WorldWideScience

Sample records for volume tissue equivalent

  1. Tissue equivalence in neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutton, D.H.; Harris, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    A brief review is presented of the essential features of neutron tissue equivalence for radiotherapy and gives the results of a computation of relative absorbed dose for 14 MeV neutrons, using various tissue models. It is concluded that for the Bragg-Gray equation for ionometric dosimetry it is not sufficient to define the value of W to high accuracy and that it is essential that, for dosimetric measurements to be applicable to real body tissue to an accuracy of better than several per cent, a correction to the total absorbed dose must be made according to the test and tissue atomic composition, although variations in patient anatomy and other radiotherapy parameters will often limit the benefits of such detailed dosimetry. (U.K.)

  2. Determination of dose equivalent with tissue-equivalent proportional counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietze, G.; Schuhmacher, H.; Menzel, H.G.

    1989-01-01

    Low pressure tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) are instruments based on the cavity chamber principle and provide spectral information on the energy loss of single charged particles crossing the cavity. Hence such detectors measure absorbed dose or kerma and are able to provide estimates on radiation quality. During recent years TEPC based instruments have been developed for radiation protection applications in photon and neutron fields. This was mainly based on the expectation that the energy dependence of their dose equivalent response is smaller than that of other instruments in use. Recently, such instruments have been investigated by intercomparison measurements in various neutron and photon fields. Although their principles of measurements are more closely related to the definition of dose equivalent quantities than those of other existing dosemeters, there are distinct differences and limitations with respect to the irradiation geometry and the determination of the quality factor. The application of such instruments for measuring ambient dose equivalent is discussed. (author)

  3. Preparation of A-150 tissue-equivalent plastic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saion, E.B.; Shaari, A.H.; Watt, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    A-150 tissue-equivalent (TE) plastic is widely used as a wall material for tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPCS) used in experimental microdosimetry. The objective of this note is to give a technical account of how A-150 TE plastic film can be fabricated in the laboratory from commercially available A-150 TE plastic. (author)

  4. Incidence of late rectal bleeding in high-dose conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer using equivalent uniform dose-based and dose-volume-based normal tissue complication probability models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soehn, Matthias; Yan Di; Liang Jian; Meldolesi, Elisa; Vargas, Carlos; Alber, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate modeling of rectal complications based on dose-volume histogram (DVH) data are necessary to allow safe dose escalation in radiotherapy of prostate cancer. We applied different equivalent uniform dose (EUD)-based and dose-volume-based normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models to rectal wall DVHs and follow-up data for 319 prostate cancer patients to identify the dosimetric factors most predictive for Grade ≥ 2 rectal bleeding. Methods and Materials: Data for 319 patients treated at the William Beaumont Hospital with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) under an adaptive radiotherapy protocol were used for this study. The following models were considered: (1) Lyman model and (2) logit-formula with DVH reduced to generalized EUD (3) serial reconstruction unit (RU) model (4) Poisson-EUD model, and (5) mean dose- and (6) cutoff dose-logistic regression model. The parameters and their confidence intervals were determined using maximum likelihood estimation. Results: Of the patients, 51 (16.0%) showed Grade 2 or higher bleeding. As assessed qualitatively and quantitatively, the Lyman- and Logit-EUD, serial RU, and Poisson-EUD model fitted the data very well. Rectal wall mean dose did not correlate to Grade 2 or higher bleeding. For the cutoff dose model, the volume receiving > 73.7 Gy showed most significant correlation to bleeding. However, this model fitted the data more poorly than the EUD-based models. Conclusions: Our study clearly confirms a volume effect for late rectal bleeding. This can be described very well by the EUD-like models, of which the serial RU- and Poisson-EUD model can describe the data with only two parameters. Dose-volume-based cutoff-dose models performed worse

  5. Study on the neutron dosimetric characteristics of Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunomiya, T.; Kim, E.; Kurosawa, T.; Taniguchi, S.; Nakamura, T. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center; Tsujimura, N.; Momose, T.; Shinohara, K. [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Environment and Safety Division, Tokai Works, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    The neutron dosimetric characteristics of TEPC (Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter) has been investigated under a cooperative study between Tohoku University and JNC since 1997. This TEPC is a spherical, large volume, single-wire proportional counter (the model LETSW-5, manufactured by Far West Technology, Inc.) and filled with a tissue equivalent gas in a spherical detector of the A-150 tissue equivalent plastic. The TEPC can measure the spectra of absorbed dose in LET and easily estimate the tissue equivalent dose to neutron. This report summarizes the dosimetric characteristics of TEPC to the monoenergetic neutrons with energy from 8 keV to 15 MeV. It is found that TEPC can estimate the ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), with an accuracy from 0.9 to 2 to the neutron above 0.25 MeV and TEPC has a good counting efficiency enough to measure neutron doses with low dose rate at the stray neutron fields. (author)

  6. Dose distribution around ion track in tissue equivalent material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wenzhong; Guo Yong; Luo Yisheng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the energy deposition micro-specialty of ions in body-tissue or tissue equivalent material (TEM). Methods: The water vapor was determined as the tissue equivalent material, based on the analysis to the body-tissue, and Monte Carlo method was used to simulate the behavior of proton in the tissue equivalent material. Some features of the energy deposition micro-specialty of ion in tissue equivalent material were obtained through the analysis to the data from calculation. Results: The ion will give the energy by the way of excitation and ionization in material, then the secondary electrons will be generated in the progress of ionization, these electron will finished ions energy deposition progress. When ions deposited their energy, large amount energy will be in the core of tracks, and secondary electrons will devote its' energy around ion track, the ion dose distribution is then formed in TEM. Conclusions: To know biological effects of radiation , the research to dose distribution of ions is of importance(significance). (authors)

  7. Neutron dosimetry using proportional counters with tissue equivalent walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerviller, H. de

    1965-01-01

    The author reminds the calculation method of the neutron absorbed dose in a material and deduce of it the conditions what this material have to fill to be equivalent to biological tissues. Various proportional counters are mode with walls in new tissue equivalent material and filled with various gases. The multiplication factor and neutron energy response of these counters are investigated and compared with those obtained with ethylene lined polyethylene counters. The conditions of working of such proportional counters for neutron dosimetry in energy range 10 -2 to 15 MeV are specified. (author) [fr

  8. Tissue Equivalents Based on Cell-Seeded Biodegradable Microfluidic Constructs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L. Tao

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the principal challenges in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine is the formation of functional microvascular networks capable of sustaining tissue constructs. Complex tissues and vital organs require a means to support oxygen and nutrient transport during the development of constructs both prior to and after host integration, and current approaches have not demonstrated robust solutions to this challenge. Here, we present a technology platform encompassing the design, construction, cell seeding and functional evaluation of tissue equivalents for wound healing and other clinical applications. These tissue equivalents are comprised of biodegradable microfluidic scaffolds lined with microvascular cells and designed to replicate microenvironmental cues necessary to generate and sustain cell populations to replace dermal and/or epidermal tissues lost due to trauma or disease. Initial results demonstrate that these biodegradable microfluidic devices promote cell adherence and support basic cell functions. These systems represent a promising pathway towards highly integrated three-dimensional engineered tissue constructs for a wide range of clinical applications.

  9. Neutron kerma factors, and water equivalence of some tissue substitutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, V. P.; Badiger, N. M.; Vega C, H. R.

    2014-08-01

    The kerma factors and kerma relative to air and water of 24 compounds used as tissue substitutes were calculated for neutron energy from 2.53 x 10 -8 up to 29 MeV. The kerma ratio of the tissue substitutes relative to air and water were calculated by the ratio of kerma factors of the tissue substitute to air and water respectively. The water equivalence of the selected tissue substitutes was observed above neutron energies 100 eV. Kerma ratio relative to the air for Poly-vinylidene fluoride and Teflon are found to be nearest to unity in very low energy (up to 1 eV) and above 63 eV respectively. It was found that the natural rubber as a water equivalent tissue substitute compound. The results of the kerma factors in our investigation shows a very good agreement with those published in ICRU-44. We found that at higher neutron energies, the kerma factors and kerma ratios of the selected tissue substitute compounds are approximately same, but differences are large for energies below 100 eV. (Author)

  10. Evaluation of a tissue equivalent ionization chamber in X-ray beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perini, Ana Paula; Neves, Lucio Pereira; Santos, William de Souza; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: aperini@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Frimaio, Audrew [Seal Technology Ind. Com. Ltda, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Costa, Paulo R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP/IF), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2014-07-01

    Tissue equivalent materials present a variety of uses, including routine quality assurance and quality control programs in both diagnostic and therapeutic physics. They are frequently used in research facilities to measure doses delivered to patients undergoing various clinical procedures. This work presents the development and evaluation of a tissue equivalent ionization chamber, with a sensitive volume of 2.3 cm{sup 3}, for routine use in X-rays beams. This ionization chamber was developed at the Calibration Laboratory/IPEN. The new tissue equivalent material was developed at the Physics Institute of the University of Sao Paulo. In order to evaluate the dosimetric performance of the new ionization chamber, several tests described by international standards were undertaken, and all results were within the recommended limits. (author)

  11. Evaluation of a tissue equivalent ionization chamber in X-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perini, Ana Paula; Neves, Lucio Pereira; Santos, William de Souza; Caldas, Linda V.E.; Frimaio, Audrew; Costa, Paulo R.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue equivalent materials present a variety of uses, including routine quality assurance and quality control programs in both diagnostic and therapeutic physics. They are frequently used in research facilities to measure doses delivered to patients undergoing various clinical procedures. This work presents the development and evaluation of a tissue equivalent ionization chamber, with a sensitive volume of 2.3 cm 3 , for routine use in X-rays beams. This ionization chamber was developed at the Calibration Laboratory/IPEN. The new tissue equivalent material was developed at the Physics Institute of the University of Sao Paulo. In order to evaluate the dosimetric performance of the new ionization chamber, several tests described by international standards were undertaken, and all results were within the recommended limits. (author)

  12. Composition of MRI phantom equivalent to human tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hirokazu; Kuroda, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Koichi; Yoshida, Atsushi; Hanamoto, Katsumi; Kawasaki, Shoji; Shibuya, Koichi; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2005-01-01

    We previously developed two new MRI phantoms (called the CAG phantom and the CAGN phantom), with T1 and T2 relaxation times equivalent to those of any human tissue at 1.5 T. The conductivity of the CAGN phantom is equivalent to that of most types of human tissue in the frequency range of 1 to 130 MHz. In this paper, the relaxation times of human tissues are summarized, and the composition of the corresponding phantoms are provided in table form. The ingredients of these phantoms are carrageenan as the gelling agent, GdCl 3 as a T1 modifier, agarose as a T2 modifier, NaCl (CAGN phantom only) as a conductivity modifier, NaN 3 as an antiseptic, and distilled water. The phantoms have T1 values of 202-1904 ms and T2 values of 38-423 ms when the concentrations of GdCl 3 and agarose are varied from 0-140 μmol/kg, and 0%-1.6%, respectively, and the CAGN phantom has a conductivity of 0.27-1.26 S/m when the NaCl concentration is varied from 0%-0.7%. These phantoms have sufficient strength to replicate a torso without the use of reinforcing agents, and can be cut by a knife into any shape. We anticipate the CAGN phantom to be highly useful and practical for MRI and hyperthermia-related research

  13. Detection of ultraviolet radiation using tissue equivalent radiochromic gel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bero, M A; Abukassem, I

    2009-01-01

    Ferrous Xylenol-orange Gelatin gel (FXG) is known to be sensitive to ionising radiation such as γ and X-rays. The effect of ionising radiation is to produce an increase in the absorption over a wide region of the visible spectrum, which is proportional to the absorbed dose. This study demonstrates that FXG gel is sensitive to ultraviolet radiation and therefore it could functions as UV detector. Short exposure to UV radiation produces linear increase in absorption measured at 550nm, however high doses of UV cause the ion indicator colour to fad away in a manner proportional to the incident UV energy. Light absorbance increase at the rate of 1.1% per minute of irradiation was monitored. The exposure level at which the detector has linear response is comparable to the natural summer UV radiation. Evaluating the UV ability to pass through tissue equivalent gel materials shows that most of the UV gets absorbed in the first 5mm of the gel materials, which demonstrate the damaging effects of this radiation type on human skin and eyes. It was concluded that FXG gel dosimeter has the potential to offer a simple, passive ultraviolet radiation detector with sensitivity suitable to measure and visualises the natural sunlight UV exposure directly by watching the materials colour changes.

  14. Detection of ultraviolet radiation using tissue equivalent radiochromic gel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bero, M. A.; Abukassem, I.

    2009-05-01

    Ferrous Xylenol-orange Gelatin gel (FXG) is known to be sensitive to ionising radiation such as γ and X-rays. The effect of ionising radiation is to produce an increase in the absorption over a wide region of the visible spectrum, which is proportional to the absorbed dose. This study demonstrates that FXG gel is sensitive to ultraviolet radiation and therefore it could functions as UV detector. Short exposure to UV radiation produces linear increase in absorption measured at 550nm, however high doses of UV cause the ion indicator colour to fad away in a manner proportional to the incident UV energy. Light absorbance increase at the rate of 1.1% per minute of irradiation was monitored. The exposure level at which the detector has linear response is comparable to the natural summer UV radiation. Evaluating the UV ability to pass through tissue equivalent gel materials shows that most of the UV gets absorbed in the first 5mm of the gel materials, which demonstrate the damaging effects of this radiation type on human skin and eyes. It was concluded that FXG gel dosimeter has the potential to offer a simple, passive ultraviolet radiation detector with sensitivity suitable to measure and visualises the natural sunlight UV exposure directly by watching the materials colour changes.

  15. Dose determination algorithms for a nearly tissue equivalent multi-element thermoluminescent dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moscovitch, M.; Chamberlain, J.; Velbeck, K.J.

    1988-01-01

    In a continuing effort to develop dosimetric systems that will enable reliable interpretation of dosimeter readings in terms of the absorbed dose or dose-equivalent, a new multi-element TL dosimeter assembly for Beta and Gamma dose monitoring has been designed. The radiation-sensitive volumes are four LiF-TLD elements, each covered by its own unique filter. For media-matching, care has been taken to employ nearly tissue equivalent filters of thicknesses of 1000 mg/cm 2 and 300 mg/cm 2 for deep dose and dose to the lens-of-the-eye measurements respectively. Only one metal filter (Cu) is employed to provide low energy photon discrimination. A Thin TL element (0.09 mm thick) is located behind an open window designed to improve the energy under-response to low energy beta rays and to provide closer estimate of the shallow dose equivalent. The deep and shallow dose equivalents are derived from the correlation of the response of the various TL elements to the above quantities through computations based on previously defined relationships obtained from experimental results. The theoretical formalization for the dose calculation algorithms is described in detail, and provides a useful methodology which can be applied to different tissue-equivalent dosimeter assemblies. Experimental data has been obtained by performing irradiation according to the specifications established by DOELAP, using 27 types of pure and mixed radiation fields including Cs-137 gamma rays, low energy photons down to 20 keV, Sr/Y-90, Uranium, and Tl-204 beta particles

  16. Microcystin-LR equivalent concentrations in fish tissue during a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of a decomposing cyanobacteria bloom on water quality and the accumulation of microcystin-LR equivalent toxin in fish at Loskop Dam were studied in May 2012. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA] was used to confirm the presence of microcystin-LR equivalent in the water and to determine the ...

  17. The performance of low pressure tissue-equivalent chambers and a new method for parameterising the dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisen, Y.

    1986-01-01

    The performance of Rossi-type spherical tissue-equivalent chambers with equivalent diameters between 0.5 μm and 2 μm was tested experimentally using monoenergetic and polyenergetic neutron sources in the energy region of 10 keV to 14.5 MeV. In agreement with theoretical predictions both chambers failed to provide LET information at low neutron energies. A dose equivalent algorithm was derived that utilises the event distribution but does not attempt to correlate event size with LET. The algorithm was predicted theoretically and confirmed by experiment. The algorithm that was developed determines the neutron dose equivalent, from the data of the 0.5 μm chamber, to better than +-20% over the energy range of 30 keV to 14.5 MeV. The same algorithm also determines the dose equivalent from the data of the 2 μm chamber to better than +-20% over the energy range of 60 keV to 14.5 MeV. The efficiency of the chambers is 33 counts per μSv, or equivalently about 10 counts s -1 per mSv.h -1 . This efficiency enables the measurement of dose equivalent rates above 1 mSv.h -1 for an integration period of 3 s. Integrated dose equivalents can be measured as low as 1 μSv. (author)

  18. Neutron measurements with a tissue-equivalent phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J W [Health Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1962-03-15

    This Appendix 3E of the dosimetry experiment at the R-B reactor describes the apparatus used and presents the obtained results. The phantom used was a 1/4-inch thick polythene container, 60 cm high, of elliptical cross-section, with a major axis of 36 cm and a minor axis of 20 cm. This was filled with an approximately tissue-equivalent liquid. A light but rigid internal framework of Perspex supported a series of small detectors through the phantom. The detectors used in the first high-level run at Vinca, to measure flux above 0.5 MeV, were 0.5-cm wide track plates wrapped in cadmium foil. Each track plate was a sandwich of two Ilford El 50 - mu emulsions, with glass backing, separated by a 250-mu polythene radiator, and was oriented at an angle of 45 deg to the front surface of the phantom. Under these conditions the response is constant with neutron energy between 0.5 MeV and 8 MeV at 1.26 X 10 sup - sup 3 tracks/neutron to within +- 15%. The detectors used in the second high-level run were gold foils (260 mg/cm sup 2 thick) for determination of the show neutron distribution. Previous experiments with 0.13 MeV, 2.5 MeV, 14 MeV and Po-Be neutrons have shown that the shape of the curve through a phantom obtained from these gold foils is the same as that given by either manganese foils or sodium samples despite the difference in resonance integrals. From the relaxation length of the neutron flux in the phantom, as measured by the track plates, the mean energy of the neutrons with energies greater than 0.5 MeV may be found by comparison with the relaxation lengths obtained by irradiation of the phantom with monoenergetic neutrons. The results of these experiments are given. Track plate results from the Vinca experiment are shown. It can be seen that the backscattered fast flux is about one-third of the incident fast flux and that the energy indicated by the shape of the curve is considerably lower than the energy of the direct neutrons. It seems possible that the high

  19. Neutron measurements with a tissue-equivalent phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J W [Health Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1962-03-01

    This Appendix 3E of the dosimetry experiment at the R-B reactor describes the apparatus used and presents the obtained results. The phantom used was a 1/4-inch thick polythene container, 60 cm high, of elliptical cross-section, with a major axis of 36 cm and a minor axis of 20 cm. This was filled with an approximately tissue-equivalent liquid. A light but rigid internal framework of Perspex supported a series of small detectors through the phantom. The detectors used in the first high-level run at Vinca, to measure flux above 0.5 MeV, were 0.5-cm wide track plates wrapped in cadmium foil. Each track plate was a sandwich of two Ilford El 50 - {mu} emulsions, with glass backing, separated by a 250-{mu} polythene radiator, and was oriented at an angle of 45 deg to the front surface of the phantom. Under these conditions the response is constant with neutron energy between 0.5 MeV and 8 MeV at 1.26 X 10{sup -3} tracks/neutron to within {+-} 15%. The detectors used in the second high-level run were gold foils (260 mg/cm{sup 2} thick) for determination of the show neutron distribution. Previous experiments with 0.13 MeV, 2.5 MeV, 14 MeV and Po-Be neutrons have shown that the shape of the curve through a phantom obtained from these gold foils is the same as that given by either manganese foils or sodium samples despite the difference in resonance integrals. From the relaxation length of the neutron flux in the phantom, as measured by the track plates, the mean energy of the neutrons with energies greater than 0.5 MeV may be found by comparison with the relaxation lengths obtained by irradiation of the phantom with monoenergetic neutrons. The results of these experiments are given. Track plate results from the Vinca experiment are shown. It can be seen that the backscattered fast flux is about one-third of the incident fast flux and that the energy indicated by the shape of the curve is considerably lower than the energy of the direct neutrons. It seems possible that the

  20. MCNP modelling of the wall effects observed in tissue-equivalent proportional counters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, J L; Townsend, L W

    2002-01-01

    Tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs) utilise tissue-equivalent materials to depict homogeneous microscopic volumes of human tissue. Although both the walls and gas simulate the same medium, they respond to radiation differently. Density differences between the two materials cause distortions, or wall effects, in measurements, with the most dominant effect caused by delta rays. This study uses a Monte Carlo transport code, MCNP, to simulate the transport of secondary electrons within a TEPC. The Rudd model, a singly differential cross section with no dependence on electron direction, is used to describe the energy spectrum obtained by the impact of two iron beams on water. Based on the models used in this study, a wall-less TEPC had a higher lineal energy (keV.micron-1) as a function of impact parameter than a solid-wall TEPC for the iron beams under consideration. An important conclusion of this study is that MCNP has the ability to model the wall effects observed in TEPCs.

  1. Construction of a self-supporting tissue-equivalent dividing wall and operational characteristics of a coaxial double-cylindrical tissue-equivalent proportional counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saion, E.B.; Watt, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    An additional feature incorporated in a coaxial double-cylindrical tissue-equivalent proportional counter, is the presence of a common tissue-equivalent dividing wall between the inner and outer counters of thickness equivalent to the corresponding maximum range of protons at the energy of interest. By appropriate use of an anti-coincidence arrangement with the outer counter, the inner counter could be used to discriminate microdosimetric spectra of neutrons at the desired low energy range from those of the faster neutrons. The construction of an A-150 self-supporting tissue-equivalent dividing wall and an anti-coincidence unit are described. Some operational characteristic tests have been performed to determine the operation of the new microdosimeter. (author)

  2. Mechanical homeostasis regulating adipose tissue volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svedman Paul

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The total body adipose tissue volume is regulated by hormonal, nutritional, paracrine, neuronal and genetic control signals, as well as components of cell-cell or cell-matrix interactions. There are no known locally acting homeostatic mechanisms by which growing adipose tissue might adapt its volume. Presentation of the hypothesis Mechanosensitivity has been demonstrated by mesenchymal cells in tissue culture. Adipocyte differentiation has been shown to be inhibited by stretching in vitro, and a pathway for the response has been elucidated. In humans, intermittent stretching of skin for reconstructional purposes leads to thinning of adipose tissue and thickening of epidermis – findings matching those observed in vitro in response to mechanical stimuli. Furthermore, protracted suspension of one leg increases the intermuscular adipose tissue volume of the limb. These findings may indicate a local homeostatic adipose tissue volume-regulating mechanism based on movement-induced reduction of adipocyte differentiation. This function might, during evolution, have been of importance in confined spaces, where overgrowth of adipose tissue could lead to functional disturbance, as for instance in the turtle. In humans, adipose tissue near muscle might in particular be affected, for instance intermuscularly, extraperitoneally and epicardially. Mechanical homeostasis might also contribute to protracted maintainment of soft tissue shape in the face and neck region. Testing of the hypothesis Assessment of messenger RNA-expression of human adipocytes following activity in adjacent muscle is planned, and study of biochemical and volumetric adipose tissue changes in man are proposed. Implications of the hypothesis The interpretation of metabolic disturbances by means of adipose tissue might be influenced. Possible applications in the head and neck were discussed.

  3. Stroke infarct volume estimation in fixed tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Vibeke; Kjølby, Birgitte F; Iversen, Nina K

    2018-01-01

    be investigated in fixed tissue and therefore allows a more direct comparison between lesion volumes from MRI and histology. Additionally, the larger MKT infarct lesion indicates that MKT do provide increased sensitivity to microstructural changes in the lesion area compared to MD....... and prepared. The infarct was clearly visible in both MD and MKT maps. The MKT lesion volume was roughly 31% larger than the MD lesion volume. Subsequent histological analysis (hematoxylin) revealed similar lesion volumes to MD. Our study shows that structural components underlying the MD/MKT mismatch can...

  4. Tissue hepatic blood volume and liver function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuyama, Mamoru

    1997-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) scan has an advantage that it can measure regional organ blood flow and volume not only quantitatively but also non-invasively. In order to estimate the liver function, tissue hepatic blood volume was measured using C 15 O inhalation in conjunction with positron emission tomography. PET scans of the liver were performed after the single breath inhalation of 20 mCi of high specific activity 15 O-labeled carbon monoxide in 105 patients which were classified 3 groups; normal, chronic hepatitis, and cirrhosis. They consist of 61, 14, and 30 patients, respectively. Significant differences between normal and cirrhotic patients were noted in tissue hepatic blood volume (mean 20.4, 18.2, 16.0 ml/100 g, respectively). Tissue hepatic blood volume (tHBV) correlated with the reaction of the peripheral reticuloendothelial compartment and protein synthesis, because there was a potent correlation between tHBV and hepatic fibrosis. In normal livers, we were able to demonstrate significant differences in tissue hepatic blood volume among liver segments. (author)

  5. Operation and application of tissue-equivalent proportional counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerdung, S.; Roos, H.

    1995-01-01

    The application of TEPCs during the past decades in dosimetry, radiation protection and radiation therapy has revealed their large potential but also the necessity of careful operation. This paper reviews the experience gathered in the past and summarises the experimental procedures to ensure proper TEPC operation. The measurement system is described including detector, electronics and quality assurance. The pulse height analysis and its interpretation in terms of microdosimetric spectra and mean values are presented as well as the variance method. On the basis of these evaluation procedures, the second part of the paper presents some typical examples of TEPC applications: dose spectrometry, time-of-flight techniques and the measurement of dose equivalent quantities. Special attention is paid to possible extensions but also to limitations of the use of TEPCs in the various fields of application. (Author)

  6. Microdosimetry of 14.7 MeV neutrons in tissue equivalent phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amols, H.I.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation has been made of energy deposition in tissue by neutrons. A one-half inch diameter Rossi type proportional counter was used to simulate a one-micron sphere of tissue. Event-size spectra were taken in air, and at various positions in a large volume of tissue equivalent fluid. From the raw spectra, LET distributions were determined, as well as dose fractions for protons, alphas, and heavy ions, and dose average and track-average LET values. The shape of the D(L) vs. LET curve is found to undergo significant change in the phantom due to moderation of the neutron beam. In addition, previous calculations of LET spectra in air are shown to be in error, and theoretical RBE and OER values, based on data from this experiment are in better agreement with biological results. A two-step theoretical calculation has also been carried out. An original Monte Carlo computer code was used to calculate neutron fluences in phantom (1), which were converted to LET distributions via standard algorithms (2). Agreement with experiment is very good, both in air and in phantom. Edge effects, backscatter effects, and effects of phantom size were also studied

  7. Numerical modelling of tissue-equivalent proportional counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segur, P.; Colautti, P.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper a survey is given of the various numerical techniques employed to study the transport of ionising particles inside a TEPC. The first part is devoted to the description of the general concept of particle transport calculations. Thereafter, the different methods available to study transport phenomena and energy deposition in the sensitive volume and in counter walls are described. Finally, the basic ionisation mechanisms which may occur in a counter are described, and the non-equilibrium phenomena which play an important role mainly for counters that are to be used in measurements at the nanodosemeter level are studied. (author)

  8. Specification and tests of three prototypes from tissue-equivalent ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, D.L.; Cardoso, D.O.; Pereira, O.S.; Nobre Filho, L.S.; Cabral, T.S.

    1992-01-01

    Three prototypes of tissue-equivalent ionization chamber are specified and tested. The results obtained by these prototypes are presented, aiming the determination of operation parameters, defined by IEC 395 standard. (C.G.C.)

  9. New technique for tissue-equivalent gamma ray dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squillante, M.R.; Stern, I.; Nagarkar, V.; Entine, G.

    1992-01-01

    The use of semiconductor sensors in dosimeters is attractive for a variety of reasons including potential low cost and high sensitivity. However, the accurate measurement of the radiation dose to tissue using solid state detectors is made difficult by the relatively high atomic number of semiconductor materials. This leads to an over response to gamma ray energies below 100 keV and an under response above that. If the energy spectrum is known, corrections can be applied to yield accurate dose. In real life situations, however, the energy spectrum is not always known and may be difficult to determine at high flux rates. Also, in some cases, the energy spectrum may change with time. This paper reports that, by operating a custom-designed CdTe sensor in the pulse mode and measuring the average energy deposited, a nearly-linear relationship between the tissue dose rate and the sensor signal was obtained. Based on this technique, a prototype detector and dosimeter system were developed

  10. Associations between regional brain volumes at term-equivalent age and development at 2 years of age in preterm children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lind, Annika; Parkkola, Riitta; Lehtonen, Liisa; Maunu, Jonna; Lapinleimu, Helena; Munck, Petriina; Haataja, Leena

    2011-01-01

    Altered brain volumes and associations between volumes and developmental outcomes have been reported in prematurely born children. To assess which regional brain volumes are different in very low birth weight (VLBW) children without neurodevelopmental impairments ([NDI] cerebral palsy, hearing loss, blindness and significantly delayed cognitive performance) compared with VLBW children with NDI, and to evaluate the association between regional brain volumes at term-equivalent age and cognitive development and neurological performance at a corrected age of 2 years. The study group consisted of a regional cohort of 164 VLBW children, divided into one group of children without NDI (n = 148) and one group of children with NDI (n = 16). Brain (MRI) was performed at term-equivalent age, from which brain volumes were manually analysed. Cognitive development was assessed with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development II (BSID-II), and neurological performance with the Hammersmith Infant Neurological Examination at the corrected age of 2 years. The volumes of total brain tissue, cerebrum, frontal lobes, basal ganglia and thalami, and cerebellum were significantly smaller, and the volume of the ventricles significantly larger, in the children with NDI than in those without NDI. Even in children without NDI, a smaller cerebellar volume was significantly correlated with poor neurological performance at 2 years of corrected age. Volumetric analysis at brain MRI can provide an additional parameter for early prediction of outcome in VLBW children. (orig.)

  11. Associations between regional brain volumes at term-equivalent age and development at 2 years of age in preterm children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Annika; Parkkola, Riitta; Lehtonen, Liisa; Munck, Petriina; Maunu, Jonna; Lapinleimu, Helena; Haataja, Leena

    2011-08-01

    Altered brain volumes and associations between volumes and developmental outcomes have been reported in prematurely born children. To assess which regional brain volumes are different in very low birth weight (VLBW) children without neurodevelopmental impairments ([NDI] cerebral palsy, hearing loss, blindness and significantly delayed cognitive performance) compared with VLBW children with NDI, and to evaluate the association between regional brain volumes at term-equivalent age and cognitive development and neurological performance at a corrected age of 2 years. The study group consisted of a regional cohort of 164 VLBW children, divided into one group of children without NDI (n = 148) and one group of children with NDI (n = 16). Brain (MRI) was performed at term-equivalent age, from which brain volumes were manually analysed. Cognitive development was assessed with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development II (BSID-II), and neurological performance with the Hammersmith Infant Neurological Examination at the corrected age of 2 years. The volumes of total brain tissue, cerebrum, frontal lobes, basal ganglia and thalami, and cerebellum were significantly smaller, and the volume of the ventricles significantly larger, in the children with NDI than in those without NDI. Even in children without NDI, a smaller cerebellar volume was significantly correlated with poor neurological performance at 2 years of corrected age. Volumetric analysis at brain MRI can provide an additional parameter for early prediction of outcome in VLBW children.

  12. Associations between regional brain volumes at term-equivalent age and development at 2 years of age in preterm children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, Annika [Turku University Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Turku (Finland); Aabo Akademi University, Department of Psychology, Turku (Finland); Parkkola, Riitta [University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Turku PET Center, PO Box 52, Turku (Finland); Lehtonen, Liisa; Maunu, Jonna; Lapinleimu, Helena [University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Turku (Finland); Munck, Petriina [Turku University Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Turku (Finland); University of Turku, Department of Psychology, Turku (Finland); Haataja, Leena [University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Turku (Finland)

    2011-08-15

    Altered brain volumes and associations between volumes and developmental outcomes have been reported in prematurely born children. To assess which regional brain volumes are different in very low birth weight (VLBW) children without neurodevelopmental impairments ([NDI] cerebral palsy, hearing loss, blindness and significantly delayed cognitive performance) compared with VLBW children with NDI, and to evaluate the association between regional brain volumes at term-equivalent age and cognitive development and neurological performance at a corrected age of 2 years. The study group consisted of a regional cohort of 164 VLBW children, divided into one group of children without NDI (n = 148) and one group of children with NDI (n = 16). Brain (MRI) was performed at term-equivalent age, from which brain volumes were manually analysed. Cognitive development was assessed with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development II (BSID-II), and neurological performance with the Hammersmith Infant Neurological Examination at the corrected age of 2 years. The volumes of total brain tissue, cerebrum, frontal lobes, basal ganglia and thalami, and cerebellum were significantly smaller, and the volume of the ventricles significantly larger, in the children with NDI than in those without NDI. Even in children without NDI, a smaller cerebellar volume was significantly correlated with poor neurological performance at 2 years of corrected age. Volumetric analysis at brain MRI can provide an additional parameter for early prediction of outcome in VLBW children. (orig.)

  13. Practicing the Test Produces Strength Equivalent to Higher Volume Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattocks, Kevin T; Buckner, Samuel L; Jessee, Matthew B; Dankel, Scott J; Mouser, J Grant; Loenneke, Jeremy P

    2017-09-01

    To determine if muscle growth is important for increasing muscle strength or if changes in strength can be entirely explained from practicing the strength test. Thirty-eight untrained individuals performed knee extension and chest press exercise for 8 wk. Individuals were randomly assigned to either a high-volume training group (HYPER) or a group just performing the one repetition maximum (1RM) strength test (TEST). The HYPER group performed four sets to volitional failure (~8RM-12RM), whereas the TEST group performed up to five attempts to lift as much weight as possible one time each visit. Data are presented as mean (90% confidence interval). The change in muscle size was greater in the HYPER group for both the upper and lower bodies at most but not all sites. The change in 1RM strength for both the upper body (difference of -1.1 [-4.8, 2.4] kg) and lower body (difference of 1.0 [-0.7, 2.8] kg for dominant leg) was not different between groups (similar for nondominant). Changes in isometric and isokinetic torque were not different between groups. The HYPER group observed a greater change in muscular endurance (difference of 2 [1,4] repetitions) only in the dominant leg. There were no differences in the change between groups in upper body endurance. There were between-group differences for exercise volume (mean [95% confidence interval]) of the dominant (difference of 11,049.3 [9254.6-12,844.0] kg) leg (similar for nondominant) and chest press with the HYPER group completing significantly more total volume (difference of 13259.9 [9632.0-16,887.8] kg). These findings suggest that neither exercise volume nor the change in muscle size from training contributed to greater strength gains compared with just practicing the test.

  14. Characterization of tissue-equivalent materials for use in construction of physical phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Edvan V. de; Oliveira, Alex C.H. de; Vieira, Jose W.; Lima, Fernando R.A.

    2013-01-01

    Phantoms are physical or computational models used to simulate the transport of ionizing radiation, their interactions with human body tissues and evaluate the deposition of energy. Depending on the application, you can build phantoms of various types and features. The physical phantoms are made of materials with behavior similar to human tissues exposed to ionizing radiation, the so-called tissue-equivalent materials. The characterization of various tissue-equivalent materials is important for the choice of materials to be used is appropriate, seeking a better cost-benefit ratio. The main objective of this work is to produce tables containing the main characteristics of tissue-equivalent materials. These tables were produced in Microsoft Office Excel. Among the main features of tissue-equivalent materials that were added to the tables, are density, chemical composition, physical state, chemical stability and solubility. The main importance of this work is to contribute to the construction of high-quality physical phantoms and avoid the waste of materials

  15. Measurement of californium-252 gamma photons depth dose distribution in tissue equivalent material. Vol. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadel, M A; El-Fiki, M A; Eissa, H M; Abdel-Hafez, A; Naguib, S H [National Institute of Standards, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    Phantom of tissue equivalent material with and without bone was used measuring depth dose distribution of gamma-rays from californium-252 source. The source was positioned at center of perspex walled phantom. Depth dose measurements were recorded for X, Y and Z planes at different distances from source. TLD 700 was used for measuring the dose distribution. Results indicate that implantation of bone in tissue equivalent medium cause changes in the gamma depth dose distribution which varies according to variation in bone geometry. 9 figs.

  16. Tissue equivalent detector measurements on Mir space station. Comparison with other data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottollier-Depois, J.F. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Dept. de Protection de la Sante de l`Homme et de Dosimetrie; Siegrist, M. [Centre National d`Etudes Spatiales (CNES), 31 - Toulouse (France); Duvivier, E.; Almarcha, B. [STEEL Technologies, Mazeres sur Salat (France); Dachev, T.P.; Semkova, J.V. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Central Lab. of Solar Energy and New Energy Sources; Petrov, V.M.; Bengin, V.; Koslova, S.B. [Institute of Biomedical Problems, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    The measurement of the dose received by the cosmonauts, due to cosmic radiations, during a space mission is an important parameter to estimate the radiological risk. Tissue equivalent measurements of radiation environment inside the MIR space station were performed continuously since July 1992. Interesting results about radiation measurements show (a) the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) crossing, (c) the increase of radiation near the poles and (d) the effects of solar eruptions. These data are compared with solid state detector (SSD) and other tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) results. (authors). 4 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Tissue equivalent detector measurements on Mir space station. Comparison with other data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottollier-Depois, J.F.; Duvivier, E.; Almarcha, B.; Dachev, T.P.; Semkova, J.V.

    1995-01-01

    The measurement of the dose received by the cosmonauts, due to cosmic radiations, during a space mission is an important parameter to estimate the radiological risk. Tissue equivalent measurements of radiation environment inside the MIR space station were performed continuously since July 1992. Interesting results about radiation measurements show (a) the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) crossing, (c) the increase of radiation near the poles and (d) the effects of solar eruptions. These data are compared with solid state detector (SSD) and other tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) results. (authors). 4 refs., 7 figs

  18. Polyurethane as a base for a family of tissue equivalent materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, R.V.

    1980-01-01

    Recent experience gained in the selection of tissue equivalent materials for the construction of whole body counting phantoms has shown that commercially available polyurethane can be used as a base for a variety of tissue equivalent materials. Tissues simulated include lung, adipose, muscle, cartilage and rib bone. When selecting tissue equivalent materials it is important to understand what tissue properties must be simulated. Materials that simply simulate the linear attenuation of low energy photons for example, are not very likely to simulate neutron interaction properties accurately. With this in mind, we have developed more than one simulation composition for a given tissue, depending on the purpose to which the simulant is to be applied. Simple simulation of linear attenuation can be achieved by addition of carefully measured amounts of higher Z material, such as calcium carbonate to the polyurethane. However, the simulation necessary for medical scanning purposes, or for use in mixed radiation fields requires more complex formulations to yield proper material density, hydrogen and nitrogen content, electron density, and effective atomic number. Though polyurethane has limitations for simulation of tissues that differ markedly from its inherent composition (such as compacted bone), it is safe and easily used in modestly equipped laboratories. The simulants are durable and generally flexible. They can also be easily cast in irregular shapes to simulate specific organ geometries. (author)

  19. Polyurethane as a base for a family of tissue equivalent materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, R.V.

    1980-01-01

    Polyurethane was used as a base material for a wide variety of tissue simulating applications. The technique in fabrication is similar to that of epoxy, however, the end products are generally more flexible for use in applications where flexibility is valuable. The material can be fabricated with relatively small laboratory equipment. The use of polyurethane provides the dosimetrist with the capability of making specific, accurate, on-the-spot tissue equivalent formulations to meet situations which require immediate calibration and response

  20. Experimental equivalent cluster-size distributions in nano-metric volumes of liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosswendt, B.; De Nardo, L.; Colautti, P.; Pszona, S.; Conte, V.; Tornielli, G.

    2004-01-01

    Ionisation cluster-size distributions in nano-metric volumes of liquid water were determined for alpha particles at 4.6 and 5.4 MeV by measuring cluster-size frequencies in small gaseous volumes of nitrogen or propane at low gas pressure as well as by applying a suitable scaling procedure. This scaling procedure was based on the mean free ionisation lengths of alpha particles in water and in the gases measured. For validation, the measurements of cluster sizes in gaseous volumes and the cluster-size formation in volumes of liquid water of equivalent size were simulated by Monte Carlo methods. The experimental water-equivalent cluster-size distributions in nitrogen and propane are compared with those in liquid water and show that cluster-size formation by alpha particles in nitrogen or propane can directly be related to those in liquid water. (authors)

  1. Bio-fabrication and physiological self-release of tissue equivalents using smart peptide amphiphile templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Ricardo M; Hamley, Ian W; Connon, Che J

    2015-10-01

    In this study we applied a smart biomaterial formed from a self-assembling, multi-functional synthetic peptide amphiphile (PA) to coat substrates with various surface chemistries. The combination of PA coating and alignment-inducing functionalised substrates provided a template to instruct human corneal stromal fibroblasts to adhere, become aligned and then bio-fabricate a highly-ordered, multi-layered, three-dimensional tissue by depositing an aligned, native-like extracellular matrix. The newly-formed corneal tissue equivalent was subsequently able to eliminate the adhesive properties of the template and govern its own complete release via the action of endogenous proteases. Tissues recovered through this method were structurally stable, easily handled, and carrier-free. Furthermore, topographical and mechanical analysis by atomic force microscopy showed that tissue equivalents formed on the alignment-inducing PA template had highly-ordered, compact collagen deposition, with a two-fold higher elastic modulus compared to the less compact tissues produced on the non-alignment template, the PA-coated glass. We suggest that this technology represents a new paradigm in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, whereby all processes for the bio-fabrication and subsequent self-release of natural, bio-prosthetic human tissues depend solely on simple template-tissue feedback interactions.

  2. Effect of cigarette smoke on the measured equivalent volume activity of 222Rn in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuckova, S.; Tykva, R.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of cigarette smoke in air on the increase of the measured equivalent volume activity of 222 Rn is demonstrated. After introduction of the smoke from one cigarette into 1 m 3 of air, this value increased up to ten times as shown be the method of sucking air through a filter. (author) 5 refs.; 1 fig

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of different positron emitting radionuclides incorporated in a soft tissue volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olaya D, H.; Martinez O, S. A.; Sevilla M, A. C.; Vega C, H. R.

    2015-10-01

    Monte Carlo calculations were carried out where compounds with positron-emitters radionuclides, like FDG ( 18 F), Acetate ( 11 C), and Ammonium ( 13 N), were incorporated into a soft tissue volume, in the aim to estimate the type of particles produced their energies, their mean free paths, and the absorbed dose at different distances with respect to the center of the volume. The volume was modeled with a radius larger than the maximum range of positrons in order to produce 0.511 keV annihilation gamma-ray photons. With the obtained results the equivalent dose, in various organs and tissues able to metabolize different radiopharmaceutical drugs, can be estimated. (Author)

  4. Early recognition of autonomous thyroid tissue by a combination of quantitative thyroid pertechnetate scintigraphy with the free T4 equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, K.; Mahlstedt, J.; Welcke, U.

    1980-01-01

    A suspicion of AFTT can be raised in 80% of still euthyroid patients by a combined evaluation of an equivalent to the free T 4 (FTE) and an equavilant to the clearance using a quantitative evaluation of the thyroid technetium scan (TcTU). The suppression test not only confirms the autonomy in a qualitative manner but also provides an estimate of the volume of autonomous tissue because The TcTU after suppression strictly correlates linearly with the volume of the AFTT. Since after iodine administration FTE increases proportionally to the volume of AFTT, the procedure can be of some prognostic value: those with autonomous tissue in excess of a critical volume will almost certainly develop hyperthyroidism following a certain minimum rate of iodine administration. A prospective study of patients under age 50 whose thyroids contained various amounts of AFTT has shown that prophylactic dietary iodine supplementation will not cause hyperthyroidism to develop provided the additional iodine intake does not exceed 100 μg per day. (orig./MG) [de

  5. A new formula for normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) as a function of equivalent uniform dose (EUD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxton, Gary; Keall, Paul J; King, Christopher R

    2008-01-07

    To facilitate the use of biological outcome modeling for treatment planning, an exponential function is introduced as a simpler equivalent to the Lyman formula for calculating normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). The single parameter of the exponential function is chosen to reproduce the Lyman calculation to within approximately 0.3%, and thus enable easy conversion of data contained in empirical fits of Lyman parameters for organs at risk (OARs). Organ parameters for the new formula are given in terms of Lyman model m and TD(50), and conversely m and TD(50) are expressed in terms of the parameters of the new equation. The role of the Lyman volume-effect parameter n is unchanged from its role in the Lyman model. For a non-homogeneously irradiated OAR, an equation relates d(ref), n, v(eff) and the Niemierko equivalent uniform dose (EUD), where d(ref) and v(eff) are the reference dose and effective fractional volume of the Kutcher-Burman reduction algorithm (i.e. the LKB model). It follows in the LKB model that uniform EUD irradiation of an OAR results in the same NTCP as the original non-homogeneous distribution. The NTCP equation is therefore represented as a function of EUD. The inverse equation expresses EUD as a function of NTCP and is used to generate a table of EUD versus normal tissue complication probability for the Emami-Burman parameter fits as well as for OAR parameter sets from more recent data.

  6. A new formula for normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) as a function of equivalent uniform dose (EUD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luxton, Gary; Keall, Paul J; King, Christopher R

    2008-01-01

    To facilitate the use of biological outcome modeling for treatment planning, an exponential function is introduced as a simpler equivalent to the Lyman formula for calculating normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). The single parameter of the exponential function is chosen to reproduce the Lyman calculation to within ∼0.3%, and thus enable easy conversion of data contained in empirical fits of Lyman parameters for organs at risk (OARs). Organ parameters for the new formula are given in terms of Lyman model m and TD 50 , and conversely m and TD 50 are expressed in terms of the parameters of the new equation. The role of the Lyman volume-effect parameter n is unchanged from its role in the Lyman model. For a non-homogeneously irradiated OAR, an equation relates d ref , n, v eff and the Niemierko equivalent uniform dose (EUD), where d ref and v eff are the reference dose and effective fractional volume of the Kutcher-Burman reduction algorithm (i.e. the LKB model). It follows in the LKB model that uniform EUD irradiation of an OAR results in the same NTCP as the original non-homogeneous distribution. The NTCP equation is therefore represented as a function of EUD. The inverse equation expresses EUD as a function of NTCP and is used to generate a table of EUD versus normal tissue complication probability for the Emami-Burman parameter fits as well as for OAR parameter sets from more recent data

  7. SU-D-BRC-04: Development of Proton Tissue Equivalent Materials for Calibration and Dosimetry Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olguin, E [Gainesville, FL (United States); Flampouri, S [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Lipnharski, I [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Bolch, W [University Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop new proton tissue equivalent materials (PTEM), urethane and fiberglass based, for proton therapy calibration and dosimetry studies. Existing tissue equivalent plastics are applicable only for x-rays because they focus on matching mass attenuation coefficients. This study aims to create new plastics that match mass stopping powers for proton therapy applications instead. Methods: New PTEMs were constructed using urethane and fiberglass resin materials for soft, fat, bone, and lung tissue. The stoichiometric analysis method was first used to determine the elemental composition of each unknown constituent. New initial formulae were then developed for each of the 4 PTEMs using the new elemental compositions and various additives. Samples of each plastic were then created and exposed to a well defined proton beam at the UF Health Proton Therapy Institute (UFHPTI) to validate its mass stopping power. Results: The stoichiometric analysis method revealed the elemental composition of the 3 components used in creating the PTEMs. These urethane and fiberglass based resins were combined with additives such as calcium carbonate, aluminum hydroxide, and phenolic micro spheres to achieve the desired mass stopping powers and densities. Validation at the UFHPTI revealed adjustments had to be made to the formulae, but the plastics eventually had the desired properties after a few iterations. The mass stopping power, density, and Hounsfield Unit of each of the 4 PTEMs were within acceptable tolerances. Conclusion: Four proton tissue equivalent plastics were developed: soft, fat, bone, and lung tissue. These plastics match each of the corresponding tissue’s mass stopping power, density, and Hounsfield Unit, meaning they are truly tissue equivalent for proton therapy applications. They can now be used to calibrate proton therapy treatment planning systems, improve range uncertainties, validate proton therapy Monte Carlo simulations, and assess in-field and out

  8. Tissue Equivalent Phantom Design for Characterization of a Coherent Scatter X-ray Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Kathryn Elizabeth

    Scatter in medical imaging is typically cast off as image-related noise that detracts from meaningful diagnosis. It is therefore typically rejected or removed from medical images. However, it has been found that every material, including cancerous tissue, has a unique X-ray coherent scatter signature that can be used to identify the material or tissue. Such scatter-based tissue-identification provides the advantage of locating and identifying particular materials over conventional anatomical imaging through X-ray radiography. A coded aperture X-ray coherent scatter spectral imaging system has been developed in our group to classify different tissue types based on their unique scatter signatures. Previous experiments using our prototype have demonstrated that the depth-resolved coherent scatter spectral imaging system (CACSSI) can discriminate healthy and cancerous tissue present in the path of a non-destructive x-ray beam. A key to the successful optimization of CACSSI as a clinical imaging method is to obtain anatomically accurate phantoms of the human body. This thesis describes the development and fabrication of 3D printed anatomical scatter phantoms of the breast and lung. The purpose of this work is to accurately model different breast geometries using a tissue equivalent phantom, and to classify these tissues in a coherent x-ray scatter imaging system. Tissue-equivalent anatomical phantoms were designed to assess the capability of the CACSSI system to classify different types of breast tissue (adipose, fibroglandular, malignant). These phantoms were 3D printed based on DICOM data obtained from CT scans of prone breasts. The phantoms were tested through comparison of measured scatter signatures with those of adipose and fibroglandular tissue from literature. Tumors in the phantom were modeled using a variety of biological tissue including actual surgically excised benign and malignant tissue specimens. Lung based phantoms have also been printed for future

  9. A Monte Carlo study of the impact of the choice of rectum volume definition on estimates of equivalent uniform doses and the volume parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvinnsland, Yngve; Muren, Ludvig Paul; Dahl, Olav

    2004-01-01

    Calculations of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) values for the rectum are difficult because it is a hollow, non-rigid, organ. Finding the true cumulative dose distribution for a number of treatment fractions requires a CT scan before each treatment fraction. This is labour intensive, and several surrogate distributions have therefore been suggested, such as dose wall histograms, dose surface histograms and histograms for the solid rectum, with and without margins. In this study, a Monte Carlo method is used to investigate the relationships between the cumulative dose distributions based on all treatment fractions and the above-mentioned histograms that are based on one CT scan only, in terms of equivalent uniform dose. Furthermore, the effect of a specific choice of histogram on estimates of the volume parameter of the probit NTCP model was investigated. It was found that the solid rectum and the rectum wall histograms (without margins) gave equivalent uniform doses with an expected value close to the values calculated from the cumulative dose distributions in the rectum wall. With the number of patients available in this study the standard deviations of the estimates of the volume parameter were large, and it was not possible to decide which volume gave the best estimates of the volume parameter, but there were distinct differences in the mean values of the values obtained

  10. Absorbed dose measurement by using tissue equivalent ionization chamber (pair ionization chamber) in the Yayoi reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasuga, N.; Okamura, K.; Terakado, T.; Mabuchi, Y.; Nakagawa, T.; Sukegawa, Toshio; Aizawa, C.; Saito, I.; Oka, Yoshiaki

    1998-01-01

    Each dose rate of neutron and gamma ray in the thermal column of the Yayoi reactor, in which an epithermal neutron field will be used for the boron neutron capture therapy, was measured by using a tissue equivalent ionization chamber and a graphite chamber. The tissue equivalent ionization chamber has some response to both neutron and gamma ray, but the graphite chamber has a few response to the neutron, so called pair ionization chamber method. The epithermal neutron fluxes of the thermal column were calculated by ANISN (one dimensional neutron-gamma transport code). A measured value for gamma dose rate by the pair ionization chamber agrees relevantly with a calculated result. For neutron dose rate, however, the measured value was too much small in comparison with the calculated result. The discrepancy between the measured value and the calculated result for neutron dose rate is discussed in detail in the report. (M. Suetake)

  11. Gas electron multiplier (GEM) operation with tissue-equivalent gases at various pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farahmand, M.; Bos, A.J.J.; Eijk, C.W.E. van

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the operation of two different Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) structures in both methane and propane based Tissue-Equivalent (TE) gases at different pressures varying from 0.1 to 1 atm. This work was motivated to explore the possibility of using a GEM for a new type of Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter. In methane based TE gas, a maximum safe GEM gain of 1.5x10 3 has been reached while in propane based TE gas this is 6x10 3 . These maxima have been reached at different gas pressures depending on GEM structure and TE gas. Furthermore, we observed a decrease of the GEM gain in time before it becomes stable. Charge up/polarisation effects can explain this

  12. Tissue-equivalent torso phantom for calibration of transuranic-nuclide counting facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, R.V.; Anderson, A.L.; Dean, P.N.; Fisher, J.C.; Sundbeck, C.W.

    1986-01-01

    Several tissue-equivalent human-torso phantoms have been constructed for the calibration of counting systems used for in-vivo measurement of transuranic radionuclides. The phantoms contain a simulated human rib cage (in some cases, real bone) and removable model organs, and they include tissue-equivalent chest plates that can be placed over the torso to simulate people with a wide range of statures. The organs included are the lungs, liver, and tracheobronchial lymph nodes. Polyurethane with varying concentrations of added calcium was used to simulate the linear photon-attenuation properties of various human tissues, including lean muscle, adipose-muscle mixtures, cartilage, and bone. Foamed polyurethane was used to simulate lung tissue. Organs have been loaded with highly pure 238 Pu, 239 Pu, 241 Am, and other radionuclides of interest. The validity of the phantom as a calibration standard has been checked in separate intercomparison studies using human subjects whose lungs contained a plutonium simulant. The resulting phantom calibration factors generally compared to within +-20% of the average calibration factors obtained for the human subjects

  13. Positron range in tissue-equivalent materials: experimental microPET studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alva-Sánchez, H.; Quintana-Bautista, C.; Martínez-Dávalos, A.; Ávila-Rodríguez, M. A.; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M.

    2016-09-01

    In this work an experimental investigation was carried out to study the effect that positron range has over positron emission tomography (PET) scans through measurements of the line spread function (LSF) in tissue-equivalent materials. Line-sources consisted of thin capillary tubes filled with 18F, 13N or 68Ga water-solution inserted along the axis of symmetry of cylindrical phantoms constructed with the tissue-equivalent materials: lung (inhale and exhale), adipose tissue, solid water, trabecular and cortical bone. PET scans were performed with a commercial small-animal PET scanner and image reconstruction was carried out with filtered-backprojection. Line-source distributions were analyzed using radial profiles taken on axial slices from which the spatial resolution was determined through the full-width at half-maximum, tenth-maximum, twentieth-maximum and fiftieth-maximum. A double-Gaussian model of the LSFs was used to fit experimental data which can be incorporated into iterative reconstruction methods. In addition, the maximum activity concentration in the line-sources was determined from reconstructed images and compared to the known values for each case. The experimental data indicates that positron range in different materials has a strong effect on both spatial resolution and activity concentration quantification in PET scans. Consequently, extra care should be taken when computing standard-uptake values in PET scans, in particular when the radiopharmaceutical is taken up by different tissues in the body, and more even so with high-energy positron emitters.

  14. Radicals formation in the PVC/DOP plastisol radiolysis used as equivalent-tissue in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pezzin, A.P.T.; Salman, K.D.; Mei, L.H.I.

    1997-01-01

    Recently, a tissue simulator called bolus was developed at FEQ/UNICAMP, which is made of dioctyl phthalate and poly (vinyl chloride) (DOC/PVC). This bolus has the function of displacing the maximum dose the skin surface in radiation therapy of skin and breast cancer. In this way the healthy tissues around the tumor are protected. Research at the Center for Women's Health (CAISM) of the Clinical Hospital of UNICAMP has shown that this material can be used as the tissue-equivalent of skin. In the present work, bolus samples were irradiated by gamma rays and the radicals formed were investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance at 110K. The results showed the radicals formation as a consequence of the homolytic scissions of the chemical bonds of DOP and the air presence interfere in the quantity of observed paramagnetic species. (author)

  15. Equivalent circuit of frog atrial tissue as determined by voltage clamp-unclamp experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarr, M; Trank, J

    1971-11-01

    The equivalent circuit that has been used in the analysis of nerve voltage-clamp data is that of the membrane capacity in parallel with the membrane resistance. Voltage-clamp experiments on frog atrial tissue indicate that this circuit will not suffice for this cardiac tissue. The change in membrane current associated with a step change in membrane potential does not show a rapid spike of capacitive current as would be expected for the simple parallel resistance-capacitance network. Rather, there is a step change in current followed by an exponential decay in current with a time constant of about 1 msec. This relatively slow capacitive charging current suggests that there is a resistance in series with the membrane capacity. A possible equivalent circuit is that of a series resistance external to the parallel resistance-capacitance network of the cell membranes. Another possible circuit assumes that the series resistance is an integral part of the cell membrane. The data presented in this paper demonstrate that the equivalent circuit of a bundle of frog atrial muscle is that of an external resistance in series with the cell membranes.

  16. Simulated Response of a Tissue-equivalent Proportional Counter on the Surface of Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northum, Jeremy D; Guetersloh, Stephen B; Braby, Leslie A; Ford, John R

    2015-10-01

    Uncertainties persist regarding the assessment of the carcinogenic risk associated with galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposure during a mission to Mars. The GCR spectrum peaks in the range of 300(-1) MeV n to 700 MeV n(-1) and is comprised of elemental ions from H to Ni. While Fe ions represent only 0.03% of the GCR spectrum in terms of particle abundance, they are responsible for nearly 30% of the dose equivalent in free space. Because of this, radiation biology studies focusing on understanding the biological effects of GCR exposure generally use Fe ions. Acting as a thin shield, the Martian atmosphere alters the GCR spectrum in a manner that significantly reduces the importance of Fe ions. Additionally, albedo particles emanating from the regolith complicate the radiation environment. The present study uses the Monte Carlo code FLUKA to simulate the response of a tissue-equivalent proportional counter on the surface of Mars to produce dosimetry quantities and microdosimetry distributions. The dose equivalent rate on the surface of Mars was found to be 0.18 Sv y(-1) with an average quality factor of 2.9 and a dose mean lineal energy of 18.4 keV μm(-1). Additionally, albedo neutrons were found to account for 25% of the dose equivalent. It is anticipated that these data will provide relevant starting points for use in future risk assessment and mission planning studies.

  17. Measurement of the tissue to A-150 tissue equivalent plastic kerma ratio at two p(66)Be neutron therapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langen, K M; Binns, P J; Schreuder, A N; Lennox, A J; Deluca, P M Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The ICRU tissue to A-150 tissue equivalent plastic kerma ratio is needed for neutron therapy dosimetry. The current ICRU protocol for neutron dosimetry recommends using a common conversion factor of 0.95 at all high-energy neutron therapy facilities. In an effort to determine facility specific ICRU tissue to A-150 plastic kerma ratios, an experimental approach was pursued. Four low pressure proportional counters that differed in wall materials (i.e. A-150, carbon, zirconium and zirconium-oxide) were used as dosimeters and integral kerma ratios were determined directly in the clinical beam. Measurements were performed at two p(66)Be facilities: iThemba LABS near Cape Town and Fermilab near Chicago. At the iThemba facility the clinical neutron beam is routinely filtered by a flattening and hardening filter combination. The influence of beam filtration on the kerma ratio was evaluated. Using two recent gas-to-wall dose conversion factor (r m,g value) evaluations a mean ICRU tissue to A-150 plastic kerma ratio of 0.93 ± 0.05 was determined for the clinical beam at iThemba LABS. The respective value for the Fermilab beam is 0.95 ± 0.05. The experimentally determined ICRU tissue to A-150 plastic kerma ratios for the two clinical beams are in agreement with theoretical evaluations. Beam filtration reduces the kerma ratio by 3 ± 2%

  18. Investigation of real tissue water equivalent path lengths using an efficient dose extinction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rongxiao; Baer, Esther; Jee, Kyung-Wook; Sharp, Gregory C.; Flanz, Jay; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2017-07-01

    For proton therapy, an accurate conversion of CT HU to relative stopping power (RSP) is essential. Validation of the conversion based on real tissue samples is more direct than the current practice solely based on tissue substitutes and can potentially address variations over the population. Based on a novel dose extinction method, we measured water equivalent path lengths (WEPL) on animal tissue samples to evaluate the accuracy of CT HU to RSP conversion and potential variations over a population. A broad proton beam delivered a spread out Bragg peak to the samples sandwiched between a water tank and a 2D ion-chamber detector. WEPLs of the samples were determined from the transmission dose profiles measured as a function of the water level in the tank. Tissue substitute inserts and Lucite blocks with known WEPLs were used to validate the accuracy. A large number of real tissue samples were measured. Variations of WEPL over different batches of tissue samples were also investigated. The measured WEPLs were compared with those computed from CT scans with the Stoichiometric calibration method. WEPLs were determined within  ±0.5% percentage deviation (% std/mean) and  ±0.5% error for most of the tissue surrogate inserts and the calibration blocks. For biological tissue samples, percentage deviations were within  ±0.3%. No considerable difference (extinction measurement took around 5 min to produce ~1000 WEPL values to be compared with calculations. This dose extinction system measures WEPL efficiently and accurately, which allows the validation of CT HU to RSP conversions based on the WEPL measured for a large number of samples and real tissues.

  19. Development and Characterization of Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter for Radiation Monitoring in International Space Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uk-Won Nam

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC can measure the Linear Energy Transfer (LET spectrum and calculate the equivalent dose for the complicated radiation field in space. In this paper, we developed and characterized a TEPC for radiation monitoring in International Space Station (ISS. The prototype TEPC which can simulate a 2 μm of the site diameter for micro-dosimetry has been tested with a standard alpha source (241Am, 5.5 MeV. Also, the calibration of the TEPC was performed by the 252Cf neutron standard source in Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS. The determined calibration factor was kf = 3.59×10-7 mSv/R.

