDs) of ΔHU{sub Pre} {sub to} {sub Arterial}, 102.7 ± 33.7 and 57.5 ± 28.8, respectively, P < 0.001). PTA ≥1 cm {sup 3} showed an early washout pattern on the venous phase, whereas PTA <1 cm {sup 3} showed a progressive enhancement pattern on the venous phase (mean values ± SDs of ΔHU{sub Arterial} {sub to} {sub Venous}, -13.2 ± 31.6 and 14.4 ± 32.7, respectively; P = 0.009). The enhancement pattern of PTA on 4D-CT is variable with respect to PTA volume based on CT. Therefore, the enhancement pattern of PTA on 4D-CT requires careful interpretation concerning the tumor volume, especially in cases of PTA <1 cm {sup 3}. (orig.)

  7. The Prognostic Role of Tumor Volume in the Outcome of Patients with Single Brain Metastasis After Stereotactic Radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, E Emily; Angelov, Lilyana; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Barnett, Gene H; Chao, Samuel T; Murphy, Erin S; Yu, Jennifer S; Suh, John H; Jia, Xuefei; Stevens, Glen H J; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S; Mohammadi, Alireza M

    2017-08-01

    Patients with single brain metastasis (SBM) have better outcomes after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). We analyzed our SRS database to evaluate possible prognostic factors in patients with SBM. A total of 584 patients with SBM were treated with SRS at our institution (2000-2012). Study end points were overall survival (OS), and distant and local intracranial progression-free survival (DPFS and LPFS, respectively). Multivariable analysis was performed to develop prognostic models. Median OS was 10.8 months. A total of 196 patients (36.7%) had distant progression and 102 patients (19.2%) had local progression. New SBM prognostic indices (SPIs) were devised for OS, DPFS, and LPFS. Graded prognostic assessment, neurologic symptoms (P = 0.01), and tumor volume (P = 0.02) were independently associated with OS. The SPI for OS was defined: unfavorable (OS, 7.3 months), intermediate (OS, 10.6 months), and favorable (OS, 19.8 months). For DPFS, age (P = 0.0029), tumor volume (P = 0.0002), and previous whole-brain radiotherapy (P = 0.027) were prognostic and were used to define SPI for DPFS: favorable (6-month cumulative incidence failure [CIF], 10.9%), intermediate (6-month CIF, 16.7%), and unfavorable (6-month CIF, 26.0%) (P CIF, 12.3%) and favorable (6-month CIF, 6%) (P < 0.001). This is the largest series of patients with SBM treated with SRS analyzed for OS, LPFS, and DPFS. SPI was devised for end points. Tumor volume had a significant association with all 3 end points. Neurologic symptoms, age, and previous whole-brain radiotherapy were also found to be prognostic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of PET and MRI threshold-based tumor volume segmentation on patient-specific targeted radionuclide therapy dosimetry using CLR1404

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besemer, Abigail E.; Titz, Benjamin; Grudzinski, Joseph J.; Weichert, Jamey P.; Kuo, John S.; Robins, H. Ian; Hall, Lance T.; Bednarz, Bryan P.

    2017-08-01

    Variations in tumor volume segmentation methods in targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) may lead to dosimetric uncertainties. This work investigates the impact of PET and MRI threshold-based tumor segmentation on TRT dosimetry in patients with primary and metastatic brain tumors. In this study, PET/CT images of five brain cancer patients were acquired at 6, 24, and 48 h post-injection of 124I-CLR1404. The tumor volume was segmented using two standardized uptake value (SUV) threshold levels, two tumor-to-background ratio (TBR) threshold levels, and a T1 Gadolinium-enhanced MRI threshold. The dice similarity coefficient (DSC), jaccard similarity coefficient (JSC), and overlap volume (OV) metrics were calculated to compare differences in the MRI and PET contours. The therapeutic 131I-CLR1404 voxel-level dose distribution was calculated from the 124I-CLR1404 activity distribution using RAPID, a Geant4 Monte Carlo internal dosimetry platform. The TBR, SUV, and MRI tumor volumes ranged from 2.3-63.9 cc, 0.1-34.7 cc, and 0.4-11.8 cc, respectively. The average  ±  standard deviation (range) was 0.19  ±  0.13 (0.01-0.51), 0.30  ±  0.17 (0.03-0.67), and 0.75  ±  0.29 (0.05-1.00) for the JSC, DSC, and OV, respectively. The DSC and JSC values were small and the OV values were large for both the MRI-SUV and MRI-TBR combinations because the regions of PET uptake were generally larger than the MRI enhancement. Notable differences in the tumor dose volume histograms were observed for each patient. The mean (standard deviation) 131I-CLR1404 tumor doses ranged from 0.28-1.75 Gy GBq-1 (0.07-0.37 Gy GBq-1). The ratio of maximum-to-minimum mean doses for each patient ranged from 1.4-2.0. The tumor volume and the interpretation of the tumor dose is highly sensitive to the imaging modality, PET enhancement metric, and threshold level used for tumor volume segmentation. The large variations in tumor doses clearly demonstrate the need for standard

  9. Clinical study on the changes of the tumor target volume and organs at risk in helical tomotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Na; FENG Lin-chun; CAI Bo-ning; HOU Jun; WANG Yun-lai; XIE Chuan-bin

    2012-01-01

    Background Helical tomotherapy (HT) is a new image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT).The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in the target volume and organs at risk (OARs) of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) during helical tomotherapy.Methods Forty-three patients with NPC and treated via HT from March 2008 to January 2010 were reviewed retrospectively.Repeated CT scanning and plan adaptation were conducted at the 20th fraction during radiotherapy.The volumetric differences between the two scans were evaluated for nasopharyngeal tumor and retro- pharyngeal lymph nodes (GTVnx),neck lymph nodes (GTVnd),and parotid glands,as well as the axial diameter of the head.Results The median interval between the two scans was 25 days (23-28 days).The volumetric decrease in GTVnx was 30.1% (median,29.8%) and in GTVnd 41.6% (median,45.9%).The variation in the GTVnd volume was correlated with the weight loss of the patient.The volume of the left parotid gland decreased by 35.5% (median,33.4%) and of the right parotid glands decreased by 36.8% (median,33.5%).The axial diameter of the head decreased by 9.39% (median,9.1%).Conclusions The target volume and OARs of patients with NPC varied considerably during HT.These changes may have potential dosimetric effects on the target volume and/or OARs and influence the clinical outcome.Repeated CT scanning and replanning during the HT for NPC patients with a large target volume or an obvious weight loss are recommended.

  10. SU-E-I-83: Error Analysis of Multi-Modality Image-Based Volumes of Rodent Solid Tumors Using a Preclinical Multi-Modality QA Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y [University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, KS (United States); Fullerton, G; Goins, B [University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In our previous study a preclinical multi-modality quality assurance (QA) phantom that contains five tumor-simulating test objects with 2, 4, 7, 10 and 14 mm diameters was developed for accurate tumor size measurement by researchers during cancer drug development and testing. This study analyzed the errors during tumor volume measurement from preclinical magnetic resonance (MR), micro-computed tomography (micro- CT) and ultrasound (US) images acquired in a rodent tumor model using the preclinical multi-modality QA phantom. Methods: Using preclinical 7-Tesla MR, US and micro-CT scanners, images were acquired of subcutaneous SCC4 tumor xenografts in nude rats (3–4 rats per group; 5 groups) along with the QA phantom using the same imaging protocols. After tumors were excised, in-air micro-CT imaging was performed to determine reference tumor volume. Volumes measured for the rat tumors and phantom test objects were calculated using formula V = (π/6)*a*b*c where a, b and c are the maximum diameters in three perpendicular dimensions determined by the three imaging modalities. Then linear regression analysis was performed to compare image-based tumor volumes with the reference tumor volume and known test object volume for the rats and the phantom respectively. Results: The slopes of regression lines for in-vivo tumor volumes measured by three imaging modalities were 1.021, 1.101 and 0.862 for MRI, micro-CT and US respectively. For phantom, the slopes were 0.9485, 0.9971 and 0.9734 for MRI, micro-CT and US respectively. Conclusion: For both animal and phantom studies, random and systematic errors were observed. Random errors were observer-dependent and systematic errors were mainly due to selected imaging protocols and/or measurement method. In the animal study, there were additional systematic errors attributed to ellipsoidal assumption for tumor shape. The systematic errors measured using the QA phantom need to be taken into account to reduce measurement

  11. Reproducibility of 18F-FDG and 3'-deoxy-3'-18F-fluorothymidine PET tumor volume measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatt, Mathieu; Cheze-Le Rest, Catherine; Aboagye, Eric O; Kenny, Laura M; Rosso, Lula; Turkheimer, Federico E; Albarghach, Nidal M; Metges, Jean-Philippe; Pradier, Olivier; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the repeatability and reproducibility limits of several volume-related PET image-derived indices-namely tumor volume (TV), mean standardized uptake value, total glycolytic volume (TGV), and total proliferative volume (TPV)-relative to those of maximum standardized uptake value (SUV(max)), commonly used in clinical practice. Fixed and adaptive thresholding, fuzzy C-means, and fuzzy locally adaptive Bayesian methodology were considered for TV delineation. Double-baseline (18)F-FDG (17 lesions, 14 esophageal cancer patients) and 3'-deoxy-3'-(18)F-fluorothymidine ((18)F-FLT) (12 lesions, 9 breast cancer patients) PET scans, acquired at a mean interval of 4 d and before any treatment, were used for reproducibility evaluation. The repeatability of each method was evaluated for the same datasets and compared with manual delineation. A negligible variability of less than 5% was measured for all segmentation approaches in comparison to manual delineation (5%-35%). SUV(max) reproducibility levels were similar to others previously reported, with a mean percentage difference of 1.8% +/- 16.7% and -0.9% +/- 14.9% for the (18)F-FDG and (18)F-FLT lesions, respectively. The best TV, TGV, and TPV reproducibility limits ranged from -21% to 31% and -30% to 37% for (18)F-FDG and (18)F-FLT images, respectively, whereas the worst reproducibility limits ranged from -90% to 73% and -68% to 52%, respectively. The reproducibility of estimating TV, mean standardized uptake value, and derived TGV and TPV was found to vary among segmentation algorithms. Some differences between (18)F-FDG and (18)F-FLT scans were observed, mainly because of differences in overall image quality. The smaller reproducibility limits for volume-derived image indices were similar to those for SUV(max), suggesting that the use of appropriate delineation tools should allow the determination of tumor functional volumes in PET images in a repeatable and reproducible fashion.

  12. A Viable Systems Engineering Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    methodology was not meeting the needs of the sponsors • The Agile approach Scrum was selected as the only viable solution for managing project...Self-organized teams Slide 11 Source: Agile Alliance (http://www.agilealliance.org/) Scrum Applied to Systems Engineering • Scrum is a framework for...ceremonies • A Scrum project is a series of iterations or Sprints where every 2-4 weeks produces fully developed requirements, functional analyses, and

  13. Sparing Healthy Tissue and Increasing Tumor Dose Using Bayesian Modeling of Geometric Uncertainties for Planning Target Volume Personalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herschtal, Alan, E-mail: Alan.Herschtal@petermac.org [Department of Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Faculty of Health, Arts and Design, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne (Australia); Te Marvelde, Luc [Department of Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Mengersen, Kerrie [School of Mathematical Sciences, Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane (Australia); Foroudi, Farshad [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Eade, Thomas [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Radiation Oncology Department, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, Sydney (Australia); Northern Clinical School, University of Sydney (Australia); Pham, Daniel [Department of Radiation Therapy, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Caine, Hannah [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Radiation Oncology Department, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, Sydney (Australia); Kron, Tomas [The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia)

    2015-06-01

    Objective: To develop a mathematical tool that can update a patient's planning target volume (PTV) partway through a course of radiation therapy to more precisely target the tumor for the remainder of treatment and reduce dose to surrounding healthy tissue. Methods and Materials: Daily on-board imaging was used to collect large datasets of displacements for patients undergoing external beam radiation therapy for solid tumors. Bayesian statistical modeling of these geometric uncertainties was used to optimally trade off between displacement data collected from previously treated patients and the progressively accumulating data from a patient currently partway through treatment, to optimally predict future displacements for that patient. These predictions were used to update the PTV position and margin width for the remainder of treatment, such that the clinical target volume (CTV) was more precisely targeted. Results: Software simulation of dose to CTV and normal tissue for 2 real prostate displacement datasets consisting of 146 and 290 patients treated with a minimum of 30 fractions each showed that re-evaluating the PTV position and margin width after 8 treatment fractions reduced healthy tissue dose by 19% and 17%, respectively, while maintaining CTV dose. Conclusion: Incorporating patient-specific displacement patterns from early in a course of treatment allows PTV adaptation for the remainder of treatment. This substantially reduces the dose to healthy tissues and thus can reduce radiation therapy–induced toxicities, improving patient outcomes.

  14. Prediction of Long-term Post-operative Testosterone Replacement Requirement Based on the Pre-operative Tumor Volume and Testosterone Level in Pituitary Macroadenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheng-Chi; Chen, Chung-Ming; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Pai, Ping-Ching; Toh, Cheng-Hong; Chuang, Chi-Cheng

    2015-11-05

    Non-functioning pituitary macroadenomas (NFPAs) are the most prevalent pituitary macroadenomas. One common symptom of NFPA is hypogonadism, which may require long-term hormone replacement. This study was designed to clarify the association between the pre-operative tumor volume, pre-operative testosterone level, intraoperative resection status and the need of long-term post-operative testosterone replacement. Between 2004 and 2012, 45 male patients with NFPAs were enrolled in this prospective study. All patients underwent transsphenoidal surgery. Hypogonadism was defined as total serum testosterone levels of testosterone to patients with defined hypogonadism or clinical symptoms of hypogonadism. Hormone replacement for longer than 1 year was considered as long-term therapy. The need for long-term post-operative testosterone replacement was significantly associated with larger pre-operative tumor volume (p = 0.0067), and lower pre-operative testosterone level (p = 0.0101). There was no significant difference between the gross total tumor resection and subtotal resection groups (p = 0.1059). The pre-operative tumor volume and testosterone level impact post-operative hypogonadism. By measuring the tumor volume and the testosterone level and by performing adequate tumor resection, surgeons will be able to predict post-operative hypogonadism and the need for long-term hormone replacement.

  15. Prognosis value of the active tumoral volume in {sup 18}F-F.D.G. for the esophagus cancer and influence of the tumor delimitation methodology; Valeur pronostique du volume tumoral actif en {sup 18}F-FDG pour le cancer de l'oesophage et influence de la methodologie de contourage de la tumeur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatt, M. [LaTIM Inserm U650, 29 - Brest (France); Cheze Le Rest, C. [CHU Morvan, departement de medecine nucleaire, 29 - Brest (France); Albarghach, M.N. [CHU Morvan, departement de radiotherapie, 29 - Brest (France)

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: compare the predictive value for survival and response to the treatment of the active tumor volume automatically measured on the PET with {sup 18}F-F.D.G. images by different methods to this one of S.U.V., in the esophagus cancer. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the tumor volume is a pertinent information of which prognosis value in the esophagus cancer is clearly superior to this one of S.U.V. (maximum or average), at the condition to be measured with accuracy, what Fuzzy locally adaptive Bayesian (F.L.A.B.) allows contrary to the thresholding methods. The predictive value of total glycolysis volume (T.G.V.) is still superior and it is less influenced by the method used, F.L.A.B. offering a better differentiation, for the different responses to the treatment or for survival. (N.C.)

  16. Optimization of the fractionated irradiation scheme considering physical doses to tumor and organ at risk based on dose–volume histograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugano, Yasutaka [Graduate School of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita-12, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812 (Japan); Mizuta, Masahiro [Laboratory of Advanced Data Science, Information Initiative Center, Hokkaido University, Kita-11, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0811 (Japan); Takao, Seishin; Shirato, Hiroki; Sutherland, Kenneth L. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita-15, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8638 (Japan); Date, Hiroyuki, E-mail: date@hs.hokudai.ac.jp [Faculty of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita-12, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy of solid tumors has been performed with various fractionation regimens such as multi- and hypofractionations. However, the ability to optimize the fractionation regimen considering the physical dose distribution remains insufficient. This study aims to optimize the fractionation regimen, in which the authors propose a graphical method for selecting the optimal number of fractions (n) and dose per fraction (d) based on dose–volume histograms for tumor and normal tissues of organs around the tumor. Methods: Modified linear-quadratic models were employed to estimate the radiation effects on the tumor and an organ at risk (OAR), where the repopulation of the tumor cells and the linearity of the dose-response curve in the high dose range of the surviving fraction were considered. The minimization problem for the damage effect on the OAR was solved under the constraint that the radiation effect on the tumor is fixed by a graphical method. Here, the damage effect on the OAR was estimated based on the dose–volume histogram. Results: It was found that the optimization of fractionation scheme incorporating the dose–volume histogram is possible by employing appropriate cell surviving models. The graphical method considering the repopulation of tumor cells and a rectilinear response in the high dose range enables them to derive the optimal number of fractions and dose per fraction. For example, in the treatment of prostate cancer, the optimal fractionation was suggested to lie in the range of 8–32 fractions with a daily dose of 2.2–6.3 Gy. Conclusions: It is possible to optimize the number of fractions and dose per fraction based on the physical dose distribution (i.e., dose–volume histogram) by the graphical method considering the effects on tumor and OARs around the tumor. This method may stipulate a new guideline to optimize the fractionation regimen for physics-guided fractionation.

  17. Three-dimensional sonoelastography: Principles and practices with application to tumor visualization and volume estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lawrence Steven

    Sonoelastography is an ultrasound imaging technique first proposed by Parker and Lerner at the University of Rochester in the 1980's. In this modality low amplitude, low frequency shear waves (less than 0.1 mm displacement and less than 1 KHz frequency) are propagated deep into tissue, while real time Doppler techniques are used to image the resulting vibration pattern. When a discrete hard inhomogeneity, such as a tumor, is present within a region of soft tissue, a decrease in the vibration amplitude will occur at its location. This forms the basis for tumor detection using sonoelastography. The acquisition of a commercial scanner modified to do vibration Doppler imaging provided the opportunity to implement sonoelastography as a real-time imaging system. Sonoelastography is applied to the imaging of hard lesions in ultrasound phantoms, thermal necrosis lesions induced in liver tissue and in-vitro prostate cancer detection. A lesion model using the injection of formaldehyde in liver tissue is developed and explored. Sonoelastography and magnetic resonance images of a tissue phantom containing a hard isoechoic inclusion are compared to evaluate the accuracy of this method. The principles behind this imaging modality are explained and the practical aspects of acquiring sonoelastography images are described. Results are shown from three-dimensional sonoelastography reconstruction of ex-vivo whole prostate specimens containing prostate cancer.

  18. Correlation between dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and histopathology in the measurement of tumor and breast volume and their ratio in breast cancer patients: a prospective study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Qian; YE Jing-ming; XU Ling; DUAN Xue-ning; ZHAO Jian-xin; LIU Yin-hua

    2012-01-01

    Background Earlier studies have examined the association between the diameter of primary tumors measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathology in breast cancer patients.However,the diameter does not completely describe the dimensions of the breast tumor or its volumetric proportion relative to the whole breast.The association between breast tumor volume/breast volume ratios measured by these two techniques has not been reported.Methods Seventy-three patients were recruited from female patients with primary breast tumors admitted to our center between January and December 2010.They were divided into two groups.Group A (n=46) underwent modified radical mastectomy (MRM),and Group B (n=27) underwent preoperative neoadjuvant chemotherapy before MRM.They were examined by dynamic-contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) to measure breast volumes (BVs),tumor volumes (TVs),and tumor volume/breast volume ratios (TV/BV).These measurements were compared with histopathology results after MRM,and the associations between MRI and pathology were analyzed by linear regression and Bland-Altman analysis.Results For Group A,the correlation coefficients for BVs,TVs,and TV/BV ratios measured by the two techniques were 0.938,0.921,and 0.897 (all P <0.001),respectively.For Group B,the correlation coefficients for BVs,TVs,and TV/BV ratios were 0.936,0.902,and 0.869 (all P<0.01),respectively.The results suggest statistically significant correlations between these parameters measured by the two techniques for both groups.Conclusion For these patients,BVs,TVs,and TV/BV ratios measured by DCE-MRI significantly correlated with those determined by histopathology.

  19. Improvement of internal tumor volumes of non-small cell lung cancer patients for radiation treatment planning using interpolated average CT in PET/CT.

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    Yao-Ching Wang

    Full Text Available Respiratory motion causes uncertainties in tumor edges on either computed tomography (CT or positron emission tomography (PET images and causes misalignment when registering PET and CT images. This phenomenon may cause radiation oncologists to delineate tumor volume inaccurately in radiotherapy treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to analyze radiology applications using interpolated average CT (IACT as attenuation correction (AC to diminish the occurrence of this scenario. Thirteen non-small cell lung cancer patients were recruited for the present comparison study. Each patient had full-inspiration, full-expiration CT images and free breathing PET images by an integrated PET/CT scan. IACT for AC in PET(IACT was used to reduce the PET/CT misalignment. The standardized uptake value (SUV correction with a low radiation dose was applied, and its tumor volume delineation was compared to those from HCT/PET(HCT. The misalignment between the PET(IACT and IACT was reduced when compared to the difference between PET(HCT and HCT. The range of tumor motion was from 4 to 17 mm in the patient cohort. For HCT and PET(HCT, correction was from 72% to 91%, while for IACT and PET(IACT, correction was from 73% to 93% (*p<0.0001. The maximum and minimum differences in SUVmax were 0.18% and 27.27% for PET(HCT and PET(IACT, respectively. The largest percentage differences in the tumor volumes between HCT/PET and IACT/PET were observed in tumors located in the lowest lobe of the lung. Internal tumor volume defined by functional information using IACT/PET(IACT fusion images for lung cancer would reduce the inaccuracy of tumor delineation in radiation therapy planning.

  20. Effect of Uniform and Non-uniform High-z Nanoparticles Distribution in Tumor Volume on Dose Enhancement Factor During 192Ir Brachytherapy

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    M Zabihzadeh

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: increase of atomic number and concentrations of NPs enhance the absorbed dose due to increased possibility of photoelectric phenomena. Non-uniform distribution of NPs underestimated dose compared to uniform distribution; therefore, considering accurate NPs distribution inside the tumor volume is crucial to calculation of dose enhancement. Targeted labeling of NPs for the maximum absorption by tumor and for the minimal penetration into peripheral tissues has potential to increase radiation therapeutic ratio.

  1. Interobserver variability in gross tumor volume delineation for hepatocellular carcinoma. Results of Korean Radiation Oncology Group 1207 study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk [Jeju National University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jun Won; Lee, Ik Jae [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Won Sup [Korea University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ansan Hospital, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Min Kyu [Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hyun [National Cancer Center, Center for Liver Cancer, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Hee [Keimyung University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Dongsan Medical Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyung-Sik [Dong-A University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hee Chul [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Hong Seok; Kay, Chul Seung [The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sang Min [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mi-Sook [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Jinsil [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Severance Hospital, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    There has been increasing use of external beam radiotherapy for localized treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with both palliative and curative intent. Quality control of target delineation in primary HCC is essential to deliver adequate doses of radiation to the primary tumor while preserving adjacent healthy organs. We analyzed interobserver variability in gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation for HCC. Twelve radiation oncologists specializing in liver malignancy participated in a multi-institutional contouring dummy-run study of nine HCC cases and independently delineated GTV on the same set of provided computed tomography images. Quantitative analysis was performed using an expectation maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) with kappa statistics calculating agreement between physicians. To quantify the interobserver variability of GTV delineations, the ratio of the actual delineated volume to the estimated consensus volume (STAPLE), the ratio of the common and encompassing volumes, and the coefficient of variation were calculated. The median kappa agreement level was 0.71 (range 0.28-0.86). The ratio of the actual delineated volume to the estimated consensus volume ranged from 0.19 to 1.93 (median 0.94) for all cases. The ratio of the common and encompassing volumes ranged from 0.001 to 0.56 (median 0.25). The coefficient of variation for GTV delineation ranged from 8 to 57 % (median 26 %). The interobserver variability in target delineation of HCC GTV in this study is noteworthy. Multi-institution studies involving radiotherapy for HCC require appropriate quality assurance programs for target delineation. (orig.) [German] Die externe kurative Strahlentherapie ist zunehmend bei der lokalisierten Behandlung hepatozellulaerer Karzinome (HCC) in palliativer und kurativer Absicht in Gebrauch. Eine Qualitaetskontrolle der Zielabgrenzung beim primaeren HCC ist entscheidend, um die passende Dosis fuer die

  2. Effect of serum testosterone and percent tumor volume on extra-prostatic extension and biochemical recurrence after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

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    Eu Chang Hwang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have revealed that the preoperative serum testosterone and percent tumor volume (PTV predict extra-prostatic extension (EPE and biochemical recurrence (BCR after radical prostatectomy. This study investigated the prognostic significance of serum testosterone and PTV in relation to EPE and BCR after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP. We reviewed 520 patients who underwent LRP between 2004 and 2012. PTV was determined as the sum of all visually estimated tumor foci in every section. BCR was defined as two consecutive increases in the postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA >0.2 ng ml−1 . The threshold for serum total testosterone was 3.0 ng ml−1 . Multivariate logistic regression was used to define the effect of variables on the risk of EPE and BCR. A low serum testosterone (<3.0 ng ml−1 was associated with a high serum PSA, Gleason score, positive core percentage of the prostate biopsy, PTV, and all pathological variables. On multivariate analysis, similar to previous studies, the serum PSA, biopsy positive core percentage, Gleason score, and pathological variables predicted EPE and BCR. In addition, low serum testosterone (<3.0 ng ml−1 , adjusted OR, 8.52; 95% CI, 5.04-14.4, P= 0.001 predicted EPE and PTV (adjusted OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.05, P= 0.046 predicted BCR. In addition to previous predictors of EPE and BCR, low serum testosterone and PTV are valuable predictors of EPE and BCR after LRP.

  3. Prognostic prediction across a gradient of total tumor volume in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma undergoing locoregional therapy

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    Lin Han C

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The size and number of tumors are important prognostic indicators for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. However, it is difficult to assess the prognosis for patients with a variable number and size of tumors. By combining these two factors, we investigated the role and prognostic accuracy of total tumor volume (TTV for HCC. Methods A total of 786 patients undergoing locoregional therapy (transarterial chemoembolization, percutaneous radiofrequency ablation and acetic acid or ethanol injection for HCC were prospectively evaluated. Results The mean and median TTV was 177 cm3 (range, 0.1-3,591 cm3 and 21 cm3, respectively. Of all, 38%, 29%, 15%, 7% and 11% of patients had TTV of 3, 10-50 cm3, 50-200 cm3, 200-500 cm3 and >500 cm3, respectively. TTV was significantly larger in patients with higher serum α-fetoprotein (AFP levels or with vascular invasion. The Child-Turcotte-Pugh score, performance status, vascular invasion, AFP level and TTV were significant independent prognostic predictors in the Cox proportional hazards model. After adjustment, patients with TTV 50-200 cm3 (relative risk [RR]: 1.74, p = 0.009, 200-500 cm3 (RR: 2.15, p = 0.006 and >500 cm3 (RR: 3.92, p 3. Conclusions TTV is a feasible prognostic predictor across a wide gradient and can be used to predict the mortality risk of HCC. Selecting appropriate cutoffs of TTV may help refine the design of cancer staging system and treatment planning. Future clinical trials of HCC may include this parameter for mortality risk stratification.

  4. Regional white matter volume and the relation with attentional functioning in survivors of malignant pediatric brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, John O.; Mulhern, Raymond K.; White, Holly A.; Wilkinson, Gina M.; Reddick, Wilburn E.

    2003-05-01

    Quantitative assessment of MR examinations in 37 survivors of childhood cancer treated with central nervous system prophylaxis revealed that normal appearing white matter (NAWM) volume is associated with attention-related problems, localized specifically in the right prefrontal region. T1-, T2-, and PD-weighted images were segmented and divided into pre-frontal, frontal, parietal/temporal, and parietal/occipital regions for each hemisphere. These eight regions were analyzed in five slices centered at the level of the basal ganglia. The patient's age at diagnosis and time elapsed from diagnosis were used as covariates in the regressions. Attentional measures showed significant deficiency when compared to age and gender normative values. Total, frontal and/or prefrontal NAWM volumes from the range of slices examined were significantly associated with 5 of the 8 attentional measures. The frontal/prefrontal region of the brain is associated with executive functioning tasks and could potentially be spared as much as possible during therapy planning. The results of the present study further support the contention that NAWM is an important substrate for treatment-induced neurocognitive problems among survivors of malignant brain tumors of childhood.

  5. Optical quantification of cellular mass, volume and density of circulating tumor cells identified in an ovarian cancer patient

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    Kevin Gregory Phillips

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Clinical studies have demonstrated that circulating tumor cells (CTCs are present in the blood of cancer patients with known metastatic disease across the major types of epithelial malignancies. Recent studies have shown that the concentration of CTCs in the blood is prognostic of overall survival in breast, prostate, colorectal and non-small cell lung cancer. This study characterizes CTCs identified using the high-definition (HD-CTC assay in an ovarian cancer patient with stage IIIC disease. We characterized the physical properties of 31 HD-CTCs and 50 normal leukocytes from a single blood draw taken just prior to the initial debulking surgery. We utilized a non-interferometric quantitative phase microscopy technique using brightfield imagery to measure cellular dry mass. Next we used a quantitative differential interference contrast microscopy technique to measure cellular volume. These techniques were combined to determine cellular dry mass density. We found that HD-CTCs were more massive than leukocytes: 33.6 ± 3.2 pg (HD-CTC compared to 18.7 ± 0.6 pg (leukocytes, p < 0.001; had greater volumes: 518.3 ± 24.5 fL (HD-CTC compared to 230.9 ± 78.5 fL (leukocyte, p<0.001; and possessed a decreased dry mass density with respect to leukocytes: 0.065 ± 0.006 pg/fL (HD-CTC compared to 0.085 ± 0.004 pg/fL (leukocyte, p < 0.006. Quantification of HD-CTC dry mass content and volume provide key insights into the fluid dynamics of cancer, and may provide the rationale for strategies to isolate, monitor or target CTCs based on their physical properties. The parameters reported here can also be incorporated into blood cell flow models to better understand metastasis.

  6. Cumulative Intracranial Tumor Volume (CITV) Enhances the Prognostic Value of the Lung-Specific Graded Prognostic Assessment (GPA) Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Logan P; Marshall, Deborah; Hirshman, Brian R; McCutcheon, Brandon A; Gonda, David D; Koiso, Takao; Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona A; Carter, Bob S; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Chen, Clark C

    2016-08-01

    Management of patients afflicted with brain metastasis requires tailoring of therapeutic strategies based on survival expectations. Therefore, the development of prognostic indices is of critical importance in this patient population. To determine whether the cumulative intracranial tumor volume (CITV) of brain metastasis augments the prognostic value of the lung-specific Graded Prognostic Assessment (GPA) index. Patient data were derived from 365 lung cancer patients with brain metastasis who were consecutively treated with stereotactic radiosurgery at the University of California, San Diego/San Diego Gamma Knife Center. CITV was analyzed to determine the volume cutoff that maximized sensitivity and specificity for 1-year survival. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard modeling was performed, and overall survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method risk stratifying with or without this optimal CITV. The prognostic value of these models (lung-specific GPA ± CITV) was quantitatively compared with the use of net reclassification improvement (>0) and integrated discrimination improvement. For the University of California, San Diego/San Diego Gamma Knife Center cohort, the CITV cutoff that had the greatest survival discrimination at 1 year was 4 cm. The addition of CITV to the lung-specific GPA indexes significantly improved the prognostic value of lung-specific GPA, with net reclassification improvement >0 of 0.430 (95% confidence interval, 0.228-0.629) and integrated discrimination improvement of 0.029 (95% confidence interval, 0.004-0.073). These findings were validated in an independent cohort of 1638 lung cancer patients with brain metastasis who were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery at the Katsuta Hospital Mito Gamma House in Japan. In independent cohorts, the addition of CITV to the lung-specific GPA index significantly improved the prognostic value of this index. AUC, area under the receiver-operating characteristic curveBM, brain metastasis

  7. Prognostic significance of metabolic tumor volume measured by {sup 18}F FDG PET/CT in operable primary breast cancer

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    Kim, Jahae; Yoo, Su Woong; Kang, Sae Ryung; Cho, Sang Geon; Oh, Jong Ryool; Chong, Ari; Min, Jung Joon; Bom, Hee Seung; Yoon, Jung Han; Song, Ho Chun [Chonnam National Univ. Medical School and Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    We investigated whether PET indices measured by {sup 18}F fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) can predict prognosis in patients with operable primary breast cancer. We reviewed 53 patients with operable primary breast cancer who underwent pretreatment FDG PET/CT. PET indices, maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) and metabolic tumor volume (MTV), were measured in the primary breast tumor (P), metastatic lymph nodes (N) and total tumor (T). The cox proportional hazards model was used with age, tumor size, clinical lymph node status, method od of surgery, presence or absence of neoadjuvant chemo therapy, histological type, histological grade, hormone grade, hormone receptors and HER2 status to predict disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Median follow up period was 50 months (range, 17 73 months), during which 17 patients had recurrent disease and nine of whom died. The univariate analysis showed that high SUV of N (N{sup SUV,} =0.011), MTV of N (N{sup MTV,} =0.011) and MTV of T (T{sup MTV,} =0.045) as well as high histological grade (=0.008), negative estrogen ( =0.045) and negative progesterone ( =0.029) receptor status were associated with shorter DFS. High N{sup SUV(}=0.035) and N{sup MTV(} =0.035) and T{sup MTV(}=0.035)as well as high histological grade (=0.012) and negative estrogen receptor status ( =0.009)were associated with shorted OS. N{sup SUV,} N{sup MTVa}nd T{sup MTw}ere found to be significantly associated with high histological grade ( =0.005). However, those failed to be statistically significant prognostic factors on multivariate analysis PET indices seem to be useful in the preoperative evaluation of prognosis in patients with operable primary breast cancer, N{sup SUV,} N{sup MTVa}nd T{sup MTVm}ight be considerable factors associated with patient outcome in operable breast cancer.

  8. Diagnostic Value of Multidetector CT and Its Multiplanar Reformation, Volume Rendering and Virtual Bronchoscopy Postprocessing Techniques for Primary Trachea and Main Bronchus Tumors.

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    Mingyue Luo

    Full Text Available To evaluate the diagnostic value of multidetector CT (MDCT and its multiplanar reformation (MPR, volume rendering (VR and virtual bronchoscopy (VB postprocessing techniques for primary trachea and main bronchus tumors.Detection results of 31 primary trachea and main bronchus tumors with MDCT and its MPR, VR and VB postprocessing techniques, were analyzed retrospectively with regard to tumor locations, tumor morphologies, extramural invasions of tumors, longitudinal involvements of tumors, morphologies and extents of luminal stenoses, distances between main bronchus tumors and trachea carinae, and internal features of tumors. The detection results were compared with that of surgery and pathology.Detection results with MDCT and its MPR, VR and VB were consistent with that of surgery and pathology, included tumor locations (tracheae, n = 19; right main bronchi, n = 6; left main bronchi, n = 6, tumor morphologies (endoluminal nodes with narrow bases, n = 2; endoluminal nodes with wide bases, n = 13; both intraluminal and extraluminal masses, n = 16, extramural invasions of tumors (brokethrough only serous membrane, n = 1; 4.0 mm-56.0 mm, n = 14; no clear border with right atelectasis, n = 1, longitudinal involvements of tumors (3.0 mm, n = 1; 5.0 mm-68.0 mm, n = 29; whole right main bronchus wall and trachea carina, n = 1, morphologies of luminal stenoses (irregular, n = 26; circular, n = 3; eccentric, n = 1; conical, n = 1 and extents (mild, n = 5; moderate, n = 7; severe, n = 19, distances between main bronchus tumors and trachea carinae (16.0 mm, n = 1; invaded trachea carina, n = 1; >20.0 mm, n = 10, and internal features of tumors (fairly homogeneous densities with rather obvious enhancements, n = 26; homogeneous density with obvious enhancement, n = 1; homogeneous density without obvious enhancement, n = 1; not enough homogeneous density with obvious enhancement, n = 1; punctate calcification with obvious enhancement, n = 1; low density

  9. The effect of induction chemotherapy on tumor volume and organ-at-risk doses in patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doornaert, Patricia; Dahele, Max; Verbakel, Wilko F. A. R.; Bohoudi, Omar; Slotman, Ben J.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: To retrospectively report changes in gross tumor volume (GTV) and organ-at-risk (OAR) doses after induction chemotherapy (IC) in oropharyngeal cancer using different contouring strategies. Materials and methods: GTV and OARs were delineated on pre- and post-IC planning CT. Tw

  10. Viable Syntax: Rethinking Minimalist Architecture

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    Ken Safir

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Hauser et al. (2002 suggest that the human language faculty emerged as a genetic innovation in the form of what is called here a ‘keystone factor’—a single, simple, formal mental capability that, interacting with the pre-existing faculties of hominid ancestors, caused a cascade of effects resulting in the language faculty in modern humans. They take Merge to be the keystone factor, but instead it is posited here that Merge is the pre-existing mechanism of thought made viable by a principle that permits relations interpretable at the interfaces to be mapped onto c-command. The simplified minimalist architecture proposed here respects the keystone factor as closely as possible, but is justified on the basis of linguistic analyses it makes available, including a relativized intervention theory applicable across Case, scope, agreement, selection and linearization, a derivation of the A/A’-distinction from Case theory, and predictions such as why in situ wh-interpretation is island-insensitive, but susceptible to intervention effects.

  11. High-volume hemofiltration reduces the expression of myocardial tumor necrosis factor-alpha in septic shock pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunmei; Zhang, Ping; Cheng, Xiuju; Chen, Jianghua

    2013-02-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in myocardium correlates with the severity of cardiac dysfunction in septic shock. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of high-volume hemofiltration (HVHF) on the expression of TNF-α in myocardium in septic shock pigs. Sixteen male Landrace pigs weighing 31 ± 5 kg were randomly assigned to control group (n = 4), septic shock group (n = 6), and HVHF group (septic shock + HVHF, n = 6). All animals were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. After baseline examinations, septic shock group and HVHF group underwent induction of peritonitis. One hour later, the animals in HVHF group received treatment with HVHF and the treatment was continued for 12 h. As the control of HVHF group, the animals in septic shock group received the same support but hemofiltration. Twelve hours after HVHF therapy, all the animals were sacrificed. TNF-α and nitric oxide (NO) levels in both circulation and myocardium were measured. Compared with those of septic shock animals, the levels of cardiac output, stroke volume, and mean arterial pressure were better maintained in HVHF group. The expression of TNF-α in myocardium in HVHF group was lower than that in septic shock group (44.17 ± 18.70 vs. 92.50 ± 33.89 pg/mg protein, P = 0.015). The difference of TNF-α in circulation between HVHF group and septic shock group was no significance at different time. However, circulating NO in HVHF group was lower than that in septic shock group. These results suggest that HVHF improves hemodynamics and heart dysfunction in septic shock pigs, which may be attributed to reduction of TNF-α in myocardium but not in circulation.

  12. Enhanced inhibition of murine prostatic carcinoma growth by immunization with or administration of viable human umbilical vein endothelial cells and CRM197

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    Zhang Huiyong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination with xenogeneic and syngeneic endothelial cells is effective for inhibiting tumor growth. Nontoxic diphtheria toxin (CRM197, as an immunogen or as a specific inhibitor of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor, has shown promising antitumor activity. Therefore, immunization with or administration of viable human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs combined with CRM197 could have an enhanced antitumor effect. Six-week-old C57BL/6J male mice were vaccinated with viable HUVECs, 1 x 10(6 viable HUVECs combined with 100 μg CRM197, or 100 μg CRM197 alone by ip injections once a week for 4 consecutive weeks. RM-1 cells (5 x 10(5 were inoculated by sc injection as a preventive procedure. During the therapeutic procedure, 6-week-old male C57BL/6J mice were challenged with 1 x 10(5 RM-1 cells, then injected sc with 1 x 10(6 viable HUVECs, 1 x 10(6 viable HUVECs + 100 μg CRM197, and 100 μg CRM197 alone twice a week for 4 consecutive weeks. Tumor volume and life span were monitored. We also investigated the effects of immunization with HUVECs on the aortic arch wall and on wound healing. Vaccination with or administration of viable HUVECs+CRM197 enhanced the inhibition of RM-1 prostatic carcinoma by 24 and 29%, respectively, and prolonged the life span for 3 and 4 days, respectively, compared with those of only vaccination or administration with viable HUVECs of tumor-bearing C57BL/6J mice. Furthermore, HUVEC immunization caused some damage to the aortic arch wall but did not have remarkable effects on the rate of wound healing; the wounds healed in approximately 13 days. Treatment with CRM197 in combination with viable HUVECs resulted in a marked enhancement of the antitumor effect in the preventive or therapeutic treatment for prostatic carcinoma in vivo, suggesting a novel combination for anti-cancer therapy.

  13. SU-E-J-179: Assessment of Tumor Volume Change and Movement During Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for Lung Cancer: Is Adaptive Radiation Therapy (ART) Necessary?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C; Lee, C [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Delineation of gross tumor volumes (GTVs) is important for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). However, tumor volume changes during treatment response. Here, we have investigated tumor volume changes and movement during SBRT for lung cancer, as a means of examining the need for adaptive radiation therapy (ART). Methods: Fifteen tumors in 15 patients with lung cancer were treated with SBRT (total dose: 60 Gy in 4 fractions). GTVs were obtained from cone-beam computed tomography scans (CBCT1–4) taken before each of the 4 fractions was administered. GTVs were delineated and measured by radiation oncologists using a treatment planning system. Variance in the tumor position was assessed between the planning CT and the CBCT images. To investigate the dosimetric effects of tumor volume changes, planning CT and CBCT4 treatment plans were compared using the conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), and Paddick’s index (PCI). Results: The GTV on CBCT1 was employed as a baseline for comparisons. GTV had decreased by a mean of 20.4% (range: 0.7% to 47.2%) on CBCT4. Most patients had smaller GTVs on CBCT4 than on CBCT1. The interfractional shifts of the tumor position between the planning CT and CBCT1–4 were as follows: right-left, −0.4 to 1.3 mm; anterior-posterior, −0.8 to 0.5 mm; and superiorinferior, −0.9 to 1.1 mm. Indices for plans from the planning CT and CBCT4 were as follows: CI = 0.94±0.02 and 1.11±0.03; HI= 1.1±0.02 and 1.10±0.03; and PCI = 1.35±0.16 and 1.11±0.02, respectively. Conclusion: CI, HI, and PCI did not differ between the planning CT and CBCTs. However, daily CBCT revealed a significant decrease in the GTV during lung SBRT. Furthermore, there was an obvious interfractional shift in tumor position. Using ART could potentially lead to a reduced GTV margin and improved regional tumor control for lung cancer patients with significantly decreased GTV.

  14. Serum levels of GFAP and EGFR in primary and recurrent high-grade gliomas: correlation to tumor volume, molecular markers, and progression-free survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviniemi, Aida; Gardberg, Maria; Frantzén, Janek; Parkkola, Riitta; Vuorinen, Ville; Pesola, Marko; Minn, Heikki

    2015-09-01

    Our aim was to study the association of two potential serum biomarkers glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with prognostic markers such as IDH1 mutation, tumor burden, and survival in patients with high-grade gliomas (HGG). Additionally, our objective was to evaluate the potential of serum EGFR as a surrogate marker for EGFR status in the tumor. Pre-operative serum samples were prospectively collected from patients with primary (n = 17) or recurrent (n = 10) HGG. Serum GFAP and EGFR levels were determined by ELISA and studied for correlation with molecular markers including EGFR amplification, tumor volume in contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI, and progression-free survival (PFS). Pre-operative serum GFAP level of ≥0.014 ng/ml was 86 % sensitive and 85 % specific for the diagnosis of glioblastoma. High GFAP was related to the lack of IDH1 mutation (P = 0.016), high Ki67 proliferation index (P < 0.001), and poor PFS (HR 5.9, CI 1.2-29.9, P = 0.032). Serum GFAP correlated with enhancing tumor volume in primary (r = 0.64 P = 0.005), but also in recurrent HGGs (r = 0.76 P = 0.011). In contrast, serum EGFR levels did not differ between HGG patients and 13 healthy controls, and were not related to EGFR status in the tumor. We conclude that high serum GFAP associates with IDH1 mutation-negative HGG, and poor PFS. Correlation with tumor burden in recurrent HGG implicates the potential of serum GFAP for detection of tumor recurrence. Our results suggest that circulating EGFR is not derived from glioma cells and cannot be used as a marker for EGFR status in the tumor.

  15. Effect of tumor dose, volume and overall treatment time on local control after radiochemotherapy including MRI guided brachytherapy of locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Fokdal, Lars Ulrik; Sturdza, Alina;

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Currently, there is no consensus on dose prescription in image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) in locally advanced cervical cancer. The purpose of this study was to provide evidence based recommendations for tumor dose prescription based on results from a multi......-center patient series (retroEMBRACE). Materials and methods This study analyzed 488 locally advanced cervical cancer patients treated with external beam radiotherapy ± chemotherapy combined with IGABT. Brachytherapy contouring and reporting was according to ICRU/GEC-ESTRO recommendations. The Cox Proportional...... Hazards model was applied to analyze the effect on local control of dose-volume metrics as well as overall treatment time (OTT), dose rate, chemotherapy, and tumor histology. Results With a median follow up of 46 months, 43 local failures were observed. Dose (D90) to the High Risk Clinical Target Volume...

  16. Predictive value of PET response combined with baseline metabolic tumor volume in peripheral T-cell lymphoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottereau, Anne-Segolene; El-Galaly, Tarec C; Becker, Stéphanie; Broussais, Florence; Peterson, Lars Jelstrup; Bonnet, Christophe; Prior, John O; Tilly, Herve; Hutchings, Martin; Casasnovas, Olivier; Meignan, Michel A

    2017-09-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) is a heterogeneous group of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas with poor outcomes with current therapy. We investigated if response assessed with Positron Emission Tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) combined with baseline total metabolic tumor volume (TMTV) could detect early relapse/refractory patients. Methods: 140 patients with nodal PTCL who underwent baseline PET/CT were selected from 7 European centers. 43 had interim PET (iPET) performed after two cycles (iPET2), 95 after 3 or 4 cycles (iPET3/4) and 96 had end of treatment PET (eotPET). Baseline TMTV was computed with 41% SUVmax threshold, and PET response was reported with the Deauville 5-point scale (5-PS). Results: With 43 months median follow-up, the 2-year Progression free survival (PFS) and Overall survival (OS) were 51% and 67%. Positive iPET2 patients (5-PS ≥4) had a significantly worse outcome than those with negative iPET2 (p230cm(3) and iPET3/4 negative (59%/84%); TMTV≤230cm(3) and iPET3/4 positive (42%/50%); TMTV>230cm(3) and iPET3/4 positive (0%/18%). Conclusion: IPET response is predictive of outcome and allows early detection of high-risk PTCL patients. Combining iPET with TMTV improves risk stratification in individual patients. Copyright © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  17. Prediction of Long-term Post-operative Testosterone Replacement Requirement Based on the Pre-operative Tumor Volume and Testosterone Level in Pituitary Macroadenoma

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng-Chi Lee; Chung-Ming Chen; Shih-Tseng Lee; Kuo-Chen Wei; Ping-Ching Pai; Cheng-Hong Toh; Chi-Cheng Chuang

    2015-01-01

    Non-functioning pituitary macroadenomas (NFPAs) are the most prevalent pituitary macroadenomas. One common symptom of NFPA is hypogonadism, which may require long-term hormone replacement. This study was designed to clarify the association between the pre-operative tumor volume, pre-operative testosterone level, intraoperative resection status and the need of long-term post-operative testosterone replacement. Between 2004 and 2012, 45 male patients with NFPAs were enrolled in this prospective...

  18. On-Chip Dielectrophoretic Separation and Concentration of Viable, Non-Viable and Viable but Not Culturable (VBNC) Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Packard, M M; Shusteff, M; Alocilja, E C

    2012-04-12

    Although bacterial culture remains the gold standard for detection of viable bacteria in environmental specimens, the typical time requirement of twenty-four hours can delay and even jeopardize appropriate public health intervention. In addition, culture is incapable of detecting viable but not culturable (VBNC) species. Conversely, nucleic acid and antibody-based methods greatly decrease time to detection but rarely characterize viability of the bacteria detected. Through selection by membrane permeability, the method described in this work employs positive dielectrophoresis (pDEP) for separation and purification of viable and VBNC species from water and allows concentration of bacteria for downstream applications.

  19. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for tumor staging and definition of tumor volumes on radiation treatment planning in nonsmall cell lung cancer: A prospective radiographic cohort study of single center clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dan; Hu, Qiaoqiao; Qi, Liping; Wang, Juan; Wu, Hao; Zhu, Guangying; Yu, Huiming

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the impact of magnetic resonance (MR) on the staging and radiotherapy planning for patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC).A total of 24 patients with NSCLC underwent MRI, which was fused with radiotherapy planning CT using rigid registration. Gross tumor volume (GTV) was delineated not only according to CT image alone (GTVCT), but also based on both CT and MR image (GTVCT/MR). For each patient, 2 conformal treatment plans were made according to GTVCT and GTVCT/MR, respectively. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) for lesion and normal organs were generated using both GTVCT and GTVCT/MR treatment plans. All patients were irradiated according to GTVCT/MR plan.Median volume of the GTVCT/MR and GTVCT were 105.42 cm and 124.45 cm, respectively, and the mean value of GTVCT/MR was significantly smaller than that of GTVCT (145.71 ± 145.04 vs 174.30 ± 150.34, P definition of tumor volume, reduces organs at risk dose and does not increase the local recurrence rate.

  20. The predictive value of mean platelet volume, plateletcrit and red cell distribution width in the differentiation of autoimmune gastritis patients with and without type I gastric carcinoid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüzün, Ali; Keskin, Onur; Yakut, Mustafa; Kalkan, Cagdas; Soykan, Irfan

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune gastritis is an autoimmune and inflammatory condition that may predispose to gastric carcinoid tumors or adenocarcinomas. The early diagnosis of these tumors is important in order to decrease morbidity and mortality. Platelet indices such as mean platelet volume and plateletcrit levels increase in inflammatory, infectious and malign conditions. The primary aim of this study was to explore wheter platelet indices and red cell distribution width have any predictive role in the discrimination of autoimmune gastritis patients with and without gastric carcinoid tumors. Also secondary aim of this study was to investigate whether any changes exist betwenn autoimmune gastritis and functional dyspepsia patients by means of platelet indices. Plateletcrit (0.22 ± 0.06 vs. 0.20 ± 0.03%, p gastritis patients compared to control group. Receiver operating curve analysis suggested that optimum plateletcrit cut-off point was 0.20% (AUC: 0.646), and 13.95% as the cut off value for red cell distribution width (AUC: 0.860). Although plateletcrit (0.22 ± 0.06 vs. 0.21 ± 0.04%, p = 0.220) and mean platelet volume (8.94 ± 1.44 vs. 8.68 ± 0.89 fl, p = 0.265) were higher in autoimmune gastritis patients without carcinoid tumor compared to patients with carcinoid tumors, these parameters were not statistically significant. Changes in plateletcrit and red cell distribution width values may be used as a marker in the discrimination of autoimmune gastritis and fucntional dyspepsia patients but not useful in patients with gastric carcinoid tumor type I.

  1. 食管癌放疗体积变化的临床研究%The Clinical Study in Tumor Volume Change of Esophageal Carcinoma in Radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢绪菁; 江振龙; 张进; 梁保辉; 文万信

    2012-01-01

    To observe and analysis the rule of esophageal tumor volume changes in 3DCRT with conventional fraction. Methods: This study was performed on eight patients with esophageal cancer who were treated with radical three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy between July 2010 and September 2010. Thoracic contrast-enhanced CT scan were performed-during early RT (second weekend), mid-RT (forth weekend), late-RT (sixth weekend) and at follow-up (1 months after RT completion). ROI-based volumetry was derived by tracing the entire tumor region in each CT slice on the computer work station. Image J software was used to calculate tumor volume. Results: Tumor volume of one patient with poorly differentiated squamous-cell carcinoma increased with rapid tumor cell proliferation rate during radiotherapy time. Tumor volume of another patient had no change with radiotherapy. Tumor volume of the third patient increased in early RT and constantly decreased in subsequent radiotherapy, mostly eliminated in two months after the end of radiotherapy. Other 5 patients had similar tumor volume change during radiotherapy time, whose tumor volumes gradually reduced in the former and had little volume change in the latter. Conclusions: Half-time extinction and recession rate of esophageal carcinoma were calculate with exponential fitting from 5 patients' tumor volume change ,which being 1.27%/d and 44.3d respectively and similar to that of lung cancer and cervical cancer. As a result, the average of tumor volume reduced by one-third after 4 weeks radiotherapy, we should modify radiation plan to avoid the influence by tumor volume change, especially with precise radiotherapy.%目的:观察分析食管癌三维适形常规分割放疗过程中肿瘤体积变化规律.方法:选择2010年7月~2010年9月进行常规分割根治性三维适形放射治疗的8例食管癌患者,在放疗期间第2、4、6周及放疗后1月复查胸部增强扫描CT并采用放疗计划系统融合不同时期的CT

  2. Lipiodol injections for optimization of target volume delineation in a patient with a second tumor of the oropharynx. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haderlein, Marlen; Merten, Ricarda; Stojanovic, Andrea; Speer, Stefan; Fietkau, Rainer; Ott, Oliver J. [University Hospitals of Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Scherl, Claudia [University Hospitals of Erlangen, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Lipiodol injections were administered in the head and neck area to improve gross tumor volume (GTV) definition for small-volume re-irradiation of a 63-year-old previously irradiated patient with a second tumor of the oropharynx in the posterior wall with longitudinal ligament infiltration (cT4cN0cM0). The patient had dialysis-depending renal failure. On diagnostic computed tomography (CT), which was performed with intravenous contrast agent, the tumor in the oropharynx was not detectable. Because of dialysis-depending renal failure comorbidity, no contrast agent was applied in the planning CT and in the diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. In each cross-sectional imaging study performed, the GTV, especially in craniocaudal extensions, was not safely delineable. Therefore, craniocaudal tumor margins were pharyngoscopically marked with Lipiodol injections, an iodine-containing contrast agent. In a second planning CT, the GTV could be defined with the help of the Lipiodol marks and small-volume re-irradiation was performed. No Lipiodol-associated side effects occurred in the patient. In the present case, the use of Lipiodol injections at the tumor margins facilitated the definition of the GTV. (orig.) [German] Anwendung von Lipiodolinjektionen im Kopf-Hals-Bereich zur Verbesserung der GTV-Definition bei einer kleinvolumigen Re-Bestrahlung eines 63-jaehrigen, vorbestrahlten Patienten mit einem Zweitmalignom im Oropharynx mit Infiltration des hinteren Laengsbandes (cT4cN0cM0). Nebenbefundlich bestand bei dem Patienten eine dialysepflichtige Niereninsuffizienz. Im initialen diagnostischen Kontrastmittel-CT der Hals und Thoraxregion war der Tumor nicht abgrenzbar, so dass das Bestrahlungsplanungs-CT in Anbetracht des diagnostischen CTs und der bekannten Niereninsuffizienz ohne intravenoeses Kontrastmittel durchgefuehrt wurde. Das diagnostische MRT (vgl. Abb. 1) wurde ebenfalls ohne intravenoeses Kontrastmittel durchgefuehrt wurden. In allen durchgefuehrten

  3. The tumor-to-breast volume ratio (TBR) predicts cancer-specific survival in breast cancer patients who underwent modified radical mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jiahuai; Ye, Feng; Huang, Xiaojia; Li, Shuaijie; Yang, Lu; Xiao, Xiangsheng; Xie, Xiaoming

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women globally, and tumor size measured as the largest diameter of the tumor focus is currently used in tumor-lymph node-metastasis (TNM) staging for prognosis and treatment decisions. The present study utilized the tumor-to-breast volume ratio (TBR) to evaluate the relative tumor size and determined the prognostic impact of TBR on survival in patients with breast cancer. Two thousand twenty-five consecutive breast cancer patients who underwent modified radical mastectomy between January 2002 and December 2008 at Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center were enrolled in this retrospective study. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to assess the prognostic effect of TBR on cancer-specific survival (CSS), and univariate log-rank test and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model were performed to identify independent prognostic factors. The optimal cutoff value of TBR was determined to be 1.70 %, and 1473 and 552 patients were categorized to low-TBR and high-TBR groups, respectively. In the whole patient cohort, CSS was significantly shorter in the high-TBR group (110.2 vs 128.5 months, P breast cancer patients (hazard ratio (HR) 1.489, 95 % CI 1.130-1.961, P = 0.005). High TBR was independently associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. This variable may serve as a valuable parameter to predict the outcomes of breast cancer.

  4. The role of metabolic tumor volume and total lesion glycolysis on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the prognosis of epithelial ovarian cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Won; Cho, Arthur; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Jong Doo; Kang, Won Jun [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemoon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Tae [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemoon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    This study assessed the prognostic value of pre-operative 2-[{sup 18}F] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) volumetric parameters, including metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG), in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer. A total of 175 patients with epithelial ovarian cancer who underwent {sup 18} F-FDG PET/CT and subsequent cytoreductive surgery were retrospectively enrolled. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was measured for all patients. Because nine patients showed low tumor-to-background uptake ratios, MTV and TLG were measured in 166 patients. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate the prognostic significance of SUVmax, MTV, TLG, and clinicopathological factors for disease progression-free survival. Disease progressed in 78 (44.6 %) of the 175 patients, and the 2-year disease progression-free survival rate was 57.5 %. Univariate analysis showed that tumor stage, histopathological type, presence of regional lymph node metastasis, residual tumor after cytoreductive surgery, pre-operative serum carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125) level, SUVmax, MTV, and TLG were significant prognostic factors (p < 0.05). Among these variables, tumor stage (p = 0.0006) and TLG (p = 0.008) independently correlated with disease progression-free survival on multivariate analysis. The disease progression rate was only 2.3 % in stage I-II patients with low TLG (≤100.0), compared to 80.0 % in stage III-IV patients with high TLG (>100.0). Along with tumor stage, TLG is an independent prognostic factor for disease progression after cytoreductive surgery in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer. By combining tumor stage and TLG, one can further stratify the risk of disease progression for patients undergoing cytoreductive surgery. (orig.)

  5. Cerebral white matter fractional anisotropy and tract volume as measured by MR imaging are associated with impaired cognitive and motor function in pediatric posterior fossa tumor survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueckriegel, Stefan M; Bruhn, Harald; Thomale, Ulrich W; Hernáiz Driever, Pablo

    2015-07-01

    Disease and therapy cause brain damage and subsequent functional loss in pediatric patients with posterior fossa tumors. Treatment-related toxicity factors are resection in patients with pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) and, additionally, cranio-spinal irradiation together with chemotherapy in patients with medulloblastoma (MB). We tested whether damage to white matter (WM) as revealed by diffusion tensor MR imaging (DTI) correlated with specific cognitive and motor impairments in survivors of pediatric posterior fossa tumors. Eighteen MB (mean age ± SD, 15.2 ± 4.9 y) and 14 PA (12.6 ± 5.0 y) survivors were investigated with DTI on a 3-Tesla-MR system. We identified fractional anisotropy (FA) of WM, the volume ratio of WM to gray matter and cerebrospinal fluid (WM/GM + CSF), and volume of specific frontocerebellar tracts. Ataxia was assessed using the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS), while the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children determined full-scale intelligence quotients (FSIQ). Amsterdam Neuropsychological Tasks (ANT) was used to assess processing speed. Handwriting automation was analyzed using a digitizing graphic tablet. The WM/GM + CSF ratio correlated significantly with cognitive measures (IQ, P = 0.002; ANT baseline speed, P = 0.04; ANT shifting attention, P = 0.004). FA of skeletonized tracts correlated significantly with FSIQ (P = 0.008), ANT baseline speed (P = 0.028) and ANT shifting attention (P = 0.045). Moreover, frontocerebellar tract volumes correlated with both the FSIQ (P = 0.011) and ICARS (P = 0.007). DTI provides a method for quantification of WM damage by tumor and by therapy-associated effects in survivors of pediatric posterior fossa tumors. DTI-derived WM integrity may be a representative marker for cognitive and motor deterioration. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Assessment of treatment response by total tumor volume and global apparent diffusion coefficient using diffusion-weighted MRI in patients with metastatic bone disease: a feasibility study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Blackledge

    Full Text Available We describe our semi-automatic segmentation of whole-body diffusion-weighted MRI (WBDWI using a Markov random field (MRF model to derive tumor total diffusion volume (tDV and associated global apparent diffusion coefficient (gADC; and demonstrate the feasibility of using these indices for assessing tumor burden and response to treatment in patients with bone metastases. WBDWI was performed on eleven patients diagnosed with bone metastases from breast and prostate cancers before and after anti-cancer therapies. Semi-automatic segmentation incorporating a MRF model was performed in all patients below the C4 vertebra by an experienced radiologist with over eight years of clinical experience in body DWI. Changes in tDV and gADC distributions were compared with overall response determined by all imaging, tumor markers and clinical findings at serial follow up. The segmentation technique was possible in all patients although erroneous volumes of interest were generated in one patient because of poor fat suppression in the pelvis, requiring manual correction. Responding patients showed a larger increase in gADC (median change = +0.18, range = -0.07 to +0.78 × 10(-3 mm2/s after treatment compared to non-responding patients (median change = -0.02, range = -0.10 to +0.05 × 10(-3 mm2/s, p = 0.05, Mann-Whitney test, whereas non-responding patients showed a significantly larger increase in tDV (median change = +26%, range = +3 to +284% compared to responding patients (median change = -50%, range = -85 to +27%, p = 0.02, Mann-Whitney test. Semi-automatic segmentation of WBDWI is feasible for metastatic bone disease in this pilot cohort of 11 patients, and could be used to quantify tumor total diffusion volume and median global ADC for assessing response to treatment.

  7. SU-E-J-123: Assessing Segmentation Accuracy of Internal Volumes and Sub-Volumes in 4D PET/CT of Lung Tumors Using a Novel 3D Printed Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soultan, D [University of California-San Diego, San Diego State University, La Jolla, CA (United States); Murphy, J; James, C; Hoh, C; Moiseenko, V; Cervino, L [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Gill, B [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Windsor, ON (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of internal target volume (ITV) segmentation of lung tumors for treatment planning of simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) radiotherapy as seen in 4D PET/CT images, using a novel 3D-printed phantom. Methods: The insert mimics high PET tracer uptake in the core and 50% uptake in the periphery, by using a porous design at the periphery. A lung phantom with the insert was placed on a programmable moving platform. Seven breathing waveforms of ideal and patient-specific respiratory motion patterns were fed to the platform, and 4D PET/CT scans were acquired of each of them. CT images were binned into 10 phases, and PET images were binned into 5 phases following the clinical protocol. Two scenarios were investigated for segmentation: a gate 30–70 window, and no gating. The radiation oncologist contoured the outer ITV of the porous insert with on CT images, while the internal void volume with 100% uptake was contoured on PET images for being indistinguishable from the outer volume in CT images. Segmented ITVs were compared to the expected volumes based on known target size and motion. Results: 3 ideal breathing patterns, 2 regular-breathing patient waveforms, and 2 irregular-breathing patient waveforms were used for this study. 18F-FDG was used as the PET tracer. The segmented ITVs from CT closely matched the expected motion for both no gating and gate 30–70 window, with disagreement of contoured ITV with respect to the expected volume not exceeding 13%. PET contours were seen to overestimate volumes in all the cases, up to more than 40%. Conclusion: 4DPET images of a novel 3D printed phantom designed to mimic different uptake values were obtained. 4DPET contours overestimated ITV volumes in all cases, while 4DCT contours matched expected ITV volume values. Investigation of the cause and effects of the discrepancies is undergoing.

  8. SU-C-210-06: Quantitative Evaluation of Dosimetric Effects Resulting From Positional Variations of Pancreatic Tumor Volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, S; Sehgal, V; Wei, R; Lawrenson, L; Kuo, J; Hanna, N; Ramsinghani, N; Daroui, P; Al-Ghazi, M [University of California, Orange, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to quantify dosimetric effects resulting from variation in pancreatic tumor position assessed by bony anatomy and implanted fiducial markers Methods: Twelve pancreatic cancer patients were retrospectively analyzed for this study. All patients received modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment using fiducial-based Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) to the intact pancreas. Using daily orthogonal kV and/or Cone beam CT images, the shift needed to co-register the daily pre-treatment images to reference CT from fiducial to bone (Fid-Bone) were recorded as Left-Right (LR), Anterior-Posterior (AP) and Superior-Inferior (SI). The original VMAT plan iso-center was shifted based on KV bone matching positions at 5 evenly spaced fractions. Dose coverage of the planning target volumes (PTVs) (V100%), mean dose to liver, kidney and stomach/duodenum were assessed in the modified plans. Results: A total of 306 fractions were analyzed. The absolute fiducial-bone positional shifts were greatest in the SI direction, (AP = 2.7 ± 3.0, LR = 2.8 ± 2.8, and SI 6.3 ± 7.9 mm, mean ± SD). The V100% was significantly reduced by 13.5%, (Fid-Bone = 95.3 ± 2.0 vs. 82.3 ± 11.8%, p=0.02). This varied widely among patients (Fid-Bone V100% Range = 2–60%), where 33% of patients had a reduction in V100% of more than 10%. The impact on OARs was greatest to the liver (Fid-Bone= 14.6 vs. 16.1 Gy, 10%), and stomach, (Fid-Bone = 23.9 vx. 25.5 Gy, 7%), however was not statistically significant (p=0.10 both). Conclusion: Compared to matching by fiducial markers, matching by bony anatomy would have substantially reduced the PTV coverage by 13.5%. This reinforces the importance of online position verification based on fiducial markers. Hence, implantation of fiducial markers is strongly recommended for pancreatic cancer patients undergoing intensity modulated radiation therapy treatments.

  9. The percent of cores positive for cancer in prostate needle biopsy specimens is strongly predictive of tumor stage and volume at radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebo, T J; Bock, B J; Cheville, J C; Lohse, C; Wollan, P; Zincke, H

    2000-01-01

    Pretreatment clinical staging of prostatic adenocarcinoma is important due to the increasing use of nonsurgical treatment options. Using multivariate analysis we assessed the predictive value of biopsy cores positive for cancer as a percent of all cores obtained as well as the percent surface area of needle cores involved with tumor for determining tumor volume and pathological stage at radical prostatectomy. Candidate variables for the multivariate model included patient age, clinical disease stage, serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) and Gleason score of cancer in the needle biopsy. We reviewed prostate needle biopsy findings in 207 consecutive patients who subsequently underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy. Each biopsy specimen was assessed for tumor involvement by calculating the percent of cores positive for cancer, percent surface area involved in all cores and Gleason score. Initial serum PSA and preoperative clinical disease stage were incorporated with biopsy results into a multivariate model to determine the parameters most predictive of pathological stage and tumor volume at radical retropubic prostatectomy. Of the 207 patients 152 (73.4%) had organ confined cancer and 55 (26.6%) had extraprostatic extension (pathological stages T2 and T3 or greater, respectively). Preoperative clinical staging information was available in 195 cases, in which disease was clinically confined and not confined in 184 (94.4%) and 11 (5.6%), respectively. Needle biopsy revealed a surface area of cancer ranging from less than 5% in 69 patients (33.3%) to 90% (mean 16, median 10). Univariate analysis demonstrated that the risk of extraprostatic extension was predicted by preoperative serum PSA (p = 0.027), the percent of cores and percent of surface area positive for cancer (p <0.0001), and Gleason score (p = 0.0009). Clinical stage approached significance (p = 0.071). Multivariate analysis showed that the percent of positive cores (p = 0.0003), initial serum PSA (p = 0

  10. Inkjet printing of viable human dental follicle stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mau Robert

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Inkjet printing technology has the potential to be used for seeding of viable cells for tissue engineering approaches. For this reason, a piezoelectrically actuated, drop-on-demand inkjet printing system was applied to deliver viable human dental follicle stem cells (hDFSC of sizes of about 15 μm up to 20 μm in diameter. The purpose of these investigations was to verify the stability of the printing process and to evaluate cell viability post printing. Using a Nanoplotter 2.1 (Gesim, Germany equipped with the piezoelectric printhead NanoTip HV (Gesim, Germany, a concentration of 6.6 ×106 cells ml−1 in DMEM with 10% fetal calf serum (FCS could be dispensed. The piezoelectric printhead has a nominal droplet volume of ~ 400 pl and was set to a voltage of 75 V and a pulse of 50 μs while dosing 50 000 droplets over a time of 100 seconds. The volume and trajectory of the droplet were checked by a stroboscope test right before and after the printing process. It was found that the droplet volume decreases significantly by 35% during printing process, while the trajectory of the droplets remains stable with only an insignificant number of degrees deviation from the vertical line. It is highly probable that some cell sedimentations or agglomerations affect the printing performance. The cell viability post printing was assessed by using the Trypan Blue dye exclusion test. The printing process was found to have no significant influence on cell survival. In conclusion, drop-on-demand inkjet printing can be a potent tool for the seeding of viable cells.

  11. Risk Factors for Neovascular Glaucoma After Proton Beam Therapy of Uveal Melanoma: A Detailed Analysis of Tumor and Dose–Volume Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Kavita K., E-mail: kmishra@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Daftari, Inder K.; Weinberg, Vivian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Cole, Tia [The Tumori Foundation, San Francisco, California (United States); Quivey, Jeanne M.; Castro, Joseph R.; Phillips, Theodore L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Char, Devron H. [The Tumori Foundation, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To determine neovascular glaucoma (NVG) incidence and identify contributing tumor and dosing factors in uveal melanoma patients treated with proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 704 PBRT patients treated by a single surgeon (DHC) for uveal melanoma (1996-2010) were reviewed for NVG in our prospectively maintained database. All patients received 56 GyE in 4 fractions. Median follow-up was 58.3 months. Analyses included the Kaplan-Meier method to estimate NVG distributions, univariate log–rank tests, and Cox's proportional hazards multivariate analysis using likelihood ratio tests to identify independent risk factors of NVG among patient, tumor, and dose–volume histogram parameters. Results: The 5-year PBRT NVG rate was 12.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 10.2%-15.9%). The 5-year rate of enucleation due to NVG was 4.9% (95% CI 3.4%-7.2%). Univariately, the NVG rate increased significantly with larger tumor diameter (P<.0001), greater height (P<.0001), higher T stage (P<.0001), and closer proximity to the disc (P=.002). Dose–volume histogram analysis revealed that if >30% of the lens or ciliary body received ≥50% dose (≥28 GyE), there was a higher probability of NVG (P<.0001 for both). Furthermore, if 100% of the disc or macula received ≥28 GyE, the NVG rate was higher (P<.0001 and P=.03, respectively). If both anterior and posterior doses were above specified cut points, NVG risk was highest (P<.0001). Multivariate analysis confirmed significant independent risk factors to include tumor height (P<.0001), age (P<.0001), %disc treated to ≥50% Dose (<100% vs 100%) (P=.0007), larger tumor diameter (P=.01), %lens treated to ≥90% Dose (0 vs >0%-30% vs >30%) (P=.01), and optic nerve length treated to ≥90% Dose (≤1 mm vs >1 mm) (P=.02). Conclusions: Our current PBRT patients experience a low rate of NVG and resultant enucleation compared with historical data. The present analysis shows that tumor height

  12. Longitudinal Studies of Angiogenesis in Hormone-Dependent Shionogi Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor P. Wade

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Vessel size imaging was used to assess changes in the average vessel size of Shionogi tumors throughout the tumor growth cycle. Changes in R2 and R2* relaxivities caused by the injection of a superparamagnetic contrast agent (ferumoxtran-10 were measured using a 2.35-T animal magnetic resonance imaging system, and average vessel size index (VSI was calculated for each stage of tumor progression: growth, regression, and relapse. Statistical analysis using Spearman rank correlation test showed no dependence between vessel size and tumor volume at any stage of the tumor growth cycle. Paired Student's t test was used to assess the statistical significance of the differences in average vessel size for the three stages of the tumor growth cycle. The average VSI for regressing tumors (15.1 ± 6.6 wm was significantly lower than that for growing tumors (35.2 ± 25.5 μm; P < .01. Relapsing tumors also had an average VSI (45.4 ± 41.8 μm higher than that of regressing tumors, although the difference was not statistically significant (P = .067. This study shows that VSI imaging is a viable method for the noninvasive monitoring of angiogenesis during the progression of a Shionogi tumor from androgen dependence to androgen independence.

  13. Metabolic Tumor Volume as a Prognostic Imaging-Based Biomarker for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Pilot Results From Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0522

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, David L., E-mail: david.schwartz@utsw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern School of Medicine, Dallas, Texas (United States); Harris, Jonathan [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Yao, Min [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rosenthal, David I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Opanowski, Adam; Levering, Anthony [American College of Radiology Imaging Network, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ang, K. Kian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Trotti, Andy M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jones, Christopher U. [Sutter Medical Group, Sacramento, California (United States); Harari, Paul [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Foote, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Holland, John [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Zhang, Qiang [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate candidate fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) imaging biomarkers for head-and-neck chemoradiotherapy outcomes in the cooperative group trial setting. Methods and Materials: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 0522 patients consenting to a secondary FDG-PET/CT substudy were serially imaged at baseline and 8 weeks after radiation. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), SUV peak (mean SUV within a 1-cm sphere centered on SUVmax), and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) using 40% of SUVmax as threshold were obtained from primary tumor and involved nodes. Results: Of 940 patients entered onto RTOG 0522, 74 were analyzable for this substudy. Neither high baseline SUVmax nor SUVpeak from primary or nodal disease were associated with poor treatment outcomes. However, primary tumor MTV above the cohort median was associated with worse local-regional control (hazard ratio 4.01, 95% confidence interval 1.28-12.52, P=.02) and progression-free survival (hazard ratio 2.34, 95% confidence interval 1.02-5.37, P=.05). Although MTV and T stage seemed to correlate (mean MTV 6.4, 13.2, and 26.8 for T2, T3, and T4 tumors, respectively), MTV remained a strong independent prognostic factor for progression-free survival in bivariate analysis that included T stage. Primary MTV remained prognostic in p16-associated oropharyngeal cancer cases, although sample size was limited. Conclusion: High baseline primary tumor MTV was associated with worse treatment outcomes in this limited patient subset of RTOG 0522. Additional confirmatory work will be required to validate primary tumor MTV as a prognostic imaging biomarker for patient stratification in future trials.

  14. Microspheres targeted with a mesothelin antibody and loaded with doxorubicin reduce tumor volume of human mesotheliomas in xenografts

    OpenAIRE

    Macura, Sherrill L; Steinbacher, Jeremy L; MacPherson, Maximilian B.; Lathrop, Melissa J; Sayan, Mutlay; Hillegass, Jedd M; Beuschel, Stacie L.; Perkins, Timothy N.; Spiess, Page C.; van der Vliet, Albert; Butnor, Kelly J.; Shukla, Arti; Wadsworth, Marilyn; Landry, Christopher C.; Mossman, Brooke T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Malignant mesotheliomas (MMs) are chemoresistant tumors related to exposure to asbestos fibers. The long latency period of MM (30-40 yrs) and heterogeneity of tumor presentation make MM difficult to diagnose and treat at early stages. Currently approved second-line treatments following surgical resection of MMs include a combination of cisplatin or carboplatin (delivered systemically) and pemetrexed, a folate inhibitor, with or without subsequent radiation. The systemic toxicities ...

  15. On the role of calcium in the regulatory volume decrease (RVD) response in Ehrlich mouse ascites tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Nanna K.; Christensen, Søren; Harbak, Henrik;

    1997-01-01

    Fysiologi, volume regulation, phosphoinositidase C, Ins(1,4,5)P*U3, Ca*O2*O+-signaling, K*O+ channels, charybdotoxin, clotrimazole......Fysiologi, volume regulation, phosphoinositidase C, Ins(1,4,5)P*U3, Ca*O2*O+-signaling, K*O+ channels, charybdotoxin, clotrimazole...

  16. Variability of Gross Tumor Volume in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Using 11C-Choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Jiang

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the variability of gross tumor volume (GTV using 11C-Choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT images for nasopharyngeal carcinomas boundary definition. Assessment consisted of inter-observer and inter-modality variation analysis. Four radiation oncologists were invited to manually contour GTV by using PET/CT fusion obtained from a cohort of 12 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC and who underwent both 11C-Choline and 18F-FDG scans. Student's paired-sample t-test was performed for analyzing inter-observer and inter-modality variability. Semi-automatic segmentation methods, including thresholding and region growing, were also validated against the manual contouring of the two types of PET images. We observed no significant variation in the results obtained by different oncologists in terms of the same type of PET/CT volumes. Choline fusion volumes were significantly larger than the FDG volumes (p < 0.0001, mean ± SD = 18.21 ± 8.19. While significantly consistent results were obtained between the oncologists and the standard references in Choline volumes compared with those in FDG volumes (p = 0.0025. Simple semi-automatic delineation methods indicated that 11C-Choline PET images could provide better results than FDG volumes (p = 0.076, CI = [-0.29, 0.025]. 11C-Choline PET/CT may be more advantageous in GTV delineation for the radiotherapy of NPC than 18F-FDG. Phantom simulations and clinical trials should be conducted to prove the possible improvement of the treatment outcome.

  17. Photothermal Therapy Using Gold Nanorods and Near-Infrared Light in a Murine Melanoma Model Increases Survival and Decreases Tumor Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary K. Popp

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Photothermal therapy (PTT treatments have shown strong potential in treating tumors through their ability to target destructive heat preferentially to tumor regions. In this paper we demonstrate that PTT in a murine melanoma model using gold nanorods (GNRs and near-infrared (NIR light decreases tumor volume and increases animal survival to an extent that is comparable to the current generation of melanoma drugs. GNRs, in particular, have shown a strong ability to reach ablative temperatures quickly in tumors when exposed to NIR light. The current research tests the efficacy of GNRs PTT in a difficult and fast growing murine melanoma model using a NIR light-emitting diode (LED light source. LED light sources in the NIR spectrum could provide a safer and more practical approach to photothermal therapy than lasers. We also show that the LED light source can effectively and quickly heat in vitro and in vivo models to ablative temperatures when combined with GNRs. We anticipate that this approach could have significant implications for human cancer therapy.

  18. The Role of Tumor Cell-Derived Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF/CCN2) in Pancreatic Tumor Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennewith, Kevin L.; Huang, Xin; Ham, Christine M.; Graves, Edward E.; Erler, Janine T.; Kambham, Neeraja; Feazell, Jonathan; Yang, George P.; Koong, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly aggressive and refractory to existing therapies. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) is a fibrosis-related gene that is thought to play a role in pancreatic tumor progression. However, CCN2 can be expressed in a variety of cell types, and the contribution of CCN2 derived from either tumor cells or stromal cells as it affects the growth of pancreatic tumors is unknown. Using genetic inhibition of CCN2, we have discovered that CCN2 derived from tumor cells is a critical regulator of pancreatic tumor growth. Pancreatic tumor cells derived from CCN2 shRNA-expressing clones showed dramatically reduced growth in soft agar and when implanted subcutaneously. We also observed a role for CCN2 in the growth of pancreatic tumors implanted orthotopically, with tumor volume measurements obtained by PET imaging. Mechanistically, CCN2 protects cells from hypoxia-mediated apoptosis, providing an in vivo selection for tumor cells that express high levels of CCN2. We found that CCN2 expression and secretion was increased in hypoxic pancreatic tumor cells in vitro, and we observed co-localization of CCN2 and hypoxia in pancreatic tumor xenografts and clinical pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Furthermore, we found increased CCN2 staining in clinical pancreatic tumor tissue relative to stromal cells surrounding the tumor, supporting our assertion that tumor cell-derived CCN2 is important for pancreatic tumor growth. Taken together, these data improve our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for pancreatic tumor growth and progression, and also indicate that CCN2 produced by tumor cells represents a viable therapeutic target for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:19179545

  19. Prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume on {sup 11}C-methionine PET in predicting progression-free survival in high-grade glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Min Young; Paeng, Jin Chul; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June Key; Kang, Keon Wook [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, E. Edmund [Dept. of Molecular Medicine and Biopharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    C-11 methionine (MET) PET is commonly used for diagnosing high-grade glioma (HGG). Recently, volumetric analysis has been widely applied to oncologic PET imaging. In this study, we investigated the prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume (MTV) on MET PET in HGG. A total of 30 patients with anaplastic astrocytoma (n = 12) and glioblastoma multiforme (n = 18) who underwent MET PET before treatment (surgery followed by chemo-radiotherapy) were retrospectively enrolled. Maximal tumor-to-normal brain ratio (TNR{sub max}, maximum tumor activity divided by mean of normal tissue) and MTV (volume of tumor tissue that shows uptake >1.3-fold of mean uptake in normal tissue) were measured on MET PET. Adult patients were classified into two subgroups according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Recursive Partitioning Analysis (RTOG RPA) classification. Prognostic values of TNR{sub max}, MTV and clinicopathologic factors were evaluated with regard to progression-free survival (PFS). Median PFS of all patients was 7.9 months (range 1.0–53.8 months). In univariate analysis, MTV (cutoff 35 cm{sup 3}) was a significant prognostic factor for PFS (P = 0.01), whereas TNR{sub max} (cutoff 3.3) and RTOG RPA class were not (P = 0.80 and 0.61, respectively). Treatment of surgical resection exhibited a borderline significance (P = 0.06). In multivariate analysis, MTV was the only independent prognostic factor for PFS (P = 0.03). MTV on MET PET is a significant and independent prognostic factor for PFS in HGG patients, whereas TNR{sub max} is not. Thus, performing volumetric analysis of MET PET is recommended in HGG for better prognostication.

  20. Effect of different segmentation algorithms on metabolic tumor volume measured on 18F-FDG PET/CT of cervical primary squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weina; Yu, Shupeng; Ma, Ying; Liu, Changping

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose It is known that fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET/computed tomography (CT) segmentation algorithms have an impact on the metabolic tumor volume (MTV). This leads to some uncertainties in PET/CT guidance of tumor radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of segmentation algorithms on the PET/CT-based MTV and their correlations with the gross tumor volumes (GTVs) of cervical primary squamous cell carcinoma. Materials and methods Fifty-five patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage Ia∼IIb and histologically proven cervical squamous cell carcinoma were enrolled. A fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT scan was performed before definitive surgery. GTV was measured on surgical specimens. MTVs were estimated on PET/CT scans using different segmentation algorithms, including a fixed percentage of the maximum standardized uptake value (20∼60% SUVmax) threshold and iterative adaptive algorithm. We divided all patients into four different groups according to the SUVmax within target volume. The comparisons of absolute values and percentage differences between MTVs by segmentation and GTV were performed in different SUVmax subgroups. The optimal threshold percentage was determined from MTV20%∼MTV60%, and was correlated with SUVmax. The correlation of MTViterative adaptive with GTV was also investigated. Results MTV50% and MTV60% were similar to GTV in the SUVmax up to 5 (P>0.05). MTV30%∼MTV60% were similar to GTV (P>0.05) in the 50.05) in the 100.05) in the SUVmax of at least 15 group. MTViterative adaptive was similar to GTV in both total and different SUVmax groups (P>0.05). Significant differences were observed among the fixed percentage method and the optimal threshold percentage was inversely correlated with SUVmax. The iterative adaptive segmentation algorithm led to the highest accuracy (6.66±50.83%). A significantly positive correlation was also observed between MTViterative

  1. Autofluorescence of viable cultured mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubin, J E

    1979-01-01

    The autofluorescence other than intrinsic protein emission of viable cultured mammalian cells has been investigated. The fluorescence was found to originate in discrete cytoplasmic vesicle-like regions and to be absent from the nucleus. Excitation and emission spectra of viable cells revealed at least two distinct fluorescent species. Comparison of cell spectra with spectra of known cellular metabolites suggested that most, if not all, of the fluorescence arises from intracellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and riboflavin and flavin coenzymes. Various changes in culture conditions did not affect the observed autofluorescence intensity. A multiparameter flow system (MACCS) was used to compare the fluorescence intensities of numerous cultured mammalian cells.

  2. A multimodality imaging model to track viable breast cancer cells from single arrest to metastasis in the mouse brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkins, Katie M.; Hamilton, Amanda M.; Makela, Ashley V.; Chen, Yuanxin; Foster, Paula J.; Ronald, John A.

    2016-10-01

    Cellular MRI involves sensitive visualization of iron-labeled cells in vivo but cannot differentiate between dead and viable cells. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) measures cellular viability, and thus we explored combining these tools to provide a more holistic view of metastatic cancer cell fate in mice. Human breast carcinoma cells stably expressing Firefly luciferase were loaded with iron particles, injected into the left ventricle, and BLI and MRI were performed on days 0, 8, 21 and 28. The number of brain MR signal voids (i.e., iron-loaded cells) on day 0 significantly correlated with BLI signal. Both BLI and MRI signals decreased from day 0 to day 8, indicating a loss of viable cells rather than a loss of iron label. Total brain MR tumour volume on day 28 also correlated with BLI signal. Overall, BLI complemented our sensitive cellular MRI technologies well, allowing us for the first time to screen animals for successful injections, and, in addition to MR measures of cell arrest and tumor burden, provided longitudinal measures of cancer cell viability in individual animals. We predict this novel multimodality molecular imaging framework will be useful for evaluating the efficacy of emerging anti-cancer drugs at different stages of the metastatic cascade.

  3. A multimodality imaging model to track viable breast cancer cells from single arrest to metastasis in the mouse brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkins, Katie M.; Hamilton, Amanda M.; Makela, Ashley V.; Chen, Yuanxin; Foster, Paula J.; Ronald, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular MRI involves sensitive visualization of iron-labeled cells in vivo but cannot differentiate between dead and viable cells. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) measures cellular viability, and thus we explored combining these tools to provide a more holistic view of metastatic cancer cell fate in mice. Human breast carcinoma cells stably expressing Firefly luciferase were loaded with iron particles, injected into the left ventricle, and BLI and MRI were performed on days 0, 8, 21 and 28. The number of brain MR signal voids (i.e., iron-loaded cells) on day 0 significantly correlated with BLI signal. Both BLI and MRI signals decreased from day 0 to day 8, indicating a loss of viable cells rather than a loss of iron label. Total brain MR tumour volume on day 28 also correlated with BLI signal. Overall, BLI complemented our sensitive cellular MRI technologies well, allowing us for the first time to screen animals for successful injections, and, in addition to MR measures of cell arrest and tumor burden, provided longitudinal measures of cancer cell viability in individual animals. We predict this novel multimodality molecular imaging framework will be useful for evaluating the efficacy of emerging anti-cancer drugs at different stages of the metastatic cascade. PMID:27767185

  4. Obtention of tumor volumes in PET images stacks using techniques of colored image segmentation; Obtencao de volumes tumorais em pilhas de imagens PET usando tecnicas de segmentacao de imagens coloridas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Jose W.; Lopes Filho, Ferdinand J., E-mail: jose.wilson@recife.ifpe.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE) Recife, PE (Brazil); Vieira, Igor F., E-mail: igoradiologia@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Lima, Fernando R.A.; Cordeiro, Landerson P., E-mail: leoxofisico@gmail.com, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-NE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    This work demonstrated step by step how to segment color images of the chest of an adult in order to separate the tumor volume without significantly changing the values of the components R (Red), G (Green) and B (blue) of the colors of the pixels. For having information which allow to build color map you need to segment and classify the colors present at appropriate intervals in images. The used segmentation technique is to select a small rectangle with color samples in a given region and then erase with a specific color called 'rubber' the other regions of image. The tumor region was segmented into one of the images available and the procedure is displayed in tutorial format. All necessary computational tools have been implemented in DIP (Digital Image Processing), software developed by the authors. The results obtained, in addition to permitting the construction the colorful map of the distribution of the concentration of activity in PET images will also be useful in future work to enter tumors in voxel phantoms in order to perform dosimetric assessments.

  5. Paternal B Vitamin Intake Is a Determinant of Growth, Hepatic Lipid Metabolism and Intestinal Tumor Volume in Female Apc1638N Mouse Offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia A Sabet

    Full Text Available The importance of maternal nutrition to offspring health and risk of disease is well established. Emerging evidence suggests paternal diet may affect offspring health as well.In the current study we sought to determine whether modulating pre-conception paternal B vitamin intake alters intestinal tumor formation in offspring. Additionally, we sought to identify potential mechanisms for the observed weight differential among offspring by profiling hepatic gene expression and lipid content.Male Apc1638N mice (prone to intestinal tumor formation were fed diets containing replete (control, CTRL, mildly deficient (DEF, or supplemental (SUPP quantities of vitamins B2, B6, B12, and folate for 8 weeks before mating with control-fed wild type females. Wild type offspring were euthanized at weaning and hepatic gene expression profiled. Apc1638N offspring were fed a replete diet and euthanized at 28 weeks of age to assess tumor burden.No differences in intestinal tumor incidence or burden were found between male Apc1638N offspring of different paternal diet groups. Although in female Apc1638N offspring there were no differences in tumor incidence or multiplicity, a stepwise increase in tumor volume with increasing paternal B vitamin intake was observed. Interestingly, female offspring of SUPP and DEF fathers had a significantly lower body weight than those of CTRL fed fathers. Moreover, hepatic trigylcerides and cholesterol were elevated 3-fold in adult female offspring of SUPP fathers. Weanling offspring of the same fathers displayed altered expression of several key lipid-metabolism genes. Hundreds of differentially methylated regions were identified in the paternal sperm in response to DEF and SUPP diets. Aside from a few genes including Igf2, there was a striking lack of overlap between these genes differentially methylated in sperm and differentially expressed in offspring.In this animal model, modulation of paternal B vitamin intake prior to mating

  6. High total metabolic tumor volume in PET/CT predicts worse prognosis in diffuse large B cell lymphoma patients with bone marrow involvement in rituximab era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Moo-Kon; Yang, Deok-Hwan; Lee, Gyeong-Won; Lim, Sung-Nam; Shin, Seunghyeon; Pak, Kyoung June; Kwon, Seong Young; Shim, Hye Kyung; Choi, Bong-Hoi; Kim, In-Suk; Shin, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Seong-Geun; Oh, So-Yeon

    2016-03-01

    Bone marrow involvement (BMI) in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) was naively regarded as an adverse clinical factor. However, it has been unknown which factor would separate clinical outcomes in DLBCL patients with BMI. Recently, metabolic tumor volume (MTV) on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) was suggested to predict prognosis in several lymphoma types. Therefore, we investigated whether MTV would separate the outcomes in DLBCL patients with BMI. MTV on PET/CT was defined as an initial tumor burden as target lesion ≥ standard uptake value, 2.5 in 107 patients with BMI. Intramedullary (IM) MTV was defined as extent of BMI and total MTV was as whole tumor burden. 260.5 cm(3) and 601.2 cm(3) were ideal cut-off values for dividing high and low MTV status in the IM and total lymphoma lesions in Receiver Operating Curve analysis. High risk NCCN-IPI (phigh IM MTV status (phigh total MTV status (phigh risk NCCN-IPI (PFS, p=0.006; OS, p=0.013), concordant subtype (PFS, p=0.005; OS, p=0.007), and high total MTV status (PFS, p<0.001; OS, p<0.001) had independent clinical impacts. MTV had prognostic significances for survivals in DLBCL with BMI.

  7. Sarcopenia Impairs Prognosis of Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma: The Role of Liver Functional Reserve and Tumor-Related Factors in Loss of Skeletal Muscle Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Imai

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia impairs survival in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. This study aimed to clarify the factors that contribute to decreased skeletal muscle volume in patients with HCC. The third lumbar vertebra skeletal muscle index (L3 SMI in 351 consecutive patients with HCC was calculated to identify sarcopenia. Sarcopenia was defined as an L3 SMI value ≤ 29.0 cm2/m2 for women and ≤ 36.0 cm2/m2 for men. The factors affecting L3 SMI were analyzed by multiple linear regression analysis and tree-based models. Of the 351 HCC patients, 33 were diagnosed as having sarcopenia and showed poor prognosis compared with non-sarcopenia patients (p = 0.007. However, this significant difference disappeared after the adjustments for age, sex, Child–Pugh score, maximum tumor size, tumor number, and the degree of portal vein invasion by propensity score matching analysis. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that age (p = 0.015 and sex (p < 0.0001 were significantly correlated with a decrease in L3 SMI. Tree-based models revealed that sex (female is the most significant factor that affects L3 SMI. In male patients, L3 SMI was decreased by aging, increased Child–Pugh score (≥56 years, and enlarged tumor size (<56 years. Maintaining liver functional reserve and early diagnosis and therapy for HCC are vital to prevent skeletal muscle depletion and improve the prognosis of patients with HCC.

  8. Improving the prognostic value of disease specific Graded Prognostic Assessment (ds-GPA) model for renal cell carcinoma by incorporation of Cumulative Intracranial Tumor Volume (CITV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mir Amaan; Hirshman, Brian R; Wilson, Bayard; Schupper, Alexander J; Joshi, Rushikesh; Proudfoot, James A; Goetsch, Steven J; Alksne, John F; Ott, Kenneth; Aiyama, Hitoshi; Nagano, Osamu; Carter, Bob S; Chiang, Veronica; Serizawa, Toru; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Chen, Clark C

    2017-07-25

    We tested the prognostic value of cumulative intracranial tumor volume (CITV) in the context of ds-GPA model for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients with brain metastasis (BM) treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Patient and tumor characteristics were collected from RCC cohorts with newly BM who underwent SRS. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression model was used to test the prognostic value of CITV, Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS), and the number of BM. Net reclassification improvement (NRI) and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) were used to assess whether CITV improved the prognostic utility of RCC ds-GPA. In univariable logistic regression models, CITV, KPS, and the number of BM independently associated with RCC patient survival. In a multivariable Cox proportional hazard model, the association between CITV and survival remained robust after controlling for KPS and the number of BM (P=.042). The incorporation of the cumulative intracranial tumor volume (CITV) into the RCC ds-GPA model (consisting of KPS and number of BM) improved prognostic accuracy with NRI>0 of 0.3156 (95% CI: 0.0883-0.5428, P=.0065) and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) of 0.0151 (95% CI: 0.0036-0.0277, P=.0183). These findings were validated in an independent cohort of 107 SRS-treated RCC BM patients. CITV is an important prognostic variable in SRS-treated RCC patients with BM. The prognostic value of the ds-GPA scale for RCC brain metastasis was enhanced by the incorporation of CITV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Time-Adjusted Internal Target Volume: A Novel Approach Focusing on Heterogeneity of Tumor Motion Based on 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography Imaging for Radiation Therapy Planning of Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishibuchi, Ikuno [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima Prefectural Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Kimura, Tomoki, E-mail: tkkimura@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Nakashima, Takeo; Ochi, Yusuke [Division of Radiation Therapy, Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Takahashi, Ippei; Doi, Yoshiko; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Ozawa, Syuichi; Murakami, Yuji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Wadasaki, Koichi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima Prefectural Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To consider nonuniform tumor motion within the internal target volume (ITV) by defining time-adjusted ITV (TTV), a volume designed to include heterogeneity of tumor existence on the basis of 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). Methods and Materials: We evaluated 30 lung cancer patients. Breath-hold CT (BH-CT) and free-breathing 4D-CT scans were acquired for each patient. The tumors were manually delineated using a lung CT window setting (window, 1600 HU; level, −300 HU). Tumor in BH-CT images was defined as gross tumor volume (GTV), and the sum of tumors in 4D-CT images was defined as ITV-4D. The TTV images were generated from the 4D-CT datasets, and the tumor existence probability within ITV-4D was calculated. We calculated the TTV{sub 80} value, which is the percentage of the volume with a tumor existence probability that exceeded 80% on ITV-4D. Several factors that affected the TTV{sub 80} value, such as the ITV-4D/GTV ratio or tumor centroid deviation, were evaluated. Results: Time-adjusted ITV images were acquired for all patients, and tumor respiratory motion heterogeneity was visualized. The median (range) ITV-4D/GTV ratio and median tumor centroid deviation were 1.6 (1.0-4.1) and 6.3 mm (0.1-30.3 mm), respectively. The median TTV{sub 80} value was 43.3% (2.9-98.7%). Strong correlations were observed between the TTV{sub 80} value and the ITV-4D/GTV ratio (R=−0.71) and tumor centroid deviation (R=−0.72). The TTV images revealed the tumor motion pattern features within ITV. Conclusions: The TTV images reflected nonuniform tumor motion, and they revealed the tumor motion pattern features, suggesting that the TTV concept may facilitate various aspects of radiation therapy planning of lung cancer while incorporating respiratory motion in the future.

  10. Monotone viable trajectories for functional differential inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Georges

    This paper is a study on functional differential inclusions with memory which represent the multivalued version of retarded functional differential equations. The main result gives a necessary and sufficient equations. The main result gives a necessary and sufficient condition ensuring the existence of viable trajectories; that means trajectories remaining in a given nonempty closed convex set defined by given constraints the system must satisfy to be viable. Some motivations for this paper can be found in control theory where F( t, φ) = { f( t, φ, u)} uɛU is the set of possible velocities of the system at time t, depending on the past history represented by the function φ and on a control u ranging over a set U of controls. Other motivations can be found in planning procedures in microeconomics and in biological evolutions where problems with memory do effectively appear in a multivalued version. All these models require viability constraints represented by a closed convex set.

  11. Regulation of Viable and Optimal Cohorts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubin, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: aubin.jp@gmail.com [VIMADES (Viabilité, Marchés, Automatique, Décisions) (France)

    2015-10-15

    This study deals with the evolution of (scalar) attributes (resources or income in evolutionary demography or economics, position in traffic management, etc.) of a population of “mobiles” (economic agents, vehicles, etc.). The set of mobiles sharing the same attributes is regarded as an instantaneous cohort described by the number of its elements. The union of instantaneous cohorts during a mobile window between two attributes is a cohort. Given a measure defining the number of instantaneous cohorts, the accumulation of the mobile attributes on a evolving mobile window is the measure of the cohort on this temporal mobile window. Imposing accumulation constraints and departure conditions, this study is devoted to the regulation of the evolutions of the attributes which are1.viable in the sense that the accumulations constraints are satisfied at each instant;2.and, among them, optimal, in the sense that both the duration of the temporal mobile window is maximum and that the accumulation on this temporal mobile window is the largest viable one. This value is the “accumulation valuation” function. Viable and optimal evolutions under accumulation constraints are regulated by an “implicit Volterra integro-differential inclusion” built from the accumulation valuation function, solution to an Hamilton–Jacobi–Bellman partial differential equation under constraints which is constructed for this purpose.

  12. Measurements of diagnostic examination performance and correlation analysis using microvascular leakage, cerebral blood volume, and blood flow derived from 3T dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging in glial tumor grading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Server, Andres; Nakstad, Per H. [Oslo University Hospital-Ullevaal, Section of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo (Norway); University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Graff, Bjoern A. [Oslo University Hospital-Ullevaal, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Orheim, Tone E.D.; Gadmar, Oeystein B. [Oslo University Hospital, Interventional Centre, Oslo (Norway); Schellhorn, Till [Oslo University Hospital-Ullevaal, Section of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Josefsen, Roger [Oslo University Hospital-Ullevaal, Department of Neurosurgery, Oslo (Norway)

    2011-06-15

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of microvascular leakage (MVL), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and blood flow (CBF) values derived from dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging (DSC-MR imaging) for grading of cerebral glial tumors, and to estimate the correlation between vascular permeability/perfusion parameters and tumor grades. A prospective study of 79 patients with cerebral glial tumors underwent DSC-MR imaging. Normalized relative CBV (rCBV) and relative CBF (rCBF) from tumoral (rCBVt and rCBFt), peri-enhancing region (rCBVe and rCBFe), and the value in the tumor divided by the value in the peri-enhancing region (rCBVt/e and rCBFt/e), as well as MVL, expressed as the leakage coefficient K{sub 2} were calculated. Hemodynamic variables and tumor grades were analyzed statistically and with Pearson correlations. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were also performed for each of the variables. The differences in rCBVt and the maximum MVL (MVL{sub max}) values were statistically significant among all tumor grades. Correlation analysis using Pearson was as follows: rCBVt and tumor grade, r = 0.774; rCBFt and tumor grade, r = 0.417; MVL{sub max} and tumor grade, r = 0.559; MVL{sub max} and rCBVt, r = 0.440; MVL{sub max} and rCBFt, r = 0.192; and rCBVt and rCBFt, r = 0.605. According to ROC analyses for distinguishing tumor grade, rCBVt showed the largest areas under ROC curve (AUC), except for grade III from IV. Both rCBVt and MVL{sub max} showed good discriminative power in distinguishing all tumor grades. rCBVt correlated strongly with tumor grade; the correlation between MVL{sub max} and tumor grade was moderate. (orig.)

  13. Deregulation of apoptotic volume decrease and ionic movements in multidrug-resistant tumor cells: role of chloride channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Kristian Arild; Andersen, E C; Hansen, C F

    2010-01-01

    3728 inhibited AVD and completely abolished the differences in AVD, ionic movements, and caspase 3 activation between WT and MDR EATC. Finally, the maximal capacity of volume-regulated anion channel was found to be strongly repressed in MDR EATC. Together, these data suggest that impairment of AVD......, MDR EATC underwent a less pronounced AVD(1,) an augmented AVD(T), and a delay in induction of AVD(2). Changes in AVD were associated with inhibition of Cl(-) loss during AVD(1), augmented NaCl uptake during AVD(T), and a delay of Cl(-) loss during AVD(2). Application of the anion channel inhibitor NS...