  20. Analysis of biological tissues in infant chest for the development of an equivalent radiographic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina, D. R.; Souza, Rafael T. F.; Duarte, Sergio B.; Alvarez, Matheus; Miranda, Jose R. A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The main purpose of the present study was to determine the amounts of different tissues in the chest of the newborn patient (age ≤1 year), with the aim of developing a homogeneous phantom chest equivalent. This type of phantom is indispensable in the development of optimization procedures for radiographic techniques, including dosimetric control, which is a crucial aspect of pediatric radiology. The authors present a systematic set of procedures, including a computational algorithm, to estimate the amounts of tissues and thicknesses of the corresponding simulator material plates used to construct the phantom. Methods: The Gaussian fit of computed tomographic (CT) analysis was applied to classify and quantify different biological tissues. The methodology is summarized with a computational algorithm, which was used to quantify tissues through automated CT analysis. The thicknesses of the equivalent homogeneous simulator material plates were determined to construct the phantom. Results: A total of 180 retrospective CT examinations with anterior-posterior diameter values ranging 8.5-13.0 cm were examined. The amounts of different tissues were evaluated. The results provided elements to construct a phantom to simulate the infant chest in the posterior-anterior or anterior-posterior (PA/AP) view. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this report represents the first demonstration of an infant chest phantom dedicated to the radiology of children younger than one year. This phantom is a key element in the development of clinical charts for optimizing radiographic technique in pediatric patients. Optimization procedures for nonstandard patients were reported previously [Pina et al., Phys. Med. Biol. 49, N215-N226 (2004) and Pina et al., Appl. Radiat. Isot. 67, 61-69 (2009)]. The constructed phantom represents a starting point to obtain radiologic protocols for the infant patient.

  1. Changes of Dielectric Properties induced by Fast neutrons in Tissue Equivalent Plastic A-150

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.S.

    2000-01-01

    Tissue equivalent plastic A-150 (TEP A-150) samples are exposed to fast neutrons. Dielectric studies for TEP A-150 are carried out in the frequency range from 40 Hz to 4 MHz in the temperature range 295-343 K. The obtained data revealed that, both the dielectric properties and conductivity sigma ac (omega) of TEP A-150 are altered when irradiated by a relatively high fast neutron dose (15 Sv). The values of dielectric constant and conductivity are increased for the irradiated samples to about 24% than the blank samples

  2. Radiation protection instruments based on tissue equivalent proportional counters: Part II of an international intercomparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberts, W.G.; Dietz, E.; Guldbakke, S.; Kluge, H.; Schumacher, H.

    1988-04-01

    This report describes the irradiation conditions and procedures of Part II of an international intercomparison of tissue-equivalent proportional counters used for radiation protection measurements. The irradiations took place in monoenergetic reference neutron fields produced by the research reactor and accelerator facilities of the PTB Braunschweig in the range from thermal neutrons to 14.8 MeV. In addition measurements were performed in 60 Co and D 2 O-moderated 252 Cf radiation fields. Prototype instruments from 7 European groups were investigated. The results of the measurements are summarized and compared with the reference data of the irradiations. (orig.) [de

  3. Use of tissue equivalent proportional counters to characterize radiation quality on the space shuttle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braby, L.A.; Conroy, T.J.; Elegy, D.C.; Brackenbush, L.W.

    1992-04-01

    Tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) are essentially cavity ionization chambers operating at low pressure and with gas gain. A small, battery powered, TEPC spectrometer, which records lineal energy spectra at one minute intervals, has been used on several space shuttle missions. The data it has collected clearly show the South Atlantic anomaly and indicate a mean quality factor somewhat higher than expected. An improved type of instrument has been developed with sufficient memory to record spectra at 10 second intervals, and with increased resolution for low LET events. This type of instrument will be used on most future space shuttle flights and in some international experiments

  4. Photoprotection by pistachio bioactives in a 3-dimensional human skin equivalent tissue model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C-Y Oliver; Smith, Avi; Liu, Yuntao; Du, Peng; Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Garlick, Jonathan

    2017-09-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during ultraviolet (UV) light exposure can induce skin damage and aging. Antioxidants can provide protection against oxidative injury to skin via "quenching" ROS. Using a validated 3-dimensional (3D) human skin equivalent (HSE) tissue model that closely mimics human skin, we examined whether pistachio antioxidants could protect HSE against UVA-induced damage. Lutein and γ-tocopherol are the predominant lipophilic antioxidants in pistachios; treatment with these compounds prior to UVA exposure protected against morphological changes to the epithelial and connective tissue compartments of HSE. Pistachio antioxidants preserved overall skin thickness and organization, as well as fibroblast morphology, in HSE exposed to UVA irradiation. However, this protection was not substantiated by the analysis of the proliferation of keratinocytes and apoptosis of fibroblasts. Additional studies are warranted to elucidate the basis of these discordant results and extend research into the potential role of pistachio bioactives promoting skin health.

  5. Measurement of the first Townsend ionization coefficient in a methane-based tissue-equivalent gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petri, A.R. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, Cidade Universitária, 05508-000 São Paulo (Brazil); Gonçalves, J.A.C. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, Cidade Universitária, 05508-000 São Paulo (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo, 01303-050 São Paulo (Brazil); Mangiarotti, A. [Instituto de Física - Universidade de São Paulo, Cidade Universitária, 05508-080 São Paulo (Brazil); Botelho, S. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, Cidade Universitária, 05508-000 São Paulo (Brazil); Bueno, C.C., E-mail: ccbueno@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, Cidade Universitária, 05508-000 São Paulo (Brazil)

    2017-03-21

    Tissue-equivalent gases (TEGs), often made of a hydrocarbon, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide, have been employed in microdosimetry for decades. However, data on the first Townsend ionization coefficient (α) in such mixtures are scarce, regardless of the chosen hydrocarbon. In this context, measurements of α in a methane-based tissue-equivalent gas (CH{sub 4} – 64.4%, CO{sub 2} – 32.4%, and N{sub 2} – 3.2%) were performed in a uniform field configuration for density-normalized electric fields (E/N) up to 290 Td. The setup adopted in our previous works was improved for operating at low pressures. The modifications introduced in the apparatus and the experimental technique were validated by comparing our results of the first Townsend ionization coefficient in nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and methane with those from the literature and Magboltz simulations. The behavior of α in the methane-based TEG was consistent with that observed for pure methane. All the experimental results are included in tabular form in the .

  6. Dose of radiation enhancement, using silver nanoparticles in a human tissue equivalent gel dosimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Muhammad; Waheed, Muhammad Mohsin; Anjum, Muhammad Naeem

    2016-01-01

    To quantify the radiation dose enhancement in a human tissue-equivalent polymer gel impregnated with silver nanoparticles. The case-control study was conducted at the Bahawalpur Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Oncology, Bahawalpur, Pakistan, in January 2014. Silver nanoparticles used in this study were prepared by wet chemical method. Polymer gel was prepared by known quantity of gelatine, methacrylic acid, ascorbic acid, copper sulphate pentahydrate, hydroquinone and water. Different concentrations of silver nanoparticles were added to the gel during its cooling process. The gel was cooled in six plastic vials of 50ml each. Two vials were used as a control sample while four vials were impregnated with silver nanoparticles. After 22 hours, the vials were irradiated with gamma rays by aCobalt-60 unit. Radiation enhancement was assessed by taking magnetic resonance images of the vials. The images were analysed using Image J software. The dose enhancement factor was 24.17% and 40.49% for 5Gy and 10Gy dose respectively. The dose enhancement factor for the gel impregnated with 0.10mM silver nanoparticles was 32.88% and 51.98% for 5Gy and 10Gy dose respectively. The impregnation of a tissue-equivalent gel with silver nanoparticles resulted in dose enhancement and this effect was magnified up to a certain level with the increase in concentration of silver nanoparticles.

  7. Test of tissue-equivalent scintillation detector for dose measurement of megavoltage beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geso, M.; Ackerly, T.; Clift, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The measurement of depth doses and profiles for a stereotactic radiotherapy beam presents special problems associated with the small beam size compared to the dosimeter's active detection area. In this work a locally fabricated organic plastic scintillator detector has been used to measure the depth dose and profile of a stereotactic radiotherapy beam. The 6MV beam is 1.25 cm diameter at isocentre, typical of small field stereotactic radiosurgery. The detector is a water/tissue equivalent plastic scintillator that is accompanied by Cerenkov subtraction detector. In this particular application, a negligible amount of Cerenkov light was detected. A photodiode and an electronic circuit is used instead of a photomultiplier for signal amplification. Comparison with data using a diode detector and a small size ionization chamber, indicate that the organic plastic scintillator detector is a valid detector for stereotactic radiosurgery dosimetry. The tissue equivalence of the organic scintillator also holds the promise of accurate dosimetry in the build up region. Depth doses measured using our plastic scintillator agree to within about 1% with those obtained using commercially available silicon diodes. Beam profiles obtained using plastic scintillator presents correct field width to within 0.35 mm, however some artifacts are visible in the profiles. These artifacts are about 5% discrepancy which has been shown not to be a significant factor in stereotactic radiotherapy dosimetry. Copyright (2000) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  8. SU-F-T-181: Proton Therapy Tissue-Equivalence of 3D Printed Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, P; Craft, D; Followill, D; Howell, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This work investigated the proton tissue-equivalence of various 3D printed materials. Methods: Three 3D printers were used to create 5 cm cubic phantoms made of different plastics with varying percentages of infill. White resin, polylactic acid (PLA), and NinjaFlex plastics were used. The infills ranged from 15% to 100%. Each phantom was scanned with a CT scanner to obtain the HU value. The relative linear stopping power (RLSP) was then determined using a multi-layer ion chamber in a 200 MeV proton beam. The RLSP was measured both parallel and perpendicular to the print direction for each material. Results: The HU values of the materials ranged from lung-equivalent (−820 HU σ160) when using a low infill, to soft-tissue-equivalent 159 (σ12). The RLSP of the materials depended on the orientation of the beam relative to the print direction. When the proton beam was parallel to the print direction, the RLSP was generally higher than the RLSP in the perpendicular orientation, by up to 45%. This difference was smaller (less than 6%) for the materials with 100% infill. For low infill cubes irradiated parallel to the print direction, the SOBP curve showed extreme degradation of the beam in the distal region. The materials with 15–25% infill had wide-ranging agreement with a clinical HU-RLSP conversion curve, with some measurements falling within 1% of the curve and others deviating up to 45%. The materials with 100% infill all fell within 7% of the curve. Conclusion: While some materials tested fall within 1% of a clinical HU-RLSP curve, caution should be taken when using 3D printed materials with proton therapy, as the orientation of the beam relative to the print direction can result in a large change in RLSP. Further investigation is needed to measure how the infill pattern affects the material RLSP. This work was supported by PHS grant CA180803.

  9. SU-F-T-181: Proton Therapy Tissue-Equivalence of 3D Printed Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, P; Craft, D; Followill, D; Howell, R [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This work investigated the proton tissue-equivalence of various 3D printed materials. Methods: Three 3D printers were used to create 5 cm cubic phantoms made of different plastics with varying percentages of infill. White resin, polylactic acid (PLA), and NinjaFlex plastics were used. The infills ranged from 15% to 100%. Each phantom was scanned with a CT scanner to obtain the HU value. The relative linear stopping power (RLSP) was then determined using a multi-layer ion chamber in a 200 MeV proton beam. The RLSP was measured both parallel and perpendicular to the print direction for each material. Results: The HU values of the materials ranged from lung-equivalent (−820 HU σ160) when using a low infill, to soft-tissue-equivalent 159 (σ12). The RLSP of the materials depended on the orientation of the beam relative to the print direction. When the proton beam was parallel to the print direction, the RLSP was generally higher than the RLSP in the perpendicular orientation, by up to 45%. This difference was smaller (less than 6%) for the materials with 100% infill. For low infill cubes irradiated parallel to the print direction, the SOBP curve showed extreme degradation of the beam in the distal region. The materials with 15–25% infill had wide-ranging agreement with a clinical HU-RLSP conversion curve, with some measurements falling within 1% of the curve and others deviating up to 45%. The materials with 100% infill all fell within 7% of the curve. Conclusion: While some materials tested fall within 1% of a clinical HU-RLSP curve, caution should be taken when using 3D printed materials with proton therapy, as the orientation of the beam relative to the print direction can result in a large change in RLSP. Further investigation is needed to measure how the infill pattern affects the material RLSP. This work was supported by PHS grant CA180803.

  10. Evaluation of tissue-equivalent materials to be used as human brain tissue substitute in dosimetry for diagnostic radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, C.C., E-mail: cassio.c.ferreira@gmail.co [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Postal Code 353, Sergipe-SE 49100-000 (Brazil); Ximenes Filho, R.E.M., E-mail: raimundoximenes@hotmail.co [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Postal Code 353, Sergipe-SE 49100-000 (Brazil); Vieira, J.W., E-mail: jwvieira@br.inter.ne [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Pernambuco (CEFET-PE), Av. Professor Luiz Freire, 500 Curado, CEP 50740-540, Recife (Brazil); Escola Politecnica de Pernambuco, Universidade de Pernambuco (EPP/UPE), Rua Benfica, 455, Madalena, CEP 50720-001, Recife (Brazil); Tomal, A., E-mail: alessandratomal@pg.ffclrp.usp.b [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto-SP 14040-90 (Brazil); Poletti, M.E., E-mail: poletti@ffclrp.usp.b [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto-SP 14040-90 (Brazil); Garcia, C.A.B., E-mail: cgarcia@ufs.b [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Postal Code 353, Sergipe-SE 49100-000 (Brazil); Maia, A.F., E-mail: afmaia@ufs.b [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Postal Code 353, Sergipe-SE 49100-000 (Brazil)

    2010-08-15

    Tissue-equivalent materials to be used as substitutes for human brain tissue in dosimetry for diagnostic radiology have been investigated in terms of calculated total mass attenuation coefficient ({mu}/{rho}), calculated mass energy-absorption coefficient ({mu}{sub en}/{rho}) and absorbed dose. Measured linear attenuation coefficients ({mu}) have been used for benchmarking the calculated total mass attenuation coefficient ({mu}/{rho}). The materials examined were bolus, nylon (registered) , orange articulation wax, red articulation wax, PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate), bees wax, paraffin I, paraffin II, pitch and water. The results show that water is the best substitute for brain among the materials investigated. The average percentage differences between the calculated {mu}/{rho} and {mu}{sub en}/{rho} coefficients for water and those for brain were 1.0% and 2.5%, respectively. Absorbed doses determined by Monte Carlo methods confirm water as being the best brain substitute to be used in dosimetry for diagnostic radiology, showing maximum difference of 0.01%. Additionally this study showed that PMMA, a material often used for the manufacturing of head phantoms for computed tomography, cannot be considered to be a suitable substitute for human brain tissue in dosimetry.

  11. The equivalent electrical permittivity of gas-solid mixtures at intermediate solid volume fractions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torczynski, John Robert; Ceccio, Steven Louis; Tortora, Paul Richard

    2005-07-01

    Several mixture models are evaluated for their suitability in predicting the equivalent permittivity of dielectric particles in a dielectric medium for intermediate solid volume fractions (0.4 to 0.6). Predictions of the Maxwell, Rayleigh, Bottcher and Bruggeman models are compared to computational simulations of several arrangements of solid particles in a gas and to the experimentally determined permittivity of a static particle bed. The experiment uses spherical glass beads in air, so air and glass permittivity values (1 and 7, respectively) are used with all of the models and simulations. The experimental system used to measure the permittivity of the static particle bed and its calibration are described. The Rayleigh model is found to be suitable for predicting permittivity over the entire range of solid volume fractions (0-0.6).

  12. Calculation of W for low energy electrons in tissue-equivalent gas. [<10 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dayashankar, [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Div. of Radiation Protection

    1977-11-01

    The mean energy expended per ion pair formed (W-value) in the tissue-equivalent gas for incident electrons of energy up to 10 keV has been calculated in the continuous slowing-down approximation. The effect of secondary and tertiary electrons has been considered by utilizing recent measurements of Opal et al., (1971, J. Chem. Phys., 55,4100) on the energy spectra of low-energy secondary electrons and the Mott formula for the spectra of high-energy secondaries. The results, which are provisional in nature due to the limitations on the accuracy of the input cross-section data and the neglect of the discrete nature of energy loss process, are compared with the available measurements.

  13. Development of a drift tissue equivalent proportional counter for radiation protection personnel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordy, J.M.

    1992-04-01

    A new multicellular geometry for proportional counter has been developed. It is made of several drift regions which are some holes drilled in the cathode in front of anodes wires. The present work is made of 3 parts: 1) A theoretical evaluation of the multicellular counter characteristics: the sensitivity increases by a factor 15 vs the Tinelli Merlin-Gerin counter; the chord length distribution study shows the possibility to use a Dirac function for the dosimetry calculations; a tissue equivalent gas mixture based on argon and propane is designed. 2) The production of a monocellular prototype made of a hole and a needle shaped anode. 3) An experimental study of the prototype electrical characteristics and a computation of the electrical field in the counter. The focalization and the electron drift into the hole, the proportional operating mode are shown. Irradiations in front of photon and neutron sources verify these results

  14. Joint use of developed collagen-containing complexes and cell cultures in creating new tissue equivalents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Kulakova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to assess the possibility of applying the integrated module as the basis of a celltissue equivalent for treatment of wounds of skin and soft tissues. In the frame of the set task the following problems were being solved: research of the spatial structure and architectonics of the surface of the developed base collagen-containing materials and their biocompatibility with cell cultures.Materials and methods. The study of a material which is a two-layer complex film, consisting of collagen and polysaccharide components was carried out. The collagen was separated from the dermis and was then impregnated with particulate demineralized bone matrix (DCM according to the original methodology. For the purposes of the study the dehydrated material was created in the form of a film. Electron microscopic examination of surfaces was performed on scanning electron microscope JEOL JSM-IT300LV in high vacuum and at low values of probe current (< 0,1 nА. Studies to assess the viability of the cells cultivated on films of collagen material (tested for cytotoxicity and the adhesive capacity were performed in vitro using strains of diploid human fibroblasts 4–6 passage. The culture condition was visually assessed using an inverted Leica microscope DM IL (Carl Zeiss, Austria, equipped with a computerizes program of control of culture growth (Leica IM 1000.Results. The data obtained in the study of the surface structure of the developed complex module showed that it seems to be promising as a basic component of the cellular-tissue system with its large number of structural formations for fixation of the cells and a well-organized barrier layer capable of vapor - permeability. Experiments in vitro confirmed the absence of toxicity of the material being studied in relation to the culture of dermal human fibroblasts, suggesting the possibility of creation on its basis of cell-tissue complex and further experimental studies in vivo

  15. SU-E-T-424: Feasibility of 3D Printed Radiological Equivalent Customizable Tissue Like Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D; Ferreira, C; Ahmad, S [University of Oklahoma Health Science Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of 3D printing CT# specific radiological equivalent tissue like materials. Methods: A desktop 3D printer was utilized to create a series of 3 cm x 3 cm x 2 cm PLA plastic blocks of varying fill densities. The fill pattern was selected to be hexagonal (Figure 1). A series of blocks was filled with paraffin and compared to a series filled with air. The blocks were evaluated with a “GE Lightspeed” 16 slice CT scanner and average CT# of the centers of the materials was determined. The attenuation properties of the subsequent blocks were also evaluated through their isocentric irradiation via “TrueBeam” accelerator under six beam energies. Blocks were placed upon plastic-water slabs of 4 cm in thickness assuring electronic equilibrium and data was collected via Sun Nuclear “Edge” diode detector. Relative changes in dose were compared with those predicted by Varian “Eclipse” TPS. Results: The CT# of 3D printed blocks was found to be a controllable variable. The fill material was able to narrow the range of variability in each sample. The attenuation of the block tracked with the density of the total fill structure. Assigned CT values in the TPS were seen to fall within an expected range predicted by the CT scans of the 3D printed blocks. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that it is possible to 3D print materials of varying tissue equivalencies, and that these materials have radiological properties that are customizable and predictable.

  16. SU-E-T-424: Feasibility of 3D Printed Radiological Equivalent Customizable Tissue Like Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D; Ferreira, C; Ahmad, S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of 3D printing CT# specific radiological equivalent tissue like materials. Methods: A desktop 3D printer was utilized to create a series of 3 cm x 3 cm x 2 cm PLA plastic blocks of varying fill densities. The fill pattern was selected to be hexagonal (Figure 1). A series of blocks was filled with paraffin and compared to a series filled with air. The blocks were evaluated with a “GE Lightspeed” 16 slice CT scanner and average CT# of the centers of the materials was determined. The attenuation properties of the subsequent blocks were also evaluated through their isocentric irradiation via “TrueBeam” accelerator under six beam energies. Blocks were placed upon plastic-water slabs of 4 cm in thickness assuring electronic equilibrium and data was collected via Sun Nuclear “Edge” diode detector. Relative changes in dose were compared with those predicted by Varian “Eclipse” TPS. Results: The CT# of 3D printed blocks was found to be a controllable variable. The fill material was able to narrow the range of variability in each sample. The attenuation of the block tracked with the density of the total fill structure. Assigned CT values in the TPS were seen to fall within an expected range predicted by the CT scans of the 3D printed blocks. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that it is possible to 3D print materials of varying tissue equivalencies, and that these materials have radiological properties that are customizable and predictable

  17. Assessment of doses caused by electrons in thin layers of tissue-equivalent materials, using MCNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heide, Bernd

    2013-10-01

    Absorbed doses caused by electron irradiation were calculated with Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP) for thin layers of tissue-equivalent materials. The layers were so thin that the calculation of energy deposition was on the border of the scope of MCNP. Therefore, in this article application of three different methods of calculation of energy deposition is discussed. This was done by means of two scenarios: in the first one, electrons were emitted from the centre of a sphere of water and also recorded in that sphere; and in the second, an irradiation with the PTB Secondary Standard BSS2 was modelled, where electrons were emitted from an (90)Sr/(90)Y area source and recorded inside a cuboid phantom made of tissue-equivalent material. The speed and accuracy of the different methods were of interest. While a significant difference in accuracy was visible for one method in the first scenario, the difference in accuracy of the three methods was insignificant for the second one. Considerable differences in speed were found for both scenarios. In order to demonstrate the need for calculating the dose in thin small zones, a third scenario was constructed and simulated as well. The third scenario was nearly equal to the second one, but a pike of lead was assumed to be inside the phantom in addition. A dose enhancement (caused by the pike of lead) of ∼113 % was recorded for a thin hollow cylinder at a depth of 0.007 cm, which the basal-skin layer is referred to in particular. Dose enhancements between 68 and 88 % were found for a slab with a radius of 0.09 cm for all depths. All dose enhancements were hardly noticeable for a slab with a cross-sectional area of 1 cm(2), which is usually applied to operational radiation protection.

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of different positron emitting radionuclides incorporated in a soft tissue volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olaya D, H.; Martinez O, S. A. [Universidad Pedagogica y Tecnologica de Colombia, Grupo de Fisica Nuclear Aplicada y Simulacion, Av. Central del Norte 39-115, 150003 Tunja, Boyaca (Colombia); Sevilla M, A. C. [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Departamento de Fisica, Grupo CRYOMAG, 111321 Bogota D. C. (Colombia); Vega C, H. R., E-mail: grupo.finuas@uptc.edu.co [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98060 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Monte Carlo calculations were carried out where compounds with positron-emitters radionuclides, like FDG ({sup 18}F), Acetate ({sup 11}C), and Ammonium ({sup 13}N), were incorporated into a soft tissue volume, in the aim to estimate the type of particles produced their energies, their mean free paths, and the absorbed dose at different distances with respect to the center of the volume. The volume was modeled with a radius larger than the maximum range of positrons in order to produce 0.511 keV annihilation gamma-ray photons. With the obtained results the equivalent dose, in various organs and tissues able to metabolize different radiopharmaceutical drugs, can be estimated. (Author)

  19. Functional imaging of small tissue volumes with diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Alexander D.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2006-03-01

    Imaging of dynamic changes in blood parameters, functional brain imaging, and tumor imaging are the most advanced application areas of diffuse optical tomography (DOT). When dealing with the image reconstruction problem one is faced with the fact that near-infrared photons, unlike X-rays, are highly scattered when they traverse biological tissue. Image reconstruction schemes are required that model the light propagation inside biological tissue and predict measurements on the tissue surface. By iteratively changing the tissue-parameters until the predictions agree with the real measurements, a spatial distribution of optical properties inside the tissue is found. The optical properties can be related to the tissue oxygenation, inflammation, or to the fluorophore concentration of a biochemical marker. If the model of light propagation is inaccurate, the reconstruction process will lead to an inaccurate result as well. Here, we focus on difficulties that are encountered when DOT is employed for functional imaging of small tissue volumes, for example, in cancer studies involving small animals, or human finger joints for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Most of the currently employed image reconstruction methods rely on the diffusion theory that is an approximation to the equation of radiative transfer. But, in the cases of small tissue volumes and tissues that contain low scattering regions diffusion theory has been shown to be of limited applicability Therefore, we employ a light propagation model that is based on the equation of radiative transfer, which promises to overcome the limitations.

  20. Operation of gas electron multiplier (GEM) with propane gas at low pressure and comparison with tissue-equivalent gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Nardo, L., E-mail: laura.denardo@unipd.it [University of Padova, Physics and Astronomy Department and PD-INFN, via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Farahmand, M., E-mail: majid.farahmand@rivm.nl [Centre for Environmental Safety and Security, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), PO Box 1, NL-3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands)

    2016-05-21

    A Tissue-Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC), based on a single GEM foil of standard geometry, has been tested with pure propane gas at low pressure, in order to simulate a tissue site of about 1 µm equivalent size. In this work, the performance of GEM with propane gas at a pressure of 21 and 28 kPa will be presented. The effective gas gain was measured in various conditions using a {sup 244}Cm alpha source. The dependence of effective gain on the electric field strength along the GEM channel and in the drift and induction region was investigated. A maximum effective gain of about 5×10{sup 3} has been reached. Results obtained in pure propane gas are compared with gas gain measurements in gas mixtures commonly employed in microdosimetry, that is propane and methane based Tissue-Equivalent gas mixtures.

  1. Errors in estimating neutron quality factor using lineal energy distributions measured in tissue-equivalent proportional counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borak, T.B.; Stinchcomb, T.G.

    1982-01-01

    Neutron dose equivalent is obtained from quality factors which are defined in terms of LET. It is possible to estimate the dose averaged quality factor, antiQ, directly from distributions in lineal energy, y, that are measured in tissue-equivalent proportional counters. This eliminates a mathematical transformation of the absorbed dose from D(y) to D(L). We evaluate the inherent error in computing Q from D(y) rather than D(L) for neutron spectra below 4 MeV. The effects of neutron energy and simulated tissue diameters within a gas cavity are examined in detail. (author)

  2. Dosimetry with tissue-equivalent ionisation chambers in fast neutron fields for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoetelief, J.; Broerse, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    The use of calibrated tissue-equivalent (TE) ionisation chambers is commonly considered to be the most practical method for total absorbed dose determinations in mixed neutron-photon fields for biomedical applications. The total absorbed dose can be derived from the charge produced within the cavity of an ionisation chamber employing a number of physical parameters. To arrive at the charge produced in the cavity several correction factors have to be introduced which are related to the operational characteristics of the chambers. Information on the operational characteristics of four TE ionisation chambers is presented in relation to ion collection, density and composition of gas in the cavity, wall thickness and effective point of measurement. In addition, some recent results from an ionisation chamber operated at high gas pressures are presented. The total absorbed doses derived from TE ionisation chambers show agreement within the uncertainty limits with results from other independent dosimetry methods, i.e., differential fluence measurements and a TE calorimeter. Conscientious experimentation and a common data base can provide dosimetry results with TE ionisation chambers with variations of less than +-2%. (author)

  3. Experimental evaluation of the thermal properties of two tissue equivalent phantom materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craciunescu, O I; Howle, L E; Clegg, S T

    1999-01-01

    Tissue equivalent radio frequency (RF) phantoms provide a means for measuring the power deposition of various hyperthermia therapy applicators. Temperature measurements made in phantoms are used to verify the accuracy of various numerical approaches for computing the power and/or temperature distributions. For the numerical simulations to be accurate, the electrical and thermal properties of the materials that form the phantom should be accurately characterized. This paper reports on the experimentally measured thermal properties of two commonly used phantom materials, i.e. a rigid material with the electrical properties of human fat, and a low concentration polymer gel with the electrical properties of human muscle. Particularities of the two samples required the design of alternative measuring techniques for the specific heat and thermal conductivity. For the specific heat, a calorimeter method is used. For the thermal diffusivity, a method derived from the standard guarded comparative-longitudinal heat flow technique was used for both materials. For the 'muscle'-like material, the thermal conductivity, density and specific heat at constant pressure were measured as: k = 0.31 +/- 0.001 W(mK)(-1), p = 1026 +/- 7 kgm(-3), and c(p) = 4584 +/- 107 J(kgK)(-1). For the 'fat'-like material, the literature reports on the density and specific heat such that only the thermal conductivity was measured as k = 0.55 W(mK)(-1).

  4. Effective atomic numbers, electron densities, and tissue equivalence of some gases and mixtures for dosimetry of radiation detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Vishwanath P.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Total mass attenuation coefficients, µm, effective atomic number, Zeff, and effective electron density, Neff, of different gases - carbon dioxide, methane, acetylene, propane, butane, and pentane used in radiation detectors, have been calculated for the photon energy of 1 keV to 100 GeV. Each gas has constant Zeff values between 0.10 to 10 MeV photon energies; however, these values are way far away from ICRU tissue. Carbon dioxide gas shows the closest tissue equivalence in the entire photon energy spectrum. Relative tissue equivalences of the mixtures of gases with respect to ICRU tissue are in the range of 0.998-1.041 for air, argon (4.5% + methane (95.5%, argon (0.5% + carbon dioxide (99.5%, and nitrogen (5% + methane (7% + carbon dioxide (88%. The gas composition of xenon (0.5% + carbon dioxide (99.5% shows 1.605 times higher tissue equivalence compared to the ICRU tissue. The investigated photon interaction parameters are useful for exposure and energy absorption buildup factors calculation and design, and fabrication of gaseous detectors for ambient radiation measurement by the Geiger-Muller detector, ionization chambers and proportional counters.

  5. Performance tests and comparison of microdosimetric measurements with four tissue-equivalent proportional counters in scanning proton therapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Farah, J.; De Saint-Hubert, M.; Mojzeszek, N.; Chiriotti, S.; Gryzinski, M.; Ploc, Ondřej; Trompier, F.; Turek, Karel; Vanhavere, F.; Olko, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 96, JAN (2017), s. 42-52 ISSN 1350-4487 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 662287 - CONCERT Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : tissue-equivalent proportional counters * microdosimetry * proton therapy * stray neutrons and prothons Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering Impact factor: 1.442, year: 2016

  6. Determination of tissue equivalent materials of a physical 8-year-old phantom for use in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhlaghi, Parisa; Miri Hakimabad, Hashem; Rafat Motavalli, Laleh

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the methodology applied to select suitable tissue equivalent materials of an 8-year phantom for use in computed tomography (CT) examinations. To find the appropriate tissue substitutes, first physical properties (physical density, electronic density, effective atomic number, mass attenuation coefficient and CT number) of different materials were studied. Results showed that, the physical properties of water and polyurethane (as soft tissue), B-100 and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) (as bone) and polyurethane foam (as lung) agree more with those of original tissues. Then in the next step, the absorbed doses in the location of 25 thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) as well as dose distribution in one slice of phantom were calculated for original and these proposed materials by Monte Carlo simulation at different tube voltages. The comparisons suggested that at tube voltages of 80 and 100 kVp using B-100 as bone, water as soft tissue and polyurethane foam as lung is suitable for dosimetric study in pediatric CT examinations. In addition, it was concluded that by considering just the mass attenuation coefficient of different materials, the appropriate tissue equivalent substitutes in each desired X-ray energy range could be found. - Highlights: • A methodology to select tissue equivalent materials for use in CT was proposed. • Physical properties of different materials were studied. • TLDs dose and dose distribution were calculated for original and proposed materials. • B-100 as bone, and water as soft tissue are best substitute materials at 80 kVp. • Mass attenuation coefficient is determinant for selecting best tissue substitutes

  7. Determinants of Indices of Cerebral Volume in Former Very Premature Infants at Term Equivalent Age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelie Naud

    Full Text Available Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI at term equivalent age (TEA is suggested to be a reliable tool to predict the outcome of very premature infants. The objective of this study was to determine simple reproducible MRI indices, in premature infants and to analyze their neonatal determinants at TEA. A cohort of infants born before 32 weeks gestational age (GA underwent a MRI at TEA in our center. Two axial images (T2 weighted, were chosen to realize nine measures. We defined 4 linear indices (MAfhlv: thickness of lateral ventricle; CSI: cortex-skull index; VCI: ventricular-cortex index; BOI: bi occipital index and 1 surface index (VS.A: volume slice area. Perinatal data were recorded. Sixty-nine infants had a GA (median (interquartile range of 30.0 weeks GA (27.0; 30.0 and a birth weight of 1240 grams (986; 1477. MRI was done at 41.0 (40.0; 42.0 weeks post menstrual age (PMA. The inter-investigator reproducibility was good. Twenty one MRI (30.5% were quoted abnormal. We observed an association with retinopathy of prematurity (OR [95CI] = 4.205 [1.231-14.368]; p = 0.017, surgery for patent ductus arteriosus (OR = 4.688 [1.01-21.89]; p = 0.036, early onset infection (OR = 4.688 [1.004-21.889]; p = 0.036 and neonatal treatment by cefotaxime (OR = 3.222 [1.093-9.497]; p = 0.03. There was a difference for VCI between normal and abnormal MRI (0.412 (0.388; 0.429 vs. 0.432 (0.418; 0.449; p = 0,019; BOI was higher when fossa posterior lesions were observed; VS.A seems to be the best surrogate for cerebral volume, 80% of VS.As' variance being explained by a multiple linear regression model including 7 variables (head circumference at birth and at TEA, PMA, dopamine, ibuprofen treatment, blood and platelets transfusions. These indices, easily and rapidly achievable, seem to be useful but need to be validated in a large population to allow generalization for diagnosis and follow-up of former premature infants.

  8. Simultaneous determination of equivalence volumes and acid dissociation constants from potentiometric titration data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanastasiou, G; Ziogas, I

    1995-06-01

    New iterative methods for analysis of potentiometric titration data of (a) mixtures of weak monoprotic acids with their conjugate bases, (b) solutions of polyprotic (di- and triprotic) acids, and (c) mixtures of two diprotic acids are presented. These methods, using data exclusively resulting from the acidic region of the titration curve permits the accurate determination of the analytical concentration of one or more acids even if the titration is stopped well before the end point of the titration. For the titration of a solution containing a conjugate acid/base pair, the proposed procedure enables the extraction of the initial composition of the mixture, as well as the dissociation constant of the concerned acid. Thus, it is possible by this type of analysis to distinguish whether a weak acid has been contaminated by a strong base and define the extent of the contamination. On the other hand, for the titration of polyprotic acids, the proposed approach enables the extraction of the accurate values of the equivalence volume and the dissociation constants K(i) even when the ionization stages overlap. Finally, for the titration of a mixture of two diprotic acids the proposed procedure enables the determination of the composition of the mixture even if the sum of the concentrations of the acids is not known. This method can be used in the analysis of solutions containing two diastereoisomeric forms of a weak diprotic acid. The test of the proposed procedures by means of ideal and Monte Carlo simulated data revealed that these methods are fairly applicable even when the titration data are considerably obscured by 'noise' or contain an important systematic error. The proposed procedures were also successfully applied to experimental titration data.

  9. TH-AB-209-12: Tissue Equivalent Phantom with Excised Human Tissue for Assessing Clinical Capabilities of Coherent Scatter Imaging Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albanese, K; Morris, R; Spencer, J [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Greenberg, J [Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Kapadia, A [Carl E Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Previously we reported the development of anthropomorphic tissue-equivalent scatter phantoms of the human breast. Here we present the first results from the scatter imaging of the tissue equivalent breast phantoms for breast cancer diagnosis. Methods: A breast phantom was designed to assess the capability of coded aperture coherent x-ray scatter imaging to classify different types of breast tissue (adipose, fibroglandular, tumor). The phantom geometry was obtained from a prone breast geometry scanned on a dedicated breast CT system. The phantom was 3D printed using the segmented DICOM breast CT data. The 3D breast phantom was filled with lard (as a surrogate for adipose tissue) and scanned in different geometries alongside excised human breast tissues (obtained from lumpectomy and mastectomy procedures). The raw data were reconstructed using a model-based reconstruction algorithm and yielded the location and form factor (i.e., momentum transfer (q) spectrum) of the materials that were imaged. The measured material form factors were then compared to the ground truth measurements acquired by x-ray diffraction (XRD) imaging. Results: Our scatter imaging system was able to define the location and composition of the various materials and tissues within the phantom. Cancerous breast tissue was detected and classified through automated spectral matching and an 86% correlation threshold. The total scan time for the sample was approximately 10 minutes and approaches workflow times for clinical use in intra-operative or other diagnostic tasks. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the first results from an anthropomorphic tissue equivalent scatter phantom to characterize a coherent scatter imaging system. The functionality of the system shows promise in applications such as intra-operative margin detection or virtual biopsy in the diagnosis of breast cancer. Future work includes using additional patient-derived tissues (e.g., human fat), and modeling additional organs

  10. Integral dose and evaluation of irradiated tissue volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivachenko, T.P.; Kalina, V.K.; Belous, A.K.; Gaevskij, V.I.

    1984-01-01

    Two parameters having potentialities of radiotherapy planning improvement are under consideration. One of these two parameters in an integral dose. An efficiency of application of special tables for integral dose estimation is noted. These tables were developed by the Kiev Physician Improvement Institute and the Cybernetics Institute of the Ukrainian SSR Academy of Science. The meaning of the term of ''irradiated tissue volume'' is specified, and the method of calculation of the irradiated tissue effective mass is considered. It is possible to evaluate with higher accuracy tolerance doses taking into account the irradiated mass

  11. The analysis for energy distribution and biological effects of the clusters from electrons in the tissue equivalent material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wenzhong; Guo Yong; Luo Yisheng; Wang Yong

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study energy distribution of the clusters from electrons in the tissue equivalent material, and discuss the important aspects of these clusters on inducing biological effects. Methods: Based on the physical mechanism for electrons interacting with tissue equivalent material, the Monte Carlo (MC) method was used. The electron tracks were lively simulated on an event-by-event (ionization, excitation, elastic scattering, Auger electron emission) basis in the material. The relevant conclusions were drawn from the statistic analysis of these events. Results: The electrons will deposit their energy in the form (30%) of cluster in passing through tissue equivalent material, and most clusters (80%) have the energy amount of more than 50 eV. The cluster density depends on its diameter and energy of electrons, and the deposited energy in the cluster depends on the type and energy of radiation. Conclusion: The deposited energy in cluster is the most important factor in inducing all sort of lesions on DNA molecules in tissue cells

  12. The volume of fluid injected into the tissue expander and the tissue expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Omranifard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Replacement of the lost tissue is the major concerns of the plastic surgeons. Expanded area should be coherent with the surrounding tissue. Tissue expansion technique is the reforming methods the skin tissue scarcities. Several methods for tissue expansion are available; including usage of silicon balloon and injecting fluid into the tissue expander. Materials and Methods: In a clinical trial study, 35 patients, with burn scars, in the face, skull and neck area were studied. We provided a tissue expander device with capacities of 125, 250 and 350cc. Fluid was injected inside the device, 3 consecutive weeks with 1-week interval. After 3 months the device was set out and the tissue expansion was measured using a transparent board and the results were analyzed. Multiple regression was done by SPSS 20 to analyze the data. Results: Regression model showed Skin expansion was positively correlated with the volume of the injected fluid. For each centimeter square of skin expansion, about 6-8 ml of fluid must be injected. Conclusion: Correction of skin defects resulting from burning scar is possible using tissue expanders. The tissue expansion is correlated with the amount of the injected fluid.

  13. Quantification of brain tissue through incorporation of partial volume effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Howard D.; Santago, Peter, II; Snyder, Wesley E.

    1992-06-01

    This research addresses the problem of automatically quantifying the various types of brain tissue, CSF, white matter, and gray matter, using T1-weighted magnetic resonance images. The method employs a statistical model of the noise and partial volume effect and fits the derived probability density function to that of the data. Following this fit, the optimal decision points can be found for the materials and thus they can be quantified. Emphasis is placed on repeatable results for which a confidence in the solution might be measured. Results are presented assuming a single Gaussian noise source and a uniform distribution of partial volume pixels for both simulated and actual data. Thus far results have been mixed, with no clear advantage being shown in taking into account partial volume effects. Due to the fitting problem being ill-conditioned, it is not yet clear whether these results are due to problems with the model or the method of solution.

  14. Calculation of dose distribution for 252Cf fission neutron source in tissue equivalent phantoms using Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Gang; Guo Yong; Luo Yisheng; Zhang Wenzhong

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To provide useful parameters for neutron radiotherapy, the author presents results of a Monte Carlo simulation study investigating the dosimetric characteristics of linear 252 Cf fission neutron sources. Methods: A 252 Cf fission source and tissue equivalent phantom were modeled. The dose of neutron and gamma radiations were calculated using Monte Carlo Code. Results: The dose of neutron and gamma at several positions for 252 Cf in the phantom made of equivalent materials to water, blood, muscle, skin, bone and lung were calculated. Conclusion: The results by Monte Carlo methods were compared with the data by measurement and references. According to the calculation, the method using water phantom to simulate local tissues such as muscle, blood and skin is reasonable for the calculation and measurements of dose distribution for 252 Cf

  15. Characterization of tissues equivalent to the human body by the Monte Carlo method for X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega R, J.; Huamani T, Y.; Mullisaca P, A. F.; Yauri C, L.

    2017-10-01

    There is a need to have materials equivalent to the human body that have the appropriate characteristics to be used as a substitute tissue in the clinical practices of radio-diagnosis, radiotherapy. In Arequipa, Peru, there are two health centers in radiotherapy applications, one with a Theratron Co-60 gamma irradiator and another with Elekta Linac; the Medical Physics Area of the School of Physics of the National University of San Agustin de Arequipa, were four equivalent materials based on epoxy resin, phenolitic spheres, calcium carbonate, etc. were built, such as bone tissue, soft tissue, adipose and lung tissue compared with water, whit the purpose of studying and applying them in future clinical applications. In this work we describe its physical and dosimetric characterization to determine its use as an equivalent material or manikin. The materials are 1 cm thick and 30 cm in diameter, the materials are non-malleable solids, they do not degrade, they have stability in their consistency due to temperature and irradiation, they are not toxic in their use, determining densities from 0.32 g/cm 3 for the lung tissue to 1.8 g/cm 3 for the bone material. These materials were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, giving the percentages by weight of the elements found to determine their effective atomic number, the physical analysis to determine their mass absorption and energy coefficients, which were studied for energy photons between 1 KeV at 20 MeV. The simulation of the equivalent materials and the physical and dosimetric study were found using the code Penelope 2008 Monte Carlo method and validated by the Nist database. The results obtained according to their coefficients of mass attenuation of each material, show lung, bone, soft and adipose tissue with differences with respect to the same Nist materials. The range maximum and minimum Rd deviation found was 35.65 - 3.16 for bone, 28.5 - 6.74 for lung, 33.78 - 9.06 for soft tissue and 86.42 - 1.28 for

  16. Dose equivalent near the bone-soft tissue interface from nuclear fragments produced by high-energy protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavers, M. R.; Poston, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    During manned space missions, high-energy nucleons of cosmic and solar origin collide with atomic nuclei of the human body and produce a broad linear energy transfer spectrum of secondary particles, called target fragments. These nuclear fragments are often more biologically harmful than the direct ionization of the incident nucleon. That these secondary particles increase tissue absorbed dose in regions adjacent to the bone-soft tissue interface was demonstrated in a previous publication. To assess radiological risks to tissue near the bone-soft tissue interface, a computer transport model for nuclear fragments produced by high energy nucleons was used in this study to calculate integral linear energy transfer spectra and dose equivalents resulting from nuclear collisions of 1-GeV protons transversing bone and red bone marrow. In terms of dose equivalent averaged over trabecular bone marrow, target fragments emitted from interactions in both tissues are predicted to be at least as important as the direct ionization of the primary protons-twice as important, if recently recommended radiation weighting factors and "worst-case" geometry are used. The use of conventional dosimetry (absorbed dose weighted by aa linear energy transfer-dependent quality factor) as an appropriate framework for predicting risk from low fluences of high-linear energy transfer target fragments is discussed.

  17. A LabVIEW-based electrical bioimpedance spectroscopic data interpreter (LEBISDI) for biological tissue impedance analysis and equivalent circuit modelling

    KAUST Repository

    Bera, Tushar Kanti

    2016-12-05

    Under an alternating electrical signal, biological tissues produce a complex electrical bioimpedance that is a function of tissue composition and applied signal frequencies. By studying the bioimpedance spectra of biological tissues over a wide range of frequencies, we can noninvasively probe the physiological properties of these tissues to detect possible pathological conditions. Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) can provide the spectra that are needed to calculate impedance parameters within a wide range of frequencies. Before impedance parameters can be calculated and tissue information extracted, impedance spectra should be processed and analyzed by a dedicated software program. National Instruments (NI) Inc. offers LabVIEW, a fast, portable, robust, user-friendly platform for designing dataanalyzing software. We developed a LabVIEW-based electrical bioimpedance spectroscopic data interpreter (LEBISDI) to analyze the electrical impedance spectra for tissue characterization in medical, biomedical and biological applications. Here, we test, calibrate and evaluate the performance of LEBISDI on the impedance data obtained from simulation studies as well as the practical EIS experimentations conducted on electronic circuit element combinations and the biological tissue samples. We analyze the Nyquist plots obtained from the EIS measurements and compare the equivalent circuit parameters calculated by LEBISDI with the corresponding original circuit parameters to assess the accuracy of the program developed. Calibration studies show that LEBISDI not only interpreted the simulated and circuitelement data accurately, but also successfully interpreted tissues impedance data and estimated the capacitive and resistive components produced by the compositions biological cells. Finally, LEBISDI efficiently calculated and analyzed variation in bioimpedance parameters of different tissue compositions, health and temperatures. LEBISDI can also be used for human tissue

  18. A LabVIEW-based electrical bioimpedance spectroscopic data interpreter (LEBISDI) for biological tissue impedance analysis and equivalent circuit modelling

    KAUST Repository

    Bera, Tushar Kanti; Jampana, Nagaraju; Lubineau, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Under an alternating electrical signal, biological tissues produce a complex electrical bioimpedance that is a function of tissue composition and applied signal frequencies. By studying the bioimpedance spectra of biological tissues over a wide range of frequencies, we can noninvasively probe the physiological properties of these tissues to detect possible pathological conditions. Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) can provide the spectra that are needed to calculate impedance parameters within a wide range of frequencies. Before impedance parameters can be calculated and tissue information extracted, impedance spectra should be processed and analyzed by a dedicated software program. National Instruments (NI) Inc. offers LabVIEW, a fast, portable, robust, user-friendly platform for designing dataanalyzing software. We developed a LabVIEW-based electrical bioimpedance spectroscopic data interpreter (LEBISDI) to analyze the electrical impedance spectra for tissue characterization in medical, biomedical and biological applications. Here, we test, calibrate and evaluate the performance of LEBISDI on the impedance data obtained from simulation studies as well as the practical EIS experimentations conducted on electronic circuit element combinations and the biological tissue samples. We analyze the Nyquist plots obtained from the EIS measurements and compare the equivalent circuit parameters calculated by LEBISDI with the corresponding original circuit parameters to assess the accuracy of the program developed. Calibration studies show that LEBISDI not only interpreted the simulated and circuitelement data accurately, but also successfully interpreted tissues impedance data and estimated the capacitive and resistive components produced by the compositions biological cells. Finally, LEBISDI efficiently calculated and analyzed variation in bioimpedance parameters of different tissue compositions, health and temperatures. LEBISDI can also be used for human tissue

  19. Fabrication of a tissue-equivalent torso phantom for intercalibration of in-vivo transuranic-nuclide counting facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, R.V.; Dean, P.N.; Anderson, A.L.; Fisher, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    A tissue-equivalent human-torso phantom has been constructed for calibration of the counting systems used for in-vivo measurement of transuranic nuclides. The phantom contains a human male rib cage, removable model organs, and includes tissue-equivalent chest plates that can be placed over the torso to simulate people with a wide range of statures. The organs included are lungs, heart, liver, kidneys, spleen, and tracheo-bronchial lymph nodes. Polyurethane with different concentrations of calcium carbonate was used to simulate the linear photon-attenuation properties of various human tissues--lean muscle, adipose-muscle mixtures, and cartilage. Foamed polyurethane with calcium carbonate simulates lung tissue. Transuranic isotopes can be incorporated uniformly in the phantom's lungs and other polyurethane-based organs by dissolution of the nitrate form in acetone with lanthanum nitrate carrier. Organs have now been labelled with highly pure 238 Pu, 239 Pu, and 241 Am for calibration measurements. This phantom is the first of three that will be used in a U.S. Department of Energy program of intercomparisons involving more than ten laboratories. The results of the intercomparison will allow participating laboratories to prepare sets of transmission curves that can be used to predict the performance of their counting systems for a wide range of subject builds and organ depositions. The intercomparison will also provide valuable information on the relative performance of a variety of detector systems and counting techniques

  20. Mineral density volume gradients in normal and diseased human tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabra I Djomehri

    Full Text Available Clinical computed tomography provides a single mineral density (MD value for heterogeneous calcified tissues containing early and late stage pathologic formations. The novel aspect of this study is that, it extends current quantitative methods of mapping mineral density gradients to three dimensions, discretizes early and late mineralized stages, identifies elemental distribution in discretized volumes, and correlates measured MD with respective calcium (Ca to phosphorus (P and Ca to zinc (Zn elemental ratios. To accomplish this, MD variations identified using polychromatic radiation from a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT benchtop unit were correlated with elemental mapping obtained from a microprobe X-ray fluorescence (XRF using synchrotron monochromatic radiation. Digital segmentation of tomograms from normal and diseased tissues (N=5 per group; 40-60 year old males contained significant mineral density variations (enamel: 2820-3095 mg/cc, bone: 570-1415 mg/cc, cementum: 1240-1340 mg/cc, dentin: 1480-1590 mg/cc, cementum affected by periodontitis: 1100-1220 mg/cc, hypomineralized carious dentin: 345-1450 mg/cc, hypermineralized carious dentin: 1815-2740 mg/cc, and dental calculus: 1290-1770 mg/cc. A plausible linear correlation between segmented MD volumes and elemental ratios within these volumes was established, and Ca/P ratios for dentin (1.49, hypomineralized dentin (0.32-0.46, cementum (1.51, and bone (1.68 were observed. Furthermore, varying Ca/Zn ratios were distinguished in adapted compared to normal tissues, such as in bone (855-2765 and in cementum (595-990, highlighting Zn as an influential element in prompting observed adaptive properties. Hence, results provide insights on mineral density gradients with elemental concentrations and elemental footprints that in turn could aid in elucidating mechanistic processes for pathologic formations.

  1. Mineral Density Volume Gradients in Normal and Diseased Human Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djomehri, Sabra I.; Candell, Susan; Case, Thomas; Browning, Alyssa; Marshall, Grayson W.; Yun, Wenbing; Lau, S. H.; Webb, Samuel; Ho, Sunita P.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical computed tomography provides a single mineral density (MD) value for heterogeneous calcified tissues containing early and late stage pathologic formations. The novel aspect of this study is that, it extends current quantitative methods of mapping mineral density gradients to three dimensions, discretizes early and late mineralized stages, identifies elemental distribution in discretized volumes, and correlates measured MD with respective calcium (Ca) to phosphorus (P) and Ca to zinc (Zn) elemental ratios. To accomplish this, MD variations identified using polychromatic radiation from a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) benchtop unit were correlated with elemental mapping obtained from a microprobe X-ray fluorescence (XRF) using synchrotron monochromatic radiation. Digital segmentation of tomograms from normal and diseased tissues (N=5 per group; 40-60 year old males) contained significant mineral density variations (enamel: 2820-3095mg/cc, bone: 570-1415mg/cc, cementum: 1240-1340mg/cc, dentin: 1480-1590mg/cc, cementum affected by periodontitis: 1100-1220mg/cc, hypomineralized carious dentin: 345-1450mg/cc, hypermineralized carious dentin: 1815-2740mg/cc, and dental calculus: 1290-1770mg/cc). A plausible linear correlation between segmented MD volumes and elemental ratios within these volumes was established, and Ca/P ratios for dentin (1.49), hypomineralized dentin (0.32-0.46), cementum (1.51), and bone (1.68) were observed. Furthermore, varying Ca/Zn ratios were distinguished in adapted compared to normal tissues, such as in bone (855-2765) and in cementum (595-990), highlighting Zn as an influential element in prompting observed adaptive properties. Hence, results provide insights on mineral density gradients with elemental concentrations and elemental footprints that in turn could aid in elucidating mechanistic processes for pathologic formations. PMID:25856386

  2. Single x-ray absorptiometry method for the quantitative mammographic measure of fibroglandular tissue volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkov, Serghei; Wang, Jeff; Kerlikowske, Karla; Cummings, Steven R.; Shepherd, John A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study describes the design and characteristics of a highly accurate, precise, and automated single-energy method to quantify percent fibroglandular tissue volume (%FGV) and fibroglandular tissue volume (FGV) using digital screening mammography. Methods: The method uses a breast tissue-equivalent phantom in the unused portion of the mammogram as a reference to estimate breast composition. The phantom is used to calculate breast thickness and composition for each image regardless of x-ray technique or the presence of paddle tilt. The phantom adheres to the top of the mammographic compression paddle and stays in place for both craniocaudal and mediolateral oblique screening views. We describe the automated method to identify the phantom and paddle orientation with a three-dimensional reconstruction least-squares technique. A series of test phantoms, with a breast thickness range of 0.5-8 cm and a %FGV of 0%-100%, were made to test the accuracy and precision of the technique. Results: Using test phantoms, the estimated repeatability standard deviation equaled 2%, with a ±2% accuracy for the entire thickness and density ranges. Without correction, paddle tilt was found to create large errors in the measured density values of up to 7%/mm difference from actual breast thickness. This new density measurement is stable over time, with no significant drifts in calibration noted during a four-month period. Comparisons of %FGV to mammographic percent density and left to right breast %FGV were highly correlated (r=0.83 and 0.94, respectively). Conclusions: An automated method for quantifying fibroglandular tissue volume has been developed. It exhibited good accuracy and precision for a broad range of breast thicknesses, paddle tilt angles, and %FGV values. Clinical testing showed high correlation to mammographic density and between left and right breasts.

  3. Study of the equivalent dose distribution in organs and tissues using periapical odontological radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, H.F.S.; Cipeli, J.F.; Fortes, M.A.B.; Federico, C.A.

    2017-01-01

    In this article presents a study of the doses obtained in periapical odontological radiography in main tissues of the head, using thermoluminescent dosemeters of type TLD-700H applied to a anthropomorphic simulator. The results indicate that the skin and salivary glands received the highest doses and the risk of calculated injury was 1.44 x 10 -6 Sv -1 per radiograph

  4. ORION: a computer code for evaluating environmental concentrations and dose equivalent to human organs or tissue from airborne radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, K.; Nomura, T.; Iwai, M.

    1983-05-01

    The computer code ORION has been developed to evaluate the environmental concentrations and the dose equivalent to human organs or tissue from air-borne radionuclides released from multiple nuclear installations. The modified Gaussian plume model is applied to calculate the dispersion of the radionuclide. Gravitational settling, dry deposition, precipitation scavenging and radioactive decay are considered to be the causes of depletion and deposition on the ground or on vegetation. ORION is written in the FORTRAN IV language and can be run on IBM 360, 370, 303X, 43XX and FACOM M-series computers. 8 references, 6 tables

  5. Gross tumor volume and clinical target volume: soft-tissue sarcoma of the extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lartigau, E.; Kantor, G.; Lagarde, P.; Taieb, S.; Ceugnart, L.; Vilain, M.O.; Penel, N.; Depadt, G.

    2001-01-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas of the extremities are currently treated with more conservative and functional approaches, combining surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The role of external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy has been defined through randomized studies performed in the 80's and 90's. However, the ubiquity of tumour location for these tumours makes difficult a systematic definition of local treatments. Tumour volume definition is based on pre and post surgical imaging (MRI) and on described pathological report. The clinical target volume will take into account quality of the resection and anatomical barriers and will be based on an anatomy and not only on safety margins around the tumour bed. General rules for this irradiation (doses, volumes) and principal results will be presented. (authors)

  6. A simple method to evaluate the composition of tissue-equivalent phantom materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geske, G.

    1977-01-01

    A description is given of a method to calculate the composition of phantom materials with given density and radiation-physical parameters mixed of components, of which are known their chemical composition and their effective specific volumes. By an example of a simple composition with three components the method is illustrated. The results of this example and some experimental details that must be considered are discussed. (orig.) [de

  7. Technical Note: Radiation properties of tissue- and water-equivalent materials formulated using the stoichiometric analysis method in charged particle therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yohannes, Indra; Vasiliniuc, Stefan [Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen 91054 (Germany); Hild, Sebastian [Faculty of Medicine, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen 91054, Germany and Department of Biophysics, GSI - Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Langner, Oliver [QRM - Quality Assurance in Radiology and Medicine GmbH, Möhrendorf 91096 (Germany); Graeff, Christian [Department of Biophysics, GSI - Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Bert, Christoph, E-mail: christoph.bert@uk-erlangen.de [Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen 91054 (Germany); Faculty of Medicine, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen 91054 (Germany); Department of Biophysics, GSI - Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Five tissue- and water-equivalent materials (TEMs) mimicking ICRU real tissues have been formulated using a previously established stoichiometric analysis method (SAM) to be applied in charged particle therapy. The purpose of this study was an experimental verification of the TEMs-SAM against charged particle beam measurements and for different computed tomography (CT) scanners. The potential of the TEMs-SAM to be employed in the dosimetry was also investigated. Methods: Experimental verification with three CT scanners was carried out to validate the calculated Hounsfield units (HUs) of the TEMs. Water-equivalent path lengths (WEPLs) of the TEMs for proton (106.8 MeV/u), helium (107.93 MeV/u), and carbon (200.3 MeV/u) ions were measured to be compared with the computed relative stopping powers. HU calibration curves were also generated. Results: Differences between the measured HUs of the TEMs and the calculated HUs of the ICRU real tissues for all CT scanners were smaller than 4 HU except for the skeletal tissues which deviated up to 21 HU. The measured WEPLs verified the calculated WEPLs of the TEMs (maximum deviation was 0.17 mm) and were in good agreement with the calculated WEPLs of the ICRU real tissues (maximum deviation was 0.23 mm). Moreover, the relative stopping powers converted from the measured WEPLs differed less than 0.8% and 1.3% from the calculated values of the SAM and the ICRU, respectively. Regarding the relative nonelastic cross section per unit of volume for 200 MeV protons, the ICRU real tissues were generally well represented by the TEMs except for adipose which differed 3.8%. Further, the HU calibration curves yielded the mean and the standard deviation of the errors not larger than 0.5% and 1.9%, respectively. Conclusions: The results of this investigation implied the potential of the TEMs formulated using the SAM to be employed for both, beam dosimetry and HU calibration in charged particle therapy.

  8. Technical Note: Radiation properties of tissue- and water-equivalent materials formulated using the stoichiometric analysis method in charged particle therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yohannes, Indra; Vasiliniuc, Stefan; Hild, Sebastian; Langner, Oliver; Graeff, Christian; Bert, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Five tissue- and water-equivalent materials (TEMs) mimicking ICRU real tissues have been formulated using a previously established stoichiometric analysis method (SAM) to be applied in charged particle therapy. The purpose of this study was an experimental verification of the TEMs-SAM against charged particle beam measurements and for different computed tomography (CT) scanners. The potential of the TEMs-SAM to be employed in the dosimetry was also investigated. Methods: Experimental verification with three CT scanners was carried out to validate the calculated Hounsfield units (HUs) of the TEMs. Water-equivalent path lengths (WEPLs) of the TEMs for proton (106.8 MeV/u), helium (107.93 MeV/u), and carbon (200.3 MeV/u) ions were measured to be compared with the computed relative stopping powers. HU calibration curves were also generated. Results: Differences between the measured HUs of the TEMs and the calculated HUs of the ICRU real tissues for all CT scanners were smaller than 4 HU except for the skeletal tissues which deviated up to 21 HU. The measured WEPLs verified the calculated WEPLs of the TEMs (maximum deviation was 0.17 mm) and were in good agreement with the calculated WEPLs of the ICRU real tissues (maximum deviation was 0.23 mm). Moreover, the relative stopping powers converted from the measured WEPLs differed less than 0.8% and 1.3% from the calculated values of the SAM and the ICRU, respectively. Regarding the relative nonelastic cross section per unit of volume for 200 MeV protons, the ICRU real tissues were generally well represented by the TEMs except for adipose which differed 3.8%. Further, the HU calibration curves yielded the mean and the standard deviation of the errors not larger than 0.5% and 1.9%, respectively. Conclusions: The results of this investigation implied the potential of the TEMs formulated using the SAM to be employed for both, beam dosimetry and HU calibration in charged particle therapy

  9. Technical Note: Radiation properties of tissue- and water-equivalent materials formulated using the stoichiometric analysis method in charged particle therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yohannes, Indra; Hild, Sebastian; Vasiliniuc, Stefan; Langner, Oliver; Graeff, Christian; Bert, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Five tissue- and water-equivalent materials (TEMs) mimicking ICRU real tissues have been formulated using a previously established stoichiometric analysis method (SAM) to be applied in charged particle therapy. The purpose of this study was an experimental verification of the TEMs-SAM against charged particle beam measurements and for different computed tomography (CT) scanners. The potential of the TEMs-SAM to be employed in the dosimetry was also investigated. Experimental verification with three CT scanners was carried out to validate the calculated Hounsfield units (HUs) of the TEMs. Water-equivalent path lengths (WEPLs) of the TEMs for proton (106.8 MeV/u), helium (107.93 MeV/u), and carbon (200.3 MeV/u) ions were measured to be compared with the computed relative stopping powers. HU calibration curves were also generated. Differences between the measured HUs of the TEMs and the calculated HUs of the ICRU real tissues for all CT scanners were smaller than 4 HU except for the skeletal tissues which deviated up to 21 HU. The measured WEPLs verified the calculated WEPLs of the TEMs (maximum deviation was 0.17 mm) and were in good agreement with the calculated WEPLs of the ICRU real tissues (maximum deviation was 0.23 mm). Moreover, the relative stopping powers converted from the measured WEPLs differed less than 0.8% and 1.3% from the calculated values of the SAM and the ICRU, respectively. Regarding the relative nonelastic cross section per unit of volume for 200 MeV protons, the ICRU real tissues were generally well represented by the TEMs except for adipose which differed 3.8%. Further, the HU calibration curves yielded the mean and the standard deviation of the errors not larger than 0.5% and 1.9%, respectively. The results of this investigation implied the potential of the TEMs formulated using the SAM to be employed for both, beam dosimetry and HU calibration in charged particle therapy.