  14. Dosimetric consequences of tumor volume changes after kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography for non-operative lung cancer during adaptive intensity-modulated radiotherapy or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Hu; Ximing Xu; Guangjin Yuan; Wei Ge; Liming Xu; Aihua Zhang; Junjian Deng

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate tumor volume changes with kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) and their dosimetric consequences for non-operative lung cancer during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Methods Eighteen patients with non-operative lung cancer who received IMRT consisting of 1.8-2.2 Gy/fraction and five fractions per week or stereotactic radiotherapy with 5-8 Gy/fraction and three fractions a week were studied. kV-CBCT was performed once per week during IMRT and at every fraction during stereotactic radiotherapy. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was contoured on the kV-CBCT images, and adaptive treatment plans were created using merged kV-CBCT and primary planning computed tomogra-phy image sets. Tumor volume changes and dosimetric parameters, including the minimum dose to 95%(D95) or 1% (D1) of the planning target volume (PTV), mean lung dose (MLD), and volume of lung tissue that received more than 5 (V5), 10 (V10), 20 (V20), and 30 (V30) Gy were retrospectively analyzed. Results The average maximum change in GTV observed during IMRT or fractionated stereotactic radio-therapy was -25.85% (range, -13.09% --56.76%). The D95 and D1 of PTV for the adaptive treatment plans in all patients were not significantly different from those for the initial or former adaptive treatment plans. In patients with tumor volume changes of >20% in the third or fourth week of treatment during IMRT, adap-tive treatment plans offered clinically meaningful decreases in MLD and V5, V10, V20, and V30; however, in patients with tumor volume changes of 20% in the third or fourth week of treatment.

  15. In vivo evaluation of battery-operated light-emitting diode-based photodynamic therapy efficacy using tumor volume and biomarker expression as endpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Mai, Zhiming; Rizvi, Imran; Hempstead, Joshua; Arnason, Stephen; Celli, Jonathan; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. In view of the increase in cancer-related mortality rates in low- to middle-income countries (LMIC), there is an urgent need to develop economical therapies that can be utilized at minimal infrastructure institutions. Photodynamic therapy (PDT), a photochemistry-based treatment modality, offers such a possibility provided that low-cost light sources and photosensitizers are available. In this proof-of-principle study, we focus on adapting the PDT light source to a low-resource setting and compare an inexpensive, portable, battery-powered light-emitting diode (LED) light source with a standard, high-cost laser source. The comparison studies were performed in vivo in a xenograft murine model of human squamous cell carcinoma subjected to 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced protoporphyrin IX PDT. We observed virtually identical control of the tumor burden by both the LED source and the standard laser source. Further insights into the biological response were evaluated by biomarker analysis of necrosis, microvessel density, and hypoxia [carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) expression] among groups of control, LED-PDT, and laser-PDT treated mice. There is no significant difference in the percent necrotic volume and CAIX expression in tumors that were treated with the two different light sources. These encouraging preliminary results merit further investigations in orthotopic animal models of cancers prevalent in LMICs. PMID:25909707

  16. Single minimum incision endoscopic radical nephrectomy for renal tumors with preoperative virtual navigation using 3D-CT volume-rendering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shioyama Yasukazu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single minimum incision endoscopic surgery (MIES involves the use of a flexible high-definition laparoscope to facilitate open surgery. We reviewed our method of radical nephrectomy for renal tumors, which is single MIES combined with preoperative virtual surgery employing three-dimensional CT images reconstructed by the volume rendering method (3D-CT images in order to safely and appropriately approach the renal hilar vessels. We also assessed the usefulness of 3D-CT images. Methods Radical nephrectomy was done by single MIES via the translumbar approach in 80 consecutive patients. We performed the initial 20 MIES nephrectomies without preoperative 3D-CT images and the subsequent 60 MIES nephrectomies with preoperative 3D-CT images for evaluation of the renal hilar vessels and the relation of each tumor to the surrounding structures. On the basis of the 3D information, preoperative virtual surgery was performed with a computer. Results Single MIES nephrectomy was successful in all patients. In the 60 patients who underwent 3D-CT, the number of renal arteries and veins corresponded exactly with the preoperative 3D-CT data (100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. These 60 nephrectomies were completed with a shorter operating time and smaller blood loss than the initial 20 nephrectomies. Conclusions Single MIES radical nephrectomy combined with 3D-CT and virtual surgery achieved a shorter operating time and less blood loss, possibly due to safer and easier handling of the renal hilar vessels.

  17. In vivo evaluation of battery-operated light-emitting diode-based photodynamic therapy efficacy using tumor volume and biomarker expression as endpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Mai, Zhiming; Rizvi, Imran; Hempstead, Joshua; Arnason, Stephen; Celli, Jonathan; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2015-04-01

    In view of the increase in cancer-related mortality rates in low- to middle-income countries (LMIC), there is an urgent need to develop economical therapies that can be utilized at minimal infrastructure institutions. Photodynamic therapy (PDT), a photochemistry-based treatment modality, offers such a possibility provided that low-cost light sources and photosensitizers are available. In this proof-of-principle study, we focus on adapting the PDT light source to a low-resource setting and compare an inexpensive, portable, battery-powered light-emitting diode (LED) light source with a standard, high-cost laser source. The comparison studies were performed in vivo in a xenograft murine model of human squamous cell carcinoma subjected to 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced protoporphyrin IX PDT. We observed virtually identical control of the tumor burden by both the LED source and the standard laser source. Further insights into the biological response were evaluated by biomarker analysis of necrosis, microvessel density, and hypoxia [carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) expression] among groups of control, LED-PDT, and laser-PDT treated mice. There is no significant difference in the percent necrotic volume and CAIX expression in tumors that were treated with the two different light sources. These encouraging preliminary results merit further investigations in orthotopic animal models of cancers prevalent in LMICs.

  18. Predictive and prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume (MTV in patients with laryngeal carcinoma treated by radiotherapy (RT / concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichiro Yabuki

    Full Text Available To evaluate the predictive and prognostic value of pretreatment metabolic tumor volume (MTV in patients with treated by radiotherapy (RT or concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT.We reviewed the records of 118 patients with newly diagnosed laryngeal carcinoma, who had been treated by RT or CCRT. Pretreatment positron emission tomography (PET was performed, and MTV values were obtained by contouring margins of standardized uptake value. Clinical factors and MTV were analyzed for their association with survival.Patients with residual disease showed a significantly higher MTV than those with a complete response (CR after primary treatment. Univariate analysis showed that the patients with a high MTV had a significantly lower disease-free survival (DFS (p < 0.001. Subsite (p = 0.010, T-stage (p < 0.001, nodal metastasis (p < 0.001 and clinical stage (p < 0.001 also correlated significantly with DFS. In the multivariate analysis, MTV and clinical stage were both found to be independent prognostic factors for DFS (p = 0.001, p = 0.034, respectively. The 3-year DFS for patients with a high MTV were significantly poorer than those with a low MTV (p < 0.001.MTV of the primary tumor is a significant prognostic factor for DFS in patients with laryngeal carcinoma treated by RT or CCRT. The results imply that MTV could be an important factor when planning treatment and follow-up for patients with laryngeal carcinoma.

  19. Natural transfer of viable microbes in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mileikowsky, C; Cucinotta, F A; Wilson, J W; Gladman, B; Horneck, G; Lindegren, L; Melosh, J; Rickman, H; Valtonen, M; Zheng, J Q

    2000-06-01

    The possibility and probability of natural transfer of viable microbes from Mars to Earth and Earth to Mars traveling in meteoroids during the first 0.5 Ga and the following 4 Ga are investigated, including: --radiation protection against the galactic cosmic ray nuclei and the solar rays, dose rates as a function of the meteorite's radial column mass (radius x density), combined with dose rates generated by natural radioactivity within the meteorite; and survival curves for some bacterial species using NASA's HZETRN transport code --other factors affecting microbe survival: vacuum; central meteorite temperatures at launch, orbiting, and arrival; pressure and acceleration at launch; spontaneous DNA decay; metal ion migration --mean sizes and numbers of unshocked meteorites ejected and percentage falling on Earth, using current semiempirical results --viable flight times for the microbe species Bacillus subtilis and Deinococcus radiodurans R1 --the approximate fraction of microbes (with properties like the two species studied) viably arriving on Earth out of those ejected from Mars during the period 4 Ga BP to the present time, and during the 700 Ma from 4.5 to 3.8 Ga. Similarly, from Earth to Mars. The conclusion is that if microbes existed or exist on Mars, viable transfer to Earth is not only possible but also highly probable, due to microbes' impressive resistance to the dangers of space transfer and to the dense traffic of billions of martian meteorites which have fallen on Earth since the dawn of our planetary system. Earth-to-Mars transfer is also possible but at a much lower frequency.

  20. Technical review of target volume delineation on the posterior fossa tumor: an optimal head and neck position

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sang Min; Lee, Sang Wook; Ahn, Seung Do; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yi, Byong Yong; Ra, Young Shin; Ghim, Thad; Choi, Eun Kyung [College of Medicine, Ulsan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-03-01

    To explore a 3D conformal radiotherapy technique for a posterior fossa boost, and the potential advantages of a prone position for such radiotherapy, A CT simulator and 3D conformal radiotherapy planning system was used for the posterior fossa boost treatment of a 13-year-old medulloblastoma patient. He was placed in the prone position and immobilized with an aquaplast mask and immobilization mold. CT scans were obtained of the brain from the top of the skull to the lower neck, with IV contrast enhancement. The target volume and normal structures were delineated on each slice, with treatment planning performed using non-coplanar conformal beams. The CT scans, and treatment in the prone position, were performed successfully. In the prone position, the definition of the target volume was made easier due to the well enhanced tentorium. In addition, the posterior fossa was located anteriorly, and with the greater choice of beam arrangements, more accurate treatment planning was possible as the primary beams were not obstructed by the treatment table. A posterior fossa boost, in the prone position, is feasible in cooperating patients, but further evaluation is needed to define the optimal and most comfortable treatment positions.

  1. Parejas viables que perduran en el tiempo

    OpenAIRE

    Juan José Cuervo Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    El presente artículo científico presenta resultados del proceso llevado a cabo en el proyecto de investigación docente "Mecanismos de autorregulación en parejas viables que perduran en el tiempo". Se soporta en una mirada compleja de la psicología basada en una epistemología de la construcción. En el ámbito metodológico, se inscribe en los estudios de terapia familiar desde una perspectiva de la comunicación humana como un todo integrado. Participaron nueve parejas. Los criterios de inclusión...

  2. Commercially viable strategies for enhancing coal quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Patwardhan; Y.P. Chugh [Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL (United States). Department of Mining and Mineral Resources Engineering

    2005-12-01

    The focus of this research is on coal quality enhancement, which includes reduction in the sulfur content and increase in heating value through simple, innovative, and commercially viable coal cleaning strategies. These strategies involve fine coal cleaning, plant optimization, partial coarse coal liberation, and multiple product generation. Evaluations on five mines in Illinois have indicated a potential to reduce the sulfur dioxide emission potential of these coals by up to 20%, while increasing the product heating value by up to 250 kcal/kg (450 BTU/lb). In addition, increases in coal yield by 2-6% are predicted depending on the specific conditions at the evaluated mine.

  3. Influence of Software Tool and Methodological Aspects of Total Metabolic Tumor Volume Calculation on Baseline [18F]FDG PET to Predict Survival in Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Kanoun

    Full Text Available To investigate the respective influence of software tool and total metabolic tumor volume (TMTV0 calculation method on prognostic stratification of baseline 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography ([18F]FDG-PET in newly diagnosed Hodgkin lymphoma (HL.59 patients with newly diagnosed HL were retrospectively included. [18F]FDG-PET was performed before any treatment. Four sets of TMTV0 were calculated with Beth Israel (BI software: based on an absolute threshold selecting voxel with standardized uptake value (SUV >2.5 (TMTV02.5, applying a per-lesion threshold of 41% of the SUV max (TMTV041 and using a per-patient adapted threshold based on SUV max of the liver (>125% and >140% of SUV max of the liver background; TMTV0125 and TMTV0140. TMTV041 was also determined with commercial software for comparison of software tools. ROC curves were used to determine the optimal threshold for each TMTV0 to predict treatment failure.Median follow-up was 39 months. There was an excellent correlation between TMTV041 determined with BI and with the commercial software (r = 0.96, p<0.0001. The median TMTV0 value for TMTV041, TMTV02.5, TMTV0125 and TMTV0140 were respectively 160 (used as reference, 210 ([28;154] p = 0.005, 183 ([-4;114] p = 0.06 and 143 ml ([-58;64] p = 0.9. The respective optimal TMTV0 threshold and area under curve (AUC for prediction of progression free survival (PFS were respectively: 313 ml and 0.70, 432 ml and 0.68, 450 ml and 0.68, 330 ml and 0.68. There was no significant difference between ROC curves. High TMTV0 value was predictive of poor PFS in all methodologies: 4-years PFS was 83% vs 42% (p = 0.006 for TMTV02.5, 83% vs 41% (p = 0.003 for TMTV041, 85% vs 40% (p<0.001 for TMTV0125 and 83% vs 42% (p = 0.004 for TMTV0140.In newly diagnosed HL, baseline metabolic tumor volume values were significantly influenced by the choice of the method used for determination of volume. However, no significant differences were found

  4. Proton Treatment Techniques for Posterior Fossa Tumors: Consequences for Linear Energy Transfer and Dose-Volume Parameters for the Brainstem and Organs at Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Adams, Judith; MacDonald, Shannon M; Paganetti, Harald

    2017-02-01

    In proton therapy of posterior fossa tumors, at least partial inclusion of the brainstem in the target is necessary because of its proximity to the tumor and required margins. Additionally, the preferred beam geometry results in directing the field distal edge toward this critical structure, raising concerns for brainstem toxicity. Some treatment techniques place the beam's distal edge within the brainstem (dose-sparing techniques), and others avoid elevated linear energy transfer (LET) of the proton field by placing the distal edge beyond it (LET-sparing techniques). Hybrid approaches are also being used. We examine the dosimetric efficacy of these techniques, accounting for LET-dependent and dose-dependent variable relative biologic effectiveness (RBE) distributions. Six techniques were applied in ependymoma cases: (a) 3-field dose-sparing; (b) 3-field LET-sparing; (c) 2-field dose-sparing, wide angles; (d) 2-field LET-sparing, wide angles; (e) 2-field LET-sparing, steep angles; and (f) 2-field LET-sparing with feathered distal end. Monte Carlo calculated dose, LET, and RBE-weighted dose distributions were compared. Decreased LET values in the brainstem by LET-sparing techniques were accompanied by higher, not statistically significant, median dose: 53.6 Gy(RBE), 53.4 Gy(RBE), and 54.3 Gy(RBE) for techniques (b), (d), and (e) versus 52.1 Gy(RBE) for technique (a). Accounting for variable RBE distributions, the brainstem volume receiving at least 55 Gy(RBE) increased from 72.5% for technique (a) to 80.3% for (b) (Ptechnique (c) to 77.6% for (d) (Ptechniques compared with the corresponding dose-sparing (P=.03 and .004). Extending the proton range beyond the brainstem to reduce LET results in clinically comparable maximum radiobiologic effective dose to this sensitive structure. However this method significantly increasing the brainstem volume receiving RBE-weighted dose higher than 55 Gy(RBE) with possible consequences based on known dose-volume parameters

  5. Beam-specific planning target volumes incorporating 4D CT for pencil beam scanning proton therapy of thoracic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liyong; Kang, Minglei; Huang, Sheng; Mayer, Rulon; Thomas, Andrew; Solberg, Timothy D; McDonough, James E; Simone, Charles B

    2015-11-08

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether organ sparing and target coverage can be simultaneously maintained for pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy treatment of thoracic tumors in the presence of motion, stopping power uncertainties, and patient setup variations. Ten consecutive patients that were previously treated with proton therapy to 66.6/1.8 Gy (RBE) using double scattering (DS) were replanned with PBS. Minimum and maximum intensity images from 4D CT were used to introduce flexible smearing in the determination of the beam specific PTV (BSPTV). Datasets from eight 4D CT phases, using ± 3% uncertainty in stopping power and ± 3 mm uncertainty in patient setup in each direction, were used to create 8 × 12 × 10 = 960 PBS plans for the evaluation of 10 patients. Plans were normalized to provide identical coverage between DS and PBS. The average lung V20, V5, and mean doses were reduced from 29.0%, 35.0%, and 16.4 Gy with DS to 24.6%, 30.6%, and 14.1 Gy with PBS, respectively. The average heart V30 and V45 were reduced from 10.4% and 7.5% in DS to 8.1% and 5.4% for PBS, respectively. Furthermore, the maximum spinal cord, esophagus, and heart doses were decreased from 37.1 Gy, 71.7 Gy, and 69.2 Gy with DS to 31.3 Gy, 67.9 Gy, and 64.6 Gy with PBS. The conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), and global maximal dose were improved from 3.2, 0.08, 77.4 Gy with DS to 2.8, 0.04, and 72.1 Gy with PBS. All differences are statistically significant, with p-values <0.05, with the exception of the heart V45 (p = 0.146). PBS with BSPTV achieves better organ sparing and improves target coverage using a repainting method for the treatment of thoracic tumors. Incorporating motion-related uncertainties is essential.

  6. More Accurate Definition of Clinical Target Volume Based on the Measurement of Microscopic Extensions of the Primary Tumor Toward the Uterus Body in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Ib-IIa Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Cervix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Wen-Jia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong Province (China); Wu, Xiao [Department of Pathology, Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong Province (China); Xue, Ren-Liang; Lin, Xiang-Ying [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong Province (China); Kidd, Elizabeth A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Yan, Shu-Mei [Department of Pathology, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province (China); Zhang, Yao-Hong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chaozhou Hospital of Chaozhou City, Guangdong Province (China); Zhai, Tian-Tian; Lu, Jia-Yang; Wu, Li-Li; Zhang, Hao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong Province (China); Huang, Hai-Hua [Department of Pathology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong Province (China); Chen, Zhi-Jian; Li, De-Rui [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong Province (China); Xie, Liang-Xi, E-mail: xieliangxi1@qq.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong Province (China)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To more accurately define clinical target volume for cervical cancer radiation treatment planning by evaluating tumor microscopic extension toward the uterus body (METU) in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage Ib-IIa squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix (SCCC). Patients and Methods: In this multicenter study, surgical resection specimens from 318 cases of stage Ib-IIa SCCC that underwent radical hysterectomy were included. Patients who had undergone preoperative chemotherapy, radiation, or both were excluded from this study. Microscopic extension of primary tumor toward the uterus body was measured. The association between other pathologic factors and METU was analyzed. Results: Microscopic extension toward the uterus body was not common, with only 12.3% of patients (39 of 318) demonstrating METU. The mean (±SD) distance of METU was 0.32 ± 1.079 mm (range, 0-10 mm). Lymphovascular space invasion was associated with METU distance and occurrence rate. A margin of 5 mm added to gross tumor would adequately cover 99.4% and 99% of the METU in the whole group and in patients with lymphovascular space invasion, respectively. Conclusion: According to our analysis of 318 SCCC specimens for METU, using a 5-mm gross tumor volume to clinical target volume margin in the direction of the uterus should be adequate for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage Ib-IIa SCCC. Considering the discrepancy between imaging and pathologic methods in determining gross tumor volume extent, we recommend a safer 10-mm margin in the uterine direction as the standard for clinical practice when using MRI for contouring tumor volume.

  7. Beam specific planning target volumes incorporating 4DCT for pencil beam scanning proton therapy of thoracic tumors

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Liyong; Huang, Sheng; Mayer, Rulon; Thomas, Andrew; Solberg, Timothy D; McDonough, James E; Simone, Charles B

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether organ sparing and target coverage can be simultaneously maintained for pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy treatment of thoracic tumors in the presence of motion, stopping power uncertainties and patient setup variations. Ten consecutive patients that were previously treated with proton therapy to 66.6/1.8 Gy (RBE) using double scattering (DS) were replanned with PBS. Minimum and maximum intensity images from 4DCT were used to introduce flexible smearing in the determination of the beam specific PTV (BSPTV). Datasets from eight 4DCT phases, using +-3% uncertainty in stopping power, and +-3 mm uncertainty in patient setup in each direction were used to create 8X12X10=960 PBS plans for the evaluation of ten patients. Plans were normalized to provide identical coverage between DS and PBS. The average lung V20, V5, and mean doses were reduced from 29.0%, 35.0%, and 16.4 Gy with DS to 24.6%, 30.6%, and 14.1 Gy with PBS, respectively. The average heart V30 and...

  8. The prognostic value of functional tumor volume and total lesion glycolysis in patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases undergoing {sup 90}Y selective internal radiation therapy plus chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulec, Seza A.; Suthar, Rekha R.; Barot, Tushar C. [Jackson North Medical Center, Florida International University College of Medicine, North Miami Beach, FL (United States); Pennington, Kenneth [Center for Cancer Care, Goshen, IN (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Functional tumor volume (FTV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) are measures of metabolic activity of tumors determined by fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT images. These parameters could potentially have clinical value in response to treatment evaluation and disease prognostication. The objectives of this study were to investigate the relationship between functional tumor parameters (FTV and TLG) and clinical outcomes in patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRCLM) undergoing {sup 90}Y-resin microsphere selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) (SIR-Spheres {sup registered}, Sirtex Medical Limited, Lane Cove, NSW, Australia). FDG PET/CT studies of 20 patients with unresectable CRCLM who underwent {sup 90}Y SIRT under a phase II clinical trial were analyzed. FTV and TLG were calculated using PET VCAR (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI, USA) on pretreatment and 4-week posttreatment scans. The effects of pretreatment and posttreatment functional tumor activity on patient survival were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier survival curves. The median survival in the study group was 14.8 months (range 2.0-27.7 months). The median survival for patients with pretreatment FTV values of above and below 200 cc were 11.2 and 26.9 months, respectively (p < 0.05). The median survival for patients with 4-week posttreatment FTV values of above and below 30 cc were 10.9 and 26.9 months, respectively (p < 0.05). The median survival for patients with pretreatment TLG values of above and below 600 g were 11.2 and 26.9 months, respectively (p < 0.05). The median survival for patients with 4-week posttreatment TLG values of above and below 100 g were 10.9 and 26.9 months, respectively (p < 0.05). Pretreatment and posttreatment FTV and TLG showed very strong association with survival. These values can be useful quantitative criteria for patient selection and disease prognostication when {sup 90}Y SIRT is contemplated in patients with CRCLM. (orig.)

  9. Roots of success: cultivating viable community forestry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacQueen, Duncan

    2009-05-15

    Is community forestry emerging from the shadows? The evidence shows that locally controlled enterprises can be economically viable, and often build on stronger social and environmental foundations than the big private-sector players. Certainly this is an industry in need of a shakeup. Many forests have become flashpoints where agro-industry, large-scale logging concerns and conservation interests clash, while forest-dependent communities are left out in the cold. Meanwhile, governments – driven by concerns over the climate impacts of deforestation – are having to gear up for legal, sustainable forestry production. Community forestry could be crucial to solving many of these challenges. By building on local core capabilities and developing strategic partnerships, they are forging key new business models that could transform the sector.

  10. Viable harvest of monotone bioeconomic models

    CERN Document Server

    De Lara, Michel; Cabrera, Hector Ramirez

    2009-01-01

    Some monospecies age class models, as well as specific multi-species models (with so-called technical interactions), exhibit useful monotonicity properties. This paper deals with discrete time monotone bioeconomics dynamics in the presence of state and control constraints. In practice, these latter ``acceptable configurations'' represent production and preservation requirements to be satisfied for all time, and they also possess monotonicity properties. A state $\\state$ is said to belong to the viability kernel if there exists a trajectory, of states and controls, starting from $\\state$ and satisfying the constraints. Under monotonicity assumptions, we present upper and lower estimates of the viability kernel. This helps delineating domains where a viable management is possible. Numerical examples, in the context of fisheries management, for the Chilean sea bass (\\emph{Dissostichus eleginoides}) and Alfonsino (\\emph{Beryx splendens}) are given.

  11. Polymerase chain reaction-based discrimination of viable from non-viable Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching Giap Tan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study was based on the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR of the 16S ribosomal nucleic acid (rRNA of Mycoplasma for detection of viable Mycoplasma gallisepticum. To determine the stability of M. gallisepticum 16S rRNA in vitro, three inactivation methods were used and the suspensions were stored at different temperatures. The 16S rRNA of M. gallisepticum was detected up to approximately 20–25 h at 37 °C, 22–25 h at 16 °C, and 23–27 h at 4 °C. The test, therefore, could detect viable or recently dead M. gallisepticum (< 20 h. The RT-PCR method was applied during an in vivo study of drug efficacy under experimental conditions, where commercial broiler-breeder eggs were inoculated with M. gallisepticum into the yolk. Hatched chicks that had been inoculated in ovo were treated with Macrolide 1. The method was then applied in a flock of day 0 chicks with naturally acquired vertical transmission of M. gallisepticum, treated with Macrolide 2. Swabs of the respiratory tract were obtained for PCR and RT-PCR evaluations to determine the viability of M. gallisepticum. This study proved that the combination of both PCR and RT-PCR enables detection and differentiation of viable from non-viable M. gallisepticum.

  12. SU-E-J-266: Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Inter-Scan and Inter-Observer Tumor Volume Variability Assessment in Patients Treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Y; Aileen, C; Kozono, D; Killoran, J; Wagar, M; Lee, S; Hacker, F; Aerts, H; Lewis, J; Mak, R [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Quantification of volume changes on CBCT during SBRT for NSCLC may provide a useful radiological marker for radiation response and adaptive treatment planning, but the reproducibility of CBCT volume delineation is a concern. This study is to quantify inter-scan/inter-observer variability in tumor volume delineation on CBCT. Methods: Twenty earlystage (stage I and II) NSCLC patients were included in this analysis. All patients were treated with SBRT with a median dose of 54 Gy in 3 to 5 fractions. Two physicians independently manually contoured the primary gross tumor volume on CBCTs taken immediately before SBRT treatment (Pre) and after the same SBRT treatment (Post). Absolute volume differences (AVD) were calculated between the Pre and Post CBCTs for a given treatment to quantify inter-scan variability, and then between the two observers for a given CBCT to quantify inter-observer variability. AVD was also normalized with respect to average volume to obtain relative volume differences (RVD). Bland-Altman approach was used to evaluate variability. All statistics were calculated with SAS version 9.4. Results: The 95% limit of agreement (mean ± 2SD) on AVD and RVD measurements between Pre and Post scans were −0.32cc to 0.32cc and −0.5% to 0.5% versus −1.9 cc to 1.8 cc and −15.9% to 15.3% for the two observers respectively. The 95% limit of agreement of AVD and RVD between the two observers were −3.3 cc to 2.3 cc and −42.4% to 28.2% respectively. The greatest variability in inter-scan RVD was observed with very small tumors (< 5 cc). Conclusion: Inter-scan variability in RVD is greatest with small tumors. Inter-observer variability was larger than inter-scan variability. The 95% limit of agreement for inter-observer and inter-scan variability (∼15–30%) helps define a threshold for clinically meaningful change in tumor volume to assess SBRT response, with larger thresholds needed for very small tumors. Part of the work was funded by a Kaye

  13. Reduction in Tumor Volume by Cone Beam Computed Tomography Predicts Overall Survival in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabbour, Salma K., E-mail: jabbousk@cinj.rutgers.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Kim, Sinae [Division of Biometrics, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Haider, Syed A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Xu, Xiaoting [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Soochow (China); Wu, Alson [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Surakanti, Sujani; Aisner, Joseph [Division of Medical Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Langenfeld, John [Division of Surgery, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Yue, Ning J.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Zou, Wei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: We sought to evaluate whether tumor response using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) performed as part of the routine care during chemoradiation therapy (CRT) could forecast the outcome of unresectable, locally advanced, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We manually delineated primary tumor volumes (TV) of patients with NSCLC who were treated with radical CRT on days 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 36, and 43 on CBCTs obtained as part of the standard radiation treatment course. Percentage reductions in TV were calculated and then correlated to survival and pattern of recurrence using Cox proportional hazard models. Clinical information including histologic subtype was also considered in the study of such associations. Results: We evaluated 38 patients with a median follow-up time of 23.4 months. The median TV reduction was 39.3% (range, 7.3%-69.3%) from day 1 (D1) to day 43 (D43) CBCTs. Overall survival was associated with TV reduction from D1 to D43 (hazard ratio [HR] 0.557, 95% CI 0.39-0.79, P=.0009). For every 10% decrease in TV from D1 to D43, the risk of death decreased by 44.3%. For patients whose TV decreased ≥39.3 or <39.3%, log-rank test demonstrated a separation in survival (P=.02), with median survivals of 31 months versus 10 months, respectively. Neither local recurrence (HR 0.791, 95% CI 0.51-1.23, P=.29), nor distant recurrence (HR 0.78, 95% CI 0.57-1.08, P=.137) correlated with TV decrease from D1 to D43. Histologic subtype showed no impact on our findings. Conclusions: TV reduction as determined by CBCT during CRT as part of routine care predicts post-CRT survival. Such knowledge may justify intensification of RT or application of additional therapies. Assessment of genomic characteristics of these tumors may permit a better understanding of behavior or prediction of therapeutic outcomes.

  14. The Conceptual Mechanism for Viable Organizational Learning Based on Complex System Theory and the Viable System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Dia; You, Yeongmahn; Song, Ji Hoon

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to explore the possibility of viable learning organizations based on identifying viable organizational learning mechanisms. Two theoretical foundations, complex system theory and viable system theory, have been integrated to provide the rationale for building the sustainable organizational learning mechanism. The…

  15. Developing Viable Financing Models for Space Tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilingsfeld, F.; Schaetzler, D.

    2002-01-01

    Increasing commercialization of space services and the impending release of government's control of space access promise to make space ventures more attractive. Still, many investors shy away from going into the space tourism market as long as they do not feel secure that their return expectations will be met. First and foremost, attracting investors from the capital markets requires qualifying financing models. Based on earlier research on the cost of capital for space tourism, this paper gives a brief run-through of commercial, technical and financial due diligence aspects. After that, a closer look is taken at different valuation techniques as well as alternative ways of streamlining financials. Experience from earlier ventures has shown that the high cost of capital represents a significant challenge. Thus, the sophistication and professionalism of business plans and financial models needs to be very high. Special emphasis is given to the optimization of the debt-to-equity ratio over time. The different roles of equity and debt over a venture's life cycle are explained. Based on the latter, guidelines for the design of an optimized loan structure are given. These are then applied to simulating the financial performance of a typical space tourism venture over time, including the calculation of Weighted Average Cost of Capital (WACC) and Net Present Value (NPV). Based on a concluding sensitivity analysis, the lessons learned are presented. If applied properly, these will help to make space tourism economically viable.

  16. Economically viable large-scale hydrogen liquefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardella, U.; Decker, L.; Klein, H.

    2017-02-01

    The liquid hydrogen demand, particularly driven by clean energy applications, will rise in the near future. As industrial large scale liquefiers will play a major role within the hydrogen supply chain, production capacity will have to increase by a multiple of today’s typical sizes. The main goal is to reduce the total cost of ownership for these plants by increasing energy efficiency with innovative and simple process designs, optimized in capital expenditure. New concepts must ensure a manageable plant complexity and flexible operability. In the phase of process development and selection, a dimensioning of key equipment for large scale liquefiers, such as turbines and compressors as well as heat exchangers, must be performed iteratively to ensure technological feasibility and maturity. Further critical aspects related to hydrogen liquefaction, e.g. fluid properties, ortho-para hydrogen conversion, and coldbox configuration, must be analysed in detail. This paper provides an overview on the approach, challenges and preliminary results in the development of efficient as well as economically viable concepts for large-scale hydrogen liquefaction.

  17. Deletion of ultraconserved elements yields viable mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahituv, Nadav; Zhu, Yiwen; Visel, Axel; Holt, Amy; Afzal, Veena; Pennacchio, Len A.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2007-07-15

    Ultraconserved elements have been suggested to retainextended perfect sequence identity between the human, mouse, and ratgenomes due to essential functional properties. To investigate thenecessities of these elements in vivo, we removed four non-codingultraconserved elements (ranging in length from 222 to 731 base pairs)from the mouse genome. To maximize the likelihood of observing aphenotype, we chose to delete elements that function as enhancers in amouse transgenic assay and that are near genes that exhibit markedphenotypes both when completely inactivated in the mouse as well as whentheir expression is altered due to other genomic modifications.Remarkably, all four resulting lines of mice lacking these ultraconservedelements were viable and fertile, and failed to reveal any criticalabnormalities when assayed for a variety of phenotypes including growth,longevity, pathology and metabolism. In addition more targeted screens,informed by the abnormalities observed in mice where genes in proximityto the investigated elements had been altered, also failed to revealnotable abnormalities. These results, while not inclusive of all thepossible phenotypic impact of the deleted sequences, indicate thatextreme sequence constraint does not necessarily reflect crucialfunctions required for viability.

  18. Hypoestoxide inhibits tumor growth in the mouse CT26 colon tumor model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emmanuel A Ojo-Amaize; Howard B Cottam; Olusola A Oyemade; Joseph I Okogun; Emeka J Nchekwube

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of the natural diterpenoid,hypoestoxide (HE) on the growth of established colon cancer in mice.METHODS: The CT26.WT mouse colon carcinoma cell line was grown and expanded in vitro. Following the expansion, BALB/c mice were inoculated s.c. with viable tumor cells. After the tumors had established and developed to about 80-90 mm3, the mice were started on chemotherapy by oral administration of HE, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or combination.RESULTS: The antiangiogenic HE has previously been shown to inhibit the growth of melanoma in the B16F1tumor model in C57BL/6 mice. Our results demonstrate that mean volume of tumors in mice treated with oral HE as a single agent or in combination with 5-FU, were significantly smaller (> 60%) than those in vehicle control mice (471.2 mm3 vs 1542.8 mm3, P < 0.01).The significant reductions in tumor burden resulted in pronounced mean survival times (MST) and increased life spans (ILS) in the treated mice.CONCLUSION: These results indicate that HE is an effective chemotherapeutic agent for colorectal cancer in mice and that HE may be used alone or in combination with 5-FU.

  19. SU-C-BRE-02: BED Vs. Local Control: Radiobiological Effect of Tumor Volume in Monte Carlo (MC) Lung SBRT Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokhrel, D; Badkul, R; Jiang, H; Estes, C; Park, J; Kumar, P; Wang, F [UniversityKansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: SBRT with hypofractionated dose schemata has emerged a compelling treatment modality for medically inoperable early stage lung cancer patients. It requires more accurate dose calculation and treatment delivery technique. This report presents the relationship between tumor control probability(TCP) and size-adjusted biological effective dose(sBED) of tumor volume for MC lung SBRT patients. Methods: Fifteen patients who were treated with MC-based lung SBRT to 50Gy in 5 fractions to PTVV100%=95% were studied. ITVs were delineated on MIP images of 4DCT-scans. PTVs diameter(ITV+5mm margins) ranged from 2.7–4.9cm (mean 3.7cm). Plans were generated using non-coplanar conformal arcs/beams using iPlan XVMC algorithm (BrainLABiPlan ver.4.1.2) for Novalis-TX with HD-MLCs and 6MVSRS(1000MU/min) mode, following RTOG-0813 dosimetric guidelines. To understand the known uncertainties of conventional heterogeneities-corrected/uncorrected pencil beam (PBhete/ PB-homo) algorithms, dose distributions were re-calculated with PBhete/ PB-homo using same beam configurations, MLCs and monitor units. Biologically effective dose(BED10) was computed using LQ-model with α/β=10Gy for meanPTV and meanITV. BED10-c*L, gave size-adjusted BED(sBED), where c=10Gy/cm and L=PTV diameter in centimeter. The TCP model was adopted from Ohri et al.(IJROBP, 2012): TCP = exp[sBEDTCD50]/ k /(1.0 + exp[sBED-TCD50]/k), where k=31Gy corresponding to TCD50=0Gy; and more realistic MC-based TCP was computed for PTV(V99%). Results: Mean PTV PB-hete TCP value was 6% higher, but, mean PTV PB-homo TCP value was 4% lower compared to mean PTV MC TCP. Mean ITV PB-hete/PB-homo TCP values were comparable (within ±3.0%) to mean ITV MC TCP. The mean PTV(V99%)had BED10=90.9±3.7%(median=92.2%),sBED=54.1±8.2%(median=53.5%) corresponding to mean MC TCP value of 84.8±3.3%(median=84.9%) at 2- year local control. Conclusion: The TCP model which incorporates BED10 and tumor diameter indicates that radiobiological

  20. Quantitative dual energy CT measurements in rabbit VX2 liver tumors: Comparison to perfusion CT measurements and histopathological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Long Jiang, E-mail: kevinzhanglongjiang@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, 305 Zhongshan East Road, Xuanwu District, Nangjing, Jiangsu Province 210002 (China); Wu, Shengyong, E-mail: cjr.wushengyong@vip.163.com [Institute of Tianjin Medical Imaging, Tianjin 300192 (China); Wang, Mei, E-mail: 281406196@qq.com [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, 305 Zhongshan East Road, Xuanwu District, Nangjing, Jiangsu Province 210002 (China); Lu, Li, E-mail: xuzhoululi@163.com [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, 305 Zhongshan East Road, Xuanwu District, Nangjing, Jiangsu Province 210002 (China); Chen, Bo, E-mail: chenbo1985@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, 305 Zhongshan East Road, Xuanwu District, Nangjing, Jiangsu Province 210002 (China); Jin, Lixin, E-mail: lixin.jin@siemens.com [Siemens Healthcare, MR Collaboration NE Asia, Shanghai (China); Wang, Jiandong, E-mail: jdwang1216@163.com [Department of Pathology, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, 305 Zhongshan East Road, Xuanwu District, Nangjing, Jiangsu Province 200012 (China); Larson, Andrew C., E-mail: a-larson@northwestern.edu [Department of Radiology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Lu, Guang Ming, E-mail: cjr.luguangming@vip.163.com [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, 305 Zhongshan East Road, Xuanwu District, Nangjing, Jiangsu Province 210002 (China)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the correlation between quantitative dual energy CT and perfusion CT measurements in rabbit VX2 liver tumors. Materials and methods: This study was approved by the institutional animal care and use committee at our institution. Nine rabbits with VX2 liver tumors underwent contrast-enhanced dual energy CT and perfusion CT. CT attenuation for the tumors and normal liver parenchyma and tumor-to-liver ratio were obtained at the 140 kVp, 80 kVp, average weighted images and dual energy CT iodine maps. Quantitative parameters for the viable tumor and adjacent liver were measured with perfusion CT. The correlation between the enhancement values of the tumor in iodine maps and perfusion CT parameters of each tumor was analyzed. Radiation dose from dual energy CT and perfusion CT was measured. Results: Enhancement values for the tumor were higher than that for normal liver parenchyma at the hepatic arterial phase (P < 0.05). The highest tumor-to-liver ratio was obtained in hepatic arterial phase iodine map. Hepatic blood flow of the tumor was higher than that for adjacent liver (P < 0.05). Enhancement values of hepatic tumors in the iodine maps positively correlated with permeability of capillary vessel surface (r = 0.913, P < 0.001), hepatic blood flow (r = 0.512, P = 0.010), and hepatic blood volume (r = 0.464, P = 0.022) at the hepatic arterial phases. The effective radiation dose from perfusion CT was higher than that from DECT (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The enhancement values for viable tumor tissues measured in iodine maps were well correlated to perfusion CT measurements in rabbit VX2 liver tumors. Compared with perfusion CT, dual energy CT of the liver required a lower radiation dose.

  1. Parejas viables que perduran en el tiempo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan José Cuervo Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo científico presenta resultados del proceso llevado a cabo en el proyecto de investigación docente "Mecanismos de autorregulación en parejas viables que perduran en el tiempo". Se soporta en una mirada compleja de la psicología basada en una epistemología de la construcción. En el ámbito metodológico, se inscribe en los estudios de terapia familiar desde una perspectiva de la comunicación humana como un todo integrado. Participaron nueve parejas. Los criterios de inclusión fueron: cinco o más años de convivencia, participación voluntaria, no presentar (ni haber presentado problemáticas especiales que ameriten intervención psicoterapéutica y la obtención de un porcentaje significativo en el uso de estrategias de comunicación asertiva en la resolución de conflictos. El método general utilizado fue el análisis de la comunicación en tarea de conversación. Los principales hallazgos señalan una estrecha relación entre el contexto de desarrollo de las parejas, la emergencia de códigos comunicacionales propios y la posibilidad de perdurar en el tiempo; también, se resalta el tipo de comunicación asertiva o constructiva, la construcción de valores como el respeto y la aceptación de las diferencias, y el deseo por vivir y construir bienestar común, como elementos constitutivos de su identidad como pareja.

  2. Baseline Metabolic Tumor Volume and Total Lesion Glycolysis Are Associated With Survival Outcomes in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dholakia, Avani S. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Chaudhry, Muhammad; Leal, Jeffrey P. [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Chang, Daniel T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Raman, Siva P. [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Hacker-Prietz, Amy [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Su, Zheng; Pai, Jonathan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Oteiza, Katharine E.; Griffith, Mary E. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Wahl, Richard L. [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Tryggestad, Erik [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Pawlik, Timothy [Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Laheru, Daniel A. [Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Wolfgang, Christopher L. [Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Koong, Albert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); and others

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: Although previous studies have demonstrated the prognostic value of positron emission tomography (PET) parameters in other malignancies, the role of PET in pancreatic cancer has yet to be well established. We analyzed the prognostic utility of PET for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) undergoing fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Materials and Methods: Thirty-two patients with LAPC in a prospective clinical trial received up to 3 doses of gemcitabine, followed by 33 Gy in 5 fractions of 6.6 Gy, using SBRT. All patients received a baseline PET scan prior to SBRT (pre-SBRT PET). Metabolic tumor volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and maximum and peak standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub peak}) on pre-SBRT PET scans were calculated using custom-designed software. Disease was measured at a threshold based on the liver SUV, using the equation Liver{sub mean} + [2 × Liver{sub sd}]. Median values of PET parameters were used as cutoffs when assessing their prognostic potential through Cox regression analyses. Results: Of the 32 patients, the majority were male (n=19, 59%), 65 years or older (n=21, 66%), and had tumors located in the pancreatic head (n=27, 84%). Twenty-seven patients (84%) received induction gemcitabine prior to SBRT. Median overall survival for the entire cohort was 18.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 15.7-22.0). An MTV of 26.8 cm{sup 3} or greater (hazard ratio [HR] 4.46, 95% CI 1.64-5.88, P<.003) and TLG of 70.9 or greater (HR 3.08, 95% CI 1.18-8.02, P<.021) on pre-SBRT PET scan were associated with inferior overall survival on univariate analysis. Both pre-SBRT MTV (HR 5.13, 95% CI 1.19-22.21, P=.029) and TLG (HR 3.34, 95% CI 1.07-10.48, P=.038) remained independently associated with overall survival in separate multivariate analyses. Conclusions: Pre-SBRT MTV and TLG are potential predictive factors for overall survival in patients with LAPC and may assist in

  3. Lymphopenia Association With Gross Tumor Volume and Lung V5 and Its Effects on Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patient Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Chad [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing, E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gomez, Daniel; Levy, Lawrence; Zhuang, Yan; Gebremichael, Rediet A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hong, David S. [Department of Investigational Cancer Therapeutics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko; Welsh, James W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) can both suppress and stimulate the immune system. We sought to investigate the mechanisms underlying radiation-induced lymphopenia and its associations with patient outcomes in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Subjects consisted of 711 patients who had received definitive RT for NSCLC. A lymphocyte nadir was calculated as the minimum lymphocyte value measured during definitive RT. Associations between gross tumor volumes (GTVs) and lung dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters with lymphocyte nadirs were assessed with Spearman correlation coefficients. Relationships between lymphocyte nadirs with overall survival (OS) and event free survival (EFS) were evaluated with Kaplan-Meier analysis and compared with log-rank test results. Multivariate regressions were conducted with linear and Cox regression analyses. All variables were analyzed as continuous if possible. Results: Larger GTVs were correlated with lower lymphocyte nadirs regardless of concurrent chemotherapy receipt (with concurrent: r = −0.26, P<.0001; without: r = −0.48, P<.0001). Analyses of lung DVH parameters revealed significant correlations at lower doses (lung V5-V10: P<.0001) that incrementally decreased and became nonsignificant at higher doses (lung V60-V70: P>.05). Of note, no significant associations were detected between GTV and lung DVH parameters with total leukocyte, neutrophil, or monocyte nadirs during RT or with lymphocyte count prior to RT. Multivariate analysis revealed larger GTV (P<.0001), receipt of concurrent chemotherapy (P<.0001), twice-daily radiation fractionation (P=.02), and stage III disease (P=.05) to be associated with lower lymphocyte nadirs. On univariate analysis, patients with higher lymphocyte nadirs exhibited significantly improved OS (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.51 per 10{sup 3} lymphocytes/μL, P=.01) and EFS (HR = 0.46 per 10{sup 3} lymphocytes/μL, P<.0001). These differences held on multivariate analyses

  4. Entry of Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio fischeri into the viable but nonculturable state

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, Neelam; Ravel, J.; Straube, W.L.; Hill, R.T.; Colwell, R.R.

    upon inocu- lation and again on day 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 10, 15, 21, 31, 45 and 62. Additional volumes of samples were removed for determin- ation of plate counts by a membrane filtration method, in which cells from 5 ml or 10 ml volumes were collected... on membrane filters, which were placed on agar plates to assay for low counts of culturable cells that might occur. Also, samples were drawn on day 81 to determine direct viable counts (DVC), and nucleoid-containing cell counts (NUCC), and culturable cells...

  5. A fully automatic, threshold-based segmentation method for the estimation of the Metabolic Tumor Volume from PET images: validation on 3D printed anthropomorphic oncological lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallivanone, F.; Interlenghi, M.; Canervari, C.; Castiglioni, I.

    2016-01-01

    18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a standard functional diagnostic technique to in vivo image cancer. Different quantitative paramters can be extracted from PET images and used as in vivo cancer biomarkers. Between PET biomarkers Metabolic Tumor Volume (MTV) has gained an important role in particular considering the development of patient-personalized radiotherapy treatment for non-homogeneous dose delivery. Different imaging processing methods have been developed to define MTV. The different proposed PET segmentation strategies were validated in ideal condition (e.g. in spherical objects with uniform radioactivity concentration), while the majority of cancer lesions doesn't fulfill these requirements. In this context, this work has a twofold objective: 1) to implement and optimize a fully automatic, threshold-based segmentation method for the estimation of MTV, feasible in clinical practice 2) to develop a strategy to obtain anthropomorphic phantoms, including non-spherical and non-uniform objects, miming realistic oncological patient conditions. The developed PET segmentation algorithm combines an automatic threshold-based algorithm for the definition of MTV and a k-means clustering algorithm for the estimation of the background. The method is based on parameters always available in clinical studies and was calibrated using NEMA IQ Phantom. Validation of the method was performed both in ideal (e.g. in spherical objects with uniform radioactivity concentration) and non-ideal (e.g. in non-spherical objects with a non-uniform radioactivity concentration) conditions. The strategy to obtain a phantom with synthetic realistic lesions (e.g. with irregular shape and a non-homogeneous uptake) consisted into the combined use of standard anthropomorphic phantoms commercially and irregular molds generated using 3D printer technology and filled with a radioactive chromatic alginate. The proposed segmentation algorithm was feasible in a

  6. FDG-PET Response Prediction in Pediatric Hodgkin’s Lymphoma: Impact of Metabolically Defined Tumor Volumes and Individualized SUV Measurements on the Positive Predictive Value

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussien, Amr Elsayed M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine (KME), Forschungszentrum Jülich, Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Jülich, 52426 (Germany); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, 40225 (Germany); Furth, Christian [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Medical School, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, 39120 (Germany); Schönberger, Stefan [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Hematology and Clinical Immunology, University Children’s Hospital, Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, 40225 (Germany); Hundsdoerfer, Patrick [Department of Pediatric Oncology and Hematology, Charité Campus Virchow, Humboldt-University Berlin, Berlin, 13353 (Germany); Steffen, Ingo G.; Amthauer, Holger [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Medical School, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, 39120 (Germany); Müller, Hans-Wilhelm; Hautzel, Hubertus, E-mail: h.hautzel@fz-juelich.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine (KME), Forschungszentrum Jülich, Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Jülich, 52426 (Germany); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, 40225 (Germany)

    2015-01-28

    Background: In pediatric Hodgkin’s lymphoma (pHL) early response-to-therapy prediction is metabolically assessed by (18)F-FDG PET carrying an excellent negative predictive value (NPV) but an impaired positive predictive value (PPV). Aim of this study was to improve the PPV while keeping the optimal NPV. A comparison of different PET data analyses was performed applying individualized standardized uptake values (SUV), PET-derived metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and the product of both parameters, termed total lesion glycolysis (TLG); Methods: One-hundred-eight PET datasets (PET1, n = 54; PET2, n = 54) of 54 children were analysed by visual and semi-quantitative means. SUVmax, SUVmean, MTV and TLG were obtained the results of both PETs and the relative change from PET1 to PET2 (Δ in %) were compared for their capability of identifying responders and non-responders using receiver operating characteristics (ROC)-curves. In consideration of individual variations in noise and contrasts levels all parameters were additionally obtained after threshold correction to lean body mass and background; Results: All semi-quantitative SUV estimates obtained at PET2 were significantly superior to the visual PET2 analysis. However, ΔSUVmax revealed the best results (area under the curve, 0.92; p < 0.001; sensitivity 100%; specificity 85.4%; PPV 46.2%; NPV 100%; accuracy, 87.0%) but was not significantly superior to SUVmax-estimation at PET2 and ΔTLGmax. Likewise, the lean body mass and background individualization of the datasets did not impove the results of the ROC analyses; Conclusions: Sophisticated semi-quantitative PET measures in early response assessment of pHL patients do not perform significantly better than the previously proposed ΔSUVmax. All analytical strategies failed to improve the impaired PPV to a clinically acceptable level while preserving the excellent NPV.

  7. FDG-PET Response Prediction in Pediatric Hodgkin’s Lymphoma: Impact of Metabolically Defined Tumor Volumes and Individualized SUV Measurements on the Positive Predictive Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr Elsayed M. Hussien

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In pediatric Hodgkin’s lymphoma (pHL early response-to-therapy prediction is metabolically assessed by (18F-FDG PET carrying an excellent negative predictive value (NPV but an impaired positive predictive value (PPV. Aim of this study was to improve the PPV while keeping the optimal NPV. A comparison of different PET data analyses was performed applying individualized standardized uptake values (SUV, PET-derived metabolic tumor volume (MTV and the product of both parameters, termed total lesion glycolysis (TLG; Methods: One-hundred-eight PET datasets (PET1, n = 54; PET2, n = 54 of 54 children were analysed by visual and semi-quantitative means. SUVmax, SUVmean, MTV and TLG were obtained the results of both PETs and the relative change from PET1 to PET2 (Δ in % were compared for their capability of identifying responders and non-responders using receiver operating characteristics (ROC-curves. In consideration of individual variations in noise and contrasts levels all parameters were additionally obtained after threshold correction to lean body mass and background; Results: All semi-quantitative SUV estimates obtained at PET2 were significantly superior to the visual PET2 analysis. However, ΔSUVmax revealed the best results (area under the curve, 0.92; p < 0.001; sensitivity 100%; specificity 85.4%; PPV 46.2%; NPV 100%; accuracy, 87.0% but was not significantly superior to SUVmax-estimation at PET2 and ΔTLGmax. Likewise, the lean body mass and background individualization of the datasets did not impove the results of the ROC analyses; Conclusions: Sophisticated semi-quantitative PET measures in early response assessment of pHL patients do not perform significantly better than the previously proposed ΔSUVmax. All analytical strategies failed to improve the impaired PPV to a clinically acceptable level while preserving the excellent NPV.