  10. Development of a tissue-engineered human oral mucosa equivalent based on an acellular allogeneic dermal matrix: a preliminary report of clinical application to burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Takuya; Takami, Yoshihiro; Yamaguchi, Ryo; Shimazaki, Shuji; Harii, Kiyonori

    2005-01-01

    Tissue-engineered skin equivalents composed of epidermal and dermal components have been widely investigated for coverage of full-thickness skin defects. We developed a tissue-engineered oral mucosa equivalent based on an acellular allogeneic dermal matrix and investigated its characteristics. We also tried and assessed its preliminary clinical application. Human oral mucosal keratinocytes were separated from a piece of oral mucosa and cultured in a chemically-defined medium. The keratinocytes were seeded on to the acellular allogeneic dermal matrix and cultured. Histologically, the mucosa equivalent had a well-stratified epithelial layer. Immunohistochemical study showed that it was similar to normal oral mucosa. We applied this equivalent in one case with an extensive burn wound. The equivalent was transplanted three weeks after the harvest of the patient's oral mucosa and about 30% of the graft finally survived. We conclude that this new oral mucosa equivalent could become a therapeutic option for the treatment of extensive burns.

  11. Equivalent uniform dose concept evaluated by theoretical dose volume histograms for thoracic irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, J L; Lorchel, F; Perrot, Y; Aletti, P; Noel, A; Wolf, D; Courvoisier, P; Bosset, J F

    2007-03-01

    The goal of our study was to quantify the limits of the EUD models for use in score functions in inverse planning software, and for clinical application. We focused on oesophagus cancer irradiation. Our evaluation was based on theoretical dose volume histograms (DVH), and we analyzed them using volumetric and linear quadratic EUD models, average and maximum dose concepts, the linear quadratic model and the differential area between each DVH. We evaluated our models using theoretical and more complex DVHs for the above regions of interest. We studied three types of DVH for the target volume: the first followed the ICRU dose homogeneity recommendations; the second was built out of the first requirements and the same average dose was built in for all cases; the third was truncated by a small dose hole. We also built theoretical DVHs for the organs at risk, in order to evaluate the limits of, and the ways to use both EUD(1) and EUD/LQ models, comparing them to the traditional ways of scoring a treatment plan. For each volume of interest we built theoretical treatment plans with differences in the fractionation. We concluded that both volumetric and linear quadratic EUDs should be used. Volumetric EUD(1) takes into account neither hot-cold spot compensation nor the differences in fractionation, but it is more sensitive to the increase of the irradiated volume. With linear quadratic EUD/LQ, a volumetric analysis of fractionation variation effort can be performed.

  12. Effect of chest wall radiotherapy in different manners using tissue equivalent bolus on skin and lung of cavia cobayas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Wei; Qu Yaqin; Song Xiangfu; Liu Shixin; Jia Xiaojing; Guo He; Yang Lei

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To probe the influence of electron beam radiotherapy in different manners using different tissue equivalent boluses on skin and lung. Methods: Adult female cavia cobayas were randomly divided into four groups as control group, half-time with bolus group, half-time with bolus group and without bolus group. Acute-irradiation animal models were established using electron beam in different manners with or without 0.5 cm tissue equivalent bolus. Pathological changes in lung, hair vesicle and fibroblast cell count were analyzed 40 clays after irradiation. Results: The radiation dermatitis in the group with bolus was slighter than that of the group without bolus, but the radiation pneumonia was reverse. With bolus, the radiation dermatitis of haft-time group was slighter than that of full-time group. The injury repair of half-time group was more active than full-time group. Conclusions: The treatment of haft-time bolus could protect lung without serious skin complications. (authors)

  13. Evaluation of brain tissue applying equivalent cross-relaxation rate using MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obata, Hideaki; Inaba, Tadashi; Tokuda, Masataka; Matsushima, Shigeru; Kinosada, Yasutomi

    2003-01-01

    The equivalent cross-relaxation rate (ECR) is a measurement method that can evaluate a change in organization structure quantitatively utilizing MRI. The goal of this study is to discover a parameter that we can use to evaluate aging of the human brain using ECR. Fourteen patients diagnosed with diseases other than those located in the cranium were imaged using a SIGNA model of GE Medical Systems equipped with a 1.5 T clinical scanner. The ECR values were defined as the percentage of signal loss between unsaturated and saturated images. It was found that the ECR value of gray matter was lower than subcortical white matter. At ages under 70 years old, the mean of ECR values of subcortical white matter showed stable values with insignificant variance. Furthermore, there was no correlation between age and ECR value of every region calculated. On the other hand, it was found that there was a negative correlation for the ECR values of subcortical white matter and gray matter at ages slightly over 70 years old. It is possible that the reduction in ECR value shows demyelination by aging in the senium. When the offset frequency is near the water resonance frequency, the ECR values mean information about neurocytes. Accordingly, the ECR (320)/ECR (1200) value probably shows that information is related to the amount or activity of neurons. (author)

  14. Optical coherence tomography detection of shear wave propagation in inhomogeneous tissue equivalent phantoms and ex-vivo carotid artery samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razani, Marjan; Luk, Timothy W.H.; Mariampillai, Adrian; Siegler, Peter; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Kolios, Michael C.; Yang, Victor X.D.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we explored the potential of measuring shear wave propagation using optical coherence elastography (OCE) in an inhomogeneous phantom and carotid artery samples based on a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Shear waves were generated using a piezoelectric transducer transmitting sine-wave bursts of 400 μs duration, applying acoustic radiation force (ARF) to inhomogeneous phantoms and carotid artery samples, synchronized with a swept-source OCT (SS-OCT) imaging system. The phantoms were composed of gelatin and titanium dioxide whereas the carotid artery samples were embedded in gel. Differential OCT phase maps, measured with and without the ARF, detected the microscopic displacement generated by shear wave propagation in these phantoms and samples of different stiffness. We present the technique for calculating tissue mechanical properties by propagating shear waves in inhomogeneous tissue equivalent phantoms and carotid artery samples using the ARF of an ultrasound transducer, and measuring the shear wave speed and its associated properties in the different layers with OCT phase maps. This method lays the foundation for future in-vitro and in-vivo studies of mechanical property measurements of biological tissues such as vascular tissues, where normal and pathological structures may exhibit significant contrast in the shear modulus. PMID:24688822

  15. Nonlinear ultrasound propagation through layered liquid and tissue-equivalent media: computational and experimental results at high frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Ross; Cherin, Emmanuel; Lam, Toby Y J; Tavakkoli, Jahangir; Zemp, Roger J; Foster, F Stuart

    2006-01-01

    Nonlinear propagation has been demonstrated to have a significant impact on ultrasound imaging. An efficient computational algorithm is presented to simulate nonlinear ultrasound propagation through layered liquid and tissue-equivalent media. Results are compared with hydrophone measurements. This study was undertaken to investigate the role of nonlinear propagation in high frequency ultrasound micro-imaging. The acoustic field of a focused transducer (20 MHz centre frequency, f-number 2.5) was simulated for layered media consisting of water and tissue-mimicking phantom, for several wide-bandwidth source pulses. The simulation model accounted for the effects of diffraction, attenuation and nonlinearity, with transmission and refraction at layer boundaries. The parameter of nonlinearity, B/A, of the water and tissue-mimicking phantom were assumed to be 5.2 and 7.4, respectively. The experimentally measured phantom B/A value found using a finite-amplitude insert-substitution method was shown to be 7.4 ± 0.6. Relative amounts of measured second and third harmonic pressures as a function of the fundamental pressures at the focus were in good agreement with simulations. Agreement within 3% was found between measurements and simulations of the beam widths of the fundamental and second harmonic signals following propagation through the tissue phantom. The results demonstrate significant nonlinear propagation effects for high frequency imaging beams

  16. MOSFET dosimeter depth-dose measurements in heterogeneous tissue-equivalent phantoms at diagnostic x-ray energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, A.K.; Pazik, F.D.; Hintenlang, D.E.; Bolch, W.E.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to explore the use of the TN-1002RD metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter for measuring tissue depth dose at diagnostic photon energies in both homogeneous and heterogeneous tissue-equivalent materials. Three cylindrical phantoms were constructed and utilized as a prelude to more complex measurements within tomographic physical phantoms of pediatric patients. Each cylindrical phantom was constructed as a stack of seven 5-cm-diameter and 1-cm-thick discs of materials radiographically representative of either soft tissue (S), bone (B), or lung tissue (L) at diagnostic photon energies. In addition to a homogeneous phantom of soft tissue (SSSSSSS), two heterogeneous phantoms were constructed: SSBBSSS and SBLLBSS. MOSFET dosimeters were then positioned at the interface of each disc, and the phantoms were then irradiated at 66 kVp and 200 mAs. Measured values of absorbed dose at depth were then compared to predicated values of point tissue dose as determined via Monte Carlo radiation transport modeling. At depths exceeding 2 cm, experimental results matched the computed values of dose with high accuracy regardless of the dosimeter orientation (epoxy bubble facing toward or away from the x-ray beam). Discrepancies were noted, however, between measured and calculated point doses near the surface of the phantom (surface to 2 cm depth) when the dosimeters were oriented with the epoxy bubble facing the x-ray beam. These discrepancies were largely eliminated when the dosimeters were placed with the flat side facing the x-ray beam. It is therefore recommended that the MOSFET dosimeters be oriented with their flat sides facing the beam when they are used at shallow depths or on the surface of either phantoms or patients

  17. Critical study of some soft-tissue equivalent material. Sensitivity to neutrons of 1 keV to 14 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerviler, H. de; Pages, L.; Tardy-Joubert, Ph.

    1965-01-01

    Authors have studied the elastic and inelastic reactions on various elements contribution to kerma in standard soft tissue and as a function of neutron energy from 1 keV to 14 MeV the ratio of kerma in tissue equivalent material to kerma in soft tissue. The results of calculations are made for materials without hydrogen in view to state exactly their neutron sensitivity and for the following hydrogenous materials: Rossi and Failla plastic, MixD, pure polyethylene and a new CEA tissue equivalent (a magnesium fluoride and polyethylene compound). Results for γ-rays are given. (authors) [fr

  18. Measurement of characteristic prompt gamma rays emitted from oxygen and carbon in tissue-equivalent samples during proton beam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polf, Jerimy C; Panthi, Rajesh; Mackin, Dennis S; McCleskey, Matt; Saastamoinen, Antti; Roeder, Brian T; Beddar, Sam

    2013-09-07

    The purpose of this work was to characterize how prompt gamma (PG) emission from tissue changes as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration, and to assess the feasibility of determining elemental concentration in tissues irradiated with proton beams. For this study, four tissue-equivalent water-sucrose samples with differing densities and concentrations of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen were irradiated with a 48 MeV proton pencil beam. The PG spectrum emitted from each sample was measured using a high-purity germanium detector, and the absolute detection efficiency of the detector, average beam current, and delivered dose distribution were also measured. Changes to the total PG emission from (12)C (4.44 MeV) and (16)O (6.13 MeV) per incident proton and per Gray of absorbed dose were characterized as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration in the sample. The intensity of the 4.44 MeV PG emission per incident proton was found to be nearly constant for all samples regardless of their carbon concentration. However, we found that the 6.13 MeV PG emission increased linearly with the total amount (in grams) of oxygen irradiated in the sample. From the measured PG data, we determined that 1.64 × 10(7) oxygen PGs were emitted per gram of oxygen irradiated per Gray of absorbed dose delivered with a 48 MeV proton beam. These results indicate that the 6.13 MeV PG emission from (16)O is proportional to the concentration of oxygen in tissue irradiated with proton beams, showing that it is possible to determine the concentration of oxygen within tissues irradiated with proton beams by measuring (16)O PG emission.

  19. Realisation and qualification of a tissue equivalent proportional counter with a multi-cellular geometry for the individual neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoflack, Ch.

    1999-01-01

    The present day dosimetry means for radiations with a strong ionization density cannot fulfill the future radioprotection regulations which will require an individual dosimetry with active dosemeters. The aim of this work is the study and development of an individual dosemeter based on a tissue equivalent proportional counter and with a multi-cellular geometry allowing to reach a sensibility equivalent to environmental dosemeters. A pressure regulation bench has been added to the detector in order to reduce the degassing of the detector parts and to reach a sufficient service life for the implementation of the characterization tests. The hole counter system has been adopted for the first prototypes in order to reduce the sensibility of the wires multiplication system with respect to mechanical vibrations. Tests performed with an internal alpha source have shown that a better electrical efficiency can be reached when more severe mechanical limits are adopted during the construction. The dose equivalent response of the prototype for mono-energy neutrons of 144 keV to 2.5 MeV is analyzed experimentally and by simulation. During experiments with normal incidence neutrons, the prototype fulfills the requirements of the CEI N O 1323 standard for energies comprised between 400 keV and 2.5 MeV, while the simulation indicates a satisfactory response up to 200 keV. A preliminary study of the behaviour of the detector with respect to the neutrons incidence indicates that the multi-cellular geometry is efficient for large angles (the sensibility of the prototype is increased by a factor 3). Finally, simulation studies have to be made to optimize the electrical operation and the geometry of the next prototype. (J.S.)

  20. A new Monte Carlo program for calculations of dose distributions within tissue equivalent phantoms irradiated from π--meson beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przybilla, G.

    1980-11-01

    The present paper reports on the structure and first results from a new Monte Carlo programme for calculations of energy distributions within tissue equivalent phantoms irradiated from π - -beams. Each pion or generated secondary particle is transported until to the complete loss of its kinetic energy taking into account pion processes like multiple Coulomb scattering, pion reactions in flight and absorption of stopped pions. The code uses mainly data from experiments, and physical models have been added only in cases of lacking data. Depth dose curves for a pensil beam of 170 MeV/c within a water phantom are discussed as a function of various parameters. Isodose contours are plotted resulting from a convolution of an extended beam profile and the dose distribution of a pencil beams. (orig.) [de

  1. Skin equivalent tissue-engineered construct: co-cultured fibroblasts/ keratinocytes on 3D matrices of sericin hope cocoons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Nayak

    Full Text Available The development of effective and alternative tissue-engineered skin replacements to autografts, allografts and xenografts has became a clinical requirement due to the problems related to source of donor tissue and the perceived risk of disease transmission. In the present study 3D tissue engineered construct of sericin is developed using co-culture of keratinocytes on the upper surface of the fabricated matrices and with fibroblasts on lower surface. Sericin is obtained from "Sericin Hope" silkworm of Bombyx mori mutant and is extracted from cocoons by autoclave. Porous sericin matrices are prepared by freeze dried method using genipin as crosslinker. The matrices are characterized biochemically and biophysically. The cell proliferation and viability of co-cultured fibroblasts and keratinocytes on matrices for at least 28 days are observed by live/dead assay, Alamar blue assay, and by dual fluorescent staining. The growth of the fibroblasts and keratinocytes in co-culture is correlated with the expression level of TGF-β, b-FGF and IL-8 in the cultured supernatants by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The histological analysis further demonstrates a multi-layered stratified epidermal layer of uninhibited keratinocytes in co-cultured constructs. Presence of involucrin, collagen IV and the fibroblast surface protein in immuno-histochemical stained sections of co-cultured matrices indicates the significance of paracrine signaling between keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the expression of extracellular matrix protein for dermal repair. No significant amount of pro inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and nitric oxide production are evidenced when macrophages grown on the sericin matrices. The results all together depict the potentiality of sericin 3D matrices as skin equivalent tissue engineered construct in wound repair.

  2. Different concentrations and volumes of p-phenylenediamine in pet. (equivalent doses) are associated with similar patch test outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Flemming; Hamann, Carsten R; Andersen, Klaus E

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Concern about causing active sensitization when patch testing is performed with p-phenylenediamine (PPD) 1% pet. has led to a recommendation to use PPD 0.3% pet. as a potentially safer preparation. However, the dose per area of allergen delivered, and hence the risk of active...... sensitization, depend on the amount dispensed into the patch test chamber, which can vary widely. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether patch testing with equivalent doses of different concentrations of PPD in pet. is associated with similar outcomes. METHODS: Seventeen known PPD-sensitive subjects were patch tested...... with different volumes and concentrations of PPD in pet. that deliver the same allergen dose per unit area (6 mg of PPD 1% pet. and 20 mg of PPD 0.3% pet. in Finn Chambers®, both equivalent to ∼ 0.09 mg/cm2 ). RESULTS: Eleven patients (65%) had positive reactions to both doses; 4 patients (24%) had negative...

  3. A theoretical study for the real-time assessment of external gamma exposure using equivalent-volume numerical integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Moon Hee

    1995-02-01

    An approximate method for estimating gamma external dose due to an arbitrary distribution of radioactive material has been developed. For the assessment of external gamma dose, the space over which radioactive material is distributed has been assumed to be composed of hexagonal cells. The evaluation of three-dimensional integration over the space is an extremely time-consuming task. Hence, a different approach has been used for the study, i.e., a equivalent-volume spherical approach in which a regular hexahedron is modeled as a equivalent-volume sphere to simplify the integration. For the justification of the current approach, two case studies have been performed: a comparison with a point source approximation and a comparison of external dose rate with the Monte Carlo integration. These comparisons show that the current approach gives reasonable results in a physical sense. Computing times of the developed and Monte Carlo integration method on VAX system have been compared as a function of the number of hexagonal cells. This comparison shows that CPU times for both methods are comparable in the region of small number of cells, but in the region of large number, Monte Carlo integration needs much more computing times. The proposed method is shown to have an accuracy equivalent to Monte Carlo method with an advantage of much shorter calculation time. Then, the method developed here evaluates early off-site consequences of a nuclear accident. An accident consequence assessment model has been integrated using Gaussian puff model which is used to obtain the distribution of radioactive material in the air and on the ground. For this work, the real meteorological data measured at Kori site for 10 years (1976 - 1985) have been statistically analyzed for obtaining site-specific conditions. The short-term external gamma exposures have been assessed for several site-specific meteorological conditions. The results show that the extent and the pattern of short-term external

  4. SU-F-T-517: Determining the Tissue Equivalence of a Brass Mesh Bolus in a Reconstructed Chest Wall Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shekel, E; Epstein, D; Levin, D [Dept of radiotherapy, Assuta Medical Centers, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the tissue equivalence of a brass mesh bolus (RPD) in the setting of a reconstructed chest wall irradiation Methods: We measured breast skin dose delivered by a tangential field plan on an anthropomorphic phantom using Mosfet and nanoDot (Landauer) dosimeters in five different locations on the breast. We also measured skin dose using no bolus, 5mm and 10 mm superflab bolus. In the Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian, Palo Alto, CA) we calculated skin dose for different bolus thicknesses, ranging from 0 to 10 mm, in order to evaluate which calculation best matches the brass mesh measurements, as the brass mesh cannot be simulated due to artefacts.Finally, we measured depth dose behavior with the brass mesh bolus to verify that the bolus does not affect the dose to the breast itself beyond the build-up region. Results: Mosfet and nanoDot measurements were consistent with each other.As expected, skin dose measurements with no bolus had the least agreement with Eclipse calculation, while measurements for 5 and 10 mm agreed well with the calculation despite the difficulty in conforming superflab bolus to the breast contour. For the brass mesh the best agreement was for 3 mm bolus Eclipse calculation. For Mosfets, the average measurement was 90.8% of the expected dose, and for nanoDots 88.33% compared to 83.34%, 88.64% and 93.94% (2,3 and 5 mm bolus calculation respectively).The brass mesh bolus increased skin dose by approximately 25% but there was no dose increase beyond the build-up region. Conclusion: Brass mesh bolus is most equivalent to a 3 mm bolus, and does not affect the dose beyond the build-up region. The brass mesh cannot be directly calculated in Eclipse, hence a 3mm bolus calculation is a good reflection of the dose response to the brass mesh bolus.

  5. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents in tissues of birds at Green Bay, Wisconsin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Paul D.; Giesy, John P.; Newsted, John L.; Verbrugge, David A.; Beaver, Donald L.; Ankley, Gerald T.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Lodge, Keith B.; Niemi, Gerald J.

    1993-01-01

    The environment has become contaminated with complex mixtures of planar, chlorinated hydrocarbons (PCHs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and structurally similar compounds. Because the potencies of individual congeners to cause the same adverse effects vary greatly and the relative as well as absolute concentrations of individual PCH vary among samples from different locations, it is difficult to assess the toxic effects of these mixtures on wildlife. These compounds can cause a number of adverse effects, however, because the toxic effects which occur at ecologically-relevant concentrations such as embryo-lethality and birth defects appear to be mediated through the same mechanism, the potency of individual congeners can be reported relative to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD) which is the most toxic congener in the PCH class. The concentations of 2,3,7,8-TCDD Equivalents (TCDD-EQ) were determined in the tissues of aquatic and terrestrial birds of Green Bay, Wisconsin by the H4IIE bioassay system and compared toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) with the concentration predicted by the use of toxic equivalency factors applied to concentrations of PCH, which were determined by instrumental analyses. Concentrations of TCDD-EQ ranged from 0.52 to 440 ng/kg, wet weight. The greatest concentrations occurred in the fish-eating birds. Concentrations of TCDD-EQ, which were determined by the two methods were significantly correlated, but the additive model which used the TEFs with concentrations of measured PCB, PCDD and PCDF congeners underestimated the concentrations of TCDD-EQ measured by the H4IIE bioassay by an average of 57%. This is thought to be due to contributions from un-quantified PCH, which are known to occur in the environment. Of the quantified PCH congeners, PCDD and PCDF contributed a small portion of the TCDD-EQ in the aquatic birds, while most of the

  6. Characterization of tissue-equivalent materials for use in construction of physical phantoms; Caracterizacao de materiais tecido-equivalentes para uso em construcao de fantomas fisicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Edvan V. de, E-mail: edvanmsn@hotmail.com [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Oliveira, Alex C.H. de, E-mail: oliveira_ach@yahoo.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Vieira, Jose W., E-mail: jose.wilson59@uol.com.br [Escola Politecnica de Pernambuco (UPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Fernando R.A., E-mail: falima@cenen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Phantoms are physical or computational models used to simulate the transport of ionizing radiation, their interactions with human body tissues and evaluate the deposition of energy. Depending on the application, you can build phantoms of various types and features. The physical phantoms are made of materials with behavior similar to human tissues exposed to ionizing radiation, the so-called tissue-equivalent materials. The characterization of various tissue-equivalent materials is important for the choice of materials to be used is appropriate, seeking a better cost-benefit ratio. The main objective of this work is to produce tables containing the main characteristics of tissue-equivalent materials. These tables were produced in Microsoft Office Excel. Among the main features of tissue-equivalent materials that were added to the tables, are density, chemical composition, physical state, chemical stability and solubility. The main importance of this work is to contribute to the construction of high-quality physical phantoms and avoid the waste of materials.

  7. Evolution of the Deep-space Galactic Cosmic Ray Lineal Energy Transfer Spectrum through Tissue Equivalent Plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, A. W.; Kasper, J. C.; Spence, H. E.; Golightly, M. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Mazur, J. E.; Blake, J. B.; Looper, M. D.; Townsend, L.; Zeitlin, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    The Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation is an energetic particle telescope that resides on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft, currently in a 50 km circular lunar polar orbit. The telescope consists of 6 silicon semi-conductor detectors placed in pairs that surround two pieces of Tissue Equivalent Plastic (TEP), which serve to absorb energy from particles as they transit through the instrument. Particles with energies greater than 12 MeV/nucleon can penetrate the outermost shield and be measured by the instrument. The primary measurement made by the instrument is of the Linear Energy Transfer (LET) of energetic particles as they transit through the telescope. CRaTER measures the LET spectrum with unprecedented energy resolution and has done so during a period of historically low solar activity that led to record high intensities of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). These LET spectra are used to study changes in the properties of the incoming particles, and to make detailed measurements of the radiation doses human explorers will experience in deep space on missions to the moon, to asteroids, or to Mars. We present LET spectra accumulated during 2009 and 2010. We show how the LET spectrum evolves through the instrument as the GCR interact with the TEP. Due to the importance of these measurements for human effects, our extensive absolute calibration procedures are presented. Of particular note is a significant reduction in the flux of particles with LET greater than 10 keV/um for detectors that lie deeper within the telescope stack, due to the attenuation of high LET particles within the TEP. By measuring this attenuation we can estimate the depth in human tissue where the highest LET particles that are most likely to cause genetic damage pose the greatest threat to humans in space.

  8. Characterization of paraffin based breast tissue equivalent phantom using a CdTe detector pulse height analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubukcu, Solen; Yücel, Haluk

    2016-12-01

    In this study, paraffin was selected as a base material and mixed with different amounts of CaSO 4 ·2H 2 O and H 3 BO 3 compounds in order to mimic breast tissue. Slab phantoms were produced with suitable mixture ratios of the additives in the melted paraffin. Subsequently, these were characterized in terms of first half-value layer (HVL) in the mammographic X-ray range using a pulse-height spectroscopic analysis with a CdTe detector. Irradiations were performed in the energy range of 23-35 kV p under broad beam conditions from Mo/Mo and Mo/Rh target/filter combinations. X-ray spectra were acquired with a CdTe detector without and with phantom material interposition in increments of 1 cm thickness and then evaluated to obtain the transmission data. The net integral areas of the spectra for the slabs were used to plot the transmission curves and these curves were fitted to the Archer model function. The results obtained for the slabs were compared with those of standard mammographic phantoms such as CIRS BR series phantoms and polymethylmethacrylate plates (PMMA). From the evaluated transmission curves, the mass attenuation coefficients and HVLs of some mixtures are close to those of the commercially available standard mammography phantoms. Results indicated that when a suitable proportion of H 3 BO 3 and CaSO 4 ·2H 2 O is added to the paraffin, the resulting material may be a good candidate for a breast tissue equivalent phantom.

  9. Sphere of equivalence--a novel target volume concept for intraoperative radiotherapy using low-energy X rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herskind, Carsten; Griebel, Jürgen; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Wenz, Frederik

    2008-12-01

    Accelerated partial breast radiotherapy with low-energy photons from a miniature X-ray machine is undergoing a randomized clinical trial (Targeted Intra-operative Radiation Therapy [TARGIT]) in a selected subgroup of patients treated with breast-conserving surgery. The steep radial dose gradient implies reduced tumor cell control with increasing depth in the tumor bed. The purpose was to compare the expected risk of local recurrence in this nonuniform radiation field with that after conventional external beam radiotherapy. The relative biologic effectiveness of low-energy photons was modeled using the linear-quadratic formalism including repair of sublethal lesions during protracted irradiation. Doses of 50-kV X-rays (Intrabeam) were converted to equivalent fractionated doses, EQD2, as function of depth in the tumor bed. The probability of local control was estimated using a logistic dose-response relationship fitted to clinical data from fractionated radiotherapy. The model calculations show that, for a cohort of patients, the increase in local control in the high-dose region near the applicator partly compensates the reduction of local control at greater distances. Thus a "sphere of equivalence" exists within which the risk of recurrence is equal to that after external fractionated radiotherapy. The spatial distribution of recurrences inside this sphere will be different from that after conventional radiotherapy. A novel target volume concept is presented here. The incidence of recurrences arising in the tumor bed around the excised tumor will test the validity of this concept and the efficacy of the treatment. Recurrences elsewhere will have implications for the rationale of TARGIT.

  10. Thermoluminescence and radioluminescence properties of tissue equivalent Cu-doped Li2B4O7 for radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz Z, E.; Furetta, C.; Marcazzo, J.; Santiago, M.; Guarneros, C.; Pacio, M.; Palomino, R.

    2015-10-01

    Thermoluminescence (Tl) and radioluminescence (Rl) properties of lithium tetraborate (Li 2 B 4 O 7 ) doped with different concentration of copper (0.25, 0.5, 1 wt %) under gamma and beta irradiation has been investigated. The feasibility of using this borate in radiation dosimetry at low doses has been evaluated. Tissue equivalent Li 2 B 4 O 7 was prepared by solid state reaction using mixing stoichiometric compositions of lithium carbonate (Li 2 CO 3 ) and boric acid (H 3 BO 3 ) and a solution of CuCl 2 as dopant. The glow curve, of the most efficient copper doped borate (Li 2 B 4 O 7 :Cu 0.5 wt %), shows a main stable peak centered at 225 degrees C and a second low temperature peak centered at 80 degrees C. The low temperature peak disappears completely after 24 hours of storage in darkness and at room temperature or after an annealing at 120 degrees C for 10 seconds. The main peak of the Li 2 B 4 O 7 :Cu remains constant. The Tl response of Li 2 B 4 O 7 :Cu shows good linearity in the analyzed dose range. The stability and repeatability of Rl signals of the borate have been studied and the Li 2 B 4 O 7 :Cu (0.5 wt %) shown the higher Rl emission and a stable and repetitive response. Results show that Li 2 B 4 O 7 :Cu has prospects to be used in gamma and beta radiation dosimetry. (Author)

  11. Fabrication and characterisation of biomimetic, electrospun gelatin fibre scaffolds for tunica media-equivalent, tissue engineered vascular grafts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsayed, Y. [Advanced Materials Group, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Lekakou, C., E-mail: C.Lekakou@surrey.ac.uk [Advanced Materials Group, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Labeed, F. [Centre of Biomedical Engineering, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Tomlins, P. [National Physical Laboratory (NPL), Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-01

    It is increasingly recognised that biomimetic, natural polymers mimicking the extracellular matrix (ECM) have low thrombogenicity and functional motifs that regulate cell–matrix interactions, with these factors being critical for tissue engineered vascular grafts especially grafts of small diameter. Gelatin constitutes a low cost substitute of soluble collagen but gelatin scaffolds so far have shown generally low strength and suture retention strength. In this study, we have devised the fabrication of novel, electrospun, multilayer, gelatin fibre scaffolds, with controlled fibre layer orientation, and optimised gelatin crosslinking to achieve not only compliance equivalent to that of coronary artery but also for the first time strength of the wet tubular acellular scaffold (swollen with absorbed water) same as that of the tunica media of coronary artery in both circumferential and axial directions. Most importantly, for the first time for natural scaffolds and in particular gelatin, high suture retention strength was achieved in the range of 1.8–1.94 N for wet acellular scaffolds, same or better than that for fresh saphenous vein. The study presents the investigations to relate the electrospinning process parameters to the microstructural parameters of the scaffold, which are further related to the mechanical performance data of wet, crosslinked, electrospun scaffolds in both circumferential and axial tubular directions. The scaffolds exhibited excellent performance in human smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation, with SMCs seeded on the top surface adhering, elongating and aligning along the local fibres, migrating through the scaffold thickness and populating a transverse distance of 186 μm and 240 μm 9 days post-seeding for scaffolds of initial dry porosity of 74 and 83%, respectively. - Highlights: • Novel crosslinked electrospun gelatin scaffolds of specific fibre layer orientation • These scaffolds have compliance equivalent to that of coronary

  12. Troglitazone treatment increases bone marrow adipose tissue volume but does not affect trabecular bone volume in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erikstrup, Lise Tornvig; Mosekilde, Leif; Justesen, J

    2001-01-01

    proliferator activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma). Histomorphometric analysis of proximal tibia was performed in order to quantitate the amount of trabecular bone volume per total volume (BV/TV %), adipose tissue volume per total volume (AV/TV %), and hematopoietic marrow volume per total volume (HV......Aging is associated with decreased trabecular bone mass and increased adipocyte formation in bone marrow. As osteoblasts and adipocytes share common precursor cells present in the bone marrow stroma, it has been proposed that an inverse relationship exists between adipocyte and osteoblast....../TV %) using the point-counting technique. Bone size did not differ between the two groups. In troglitazone-treated mice, AV/TV was significantly higher than in control mice (4.7+/-2.1% vs. 0.2+/-0.3%, respectively, mean +/- SD, P

  13. Hydrocortisone and triiodothyronine regulate hyaluronate synthesis in a tissue-engineered human dermal equivalent through independent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Madhura; Papp, Suzanne; Schaffer, Lana; Pouyani, Tara

    2015-02-01

    Hydrocortisone (HC) and triiodothyronine (T3) have both been shown to be capable of independently inhibiting hyaluronate (HA, hyaluronic acid) synthesis in a self-assembled human dermal equivalent (human dermal matrix). We sought to investigate the action of these two hormones in concert on extracellular matrix formation and HA inhibition in the tissue engineered human dermal matrix. To this end, neonatal human dermal fibroblasts were cultured in defined serum-free medium for 21 days in the presence of each hormone alone, or in combination, in varying concentrations. Through a process of self-assembly, a substantial dermal extracellular matrix formed that was characterized. The results of these studies demonstrate that combinations of the hormones T3 and hydrocortisone showed significantly higher levels of hyaluronate inhibition as compared to each hormone alone in the human dermal matrix. In order to gain preliminary insight into the genes regulating HA synthesis in this system, a differential gene array analysis was conducted in which the construct prepared in the presence of 200 μg/mL HC and 0.2 nM T3 was compared to the normal construct (0.4 μg/mL HC and 20 pM T3). Using a GLYCOv4 gene chip containing approximately 1260 human genes, we observed differential expression of 131 genes. These data suggest that when these two hormones are used in concert a different mechanism of inhibition prevails and a combination of degradation and inhibition of HA synthesis may be responsible for HA regulation in the human dermal matrix. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of average glandular dose in screen-film and digital mammography using breast tissue-equivalent phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Gwi Soon; Kim, Jung Min; Kim, You Hyun; Choi, Jong Hak; Kim, Chang Kyun

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, mammography system is changed rapidly from conventional screen-film system to digital system for application to screening and diagnosis. Digital mammography system provides several advantages over screen-film mammography system. According to the information provided by the manufacturer, digital mammography system offers radiation dose reduction in comparison with screen-film mammography system, because of digital detector, particularly direct digital detector has higher x-ray absorption efficiency than screen-film combination or imaging plate (IP). We measured average glandular doses (ADG) in screen-film mammography (SFM) system with slow screen-film combination, computed mammography (CM) system, indirect digital mammography (IDM) system and direct digital mammography (DDM) system using breast tissue-equivalent phantom (glandularity 30%, 50% and 70%). The results were shown as follows: AGD values for DDM system were highest than those for other systems. Although automatic exposure control (AEC) mode was selected, the curve of the AGD values against thickness or glandularity increased significantly for the SFM system with the uniform target/filter (Mo/Mo) combination. Therefore, the AGD values for the high energy examinations were highest in the SFM system, and those for the low energy examinations were highest in the DDM system. But the curve of the AGD values against thickness and glandularity increased gently for CM system with the automatic selection of the target/filter combination (from Mo/Mo to Mo/Rh or from Mo/Rh to Rh/Rh), and the AGD values were lowest. Consequently, the parameters in mammography for each exposure besides detection efficiency play an important role in order to estimate a patient radiation dose

  15. Preclinical study of mouse pluripotent parthenogenetic embryonic stem cell derivatives for the construction of tissue-engineered skin equivalent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Yang; Cui, Jihong; Yin, Lu; Liu, Wei; Liu, Wenguang; Sun, Mei; Yan, Xingrong; Wang, Ling; Chen, Fulin

    2016-10-22

    Embryonic stem cell (ESC) derivatives hold great promise for the construction of tissue-engineered skin equivalents (TESE). However, harvesting of ESCs destroys viable embryos and may lead to political and ethical concerns over their application. In the current study, we directed mouse parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells (pESCs) to differentiate into fibroblasts, constructed TESE, and evaluated its function in vivo. The stemness marker expression and the pluripotent differentiation ability of pESCs were tested. After embryoid body (EB) formation and adherence culture, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were enriched and directed to differentiate into fibroblastic lineage. Characteristics of derived fibroblasts were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR and ELISA. Functional ability of the constructed TESE was tested by a mouse skin defects repair model. Mouse pESCs expressed stemness marker and could form teratoma containing three germ layers. MSCs could be enriched from outgrowths of EBs and directed to differentiate into fibroblastic lineage. These cells express a high level of growth factors including FGF, EGF, VEGF, TGF, PDGF, and IGF1, similar to those of ESC-derived fibroblasts and mouse fibroblasts. Seeded into collagen gels, the fibroblasts derived from pESCs could form TESE. Mouse skin defects could be successfully repaired 15 days after transplantation of TESE constructed by fibroblasts derived from pESCs. pESCs could be induced to differentiate into fibroblastic lineage, which could be applied to the construction of TESE and skin defect repair. Particularly, pESC derivatives avoid the limitations of political and ethical concerns, and provide a promising source for regenerative medicine.

  16. Whole body and tissue blood volumes of two strains of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingerich, W.H.; Pityer, R.A.; Rach, J.J.

    1990-01-01

    1. Estimates of apparent packed cell, plasma and total blood volumes for the whole body and for 13 selected tissues were compared between Kamloops and Wytheville strains of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by the simultaneous injection of two vascular tracers, radiolabeled trout erythrocytes (51Cr-RBC) and radioiodated bovine serum albumin (125I-BSA).2. Whole body total blood volume, plasma volume and packed cell volume were slightly, but not significantly greater in the Wytheville trout, whereas, the apparent plasma volumes and total blood volumes in 4 of 13 tissues were significantly greater in the Kamloops strain.3. Differences were most pronounced in highly perfused organs, such as the liver and kidney and in organs of digestion such as the stomach and intestines.4. Differences in blood volumes between the two strains may be related to the greater permeability of the vascular membranes in the Kamloops strain fish.

  17. Simulation study of a magnetocardiogram based on a virtual heart model: effect of a cardiac equivalent source and a volume conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shou Guo-Fa; Xia Ling; Dai Ling; Ma Ping; Tang Fa-Kuan

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a magnetocardiogram (MCG) simulation study using the boundary element method (BEM) and based on the virtual heart model and the realistic human volume conductor model. The different contributions of cardiac equivalent source models and volume conductor models to the MCG are deeply and comprehensively investigated. The single dipole source model, the multiple dipoles source model and the equivalent double layer (EDL) source model are analysed and compared with the cardiac equivalent source models. Meanwhile, the effect of the volume conductor model on the MCG combined with these cardiac equivalent sources is investigated. The simulation results demonstrate that the cardiac electrophysiological information will be partly missed when only the single dipole source is taken, while the EDL source is a good option for MCG simulation and the effect of the volume conductor is smallest for the EDL source. Therefore, the EDL source is suitable for the study of MCG forward and inverse problems, and more attention should be paid to it in future MCG studies. (general)

  18. Real ear unaided gain and its relation with the equivalent volume of the external and middle ear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastos, Bárbara Guimarães

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Old age is associated with changes in the characteristics of the middle ear transmission system and in external ear resonance, and these carry implications for the hearing aid (HA verification process for which targets and measures of the real ear insertion gain (REIG are used. Aim: To compare the real ear unaided gain (REUG and the equivalent volumes of the external ear (VeqEE and the middle ear (VeqME between elderly and adult patients. Methods: This is a retrospective study in which the medical records of 28 elderly patients (aged between 61 and 102 years, average hearing thresholds between 38.75 and 85 dB HL and 23 adult patients (aged 20-59, mean hearing thresholds between 31.25 and 116.25 dB HL with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss and no history of middle ear abnormalities were analyzed. Immittance measurements (VeqEE, VeqME, and pressure of the peak of maximum compliance and the REUG (frequency and amplitude of the primary peak were recovered for a total of 40 ears. These data were compared between elderly and adults as well as between men and women, using Student's t test. Correlations (Pearson between immittance and REUG data were also verified. Results: No statistically significant differences (p < 0.01 were found for immittance and REUG data between elderly and adults, or between men and women. A negative and weak but significant correlation was observed between the REUG primary peak and VeqEE. Conclusion: Hearing aid verification can be performed with target and measures of the REIG in the elderly population.

  19. Calculation of normal tissue complication probability and dose-volume histogram reduction schemes for tissues with a critical element architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemierko, Andrzej; Goitein, Michael

    1991-01-01

    The authors investigate a model of normal tissue complication probability for tissues that may be represented by a critical element architecture. They derive formulas for complication probability that apply to both a partial volume irradiation and to an arbitrary inhomogeneous dose distribution. The dose-volume isoeffect relationship which is a consequence of a critical element architecture is discussed and compared to the empirical power law relationship. A dose-volume histogram reduction scheme for a 'pure' critical element model is derived. In addition, a point-based algorithm which does not require precomputation of a dose-volume histogram is derived. The existing published dose-volume histogram reduction algorithms are analyzed. The authors show that the existing algorithms, developed empirically without an explicit biophysical model, have a close relationship to the critical element model at low levels of complication probability. However, it is also showed that they have aspects which are not compatible with a critical element model and the authors propose a modification to one of them to circumvent its restriction to low complication probabilities. (author). 26 refs.; 7 figs

  20. Estimation of gas and tissue lung volumes by MRI: functional approach of lung imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qanadli, S D; Orvoen-Frija, E; Lacombe, P; Di Paola, R; Bittoun, J; Frija, G

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the accuracy of MRI for the determination of lung gas and tissue volumes. Fifteen healthy subjects underwent MRI of the thorax and pulmonary function tests [vital capacity (VC) and total lung capacity (TLC)] in the supine position. MR examinations were performed at inspiration and expiration. Lung volumes were measured by a previously validated technique on phantoms. Both individual and total lung volumes and capacities were calculated. MRI total vital capacity (VC(MRI)) was compared with spirometric vital capacity (VC(SP)). Capacities were correlated to lung volumes. Tissue volume (V(T)) was estimated as the difference between the total lung volume at full inspiration and the TLC. No significant difference was seen between VC(MRI) and VC(SP). Individual capacities were well correlated (r = 0.9) to static volume at full inspiration. The V(T) was estimated to be 836+/-393 ml. This preliminary study demonstrates that MRI can accurately estimate lung gas and tissue volumes. The proposed approach appears well suited for functional imaging of the lung.

  1. Preliminary studies on fragmentation in tissue-equivalent material produced by 55 MeV/u 40Ar17+ ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Bingrong; Wei Zengquan; Duan Limin; Zhang Baoguo; Li Songlin; Yin Xu; Zhu Yongtai; Li Wenjian; Li Qiang; Yuan Shibin

    2002-01-01

    By using a 55 MeV/u 40 Ar 17+ beam produced by HIRFL, the distribution of fragments in 1.5 mm lucite on three different directions were measured at the radiobiology terminal. Feasibilities of the phoswich detector composed of fast plastic scintillator and CsI(Tl) detectors for determination of angular distribution of fragments in tissue-equivalent materials were investigated. The results obtained were satisfactory

  2. Frequency of occurrence of various nuclear reactions when fast neutrons (greater than or equal to 50 MeV) pass through tissue-equivalent material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.

    1975-07-01

    Calculated results are presented for the frequency with which various partial nuclear-reaction cross sections are utilized when fast neutrons (less than or equal to 50 MeV) are transported through a tissue-equivalent phantom to obtain an indication of which cross sections are of most importance for radiotherapy applications and are therefore in need of experimental verification. (6 tables) (U.S.)

  3. Automated planning volume definition in soft-tissue sarcoma adjuvant brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eva K.; Fung, Albert Y.C.; Zaider, Marco; Brooks, J. Paul

    2002-01-01

    In current practice, the planning volume for adjuvant brachytherapy treatment for soft-tissue sarcoma is either not determined a priori (in this case, seed locations are selected based on isodose curves conforming to a visual estimate of the planning volume), or it is derived via a tedious manual process. In either case, the process is subjective and time consuming, and is highly dependent on the human planner. The focus of the work described herein involves the development of an automated contouring algorithm to outline the planning volume. Such an automatic procedure will save time and provide a consistent and objective method for determining planning volumes. In addition, a definitive representation of the planning volume will allow for sophisticated brachytherapy treatment planning approaches to be applied when designing treatment plans, so as to maximize local tumour control and minimize normal tissue complications. An automated tumour volume contouring algorithm is developed utilizing computational geometry and numerical interpolation techniques in conjunction with an artificial intelligence method. The target volume is defined to be the slab of tissue r cm perpendicularly away from the curvilinear plane defined by the mesh of catheters. We assume that if adjacent catheters are over 2r cm apart, the tissue between the two catheters is part of the tumour bed. Input data consist of the digitized coordinates of the catheter positions in each of several cross-sectional slices of the tumour bed, and the estimated distance r from the catheters to the tumour surface. Mathematically, one can view the planning volume as the volume enclosed within a minimal smoothly-connected surface which contains a set of circles, each circle centred at a given catheter position in a given cross-sectional slice. The algorithm performs local interpolation on consecutive triplets of circles. The effectiveness of the algorithm is evaluated based on its performance on a collection of

  4. Automated planning volume definition in soft-tissue sarcoma adjuvant brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eva K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Fung, Albert Y.C.; Zaider, Marco [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Brooks, J. Paul [School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2002-06-07

    In current practice, the planning volume for adjuvant brachytherapy treatment for soft-tissue sarcoma is either not determined a priori (in this case, seed locations are selected based on isodose curves conforming to a visual estimate of the planning volume), or it is derived via a tedious manual process. In either case, the process is subjective and time consuming, and is highly dependent on the human planner. The focus of the work described herein involves the development of an automated contouring algorithm to outline the planning volume. Such an automatic procedure will save time and provide a consistent and objective method for determining planning volumes. In addition, a definitive representation of the planning volume will allow for sophisticated brachytherapy treatment planning approaches to be applied when designing treatment plans, so as to maximize local tumour control and minimize normal tissue complications. An automated tumour volume contouring algorithm is developed utilizing computational geometry and numerical interpolation techniques in conjunction with an artificial intelligence method. The target volume is defined to be the slab of tissue r cm perpendicularly away from the curvilinear plane defined by the mesh of catheters. We assume that if adjacent catheters are over 2r cm apart, the tissue between the two catheters is part of the tumour bed. Input data consist of the digitized coordinates of the catheter positions in each of several cross-sectional slices of the tumour bed, and the estimated distance r from the catheters to the tumour surface. Mathematically, one can view the planning volume as the volume enclosed within a minimal smoothly-connected surface which contains a set of circles, each circle centred at a given catheter position in a given cross-sectional slice. The algorithm performs local interpolation on consecutive triplets of circles. The effectiveness of the algorithm is evaluated based on its performance on a collection of

  5. Controlling human corneal stromal stem cell contraction to mediate rapid cell and matrix organization of real architecture for 3-dimensional tissue equivalents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhey, Dev; Phillips, James B; Daniels, Julie T; Kureshi, Alvena K

    2018-02-01

    The architecture of the human corneal stroma consists of a highly organized extracellular matrix (ECM) interspersed with keratocytes. Their progenitor cells; corneal stromal stem cells (CSSC) are located at the periphery, in the limbal stroma. A highly organized corneal ECM is critical for effective transmission of light but this structure may be compromised during injury or disease, resulting in loss of vision. Re-creating normal organization in engineered tissue equivalents for transplantation often involves lengthy culture times that are inappropriate for clinical use or utilisation of synthetic substrates that bring complications such as corneal melting. CSSC have great therapeutic potential owing to their ability to reorganize a disorganized matrix, restoring transparency in scarred corneas. We examined CSSC contractile behavior to assess whether this property could be exploited to rapidly generate cell and ECM organization in Real Architecture For 3D Tissues (RAFT) tissue equivalents (TE) for transplantation. Free-floating collagen gels were characterized to assess contractile behavior of CSSC and establish optimum cell density and culture times. To mediate cell and collagen organization, tethered collagen gels seeded with CSSC were cultured and subsequently stabilized with the RAFT process. We demonstrated rapid creation of biomimetic RAFT TE with tunable structural properties. These displayed three distinct regions of varying degrees of cellular and collagen organization. Interestingly, increased organization coincided with a dramatic loss of PAX6 expression in CSSC, indicating rapid differentiation into keratocytes. The organized RAFT TE system could be a useful bioengineering tool to rapidly create an organized ECM while simultaneously controlling cell phenotype. For the first time, we have demonstrated that human CSSC exhibit the phenomenon of cellular self-alignment in tethered collagen gels. We found this mediated rapid co-alignment of collagen fibrils

  6. Microcystin-LR equivalent concentrations in fish tissue during a postbloom Microcystis exposure in Loskop Dam, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nchabeleng, T

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of a decomposing cyanobacteria bloom on water quality and the accumulation of microcystin-LR equivalent toxin in fish at Loskop Dam were studied in May 2012. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA] was used to confirm the presence...

  7. TU-H-CAMPUS-IeP2-05: Breast and Soft Tissue-Equivalent 3D Printed Phantoms for Imaging and Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hintenlang, D; Terracino, B [University Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The study has the goal to demonstrate that breast and soft tissue-equivalent phantoms for dosimetry applications in the diagnostic energy range can be fabricated using common 3D printing methods. Methods: 3D printing provides the opportunity to rapidly prototype uniquely designed objects from a variety of materials. Common 3D printers are usually limited to printing objects based on thermoplastic materials such as PLA, or ABS. The most commonly available plastic is PLA, which has a density significantly greater than soft tissue. We utilized a popular 3D printer to demonstrate that tissue specific phantom materials can be generated through the careful selection of 3D printing parameters. A series of stepwedges were designed and printed using a Makerbot Replicator2 3D printing system. The print file provides custom adjustment of the infill density, orientation and position of the object on the printer stage, selection of infill patterns, and other control parameters. The x-ray attenuation and uniformity of fabricated phantoms were evaluated and compared to common tissue-equivalent phantom materials, acrylic and BR12. X-ray exposure measurements were made using narrow beam geometry on a clinical mammography unit at 28 kVp on the series of phantoms. The 3D printed phantoms were imaged at 28 kVp to visualize the internal structure and uniformity in different planes of the phantoms. Results: By utilizing specific in-fill density and patterns we are able to produce a phantom closely matching the attenuation characteristics of BR12 at 28 kVp. The in-fill patterns used are heterogeneous, so a judicious selection of fill pattern and the orientation of the fill pattern must be made in order to obtain homogenous attenuation along the intended direction of beam propagation. Conclusions: By careful manipulation of the printing parameters, breast and soft tissue-equivalent phantoms appropriate for use at imaging energies can be fabricated using 3D printing techniques.

  8. TU-H-CAMPUS-IeP2-05: Breast and Soft Tissue-Equivalent 3D Printed Phantoms for Imaging and Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hintenlang, D; Terracino, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The study has the goal to demonstrate that breast and soft tissue-equivalent phantoms for dosimetry applications in the diagnostic energy range can be fabricated using common 3D printing methods. Methods: 3D printing provides the opportunity to rapidly prototype uniquely designed objects from a variety of materials. Common 3D printers are usually limited to printing objects based on thermoplastic materials such as PLA, or ABS. The most commonly available plastic is PLA, which has a density significantly greater than soft tissue. We utilized a popular 3D printer to demonstrate that tissue specific phantom materials can be generated through the careful selection of 3D printing parameters. A series of stepwedges were designed and printed using a Makerbot Replicator2 3D printing system. The print file provides custom adjustment of the infill density, orientation and position of the object on the printer stage, selection of infill patterns, and other control parameters. The x-ray attenuation and uniformity of fabricated phantoms were evaluated and compared to common tissue-equivalent phantom materials, acrylic and BR12. X-ray exposure measurements were made using narrow beam geometry on a clinical mammography unit at 28 kVp on the series of phantoms. The 3D printed phantoms were imaged at 28 kVp to visualize the internal structure and uniformity in different planes of the phantoms. Results: By utilizing specific in-fill density and patterns we are able to produce a phantom closely matching the attenuation characteristics of BR12 at 28 kVp. The in-fill patterns used are heterogeneous, so a judicious selection of fill pattern and the orientation of the fill pattern must be made in order to obtain homogenous attenuation along the intended direction of beam propagation. Conclusions: By careful manipulation of the printing parameters, breast and soft tissue-equivalent phantoms appropriate for use at imaging energies can be fabricated using 3D printing techniques.

  9. Relative cerebral blood volume as a marker of durable tissue-at-risk viability in hyperacute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortijo, Elisa; Calleja, Ana Isabel; García-Bermejo, Pablo; Mulero, Patricia; Pérez-Fernández, Santiago; Reyes, Javier; Muñoz, Ma Fe; Martínez-Galdámez, Mario; Arenillas, Juan Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Selection of best responders to reperfusion therapies could be aided by predicting the duration of tissue-at-risk viability, which may be dependant on collateral circulation status. We aimed to identify the best predictor of good collateral circulation among perfusion computed tomography (PCT) parameters in middle cerebral artery (MCA) ischemic stroke and to analyze how early MCA response to intravenous thrombolysis and PCT-derived markers of good collaterals interact to determine stroke outcome. We prospectively studied patients with acute MCA ischemic stroke treated with intravenous thrombolysis who underwent PCT before treatment showing a target mismatch profile. Collateral status was assessed using a PCT source image-based score. PCT maps were quantitatively analyzed. Cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow, and Tmax were calculated within the hypoperfused volume and in the equivalent region of unaffected hemisphere. Occluded MCAs were monitored by transcranial Duplex to assess early recanalization. Main outcome variables were brain hypodensity volume and modified Rankin scale score at day 90. One hundred patients with MCA ischemic stroke imaged by PCT received intravenous thrombolysis, and 68 met all inclusion criteria. A relative CBV (rCBV) >0.93 emerged as the only predictor of good collaterals (odds ratio, 12.6; 95% confidence interval, 2.9-55.9; P=0.001). Early MCA recanalization was associated with better long-term outcome and lower infarct volume in patients with rCBV<0.93, but not in patients with high rCBV. None of the patients with rCBV<0.93 achieved good outcome in absence of early recanalization. High rCBV was the strongest marker of good collaterals and may characterize durable tissue-at-risk viability in hyperacute MCA ischemic stroke.

  10. Calculating regional tissue volume for hyperthermic isolated limb perfusion: Four methods compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchin, D; Negri, A; Frigo, A C; Bui, F; Zucchetta, P; Bodanza, V; Gregianin, M; Campana, L G; Rossi, C R; Rastrelli, M

    2016-12-01

    Hyperthermic isolated limb perfusion (HILP) can be performed as an alternative to amputation for soft tissue sarcomas and melanomas of the extremities. Melphalan and tumor necrosis factor-alpha are used at a dosage that depends on the volume of the limb. Regional tissue volume is traditionally measured for the purposes of HILP using water displacement volumetry (WDV). Although this technique is considered the gold standard, it is time-consuming and complicated to implement, especially in obese and elderly patients. The aim of the present study was to compare the different methods described in the literature for calculating regional tissue volume in the HILP setting, and to validate an open source software. We reviewed the charts of 22 patients (11 males and 11 females) who had non-disseminated melanoma with in-transit metastases or sarcoma of the lower limb. We calculated the volume of the limb using four different methods: WDV, tape measurements and segmentation of computed tomography images using Osirix and Oncentra Masterplan softwares. The overall comparison provided a concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) of 0.92 for the calculations of whole limb volume. In particular, when Osirix was compared with Oncentra (validated for volume measures and used in radiotherapy), the concordance was near-perfect for the calculation of the whole limb volume (CCC = 0.99). With methods based on CT the user can choose a reliable plane for segmentation purposes. CT-based methods also provides the opportunity to separate the whole limb volume into defined tissue volumes (cortical bone, fat and water). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of water immersion to the neck on pulmonary circulation and tissue volume in man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begin, R.; Epstein, M.; Sackner, M. A.; Levinson, R.; Dougherty, R.; Duncan, D.

    1976-01-01

    A rapid noninvasive breathing method is used to obtain serial measurements of the pulmonary capillary blood flow, diffusing capacity per unit of alveolar volume, combined pulmonary tissue plus capillary volume, functional residual capacity, and oxygen consumption in five normal subjects undergoing 6 h of sitting, 4 h of sitting while immersed to the neck in thermoneutral water, and 4 h of lying in thermoneutral water to the neck. The rebreathing method employed a test gas mixture containing 0.5% C2H2, 0.3% C(18)O, 10% He, 21% O2, and balance N2. It is shown that immersion to the neck in the seated posture results in significant increases in sodium excretion cardiac output, and diffusing capacity per unit of alveolar volume. The pulmonary tissue plus capillary volume did not change, demonstrating that the central vascular engorgement induced by water immersion is not accompanied by significant extravasation of fluid into the pulmonary interstitial space.

  12. Absorption and scattering coefficient dependence of laser-Doppler flowmetry models for large tissue volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binzoni, T; Leung, T S; Ruefenacht, D; Delpy, D T

    2006-01-01

    Based on quasi-elastic scattering theory (and random walk on a lattice approach), a model of laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) has been derived which can be applied to measurements in large tissue volumes (e.g. when the interoptode distance is >30 mm). The model holds for a semi-infinite medium and takes into account the transport-corrected scattering coefficient and the absorption coefficient of the tissue, and the scattering coefficient of the red blood cells. The model holds for anisotropic scattering and for multiple scattering of the photons by the moving scatterers of finite size. In particular, it has also been possible to take into account the simultaneous presence of both Brownian and pure translational movements. An analytical and simplified version of the model has also been derived and its validity investigated, for the case of measurements in human skeletal muscle tissue. It is shown that at large optode spacing it is possible to use the simplified model, taking into account only a 'mean' light pathlength, to predict the blood flow related parameters. It is also demonstrated that the 'classical' blood volume parameter, derived from LDF instruments, may not represent the actual blood volume variations when the investigated tissue volume is large. The simplified model does not need knowledge of the tissue optical parameters and thus should allow the development of very simple and cost-effective LDF hardware

  13. Adrenal gland volume, intra-abdominal and pericardial adipose tissue in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Kai G; Schweiger, Ulrich; Pars, Kaweh; Kunikowska, Alicja; Deuschle, Michael; Gutberlet, Marcel; Lichtinghagen, Ralf; Bleich, Stefan; Hüper, Katja; Hartung, Dagmar

    2015-08-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with an increased risk for the development of cardio-metabolic diseases. Increased intra-abdominal (IAT) and pericardial adipose tissue (PAT) have been found in depression, and are discussed as potential mediating factors. IAT and PAT are thought to be the result of a dysregulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPAA) with subsequent hypercortisolism. Therefore we examined adrenal gland volume as proxy marker for HPAA activation, and IAT and PAT in depressed patients. Twenty-seven depressed patients and 19 comparison subjects were included in this case-control study. Adrenal gland volume, pericardial, intraabdominal and subcutaneous adipose tissue were measured by magnetic resonance imaging. Further parameters included factors of the metabolic syndrome, fasting cortisol, fasting insulin, and proinflammatory cytokines. Adrenal gland and pericardial adipose tissue volumes, serum concentrations of cortisol and insulin, and serum concentrations tumor-necrosis factor-α were increased in depressed patients. Adrenal gland volume was positively correlated with intra-abdominal and pericardial adipose tissue, but not with subcutaneous adipose tissue. Our findings point to the role of HPAA dysregulation and hypercortisolism as potential mediators of IAT and PAT enlargement. Further studies are warranted to examine whether certain subtypes of depression are more prone to cardio-metabolic diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Epicardial adipose tissue volume estimation by postmortem computed tomography of eviscerated hearts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hindsø, Louise; Jakobsen, Lykke S; Jacobsen, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) may play a role in the development of coronary artery disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a method based on postmortem computed tomography (PMCT) for the estimation of EAT volume. We PMCT-scanned the eviscerated hearts of 144 deceased individuals, wh...

  15. Pulmonary tissue volume, cardiac output, and diffusing capacity in sustained microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbanck, S.; Larsson, H.; Linnarsson, D.; Prisk, G. K.; West, J. B.; Paiva, M.

    1997-01-01

    In microgravity (microG) humans have marked changes in body fluids, with a combination of an overall fluid loss and a redistribution of fluids in the cranial direction. We investigated whether interstitial pulmonary edema develops as a result of a headward fluid shift or whether pulmonary tissue fluid volume is reduced as a result of the overall loss of body fluid. We measured pulmonary tissue volume (Vti), capillary blood flow, and diffusing capacity in four subjects before, during, and after 10 days of exposure to microG during spaceflight. Measurements were made by rebreathing a gas mixture containing small amounts of acetylene, carbon monoxide, and argon. Measurements made early in flight in two subjects showed no change in Vti despite large increases in stroke volume (40%) and diffusing capacity (13%) consistent with increased pulmonary capillary blood volume. Late in-flight measurements in four subjects showed a 25% reduction in Vti compared with preflight controls (P volume, to the extent that it was no longer significantly different from preflight control. Diffusing capacity remained elevated (11%; P pulmonary perfusion and pulmonary capillary blood volume, interstitial pulmonary edema does not result from exposure to microG.