  8. Prognostic Value of Metabolic Tumor Volume Measured by {sup 18F} FDG PET/CT in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas Treated by Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyu Ho; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Han, Eun Ji; Kim, Yeon Sil; Kim, Gi Wom; Na, Sea Jung; Sun, Dong Il; Jung, So Lyung; Jung, Chan Kwon; Kim, Min Sik; Lee, So Yeon; Kim, Sung Hoon [The Cathholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    We assessed the prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume (MTV) measured using {sup 18F} fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) inpatients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We retrospectively reviewed 56 patients (51 men, five women; mean age 56.0{+-}8.8 years) who had locally advanced HNSCC and underwent FDG PET/CT for initial evaluation. All patients had surgical resection and radiotherapy with or without concurrent chemotherapy. The peak standardized uptake (SUV{sup peak)} and MTV of the target lesion, including primary HNSCC and metastatic cervical lymph nodes, were measured SUV{sup peak,} MTV, and clinico pathologic variables such as age, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status, pN stage, pT stage, TNM stage, histologic grade and treatment modality to disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). On the initial FDG PET/CT scans, the median SUV{sup peakw}as 7.8 (range, 1.8-19.0) and MTV was 17.0cm{sup 3(}range, 0.1-131.0cm{sup 3)}. The estimated 2 year DFS and OS rates were 67.2% and 81.8%. The cutoff points of SUV{sup peak6}.2 and MTV 20.7cm{sup 3w}ere the best discriminative values for predicting clinical outcome. MTV and ECOG performance status were significantly related to DFS and OS on univariate and multivariate analyses (P=0.05). The MTV obtained from initial FDG PET/CT scan is a significant prognostic factor for disease recurrence and mortality in locally advanced HNSCC treated with surgery and radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy.

  9. Histogram analysis reveals a better delineation of tumor volume from background in {sup 18}F-FET PET compared to CBV maps in a hybrid PET–MR studie in gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filss, Christian P., E-mail: c.filss@fz-juelich.de [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3,-4,-5), Research Center Jülich, Jülich (Germany); Stoffels, Gabriele [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3,-4,-5), Research Center Jülich, Jülich (Germany); Galldiks, Norbert [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3,-4,-5), Research Center Jülich, Jülich (Germany); Department of Neurology, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Sabel, Michael [Department of Neurosurgery, University Düsseldorf, Medical Faculty, Düsseldorf (Germany); Wittsack, Hans J. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Düsseldorf, Medical Faculty, Düsseldorf (Germany); Coenen, Heinz H. [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3,-4,-5), Research Center Jülich, Jülich (Germany); Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA) – Section JARA-Brain (Germany); Shah, Nadim J. [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3,-4,-5), Research Center Jülich, Jülich (Germany); Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA) – Section JARA-Brain (Germany); Department of Neurology, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Aachen (Germany); Herzog, Hans [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3,-4,-5), Research Center Jülich, Jülich (Germany); Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA) – Section JARA-Brain (Germany); and others

    2014-01-11

    Anatomical imaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is currently the method of first choice for diagnostic investigation of glial tumors. However, different MR sequences may over- or underestimate tumor size and thus it may not be possible to delineate tumor from adjacent brain. In order to compensate this confinement additonal MR sequences like perfusion weighted MRI (PWI) with regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) or positron emission tomography (PET) with aminoacids are used to gain further information. Recent studies suggest that both of theses image modalities provide similar diagnostic information. For comparison tumor to brain ratios (TBR) with mean and maximum values are frequently used but results from different studies can often not be checked against each other. Furthermore, especially the maximum TBR in rCBV is at risk to be falsified by artifacts (e.g. blood vessels). These confinements are reduced by the use of histograms since all information of the VOIs are equally displayed. In this study we measured and compared the intersection of tumor and reference tissue histograms in {sup 18}F-FET PET and rCBV maps in glioma patients. Methods: Twenty-seven glioma patients with contrast enhancing lesion on T1-weighted MR images were investigated using static {sup 18}F-FET PET and rCBV in MRI using a PET–MR hybrid scanner. In all patients diagnosis was confirmed histologically (7 grade II gliomas, 6 grade III gliomas and 14 grade IV gliomas). We generated a set of tumor and reference tissue Volumes-of-Interest (VOIs) based on T1 weighted images in MRI with the tumor VOI defined by contrast enhancement and transferred these VOIs to the corresponding {sup 18}F-FET PET scans and rCBV maps. From these VOIs we generated tumor and reference tissue histograms with a unity of one for each curve integral and measured the proportion of the area under the tumor curve that falls into the reference curve for {sup 18}F-FET PET and rCBV maps for each patient. Results

  10. DNA level, tumor thickness, and stereological estimates of nuclear volume in stage I cutaneous malignant melanomas. A comparative study with analysis of prognostic impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Kristensen, I B; Grymer, F;

    1991-01-01

    index (DI) was determined by flow cytometry in adjacent sections from the same paraffin-embedded specimens. The correlation between tumor thickness and nuclear nu v was only moderate (r = .60). Euploid lesions had a smaller nuclear nu v than aneuploid tumors (2p = .01), but with considerable overlap....... No significant association between tumor thickness and DI could be demonstrated. Single-factor analysis showed prognostic value of nuclear nu v and tumor thickness (2p = .0007 and 2p = .03, respectively), whereas DI was without prognostic impact (2p = .54). When analyzing the three parameters in a Cox model...

  11. Three-dimensional segmentation of the tumor in computed tomographic images of neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deglint, Hanford J; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M; Ayres, Fábio J; Boag, Graham S; Zuffo, Marcelo K

    2007-09-01

    Segmentation of the tumor in neuroblastoma is complicated by the fact that the mass is almost always heterogeneous in nature; furthermore, viable tumor, necrosis, and normal tissue are often intermixed. Tumor definition and diagnosis require the analysis of the spatial distribution and Hounsfield unit (HU) values of voxels in computed tomography (CT) images, coupled with a knowledge of normal anatomy. Segmentation and analysis of the tissue composition of the tumor can assist in quantitative assessment of the response to therapy and in the planning of the delayed surgery for resection of the tumor. We propose methods to achieve 3-dimensional segmentation of the neuroblastic tumor. In our scheme, some of the normal structures expected in abdominal CT images are delineated and removed from further consideration; the remaining parts of the image volume are then examined for tumor mass. Mathematical morphology, fuzzy connectivity, and other image processing tools are deployed for this purpose. Expert knowledge provided by a radiologist in the form of the expected structures and their shapes, HU values, and radiological characteristics are incorporated into the segmentation algorithm. In this preliminary study, the methods were tested with 10 CT exams of four cases from the Alberta Children's Hospital. False-negative error rates of less than 12% were obtained in eight of 10 exams; however, seven of the exams had false-positive error rates of more than 20% with respect to manual segmentation of the tumor by a radiologist.

  12. Distribution of Functional Liver Volume in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients with Portal Vein Tumor Thrombus in the 1st Branch and Main Trunk Using Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography—Application to Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Ikoma

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To analyze the distribution of functional liver volume (FLV in the margin volume (MV surrounding hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC with portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT before radiation therapy (RT and to verify the safety of single photon emission computed tomography-based three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (SPECT-B3DCRT by exploring the relation of FLV in MV to radiation-induced liver disease (RILD. Methods and Materials: Clinical target volume (CTV included main tumor and PVTT, and planning target volume (PTV included CTV with a 10 mm margin. MV was defined as PTV–CTV. FLV ratio in MV was calculated as FLV in MV/MV × 100 (%. The two high-dose beams were planned to irradiate FLV as little as possible. Fifty-seven cases of HCC (26/57, 46%; Child–Pugh grade B with PVTT underwent SPECT-B3DCRT which targeted the CTV to a total dose of 45 Gy/18 fractions. The destructive ratio was defined as radiation induced dysfunctional volume/FLV × 100 (%. Results: We observed a significant negative correlation between FLV ratio in MV and CTV (p < 0.001. Three cases with CTVs of 287, 587 and 1184 cm3 experienced transient RILD. The FLV ratio in MV was highest in patients with RILD: nine patients with CTV of 200–300 cm3, three with CTV of 500–600 cm3, and two with CTV of 1100–1200 cm3. The destructive ratio yielded a mean value of 24.2 ± 1.5%. Conclusions: Radiation planning that takes into account the distribution of FLV appears to result in the least possible RILD.

  13. Phantom crossing in viable $f(R)$ theories

    CERN Document Server

    Bamba, Kazuharu; Lee, Chung-Chi

    2011-01-01

    We review the equation of state for dark energy in modified gravity theories. In particular, we summarize the generic feature of the phantom divide crossing in the past and future in viable $f(R)$ gravity models.

  14. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  15. The Presence of Anti-p53 Antibodies in Sera Prior to Thoracic Surgery in Non Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients: Its Implications on Tumor Volume, Nodal Involvement, and Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bergqvist

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During recent years, a correlation between the presence of antibodies in sera against p53 and survival has been reported. The aim of the present study was to analyze anti-p53 antibodies in sera from patients with non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC prior to thoracic surgery and their correlation to survival, nodal involvement, and tumor volume. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Serum samples from 58 patients with NSCLC admitted to the Department of Pulmonary Medicine in Uppsala were collected between 1993 and 1995 and analyzed for the expression of anti-p53 antibodies. RESULTS: Antibodies against p53 were detected in 12 patients (21%. No association was found between increased levels of anti-p53 antibodies and tumor volume (P = .84. There was a numerical trend towards higher levels of anti-p53 antibodies in patients without nodal disease, when compared with patients with nodal involvement, although not statistically significant (P = .136. However, when patients with metastatic disease were included, statistically significantly lower levels of anti-p53 antibodies were demonstrated, in comparison to patients without any sign of nodal engagement or metastatic disease (P = .038. Anti-p53 antibodies and survival showed no correlation between increasing index levels of anti-p53 antibodies and survival (P = .18. Neither was a correlation found between using the cutoff (>1.1 described by the manufacturer and survival. CONCLUSION: The presence of anti-p53 antibodies was correlated neither to survival nor to tumor volume in the present study. However, patients with either nodal or metastatic disease had lower levels of anti-p53 antibodies in comparison to patients without signs of either nodal or metastatic disease. These issues are discussed.

  16. Cervical gross tumor volume dose predicts local control using magnetic resonance imaging/diffusion-weighted imaging-guided high-dose-rate and positron emission tomography/computed tomography-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyk, Pawel; Jiang, Naomi; Sun, Baozhou; DeWees, Todd A; Fowler, Kathryn J; Narra, Vamsi; Garcia-Ramirez, Jose L; Schwarz, Julie K; Grigsby, Perry W

    2014-11-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging/diffusion weighted-imaging (MRI/DWI)-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) - positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the definitive treatment of cervical cancer is a novel treatment technique. The purpose of this study was to report our analysis of dose-volume parameters predicting gross tumor volume (GTV) control. We analyzed the records of 134 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages IB1-IVB cervical cancer treated with combined MRI-guided HDR and IMRT from July 2009 to July 2011. IMRT was targeted to the metabolic tumor volume and lymph nodes by use of FDG-PET/CT simulation. The GTV for each HDR fraction was delineated by use of T2-weighted or apparent diffusion coefficient maps from diffusion-weighted sequences. The D100, D90, and Dmean delivered to the GTV from HDR and IMRT were summed to EQD2. One hundred twenty-five patients received all irradiation treatment as planned, and 9 did not complete treatment. All 134 patients are included in this analysis. Treatment failure in the cervix occurred in 24 patients (18.0%). Patients with cervix failures had a lower D100, D90, and Dmean than those who did not experience failure in the cervix. The respective doses to the GTV were 41, 58, and 136 Gy for failures compared with 67, 99, and 236 Gy for those who did not experience failure (PD100, D90, and Dmean doses required for ≥90% local control to be 69, 98, and 260 Gy (P<.001). Total dose delivered to the GTV from combined MRI-guided HDR and PET/CT-guided IMRT is highly correlated with local tumor control. The findings can be directly applied in the clinic for dose adaptation to maximize local control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Peritumoral Tissue Compression is Predictive of Exudate Flux in a Rat Model of Cerebral Tumor: an MRI Study in an Embedded Tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Ewing, James R; Nagaraja, Tavarekere N.; Aryal, Madhava P.; Keenan, Kelly A.; Elmghirbi, Rasha; Bagher-Ebadian, Hassan; Panda, Swayamprava; Lu, Mei; Mikkelsen, Tom; Cabral, Glauber; Brown, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    MRI estimates of extracellular volume and tumor exudate flux in peritumoral tissue are demonstrated in an experimental model of cerebral tumor. Peritumoral extracellular volume predicted the tumor exudate flux.

  18. Dose escalation to high-risk sub-volumes based on non-invasive imaging of hypoxia and glycolytic activity in canine solid tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Malene M.; Hansen, Anders Elias; af Rosenschold, Per Munck;

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Glycolytic activity and hypoxia are associated with poor prognosis and radiation resistance. Including both the tumor uptake of 2-deoxy-2-[18 F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and the proposed hypoxia tracer copper(II)diacetyl-bis(N4)-methylsemithio-carbazone (Cu-ATSM) in targeted therapy...

  19. Hoechst fluorescence intensity can be used to separate viable bromodeoxyuridine-labeled cells from viable non-bromodeoxyuridine-labeled cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozdziak, P. E.; Pulvermacher, P. M.; Schultz, E.; Schell, K.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) is a powerful compound to study the mitotic activity of a cell. Most techniques that identify BrdU-labeled cells require conditions that kill the cells. However, the fluorescence intensity of the membrane-permeable Hoechst dyes is reduced by the incorporation of BrdU into DNA, allowing the separation of viable BrdU positive (BrdU+) cells from viable BrdU negative (BrdU-) cells. METHODS: Cultures of proliferating cells were supplemented with BrdU for 48 h and other cultures of proliferating cells were maintained without BrdU. Mixtures of viable BrdU+ and viable BrdU- cells from the two proliferating cultures were stained with Hoechst 33342. The viable BrdU+ and BrdU- cells were sorted into different fractions from a mixture of BrdU+ and BrdU- cells based on Hoechst fluorescence intensity and the ability to exclude the vital dye, propidium iodide. Subsequently, samples from the original mixture, the sorted BrdU+ cell population, and the sorted BrdU- cell population were immunostained using an anti-BrdU monoclonal antibody and evaluated using flow cytometry. RESULTS: Two mixtures consisting of approximately 55% and 69% BrdU+ cells were sorted into fractions consisting of greater than 93% BrdU+ cells and 92% BrdU- cells. The separated cell populations were maintained in vitro after sorting to demonstrate their viability. CONCLUSIONS: Hoechst fluorescence intensity in combination with cell sorting is an effective tool to separate viable BrdU+ from viable BrdU- cells for further study. The separated cell populations were maintained in vitro after sorting to demonstrate their viability. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. [Role of 18FDG-PET/CT in the management and gross tumor volume definition for radiotherapy of head and neck cancer; single institution experiences based on long-term follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hideghéty, Katalin; Cserháti, Adrienne; Besenyi, Zsuzsanna; Zag, Levente; Gaál, Szilvia; Együd, Zsófia; Mózes, Petra; Szántó, Erika; Csenki, Melinda; Rusz, Orsolya; Varga, Zoltán; Dobi, Ágnes; Maráz, Anikó; Pávics, László; Lengyel, Zsolt

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of our work is evaluation of the impact of 18FDG-PET/CT on the complex management of locoregionally advanced (T3-4N1-3) head and neck squamous cell cancer (LAHNSC), and on the target definition for 3D conformal (3DCRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). 18FDG-PET/CT were performed on 185 patients with LAHNSC prior to radiotherapy/chemoradiation in the treatment position between 2006 and 2011. Prior to it 91 patients received induction chemotherapy (in 20 cases of these, baseline PET/CT was also available). The independently delineated CT-based gross tumor volume (GTVct) and PET/CT based ones (GTVpet) were compared. Impact of PET/CT on the treatment strategy, on tumor response evaluation to ICT, on GTV definition furthermore on overall and disease-specific survival (OS, DSS) was analysed. PET/CT revealed 10 head and neck, 2 lung cancers for 15 patients with carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP) while 3 remained unknown. Second tumors were detected in 8 (4.4%), distant metastasis in 15 (8.2%) cases. The difference between GTVct and GTVpet was significant (p=0.001). In 16 patients (14%) the GTVpet were larger than GTVct due to multifocal manifestations in the laryngo-pharyngeal regions (4 cases) or lymph node metastases (12 cases). In the majority of the cases (82 pts, 72%) PET/CT-based conturing resulted in remarkable decrease in the volume (15-20%: 4 cases, 20-50%: 46 cases, >50%: 32 cases). On the basis of the initial and post-ICT PET/CT comparison in 15/20 patients more than 50% volume reduction and in 6/20 cases complete response were achieved. After an average of 6.4 years of follow-up the OS (median: 18.3±2.6 months) and DSS (median: 25.0±4.0 months) exhibited close correlation (p=0.0001) to the GTVpet. In cases with GTVpet 40 cm3 the median DSS was 8.4±0.96 months (HR= 11.48; 95% CI: 5.3-24.9). Our results suggest that 18FDG-PET/CT plays an important role for patient with LAHNSC, by modifying the treatment concept and improving the target

  1. Successful Large-volume Leukapheresis for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Collection in a Very-low-weight Brain Tumor Infant with Coagulopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Mei Liao

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral apheresis has become a safe procedure to collect hematopoietic stem cells, even in pediatric patients and donors. However, the apheresis procedure for small and sick children is more complicated due to difficult venous access, relatively large extracorporeal volume, toxicity of citrate, and unstable hemostasis. We report a small and sick child with refractory medulloblastoma, impaired liver function, and coagulopathy after several major cycles of cisplatin-based chemotherapy. She successfully received large-volume leukapheresis for hematopoietic stem cell collection, although the patient experienced severe coagulopathy during the procedures. Health care providers should be alert to this potential risk.

  2. Co-Encapsulation of Doxorubicin With Galactoxyloglucan Nanoparticles for Intracellular Tumor-Targeted Delivery in Murine Ascites and Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu M. Joseph

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Doxorubicin (Dox treatment is limited by severe toxicity and frequent episodes of treatment failure. To minimize adverse events and improve drug delivery efficiently and specifically in cancer cells, encapsulation of Dox with naturally obtained galactoxyloglucan polysaccharide (PST001, isolated from Tamarindus indica was attempted. Thus formed PST-Dox nanoparticles induced apoptosis and exhibited significant cytotoxicity in murine ascites cell lines, Dalton’s lymphoma ascites and Ehrlich’s ascites carcinoma. The mechanism contributing to the augmented cytotoxicity of nanoconjugates at lower doses was validated by measuring the Dox intracellular uptake in human colon, leukemic and breast cancer cell lines. PST-Dox nanoparticles showed rapid internalization of Dox into cancer cells within a short period of incubation. Further, in vivo efficacy was tested in comparison to the parent counterparts - PST001 and Dox, in ascites and solid tumor syngraft mice models. Treatment of ascites tumors with PST-Dox nanoparticles significantly reduced the tumor volume, viable tumor cell count, and increased survival and percentage life span in the early, established and prophylactic phases of the disease. Administration of nanoparticles through intratumoral route delivered more robust antitumor response than the intraperitoneal route in solid malignancies. Thus, the results indicate that PST-Dox nanoparticles have greater potential compared to the Dox as targeted drug delivery nanocarriers for loco regional cancer chemotherapy applications.

  3. Under conditions of large geometric miss, tumor control probability can be higher for static gantry intensity-modulated radiation therapy compared to volume-modulated arc therapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balderson, Michael, E-mail: michael.balderson@rmp.uhn.ca; Brown, Derek; Johnson, Patricia; Kirkby, Charles

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare static gantry intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in terms of tumor control probability (TCP) under scenarios involving large geometric misses, i.e., those beyond what are accounted for when margin expansion is determined. Using a planning approach typical for these treatments, a linear-quadratic–based model for TCP was used to compare mean TCP values for a population of patients who experiences a geometric miss (i.e., systematic and random shifts of the clinical target volume within the planning target dose distribution). A Monte Carlo approach was used to account for the different biological sensitivities of a population of patients. Interestingly, for errors consisting of coplanar systematic target volume offsets and three-dimensional random offsets, static gantry IMRT appears to offer an advantage over VMAT in that larger shift errors are tolerated for the same mean TCP. For example, under the conditions simulated, erroneous systematic shifts of 15 mm directly between or directly into static gantry IMRT fields result in mean TCP values between 96% and 98%, whereas the same errors on VMAT plans result in mean TCP values between 45% and 74%. Random geometric shifts of the target volume were characterized using normal distributions in each Cartesian dimension. When the standard deviations were doubled from those values assumed in the derivation of the treatment margins, our model showed a 7% drop in mean TCP for the static gantry IMRT plans but a 20% drop in TCP for the VMAT plans. Although adding a margin for error to a clinical target volume is perhaps the best approach to account for expected geometric misses, this work suggests that static gantry IMRT may offer a treatment that is more tolerant to geometric miss errors than VMAT.

  4. Definitions and general remarks on surgical pathology in the field of oncology; Volume tumoral macroscopique et volume-cible anatomoclinique en radiotherapie: generalites. Definitions et generalites en anatomie pathologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnould, L. [Centre Georges-Francois-Leclerc, Service d' anatomie et de cytologie pathologiques, 21 - Dijon (France)

    2001-10-01

    In the field of oncology, surgical pathology analysis of biopsies or surgical specimens directly determines the care program of each patient. Without going into too much detail, we report here the description of different characteristics of neoplastic lesions, necessary or useful for the establishment of the care program of the patients. These macroscopic and microscopic analyses should result in the most precise possible diagnosis and should take into account a list of other factors which allow the development of an optimal strategy for therapy, and the establishment of prognosis of the tumor. These characteristics include properties of the tumor such as the size, shape, exact location, and the grade of the lesion, etc. They also concern the relationship of the tumor to certain structures like the basal membranes, the stroma reaction, the lymphatic vessels, the nerves, and so forth. The description of local and locoregional spreading, as well as the analysis of the surgical margins gives essential information as well. Finally, in certain cases, the description of modifications induced by neo-adjuvant therapy allows the evaluation of the treatment's efficacy. (author)

  5. Microfiltration of enzyme treated egg whites for accelerated detection of viable Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Seockmo; Ximenes, Eduardo; Kreke, Thomas; Foster, Kirk; Deering, Amanda J; Ladisch, Michael R

    2016-11-01

    We report detection of microfiltration through 0.2-μm cutoff polyethersulfone hollow fiber membranes. A combination of enzyme treatment, controlled cross-flow on both sides of the hollow fibers, and media selection were key to controlling membrane fouling so that rapid concentration and the subsequent detection of low numbers of microbial cells were achieved. We leveraged the protective effect of egg white proteins and peptone so that the proteolytic enzymes did not attack the living cells while hydrolyzing the egg white proteins responsible for fouling. The molecular weight of egg white proteins was reduced from about 70 kDa to 15 kDa during hydrolysis. This enabled a 50-fold concentration of the cells when a volume of 525 mL of peptone and egg white, containing 13 CFU of Salmonella, was decreased to a 10 mL volume in 50 min. A 10-min microcentrifugation step further concentrated the viable Salmonella cells by 10×. The final cell recovery exceeded 100%, indicating that microbial growth occurred during the 3-h processing time. The experiments leading to rapid concentration, recovery, and detection provided further insights on the nature of membrane fouling enabling fouling effects to be mitigated. Unlike most membrane processes where protein recovery is the goal, recovery of viable microorganisms for pathogen detection is the key measure of success, with modification of cell-free proteins being both acceptable and required to achieve rapid microfiltration of viable microorganisms. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1464-1471, 2016.

  6. A single institution experience with biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy for tumors that on pathology are of small volume or "insignificant".

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, I.M. van; Kok, D.E.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.; Witjes, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Small volume prostate cancers (<0.5 cc, svPC), and insignificant prostate cancers (<0.5 cc and Gleason scores <7, InsigPC) are considered clinically insignificant by some investigators. The aim of this study is to determine the biochemical recurrence rate (BCR) of svPC and InsigP

  7. The development of PET/CT in determining gross tumor target volume of esophageal carcinoma in precise radiotherapy%PET/CT确定食管癌大体靶区的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张炜; 宋轶鹏; 姜翠芳

    2014-01-01

    随着功能影像及分子影像的发展,PET/CT逐渐成为辅助制定肿瘤最佳精确放疗计划的成像方式.许多研究支持18 F-FDG PET/CT用于精确放疗中食管癌的靶区勾画,然而18F-FDGPET/CT在食管癌靶区勾画中的有效性尚需进一步研究.该文主要对18F-FDG PET/CT用于食管癌原发病灶、区域转移淋巴结GTV勾画的应用价值及有效性等方面的研究进行综述.%As the development of functional and molecular imaging,PET/CT gradually becomes one of methods in optimizing cancer radiotherapy treatment planning.Currently,numerous hospitals routinely use 18F-FDG PET/CT for the delineation of target volume in esophageal carcinoma (EC).However,the validity of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the delineation of target volume for EC is limited and needs further clinical validation.This review focuses on the value and validity of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the delineation of gross tumor target volume of EC primary lesions and regional lymph nodes.

  8. A commercially viable route to polymerization grade phenylterephthalic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshel, G.N.; Koshel, S.G.; Rudkovsky, E.K. [Yaroslav, Yaroslav State Technical University (Russian Federation). Dept. of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry; Poli, G.; Vitolo, S.; Magagnini, P. [Pisa, Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Ingegneria Chimica, Chimica Industriale e Scienza dei materiali

    1998-03-01

    Phenylterephthalic acid (PTA) has a potential as comonomer for the production of high performance liquid-crystalline polyesters. The available synthetic routes to PTA are reviewed, and a new, commercially viable process based on the use of cheap raw materials, such as p-xylene and cyclohexene, is described.

  9. Singularity phenomena in viable f(R) gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Chung-Chi; Yang, Louis

    2012-01-01

    The curvature singularity in viable f(R) gravity models is examined when the background density is dense. This singularity could be eliminated by adding the $R^{2}$ term in the Lagrangian. Some of cosmological consequences, in particular the source for the scalar mode of gravitational waves, are discussed.

  10. A METHOD TO DETECT VIABLE HELICOBACTER PYLORI BACTERIA IN GROUNDWATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    The inability to detect the presence of viable Helicobacter pylori bacteria in environmental waters has hindered the public health community in assessing the role water may playin the transmission of this pathogen. This work describes a cultural enrichment method coupled with an...

  11. Gaussia Luciferase for Bioluminescence Tumor Monitoring in Comparison with Firefly Luciferase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Inoue

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Gaussia luciferase (Gluc is a secreted reporter, and its expression in living animals can be assessed by in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI or blood assays. We characterized Gluc as an in vivo reporter in comparison with firefly luciferase (Fluc. Mice were inoculated subcutaneously with tumor cells expressing both Fluc and Gluc and underwent Flue BLI, Gluc BLI, blood assays of Glue activity, and caliper measurement. In Gluc BLI, the signal from the tumor peaked immediately and then decreased rapidly. In the longitudinal monitoring, all measures indicated an increase in tumor burden early after cell inoculation. However, the increase reached plateaus in Gluc BLI and Fluc BLI despite a continuous increase in the caliper measurement and Gluc blood assay. Significant correlations were found between the measures, and the correlation between the blood signal and caliper volume was especially high. Gluc allows tumor monitoring in mice and should be applicable to dual-reporter assessment in combination with Fluc. The Gluc blood assay appears to provide a reliable indicator of viable tumor burden, and the combination of a blood assay and in vivo BLI using Glue should be promising for quantifying and localizing the tumors.

  12. Cervical Gross Tumor Volume Dose Predicts Local Control Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging/Diffusion-Weighted Imaging—Guided High-Dose-Rate and Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography—Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyk, Pawel; Jiang, Naomi; Sun, Baozhou; DeWees, Todd A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Fowler, Kathryn J.; Narra, Vamsi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Garcia-Ramirez, Jose L.; Schwarz, Julie K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Grigsby, Perry W., E-mail: pgrigsby@wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging/diffusion weighted-imaging (MRI/DWI)-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) — positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the definitive treatment of cervical cancer is a novel treatment technique. The purpose of this study was to report our analysis of dose-volume parameters predicting gross tumor volume (GTV) control. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the records of 134 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages IB1-IVB cervical cancer treated with combined MRI-guided HDR and IMRT from July 2009 to July 2011. IMRT was targeted to the metabolic tumor volume and lymph nodes by use of FDG-PET/CT simulation. The GTV for each HDR fraction was delineated by use of T2-weighted or apparent diffusion coefficient maps from diffusion-weighted sequences. The D100, D90, and Dmean delivered to the GTV from HDR and IMRT were summed to EQD2. Results: One hundred twenty-five patients received all irradiation treatment as planned, and 9 did not complete treatment. All 134 patients are included in this analysis. Treatment failure in the cervix occurred in 24 patients (18.0%). Patients with cervix failures had a lower D100, D90, and Dmean than those who did not experience failure in the cervix. The respective doses to the GTV were 41, 58, and 136 Gy for failures compared with 67, 99, and 236 Gy for those who did not experience failure (P<.001). Probit analysis estimated the minimum D100, D90, and Dmean doses required for ≥90% local control to be 69, 98, and 260 Gy (P<.001). Conclusions: Total dose delivered to the GTV from combined MRI-guided HDR and PET/CT-guided IMRT is highly correlated with local tumor control. The findings can be directly applied in the clinic for dose adaptation to maximize local control.

  13. Simultaneous assessment of cerebral blood volume and diffusion heterogeneity using hybrid IVIM and DK MR imaging: initial experience with brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wen-Chau [National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Oncology, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei (China); Yang, Shun-Chung; Chen, Ya-Fang; My, Pei-Chi [National Taiwan University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei (China); Tseng, Han-Min [National Taiwan University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Taipei (China)

    2017-01-15

    To investigate the feasibility of simultaneously assessing cerebral blood volume and diffusion heterogeneity using hybrid diffusion-kurtosis (DK) and intravoxel-incoherent-motion (IVIM) MR imaging. Fifteen healthy volunteers and 30 patients with histologically proven brain tumours (25 WHO grade II-IV gliomas and five metastases) were recruited. On a 3-T system, diffusion-weighted imaging was performed with six b-values ranging from 0 to 1,700 s/mm{sup 2}. Nonlinear least-squares fitting was employed to extract diffusion coefficient (D), diffusion kurtosis coefficient (K, a measure of the degree of non-Gaussian and heterogeneous diffusion) and intravascular volume fraction (f, a measure proportional to cerebral blood volume). Repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance and receiver operating characteristic analysis were performed to assess the ability of D/K/f in differentiating contrast-enhanced tumour from peritumoral oedema and normal-appearing white matter. Based on our imaging setting (baseline signal-to-noise ratio = 32-128), coefficient of variation was 14-20 % for K, ∝6 % for D and 26-44 % for f. The indexes were able to differentiate contrast-enhanced tumour (Wilks' λ = 0.026, p < 10{sup -3}), and performance was greatest with K, followed by f and D. Hybrid DK IVIM imaging is capable of simultaneously measuring cerebral perfusion and diffusion indexes that together may improve brain tumour diagnosis. (orig.)

  14. Disseminação linfática em neoplasias: determinação do volume nuclear e quantificação do DNA de células do tumor de Ehrlich do coxim plantar e do linfonodo regional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lúca Zaidan Dagli

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available When inoculated into the footpad of mice, Ehrlich tumor grows in a solid form and disseminates to popliteal lymph nodes. This study was performed in order to characterize the tumor cells that migrated from footpad to popliteal lymph nodes. The nuclear volume of primitive and lymph node tumor cells was measured with a caryometric ocular. DNA quantitation was performed in Feulgen stained slides by scanning cytophotometry. Tumor cells harvested from popliteal lymph nodes one hour after inoculation into the footpad showed no statistical differences in DNA quantitation from original ascitic and footpad tumor cells. Tumor cells in popliteal lymph nodes 30 days after inoculation showed a smaller nuclear volume, but presented the same DNA content as the cells that grew in the footpad. Tumor cells in the footpad 30 days after inoculation showed a greater DNA content than those in the footpad one hour after inoculation.These results suggest a possible selective effect for Ehriich tumor cells when they grow in the footpad, but not when they metastasize to regional lymph node.

  15. The research progress of volume-sensitive Cl- channel in tumor%容积敏感性氯离子通道在肿瘤中的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闵先军; 王军; 李辉

    2010-01-01

    细胞肿胀后可以激活或上调一系列阴离子通道,在这些容积激活或调节的阴离子通道中,容积敏感性外向整流(VSOR)氯离子通道的激活和表达最显著和常见.先前研究表明,VSOR在肿瘤细胞的容积调节、细胞增殖、分化、迁移、凋亡和耐药等病理生理过程中发挥重要作用,研究还发现许多信号分子参与了VSOR氯离子通道活性的调节,但其分子定位和激活机制尚不清楚.因此,明确其分子定位和激活机制可能会使VSOR氯离子通道成为肿瘤治疗的新靶点.%Cell swelling activates or upregulates a number of anion channels. Of the volume-activated or-regulated anion channels, the volume-sensitive outwardly rectifying anion channel (VSOR) is most prominently activated and ubiquitously expressed. Volume regulated chloride channels play significant roles in a variety of physiological processes including volume regulation, proliferation, differentiation, migration,apoptosis and resistance of tumor cells. Molecular identification and activation mechanisms of VSOR are poorly understood. Many signaling molecules have been shown to regulate VSOR activity in research, playing permissive or modulatory roles. Therefore, VSOR may be a new anticancer target by identifying its signaling molecules and activation mechanisms.

  16. Viable Myocardium Impact on Left Ventricular Function after Late Revascularization of Infarct-related Artery in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Likun; Yu Hua; Huang Xiangyang; Feng Kefu; Han Xiaoping; Ye Qi

    2006-01-01

    Objectives The long-term benefit of late reperfusion of infarct-related artery (IRA) after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is controversial, and the benefit mechanisms remain uncertain. Low dose dobutamine stress echocardiography (LDSE) can identify viable myocardium and predict improvement of wall motion after revascularization. Methods Sixtynine patients with first AMI who did not received early reperfusion therapy were studied by LDSE at 5 to 10 days after AMI. Wall motion abnormality and left ventricular size were measured at the same time.Successful PCI were done in all patients at 10 to 21 days after AMI onset. Patients were divided in two groups based on the presence or absence of viable myocardium. Echocardiography was repeated six months later. Results There were 157 motion abnormality segments. 89 segments (57%) were viable during LDSE. 26 patients (38%) with viability and 43(62%) without. In viable group, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was increased (P<0.05),and left ventricular end systolic volume index (LVESVI) and wall motion score (WMS) were decreased (P<0.05 and P<0.01) significantly at 6 months compared with baseline. But in patients without viability, LVEF was decreased (P<0.01), and LVESVI and left ventricular end diastolic volume index (LVEDVI) were increased (P<0.05) significantly after 6 months, and the WMS did not changed (P>0.05). LVEF increased (P<0.05) and WMS decreased (P<0.05) on LDSE during acute phase in patients with viability, but they were not changed in the nonviable group. Conclusions Late revascularization of IRA in patients with presence of viable myocardium after AMI is associated with long-term preservation left ventricular function and less ventricular remodeling.Improvement of left ventricular systolic function on LDSE indicates late phase recovery of left ventricular function after late revascularization.

  17. Removal of viable bacteria and endotoxins by Electro Deionization (EDI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Norimitsu; Otomo, Teruo; Watabe, Tomoichi; Ase, Tomonobu; Takemura, Takuto; Sato, Toshio

    2011-09-01

    Viable bacteria and endotoxins in water sometimes cause problems for human health. Endotoxins are major components of the outer cell wall of gram-negative bacteria (lipopolysaccharides). In medical procedures, especially haemodialysis (HD) and related therapies (haemodiafiltration (HDF), haemofiltration (HF)), endotoxins in the water for haemodialysis can permeate through the haemodialysis membrane and cause microinflammation or various haemodialysis-related illnesses. To decrease such a biological risk, RO and UF membranes are generally used. Also, hot water disinfection or the chemical disinfection is regularly executed to kill bacteria which produce endotoxins. However, simple treatment methods and equipment may be able to decrease the biological risk more efficiently. In our experiments, we confirmed that viable bacteria and endotoxins were removed by Electro Deionization (EDI) technology and also clarified the desorption mechanisms.

  18. Viable Options a Shipper has in Using Different Logistic Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Grevesmühl, Vasco; Chehreh, Reza

    2013-01-01

    The research question explores the viable options a shipper has in using different logistic solutions. An investigation was conducted by first understanding the different provider levels based on their activities and then differentiate the logistic solutions based on attributes that are important for a shipper in their supply chain. These attributes were; organization, information technology (IT), flexibility and transportation quality aspects. Once the investigation was done, it was applied ...

  19. Viable Legionella Pneumophila Not Detectable by Culture on Agar Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    UNIT ELEMENT NO. NO. NO. ACCESSION NO. , N/A 1 1. TITLE (JIncJuue Security Ciaisuicarlon) Viable Legionella Pneumophila not Detectable by Culture on...106 cells-𔄁. Legionella have others. To study this loss of culturability, been sliown to vary in an tigenic composition, virulence L. pneumophila ...COSATICODES 18. SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) GROUP SUB-GROUP LEGIONELLA FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY

  20. A New Class of Cosmologically `Viable' $f(R)$ Models

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Rohin

    2016-01-01

    Instead of assuming a form of gravity and demand cosmology fit with $\\Lambda CDM$, a potentially `viable' $f(R)$ gravity model is derived assuming an alternative model of cosmology. Taking the `designer' approach to $f(R)$, a new class of solutions are derived starting with linear coasting cosmology in which scale factor linearly increases with time during matter domination. The derived forms of $f(R)$ are presented as result.

  1. Possible interrelationship between changes in F-actin and myosin II, protein phosphorylation, and cell volume regulation in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, S F; Hoffmann, E K

    2002-01-01

    Osmotic shrinkage of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EATC) elicited translocation of myosin II from the cytosol to the cortical region, and swelling elicits concentration of myosin II in the Golgi region. Rho kinase and p38 both appeared to be involved in shrinkage-induced myosin II reorganization....... In contrast, the previously reported shrinkage-induced actin polymerization [Pedersen et al. (1999) Exp. Cell Res. 252, 63-74] was independent of Rho kinase, p38, myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), and protein kinase C (PKC), which thus do not exert their effects on the shrinkage-activated transporters via...... by osmotic shrinkage and by the serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor Calyculin A (CL-A). Both stimuli caused Rho kinase-dependent myosin II relocation to the cortical cytoplasm, but in contrast to the shrinkage-induced F-actin polymerization, CL-A treatment elicited a slight F-actin depolymerization...

  2. Formation and resuscitation of viable but nonculturable Salmonella typhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Bin; Zhao, Guozhong; Cao, Xiaohong; Yang, Zhen; Wang, Chunling; Hou, Lihua

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella typhi is a pathogen that causes the human disease of typhoid fever. The aim of this study was to investigate the viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state of S. typhi. Some samples were stimulated at 4°C or -20°C, while others were induced by different concentrations of CuSO4. Total cell counts remained constant throughout several days by acridine orange direct counting; however, plate counts declined to undetectable levels within 48 hours by plate counting at -20°C. The direct viable counts remained fairly constant at this level by direct viable counting. Carbon and nitrogen materials slowly decreased which indicated that a large population of cells existed in the VBNC state and entered the VBNC state in response to exposure to 0.01 or 0.015 mmol/L CuSO4 for more than 14 or 12 days, respectively. Adding 3% Tween 20 or 1% catalase enabled cells to become culturable again, with resuscitation times of 48 h and 24 h, respectively. The atomic force microscope results showed that cells gradually changed in shape from short rods to coccoids, and decreased in size when they entered the VBNC state. Further animal experiments suggested that resuscitated cells might regain pathogenicity.

  3. Gravitational Waves in Viable f(R) Models

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Louis; Geng, Chao-Qiang

    2011-01-01

    We study gravitational waves in viable $f(R)$ theories under a non-zero background curvature. In general, an $f(R)$ theory contains an extra scalar degree of freedom corresponding to a massive scalar mode of gravitational wave. For viable $f(R)$ models, since there always exits a de-Sitter point where the background curvature in vacuum is non-zero, the mass squared of the scalar mode of gravitational wave is about the de-Sitter point curvature $R_{d}\\sim10^{-66}eV^{2}$. We illustrate our results in two types of viable $f(R)$ models: the exponential gravity and Starobinsky models. In both cases, the mass will be in the order of $10^{-33}eV$ when it propagates in vacuum. However, in the presence of matter density in galaxy, the scalar mode can be heavy. Explicitly, in the exponential gravity model, the mass becomes almost infinity, implying the disappearance of the scalar mode of gravitational wave, while the Starobinsky model gives the lowest mass around $10^{-24}eV$, corresponding to the lowest frequency of $...

  4. Gravitational waves in viable f(R) models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Louis; Lee, Chung-Chi; Geng, Chao-Qiang, E-mail: louis.lineage@msa.hinet.net, E-mail: geng@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: g9522545@oz.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2011-08-01

    We study gravitational waves in viable f(R) theories under a non-zero background curvature. In general, an f(R) theory contains an extra scalar degree of freedom corresponding to a massive scalar mode of gravitational wave. For viable f(R) models, since there always exits a de-Sitter point where the background curvature in vacuum is non-zero, the mass squared of the scalar mode of gravitational wave is about the de-Sitter point curvature R{sub d} ∼ 10{sup −66}eV{sup 2}. We illustrate our results in two types of viable f(R) models: the exponential gravity and Starobinsky models. In both cases, the mass will be in the order of 10{sup −33}eV when it propagates in vacuum. However, in the presence of matter density in galaxy, the scalar mode can be heavy. Explicitly, in the exponential gravity model, the mass becomes almost infinity, implying the disappearance of the scalar mode of gravitational wave, while the Starobinsky model gives the lowest mass around 10{sup −24}eV, corresponding to the lowest frequency of 10{sup −9} Hz, which may be detected by the current and future gravitational wave probes, such as LISA and ASTROD-GW.

  5. A new viable region of the inert doublet model

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez-Honorez, Laura

    2010-01-01

    The inert doublet model, a minimal extension of the Standard Model by a second Higgs doublet, is one of the simplest and most attractive scenarios that can explain the dark matter. In this paper, we demonstrate the existence of a new viable region of the inert doublet model featuring dark matter masses between Mw and about 160 GeV. Along this previously overlooked region of the parameter space, the correct relic density is obtained thanks to cancellations between different diagrams contributing to dark matter annihilation into gauge bosons (W+W- and ZZ). First, we explain how these cancellations come about and show several examples illustrating the effect of the parameters of the model on the cancellations themselves and on the predicted relic density. Then, we perform a full scan of the new viable region and analyze it in detail by projecting it onto several two-dimensional planes. Finally, the prospects for the direct and the indirect detection of inert Higgs dark matter within this new viable region are st...

  6. Detecting and measuring small numbers of viable Coxiella burnetii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, Michelle; Islam, Aminul; Graves, Stephen; Fenwick, Stan; Stenos, John

    2012-02-01

    Coxiella burnetii is an acidophilic, intracellular bacterium that causes the human disease Q fever. In some studies, it is important to distinguish between viable and nonviable C. burnetii. We compared four methods for detecting and measuring viable C. burnetii in biological samples as follows: growth in two different cell culture lines, infection of severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice (leading to death) and infection of SCID mice with detection of C. burnetii in their spleen (after euthanasia at day 50 postinfection). Two isolates of C. burnetii were used ('Henzerling' and 'Arandale'). Our in-house qPCR assay for C. burnetii DNA was used as a control. SCID mouse inoculation was more sensitive than cell culture. The assay that detected C. burnetii in SCID mouse spleens was slightly more sensitive than SCID mice deaths alone. Approximately one viable C. burnetii cell could be detected by this method, making it suitable for determining the viability of C. burnetii in a sample. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The early predictive value of a decrease of metabolic tumor volume in repeated (18)F-FDG PET/CT for recurrence of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer with concurrent radiochemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Liu, Bo; Fan, Min; Zhou, Tao; Fu, Zheng; Zhang, Zicheng; Li, Hongsheng; Li, Baosheng

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the value of [(18)F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ((18)F FDG PET/CT) to predict recurrence of patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during the early stage of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). A total of 53 stage III NSCLC patients without diabetics or undergoing surgery were enrolled in the prospective study. Those patients were evaluated by FDG PET before and following 40Gy radiotherapy (RT) with a concurrent cisplatin-based heterogeneous chemotherapy regimen. Semiquantitative assessment was used to determine maximum and mean SUVs (SUVmax/SUVmean) and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) of the primary tumor. The prognostic significance of PET/CT parameters and other clinical variables was assessed using Cox regression analyses. The cutoffs of PET/CT parameters which have been determined by the previous study were used to separate the groups with Kaplan-Meier curves. Recurrence rates at 1- and 2-years were 18.9% (10/53) and 50.9% (27/53) for all patients, respectively. Cox regression analysis showed that the only prognostic factor for recurrence was a decrease of MTV. Using the cutoff of 29.7%, a decrease of MTV can separate the patients into 2 groups with Kaplan-Meier curve successfully. The prospective study has reinforced the early predictive value of MTV in repeated (18)F-FDG PET/CT for recurrence in a subgroup of locally advanced NSCLC who underwent CCRT. A decrease of MTV in (18)F-FDG uptake by the primary tumor correlates with higher LRFS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Wilms Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilms tumor is a rare type of kidney cancer. It causes a tumor on one or both kidneys. It usually affects ... are at risk should be screened for Wilms tumor every three months until they turn eight. Symptoms ...

  9. Irradiation of hepatocellular carcinoma: Impact of breathing on motions and variations of volume of the tumor, liver and upper abdominal organs; L'irradiation des carcinomes hepatocellulaires: impact de la respiration sur les mouvements et variations de volume de la tumeur, du foie et des organes intra-abdominaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubas, A.; Mornex, F.; D' Hombres, A.; Lorchel, F.; Chapet, O. [Centre hospitalier Lyon-Sud, Service de Radiotherapie-oncologie Rhone-Alpes, 69 - Pierre-Benite (France); Merle, P. [Hopital de l' Hotel-Dieu, Service d' Hepatogastroenterologie, 69 - Lyon (France)

    2008-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the amplitude of motion and the variations of volume of the tumor, the liver and upper abdominal organs induced by breathing during the irradiation of hepatocellular carcinoma (H.C.C.). Material and methods: Two scanners were performed in inhale and in exhale not forced in 20 patients with a H.C.C.. The liver (left/right lobes), the tumor, the duodenum, the two kidneys and the pancreas were delineated on each acquisition. The superposition of the two spirals made it possible to measure the displacements and variations of volume of these structures in the cranio caudal (C.C.), lateral (Lat), and anteroposterior (A.P.) directions. Results:The mean displacement of the tumour in C.C., Lat and A.P. was of 19.7 {+-} 8.3 mm, 4.5 {+-} 2.3 mm, and 8.9 {+-} 6.5 mm. The greatest amplitude of movement was obtained in C.C. for the right and left hepatic lobes (19 {+-} 6.5 mm, 10 {+-} 5.6 mm), the duodenum(12.6 {+-} 6.4 mm), the kidneys right and left (15.5 {+-} 6.1 mm, 16.2 {+-} 10 mm) and the pancreas (13.2 {+-} 6 mm). No significant variation of volume was observed for these organs. Conclusion: The movements of the tumour, the liver and the abdominal organs, induced by breathing are significant. The respiratory gating appears essential in particular with the development of new techniques of irradiation such as the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (I.M.R.T.) or the stereotactic body radiation therapy (S.B.R.T.). (authors)

  10. Antitumor effectiveness of different amounts of electrical charge in Ehrlich and fibrosarcoma Sa-37 tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González TR

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vivo studies were conducted to quantify the effectiveness of low-level direct electric current for different amounts of electrical charge and the survival rate in fibrosarcoma Sa-37 and Ehrlich tumors, also the effect of direct electric in Ehrlich tumor was evaluate through the measurements of tumor volume and the peritumoral and tumoral findings. Methods BALB/c male mice, 7–8 week old and 20–22 g weight were used. Ehrlich and fibrosarcoma Sa-37 cell lines, growing in BALB/c mice. Solid and subcutaneous Ehrlich and fibrosarcoma Sa-37 tumors, located dorsolaterally in animals, were initiated by the inoculation of 5 × 106 and 1 × 105 viable tumor cells, respectively. For each type of tumor four groups (one control group and three treated groups consisting of 10 mice randomly divided were formed. When the tumors reached approximately 0.5 cm3, four platinum electrodes were inserted into their bases. The electric charge delivered to the tumors was varied in the range of 5.5 to 110 C/cm3 for a constant time of 45 minutes. An additional experiment was performed in BALB/c male mice bearing Ehrlich tumor to examine from a histolological point of view the effects of direct electric current. A control group and a treated group with 77 C/cm3 (27.0 C in 0.35 cm3 and 10 mA for 45 min were formed. In this experiment when the tumor volumes reached 0.35 cm3, two anodes and two cathodes were inserted into the base perpendicular to the tumor long axis. Results Significant tumor growth delay and survival rate were achieved after electrotherapy and both were dependent on direct electric current intensity, being more marked in fibrosarcoma Sa-37 tumor. Complete regressions for fibrosarcoma Sa-37 and Ehrlich tumors were observed for electrical charges of 80 and 92 C/cm3, respectively. Histopathological and peritumoral findings in Ehrlich tumor revealed in the treated group marked tumor necrosis, vascular congestion, peritumoral neutrophil

  11. Pituitary Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... institutes of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conduct research related to brain tumors, including pituitary tumors, in their laboratories at ... institutes of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conduct research related to brain tumors, including pituitary tumors, in their laboratories at ...

  12. Flat-Panel Detector—Based Volume Computed Tomography: A Novel 3D Imaging Technique to Monitor Osteolytic Bone Lesions in a Mouse Tumor Metastasis Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannine Missbach-Guentner

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal metastasis is an important cause of mortality in patients with breast cancer. Hence, animal models, in combination with various imaging techniques, are in high demand for preclinical assessment of novel therapies. We evaluated the applicability of flat-panel volume computed tomography (fpVCT to noninvasive detection of osteolytic bone metastases that develop in severe immunodeficient mice after intracardial injection of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. A single fpVCT scan at 200-wm isotropic resolution was employed to detect osteolysis within the entire skeleton. Osteolytic lesions identified by fpVCT correlated with Faxitron X-ray analysis and were subsequently confirmed by histopathological examination. Isotropic three-dimensional image data sets obtained by fpVCT were the basis for the precise visualization of the extent of the lesion within the cortical bone and for the measurement of bone loss. Furthermore, fpVCT imaging allows continuous monitoring of growth kinetics for each metastatic site and visualization of lesions in more complex regions of the skeleton, such as the skull. Our findings suggest that fpVCT is a powerful tool that can be used to monitor the occurrence and progression of osteolytic lesions in vivo and can be further developed to monitor responses to antimetastatic therapies over the course of the disease.

  13. Chitinolytic activity in viable spores of encephalitozoon species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schottelius J

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available By employing 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-NN',N"-triacetylchitotriose substrate in a semi quantitative assay, chitinolytic activity in viable spores of Encephalitozoon cuniculi and E. intestinalis was detected and dependence on reaction time, spore concentration, concentration of substrate and temperature were demonstrated. It was possible to block the chitinolytic activity by chitin hydrolysate. By incubation at 80°C for 10 min or at 55°C for 20 min the spores were loosing the chitinolytic activity. Incubation of the spores in trypsin reduced the chitinolytic activity. Cellulase activity could not be detected.