  16. Brain Volumes at Term-Equivalent Age in Preterm Infants : Imaging Biomarkers for Neurodevelopmental Outcome through Early School Age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keunen, Kristin; Išgum, Ivana; van Kooij, Britt J M; Anbeek, Petronella; van Haastert, Ingrid C; Koopman-Esseboom, Corine; van Stam, Petronella C; Nievelstein, Rutger A J; Viergever, Max A; de Vries, Linda S; Groenendaal, Floris; Benders, Manon J N L

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relationship between brain volumes at term and neurodevelopmental outcome through early school age in preterm infants. STUDY DESIGN: One hundred twelve preterm infants (born mean gestational age 28.6 ± 1.7 weeks) were studied prospectively with magnetic resonance imaging

  17. Time-specific measurements of energy deposition from radiation fields in simulated sub-micron tissue volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Famiano, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    A tissue-equivalent spherical proportional counter is used with a modified amplifier system to measure specific energy deposited from a uniform radiation field for short periods of time (∼1 micros to seconds) in order to extrapolate to dose in sub-micron tissue volumes. The energy deposited during these time intervals is compared to biological repair processes occurring within the same intervals after the initial energy deposition. The signal is integrated over a variable collection time which is adjusted with a square-wave pulse. Charge from particle passages is collected on the anode during the period in which the integrator is triggered, and the signal decays quickly to zero after the integrator feedback switch resets; the process repeats for every triggering pulse. Measurements of energy deposited from x rays, 137 Cs gamma rays, and electrons from a 90 Sr/ 90 Y source for various time intervals are taken. Spectral characteristics as a function of charge collection time are observed and frequency plots of specific energy and collection time-interval are presented. In addition, a threshold energy flux is selected for each radiation type at which the formation of radicals (based on current measurements) in mammalian cells equals the rate at which radicals are repaired

  18. Tracking Regional Tissue Volume and Function Change in Lung Using Image Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunlin Cao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated the 24-hour redistribution and reabsorption of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid delivered to the lung during a bronchoscopic procedure in normal volunteers. In this work we utilize image-matching procedures to correlate fluid redistribution and reabsorption to changes in regional lung function. Lung CT datasets from six human subjects were used in this study. Each subject was scanned at four time points before and after BAL procedure. Image registration was performed to align images at different time points and different inflation levels. The resulting dense displacement fields were utilized to track tissue volume changes and reveal deformation patterns of local parenchymal tissue quantitatively. The registration accuracy was assessed by measuring landmark matching errors, which were on the order of 1 mm. The results show that quantitative-assessed fluid volume agreed well with bronchoscopist-reported unretrieved BAL volume in the whole lungs (squared linear correlation coefficient was 0.81. The average difference of lung tissue volume at baseline and after 24 hours was around 2%, which indicates that BAL fluid in the lungs was almost absorbed after 24 hours. Regional lung-function changes correlated with the presence of BAL fluid, and regional function returned to baseline as the fluid was reabsorbed.

  19. The cerebrovascular structure and brain tissue volume: a comparative study between beagle dogs and mongrel dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Sheng; Shi Haibin; Hu Weixing; Zu Qingquan; Lu Shanshan; Xu Xiaoquan; Sun Lei; Li Linsun

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare the differences of cerebrovascular structure and brain tissue volume between beagle and mongrel dogs by using angiography and MR scanning. Methods: A total of 40 dogs, including 20 beagle dogs (beagle group) and 20 mongrel dogs (mongrel group), were enrolled in this study. Under general anesthesia, all dogs were examined with cerebral angiography and MR scanning. The cerebrovascular structure was evaluated with angiography via selective catheterization of aortic arch, bilateral external cerebral arteries (ECA), maxillary arteries, internal cerebral arteries (ICA) and vertebral arteries separately. The diameters of the ICA, middle cerebral artery (MCA), rostral cerebral artery (RCA), the anastomosis channel ICA and ECA, and basilar artery (BA) were measured at the similar point of each dog. Meanwhile the volumes of the brain tissue were calculated in coronal T2 view of MR scanning. The statistical analysis was performed among the weight of dogs, the diameter of arteries and the volume of brain tissue. The differences in the diameters and brain tissue volume were compared between the two groups. Results: No obvious variations in the cerebrovascular structure and brain tissue volume were found in these dogs. One mongrel dog was excluded from this study because of the severe stenosis of ICA. The mean weight of 20 beagle dogs and 19 mongrel dogs was (12.81±1.29) kg and (12.85±1.12) kg, respectively. The diameters of the ICA, MCA, RCA, the anastomosis channel between ICA and ECA and BA in beagle group were (1.26±0.07) mm, (0.90±0.05) mm, (0.58±0.07) mm, (0.55±0.07) mm and (0.95±0.06) mm, respectively. These parameters in mongrel group were (1.27±0.07) mm, (0.92±0.05) mm, (0.59±0.06) mm, (0.67±0.07) mm and (0.94±0.05) mm, respectively. The volume of brain in two groups was (76232.33±5018.51) mm 3 and (71863.96±4626.87) mm 3 , respectively. There were no obvious correlation among the body weight, the cerebrovascular diameters and brain

  20. Open-air ionisation chambers with walls of soft-tissue equivalent material for measuring photon doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vialettes, H.; Anceau, J.C.; Grand, M.; Petit, G.

    1968-01-01

    The ionisation chambers presented in this report constitute a contribution to research into methods of carrying out correct determinations in the field of health physics. The use of a mixture of teflon containing 42.5 per cent by weight of carbon for the chamber walls makes it possible to measure directly the dose absorbed in air through 300 mg/cm 2 of soft tissue and, consequently, the dose absorbed in the soft tissues with a maximum error of 10 per cent for photon energies of between 10 keV and 10 MeV. Furthermore since this material does not contain hydrogen, the chamber has a sensitivity to neutrons which is much less than other chambers in current use. Finally the shape of these chambers has been studied with a view to obtaining a satisfactory measurement from the isotropy point of view; for example for gamma radiation of 27 keV, the 3 litre chamber is isotropic to within 10 per cent over 270 degrees, and the 12 litre chamber is isotropic to within 10 per cent over 300 degrees; for 1.25 MeV gamma radiation this range is extended over 330 degrees for the 3 litre chamber, and 360 degrees for the 12 litre chamber. This report presents the measurements carried out with these chambers as well as the results obtained. These results are then compared to those obtained with other chambers currently used in the field of health physics. (authors) [fr

  1. A formulation of tissue- and water-equivalent materials using the stoichiometric analysis method for CT-number calibration in radiotherapy treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yohannes, Indra; Kolditz, Daniel; Langner, Oliver; Kalender, Willi A.

    2012-03-01

    Tissue- and water-equivalent materials (TEMs) are widely used in quality assurance and calibration procedures, both in radiodiagnostics and radiotherapy. In radiotherapy, particularly, the TEMs are often used for computed tomography (CT) number calibration in treatment planning systems. However, currently available TEMs may not be very accurate in the determination of the calibration curves due to their limitation in mimicking radiation characteristics of the corresponding real tissues in both low- and high-energy ranges. Therefore, we are proposing a new formulation of TEMs using a stoichiometric analysis method to obtain TEMs for the calibration purposes. We combined the stoichiometric calibration and the basic data method to compose base materials to develop TEMs matching standard real tissues from ICRU Report 44 and 46. First, the CT numbers of six materials with known elemental compositions were measured to get constants for the stoichiometric calibration. The results of the stoichiometric calibration were used together with the basic data method to formulate new TEMs. These new TEMs were scanned to validate their CT numbers. The electron density and the stopping power calibration curves were also generated. The absolute differences of the measured CT numbers of the new TEMs were less than 4 HU for the soft tissues and less than 22 HU for the bone compared to the ICRU real tissues. Furthermore, the calculated relative electron density and electron and proton stopping powers of the new TEMs differed by less than 2% from the corresponding ICRU real tissues. The new TEMs which were formulated using the proposed technique increase the simplicity of the calibration process and preserve the accuracy of the stoichiometric calibration simultaneously.

  2. Feasibility of salvage interstitial microwave thermal therapy for prostate carcinoma following failed brachytherapy: studies in a tissue equivalent phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCann, Claire; Kumaradas, J Carl; Gertner, Mark R; Davidson, Sean R H; Dolan, Alfred M; Sherar, Michael D

    2003-01-01

    Thermal therapy is an experimental treatment to destroy solid tumours by heating them to temperatures ranging from 55 deg C to 90 deg C, inducing thermal coagulation and necrosis of the tumour. We are investigating the feasibility of interstitial microwave thermal therapy as a salvage treatment for prostate cancer patients with local recurrence following failed brachytherapy. Due to the electrical and thermal conductivity of the brachytherapy seeds, we hypothesized that the seeds could scatter the microwave energy and cause unpredictable heating. To investigate this, a 915 MHz helical antenna was inserted into a muscle-equivalent phantom with and without brachytherapy seeds. Following a 10 W, 5 s input to the antenna, the temperature rise was used to calculate absorbed power, also referred to as specific absorption rate (SAR). Plane wave models based on Maxwell's equations were also used to characterize the electromagnetic scattering effect of the seeds. In addition, the phantom was heated with 8 W for 5 min to quantify the effect of the seeds on the temperature distribution during extended heating. SAR measurements indicated that the seeds had no significant effect on the shape and size of the SAR pattern of the antenna. However, the plane wave simulations indicated that the seeds could scatter the microwave energy resulting in hot spots at the seed edges. Lack of experimental evidence of these hot spots was probably due to the complex polarization of the microwaves emitted by the helical antenna. Extended heating experiments also demonstrated that the seeds had no significant effect on the temperature distributions and rates of temperature rise measured in the phantom. The results indicate that brachytherapy seeds are not a technical impediment to interstitial microwave thermal therapy as a salvage treatment following failed brachytherapy

  3. Low power digital communication in implantable devices using volume conduction of biological tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ning; Lee, Heung-No; Sclabassi, R J; Sun, Mingui

    2006-01-01

    This work investigates the data communication problem of implantable devices using fundamental theories in communications. We utilize the volume conduction property of biological tissues to establish a digital communications link. Data obtained through animal experiments are used to analyze the time and frequency response of the volume conduction channel as well as to characterize the biological signals and noises present in the system. A low power bandwidth efficient channel-coded modulation scheme is proposed to conserve battery power and reduce the health risks associated.

  4. Association between increased epicardial adipose tissue volume and coronary plaque composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Kennosuke; Yamamoto, Myong Hwa; Ebara, Seitarou; Okabe, Toshitaka; Saito, Shigeo; Hoshimoto, Koichi; Yakushiji, Tadayuki; Isomura, Naoei; Araki, Hiroshi; Obara, Chiaki; Ochiai, Masahiko

    2014-09-01

    To assess the relationship between epicardial adipose tissue volume (EATV) and plaque vulnerability in significant coronary stenosis using a 40-MHz intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging system (iMap-IVUS), we analyzed 130 consecutive patients with coronary stenosis who underwent dual-source computed tomography (CT) and cardiac catheterization. Culprit lesions were imaged by iMap-IVUS before stenting. The iMAP-IVUS system classified coronary plaque components as fibrous, lipid, necrotic, or calcified tissue, based on the radiofrequency spectrum. Epicardial adipose tissue was measured as the tissue ranging from -190 to -30 Hounsfield units. EATV, calculated as the sum of the fat areas on short-axis images, was 85.0 ± 34.0 cm(3). There was a positive correlation between EATV and the percentage of necrotic plaque tissue (R (2) = 0.34, P EATV and the percentage of fibrous tissue (R (2) = 0.24, P EATV (β = 0.14, P = 0.02) were independently associated with the percentage of necrotic plaque tissue. An increase in EATV was associated with the development of coronary atherosclerosis and, potentially, with the most dangerous type of plaque.

  5. Influence of length of interval between pulses in PDR brachytherapy (PDRBT on value of Biologically Equivalent Dose (BED in healthy tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Piotrowski

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Different PDR treatment schemas are used in clinical practice, however optimal length of interval between pulses still remains unclear. The aim of this work was to compare value of BED doses measured in surrounded healthy tissues according to different intervals between pulses in PDRBT. Influence of doses optimization on BED values was analyzed.Material and methods: Fifty-one patients treated in Greater Poland Cancer Centre were qualified for calculations.Calculations of doses were made in 51 patients with head and neck cancer, brain tumor, breast cancer, sarcoma, penis cancer and rectal cancer. Doses were calculated with the use of PLATO planning system in chosen critical points in surrounded healthy tissues. For all treatment plans the doses were compared using Biologically Equivalent Dose formula.Three interval lengths (1, 2 and 4 hours between pulses were chosen for calculations. For statistical analysis Friedman ANOVA test and Kendall ratio were used.Results: The median value of BED in chosen critical points in healthy tissues was statistically related to the length of interval between PDR pulses and decreased exponentially with 1 hour interval to 4 hours (Kendall = from 0.48 to 1.0; p = from 0.002 to 0.00001.Conclusions: Prolongation of intervals between pulses in PDR brachytherapy was connected with lower values of BED doses in healthy tissues. It seems that longer intervals between pulses reduced the risk of late complications, but also decreased the tumour control. Furthermore, optimization influenced the increase of doses in healthy tissues.

  6. Considerations of anthropometric, tissue volume, and tissue mass scaling for improved patient specificity of skeletal S values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolch, W.E.; Patton, P.W.; Shah, A.P.; Rajon, D.A.; Jokisch, D.W.

    2002-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that reference man (70 kg in mass and 170 cm in height) does not adequately represent the stature and physical dimensions of many patients undergoing radionuclide therapy, and thus scaling of radionuclide S values is required for patient specificity. For electron and beta sources uniformly distributed within internal organs, the mean dose from self-irradiation is noted to scale inversely with organ mass, provided no escape of electron energy occurs at the organ boundaries. In the skeleton, this same scaling approach is further assumed to be correct for marrow dosimetry; nevertheless, difficulties in quantitative assessments of marrow mass in specific skeletal regions of the patient make this approach difficult to implement clinically. Instead, scaling of marrow dose is achieved using various anthropometric parameters that presumably scale in the same proportion. In this study, recently developed three-dimensional macrostructural transport models of the femoral head and humeral epiphysis in three individuals (51-year male, 82-year female, and 86-year female) are used to test the abilities of different anthropometric parameters (total body mass, body surface area, etc.) to properly scale radionuclide S values from reference man models. The radionuclides considered are 33 P, 177 Lu, 153 Sm, 186 Re, 89 Sr, 166 Ho, 32 P, 188 Re, and 90 Y localized in either the active marrow or endosteal tissues of the bone trabeculae. S value scaling is additionally conducted in which the 51-year male subject is assigned as the reference individual; scaling parameters are then expanded to include tissue volumes and masses for both active marrow and skeletal spongiosa. The study concludes that, while no single anthropometric parameter emerges as a consistent scaler of reference man S values, lean body mass is indicated as an optimal scaler when the reference S values are based on 3D transport techniques. Furthermore, very exact patient-specific scaling of

  7. Quantifying brain tissue volume in multiple sclerosis with automated lesion segmentation and filling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Valverde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lesion filling has been successfully applied to reduce the effect of hypo-intense T1-w Multiple Sclerosis (MS lesions on automatic brain tissue segmentation. However, a study of fully automated pipelines incorporating lesion segmentation and lesion filling on tissue volume analysis has not yet been performed. Here, we analyzed the % of error introduced by automating the lesion segmentation and filling processes in the tissue segmentation of 70 clinically isolated syndrome patient images. First of all, images were processed using the LST and SLS toolkits with different pipeline combinations that differed in either automated or manual lesion segmentation, and lesion filling or masking out lesions. Then, images processed following each of the pipelines were segmented into gray matter (GM and white matter (WM using SPM8, and compared with the same images where expert lesion annotations were filled before segmentation. Our results showed that fully automated lesion segmentation and filling pipelines reduced significantly the % of error in GM and WM volume on images of MS patients, and performed similarly to the images where expert lesion annotations were masked before segmentation. In all the pipelines, the amount of misclassified lesion voxels was the main cause in the observed error in GM and WM volume. However, the % of error was significantly lower when automatically estimated lesions were filled and not masked before segmentation. These results are relevant and suggest that LST and SLS toolboxes allow the performance of accurate brain tissue volume measurements without any kind of manual intervention, which can be convenient not only in terms of time and economic costs, but also to avoid the inherent intra/inter variability between manual annotations.

  8. Brain tissues volume measurements from 2D MRI using parametric approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'vov, A. A.; Toropova, O. A.; Litovka, Yu. V.

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of the paper is to propose a fully automated method of volume assessment of structures within human brain. Our statistical approach uses maximum interdependency principle for decision making process of measurements consistency and unequal observations. Detecting outliers performed using maximum normalized residual test. We propose a statistical model which utilizes knowledge of tissues distribution in human brain and applies partial data restoration for precision improvement. The approach proposes completed computationally efficient and independent from segmentation algorithm used in the application.

  9. Association between increased epicardial adipose tissue volume and coronary plaque composition

    OpenAIRE

    Yamashita, Kennosuke; Yamamoto, Myong Hwa; Ebara, Seitarou; Okabe, Toshitaka; Saito, Shigeo; Hoshimoto, Koichi; Yakushiji, Tadayuki; Isomura, Naoei; Araki, Hiroshi; Obara, Chiaki; Ochiai, Masahiko

    2013-01-01

    To assess the relationship between epicardial adipose tissue volume (EATV) and plaque vulnerability in significant coronary stenosis using a 40-MHz intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging system (iMap-IVUS), we analyzed 130 consecutive patients with coronary stenosis who underwent dual-source computed tomography (CT) and cardiac catheterization. Culprit lesions were imaged by iMap-IVUS before stenting. The iMAP-IVUS system classified coronary plaque components as fibrous, lipid, necrotic, or ...

  10. Adipose tissue depot volume relationships with spinal trabecular bone mineral density in African Americans with diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary C Chan

    Full Text Available Changes in select adipose tissue volumes may differentially impact bone mineral density. This study was performed to assess cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between computed tomography-determined visceral (VAT, subcutaneous (SAT, inter-muscular (IMAT, and pericardial adipose tissue (PAT volumes with respective changes in thoracic vertebral and lumbar vertebral volumetric trabecular bone mineral density (vBMD in African Americans with type 2 diabetes. Generalized linear models were fitted to test relationships between baseline and change in adipose volumes with change in vBMD in 300 African American-Diabetes Heart Study participants; adjustment was performed for age, sex, diabetes duration, study interval, smoking, hypertension, BMI, kidney function, and medications. Participants were 50% female with mean ± SD age 55.1±9.0 years, diabetes duration 10.2±7.2 years, and BMI 34.7±7.7 kg/m2. Over 5.3 ± 1.4 years, mean vBMD decreased in thoracic/lumbar spine, while mean adipose tissue volumes increased in SAT, IMAT, and PAT, but not VAT depots. In fully-adjusted models, changes in lumbar and thoracic vBMD were positively associated with change in SAT (β[SE] 0.045[0.011], p<0.0001; 0.40[0.013], p = 0.002, respectively. Change in thoracic vBMD was positively associated with change in IMAT (p = 0.029 and VAT (p = 0.016; and change in lumbar vBMD positively associated with baseline IMAT (p<0.0001. In contrast, vBMD was not associated with change in PAT. After adjusting for BMI, baseline and change in volumes of select adipose depots were associated with increases in thoracic and lumbar trabecular vBMD in African Americans. Effects of adiposity on trabecular bone appear to be site-specific and related to factors beyond mechanical load.

  11. External Volume Expansion in Irradiated Tissue: Effects on the Recipient Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Michael S; Lujan-Hernandez, Jorge; Babchenko, Oksana; Bannon, Elizabeth; Perry, Dylan J; Chappell, Ava G; Lo, Yuan-Chyuan; Fitzgerald, Thomas J; Lalikos, Janice F

    2016-05-01

    External volume expansion prepares recipient sites to improve outcomes of fat grafting. For patients receiving radiotherapy after mastectomy, results with external volume expansion vary, and the relationship between radiotherapy and expansion remains unexplored. Thus, the authors developed a new translational model to investigate the effects in chronic skin fibrosis after radiation exposure. Twenty-four SKH1-E mice received 50 Gy of β-radiation to each flank and were monitored until fibrosis developed (8 weeks). External volume expansion was then applied at -25 mmHg to one side for 6 hours for 5 days. The opposite side served as the control. Perfusion changes were assessed with hyperspectral imaging. Mice were euthanized at 5 (n = 12) and 15 days (n = 12) after the last expansion application. Tissue samples were analyzed with immunohistochemistry for CD31 and Ki67, Masson trichrome for skin thickness, and picrosirius red to analyze collagen composition. All animals developed skin fibrosis 8 weeks after radiotherapy and became hypoperfused based on hyperspectral imaging. Expansion induced edema on treated sides after stimulation. Perfusion was decreased by 13 percent on the expansion side (p External volume expansion temporarily reduces perfusion, likely because of transient ischemia or edema. Together with mechanotransduction, these effects encourage a proangiogenic and proliferative environment in fibrotic tissue after radiotherapy in the authors' mouse model. Further studies are needed to assess these changes in fat graft retention.

  12. Final Report, Volume 4, The Develpoment of Qualification Standards forCast Super Duplex Stainless Steel (2507 Wrought Equivalent)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, D.

    2005-09-30

    was carried out between the ferrite content, hardness values and the type of fracture. SEM was also carried out on the corrosion samples in order to see the difference on the surface after corrosion analysis has been carried out. Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy was carried out on the material acquired from Foundry D in order to determine the variation in the amount of the chemical composition of various elements when the material is subjected to different heat treatment schedules. X-Ray analysis was also carried out in order to verify whether it is possible to identify the different phases present in the material. Volume percentage of ferrite was also calculated from X-Ray diffraction and compared with the Feritscope{reg_sign} and ASTM E562 Manual Point Count data in order to determine whether X-Ray Diffraction is a suitable method for carrying out qualitative analysis of different phases present. From the various tests that were conducted, it was concluded that since ASTM A923 Methods adequately identifies the presence of intermetallic phases in A890-5A grade Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel A890-5A can be directly included in ASTM A923. Correlation was determined between all the ASTM A923 Test Methods A, B and C and Test Method B were identified as the best method for detecting the presence of detrimental intermetallic phases. The micrographs from the A890-4A grade (now in ASTM A923) were identified as applicable for the A890-5A grade to compare and detect the presence of intermetallic phases. Using these micrographs one can verify whether an A890-5A sample has an unaffected, affected or a possibly affected structure. It was also observed that when compared to the A890-4A grade A890-5A grade is more sensitive to heat treatment. From the ferrite and hardness measurement a correlation was developed between toughness, volume percentage ferrite and hardness of the material. From SEM and EDS the type of intermetallic phase present and its chemical composition was

  13. Final Report, Volume 4, The Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel (2507 Wrought Equivalent)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, W.

    2005-09-30

    carried out between the ferrite content, hardness values and the type of fracture. SEM was also carried out on the corrosion samples in order to see the difference on the surface after corrosion analysis has been carried out. Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy was carried out on the material acquired from Foundry D in order to determine the variation in the amount of the chemical composition of various elements when the material is subjected to different heat treatment schedules. X-Ray analysis was also carried out in order to verify whether it is possible to identify the different phases present in the material. Volume percentage of ferrite was also calculated from X-Ray diffraction and compared with the Feritscope® and ASTM E562 Manual Point Count data in order to determine whether X-Ray Diffraction is a suitable method for carrying out qualitative analysis of different phases present. From the various tests that were conducted, it was concluded that since ASTM A923 Methods adequately identifies the presence of intermetallic phases in A890 5A grade Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel A890 5A can be directly included in ASTM A923. Correlation was determined between all the ASTM A923 Test Methods A, B and C and Test Method B were identified as the best method for detecting the presence of detrimental intermetallic phases. The micrographs from the A890-4A grade (now in ASTM A923) were identified as applicable for the A890-5A grade to compare and detect the presence of intermetallic phases. Using these micrographs one can verify whether an A890-5A sample has an unaffected, affected or a possibly affected structure. It was also observed that when compared to the A890-4A grade A890-5A grade is more sensitive to heat treatment. From the ferrite and hardness measurement a correlation was developed between toughness, volume percentage ferrite and hardness of the material. From SEM and EDS the type of intermetallic phase present and its chemical composition was determined. The best

  14. Rapid determination of the equivalence volume in potentiometric acid-base titrations to a preset pH-I Theory and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivaska, A

    1974-06-01

    A new approach to shorten the time needed for an acid-base titration has been made. The method developed is based on the equation for acid-base titrations derived by Ingman and Still. The equation is transformed into such a form that only one titration point is needed to calculate the equivalence volume when the titration is carried out to a preset pH which can be chosen according to the experimental conditions. The method is used for titration of acetic acid, log K(H)(HA) = 4.65, hydroxylammonium ion, log K(H)(HA) approximately 6.2, and boric acid, log K(H)(HA) approximately 9.1, with an error of 0.1-0.5%. In titration of hydrogen ascorbate ion, log K(H)(HA) approximately 11.3, the error obtained was about 0.3-2%.

  15. The response of a spherical tissue-equivalent proportional counter to 56-Fe particles from 200-1000 MeV/nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gersey, Bradford B.; Borak, Thomas B.; Guetersloh, Stephen B.; Zeitlin, Cary J.; Miller, J.; Heilbronn, L.; Murakami, T.; Iwata, Y.

    2001-09-04

    The radiation environment aboard the space shuttle and the International Space Station includes high-Z and high-energy (HZE) particles that are part of the galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) spectrum. Iron-56 is considered to be one of the most biologically important parts of the GCR spectrum. Tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) are used as active dosimeters on manned space flights. These TEPC's are further used to determine average quality factor for each space mission. A TEPC simulating a 1 micron diameter sphere of tissue was exposed as part of a particle spectrometer to iron-56 at energies from 200-1000 MeV/nucleon. The response of TEPC in terms of frequency-averaged lineal energy, dose-averaged lineal energy, as well as energy deposited at different impact parameters through detector was determined for six different incident energies of iron-56 in this energy range. Calculations determined that charged particle equilibrium was achieved for each of the six experiments. Energy depositions at different impact parameters were calculated using a radial dose distribution model and the results compared to experimental data.

  16. SU-E-J-210: Characterizing Tissue Equivalent Materials for the Development of a Dual MRI-CT Heterogeneous Anthropomorphic Phantom Designed Specifically for MRI Guided Radiotherapy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinmann, A; Stafford, R; Yung, J; Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI guided radiotherapy (MRIgRT) is an emerging technology which will eventually require a proficient quality auditing system. Due to different principles in which MR and CT acquire images, there is a need for a multi-imaging-modality, end-to-end QA phantom for MRIgRT. The purpose of this study is to identify lung, soft tissue, and tumor equivalent substitutes that share similar human-like CT and MR properties (i.e. Hounsfield units and relaxation times). Methods: Materials of interested such as common CT QA phantom materials, and other proprietary gels/silicones from Polytek, SmoothOn, and CompositeOne were first scanned on a GE 1.5T Signa HDxT MR. Materials that could be seen on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images were then scanned on a GE Lightspeed RT16 CT simulator and a GE Discovery 750HD CT scanner and their HU values were then measured. The materials with matching HU values of lung (−500 to −700HU), muscle (+40HU) and soft tissue (+100 to +300HU) were further scanned on GE 1.5T Signa HDx to measure their T1 and T2 relaxation times from varying parameters of TI and TE. Results: Materials that could be visualized on T1-weighted and T2-weighted images from a 1.5T MR unit and had an appropriate average CT number, −650, −685, 46,169, and 168 HUs were: compressed cork saturated with water, Polytek Platsil™ Gel-00 combined with mini styrofoam balls, radiotherapy bolus material, SmoothOn Dragon-Skin™ and SmoothOn Ecoflex™, respectively. Conclusion: Post processing analysis is currently being performed to accurately map T1 and T2 values for each material tested. From previous MR visualization and CT examinations it is expected that Dragon-Skin™, Ecoflex™ and bolus will have values consistent with tissue and tumor substitutes. We also expect compressed cork statured with water, and Polytek™-styrofoam combination to have approximate T1 and T2 values suitable for lung-equivalent materials.

  17. SU-E-J-210: Characterizing Tissue Equivalent Materials for the Development of a Dual MRI-CT Heterogeneous Anthropomorphic Phantom Designed Specifically for MRI Guided Radiotherapy Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinmann, A; Stafford, R; Yung, J; Followill, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: MRI guided radiotherapy (MRIgRT) is an emerging technology which will eventually require a proficient quality auditing system. Due to different principles in which MR and CT acquire images, there is a need for a multi-imaging-modality, end-to-end QA phantom for MRIgRT. The purpose of this study is to identify lung, soft tissue, and tumor equivalent substitutes that share similar human-like CT and MR properties (i.e. Hounsfield units and relaxation times). Methods: Materials of interested such as common CT QA phantom materials, and other proprietary gels/silicones from Polytek, SmoothOn, and CompositeOne were first scanned on a GE 1.5T Signa HDxT MR. Materials that could be seen on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images were then scanned on a GE Lightspeed RT16 CT simulator and a GE Discovery 750HD CT scanner and their HU values were then measured. The materials with matching HU values of lung (−500 to −700HU), muscle (+40HU) and soft tissue (+100 to +300HU) were further scanned on GE 1.5T Signa HDx to measure their T1 and T2 relaxation times from varying parameters of TI and TE. Results: Materials that could be visualized on T1-weighted and T2-weighted images from a 1.5T MR unit and had an appropriate average CT number, −650, −685, 46,169, and 168 HUs were: compressed cork saturated with water, Polytek Platsil™ Gel-00 combined with mini styrofoam balls, radiotherapy bolus material, SmoothOn Dragon-Skin™ and SmoothOn Ecoflex™, respectively. Conclusion: Post processing analysis is currently being performed to accurately map T1 and T2 values for each material tested. From previous MR visualization and CT examinations it is expected that Dragon-Skin™, Ecoflex™ and bolus will have values consistent with tissue and tumor substitutes. We also expect compressed cork statured with water, and Polytek™-styrofoam combination to have approximate T1 and T2 values suitable for lung-equivalent materials

  18. Equivalent Lagrangians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojman, S.

    1982-01-01

    We present a review of the inverse problem of the Calculus of Variations, emphasizing the ambiguities which appear due to the existence of equivalent Lagrangians for a given classical system. In particular, we analyze the properties of equivalent Lagrangians in the multidimensional case, we study the conditions for the existence of a variational principle for (second as well as first order) equations of motion and their solutions, we consider the inverse problem of the Calculus of Variations for singular systems, we state the ambiguities which emerge in the relationship between symmetries and conserved quantities in the case of equivalent Lagrangians, we discuss the problems which appear in trying to quantize classical systems which have different equivalent Lagrangians, we describe the situation which arises in the study of equivalent Lagrangians in field theory and finally, we present some unsolved problems and discussion topics related to the content of this article. (author)

  19. Determination of quantitative tissue composition by iterative reconstruction on 3D DECT volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnusson, Maria [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics; Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV); Malusek, Alexandr [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics; Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV); Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR, Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Radiation Dosimetry; Muhammad, Arif [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics; Carlsson, Gudrun Alm [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics; Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV)

    2011-07-01

    Quantitative tissue classification using dual-energy CT has the potential to improve accuracy in radiation therapy dose planning as it provides more information about material composition of scanned objects than the currently used methods based on single-energy CT. One problem that hinders successful application of both single- and dual-energy CT is the presence of beam hardening and scatter artifacts in reconstructed data. Current pre- and post-correction methods used for image reconstruction often bias CT attenuation values and thus limit their applicability for quantitative tissue classification. Here we demonstrate simulation studies with a novel iterative algorithm that decomposes every soft tissue voxel into three base materials: water, protein, and adipose. The results demonstrate that beam hardening artifacts can effectively be removed and accurate estimation of mass fractions of each base material can be achieved. Our iterative algorithm starts with calculating parallel projections on two previously reconstructed DECT volumes reconstructed from fan-beam or helical projections with small conebeam angle. The parallel projections are then used in an iterative loop. Future developments include segmentation of soft and bone tissue and subsequent determination of bone composition. (orig.)

  20. Revisiting the Logan plot to account for non-negligible blood volume in brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schain, Martin; Fazio, Patrik; Mrzljak, Ladislav; Amini, Nahid; Al-Tawil, Nabil; Fitzer-Attas, Cheryl; Bronzova, Juliana; Landwehrmeyer, Bernhard; Sampaio, Christina; Halldin, Christer; Varrone, Andrea

    2017-08-18

    Reference tissue-based quantification of brain PET data does not typically include correction for signal originating from blood vessels, which is known to result in biased outcome measures. The bias extent depends on the amount of radioactivity in the blood vessels. In this study, we seek to revisit the well-established Logan plot and derive alternative formulations that provide estimation of distribution volume ratios (DVRs) that are corrected for the signal originating from the vasculature. New expressions for the Logan plot based on arterial input function and reference tissue were derived, which included explicit terms for whole blood radioactivity. The new methods were evaluated using PET data acquired using [ 11 C]raclopride and [ 18 F]MNI-659. The two-tissue compartment model (2TCM), with which signal originating from blood can be explicitly modeled, was used as a gold standard. DVR values obtained for [ 11 C]raclopride using the either blood-based or reference tissue-based Logan plot were systematically underestimated compared to 2TCM, and for [ 18 F]MNI-659, a proportionality bias was observed, i.e., the bias varied across regions. The biases disappeared when optimal blood-signal correction was used for respective tracer, although for the case of [ 18 F]MNI-659 a small but systematic overestimation of DVR was still observed. The new method appears to remove the bias introduced due to absence of correction for blood volume in regular graphical analysis and can be considered in clinical studies. Further studies are however required to derive a generic mapping between plasma and whole-blood radioactivity levels.

  1. Real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound determination of microvascular blood volume in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue in man. Evidence for adipose tissue capillary recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tobin, L; Simonsen, L; Bülow, J

    2010-01-01

    The adipose tissue metabolism is dependent on its blood perfusion. During lipid mobilization e.g. during exercise and during lipid deposition e.g. postprandial, adipose tissue blood flow is increased. This increase in blood flow may involve capillary recruitment in the tissue. We investigated...... of ultrasound contrast agent to establish the reproducibility of the technique. In nine subjects, the effect of an oral glucose load on blood flow and microvascular volume was measured in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue and forearm skeletal muscle. ¹³³Xe washout and venous occlusion strain......-gauge plethysmography was used to measure the adipose tissue and forearm blood flow, respectively. Ultrasound signal intensity of the first plateau phases was 27 ± dB in the abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue and 18 ± 2 dB (P

  2. Critical study of some soft-tissue equivalent material. Sensitivity to neutrons of 1 keV to 14 MeV; Etude critique de quelques materiaux equivalents aux tissus mous. Sensibilite aux neutrons de 1 keV a 14 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerviler, H de; Pages, L; Tardy-Joubert, Ph [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    Authors have studied the elastic and inelastic reactions on various elements contribution to kerma in standard soft tissue and as a function of neutron energy from 1 keV to 14 MeV the ratio of kerma in tissue equivalent material to kerma in soft tissue. The results of calculations are made for materials without hydrogen in view to state exactly their neutron sensitivity and for the following hydrogenous materials: Rossi and Failla plastic, MixD, pure polyethylene and a new CEA tissue equivalent (a magnesium fluoride and polyethylene compound). Results for {gamma}-rays are given. (authors) [French] Les auteurs ont etudie la contribution au kerma total des reactions elastiques et inelastiques sur les divers composants du tissu mou standard et la variation, en fonction de l'energie des neutrons de 1 keV a 14 MeV, du rapport des kermas dans differents materiaux equivalents au tissu au kerma dans les tissus mous. Les materiaux etudies sont des materiaux sans hydrogene afin de preciser leur sensibilite aux neutrons et les materiaux hydrogenes suivants: plastique de Rossi et Failla, polyethylene pur, MixD, nouveau plastique CEA a base de polyethylene et de fluorure de magnesium. Les resultats pour les photons sont egalement rappeles. (auteurs)

  3. Association Between Treatment at High-Volume Facilities and Improved Overall Survival in Soft Tissue Sarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venigalla, Sriram; Nead, Kevin T; Sebro, Ronnie; Guttmann, David M; Sharma, Sonam; Simone, Charles B; Levin, William P; Wilson, Robert J; Weber, Kristy L; Shabason, Jacob E

    2018-03-15

    Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are rare malignancies that require complex multidisciplinary management. Therefore, facilities with high sarcoma case volume may demonstrate superior outcomes. We hypothesized that STS treatment at high-volume (HV) facilities would be associated with improved overall survival (OS). Patients aged ≥18 years with nonmetastatic STS treated with surgery and radiation therapy at a single facility from 2004 through 2013 were identified from the National Cancer Database. Facilities were dichotomized into HV and low-volume (LV) cohorts based on total case volume over the study period. OS was assessed using multivariable Cox regression with propensity score-matching. Patterns of care were assessed using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Of 9025 total patients, 1578 (17%) and 7447 (83%) were treated at HV and LV facilities, respectively. On multivariable analysis, high educational attainment, larger tumor size, higher grade, and negative surgical margins were statistically significantly associated with treatment at HV facilities; conversely, black race and non-metropolitan residence were negative predictors of treatment at HV facilities. On propensity score-matched multivariable analysis, treatment at HV facilities versus LV facilities was associated with improved OS (hazard ratio, 0.87, 95% confidence interval, 0.80-0.95; P = .001). Older age, lack of insurance, greater comorbidity, larger tumor size, higher tumor grade, and positive surgical margins were associated with statistically significantly worse OS. In this observational cohort study using the National Cancer Database, receipt of surgery and radiation therapy at HV facilities was associated with improved OS in patients with STS. Potential sociodemographic disparities limit access to care at HV facilities for certain populations. Our findings highlight the importance of receipt of care at HV facilities for patients with STS and warrant further study into improving access to

  4. Mechanistic simulation of normal-tissue damage in radiotherapy-implications for dose-volume analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowska, Eva; Baker, Colin; Nahum, Alan

    2010-01-01

    A radiobiologically based 3D model of normal tissue has been developed in which complications are generated when 'irradiated'. The aim is to provide insight into the connection between dose-distribution characteristics, different organ architectures and complication rates beyond that obtainable with simple DVH-based analytical NTCP models. In this model the organ consists of a large number of functional subunits (FSUs), populated by stem cells which are killed according to the LQ model. A complication is triggered if the density of FSUs in any 'critical functioning volume' (CFV) falls below some threshold. The (fractional) CFV determines the organ architecture and can be varied continuously from small (series-like behaviour) to large (parallel-like). A key feature of the model is its ability to account for the spatial dependence of dose distributions. Simulations were carried out to investigate correlations between dose-volume parameters and the incidence of 'complications' using different pseudo-clinical dose distributions. Correlations between dose-volume parameters and outcome depended on characteristics of the dose distributions and on organ architecture. As anticipated, the mean dose and V 20 correlated most strongly with outcome for a parallel organ, and the maximum dose for a serial organ. Interestingly better correlation was obtained between the 3D computer model and the LKB model with dose distributions typical for serial organs than with those typical for parallel organs. This work links the results of dose-volume analyses to dataset characteristics typical for serial and parallel organs and it may help investigators interpret the results from clinical studies.

  5. Experimental Models Used in Fat Grafting Research for Volume Augmentation in Soft Tissue Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Lujan-Hernandez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available As the popularity of fat grafting research increases, animal models are being used as the source of pre-clinical experimental information for discovery and to enhance techniques. To date, animal models used in this research have not been compared to provide a standardized model. We analyzed publications from 1968–2015 to compare published accounts of animal models in fat grafting research. Data collected included: species used, graft characteristics (donor tissue, recipient area, amount injected, injection technique, time of sacrifice and quantification methods. Mice were most commonly used (56% of studies, with the “athymic nude” strain utilized most frequently (44%. Autologous fat was the most common source of grafted tissue (52%. Subcutaneous dorsum was the most common recipient site (51%. On average, 0.80±0.60 mL of fat was grafted. A single bolus technique was used in 57% of studies. Fat volume assessment was typically completed at the end of the study, occurring at less than 1 week to one year. Graft volume was quantified by weight (63%, usually in conjunction with another analysis. The results demonstrate the current heterogeneity of animal models in this research. We propose that the research community reach a consensus to allow better comparison of techniques and results. One example is the model used in our laboratory and others; this model is described in detail. Eventually, larger animal models may better translate to the human condition but, given increased financial costs and animal facility capability, should be explored when data obtained from small animal studies is exhausted or inconclusive.

  6. Response of human limbal epithelial cells to wounding on 3D RAFT tissue equivalents: effect of airlifting and human limbal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massie, Isobel; Levis, Hannah J; Daniels, Julie T

    2014-10-01

    Limbal epithelial stem cell deficiency can cause blindness but may be treated by human limbal epithelial cell (hLE) transplantation, normally on human amniotic membrane. Clinical outcomes using amnion can be unreliable and so we have developed an alternative tissue equivalent (TE), RAFT (Real Architecture for 3D Tissue), which supports hLE expansion, and stratification when airlifted. Human limbal fibroblasts (hLF) may be incorporated into RAFT TEs, where they support overlying hLE and improve phenotype. However, the impact of neither airlifting nor hLF on hLE function has been investigated. hLE on RAFT TEs (±hLF and airlifting) were wounded using heptanol and re-epithelialisation (fluorescein diacetate staining), and percentage putative stem cell marker p63α and proliferative marker Ki67 expression (wholemount immunohistochemistry), measured. Airlifted, hLF- RAFT TEs were unable to close the wound and p63α expression was 7 ± 0.2% after wounding. Conversely, non-airlifted, hLF- RAFT TEs closed the wound within 9 days and p63α expression was higher at 22 ± 5% (p < 0.01). hLE on both hLF- and hLF+ RAFT TEs (non-airlifted) closed the wound and p63α expression was 26 ± 8% and 36 ± 3% respectively (ns). Ki67 expression by hLE increased from 1.3 ± 0.5% before wounding to 7.89 ± 2.53% post-wounding for hLF- RAFT TEs (p < 0.01), and 0.8 ± 0.08% to 17.68 ± 10.88% for hLF+ RAFT TEs (p < 0.05), suggesting that re-epithelialisation was a result of proliferation. These data suggest that neither airlifting nor hLF are necessarily required to maintain a functional epithelium on RAFT TEs, thus simplifying and shortening the production process. This is important when working towards clinical application of regenerative medicine products. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Limbal Fibroblasts Maintain Normal Phenotype in 3D RAFT Tissue Equivalents Suggesting Potential for Safe Clinical Use in Treatment of Ocular Surface Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massie, Isobel; Dale, Sarah B; Daniels, Julie T

    2015-06-01

    Limbal epithelial stem cell deficiency can cause blindness, but transplantation of these cells on a carrier such as human amniotic membrane can restore vision. Unfortunately, clinical graft manufacture using amnion can be inconsistent. Therefore, we have developed an alternative substrate, Real Architecture for 3D Tissue (RAFT), which supports human limbal epithelial cells (hLE) expansion. Epithelial organization is improved when human limbal fibroblasts (hLF) are incorporated into RAFT tissue equivalent (TE). However, hLF have the potential to transdifferentiate into a pro-scarring cell type, which would be incompatible with therapeutic transplantation. The aim of this work was to assess the scarring phenotype of hLF in RAFT TEs in hLE+ and hLE- RAFT TEs and in nonairlifted and airlifted RAFT TEs. Diseased fibroblasts (dFib) isolated from the fibrotic conjunctivae of ocular mucous membrane pemphigoid (Oc-MMP) patients were used as a pro-scarring positive control against which hLF were compared using surrogate scarring parameters: matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, de novo collagen synthesis, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) secretion. Normal hLF and dFib maintained different phenotypes in RAFT TE. MMP-2 and -9 activity, de novo collagen synthesis, and α-SMA expression were all increased in dFib cf. normal hLF RAFT TEs, although TGF-β1 secretion did not differ between normal hLF and dFib RAFT TEs. Normal hLF do not progress toward a scarring-like phenotype during culture in RAFT TEs and, therefore, may be safe to include in therapeutic RAFT TE, where they can support hLE, although in vivo work is required to confirm this. dFib RAFT TEs (used in this study as a positive control) may be useful toward the development of an ex vivo disease model of Oc-MMP.

  8. Characterization of MOSFET dosimeter angular dependence in three rotational axes measured free-in-air and in soft-tissue equivalent material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koivisto, Juha; Kiljunen, Timo; Wolff, Jan; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2013-01-01

    When performing dose measurements on an X-ray device with multiple angles of irradiation, it is necessary to take the angular dependence of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters into account. The objective of this study was to investigate the angular sensitivity dependence of MOSFET dosimeters in three rotational axes measured free-in-air and in soft-tissue equivalent material using dental photon energy. Free-in-air dose measurements were performed with three MOSFET dosimeters attached to a carbon fibre holder. Soft tissue measurements were performed with three MOSFET dosimeters placed in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom. All measurements were made in the isocenter of a dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanner using 5° angular increments in the three rotational axes: axial, normal-to-axial and tangent-to-axial. The measurements were referenced to a RADCAL 1015 dosimeter. The angular sensitivity free-in-air (1 SD) was 3.7 ± 0.5 mV/mGy for axial, 3.8 ± 0.6 mV/mGy for normal-to-axial and 3.6 ± 0.6 mV/mGy for tangent-to-axial rotation. The angular sensitivity in the PMMA phantom was 3.1 ± 0.1 mV/mGy for axial, 3.3 ± 0.2 mV/mGy for normal-to-axial and 3.4 ± 0.2 mV/mGy for tangent-to-axial rotation. The angular sensitivity variations are considerably smaller in PMMA due to the smoothing effect of the scattered radiation. The largest decreases from the isotropic response were observed free-in-air at 90° (distal tip) and 270° (wire base) in the normal-to-axial and tangent-to-axial rotations, respectively. MOSFET dosimeters provide us with a versatile dosimetric method for dental radiology. However, due to the observed variation in angular sensitivity, MOSFET dosimeters should always be calibrated in the actual clinical settings for the beam geometry and angular range of the CBCT exposure. (author)

  9. Characterization of MOSFET dosimeter angular dependence in three rotational axes measured free-in-air and in soft-tissue equivalent material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, Juha; Kiljunen, Timo; Wolff, Jan; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2013-09-01

    When performing dose measurements on an X-ray device with multiple angles of irradiation, it is necessary to take the angular dependence of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters into account. The objective of this study was to investigate the angular sensitivity dependence of MOSFET dosimeters in three rotational axes measured free-in-air and in soft-tissue equivalent material using dental photon energy. Free-in-air dose measurements were performed with three MOSFET dosimeters attached to a carbon fibre holder. Soft tissue measurements were performed with three MOSFET dosimeters placed in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom. All measurements were made in the isocenter of a dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanner using 5º angular increments in the three rotational axes: axial, normal-to-axial and tangent-to-axial. The measurements were referenced to a RADCAL 1015 dosimeter. The angular sensitivity free-in-air (1 SD) was 3.7 ± 0.5 mV/mGy for axial, 3.8 ± 0.6 mV/mGy for normal-to-axial and 3.6 ± 0.6 mV/mGy for tangent-to-axial rotation. The angular sensitivity in the PMMA phantom was 3.1 ± 0.1 mV/mGy for axial, 3.3 ± 0.2 mV/mGy for normal-to-axial and 3.4 ± 0.2 mV/mGy for tangent-to-axial rotation. The angular sensitivity variations are considerably smaller in PMMA due to the smoothing effect of the scattered radiation. The largest decreases from the isotropic response were observed free-in-air at 90° (distal tip) and 270° (wire base) in the normal-to-axial and tangent-to-axial rotations, respectively. MOSFET dosimeters provide us with a versatile dosimetric method for dental radiology. However, due to the observed variation in angular sensitivity, MOSFET dosimeters should always be calibrated in the actual clinical settings for the beam geometry and angular range of the CBCT exposure.

  10. Thermoluminescence and radioluminescence properties of tissue equivalent Cu-doped Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} for radiation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz Z, E.; Furetta, C. [UNAM, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 70543, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Marcazzo, J.; Santiago, M. [Instituto de Fisica Arroyo Seco / UNICEN, Gral. Pinto 399, 7000 Tandil, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Guarneros, C. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Altamira Km 14.5, 896000 Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Pacio, M. [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Instituto de Ciencias, Centro de Investigacion en Dispositivos Semiconductores, Av. 14 Sur, 72570 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Palomino, R., E-mail: ecruz@nucleares.unam.mx [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas, Av. San Claudio y 18 Sur, 72570 Puebla Pue. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Thermoluminescence (Tl) and radioluminescence (Rl) properties of lithium tetraborate (Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}) doped with different concentration of copper (0.25, 0.5, 1 wt %) under gamma and beta irradiation has been investigated. The feasibility of using this borate in radiation dosimetry at low doses has been evaluated. Tissue equivalent Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} was prepared by solid state reaction using mixing stoichiometric compositions of lithium carbonate (Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) and boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}) and a solution of CuCl{sub 2} as dopant. The glow curve, of the most efficient copper doped borate (Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Cu 0.5 wt %), shows a main stable peak centered at 225 degrees C and a second low temperature peak centered at 80 degrees C. The low temperature peak disappears completely after 24 hours of storage in darkness and at room temperature or after an annealing at 120 degrees C for 10 seconds. The main peak of the Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Cu remains constant. The Tl response of Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Cu shows good linearity in the analyzed dose range. The stability and repeatability of Rl signals of the borate have been studied and the Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Cu (0.5 wt %) shown the higher Rl emission and a stable and repetitive response. Results show that Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Cu has prospects to be used in gamma and beta radiation dosimetry. (Author)

  11. Hierarchical imaging: a new concept for targeted imaging of large volumes from cells to tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Irene; Spomer, Waldemar; Hofmann, Andreas; Thaler, Marlene; Hillmer, Stefan; Gengenbach, Ulrich; Schröder, Rasmus R

    2016-12-12

    volume data at different levels of resolution can yield comprehensive information, including statistics, morphology and organization of cells and tissue. We predict, that hierarchical imaging will be a first step in tackling the big data issue inevitably connected with volume EM.

  12. Volume fractions of DCE-MRI parameter as early predictor of histologic response in soft tissue sarcoma: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wei; Yan, Zhuangzhi; Gao, Xin

    2017-10-01

    To find early predictors of histologic response in soft tissue sarcoma through volume transfer constant (K trans ) analysis based on dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). 11 Patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the lower extremity that underwent preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by limb salvage surgery were included in this retrospective study. For each patient, DCE-MRI data sets were collected before and two weeks after therapy initiation, and histologic tumor cell necrosis rate (TCNR) was reported at surgery. The DCE-MRI volumes were aligned by registration. Then, the aligned volumes were used to obtain the K trans variation map. Accordingly, three sub-volumes (with increased, decreased or unchanged K trans ) were defined and identified, and fractions of the sub-volumes, denoted as F + , F - and F 0 , respectively, were calculated. The predictive ability of volume fractions was determined by using area under a receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Linear regression analysis was performed to investigate the relationship between TCNR and volume fractions. In addition, the K trans values of the sub-volumes were compared. The AUC for F - (0.896) and F 0 (0.833) were larger than that for change of tumor longest diameter ΔD (0.625) and the change of mean K trans ΔK trans ¯ (0.792). Moreover, the regression results indicated that TCNR was directly proportional to F 0 (R 2 =0.75, P=0.0003), while it was inversely proportional to F - (R 2 =0.77, P=0.0002). However, TCNR had relatively weak linear relationship with ΔK trans ¯ (R 2 =0.64, P=0.0018). Additionally, TCNR did not have linear relationship with DD (R 2 =0.16, P=0.1246). The volume fraction F - and F 0 have potential as early predictors of soft tissue sarcoma histologic response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Gyrokinetic equivalence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parra, Felix I; Catto, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    We compare two different derivations of the gyrokinetic equation: the Hamiltonian approach in Dubin D H E et al (1983 Phys. Fluids 26 3524) and the recursive methodology in Parra F I and Catto P J (2008 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 50 065014). We prove that both approaches yield the same result at least to second order in a Larmor radius over macroscopic length expansion. There are subtle differences in the definitions of some of the functions that need to be taken into account to prove the equivalence.

  14. Epicardial adipose tissue volume and adipocytokine imbalance are strongly linked to human coronary atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimabukuro, Michio; Hirata, Yoichiro; Tabata, Minoru; Dagvasumberel, Munkhbaatar; Sato, Hiromi; Kurobe, Hirotsugu; Fukuda, Daiju; Soeki, Takeshi; Kitagawa, Tetsuya; Takanashi, Shuichiro; Sata, Masataka

    2013-05-01

    The impact of epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) over abdominal or overall adiposity on coronary artery disease (CAD) is currently unknown. We compared the association among EAT volume (EATV), cytokine/adipocytokine profiles in EAT and subcutaneous fat, and atherogenic CAD. Paired samples were obtained from EAT and subcutaneous adipose tissue during elective cardiac surgery for CAD (n=50) or non-CAD (n=50). EATV was the sum of cross-sectional EAT areas, and visceral and subcutaneous fat areas were determined at the umbilicus level on computed tomography scans. CD68(+), CD11c(+), and CD206(+) cells were counted using immunohistochemical staining. Cytokine/adipocytokine expression was evaluated using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Multivariate analysis indicated that male sex, age, diabetes mellitus, high triglycerides, and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and EATV index (EATV/body surface area, cm(3)/m(2)) were significant CAD predictors (corrected R(2)=0.401; PEATV index positively correlated with the CD68(+) and CD11c(+) cell numbers and nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich-containing family, pyrin domain-containing-3 (NLRP3), interleukin-1β, and interleukin-1R expression; and negatively correlated with adiponectin expression in EAT. A multivariate analysis model, including CD68(+) cells and interleukin-1β, and adiponectin expression in EAT strongly predicted CAD (corrected R(2)=0.756; PEATV and macrophage and cytokine/adipocytokine signals in EAT strongly correlated with CAD. Our findings suggest that EATV and adipocytokine imbalance are strongly linked to human coronary atherosclerosis.

  15. Establishing Substantial Equivalence: Transcriptomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudo, María Marcela; Powers, Stephen J.; Mitchell, Rowan A. C.; Shewry, Peter R.

    Regulatory authorities in Western Europe require transgenic crops to be substantially equivalent to conventionally bred forms if they are to be approved for commercial production. One way to establish substantial equivalence is to compare the transcript profiles of developing grain and other tissues of transgenic and conventionally bred lines, in order to identify any unintended effects of the transformation process. We present detailed protocols for transcriptomic comparisons of developing wheat grain and leaf material, and illustrate their use by reference to our own studies of lines transformed to express additional gluten protein genes controlled by their own endosperm-specific promoters. The results show that the transgenes present in these lines (which included those encoding marker genes) did not have any significant unpredicted effects on the expression of endogenous genes and that the transgenic plants were therefore substantially equivalent to the corresponding parental lines.

  16. Percutaneous bone cement refixation of aseptically loose hip prostheses: the effect of interface tissue removal on injected cement volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malan, Daniel F. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedics, Leiden (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Department of Intelligent Systems, Delft (Netherlands); Valstar, Edward R. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedics, Leiden (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Department of Biomechanical Engineering, Delft (Netherlands); Nelissen, Rob G.H.H. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedics, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-11-15

    To quantify whether injected cement volumes differed between two groups of patients who underwent experimental minimally invasive percutaneous cement injection procedures to stabilize aseptically loose hip prostheses. One patient group was preoperatively treated using gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy to remove fibrous interface tissue, while the other group received no preoperative treatment. It was hypothesized that cement penetration may have been inhibited by the presence of fibrous interface tissue in periprosthetic lesions. We analyzed 17 patients (14 female, 3 male, ages 72-91, ASA categories 2-4) who were treated at our institution. Osteolytic lesions and injected cement were manually delineated using 3D CT image segmentation, and the deposition of injected cement was quantified. Patients who underwent preoperative gene-directed enzyme therapy to remove fibrous tissue exhibited larger injected cement volumes than those who did not. The observed median increase in injected cement volume was 6.8 ml. Higher cement leakage volumes were also observed for this group. We conclude that prior removal of periprosthetic fibrous interface tissue may enable better cement flow and penetration. This might lead to better refixation of aseptically loosened prostheses. (orig.)

  17. Fractionation in normal tissues: the (α/β)eff concept can account for dose heterogeneity and volume effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Aswin L; Nahum, Alan E

    2013-10-07

    The simple Linear-Quadratic (LQ)-based Withers iso-effect formula (WIF) is widely used in external-beam radiotherapy to derive a new tumour dose prescription such that there is normal-tissue (NT) iso-effect when changing the fraction size and/or number. However, as conventionally applied, the WIF is invalid unless the normal-tissue response is solely determined by the tumour dose. We propose a generalized WIF (gWIF) which retains the tumour prescription dose, but replaces the intrinsic fractionation sensitivity measure (α/β) by a new concept, the normal-tissue effective fractionation sensitivity, [Formula: see text], which takes into account both the dose heterogeneity in, and the volume effect of, the late-responding normal-tissue in question. Closed-form analytical expressions for [Formula: see text] ensuring exact normal-tissue iso-effect are derived for: (i) uniform dose, and (ii) arbitrary dose distributions with volume-effect parameter n = 1 from the normal-tissue dose-volume histogram. For arbitrary dose distributions and arbitrary n, a numerical solution for [Formula: see text] exhibits a weak dependence on the number of fractions. As n is increased, [Formula: see text] increases from its intrinsic value at n = 0 (100% serial normal-tissue) to values close to or even exceeding the tumour (α/β) at n = 1 (100% parallel normal-tissue), with the highest values of [Formula: see text] corresponding to the most conformal dose distributions. Applications of this new concept to inverse planning and to highly conformal modalities are discussed, as is the effect of possible deviations from LQ behaviour at large fraction sizes.

  18. Translational and Brownian motion in laser-Doppler flowmetry of large tissue volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binzoni, T; Leung, T S; Seghier, M L; Delpy, D T

    2004-01-01

    This study reports the derivation of a precise mathematical relationship existing between the different p-moments of the power spectrum of the photoelectric current, obtained from a laser-Doppler flowmeter (LDF), and the red blood cell speed. The main purpose is that both the Brownian (defining the 'biological zero') and the translational movements are taken into account, clarifying in this way what the exact contribution of each parameter is to the LDF derived signals. The derivation of the equations is based on the quasi-elastic scattering theory and holds for multiple scattering (i.e. measurements in large tissue volumes and/or very high red blood cell concentration). The paper also discusses why experimentally there exists a range in which the relationship between the first moment of the power spectrum and the average red blood cells speed may be considered as 'linear' and what are the physiological determinants that can result in nonlinearity. A correct way to subtract the biological zero from the LDF data is also proposed. The findings should help in the design of improved LDF instruments and in the interpretation of experimental data

  19. Effect of the Epicardial Adipose Tissue Volume on the Prevalence of Paroxysmal and Persistent Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oba, Kageyuki; Maeda, Minetaka; Maimaituxun, Gulinu; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Arasaki, Osamu; Fukuda, Daiju; Yagi, Shusuke; Hirata, Yukina; Nishio, Susumu; Iwase, Takashi; Takao, Shoichiro; Kusunose, Kenya; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Soeki, Takeshi; Wakatsuki, Tetsuzo; Harada, Masafumi; Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Sata, Masataka; Shimabukuro, Michio

    2018-05-25

    Although increasing evidence suggests that epicardial adipose tissue volume (EATV) is associated with atrial fibrillation (AF), it is controversial whether there is a dose-response relationship of increasing EATV along the continuum of AF. We evaluated the effect of the EATV on the prevalence of paroxysmal AF (PAF) and persistent AF (PeAF) and the relationships with cardiac structure and functional remodeling.Methods and Results:Subjects who underwent multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) coronary angiography because of symptoms suggestive of coronary artery disease were divided into sinus rhythm (SR) (n=112), PAF (n=133), and PeAF (n=71) groups. The EATV index (EATV/body surface area, mL/m 2 ) was strongly associated with the prevalence of PAF and PeAF on the model adjusted for known AF risk factors. The effect of the EATV index on the prevalence of PeAF, but not on that of PAF, was modified by the left atrial (LA) dimension, suggesting that extension of the LA dimension is related to EATV expansion in PeAF. The cutoff value of the EATV index for the prevalence was higher in PeAF than in PAF (64 vs. 55 mL/m 2 , PEATV index is associated with the prevalence of PAF and PeAF, and its cutoff values are predictive for PAF and PeAF development independently of other AF risk factors.

  20. Characterization of tissues equivalent to the human body by the Monte Carlo method for X-rays; Caracterizacion de tejidos equivalentes al cuerpo humano mediante el metodo Monte Carlo para rayos X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega R, J.; Huamani T, Y.; Mullisaca P, A. F.; Yauri C, L., E-mail: josevegaramirez@yahoo.es [Universidad Nacional de San Agustin de Arequipa, Av. Independencia s/n, 04000 Arequipa (Peru)

    2017-10-15

    There is a need to have materials equivalent to the human body that have the appropriate characteristics to be used as a substitute tissue in the clinical practices of radio-diagnosis, radiotherapy. In Arequipa, Peru, there are two health centers in radiotherapy applications, one with a Theratron Co-60 gamma irradiator and another with Elekta Linac; the Medical Physics Area of the School of Physics of the National University of San Agustin de Arequipa, were four equivalent materials based on epoxy resin, phenolitic spheres, calcium carbonate, etc. were built, such as bone tissue, soft tissue, adipose and lung tissue compared with water, whit the purpose of studying and applying them in future clinical applications. In this work we describe its physical and dosimetric characterization to determine its use as an equivalent material or manikin. The materials are 1 cm thick and 30 cm in diameter, the materials are non-malleable solids, they do not degrade, they have stability in their consistency due to temperature and irradiation, they are not toxic in their use, determining densities from 0.32 g/cm{sup 3} for the lung tissue to 1.8 g/cm{sup 3} for the bone material. These materials were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, giving the percentages by weight of the elements found to determine their effective atomic number, the physical analysis to determine their mass absorption and energy coefficients, which were studied for energy photons between 1 KeV at 20 MeV. The simulation of the equivalent materials and the physical and dosimetric study were found using the code Penelope 2008 Monte Carlo method and validated by the Nist database. The results obtained according to their coefficients of mass attenuation of each material, show lung, bone, soft and adipose tissue with differences with respect to the same Nist materials. The range maximum and minimum Rd deviation found was 35.65 - 3.16 for bone, 28.5 - 6.74 for lung, 33.78 - 9.06 for soft tissue and 86.42 - 1

  1. Examination of the Pattern of Growth of Cerebral Tissue Volumes From Hospital Discharge to Early Childhood in Very Preterm Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monson, Brian B; Anderson, Peter J; Matthews, Lillian G; Neil, Jeffrey J; Kapur, Kush; Cheong, Jeanie L Y; Doyle, Lex W; Thompson, Deanne K; Inder, Terrie E

    2016-08-01

    Smaller cerebral volumes at hospital discharge in very preterm (VPT) infants are associated with poor neurobehavioral outcomes. Brain growth from the newborn period to middle childhood has not been explored because longitudinal data have been lacking. To examine the pattern of growth of cerebral tissue volumes from hospital discharge to childhood in VPT infants and to determine perinatal risk factors for impaired brain growth and associations with neurobehavioral outcomes at 7 years. Prospective cohort study of VPT infants (childhood and outcomes in VPT infants. Low brain volumes observed in VPT infants are exaggerated at 7 years. Low brain volume in infancy is associated with long-term functional outcomes, emphasizing the persisting influence of early brain development on subsequent growth and outcomes.