  14. Molar Pregnancy with a Co-Existing Viable Fetus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruya Deveer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available     The aim of this study was to report the clinical features, management, and outcome of a case of molar pregnancy with a coexisting viable fetus and to review the literature. In this article, we report a case of pregnancy with diffuse placental molar change and a normal fetus which presented with hyperemesis gravidarum and hyperthyroidism. Genetic amniocentesis showed normal fetal karyotype. A healthy full-term live male infant was delivered by cesarean section. In molar pregnancies with a normal karyotype fetus, with intensive maternal follow-up, continuation of pregnancy can be suggested.

  15. Kit Tests for Rapid Detection of Viable Bacteria and Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    34 ®,, LEYE V TŘ CHEMICAL SYSTEMS LABORATORY CONTRACTOR REPORTo ARCSL-CR-80064 KIT TESTS FOR RAPID DETECTION OF VIABLE BACTERIA AND VIRUSES Final Report by R.H...they are converted from colorless, water-soluble compounds to brightly colored insoluble precipitates on reduction. The reduced form remains at the...per test) Observation 0 no obvious change in 30 minutes 5 x 14trace color in 30 minutes 2 x 10 s trace color in 17 minutes, distinct in 30 minutes 5 x

  16. Metabolic activity of bacterial cells enumerated by direct viable count

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roszak, D.B.; Colwell, R.R.

    1987-12-01

    The direct viable count (DVC) method was modified by incorporating radiolabeled substrates in microautoradiographic analyses to assess bacterial survival in controlled laboratory microcosms. The DVC method, which permits enumeration of culturable and nonculturable cells, discriminates those cells that are responsive to added nutrients but in which division is inhibited by the addition of nalidixic acid. The resulting elongated cells represent all viable cells; this includes those that are culturable on routine media and those that are not. Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis were employed in the microcosm studies, and radiolabeled substrates included (methyl-tritium thymidine or (Uranium-Carbon 14) glutamic acid. Samples taken at selected intervals during the survival experiments were examined by epifluorescence microscopy to enumerate cells by the DVC and acridine orange direct count methods, as well as by culture methods. Good correlation was obtained for cell-associated metabolic activity, measured by microautoradiography and substrate responsiveness (by the DVC method) at various stages of survival. Of the cells responsive to nutrients by the DVC method, ca 90% were metabolically active by the microautoradiographic method. No significant difference was observed between DVC enumerations with or without added radiolabeled substrate.

  17. Microglia engulf viable newborn cells in the epileptic dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Cong; Koyama, Ryuta; Ikegaya, Yuji

    2016-09-01

    Microglia, which are the brain's resident immune cells, engulf dead neural progenitor cells during adult neurogenesis in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG). The number of newborn cells in the SGZ increases significantly after status epilepticus (SE), but whether and how microglia regulate the number of newborn cells after SE remain unclear. Here, we show that microglia rapidly eliminate newborn cells after SE by primary phagocytosis, a process by which viable cells are engulfed, thereby regulating the number of newborn cells that are incorporated into the DG. The number of newborn cells in the DG was increased at 5 days after SE in the adult mouse brain but rapidly decreased to the control levels within a week. During this period, microglia in the DG were highly active and engulfed newborn cells. We found that the majority of engulfed newborn cells were caspase-negative viable cells. Finally, inactivation of microglia with minocycline maintained the increase in the number of newborn cells after SE. Furthermore, minocycline treatment after SE induced the emergence of hilar ectopic granule cells. Thus, our findings suggest that microglia may contribute to homeostasis of the dentate neurogenic niche by eliminating excess newborn cells after SE via primary phagocytosis. GLIA 2016;64:1508-1517.

  18. Free-floating planets: a viable option for panspermia

    CERN Document Server

    Durand-Manterola, Hector Javier

    2010-01-01

    Genomic complexity can be used as a clock with which the moment in which life originated can be measured. Some authors who have studied this problem have come to the conclusion that it is not possible that terrestrial life originated here and that, in reality, life originated giga-years ago, before the solar system existed. If we accept this conclusion there is no other option than to admit that panspermia is something viable.The goal of this study is to propose a viable hypothesis for the transport of SLF from one planetary system to another. During the formation period of a planetary system giant planets can eject planets the size of the Earth, or larger, turning them into free-floating planets in interstellar space. These free-floating planets have also been called free floaters. If a free floater, which has developed life, enters a lifeless planetary system, it can seed the worlds of this system with SLF dragged by the stellar wind from one planet to another or by great impacts on the free planet. To supp...

  19. Models with radiative neutrino masses and viable dark matter candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Restrepo, Diego; Yaguna, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    We provide a list of particle physics models at the TeV-scale that are compatible with neutrino masses and dark matter. In these models, the Standard Model particle content is extended with a small number (\\leq 4) of scalar and fermion fields transforming as singlets, doublets or triplets under SU(2), and neutrino masses are generated radiatively via 1-loop diagrams. The dark matter candidates are stabilized by a Z_2 symmetry and are in general mixtures of the neutral components of such new multiplets. We describe the particle content of each of these models and determine the conditions under which they are consistent with current data. We find a total of 35 viable models, most of which have not been previously studied in the literature. There is a great potential to test these models at the LHC not only due to the TeV-scale masses of the new fields but also because about half of the viable models contain particles with exotic electric charges, which give rise to background-free signals. Our results should se...

  20. Production of viable cultures of Flavobacterium psychrophilum: approach and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, C; Antonio, D; Hedrick, R P

    1999-06-01

    Although the fish pathogen Flavobacterium psychrophilum is a major source of concern in salmonid hatcheries, few studies have been conducted on its pathogenicity. Difficulties are often experienced when trying to control or quantify standard procedures for in vitro culture of the bacterium. Plate enumeration and counting chamber enumeration combined with epifluorescent microscopy with fluorescent dyes determined that no more than 25% of the bacterial cells present in the cultures were able to produce colonies on agar media. This was strongly dependent upon different medium components. Tryptone-enriched Anacker and Ordal medium proved more suitable than tryptone-yeast extract-salts with skimmed milk. Adding horse serum and trace elements in controlled proportions offered the most reproducible results. Viable but nonculturable forms were apparently not responsible for the difficulties in production of F. psychrophilum, but the cells were highly susceptible to osmotic conditions. Improvements in the media and careful handling of the bacteria in isotonic suspension media resulted in predictable production of viable bacteria and allowed an absorbance/colony-forming-units relation curve to be established.

  1. Formas cocoides de Helicobacter pylori: viables o degenerativas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Cava

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available De los trabajos presentados acerca de las formas cocoides de Helicobacter pylori se deduce una controversia mucho mayor que la resultante del mero estudio clínico de este microorganismo. Parece claro que existe una conversión tanto in vivo como in vitro de las formas espirales a las formas cocoides inducida por varios motivos, como cultivos prolongados, estrés físico y químico, y agentes antimicrobianos. En esta revisión repasamos los puntos de vista que han dividido a investigadores de esta área en dos grupos bien definidos: Los que consideran a estas formas cocoides como un producto no viable de degeneración celular y los que piensan que estas formas son estructuras viables,durmientes o de resistencia frente a condiciones ambientales adversas. Esta discrepancia conlleva a que interrogantes sobre la relación entre la transmisión de la enfermedad y estas formas cocoides permanezcan sin respuesta todavía.

  2. [Radiation induced tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez Bayard, L; Delgado López, L; Tirado Bejarano, C; Gómez Puerto, A; García Fernández, J L

    1998-04-01

    Radiations at cellular level produce different effects, depending on type of radiation and irradiated tissue. The radiation-induced cancers are associated to non-letals genetics mutations, and to classify like radiation induced tumors is necessary that appear in the treatment volume, a long latency period (years), histolo-different to the primary lesion, enough doses quantitatively and that exists a greater incidence in the irradiated populations. The genetics mutations affect at tumoral suppressors gen(Gen RB I, p53, BRCA I, BRCA 2) and repressors gen (hMSH 2, hMLH I,...), they could be longer and multifocals mutations, and produce lack of cellular control and a greater predisposition to develop tumors and a probable risk of increment of radiosensitivity. We present some of the more representatives studies about radiation-induced tumors.

  3. Phase II Trial of Radiosurgery to Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy-Defined High-Risk Tumor Volumes in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einstein, Douglas B., E-mail: douglas.einstein@khnetwork.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Wessels, Barry [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Bangert, Barbara [Department of Radiology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Fu, Pingfu [Department of Biostatistics, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Nelson, A. Dennis [Department of Radiology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Cohen, Mark [Department of Pathology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Sagar, Stephen [Department of Neurology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Lewin, Jonathan [Department of Radiology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Sloan, Andrew [Department of Neurosurgery, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Zheng Yiran; Williams, Jordonna; Colussi, Valdir; Vinkler, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Maciunas, Robert [Department of Neurosurgery, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of a Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) boost to areas of high risk determined by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) functional imaging in addition to standard radiotherapy for patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients in this prospective Phase II trial underwent surgical resection or biopsy for a GBM followed by SRS directed toward areas of MRS-determined high biological activity within 2 cm of the postoperative enhancing surgical bed. The MRS regions were determined by identifying those voxels within the postoperative T2 magnetic resonance imaging volume that contained an elevated choline/N-acetylaspartate ratio in excess of 2:1. These voxels were marked, digitally fused with the SRS planning magnetic resonance image, targeted with an 8-mm isocenter per voxel, and treated using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group SRS dose guidelines. All patients then received conformal radiotherapy to a total dose of 60 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Results: The median survival for the entire cohort was 15.8 months. With 75% of recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class 3 patients still alive 18 months after treatment, the median survival for RPA Class 3 has not yet been reached. The median survivals for RPA Class 4, 5, and 6 patients were 18.7, 12.5, and 3.9 months, respectively, compared with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiotherapy-alone historical control survivals of 11.1, 8.9, and 4.6 months. For the 16 of 35 patients who received concurrent temozolomide in addition to protocol radiotherapeutic treatment, the median survival was 20.8 months, compared with European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer historical controls of 14.6 months using radiotherapy and temozolomide. Grade 3/4 toxicities possibly attributable to treatment were 11%. Conclusions: This represents the first prospective trial using selective MRS-targeted functional SRS

  4. A quantitative comparison of gross tumor volumes delineated on [18F]-FDG-PET/CT scan and contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan in locally advanced head and neck carcinoma treated with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarjuna Burela

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Accurate tumor diagnosis is important in highly conformal techniques such as Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT, which aims for high therapeutic ratio. We compared Gross Tumor Volume (GTV (primary and nodal delineated on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([18F]-FDG-PET scan to those delineated on contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT scan and its impact on staging treated by IMRT. A total of 30 consecutive patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck were included in this study. FDG-PET and CECT scans were performed with dedicated positron emission tomography–computed tomography (PET/CT scanner in a single session as part of radiotherapy treatment planning for IMRT. After treatment with concurrent chemoradiotherapy, all patients were followed for one year. Three out of 30 patients were excluded from the final analysis, as there was complete remission in PET/CT after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. For remaining 27 cases, the primary sites were 17 oropharynx, 2 hypopharynx, 7 larynx and 1 unknown primary with secondary neck node. PET–CT resulted in changes of CT-based staging in 25% patients (up-staged in 3 and down-staged in 4. GTV delineated on PET vs CT scan was GTV-PET (primary of 20.15 cm3 vs GTV-CT (primary of 18.75 cm3, p = 0.803; and GTV-PET (nodes of 28.45 cm3 vs GTV-CT (nodes of 21.56 cm3, p = 0.589. The mismatch between two target volumes was statistically insignificant (p = 0.635 for GTV primary, p = 0.187 for nodes. The mean GTV-PET outside CT for primary was 5.83 cm3, and for node was 8.47 cm3. Median follow-up was 12 months. One-year loco-regional control was 92%. The target delineation of GTV can be improved with functional imaging [18F]-FDG-PET/CT.

  5. Estimation of the mediastinal involvement probability in non-small cell lung cancer: a statistical definition of the clinical target volume for 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy?; Estimation de la propabilite d'envahissement tumoral mediastinal: une definition statistique du volume-cible anatomoclinique pour la radiotherapie conformationnelle des cancers bronchiques non a petites cellules?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giraud, P.; Dubray, B.; Helfre, S.; Dauphinot, C.; Rosenwald, J.C.; Cosset, J.M. [Institut Curie, Dept. d' Oncologie-Radiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France); Rycke, Y. de [Institut Curie, Dept. de Biostatistiques, 75 - Paris (France); Minet, P. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Service de Radiotherapie, Liege (Belgium); Danhier, S. [Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Service de Radiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France)

    2001-12-01

    Purpose. - Conformal irradiation of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is largely based on a precise definition of the nodal clinical target volume (CTVn). The reduction of the number of nodal stations to be irradiated would render tumor dose escalation more achievable. The aim of this work was to design an mathematical tool based on documented data, that would predict the risk of metastatic involvement for each nodal station. Methods and material. - From the large surgical series published in the literature we looked at the main pre-treatment parameters that modify the risk of nodal invasion. The probability of involvement for the 17 nodal stations described by the American Thoracic Society (ATS) was computed from all these publications and then weighted according to the French epidemiological data. Starting from the primitive location of the tumour as the main characteristic, we built a probabilistic tree for each nodal station representing the risk distribution as a function of each tumor feature. From the statistical point of view, we used the inversion of probability trees method described by Weinstein and Feinberg. Results. -Taking into account all the different parameters of I the pre-treatment staging relative to each level of the ATS map brings up to 20,000 different combinations. The first chosen parameters in the tree were, depending on the tumour location, the histological classification, the metastatic stage, the nodal stage weighted in function of the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnostic examination used (PET scan, CAT scan) and the tumoral stage. A software is proposed to compute a predicted probability of involvement of each nodal station for any given clinical presentation.Conclusion. -To better define the CTVn in NSCLC 3DRT, we propose a software that evaluates the mediastinal nodal involvement risk from easily accessible individual pretreatment parameters. (authors)

  6. The early predictive value of a decrease of metabolic tumor volume in repeated {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for recurrence of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer with concurrent radiochemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Wei, E-mail: weihuang@mcw.com [Department of Radiation Oncology (Chest Section), Shandong' s Key Laboratory of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, 440 Jiyan Road, Jinan 250117 (China); Liu, Bo; Fan, Min [Department of Internal Medicine Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan (China); Zhou, Tao [Department of Radiation Oncology (Chest Section), Shandong' s Key Laboratory of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, 440 Jiyan Road, Jinan 250117 (China); Fu, Zheng [PET/CT center, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan (China); Zhang, Zicheng; Li, Hongsheng [Department of Radiation Oncology (Chest Section), Shandong' s Key Laboratory of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, 440 Jiyan Road, Jinan 250117 (China); Li, Baosheng, E-mail: alvinbird@163.com [Department of Radiation Oncology (Chest Section), Shandong' s Key Laboratory of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, 440 Jiyan Road, Jinan 250117 (China)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: •The patients underwent the second FDG PET during the early stage of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). •To our knowledge, this could be the first study showing that the repeated FDG PET during the early stage of CCRT has added value by being a prognostic factor for recurrence of the locally advanced NSCLC patients. •This is a result of continuous research. •The decrease of MTV was the only significant risk factor for recurrence. -- Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this study is to investigate the value of [{sup 18}F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F FDG PET/CT) to predict recurrence of patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during the early stage of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Methods: A total of 53 stage III NSCLC patients without diabetics or undergoing surgery were enrolled in the prospective study. Those patients were evaluated by FDG PET before and following 40 Gy radiotherapy (RT) with a concurrent cisplatin-based heterogeneous chemotherapy regimen. Semiquantitative assessment was used to determine maximum and mean SUVs (SUVmax/SUVmean) and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) of the primary tumor. The prognostic significance of PET/CT parameters and other clinical variables was assessed using Cox regression analyses. The cutoffs of PET/CT parameters which have been determined by the previous study were used to separate the groups with Kaplan–Meier curves. Results: Recurrence rates at 1- and 2-years were 18.9% (10/53) and 50.9% (27/53) for all patients, respectively. Cox regression analysis showed that the only prognostic factor for recurrence was a decrease of MTV. Using the cutoff of 29.7%, a decrease of MTV can separate the patients into 2 groups with Kaplan–Meier curve successfully. Conclusion: The prospective study has reinforced the early predictive value of MTV in repeated {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for recurrence in a subgroup of locally advanced NSCLC who

  7. Dendritic cells take up and present antigens from viable and apoptotic polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alfaro

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC are endowed with the ability to cross-present antigens from other cell types to cognate T cells. DC are poised to meet polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs as a result of being co-attracted by interleukin-8 (IL-8, for instance as produced by tumor cells or infected tissue. Human monocyte-derived and mouse bone marrow-derived DC can readily internalize viable or UV-irradiated PMNs. Such internalization was abrogated at 4°C and partly inhibited by anti-CD18 mAb. In mice, DC which had internalized PMNs containing electroporated ovalbumin (OVA protein, were able to cross-present the antigen to CD8 (OT-1 and CD4 (OT-2 TCR-transgenic T cells. Moreover, in humans, tumor cell debris is internalized by PMNs and the tumor-cell material can be subsequently taken up from the immunomagnetically re-isolated PMNs by DC. Importantly, if human neutrophils had endocytosed bacteria, they were able to trigger the maturation program of the DC. Moreover, when mouse PMNs with E. coli in their interior are co-injected in the foot pad with DC, many DC loaded with fluorescent material from the PMNs reach draining lymph nodes. Using CT26 (H-2(d mouse tumor cells, it was observed that if tumor cells are intracellularly loaded with OVA protein and UV-irradiated, they become phagocytic prey of H-2(d PMNs. If such PMNs, that cannot present antigens to OT-1 T cells, are immunomagnetically re-isolated and phagocytosed by H-2(b DC, such DC productively cross-present OVA antigen determinants to OT-1 T cells. Cross-presentation to adoptively transferred OT-1 lymphocytes at draining lymph nodes also take place when OVA-loaded PMNs (H-2(d are coinjected in the footpad of mice with autologous DC (H-2(b. In summary, our results indicate that antigens phagocytosed by short-lived PMNs can be in turn internalized and productively cross-presented by DC.

  8. Viable Compositional Analysis of an Eleven Species Oral Polymicrobial Biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, Leighann; Lappin, Gillian; O'Donnell, Lindsay E.; Millhouse, Emma; Millington, Owain R.; Bradshaw, David J.; Axe, Alyson S.; Williams, Craig; Nile, Christopher J.; Ramage, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Polymicrobial biofilms are abundant in clinical disease, particularly within the oral cavity. Creating complex biofilm models that recapitulate the polymicrobiality of oral disease are important in the development of new chemotherapeutic agents. In order to do this accurately we require the ability to undertake compositional analysis, in addition to determine individual cell viability, which is difficult using conventional microbiology. The aim of this study was to develop a defined multispecies denture biofilm model in vitro, and to assess viable compositional analysis following defined oral hygiene regimens. Methods: An in vitro multispecies denture biofilm containing various oral commensal and pathogenic bacteria and yeast was created on poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Denture hygiene regimens tested against the biofilm model included brushing only, denture cleansing only and combinational brushing and denture cleansing. Biofilm composition and viability were assessed by culture (CFU) and molecular (qPCR) methodologies. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy were also employed to visualize changes in denture biofilms following treatment. Results: Combinational treatment of brushing and denture cleansing had the greatest impact on multispecies denture biofilms, reducing the number of live cells by more than 2 logs, and altering the overall composition in favor of streptococci. This was even more evident during the sequential testing, whereby daily sequential treatment reduced the total and live number of bacteria and yeast more than those treated intermittently. Bacteria and yeast remaining following treatment tended to aggregate in the pores of the PMMA, proving more difficult to fully eradicate the biofilm. Conclusions: Overall, we are the first to develop a method to enable viable compositional analysis of an 11 species denture biofilm following chemotherapeutic challenge. We were able to demonstrate viable cell

  9. Viable behavioural and technological energy-saving measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poortinga, W. [Centre for Environmental Risk, University of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom); Steg, L. [Department of Psychology, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2002-07-01

    Both in the natural and social sciences sustainable household consumption has been studied for a long time. However, cooperation between the two has been fairly uncommon. This paper argues that the disciplines should collaborate closely in designing more successful environmental policies on household energy use. It demonstrates how data from the natural and social sciences may be combined to identify energy saving measures that are most likely to be successful, i.e., effective and acceptable (so-called viable energy-saving measures). Moreover, this study examined differences in acceptability of energy-saving measures between various socio-demographic groups. Differences in acceptability of behavioural and technological measures proved attributable not only to levels of environmental concern, but also to differences in income.

  10. A viable logarithmic f(R) model for inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin, M.; Khalil, S. [Center for Fundamental Physics, Zewail City of Science and Technology,6 October City, Giza (Egypt); Salah, M. [Center for Fundamental Physics, Zewail City of Science and Technology,6 October City, Giza (Egypt); Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Cairo University,Giza (Egypt)

    2016-08-18

    Inflation in the framework of f(R) modified gravity is revisited. We study the conditions that f(R) should satisfy in order to lead to a viable inflationary model in the original form and in the Einstein frame. Based on these criteria we propose a new logarithmic model as a potential candidate for f(R) theories aiming to describe inflation consistent with observations from Planck satellite (2015). The model predicts scalar spectral index 0.9615

  11. Social Networking and Smart Technology: Viable Environmental Communication Tools…?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montain, J.; Byrne, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    To what extent do popular social networking channels represent a viable means for disseminating information regarding environmental change to the general public? Are new forms of communication such as YouTube™, Facebook™, MySpace™ and Twitter™ and smart devices such as iPhone™ and BlackBerry™ useful and effective in terms motivating people into social action and behavioural modification; or do they simply pay ‘lip service’ to these pressing environmental issues? This project will explore the background connections between social networking and environmental communication and education; and outline why such tools might be an appropriate way to connect to a broad audience in an efficient and unconventional manner. Further, research will survey the current prevalence of reliable environmental change information on social networking Internet-based media; and finally, suggestions for improved strategies and new directions will be provided.

  12. Simultaneous pyometra and viable puppies’ gestation in a bitch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Risso

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Here we describe a case of pyometra coexisting with gestation in a 4.5 year-old miniature short-haired Dachshund. The dog exhibited depression, vaginal discharge, polydipsia and dehydration. Ultrasound examination revealed the presence of low to moderate anechoic fluid collection in the left uterine horn. Blood analysis revealed mild neutrophilia with a left shift. Based on these findings a presumptive diagnosis of pyometra was made and the bitch was treated using amoxicillin-clavulanate with dopaminergic agonist (cabergoline. A second ultrasound scan revealed the presence of two gestational vesicles in the right uterine horn that were successfully carried to term. Unusually, while pyometra persisted in the left uterine horn, two viable puppies were delivered by caesarean section from the right uterine horn.

  13. Simultaneous pyometra and viable puppies’ gestation in a bitch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risso, A.; Pellegrino, F.J.; Corrada, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe a case of pyometra coexisting with gestation in a 4.5 year-old miniature short-haired Dachshund. The dog exhibited depression, vaginal discharge, polydipsia and dehydration. Ultrasound examination revealed the presence of low to moderate anechoic fluid collection in the left uterine horn. Blood analysis revealed mild neutrophilia with a left shift. Based on these findings a presumptive diagnosis of pyometra was made and the bitch was treated using amoxicillin-clavulanate with dopaminergic agonist (cabergoline). A second ultrasound scan revealed the presence of two gestational vesicles in the right uterine horn that were successfully carried to term. Unusually, while pyometra persisted in the left uterine horn, two viable puppies were delivered by caesarean section from the right uterine horn. PMID:26623344

  14. Dye Sensitized Solar Cells for Economically Viable Photovoltaic Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyun Suk; Lee, Jung-Kun

    2013-05-16

    TiO2 nanoparticle-based dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have attracted a significant level of scientific and technological interest for their potential as economically viable photovoltaic devices. While DSSCs have multiple benefits such as material abundance, a short energy payback period, constant power output, and compatibility with flexible applications, there are still several challenges that hold back large scale commercialization. Critical factors determining the future of DSSCs involve energy conversion efficiency, long-term stability, and production cost. Continuous advancement of their long-term stability suggests that state-of-the-art DSSCs will operate for over 20 years without a significant decrease in performance. Nevertheless, key questions remain in regards to energy conversion efficiency improvements and material cost reduction. In this Perspective, the present state of the field and the ongoing efforts to address the requirements of DSSCs are summarized with views on the future of DSSCs.

  15. Simultaneous pyometra and viable puppies' gestation in a bitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risso, A; Pellegrino, F J; Corrada, Y

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe a case of pyometra coexisting with gestation in a 4.5 year-old miniature short-haired Dachshund. The dog exhibited depression, vaginal discharge, polydipsia and dehydration. Ultrasound examination revealed the presence of low to moderate anechoic fluid collection in the left uterine horn. Blood analysis revealed mild neutrophilia with a left shift. Based on these findings a presumptive diagnosis of pyometra was made and the bitch was treated using amoxicillin-clavulanate with dopaminergic agonist (cabergoline). A second ultrasound scan revealed the presence of two gestational vesicles in the right uterine horn that were successfully carried to term. Unusually, while pyometra persisted in the left uterine horn, two viable puppies were delivered by caesarean section from the right uterine horn.

  16. Dissolvable tattoo sensors: from science fiction to a viable technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Huanyu; Yi, Ning

    2017-01-01

    Early surrealistic painting and science fiction movies have envisioned dissolvable tattoo electronic devices. In this paper, we will review the recent advances that transform that vision into a viable technology, with extended capabilities even beyond the early vision. Specifically, we focus on the discussion of a stretchable design for tattoo sensors and degradable materials for dissolvable sensors, in the form of inorganic devices with a performance comparable to modern electronics. Integration of these two technologies as well as the future developments of bio-integrated devices is also discussed. Many of the appealing ideas behind developments of these devices are drawn from nature and especially biological systems. Thus, bio-inspiration is believed to continue playing a key role in future devices for bio-integration and beyond.

  17. Viable spore counts in biological controls pre-sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusca, María I; Bernat, María I; Turcot, Liliana; Nastri, Natalia; Nastri, Maria; Rosa, Alcira

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the total count of viable spores in standardized inoculated carriers pre-sterilization. Samples of "Bacterial Spore Sterilization Strip" (R Biological Laboratories) (well before their expiry date) were divided into Group A (B. subtilis) and Group B (B. stearothermophylus). Twenty-four strips were tested per group. The strips were minced in groups of three, placed in chilled sterile water and vortexed for 5 minutes to obtain a homogenous suspension. Ten ml of the homogenous suspension were transferred to two sterile jars, i.e. one jar per group. The samples were then heated in a water bath at 95 degrees C (Group A) or 80 degrees C (Group B) for 15 minutes and cooled rapidly in an ice bath at 0- 4 degrees C during 15 minutes. Successive dilutions were performed until a final aliquot of 30 to 300 colony-forming units (CFU) was obtained. The inoculums were placed in Petri dishes with culture medium (soy extract, casein agar adapted for spores, melted and cooled to 45-50 degrees C) and incubated at 55 degrees C or 37 degrees C. Statistical analysis of the data was performed. A larger number of spores were found at 48 hours than at 24 hours. However, this finding did not hold true for all the groups. The present results show that monitoring viable spores pre-sterilization would guarantee the accuracy of the data. Total spore counts must be within 50 and 300% of the number of spores indicated in the biological control. The procedure is essential to guarantee the efficacy of the biological control.

  18. Wilms Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Wilms tumor is 1 pound at diagnosis. Some children also may have nausea, stomach pain, high blood pressure (hypertension), blood in the urine, loss of appetite, or fever. Even though Wilms tumors often are ...

  19. Hypothalamic tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Complications of brain surgery may include: Bleeding Brain damage Death (rarely) Infection Seizures can result from the tumor or from any surgical procedure on the brain. Hydrocephalus can occur with some tumors and ...

  20. 9 CFR 113.26 - Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Detection of viable bacteria and fungi... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Standard Procedures § 113.26 Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except... required to be free of viable bacteria and fungi, they shall also be tested as prescribed in this section...

  1. Urogenital tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    An overview is provided for veterinary care of urogenital tumors in companion animals, especially the dog. Neoplasms discussed include tumors of the kidney, urinary bladder, prostate, testis, ovary, vagina, vulva and the canine transmissible venereal tumor. Topics addressed include description, diagnosis and treatment.

  2. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  3. Odontogenic Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    TAHSİNOĞLU, Melih

    2013-01-01

    DefinitionThe neoplasms that consist of the cells considered specialized for odontogenesis, and their product (dentin, enamel, cementum) are called odontogenic tumors.ClassificationTo initiate odontogenesis, epithelium is a must. Same rule holds for the odontogenic tumors: without odontogenic epithelium, odontogenic tumors cannot be, without the induction of odontogenic epithelium odontogenic mesenchyme cannot develop.

  4. Production of viable male unreduced gametes in Brassica interspecific hybrids is genotype specific and stimulated by cold temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cowling Wallace A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unreduced gametes (gametes with the somatic chromosome number may provide a pathway for evolutionary speciation via allopolyploid formation. We evaluated the effect of genotype and temperature on male unreduced gamete formation in Brassica allotetraploids and their interspecific hybrids. The frequency of unreduced gametes post-meiosis was estimated in sporads from the frequency of dyads or giant tetrads, and in pollen from the frequency of viable giant pollen compared with viable normal pollen. Giant tetrads were twice the volume of normal tetrads, and presumably resulted from pre-meiotic doubling of chromosome number. Giant pollen was defined as pollen with more than 1.5 × normal diameter, under the assumption that the doubling of DNA content in unreduced gametes would approximately double the pollen cell volume. The effect of genotype was assessed in five B. napus, two B. carinata and one B. juncea parents and in 13 interspecific hybrid combinations. The effect of temperature was assessed in a subset of genotypes in hot (day/night 30°C/20°C, warm (25°C/15°C, cool (18°C/13°C and cold (10°C/5°C treatments. Results Based on estimates at the sporad stage, some interspecific hybrid genotypes produced unreduced gametes (range 0.06 to 3.29% at more than an order of magnitude higher frequency than in the parents (range 0.00% to 0.11%. In nine hybrids that produced viable mature pollen, the frequency of viable giant pollen (range 0.2% to 33.5% was much greater than in the parents (range 0.0% to 0.4%. Giant pollen, most likely formed from unreduced gametes, was more viable than normal pollen in hybrids. Two B. napus × B. carinata hybrids produced 9% and 23% unreduced gametes based on post-meiotic sporad observations in the cold temperature treatment, which was more than two orders of magnitude higher than in the parents. Conclusions These results demonstrate that sources of unreduced gametes, required for the triploid

  5. Impact of MR-guided boiling histotripsy in distinct murine tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenboom, Martijn; Eikelenboom, Dylan C; van den Bijgaart, Renske J E; Heerschap, Arend; Wesseling, Pieter; den Brok, Martijn H; Fütterer, Jurgen J; Adema, Gosse J

    2017-09-01

    Interest in mechanical high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation is rapidly growing. Boiling histotripsy (BH) is applied for mechanical fragmentation of soft tissue into submicron fragments with limited temperature increase using the shock wave and cavitation effects of HIFU. Research on BH has been largely limited to ex vivo experiments. As a consequence, the in vivo pathology after BH treatment and the relation to preexistent tissue characteristics are not well understood. This study reports on in vivo MR guided BH treatment, either with 100 or 200 pulses per focal spot, in three different subcutaneous mouse tumor models: a soft-tissue melanoma (B16OVA), a compact growing thymoma (EL4), and a highly vascularized neuroblastoma (9464D). Extensive treatment evaluation was performed using MR imaging followed by histopathology 2h after treatment. T2 weighted MRI allowed direct in vivo visualization of the BH lesions in all tumor models. The 100-pulse treated area in the B16OVA tumors was larger than the predicted treatment volume (500±10%). For the more compact growing EL4 and 9464D tumors this was 95±13% and 55±33%, respectively. Histopathology after the 100-pulse treatment revealed completely disintegrated lesions in the treated area with sharp borders in the compact EL4 and 9464D tumors, while for B16OVA tumors the lesion contained a mixture of discohesive (partly viable) clusters of cells, micro-vessel remainings, and tumor cell debris. The treatment of B16OVA with 200 pulses increased the fragmentation of tumor tissue. In all tumor types only micro-hemorrhages were detected after ablation (slightly higher after 200-pulse treatment for the highly vascularized 9464D tumors). Collagen staining revealed that the collagen fibers were to a greater or lesser extent still intact and partly clotted together near the lesion border in all tumor models. In conclusion, this study reveals effective mechanical fragmentation of different tumor types using BH without

  6. Towards a viable and just global nursing ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crigger, Nancy J

    2008-01-01

    Globalization, an outgrowth of technology, while informing us about people throughout the world, also raises our awareness of the extreme economic and social disparities that exist among nations. As part of a global discipline, nurses are vitally interested in reducing and eliminating disparities so that better health is achieved for all people. Recent literature in nursing encourages our discipline to engage more actively with social justice issues. Justice in health care is a major commitment of nursing; thus questions in the larger sphere of globalization, justice and ethics, are our discipline's questions also. Global justice, or fairness, is not an issue for some groups or institutions, but a deeper human rights issue that is a responsibility for everyone. What can we do to help reduce or eliminate the social and economic disparities that are so evident? What kind of ethical milieu is needed to address the threat that globalization imposes on justice and fairness? This article enriches the conceptualization of globalization by investigating recent work by Schweiker and Twiss. In addition, I discuss five qualities or characteristics that will facilitate the development of a viable and just global ethic. A global ethic guides all people in their response to human rights and poverty. Technology and business, two major forces in globalization that are generally considered beneficial, are critiqued as barriers to social justice and the common good.

  7. Rapid isolation of intact, viable fetal cartilage models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, R.R.; Chepenik, K.P.; Paynton, B.V.; Cotler, J.M.

    1982-04-01

    A rapid procedure is described for the isolation of viable, intact, femoral cartilage models (humeri and femora) obtained from pregnant rats on the 18th day of gestation. Viability of these models is demonstrated in an in vitro system where the incorporation of /sup 35/S-sulfate was linear with time of incubation and with numbers of cartilage models utilized. Treatment of cartilage models with ice-cold trichloroacetic acid and a boiling water bath prior to incubation with radiolabel, reduced the amount of radioactivity incorporated to 1.3% of that observed for models incubated by routine procedures. Furthermore, digestion of cartilage model homogenates with protease yielded a supernatant from which 51% to 57% of the radioactivity was precipitated as GAG. This method may also be used to isolate fetal cartilage models as early as the 16th day of gestation. with this system, specific biochemical parameters of mammalian fetal chondrogenesis may be surveyed in normally and abnormally developing fetal cartilage free of surrounding soft tissue.

  8. Stepwise changes in viable but nonculturable Vibrio cholerae cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Daisuke; Mizuno, Tamaki; Miyoshi, Shin-ichi; Shinoda, Sumio

    2015-05-01

    Many bacterial species are known to become viable but nonculturable (VBNC) under conditions that are unsuitable for growth. In this study, the requirements for resuscitation of VBNC-state Vibrio cholerae cells were found to change over time. Although VBNC cells could initially be converted to culturable by treatment with catalase or HT-29 cell extract, they subsequently entered a state that was not convertible to culturable by these factors. However, fluorescence microscopy revealed the presence of live cells in this state, from which VBNC cells were resuscitated by co-cultivation with HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cells. Ultimately, all cells entered a state from which they could not be resuscitated, even by co-cultivation with HT-29. These characteristic changes in VBNC-state cells were a common feature of strains in both V. cholerae O1 and O139 serogroups. Thus, the VBNC state of V. cholerae is not a single property but continues to change over time. © 2015 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Exploring viable vacua of the Z 3-symmetric NMSSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuria, Jyotiranjan; Chattopadhyay, Utpal; Datta, AseshKrishna; Dey, Abhishek

    2017-04-01

    We explore the vacua of the Z 3-symmetric Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) and their stability by going beyond the simplistic paradigm that works with a tree-level neutral scalar potential and adheres to some specific flat directions in the field space. We work in the so-called phenomenological NMSSM (pNMSSM) scenario. Also, for our purpose, we adhere to a reasonably `natural' setup by requiring | μ eff| not too large. Key effects are demonstrated by first studying the profiles of this potential under various circumstances of physical interest via a semi-analytical approach. The results thereof are compared to the ones obtained from a dedicated package like Vevacious which further incorporates the thermal effects to the potential. Regions of the pNMSSM parameter space that render the desired symmetry breaking (DSB) vacuum absolutely stable, long- or short-lived (in relation to the age of the Universe) under quantum/thermal tunneling are delineated. Regions that result in the appearance of color and charge breaking (CCB) minima are also presented. It is demonstrated that light singlet scalars along with a light LSP (lightest supersymmetric particle) having an appreciable singlino admixture are compatible with a viable DSB vacuum. Their implications for collider experiments are commented upon.

  10. Keeping checkpoint/restart viable for exascale systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riesen, Rolf E.; Bridges, Patrick G. (IBM Research, Ireland, Mulhuddart, Dublin); Stearley, Jon R.; Laros, James H., III; Oldfield, Ron A.; Arnold, Dorian (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Pedretti, Kevin Thomas Tauke; Ferreira, Kurt Brian; Brightwell, Ronald Brian

    2011-09-01

    Next-generation exascale systems, those capable of performing a quintillion (10{sup 18}) operations per second, are expected to be delivered in the next 8-10 years. These systems, which will be 1,000 times faster than current systems, will be of unprecedented scale. As these systems continue to grow in size, faults will become increasingly common, even over the course of small calculations. Therefore, issues such as fault tolerance and reliability will limit application scalability. Current techniques to ensure progress across faults like checkpoint/restart, the dominant fault tolerance mechanism for the last 25 years, are increasingly problematic at the scales of future systems due to their excessive overheads. In this work, we evaluate a number of techniques to decrease the overhead of checkpoint/restart and keep this method viable for future exascale systems. More specifically, this work evaluates state-machine replication to dramatically increase the checkpoint interval (the time between successive checkpoint) and hash-based, probabilistic incremental checkpointing using graphics processing units to decrease the checkpoint commit time (the time to save one checkpoint). Using a combination of empirical analysis, modeling, and simulation, we study the costs and benefits of these approaches on a wide range of parameters. These results, which cover of number of high-performance computing capability workloads, different failure distributions, hardware mean time to failures, and I/O bandwidths, show the potential benefits of these techniques for meeting the reliability demands of future exascale platforms.

  11. Generation of Viable Cell and Biomaterial Patterns by Laser Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringeisen, Bradley

    2001-03-01

    In order to fabricate and interface biological systems for next generation applications such as biosensors, protein recognition microarrays, and engineered tissues, it is imperative to have a method of accurately and rapidly depositing different active biomaterials in patterns or layered structures. Ideally, the biomaterial structures would also be compatible with many different substrates including technologically relevant platforms such as electronic circuits or various detection devices. We have developed a novel laser-based technique, termed matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation direct write (MAPLE DW), that is able to direct write patterns and three-dimensional structures of numerous biologically active species ranging from proteins and antibodies to living cells. Specifically, we have shown that MAPLE DW is capable of forming mesoscopic patterns of living prokaryotic cells (E. coli bacteria), living mammalian cells (Chinese hamster ovaries), active proteins (biotinylated bovine serum albumin, horse radish peroxidase), and antibodies specific to a variety of classes of cancer related proteins including intracellular and extracellular matrix proteins, signaling proteins, cell cycle proteins, growth factors, and growth factor receptors. In addition, patterns of viable cells and active biomolecules were deposited on different substrates including metals, semiconductors, nutrient agar, and functionalized glass slides. We will present an explanation of the laser-based transfer mechanism as well as results from our recent efforts to fabricate protein recognition microarrays and tissue-based microfluidic networks.

  12. Rebound peer review: a viable recourse for aggrieved authors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Chandan K

    2012-02-15

    Scholarly peer review represents the linchpin of academic publishing. Recognized benefits of the peer review system are manifold. Critics raise several valid concerns that deserve attention. Several studies show that the current peer review system lacks robustness and is subject to bias in favor of well-established research groups and "mainstream" theories. Hypotheses that harmonize with that of the leaders in the field are more likely to be accepted for publication in prestigious journals than heretic or radical ones. Then, there is the risk posed by the potentially unscrupulous reviewer. Alternatives to traditional peer review have been tried but the outcomes fall much short of expectations. Postreview rejection can be equally frustrating for the author and editor particularly when they are victims of limitations of the blinded forms of review. To provide recourse for authors who felt that their work has been rejected not because of the quality of science but because of the constraints of the peer review system, ARS introduces a rebound track for peer review ( www.liebertpub.com/ars ). The rebound peer review track is a two-tier process that represents a hybrid of partially blinded and open peer review systems. The goal is to make sure that every author has the opportunity to rescue their rejected work which they feel may have been victimized by the glitches of the current peer review system. I invite affected authors to make full use of this experimental mechanism so we know whether the rebound peer review should prevail as a viable recourse.

  13. Targeting stromal glutamine synthetase in tumors disrupts tumor microenvironment-regulated cancer cell growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive stromal cells are an integral part of tumor microenvironment (TME) and interact with cancer cells to regulate their growth. Although targeting stromal cells could be a viable therapy to regulate the communication between TME and cancer cells, identification of stromal targets that make canc...

  14. Cereal crops as viable production and storage systems for pharmaceutical scFv antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöger, E; Vaquero, C; Torres, E; Sack, M; Nicholson, L; Drossard, J; Williams, S; Keen, D; Perrin, Y; Christou, P; Fischer, R

    2000-03-01

    This report describes the stable expression of a medically important antibody in the staple cereal crops rice and wheat. We successfully expressed a single-chain Fv antibody (ScFvT84.66) against carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a well characterized tumor-associated marker antigen. scFv constructs were engineered for recombinant antibody targeting to the plant cell apoplast and ER. Up to 30 microg/g of functional recombinant antibody was detected in the leaves and seeds of wheat and rice. We confirmed that transgenic dry seeds could be stored for at least five months at room temperature, without significant loss of the amount or activity of scFvT84.66. Our results represent the first transition from model plant expression systems, such as tobacco and Arabidopsis, to widely cultivated cereal crops, such as rice and wheat, for expression of an antibody molecule that has already shown efficacy in clinical applications. Thus, we have established that molecular pharming in cereals can be a viable production system for such high-value pharmaceutical macromolecules. Our findings provide a strong foundation for exploiting alternative uses of cereal crops both in industrialized and developing countries.

  15. Volume Entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Astuti, Valerio; Rovelli, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Building on a technical result by Brunnemann and Rideout on the spectrum of the Volume operator in Loop Quantum Gravity, we show that the dimension of the space of the quadrivalent states --with finite-volume individual nodes-- describing a region with total volume smaller than $V$, has \\emph{finite} dimension, bounded by $V \\log V$. This allows us to introduce the notion of "volume entropy": the von Neumann entropy associated to the measurement of volume.

  16. Acupuntura un tratamiento viable para las adicciones en Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernán López-Suescún

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Resumen La acupuntura es una antigua técnica terapéutica desarrollada en China, que ha evidenciado ser efectiva en síntomas como las náuseas, vómito y dolor dentario. A pesar del sustento fisiológico que posibilitaría un uso efectivo en otras patologías, incluyendo el campo de las adicciones, los estudios son contradictorios, posiblemente por la diferencias de visión entre la medicina oriental y la occidental. El consumo de psicoactivos es un problema de salud pública en Colombia y en el mundo que genera grandes costos tangibles e intangibles, los cuales, en países desarrollados, puede llegar hasta el 1,6 % del PIB. En contraste, el beneficio económico del tratamiento de las adicciones, según las Naciones Unidas Contra la Droga y el Delito (UNODC, está entre 1:3 a 1:13; por lo tanto, cualquier esfuerzo que se realice en favor de los consumidores es una ganancia. Con base en estos datos, los organismos internacionales han generado políticas que ayudan a aminorar estos efectos. Colombia, como integrante de estos organismos, ha realizado varios compromisos para llevar a cabo dichas metas. Los tratamientos con auriculoterapia, como el protocolo NADA (National Acupuncture Detoxification Association, son los métodos más usados para las adicciones en el mundo, y aunque no se ha logrado evidenciar su efectividad, por su costo, facilidad y el poco riesgo de efectos adversos se hace viable en un país con pocos recursos económicos como Colombia.

  17. Coronectomy - A viable alternative to prevent inferior alveolar nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Sagtani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Coronectomy is a relatively new method to prevent the risk of Inferior Alveolar Nerve (IAN injury during removal of lower third molars with limited scientific literature among Nepalese patients. Thus, a study was designed to evaluate coronectomy regarding its use, outcomes and complications.Materials and Methods: A descriptive study was conducted from December 2012 to December 2013 among patients attending Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, College of Dental Sciences, BP Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal for removal of mandibular third molars. After reviewing the radiograph for proximity of third molar to the IAN, coronectomy was advised. A written informed consent was obtained from the patients and coronectomy was performed. Patients were recalled after one week. The outcome measures in the follow-up visit were primary healing, pain, infection, dry socket, root exposure and IAN injury. The prevalence of IAN proximity of lower third molars and incidence of complications were calculated.Results: A total 300 mandibular third molars were extracted in 278 patients during the study period. Out of 300 impacted mandibular third molar, 41 (13.7% showed close proximity to inferior alveolar nerve . The incidence of complications and failed procedure was 7.4% among the patients who underwent coronectomy. During the follow up visit, persistent pain and root exposure was reported while other complications like inferior alveolar nerve injury, dry socket and infection was not experienced by the study patients.Conclusion: With a success rate of 92.6% among the 41 patients, coronectomy is a viable alternative to conventional total extraction for mandibular third molars who have a higher risk for damage to the inferior alveolar nerve.JCMS Nepal. 2015;11(3:1-5.

  18. Viable cell sorting of dinoflagellates by multiparametric flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinigalliano, Christopher D; Winshell, Jamie; Guerrero, Maria A; Scorzetti, Gloria; Fell, Jack W; Eaton, Richard W; Brand, Larry; Rein, Kathleen S

    2009-07-01

    Electronic cell sorting for isolation and culture of dinoflagellates and other marine eukaryotic phytoplankton was compared to the traditional method of manually picking cells using a micropipette. Trauma to electronically sorted cells was not a limiting factor, as fragile dinoflagellates, such as Karenia brevis (Dinophyceae), survived electronic cell sorting to yield viable cells. The rate of successful isolation of large-scale (> 4 litres) cultures was higher for manual picking than for electronic cell sorting (2% vs 0.5%, respectively). However, manual picking of cells is more labor intensive and time consuming. Most manually isolated cells required repicking, as the cultures were determined not to be unialgal after a single round of isolation; whereas, no cultures obtained in this study from electronic single-cell sorting required resorting. A broad flow cytometric gating logic was employed to enhance species diversity. The percentages of unique genotypes produced by manual picking or electronic cell sorting were similar (57% vs 54%, respectively), and each approach produced a variety of dinoflagellate or raphidophyte genera. Alternatively, a highly restrictive gating logic was successfully used to target K. brevis from a natural bloom sample. Direct electronic single-cell sorting was more successful than utilizing a pre-enrichment sort followed by electronic single-cell sorting. The appropriate recovery medium may enhance the rate of successful isolations. Seventy percent of isolated cells were recovered in a new medium (RE) reported here, which was optimized for axenic dinoflagellate cultures. The greatest limiting factor to the throughput of electronic cell sorting is the need for manual postsort culture maintenance and assessment of the large number of isolated cells. However, when combined with newly developed automated methods for growth screening, electronic single-cell sorting has the potential to accelerate the discovery of new algal strains.

  19. Mice Lacking Hbp1 Function Are Viable and Fertile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Dagmar; Jans, David A.; Bowles, Josephine; Koopman, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Fetal germ cell development is tightly regulated by the somatic cell environment, and is characterised by cell cycle states that differ between XY and XX gonads. In the testis, gonocytes enter G1/G0 arrest from 12.5 days post coitum (dpc) in mice and maintain cell cycle arrest until after birth. Failure to correctly maintain G1/G0 arrest can result in loss of germ cells or, conversely, germ cell tumours. High mobility group box containing transcription factor 1 (HBP1) is a transcription factor that was previously identified in fetal male germ cells at the time of embryonic cell cycle arrest. In somatic cells, HBP1 is classified as a tumour suppressor protein, known to regulate proliferation and senescence. We therefore investigated the possible role of HBP1 in the initiation and maintenance of fetal germ cell G1/G0 arrest using the mouse model. We identified two splice variants of Hbp1, both of which are expressed in XY and XX fetal gonads, but only one of which is localised to the nucleus in in vitro assays. To investigate Hbp1 loss of function, we used embryonic stem (ES) cells carrying a Genetrap mutation for Hbp1 to generate mice lacking Hbp1 function. We found that Hbp1-genetrap mouse mutant germ cells proliferated correctly throughout development, and adult males were viable and fertile. Multiple Hbp1-LacZ reporter mouse lines were generated, unexpectedly revealing Hbp1 embryonic expression in hair follicles, eye and limbs. Lastly, in a model of defective germ cell G1/G0 arrest, the Rb1-knockout model, we found no evidence for Hbp1 mis-regulation, suggesting that the reported RB1-HBP1 interaction is not critical in the germline, despite co-expression. PMID:28107452

  20. MR DIFFUSION WEIGHTED IMAGING FOR EVALUATION OF RADIOTHERAPEUTIC EFFECTS ON RABBIT VX2 TUMOR MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuo Li; Hua-dan Xue; Xin-hai Wang; Fei Sun; Bo Jiang; Dong Liu; Jing Lei; Zheng-yu Jin

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the feasibility of magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) for evaluation of radiotherapeutic effects on rabbit VX2 tumor model.Methods Sixteen New Zealand white rabbits received a subcutaneous implantation of VX2 tumor cdl suspension 0.5 mL (4× 107cells/mL) in their right thighs to set up tumor model. And 2 weeks later they were randomly divided into therapy group (Group T, n = 10) and control group (Group C, n = 6). Group T received radiotherapy at a single dose of 10 Gy. MR imaging (MRI) scan including short TI inversion recovery echo-planar imaging DWI, T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) sequences were performed 1 day prior to as well as 1 day, 2 days, 3 days and 7 days after radiotherapy. Group C received only MRI scan at the same time points without any treatment. MRI appearance on T2WI, T1WI, and DWI images was compared and tumor volume was calculated. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the tumor were evaluated in all cases. HE staining was used for pathological study.Results Necrosis (n = 8) and hemorrhage (n = 2) were seen gradually on T2WI and T1WI images of Group T after time point of day 2 after irradiation. In Group C, no obvious necrosis was found until day 7. There was no significant difference in tumor volume between the two groups before radiotherapy. After radiotherapy, tumors in Group T showed a gradual growth but not as obvious as Group C. There was a significant difference in tumor volume between the two groups from day 2 on (P < 0.05). ADC value changed dramatically right from the 1st day after radio-therapy in Group T [(0.99 ± 0.15) ×10-3 mm2/s for 1 day before radiotherapy, (1.23 ± 0.08) ×10-3 , (1.45 ± 0.07) ×10-3 , (1.63 ± 0.06) ×10-3 , and (2.02 ± 0.18) ×10-3 mm2/s for day 1, 2, 3, and 7]; and ADC value had no significant changes after radiotherapy in Group C except day 7 [(1.07 ± 0.08) ×10-3 mm2/s for 1 day before radiotherapy, (1.03 ± 0.04) ×10

  1. The delivery of BCNU to brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C C; Li, J; Teo, C S; Lee, T

    1999-08-27

    This paper reports the development of three-dimensional simulations to study the effect of various factors on the delivery of 1-3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) to brain tumors. The study yields information on the efficacy of various delivery methods, and the optimal location of polymer implantation. Two types of drug deliveries, namely, systemic administration and controlled release from polymers, were simulated using fluid dynamics analysis package (FIDAP) to predict the temporal and spatial variation of drug distribution. Polymer-based delivery provides higher mean concentration, longer BCNU exposure time and reduced systemic toxicity than bolus injection. Polymer implanted in the core gives higher concentration of drug in both the core and viable zone than the polymer in the viable zone case. The penetration depth of BCNU is very short. This is because BCNU can get drained out of the system before diffusing to any appreciable distance. Since transvascular permeation is the dominant means of BCNU delivery, the interstitial convection has minor effect because of the extremely small transvascular Peclet number. The reaction of BCNU with brain tissues reduces the drug concentration in all regions and its effect increases with rate constant. The implantation of BCNU/ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer (EVAc) matrix at the lumen of the viable zone immediately following the surgical removal of 80% of the tumor may be an effective treatment for the chemotherapy of brain tumors. The present study provides a quantitative examination on the working principle of Gliadel wafer for the treatment of brain tumors.