  2. Training volume and soft tissue injury in professional and non-professional rugby union players: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Shane; Halaki, Mark; Orr, Rhonda

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the relationship between training volume and soft tissue injury incidence, and characterise soft tissue injury in rugby union players. A systematic search of electronic databases was performed. The search strategy combined terms covering: training volume and injury, and rugby union, and players of all levels. Medline, SPORTDiscus, Web of Science, Embase, PubMed. Studies were included if they reported: male rugby union players, a clear definition of a rugby union injury, the amount of training volume undertaken by participants, and epidemiological data for soft-tissue injuries including the number or incidence. 15 studies were eligible for inclusion. Overall match and training injury incidence ranged from 3.3 to 218.0 injuries/1000 player match hours and 0.1-6.1 injuries/1000 player training hours, respectively. Muscle and tendon as well as joint (non-bone) and ligament injuries were the most frequently occurring injuries. The lower limb was the most prevalent injury location. Injury incidence was higher in professional rugby union players than non-professional players. Contact events were responsible for the greatest injury incidence. For non-contact mechanisms, running was responsible for the highest injury incidence. Inconsistent injury definitions hindered reliable comparison of injury data. The lack of reporting training volumes in hours per player per week limited the ability to investigate associations between training volume and injury incidence. A higher level of play may result in higher match injury incidence. Muscle and tendon injuries were the most common type of soft tissue injury, while the lower limb was the most common location of injury in rugby union players, and running was responsible for the highest injury incidence during non-contact events. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. SU-F-T-150: Comparing Normal Tissue Irradiated Volumes for Proton Vs. Photon Treatment Plans On Lung Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, A; Mohan, R; Liao, Z [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to compare the “irradiated volume” (IRV) of normal tissues receiving 5, 20, 50, 80 and 90% or higher of the prescription dose with passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) vs. IMRT of lung cancer patients. The overall goal of this research is to understand the factors affecting outcomes of a randomized PSPT vs. IMRT lung trial. Methods: Thirteen lung cancer patients, selected randomly, were analyzed. Each patient had PSPT and IMRT 74 Gy (RBE) plans meeting the same normal tissue constraints generated. IRVs were created for pairs of IMRT and PSPT plans on each patient. The volume of iGTV, (respiratory motion-incorporated GTV) was subtracted from each IRV to create normal tissue irradiated volume IRVNT. The average of IRVNT DVHs over all patients was also calculated for both modalities and inter-compared as were the selected dose-volume indices. Probability (p value) curves were calculated based on the Wilcoxon matched-paired signed-rank test to determine the dose regions where the statistically significant differences existed. Results: As expected, the average 5, 20 and 50% IRVNT’s for PSPT was found to be significantly smaller than for IMRT (p < 0.001, 0.01, and 0.001 respectively). However, the average 90% IRVNT for PSPT was greater than for IMRT (p = 0.003) presumably due to larger penumbra of protons and the long range of protons in lower density media. The 80% IRVNT for PSPT was also larger but not statistically distinguishable (p = .224). Conclusion: PSPT modality has smaller irradiated volume at lower doses, but larger volume at high doses. A larger cohort of lung patients will be analyzed in the future and IRVNT of patients treated with PSPT and IMRT will be compared to determine if the irradiated volumes (the magnitude of “dose bath”) correlate with outcomes.

  4. Mixed field dose equivalent measuring instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brackenbush, L.W.; McDonald, J.C.; Endres, G.W.R.; Quam, W.

    1985-01-01

    In the past, separate instruments have been used to monitor dose equivalent from neutrons and gamma rays. It has been demonstrated that it is now possible to measure simultaneously neutron and gamma dose with a single instrument, the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC). With appropriate algorithms dose equivalent can also be determined from the TEPC. A simple ''pocket rem meter'' for measuring neutron dose equivalent has already been developed. Improved algorithms for determining dose equivalent for mixed fields are presented. (author)

  5. Tomographic particle image velocimetry of a water-jet for low volume harvesting of fat tissue for regenerative medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drobek Christoph

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV measurements of a water-jet for water-assisted liposuction (WAL are carried out to investigate the distribution of velocity and therefore momentum and acting force on the human sub-cutaneous fat tissue. These results shall validate CFD simulations and force sensor measurements of the water-jet and support the development of a new WAL device that is able to harvest low volumes of fat tissue for regenerative medicine even gentler than regular WAL devices.

  6. [Association of human epicardial adipose tissue volume and inflammatory mediators with atherosclerosis and vulnerable coronary atherosclerotic plaque].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Liangliang; Gong, Jianbin; Li, Demin; Lu, Guangming; Chen, Dong; Wang, Jing

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the relation of epicardial adipose tissue volume (EATV) determined by dual-source CT (DSCT) cardiac angiography and EAT-derived inflammatory factors to coronary heart disease (CHD) and vulnerable plaque. A total of 260 patients underwent cardiac computed tomography to evaluate stenosis of coronary artery, and blood samples were obtained from each patient. CHD was confirmed in 180 patients by DSA and CHD was excluded in the remaining 80 patients (NCHD). Vascular remodeling index and plaque vulnerability parameters (fatty volume, fibrous volume and calcification volume and fiber volume) were measured in CHD patients and correlation with EATV was analyzed. Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) and intrathoracic adipose tissue (TAT) were collected from 40 CHD patients undergoing CABG surgery, and, mRNA and protein expressions of leptin and MMP9 were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. (1) The EATV was significantly higher in the CHD group than in NCHD group ((121.2 ± 40.6) mm³ vs. (74.7 ± 18.1) mm³, P = 0.01). (2) Subgroup analysis of the CHD patients demonstrated that EATV was significantly higher in patients with positive remodeling than in patients without positive remodeling ((97.6 ± 42.0) cm³ vs. (75.5 ± 25.4) cm³, P = 0.01). Lipid plaque volume was positively correlated with EATV (r = 0.34, P = 0.002); however, fiber plaque volume was negatively correlated with EATV (r = -0.30, P = 0.008). (3) Logistic regression analysis indicated that EATV was an independent risk factor for positive vascular remodeling (OR = 2.01, 95% CI: 1.30-2.32, P = 0.01). (4) mRNA and protein expression of leptin and MMP9 in EAT was significantly upregulated in 40 CHD patients who received CABG surgery compared to 40 NCHD patients (P 0.05) in mRNA and protein expression of leptin and MMP9 from the SAT between CHD and NCHD patients. (5) In the CHD group, leptin and MMP9 levels in EAT and EATV were positively correlated with lipid plaque volume and fibrous plaque

  7. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of subsurface tissue structures with a volume holographic spatial-spectral imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuan; Gelsinger-Austin, Paul J; Watson, Jonathan M; Barbastathis, George; Barton, Jennifer K; Kostuk, Raymond K

    2008-09-15

    A three-dimensional imaging system incorporating multiplexed holographic gratings to visualize fluorescence tissue structures is presented. Holographic gratings formed in volume recording materials such as a phenanthrenquinone poly(methyl methacrylate) photopolymer have narrowband angular and spectral transmittance filtering properties that enable obtaining spatial-spectral information within an object. We demonstrate this imaging system's ability to obtain multiple depth-resolved fluorescence images simultaneously.

  8. A higher volume of fibrotic tissue on virtual histology prior to coronary stent implantation predisposes to more pronounced neointima proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haine, Steven; Wouters, Kristien; Miljoen, Hielko; Vandendriessche, Tom; Claeys, Marc; Bosmans, Johan; Vrints, Christiaan

    2018-04-01

    Since neointima smooth muscle cells (SMC) mainly originate from the vessel wall, we investigated whether atherosclerotic plaque composition influences subsequent in-stent neointima proliferation and restenosis. We performed intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) with virtual histology in 98 patients prior to elective bare-metal stent (BMS) implantation in de novo coronary artery lesions. Virtual histology variables pre-percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were related to in-stent neointima proliferation six months after implantation assessed as late luminal loss of 0.88 mm (interquartile range (IQR) 0.37-1.23 mm) on angiography and as maximal percentage area stenosis of 42% (IQR 33-59%) and percentage volume intima hyperplasia of 27% (IQR 20-36%) on IVUS. A ridge-trace based multiple linear regression model was constructed to account for multicollinearity of the virtual histology variables and was corrected for implanted stent length (18 mm, IQR 15-23 mm), stent diameter (3.0 mm, IQR 2.75-3.5 mm) and lesion volume (146 mm³, IQR 80-201 mm³) prior to PCI. Fibrous tissue volume prior to PCI (49 mm³, IQR 30-77 mm³) was significantly and independently related to late luminal loss (p = .038), maximal percentage area stenosis (p = .041) and percentage volume intima hyperplasia (p = .004). Neither absolute nor relative amounts of fibrofatty, calcified or necrotic core tissue appeared related to any of the restenosis parameters. Subgroup analysis after exclusion of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients yielded similar results. Lesions with more voluminous fibrotic tissue pre-PCI show more pronounced in-stent neointima proliferation, even after correction for lesion plaque volume.

  9. Using deep learning to segment breast and fibroglandular tissue in MRI volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmış, Mehmet Ufuk; Litjens, Geert; Holland, Katharina; Setio, Arnaud; Mann, Ritse; Karssemeijer, Nico; Gubern-Mérida, Albert

    2017-02-01

    Automated segmentation of breast and fibroglandular tissue (FGT) is required for various computer-aided applications of breast MRI. Traditional image analysis and computer vision techniques, such atlas, template matching, or, edge and surface detection, have been applied to solve this task. However, applicability of these methods is usually limited by the characteristics of the images used in the study datasets, while breast MRI varies with respect to the different MRI protocols used, in addition to the variability in breast shapes. All this variability, in addition to various MRI artifacts, makes it a challenging task to develop a robust breast and FGT segmentation method using traditional approaches. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the use of a deep-learning approach known as "U-net." We used a dataset of 66 breast MRI's randomly selected from our scientific archive, which includes five different MRI acquisition protocols and breasts from four breast density categories in a balanced distribution. To prepare reference segmentations, we manually segmented breast and FGT for all images using an in-house developed workstation. We experimented with the application of U-net in two different ways for breast and FGT segmentation. In the first method, following the same pipeline used in traditional approaches, we trained two consecutive (2C) U-nets: first for segmenting the breast in the whole MRI volume and the second for segmenting FGT inside the segmented breast. In the second method, we used a single 3-class (3C) U-net, which performs both tasks simultaneously by segmenting the volume into three regions: nonbreast, fat inside the breast, and FGT inside the breast. For comparison, we applied two existing and published methods to our dataset: an atlas-based method and a sheetness-based method. We used Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) to measure the performances of the automated methods, with respect to the manual segmentations. Additionally, we computed

  10. Marrow Adipose Tissue in Older Men: Association with Visceral and Subcutaneous Fat, Bone Volume, Metabolism, and Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bani Hassan, Ebrahim; Demontiero, Oddom; Vogrin, Sara; Ng, Alvin; Duque, Gustavo

    2018-03-26

    Marrow (MAT) and subcutaneous (SAT) adipose tissues display different metabolic profiles and varying associations with aging, bone density, and fracture risk. Using a non-invasive imaging methodology, we aimed to investigate the associations between MAT, SAT, and visceral fat (VAT) with bone volume, bone remodeling markers, insulin resistance, and circulating inflammatory mediators in a population of older men. In this cross-sectional study, 96 healthy men (mean age 67 ± 5.5) were assessed for anthropometric parameters, body composition, serum biochemistry, and inflammatory panel. Using single-energy computed tomography images, MAT (in L2 and L3 and both hips), VAT, and SAT (at the level of L2-L3 and L4-L5) were measured employing Slice-O-Matic software (Tomovision), which enables specific tissue demarcation applying previously reported Hounsfield unit thresholds. MAT volume was similar in all anatomical sites and independent of BMI. In all femoral regions of interest (ROIs) there was a strong negative association between bone and MAT volumes (r = - 0.840 to - 0.972, p strong inverse correlations between MAT and bone mass, which have been previously observed in women, were also confirmed in older men. However, MAT volume in all ROIs was interrelated and unlike women, mainly independent of VAT or SAT. The lack of strong association between MAT vs VAT/SAT, and its discordant associations with metabolic and inflammatory mediators provide further evidence on MAT's distinct attributes in older men.

  11. Sparing Healthy Tissue and Increasing Tumor Dose Using Bayesian Modeling of Geometric Uncertainties for Planning Target Volume Personalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herschtal, Alan; Te Marvelde, Luc; Mengersen, Kerrie; Foroudi, Farshad; Eade, Thomas; Pham, Daniel; Caine, Hannah; Kron, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To develop a mathematical tool that can update a patient's planning target volume (PTV) partway through a course of radiation therapy to more precisely target the tumor for the remainder of treatment and reduce dose to surrounding healthy tissue. Methods and Materials: Daily on-board imaging was used to collect large datasets of displacements for patients undergoing external beam radiation therapy for solid tumors. Bayesian statistical modeling of these geometric uncertainties was used to optimally trade off between displacement data collected from previously treated patients and the progressively accumulating data from a patient currently partway through treatment, to optimally predict future displacements for that patient. These predictions were used to update the PTV position and margin width for the remainder of treatment, such that the clinical target volume (CTV) was more precisely targeted. Results: Software simulation of dose to CTV and normal tissue for 2 real prostate displacement datasets consisting of 146 and 290 patients treated with a minimum of 30 fractions each showed that re-evaluating the PTV position and margin width after 8 treatment fractions reduced healthy tissue dose by 19% and 17%, respectively, while maintaining CTV dose. Conclusion: Incorporating patient-specific displacement patterns from early in a course of treatment allows PTV adaptation for the remainder of treatment. This substantially reduces the dose to healthy tissues and thus can reduce radiation therapy–induced toxicities, improving patient outcomes

  12. Sparing Healthy Tissue and Increasing Tumor Dose Using Bayesian Modeling of Geometric Uncertainties for Planning Target Volume Personalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herschtal, Alan, E-mail: Alan.Herschtal@petermac.org [Department of Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Faculty of Health, Arts and Design, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne (Australia); Te Marvelde, Luc [Department of Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Mengersen, Kerrie [School of Mathematical Sciences, Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane (Australia); Foroudi, Farshad [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Eade, Thomas [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Radiation Oncology Department, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, Sydney (Australia); Northern Clinical School, University of Sydney (Australia); Pham, Daniel [Department of Radiation Therapy, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Caine, Hannah [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Radiation Oncology Department, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, Sydney (Australia); Kron, Tomas [The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia)

    2015-06-01

    Objective: To develop a mathematical tool that can update a patient's planning target volume (PTV) partway through a course of radiation therapy to more precisely target the tumor for the remainder of treatment and reduce dose to surrounding healthy tissue. Methods and Materials: Daily on-board imaging was used to collect large datasets of displacements for patients undergoing external beam radiation therapy for solid tumors. Bayesian statistical modeling of these geometric uncertainties was used to optimally trade off between displacement data collected from previously treated patients and the progressively accumulating data from a patient currently partway through treatment, to optimally predict future displacements for that patient. These predictions were used to update the PTV position and margin width for the remainder of treatment, such that the clinical target volume (CTV) was more precisely targeted. Results: Software simulation of dose to CTV and normal tissue for 2 real prostate displacement datasets consisting of 146 and 290 patients treated with a minimum of 30 fractions each showed that re-evaluating the PTV position and margin width after 8 treatment fractions reduced healthy tissue dose by 19% and 17%, respectively, while maintaining CTV dose. Conclusion: Incorporating patient-specific displacement patterns from early in a course of treatment allows PTV adaptation for the remainder of treatment. This substantially reduces the dose to healthy tissues and thus can reduce radiation therapy–induced toxicities, improving patient outcomes.

  13. Measurement of extrapolation curves for the secondary pattern of beta radiation Nr. 86 calibrated in rapidity of absorbed dose for tissue equivalent by the Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez R, J.T.

    1988-10-01

    The following report has as objective to present the obtained results of measuring - with a camera of extrapolation of variable electrodes (CE) - the dose speed absorbed in equivalent fabric given by the group of sources of the secondary pattern of radiation Beta Nr. 86, (PSB), and to compare this results with those presented by the calibration certificates that accompany the PSB extended by the primary laboratory Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt, (PTB), of the R.F.A. as well as the uncertainties associated to the measure process. (Author)

  14. Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Morrissey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In vivo gene therapy directed at tissues of mesenchymal origin could potentially augment healing. We aimed to assess the duration and magnitude of transene expression in vivo in mice and ex vivo in human tissues. Methods. Using bioluminescence imaging, plasmid and adenoviral vector-based transgene expression in murine quadriceps in vivo was examined. Temporal control was assessed using a doxycycline-inducible system. An ex vivo model was developed and optimised using murine tissue, and applied in ex vivo human tissue. Results. In vivo plasmid-based transgene expression did not silence in murine muscle, unlike in liver. Although maximum luciferase expression was higher in muscle with adenoviral delivery compared with plasmid, expression reduced over time. The inducible promoter cassette successfully regulated gene expression with maximum levels a factor of 11 greater than baseline. Expression was re-induced to a similar level on a temporal basis. Luciferase expression was readily detected ex vivo in human muscle and tendon. Conclusions. Plasmid constructs resulted in long-term in vivo gene expression in skeletal muscle, in a controllable fashion utilising an inducible promoter in combination with oral agents. Successful plasmid gene transfection in human ex vivo mesenchymal tissue was demonstrated for the first time.

  15. SU-F-J-193: Efficient Dose Extinction Method for Water Equivalent Path Length (WEPL) of Real Tissue Samples for Validation of CT HU to Stopping Power Conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, R; Baer, E; Jee, K; Sharp, G; Flanz, J; Lu, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: For proton therapy, an accurate model of CT HU to relative stopping power (RSP) conversion is essential. In current practice, validation of these models relies solely on measurements of tissue substitutes with standard compositions. Validation based on real tissue samples would be much more direct and can address variations between patients. This study intends to develop an efficient and accurate system based on the concept of dose extinction to measure WEPL and retrieve RSP in biological tissue in large number of types. Methods: A broad AP proton beam delivering a spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) is used to irradiate the samples with a Matrixx detector positioned immediately below. A water tank was placed on top of the samples, with the water level controllable in sub-millimeter by a remotely controlled dosing pump. While gradually lowering the water level with beam on, the transmission dose was recorded at 1 frame/sec. The WEPL were determined as the difference between the known beam range of the delivered SOBP (80%) and the water level corresponding to 80% of measured dose profiles in time. A Gammex 467 phantom was used to test the system and various types of biological tissue was measured. Results: RSP for all Gammex inserts, expect the one made with lung-450 material (<2% error), were determined within ±0.5% error. Depends on the WEPL of investigated phantom, a measurement takes around 10 min, which can be accelerated by a faster pump. Conclusion: Based on the concept of dose extinction, a system was explored to measure WEPL efficiently and accurately for a large number of samples. This allows the validation of CT HU to stopping power conversions based on large number of samples and real tissues. It also allows the assessment of beam uncertainties due to variations over patients, which issue has never been sufficiently studied before.

  16. SU-F-J-193: Efficient Dose Extinction Method for Water Equivalent Path Length (WEPL) of Real Tissue Samples for Validation of CT HU to Stopping Power Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, R; Baer, E; Jee, K; Sharp, G; Flanz, J; Lu, H [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: For proton therapy, an accurate model of CT HU to relative stopping power (RSP) conversion is essential. In current practice, validation of these models relies solely on measurements of tissue substitutes with standard compositions. Validation based on real tissue samples would be much more direct and can address variations between patients. This study intends to develop an efficient and accurate system based on the concept of dose extinction to measure WEPL and retrieve RSP in biological tissue in large number of types. Methods: A broad AP proton beam delivering a spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) is used to irradiate the samples with a Matrixx detector positioned immediately below. A water tank was placed on top of the samples, with the water level controllable in sub-millimeter by a remotely controlled dosing pump. While gradually lowering the water level with beam on, the transmission dose was recorded at 1 frame/sec. The WEPL were determined as the difference between the known beam range of the delivered SOBP (80%) and the water level corresponding to 80% of measured dose profiles in time. A Gammex 467 phantom was used to test the system and various types of biological tissue was measured. Results: RSP for all Gammex inserts, expect the one made with lung-450 material (<2% error), were determined within ±0.5% error. Depends on the WEPL of investigated phantom, a measurement takes around 10 min, which can be accelerated by a faster pump. Conclusion: Based on the concept of dose extinction, a system was explored to measure WEPL efficiently and accurately for a large number of samples. This allows the validation of CT HU to stopping power conversions based on large number of samples and real tissues. It also allows the assessment of beam uncertainties due to variations over patients, which issue has never been sufficiently studied before.

  17. Non-invasive assessment of distribution volume ratios and binding potential: tissue heterogeneity and interindividually averaged time-activity curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimold, M.; Mueller-Schauenburg, W.; Dohmen, B.M.; Bares, R. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Tuebingen, Otfried-Mueller-Strasse 14, 72076, Tuebingen (Germany); Becker, G.A. [Nuclear Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Reischl, G. [Radiopharmacy, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2004-04-01

    Due to the stochastic nature of radioactive decay, any measurement of radioactivity concentration requires spatial averaging. In pharmacokinetic analysis of time-activity curves (TAC), such averaging over heterogeneous tissues may introduce a systematic error (heterogeneity error) but may also improve the accuracy and precision of parameter estimation. In addition to spatial averaging (inevitable due to limited scanner resolution and intended in ROI analysis), interindividual averaging may theoretically be beneficial, too. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of such averaging on the binding potential (BP) calculated with Logan's non-invasive graphical analysis and the ''simplified reference tissue method'' (SRTM) proposed by Lammertsma and Hume, on the basis of simulated and measured positron emission tomography data [{sup 11}C]d-threo-methylphenidate (dMP) and [{sup 11}C]raclopride (RAC) PET. dMP was not quantified with SRTM since the low k {sub 2} (washout rate constant from the first tissue compartment) introduced a high noise sensitivity. Even for considerably different shapes of TAC (dMP PET in parkinsonian patients and healthy controls, [{sup 11}C]raclopride in patients with and without haloperidol medication) and a high variance in the rate constants (e.g. simulated standard deviation of K {sub 1}=25%), the BP obtained from average TAC was close to the mean BP (<5%). However, unfavourably distributed parameters, especially a correlated large variance in two or more parameters, may lead to larger errors. In Monte Carlo simulations, interindividual averaging before quantification reduced the variance from the SRTM (beyond a critical signal to noise ratio) and the bias in Logan's method. Interindividual averaging may further increase accuracy when there is an error term in the reference tissue assumption E=DV {sub 2}-DV ' (DV {sub 2} = distribution volume of the first tissue compartment, DV &apos

  18. Detection and volume estimation of artificial hematomas in the subcutaneous fatty tissue: comparison of different MR sequences at 3.0 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogris, Kathrin; Petrovic, Andreas; Scheicher, Sylvia; Sprenger, Hanna; Urschler, Martin; Hassler, Eva Maria; Yen, Kathrin; Scheurer, Eva

    2017-06-01

    In legal medicine, reliable localization and analysis of hematomas in subcutaneous fatty tissue is required for forensic reconstruction. Due to the absence of ionizing radiation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is particularly suited to examining living persons with forensically relevant injuries. However, there is limited experience regarding MRI signal properties of hemorrhage in soft tissue. The aim of this study was to evaluate MR sequences with respect to their ability to show high contrast between hematomas and subcutaneous fatty tissue as well as to reliably determine the volume of artificial hematomas. Porcine tissue models were prepared by injecting blood into the subcutaneous fatty tissue to create artificial hematomas. MR images were acquired at 3T and four blinded observers conducted manual segmentation of the hematomas. To assess segmentability, the agreement of measured volume with the known volume of injected blood was statistically analyzed. A physically motivated normalization taking into account partial volume effect was applied to the data to ensure comparable results among differently sized hematomas. The inversion recovery sequence exhibited the best segmentability rate, whereas the T1T2w turbo spin echo sequence showed the most accurate results regarding volume estimation. Both sequences led to reproducible volume estimations. This study demonstrates that MRI is a promising forensic tool to assess and visualize even very small amounts of blood in soft tissue. The presented results enable the improvement of protocols for detection and volume determination of hemorrhage in forensically relevant cases and also provide fundamental knowledge for future in-vivo examinations.

  19. Long-term occupational stress is associated with regional reductions in brain tissue volumes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Blix

    Full Text Available There are increasing reports of cognitive and psychological declines related to occupational stress in subjects without psychiatric premorbidity or major life trauma. The underlying neurobiology is unknown, and many question the notion that the described disabilities represent a medical condition. Using PET we recently found that persons suffering from chronic occupational stress had limbic reductions in the 5-HT1A receptor binding potential. Here we examine whether chronic work-related stress is also associated with changes in brain structure. We performed MRI-based voxel-based morphometry and structural volumetry in stressed subjects and unstressed controls focusing on gray (GM and white matter (WM volumes, and the volumes of hippocampus, caudate, and putamen - structures known to be susceptible to neurotoxic changes. Stressed subjects exhibited significant reductions in the GM volumes of the anterior cingulate cortex and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Furthermore, their caudate and putamen volumes were reduced, and the volumes correlated inversely to the degree of perceived stress. Our results add to previous data on chronic psychosocial stress, and indicate a morphological involvement of the frontostriatal circuits. The present findings of morphological changes in these regions confirm our previous conclusion that symptoms from occupational stress merit careful investigations and targeted treatment.

  20. Long-Term Occupational Stress Is Associated with Regional Reductions in Brain Tissue Volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blix, Eva; Perski, Aleksander; Berglund, Hans; Savic, Ivanka

    2013-01-01

    There are increasing reports of cognitive and psychological declines related to occupational stress in subjects without psychiatric premorbidity or major life trauma. The underlying neurobiology is unknown, and many question the notion that the described disabilities represent a medical condition. Using PET we recently found that persons suffering from chronic occupational stress had limbic reductions in the 5-HT1A receptor binding potential. Here we examine whether chronic work-related stress is also associated with changes in brain structure. We performed MRI-based voxel-based morphometry and structural volumetry in stressed subjects and unstressed controls focusing on gray (GM) and white matter (WM) volumes, and the volumes of hippocampus, caudate, and putamen – structures known to be susceptible to neurotoxic changes. Stressed subjects exhibited significant reductions in the GM volumes of the anterior cingulate cortex and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Furthermore, their caudate and putamen volumes were reduced, and the volumes correlated inversely to the degree of perceived stress. Our results add to previous data on chronic psychosocial stress, and indicate a morphological involvement of the frontostriatal circuits. The present findings of morphological changes in these regions confirm our previous conclusion that symptoms from occupational stress merit careful investigations and targeted treatment. PMID:23776438

  1. Predicting volume of distribution with decision tree-based regression methods using predicted tissue:plasma partition coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Alex A; Limbu, Kriti; Ghafourian, Taravat

    2015-01-01

    Volume of distribution is an important pharmacokinetic property that indicates the extent of a drug's distribution in the body tissues. This paper addresses the problem of how to estimate the apparent volume of distribution at steady state (Vss) of chemical compounds in the human body using decision tree-based regression methods from the area of data mining (or machine learning). Hence, the pros and cons of several different types of decision tree-based regression methods have been discussed. The regression methods predict Vss using, as predictive features, both the compounds' molecular descriptors and the compounds' tissue:plasma partition coefficients (Kt:p) - often used in physiologically-based pharmacokinetics. Therefore, this work has assessed whether the data mining-based prediction of Vss can be made more accurate by using as input not only the compounds' molecular descriptors but also (a subset of) their predicted Kt:p values. Comparison of the models that used only molecular descriptors, in particular, the Bagging decision tree (mean fold error of 2.33), with those employing predicted Kt:p values in addition to the molecular descriptors, such as the Bagging decision tree using adipose Kt:p (mean fold error of 2.29), indicated that the use of predicted Kt:p values as descriptors may be beneficial for accurate prediction of Vss using decision trees if prior feature selection is applied. Decision tree based models presented in this work have an accuracy that is reasonable and similar to the accuracy of reported Vss inter-species extrapolations in the literature. The estimation of Vss for new compounds in drug discovery will benefit from methods that are able to integrate large and varied sources of data and flexible non-linear data mining methods such as decision trees, which can produce interpretable models. Graphical AbstractDecision trees for the prediction of tissue partition coefficient and volume of distribution of drugs.

  2. A stereotaxic, population-averaged T1w ovine brain atlas including cerebral morphology and tissue volumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn eNitzsche

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Standard stereotaxic reference systems play a key role in human brain studies. Stereotaxic coordinate systems have also been developed for experimental animals including non-human primates, dogs and rodents. However, they are lacking for other species being relevant in experimental neuroscience including sheep. Here, we present a spatial, unbiased ovine brain template with tissue probability maps (TPM that offer a detailed stereotaxic reference frame for anatomical features and localization of brain areas, thereby enabling inter-individual and cross-study comparability. Three-dimensional data sets from healthy adult Merino sheep (Ovis orientalis aries, 12 ewes and 26 neutered rams were acquired on a 1.5T Philips MRI using a T1w sequence. Data were averaged by linear and non-linear registration algorithms. Moreover, animals were subjected to detailed brain volume analysis including examinations with respect to body weight, age and sex. The created T1w brain template provides an appropriate population-averaged ovine brain anatomy in a spatial standard coordinate system. Additionally, TPM for gray (GM and white (WM matter as well as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF classification enabled automatic prior-based tissue segmentation using statistical parametric mapping (SPM. Overall, a positive correlation of GM volume and body weight explained about 15% of the variance of GM while a positive correlation between WM and age was found. Absolute tissue volume differences were not detected, indeed ewes showed significantly more GM per bodyweight as compared to neutered rams. The created framework including spatial brain template and TPM represent a useful tool for unbiased automatic image preprocessing and morphological characterization in sheep. Therefore, the reported results may serve as a starting point for further experimental and/or translational research aiming at in vivo analysis in this species.

  3. Multi-tissue partial volume quantification in multi-contrast MRI using an optimised spectral unmixing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collewet, Guylaine; Moussaoui, Saïd; Deligny, Cécile; Lucas, Tiphaine; Idier, Jérôme

    2018-06-01

    Multi-tissue partial volume estimation in MRI images is investigated with a viewpoint related to spectral unmixing as used in hyperspectral imaging. The main contribution of this paper is twofold. It firstly proposes a theoretical analysis of the statistical optimality conditions of the proportion estimation problem, which in the context of multi-contrast MRI data acquisition allows to appropriately set the imaging sequence parameters. Secondly, an efficient proportion quantification algorithm based on the minimisation of a penalised least-square criterion incorporating a regularity constraint on the spatial distribution of the proportions is proposed. Furthermore, the resulting developments are discussed using empirical simulations. The practical usefulness of the spectral unmixing approach for partial volume quantification in MRI is illustrated through an application to food analysis on the proving of a Danish pastry. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular theory for nuclear magnetic relaxation in protein solutions and tissue; Surface diffusion and free-volume analogy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimmich, R; Nusser, W; Gneiting, T [Ulm Universitaet (Federal Republic of Germany). Sektion Kernresonanzspektroskopie

    1990-04-01

    A model theory is presented explaining a series of striking phenomena observed with nuclear magnetic relaxation in protein systems such as solutions or tissue. The frequency, concentration and temperature dependences of proton or deuteron relaxation times of protein solutions and tissue are explained. It is concluded that the translational diffusion of water molecules along the rugged surfaces of proteins and, to a minor degree, protein backbone fluctuations are crucial processes. The rate limiting factor of macromolecular tumbling is assumed to be given by the free water content in a certain analogy to the free-volume model of Cohen ad Turnbull. There are two characteristic water mass fractions indicating the saturation of the hydration shells and the onset of protein tumbling. A closed and relatively simple set of relaxation formulas is presented. The potentially fractal nature of the diffusion of water molecules on the protein surface is discussed. (author). 43 refs.; 4 figs.

  5. David valve-sparing aortic root replacement: equivalent mid-term outcome for different valve types with or without connective tissue disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvitting, John-Peder Escobar; Kari, Fabian A; Fischbein, Michael P; Liang, David H; Beraud, Anne-Sophie; Stephens, Elizabeth H; Mitchell, R Scott; Miller, D Craig

    2013-01-01

    Although implicitly accepted by many that the durability of valve-sparing aortic root replacement in patients with bicuspid aortic valve disease and connective tissue disorders will be inferior, this hypothesis has not been rigorously investigated. From 1993 to 2009, 233 patients (27% bicuspid aortic valve, 40% Marfan syndrome) underwent Tirone David valve-sparing aortic root replacement. Follow-up averaged 4.7 ± 3.3 years (1102 patient-years). Freedom from adverse outcomes was determined using log-rank calculations. Survival at 5 and 10 years was 98.7% ± 0.7% and 93.5% ± 5.1%, respectively. Freedom from reoperation (all causes) on the aortic root was 92.2% ± 3.6% at 10 years; 3 reoperations were aortic valve replacement owing to structural valve deterioration. Freedom from structural valve deterioration at 10 years was 96.1% ± 2.1%. No significant differences were found in survival (P = .805, P = .793, respectively), reoperation (P = .179, P = .973, respectively), structural valve deterioration (P = .639, P = .982, respectively), or any other functional or clinical endpoints when patients were stratified by valve type (tricuspid aortic valve vs bicuspid aortic valve) or associated connective tissue disorder. At the latest echocardiographic follow-up (95% complete), 202 patients (94.8%) had none or trace aortic regurgitation, 10 (4.7%) mild, 0 had moderate to severe, and 1 (0.5%) had severe aortic regurgitation. Freedom from greater than 2+ aortic regurgitation at 10 years was 95.3% ± 2.5%. Six patients sustained acute type B aortic dissection (freedom at 10 years, 90.4% ± 5.0%). Tirone David reimplantation valve-sparing aortic root replacement in carefully selected young patients was associated with excellent clinical and echocardiographic outcome in patients with either a tricuspid aortic valve or bicuspid aortic valve. No demonstrable adverse influence was found for Marfan syndrome or connective tissue disorder on durability, clinical outcome

  6. Matching of equivalent field regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel-Hansen, Jørgen; Rengarajan, S.B.

    2005-01-01

    In aperture problems, integral equations for equivalent currents are often found by enforcing matching of equivalent fields. The enforcement is made in the aperture surface region adjoining the two volumes on each side of the aperture. In the case of an aperture in a planar perfectly conducting...... screen, having the same homogeneous medium on both sides and an impressed current on one aide, an alternative procedure is relevant. We make use of the fact that in the aperture the tangential component of the magnetic field due to the induced currents in the screen is zero. The use of such a procedure...... shows that equivalent currents can be found by a consideration of only one of the two volumes into which the aperture plane divides the space. Furthermore, from a consideration of an automatic matching at the aperture, additional information about tangential as well as normal field components...

  7. Using deep learning to segment breast and fibroglandular tissue in MRI volumes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalmis, M.U.; Litjens, G.J.; Holland, K.; Setio, A.A.A.; Mann, R.M.; Karssemeijer, N.; Gubern Merida, A.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Automated segmentation of breast and fibroglandular tissue (FGT) is required for various computer-aided applications of breast MRI. Traditional image analysis and computer vision techniques, such atlas, template matching, or, edge and surface detection, have been applied to solve this task.

  8. Cerebral gray matter volume losses in essential tremor: A case-control study using high resolution tissue probability maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Eric; Dyke, Jonathan P; Hernandez, Nora; Louis, Elan D; Dydak, Ulrike

    2018-03-10

    Essential tremor (ET) is increasingly recognized as a multi-dimensional disorder with both motor and non-motor features. For this reason, imaging studies are more broadly examining regions outside the cerebellar motor loop. Reliable detection of cerebral gray matter (GM) atrophy requires optimized processing, adapted to high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We investigated cerebral GM volume loss in ET cases using automated segmentation of MRI T1-weighted images. MRI was acquired on 47 ET cases and 36 controls. Automated segmentation and voxel-wise comparisons of volume were performed using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) software. To improve upon standard protocols, the high-resolution International Consortium for Brain Mapping (ICBM) 2009a atlas and tissue probability maps were used to process each subject image. Group comparisons were performed: all ET vs. Controls, ET with head tremor (ETH) vs. Controls, and severe ET vs. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed between ET with and without head tremor and controls. Age, sex, and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) score were regressed out from each comparison. We were able to consistently identify regions of cerebral GM volume loss in ET and in ET subgroups in the posterior insula, superior temporal gyri, cingulate cortex, inferior frontal gyri and other occipital and parietal regions. There were no significant increases in GM volume in ET in any comparisons with controls. This study, which uses improved methodologies, provides evidence that GM volume loss in ET is present beyond the cerebellum, and in fact, is widespread throughout the cerebrum as well. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Association between epicardial adipose tissue volumes on 3-dimensional reconstructed CT images and recurrence of atrial fibrillation after catheter ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagashima, Koichi; Okumura, Yasuo; Watanabe, Ichiro

    2011-01-01

    Whether epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) is independently associated with atrial fibrillation (AF) and outcome after catheter ablation (CA) for AF remains unclear. Three-dimensional volume-rendering reconstructed images of EAT (total EAT) and EAT surrounding the left atrium (LA-EAT) were measured on 320-row multidetector computed tomography in 40 patients with AF (paroxysmal AF [PAF], n=24; persistent AF [PerAF], n=16) who underwent CA, and in 37 age-matched control patients. EAT volumes were as follows for the control, PAF and PerAF patients: total EAT, 138.3±45.2 cm 3 vs. 158.3±47.2 cm 3 vs. 226.4±93.3 cm 3 (P 3 vs. 41.3±15.3 cm 3 vs. 66.8±35.1 cm 3 (P 3 vs. 106.2±27.3 cm 3 , P=0.021; LA-EAT: 34.0±10.6 cm 3 vs. 21.8±6.9 cm 3 , P=0.0006). EAT volumes were greater in the 15 AF patients (37.5%) with post-ablation recurrence than in patients without recurrence (total EAT: 239.0±90.2 cm 3 vs. 153.5±42.7 cm 3 , P=0.0002; LA-EAT: 69.6±35.5 cm 3 vs. 40.7±13.9 cm 3 , P=0.0008). EAT volume increases in AF patients independent of conventional risk factors and is greater in patients with lone AF than in non-AF patients. EAT volume might be useful for predicting AF recurrence after CA. (author)

  10. Dose Distribution in Bladder and Surrounding Normal Tissues in Relation to Bladder Volume in Conformal Radiotherapy for Bladder Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majewski, Wojciech; Wesolowska, Iwona; Urbanczyk, Hubert; Hawrylewicz, Leszek; Schwierczok, Barbara; Miszczyk, Leszek

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate bladder movements and changes in dose distribution in the bladder and surrounding tissues associated with changes in bladder filling and to estimate the internal treatment margins. Methods and Materials: A total of 16 patients with bladder cancer underwent planning computed tomography scans with 80- and 150-mL bladder volumes. The bladder displacements associated with the change in volume were measured. Each patient had treatment plans constructed for a 'partially empty' (80 mL) and a 'partially full' (150 mL) bladder. An additional plan was constructed for tumor irradiation alone. A subsequent 9 patients underwent sequential weekly computed tomography scanning during radiotherapy to verify the bladder movements and estimate the internal margins. Results: Bladder movements were mainly observed cranially, and the estimated internal margins were nonuniform and largest (>2 cm) anteriorly and cranially. The dose distribution in the bladder worsened if the bladder increased in volume: 70% of patients (11 of 16) would have had bladder underdosed to 70%, 80%, and 90% of the prescribed dose was 23%, 20%, and 15% for the rectum and 162, 144, 123 cm 3 for the intestines, respectively) than with a 'partially full' bladder (volume that received >70%, 80%, and 90% of the prescribed dose was 28%, 24%, and 18% for the rectum and 180, 158, 136 cm 3 for the intestines, respectively). The change in bladder filling during RT was significant for the dose distribution in the intestines. Tumor irradiation alone was significantly better than whole bladder irradiation in terms of organ sparing. Conclusion: The displacements of the bladder due to volume changes were mainly related to the upper wall. The internal margins should be nonuniform, with the largest margins cranially and anteriorly. The changes in bladder filling during RT could influence the dose distribution in the bladder and intestines. The dose distribution in the rectum and bowel was slightly better with

  11. Evaluation of two intracavitary high-dose-rate brachytherapy devices for irradiating additional and irregularly shaped volumes of breast tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Sharon M.; Scanderbeg, Daniel J.; Barna, Patrick; Yashar, William; Yashar, Catheryn

    2012-01-01

    The SAVI and Contura breast brachytherapy applicators represent 2 recent advancements in brachytherapy technology that have expanded the number of women eligible for accelerated partial breast irradiation in the treatment of early-stage breast cancer. Early clinical experience with these 2 single-entry, multichannel high-dose-rate brachytherapy devices confirms their ease of use and dosimetric versatility. However, current clinical guidelines for SAVI and Contura brachytherapy may result in a smaller or less optimal volume of treated tissue compared with traditional interstitial brachytherapy. This study evaluates the feasibility of using the SAVI and Contura to irradiate larger and irregularly shaped target volumes, approaching what is treatable with the interstitial technique. To investigate whether additional tissue can be treated, 17 patients treated with the SAVI and 3 with the Contura were selected. For each patient, the planning target volume (PTV) was modified to extend 1.1 cm, 1.3 cm, and 1.5 cm beyond the tumor bed cavity. To evaluate dose conformance to an irregularly shaped target volume, 9 patients treated with the SAVI and 3 with the Contura were selected from the original 20 patients. The following asymmetric PTV margin combinations were assessed for each patient: 1.5/0.3, 1.3/0.3, and 1.1/0.3 cm. For all patients, treatment planning was performed, adopting the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project guidelines, and dosimetric comparisons were made. The 6–1 and 8–1 SAVI devices can theoretically treat a maximal tissue margin of 1.5 cm and an asymmetric PTV with margins ranging from 0.3 to 1.5 cm. The 10–1 SAVI and Contura can treat a maximal margin of 1.3 cm and 1.1 cm, respectively, and asymmetric PTV with margins ranging from 0.3–1.3 cm. Compared with the Contura, the SAVI demonstrated greater dosimetric flexibility. Risk of developing excessive hot spots increased with the size of the SAVI device. Both the SAVI and Contura

  12. Quantitative analysis of rat adipose tissue cell recovery, and non-fat cell volume, in primary cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floriana Rotondo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background White adipose tissue (WAT is a complex, diffuse, multifunctional organ which contains adipocytes, and a large proportion of fat, but also other cell types, active in defense, regeneration and signalling functions. Studies with adipocytes often require their isolation from WAT by breaking up the matrix of collagen fibres; however, it is unclear to what extent adipocyte number in primary cultures correlates with their number in intact WAT, since recovery and viability are often unknown. Experimental Design Epididymal WAT of four young adult rats was used to isolate adipocytes with collagenase. Careful recording of lipid content of tissue, and all fraction volumes and weights, allowed us to trace the amount of initial WAT fat remaining in the cell preparation. Functionality was estimated by incubation with glucose and measurement of glucose uptake and lactate, glycerol and NEFA excretion rates up to 48 h. Non-adipocyte cells were also recovered and their sizes (and those of adipocytes were measured. The presence of non-nucleated cells (erythrocytes was also estimated. Results Cell numbers and sizes were correlated from all fractions to intact WAT. Tracing the lipid content, the recovery of adipocytes in the final, metabolically active, preparation was in the range of 70–75%. Cells showed even higher metabolic activity in the second than in the first day of incubation. Adipocytes were 7%, erythrocytes 66% and other stromal (nucleated cells 27% of total WAT cells. However, their overall volumes were 90%, 0.05%, and 0.2% of WAT. Non-fat volume of adipocytes was 1.3% of WAT. Conclusions The methodology presented here allows for a direct quantitative reference to the original tissue of studies using isolated cells. We have also found that the “live cell mass” of adipose tissue is very small: about 13 µL/g for adipocytes and 2 µL/g stromal, plus about 1 µL/g blood (the rats were killed by exsanguination. These data translate (with

  13. Normal tissue complication probabilities: dependence on choice of biological model and dose-volume histogram reduction scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moiseenko, Vitali; Battista, Jerry; Van Dyk, Jake

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of dose-volume histogram (DVH) reduction schemes and models of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) on ranking of radiation treatment plans. Methods and Materials: Data for liver complications in humans and for spinal cord in rats were used to derive input parameters of four different NTCP models. DVH reduction was performed using two schemes: 'effective volume' and 'preferred Lyman'. DVHs for competing treatment plans were derived from a sample DVH by varying dose uniformity in a high dose region so that the obtained cumulative DVHs intersected. Treatment plans were ranked according to the calculated NTCP values. Results: Whenever the preferred Lyman scheme was used to reduce the DVH, competing plans were indistinguishable as long as the mean dose was constant. The effective volume DVH reduction scheme did allow us to distinguish between these competing treatment plans. However, plan ranking depended on the radiobiological model used and its input parameters. Conclusions: Dose escalation will be a significant part of radiation treatment planning using new technologies, such as 3-D conformal radiotherapy and tomotherapy. Such dose escalation will depend on how the dose distributions in organs at risk are interpreted in terms of expected complication probabilities. The present study indicates considerable variability in predicted NTCP values because of the methods used for DVH reduction and radiobiological models and their input parameters. Animal studies and collection of standardized clinical data are needed to ascertain the effects of non-uniform dose distributions and to test the validity of the models currently in use

  14. Politico-economic equivalence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez Eiras, Martin; Niepelt, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Traditional "economic equivalence'' results, like the Ricardian equivalence proposition, define equivalence classes over exogenous policies. We derive "politico-economic equivalence" conditions that apply in environments where policy is endogenous and chosen sequentially. A policy regime and a st......Traditional "economic equivalence'' results, like the Ricardian equivalence proposition, define equivalence classes over exogenous policies. We derive "politico-economic equivalence" conditions that apply in environments where policy is endogenous and chosen sequentially. A policy regime...... their use in the context of several applications, relating to social security reform, tax-smoothing policies and measures to correct externalities....

  15. Range-energy relations and stopping power of water, water vapour and tissue equivalent liquid for α particles over the energy range 0.5 to 8 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.J.; Akhavan-Rezayat, Ahmad

    1978-01-01

    Experimental range-energy relations are presented for alpha particles in water, water vapour and tissue equivalent liquid at energies up to 8 MeV. From these relations differential stopping powers are derived at 0.25 MeV energy intervals. Consideration is given to sources of error in the range-energy measurements and to the uncertainties that these will introduce into the stopping power values. The ratio of the differential stopping power of muscle equivalent liquid to that of water over the energy range 0.5 to 7.5 MeV is discussed in relation to the specific gravity and chemical composition of the muscle equivalent liquid. Theoretical molecular stopping power calculations based upon the Bethe formula are also presented for water. The effect of phase upon the stopping power of water is discussed. The molecular stopping power of water vapour is shown to be significantly higher than that of water for energies below 1.25 MeV and above 2.5 MeV, the ratio of the two stopping powers rising to 1.39 at 0.5 MeV and to 1.13 at 7.0 MeV. Stopping power measurements for other liquids and vapours are compared with the results for water and water vapour and some are observed to have stopping power ratios in the vapour and liquid phases which vary with energy in a similar way to water. It is suggested that there may be several factors contributing to the increased stopping power of liquids. The need for further experimental results on a wider range of liquids is stressed

  16. Abnormalities in lung volumes and airflow in children with newly diagnosed connective tissue disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peradzyńska, Joanna; Krenke, Katarzyna; Szylling, Anna; Kołodziejczyk, Beata; Gazda, Agnieszka; Rutkowska-Sak, Lidia; Kulus, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Connective tissue diseases (CTDs) of childhood are rare inflammatory disorders, involving various organs and tissues including respiratory system. Pulmonary involvement in patients with CTDs is uncommon but may cause functional impairment. Data on prevalence and type of lung function abnormalities in children with CTDs are scarce. Thus, the aim of this study was to asses pulmonary functional status in children with newly diagnosed CTD and follow the results after two years of the disease course. There were 98 children (mean age: 13 ± 3; 76 girls), treated in Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Institute of Rheumatology, Warsaw and 80 aged-matched, healthy controls (mean age 12.7 ± 2.4; 50 girls) included into the study. Study procedures included medical history, physical examination, chest radiograph and PFT (spirometry and whole body-plethysmography). Then, the assessment of PFT was performed after 24 months. FEV₁, FEV₁/FVC and MEF50 were significantly lower in CTD as compared to control group, there was no difference in FVC and TLC. The proportion of patients with abnormal lung function was significantly higher in the study group, 41 (42%) vs 9 (11%). 24-months observation didn't reveal progression in lung function impairment. Lung function impairment is relatively common in children with CTDs. Although restrictive ventilatory pattern is considered typical feature of lung involvement in CTDs, airflow limitation could also be an initial abnormality.

  17. Fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging in large tissue volumes using a gain-modulated ICCD camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godavarty, Anuradha; Eppstein, Margaret J; Zhang, Chaoyang; Theru, Sangeeta; Thompson, Alan B; Gurfinkel, Michael; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M

    2003-01-01

    A novel image-intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) imaging system has been developed to perform 3D fluorescence tomographic imaging in the frequency-domain using near-infrared contrast agents. The imager is unique since it (i) employs a large tissue-mimicking phantom, which is shaped and sized to resemble a female breast and part of the extended chest-wall region, and (ii) enables rapid data acquisition in the frequency-domain by using a gain-modulated ICCD camera. Diffusion model predictions are compared to experimental measurements using two different referencing schemes under two different experimental conditions of perfect and imperfect uptake of fluorescent agent into a target. From these experimental measurements, three-dimensional images of fluorescent absorption were reconstructed using a computationally efficient variant of the approximate extended Kalman filter algorithm. The current work represents the first time that 3D fluorescence-enhanced optical tomographic reconstructions have been achieved from experimental measurements of the time-dependent light propagation on a clinically relevant breast-shaped tissue phantom using a gain-modulated ICCD camera

  18. Robust volume assessment of brain tissues for 3-dimensional fourier transformation MRI via a novel multispectral technique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh-Wen Chai

    Full Text Available A new TRIO algorithm method integrating three different algorithms is proposed to perform brain MRI segmentation in the native coordinate space, with no need of transformation to a standard coordinate space or the probability maps for segmentation. The method is a simple voxel-based algorithm, derived from multispectral remote sensing techniques, and only requires minimal operator input to depict GM, WM, and CSF tissue clusters to complete classification of a 3D high-resolution multislice-multispectral MRI data. Results showed very high accuracy and reproducibility in classification of GM, WM, and CSF in multislice-multispectral synthetic MRI data. The similarity indexes, expressing overlap between classification results and the ground truth, were 0.951, 0.962, and 0.956 for GM, WM, and CSF classifications in the image data with 3% noise level and 0% non-uniformity intensity. The method particularly allows for classification of CSF with 0.994, 0.961 and 0.996 of accuracy, sensitivity and specificity in images data with 3% noise level and 0% non-uniformity intensity, which had seldom performed well in previous studies. As for clinical MRI data, the quantitative data of brain tissue volumes aligned closely with the brain morphometrics in three different study groups of young adults, elderly volunteers, and dementia patients. The results also showed very low rates of the intra- and extra-operator variability in measurements of the absolute volumes and volume fractions of cerebral GM, WM, and CSF in three different study groups. The mean coefficients of variation of GM, WM, and CSF volume measurements were in the range of 0.03% to 0.30% of intra-operator measurements and 0.06% to 0.45% of inter-operator measurements. In conclusion, the TRIO algorithm exhibits a remarkable ability in robust classification of multislice-multispectral brain MR images, which would be potentially applicable for clinical brain volumetric analysis and explicitly promising

  19. The incorporation of specific tissue/nuclide attenuation data into the Anderson method for producing brachytherapy volume-dose histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loft, S.M.; Dale, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    Anderson (1986) has proposed an analytical method for deriving volume-dose histograms relating to three-dimensional brachytherapy distributions. Because the mathematical transformation allows the otherwise dominant effects of the inverse-square fall-off about individual sources to be effectively suppressed, resulting histograms provide the potential for visually and numerically assessing overall quality of a brachytherapy treatment. In this paper the Anderson equations have been combined with the radial-dose polynomials of Dale, which are applicable to a number of tissue/nuclide combinations, and the predictions of the combined formalism used to further investigate the physical aspects of brachytherapy dosimetry. The problems associated with the dosimetry of low-energy γ-emitters such as 125 I are once again highlighted, as are potential advantages of using a radionuclide with an intermediate γ-ray energy. (author)

  20. Disease and genetic contributions toward local tissue volume disturbances in schizophrenia: a tensor-based morphometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yaling; Nuechterlein, Keith H; Phillips, Owen R; Gutman, Boris; Kurth, Florian; Dinov, Ivo; Thompson, Paul M; Asarnow, Robert F; Toga, Arthur W; Narr, Katherine L

    2012-09-01

    Structural brain deficits, especially frontotemporal volume reduction and ventricular enlargement, have been repeatedly reported in patients with schizophrenia. However, it remains unclear whether brain structural deformations may be attributable to disease-related or genetic factors. In this study, the structural magnetic resonance imaging data of 48 adult-onset schizophrenia patients, 65 first-degree nonpsychotic relatives of schizophrenia patients, 27 community comparison (CC) probands, and 73 CC relatives were examined using tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to isolate global and localized differences in tissue volume across the entire brain between groups. We found brain tissue contractions most prominently in frontal and temporal regions and expansions in the putamen/pallidum, and lateral and third ventricles in schizophrenia patients when compared with unrelated CC probands. Results were similar, though less prominent when patients were compared with their nonpsychotic relatives. Structural deformations observed in unaffected patient relatives compared to age-similar CC relatives were suggestive of schizophrenia-related genetic liability and were pronounced in the putamen/pallidum and medial temporal regions. Schizophrenia and genetic liability effects for the putamen/pallidum were confirmed by regions-of-interest analysis. In conclusion, TBM findings complement reports of frontal, temporal, and ventricular dysmorphology in schizophrenia and further indicate that putamen/pallidum enlargements, originally linked mainly with medication exposure in early studies, also reflect a genetic predisposition for schizophrenia. Thus, brain deformation profiles revealed in this study may help to clarify the role of specific genetic or environmental risk factors toward altered brain morphology in schizophrenia.

  1. Ablation of clinically relevant kidney tissue volumes by high-intensity focused ultrasound: Preliminary results of standardized ex-vivo investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häcker, Axel; Peters, Kristina; Knoll, Thomas; Marlinghaus, Ernst; Alken, Peter; Jenne, Jürgen W; Michel, Maurice Stephan

    2006-11-01

    To investigate strategies to achieve confluent kidney-tissue ablation by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Our model of the perfused ex-vivo porcine kidney was used. Tissue ablation was performed with an experimental HIFU device (Storz Medical, Kreuzlingen, Switzerland). Lesion-to-lesion interaction was investigated by varying the lesion distance (5 to 2.5 mm), generator power (300, 280, and 260 W), cooling time (10, 20, and 30 seconds), and exposure time (4, 3, and 2 seconds). The lesion rows were analyzed grossly and by histologic examination (hematoxylin-eosin and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide staining). It was possible to achieve complete homogeneous ablation of a clinically relevant tissue volume but only by meticulous adjustment of the exposure parameters. Minimal changes in these parameters caused changes in lesion formation with holes within the lesions and lesion-to-lesion interaction. Our preliminary results show that when using this new device, HIFU can ablate a large tissue volume homogeneously in perfused ex-vivo porcine tissue under standardized conditions with meticulous adjustment of exposure parameters. Further investigations in vivo are necessary to test whether large tissue volumes can be ablated completely and reliably despite the influence of physiologic tissue and organ movement.

  2. Equivalence principles and electromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, W.-T.

    1977-01-01

    The implications of the weak equivalence principles are investigated in detail for electromagnetic systems in a general framework. In particular, it is shown that the universality of free-fall trajectories (Galileo weak equivalence principle) does not imply the validity of the Einstein equivalence principle. However, the Galileo principle plus the universality of free-fall rotation states does imply the Einstein principle.

  3. The application of three-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasound to measure volume of affected tissue after HIFU treatment for localized prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedelaar, J. P.; Aarnink, R. G.; van Leenders, G. J.; Beerlage, H. P.; Debruyne, F. M.; Wijkstra, H.; de la Rosette, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Adequate monitoring of volume and location of affected tissue might provide helpful information when performing localized ablative therapy for prostate cancer. We hypothesize that the change in blood flow patterns after therapy in comparison to the blood flow pattern prior to therapy

  4. A new method to study changes in microvascular blood volume in muscle and adipose tissue: Real time imaging in humans and rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøberg, Kim Anker; Rattigan, Stephen; Hiscock, Natalie J

    2011-01-01

    We employed and evaluated a new application of contrast enhanced ultrasound for real time imaging of changes in microvascular blood volume (MVB) in tissues in females, males and rat. Continuous real time imaging was performed using contrast enhanced ultrasound to quantify infused gas filled micro...

  5. Whole-body adipose tissue and lean muscle volumes and their distribution across gender and age: MR-derived normative values in a normal-weight Swiss population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, Erika J; Nanz, Daniel; Leinhard, Olof Dahlqvist; Marcon, Magda; Fischer, Michael A

    2018-01-01

    To determine age- and gender-dependent whole-body adipose tissue and muscle volumes in healthy Swiss volunteers in Dixon MRI in comparison with anthropometric and bioelectrical impedance (BIA) measurements. Fat-water-separated whole-body 3 Tesla MRI of 80 healthy volunteers (ages 20 to 62 years) with a body mass index (BMI) of 17.5 to 26.2 kg/m 2 (10 men, 10 women per decade). Age and gender-dependent volumes of total adipose tissue (TAT), visceral adipose tissue (VAT), total abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (ASAT) and total abdominal adipose tissue (TAAT), and the total lean muscle tissue (TLMT) normalized for body height were determined by semi-automatic segmentation, and correlated with anthropometric and BIA measurements as well as lifestyle parameters. The TAT, ASAT, VAT, and TLMT indexes (TATi, ASATi, VATi, and TLMTi, respectively) (L/m 2  ± standard deviation) for women/men were 6.4 ± 1.8/5.3 ± 1.7, 1.6 ± 0.7/1.2 ± 0.5, 0.4 ± 0.2/0.8 ± 0.5, and 5.6 ± 0.6/7.1 ± 0.7, respectively. The TATi correlated strongly with ASATi (r > 0.93), VATi, BMI and BIA (r > 0.70), and TAATi (r > 0.96), and weak with TLMTi for both genders (r > -0.34). The VAT was the only parameter showing an age dependency (r > 0.32). The BMI and BIA showed strong correlation with all MR-derived adipose tissue volumes. The TAT mass was estimated significantly lower from BIA than from MRI (both genders P muscle volumes might serve as normative values. The estimation of adipose tissue volumes was significantly lower from anthropometric and BIA measurements than from MRI. Magn Reson Med 79:449-458, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  6. Methods for Reducing Normal Tissue Complication Probabilities in Oropharyngeal Cancer: Dose Reduction or Planning Target Volume Elimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuels, Stuart E.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Vineberg, Karen; Lee, Jae; Lee, Choonik; Matuszak, Martha M.; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Brock, Kristy K., E-mail: kbrock@med.umich.edu

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: Strategies to reduce the toxicities of head and neck radiation (ie, dysphagia [difficulty swallowing] and xerostomia [dry mouth]) are currently underway. However, the predicted benefit of dose and planning target volume (PTV) reduction strategies is unknown. The purpose of the present study was to compare the normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) for swallowing and salivary structures in standard plans (70 Gy [P70]), dose-reduced plans (60 Gy [P60]), and plans eliminating the PTV margin. Methods and Materials: A total of 38 oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) plans were analyzed. Standard organ-sparing volumetric modulated arc therapy plans (P70) were created and then modified by eliminating the PTVs and treating the clinical tumor volumes (CTVs) only (C70) or maintaining the PTV but reducing the dose to 60 Gy (P60). NTCP dose models for the pharyngeal constrictors, glottis/supraglottic larynx, parotid glands (PGs), and submandibular glands (SMGs) were analyzed. The minimal clinically important benefit was defined as a mean change in NTCP of >5%. The P70 NTCP thresholds and overlap percentages of the organs at risk with the PTVs (56-59 Gy, vPTV{sub 56}) were evaluated to identify the predictors for NTCP improvement. Results: With the P60 plans, only the ipsilateral PG (iPG) benefited (23.9% vs 16.2%; P<.01). With the C70 plans, only the iPG (23.9% vs 17.5%; P<.01) and contralateral SMG (cSMG) (NTCP 32.1% vs 22.9%; P<.01) benefited. An iPG NTCP threshold of 20% and 30% predicted NTCP benefits for the P60 and C70 plans, respectively (P<.001). A cSMG NTCP threshold of 30% predicted for an NTCP benefit with the C70 plans (P<.001). Furthermore, for the iPG, a vPTV{sub 56} >13% predicted benefit with P60 (P<.001) and C70 (P=.002). For the cSMG, a vPTV{sub 56} >22% predicted benefit with C70 (P<.01). Conclusions: PTV elimination and dose-reduction lowered the NTCP of the iPG, and PTV elimination lowered the NTCP of the cSMG. NTCP thresholds and the

  7. Effective dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyskens, C.J.; Passchier, W.F.

    1988-01-01

    The effective dose equivalent is a quantity which is used in the daily practice of radiation protection as well as in the radiation hygienic rules as measure for the health risks. In this contribution it is worked out upon which assumptions this quantity is based and in which cases the effective dose equivalent can be used more or less well. (H.W.)