  2. Pindborg tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliaperoumal, Santhosh Kumar; Gowri, S.; Dinakar, J.

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT), also known as Pindborg tumor, is a rare odontogenic epithelial neoplasm. So far, nearly 200 cases have been reported in the literature. We are reporting a case of CEOT in a 42-year-old male patient with painless bony swelling in the mandible. The clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic features are discussed with relevant references. PMID:27041911

  3. Pindborg tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhosh Kumar Caliaperoumal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT, also known as Pindborg tumor, is a rare odontogenic epithelial neoplasm. So far, nearly 200 cases have been reported in the literature. We are reporting a case of CEOT in a 42-year-old male patient with painless bony swelling in the mandible. The clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic features are discussed with relevant references.

  4. Coscheduling in Clusters: Is It a Viable Alternative?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, G S; Kim, J H; Ersoz, D; Yoo, A B; Das, C R

    2003-11-10

    than spin-based techniques like PB on a Linux platform. Third, the proposed HYBRID scheduling provides the best performance-energy behavior and can be implemented on any cluster with little effort. All these results suggest that blocking-based coscheduling techniques are viable candidates to be used instead of batching scheme for significant performance-energy benefits.

  5. Challenge of N95 Filtering Facepiece Respirators with Viable H1N1 Influenza Aerosols (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    AFRL-RX-TY-TP-2012-0025 CHALLENGE OF N95 FILTERING FACEPIECE RESPIRATORS WITH VIABLE H1N1 INFLUENZA AEROSOLS (POSTPRINT) Joseph D...TITLE AND SUBTITLE CHALLENGE OF N95 FILTERING FACEPIECE RESPIRATORS WITH VIABLE H1N1 INFLUENZA AEROSOLS (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA4819-10...study evaluates the ability of N95 FFRs to capture viable H1N1 influenza aerosols. METHODs. Five N95 FFR models were challenged with aerosolized

  6. Textural analysis of pre-therapeutic [18F]-FET-PET and its correlation with tumor grade and patient survival in high-grade gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyka, Thomas; Hiob, Daniela; Wester, Hans-Juergen [Klinikum Rechts der Isar der TU Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Gempt, Jens; Ringel, Florian; Meyer, Bernhard [Klinikum Rechts der Isar der TU Muenchen, Neurosurgic Department, Munich (Germany); Schlegel, Juergen [Klinikum Rechts der Isar der TU Muenchen, Institute of Pathology and Neuropathology, Munich (Germany); Bette, Stefanie [Klinikum Rechts der Isar der TU Muenchen, Neuroradiologic department, Munich (Germany); Foerster, Stefan [Klinikum Rechts der Isar der TU Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Klinikum Rechts der Isar der TU Muenchen, TUM Neuroimaging Center (TUM-NIC), Munich (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Amino acid positron emission tomography (PET) with [18F]-fluoroethyl-L-tyrosine (FET) is well established in the diagnostic work-up of malignant brain tumors. Analysis of FET-PET data using tumor-to-background ratios (TBR) has been shown to be highly valuable for the detection of viable hypermetabolic brain tumor tissue; however, it has not proven equally useful for tumor grading. Recently, textural features in 18-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET have been proposed as a method to quantify the heterogeneity of glucose metabolism in a variety of tumor entities. Herein we evaluate whether textural FET-PET features are of utility for grading and prognostication in patients with high-grade gliomas. One hundred thirteen patients (70 men, 43 women) with histologically proven high-grade gliomas were included in this retrospective study. All patients received static FET-PET scans prior to first-line therapy. TBR (max and mean), volumetric parameters and textural parameters based on gray-level neighborhood difference matrices were derived from static FET-PET images. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and discriminant function analyses were used to assess the value for tumor grading. Kaplan-Meier curves and univariate and multivariate Cox regression were employed for analysis of progression-free and overall survival. All FET-PET textural parameters showed the ability to differentiate between World Health Organization (WHO) grade III and IV tumors (p < 0.001; AUC 0.775). Further improvement in discriminatory power was possible through a combination of texture and metabolic tumor volume, classifying 85 % of tumors correctly (AUC 0.830). TBR and volumetric parameters alone were correlated with tumor grade, but showed lower AUC values (0.644 and 0.710, respectively). Furthermore, a correlation of FET-PET texture but not TBR was shown with patient PFS and OS, proving significant in multivariate analysis as well. Volumetric parameters were predictive for OS, but this correlation did not

  7. DCE-MRI Perfusion and Permeability Parameters as predictors of tumor response to CCRT in Patients with locally advanced NSCLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xiuli; Wang, Lvhua; Hui, Zhouguang; Liu, Li; Ye, Feng; Song, Ying; Tang, Yu; Men, Yu; Lambrou, Tryphon; Su, Zihua; Xu, Xiao; Ouyang, Han; Wu, Ning

    2016-01-01

    In this prospective study, 36 patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), who underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) before concurrent chemo-radiotherapy (CCRT) were enrolled. Pharmacokinetic analysis was carried out after non-rigid motion registration. The perfusion parameters [including Blood Flow (BF), Blood Volume (BV), Mean Transit Time (MTT)] and permeability parameters [including endothelial transfer constant (Ktrans), reflux rate (Kep), fractional extravascular extracellular space volume (Ve), fractional plasma volume (Vp)] were calculated, and their relationship with tumor regression was evaluated. The value of these parameters on predicting responders were calculated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to find the independent variables. Tumor regression rate is negatively correlated with Ve and its standard variation Ve_SD and positively correlated with Ktrans and Kep. Significant differences between responders and non-responders existed in Ktrans, Kep, Ve, Ve_SD, MTT, BV_SD and MTT_SD (P < 0.05). ROC indicated that Ve < 0.24 gave the largest area under curve of 0.865 to predict responders. Multivariate logistic regression analysis also showed Ve was a significant predictor. Baseline perfusion and permeability parameters calculated from DCE-MRI were seen to be a viable tool for predicting the early treatment response after CCRT of NSCLC. PMID:27762331

  8. Comparing the effects of brushing with a new gel-to-foam dentifrice to brushing with regular fluoride control dentifrices on viable bacteria levels in saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, David; Schaeffer, Lyndsay; Du-Thumm, Laurence; Vandeven, Mark; Cummins, Diane

    2009-10-01

    To compare the effects of a new gel-to-foam dentifrice to two standard fluoride control dentifrices on foam generation, levels of total viable anaerobes and total viable volatile sulfur compound (VSC)-producing bacteria in expectorate after brushing. 36 subjects participated in this investigator-blind, randomized, crossover study. After a 1-week wash-out period prior to each product use, participants reported to the test site having refrained from oral hygiene, eating and drinking on the morning prior to the visit. Subjects brushed with a full ribbon of assigned dentifrice (Aquafresh Iso-active, Aquafresh Extreme Clean or Aquafresh Fresh & Minty), then expectorated the slurry into a collection vessel after 30 and 60 seconds of supervised brushing. Total foam volume was immediately measured. Subjects then rinsed with sterile water for 10 seconds and expectorated into the same vessel, which was processed for microbiological analysis. Total viable anaerobes and total viable VSC-producing bacteria were enumerated using appropriate selective media. No statistically significant difference was indicated between the gel-to-foam dentifrice and either of the control dentifrices with respect to the level of total viable anaerobes (P > 0.05). The level of total viable VSC-producing bacteria was statistically significantly lower for the gel-to-foam dentifrice (Aquafresh Iso-active) than for one of the control dentifrices (Aquafresh Fresh & Minty) (P dentifrice than for the other control dentifrice (Aquafresh Extreme Clean) (P = 0.0526). Use of the gel-to-foam dentifrice resulted in statistically significantly greater (P dentifrices.

  9. Optical properties of tumor tissues grown on the chorioallantoic membrane of chicken eggs: tumor model to assay of tumor response to photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Norihiro; Kariyama, Yoichiro; Hazama, Hisanao; Ishii, Takuya; Kitajima, Yuya; Inoue, Katsushi; Ishizuka, Masahiro; Tanaka, Tohru; Awazu, Kunio

    2015-12-01

    Herein, the optical adequacy of a tumor model prepared with tumor cells grown on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of a chicken egg is evaluated as an alternative to the mouse tumor model to assess the optimal irradiation conditions in photodynamic therapy (PDT). The optical properties of CAM and mouse tumor tissues were measured with a double integrating sphere and the inverse Monte Carlo technique in the 350- to 1000-nm wavelength range. The hemoglobin and water absorption bands observed in the CAM tumor tissue (10 eggs and 10 tumors) are equal to that of the mouse tumor tissue (8 animals and 8 tumors). The optical intersubject variability of the CAM tumor tissues meets or exceeds that of the mouse tumor tissues, and the reduced scattering coefficient spectra of CAM tumor tissues can be equated with those of mouse tumor tissues. These results confirm that the CAM tumor model is a viable alternative to the mouse tumor model, especially for deriving optimal irradiation conditions in PDT.

  10. Impact of tumor volume doubling time on post-metastatic survival in bone or soft-tissue sarcoma patients treated with metastasectomy and/or radiofrequency ablation of the lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tomoki; Matsumine, Akihiko; Takao, Motoshi; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Matsubara, Takao; Asanuma, Kunihiro; Sudo, Akihiro

    2017-01-01

    Metastasectomy represents the standard treatment for improving survival in patients with lung metastases (LMs) from bone (BS) or soft-tissue sarcoma (STS). Recently, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of the LMs has been proved to be a useful option which can promise the similar effect to metastasectomy. The aim of this study was to determine prognostic factors, including tumor volume doubling time (TVDT), for post-metastatic survival in BS and STS patients treated with metastasectomy and/or RFA of the lung. Forty-eight patients with LMs were retrospectively reviewed. The mean age of the patients at the time of LMs was 56 years. The cohort comprised 27 male and 21 female patients. Eight of the 48 patients had LMs at the point of initial presentation. The mean follow-up period after commencing the treatment for LMs was 37 months. The mean maximum diameter of the initial LMs was 11 mm. The mean number of LMs was 4. The TVDT was calculated using a method originally described by Schwartz. At last follow-up, 5 patients had no evidence of disease, 3 patients were still alive with disease, and 32 patients had died of disease. The 3-year and 5-year post-metastatic survival rates were 32% and 16.8%, respectively. In a Cox univariate analysis, the size (P=0.04) and number of LMs (P<0.001), disease-free interval (P=0.04), curability of the initial LMs (P<0.001), and TVDT (P<0.001) were significantly identified as factors which affect prognosis. In the multivariate analysis, TVDT (P<0.001) and curability of the initial LMs (P<0.001) were confirmed as independent predictors of survival. There was a significant association between the number and curability of the initial LMs (P<0.001). In conclusion, metastasectomy and/or RFA of LMs is recommended for improving survival. However, TVDT and the curability of the LMs should be taken into consideration. PMID:28203089

  11. SU-E-T-79: A Study of the Effect of Clinical Tumor Volume Displacement On the Dosage of Post Modified Radical Mastectomy Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Plans for Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, W; Ma, C; Li, D; Wu, F [Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the effect of clinical tumor volume (CTV) displacement on the dosage of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for left-sided breast cancer after modified radical mastectomy. Methods: We created 2 sets of IMRT plans based on PTV0.5 and PTV0.7 (with CTV displacement of 0.5cm and 0.7cm respectively) for each of the ten consecutive left-sided breast cancer patients after modified radical mastectomy, and compared the difference in PTV coverage and organ at risk (OAR) sparing between the two groups. And then, we compared the difference in PTV coverage in IMRT plans based on PTV0.5 between the group with properly estimated CTV displacement (presuming the actual CTV displacement was 0.5cm) and the one with underestimated CTV displacement (presuming the actual CTV displacement was 0.7cm). The difference in results between the corresponding two groups was compared using paired-sample t-test. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: IMRT plans derived from PTV0.5 had more homogenous PTV coverage, and less heart, left lung, right breast, right lung, left humeral head and B-P radiation exposure, as well as less total Mu as compared with the ones stemmed from PTV0.7 (all p<0.05). IMRT plans with appropriate estimation of CTV displacement had better PTV coverage compared with the ones with underestimated CTV displacement (all p<0.01). Conclusion: The IMRT plans with smaller CTV displacement in post modified radical mastectomy radiotherapy for left-sided breast cancer has dosimetrical advantages over the ones with larger CTV displacement. Underestimation of CTV displacement can lead to significant reduction of PTV coverage. Individually quantifying and minimizing CTV displacement can significantly improve PTV coverage and OAR (including heart and left lung) sparing. This work was supported by the Medical Scientific Research Foundation of Guangdong Procvince (A2014455 to Changchun Ma)

  12. A technique for determining viable military logistics support alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Jesse Stuart

    A look at today's US military will see them operating much beyond the scope of protecting and defending the United States. These operations now consist of, but are not limited to humanitarian aid, disaster relief, peace keeping, and conflict resolution. This broad spectrum of operational environments has necessitated a transformation of the individual military services to a hybrid force that is attempting to leverage the inherent and emerging capabilities and strengths of all those under the umbrella of the Department of Defense (DOD), this concept has been coined Joint Operations. Supporting Joint Operations requires a new approach to determining a viable military logistics support system. The logistics architecture for these operations has to accommodate scale, time, varied mission objectives, and imperfect information. Compounding the problem is the human in the loop (HITL) decision maker (DM) who is a necessary component for quickly assessing and planning logistics support activities. Past outcomes are not necessarily good indicators of future results, but they can provide a reasonable starting point for planning and prediction of specific needs for future requirements. Adequately forecasting the necessary logistical support structure and commodities needed for any resource intensive environment has progressed well beyond stable demand assumptions to one in which dynamic and nonlinear environments can be captured with some degree of fidelity and accuracy. While these advances are important, a holistic approach that allows exploration of the operational environment or design space does not exist to guide the military logistician in a methodical way to support military forecasting activities. To bridge this capability gap, a method called Adaptive Technique for Logistics Architecture Solutions (ATLAS) has been developed. This method provides a process that facilitates the use of techniques and tools that filter and provide relevant information to the DM. By doing

  13. Grazing of particle-associated bacteria-an elimination of the non-viable fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalves, Maria-Judith; Fernandes, Sheryl Oliveira; Priya, Madasamy Lakshmi; LokaBharathi, Ponnapakkam Adikesavan

    Quantification of bacteria being grazed by microzooplankton is gaining importance since they serve as energy subsidies for higher trophic levels which consequently influence fish production. Hence, grazing pressure on viable and non-viable fraction of free and particle-associated bacteria in a tropical estuary controlled mainly by protist grazers was estimated using the seawater dilution technique. In vitro incubations over a period of 42h showed that at the end of 24h, growth coefficient (k) of particle-associated bacteria was 9 times higher at 0.546 than that of free forms. Further, 'k' value of viable cells on particles was double that of free forms at 0.016 and 0.007, respectively. While bacteria associated with particles were grazed (coefficient of removal (g)=0.564), the free forms were relatively less grazed indicating that particle-associated bacteria were exposed to grazers in these waters. Among the viable and non-viable forms, 'g' of non-viable fraction (particle-associated bacteria=0.615, Free=0.0086) was much greater than the viable fraction (particle-associated bacteria=0.056, Free=0.068). Thus, grazing on viable cells was relatively low in both the free and attached states. These observations suggest that non-viable forms of particle-associated bacteria were more prone to grazing and were weeded out leaving the viable cells to replenish the bacterial standing stock. Particle colonization could thus be a temporary refuge for the "persistent variants" where the viable fraction multiply and release their progeny.

  14. Digital holographic microscopy for imaging growth and treatment response in 3D tumor models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuyu; Petrovic, Ljubica; Celli, Jonathan P.; Yelleswarapu, Chandra S.

    2014-03-01

    While three-dimensional tumor models have emerged as valuable tools in cancer research, the ability to longitudinally visualize the 3D tumor architecture restored by these systems is limited with microscopy techniques that provide only qualitative insight into sample depth, or which require terminal fixation for depth-resolved 3D imaging. Here we report the use of digital holographic microscopy (DHM) as a viable microscopy approach for quantitative, non-destructive longitudinal imaging of in vitro 3D tumor models. Following established methods we prepared 3D cultures of pancreatic cancer cells in overlay geometry on extracellular matrix beds and obtained digital holograms at multiple timepoints throughout the duration of growth. The holograms were digitally processed and the unwrapped phase images were obtained to quantify nodule thickness over time under normal growth, and in cultures subject to chemotherapy treatment. In this manner total nodule volumes are rapidly estimated and demonstrated here to show contrasting time dependent changes during growth and in response to treatment. This work suggests the utility of DHM to quantify changes in 3D structure over time and suggests the further development of this approach for time-lapse monitoring of 3D morphological changes during growth and in response to treatment that would otherwise be impractical to visualize.

  15. Fluorodeoxyglucose-based positron emission tomography imaging to monitor drug responses in hematological tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbold, Andrea; Martin, Ben P; Cullinane, Carleen; Bots, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) can be used to monitor the uptake of the labeled glucose analog fluorodeoxyglucose (¹⁸F-FDG), a process that is generally believed to reflect viable tumor cell mass. The use of ¹⁸F-FDG PET can be helpful in documenting over time the reduction in tumor mass volume in response to anticancer drug therapy in vivo. In this protocol, we describe how to monitor the response of murine B-cell lymphomas to an inducer of apoptosis, the anticancer drug vorinostat (a histone deacetylase inhibitor). B-cell lymphoma cells are injected into recipient mice and, on tumor formation, the mice are treated with vorinostat. The tracer ¹⁸F-FDG is then injected into the mice at several time points, and its uptake is monitored using PET. Because the uptake of ¹⁸F-FDG is not a direct measure of apoptosis, an additional direct method proving that apoptotic cells are present should also be performed.

  16. Tumor segmentation of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging in neurofibromatosis type 1 patients: tumor burden correlates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heffler, Michael A.; Xi, Yin; Chhabra, Avneesh [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States); Le, Lu Q. [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Dermatology, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Segmentation of whole-body MRI (WBMRI) to assess the feasibility, quantitate the total tumor volume (tumor burden) in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and examine associations with demographic, disease-related and anthropomorphic features. A consecutive series of patients with NF1 underwent WBMRI and were reviewed for tumors. Tumors were segmented using a semiautomated software-based tool. Tumors were classified as superficial or deep and discrete or plexiform. Segmentation times were recorded. Segmentation yielded the quantity and tumor burden of superficial, internal and plexiform tumors. Correlations between segmentation data and demographic, disease-related and anthropomorphic features were examined. Fifteen patients were evaluated (42.3 ± 13.6 years, 10 female, 5 male). Segmentation times were a median of 30 min and yielded 2,328 tumors (1,582 superficial, 746 internal and 23 plexiform). One tumor was malignant. Tumor counts ranged from 14 to 397. Tumor burden ranged from 6.95 cm3 to 571 cm3. Individual tumor volume ranged from 0.0120 cm3 to 298 cm3. Significant correlation was found between the total volume of superficial tumors and height (ρ = 0.5966, p < 0.02). Male patients had higher overall tumor burdens (p < 0.05) and higher superficial tumor burden (p < 0.03). Patients with negative family history had more tumors (p < 0.05). Segmentation of WBMRI in patients with NF1 is feasible and elucidates meaningful relationships among disease phenotype, anthropomorphic and demographic features. (orig.)

  17. Ear Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Japanese Espaniol Find information on medical topics, symptoms, drugs, procedures, news and more, written in everyday language. * This is ... the Ears, Nose, and Throat Additional Content Medical News Ear Tumors ... NOTE: This is the Consumer Version. DOCTORS: Click ...

  18. Pituitary tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enough of its hormones. This condition is called hypopituitarism . The causes of pituitary tumors are unknown. Some ... Cyst Endocrine glands Gigantism Growth hormone test Hyperthyroidism Hypopituitarism Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) I Prolactin blood test ...

  19. Wilms' Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... team and have training in child development, recreation, psychology or social work. If your child must remain ... conditions/wilms-tumor/basics/definition/CON-20043492 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms Any use of ...

  20. Tumor Grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training at ... much of the tumor tissue has normal breast (milk) duct structures Nuclear grade : an evaluation of the ...

  1. Pituitary Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... impairment, and behavioral changes. Tumors can also either produce excessive amounts of hormone or limit how much hormone is produced. The hormones most commonly affected include: growth hormone (regulates body height and structure), prolactin (controls ...

  2. Volume-effect and radiotherapy [2]. Part 2: volume-effect and normal tissue; Effet volume en radiotherapie [2]. Deuxieme partie: volume et tolerance des tissus sains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huchet, A.; Caudry, M.; Trouette, R.; Vendrely, V.; Causse, N.; Recaldini, L.; Maire, J.P. [Hopital Saint Andre, Service de Radiotherapie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Belkacemi, Y. [Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Oscar-Lambret, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 59 - Lille (France); Atlan, D. [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Service de Radiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France)

    2003-10-01

    The first part of our work has focused on the relationship bet men tumor Volume and tumor control. Indeed, it is well known that the importance of irradiated volume could be a main parameter of radiation-induced complications. Numerous mathematical models have described the correlation between the irradiated volume and the risk of adverse effects. These models should predict the complication rate of each treatment planning. At the present time late effects have been the most studied. In this report we firstly propose a review of different mathematical models described for volume effect. Secondly, we will discuss whether these theoretical considerations can influence our view of radiation treatment planning optimization. (authors)

  3. Ependymal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, Timothy J

    2003-12-01

    Ependymal tumors are rare malignancies that arise from the cells that line the ventricles and central canal of the spinal cord. Although they are more common in children, adults may also be effected by ependymal tumors. Prognosis is dependent on tumor location, histology, especially for myxopapillary tumors that tend to occur in the lumbar spine, extent of surgical resection, and stage of disease. Standard therapy consists of complete resection when feasible. The exact role of adjuvant radiotherapy in patients with radiographically confirmed complete resection is poorly defined. Patients with known residual disease may benefit from local radiation therapy, but the extent of radiation field and total dose are controversial. Even in patients treated with involved field radiotherapy, most relapses occur within the original tumor bed, thus local control remains the biggest obstacle to effective therapy. Chemotherapy has little impact against this tumor and has no role in the adjuvant setting, outside of a well designed clinical trial, with the possible exception of children younger than 5 years in an effort to delay radiation. A minority of patients may respond to one of several chemotherapy regimens at the time of recurrence, but the impact of this therapy is limited. Newer treatment strategies are needed.

  4. A potential source of recruitment of Acartia pacifica nauplii:viable benthic resting eggs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Guizhong; JIANG Xiaodong; LI Shaojing; WU Lisheng; WU Dingxun

    2005-01-01

    Many estuarine and coastal planktonic copepods depend on the hatching of benthic resting eggs for recruitment of nauplii to the water column population. The distribution and abundance of viable resting eggs of Acartia pacifica in the Xiamen Bay were determined by the presence of nauplii in the laboratory. The number of viable eggs varied temporally and spatially. The maximum number (9.2×104m-2) of viable eggs was in summer. In spring the average abundance of viable eggs was 5.6×104 m-2. The abundances of viable eggs in fall and winter were similar, respectively 2.7×104 and 3.3×104 m-2, which were the lowest in the year. The numbers of viable eggs inside the stations of the Xiamen Bay were higher than those outside the stations. The viable eggs were found at all depths (0~10 cm),although not in every station. The maximin number did not necessarily occur in the uppermost centimeter of the sediments but often occurred several centimeters below the water-sediment interface. The accumulation of viable eggs in the seabed of a subtropical bay constitutes a potential source of recruitment of nauplii into the pelagic population.

  5. Cybernetically sound organizational structures II: Relating de Sitter's design theory to Beer's viable system model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterbergh, J.M.I.M.; Vriens, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    - Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to show how the viable system model (VSM) and de Sitter's design theory can complement each other in the context of the diagnosis and design of viable organizations. - Design/methodology/approach – Key concepts from Beer's model and de Sitter's design theory

  6. Carbohydrate plasma expanders for passive tumor targeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Stefan; Caysa, Henrike; Kuntsche, Judith

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the suitability of carbohydrate plasma volume expanders as a novel polymer platform for tumor targeting. Many synthetic polymers have already been synthesized for targeted tumor therapy, but potential advantages of these carbohydrates include...

  7. Hymenolepis nana: immunity against oncosphere challenge in mice previously given viable or non-viable oncospheres of H. nana, H. diminuta, H. microstoma and Taenia taeniaeformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, A; Onitake, K; Sasaki, J; Takami, T

    1991-04-01

    When mice, previously given oral inoculation with viable oncospheres of the heterologous cestode species (Hymenolepis diminuta, H. microstoma, Taenia taeniaeformis) and the homologous one (H. nana), were challenged with oncospheres of H. nana 4 days after the primary inoculation, they showed strong and complete resistance to H. nana challenge, respectively. However, the resistance was not evoked in mice given either infective eggs of Toxocara canis or non-viable oncospheres of all cestode species examined. Congenitally athymic nude mice given viable oncospheres did not show any resistance to H. nana either. Eosinophil infiltration around cysticercoids of H. nana in the intestinal villi appeared to be more prominent in mice previously given viable oncospheres of H. diminuta than in mice given non-viable oncospheres or PBS only. Some of the eosinophils in the villus harboring cysticercoid(s) of H. nana invaded the epithelia in the former, whereas all eosinophils remained in the lamina propria in the latter. There was almost no eosinophil infiltration in nude mice. Microscopic observations revealed that oncospheres of H. diminuta, which require beetles as the intermediate host like H. microstoma, could invade the mouse intestinal tissue. Therefore, it is strongly suggested that the strong cross resistance to H. nana in mice, induced by oncospheres of all heterologous cestode species, is thymus-dependent and due to oncospheral invasion into the intestinal tissue of mice.

  8. Quantitative sodium MRI of the human brain at 9.4 T provides assessment of tissue sodium concentration and cell volume fraction during normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thulborn, Keith; Lui, Elaine; Guntin, Jonathan; Jamil, Saad; Sun, Ziqi; Claiborne, Theodore C; Atkinson, Ian C

    2016-02-01

    Sodium ion homeostasis is a fundamental property of viable tissue, allowing the tissue sodium concentration to be modeled as the tissue cell volume fraction. The modern neuropathology literature using ex vivo tissue from selected brain regions indicates that human brain cell density remains constant during normal aging and attributes the volume loss that occurs with advancing age to changes in neuronal size and dendritic arborization. Quantitative sodium MRI performed with the enhanced sensitivity of ultrahigh-field 9.4 T has been used to investigate tissue cell volume fraction during normal aging. This cross-sectional study (n = 49; 21-80 years) finds that the in vivo tissue cell volume fraction remains constant in all regions of the brain with advancing age in individuals who remain cognitively normal, extending the ex vivo literature reporting constant neuronal cell density across the normal adult age range. Cell volume fraction, as measured by quantitative sodium MRI, is decreased in diseases of cell loss, such as stroke, on a time scale of minutes to hours, and in response to treatment of brain tumors on a time scale of days to weeks. Neurodegenerative diseases often have prodromal periods of decades in which regional neuronal cell loss occurs prior to clinical presentation. If tissue cell volume fraction can detect such early pathology, this quantitative parameter may permit the objective measurement of preclinical disease progression. This current study in cognitively normal aging individuals provides the basis for the pursuance of investigations directed towards such neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Tumor Types: Understanding Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Classification of Tumors of the Central Nervous System Purchase WHO Blue Book NBTS Official Statement Questions and ... Privacy Copyright Site Search Search term Submit Submit Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr

  10. Methodical and critical analysis of the determination of target volumes in case of hypopharyngeal and epiglottic tumors and the adaptation of the dose distribution to their dimensions. Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauwerky, J.; Kuttig, H.

    1981-04-01

    After having discussed the problem of optimization with regard to the dose distribution in space, the authors enter into the particulars of the classification of hypopharyngeal and epiglottic tumors according to the TNM system. Taking into consideration the communications of literature and the cases of the Radiologic Hospital of the University of Heidelberg, the authors describe the clinical manifestations of these tumors, their histology, their distribution to age and sex, their symptomatology and time of anamnesis as well as the therapeutic results.

  11. Augmentation of anti-tumor activity by immunization with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Tbc and tuberculin-coupled tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yada,Yoshihiko

    1985-04-01

    Full Text Available The anti-tumor effect of immunization with heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Tbc and Tuberculin (PPD-coupled syngeneic tumor cells was examined in vivo. Three tumor cell lines were employed. Immunization of Tbc-primed BALB/c mice with PPD-coupled syngeneic Meth-A tumor cells displayed a potent anti-tumor effect on viable Meth-A cells inoculated subcutaneously. Neither PPD-coupled LLC (Lewis Lung Carcinoma cells nor sonicated PPD-coupled Meth-A cells were capable of immunizing these mice. PPD-coupled syngeneic whole tumor cells were indispensable for induction of this tumor-specific resistance. Immunization of Tbc-primed C3H/He mice with PPD-coupled syngeneic MH134 tumor cells did not elicit anti-tumor activity against MH134, but additional pretreatment of mice with cyclophosphamide brought on an anti-tumor effect. Antimetastatic reactivity was investigated in C57BL/6 mice bearing LLC, with a reduction in metastases noted. This antimetastatic effect was observed even when the mice were immunized with PPD-coupled LLC cells three days after removal of the initial tumor. Immunization with Tbc and PPD-coupled Meth-A cells together with intraperitoneal administration of murine or rat interleukin 2 (IL 2 further augmented anti-Meth-A resistance. Murine IL 2 further inhibited tumor growth during the early stage, while rat IL 2 showed an anti-tumor effect throughout the course of tumor growth.

  12. Influence of gross tumor volume and radiotherapy dose on prognosis of three dimensional conformal ;radiation therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer%肿瘤体积和放疗剂量对局部晚期非小细胞肺癌三维适形放疗预后的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘兴祥

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate influence of gross tumor volume and radiotherapy dose on prognosis of three dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods There were 78 locally advanced NSCLC patients receiving 3D-CRT as study subjects. Three dimensional conformal radiation planning system and CT screening were applied for delineating corresponding target sections, as GTV-T, GTV-P and GTV-N. Gross tumor volume and radiotherapy dose in each target section were analyzed for their prognosis effects. Results Patients with tumor diameter<5.00 cm had higher survival rate than those with tumor diameter≥5.00 cm (P<0.05). Patients with GTV-T<100.00 cm3 had obviously higher survival rate than those with GTV-T≥100.00 cm3 (P<0.05). Stratification analysis showed that in subgroup with radiotherapy dose ≤66 Gy, the survival rate increased while gross tumor volume declined. Conclusion Gross tumor volume shown by three dimensional conformal radiation planning system and CT screening has remarkable influence on long-term survival rate in NSCLC patients. It is also beneficial for locally advanced NSCLC patients receiving large radiotherapy dose for small tumor volume.%目的:探讨肿瘤体积和放疗剂量对局部晚期非小细胞肺癌(NSCLC)三维适形放疗(3D-CRT)预后的影响。方法78例接受3D-CRT的局部晚期NSCLC患者为研究对象,利用三维适形放射计划系统和CT扫描勾画相应靶区,分别定义为GTV-T、GTV-P和GTV-N,分析各靶区肿瘤体积和放疗剂量对3D-CRT的预后效果。结果全组研究对象中肿瘤最大直径<5.00 cm的患者生存率高于肿瘤最大直径≥5.00 cm的患者(P<0.05);GTV-T<100.00 cm3的患者生存率明显高于GTV-T≥100.00 cm3的患者(P<0.05)。分层分析显示放疗处方剂量≤66 Gy亚组中,肿瘤大体体积越小,生存率越高。结论应用三维适形放射计划系统和CT扫描所勾画的大体肿瘤体积对接受

  13. Testicular tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Rosti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Germ cell tumors of the testes represent a unique paradigm of diseases which can be cured even in extremely advanced phase. Unfortunately, this makes them unique among adult solid tumors. Seminoma and non seminoma are relatively rare with approximatively 25,000 patients in Europe per year, but numbers are increasing world wide. Different strategies are needed depending on stage and prognostic scores. Seminoma is extremely sensitive to radiation therapy and chemotherapy, while all germ cell tumors show a very good response to chemotherapy. Clinical stage I seminoma is currently treated with radiation, single course carboplatin or surveillance policy. Clinical stage I non seminoma can also be approached with different strategies such as retroperitoneal lymph node dissection, observation or one-two courses of standard chemotherapy. Stage II seminoma may be treated with either radiation or chemotherapy, while for all advanced stages chemotherapy is mandatory. Since the mid-eighties PEB (Cisplatin, Etoposide and Bleomycin is the regimen of choice and no other schedule has proved superior in terms of efficacy. Surgery on the residual disease is crucial to the whole strategy and should be performed or attempted in all cases. Consequently, the correct treatment strategy for these tumors does not depend only on the ability of a single physician, but on a skilled team specialized in this particular tumor. Second line therapies (VeIP, PEI, TIP can cure 25%–40% of patients, but improved strategies for resistant tumors are desperately needed. High-dose chemotherapy has shown very good results in some studies while being less impressive in others. In any case, it should remain an option for relapsing patients and could be used in some cases of upfront chemotherapy in patients with slow marker decline, but this should only be considered in referring centers.

  14. Tumor thrombus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravina, Mudalsha; Hess, Søren; Chauhan, Mahesh Singh

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Thrombosis in cancer may manifest itself as venous thromboembolic disease or tumor thrombosis (TT). We present our experience with incidentally detected TT on FDG PET/CT in 21 oncologic patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed all FDG PET/CT examinations during a 5-year......), but most other major branches of the venous vasculature was represented, and some patients had thrombi in several vessels. FDG uptake was linear in 7 patients, linear with a dilated vessel in 6 patients, and focal in 7 patients. The mean SUVmax of the primary tumors was 10.3 (range, 2.6-31.2; median, 6...

  15. Vaccination with hatched but non-activated, non-viable oncospheres of Taenia taeniaeformis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, A; Hashimoto, A

    1993-06-01

    The usefulness of hatched but non-activated oncospheres as a candidate vaccine was evaluated using a Taenia taeniaeformis/rat system, since preparation of these oncospheres in vitro is known to be very simple. The findings were: (1) rats vaccinated with non-viable oncospheres became completely resistant to challenge infection; (2) intra-venous injection was the most effective to induce complete resistance; (3) a single oncosphere was sufficient to induce complete resistance in infected rats, whereas approximately 50 and 500 non-viable oncospheres were required to evoke strong and complete resistance, respectively, in vaccinated rats. The usefulness of non-viable oncospheres without adjuvant is discussed.

  16. Cell Mediated Photothermal Therapy of Brain Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschberg, Henry; Madsen, Steen J

    2017-03-01

    Gold based nanoparticles with strong near infra-red (NIR) absorption are ideally suited for photothermal therapy (PTT) of brain tumors. The goal of PTT is to induce rapid heating in tumor tissues while minimizing thermal diffusion to normal brain. PTT efficacy is sensitively dependent on both nanoparticle concentration and distribution in tumor tissues. Nanoparticle delivery via passive approaches such as the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect is unlikely to achieve sufficient nanoparticle concentrations throughout tumor volumes required for effective PTT. A simple approach for improving tumor biodsitribution of nanoparticles is the use of cellular delivery vehicles. Specifically, this review focuses on the use of monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) as gold nanoparticle delivery vectors for PTT of brain tumors. Although the efficacy of this delivery approach has been demonstrated in both in vitro and animal PTT studies, its clinical potential for the treatment of brain tumors remains uncertain.

  17. Superior sulcus tumors (Pancoast tumors).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marulli, Giuseppe; Battistella, Lucia; Mammana, Marco; Calabrese, Francesca; Rea, Federico

    2016-06-01

    Superior Sulcus Tumors, frequently termed as Pancoast tumors, are a wide range of tumors invading the apical chest wall. Due to its localization in the apex of the lung, with the potential invasion of the lower part of the brachial plexus, first ribs, vertebrae, subclavian vessels or stellate ganglion, the superior sulcus tumors cause characteristic symptoms, like arm or shoulder pain or Horner's syndrome. The management of superior sulcus tumors has dramatically evolved over the past 50 years. Originally deemed universally fatal, in 1956, Shaw and Paulson introduced a new treatment paradigm with combined radiotherapy and surgery ensuring 5-year survival of approximately 30%. During the 1990s, following the need to improve systemic as well as local control, a trimodality approach including induction concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgical resection was introduced, reaching 5-year survival rates up to 44% and becoming the standard of care. Many efforts have been persecuted, also, to obtain higher complete resection rates using appropriate surgical approaches and involving multidisciplinary team including spine surgeon or vascular surgeon. Other potential treatment options are under consideration like prophylactic cranial irradiation or the addition of other chemotherapy agents or biologic agents to the trimodality approach.

  18. Nuclear volume and prognosis in ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O.; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Bichel, P.

    1992-01-01

    The prognostic value of the volume-weighted mean nuclear volume (MNV) was investigated retrospectively in 100 ovarian cancer patients with FIGO-stage IB-II (n = 51) and stage III-IV (n = 49) serous tumors. No association was demonstrated between the MNV and the survival or between the MNV and two...

  19. Nuclear volume and prognosis in ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O.; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Bichel, P.;

    1992-01-01

    The prognostic value of the volume-weighted mean nuclear volume (MNV) was investigated retrospectively in 100 ovarian cancer patients with FIGO-stage IB-II (n = 51) and stage III-IV (n = 49) serous tumors. No association was demonstrated between the MNV and the survival or between the MNV and two...

  20. Adoptive Immunotherapy for Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Using T-cells Simultaneously Targeted to Tumor and Tumor-Associated Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Figure   10   that   demonstrate   ring   enhancement   around   the   viable   circumference   of   the   tumor.   When...in head and neck cancer. Taken together, it is logical to build on this experience by developing the use of TiN-4+ T-cell immunotherapy for the

  1. Treatment of Murine Tumor Models of Breast Adenocarcinoma by Continuous Dual-Frequency Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hoshang Barati

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acoustic transient cavitation is the primary mechanism of sonochemical reaction and has potential use for tumor treatment. In this study, the in vivo anti-tumor effect of simultaneous dual-frequency ultrasound at low-level intensity (ISATA < 6 W/cm2 was investigated in a spontaneous murine model of breast adenocarcinoma in Balb/c mice. Materials and Methods: Forty tumor bearing mice were divided into four groups (10 in each group. The treated groups received 15 or 30 minutes of combined dual-frequency ultrasound in continuous mode (1 MHzcon + 150 kHzcon respectively. The control and the sham groups contained the untreated mice. The tumor growth delay parameters including tumor volume, relative tumor volume, T5 and T2 (the needed time for each tumor to reach 5 and 2 times the initial tumor volume, respectively, survival period and percent of tumor growth inhibition ratio were measured on different days after treatment. Results: The results showed that the 30 min treatment was effective in tumor growth delay and percent of tumor growth inhibitory ratio compared to the sham and the control groups. The tumor volume growth and relative volume of tumors in the same treated group showed an anti-tumor effect relative to the sham and the control groups. There was a significant difference in tumor volume growth between this 30 min treatment group and the sham group 12 days after treatment (p-value

  2. Viable bacteria associated with red blood cells and plasma in freshly drawn blood donations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Damgaard, Christian; Magnussen, Karin; Enevold, Christian; Nilsson, Martin; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Holmstrup, Palle; Nielsen, Claus Henrik

    2015-01-01

    ...% of blood units tested. The aim of the study was to identify viable bacteria in standard blood-pack units, with particular focus on bacteria from the oral cavity, and to determine the distribution of bacteria revealed...

  3. Teacher training in South Africa: The integrated model as viable option

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Teacher training in South Africa: The integrated model as viable option. ... South African Journal of Higher Education ... between the scientific basis of subject knowledge, teaching methodology, pedagogy and repeated practice in schools.

  4. Immediate natural tooth pontic: A viable yet temporary prosthetic solution: A patient reported outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Bhandari

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: The concept of immediate pontic placement is surely a viable treatment option and promises an excellent transient esthetic solution for a lost tooth as well as enables good preparation of the extraction site for future prosthetic replacement.

  5. Volume-effect in radiation therapy part one: volume-effect and tumour; L'effet volume en radiotherapie premiere partie: effet volume et tumeur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huchet, A.; Wu, J. [Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou (AP-HP), Service de Radiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France); Caudry, M.; Trouette, R.; Vendrely, V.; Causse, N.; Recaldini, L.; Dahan, O.; Maire, J.P. [Hopital Saint-Andre, Service de Radiotherapie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Belkacemi, Y. [Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Oscar-Lambret, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 59 - Lille (France)

    2003-04-01

    Volume is an important parameter of radiation therapy. Local control is inversely related to tumor size and the complication rate increases with the importance of the irradiated volume. Although the effect of irradiated volume has been widely reported since the beginning of radiotherapy, it has been less studied than other radiation parameters such as dose, fractionation, or treatment duration. One of the first organ system in which the adverse effect of increased volume was well defined is the skin. Over the last twenty years, numerous mathematical models have been developed for different organs. In this report we will discuss the relation between irradiated volume and tumor control. In a second article we will study the impact of irradiated volume on radiation adverse effects. (authors)

  6. A kinetic model of tumor growth and its radiation response with an application to Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, Yoichi; Leder, Kevin Z; Hui, Susanta K

    2015-01-01

    We developed a mathematical model to simulate the growth of tumor volume and its response to a single fraction of high dose irradiation. We made several key assumptions of the model. Tumor volume is composed of proliferating (or dividing) cancer cells and non-dividing (or dead) cells. Tumor growth rate (or tumor volume doubling time, Td) is proportional to the ratio of the volumes of tumor vasculature and the tumor. The vascular volume grows slower than the tumor by introducing the vascular growth retardation factor, theta. Upon irradiation the proliferating cells gradually die over a fixed time period after irradiation. Dead cells are cleared away with cell clearance time, Tcl. The model was applied to simulate pre-treatment growth and post-treatment radiation response of rat rhabdomyosarcoma tumor and metastatic brain tumors of five patients who were treated by Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS). By selecting appropriate model parameters, we showed the temporal variation of the tumors for both th...

  7. Immunization of rodents against Hymenolepis infections using non-viable homologous oncospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ping-Chin; Chung, Wen-Cheng; Ito, Akira

    2004-12-01

    Immunity to Taiwan Taenia infection in pigs can be stimulated using homologous or heterologous non-viable Taenia oncospheres. This study was designed to determine whether homologous non-viable oncospheres could stimulate immunity to Hymenolepis infection in rodents. Hatched oncospheres were prepared from eggs of Hymenolepis diminuta, Hymenolepis nana, and Hymenolepis microstoma and kept at -70 degrees C for more than 1 month. A mixture of 500 non-viable oncospheres of each tapeworm and complete Freund's adjuvant was injected subcutaneously in four groups of Sprague-Dawley rats or ICR mice one to four times at an interval of 1 week; controls were not immunized. After immunization, each rodent was orally inoculated with three fresh active cysticercoids of H. diminuta or H. microstoma or 500 fresh eggs of H. nana. The animals were then necropsied for adult tapeworms. No rats or mice immunized with non-viable oncospheres of H. diminuta or H. nana were infected by the challenge inoculation. However, 28 of 34 mice immunized with non-viable H. microstoma oncospheres were infected after inoculation with cysticercoids. This study demonstrated complete protection against infection by homologous parasites in rats or mice immunized with non-viable oncospheres of H. diminuta and H. nana, respectively. Repeated immunization may not be required if resistance is stimulated in rodent hosts.

  8. Contemporary treatment of renal tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nisen, Harry; Järvinen, Petrus; Fovaeus, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    questions on renal tumor management and surgical education was designed and sent to 91 institutions performing renal tumor surgery in 2015. The response rate was 68% (62 hospitals), including 28 academic, 25 central and nine district hospitals. Hospital volume was defined as low (LVH: ...% thermoablations. For RN and PN, the percentages of open, laparoscopic and robotic approaches were 47%, 40%, 13% and 47%, 20%, 33%, respectively. The mean complication rate (Clavien–Dindo 3–5) was 4.9%, and 30 day mortality (TDM) was 0.5%. The median length of hospital stay was 4 days. Training with a simulator...

  9. New approach to optical imaging of tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilefu, Samuel I.; Bugaj, Joseph E.; Dorshow, Richard B.; Jimenez, Hermo N.; Rajagopalan, Raghavan

    2001-07-01

    Site specific delivery of drugs and contrast agents to tumors protects normal tissues from the cytotoxic effect of drugs, and enhances the contrast between normal and diseased tissues. In optical medicine, biocompatible dyes can be used as phototherapeutics or as contrast agents. Previous studies have shown that the use of covalent or non-covalent dye conjugates of carriers such as antibiodies, liposomes, and polysaccharides improves the delivery of such molecules to tumors. However, large biomolecules can elicit adverse immunogenic reactions and also result in long blood clearance times, delaying visualization of target tissues. A viable alternative to this strategy is to use small bioactive molecule-dye conjugates. These molecules have several advantages over large biomolecules, including ease of synthesis of a variety of high purity compounds for combinatorial screening of new targets, enhanced diffusivity to solid tumors, and the ability to affect the pharmacokinetics of the conjugates by minor structural changes. Thus, we conjugated a near infrared absorbing dye to several bioactive peptides that specifically target overexpressed tumor receptors in established rat tumor lines. High tumor uptake of the conjugates was obtained without loss of either the peptide receptor affinity or the dye fluorescence. These findings demonstrate the efficacy of a small peptide-dye conjugate strategy for in vivo tumor imaging. Site-specific delivery of photodynamic therapy agents may also benefit from this approach.

  10. Intensity- and energy-modulated electron radiotherapy by means of an xMLC for head and neck shallow tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salguero, Francisco Javier; Palma, Bianey Atriana; Leal, Antonio [Departamento de FisiologIa Medica y Biofisica, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Arrans, Rafael [Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla (Spain)], E-mail: alplaza@us.es

    2010-03-07

    The purpose of this paper is to assess the feasibility of delivering intensity- and energy-modulated electron radiation treatment (MERT) by a photon multileaf collimator (xMLC) and to evaluate the improvements obtained in shallow head and neck (HN) tumors. Four HN patient cases covering different clinical situations were planned by MERT, which used an in-house treatment planning system that utilized Monte Carlo dose calculation. The cases included one oronasal, two parotid and one middle ear tumors. The resulting dose-volume histograms were compared with those obtained from conventional photon and electron treatment techniques in our clinic, which included IMRT, electron beam and mixed beams, most of them using fixed-thickness bolus. Experimental verification was performed with plane-parallel ionization chambers for absolute dose verification, and a PTW ionization chamber array and radiochromic film for relative dosimetry. A MC-based treatment planning system for target with compromised volumes in depth and laterally has been validated. A quality assurance protocol for individual MERT plans was launched. Relative MC dose distributions showed a high agreement with film measurements and absolute ion chamber dose measurements performed at a reference point agreed with MC calculations within 2% in all cases. Clinically acceptable PTV coverage and organ-at-risk sparing were achieved by using the proposed MERT approach. MERT treatment plans, based on delivery of intensity-modulated electron beam using the xMLC, for superficial head and neck tumors, demonstrated comparable or improved PTV dose homogeneity with significantly lower dose to normal tissues. The clinical implementation of this technique will be able to offer a viable alternative for the treatment of shallow head and neck tumors.

  11. Tumor-Targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R in Combination with Trastuzumab Eradicates HER-2-Positive Cervical Cancer Cells in Patient-Derived Mouse Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihiko Hiroshima

    Full Text Available We have previously developed mouse models of HER-2-positive cervical cancer. Tumors in nude mice had histological structures similar to the original tumor and were stained by anti-HER-2 antibody in the same pattern as the patient's cancer. We have also previously developed tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R and have demonstrated its efficacy against patient-derived tumor mouse models, both alone and in combination. In the current study, we determined the efficacy of S. typhimurium A1-R in combination with trastuzumab on a patient-cancer nude-mouse model of HER-2 positive cervical cancer. Mice were randomized to 5 groups and treated as follows: (1 no treatment; (2 carboplatinum (30 mg/kg, ip, weekly, 5 weeks; (3 trastuzumab (20 mg/kg, ip, weekly, 5 weeks; (4 S. typhimurium A1-R (5 × 107 CFU/body, ip, weekly, 5 weeks; (5 S. typhimurium A1-R (5 × 107 CFU/body, ip, weekly, 5 weeks + trastuzumab (20 mg/kg, ip, weekly, 5 weeks. All regimens had significant efficacy compared to the untreated mice. The relative tumor volume of S. typhimurium A1-R + trastuzumab-treated mice was smaller compared to trastuzumab alone (p = 0.007 and S. typhimurium A1-R alone (p = 0.039. No significant body weight loss was found compared to the no treatment group except for carboplatinum-treated mice (p = 0.021. Upon histological examination, viable tumor cells were not detected, and replaced by stromal cells in the tumors treated with S. typhimurium A1-R + trastuzumab. The results of the present study suggest that S. typhimurium A1-R and trastuzumab in combination are highly effective against HER-2-expressing cervical cancer.