  8. Characterization of revenue equivalence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heydenreich, B.; Müller, R.; Uetz, Marc Jochen; Vohra, R.

    2009-01-01

    The property of an allocation rule to be implementable in dominant strategies by a unique payment scheme is called revenue equivalence. We give a characterization of revenue equivalence based on a graph theoretic interpretation of the incentive compatibility constraints. The characterization holds

  9. Characterization of Revenue Equivalence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heydenreich, Birgit; Müller, Rudolf; Uetz, Marc Jochen; Vohra, Rakesh

    2008-01-01

    The property of an allocation rule to be implementable in dominant strategies by a unique payment scheme is called \\emph{revenue equivalence}. In this paper we give a characterization of revenue equivalence based on a graph theoretic interpretation of the incentive compatibility constraints. The

  10. On the operator equivalents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenet, G.; Kibler, M.

    1978-06-01

    A closed polynomial formula for the qth component of the diagonal operator equivalent of order k is derived in terms of angular momentum operators. The interest in various fields of molecular and solid state physics of using such a formula in connection with symmetry adapted operator equivalents is outlined

  11. Open-air ionisation chambers with walls of soft-tissue equivalent material for measuring photon doses; Chambres d'ionisation d'ambiance a parois en materiau equivalent aux tissus mous pour la mesure des doses absorbees dues aux photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vialettes, H.; Anceau, J.C.; Grand, M.; Petit, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    The ionisation chambers presented in this report constitute a contribution to research into methods of carrying out correct determinations in the field of health physics. The use of a mixture of teflon containing 42.5 per cent by weight of carbon for the chamber walls makes it possible to measure directly the dose absorbed in air through 300 mg/cm{sup 2} of soft tissue and, consequently, the dose absorbed in the soft tissues with a maximum error of 10 per cent for photon energies of between 10 keV and 10 MeV. Furthermore since this material does not contain hydrogen, the chamber has a sensitivity to neutrons which is much less than other chambers in current use. Finally the shape of these chambers has been studied with a view to obtaining a satisfactory measurement from the isotropy point of view; for example for gamma radiation of 27 keV, the 3 litre chamber is isotropic to within 10 per cent over 270 degrees, and the 12 litre chamber is isotropic to within 10 per cent over 300 degrees; for 1.25 MeV gamma radiation this range is extended over 330 degrees for the 3 litre chamber, and 360 degrees for the 12 litre chamber. This report presents the measurements carried out with these chambers as well as the results obtained. These results are then compared to those obtained with other chambers currently used in the field of health physics. (authors) [French] Les chambres d'ionisation presentees dans ce rapport apportent une contribution a la recherche de moyens dosimetriques adaptes aux mesures a effectuer pour assurer une dosimetrie correcte dans le domaine de la radioprotection. L'utilisation d'un melange de teflon charge a 42.5 pour cent en masse de carbone comme materiau constituant les parois de la chambre permet de realiser un dosimetre mesurant directement la dose absorbee dans l'air sous 3OO mg/cm{sup 2} de tissu mou et, par consequent, la dose absorbee dans les tissus mous avec une erreur maximale de 10 pour cent, pour des photons d

  12. Development of solid water-equivalent radioactive certified reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finke, E.; Greupner, H.; Groche, K.; Rittwag, R.; Geske, G.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a brief description of the development of solid water-equivalent beta volume radioactive certified reference materials. These certified reference materials were prepared for the beta fission nuclides 90 Sr/ 90 Y, 137 Cs, 147 Pm and 204 Tl. Comparative measurements of liquid and solid water-equivalent beta volume radioactive certified reference materials are discussed. (author)

  13. Gender-linked impact of epicardial adipose tissue volume in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft surgery or non-coronary valve surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Maimaituxun, Gulinu; Shimabukuro, Michio; Salim, Hotimah Masdan; Tabata, Minoru; Yuji, Daisuke; Morimoto, Yoshihisa; Akasaka, Takeshi; Matsuura, Tomomi; Yagi, Shusuke; Fukuda, Daiju; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Soeki, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Takaki; Tanaka, Masashi; Takanashi, Shuichiro

    2017-01-01

    Background Traditional and non-traditional risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) are different between men and women. Gender-linked impact of epicardial adipose tissue volume (EATV) in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) remains unknown. Methods Gender-linked impact of EATV, abdominal fat distribution and other traditional ASCVD risk factors were compared in 172 patients (men: 115; women: 57) who underwent CABG or non-coronary valvular surgery ...

  14. Gender disparities in the association between epicardial adipose tissue volume and coronary atherosclerosis: A 3-dimensional cardiac computed tomography imaging study in Japanese subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Dagvasumberel Munkhbaatar; Shimabukuro Michio; Nishiuchi Takeshi; Ueno Junji; Takao Shoichiro; Fukuda Daiju; Hirata Yoichiro; Kurobe Hirotsugu; Soeki Takeshi; Iwase Takashi; Kusunose Kenya; Niki Toshiyuki; Yamaguchi Koji; Taketani Yoshio; Yagi Shusuke

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Growing evidence suggests that epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) may contribute to the development of coronary artery disease (CAD). In this study, we explored gender disparities in EAT volume (EATV) and its impact on coronary atherosclerosis. Methods The study population consisted of 90 consecutive subjects (age: 63 ± 12 years; men: 47, women: 43) who underwent 256-slice multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) coronary angiography. EATV was measured as the sum of cross-se...

  15. Improvement of oxygen supply by an artificial carrier in combination with normobaric oxygenation decreases the volume of tissue hypoxia and tissue damage from transient focal cerebral ischemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seiffge, David J.; Lapina, Natalia E.; Tsagogiorgas, Charalambos; Theisinger, Bastian; Henning, Robert H.; Schilling, Lothar

    Tissue hypoxia may play an important role in the development of ischemic brain damage. In the present study we investigated in a rat model of transient focal brain ischemia the neuroprotective effects of increasing the blood oxygen transport capacity by applying a semifluorinated alkane

  16. Equivalent Dynamic Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Peter C M

    2017-01-01

    Equivalences of two classes of dynamic models for weakly stationary multivariate time series are discussed: dynamic factor models and autoregressive models. It is shown that exploratory dynamic factor models can be rotated, yielding an infinite set of equivalent solutions for any observed series. It also is shown that dynamic factor models with lagged factor loadings are not equivalent to the currently popular state-space models, and that restriction of attention to the latter type of models may yield invalid results. The known equivalent vector autoregressive model types, standard and structural, are given a new interpretation in which they are conceived of as the extremes of an innovating type of hybrid vector autoregressive models. It is shown that consideration of hybrid models solves many problems, in particular with Granger causality testing.

  17. Serial section scanning electron microscopy (S3EM) on silicon wafers for ultra-structural volume imaging of cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmann, Heinz; Körber, Christoph; Sätzler, Kurt; Aydin, Daniel; Kuner, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    High resolution, three-dimensional (3D) representations of cellular ultrastructure are essential for structure function studies in all areas of cell biology. While limited subcellular volumes have been routinely examined using serial section transmission electron microscopy (ssTEM), complete ultrastructural reconstructions of large volumes, entire cells or even tissue are difficult to achieve using ssTEM. Here, we introduce a novel approach combining serial sectioning of tissue with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) using a conductive silicon wafer as a support. Ribbons containing hundreds of 35 nm thick sections can be generated and imaged on the wafer at a lateral pixel resolution of 3.7 nm by recording the backscattered electrons with the in-lens detector of the SEM. The resulting electron micrographs are qualitatively comparable to those obtained by conventional TEM. S(3)EM images of the same region of interest in consecutive sections can be used for 3D reconstructions of large structures. We demonstrate the potential of this approach by reconstructing a 31.7 µm(3) volume of a calyx of Held presynaptic terminal. The approach introduced here, Serial Section SEM (S(3)EM), for the first time provides the possibility to obtain 3D ultrastructure of large volumes with high resolution and to selectively and repetitively home in on structures of interest. S(3)EM accelerates process duration, is amenable to full automation and can be implemented with standard instrumentation.

  18. Serial section scanning electron microscopy (S3EM on silicon wafers for ultra-structural volume imaging of cells and tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz Horstmann

    Full Text Available High resolution, three-dimensional (3D representations of cellular ultrastructure are essential for structure function studies in all areas of cell biology. While limited subcellular volumes have been routinely examined using serial section transmission electron microscopy (ssTEM, complete ultrastructural reconstructions of large volumes, entire cells or even tissue are difficult to achieve using ssTEM. Here, we introduce a novel approach combining serial sectioning of tissue with scanning electron microscopy (SEM using a conductive silicon wafer as a support. Ribbons containing hundreds of 35 nm thick sections can be generated and imaged on the wafer at a lateral pixel resolution of 3.7 nm by recording the backscattered electrons with the in-lens detector of the SEM. The resulting electron micrographs are qualitatively comparable to those obtained by conventional TEM. S(3EM images of the same region of interest in consecutive sections can be used for 3D reconstructions of large structures. We demonstrate the potential of this approach by reconstructing a 31.7 µm(3 volume of a calyx of Held presynaptic terminal. The approach introduced here, Serial Section SEM (S(3EM, for the first time provides the possibility to obtain 3D ultrastructure of large volumes with high resolution and to selectively and repetitively home in on structures of interest. S(3EM accelerates process duration, is amenable to full automation and can be implemented with standard instrumentation.

  19. A method to estimate the fractional fat volume within a ROI of a breast biopsy for WAXS applications: Animal tissue evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Robert Y.; McDonald, Nancy; Laamanen, Curtis; LeClair, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a method to estimate the mean fractional volume of fat (ν ¯ fat ) within a region of interest (ROI) of a tissue sample for wide-angle x-ray scatter (WAXS) applications. A scatter signal from the ROI was obtained and use of ν ¯ fat in a WAXS fat subtraction model provided a way to estimate the differential linear scattering coefficient μ s of the remaining fatless tissue. Methods: The efficacy of the method was tested using animal tissue from a local butcher shop. Formalin fixed samples, 5 mm in diameter 4 mm thick, were prepared. The two main tissue types were fat and meat (fibrous). Pure as well as composite samples consisting of a mixture of the two tissue types were analyzed. For the latter samples, ν fat for the tissue columns of interest were extracted from corresponding pixels in CCD digital x-ray images using a calibration curve. The means ν ¯ fat were then calculated for use in a WAXS fat subtraction model. For the WAXS measurements, the samples were interrogated with a 2.7 mm diameter 50 kV beam and the 6° scattered photons were detected with a CdTe detector subtending a solid angle of 7.75 × 10 −5 sr. Using the scatter spectrum, an estimate of the incident spectrum, and a scatter model, μ s was determined for the tissue in the ROI. For the composite samples, a WAXS fat subtraction model was used to estimate the μ s of the fibrous tissue in the ROI. This signal was compared to μ s of fibrous tissue obtained using a pure fibrous sample. Results: For chicken and beef composites, ν ¯ fat =0.33±0.05 and 0.32 ± 0.05, respectively. The subtractions of these fat components from the WAXS composite signals provided estimates of μ s for chicken and beef fibrous tissue. The differences between the estimates and μ s of fibrous obtained with a pure sample were calculated as a function of the momentum transfer x. A t-test showed that the mean of the differences did not vary from zero in a statistically significant way thereby

  20. On uncertainties in definition of dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Keiji

    1995-01-01

    The author has entertained always the doubt that in a neutron field, if the measured value of the absorbed dose with a tissue equivalent ionization chamber is 1.02±0.01 mGy, may the dose equivalent be taken as 10.2±0.1 mSv. Should it be 10.2 or 11, but the author considers it is 10 or 20. Even if effort is exerted for the precision measurement of absorbed dose, if the coefficient being multiplied to it is not precise, it is meaningless. [Absorbed dose] x [Radiation quality fctor] = [Dose equivalent] seems peculiar. How accurately can dose equivalent be evaluated ? The descriptions related to uncertainties in the publications of ICRU and ICRP are introduced, which are related to radiation quality factor, the accuracy of measuring dose equivalent and so on. Dose equivalent shows the criterion for the degree of risk, or it is considered only as a controlling quantity. The description in the ICRU report 1973 related to dose equivalent and its unit is cited. It was concluded that dose equivalent can be considered only as the absorbed dose being multiplied by a dimensionless factor. The author presented the questions. (K.I.)

  1. Individualized determination of lower margin in pelvic radiation field after low anterior resection for rectal cancer resulted in equivalent local control and radiation volume reduction compared with traditional method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Suk Won; Ahn, Yong Chan; Huh, Seung Jae; Chun, Ho Kyung; Kang, Won Ki; Kim, Dae Yong; Lim, Do Hoon; Noh, Young Ju; Lee, Jung Eun

    2000-01-01

    . There was no significant difference with respect to local control and disease-free survival rates (p=0.42, p=0.68) between two groups of different lower margin determination policies. The new concept in the individualized determination of the lower margin depending on the anastomotic site has led to the equivalent local control and disease-free survival rates, and is expected to contribute to the reduction of unnecessary radiation-related morbidity by reduction of radiation volume, compared with the traditional method of lower margin determination

  2. Volume and Tissue Composition Changes Measured with Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry in Melanoma-Related Limb Lymphedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjorup, Caroline A; Hendel, Helle W; Zerahn, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Abstracts Background: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the volume, fat mass, and lean mass in both upper and lower limbs measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in melanoma patients with melanoma-related limb lymphedema. METHODS AND RESULTS: Four hundred thirty...... lymphedema was diagnosed on the basis of history and characteristic physical findings on the clinical examination. The inter-limb differences in volume, fat mass, and lean mass measured with DXA were categorized as none/mild, moderate, or severe according to reference values (taking handedness into account......, and the majority of lymphedemas were categorized as mild. The increase in the volume of limbs with lymphedema was primarily due to an increase in fat mass. CONCLUSION: There is a high prevalence of melanoma-related limb lymphedema. The increase in volume in the limb with lymphedema is primarily due to an increase...

  3. Reduction in adipose tissue volume using a new high-power radiofrequency technology combined with infrared light and mechanical manipulation for body contouring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adatto, Maurice A; Adatto-Neilson, Robyn M; Morren, Grietje

    2014-09-01

    A growing patient demand for a youthful skin appearance with a favorable body shape has led to the recent development of new noninvasive body contouring techniques. We have previously demonstrated that the combination of bipolar radiofrequency (RF) and optical energies with tissue manipulation is an efficient reshaping modality. Here, we investigated the efficacy and safety of a new high-power version of this combined technology, in terms of adipose tissue reduction and skin tightening. Thirty-five patients received one treatment per week over 6 weeks to their abdomen/flank, buttock, or thigh areas and were followed up to 3 months post completion of the treatment protocol. This new device has an increased power in the bipolar RF, as this parameter appears to be the most important energy modality for volume reduction. Patient circumferences were measured and comparisons of baseline and post treatment outcomes were made. Diagnostic ultrasound (US) measurements were performed in 12 patients to evaluate the reduction in adipose tissue volume, and a cutometer device was used to assess improvements in skin tightening. We observed a gradual decline in patient circumferences from baseline to post six treatments. The overall body shaping effect was accompanied with improvement in skin tightening and was clearly noticeable in the comparison of the before and after treatment clinical photographs. These findings correlated with measurements of adipose tissue volume and skin firmness/elasticity using diagnostic US and cutometer, respectively. The thickness of the fat layer showed on average a 29% reduction between baseline and the 1-month follow up. The average reduction in the circumference of the abdomen/flanks, buttocks, and thighs from baseline to the 3-month follow-up was 1.4, 0.5, and 1.2 cm, respectively, and 93% of study participants demonstrated a 1-60% change in fat layer thickness. Patients subjectively described comfort and satisfaction from treatment, and 97% of

  4. One-month spaceflight compromises the bone microstructure, tissue-level mechanical properties, osteocyte survival and lacunae volume in mature mice skeletons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbaix, Maude; Gnyubkin, Vasily; Farlay, Delphine; Olivier, Cécile; Ammann, Patrick; Courbon, Guillaume; Laroche, Norbert; Genthial, Rachel; Follet, Hélène; Peyrin, Françoise; Shenkman, Boris; Gauquelin-Koch, Guillemette; Vico, Laurence

    2017-06-01

    The weightless environment during spaceflight induces site-specific bone loss. The 30-day Bion-M1 mission offered a unique opportunity to characterize the skeletal changes after spaceflight and an 8-day recovery period in mature male C57/BL6 mice. In the femur metaphysis, spaceflight decreased the trabecular bone volume (-64% vs. Habitat Control), dramatically increased the bone resorption (+140% vs. Habitat Control) and induced marrow adiposity invasion. At the diaphysis, cortical thinning associated with periosteal resorption was observed. In the Flight animal group, the osteocyte lacunae displayed a reduced volume and a more spherical shape (synchrotron radiation analyses), and empty lacunae were highly increased (+344% vs. Habitat Control). Tissue-level mechanical cortical properties (i.e., hardness and modulus) were locally decreased by spaceflight, whereas the mineral characteristics and collagen maturity were unaffected. In the vertebrae, spaceflight decreased the overall bone volume and altered the modulus in the periphery of the trabecular struts. Despite normalized osteoclastic activity and an increased osteoblast number, bone recovery was not observed 8 days after landing. In conclusion, spaceflight induces osteocyte death, which may trigger bone resorption and result in bone mass and microstructural deterioration. Moreover, osteocyte cell death, lacunae mineralization and fatty marrow, which are hallmarks of ageing, may impede tissue maintenance and repair.

  5. The principle of equivalence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unnikrishnan, C.S.

    1994-01-01

    Principle of equivalence was the fundamental guiding principle in the formulation of the general theory of relativity. What are its key elements? What are the empirical observations which establish it? What is its relevance to some new experiments? These questions are discussed in this article. (author). 11 refs., 5 figs

  6. Radioactive waste equivalence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlowski, S.; Schaller, K.H.

    1990-01-01

    The report reviews, for the Member States of the European Community, possible situations in which an equivalence concept for radioactive waste may be used, analyses the various factors involved, and suggests guidelines for the implementation of such a concept. Only safety and technical aspects are covered. Other aspects such as commercial ones are excluded. Situations where the need for an equivalence concept has been identified are processes where impurities are added as a consequence of the treatment and conditioning process, the substitution of wastes from similar waste streams due to the treatment process, and exchange of waste belonging to different waste categories. The analysis of factors involved and possible ways for equivalence evaluation, taking into account in particular the chemical, physical and radiological characteristics of the waste package, and the potential risks of the waste form, shows that no simple all-encompassing equivalence formula may be derived. Consequently, a step-by-step approach is suggested, which avoids complex evaluations in the case of simple exchanges

  7. Equivalent Colorings with "Maple"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, David R.; Wang, Rongdong

    2005-01-01

    Many counting problems can be modeled as "colorings" and solved by considering symmetries and Polya's cycle index polynomial. This paper presents a "Maple 7" program link http://users.tamuk.edu/kfdrc00/ that, given Polya's cycle index polynomial, determines all possible associated colorings and their partitioning into equivalence classes. These…

  8. Correspondences. Equivalence relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouligand, G.M.

    1978-03-01

    We comment on sections paragraph 3 'Correspondences' and paragraph 6 'Equivalence Relations' in chapter II of 'Elements de mathematique' by N. Bourbaki in order to simplify their comprehension. Paragraph 3 exposes the ideas of a graph, correspondence and map or of function, and their composition laws. We draw attention to the following points: 1) Adopting the convention of writting from left to right, the composition law for two correspondences (A,F,B), (U,G,V) of graphs F, G is written in full generality (A,F,B)o(U,G,V) = (A,FoG,V). It is not therefore assumed that the co-domain B of the first correspondence is identical to the domain U of the second (EII.13 D.7), (1970). 2) The axiom of choice consists of creating the Hilbert terms from the only relations admitting a graph. 3) The statement of the existence theorem of a function h such that f = goh, where f and g are two given maps having the same domain (of definition), is completed if h is more precisely an injection. Paragraph 6 considers the generalisation of equality: First, by 'the equivalence relation associated with a map f of a set E identical to (x is a member of the set E and y is a member of the set E and x:f = y:f). Consequently, every relation R(x,y) which is equivalent to this is an equivalence relation in E (symmetrical, transitive, reflexive); then R admits a graph included in E x E, etc. Secondly, by means of the Hilbert term of a relation R submitted to the equivalence. In this last case, if R(x,y) is separately collectivizing in x and y, theta(x) is not the class of objects equivalent to x for R (EII.47.9), (1970). The interest of bringing together these two subjects, apart from this logical order, resides also in the fact that the theorem mentioned in 3) can be expressed by means of the equivalence relations associated with the functions f and g. The solutions of the examples proposed reveal their simplicity [fr

  9. Dosimetric Coverage of the Prostate, Normal Tissue Sparing, and Acute Toxicity with High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Large Prostate Volumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurposeTo evaluate dosimetric coverage of the prostate, normal tissue sparing, and acute toxicity with HDR brachytherapy for large prostate volumes.Materials and MethodsOne hundred and two prostate cancer patients with prostate volumes >50 mL (range: 5-29 mL were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy ± intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT to 4,500 cGy in 25 daily fractions between 2009 and 2013. HDR brachytherapy monotherapy doses consisted of two 1,350-1,400 cGy fractions separated by 2-3 weeks, and HDR brachytherapy boost doses consisted of two 950-1,150 cGy fractions separated by 4 weeks. Twelve of 32 (38% unfavorable intermediate risk, high risk, and very high risk patients received androgen deprivation therapy. Acute toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE version 4.ResultsMedian follow-up was 14 months. Dosimetric goals were achieved in over 90% of cases. Three of 102 (3% patients developed Grade 2 acute proctitis. No variables were significantly associated with Grade 2 acute proctitis. Seventeen of 102 (17% patients developed Grade 2 acute urinary retention. American Urological Association (AUA symptom score was the only variable significantly associated with Grade 2 acute urinary retention (p=0.04. There was no ≥ Grade 3 acute toxicity.ConclusionsDosimetric coverage of the prostate and normal tissue sparing were adequate in patients with prostate volumes >50 mL. Higher pre-treatment AUA symptom scores increased the relative risk of Grade 2 acute urinary retention. However, the overall incidence of acute toxicity was acceptable in patients with large prostate volumes.

  10. Dosimetric coverage of the prostate, normal tissue sparing, and acute toxicity with high-dose-rate brachytherapy for large prostate volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, George; Strom, Tobin J.; Shrinath, Kushagra; Mellon, Eric A.; Fernandez, Daniel C.; Biagioli, Matthew C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: mcbiagioli@yahoo.com [Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Newnan, GA (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: to evaluate dosimetric coverage of the prostate, normal tissue sparing, and acute toxicity with HDR brachytherapy for large prostate volumes. Materials and methods: one hundred and two prostate cancer patients with prostate volumes >50 mL (range: 5-29 mL) were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy ± intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to 4,500 cGy in 25 daily fractions between 2009 and 2013. HDR brachytherapy monotherapy doses consisted of two 1,350-1,400 cGy fractions separated by 2-3 weeks, and HDR brachytherapy boost doses consisted of two 950-1,150 cGy fractions separated by 4 weeks. Twelve of 32 (38%) unfavorable intermediate risk, high risk, and very high risk patients received androgen deprivation therapy. Acute toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4. Results: median follow-up was 14 months. Dosimetric goals were achieved in over 90% of cases. Three of 102 (3%) patients developed Grade 2 acute proctitis. No variables were significantly associated with Grade 2 acute proctitis. Seventeen of 102 (17%) patients developed Grade 2 acute urinary retention. American Urological Association (AUA) symptom score was the only variable significantly associated with Grade 2 acute urinary retention (p-0.04). There was no ≥ Grade 3 acute toxicity. Conclusions: dosimetric coverage of the prostate and normal tissue sparing were adequate in patients with prostate volumes >50 mL. Higher pre-treatment AUA symptom scores increased the relative risk of Grade 2 acute urinary retention. However, the overall incidence of acute toxicity was acceptable in patients with large prostate volumes. (author)

  11. Evaluating the accuracy of the XVI dual registration tool compared with manual soft tissue matching to localise tumour volumes for post-prostatectomy patients receiving radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, Amelia; Brown, Elizabeth; Pryor, David; Lehman, Margot; Owen, Rebecca; Bernard, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computerised tomography (CBCT) enables soft tissue visualisation to optimise matching in the post-prostatectomy setting, but is associated with inter-observer variability. This study assessed the accuracy and consistency of automated soft tissue localisation using XVI's dual registration tool (DRT). Sixty CBCT images from ten post-prostatectomy patients were matched using: (i) the DRT and (ii) manual soft tissue registration by six radiation therapists (RTs). Shifts in the three Cartesian planes were recorded. The accuracy of the match was determined by comparing shifts to matches performed by two genitourinary radiation oncologists (ROs). A Bland–Altman method was used to assess the 95% levels of agreement (LoA). A clinical threshold of 3 mm was used to define equivalence between methods of matching. The 95% LoA between DRT-ROs in the superior/inferior, left/right and anterior/posterior directions were −2.21 to +3.18 mm, −0.77 to +0.84 mm, and −1.52 to +4.12 mm, respectively. The 95% LoA between RTs-ROs in the superior/inferior, left/right and anterior/posterior directions were −1.89 to +1.86 mm, −0.71 to +0.62 mm and −2.8 to +3.43 mm, respectively. Five DRT CBCT matches (8.33%) were outside the 3-mm threshold, all in the setting of bladder underfilling or rectal gas. The mean time for manual matching was 82 versus 65 s for DRT. XVI's DRT is comparable with RTs manually matching soft tissue on CBCT. The DRT can minimise RT inter-observer variability; however, involuntary bladder and rectal filling can influence the tools accuracy, highlighting the need for RT evaluation of the DRT match.

  12. The equivalence theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veltman, H.

    1990-01-01

    The equivalence theorem states that, at an energy E much larger than the vector-boson mass M, the leading order of the amplitude with longitudinally polarized vector bosons on mass shell is given by the amplitude in which these vector bosons are replaced by the corresponding Higgs ghosts. We prove the equivalence theorem and show its validity in every order in perturbation theory. We first derive the renormalized Ward identities by using the diagrammatic method. Only the Feynman-- 't Hooft gauge is discussed. The last step of the proof includes the power-counting method evaluated in the large-Higgs-boson-mass limit, needed to estimate the leading energy behavior of the amplitudes involved. We derive expressions for the amplitudes involving longitudinally polarized vector bosons for all orders in perturbation theory. The fermion mass has not been neglected and everything is evaluated in the region m f ∼M much-lt E much-lt m Higgs

  13. Radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease based on tissue-absorbed dose calculations: effect of pre-treatment thyroid volume on clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, Michael J; Joe, Alexius Y; Mallek, Dirk von; Ezziddin, Samer; Palmedo, Holger [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Brink, Ingo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Freiburg (Germany); Krause, Thomas M [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Inselspital Bern (Switzerland)

    2002-09-01

    This study was performed with three aims. The first was to analyse the effectiveness of radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease patients with and without goitres under conditions of mild iodine deficiency using several tissue-absorbed doses. The second aim was to detect further parameters which might be predictive for treatment outcome. Finally, we wished to determine the deviation of the therapeutically achieved dose from that intended. Activities of 185-2,220 MBq radioiodine were calculated by means of Marinelli's formula to deliver doses of 150, 200 or 300 Gy to the thyroids of 224 patients with Graves' disease and goitres up to 130 ml in volume. Control of hyperthyroidism, change in thyroid volume and thyrotropin-receptor antibodies were evaluated 15{+-}9 months after treatment for each dose. The results were further evaluated with respect to pre-treatment parameters which might be predictive for therapy outcome. Thyroidal radioiodine uptake was measured every day during therapy to determine the therapeutically achieved target dose and its coefficient of variation. There was a significant dose dependency in therapeutic outcome: frequency of hypothyroidism increased from 27.4% after 150 Gy to 67.7% after 300 Gy, while the frequency of persistent hyperthyroidism decreased from 27.4% after 150 Gy to 8.1% after 300 Gy. Patients who became hypothyroid had a maximum thyroid volume of 42 ml and received a target dose of 256{+-}80 Gy. The coefficient of variation for the achieved target dose ranged between 27.7% for 150 Gy and 17.8% for 300 Gy. When analysing further factors which might influence therapeutic outcome, only pre-treatment thyroid volume showed a significant relationship to the result of treatment. It is concluded that a target dose of 250 Gy is essential to achieve hypothyroidism within 1 year after radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease patients with goitres up to 40 ml in volume. Patients with larger goitres might need higher doses. (orig.)

  14. Radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease based on tissue-absorbed dose calculations: effect of pre-treatment thyroid volume on clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhardt, Michael J.; Joe, Alexius Y.; Mallek, Dirk von; Ezziddin, Samer; Palmedo, Holger; Brink, Ingo; Krause, Thomas M.

    2002-01-01

    This study was performed with three aims. The first was to analyse the effectiveness of radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease patients with and without goitres under conditions of mild iodine deficiency using several tissue-absorbed doses. The second aim was to detect further parameters which might be predictive for treatment outcome. Finally, we wished to determine the deviation of the therapeutically achieved dose from that intended. Activities of 185-2,220 MBq radioiodine were calculated by means of Marinelli's formula to deliver doses of 150, 200 or 300 Gy to the thyroids of 224 patients with Graves' disease and goitres up to 130 ml in volume. Control of hyperthyroidism, change in thyroid volume and thyrotropin-receptor antibodies were evaluated 15±9 months after treatment for each dose. The results were further evaluated with respect to pre-treatment parameters which might be predictive for therapy outcome. Thyroidal radioiodine uptake was measured every day during therapy to determine the therapeutically achieved target dose and its coefficient of variation. There was a significant dose dependency in therapeutic outcome: frequency of hypothyroidism increased from 27.4% after 150 Gy to 67.7% after 300 Gy, while the frequency of persistent hyperthyroidism decreased from 27.4% after 150 Gy to 8.1% after 300 Gy. Patients who became hypothyroid had a maximum thyroid volume of 42 ml and received a target dose of 256±80 Gy. The coefficient of variation for the achieved target dose ranged between 27.7% for 150 Gy and 17.8% for 300 Gy. When analysing further factors which might influence therapeutic outcome, only pre-treatment thyroid volume showed a significant relationship to the result of treatment. It is concluded that a target dose of 250 Gy is essential to achieve hypothyroidism within 1 year after radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease patients with goitres up to 40 ml in volume. Patients with larger goitres might need higher doses. (orig.)

  15. A method to estimate the fractional fat volume within a ROI of a breast biopsy for WAXS applications: Animal tissue evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Robert Y., E-mail: rx-tang@laurentian.ca [Biomolecular Sciences Program, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada); McDonald, Nancy, E-mail: mcdnancye@gmail.com; Laamanen, Curtis, E-mail: cx-laamanen@laurentian.ca [Department of Physics, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada); LeClair, Robert J., E-mail: rleclair@laurentian.ca [Department of Physics, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6, Canada and Biomolecular Sciences Program, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To develop a method to estimate the mean fractional volume of fat (ν{sup ¯}{sub fat}) within a region of interest (ROI) of a tissue sample for wide-angle x-ray scatter (WAXS) applications. A scatter signal from the ROI was obtained and use of ν{sup ¯}{sub fat} in a WAXS fat subtraction model provided a way to estimate the differential linear scattering coefficient μ{sub s} of the remaining fatless tissue. Methods: The efficacy of the method was tested using animal tissue from a local butcher shop. Formalin fixed samples, 5 mm in diameter 4 mm thick, were prepared. The two main tissue types were fat and meat (fibrous). Pure as well as composite samples consisting of a mixture of the two tissue types were analyzed. For the latter samples, ν{sub fat} for the tissue columns of interest were extracted from corresponding pixels in CCD digital x-ray images using a calibration curve. The means ν{sup ¯}{sub fat} were then calculated for use in a WAXS fat subtraction model. For the WAXS measurements, the samples were interrogated with a 2.7 mm diameter 50 kV beam and the 6° scattered photons were detected with a CdTe detector subtending a solid angle of 7.75 × 10{sup −5} sr. Using the scatter spectrum, an estimate of the incident spectrum, and a scatter model, μ{sub s} was determined for the tissue in the ROI. For the composite samples, a WAXS fat subtraction model was used to estimate the μ{sub s} of the fibrous tissue in the ROI. This signal was compared to μ{sub s} of fibrous tissue obtained using a pure fibrous sample. Results: For chicken and beef composites, ν{sup ¯}{sub fat}=0.33±0.05 and 0.32 ± 0.05, respectively. The subtractions of these fat components from the WAXS composite signals provided estimates of μ{sub s} for chicken and beef fibrous tissue. The differences between the estimates and μ{sub s} of fibrous obtained with a pure sample were calculated as a function of the momentum transfer x. A t-test showed that the mean of the

  16. Calculation of neutron fluence to dose equivalent conversion coefficients using GEANT4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Rosane M.; Santos, Denison de S.; Queiroz Filho, Pedro P. de; Mauricio, CLaudia L.P.; Silva, Livia K. da; Pessanha, Paula R.

    2014-01-01

    Fluence to dose equivalent conversion coefficients provide the basis for the calculation of area and personal monitors. Recently, the ICRP has started a revision of these coefficients, including new Monte Carlo codes for benchmarking. So far, little information is available about neutron transport below 10 MeV in tissue-equivalent (TE) material performed with Monte Carlo GEANT4 code. The objective of this work is to calculate neutron fluence to personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients, H p (10)/Φ, with GEANT4 code. The incidence of monoenergetic neutrons was simulated as an expanded and aligned field, with energies ranging between thermal neutrons to 10 MeV on the ICRU slab of dimension 30 x 30 x 15 cm 3 , composed of 76.2% of oxygen, 10.1% of hydrogen, 11.1% of carbon and 2.6% of nitrogen. For all incident energy, a cylindrical sensitive volume is placed at a depth of 10 mm, in the largest surface of the slab (30 x 30 cm 2 ). Physic process are included for neutrons, photons and charged particles, and calculations are made for neutrons and secondary particles which reach the sensitive volume. Results obtained are thus compared with values published in ICRP 74. Neutron fluence in the sensitive volume was calculated for benchmarking. The Monte Carlo GEANT4 code was found to be appropriate to calculate neutron doses at energies below 10 MeV correctly. (author)

  17. Automation of 3D reconstruction of neural tissue from large volume of conventional serial section transmission electron micrographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Yuriy

    2009-01-30

    We describe an approach for automation of the process of reconstruction of neural tissue from serial section transmission electron micrographs. Such reconstructions require 3D segmentation of individual neuronal processes (axons and dendrites) performed in densely packed neuropil. We first detect neuronal cell profiles in each image in a stack of serial micrographs with multi-scale ridge detector. Short breaks in detected boundaries are interpolated using anisotropic contour completion formulated in fuzzy-logic framework. Detected profiles from adjacent sections are linked together based on cues such as shape similarity and image texture. Thus obtained 3D segmentation is validated by human operators in computer-guided proofreading process. Our approach makes possible reconstructions of neural tissue at final rate of about 5 microm3/manh, as determined primarily by the speed of proofreading. To date we have applied this approach to reconstruct few blocks of neural tissue from different regions of rat brain totaling over 1000microm3, and used these to evaluate reconstruction speed, quality, error rates, and presence of ambiguous locations in neuropil ssTEM imaging data.

  18. Noncommutative Yang-Mills from equivalence of star products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurco, B.; Schupp, P.

    2000-01-01

    It is shown that the transformation between ordinary and noncommutative Yang-Mills theory as formulated by Seiberg and Witten is due to the equivalence of certain star products on the D-brane world-volume. (orig.)

  19. Noncommutative Yang-Mills from equivalence of star products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurco, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mathematik, Bonn (Germany); Schupp, P. [Sektion Physik, Universitaet Muenchen, Theresienstrasse 37, 80333 Muenchen (Germany)

    2000-05-01

    It is shown that the transformation between ordinary and noncommutative Yang-Mills theory as formulated by Seiberg and Witten is due to the equivalence of certain star products on the D-brane world-volume. (orig.)

  20. Equivalence, commensurability, value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Deriving value in Capital Marx uses three commensurability arguments (CA1-3). CA1 establishes equivalence in exchange as exchangeability with the same third commodity. CA2 establishes value as common denominator in commodities: embodied abstract labour. CA3 establishes value substance...... as commonality of labour: physiological labour. Tensions between these logics have permeated Marxist interpretations of value. Some have supported value as embodied labour (CA2, 3), others a monetary theory of value and value as ‘pure’ societal abstraction (ultimately CA1). They all are grounded in Marx....

  1. Development of solid water-equivalent radioactive certified reference materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finke, E.; Greupner, H.; Groche, K.; Rittwag, R. (Office for Standardization, Metrology and Quality Control (ASMW), Berlin (Germany, F.R.)); Geske, G. (Jena Univ. (Germany, F.R.))

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a brief description of the development of solid water-equivalent beta volume radioactive certified reference materials. These certified reference materials were prepared for the beta fission nuclides {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 147}Pm and {sup 204}Tl. Comparative measurements of liquid and solid water-equivalent beta volume radioactive certified reference materials are discussed. (author).

  2. The Relationship Between Local Recurrence and Radiotherapy Treatment Volume for Soft Tissue Sarcomas Treated With External Beam Radiotherapy and Function Preservation Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickie, Colleen I., E-mail: Colleen.dickie@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Griffin, Anthony M. [Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, University Musculoskeletal Oncology Unit, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Parent, Amy L. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Chung, Peter W.M.; Catton, Charles N. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Svensson, Jon [AngliaRuskin University, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Ferguson, Peter C.; Wunder, Jay S.; Bell, Robert S. [Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, University Musculoskeletal Oncology Unit, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Sharpe, Michael B.; O' Sullivan, Brian [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To examine the geometric relationship between local recurrence (LR) and external beam radiotherapy (RT) volumes for soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) patients treated with function-preserving surgery and RT. Methods and Materials: Sixty of 768 (7.8%) STS patients treated with combined therapy within our institution from 1990 through 2006 developed an LR. Thirty-two received preoperative RT, 16 postoperative RT, and 12 preoperative RT plus a postoperative boost. Treatment records, RT simulation images, and diagnostic MRI/CT data sets of the original and LR disease were retrospectively compared. For LR location analysis, three RT target volumes were defined according to the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements 29 as follows: (1) the gross tumor or operative bed; (2) the treatment volume (TV) extending 5 cm longitudinally beyond the tumor or operative bed unless protected by intact barriers to spread and at least 1-2 cm axially (the TV was enclosed by the isodose curve representing the prescribed target absorbed dose [TAD] and accounted for target/patient setup uncertainty and beam characteristics), and (3) the irradiated volume (IRV) that received at least 50% of the TAD, including the TV. LRs were categorized as developing in field within the TV, marginal (on the edge of the IRV), and out of field (occurring outside of the IRV). Results: Forty-nine tumors relapsed in field (6.4% overall). Nine were out of field (1.1% overall), and 2 were marginal (0.3% overall). Conclusions: The majority of STS tumors recur in field, indicating that the incidence of LR may be affected more by differences in biologic and molecular characteristics rather than aberrations in RT dose or target volume coverage. In contrast, only two patients relapsed at the IRV boundary, suggesting that the risk of a marginal relapse is low when the TV is appropriately defined. These data support the accurate delivery of optimal RT volumes in the most precise way using advanced

  3. The Relationship Between Local Recurrence and Radiotherapy Treatment Volume for Soft Tissue Sarcomas Treated With External Beam Radiotherapy and Function Preservation Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickie, Colleen I.; Griffin, Anthony M.; Parent, Amy L.; Chung, Peter W.M.; Catton, Charles N.; Svensson, Jon; Ferguson, Peter C.; Wunder, Jay S.; Bell, Robert S.; Sharpe, Michael B.; O’Sullivan, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the geometric relationship between local recurrence (LR) and external beam radiotherapy (RT) volumes for soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) patients treated with function-preserving surgery and RT. Methods and Materials: Sixty of 768 (7.8%) STS patients treated with combined therapy within our institution from 1990 through 2006 developed an LR. Thirty-two received preoperative RT, 16 postoperative RT, and 12 preoperative RT plus a postoperative boost. Treatment records, RT simulation images, and diagnostic MRI/CT data sets of the original and LR disease were retrospectively compared. For LR location analysis, three RT target volumes were defined according to the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements 29 as follows: (1) the gross tumor or operative bed; (2) the treatment volume (TV) extending 5 cm longitudinally beyond the tumor or operative bed unless protected by intact barriers to spread and at least 1–2 cm axially (the TV was enclosed by the isodose curve representing the prescribed target absorbed dose [TAD] and accounted for target/patient setup uncertainty and beam characteristics), and (3) the irradiated volume (IRV) that received at least 50% of the TAD, including the TV. LRs were categorized as developing in field within the TV, marginal (on the edge of the IRV), and out of field (occurring outside of the IRV). Results: Forty-nine tumors relapsed in field (6.4% overall). Nine were out of field (1.1% overall), and 2 were marginal (0.3% overall). Conclusions: The majority of STS tumors recur in field, indicating that the incidence of LR may be affected more by differences in biologic and molecular characteristics rather than aberrations in RT dose or target volume coverage. In contrast, only two patients relapsed at the IRV boundary, suggesting that the risk of a marginal relapse is low when the TV is appropriately defined. These data support the accurate delivery of optimal RT volumes in the most precise way using advanced

  4. A novel optical microscope for imaging large embryos and tissue volumes with sub-cellular resolution throughout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Gail; Trägårdh, Johanna; Amor, Rumelo; Dempster, John; Reid, Es; Amos, William Bradshaw

    2016-09-23

    Current optical microscope objectives of low magnification have low numerical aperture and therefore have too little depth resolution and discrimination to perform well in confocal and nonlinear microscopy. This is a serious limitation in important areas, including the phenotypic screening of human genes in transgenic mice by study of embryos undergoing advanced organogenesis. We have built an optical lens system for 3D imaging of objects up to 6 mm wide and 3 mm thick with depth resolution of only a few microns instead of the tens of microns currently attained, allowing sub-cellular detail to be resolved throughout the volume. We present this lens, called the Mesolens, with performance data and images from biological specimens including confocal images of whole fixed and intact fluorescently-stained 12.5-day old mouse embryos.

  5. Waste Determination Equivalency - 12172

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, Rebecca D. [Savannah River Remediation (United States)

    2012-07-01

    by the Secretary of Energy in January of 2006 based on proposed processing techniques with the expectation that it could be revised as new processing capabilities became viable. Once signed, however, it became evident that any changes would require lengthy review and another determination signed by the Secretary of Energy. With the maturation of additional salt removal technologies and the extension of the SWPF start-up date, it becomes necessary to define 'equivalency' to the processes laid out in the original determination. For the purposes of SRS, any waste not processed through Interim Salt Processing must be processed through SWPF or an equivalent process, and therefore a clear statement of the requirements for a process to be equivalent to SWPF becomes necessary. (authors)

  6. Establishing Substantial Equivalence: Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovegrove, Alison; Salt, Louise; Shewry, Peter R.

    Wheat is a major crop in world agriculture and is consumed after processing into a range of food products. It is therefore of great importance to determine the consequences (intended and unintended) of transgenesis in wheat and whether genetically modified lines are substantially equivalent to those produced by conventional plant breeding. Proteomic analysis is one of several approaches which can be used to address these questions. Two-dimensional PAGE (2D PAGE) remains the most widely available method for proteomic analysis, but is notoriously difficult to reproduce between laboratories. We therefore describe methods which have been developed as standard operating procedures in our laboratory to ensure the reproducibility of proteomic analyses of wheat using 2D PAGE analysis of grain proteins.

  7. Identification of radiation response genes and proteins from mouse pulmonary tissues after high-dose per fraction irradiation of limited lung volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hee; Jeon, Seulgi; Kang, Ga-Young; Lee, Hae-June; Cho, Jaeho; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2017-02-01

    The molecular effects of focal exposure of limited lung volumes to high-dose per fraction irradiation (HDFR) such as stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) have not been fully characterized. In this study, we used such an irradiation system and identified the genes and proteins after HDFR to mouse lung, similar to those associated with human therapy. High focal radiation (90 Gy) was applied to a 3-mm volume of the left lung of C57BL6 mice using a small-animal stereotactic irradiator. As well as histological examination for lungs, a cDNA micro array using irradiated lung tissues and a protein array of sera were performed until 4 weeks after irradiation, and radiation-responsive genes and proteins were identified. For comparison, the long-term effects (12 months) of 20 Gy radiation wide-field dose to the left lung were also investigated. The genes ermap, epb4.2, cd200r3 (up regulation) and krt15, hoxc4, gdf2, cst9, cidec, and bnc1 (down-regulation) and the proteins of AIF, laminin, bNOS, HSP27, β-amyloid (upregulation), and calponin (downregulation) were identified as being responsive to 90 Gy HDFR. The gdf2, cst9, and cidec genes also responded to 20 Gy, suggesting that they are universal responsive genes in irradiated lungs. No universal proteins were identified in both 90 Gy and 20 Gy. Calponin, which was downregulated in protein antibody array analysis, showed a similar pattern in microarray data, suggesting a possible HDFR responsive serum biomarker that reflects gene alteration of irradiated lung tissue. These genes and proteins also responded to the lower doses of 20 Gy and 50 Gy HDFR. These results suggest that identified candidate genes and proteins are HDFR-specifically expressed in lung damage induced by HDFR relevant to SBRT in humans.

  8. Gender-linked impact of epicardial adipose tissue volume in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft surgery or non-coronary valve surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulinu Maimaituxun

    Full Text Available Traditional and non-traditional risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD are different between men and women. Gender-linked impact of epicardial adipose tissue volume (EATV in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG remains unknown.Gender-linked impact of EATV, abdominal fat distribution and other traditional ASCVD risk factors were compared in 172 patients (men: 115; women: 57 who underwent CABG or non-coronary valvular surgery (non-CABG.In men, EATV, EATV index (EATV/body surface area and the markers of adiposity such as body mass index, waist circumference and visceral fat area were higher in the CABG group than in the non-CABG group. Traditional ASCVD risk factors were also prevalent in the CABG group. In women, EATV and EATV index were higher in the CABG group, but other adiposity markers were comparable between CABG and non-CABG groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that in men, CABG was determined by EATV Index and other ASCVD risk factors including hypertension, dyslipidemia, adiponectin, high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP and type 2 diabetes mellitus (Corrected R2 = 0.262, p < 0.0001, while in women, type 2 diabetes mellitus is a single strong predictor for CABG, excluding EATV Index (Corrected R2 = 0.266, p = 0.005.Our study found that multiple risk factors, including epicardial adipose tissue volume and traditional ASCVD factors are determinants for CABG in men, but type 2 diabetes mellitus was the sole determinant in women. Gender-specific disparities in risk factors of CABG prompt us to evaluate new diagnostic and treatment strategies and to seek underlying mechanisms.

  9. Gender-linked impact of epicardial adipose tissue volume in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft surgery or non-coronary valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimaituxun, Gulinu; Shimabukuro, Michio; Salim, Hotimah Masdan; Tabata, Minoru; Yuji, Daisuke; Morimoto, Yoshihisa; Akasaka, Takeshi; Matsuura, Tomomi; Yagi, Shusuke; Fukuda, Daiju; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Soeki, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Takaki; Tanaka, Masashi; Takanashi, Shuichiro; Sata, Masataka

    2017-01-01

    Traditional and non-traditional risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) are different between men and women. Gender-linked impact of epicardial adipose tissue volume (EATV) in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) remains unknown. Gender-linked impact of EATV, abdominal fat distribution and other traditional ASCVD risk factors were compared in 172 patients (men: 115; women: 57) who underwent CABG or non-coronary valvular surgery (non-CABG). In men, EATV, EATV index (EATV/body surface area) and the markers of adiposity such as body mass index, waist circumference and visceral fat area were higher in the CABG group than in the non-CABG group. Traditional ASCVD risk factors were also prevalent in the CABG group. In women, EATV and EATV index were higher in the CABG group, but other adiposity markers were comparable between CABG and non-CABG groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that in men, CABG was determined by EATV Index and other ASCVD risk factors including hypertension, dyslipidemia, adiponectin, high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (Corrected R2 = 0.262, p EATV Index (Corrected R2 = 0.266, p = 0.005). Our study found that multiple risk factors, including epicardial adipose tissue volume and traditional ASCVD factors are determinants for CABG in men, but type 2 diabetes mellitus was the sole determinant in women. Gender-specific disparities in risk factors of CABG prompt us to evaluate new diagnostic and treatment strategies and to seek underlying mechanisms.

  10. Quantification of the equivalence principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, K.J.

    1978-01-01

    Quantitative relationships illustrate Einstein's equivalence principle, relating it to Newton's ''fictitious'' forces arising from the use of noninertial frames, and to the form of the relativistic time dilatation in local Lorentz frames. The equivalence principle can be interpreted as the equivalence of general covariance to local Lorentz covariance, in a manner which is characteristic of Riemannian and pseudo-Riemannian geometries

  11. Volume arc therapy of gynaecological tumours: target volume coverage improvement without dose increase for critical organs; Arctherapie volumique des tumeurs gynecologiques: amelioration de la couverture du volume cible sans augmentation de la dose aux organes critiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducteil, A.; Kerr, C.; Idri, K.; Fenoglietto, P.; Vieillot, S.; Ailleres, N.; Dubois, J.B.; Azria, D. [CRLC Val-d' Aurelle, Montpellier (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report the assessment of the application of conventional intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy (IMRT) and volume arc-therapy (RapidArc) for the treatment of cervical cancers, with respect to conventional radiotherapy. Dosimetric plans associated with each of these techniques have been compared. Dose-volume histograms of these three plans have also been compared for the previsional target volume (PTV), organs at risk, and sane tissue. IMCT techniques are equivalent in terms of sparing of organs at risk, and improve target volume coverage with respect to conventional radiotherapy. Arc-therapy reduces significantly treatment duration. Short communication

  12. Calculation simulation of equivalent irradiation swelling for dispersion nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Wei; Zhao Yunmei; Gong Xin; Ding Shurong; Huo Yongzhong

    2015-01-01

    The dispersion nuclear fuel was regarded as a kind of special particle composites. Assuming that the fuel particles are periodically distributed in the dispersion nuclear fuel meat, the finite element model to calculate its equivalent irradiation swelling was developed with the method of computational micro-mechanics. Considering irradiation swelling in the fuel particles and the irradiation hardening effect in the metal matrix, the stress update algorithms were established respectively for the fuel particles and metal matrix. The corresponding user subroutines were programmed, and the finite element simulation of equivalent irradiation swelling for the fuel meat was performed in Abaqus. The effects of the particle size and volume fraction on the equivalent irradiation swelling were investigated, and the fitting formula of equivalent irradiation swelling was obtained. The results indicate that the main factors to influence equivalent irradiation swelling of the fuel meat are the irradiation swelling and volume fraction of fuel particles. (authors)

  13. Radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease based on tissue-absorbed dose calculations: effect of pre-treatment thyroid volume on clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, Michael J.; Joe, Alexius Y.; Mallek, Dirk von; Ezziddin, Samer; Palmedo, Holger [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Brink, Ingo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Freiburg (Germany); Krause, Thomas M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Inselspital Bern (Switzerland)

    2002-09-01

    This study was performed with three aims. The first was to analyse the effectiveness of radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease patients with and without goitres under conditions of mild iodine deficiency using several tissue-absorbed doses. The second aim was to detect further parameters which might be predictive for treatment outcome. Finally, we wished to determine the deviation of the therapeutically achieved dose from that intended. Activities of 185-2,220 MBq radioiodine were calculated by means of Marinelli's formula to deliver doses of 150, 200 or 300 Gy to the thyroids of 224 patients with Graves' disease and goitres up to 130 ml in volume. Control of hyperthyroidism, change in thyroid volume and thyrotropin-receptor antibodies were evaluated 15{+-}9 months after treatment for each dose. The results were further evaluated with respect to pre-treatment parameters which might be predictive for therapy outcome. Thyroidal radioiodine uptake was measured every day during therapy to determine the therapeutically achieved target dose and its coefficient of variation. There was a significant dose dependency in therapeutic outcome: frequency of hypothyroidism increased from 27.4% after 150 Gy to 67.7% after 300 Gy, while the frequency of persistent hyperthyroidism decreased from 27.4% after 150 Gy to 8.1% after 300 Gy. Patients who became hypothyroid had a maximum thyroid volume of 42 ml and received a target dose of 256{+-}80 Gy. The coefficient of variation for the achieved target dose ranged between 27.7% for 150 Gy and 17.8% for 300 Gy. When analysing further factors which might influence therapeutic outcome, only pre-treatment thyroid volume showed a significant relationship to the result of treatment. It is concluded that a target dose of 250 Gy is essential to achieve hypothyroidism within 1 year after radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease patients with goitres up to 40 ml in volume. Patients with larger goitres might need higher doses

  14. Ridge augmentation with soft tissue procedures in aesthetic dentistry: pre- and postoperative volume measurements with a new kind of moire technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Stephan P.; Mueller, Ernst; Bucher, Alfred

    1993-09-01

    The aim of this paper was to measure the volume differences of operated alveolar ridge defects before and until 3 months post-surgically. Ten patients with ten localized alveolar ridge defects were operated on. Five alveolar ridge defects were corrected by using the full thickness onlay graft technique and the other five defects were operated by the subepithelial connective tissue graft technique. A strict standardized operation protocol was followed and all alveolar ridge defects were operated on by the same dental surgeon. Before as well as 1, 2, and 3 months after surgery the corrected defect was photographed and an impression was made by using an A-silicon material to produce a gypsum-cast model. The form of all these cast models was then measured using the moire technique. The three months result of ten cases shows that the form of the operated alveolar ridge defects, which were corrected by the subepithelial connective tissue graft technique are more stable compared to those which were operated on by the full thickness onlay graft technique. Localized alveolar ridge defects using the latter method does not show a form stability after 3 months post-surgically.

  15. Gestalt Breastfeeding: Helping Mothers and Infants Optimize Positional Stability and Intraoral Breast Tissue Volume for Effective, Pain-Free Milk Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Pamela; Keogh, Renee

    2017-08-01

    In the past decade, biological nurturing and activation of maternal and infant instincts after birth have constituted a major advance in clinical breastfeeding support. Yet, physiologic breastfeeding initiation is not enough to ensure ongoing pain-free and effective breastfeeding for many pairs. Current interventions, including "hands-off" mammalian approaches, do not improve breastfeeding outcomes, including in randomized controlled trials. Back-arching, difficulty latching or staying on the breast, and fussing at the breast are common signs of infant positional instability during breastfeeding. These cues are, however, often misdiagnosed as signs of medical conditions or oral connective tissue abnormalities, and underlying positional instability is not addressed. New clinical approaches are urgently required. This article offers a clinical approach to fit and hold (or latch and positioning)- gestalt breastfeeding, which aims to optimize positional stability and intraoral breast tissue volumes for pain-free effective breastfeeding. The word gestalt (pronounced "ger-shtolt") means a whole that is more than the sum of its parts. Gestalt breastfeeding builds on the theoretical foundations of complexity science, physiologic breastfeeding initiation, and new understandings of the biomechanics of infant suck elucidated in ultrasound studies. It also integrates simple psychological strategies from applied functional contextualism, popularly known as Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, empowering women to attend mindfully to breast sensations and their infant's cues. Gestalt breastfeeding can be reproduced for research purposes, including in comparison studies with oral surgery, and has the potential to improve breastfeeding outcomes.

  16. New recommendations for dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, G.

    1985-01-01

    In its report 39, the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), has defined four new quantities for the determination of dose equivalents from external sources: the ambient dose equivalent, the directional dose equivalent, the individual dose equivalent, penetrating and the individual dose equivalent, superficial. The rationale behind these concepts and their practical application are discussed. Reference is made to numerical values of these quantities which will be the subject of a coming publication from the International Commission on Radiological Protection, ICRP. (Author)

  17. System equivalent model mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen, Steven W. B.; van der Seijs, Maarten V.; de Klerk, Dennis

    2018-05-01

    This paper introduces SEMM: a method based on Frequency Based Substructuring (FBS) techniques that enables the construction of hybrid dynamic models. With System Equivalent Model Mixing (SEMM) frequency based models, either of numerical or experimental nature, can be mixed to form a hybrid model. This model follows the dynamic behaviour of a predefined weighted master model. A large variety of applications can be thought of, such as the DoF-space expansion of relatively small experimental models using numerical models, or the blending of different models in the frequency spectrum. SEMM is outlined, both mathematically and conceptually, based on a notation commonly used in FBS. A critical physical interpretation of the theory is provided next, along with a comparison to similar techniques; namely DoF expansion techniques. SEMM's concept is further illustrated by means of a numerical example. It will become apparent that the basic method of SEMM has some shortcomings which warrant a few extensions to the method. One of the main applications is tested in a practical case, performed on a validated benchmark structure; it will emphasize the practicality of the method.

  18. NMR imaging of cell phone radiation absorption in brain tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gultekin, David H.; Moeller, Lothar

    2013-01-01

    A method is described for measuring absorbed electromagnetic energy radiated from cell phone antennae into ex vivo brain tissue. NMR images the 3D thermal dynamics inside ex vivo bovine brain tissue and equivalent gel under exposure to power and irradiation time-varying radio frequency (RF) fields. The absorbed RF energy in brain tissue converts into Joule heat and affects the nuclear magnetic shielding and the Larmor precession. The resultant temperature increase is measured by the resonance frequency shift of hydrogen protons in brain tissue. This proposed application of NMR thermometry offers sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to characterize the hot spots from absorbed cell phone radiation in aqueous media and biological tissues. Specific absorption rate measurements averaged over 1 mg and 10 s in the brain tissue cover the total absorption volume. Reference measurements with fiber optic temperature sensors confirm the accuracy of the NMR thermometry. PMID:23248293

  19. The equivalence principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smorodinskij, Ya.A.

    1980-01-01

    The prerelativistic history of the equivalence principle (EP) is presented briefly. Its role in history of the general relativity theory (G.R.T.) discovery is elucidated. A modern idea states that the ratio of inert and gravitational masses does not differ from 1 at least up to the 12 sign after comma. Attention is paid to the difference of the gravitational field from electromagnetic one. The difference is as follows, the energy of the gravitational field distributed in space is the source of the field. These fields always interact at superposition. Electromagnetic fields from different sources are put together. On the basis of EP it is established the Sun field interact with the Earth gravitational energy in the same way as with any other one. The latter proves the existence of gravitation of the very gravitational field to a heavy body. A problem on gyroscope movement in the Earth gravitational field is presented as a paradox. The calculation has shown that gyroscope at satellite makes a positive precession, and its axis turns in an angle equal to α during a turn of the satellite round the Earth, but because of the space curvature - into the angle two times larger than α. A resulting turn is equal to 3α. It is shown on the EP basis that the polarization plane in any coordinate system does not turn when the ray of light passes in the gravitational field. Together with the historical value of EP noted is the necessity to take into account the requirements claimed by the EP at description of the physical world

  20. A first vascularized skin equivalent as an alternative to animal experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeber, Florian; Engelhardt, Lisa; Lange, Julia; Kurdyn, Szymon; Schmid, Freia F; Rücker, Christoph; Mielke, Stephan; Walles, Heike; Hansmann, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Tissue-engineered skin equivalents mimic key aspects of the human skin, and can thus be employed as wound coverage for large skin defects or as in vitro test systems as an alternative to animal models. However, current skin equivalents lack a functional vasculature limiting clinical and research applications. This study demonstrates the generation of a vascularized skin equivalent with a perfused vascular network by combining a biological vascularized scaffold (BioVaSc) based on a decellularized segment of a porcine jejunum and a tailored bioreactor system. Briefly, the BioVaSc was seeded with human fibroblasts, keratinocytes, and human microvascular endothelial cells. After 14 days at the air-liquid interface, hematoxylin & eosin and immunohistological staining revealed a specific histological architecture representative of the human dermis and epidermis including a papillary-like architecture at the dermal-epidermal-junction. The formation of the skin barrier was measured non-destructively using impedance spectroscopy. Additionally, endothelial cells lined the walls of the formed vessels that could be perfused with a physiological volume flow. Due to the presence of a complex in-vivo-like vasculature, the here shown skin equivalent has the potential for skin grafting and represents a sophisticated in vitro model for dermatological research.

  1. Logically automorphically equivalent knowledge bases

    OpenAIRE

    Aladova, Elena; Plotkin, Tatjana

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge bases theory provide an important example of the field where applications of universal algebra and algebraic logic look very natural, and their interaction with practical problems arising in computer science might be very productive. In this paper we study the equivalence problem for knowledge bases. Our interest is to find out how the informational equivalence is related to the logical description of knowledge. Studying various equivalences of knowledge bases allows us to compare d...