  12. Evaluation of Tumor Angiogenesis by MRI Study Using Iron Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Ashoor

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is the growth of new blood vessels from existing ones and it is a perquisite for the growth, invasion and metastasis of solid tumors. This complex process involves multiple steps and pathways dependent on the local balance between positive and negative regulatory factors, as well as interactions among the tumor, its vasculature and the surrounding extracellular tissue matrix. Tumors lay dormant yet viable, unable to grow beyond 2-3 mm3 in size without angiogenesis."nWith the development of novel therapies for treat-ment of several diseases, directed noninvasive imaging strategies will be critical for defining the pathophysiology of angiogenesis. Imaging modalities used to detect angiogenesis include PET, SPECT, MRI, CT, US and near-infrared optical imaging. For these modalities, methods have been developed to measure blood volume, blood flow and several other semi quantitative and quantitative kinetic hemodynamic parameters such as vascular permeability. Characteristic molecular makers of angiogenesis may be visualized with the aid of molecular imaging agents such as VEGFs or the α vß3 integrin. "nMRI is a practical modality for assessing angiogenesis over time because it is already widely used clinically to assess tumor growth and for response evaluation. Anatomical information can be co registered with functional and molecular information within a single imaging method. Moreover, MRI does not involve ionizing radiation and the commonly used contrast agent has low toxicity. "nSuper paramagnetic iron oxides (SPIO are FDA-approved contrast agents for use in magnetic reson-ance (MR imaging. Most of the administered SPIO end up in the reticuloendotelial system via endocytosis and the iron core released from the SPIO is utilized in normal iron metabolism pathways. We utilize the paramagnetic characteristics of SPIO to improve the contrast of the image in MRI."nFor the first time we will introduce a method for evaluating angiogenesis

  13. Effect of tumor hypoxia on efficacy of tirapazamine combined with fractionated irradiation in mouse tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Il Han [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-06-01

    Tumor hypoxia can be overcome with hypoxic cytotoxin. In mouse tumor, tirapazamine's efficacy of the potentiating radiation effect was tested by the tumor oxygenation status combined with hyperfactionated radiotherapy. The control and hypoxic mouse tumors were established by inoculation of RIF-1 tumor cells into the normal or previously irradiated back and thigh of C3H mice. When the tumors reached a proper size, both the control and hypoxic tumors were given hyperfractionated treatments (8 fractions/4 days) with saline (0.02 ml/g), tirapazamin (0.08 mM/0.02 ml/kg), irradiation (2.5 Gy), irradiation combined with tirapazamine given 30 minutes prior to each irradiation. The response was evaluated by the growth delay assay by measuring tumor size from day 0 (12 hrs prior to the first fractionation) to the day when the volume had 4-fold increase or cross sectional area had 2-fold increase. Overall growth pattern showed that tirapazamine potentiated radiation effect in back and thigh tumors grew in the normal and preirradiated tumor bed. With growth delay assay using reference point of initial tumor volume or cross sectional area, tirapazamine potentiated radiation effect 1.9 times for the control and 2.4 times for the hypoxic tumors in back, and 1.85 times for the control and 1.6 times for the hypoxic tumors. With reference of 4-fold increase of the initial volume or 2-fold increase of the cross sectional area, tirapazamine potentiated radiation effect 1.48 times for the control and 2.02 times for the hypxic tumors in back, and 1.85 times for the control and 1.6 times for the hypoxic tumors. Present result indicated that radiation response of hypoxic tumors was potentiated by tirapazamine in the back or thigh tumors grew in the control or preirradiated tumor bed, and potentiation of the hypoxic tumors was equal to or greater than that of the control tumors in the back or thigh.

  14. Inter-radiotherapists variability in the tumor delineation: example of volume intercomparison in the bronchi cancer and training impact; Variabilite inter-radiotherapeutes dans la delineation tumorale: exemple d'intercomparaison de volumes dans le cancer bronchique et impact de la formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewas, S.; Lacornerie, T. [Centre Oscar-Lambret, Dept. Universitaire de Radiotherapie, 59 - Lille (France); Blanchard, P.; Vautravers-dewas, C.; Pointreau, Y. [Societe Francaise des jeunes Radiotherapeutes et Oncologues (SFjRO), 75 - Paris (France); Gibon, D. [Societe Aquilab, 59 - Lille (France); Giraud, P. [Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, 75 - Paris (France)

    2009-10-15

    No significant volume modification has been found after lecturing. It allows however, an adaptation to margins of expansion and shows a trend to an increase of the prescribed dose as well a decrease of the delineated volume. The good quality of the initial delineation could explain the lack of progression after the teaching. (N.C.)

  15. Understanding Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Know About Brain Tumors . What is a Brain Tumor? A brain tumor is an abnormal growth
 ... Tumors” from Frankly Speaking Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Brain Tumors Download the full book Questions to ask ...

  16. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  17. Brain tumor - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children) ... The cause of primary brain tumors is unknown. Primary brain tumors may ... (spread to nearby areas) Cancerous (malignant) Brain tumors ...

  18. Adrenal Gland Tumors: Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gland Tumor: Statistics Request Permissions Adrenal Gland Tumor: Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 03/ ... primary adrenal gland tumor is very uncommon. Exact statistics are not available for this type of tumor ...

  19. Radiofrequency ablation of pulmonary tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocetti, Laura, E-mail: l.crocetti@med.unipi.i [Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Intervention, Department of Liver Transplants, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases, Pisa University School of Medicine (Italy); Lencioni, Riccardo [Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Intervention, Department of Liver Transplants, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases, Pisa University School of Medicine (Italy)

    2010-07-15

    The development of image-guided percutaneous techniques for local tumor ablation has been one of the major advances in the treatment of solid tumors. Among these methods, radiofrequency (RF) ablation is currently established as the primary ablative modality at most institutions. RF ablation is accepted as the best therapeutic choice for patients with early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma when liver transplantation or surgical resection are not suitable options and is considered as a viable alternate to surgery for inoperable patients with limited hepatic metastatic disease, especially from colorectal cancer. Recently, RF ablation has been demonstrated to be a safe and valuable treatment option for patients with unresectable or medically inoperable lung malignancies. Resection should remain the standard therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) but RF ablation may be better than conventional external-beam radiation for the treatment of the high-risk individual with NSCLC. Initial favourable outcomes encourage combining radiotherapy and RF ablation, especially for treating larger tumors. In the setting of colorectal cancer lung metastases, survival rates provided by RF ablation in selected patients, are substantially higher than those obtained with any chemotherapy regimens and provide indirect evidence that RF ablation therapy improves survival in patients with limited lung metastatic disease.

  20. Trace detection of specific viable bacteria using tetracysteine-tagged bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lina; Luan, Tian; Yang, Xiaoting; Wang, Shuo; Zheng, Yan; Huang, Tianxun; Zhu, Shaobin; Yan, Xiaomei

    2014-01-01

    Advanced methods are urgently needed to determine the identity and viability of trace amounts of pathogenic bacteria in a short time. Existing approaches either fall short in the accurate assessment of microbial viability or lack specificity in bacterial identification. Bacteriophages (or phages for short) are viruses that exclusively infect bacterial host cells with high specificity. As phages infect and replicate only in living bacterial hosts, here we exploit the strategy of using tetracysteine (TC)-tagged phage in combination with biarsenical dye to the discriminative detection of viable target bacteria from dead target cells and other viable but nontarget bacterial cells. Using recombinant M13KE-TC phage and Escherichia coli ER2738 as a model system, distinct differentiation between individual viable target cells from dead target cells was demonstrated by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. As few as 1% viable E. coli ER2738 can be accurately quantified in a mix with dead E. coli ER2738 by flow cytometry. With fluorescence microscopic measurement, specific detection of as rare as 1 cfu/mL original viable target bacteria was achieved in the presence of a large excess of dead target cells and other viable but nontarget bacterial cells in 40 mL artificially contaminated drinking water sample in less than 3 h. This TC-phage-FlAsH approach is sensitive, specific, rapid, and simple, and thus shows great potential in water safety monitoring, health surveillance, and clinical diagnosis of which trace detection and identification of viable bacterial pathogens is highly demanded.

  1. Pediatric brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poussaint, Tina Y. [Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Panigrahy, Ashok [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Huisman, Thierry A.G.M. [Charlotte R. Bloomberg Children' s Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Division of Pediatric Radiology and Pediatric Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Among all causes of death in children from solid tumors, pediatric brain tumors are the most common. This article includes an overview of a subset of infratentorial and supratentorial tumors with a focus on tumor imaging features and molecular advances and treatments of these tumors. Key to understanding the imaging features of brain tumors is a firm grasp of other disease processes that can mimic tumor on imaging. We also review imaging features of a common subset of tumor mimics. (orig.)

  2. Non-Breeding Eusocial Mole-Rats Produce Viable Sperm--Spermiogram and Functional Testicular Morphology of Fukomys anselli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Garcia Montero

    Full Text Available Ansell's mole-rats (Fukomys anselli are subterranean rodents living in families composed of about 20 members with a single breeding pair and their non-breeding offspring. Most of them remain with their parents for their lifetime and help to maintain and defend the natal burrow system, forage, and care for younger siblings. Since incest avoidance is based on individual recognition (and not on social suppression we expect that non-breeders produce viable sperm spontaneously. We compared the sperm of breeding and non-breeding males, obtained by electroejaculation and found no significant differences in sperm parameters between both groups. Here, we used electroejaculation to obtain semen for the first time in a subterranean mammal. Spermiogram analysis revealed no significant differences in sperm parameters between breeders and non-breeders. We found significantly larger testes (measured on autopsies and on living animals per ultrasonography of breeders compared to non-breeders (with body mass having a significant effect. There were no marked histological differences between breeding and non-breeding males, and the relative area occupied by Leydig cells and seminiferous tubules on histological sections, respectively, was not significantly different between both groups. The seminiferous epithelium and to a lesser degree the interstitial testicular tissue are characterized by lesions (vacuolar degenerations, however, this feature does not hinder fertilization even in advanced stages of life. The continuous production of viable sperm also in sexually abstinent non-breeders might be best understood in light of the mating and social system of Fukomys anselli, and the potential to found a new family following an unpredictable and rare encounter with an unfamiliar female ("provoked or induced dispersal". Apparently, the non-breeders do not reproduce because they do not copulate but not because they would be physiologically infertile. The significantly

  3. Non-Breeding Eusocial Mole-Rats Produce Viable Sperm—Spermiogram and Functional Testicular Morphology of Fukomys anselli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Montero, Angelica; Vole, Christiane; Burda, Hynek; Malkemper, Erich Pascal; Holtze, Susanne; Morhart, Michaela; Saragusty, Joseph; Hildebrandt, Thomas B.; Begall, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Ansell’s mole-rats (Fukomys anselli) are subterranean rodents living in families composed of about 20 members with a single breeding pair and their non-breeding offspring. Most of them remain with their parents for their lifetime and help to maintain and defend the natal burrow system, forage, and care for younger siblings. Since incest avoidance is based on individual recognition (and not on social suppression) we expect that non-breeders produce viable sperm spontaneously. We compared the sperm of breeding and non-breeding males, obtained by electroejaculation and found no significant differences in sperm parameters between both groups. Here, we used electroejaculation to obtain semen for the first time in a subterranean mammal. Spermiogram analysis revealed no significant differences in sperm parameters between breeders and non-breeders. We found significantly larger testes (measured on autopsies and on living animals per ultrasonography) of breeders compared to non-breeders (with body mass having a significant effect). There were no marked histological differences between breeding and non-breeding males, and the relative area occupied by Leydig cells and seminiferous tubules on histological sections, respectively, was not significantly different between both groups. The seminiferous epithelium and to a lesser degree the interstitial testicular tissue are characterized by lesions (vacuolar degenerations), however, this feature does not hinder fertilization even in advanced stages of life. The continuous production of viable sperm also in sexually abstinent non-breeders might be best understood in light of the mating and social system of Fukomys anselli, and the potential to found a new family following an unpredictable and rare encounter with an unfamiliar female (“provoked or induced dispersal”). Apparently, the non-breeders do not reproduce because they do not copulate but not because they would be physiologically infertile. The significantly increased

  4. Non-Breeding Eusocial Mole-Rats Produce Viable Sperm--Spermiogram and Functional Testicular Morphology of Fukomys anselli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Montero, Angelica; Vole, Christiane; Burda, Hynek; Malkemper, Erich Pascal; Holtze, Susanne; Morhart, Michaela; Saragusty, Joseph; Hildebrandt, Thomas B; Begall, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Ansell's mole-rats (Fukomys anselli) are subterranean rodents living in families composed of about 20 members with a single breeding pair and their non-breeding offspring. Most of them remain with their parents for their lifetime and help to maintain and defend the natal burrow system, forage, and care for younger siblings. Since incest avoidance is based on individual recognition (and not on social suppression) we expect that non-breeders produce viable sperm spontaneously. We compared the sperm of breeding and non-breeding males, obtained by electroejaculation and found no significant differences in sperm parameters between both groups. Here, we used electroejaculation to obtain semen for the first time in a subterranean mammal. Spermiogram analysis revealed no significant differences in sperm parameters between breeders and non-breeders. We found significantly larger testes (measured on autopsies and on living animals per ultrasonography) of breeders compared to non-breeders (with body mass having a significant effect). There were no marked histological differences between breeding and non-breeding males, and the relative area occupied by Leydig cells and seminiferous tubules on histological sections, respectively, was not significantly different between both groups. The seminiferous epithelium and to a lesser degree the interstitial testicular tissue are characterized by lesions (vacuolar degenerations), however, this feature does not hinder fertilization even in advanced stages of life. The continuous production of viable sperm also in sexually abstinent non-breeders might be best understood in light of the mating and social system of Fukomys anselli, and the potential to found a new family following an unpredictable and rare encounter with an unfamiliar female ("provoked or induced dispersal"). Apparently, the non-breeders do not reproduce because they do not copulate but not because they would be physiologically infertile. The significantly increased testes

  5. Variations in clinical estimates of tumor volume regression parameters and time factor during external radiotherapy in cancer cervix: Does it mimic the linear-quadratic model of cell survival?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Datta N

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tumor regression parameters and time factor during external radiotherapy (EXTRT are of paramount importance. AIMS: To quantify the parameters of tumor regression and time factor during EXTRT in cancer cervix. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Patients, treated solely with radiotherapy and enrolled for other prospective studies having weekly tumor regressions recorded were considered. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-seven patients received 50Gy of EXTRT followed by intracavitary brachytherapy. Loco-regional regressions were assessed clinically and regression fraction (RF was represented as RF = c + a1D + a2D2- a3T, with c, D and T as constant, cumulative EXTRT dose and treatment time respectively. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: Step wise linear regression was performed for RF. Scatter plots were fitted using linear-quadratic fit. RESULTS: Coefficients of parameters D, D2 and T were computed for various dose intervals, namely 0-20 Gy, 0-30 Gy, 0-40 Gy and 0-50 Gy. At 0-20 Gy and 0-30 Gy, only the coefficient of D2 was significant (P < 0.001, while both D2 and T turned significant (P < 0.001 at 0-40 Gy. For the entire range of 0-50 Gy, all the coefficients of D, D2 and T showed significance, leading to an estimate of 26 Gy for a1/a2 and 0.96 Gy/day for a3/a1. CONCLUSIONS: As with a/β and g/a of post-irradiation cell survival curves, a1/a2 and a3/a1 represents the cumulative effect of various radiobiological factors influencing clinical regression of tumor during the course of EXTRT. The dynamic changes in the coefficients of D, D2sub and T, indicate their relative importance during various phases of EXTRT.

  6. Quantitative modeling of viable cell density, cell size, intracellular conductivity, and membrane capacitance in batch and fed-batch CHO processes using dielectric spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opel, Cary F; Li, Jincai; Amanullah, Ashraf

    2010-01-01

    Dielectric spectroscopy was used to analyze typical batch and fed-batch CHO cell culture processes. Three methods of analysis (linear modeling, Cole-Cole modeling, and partial least squares regression), were used to correlate the spectroscopic data with routine biomass measurements [viable packed cell volume, viable cell concentration (VCC), cell size, and oxygen uptake rate (OUR)]. All three models predicted offline biomass measurements accurately during the growth phase of the cultures. However, during the stationary and decline phases of the cultures, the models decreased in accuracy to varying degrees. Offline cell radius measurements were unsuccessfully used to correct for the deviations from the linear model, indicating that physiological changes affecting permittivity were occurring. The beta-dispersion was analyzed using the Cole-Cole distribution parameters Deltaepsilon (magnitude of the permittivity drop), f(c) (critical frequency), and alpha (Cole-Cole parameter). Furthermore, the dielectric parameters static internal conductivity (sigma(i)) and membrane capacitance per area (C(m)) were calculated for the cultures. Finally, the relationship between permittivity, OUR, and VCC was examined, demonstrating how the definition of viability is critical when analyzing biomass online. The results indicate that the common assumptions of constant size and dielectric properties used in dielectric analysis are not always valid during later phases of cell culture processes. The findings also demonstrate that dielectric spectroscopy, while not a substitute for VCC, is a complementary measurement of viable biomass, providing useful auxiliary information about the physiological state of a culture.

  7. Seasonal changes of viable diatom resting stages in bottom sediments of Xiamen Bay, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang-ping; Sun, Lin; Gao, Ya-hui; Zhou, Qian-qian; Zheng, Min-hua; Li, Bin-qian; Yu, Yang; Lu, Dou-ding

    2009-02-01

    The seasonal abundance of planktonic diatoms in the water column of Xiamen Bay, China, was investigated monthly during 2007 and 2008, and the viability of their resting stages in the bottom sediments was estimated using the extinction dilution method (most probable number method, MPN). The dominant genera in the planktonic diatom community were Skeletonema, Chaetoceros and Thalassiosira, whose viable resting stages were also the most abundant in the sediments. The highest concentration of viable diatom resting stages occurred 1 to 2 months after the maximum cell density of diatom communities occurred in the water column. The viability of Skeletonema resting cells increased in the sediments in either April or May at each station before the start of a Skeletonema bloom in June or July, suggesting that the germination of resting cells suspended in water could have influenced the blooming of Skeletonema species in the summer. Canonical correspondence analysis and multiple linear regression analysis revealed that the MPN of viable diatom resting stages was negatively correlated with silicate ( p concentration ( p > 0.05). The distribution of viable Chaetoceros resting spores and viable Skeletonema resting cells was different, possibly due to the different silicate cost in sea water during the formation of resting spores and resting cells, and also their survival ability in unfavorable environments.

  8. PMA-Linked Fluorescence for Rapid Detection of Viable Bacterial Endospores

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDuc, Myron T.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Mohapatra, Bidyut

    2012-01-01

    The most common approach for assessing the abundance of viable bacterial endospores is the culture-based plating method. However, culture-based approaches are heavily biased and oftentimes incompatible with upstream sample processing strategies, which make viable cells/spores uncultivable. This shortcoming highlights the need for rapid molecular diagnostic tools to assess more accurately the abundance of viable spacecraft-associated microbiota, perhaps most importantly bacterial endospores. Propidium monoazide (PMA) has received a great deal of attention due to its ability to differentiate live, viable bacterial cells from dead ones. PMA gains access to the DNA of dead cells through compromised membranes. Once inside the cell, it intercalates and eventually covalently bonds with the double-helix structures upon photoactivation with visible light. The covalently bound DNA is significantly altered, and unavailable to downstream molecular-based manipulations and analyses. Microbiological samples can be treated with appropriate concentrations of PMA and exposed to visible light prior to undergoing total genomic DNA extraction, resulting in an extract comprised solely of DNA arising from viable cells. This ability to extract DNA selectively from living cells is extremely powerful, and bears great relevance to many microbiological arenas.

  9. Immunization of Rodents Against Hymenolepis Infections using Non-Viable Homologous Oncospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Chin Fan

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Immunity to Taiwan Taenia infection in pigs can be stimulated using homologous or heterologous nonviable Taenia oncospheres. This study was designed to determine whether homologous non-viable oncospheres could stimulate immunity to Hymenolepis infection in rodents. Hatched oncospheres were prepared from eggs of Hymenolepis diminuta, Hymenolepis nana, and Hymenolepis microstoma and kept at −70°C for more than 1 month. A mixture of 500 non-viable oncospheres of each tapeworm and complete Freund's adjuvant was injected subcutaneously in four groups of Sprague-Dawley rats or ICR mice one to four times at an interval of 1 week; controls were not immunized. After immunization, each rodent was orally inoculated with three fresh active cysticercoids of H. diminuta or H. microstoma or 500 fresh eggs of H. nana. The animals were then necropsied for adult tapeworms. No rats or mice immunized with non-viable oncospheres of H. diminuta or H. nana were infected by the challenge inoculation. However, 28 of 34 mice immunized with non-viable H. microstoma oncospheres were infected after inoculation with cysticercoids. This study demonstrated complete protection against infection by homologous parasites in rats or mice immunized with non-viable oncospheres of H. diminuta and H. nana, respectively. Repeated immunization may not be required if resistance is stimulated in rodent hosts.

  10. Teratoid Wilms′ tumor - A rare renal tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswanath Mukhopadhyay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Teratoid Wilms′ tumor is an extremely rare renal tumor. We report a case of unilateral teratoid Wilms′ tumor in a 4-year-old girl. The patient was admitted with a right-sided abdominal mass. The mass was arising from the right kidney. Radical nephrectomy was done and the patient had an uneventful recovery. Histopathology report showed teratoid Wilms′ tumor.

  11. The rationale for liquid biopsy in colorectal cancer: a focus on circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzaniga, Paola; Raimondi, Cristina; Nicolazzo, Chiara; Carletti, Raffaella; di Gioia, Cira; Gradilone, Angela; Cortesi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Capturing circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and/or circulating tumor DNA from blood, which represents a precious source of biological material derived from both primary and metastatic tumors, has been named a 'liquid biopsy'. While the circulating tumor DNA might be more representative of the bulk of the metastatic tumor, CTCs are thought to reflect more of the metastases-initiating cells. Consequently, a liquid biopsy made of tumor cells and tumor DNA that is able to track cancer evolution, as a fingerprint of the patient's individual tumor, and is easy to perform at every stage of the disease course, sounds attractive. This article mainly focuses on the applications of CTCs to track tumor dynamics in real time using colorectal cancer as a model system. The analysis of viable CTCs at DNA, RNA and protein levels, as well as their expansion in vitro, may allow deep investigation of the features of metastases-initiating cells.

  12. Radiofrequency ablation of liver VX2 tumor: experimental results with MR diffusion-weighted imaging at 3.0T.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubao Liu

    Full Text Available To evaluate the value of DWI in detecting the lesions of pre- and post-radiofrequency ablation (RFA of the rabbit liver VX2 tumors.Twenty-two New Zealand White rabbits were tested. The protocol was approved by the Committee on the Ethics of Animal Experiments. Twenty separate tumor fragments were implanted into the livers of 20 rabbits, the liver was exposed by performing midline laparotomy. 3.0T MR DWI (b = 0, 200, 400, 600, 800,1000 s/mm2 were performed 14-21 days after tumor implantation (mean, 17 days in the 18 tumor-bearing animals. Then RFA was performed in the 18 tumor-bearing animals and in the two healthy animals. 3.0T MR DWI was performed 7-10 days after RFA (mean, 8 days. Pathology exam was performed immediately after the completion of post- RFA MR imaging. Analyzing the features of MRI and ADC values in the pre- and post- RFA lesions of the VX2 tumors, and histopathologic results were compared with imaging findings.The difference of ADC value between viable tumor and normal liver parenchyma was significant (P<.001. After RFA, when b = 200, 400, 600, 800, 1000 s/mm2, the differences of ADC values of viable tumor, granulation tissue, necrosis, normal liver parenchyma were significant (P<.001. At the time the animals were sacrificed after RFA and MR imaging, histopathologic results of local viable tumors were found in 9 (50% of the 18 treated tumors. Macroscopic viable tumors were found at the RFA sites in 3 (17%, all 3 macroscopic viable tumors were visualized at the periphery of the RFA areas.3.0T MR DWI can be used to follow up the progress of the RFA lesion, it is useful in detecting different tissues after RFA, and it is valuable in the further clinical research.

  13. Issues of organizational cybernetics and viability beyond Beer's viable systems model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechansky, Helmut

    2013-11-01

    The paper starts summarizing the claims of Beer's viable systems model to identify five issues any viable organizations has to deal with in an unequivocal hierarchical structure of five interrelated systems. Then the evidence is introduced for additional issues and related viable structures of organizations, which deviate from Beer's model. These issues are: (1) the establishment and (2) evolution of an organization; (3) systems for independent top-down control (like "Six Sigma"); (4) systems for independent bottom-up correction of performance problems (like "Kaizen"), both working outside a hierarchical structure; (5) pull production systems ("Just in Time") and (6) systems for checks and balances of top-level power (like boards and shareholder meetings). Based on that an evolutionary approach to organizational cybernetics is outlined, addressing the establishment of organizations and possible courses of developments, including recent developments in quality and production engineering, as well as problems of setting and changing goal values determining organizational policies.

  14. Formation of non-viable spores of Dictyostelium discoideum by UV-irradiation and caffeine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, T.; Hazama, M.; Okaichi, K.; Nozu, K. (Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan))

    1982-09-01

    The spores formed from amoeboid cells of the wild type strain of Dictyostelium discoideum after UV-irradiation were characterized. Cell differentiation in the presence of caffeine after a fluence of 300 J/m/sup 2/ resulted in a population of spores which was 98% non-viable. The UV-irradiation did not affect the conversion of the spores to swollen spores but did affect the conversion of swollen spores to amoeboid cells. When the germination of the spores was done without caffeine, only a small effect on conversion of swollen spores to amoeboid cells and on the beginning of growth was detected. On the other hand, in the presence of caffeine, the spores had a remarkable delay in both. It was also shown that few, if any, pyrimidine dimers exist in the DNA of the non-viable spores. Possible mechanisms of formation of non-viable spores are discussed.

  15. A multicenter study of viable PCR using propidium monoazide to detect Legionella in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaturro, Maria; Fontana, Stefano; Dell'eva, Italo; Helfer, Fabrizia; Marchio, Michele; Stefanetti, Maria Vittoria; Cavallaro, Mario; Miglietta, Marilena; Montagna, Maria Teresa; De Giglio, Osvalda; Cuna, Teresa; Chetti, Leonarda; Sabattini, Maria Antonietta Bucci; Carlotti, Michela; Viggiani, Mariagabriella; Stenico, Alberta; Romanin, Elisa; Bonanni, Emma; Ottaviano, Claudio; Franzin, Laura; Avanzini, Claudio; Demarie, Valerio; Corbella, Marta; Cambieri, Patrizia; Marone, Piero; Rota, Maria Cristina; Bella, Antonino; Ricci, Maria Luisa

    2016-07-01

    Legionella quantification in environmental samples is overestimated by qPCR. Combination with a viable dye, such as Propidium monoazide (PMA), could make qPCR (named then vPCR) very reliable. In this multicentre study 717 artificial water samples, spiked with fixed concentrations of Legionella and interfering bacterial flora, were analysed by qPCR, vPCR and culture and data were compared by statistical analysis. A heat-treatment at 55 °C for 10 minutes was also performed to obtain viable and not-viable bacteria. When data of vPCR were compared with those of culture and qPCR, statistical analysis showed significant differences (P 0.05). Overall this study provided a good experimental reproducibility of vPCR but also highlighted limits of PMA in the discriminating capability of dead and live bacteria, making vPCR not completely reliable.

  16. Thoracic wall reconstruction after tumor resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran eHarati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgical treatment of malignant thoracic wall tumors represents a formidable challenge. In particular, locally advanced tumors that have already infiltrated critical anatomic structures are associated with a high surgical morbidity and can result in full thickness defects of the thoracic wall. Plastic surgery can reduce this surgical morbidity by reconstructing the thoracic wall through various tissue transfer techniques. Sufficient soft tissue reconstruction of the thoracic wall improves life quality and mitigates functional impairment after extensive resection. The aim of this article is to illustrate the various plastic surgery treatment options in the multimodal therapy of patients with malignant thoracic wall tumors.Material und methods: This article is based on a review of the current literature and the evaluation of a patient database.Results: Several plastic surgical treatment options can be implemented in the curative and palliative therapy of patients with malignant solid tumors of the chest wall. Large soft tissue defects after tumor resection can be covered by local, pedicled or free flaps. In cases of large full-thickness defects, flaps can be combined with polypropylene mesh to improve chest wall stability and to maintain pulmonary function. The success of modern medicine has resulted in an increasing number of patients with prolonged survival suffering from locally advanced tumors that can be painful, malodorous or prone to bleeding. Resection of these tumors followed by thoracic wall reconstruction with viable tissue can substantially enhance the life quality of these patients. Discussion: In curative treatment regimens, chest wall reconstruction enables complete resection of locally advanced tumors and subsequent adjuvant radiotherapy. In palliative disease treatment, stadium plastic surgical techniques of thoracic wall reconstruction provide palliation of tumor-associated morbidity and can therefore improve

  17. [A meta-analysis of treatment of infantile diarrhea with bifid triple viable bacterial tablet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xian-gang; Zhong, Qu; Li, Rui

    2005-06-01

    To assess the efficacy and safety of bifid triple viable bacterial tablet in treatment of infantile diarrhea. According to the requirements of Cochrane systematic review, a thorough literature search was performed among Chinese Digital Hospital Library (www.chkd.cnki.net) and Chinese Biomedical Literature Disk Database (CBMdisk). A meta analysis was performed on a total of 1326 patients involved in 12 papers which met the inclusion criteria. Publication bias analysis showed that the funnel plot was symmetrical. Test for heterogeneity showed that the groups treated with bifid triple viable bacterial tablet and antibiotics or anti-viral agents or placebo control had clinical homogeneity and statistical homogeneity (P = 0.66, 0.67, 0.85, respectively, I(2) = 0%), which allowed to use fixed effect model analysis. The bifid triple viable bacterial tablet and Smecta did not have statistical homogeneity (P = 0.02, I(2) = 70.9%), therefore random effect model analysis was applied. Incorporation analysis showed that in comparison of the bifid triple viable bacterial tablet versus antibiotics or anti-viral agents or placebo control, the odds ratios were 5.34, 4.74 and 6.43, respectively, and 95% CIs were [2.81, 10.16], [2.47, 9.09], and [2.61, 15.83], on test for overall effect, Z = 5.11, 4.67 and 4.04, P border of effectiveness. However, no statistically significant difference was found between bifid triple viable bacterial tablet and Smecta. The clinical evidences available so far indicated that treatment of infantile diarrhea with bifid triple viable bacterial tablet is safe and effective although rigorously designed large sample size randomized double blind clinical trials are required to further demonstrate and support the conclusion.

  18. Renormalized Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gover, A. Rod; Waldron, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    We develop a universal distributional calculus for regulated volumes of metrics that are suitably singular along hypersurfaces. When the hypersurface is a conformal infinity we give simple integrated distribution expressions for the divergences and anomaly of the regulated volume functional valid for any choice of regulator. For closed hypersurfaces or conformally compact geometries, methods from a previously developed boundary calculus for conformally compact manifolds can be applied to give explicit holographic formulæ for the divergences and anomaly expressed as hypersurface integrals over local quantities (the method also extends to non-closed hypersurfaces). The resulting anomaly does not depend on any particular choice of regulator, while the regulator dependence of the divergences is precisely captured by these formulæ. Conformal hypersurface invariants can be studied by demanding that the singular metric obey, smoothly and formally to a suitable order, a Yamabe type problem with boundary data along the conformal infinity. We prove that the volume anomaly for these singular Yamabe solutions is a conformally invariant integral of a local Q-curvature that generalizes the Branson Q-curvature by including data of the embedding. In each dimension this canonically defines a higher dimensional generalization of the Willmore energy/rigid string action. Recently, Graham proved that the first variation of the volume anomaly recovers the density obstructing smooth solutions to this singular Yamabe problem; we give a new proof of this result employing our boundary calculus. Physical applications of our results include studies of quantum corrections to entanglement entropies.

  19. Generic feature of future crossing of phantom divide in viable $f(R)$ gravity models

    CERN Document Server

    Bamba, Kazuharu; Lee, Chung-Chi

    2010-01-01

    We study the equation of state for dark energy and explicitly demonstrate that the future crossings of the phantom divide line $w_{\\mathrm{DE}}=-1$ are the generic feature in the existing viable $f(R)$ gravity models. We also explore the future evolution of the cosmological horizon entropy and illustrate that the cosmological horizon entropy oscillates with time due to the oscillatory behavior of the Hubble parameter. The important cosmological consequence is that in the future, the sign of the time derivative of the Hubble parameter changes from negative to positive in these viable $f(R)$ gravity models.

  20. Generic feature of future crossing of phantom divide in viable f(R) gravity models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamba, Kazuharu; Geng, Chao-Qiang; Lee, Chung-Chi, E-mail: bamba@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: geng@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: g9522545@oz.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang Fu Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2010-11-01

    We study the equation of state for dark energy and explicitly demonstrate that the future crossings of the phantom divide line w{sub DE} = −1 are the generic feature in the existing viable f(R) gravity models. We also explore the future evolution of the cosmological horizon entropy and illustrate that the cosmological horizon entropy oscillates with time due to the oscillatory behavior of the Hubble parameter. The important cosmological consequence is that in the future, the sign of the time derivative of the Hubble parameter changes from negative to positive in these viable f(R) gravity models.

  1. El modelo de sistema viable: un instrumento para la organización efectiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norlando Sánchez Rueda

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN En este ensayo se presenta una interpretación teórica del denominado Modelo de Sistema Viable (MSV, de Stafford Beer y su Potencial Aplicación en Tareas de Diagnóstico  y diseño empresarial, al igual que para Mejorar las capacidades Organizacionales de Auto- Regulación  y Auto- Organización. Se explica como el Modelo del Sistema Viable permite conocer e interpretar  los mecanismos de estabilidad y adaptabilidad de las organizaciones, pilares para el crecimiento de una verdadera organización Efectiva.

  2. Cholecystokinin expression in tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Jens F

    2016-01-01

    in different neuroendocrine tumors; cerebral gliomas and astrocytomas and specific pediatric tumors. Tumor hypersecretion of CCK was recently reported in a patient with a metastatic islet cell tumor and hypercholecystokininemia resulting in a novel tumor syndrome, the cholecystokininoma syndrome. This review...... presents an overview of the cell-specific biogenesis of CCK peptides, and a description of the CCK expression in tumors and of the cholecystokininoma syndrome. Finally, assays for the diagnosis of CCK-producing tumors are reviewed....

  3. Repeated computed tomography scanning in assessing the change of tumor bed volume during whole breast irradiation in early-stage breast cancer after breast conservative surgery%早期乳腺癌保乳术后全乳放疗中瘤床体积变化的CT评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨昭志; 蔡钢; 潘自强; 陈佳艺; 郭小毛; 俞晓立; 章倩; 梅欣; 李炯雁

    2010-01-01

    目的 用重复定位CT评价早期乳腺癌保乳术后放疗中瘤床体积变化规律,分析不同CT上进行瘤床加量计划的剂量学差异.方法 2008-2009年共收集早期乳腺癌保乳术后放疗患者16例,放疗均采用全乳放疗和瘤床加量.患者均接受了3次CT扫描,分别为放疗前(CT1,常规全乳放疗计划CT)、放疗中(CT2)、瘤床加量前(CT3).在3次CT上勾画瘤床.在CT1和CT3上进行三维适形瘤床加量计划并分析剂量体积直方图.结果 CT1、CT2、CT3瘤床平均体积分别为49.5、25.6、22.2 cm3(F=5.63,P=0.007),CT1的>CT2(q=0.03,P=0.010)和CT3的(q=0.01,P=0.004),CT3与CT2的相似(q=1.00,P=0.333).CT3总体积平均下降43.4%,其中下降>20%的占88%(14例)、>50%的占38%(6例).CT1、CT3上患侧乳腺内接受100%处方剂量的平均体积分别为183.5、144.5 cm3(t=3.06,P=0.008).结论 早期乳腺癌保乳术后放疗患者放疗中瘤床体积以放疗后的早期变化显著,在瘤床加量前重新CT扫描进行三维适形瘤床加量计划是合理的.%Objective To determine the change of tumor bed volume during whole breast irradiation by repeated computed tomography scanning and to analyze the dosimetric impact of boost-planning on different CT images. Methods From July 2008 to Jan 2009, sixteen patients with early-stage breast cancer underwent breast conservative surgery (BCS) were enrolled in the study. All patients received whole breast irradiation and tumor bed boost, no adjuvant chemotherapy was given. Two additional CT scans were acquired in addition to the planning CT ( CT1 ), one in the course of radiotherapy ( CT2 ) and the other before the boost (CT3). Tumor beds were contoured in all CT images. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy planning for tumor bed boost was done on CT1 and CT3 respectively. Results The mean tumor bed volume on CT1, CT2 and CT3 were 49.5 cm3, 25.6 cm3 and 22. 2 cm3 ( F = 5. 63, P = 0. 007 ),respectively. Further analysis found statistically

  4. Tumor Stiffening, a Key Determinant of Tumor Progression, is Reversed by Nanomaterial-Induced Photothermal Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangon, Iris; Silva, Amanda A. K.; Guilbert, Thomas; Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena; Marchiol, Carmen; Natkhunarajah, Sharuja; Chamming's, Foucault; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Bianco, Alberto; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Renault, Gilles; Gazeau, Florence

    2017-01-01

    Tumor stiffening, stemming from aberrant production and organization of extracellular matrix (ECM), has been considered a predictive marker of tumor malignancy, non-invasively assessed by ultrasound shear wave elastography (SWE). Being more than a passive marker, tumor stiffening restricts the delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic agents to the tumor and per se could modulate cellular mechano-signaling, tissue inflammation and tumor progression. Current strategies to modify the tumor extracellular matrix are based on ECM-targeting chemical agents but also showed deleterious systemic effects. On-demand excitable nanomaterials have shown their ability to perturb the tumor microenvironment in a spatiotemporal-controlled manner and synergistically with chemotherapy. Here, we investigated the evolution of tumor stiffness as well as tumor integrity and progression, under the effect of mild hyperthermia and thermal ablation generated by light-exposed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in an epidermoid carcinoma mouse xenograft. SWE was used for real-time mapping of the tumor stiffness, both during the two near infrared irradiation sessions and over the days after the treatment. We observed a transient and reversible stiffening of the tumor tissue during laser irradiation, which was lowered at the second session of mild hyperthermia or photoablation. In contrast, over the days following photothermal treatment, the treated tumors exhibited a significant softening together with volume reduction, whereas non-treated growing tumors showed an increase of tumor rigidity. The organization of the collagen matrix and the distribution of CNTs revealed a spatio-temporal correlation between the presence of nanoheaters and the damages on collagen and cells. This study highlights nanohyperthermia as a promising adjuvant strategy to reverse tumor stiffening and normalize the mechanical tumor environment. PMID:28042338

  5. Quantification of tumor extension in prostate biopsies: importance in the identification of confined tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leite Kátia R.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the importance of quantifying the adenocarcinoma in prostate biopsies when determining the tumor's final stage in patients who undergo radical prostatectomy. To identify the best methodology for obtaining such data. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Prostate biopsies from 132 patients were examined, with determination of Gleason histological grade and tumor volume in number of involved fragments, tumor extent of the fragment mostly affected by the tumor and the total percentage of tumor in the specimen. Theses parameters were statistically correlated with the neoplasia's final stage following the evaluation of radical prostatectomy specimens. RESULTS: An average of 12 and a median of 14 biopsy fragments were evaluated per patient. In the univariate analysis the Gleason histological grade, the largest tumor extent in one fragment and the total percentage of tumor in the specimen were correlated with tumor stage of the surgical specimen. In the multivariate analysis, the Gleason histological grade and the total percentage of tumor were strongly correlated with the neoplasia's final stage. The risk of the tumor not being confined was 3 for Gleason 7 tumors and 10.6 for Gleason 8 tumors or above. In cases where the tumor involved more than 60% of the specimen, the risk of non-confined disease was 4.4 times. Among 19 patients with unfavorable histological parameters, Gleason > 7 and extension greater than 60% the tumor final stage was pT3 in 95%. CONCLUSION: When associated to the Gleason histological grade, tumor quantification in prostate biopsies is an important factor for determining organ-confined disease, and among the methods, total percentage of tumor is the most informative one. Such data should be included in the pathological report and must be incorporated in future nomograms.

  6. Combination bacteriolytic therapy for the treatment of experimental tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, L H; Bettegowda, C; Huso, D L; Kinzler, K W; Vogelstein, B

    2001-12-18

    Current chemotherapeutic approaches for cancer are in part limited by the inability of drugs to destroy neoplastic cells within poorly vascularized compartments of tumors. We have here systematically assessed anaerobic bacteria for their capacity to grow expansively within avascular compartments of transplanted tumors. Among 26 different strains tested, one (Clostridium novyi) appeared particularly promising. We created a strain of C. novyi devoid of its lethal toxin (C. novyi-NT) and showed that intravenously injected C. novyi-NT spores germinated within the avascular regions of tumors in mice and destroyed surrounding viable tumor cells. When C. novyi-NT spores were administered together with conventional chemotherapeutic drugs, extensive hemorrhagic necrosis of tumors often developed within 24 h, resulting in significant and prolonged antitumor effects. This strategy, called combination bacteriolytic therapy (COBALT), has the potential to add a new dimension to the treatment of cancer.

  7. Characterisation of endometrial gene expression and metabolic parameters in beef heifers yielding viable or non-viable embryos on Day 7 after insemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltman, M E; Forde, N; Furney, P; Carter, F; Roche, J F; Lonergan, P; Crowe, M A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the hormonal and metabolic characteristics and endometrial gene expression profiles in beef heifers yielding either a viable or degenerate embryo on Day 7 after insemination as a means to explain differences in embryo survival. Oestrus was synchronised in cross-bred beef heifers (n = 145) using a controlled internal drug release (CIDR)-prostaglandin protocol. Heifers (n = 102) detected in standing oestrus (within 24-48 h after CIDR removal) were inseminated 12-18 h after detection of oestrus (Day 0) with frozen-thawed semen from a single ejaculate of a bull with proven fertility. Blood samples were collected from Day 4 to Day 7 after oestrus to measure progesterone (on Days 4, 5 and 7), insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I (on Days 4 and 6) and urea (on Day 7) concentrations. All animals were killed on Day 7. Uterine pH was determined at the time of death. Animals from which an embryo was recovered were classified as either having a viable embryo (morula/blastocyst stage; n = 32) or a retarded embryo (arrested at the two- to 16-cell stage; n = 19). In addition, 14 single-celled unfertilised oocytes were recovered, giving an overall recovery rate of 64%. There was no significant difference in the blood parameters determined or uterine pH at the time of death between heifers with either a viable or retarded embryo. The relative abundance of nine transcripts (i.e. MOGAT1, PFKB2, LYZ2, SVS8, UHRF1, PTGES, AGPAT4, DGKA and HGPD) of 53 tested in the endometrial tissue differed between heifers with a viable or retarded embryo. Both LYZ2 and UHRF1 are associated with regulation of the immune system; PFKFB2 is a mediator in glycolysis; MOGAT, AGPAT4 and DGKA belong to the triglyceride synthesis pathway; and PTGES and HGPD belong to the prostaglandin pathway. Both these metabolic pathways are important for early embryonic development. In conclusion, retarded embryo development in the present study was not related to serum

  8. Freehand 3D ultrasound breast tumor segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qi; Ge, Yinan; Ou, Yue; Cao, Biao

    2007-12-01

    It is very important for physicians to accurately determine breast tumor location, size and shape in ultrasound image. The precision of breast tumor volume quantification relies on the accurate segmentation of the images. Given the known location and orientation of the ultrasound probe, We propose using freehand three dimensional (3D) ultrasound to acquire original images of the breast tumor and the surrounding tissues in real-time, after preprocessing with anisotropic diffusion filtering, the segmentation operation is performed slice by slice based on the level set method in the image stack. For the segmentation on each slice, the user can adjust the parameters to fit the requirement in the specified image in order to get the satisfied result. By the quantification procedure, the user can know the tumor size varying in different images in the stack. Surface rendering and interpolation are used to reconstruct the 3D breast tumor image. And the breast volume is constructed by the segmented contours in the stack of images. After the segmentation, the volume of the breast tumor in the 3D image data can be obtained.

  9. Effect of tumor shape and size on drug delivery to solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soltani M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumor shape and size effect on drug delivery to solid tumors are studied, based on the application of the governing equations for fluid flow, i.e., the conservation laws for mass and momentum, to physiological systems containing solid tumors. The discretized form of the governing equations, with appropriate boundary conditions, is developed for predefined tumor geometries. The governing equations are solved using a numerical method, the element-based finite volume method. Interstitial fluid pressure and velocity are used to show the details of drug delivery in a solid tumor, under an assumption that drug particles flow with the interstitial fluid. Drug delivery problems have been most extensively researched in spherical tumors, which have been the simplest to examine with the analytical methods. With our numerical method, however, more complex shapes of the tumor can be studied. The numerical model of fluid flow in solid tumors previously introduced by our group is further developed to incorporate and investigate non-spherical tumors such as prolate and oblate ones. Also the effects of the surface area per unit volume of the tissue, vascular and interstitial hydraulic conductivity on drug delivery are investigated.

  10. Radiation therapy for intracranial germ cell tumors. Predictive value of tumor response as evaluated by computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Toita, Takafumi; Kakinohana, Yasumasa; Yamaguchi, Keiichiro; Miyagi, Koichi; Kinjo, Toshihiko; Yamashiro, Katsumi; Sawada, Satoshi [Ryukyu Univ., Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan). School of Medicine

    1997-07-01

    This retrospective study analyzed the outcome in patients with intracranial germ-cell tumors to determine whether tumor response during radiation therapy can predict achievement of primary local with radiation therapy alone. Between 1983 and 1993, 22 patients with untreated primary intracranial germ cell tumors received a total whole brain radiation dose of between 18 Gy and 45 Gy (mean 31.3 Gy) with or without a localized field of 10 to 36.4 Gy (mean, 22.4 Gy), or local irradiation only (1 patient). In 10 patients with pineal tumor only, who were treated first with radiation therapy, tumor response to radiation therapy was evaluated using computed tomography (CT) (at baseline, and approximately 20 Gy and 50 Gy). Areas of calcification in the tumor were subtracted from total tumor volume. Follow-up time ranged from 2 to 12 years. Five-year actuarial survival rates for patients with germinoma were 71%, 100% for patients with a teratoma component, and 100% for patients without histologic verification. Patients with germinomas or tumors suspected of being germinomas who were given more than 50 Gy had no local relapse. There was no correlation between primary local control by radiation therapy alone and initial tumor volume. The rate of tumor volume response to irradiation assessed by CT was significantly different in those patients who relapsed compared to those who did not relapse. Tumor response during radiation therapy using CT was considered to be predictive of primary local control with radiation therapy alone. (author)

  11. In Search of Viable Business Models for Development: Sustainable Energy in Developing Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Kolk (Ans); D. van den Buuse (Daniel)

    2012-01-01

    markdownabstractPurpose – Although the crucial role of business, and of business-based approaches, in development is increasingly emphasised by academics and practitioners, we lack insight into the ‘whether and how’ of viable business models, in environmental, social and economical terms. This artic

  12. In search of viable business models for development: sustainable energy in developing countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, A.; van den Buuse, D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose - Although the crucial role of business, and of business-based approaches, in development is increasingly emphasised by academics and practitioners, insight is lacking into the "whether and how" of viable business models, in environmental, social and economical terms. This article analyses p

  13. Sorption and precipitation of Mn2+ by viable and autoclaved Shewanella putrefaciens: Effect of contact time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chubar, N.; Visser, T.; Avramut, C.; de Waard, H.C.

    2013-01-01

    The sorption of Mn(II) by viable and inactivated cells of Shewanella putrefaciens, a non-pathogenic, facultative anaerobic, gram-negative bacterium characterised as a Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reducer, was studied under aerobic conditions, as a function of pH, bacterial density and metal loading. During

  14. Quantitative Approach to Determining the Contribution of Viable-but-Nonculturable Subpopulations to Malolactic Fermentation Processes▿

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Different sizes of viable-but-nonculturable cell subpopulations of a lactic acid bacterium strain were induced by adding increasing amounts of SO2. The experimental data obtained here were fitted to a segregated kinetic model developed previously. This procedure allowed us to determine in quantitative terms the contribution of this physiological state to malolactic fermentation.

  15. ATP as a biomarker of viable microorganisms in clean-room facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Hattori, Noriaki; La Duc, Myron T.; Kern, Roger

    2003-01-01

    A new firefly luciferase bioluminescence assay method that differentiates free extracellular ATP (dead cells, etc.) from intracellular ATP (viable microbes) was used to determine the viable microbial cleanliness of various clean-room facilities. For comparison, samples were taken from both clean-rooms, where the air was filtered to remove particles >0.5 microm, and ordinary rooms with unfiltered air. The intracellular ATP was determined after enzymatically degrading the sample's free ATP. Also for comparison, cultivable microbial populations were counted on nutrient-rich trypticase soy agar (TSA) plates. Both the cultivable and ATP-based determinations indicate that the microbial burden was lower in clean-room facilities than in ordinary rooms. However, there was no direct correlation between the two sets of measurements because the two assays measured very different populations. A large fraction of the samples yielded no colony formers on TSA, but were positive for intracellular ATP. Subsequently, genomic DNA was isolated directly from selected samples and 16S rDNA fragments were cloned and sequenced, identifying nearest neighbors, many of which are known to be noncultivable in the media employed. It was concluded that viable microbial contamination can be reliably monitored by measurement of intracellular ATP, and that this method may be considered superior to cultivable colony counts due to its speed and its ability to report the presence of viable but noncultivable organisms. When the detection of nonviable microbes is of interest, the ATP assay can be supplemented with DNA analysis.

  16. Amplification of RNA by NASBA allows direct detection of viable cells of Ralstonia solanacearum in potato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bentsink, L.; Leone, G.O.M.; Beckhoven, van J.R.C.M.; Schijndel, van H.B.; Gemen, van B.; Wolf, van der J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Aims: The objective of this study was to develop a Nucleic Acid Sequence Based Amplification (NASBA) assay, targeting 16S rRNA sequences, for direct detection of viable cells of Ralstonia solanacearum, the causal organism of bacterial wilt. The presence of intact 16S rRNA is considered to be a usefu

  17. Use of propidium monoazide for selective profiling of viable microbial cells during Gouda cheese ripening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkus, O.; Jager, V.C. de; Geene, R.T.; Alen-Boerrigter, I.J. van; Hazelwood, L.; Hijum, S.A.F.T. van; Kleerebezem, M; Smid, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    DNA based microbial community profiling of food samples is confounded by the presence of DNA derived from membrane compromised (dead or injured) cells. Selective amplification of DNA from viable (intact) fraction of the community by propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment could circumvent this problem.

  18. Two and three-color fluorescence flow cytometric analysis of immunoidentified viable bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbesti, S; Citterio, S; Labra, M; Baroni, M D; Neri, M G; Sgorbati, S

    2000-07-01

    Traditional culture methods well established in the past and still in use are not able to detect the environmental microorganisms that exist in a viable but not culturable state. A number of different fluorescence-based assays have been developed over the past decade to detect and identify viable bacteria in the environment. We have developed a simple and rapid method for measuring the number and viability of immunolabeled bacteria by means of a two/three color fluorescence flow cytometric analysis. After washing, cultured bacteria in suspension were labeled with a rabbit polyclonal antibody recognizing the wall lipopolysaccharide complex. A secondary biotinylated anti-rabbit polyclonal antibody was added allowing the cells to be labeled with the streptavidin R-phycoerythrin-Cyanine 5 (RPE-Cy5) fluorochrome. Before flow cytometric analysis, bacterial suspensions were stained with SYBR Green I and propidium iodide which stain all of the cells and the non viable ones, respectively. With the appropriate filter sets of both Bryte-HS (Bio-Rad, Hercules, CA) and FACScan (Becton Dickinson, San Jose, CA) flow cytometers, the measurement of separated green (SYBR Green I), orange-red (propidium iodide), and far red (RPE-Cy5) fluorescence was possible, allowing the enumeration of viable immunodetected bacteria. The entire protocol is completed in less than 3 h, offering numerous possibilities for rapid and precise analyses in sanitary, industrial, and environmental microbiology. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Economically viable biochemical processes for the advanced rural biorefinery and downstream recovery operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rural biorefineries offer an alternative to traditional ethanol production by providing the opportunity to produce fuel on site to reduce costs associated with biomass transportation thus making the fuel economically viable. Widespread installation of rural biorefineries could lead to increased upt...