  2. Testing statistical hypotheses of equivalence

    CERN Document Server

    Wellek, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Equivalence testing has grown significantly in importance over the last two decades, especially as its relevance to a variety of applications has become understood. Yet published work on the general methodology remains scattered in specialists' journals, and for the most part, it focuses on the relatively narrow topic of bioequivalence assessment.With a far broader perspective, Testing Statistical Hypotheses of Equivalence provides the first comprehensive treatment of statistical equivalence testing. The author addresses a spectrum of specific, two-sided equivalence testing problems, from the

  3. Bone Fractures Following External Beam Radiotherapy and Limb-Preservation Surgery for Lower Extremity Soft Tissue Sarcoma: Relationship to Irradiated Bone Length, Volume, Tumor Location and Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickie, Colleen I.; Parent, Amy L.; Griffin, Anthony M.; Fung, Sharon; Chung, Peter W.M.; Catton, Charles N.; Ferguson, Peter C.; Wunder, Jay S.; Bell, Robert S.; Sharpe, Michael B.; O'Sullivan, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the relationship between tumor location, bone dose, and irradiated bone length on the development of radiation-induced fractures for lower extremity soft tissue sarcoma (LE-STS) patients treated with limb-sparing surgery and radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Of 691 LE-STS patients treated from 1989 to 2005, 31 patients developed radiation-induced fractures. Analysis was limited to 21 fracture patients (24 fractures) who were matched based on tumor size and location, age, beam arrangement, and mean total cumulative RT dose to a random sample of 53 nonfracture patients and compared for fracture risk factors. Mean dose to bone, RT field size (FS), maximum dose to a 2-cc volume of bone, and volume of bone irradiated to ≥40 Gy (V40) were compared. Fracture site dose was determined by comparing radiographic images and surgical reports to fracture location on the dose distribution. Results: For fracture patients, mean dose to bone was 45 ± 8 Gy (mean dose at fracture site 59 ± 7 Gy), mean FS was 37 ± 8 cm, maximum dose was 64 ± 7 Gy, and V40 was 76 ± 17%, compared with 37 ± 11 Gy, 32 ± 9 cm, 59 ± 8 Gy, and 64 ± 22% for nonfracture patients. Differences in mean, maximum dose, and V40 were statistically significant (p = 0.01, p = 0.02, p = 0.01). Leg fractures were more common above the knee joint. Conclusions: The risk of radiation-induced fracture appears to be reduced if V40 <64%. Fracture incidence was lower when the mean dose to bone was <37 Gy or maximum dose anywhere along the length of bone was <59 Gy. There was a trend toward lower mean FS for nonfracture patients.

  4. Bone fractures following external beam radiotherapy and limb-preservation surgery for lower extremity soft tissue sarcoma: relationship to irradiated bone length, volume, tumor location and dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickie, Colleen I; Parent, Amy L; Griffin, Anthony M; Fung, Sharon; Chung, Peter W M; Catton, Charles N; Ferguson, Peter C; Wunder, Jay S; Bell, Robert S; Sharpe, Michael B; O'Sullivan, Brian

    2009-11-15

    To examine the relationship between tumor location, bone dose, and irradiated bone length on the development of radiation-induced fractures for lower extremity soft tissue sarcoma (LE-STS) patients treated with limb-sparing surgery and radiotherapy (RT). Of 691 LE-STS patients treated from 1989 to 2005, 31 patients developed radiation-induced fractures. Analysis was limited to 21 fracture patients (24 fractures) who were matched based on tumor size and location, age, beam arrangement, and mean total cumulative RT dose to a random sample of 53 nonfracture patients and compared for fracture risk factors. Mean dose to bone, RT field size (FS), maximum dose to a 2-cc volume of bone, and volume of bone irradiated to >or=40 Gy (V40) were compared. Fracture site dose was determined by comparing radiographic images and surgical reports to fracture location on the dose distribution. For fracture patients, mean dose to bone was 45 +/- 8 Gy (mean dose at fracture site 59 +/- 7 Gy), mean FS was 37 +/- 8 cm, maximum dose was 64 +/- 7 Gy, and V40 was 76 +/- 17%, compared with 37 +/- 11 Gy, 32 +/- 9 cm, 59 +/- 8 Gy, and 64 +/- 22% for nonfracture patients. Differences in mean, maximum dose, and V40 were statistically significant (p = 0.01, p = 0.02, p = 0.01). Leg fractures were more common above the knee joint. The risk of radiation-induced fracture appears to be reduced if V40 Fracture incidence was lower when the mean dose to bone was lower mean FS for nonfracture patients.

  5. Brain Tissue Volumes and Perfusion Change with the Number of Optic Neuritis Attacks in Relapsing Neuromyelitis Optica: A Voxel-Based Correlation Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A Sánchez-Catasús

    Full Text Available Recent neuroimaging studies show that brain abnormalities in neuromyelitis optica (NMO are more frequent than earlier described. Yet, more research considering multiple aspects of NMO is necessary to better understand these abnormalities. A clinical feature of relapsing NMO (RNMO is that the incremental disability is attack-related. Therefore, association between the attack-related process and neuroimaging might be expected. On the other hand, the immunopathological analysis of NMO lesions has suggested that CNS microvasculature could be an early disease target, which could alter brain perfusion. Brain tissue volume changes accompanying perfusion alteration could also be expected throughout the attack-related process. The aim of this study was to investigate in RNMO patients, by voxel-based correlation analysis, the assumed associations between regional brain white (WMV and grey matter volumes (GMV and/or perfusion on one side, and the number of optic neuritis (ON attacks, myelitis attacks and/or total attacks on the other side. For this purpose, high resolution T1-weighted MRI and perfusion SPECT imaging were obtained in 15 RNMO patients. The results showed negative regional correlations of WMV, GMV and perfusion with the number of ON attacks, involving important components of the visual system, which could be relevant for the comprehension of incremental visual disability in RNMO. We also found positive regional correlation of perfusion with the number of ON attacks, mostly overlapping the brain area where the WMV showed negative correlation. This provides evidence that brain microvasculature is an early disease target and suggests that perfusion alteration could be important in the development of brain structural abnormalities in RNMO.

  6. Normal tissue dose-effect models in biological dose optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alber, M.

    2008-01-01

    Sophisticated radiotherapy techniques like intensity modulated radiotherapy with photons and protons rely on numerical dose optimisation. The evaluation of normal tissue dose distributions that deviate significantly from the common clinical routine and also the mathematical expression of desirable properties of a dose distribution is difficult. In essence, a dose evaluation model for normal tissues has to express the tissue specific volume effect. A formalism of local dose effect measures is presented, which can be applied to serial and parallel responding tissues as well as target volumes and physical dose penalties. These models allow a transparent description of the volume effect and an efficient control over the optimum dose distribution. They can be linked to normal tissue complication probability models and the equivalent uniform dose concept. In clinical applications, they provide a means to standardize normal tissue doses in the face of inevitable anatomical differences between patients and a vastly increased freedom to shape the dose, without being overly limiting like sets of dose-volume constraints. (orig.)

  7. SAPONIFICATION EQUIVALENT OF DASAMULA TAILA

    OpenAIRE

    Saxena, R. B.

    1994-01-01

    Saponification equivalent values of Dasamula taila are very useful for the technical and analytical work. It gives the mean molecular weight of the glycerides and acids present in Dasamula Taila. Saponification equivalent values of Dasamula taila are reported in different packings.

  8. Saponification equivalent of dasamula taila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, R B

    1994-07-01

    Saponification equivalent values of Dasamula taila are very useful for the technical and analytical work. It gives the mean molecular weight of the glycerides and acids present in Dasamula Taila. Saponification equivalent values of Dasamula taila are reported in different packings.

  9. A study on lead equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Guanxin

    1991-01-01

    A study on the rules in which the lead equivalent of lead glass changes with the energy of X rays or γ ray is described. The reason of this change is discussed and a new testing method of lead equivalent is suggested

  10. Gender disparities in the association between epicardial adipose tissue volume and coronary atherosclerosis: a 3-dimensional cardiac computed tomography imaging study in Japanese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagvasumberel, Munkhbaatar; Shimabukuro, Michio; Nishiuchi, Takeshi; Ueno, Junji; Takao, Shoichiro; Fukuda, Daiju; Hirata, Yoichiro; Kurobe, Hirotsugu; Soeki, Takeshi; Iwase, Takashi; Kusunose, Kenya; Niki, Toshiyuki; Yamaguchi, Koji; Taketani, Yoshio; Yagi, Shusuke; Tomita, Noriko; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Wakatsuki, Tetsuzo; Harada, Masafumi; Kitagawa, Tetsuya; Sata, Masataka

    2012-09-10

    Growing evidence suggests that epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) may contribute to the development of coronary artery disease (CAD). In this study, we explored gender disparities in EAT volume (EATV) and its impact on coronary atherosclerosis. The study population consisted of 90 consecutive subjects (age: 63 ± 12 years; men: 47, women: 43) who underwent 256-slice multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) coronary angiography. EATV was measured as the sum of cross-sectional epicardial fat area on CT images, from the lower surface of the left pulmonary artery origin to the apex. Subjects were segregated into the CAD group (coronary luminal narrowing > 50%) and non-CAD group. EATV/body surface area (BSA) was higher among men in the CAD group than in the non-CAD group (62 ± 13 vs. 33 ± 10 cm3/m2, p EATV/BSA was the single predictor for >50% coronary luminal narrowing in men (p EATV is strongly associated with coronary atherosclerosis in men.

  11. Gender disparities in the association between epicardial adipose tissue volume and coronary atherosclerosis: A 3-dimensional cardiac computed tomography imaging study in Japanese subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagvasumberel Munkhbaatar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Growing evidence suggests that epicardial adipose tissue (EAT may contribute to the development of coronary artery disease (CAD. In this study, we explored gender disparities in EAT volume (EATV and its impact on coronary atherosclerosis. Methods The study population consisted of 90 consecutive subjects (age: 63 ± 12 years; men: 47, women: 43 who underwent 256-slice multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT coronary angiography. EATV was measured as the sum of cross-sectional epicardial fat area on CT images, from the lower surface of the left pulmonary artery origin to the apex. Subjects were segregated into the CAD group (coronary luminal narrowing > 50% and non-CAD group. Results EATV/body surface area (BSA was higher among men in the CAD group than in the non-CAD group (62 ± 13 vs. 33 ± 10 cm3/m2, p 3/m2, not significant. Multivariate logistic analysis showed that EATV/BSA was the single predictor for >50% coronary luminal narrowing in men (p Conclusions Increased EATV is strongly associated with coronary atherosclerosis in men.

  12. Epicardial adipose tissue volume a diagnostic study for independent predicting disorder of circadian rhythm of blood pressure in patients with essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L; Deng, Y; Gong, J; Chen, X; Zhang, Q; Wang, J

    2016-05-30

    The aim of the study was to determine whether epicardial adipose tissue volume (EATV), a new cardiometabolic risk factor, is associated with circadian changes of blood pressure (BP) in patients with newly diagnosed essential hypertension. Ninety patients with newly diagnosed essential hypertension underwent ambulatory blood pressure monitoring for 24 h. EATV was measured using cardiac computed tomography. These patients were categorized into three groups according to their BP patterns (group 1, n=46, dipper hypertension, also called normal pattern; group 2, n=24, non-dipper hypertension; group 3, n=20, anti-dipper hypertension; group 2 and 3 are also called abnormal pattern). Data were collected retrospectively and compared between hypertensive patients with normal pattern and abnormal pattern. The normal pattern hypertensive patient had significant lower mean EATV and BP ((EATV, 91.3±29.4 cm3) than those of abnormal pattern patients including group 2 (EATV, 116.2±31.06cm3, EATV, 124.8±28.5cm3, PEATV with abnormal blood pressure mode was 0.500 (pEATV was elevated in newly diagnosed and untreated patients with non-dipper hypertension and anti-dipper hypertension. EATV measured by cardiac computed tomography can be used to indicate the increased risk of circadian rhythm of blood pressure.

  13. A mouse anti-myostatin antibody increases muscle mass and improves muscle strength and contractility in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and its humanized equivalent, domagrozumab (PF-06252616), increases muscle volume in cynomolgus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Andre, Michael; Johnson, Mark; Bansal, Prashant N; Wellen, Jeremy; Robertson, Andrew; Opsahl, Alan; Burch, Peter M; Bialek, Peter; Morris, Carl; Owens, Jane

    2017-11-09

    The treatments currently approved for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a progressive skeletal muscle wasting disease, address the needs of only a small proportion of patients resulting in an urgent need for therapies that benefit all patients regardless of the underlying mutation. Myostatin is a member of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family of ligands and is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass. Loss of myostatin has been shown to increase muscle mass and improve muscle function in both normal and dystrophic mice. Therefore, myostatin blockade via a specific antibody could ameliorate the muscle weakness in DMD patients by increasing skeletal muscle mass and function, thereby reducing patients' functional decline. A murine anti-myostatin antibody, mRK35, and its humanized analog, domagrozumab, were developed and their ability to inhibit several TGB-β ligands was measured using a cell-based Smad-activity reporter system. Normal and mdx mice were treated with mRK35 to examine the antibody's effect on body weight, lean mass, muscle weights, grip strength, ex vivo force production, and fiber size. The humanized analog (domagrozumab) was tested in non-human primates (NHPs) for changes in skeletal muscle mass and volume as well as target engagement via modulation of circulating myostatin. Both the murine and human antibodies are specific and potent inhibitors of myostatin and GDF11. mRK35 is able to increase body weight, lean mass, and muscle weights in normal mice. In mdx mice, mRK35 significantly increased body weight, muscle weights, grip strength, and ex vivo force production in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle. Further, tibialis anterior (TA) fiber size was significantly increased. NHPs treated with domagrozumab demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in lean mass and muscle volume and exhibited increased circulating levels of myostatin demonstrating target engagement. We demonstrated that the potent anti-myostatin antibody mRK35 and

  14. Association of Habitual Patterns and Types of Physical Activity and Inactivity with MRI-Determined Total Volumes of Visceral and Subcutaneous Abdominal Adipose Tissue in a General White Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Fischer

    Full Text Available Population-based evidence for the role of habitual physical activity (PA in the accumulation of visceral (VAT and subcutaneous (SAAT abdominal adipose tissue is limited. We investigated if usual patterns and types of self-reported PA and inactivity were associated with VAT and SAAT in a general white population. Total volumes of VAT and SAAT were quantified by magnetic resonance imaging in 583 men and women (61 ± 11.9 y; BMI 27.2 ± 4.4 kg/m2. Past-year PA and inactivity were self-reported by questionnaire. Exploratory activity patterns (APAT were derived by principal components analysis. Cross-sectional associations between individual activities, total PA in terms of metabolic equivalents (PA MET, or overall APAT and either VAT or SAAT were analyzed by multivariable-adjusted robust or generalized linear regression models. Whereas vigorous-intensity PA (VPA was negatively associated with both VAT and SAAT, associations between total PA MET, moderate-intensity PA (MPA, or inactivity and VAT and/or SAAT depended on sex. There was also evidence of a threshold effect in some of these relationships. Total PA MET was more strongly associated with VAT in men (B = -3.3 ± 1.4; P = 0.02 than women (B = -2.1 ± 1.1; P = 0.07, but was more strongly associated with SAAT in women (B = -5.7 ± 2.5; P = 0.05 than men (B = -1.7 ± 1.6; P = 0.3. Men (-1.52 dm3 or -1.89 dm3 and women (-1.15 dm3 or -2.61 dm3 in the highest (>6.8 h/wk VPA or second (4.0-6.8 h/wk VPA tertile of an APAT rich in VPA, had lower VAT and SAAT, respectively, than those in the lowest (<4.0 h/wk VPA tertile (P ≤ 0.016; P trend ≤ 0.0005. They also had lower VAT and SAAT than those with APAT rich in MPA and/or inactivity only. In conclusion, our results suggest that in white populations, habitual APAT rich in MPA might be insufficient to impact on accumulation of VAT or SAAT. APAT including ≥ 4.0-6.8 h/wk VPA, by contrast, are more strongly associated with lower VAT and SAAT.

  15. What is correct: equivalent dose or dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franic, Z.

    1994-01-01

    In Croatian language some physical quantities in radiation protection dosimetry have not precise names. Consequently, in practice either terms in English or mathematical formulas are used. The situation is even worse since the Croatian language only a limited number of textbooks, reference books and other papers are available. This paper compares the concept of ''dose equivalent'' as outlined in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations No. 26 and newest, conceptually different concept of ''equivalent dose'' which is introduced in ICRP 60. It was found out that Croatian terminology is both not uniform and unprecise. For the term ''dose equivalent'' was, under influence of Russian and Serbian languages, often used as term ''equivalent dose'' even from the point of view of ICRP 26 recommendations, which was not justified. Unfortunately, even now, in Croatia the legal unit still ''dose equivalent'' defined as in ICRP 26, but the term used for it is ''equivalent dose''. Therefore, in Croatian legislation a modified set of quantities introduced in ICRP 60, should be incorporated as soon as possible

  16. Quantifying the Combined Effect of Radiation Therapy and Hyperthermia in Terms of Equivalent Dose Distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kok, H. Petra; Crezee, Johannes; Franken, Nicolaas A.P.; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Barendsen, Gerrit W.; Bel, Arjan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a method to quantify the therapeutic effect of radiosensitization by hyperthermia; to this end, a numerical method was proposed to convert radiation therapy dose distributions with hyperthermia to equivalent dose distributions without hyperthermia. Methods and Materials: Clinical intensity modulated radiation therapy plans were created for 15 prostate cancer cases. To simulate a clinically relevant heterogeneous temperature distribution, hyperthermia treatment planning was performed for heating with the AMC-8 system. The temperature-dependent parameters α (Gy −1 ) and β (Gy −2 ) of the linear–quadratic model for prostate cancer were estimated from the literature. No thermal enhancement was assumed for normal tissue. The intensity modulated radiation therapy plans and temperature distributions were exported to our in-house-developed radiation therapy treatment planning system, APlan, and equivalent dose distributions without hyperthermia were calculated voxel by voxel using the linear–quadratic model. Results: The planned average tumor temperatures T90, T50, and T10 in the planning target volume were 40.5°C, 41.6°C, and 42.4°C, respectively. The planned minimum, mean, and maximum radiation therapy doses were 62.9 Gy, 76.0 Gy, and 81.0 Gy, respectively. Adding hyperthermia yielded an equivalent dose distribution with an extended 95% isodose level. The equivalent minimum, mean, and maximum doses reflecting the radiosensitization by hyperthermia were 70.3 Gy, 86.3 Gy, and 93.6 Gy, respectively, for a linear increase of α with temperature. This can be considered similar to a dose escalation with a substantial increase in tumor control probability for high-risk prostate carcinoma. Conclusion: A model to quantify the effect of combined radiation therapy and hyperthermia in terms of equivalent dose distributions was presented. This model is particularly instructive to estimate the potential effects of interaction from different treatment

  17. Predicting volumes of metabolically important whole-body adipose tissue compartments in overweight and obese adolescents by different MRI approaches and anthropometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Springer, Fabian; Ehehalt, Stefan; Sommer, Julia; Ballweg, Verena; Machann, Jürgen; Binder, Gerhard; Claussen, Claus D.; Schick, Fritz

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate 5-slice stack/single-slice MRI approaches and anthropometric measures as predictors for metabolically relevant whole-body adipose tissue (AT) compartments in overweight/obese adolescents. Methods: Forty adolescents (22 males, age 11.4–16.1 years) were included with a BMI above the 90th percentile. Volumes of whole-body AT compartments, i.e. total AT (TAT), subcutaneous AT (SCAT) and visceral AT (VAT), were determined using a breath-hold T1-weighted-FSE-MR-sequence and semi-automated segmentation serving as the gold standard. SCAT, VAT and TAT was estimated by either axially oriented single-slices or 5-slice-stacks centred at specific anatomic landmarks (umbilicus, head of femur and humerus). Furthermore, anthropometric measures were also evaluated as predictors of whole-body AT compartments. Results: Strong correlations were found for both genders between TAT/SCAT and single-slice evaluation (e.g. whole-body SCAT-SCAT at umbilicus level: r = 0.91 (m), r = 0.92 (f)) or anthropometry (SCAT-BMI: r = 0.93 (m, f)). VAT was correlated to VAT at umbilicus (r = 0.71 (m), r = 0.94 (f)) but only weakly to anthropometry. Conclusions: Anthropometric measures and single-slice MRI can accurately predict TAT/SCAT which cannot be improved by evaluation of 5-slice stacks. Prediction of VAT by 5-slice stack/single-slice MRI protocols seems only to be accurate in females. Anthropometry cannot be reliably used for prediction of VAT in both genders. Thus, MRI seems to be necessary for quantification of VAT in overweight/obese adolescents of both genders.

  18. Symmetries of dynamically equivalent theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gitman, D.M.; Tyutin, I.V. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Lebedev Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-03-15

    A natural and very important development of constrained system theory is a detail study of the relation between the constraint structure in the Hamiltonian formulation with specific features of the theory in the Lagrangian formulation, especially the relation between the constraint structure with the symmetries of the Lagrangian action. An important preliminary step in this direction is a strict demonstration, and this is the aim of the present article, that the symmetry structures of the Hamiltonian action and of the Lagrangian action are the same. This proved, it is sufficient to consider the symmetry structure of the Hamiltonian action. The latter problem is, in some sense, simpler because the Hamiltonian action is a first-order action. At the same time, the study of the symmetry of the Hamiltonian action naturally involves Hamiltonian constraints as basic objects. One can see that the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian actions are dynamically equivalent. This is why, in the present article, we consider from the very beginning a more general problem: how the symmetry structures of dynamically equivalent actions are related. First, we present some necessary notions and relations concerning infinitesimal symmetries in general, as well as a strict definition of dynamically equivalent actions. Finally, we demonstrate that there exists an isomorphism between classes of equivalent symmetries of dynamically equivalent actions. (author)

  19. Equivalence ratio and constriction effects on RBCC thrust augmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koupriyanov, M.; Etele, J.

    2011-06-01

    A theoretical analysis of a variable area rocket based combined cycle engine with and without simultaneous mixing and combustion is presented. The flowfield is solved using a steady, quasi-one-dimensional, inviscid control volume formulation with combustion effects included via a generalized equilibrium calculation. Compression augmentation is shown to be sensitive to the equivalence ratio within the primary rocket chamber, where ejector section performance is greatest at both low and high equivalence ratios but near a minimum at stoichiometric conditions. The thrust generated by the RBCC engine compared to that generated by the same rocket in isolation can be increased by as much as 12% at constriction ratios of between 45% and 50%. Thrust augmentation is also shown to vary with equivalence ratio, where for a fixed geometry the maximum thrust is generated at equivalence ratios slightly below unity.

  20. Teleparallel equivalent of Lovelock gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, P. A.; Vásquez, Yerko

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing interest in modified gravity theories based on torsion, as these theories exhibit interesting cosmological implications. In this work inspired by the teleparallel formulation of general relativity, we present its extension to Lovelock gravity known as the most natural extension of general relativity in higher-dimensional space-times. First, we review the teleparallel equivalent of general relativity and Gauss-Bonnet gravity, and then we construct the teleparallel equivalent of Lovelock gravity. In order to achieve this goal, we use the vielbein and the connection without imposing the Weitzenböck connection. Then, we extract the teleparallel formulation of the theory by setting the curvature to null.

  1. Attainment of radiation equivalency principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shmelev, A.N.; Apseh, V.A.

    2004-01-01

    Problems connected with the prospects for long-term development of the nuclear energetics are discussed. Basic principles of the future large-scale nuclear energetics are listed, primary attention is the safety of radioactive waste management of nuclear energetics. The radiation equivalence principle means close of fuel cycle and management of nuclear materials transportation with low losses on spent fuel and waste processing. Two aspects are considered: radiation equivalence in global and local aspects. The necessity of looking for other strategies of fuel cycle management in full-scale nuclear energy on radioactive waste management is supported [ru

  2. Equivalent Circuit Modeling of the Dielectric Loaded Microwave Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Jilani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the modeling of biological tissues at microwave frequency using equivalent lumped elements. A microwave biosensor based on microstrip ring resonator (MRR, that has been utilized previously for meat quality evaluation is used for this purpose. For the first time, the ring-resonator loaded with the lossy and high permittivity dielectric material, such as; biological tissue, in a partial overlay configuration is analyzed. The equivalent circuit modeling of the structure is then performed to identify the effect of overlay thickness on the resonance frequency. Finally, the relationship of an overlay thickness with the corresponding RC values of the meat equivalent circuit is established. Simulated, calculated and measured results are then compared for validation. Results are well agreed while the observed discrepancy is in acceptable limit.

  3. Equivalence of Gyn GEC-ESTRO guidelines for image guided cervical brachytherapy with EUD-based dose prescription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, William; Rae, William ID; Alber, Markus L

    2013-01-01

    To establish a generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) -based prescription method for Image Guided Brachytherapy (IGBT) that reproduces the Gyn GEC-ESTRO WG (GGE) prescription for cervix carcinoma patients on CT images with limited soft tissue resolution. The equivalence of two IGBT planning approaches was investigated in 20 patients who received external beam radiotherapy (EBT) and 5 concomitant high dose rate IGBT treatments. The GGE planning strategy based on dose to the most exposed 2 cm 3 (D2cc) was used to derive criteria for the gEUD-based planning of the bladder and rectum. The safety of gEUD constraints in terms of GGE criteria was tested by maximizing dose to the gEUD constraints for individual fractions. The gEUD constraints of 3.55 Gy for the rectum and 5.19 Gy for the bladder were derived. Rectum and bladder gEUD-maximized plans resulted in D2cc averages very similar to the initial GGE criteria. Average D2ccs and EUDs from the full treatment course were comparable for the two techniques within both sets of normal tissue constraints. The same was found for the tumor doses. The derived gEUD criteria for normal organs result in GGE-equivalent IGBT treatment plans. The gEUD-based planning considers the entire dose distribution of organs in contrast to a single dose-volume-histogram point

  4. Experimental evidence for negative turgor pressure in small leaf cells of Robinia pseudoacacia L versus large cells of Metasequoia glyptostroboides Hu et W.C.Cheng. 1. Evidence from pressure-volume curve analysis of dead tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dongmei; Pan, Shaoan; Ding, Yiting; Tyree, Melvin T

    2017-03-01

    This paper provides a mini-review of evidence for negative turgor pressure in leaf cells starting with experimental evidence in the late 1950s and ending with biomechanical models published in 2014. In the present study, biomechanical models were used to predict how negative turgor pressure might be manifested in dead tissue, and experiments were conducted to test the predictions. The main findings were as follows: (i) Tissues killed by heating to 60 or 80 °C or by freezing in liquid nitrogen all became equally leaky to cell sap solutes and all seemed to pass freely through the cell walls. (ii) Once cell sap solutes could freely pass the cell walls, the shape of pressure-volume curves was dramatically altered between living and dead cells. (iii) Pressure-volume curves of dead tissue seem to measure negative turgor defined as negative when inside minus outside pressure is negative. (iv) Robinia pseudoacacia leaves with small palisade cells had more negative turgor than Metasequoia glyptostroboides with large cells. (v) The absolute difference in negative turgor between R. pseudoacacia and M. glyptostroboides approached as much as 1.0 MPa in some cases. The differences in the manifestation of negative turgor in living versus dead tissue are discussed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Comments on field equivalence principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel-Hansen, Jørgen

    1987-01-01

    It is pointed Out that often-used arguments based on a short-circuit concept in presentations of field equivalence principles are not correct. An alternative presentation based on the uniqueness theorem is given. It does not contradict the results obtained by using the short-circuit concept...

  6. EQUIVALENCE VERSUS NON-EQUIVALENCE IN ECONOMIC TRANSLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina, Chifane

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at highlighting the fact that “equivalence” represents a concept worth revisiting and detailing upon when tackling the translation process of economic texts both from English into Romanian and from Romanian into English. Far from being exhaustive, our analysis will focus upon the problems arising from the lack of equivalence at the word level. Consequently, relevant examples from the economic field will be provided to account for the following types of non-equivalence at word level: culturespecific concepts; the source language concept is not lexicalised in the target language; the source language word is semantically complex; differences in physical and interpersonal perspective; differences in expressive meaning; differences in form; differences in frequency and purpose of using specific forms and the use of loan words in the source text. Likewise, we shall illustrate a number of translation strategies necessary to deal with the afore-mentioned cases of non-equivalence: translation by a more general word (superordinate; translation by a more neutral/less expressive word; translation by cultural substitution; translation using a loan word or loan word plus explanation; translation by paraphrase using a related word; translation by paraphrase using unrelated words; translation by omission and translation by illustration.

  7. A Cp-theory problem book functional equivalencies

    CERN Document Server

    Tkachuk, Vladimir V

    2016-01-01

    This fourth volume in Vladimir Tkachuk's series on Cp-theory gives reasonably complete coverage of the theory of functional equivalencies through 500 carefully selected problems and exercises. By systematically introducing each of the major topics of Cp-theory, the book is intended to bring a dedicated reader from basic topological principles to the frontiers of modern research. The book presents complete and up-to-date information on the preservation of topological properties by homeomorphisms of function spaces.  An exhaustive theory of t-equivalent, u-equivalent and l-equivalent spaces is developed from scratch.   The reader will also find introductions to the theory of uniform spaces, the theory of locally convex spaces, as well as  the theory of inverse systems and dimension theory. Moreover, the inclusion of Kolmogorov's solution of Hilbert's Problem 13 is included as it is needed for the presentation of the theory of l-equivalent spaces. This volume contains the most important classical re...

  8. Seismic design technology for Breeder Reactor structures. Volume 3: special topics in reactor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, D.P.

    1983-04-01

    This volume is divided into six chapters: analysis techniques, equivalent damping values, probabilistic design factors, design verifications, equivalent response cycles for fatigue analysis, and seismic isolation

  9. On the calibration of photon dosemeters in the equivalent dose units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bregadze, Yu.I.; Isaev, B.M.; Maslyaev, P.F.

    1980-01-01

    General aspects of transition from exposure dose of photo radiation to equivalent one are considered. By determination the equivalent dose is a function of point location in an irradiated object, that is why it is necessary to know equivalent dose distribution in the human body for uniform description of the risk degree. The international electrotechnical comission recommends to measure equivalent doses at 7 and 800 mg/cm 2 depths in a tissue-equivalent ball with 30 cm diameter, calling them skin equivalent dose and depth equivalent dose, respectively, and to compare them with the permissible 500 mZ and 50 mZ a year, respectively. Practical transition to using equivalent dose for evaluation of radiation danger of being in photon radiation field of low energy should include measures on regraduating already produced dose meters, graduating the dose meters under production and developing the system of their metrologic supply [ru

  10. The Source Equivalence Acceleration Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Everson, Matthew S.; Forget, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We present a new acceleration method, the Source Equivalence Acceleration Method. • SEAM forms an equivalent coarse group problem for any spatial method. • Equivalence is also formed across different spatial methods and angular quadratures. • Testing is conducted using OpenMOC and performance is compared with CMFD. • Results show that SEAM is preferable for very expensive transport calculations. - Abstract: Fine-group whole-core reactor analysis remains one of the long sought goals of the reactor physics community. Such a detailed analysis is typically too computationally expensive to be realized on anything except the largest of supercomputers. Recondensation using the Discrete Generalized Multigroup (DGM) method, though, offers a relatively cheap alternative to solving the fine group transport problem. DGM, however, suffered from inconsistencies when applied to high-order spatial methods. While an exact spatial recondensation method was developed and provided full spatial consistency with the fine group problem, this approach substantially increased memory requirements for realistic problems. The method described in this paper, called the Source Equivalence Acceleration Method (SEAM), forms a coarse-group problem which preserves the fine-group problem even when using higher order spatial methods. SEAM allows recondensation to converge to the fine-group solution with minimal memory requirements and little additional overhead. This method also provides for consistency when using different spatial methods and angular quadratures between the coarse group and fine group problems. SEAM was implemented in OpenMOC, a 2D MOC code developed at MIT, and its performance tested against Coarse Mesh Finite Difference (CMFD) acceleration on the C5G7 benchmark problem and on a 361 group version of the problem. For extremely expensive transport calculations, SEAM was able to outperform CMFD, resulting in speed-ups of 20–45 relative to the normal power

  11. Equivalent statistics and data interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Gregory

    2017-08-01

    Recent reform efforts in psychological science have led to a plethora of choices for scientists to analyze their data. A scientist making an inference about their data must now decide whether to report a p value, summarize the data with a standardized effect size and its confidence interval, report a Bayes Factor, or use other model comparison methods. To make good choices among these options, it is necessary for researchers to understand the characteristics of the various statistics used by the different analysis frameworks. Toward that end, this paper makes two contributions. First, it shows that for the case of a two-sample t test with known sample sizes, many different summary statistics are mathematically equivalent in the sense that they are based on the very same information in the data set. When the sample sizes are known, the p value provides as much information about a data set as the confidence interval of Cohen's d or a JZS Bayes factor. Second, this equivalence means that different analysis methods differ only in their interpretation of the empirical data. At first glance, it might seem that mathematical equivalence of the statistics suggests that it does not matter much which statistic is reported, but the opposite is true because the appropriateness of a reported statistic is relative to the inference it promotes. Accordingly, scientists should choose an analysis method appropriate for their scientific investigation. A direct comparison of the different inferential frameworks provides some guidance for scientists to make good choices and improve scientific practice.

  12. Relations between brain volumes, neuropsychological assessment and parental questionnaire in prematurely born children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Annika; Haataja, Leena; Rautava, Liisi; Väliaho, Anniina; Lehtonen, Liisa; Lapinleimu, Helena; Parkkola, Riitta; Korkman, Marit

    2010-05-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between brain volumes at term equivalent age and neuropsychological functions at 5 years of age in very low birth weight (VLBW) children, and to compare the results from a neuropsychological assessment and a parental questionnaire at 5 years of age. The study group included a regional cohort of 97 VLBW children and a control group of 161 children born at term. At term equivalent age, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on the VLBW children, and analysed for total and regional brain volumes. At 5 years of age, a psychologist assessed the neuropsychological performance with NEPSY II, and parents completed the Five to fifteen (FTF) questionnaire on development and behaviour. The results of the control group were used to give the age-specific reference values. No significant associations were found between the brain volumes and the NEPSY II domains. As for the FTF, significant associations were found between a smaller total brain tissue volume and poorer executive functions, between a smaller cerebellar volume and both poorer executive functions and motor skills, and, surprisingly, between a larger volume of brainstem and poorer language functions. Even after adjustment for total brain tissue volume, the two associations between the cerebellar volume and the FTF domains remained borderline significant (P = 0.05). The NEPSY II domains Executive Functioning, Language and Motor Skills were significantly associated with the corresponding FTF domains. In conclusion, altered brain volumes at term equivalent age appear to affect development still at 5 years of age. The FTF seems to be a good instrument when used in combination with other neuropsychological assessment.

  13. Reduction in adipose tissue volume using a new high-power radiofrequency technology combined with infrared light and mechanical manipulation for body contouring

    OpenAIRE

    Adatto, Maurice A.; Adatto-Neilson, Robyn M.; Morren, Grietje

    2014-01-01

    A growing patient demand for a youthful skin appearance with a favorable body shape has led to the recent development of new noninvasive body contouring techniques. We have previously demonstrated that the combination of bipolar radiofrequency (RF) and optical energies with tissue manipulation is an efficient reshaping modality. Here, we investigated the efficacy and safety of a new high-power version of this combined technology, in terms of adipose tissue reduction and skin tightening. Thirt...

  14. Evaluation of the relationship between extremity soft tissue sarcomas and adjacent major vessels using contrast-enhanced multidetector CT and three-dimensional volume-rendered CT angiography - A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, YangKang; Lin, JianBang; Cai, AiQun; Zhou, XiuGuo; Zheng, Yu; Wei, XiaoLong; Cheng, Ying; Liu, GuoRui

    2013-01-01

    Background: Accurate description of the relationship between extremity soft tissue sarcoma and the adjacent major vessels is crucial for successful surgery. In addition to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or in patients who cannot undergo MRI, two-dimensional (2D) postcontrast computed tomography (CT) images and three-dimensional (3D) volume-rendered CT angiography may be valuable alternative imaging techniques for preoperative evaluation of extremity sarcomas. Purpose: To preoperatively assess extremity sarcomas using multidetector CT (MDCT), with emphasis on postcontrast MDCT images and 3D volume-rendered MDCT angiography in evaluating the relationship between tumors and adjacent major vessels. Material and Methods: MDCT examinations were performed on 13 patients with non-metastatic extremity sarcomas. Conventional CT images and 3D volume-rendered CT angiography were evaluated, with focus on the relationship between tumors and adjacent major vessels. Kappa consistency statistics were performed with surgery serving as the reference standard. Results: The relationship between sarcomas and adjacent vessels was described as one of three patterns: proximity, adhesion, and encasement. Proximity was seen in five cases on postcontrast CT images or in eight cases on volume-rendered images. Adhesion was seen in three cases on both postcontrast CT images and volume-rendered images. Encasement was seen in five cases on postcontrast CT images or in two cases on volume-rendered images. Compared to surgical results, postcontrast CT images had 100% sensitivity, 83.3% specificity, 87.5% positive predictive value, 100% negative predictive value, and 92.3% accuracy in the detection of vascular invasion (κ = 0.843, P = 0.002). 3D volume-rendered CT angiography had 71.4% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% positive predictive value, 75% negative predictive value, and 84.6% accuracy in the detection of vascular invasion (κ = 0.698, P = 0.008). On volume-rendered images, all cases

  15. Equivalent nozzle in thermomechanical problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesari, F.

    1977-01-01

    When analyzing nuclear vessels, it is most important to study the behavior of the nozzle cylinder-cylinder intersection. For the elastic field, this analysis in three dimensions is quite easy using the method of finite elements. The same analysis in the non-linear field becomes difficult for designs in 3-D. It is therefore necessary to resolve a nozzle in two dimensions equivalent to a 3-D nozzle. The purpose of the present work is to find an equivalent nozzle both with a mechanical and thermal load. This has been achieved by the analysis in three dimensions of a nozzle and a nozzle cylinder-sphere intersection, of a different radius. The equivalent nozzle will be a nozzle with a sphere radius in a given ratio to the radius of a cylinder; thus, the maximum equivalent stress is the same in both 2-D and 3-D. The nozzle examined derived from the intersection of a cylindrical vessel of radius R=191.4 mm and thickness T=6.7 mm with a cylindrical nozzle of radius r=24.675 mm and thickness t=1.350 mm, for which the experimental results for an internal pressure load are known. The structure was subdivided into 96 finite, three-dimensional and isoparametric elements with 60 degrees of freedom and 661 total nodes. Both the analysis with a mechanical load as well as the analysis with a thermal load were carried out on this structure according to the Bersafe system. The thermal load consisted of a transient typical of an accident occurring in a sodium-cooled fast reactor, with a peak of the temperature (540 0 C) for the sodium inside the vessel with an insulating argon temperature constant at 525 0 C. The maximum value of the equivalent tension was found in the internal area at the union towards the vessel side. The analysis of the nozzle in 2-D consists in schematizing the structure as a cylinder-sphere intersection, where the sphere has a given relation to the

  16. 21 CFR 26.9 - Equivalence determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equivalence determination. 26.9 Section 26.9 Food... Specific Sector Provisions for Pharmaceutical Good Manufacturing Practices § 26.9 Equivalence determination... document insufficient evidence of equivalence, lack of opportunity to assess equivalence or a determination...

  17. Information Leakage from Logically Equivalent Frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Shlomi; McKenzie, Craig R. M.

    2006-01-01

    Framing effects are said to occur when equivalent frames lead to different choices. However, the equivalence in question has been incompletely conceptualized. In a new normative analysis of framing effects, we complete the conceptualization by introducing the notion of information equivalence. Information equivalence obtains when no…

  18. Wijsman Orlicz Asymptotically Ideal -Statistical Equivalent Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bipan Hazarika

    2013-01-01

    in Wijsman sense and present some definitions which are the natural combination of the definition of asymptotic equivalence, statistical equivalent, -statistical equivalent sequences in Wijsman sense. Finally, we introduce the notion of Cesaro Orlicz asymptotically -equivalent sequences in Wijsman sense and establish their relationship with other classes.

  19. Equivalence relations of AF-algebra extensions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we consider equivalence relations of *-algebra extensions and describe the relationship between the isomorphism equivalence and the unitary equivalence. We also show that a certain group homomorphism is the obstruction for these equivalence relations to be the same.

  20. Calculation of neutron fluence to dose equivalent conversion coefficients using GEANT4; Calculo de coeficientes de fluencia de neutrons para equivalente de dose individual utilizando o GEANT4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Rosane M.; Santos, Denison de S.; Queiroz Filho, Pedro P. de; Mauricio, CLaudia L.P.; Silva, Livia K. da; Pessanha, Paula R., E-mail: rosanemribeiro@oi.com.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Fluence to dose equivalent conversion coefficients provide the basis for the calculation of area and personal monitors. Recently, the ICRP has started a revision of these coefficients, including new Monte Carlo codes for benchmarking. So far, little information is available about neutron transport below 10 MeV in tissue-equivalent (TE) material performed with Monte Carlo GEANT4 code. The objective of this work is to calculate neutron fluence to personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients, H{sub p} (10)/Φ, with GEANT4 code. The incidence of monoenergetic neutrons was simulated as an expanded and aligned field, with energies ranging between thermal neutrons to 10 MeV on the ICRU slab of dimension 30 x 30 x 15 cm{sup 3}, composed of 76.2% of oxygen, 10.1% of hydrogen, 11.1% of carbon and 2.6% of nitrogen. For all incident energy, a cylindrical sensitive volume is placed at a depth of 10 mm, in the largest surface of the slab (30 x 30 cm{sup 2}). Physic process are included for neutrons, photons and charged particles, and calculations are made for neutrons and secondary particles which reach the sensitive volume. Results obtained are thus compared with values published in ICRP 74. Neutron fluence in the sensitive volume was calculated for benchmarking. The Monte Carlo GEANT4 code was found to be appropriate to calculate neutron doses at energies below 10 MeV correctly. (author)

  1. The radiobiology of boron neutron capture therapy: Are ''photon-equivalent'' doses really photon-equivalent?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coderre, J.A.; Diaz, A.Z.; Ma, R.

    2001-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) produces a mixture of radiation dose components. The high-linear energy transfer (LET) particles are more damaging in tissue than equal doses of low-LET radiation. Each of the high-LET components can multiplied by an experimentally determined factor to adjust for the increased biological effectiveness and the resulting sum expressed in photon-equivalent units (Gy-Eq). BNCT doses in photon-equivalent units are based on a number of assumptions. It may be possible to test the validity of these assumptions and the accuracy of the calculated BNCT doses by 1) comparing the effects of BNCT in other animal or biological models where the effects of photon radiation are known, or 2) if there are endpoints reached in the BNCT dose escalation clinical trials that can be related to the known response to photons of the tissue in question. The calculated Gy-Eq BNCT doses delivered to dogs and to humans with BPA and the epithermal neutron beam of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor were compared to expected responses to photon irradiation. The data indicate that Gy-Eq doses in brain may be underestimated. Doses to skin are consistent with the expected response to photons. Gy-Eq doses to tumor are significantly overestimated. A model system of cells in culture irradiated at various depths in a lucite phantom using the epithermal beam is under development. Preliminary data indicate that this approach can be used to detect differences in the relative biological effectiveness of the beam. The rat 9L gliosarcoma cell survival data was converted to photon-equivalent doses using the same factors assumed in the clinical studies. The results superimposed on the survival curve derived from irradiation with Cs-137 photons indicating the potential utility of this model system. (author)

  2. SU-E-J-231: Comparison of Delineation Variability of Soft Tissue Volume and Position in Head-And-Neck Between Two T1-Weighted Pulse Sequences Using An MR-Simulator with Immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, O; Lo, G; Yuan, J; Law, M; Ding, A; Cheng, K; Chan, K; Cheung, K; Yu, S [Hong Kong Sanatorium & Hospital, Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: There is growing interests in applying MR-simulator(MR-sim) in radiotherapy but MR images subject to hardware, patient and pulse sequence dependent geometric distortion that may potentially influence target definition. This study aimed to evaluate the influence on head-and-neck tissue delineation, in terms of positional and volumetric variability, of two T1-weighted(T1w) MR sequences on a 1.5T MR-sim Methods: Four healthy volunteers were scanned (4 scans for each on different days) using both spin-echo (3DCUBE, TR/TE=500/14ms, TA=183s) and gradient-echo sequences (3DFSPGR, TE/TR=7/4ms, TA=173s) with identical coverage, voxel-size(0.8×0.8×1.0mm3), receiver-bandwidth(62.5kHz/pix) and geometric correction on a 1.5T MR-sim immobilized with personalized thermoplastic cast and head-rest. Under this setting, similar T1w contrast and signal-to-noise ratio were obtained, and factors other than sequence that might bias image distortion and tissue delineation were minimized. VOIs of parotid gland(PGR, PGL), pituitary gland(PIT) and eyeballs(EyeL, EyeR) were carefully drawn, and inter-scan coefficient-of-variation(CV) of VOI centroid position and volume were calculated for each subject. Mean and standard deviation(SD) of the CVs for four subjects were compared between sequences using Wilcoxon ranksum test. Results: The mean positional(<4%) and volumetric(<7%) CVs varied between tissues, majorly dependent on tissue inherent properties like volume, location, mobility and deformability. Smaller mean volumetric CV was found in 3DCUBE, probably due to its less proneness to tissue susceptibility, but only PGL showed significant difference(P<0.05). Positional CVs had no significant differences for all VOIs(P>0.05) between sequences, suggesting volumetric variation might be more sensitive to sequence-dependent delineation difference. Conclusion: Although 3DCUBE is considered less prone to tissue susceptibility-induced artifact and distortion, our preliminary data showed

  3. Derived equivalences for group rings

    CERN Document Server

    König, Steffen

    1998-01-01

    A self-contained introduction is given to J. Rickard's Morita theory for derived module categories and its recent applications in representation theory of finite groups. In particular, Broué's conjecture is discussed, giving a structural explanation for relations between the p-modular character table of a finite group and that of its "p-local structure". The book is addressed to researchers or graduate students and can serve as material for a seminar. It surveys the current state of the field, and it also provides a "user's guide" to derived equivalences and tilting complexes. Results and proofs are presented in the generality needed for group theoretic applications.

  4. Calculation methods for determining dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endres, G.W.R.; Tanner, J.E.; Scherpelz, R.I.; Hadlock, D.E.

    1987-11-01

    A series of calculations of neutron fluence as a function of energy in an anthropomorphic phantom was performed to develop a system for determining effective dose equivalent for external radiation sources. Critical organ dose equivalents are calculated and effective dose equivalents are determined using ICRP-26 [1] methods. Quality factors based on both present definitions and ICRP-40 definitions are used in the analysis. The results of these calculations are presented and discussed. The effective dose equivalent determined using ICRP-26 methods is significantly smaller than the dose equivalent determined by traditional methods. No existing personnel dosimeter or health physics instrument can determine effective dose equivalent. At the present time, the conversion of dosimeter response to dose equivalent is based on calculations for maximal or ''cap'' values using homogeneous spherical or cylindrical phantoms. The evaluated dose equivalent is, therefore, a poor approximation of the effective dose equivalent as defined by ICRP Publication 26. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  5. Editorial: New operational dose equivalent quantities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The ICRU Report 39 entitled ''Determination of Dose Equivalents Resulting from External Radiation Sources'' is briefly discussed. Four new operational dose equivalent quantities have been recommended in ICRU 39. The 'ambient dose equivalent' and the 'directional dose equivalent' are applicable to environmental monitoring and the 'individual dose equivalent, penetrating' and the 'individual dose equivalent, superficial' are applicable to individual monitoring. The quantities should meet the needs of day-to-day operational practice, while being acceptable to those concerned with metrological precision, and at the same time be used to give effective control consistent with current perceptions of the risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiations. (U.K.)

  6. Cell and Tissue Organization in the Circulatory and Ventilatory Systems Volume 1 Signaling in Cell Organization, Fate, and Activity, Part A Cell Structure and Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Thiriet, Marc

    2011-01-01

    The volumes in this authoritative series present a multidisciplinary approach to modeling and simulation of flows in the cardiovascular and ventilatory systems, especially multiscale modeling and coupled simulations. The cardiovascular and respiratory systems are tightly coupled, as their primary function is to supply oxygen to and remove carbon dioxide from the body's cells. Because physiological conduits have deformable and reactive walls, macroscopic flow behavior and prediction must be coupled to nano- and microscopic events in a corrector scheme of regulated mechanisms. Therefore, investigation of flows of blood and air in physiological conduits requires an understanding of the biology, chemistry, and physics of these systems together with the mathematical tools to describe their functioning.  The present volume is devoted to cellular events that allow adaptation to environmental conditions, particularly mechanotransduction. It begins with cell organization and a survey of cell types in the vasculatur...

  7. Evaluation of dose coverage to target volume and normal tissue sparing in the adjuvant radiotherapy of gastric cancers: 3D-CRT compared with dynamic IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Kk; Shukeili, Ka; Kumar, Ss; Davis, Ca; Chandran, Rr; Namrata, S

    2010-01-01

    To assess the potential advantage of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) over 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) planning in postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy for patients with gastric carcinoma. In a retrospective study, for plan comparison, dose distribution was recalculated in 15 patients treated with 3D-CRT on the contoured structures of same CT images using an IMRT technique. 3D-conformal plans with three fields and four-fields were compared with seven-field dynamic IMRT plans. The different plans were compared by analyzing the dose coverage of planning target volume using TV(95), D(mean), uniformity index, conformity index and homogeneity index parameters. To assess critical organ sparing, D(mean), D(max), dose to one-third and two-third volumes of the OARs and percentage of volumes receiving more than their tolerance doses were compared. The average dose coverage values of PTV with 3F-CRT and 4F-CRT plans were comparable, where as IMRT plans achieved better target coverage(p3D-CRT plans. The doses to the liver and bowel reduced significantly (p3D-CRT plans. For all OARs the percentage of volumes receiving more than their tolerance doses were reduced with the IMRT plans. This study showed that a better target coverage and significant dose reduction to OARs could be achieved with the IMRT plans. The IMRT can be preferred with caution for organ motion. The authors are currently studying organ motion in the upper abdomen to use IMRT for patient treatment.

  8. Foreword: Biomonitoring Equivalents special issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, M E; Sonawane, B; Becker, R A

    2008-08-01

    The challenge of interpreting results of biomonitoring for environmental chemicals in humans is highlighted in this Foreword to the Biomonitoring Equivalents (BEs) special issue of Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology. There is a pressing need to develop risk-based tools in order to empower scientists and health professionals to interpret and communicate the significance of human biomonitoring data. The BE approach, which integrates dosimetry and risk assessment methods, represents an important advancement on the path toward achieving this objective. The articles in this issue, developed as a result of an expert panel meeting, present guidelines for derivation of BEs, guidelines for communication using BEs and several case studies illustrating application of the BE approach for specific substances.

  9. Radiological equivalent of chemical pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, V.O.

    1982-01-01

    The development of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy has caused continued effort toward public safety through radiation health protection measures and nuclear management practices. However, concern has not been focused on the development specifically in the operation of chemical pestrochemical industries as well as other industrial processes brought about by technological advancements. This article presents the comparison of the risk of radiation and chemicals. The methods used for comparing the risks of late effects of radiation and chemicals are considered at three levels. (a) as a frame of reference to give an impression of resolving power of biological tests; (b) as methods to quantify risks; (c) as instruments for an epidemiological survey of human populations. There are marked dissimilarities between chemicals and radiation and efforts to interpret chemical activity may not be achieved. Applicability of the concept of rad equivalence has many restrictions and as pointed out this approach is not an established one. (RTD)

  10. Expanding the Interaction Equivalency Theorem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Cecilia Padilla Rodriguez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Although interaction is recognised as a key element for learning, its incorporation in online courses can be challenging. The interaction equivalency theorem provides guidelines: Meaningful learning can be supported as long as one of three types of interactions (learner-content, learner-teacher and learner-learner is present at a high level. This study sought to apply this theorem to the corporate sector, and to expand it to include other indicators of course effectiveness: satisfaction, knowledge transfer, business results and return on expectations. A large Mexican organisation participated in this research, with 146 learners, 30 teachers and 3 academic assistants. Three versions of an online course were designed, each emphasising a different type of interaction. Data were collected through surveys, exams, observations, activity logs, think aloud protocols and sales records. All course versions yielded high levels of effectiveness, in terms of satisfaction, learning and return on expectations. Yet, course design did not dictate the types of interactions in which students engaged within the courses. Findings suggest that the interaction equivalency theorem can be reformulated as follows: In corporate settings, an online course can be effective in terms of satisfaction, learning, knowledge transfer, business results and return on expectations, as long as (a at least one of three types of interaction (learner-content, learner-teacher or learner-learner features prominently in the design of the course, and (b course delivery is consistent with the chosen type of interaction. Focusing on only one type of interaction carries a high risk of confusion, disengagement or missed learning opportunities, which can be managed by incorporating other forms of interactions.

  11. Equivalent damage of loads on pavements

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Prozzi, JA

    2009-05-26

    Full Text Available This report describes a new methodology for the determination of Equivalent Damage Factors (EDFs) of vehicles with multiple axle and wheel configurations on pavements. The basic premise of this new procedure is that "equivalent pavement response...

  12. Investigation of Equivalent Circuit for PEMFC Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myong, Kwang Jae

    2011-01-01

    Chemical reactions occurring in a PEMFC are dominated by the physical conditions and interface properties, and the reactions are expressed in terms of impedance. The performance of a PEMFC can be simply diagnosed by examining the impedance because impedance characteristics can be expressed by an equivalent electrical circuit. In this study, the characteristics of a PEMFC are assessed using the AC impedance and various equivalent circuits such as a simple equivalent circuit, equivalent circuit with a CPE, equivalent circuit with two RCs, and equivalent circuit with two CPEs. It was found in this study that the characteristics of a PEMFC could be assessed using impedance and an equivalent circuit, and the accuracy was highest for an equivalent circuit with two CPEs

  13. 46 CFR 175.540 - Equivalents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Safety Management (ISM) Code (IMO Resolution A.741(18)) for the purpose of determining that an equivalent... Organization (IMO) “Code of Safety for High Speed Craft” as an equivalent to compliance with applicable...

  14. Volume of the crocodilian brain and endocast during ontogeny.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Jirak

    Full Text Available Understanding complex situations and planning difficult actions require a brain of appropriate size. Animal encephalisation provides an indirect information about these abilities. The brain is entirely composed of soft tissue and, as such, rarely fossilises. As a consequence, the brain proportions and morphology of some extinct vertebrates are usually only inferred from their neurocranial endocasts. However, because the morphological configuration of the brain is not fully reflected in the endocast, knowledge of the brain/endocast relationship is essential (especially the ratio of brain volume to endocast volume or the equivalent proportion of interstitial tissue for studying the endocasts of extinct animals. Here we assess the encephalic volume and structure of modern crocodilians. The results we obtained using ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging reveal how the endoneurocranial cavity and brain compartments of crocodilians change configuration during ontogeny. We conclude that the endocasts of adult crocodilians are elongated and expanded while their brains are more linearly organised. The highest proportion of brain tissue to endocast volume is in the prosencephalon at over 50% in all but the largest animals, whereas the proportion in other brain segments is under 50% in all but the smallest animals and embryos. Our results may enrich the field of palaeontological study by offering more precise phylogenetic interpretations of the neuroanatomic characteristics of extinct vertebrates at various ontogenetic stages.

  15. Verification of an effective dose equivalent model for neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, J.E.; Piper, R.K.; Leonowich, J.A.; Faust, L.G.

    1992-01-01

    Since the effective dose equivalent, based on the weighted sum of organ dose equivalents, is not a directly measurable quantity, it must be estimated with the assistance of computer modelling techniques and a knowledge of the incident radiation field. Although extreme accuracy is not necessary for radiation protection purposes, a few well chosen measurements are required to confirm the theoretical models. Neutron doses and dose equivalents were measured in a RANDO phantom at specific locations using thermoluminescence dosemeters, etched track dosemeters, and a 1.27 cm (1/2 in) tissue-equivalent proportional counter. The phantom was exposed to a bare and a D 2 O-moderated 252 Cf neutron source at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Low Scatter Facility. The Monte Carlo code MCNP with the MIRD-V mathematical phantom was used to model the human body and to calculate the organ doses and dose equivalents. The experimental methods are described and the results of the measurements are compared with the calculations. (author)

  16. Verification of an effective dose equivalent model for neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, J.E.; Piper, R.K.; Leonowich, J.A.; Faust, L.G.

    1991-10-01

    Since the effective dose equivalent, based on the weighted sum of organ dose equivalents, is not a directly measurable quantity, it must be estimated with the assistance of computer modeling techniques and a knowledge of the radiation field. Although extreme accuracy is not necessary for radiation protection purposes, a few well-chosen measurements are required to confirm the theoretical models. Neutron measurements were performed in a RANDO phantom using thermoluminescent dosemeters, track etch dosemeters, and a 1/2-in. (1.27-cm) tissue equivalent proportional counter in order to estimate neutron doses and dose equivalents within the phantom at specific locations. The phantom was exposed to bare and D 2 O-moderated 252 Cf neutrons at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Low Scatter Facility. The Monte Carlo code MCNP with the MIRD-V mathematical phantom was used to model the human body and calculate organ doses and dose equivalents. The experimental methods are described and the results of the measurements are compared to the calculations. 8 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Committed dose equivalent in the practice of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nenot, J.C.; Piechowski, J.

    1985-01-01

    In the case of internal exposure, the dose is not received at the moment of exposure, as happens with external exposure, since the incorporated radionuclide irradiates the various organs and tissues during the time it is present in the body. By definition, the committed dose equivalent corresponds to the received dose integrated over 50 years from the date of intake. In order to calculate it, one has to know the intake activity and the value of the committed dose equivalent per unit of intake activity. The uncertainties of the first parameter are such that the committed dose equivalent can only be regarded as an order of magnitude and not as a very accurate quantity. The use of it is justified, however, for, like the dose equivalent for external exposure, it expresses the risk of stochastic effects for the individual concerned since these effects, should they appear, would do so only after a latent period which is generally longer than the dose integration time. Moreover, the use of the committed dose equivalent offers certain advantages for dosimetric management, especially when it is simplified. A practical problem which may arise is that the annual dose limit is apparently exceeded by virtue of the fact that one is taking account, in the first year, of doses which will actually be received only in the following years. These problems are rare enough in practice to be dealt with individually in each case. (author)

  18. Some spectral equivalences between Schroedinger operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunning, C; Hibberd, K E; Links, J

    2008-01-01

    Spectral equivalences of the quasi-exactly solvable sectors of two classes of Schroedinger operators are established, using Gaudin-type Bethe ansatz equations. In some instances the results can be extended leading to full isospectrality. In this manner we obtain equivalences between PT-symmetric problems and Hermitian problems. We also find equivalences between some classes of Hermitian operators

  19. The definition of the individual dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlich, Margarete

    1986-01-01

    A brief note examines the choice of the present definition of the individual dose equivalent, the new operational dosimetry quantity for external exposure. The consequences of the use of the individual dose equivalent and the danger facing the individual dose equivalent, as currently defined, are briefly discussed. (UK)

  20. Effect of epoxide equivalent on microstructure of epoxy/rectorite nanocomposite studied by positrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, L.M.; Fang, P.F.; Zhang, S.P.; Wang, S.J.