  20. Increased intestinal delivery of viable Saccharomyces boulardii by encapsulation in microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Sandrine; Hussain, Sajjad; Chaumeil, Jean-Claude; Charrueau, Christine

    2008-06-01

    Although probiotics are of a major potential therapeutic interest, their efficacy is usually limited by poor bioavailability of viable microorganisms on site. The aim of this study was to protect the probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii from degradation in order to ensure a greater number of viable yeast in the colon. Alginate microspheres coated with or not with chitosan were used to encapsulate the yeast by an extrusion method. The efficiency of encapsulation was assessed both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, less than 1% of the non-encapsulated probiotic survived after 120 min at pH 1.1, whereas the majority of encapsulated yeast cells remained entrapped within both types of microspheres. Further exposure to a pH 6.8 allowed the release of about 35% of viable yeasts. In vivo, the percentage of viable yeast excreted over 96 h after a single oral dose of 2 x 10(8) cfu/100 g in rats was 2.5% for nonencapsulated yeast and reached 13.3 and 9.0% of the dose administered for the uncoated and chitosan-coated microspheres, respectively. Given the dose-dependent efficacy of S. boulardii and the efficiency of microencapsulation in protecting the yeast from degradation, alginate microspheres could be of great interest in therapeutic applications of the yeast.

  1. The ghost of extinction: Preservation values and minimum viable population in wildlife models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eiswerth, M.E.; Kooten, van G.C.

    2009-01-01

    The inclusion of a minimum viable population in bioeconomic modeling creates at least two complications that are not resolved by using a modified logistic growth function. The first complication can be dealt with by choosing a different depensational growth function. The second complication relates

  2. ATP as a biomarker of viable microorganisms in clean-room facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Hattori, Noriaki; La Duc, Myron T.; Kern, Roger

    2003-01-01

    A new firefly luciferase bioluminescence assay method that differentiates free extracellular ATP (dead cells, etc.) from intracellular ATP (viable microbes) was used to determine the viable microbial cleanliness of various clean-room facilities. For comparison, samples were taken from both clean-rooms, where the air was filtered to remove particles >0.5 microm, and ordinary rooms with unfiltered air. The intracellular ATP was determined after enzymatically degrading the sample's free ATP. Also for comparison, cultivable microbial populations were counted on nutrient-rich trypticase soy agar (TSA) plates. Both the cultivable and ATP-based determinations indicate that the microbial burden was lower in clean-room facilities than in ordinary rooms. However, there was no direct correlation between the two sets of measurements because the two assays measured very different populations. A large fraction of the samples yielded no colony formers on TSA, but were positive for intracellular ATP. Subsequently, genomic DNA was isolated directly from selected samples and 16S rDNA fragments were cloned and sequenced, identifying nearest neighbors, many of which are known to be noncultivable in the media employed. It was concluded that viable microbial contamination can be reliably monitored by measurement of intracellular ATP, and that this method may be considered superior to cultivable colony counts due to its speed and its ability to report the presence of viable but noncultivable organisms. When the detection of nonviable microbes is of interest, the ATP assay can be supplemented with DNA analysis.

  3. In search of viable business models for development: sustainable energy in developing countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, A.; van den Buuse, D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose - Although the crucial role of business, and of business-based approaches, in development is increasingly emphasised by academics and practitioners, insight is lacking into the "whether and how" of viable business models, in environmental, social and economical terms. This article analyses p

  4. In Search of Viable Business Models for Development: Sustainable Energy in Developing Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Kolk (Ans); D. van den Buuse (Daniel)

    2012-01-01

    markdownabstractPurpose – Although the crucial role of business, and of business-based approaches, in development is increasingly emphasised by academics and practitioners, we lack insight into the ‘whether and how’ of viable business models, in environmental, social and economical terms. This artic

  5. Detection of the total viable counts in chicken based on visible/near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fachao; Long, Yuan; Tang, Xiuying; Zhao, Linlin; Peng, Yankun; Wang, Caiping

    2014-05-01

    The viable counts in chicken have significant effects on food safety. Exceeding standard index can have negative influence to the public. Visible-near infrared spectra have had rapid development in food safety recently. The objective of this study was to detect the total viable counts in chicken breast fillets.36 chicken breast fillets used in the study were stored in a refrigerator at 4°C for 9 days. Each day four samples were taken and Vis/NIR spectra were collected from each sample before detecting their total viable counts by standard method. The original data was processed in four main steps: Savitzky-Golay smoothing method, standard normalized variate (SNV), model calibrating and model validating. Prediction model was established using partial least squares regression (PLSR) method. Several statistical indicators such as root mean squared errors and coefficients were calculated for determination of calibration and validation accuracy respectively. As a result, the Rc, SEC, Rv and SEV, of the best model were obtained to be 0.8854, 0.7455, 0.9070 and 0.6045 respectively, which demonstrate that visible-near infrared spectra is a potential technique to detect the total viable counts(TVC) in chicken and the best wavelengths for the establishment of the calibration model are near 449nm.

  6. Use of propidium monoazide for selective profiling of viable microbial cells during Gouda cheese ripening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkus, Oylum; Jager, de Victor C.L.; Geene, Renske T.C.M.; Alen-Boerrigter, van Ingrid; Hazelwood, Lucie; Hijum, van Sacha A.F.T.; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Smid, Eddy J.

    2016-01-01

    DNA based microbial community profiling of food samples is confounded by the presence of DNA derived from membrane compromised (dead or injured) cells. Selective amplification of DNA from viable (intact) fraction of the community by propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment could circumvent this

  7. Separable Bilayer Microfiltration Device for Viable Label-free Enrichment of Circulating Tumour Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ming-Da; Hao, Sijie; Williams, Anthony J.; Harouaka, Ramdane A.; Schrand, Brett; Rawal, Siddarth; Ao, Zheng; Brennaman, Randall; Gilboa, Eli; Lu, Bo; Wang, Shuwen; Zhu, Jiyue; Datar, Ram; Cote, Richard; Tai, Yu-Chong; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2014-12-01

    The analysis of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in cancer patients could provide important information for therapeutic management. Enrichment of viable CTCs could permit performance of functional analyses on CTCs to broaden understanding of metastatic disease. However, this has not been widely accomplished. Addressing this challenge, we present a separable bilayer (SB) microfilter for viable size-based CTC capture. Unlike other single-layer CTC microfilters, the precise gap between the two layers and the architecture of pore alignment result in drastic reduction in mechanical stress on CTCs, capturing them viably. Using multiple cancer cell lines spiked in healthy donor blood, the SB microfilter demonstrated high capture efficiency (78-83%), high retention of cell viability (71-74%), high tumour cell enrichment against leukocytes (1.7-2 × 103), and widespread ability to establish cultures post-capture (100% of cell lines tested). In a metastatic mouse model, SB microfilters successfully enriched viable mouse CTCs from 0.4-0.6 mL whole mouse blood samples and established in vitro cultures for further genetic and functional analysis. Our preliminary studies reflect the efficacy of the SB microfilter device to efficiently and reliably enrich viable CTCs in animal model studies, constituting an exciting technology for new insights in cancer research.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging dynamic contrast enhancement (DCE) characteristics of healed myocardial infarction differ from viable myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, James W; Zhao, Wenguo

    2014-12-01

    To determine whether healed myocardial infarction alters dynamic contrast-enhancement (DCE) curve shapes as well as late gadolinium-enhancement (LGE). Twenty patients with chronic myocardial infarction underwent MR imaging at 1.5 T with blood and myocardial T1 measurements before and after contrast administration for forty minutes. Viable and infarcted myocardial partition coefficients were calculated using multipoint slope methods for ten different DCE sampling intervals and windows. Partition coefficients and coefficients of determination were compared with paired statistical tests to assess the linearity of DCE curve shapes over the 40 min time period. Calculated partition coefficients did not vary significantly between methods (p=0.325) for viable myocardium but did differ for infarcted myocardium (pinfarcted DCE. There was a significant difference between viable and infarcted myocardial partition coefficients estimates for all methods with the exception of methods that included measurements during the first 10 min after contrast agent administration. Myocardial partition coefficients calculated from a slope calculation vary in healed myocardial infarction based on the selection of samples due to non-linear DCE curve shapes. Partition coefficient calculations are insensitive to data sampling effects in viable myocardium due to linear DCE curve shapes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Determination of viable Salmonellae from potable and source water through PMA assisted qPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gulshan; Vajpayee, Poornima; Bhatti, Saurabh; Ronnie, Nirmala; Shah, Nimish; McClure, Peter; Shanker, Rishi

    2013-07-01

    Resource constrained countries identified as endemic zones for pathogenicity of Salmonella bear an economic burden due to recurring expenditure on medical treatment. qPCR used for Salmonella detection could not discriminate between viable and nonviable cells. Propidium monoazide (PMA) that selectively penetrates nonviable cells to cross-link their DNA, was coupled with ttr gene specific qPCR for quantifying viable salmonellae in source/potable waters collected from a north Indian city. Source water (raw water for urban potable water supply) and urban potable water exhibited viable salmonellae in the range of 2.1×10(4)-2.6×10(6) and 2-7160CFU/100mL, respectively. Potable water at water works exhibited DNA from dead cells but no viable cells were detected. PMA assisted qPCR could specifically detect low numbers of live salmonellae in Source and potable waters. This strategy can be used in surveillance of urban potable water distribution networks to map contamination points for better microbial risk management.

  10. Use of propidium monoazide for selective profiling of viable microbial cells during Gouda cheese ripening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkus, Oylum; Jager, de Victor C.L.; Geene, Renske T.C.M.; Alen-Boerrigter, van Ingrid; Hazelwood, Lucie; Hijum, van Sacha A.F.T.; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Smid, Eddy J.

    2016-01-01

    DNA based microbial community profiling of food samples is confounded by the presence of DNA derived from membrane compromised (dead or injured) cells. Selective amplification of DNA from viable (intact) fraction of the community by propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment could circumvent this proble

  11. Multimodality Imaging of Tumor Response to Doxil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Zhang, Lei Zhu, Gang Liu, Naoki Hida, Guangming Lu, Henry S. Eden, Gang Niu, Xiaoyuan Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Early assessment of tumor responses to chemotherapy could enhance treatment outcomes by ensuring that, from the beginning, treatments meet the individualized needs of patients. In this study, we applied multiple modality molecular imaging techniques to pre-clinical monitoring of early tumor responses to Doxil, focusing on imaging of apoptosis.Methods: Mice bearing UM-SCC-22B human head and neck squamous cancer tumors received either PBS or 1 to 2 doses of Doxil® (doxorubicin HCl liposome injection (10 mg/kg/dose. Bioluminescence signals from an apoptosis-responsive reporter gene were captured for apoptosis evaluation. Tumor metabolism and proliferation were assessed by 18F-FDG and 3'-18F-fluoro-3'-deoxythymidine (18F-FLT positron emission tomography. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI was performed to calculate averaged apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs for the whole tumor volume. After imaging, tumor samples were collected for histological evaluation, including terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL, anti-CD31, and Ki-67 immunostaining.Results: Two doses of Doxil significantly inhibited tumor growth. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI indicated apoptosis of tumor cells after just 1 dose of Doxil treatment, before apparent tumor shrinkage. 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT PET imaging identified decreased tumor metabolism and proliferation at later time points than those at which BLI indicated apoptosis. MRI measurements of ADC altered in response to Doxil, but only after tumors were treated with 2 doses. Decreased tumor proliferation and increased apoptotic cells were confirmed by changes of Ki-67 index and apoptotic ratio.Conclusion: Our study of tumor responses to different doses of Doxil demonstrated that it is essential to combine apoptosis imaging strategies with imaging of other critical biological or pathological pathways, such as metabolism and proliferation, to improve clinical decision making

  12. Failure pattern of pineal and ectopic pineal germ cell tumor after gamma knife radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Heung Lae; Sohn, Seung Chang [College of Medicine, Inje Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-06-01

    This study was performed to determine the optimal treatment volume of patients treating with radiation therapy for intracranial germ cell tumor. From 1993 to 1998, 19 patients with intracranial germ cell tumors treated by gamma knife radiosurgery were analyzed. The location of tumor was as follows; 9 cases on pineal region, 1 case on suprasellar region, and 9 cases of multiple lesion. 7 patients were pathologically verified; 5 cases of germ cell tumor and 2 cases of non germinomatous germ cell tumor. Tumor volume was ranged from 2.4 cm{sup 3} to 74 cm{sup 3}. Irradiation dose was 10 Gy to 20 Gy with 50% isodose curve. Follow up period was 10 months to 54 months. Recurrences were observed in 14 cases among 19 (74%) patients. Complete remission and partial remission were achieved in 2 (11%) and 10 (53%) respectively. No response was observed in 7 (36%). 2 cases were recurred within original tumor bed. 6 cases were recurred beyond but contiguous with tumor bed. Bentricular relapses separated from pretreatment tumor bed were 3. Spinal recurrences were 4. Among 8 recurred cases of which tumor volume is smaller than 20 cm{sup 3}, 2 were recurred within original tumor bed, 4 were recurred beyond but contiguous with tumor bed, and 1 spinal recurrence. Meanwhile, 6 cases of which tumor volume larger than 20 cm{sup 3}, 1 case was recurred beyond but contiguous with tumor bed, 2 ventricular recurrences separated with original tumor bed, and 3 spinal recurrences. 5 cases which did not show any recurrence sign show any recurrence sign showed characteristics of single lesion, tumor volume smaller than 20 cm{sup 3} and normal tumor marker. All of 4 cases of spinal recurrences happened in the case having ventricular invasion or lesion. Among 9 cases having multiple lesion, only 3 cases recurred within original tumor bed or around tumor bed, the other 6 cases recurred separated from pretreatment tumor bed. Gamma knife radiosurgery is not recommended for the treatment of

  13. Dynamic perfusion CT in brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Timothy Pok Chi; Bauman, Glenn; Yartsev, Slav; Fainardi, Enrico; Macdonald, David; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic perfusion CT (PCT) is an imaging technique for assessing the vascular supply and hemodynamics of brain tumors by measuring blood flow, blood volume, and permeability-surface area product. These PCT parameters provide information complementary to histopathologic assessments and have been used for grading brain tumors, distinguishing high-grade gliomas from other brain lesions, differentiating true progression from post-treatment effects, and predicting prognosis after treatments. In this review, the basic principles of PCT are described, and applications of PCT of brain tumors are discussed. The advantages and current challenges, along with possible solutions, of PCT are presented.

  14. Cyclophosphamide Enhances Human Tumor Growth in Nude Rat Xenografted Tumor Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingjen Jeffrey Wu

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the immunomodulatory chemotherapeutic agent cyclophosphamide (CTX on tumor growth was investigated in primary and metastatic intracerebral and subcutaneous rat xenograft models. Nude rats were treated with CTX (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally 24 hours before human ovarian carcinoma (SKOV3, small cell lung carcinoma (LX-1 SCLC, and glioma (UW28, U87MG, and U251 tumor cells were inoculated subcutaneously, intraperitoneally, or in the right cerebral hemisphere or were infused into the right internal carotid artery. Tumor development was monitored and recorded. Potential mechanisms were further investigated. Only animals that received both CTX and Matrigel showed consistent growth of subcutaneous tumors. Cyclophosphamide pretreatment increased the percentage (83.3% vs 0% of animals showing intraperitoneal tumors. In intracerebral implantation tumor models, CTX pretreatment increased the tumor volume and the percentage of animals showing tumors. Cyclophosphamide increased lung carcinoma bone and facial metastases after intra-arterial injection, and 20% of animals showed brain metastases. Cyclophosphamide transiently decreased nude rat white blood cell counts and glutathione concentration, whereas serum vascular endothelial growth factor was significantly elevated. Cyclophosphamide also increased CD31 reactivity, a marker of vascular endothelium, and macrophage (CD68-positive infiltration into glioma cell-inoculated rat brains. Cyclophosphamide may enhance primary and metastatic tumor growth through multiple mechanisms, including immune modulation, decreased response to oxidative stress, increased tumor vascularization, and increased macrophage infiltration. These findings may be clinically relevant because chemotherapy may predispose human cancer subjects to tumor growth in the brain or other tissues.

  15. Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor of the Pelvis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Yousefi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET belongs to a group of highly malignant tumors and is composed of small round cells of a neuroectodermal origin. Categorized in the same tumor family as Ewing sarcoma, the PNET is most likely to occur in bones and soft tissues. However, a small number of PNET cases arising in the pelvis have been reported as well. We present three cases of pelvic PNET: two cases in the ovary and one case in the broad ligament. The PNET often exhibits aggressive clinical behavior with worse outcomes than other small round cell tumors. The significant prognostic factors of the PNET include site of tumor, volume of neoplasm, and presence of metastasis. The treatment protocol is multimodal and includes local surgical treatment followed by chemotherapy. We herein describe three PNET cases as a rare entity in the pelvis. Pelvic PNETs should be included in the differential diagnosis of pelvic masses.

  16. Ovarian steroid cell tumors: sonographic characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteagudo, A; Heller, D; Husami, N; Levine, R U; McCaffrey, R; Timor-Tritsch, I E

    1997-10-01

    The goal of the gynecologist is to detect ovarian tumors in their earliest stages. Small virilizing tumors, which barely affect the size of the ovaries, are such lesions. Since the introduction of transvaginal sonography it is technically possible to detect small intraovarian neoplasms. Three cases of virilizing steroid cell tumors in postmenopausal women with ovarian volumes just exceeding the normal sizes for age are presented. High-frequency transvaginal ultrasound and color Doppler studies to measure flow parameters were used. These small tumors had different echogenicity from the surrounding ovarian tissue and two had low impedance-to-flow values. Gray-scale transvaginal sonography combined with color Doppler studies can make the diagnosis of small steroid cell tumors easier and, at times, better than other, more costly imaging modalities.

  17. Late course shrinking gross tumor volume (GTV) and boost radiotherapy for a special left lung cancer patient whose right lung was resected: a case report%右肺全切患者左肺中心型肺癌后程缩野加量放疗后长期存活1例报道

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaohui Cheng; Zhanzhao Fu; Tao Gu

    2012-01-01

    We reported a special case of a locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the left lung. Due to pulmonary tuberculosis, the patient had underwent a complete right-side pulmonary lobectomy 20 years ago. Left lung supports his life, he is unable to carry on an operation treatment, so he accepted radiotherapy. Firstly, we defined gross tumor volume (GTV1) by CT simulation location, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) was used until tumor dose reached 50 Gy/25 f. Secondly, by repeating the planning CT scan, defined GTV2, continued to radiotherapy by 2.5 Gy/f until the dose was 65 Gy/31 f. Using the same method for third CT scan, defined GTV3, continued to radiotherapy by 3 Gy/f until the total dose was 74 Gy/34 f. After radiotherapy, the patient acquired complete response and he had no obvious side-effect of radiotherapy. There has been no recurrence for 5 years now.

  18. Biochemomechanical poroelastic theory of avascular tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Shi-Lei; Li, Bo; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Gao, Huajian

    2016-09-01

    Tumor growth is a complex process involving genetic mutations, biochemical regulations, and mechanical deformations. In this paper, a thermodynamics-based nonlinear poroelastic theory is established to model the coupling among the mechanical, chemical, and biological mechanisms governing avascular tumor growth. A volumetric growth law accounting for mechano-chemo-biological coupled effects is proposed to describe the development of solid tumors. The regulating roles of stresses and nutrient transport in the tumor growth are revealed under different environmental constraints. We show that the mechano-chemo-biological coupling triggers anisotropic and heterogeneous growth, leading to the formation of layered structures in a growing tumor. There exists a steady state in which tumor growth is balanced by resorption. The influence of external confinements on tumor growth is also examined. A phase diagram is constructed to illustrate how the elastic modulus and thickness of the confinements jointly dictate the steady state of tumor volume. Qualitative and quantitative agreements with experimental observations indicate the developed model is capable of capturing the essential features of avascular tumor growth in various environments.

  19. Bronchial carcinoid tumors: A rare malignant tumor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-02-03

    Feb 3, 2015 ... Key words: Bronchial carcinoid tumor, diagnosis, outcome, treatment, West .... They can present with carcinoid syndrome, Cushing's ... 2012 reported BCT as a rare differential of pulmonary ... Management of carcinoid tumors.

  20. DCB - Tumor Metastasis Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor metastasis research examines the mechanisms that allow cancer cells to leave the primary tumor and spread to another part of the body. Learn about recent tumor metastasis research studies supported by the Division of Cancer Biology.

  1. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Brain Tumors KidsHealth > For Parents > Brain Tumors Print A ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  2. Childhood Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain tumors are abnormal growths inside the skull. They are among the most common types of childhood ... still be serious. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors can cause headaches and ...

  3. Tumors and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumors during pregnancy are rare, but they can happen. Tumors can be either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. The most common cancers in pregnancy are breast cancer, cervical cancer, lymphoma, and melanoma. ...

  4. Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumor > Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics Request Permissions Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 11/ ... the United States are diagnosed with Merkel cell skin cancer each year. Almost all people diagnosed with the ...

  5. Energy and Redox Homeostasis in Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Fernandes de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells display abnormal morphology, chromosomes, and metabolism. This review will focus on the metabolism of tumor cells integrating the available data by way of a functional approach. The first part contains a comprehensive introduction to bioenergetics, mitochondria, and the mechanisms of production and degradation of reactive oxygen species. This will be followed by a discussion on the oxidative metabolism of tumor cells including the morphology, biogenesis, and networking of mitochondria. Tumor cells overexpress proteins that favor fission, such as GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1. The interplay between proapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family that promotes Drp 1-dependent mitochondrial fragmentation and fusogenic antiapoptotic proteins such as Opa-1 will be presented. It will be argued that contrary to the widespread belief that in cancer cells, aerobic glycolysis completely replaces oxidative metabolism, a misrepresentation of Warburg’s original results, mitochondria of tumor cells are fully viable and functional. Cancer cells also carry out oxidative metabolism and generally conform to the orthodox model of ATP production maintaining as well an intact electron transport system. Finally, data will be presented indicating that the key to tumor cell survival in an ROS rich environment depends on the overexpression of antioxidant enzymes and high levels of the nonenzymatic antioxidant scavengers.

  6. Stereological analysis of nuclear volume in recurrent meningiomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, C; Schrøder, H D

    1994-01-01

    A stereological estimation of nuclear volume in recurrent and non-recurrent meningiomas was made. The aim was to investigate whether this method could discriminate between these two groups. We found that the mean nuclear volumes in recurrent meningiomas were all larger at debut than in any...... of the control tumors. The mean nuclear volume of the individual recurrent tumors appeared to change with time, showing a tendency to diminish. A relationship between large nuclear volume at presentation and number of or time interval between recurrences was not found. We conclude that measurement of mean...

  7. Dynamic volume perfusion CT in patients with lung cancer: Baseline perfusion characteristics of different histological subtypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Jingyun, E-mail: shijingyun89179@126.com [Department of Radiology, Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine (China); Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, 68167 Mannheim (Germany); Schmid-Bindert, Gerald, E-mail: gerald.schmid-bindert@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Division of Surgical Oncology and Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, 68167 Mannheim (Germany); Fink, Christian, E-mail: Christian.Fink@akh-celle.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, 68167 Mannheim (Germany); Sudarski, Sonja, E-mail: sonja_sudarski@gmx.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, 68167 Mannheim (Germany); Apfaltrer, Paul, E-mail: Paul.Apfaltrer@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, 68167 Mannheim (Germany); Pilz, Lothar R., E-mail: Lothar.Pilz@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1, 68167 Mannheim (Germany); Liu, Bo, E-mail: bo.liu@siemens.com [Siemens Healthcare, No. 278, Zhouzhu Road, Shanghai, 201318 (China); Haberland, Ulrike, E-mail: ulrike.haberland@siemens.com [Siemens Healthcare Sector, H IM CR R and D PA SC, Siemensstraße 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Klotz, Ernst, E-mail: ernst.klotz@siemens.com [Siemens Healthcare Sector, H IM CR R and D PA SC, Siemensstraße 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); and others

    2013-12-01

    Objective: To evaluate dynamic volume perfusion CT (dVPCT) tumor baseline characteristics of three different subtypes of lung cancer in untreated patients. Materials and methods: 173 consecutive patients (131 men, 42 women; mean age 61 ± 10 years) with newly diagnosed lung cancer underwent dVPCT prior to biopsy. Tumor permeability, blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV) and mean transit time (MTT) were quantitatively assessed as well as tumor diameter and volume. Tumor subtypes were histologically determined and compared concerning their dVPCT results. dVPCT results were correlated to tumor diameter and volume. Results: Histology revealed adenocarcinoma in 88, squamous cell carcinoma in 54 and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) in 31 patients. Tumor permeability was significantly differing between adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and SCLC (all p < 0.05). Tumor BF and BV were higher in adenocarcinomathan in SCLC (p = 0.001 and p = 0.0002 respectively). BV was also higher in squamous cell carcinoma compared to SCLC (p = 0.01). MTT was not differing between tumor subtypes. Regarding all tumors, tumor diameter did not correlate with any of the dVPCT parameters, whereas tumor volume was negatively associated with permeability, BF and BV (r = −0.22, −0.24, −0.24, all p < 0.05). In squamous cell carcinoma, tumor diameter und volume correlated with BV (r = 0.53 and r = −0.40, all p < 0.05). In SCLC, tumor diameter und volume correlated with MTT (r = 0.46 and r = 0.39, all p < 0.05). In adenocarcinoma, no association between morphological and functional tumor characteristics was observed. Conclusions: dVPCT parameters are only partially related to tumor diameter and volume and are significantly differing between lung cancer subtypes.

  8. Quantitative bioluminescence imaging of mouse tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Jen-Chieh; Kung, Andrew L

    2015-01-05

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) has become an essential technique for preclinical evaluation of anticancer therapeutics and provides sensitive and quantitative measurements of tumor burden in experimental cancer models. For light generation, a vector encoding firefly luciferase is introduced into human cancer cells that are grown as tumor xenografts in immunocompromised hosts, and the enzyme substrate luciferin is injected into the host. Alternatively, the reporter gene can be expressed in genetically engineered mouse models to determine the onset and progression of disease. In addition to expression of an ectopic luciferase enzyme, bioluminescence requires oxygen and ATP, thus only viable luciferase-expressing cells or tissues are capable of producing bioluminescence signals. Here, we summarize a BLI protocol that takes advantage of advances in hardware, especially the cooled charge-coupled device camera, to enable detection of bioluminescence in living animals with high sensitivity and a large dynamic range.

  9. Dosimetric Comparison Between VMAT and IMRT for Different Tumor Volume and Different Lesion Length of E-sophageal Cancer%VMAT与IMRT在不同瘤体体积和瘤体长度食管癌中的剂量学比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨瑜; 刘丽虹; 韩春; 王澜; 田华

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the dosimetric differences between volumetric modulated arc therapy ( VMAT ) and static intensity modulated radiotherapy ( IMRT) for different tumor volume and different lesion length of esophageal cancer. Meth-ods The Elekta Oncentra4. 1 Planning System was adopted to design both VMAT and IMRT plans for fifty patients who were diag-nosed with thoracic esophageal cancer. All treatment plans of the 50 cases were evaluated using the dose-volume histogram parame-ters of PTV and the organs at risk. The monitor units (MUs) were Also examined. Results ①For GTV volume55cm 3 group. ②For lesion length9cm group,VMAT plan achieved lower D90 and V100, whereas HI and CI were not significantly different.③For GTV vol-ume9cm group, VMAT plan resulted in a slightly lower lung V10 and higher lung V30. For GTV volume>55cm 3 group,VMAT plan resulted in a lower lung V10. For 5~9cm group,sparing of lungs showed no statistically significant differences between the two techniques.④The Dmean of heart in VMAT plan was not statistically different in comparison with IMRT plan for GTV volume>55cm 3 group and lesion length>9cm group, but higher than in IMRT for GTV volume55cm 3 group, and by an average of 16. 1% and 16. 0% in the 5~9cm group and >9cm group. However, VMAT plan provided an aver-age of 10. 4% and 14. 4% more monitor units than IMRT plan in the volume55cm3组, VMAT PTVV100低于IMRT。②GTV长度9cm组,VMAT D90、V100低于IMRT,HI和CI无明显差异。③体积9cm组,VMAT肺V10降低,V30增高;体积>55cm 3组,VMAT肺V10低于IMRT;长度5~9cm组,两种计划差异无统计学意义。④GTV体积55cm 3和长度>9cm组两种计划心脏受量相似。脊髓Dmax两种计划比较差异无统计学意义。⑤在机器调数( MU)方面GTV体积15~55cm 3和>55cm 3组及GTV长度5~9cm和>9cm组,VMAT的MU较IMRT分别减少11.3%、18.1%、16.1%和16.0%。而体积<15cm3和长度<5cm组,VMAT的MU则分别增加了10.4%和14.4%。结论在

  10. Localization of liver tumors in freehand 3D laparoscopic ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahin, O.; Martens, V.; Besirevic, A.; Kleemann, M.; Schlaefer, A.

    2012-02-01

    The aim of minimally invasive laparoscopic liver interventions is to completely resect or ablate tumors while minimizing the trauma caused by the operation. However, restrictions such as limited field of view and reduced depth perception can hinder the surgeon's capabilities to precisely localize the tumor. Typically, preoperative data is acquired to find the tumor(s) and plan the surgery. Nevertheless, determining the precise position of the tumor is required, not only before but also during the operation. The standard use of ultrasound in hepatic surgery is to explore the liver and identify tumors. Meanwhile, the surgeon mentally builds a 3D context to localize tumors. This work aims to upgrade the use of ultrasound in laparoscopic liver surgery. We propose an approach to segment and localize tumors intra-operatively in 3D ultrasound. We reconstruct a 3D laparoscopic ultrasound volume containing a tumor. The 3D image is then preprocessed and semi-automatically segmented using a level set algorithm. During the surgery, for each subsequent reconstructed volume, a fast update of the tumor position is accomplished via registration using the previously segmented and localized tumor as a prior knowledge. The approach was tested on a liver phantom with artificial tumors. The tumors were localized in approximately two seconds with a mean error of less than 0.5 mm. The strengths of this technique are that it can be performed intra-operatively, it helps the surgeon to accurately determine the location, shape and volume of the tumor, and it is repeatable throughout the operation.

  11. Tumor cell culture on collagen–chitosan scaffolds as three-dimensional tumor model: A suitable model for tumor studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Mahmoudzadeh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cells naturally live in three-dimensional (3D microenvironments, while common laboratory tests and evaluations are done in two-dimensional (2D plates. This study examined the impact of cultured 4T1 cancer cells in a 3D collagen–chitosan scaffold compared with 2D plate cultures. Collagen–chitosan scaffolds were provided and passed confirmatory tests. 4T1 tumor cells were cultured on scaffolds and then tumor cells growth rate, resistance to X-ray radiation, and cyclophosphamide as a chemotherapy drug were analyzed. Furthermore, 4T1 cells were extracted from the scaffold model and were injected into the mice. Tumor growth rate, survival rate, and systemic immune responses were evaluated. Our results showed that 4T1 cells infiltrated the scaffolds pores and constructed a 3D microenvironment. Furthermore, 3D cultured tumor cells showed a slower proliferation rate, increased levels of survival to the X-ray irradiation, and enhanced resistance to chemotherapy drugs in comparison with 2D plate cultures. Transfer of extracted cells to the mice caused enhanced tumor volume and decreased life span. This study indicated that collagen–chitosan nanoscaffolds provide a suitable model of tumor that would be appropriate for tumor studies.

  12. Canine parvovirus NS1 protein exhibits anti-tumor activity in a mouse mammary tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shishir Kumar; Yadav, Pavan Kumar; Gandham, Ravi Kumar; Sahoo, A P; Harish, D R; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Tiwari, A K

    2016-02-02

    Many viral proteins have the ability to kill tumor cells specifically without harming the normal cells. These proteins, on ectopic expression, cause lysis or induction of apoptosis in the target tumor cells. Parvovirus NS1 is one of such proteins, which is known to kill high proliferating tumor cells. In the present study, we assessed the apoptosis inducing ability of canine parvovirus type 2 NS1 protein (CPV2.NS1) in vitro in 4T1 cells, and found it to cause significant cell death due to induction of apoptosis through intrinsic or mitochondrial pathway. Further, we also evaluated the oncolytic activity of CPV2.NS1 protein in a mouse mammary tumor model. The results suggested that CPV2.NS1 was able to inhibit the growth of 4T1 induced mouse mammary tumor as indicated by significantly reduced tumor volume, mitotic, AgNOR and PCNA indices. Further, inhibition of tumor growth was found to be because of induction of apoptosis in the tumor cells, which was evident by a significant increase in the number of TUNEL positive cells. Further, CPV2.NS1 was also able to stimulate the immune cells against the tumor antigens as indicated by the increased CD4+ and CD8+ counts in the blood of CVP2.NS1 treated mice. Further optimization of the delivery of NS1 protein and use of an adjuvant may further enhance its anti-tumor activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Isolation of viable Neospora caninum from brains of wild gray wolves (Canis lupus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, J P; Jenkins, M C; Ferreira, L R; Choudhary, S; Verma, S K; Kwok, O C H; Fetterer, R; Butler, E; Carstensen, M

    2014-03-17

    Neospora caninum is a common cause of abortion in cattle worldwide. Canids, including the dog and the dingo (Canis familiaris), the coyote (Canis latrans), and the gray wolf (Canis lupus) are its definitive hosts that can excrete environmentally resistant oocysts in the environment, but also can act as intermediate hosts, harboring tissue stages of the parasite. In an attempt to isolate viable N. caninum from tissues of naturally infected wolves, brain and heart tissue from 109 wolves from Minnesota were bioassayed in mice. Viable N. caninum (NcWolfMn1, NcWolfMn2) was isolated from the brains of two wolves by bioassays in interferon gamma gene knockout mice. DNA obtained from culture-derived N. caninum tachyzoites of the two isolates were analyzed by N. caninum-specific Nc5 polymerase chain reaction and confirmed diagnosis. This is the first report of isolation of N. caninum from tissues of any wild canid host.

  14. Theoretical and observational constraints of viable f(R) theories of gravity

    CERN Document Server

    de la Cruz-Dombriz, Alvaro; Kandhai, Sulona; Saez-Gomez, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Modified gravity has attracted much attention over the last few years and remains a potential candidate for dark energy. In particular, the so-called viable f(R) gravity theories, which are able to both recover General Relativity (GR) and produce late-time cosmic acceleration, have been widely studied in recent literature. Nevertheless, extended theories of gravity suffer from several shortcomings which compromise their ability to provide realistic alternatives to the standard cosmological Lambda CDM Concordance model. We address the existence of cosmological singularities and the conditions that guarantee late-time acceleration,assuming reasonable energy conditions for standard matter in the so-called Hu-Sawicki f(R) model, currently among the most widely studied modifications to General Relativity. Then using the Supernovae Ia Union 2.1 catalogue, we further constrain the free parameters of this model. The combined analysis of both theoretical and observational constraints sheds some light on the viable par...

  15. Viable Intrauterine Pregnancy and Coexisting Molar Pregnancy in a Bicornuate Uterus: A Rare Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha Krishnamoorthy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A complete hydatidiform mole with a viable coexisting fetus (CMCF is a rare occurrence. Similarly, Mullerian anomalies such as a bicornuate uterus are uncommon variants of normal anatomy. We report a case of a 40-year-old female with a known bicornuate uterus presenting at 13 weeks gestation with vaginal bleeding. Ultrasound findings showed a healthy viable pregnancy in the right horn with complete molar pregnancy in the left horn. After extensive counseling, the patient desired conservative management, however, was unable to continue due to profuse vaginal bleeding. The patient underwent suction dilation and curettage under general anesthesia and evacuation of the uterine horns. Postoperatively, the patient was followed until serum beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG level dropped to <5 mU. This is the first case of a CMCF reported in a bicornuate uterus, diagnosed with the use of ultrasound imaging.

  16. A simple way to identify non-viable cells within living plant tissue using confocal microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truernit Elisabeth

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant cell death is a normal process during plant development. Mutant plants may exhibit misregulation of this process, which can lead to severe growth defects. Simple ways of visualising cell death in living plant tissues can aid the study of plant development and physiology. Results Spectral variants of the fluorescent SYTOX dyes were tested for their usefulness for the detection of non-viable cells within plant embryos and roots using confocal laser-scanning microscopy. The dyes were selective for non-viable cells and showed very little background staining in living cells. Simultaneous detection of SYTOX dye and fluorescent protein (e.g. GFP fluorescence was possible. Conclusion The fluorescent SYTOX dyes are useful for an easy and quick first assay of plant cell viability in living plant samples using fluorescence and confocal laser-scanning microscopy.

  17. Glioma spheroids obtained via ultrasonic aspiration are viable and express stem cell markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stine Skov; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte; Andersen, Claus

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic aspirators allow safe, rapid, and accurate removal of brain tumors. However, the tissue fragments removed are used surprisingly little in research.......Ultrasonic aspirators allow safe, rapid, and accurate removal of brain tumors. However, the tissue fragments removed are used surprisingly little in research....

  18. Generation of Viable Mice from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) Through Tetraploid Complementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Lan; Gao, Shaorong

    2015-01-01

    Tetraploid complementation assay is the most rigorous criteria for pluripotency characterization of pluripotent stem cells including embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Pluripotent stem cells could complement the developmental deficiency of tetraploid embryos and thus support the full-term mice development. Here we describe the protocol for tetraploid complementation using iPSCs to produce viable all-iPSC mice.

  19. Matter Power Spectra in Viable $f(R)$ Gravity Models with Massive Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Shen, Jia-Liang

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the matter power spectra in the power law and exponential types of viable $f(R)$ theories along with massive neutrinos. The enhancement of the matter power spectrum is found to be a generic feature in these models. In particular, we show that in the former type, such as the Starobinsky model, the spectrum is magnified much larger than the latter one, such as the exponential model. A greater scale of the total neutrino mass, $\\Sigma m_{\

  20. MFG-E8 mediates primary phagocytosis of viable neurons during neuroinflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Fricker, Michael; Neher, Jonas J.; Zhao, Jing-Wei; Théry, Clotilde; Tolkovsky, Aviva M; Brown, Guy C.

    2012-01-01

    Milk-fat globule EGF factor-8 (MFG-E8, SED1, lactadherin) is known to mediate the phagocytic removal of apoptotic cells by bridging phosphatidylserine (PS)-exposing cells and the vitronectin receptor (VR) on phagocytes. However, we show here that MFG-E8 can mediate phagocytosis of viable neurons during neuroinflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), thereby causing neuronal death. In vitro, inflammatory neuronal loss is independent of apoptotic pathways, and is inhibited by blocking th...

  1. Agricultural mechanization in Ghana: Is specialization in agricultural mechanization a viable business model?

    OpenAIRE

    Houssou, Nazaire; DIAO, Xinshen; Cossar, Frances; Kolavalli, Shashidhara; Jimah, Kipo; Aboagye, Patrick Ohene

    2013-01-01

    The Government of Ghana (GoG) since 2007 has been providing subsidized agricultural machines to individual farmers and private enterprises established as specialized Agricultural Mechanization Services Enterprise Centers (AMSECs) to offer tractor-hire services to small-scale farmers across the country. Current demand in the country is primarily focused on land preparation services, especially plowing. This paper assesses whether AMSEC enterprises are a viable business model attractive to priv...

  2. Reduced infectivity of waterborne viable but nonculturable Helicobacter pylori strain SS1 in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehnke, Kevin F; Eaton, Kathryn A; Fontaine, Clinton; Brewster, Rebecca; Wu, Jianfeng; Eisenberg, Joseph N S; Valdivieso, Manuel; Baker, Laurence H; Xi, Chuanwu

    2017-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection has been consistently associated with lack of access to clean water and proper sanitation, but no studies have demonstrated that the transmission of viable but nonculturable (VBNC) H. pylori can occur from drinking contaminated water. In this study, we used a laboratory mouse model to test whether waterborne VBNCH. pylori could cause gastric infection. We performed five mouse experiments to assess the infectivity of VBNCH. pylori in various exposure scenarios. VBNC viability was examined using Live/Dead staining and Biolog phenotype metabolism arrays. High doses of VBNCH. pylori in water were chosen to test the "worst-case" scenario for different periods of time. One experiment also investigated the infectious capabilities of VBNC SS1 using gavage. Further, immunocompromised mice were exposed to examine infectivity among potentially vulnerable groups. After exposure, mice were euthanized and their stomachs were examined for H. pylori infection using culture and PCR methodology. VBNC cells were membrane intact and retained metabolic activity. Mice exposed to VBNCH. pylori via drinking water and gavage were not infected, despite the various exposure scenarios (immunocompromised, high doses) that might have permitted infection with VBNCH. pylori. The positive controls exposed to viable, culturable H. pylori did become infected. While other studies that have used viable, culturable SS1 via gavage or drinking water exposures to successfully infect mice, in our study, waterborne VBNC SS1 failed to colonize mice under all test conditions. Future studies could examine different H. pylori strains in similar exposure scenarios to compare the relative infectivity of the VBNC vs the viable, culturable state, which would help inform future risk assessments of H. pylori in water. © 2017 The Authors. Helicobacter Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Fate of viable but non-culturable Listeria monocytogenes in pig manure microcosms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy eDesneux

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The fate of two strains of L. monocytogenes and their ability to become viable but non-culturable (VBNC was investigated in microcosms containing piggery effluents (two raw manures and two biologically treated manures stored for two months at 8°C and 20°C. Levels of L. monocytogenes were estimated using the culture method, qPCR, and propidium monoazide treatment combined with qPCR (qPCRPMA. The chemical composition and the microbial community structure of the manures were also analysed. The strains showed similar decline rates and persisted up to 63 days. At day zero, the percentage of VBNC cells among viable cells was higher in raw manures (81.5-94.8% than in treated manures (67.8-79.2%. The changes in their proportion over time depended on the temperature and on the type of effluent: the biggest increase was observed in treated manures at 20°C and the smallest increase in raw manures at 8°C. The chemical parameters had no influence on the behaviour of the strains, but decrease of the persistence of viable cells was associated with an increase in the microbial richness of the manures. This study demonstrated that storing manure altered the culturability of L. monocytogenes, which rapidly entered the VBNC state, and underlines the importance of including VBNC cells when estimating the persistence of the pathogens in farm effluents.

  4. Assessment of viable bacteria and bacterial DNA in blood and bloodstain specimens stored under various conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa-Muto, Junji; Fujinami, Yoshihito; Mizuno, Natsuko

    2013-11-01

    Microbial forensic specimens that are collected at biocrime and bioterrorism scenes include blood, tissue, cloths containing biological fluids, swabs, water, soil, and aerosols. It is preferable that pathogens in such specimens are alive and kept in a steady state. Specimens may be stored for a prolonged period before analysis; therefore, it is important to understand the effect of the storage conditions on the pathogens contained within the specimens. In this study, we prepared blood and bloodstain specimens containing Gram-negative or -positive bacteria, stored the samples for 482 days under various conditions, and measured viable bacterial counts and total bacterial contents in the samples. Viable bacteria were preserved well in the samples stored at -30 and -80 °C, but were diminished or undetectable in the samples stored at 4 °C and room temperature. The total bacterial content was maintained in the blood samples stored at -30 and -80 °C and in the bloodstain samples stored under all temperature conditions, but decreased in the blood samples stored at 4 °C and room temperature. This study showed that the storage conditions affected viable bacteria and bacterial DNA and that freezing and drying were significant for their long-term storage. We provide important information for the storage of microbial forensic specimens.

  5. Real-time quantification of viable bacteria in liquid medium using infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaimeh, Ahmad A.; Campion, Jeffrey J.; Gharaibeh, Belal Y.; Evans, Martin E.; Saito, Kozo

    2011-11-01

    Quantifying viable bacteria in liquids is important in environmental, food processing, manufacturing, and medical applications. Since vegetative bacteria generate heat as a result of biochemical reactions associated with cellular functions, thermal sensing techniques, including infrared thermography (IRT), have been used to detect viable cells in biologic samples. We developed a novel method that extends the dynamic range and improves the sensitivity of bacterial quantification by IRT. The approach uses IRT video, thermodynamics laws, and heat transfer mechanisms to directly measure, in real-time, the amount of energy lost as heat from the surface of a liquid sample containing bacteria when the specimen cools to a lower temperature over 2 min. We show that the Energy Content ( EC) of liquid media containing as few as 120 colony-forming units (CFU) of Escherichia coli per ml was significantly higher than that of sterile media ( P < 0.0001), and that EC and viable counts were strongly positively correlated ( r = 0.986) over a range of 120 to approximately 5 × 10 8 CFU/ml. Our IRT approach is a unique non-contact method that provides real-time bacterial enumeration over a wide dynamic range without the need for sample concentration, modification, or destruction. The approach could be adapted to quantify other living cells in a liquid milieu and has the potential for automation and high throughput.

  6. Use of propidium monoazide for selective profiling of viable microbial cells during Gouda cheese ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkus, Oylum; de Jager, Victor C L; Geene, Renske T C M; van Alen-Boerrigter, Ingrid; Hazelwood, Lucie; van Hijum, Sacha A F T; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Smid, Eddy J

    2016-07-02

    DNA based microbial community profiling of food samples is confounded by the presence of DNA derived from membrane compromised (dead or injured) cells. Selective amplification of DNA from viable (intact) fraction of the community by propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment could circumvent this problem. Gouda cheese manufacturing is a proper model to evaluate the use of PMA for selective detection of intact cells since large fraction of membrane compromised cells emerges as a background in the cheese matrix during ripening. In this study, the effect of PMA on cheese community profiles was evaluated throughout manufacturing and ripening using quantitative PCR (qPCR). PMA effectively inhibited the amplification of DNA derived from membrane compromised cells and enhanced the analysis of the intact fraction residing in the cheese samples. Furthermore, a two-step protocol, which involves whole genome amplification (WGA) to enrich the DNA not modified with PMA and subsequent sequencing, was developed for the selective metagenome sequencing of viable fraction in the Gouda cheese microbial community. The metagenome profile of PMA treated cheese sample reflected the viable community profile at that time point in the cheese manufacturing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The importance of the viable but non-culturable state in human bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laam eLi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Many bacterial species have been found to exist in a viable but non-culturable (VBNC state since its discovery in 1982. VBNC cells are characterized by a loss of culturability on routine agar, which impairs their detection by conventional plate count techniques. This leads to an underestimation of total viable cells in environmental or clinical samples, and thus poses a risk to public health. In this review, we present recent findings on the VBNC state of human bacterial pathogens. The characteristics of VBNC cells, including the similarities and differences to viable, culturable cells and dead cells, and different detection methods are discussed. Exposure to various stresses can induce the VBNC state, and VBNC cells may be resuscitated back to culturable cells under suitable stimuli. The conditions that trigger the induction of the VBNC state and resuscitation from it are summarized and the mechanisms underlying these two processes are discussed. Last but not least, the significance of VBNC cells and their potential influence on human health are also reviewed.

  8. Renormalized Volume

    CERN Document Server

    Gover, A Rod

    2016-01-01

    For any conformally compact manifold with hypersurface boundary we define a canonical renormalized volume functional and compute an explicit, holographic formula for the corresponding anomaly. For the special case of asymptotically Einstein manifolds, our method recovers the known results. The anomaly does not depend on any particular choice of regulator, but the coefficients of divergences do. We give explicit formulae for these divergences valid for any choice of regulating hypersurface; these should be relevant to recent studies of quantum corrections to entanglement entropies. The anomaly is expressed as a conformally invariant integral of a local Q-curvature that generalizes the Branson Q-curvature by including data of the embedding. In each dimension this canonically defines a higher dimensional generalization of the Willmore energy/rigid string action. We show that the variation of these energy functionals is exactly the obstruction to solving a singular Yamabe type problem with boundary data along the...

  9. High efficiency diffusion molecular retention tumor targeting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyan Guo

    Full Text Available Here we introduce diffusion molecular retention (DMR tumor targeting, a technique that employs PEG-fluorochrome shielded probes that, after a peritumoral (PT injection, undergo slow vascular uptake and extensive interstitial diffusion, with tumor retention only through integrin molecular recognition. To demonstrate DMR, RGD (integrin binding and RAD (control probes were synthesized bearing DOTA (for (111 In(3+, a NIR fluorochrome, and 5 kDa PEG that endows probes with a protein-like volume of 25 kDa and decreases non-specific interactions. With a GFP-BT-20 breast carcinoma model, tumor targeting by the DMR or i.v. methods was assessed by surface fluorescence, biodistribution of [(111In] RGD and [(111In] RAD probes, and whole animal SPECT. After a PT injection, both probes rapidly diffused through the normal and tumor interstitium, with retention of the RGD probe due to integrin interactions. With PT injection and the [(111In] RGD probe, SPECT indicated a highly tumor specific uptake at 24 h post injection, with 352%ID/g tumor obtained by DMR (vs 4.14%ID/g by i.v.. The high efficiency molecular targeting of DMR employed low probe doses (e.g. 25 ng as RGD peptide, which minimizes toxicity risks and facilitates clinical translation. DMR applications include the delivery of fluorochromes for intraoperative tumor margin delineation, the delivery of radioisotopes (e.g. toxic, short range alpha emitters for radiotherapy, or the delivery of photosensitizers to tumors accessible to light.

  10. Updates in Orbital Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nila; F.Moeloek

    1993-01-01

    Orbital anatomy, the clinical features of orbital tumors, the recent development of the diagnosis and management of orbital tumors were described. The incidence of orbital tumors in Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital in the past years were introduced. The principle of management of orbital tumors and their prognosis were discussed.

  11. Endocrine Tumor: Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Endocrine Tumor Endocrine Tumor This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Endocrine Tumor. Use the menu below to choose the ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Endocrine Tumor Introduction Statistics Risk Factors Symptoms and Signs ...

  12. Thermo-sensitive liposomes loaded with doxorubicin and lysine modified single-walled carbon nanotubes as tumor-targeting drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiali; Xie, Yingxia; Zhang, Yingjie; Huang, Heqing; Huang, Shengnan; Hou, Lin; Zhang, Huijuan; Li, Zhi; Shi, Jinjin; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2014-11-01

    This report focuses on the thermo-sensitive liposomes loaded with doxorubicin and lysine-modified single-walled carbon nanotube drug delivery system, which was designed to enhance the anti-tumor effect and reduce the side effects of doxorubicin. Doxorubicin-lysine/single-walled carbon nanotube-thermo-sensitive liposomes was prepared by reverse-phase evaporation method, the mean particle size was 232.0 ± 5.6 nm, and drug entrapment efficiency was 86.5 ± 3.7%. The drug release test showed that doxorubicin released more quickly at 42℃ than at 37℃. Compared with free doxorubicin, doxorubicin-lysine/single-walled carbon nanotube-thermo-sensitive liposomes could efficiently cross the cell membranes and afford higher anti-tumor efficacy on the human hepatic carcinoma cell line (SMMC-7721) cells in vitro. For in vivo experiments, the relative tumor volumes of the sarcomaia 1