    2005-01-01

    The epoxy/rectorite nanocomposites with different epoxide equivalent ranging from 188 to 1110 were prepared and the effects of epoxide equivalent on microstructure of materials were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscope (PALS). In nanocomposites, the formation of exfoliated structure was observed from XRD pattern at epoxide equivalent >263. The PALS measurements reveal that the fractional free volume in nanocomposites was strongly affected by epoxide equivalent, in particular, the free-volume concentration was dramatically decreased with the increasing epoxide equivalent from 188 to 263, and the S parameter indicates the rectorite structure change and the high sensitivity of positron annihilation to the entry of rectorite into epoxy. These results indicate that positron annihilation characteristics are useful for study the microstructure of epoxy/rectorite nanocomposites

  1. Applications of tissue heterogeneity corrections and biologically effective dose volume histograms in assessing the doses for accelerated partial breast irradiation using an electronic brachytherapy source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chengyu; Guo, Bingqi; Cheng, Chih-Yao; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Nikos

    2010-09-01

    A low-energy electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the model S700 Axxent™ x-ray device developed by Xoft Inc., has been used in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) as an alternative to an Ir-192 source. The prescription dose and delivery schema of the electronic brachytherapy APBI plan are the same as the Ir-192 plan. However, due to its lower mean energy than the Ir-192 source, an EBS plan has dosimetric and biological features different from an Ir-192 source plan. Current brachytherapy treatment planning methods may have large errors in treatment outcome prediction for an EBS plan. Two main factors contribute to the errors: the dosimetric influence of tissue heterogeneities and the enhancement of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of electronic brachytherapy. This study quantified the effects of these two factors and revisited the plan quality of electronic brachytherapy APBI. The influence of tissue heterogeneities is studied by a Monte Carlo method and heterogeneous 'virtual patient' phantoms created from CT images and structure contours; the effect of RBE enhancement in the treatment outcome was estimated by biologically effective dose (BED) distribution. Ten electronic brachytherapy APBI cases were studied. The results showed that, for electronic brachytherapy cases, tissue heterogeneities and patient boundary effect decreased dose to the target and skin but increased dose to the bones. On average, the target dose coverage PTV V100 reduced from 95.0% in water phantoms (planned) to only 66.7% in virtual patient phantoms (actual). The actual maximum dose to the ribs is 3.3 times higher than the planned dose; the actual mean dose to the ipsilateral breast and maximum dose to the skin were reduced by 22% and 17%, respectively. Combining the effect of tissue heterogeneities and RBE enhancement, BED coverage of the target was 89.9% in virtual patient phantoms with RBE enhancement (actual BED) as compared to 95

  2. Applications of tissue heterogeneity corrections and biologically effective dose volume histograms in assessing the doses for accelerated partial breast irradiation using an electronic brachytherapy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Chengyu; Guo Bingqi; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Nikos [Cancer Therapy and Research Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Cheng, Chih-Yao, E-mail: shic@uthscsa.ed [Radiation Oncology Department, Oklahoma University Health Science Center, Oklahoma, OK 73104 (United States)

    2010-09-21

    A low-energy electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the model S700 Axxent(TM) x-ray device developed by Xoft Inc., has been used in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) as an alternative to an Ir-192 source. The prescription dose and delivery schema of the electronic brachytherapy APBI plan are the same as the Ir-192 plan. However, due to its lower mean energy than the Ir-192 source, an EBS plan has dosimetric and biological features different from an Ir-192 source plan. Current brachytherapy treatment planning methods may have large errors in treatment outcome prediction for an EBS plan. Two main factors contribute to the errors: the dosimetric influence of tissue heterogeneities and the enhancement of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of electronic brachytherapy. This study quantified the effects of these two factors and revisited the plan quality of electronic brachytherapy APBI. The influence of tissue heterogeneities is studied by a Monte Carlo method and heterogeneous 'virtual patient' phantoms created from CT images and structure contours; the effect of RBE enhancement in the treatment outcome was estimated by biologically effective dose (BED) distribution. Ten electronic brachytherapy APBI cases were studied. The results showed that, for electronic brachytherapy cases, tissue heterogeneities and patient boundary effect decreased dose to the target and skin but increased dose to the bones. On average, the target dose coverage PTV V{sub 100} reduced from 95.0% in water phantoms (planned) to only 66.7% in virtual patient phantoms (actual). The actual maximum dose to the ribs is 3.3 times higher than the planned dose; the actual mean dose to the ipsilateral breast and maximum dose to the skin were reduced by 22% and 17%, respectively. Combining the effect of tissue heterogeneities and RBE enhancement, BED coverage of the target was 89.9% in virtual patient phantoms with RBE enhancement (actual BED) as

  3. Applications of tissue heterogeneity corrections and biologically effective dose volume histograms in assessing the doses for accelerated partial breast irradiation using an electronic brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Chengyu; Guo Bingqi; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Cheng, Chih-Yao

    2010-01-01

    A low-energy electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the model S700 Axxent(TM) x-ray device developed by Xoft Inc., has been used in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) as an alternative to an Ir-192 source. The prescription dose and delivery schema of the electronic brachytherapy APBI plan are the same as the Ir-192 plan. However, due to its lower mean energy than the Ir-192 source, an EBS plan has dosimetric and biological features different from an Ir-192 source plan. Current brachytherapy treatment planning methods may have large errors in treatment outcome prediction for an EBS plan. Two main factors contribute to the errors: the dosimetric influence of tissue heterogeneities and the enhancement of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of electronic brachytherapy. This study quantified the effects of these two factors and revisited the plan quality of electronic brachytherapy APBI. The influence of tissue heterogeneities is studied by a Monte Carlo method and heterogeneous 'virtual patient' phantoms created from CT images and structure contours; the effect of RBE enhancement in the treatment outcome was estimated by biologically effective dose (BED) distribution. Ten electronic brachytherapy APBI cases were studied. The results showed that, for electronic brachytherapy cases, tissue heterogeneities and patient boundary effect decreased dose to the target and skin but increased dose to the bones. On average, the target dose coverage PTV V 100 reduced from 95.0% in water phantoms (planned) to only 66.7% in virtual patient phantoms (actual). The actual maximum dose to the ribs is 3.3 times higher than the planned dose; the actual mean dose to the ipsilateral breast and maximum dose to the skin were reduced by 22% and 17%, respectively. Combining the effect of tissue heterogeneities and RBE enhancement, BED coverage of the target was 89.9% in virtual patient phantoms with RBE enhancement (actual BED) as compared to 95

  4. A randomized, controlled, double-blind crossover study on the effects of 1-L infusions of 6% hydroxyethyl starch suspended in 0.9% saline (voluven) and a balanced solution (Plasma Volume Redibag) on blood volume, renal blood flow velocity, and renal cortical tissue perfusion in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Abeed H; Cox, Eleanor F; Francis, Susan T; Lobo, Dileep N

    2014-05-01

    We compared the effects of intravenous administration of 6% hydroxyethyl starch (maize-derived) in 0.9% saline (Voluven; Fresenius Kabi, Runcorn, United Kingdom) and a "balanced" preparation of 6% hydroxyethyl starch (potato-derived) [Plasma Volume Redibag (PVR); Baxter Healthcare, Thetford, United Kingdom] on renal blood flow velocity and renal cortical tissue perfusion in humans using magnetic resonance imaging. Hyperchloremia resulting from 0.9% saline infusion may adversely affect renal hemodynamics when compared with balanced crystalloids. This phenomenon has not been studied with colloids. Twelve healthy adult male subjects received 1-L intravenous infusions of Voluven or PVR over 30 minutes in a randomized, double-blind manner, with crossover studies 7 to 10 days later. Magnetic resonance imaging proceeded for 60 minutes after commencement of infusion to measure renal artery blood flow velocity and renal cortical perfusion. Blood was sampled, and weight was recorded at 0, 30, 60, 120, 180, and 240 minutes. Mean peak serum chloride concentrations were 108 and 106 mmol/L, respectively, after Voluven and PVR infusion (P = 0.032). Changes in blood volume (P = 0.867), strong ion difference (P = 0.219), and mean renal artery flow velocity (P = 0.319) were similar. However, there was a significant increase in mean renal cortical tissue perfusion after PVR when compared with Voluven (P = 0.033). There was no difference in urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated liopcalin to creatinine ratios after the infusion (P = 0.164). There was no difference in the blood volume-expanding properties of the 2 preparations of 6% hydroxyethyl starch. The balanced starch produced an increase in renal cortical tissue perfusion, a phenomenon not seen with starch in 0.9% saline.

  5. The equidosemeter ED-02 as a device for dose equivalent measurements in mixed neutron and photon radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrosimov, A.I.; Alekseev, A.G.; Antipov, V.A.; Golovachik, V.T.

    1985-01-01

    The equidosemeter ED-02 is to be used for simultaneous measurements of the dose equivalent, absorbed dose, and mean quality factor of mixed radiations. The detector is a tissue equivalent spherical low-pressure proportional counter tube the signal of which is simultaneously recorded in two channels - a current channel and a pulse one. The current channel is linear and its response proportional to the absorbed dose. The pulse channel includes a nonlinear pulse amplitude converter the characteristic of which, taking into account the required dependence of the mean quality factor on linear energy transfer, has been chosen in such a way that in final counting the pulse channel response is proportional to the difference between dose equivalent and absorbed dose. On the basis of calculations of event spectra in the sensitive volume of the detector, the energy dependence of the dosemeter sensitivity is analysed for neutron energies up to 20 MeV. The characteristic of the nonlinear converter has been calculated on the basis of the construction parameters of the detector and optimized with respect to a representative sample of neutron spectra beyond the shields of nuclear plants. The heterogeneity of the detector, i.e. the difference between the atomic composition of wall and filling and the composition of soft biological tissue as well as the effect of the conducting coating of the case cathode, has been taken into consideration. Moreover, the test results of the device in mixed neutron-photon fields of 60 Co, 239 Pu-α-Be and 252 Cf radioisotope sources are presented. The main measuring error of dose characteristics is shown to be less than 20% in the dose range 1 x 10 -3 to 4 x 10 -3 Sv/h. (author)

  6. Development of dose equivalent meters based on microdosimetric principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booz, J.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper, the employment of microdosimetric dose-equivalent meters in radiation protection is described considering the advantages of introducing microdosimetric methods into radiation protection, the technical suitability of such instruments for measuring dose equivalent, and finally technical requirements, constraints and solutions together with some examples of instruments and experimental results. The advantage of microdosimetric methods in radiation protection is illustrated with the evaluation of dose-mean quality factors in radiation fields of unknown composition and with the methods of evaluating neutron- and gamma-dose fractions. - It is shown that there is good correlation between dose-mean lineal energy, anti ysub(anti D), and the ICRP quality factor. - Neutron- and gamma-dose fractions of unknown radiation fields can be evaluated with microdosimetric proportional counters without recurrence to other instruments and methods. The problems of separation are discussed. The technical suitability of microdosimetric instruments for measuring dose equivalent is discussed considering the energy response to neutrons and photons and the sensitivity in terms of dose-equivalent rate. Then, considering technical requirements, constraints, and solutions, the problem of the large dynamic range in LET, the large dynamic range in pulse rate, geometry of sensitive volume and electrodes, evaluation of dose-mean quality factors, calibration methods, and uncertainties are discussed. (orig.)

  7. Application of A150-plastic equivalent gases in microdosimetric measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Higgins, P.D.; Pearson, D.W.; Schell, M.; Attix, F.H.

    1981-01-01

    Neutron dosimetry measurements with ionization chambers, for the most part, employ tissue equivalent plastic-walled cavities (Shonka A150) filled with either air or a methane-base tissue-like gas. The atomic composition of TE-gas and A150 plastic are not matched and are quite dissimilar from muscle. Awschalom and Attix (1980) have partially resolved the problem by formulating a novel A150-plastic equivalent gas. This establishes a homogeneous wall-gas cavity dosimeter for neutron measurements and confines the necessary corrections to the applications of kerma ratios. In this report, we present measurements of applications of two A150-plastic equivalent gases in a low pressure spherical proportional counter. Gas gains and alpha-particle resolutions were determined. For these A150-mixtures as well as a methane-based TE-gas and an Ar-CO 2 mixture, we report measurements of event size distributions from exposure to a beam of 14.8 MeV neutrons

  8. Correction factors to convert microdosimetry measurements in silicon to tissue in 12C ion therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolst, David; Guatelli, Susanna; Tran, Linh T; Chartier, Lachlan; Lerch, Michael L F; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B

    2017-03-21

    Silicon microdosimetry is a promising technology for heavy ion therapy (HIT) quality assurance, because of its sub-mm spatial resolution and capability to determine radiation effects at a cellular level in a mixed radiation field. A drawback of silicon is not being tissue-equivalent, thus the need to convert the detector response obtained in silicon to tissue. This paper presents a method for converting silicon microdosimetric spectra to tissue for a therapeutic 12 C beam, based on Monte Carlo simulations. The energy deposition spectra in a 10 μm sized silicon cylindrical sensitive volume (SV) were found to be equivalent to those measured in a tissue SV, with the same shape, but with dimensions scaled by a factor κ equal to 0.57 and 0.54 for muscle and water, respectively. A low energy correction factor was determined to account for the enhanced response in silicon at low energy depositions, produced by electrons. The concept of the mean path length [Formula: see text] to calculate the lineal energy was introduced as an alternative to the mean chord length [Formula: see text] because it was found that adopting Cauchy's formula for the [Formula: see text] was not appropriate for the radiation field typical of HIT as it is very directional. [Formula: see text] can be determined based on the peak of the lineal energy distribution produced by the incident carbon beam. Furthermore it was demonstrated that the thickness of the SV along the direction of the incident 12 C ion beam can be adopted as [Formula: see text]. The tissue equivalence conversion method and [Formula: see text] were adopted to determine the RBE 10 , calculated using a modified microdosimetric kinetic model, applied to the microdosimetric spectra resulting from the simulation study. Comparison of the RBE 10 along the Bragg peak to experimental TEPC measurements at HIMAC, NIRS, showed good agreement. Such agreement demonstrates the validity of the developed tissue equivalence correction factors and of

  9. Impacto do volume de gordura aspirado na resistência insulínica após lipoaspiração Impact of the aspirated volume of fat tissue in the insulin resistance after liposuction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio de Souza Oliveira

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: investigar a resistência insulínica imposta pela lipoaspiração, correlacionando sua intensidade com a extensão da operação. MÉTODOS: A amostra foi formada de 20 pacientes do sexo feminino sem comorbidades, com idade entre 21 e 43 anos, índice de massa corporal entre 19 e 27 Kg/m², submetidas à lipoaspiração isolada ou associada à prótese de mamas. Foram coletados os indicadores de resistência insulínica no início e término da cirurgia para o cálculo do Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA-IR. As variáveis operatórias foram tempo de lipoaspiração, tempo de prótese de mamas, áreas corporais lipoaspiradas e gordura total aspirada. RESULTADOS: O tempo de lipoaspiração foi 94 a 278 min (média=174 min, tempo de prótese de mamas de 20 a 140 min (média=65 min, gordura total aspirada de 680 a 4280 g (média=1778 g. A análise estatística foi realizada por uma linha de corte de 1500 g de gordura aspirada e revelou uma resistência insulínica pelo índice de HOMA significativamente mais intensa no grupo >1500 g (aumento de 123% em relação ao grupo d"1500 g (aumento de 53%, a partir dos dados basais (p=0,02. As demais variáveis operatórias não apresentaram correlação significativa. CONCLUSÃO: A resistência insulínica apresenta aumento significativo na lipoaspiração, correlacionada ao volume de gordura aspirado.OBJECTIVE: To investigate insulin resistance imposed by liposuction, correlating its intensity with the extent of the operation. METHODS: The sample consisted of 20 female patients without comorbidities, aged between 21 and 43 years, body mass index between 19 and 27 kg/m², undergoing liposuction alone or associated with breasts' prosthesis. We assessed insulin resistance at the beginning and end of the procedure by calculating the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA-IR. The operative variables were length of liposuction, breast prosthesis time, body areas submitted to liposuction and total fat

  10. The Complexity of Identifying Large Equivalence Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skyum, Sven; Frandsen, Gudmund Skovbjerg; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    1999-01-01

    We prove that at least 3k−4/k(2k−3)(n/2) – O(k)equivalence tests and no more than 2/k (n/2) + O(n) equivalence tests are needed in the worst case to identify the equivalence classes with at least k members in set of n elements. The upper bound is an improvement by a factor 2 compared to known res...

  11. Equivalent Simplification Method of Micro-Grid

    OpenAIRE

    Cai Changchun; Cao Xiangqin

    2013-01-01

    The paper concentrates on the equivalent simplification method for the micro-grid system connection into distributed network. The equivalent simplification method proposed for interaction study between micro-grid and distributed network. Micro-grid network, composite load, gas turbine synchronous generation, wind generation are equivalent simplification and parallel connect into the point of common coupling. A micro-grid system is built and three phase and single phase grounded faults are per...

  12. Calculation methods for determining dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endres, G.W.R.; Tanner, J.E.; Scherpelz, R.I.; Hadlock, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    A series of calculations of neutron fluence as a function of energy in an anthropomorphic phantom was performed to develop a system for determining effective dose equivalent for external radiation sources. critical organ dose equivalents are calculated and effective dose equivalents are determined using ICRP-26 methods. Quality factors based on both present definitions and ICRP-40 definitions are used in the analysis. The results of these calculations are presented and discussed

  13. Equivalences of real submanifolds in complex space.

    OpenAIRE

    ZAITSEV, DMITRI

    2001-01-01

    PUBLISHED We show that for any real-analytic submanifold M in CN there is a proper real-analytic subvariety V contained in M such that for any p ? M \\ V , any real-analytic submanifold M? in CN, and any p? ? M?, the germs of the submanifolds M and M? at p and p? respectively are formally equivalent if and only if they are biholomorphically equivalent. More general results for k-equivalences are also stated and proved.

  14. Relations of equivalence of conditioned radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumer, L.; Szeless, A.; Oszuszky, F.

    1982-01-01

    A compensation for the wastes remaining with the operator of a waste management center, to be given by the agent having caused the waste, may be assured by effecting a financial valuation (equivalence) of wastes. Technically and logically, this equivalence between wastes (or specifically between different waste categories) and financial valuation has been established as reasonable. In this paper, the possibility of establishing such equivalences are developed, and their suitability for waste management concepts is quantitatively expressed

  15. Behavioural equivalence for infinite systems - Partially decidable!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunesen, Kim; Nielsen, Mogens

    1996-01-01

    languages with two generalizations based on traditional approaches capturing non-interleaving behaviour, pomsets representing global causal dependency, and locality representing spatial distribution of events. We first study equivalences on Basic Parallel Processes, BPP, a process calculus equivalent...... of processes between BPP and TCSP, not only are the two equivalences different, but one (locality) is decidable whereas the other (pomsets) is not. The decidability result for locality is proved by a reduction to the reachability problem for Petri nets....

  16. Equivalence in Bilingual Lexicography: Criticism and Suggestions*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert Ernst Wiegand

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available

    Abstract: A reminder of general problems in the formation of terminology, as illustrated by theGerman Äquivalence (Eng. equivalence and äquivalent (Eng. equivalent, is followed by a critical discussionof the concept of equivalence in contrastive lexicology. It is shown that especially the conceptof partial equivalence is contradictory in its different manifestations. Consequently attemptsare made to give a more precise indication of the concept of equivalence in the metalexicography,with regard to the domain of the nominal lexicon. The problems of especially the metalexicographicconcept of partial equivalence as well as that of divergence are fundamentally expounded.In conclusion the direction is indicated to find more appropriate metalexicographic versions of theconcept of equivalence.

    Keywords: EQUIVALENCE, LEXICOGRAPHIC EQUIVALENT, PARTIAL EQUIVALENCE,CONGRUENCE, DIVERGENCE, CONVERGENCE, POLYDIVERGENCE, SYNTAGM-EQUIVALENCE,ZERO EQUIVALENCE, CORRESPONDENCE

    Abstrakt: Äquivalenz in der zweisprachigen Lexikographie: Kritik und Vorschläge.Nachdem an allgemeine Probleme der Begriffsbildung am Beispiel von dt. Äquivalenzund dt. äquivalent erinnert wurde, wird zunächst auf Äquivalenzbegriffe in der kontrastiven Lexikologiekritisch eingegangen. Es wird gezeigt, dass insbesondere der Begriff der partiellen Äquivalenzin seinen verschiedenen Ausprägungen widersprüchlich ist. Sodann werden Präzisierungenzu den Äquivalenzbegriffen in der Metalexikographie versucht, die sich auf den Bereich der Nennlexikbeziehen. Insbesondere der metalexikographische Begriff der partiellen Äquivalenz sowie derder Divergenz werden grundsätzlich problematisiert. In welche Richtung man gehen kann, umangemessenere metalexikographische Fassungen des Äquivalenzbegriffs zu finden, wird abschließendangedeutet.

    Stichwörter: ÄQUIVALENZ, LEXIKOGRAPHISCHES ÄQUIVALENT, PARTIELLE ÄQUIVALENZ,KONGRUENZ, DIVERGENZ, KONVERGENZ, POLYDIVERGENZ

  17. Dose sculpting with generalized equivalent uniform dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Qiuwen; Djajaputra, David; Liu, Helen H.; Dong Lei; Mohan, Radhe; Wu, Yan

    2005-01-01

    With intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), a variety of user-defined dose distribution can be produced using inverse planning. The generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) has been used in IMRT optimization as an alternative objective function to the conventional dose-volume-based criteria. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of gEUD optimization to fine tune the dose distributions of IMRT plans. We analyzed the effect of gEUD-based optimization parameters on plan quality. The objective was to determine whether dose distribution to selected structures could be improved using gEUD optimization without adversely altering the doses delivered to other structures, as in sculpting. We hypothesized that by carefully defining gEUD parameters (EUD 0 and n) based on the current dose distributions, the optimization system could be instructed to search for alternative solutions in the neighborhood, and we could maintain the dose distributions for structures already satisfactory and improve dose for structures that need enhancement. We started with an already acceptable IMRT plan optimized with any objective function. The dose distribution was analyzed first. For structures that dose should not be changed, a higher value of n was used and EUD 0 was set slightly higher/lower than the EUD value at the current dose distribution for critical structures/targets. For structures that needed improvement in dose, a higher to medium value of n was used, and EUD 0 was set to the EUD value or slightly lower/higher for the critical structure/target at the current dose distribution. We evaluated this method in one clinical case each of head and neck, lung and prostate cancer. Dose volume histograms, isodose distributions, and relevant tolerance doses for critical structures were used for the assessment. We found that by adjusting gEUD optimization parameters, the dose distribution could be improved with only a few iterations. A larger value of n could lead to

  18. Composition variability and equivalence of Shonka TE plastic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spokas, J.J.

    1973-01-01

    A number of conducting plastic mixtures had been developed by Francis R. Shonka, and collaborators, in the Physical Sciences Laboratory of Illinois Benedictine College (formerly St. Procopius College). Several of these mixtures have been used widely in radiation research. In particular, a tissue-equivalent (muscle) formulation designated A-150 has been used extensively in the dosimetry, research and measurements of gamma, neutron and pion beams. Certain confusion has arisen concerning the composition of A-150. The definition of A-150 is reviewed and what is known of the composition is summarized. The equivalence of A-150 and ICRU ''muscle'' with respect to photons is discussed as a function of photon energy using the latest data on extra-nuclear photon cross sections. (U.S.)

  19. Clinical Validation of Atlas-Based Auto-Segmentation of Multiple Target Volumes and Normal Tissue (Swallowing/Mastication) Structures in the Head and Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teguh, David N.; Levendag, Peter C.; Voet, Peter W.J.; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Han Xiao; Wolf, Theresa K.; Hibbard, Lyndon S.; Nowak, Peter; Akhiat, Hafid; Dirkx, Maarten L.P.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.

    2011-01-01

    . Conclusion: Multiple-subject ABAS of computed tomography images proved to be a useful novel tool in the rapid delineation of target and normal tissues. Although editing of the autocontours is inevitable, a substantial time reduction was achieved using editing, instead of manual contouring (180 vs. 66 min).

  20. Clinical Validation of Atlas-Based Auto-Segmentation of Multiple Target Volumes and Normal Tissue (Swallowing/Mastication) Structures in the Head and Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teguh, David N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Levendag, Peter C., E-mail: p.levendag@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Voet, Peter W.J.; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Han Xiao; Wolf, Theresa K.; Hibbard, Lyndon S. [Elekta-CMS Software, Maryland Heights, MO 63043 (United States); Nowak, Peter; Akhiat, Hafid; Dirkx, Maarten L.P.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    . Conclusion: Multiple-subject ABAS of computed tomography images proved to be a useful novel tool in the rapid delineation of target and normal tissues. Although editing of the autocontours is inevitable, a substantial time reduction was achieved using editing, instead of manual contouring (180 vs. 66 min).

  1. SU-E-T-417: The Impact of Normal Tissue Constraints On PTV Dose Homogeneity for Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT), Volume Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) and Tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, J; McDonald, D; Ashenafi, M; Ellis, A; Vanek, K [Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Complex intensity modulated arc therapy tends to spread low dose to normal tissue(NT)regions to obtain improved target conformity and homogeneity and OAR sparing.This work evaluates the trade-offs between PTV homogeneity and reduction of the maximum dose(Dmax)spread to NT while planning of IMRT,VMAT and Tomotherapy. Methods: Ten prostate patients,previously planned with step-and-shoot IMRT,were selected.To fairly evaluate how PTV homogeneity was affected by NT Dmax constraints,original IMRT DVH objectives for PTV and OARs(femoral heads,and rectal and bladder wall)applied to 2 VMAT plans in Pinnacle(V9.0), and Tomotherapy(V4.2).The only constraint difference was the NT which was defined as body contours excluding targets,OARs and dose rings.NT Dmax constraint for 1st VMAT was set to the prescription dose(Dp).For 2nd VMAT(VMAT-NT)and Tomotherapy,it was set to the Dmax achieved in IMRT(~70-80% of Dp).All NT constraints were set to the lowest priority.Three common homogeneity indices(HI),RTOG-HI=Dmax/Dp,moderated-HI=D95%/D5% and complex-HI=(D2%-D98%)/Dp*100 were calculated. Results: All modalities with similar dosimetric endpoints for PTV and OARs.The complex-HI shows the most variability of indices,with average values of 5.9,4.9,9.3 and 6.1 for IMRT,VMAT,VMAT-NT and Tomotherapy,respectively.VMAT provided the best PTV homogeneity without compromising any OAR/NT sparing.Both VMAT-NT and Tomotherapy,planned with more restrictive NT constraints,showed reduced homogeneity,with VMAT-NT showing the worst homogeneity(P<0.0001)for all HI.Tomotherapy gave the lowest NT Dmax,with slightly decreased homogeneity compared to VMAT. Finally, there was no significant difference in NT Dmax or Dmean between VMAT and VMAT-NT. Conclusion: PTV HI is highly dependent on permitted NT constraints. Results demonstrated that VMAT-NT with more restrictive NT constraints does not reduce Dmax NT,but significantly receives higher Dmax and worse target homogeneity.Therefore, it is critical

  2. Equivalent drawbead performance in deep drawing simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meinders, Vincent T.; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Huetink, Han

    1999-01-01

    Drawbeads are applied in the deep drawing process to improve the control of the material flow during the forming operation. In simulations of the deep drawing process these drawbeads can be replaced by an equivalent drawbead model. In this paper the usage of an equivalent drawbead model in the

  3. Orientifold Planar Equivalence: The Chiral Condensate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armoni, Adi; Lucini, Biagio; Patella, Agostino

    2008-01-01

    The recently introduced orientifold planar equivalence is a promising tool for solving non-perturbative problems in QCD. One of the predictions of orientifold planar equivalence is that the chiral condensates of a theory with $N_f$ flavours of Dirac fermions in the symmetric (or antisymmetric...

  4. 7 CFR 1005.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1005.54 Section 1005.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1005.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Uniform Prices ...

  5. 7 CFR 1126.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1126.54 Section 1126.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1126.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Producer Price Differential ...

  6. 7 CFR 1001.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1001.54 Section 1001.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1001.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Producer Price Differential ...

  7. 7 CFR 1032.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1032.54 Section 1032.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1032.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Producer Price Differential ...

  8. 7 CFR 1124.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1124.54 Section 1124.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Regulating Handling Class Prices § 1124.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Producer Price Differential ...

  9. 7 CFR 1030.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1030.54 Section 1030.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1030.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. ...

  10. 7 CFR 1033.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1033.54 Section 1033.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1033.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Producer Price Differential ...

  11. 7 CFR 1131.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1131.54 Section 1131.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1131.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Uniform Prices ...

  12. 7 CFR 1006.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1006.54 Section 1006.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1006.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Uniform Prices ...

  13. 7 CFR 1007.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1007.54 Section 1007.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1007.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Uniform Prices ...

  14. 7 CFR 1000.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1000.54 Section 1000.54 Agriculture... Prices § 1000.54 Equivalent price. If for any reason a price or pricing constituent required for computing the prices described in § 1000.50 is not available, the market administrator shall use a price or...

  15. Finding small equivalent decision trees is hard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zantema, H.; Bodlaender, H.L.

    2000-01-01

    Two decision trees are called decision equivalent if they represent the same function, i.e., they yield the same result for every possible input. We prove that given a decision tree and a number, to decide if there is a decision equivalent decision tree of size at most that number is NPcomplete. As

  16. What is Metaphysical Equivalence? | Miller | Philosophical Papers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Theories are metaphysically equivalent just if there is no fact of the matter that could render one theory true and the other false. In this paper I argue that if we are judiciously to resolve disputes about whether theories are equivalent or not, we need to develop testable criteria that will give us epistemic access to the obtaining ...

  17. EQUIVALENT MODELS IN COVARIANCE STRUCTURE-ANALYSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LUIJBEN, TCW

    1991-01-01

    Defining equivalent models as those that reproduce the same set of covariance matrices, necessary and sufficient conditions are stated for the local equivalence of two expanded identified models M1 and M2 when fitting the more restricted model M0. Assuming several regularity conditions, the rank

  18. Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain; Logue, Jennifer

    2011-08-01

    We ventilate buildings to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). Ventilation standards (such as American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Enginners [ASHRAE] Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing energy consumption or improving IAQ or comfort. Variable ventilation is one innovative strategy. To use variable ventilation in a way that meets standards, it is necessary to have a method for determining equivalence in terms of either ventilation or indoor air quality. This study develops methods to calculate either equivalent ventilation or equivalent IAQ. We demonstrate that equivalent ventilation can be used as the basis for dynamic ventilation control, reducing peak load and infiltration of outdoor contaminants. We also show that equivalent IAQ could allow some contaminants to exceed current standards if other contaminants are more stringently controlled.

  19. Beyond Language Equivalence on Visibly Pushdown Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srba, Jiri

    2009-01-01

    We study (bi)simulation-like preorder/equivalence checking on the class of visibly pushdown automata and its natural subclasses visibly BPA (Basic Process Algebra) and visibly one-counter automata. We describe generic methods for proving complexity upper and lower bounds for a number of studied...... preorders and equivalences like simulation, completed simulation, ready simulation, 2-nested simulation preorders/equivalences and bisimulation equivalence. Our main results are that all the mentioned equivalences and preorders are EXPTIME-complete on visibly pushdown automata, PSPACE-complete on visibly...... one-counter automata and P-complete on visibly BPA. Our PSPACE lower bound for visibly one-counter automata improves also the previously known DP-hardness results for ordinary one-counter automata and one-counter nets. Finally, we study regularity checking problems for visibly pushdown automata...

  20. Equivalent Air Spring Suspension Model for Quarter-Passive Model of Passenger Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Abid, Haider J.; Chen, Jie; Nassar, Ameen A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the GENSIS air spring suspension system equivalence to a passive suspension system. The SIMULINK simulation together with the OptiY optimization is used to obtain the air spring suspension model equivalent to passive suspension system, where the car body response difference from both systems with the same road profile inputs is used as the objective function for optimization (OptiY program). The parameters of air spring system such as initial pressure, volume of bag, l...

  1. Martensitic transformation in SUS304 steels with the same Ni equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, T.; Okino, Y.; Takahashi, S.; Echigoya, J.; Kamada, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The behavior of martensitic transformation due to plastic deformation at room temperature was investigated in SUS304 austenitic stainless steels with the same nickel equivalent. The absolute volume of the martensitic phase was obtained by saturation magnetization. We discuss the shapes of the martensitic phase caused by different values of coercive force. Martensitic transformation depends on the applied stress but is independent of nickel content with same nickel equivalent. We investigated applications to nondestructive testing on the basis of the present study. (author)

  2. 78 FR 67360 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Five New Equivalent Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-12

    ... Methods: Designation of Five New Equivalent Methods AGENCY: Office of Research and Development; Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of the designation of five new equivalent methods for...) has designated, in accordance with 40 CFR Part 53, five new equivalent methods, one for measuring...

  3. 77 FR 60985 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Three New Equivalent Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... Methods: Designation of Three New Equivalent Methods AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Notice of the designation of three new equivalent methods for monitoring ambient air quality. SUMMARY... equivalent methods, one for measuring concentrations of PM 2.5 , one for measuring concentrations of PM 10...

  4. Analytical and numerical construction of equivalent cables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, K A; Rosenberg, J R; Tucker, G

    2003-08-01

    The mathematical complexity experienced when applying cable theory to arbitrarily branched dendrites has lead to the development of a simple representation of any branched dendrite called the equivalent cable. The equivalent cable is an unbranched model of a dendrite and a one-to-one mapping of potentials and currents on the branched model to those on the unbranched model, and vice versa. The piecewise uniform cable, with a symmetrised tri-diagonal system matrix, is shown to represent the canonical form for an equivalent cable. Through a novel application of the Laplace transform it is demonstrated that an arbitrary branched model of a dendrite can be transformed to the canonical form of an equivalent cable. The characteristic properties of the equivalent cable are extracted from the matrix for the transformed branched model. The one-to-one mapping follows automatically from the construction of the equivalent cable. The equivalent cable is used to provide a new procedure for characterising the location of synaptic contacts on spinal interneurons.

  5. Geometry of the local equivalence of states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawicki, A; Kus, M, E-mail: assawi@cft.edu.pl, E-mail: marek.kus@cft.edu.pl [Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warszawa (Poland)

    2011-12-09

    We present a description of locally equivalent states in terms of symplectic geometry. Using the moment map between local orbits in the space of states and coadjoint orbits of the local unitary group, we reduce the problem of local unitary equivalence to an easy part consisting of identifying the proper coadjoint orbit and a harder problem of the geometry of fibers of the moment map. We give a detailed analysis of the properties of orbits of 'equally entangled states'. In particular, we show connections between certain symplectic properties of orbits such as their isotropy and coisotropy with effective criteria of local unitary equivalence. (paper)

  6. Cosmological equivalence principle and the weak-field limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiltshire, David L.

    2008-01-01

    The strong equivalence principle is extended in application to averaged dynamical fields in cosmology to include the role of the average density in the determination of inertial frames. The resulting cosmological equivalence principle is applied to the problem of synchronization of clocks in the observed universe. Once density perturbations grow to give density contrasts of order 1 on scales of tens of megaparsecs, the integrated deceleration of the local background regions of voids relative to galaxies must be accounted for in the relative synchronization of clocks of ideal observers who measure an isotropic cosmic microwave background. The relative deceleration of the background can be expected to represent a scale in which weak-field Newtonian dynamics should be modified to account for dynamical gradients in the Ricci scalar curvature of space. This acceleration scale is estimated using the best-fit nonlinear bubble model of the universe with backreaction. At redshifts z -10 ms -2 , is small, when integrated over the lifetime of the universe it amounts to an accumulated relative difference of 38% in the rate of average clocks in galaxies as compared to volume-average clocks in the emptiness of voids. A number of foundational aspects of the cosmological equivalence principle are also discussed, including its relation to Mach's principle, the Weyl curvature hypothesis, and the initial conditions of the universe.

  7. Volume independence in large Nc QCD-like gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovtun, Pavel; Uensal, Mithat; Yaffe, Laurence G.

    2007-01-01

    Volume independence in large N c gauge theories may be viewed as a generalized orbifold equivalence. The reduction to zero volume (or Eguchi-Kawai reduction) is a special case of this equivalence. So is temperature independence in confining phases. A natural generalization concerns volume independence in 'theory space' of quiver gauge theories. In pure Yang-Mills theory, the failure of volume independence for sufficiently small volumes (at weak coupling) due to spontaneous breaking of center symmetry, together with its validity above a critical size, nicely illustrate the symmetry realization conditions which are both necessary and sufficient for large N c orbifold equivalence. The existence of a minimal size below which volume independence fails also applies to Yang-Mills theory with antisymmetric representation fermions [QCD(AS)]. However, in Yang-Mills theory with adjoint representation fermions [QCD(Adj)], endowed with periodic boundary conditions, volume independence remains valid down to arbitrarily small size. In sufficiently large volumes, QCD(Adj) and QCD(AS) have a large N c ''orientifold'' equivalence, provided charge conjugation symmetry is unbroken in the latter theory. Therefore, via a combined orbifold-orientifold mapping, a well-defined large N c equivalence exists between QCD(AS) in large, or infinite, volume and QCD(Adj) in arbitrarily small volume. Since asymptotically free gauge theories, such as QCD(Adj), are much easier to study (analytically or numerically) in small volume, this equivalence should allow greater understanding of large N c QCD in infinite volume

  8. ELECTRICAL EQUIVALENT CIRCUIT OF BIOLOGICAL OBJECTS OF VEGETABLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Golev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary.The results of measurements of complex biological tissues electrical resistance of vegetable origin are presented. The measurements were performed at T=296 K in the frequency range from 5 to 500 kHz. As the electrodes were covered with tin (purity of 99.9% copper plates.. Experimentally investigated the following objects: samples parenchymal tissue of Apple in the form of cylinders with a diameter of 20 mm and a length of 20 mm; Apple juice, obtained by mechanical destruction of cells; pressed Apple pulp (juice content of not more than 20%obtained by the centrifugal separation, which destroyed the system of cells. For plant tissue with a holistic system of cells in the field 103 - 105 Hz is observed pronounced minimum angle of phase shift. In the absence of cells and its value is greatly reduced .The equivalent electrical circuit fabrics are considered. The calculation of all its elements is made. The equivalent capacitance of the electrical double layer at the interface of metal measuring electrode and extracellular fluid is element of C1 . The electrical resistance of this layer alternating current is characterized by the element R1 . Chain parallel connected resistance and capacitance describes the system of plant cells. The capacitance C2 is due to the electrical capacity of the cell membranes, and the resistance R2 is the electrical resistance of the membranes and intracellular space.The coincidence of experimental and calculated data in a frequency range of more than 103 Hz satisfactory. In the region of lower frequencies is observed differences. This may be due to the specific behavior of the electrical double layer. However, in the frequency region where the electrical properties of the cell structure of the investigated tissue match good, which proves the validity of the considered equivalent circuit. It is shown that the value of the complex electrical impedance of vegetable tissue in the frequency range from 103 Hz to 105

  9. Quantum equivalence principle without mass superselection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Coronado, H.; Okon, E.

    2013-01-01

    The standard argument for the validity of Einstein's equivalence principle in a non-relativistic quantum context involves the application of a mass superselection rule. The objective of this work is to show that, contrary to widespread opinion, the compatibility between the equivalence principle and quantum mechanics does not depend on the introduction of such a restriction. For this purpose, we develop a formalism based on the extended Galileo group, which allows for a consistent handling of superpositions of different masses, and show that, within such scheme, mass superpositions behave as they should in order to obey the equivalence principle. - Highlights: • We propose a formalism for consistently handling, within a non-relativistic quantum context, superpositions of states with different masses. • The formalism utilizes the extended Galileo group, in which mass is a generator. • The proposed formalism allows for the equivalence principle to be satisfied without the need of imposing a mass superselection rule

  10. On the equivalence of chaos control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaofan

    2003-01-01

    For a given chaotic system, different control systems can be constructed depending on which parameter is tuned or where the external input is added. We prove that two different feedback control systems are qualitatively equivalent if they are feedback linearizable

  11. Equivalence relations and the reinforcement contingency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidman, M

    2000-07-01

    Where do equivalence relations come from? One possible answer is that they arise directly from the reinforcement contingency. That is to say, a reinforcement contingency produces two types of outcome: (a) 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, or n-term units of analysis that are known, respectively, as operant reinforcement, simple discrimination, conditional discrimination, second-order conditional discrimination, and so on; and (b) equivalence relations that consist of ordered pairs of all positive elements that participate in the contingency. This conception of the origin of equivalence relations leads to a number of new and verifiable ways of conceptualizing equivalence relations and, more generally, the stimulus control of operant behavior. The theory is also capable of experimental disproof.

  12. REFractions: The Representing Equivalent Fractions Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Stephen I.

    2014-01-01

    Stephen Tucker presents a fractions game that addresses a range of fraction concepts including equivalence and computation. The REFractions game also improves students' fluency with representing, comparing and adding fractions.

  13. ON THE EQUIVALENCE OF THE ABEL EQUATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This article uses the reflecting function of Mironenko to study some complicated differential equations which are equivalent to the Abel equation. The results are applied to discuss the behavior of solutions of these complicated differential equations.

  14. interpratation: of equivalences and cultural untranslatability

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jgmweri

    translatability in cultural diversity in terms equivalences such as –Vocabulary or lexical ..... A KSL interpreter who does not understand this English idiom may literally interpret it .... Nida, E.A. (1958) Analysis of meaning and dictionary making.

  15. Equivalence Principle, Higgs Boson and Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Francaviglia

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We discuss here possible tests for Palatini f(R-theories together with their implications for different formulations of the Equivalence Principle. We shall show that Palatini f(R-theories obey the Weak Equivalence Principle and violate the Strong Equivalence Principle. The violations of the Strong Equivalence Principle vanish in vacuum (and purely electromagnetic solutions as well as on short time scales with respect to the age of the universe. However, we suggest that a framework based on Palatini f(R-theories is more general than standard General Relativity (GR and it sheds light on the interpretation of data and results in a way which is more model independent than standard GR itself.

  16. The gauge principle vs. the equivalence principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gates, S.J. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Within the context of field theory, it is argued that the role of the equivalence principle may be replaced by the principle of gauge invariance to provide a logical framework for theories of gravitation

  17. Dark matter and the equivalence principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Gradwohl, Ben-Ami

    1993-01-01

    A survey is presented of the current understanding of dark matter invoked by astrophysical theory and cosmology. Einstein's equivalence principle asserts that local measurements cannot distinguish a system at rest in a gravitational field from one that is in uniform acceleration in empty space. Recent test-methods for the equivalence principle are presently discussed as bases for testing of dark matter scenarios involving the long-range forces between either baryonic or nonbaryonic dark matter and ordinary matter.

  18. S-equivalents lagrangians in generalized mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negri, L.J.; Silva, Edna G. da.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of s-equivalent lagrangians is considered in the realm of generalized mechanics. Some results corresponding to the ordinary (non-generalized) mechanics are extended to the generalized case. A theorem for the reduction of the higher order lagrangian description to the usual order is found to be useful for the analysis of generalized mechanical systems and leads to a new class of equivalence between lagrangian functions. Some new perspectives are pointed out. (Author) [pt

  19. Validation of artificial skin equivalents as in vitro testing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Robert; Marx, Ulrich; Walles, Heike; Schober, Lena

    2011-03-01

    With the increasing complexity of the chemical composition of pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and everyday substances, the awareness of potential health issues and long term damages for humanoid organs is shifting into focus. Artificial in vitro testing systems play an important role in providing reliable test conditions and replacing precarious animal testing. Especially artificial skin equivalents ASEs are used for a broad spectrum of studies like penetration, irritation and corrosion of substances. One major challenge in tissue engineering is the qualification of each individual ASE as in vitro testing system. Due to biological fluctuations, the stratum corneum hornified layer of some ASEs may not fully develop or other defects might occur. For monitoring these effects we developed an fully automated Optical Coherence Tomography device. Here, we present different methods to characterize and evaluate the quality of the ASEs based on image and data processing of OCT B-scans. By analysing the surface structure, defects, like cuts or tears, are detectable. A further indicator for the quality of the ASE is the morphology of the tissue. This allows to determine if the skin model has reached the final growth state. We found, that OCT is a well suited technology for automatically characterizing artificial skin equivalents and validating the application as testing system.

  20. Measurement of extrapolation curves for the secondary pattern of beta radiation Nr. 86 calibrated in rapidity of absorbed dose for tissue equivalent by the Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt; Medicion de curvas de extrapolacion para el patron secundario de radiacion beta Nr. 86 calibrado en rapidez de dosis absorbida para tejido equivalente por el Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez R, J.T

    1988-10-15

    The following report has as objective to present the obtained results of measuring - with a camera of extrapolation of variable electrodes (CE) - the dose speed absorbed in equivalent fabric given by the group of sources of the secondary pattern of radiation Beta Nr. 86, (PSB), and to compare this results with those presented by the calibration certificates that accompany the PSB extended by the primary laboratory Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt, (PTB), of the R.F.A. as well as the uncertainties associated to the measure process. (Author)

  1. Calculation of complication probability of pion treatment at PSI using dose-volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Keiichi; Akanuma, Atsuo; Aoki, Yukimasa

    1991-01-01

    In the conformation technique a target volume is irradiated uniformly as in conventional radiations, whereas surrounding tissue and organs are nonuniformly irradiated. Clinical data on radiation injuries that accumulate with conventional radiation are not applicable without appropriate compensation. Recently a putative solution of this problem was proposed by Lyman using dose-volume histograms. This histogram reduction method reduces a given dose-volume histogram of an organ to a single step which corresponds to the equivalent complication probability by interpolation. As a result it converts nonuniform radiation into a unique dose to the whole organ which has the equivalent likelihood of radiation injury. This method is based on low LET radiation with conventional fractionation schedules. When it is applied to high LET radiation such as negative pion treatment, a high LET dose should be converted to an equivalent photon dose using an appropriate value of RBE. In the present study the histogram reduction method was applied to actual patients treated by the negative pion conformation technique at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Out of evaluable 90 cases of pelvic tumors, 16 developed grade III-IV bladder injury, and 7 developed grade III-IV rectal injury. The 90 cases were divided into roughly equal groups according to the equivalent doses to the entire bladder and rectum. Complication rates and equivalent doses to the full organs in these groups could be represented by a sigmoid dose-effect relation. When RBE from a pion dose to a photon dose is assumed to be 2.1 for bladder injury, the rates of bladder complications fit best to the theoretical complication curve. When the RBE value was 2.3, the rates of rectal injury fit the theoretical curve best. These values are close to the conversion factor of 2.0 that is used in clinical practice at PSI. This agreement suggests the clinical feasibility of the histogram reduction method in conformation radiotherapy. (author)

  2. The principle of equivalence reconsidered: assessing the relevance of the principle of equivalence in prison medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jotterand, Fabrice; Wangmo, Tenzin

    2014-01-01

    In this article we critically examine the principle of equivalence of care in prison medicine. First, we provide an overview of how the principle of equivalence is utilized in various national and international guidelines on health care provision to prisoners. Second, we outline some of the problems associated with its applications, and argue that the principle of equivalence should go beyond equivalence to access and include equivalence of outcomes. However, because of the particular context of the prison environment, third, we contend that the concept of "health" in equivalence of health outcomes needs conceptual clarity; otherwise, it fails to provide a threshold for healthy states among inmates. We accomplish this by examining common understandings of the concepts of health and disease. We conclude our article by showing why the conceptualization of diseases as clinical problems provides a helpful approach in the delivery of health care in prison.

  3. The Voronoi volume and molecular representation of molar volume: equilibrium simple fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunjan, Jagtar Singh; Eu, Byung Chan

    2010-04-07

    The Voronoi volume of simple fluids was previously made use of in connection with volume transport phenomena in nonequilibrium simple fluids. To investigate volume transport phenomena, it is important to develop a method to compute the Voronoi volume of fluids in nonequilibrium. In this work, as a first step to this goal, we investigate the equilibrium limit of the nonequilibrium Voronoi volume together with its attendant related molar (molal) and specific volumes. It is proved that the equilibrium Voronoi volume is equivalent to the molar (molal) volume. The latter, in turn, is proved equivalent to the specific volume. This chain of equivalences provides an alternative procedure of computing the equilibrium Voronoi volume from the molar volume/specific volume. We also show approximate methods of computing the Voronoi and molar volumes from the information on the pair correlation function. These methods may be employed for their quick estimation, but also provide some aspects of the fluid structure and its relation to the Voronoi volume. The Voronoi volume obtained from computer simulations is fitted to a function of temperature and pressure in the region above the triple point but below the critical point. Since the fitting function is given in terms of reduced variables for the Lennard-Jones (LJ) model and the kindred volumes (i.e., specific and molar volumes) are in essence equivalent to the equation of state, the formula obtained is a reduced equation state for simple fluids obeying the LJ model potential in the range of temperature and pressure examined and hence can be used for other simple fluids.

  4. Equivalence of Szegedy's and coined quantum walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Thomas G.

    2017-09-01

    Szegedy's quantum walk is a quantization of a classical random walk or Markov chain, where the walk occurs on the edges of the bipartite double cover of the original graph. To search, one can simply quantize a Markov chain with absorbing vertices. Recently, Santos proposed two alternative search algorithms that instead utilize the sign-flip oracle in Grover's algorithm rather than absorbing vertices. In this paper, we show that these two algorithms are exactly equivalent to two algorithms involving coined quantum walks, which are walks on the vertices of the original graph with an internal degree of freedom. The first scheme is equivalent to a coined quantum walk with one walk step per query of Grover's oracle, and the second is equivalent to a coined quantum walk with two walk steps per query of Grover's oracle. These equivalences lie outside the previously known equivalence of Szegedy's quantum walk with absorbing vertices and the coined quantum walk with the negative identity operator as the coin for marked vertices, whose precise relationships we also investigate.

  5. Role of the parameters involved in the plan optimization based on the generalized equivalent uniform dose and radiobiological implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widesott, L; Strigari, L; Pressello, M C; Landoni, V; Benassi, M

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the role and the weight of the parameters involved in the intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) optimization based on the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) method, for prostate and head-and-neck plans. We systematically varied the parameters (gEUD max and weight) involved in the gEUD-based optimization of rectal wall and parotid glands. We found that the proper value of weight factor, still guaranteeing planning treatment volumes coverage, produced similar organs at risks dose-volume (DV) histograms for different gEUD max with fixed a = 1. Most of all, we formulated a simple relation that links the reference gEUD max and the associated weight factor. As secondary objective, we evaluated plans obtained with the gEUD-based optimization and ones based on DV criteria, using the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models. gEUD criteria seemed to improve sparing of rectum and parotid glands with respect to DV-based optimization: the mean dose, the V 40 and V 50 values to the rectal wall were decreased of about 10%, the mean dose to parotids decreased of about 20-30%. But more than the OARs sparing, we underlined the halving of the OARs optimization time with the implementation of the gEUD-based cost function. Using NTCP models we enhanced differences between the two optimization criteria for parotid glands, but no for rectum wall

  6. Methodological issues in radiation dose-volume outcome analyses: Summary of a joint AAPM/NIH workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deasy, Joseph O.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Herbert, Donald; Yan, Di; Jackson, Andrew; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Langer, Mark; Sapareto, Steve

    2002-01-01

    This report represents a summary of presentations at a joint workshop of the National Institutes of Health and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). Current methodological issues in dose-volume modeling are addressed here from several different perspectives. Areas of emphasis include (a) basic modeling issues including the equivalent uniform dose framework and the bootstrap method, (b) issues in the valid use of statistics, including the need for meta-analysis, (c) issues in dealing with organ deformation and its effects on treatment response, (d) evidence for volume effects for rectal complications, (e) the use of volume effect data in liver and lung as a basis for dose escalation studies, and (f) implications of uncertainties in volume effect knowledge on optimized treatment planning. Taken together, these approaches to studying volume effects describe many implications for the development and use of this information in radiation oncology practice. Areas of significant interest for further research include the meta-analysis of clinical data; interinstitutional pooled data analyses of volume effects; analyses of the uncertainties in outcome prediction models, minimal parameter number outcome models for ranking treatment plans (e.g., equivalent uniform dose); incorporation of the effect of motion in the outcome prediction; dose-escalation/isorisk protocols based on outcome models; the use of functional imaging to study radio-response; and the need for further small animal tumor control probability/normal tissue complication probability studies

  7. A method for calculating equivalent diameter of fiber in self-compacting fiber reinforced concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, R.; Spiesz, P.R.; Brouwers, H.J.H.; Fischer, H.-B.; Bode, K.-A.; Beuthan, C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a method for calculating the equivalent diameter of fiber in self-compacting fiber reinforced concrete (SCFRC). The key idea is to utilize a small amount of particles with a narrow particle size distribution to replace the fibers by the same volume, without causing any obvious

  8. Equivalent Air Spring Suspension Model for Quarter-Passive Model of Passenger Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, Haider J; Chen, Jie; Nassar, Ameen A

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the GENSIS air spring suspension system equivalence to a passive suspension system. The SIMULINK simulation together with the OptiY optimization is used to obtain the air spring suspension model equivalent to passive suspension system, where the car body response difference from both systems with the same road profile inputs is used as the objective function for optimization (OptiY program). The parameters of air spring system such as initial pressure, volume of bag, length of surge pipe, diameter of surge pipe, and volume of reservoir are obtained from optimization. The simulation results show that the air spring suspension equivalent system can produce responses very close to the passive suspension system.

  9. Distribution of Snow and Maximum Snow Water Equivalent Obtained by LANDSAT Data and Degree Day Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, K.; Ochiai, H.; Takeuchi, S.

    1985-01-01

    Maximum snow water equivalence and snowcover distribution are estimated using several LANDSAT data taken in snowmelting season over a four year period. The test site is Okutadami-gawa Basin located in the central position of Tohoku-Kanto-Chubu District. The year to year normalization for snowmelt volume computation on the snow line is conducted by year to year correction of degree days using the snowcover percentage within the test basin obtained from LANDSAT data. The maximum snow water equivalent map in the test basin is generated based on the normalized snowmelt volume on the snow line extracted from four LANDSAT data taken in a different year. The snowcover distribution on an arbitrary day in snowmelting of 1982 is estimated from the maximum snow water equivalent map. The estimated snowcover is compared with the snowcover area extracted from NOAA-AVHRR data taken on the same day. The applicability of the snow estimation using LANDSAT data is discussed.

  10. Quantum mechanics and the equivalence principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, P C W

    2004-01-01

    A quantum particle moving in a gravitational field may penetrate the classically forbidden region of the gravitational potential. This raises the question of whether the time of flight of a quantum particle in a gravitational field might deviate systematically from that of a classical particle due to tunnelling delay, representing a violation of the weak equivalence principle. I investigate this using a model quantum clock to measure the time of flight of a quantum particle in a uniform gravitational field, and show that a violation of the equivalence principle does not occur when the measurement is made far from the turning point of the classical trajectory. The results are then confirmed using the so-called dwell time definition of quantum tunnelling. I conclude with some remarks about the strong equivalence principle in quantum mechanics

  11. Water equivalence of polymer gel dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellakumar, P.; James Jebaseelan Samuel, E.; Supe, Sanjay S.

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the water equivalence and radiation transport properties of polymer gel dosimeters over the wide range of photon and electron energies 14 different types of polymer gels were considered. Their water equivalence was evaluated in terms of effective atomic number (Z eff ), electron density (ρ e ), photon mass attenuation coefficient (μ/ρ), photon mass energy absorption coefficient (μ en /ρ) and total stopping power (S/ρ) tot of electrons using the XCOM and the ESTAR database. The study showed that the effective atomic number of polymer gels were very close ( en /ρ for all polymer gels were in close agreement ( tot of electrons in polymer gel dosimeters were within 1% agreement with that of water. From the study we conclude that at lower energy (<80keV) the polymer gel dosimeters cannot be considered water equivalent and study has to be carried out before using the polymer gel for clinical application

  12. Using frequency equivalency in stability calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruzdev, I.A.; Temirbulatov, R.A.; Tereshko, L.A.

    1981-01-01

    A methodology for calculating oscillatory instability that involves using frequency equivalency is employed in carrying out the following proceedures: dividing an electric power system into subgroups; determining the adjustments to the automatic excitation control in each subsystem; simplifying the mathematical definition of the separate subsystems by using frequency equivalency; gradually re-tuning the automatic excitation control in the separate subsystems to account for neighboring subsystems by using their equivalent frequency characteristics. The methodology is to be used with a computer program to determine the gain in the stabilization channels of the automatic excitation control unit in which static stability of the entire aggregate of normal and post-breakdown conditions acceptable damping of transient processes are provided. The possibility of reducing the equation series to apply to chosen regions of the existing range of frequencies is demonstrated. The use of the methodology is illustrated in a sample study on stability in a Siberian unified power system.

  13. Focal exposure of limited lung volumes to high-dose irradiation down-regulated organ development-related functions and up-regulated the immune response in mouse pulmonary tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bu-Yeo; Jin, Hee; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Kang, Ga-Young; Cho, Jaeho; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2016-01-27

    Despite the emergence of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for treatment of medically inoperable early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer patients, the molecular effects of focal exposure of limited lung volumes to high-dose radiation have not been fully characterized. This study was designed to identify molecular changes induced by focal high-dose irradiation using a mouse model of SBRT. Central areas of the mouse left lung were focally-irradiated (3 mm in diameter) with a single high-dose of radiation (90 Gy). Temporal changes in gene expression in the irradiated and non-irradiated neighboring lung regions were analyzed by microarray. For comparison, the long-term effect (12 months) of 20 Gy radiation on a diffuse region of lung was also measured. The majority of genes were down-regulated in the focally-irradiated lung areas at 2 to 3 weeks after irradiation. This pattern of gene expression was clearly different than gene expression in the diffuse region of lungs exposed to low-dose radiation. Ontological and pathway analyses indicated these down-regulated genes were mainly associated with organ development. Although the number was small, genes that were up-regulated after focal irradiation were associated with immune-related functions. The temporal patterns of gene expression and the associated biological functions were also similar in non-irradiated neighboring lung regions, although statistical significance was greatly reduced when compared with those from focally-irradiated areas of the lung. From network analysis of temporally regulated genes, we identified inter-related modules associated with diverse functions, including organ development and the immune response, in both the focally-irradiated regions and non-irradiated neighboring lung regions. Focal exposure of lung tissue to high-dose radiation induced expression of genes associated with organ development and the immune response. This pattern of gene expression was also observed in non

  14. The equivalence problem for LL- and LR-regular grammars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Gecsec, F.

    It will be shown that the equivalence problem for LL-regular grammars is decidable. Apart from extending the known result for LL(k) grammar equivalence to LLregular grammar equivalence, we obtain an alternative proof of the decidability of LL(k) equivalence. The equivalence prob]em for LL-regular

  15. Proposal of Design Formulae for Equivalent Elasticity of Masonry Structures Made with Bricks of Low Modulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ridwan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bricks of low elastic modulus are occasionally used in some developing countries, such as Indonesia and India. Most of the previous research efforts focused on masonry structures built with bricks of considerably high elastic modulus. The objective of this study is to quantify the equivalent elastic modulus of lower-stiffness masonry structures, when the mortar has a higher modulus of elasticity than the bricks, by employing finite element (FE simulations and adopting the homogenization technique. The reported numerical simulations adopted the two-dimensional representative volume elements (RVEs using quadrilateral elements with four nodes. The equivalent elastic moduli of composite elements with various bricks and mortar were quantified. The numerically estimated equivalent elastic moduli from the FE simulations were verified using previously established test data. Hence, a new simplified formula for the calculation of the equivalent modulus of elasticity of such masonry structures is proposed in the present study.

  16. Fiscal adjustments in Europe and Ricardian equivalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. DE BONIS

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available According to the ‘Ricardian’ equivalence hypothesis, consumption is dependent on permanent disposable income and current deficits are equivalent to future tax payments. This hypothesis is tested on 14 European countries in the 1990s. The relationships between private sector savings and general government deficit, and the GDP growth rate and the unemployment rate are determined. The results show the change in consumers' behaviour with respect to government deficit, and that expectations of an increase in future wealth are no longer associated with a decrease in deficit.

  17. Equivalent circuit analysis of terahertz metamaterial filters

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xueqian

    2011-01-01

    An equivalent circuit model for the analysis and design of terahertz (THz) metamaterial filters is presented. The proposed model, derived based on LMC equivalent circuits, takes into account the detailed geometrical parameters and the presence of a dielectric substrate with the existing analytic expressions for self-inductance, mutual inductance, and capacitance. The model is in good agreement with the experimental measurements and full-wave simulations. Exploiting the circuit model has made it possible to predict accurately the resonance frequency of the proposed structures and thus, quick and accurate process of designing THz device from artificial metamaterials is offered. ©2011 Chinese Optics Letters.

  18. Topological equivalence of nonlinear autonomous dynamical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Huynh Phan; Tran Van Nhung

    1995-12-01

    We show in this paper that the autonomous nonlinear dynamical system Σ(A,B,F): x' = Ax+Bu+F(x) is topologically equivalent to the linear dynamical system Σ(A,B,O): x' = Ax+Bu if the projection of A on the complement in R n of the controllable vectorial subspace is hyperbolic and if lipschitz constant of F is sufficiently small ( * ) and F(x) = 0 when parallel x parallel is sufficiently large ( ** ). In particular, if Σ(A,B,O) is controllable, it is topologically equivalent to Σ(A,B,F) when it is only that F satisfy ( ** ). (author). 18 refs

  19. A neutron dose equivalent meter at CAEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Shihai; Lu Yan; Wang Heyi; Yuan Yonggang; Chen Xu

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of neutron dose equivalent has been a widespread need in industry and research. In this paper, aimed at improving the accuracy of neutron dose equivalent meter: a neutron dose counter is simulated with MCNP5, and the energy response curve is optimized. The results show that the energy response factor is from 0.2 to 1.8 for neutrons in the energy range of 2.53×10 -8 MeV to 10 MeV Compared with other related meters, it turns that the design of this meter is right. (authors)

  20. Measurements of the personal dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarlat, F.; Scarisoreanu, A.; Badita, E.; Oane, M.; Mitru, E.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The paper presents the results of measurements related to the personal dose equivalent in the rooms adjacent to NILPRP 7 MeV linear accelerator, by means of the secondary standard chamber T34035 Hp(10). The chamber was calibrated by PTB at S- 137 Cs (E av = 661.6 keV, T 1/2 11050 days) and has N H = 3.17x10 6 Sv/C calibration factor for the personal dose equivalent, Hp(10), at a depth of 10 mm in climatic reference conditions. The measurements were made for the two operation mode of the 7 MeV linac: electrons and bremsstrahlung

  1. Tissue engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, John P; Bronzino, Joseph D

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly viewed as the future of medicine, the field of tissue engineering is still in its infancy. As evidenced in both the scientific and popular press, there exists considerable excitement surrounding the strategy of regenerative medicine. To achieve its highest potential, a series of technological advances must be made. Putting the numerous breakthroughs made in this field into a broad context, Tissue Engineering disseminates current thinking on the development of engineered tissues. Divided into three sections, the book covers the fundamentals of tissue engineering, enabling technologies, and tissue engineering applications. It examines the properties of stem cells, primary cells, growth factors, and extracellular matrix as well as their impact on the development of tissue engineered devices. Contributions focus on those strategies typically incorporated into tissue engineered devices or utilized in their development, including scaffolds, nanocomposites, bioreactors, drug delivery systems, and gene t...

  2. Determination of equivalent copper thickness of patient equivalent phantoms in terms of attenuation, used in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, J.Th.M.; Suliman, I.I.; Zoetelief, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In the radiation protection research programme of the European Union, as part of the DIMOND concerted action, constancy check protocols for fluoroscopic systems have been developed. For practical reasons copper filters are preferred to patients and tissue equivalent, water or PMMA, phantoms. The objectives are to derive patient entrance surface dose rates and the dose rate at the image intensifier input. The protocol states that copper sheets of either 1 mm or 1.5 mm thick may be used. The present study investigates the equivalent thickness of copper filters compared to PMMA phantoms in terms of attenuation for both geometries and different tube voltage and filter combinations. The geometry to determine the patient entrance surface dose is with the copper filter close to the image intensifier. The ionisation chamber is placed on the side of the copper sheet nearest to the X-ray tube. The inverse square law is used to correct for differences in position. Measurements are performed with different settings and with and without the use of an anti-scatter grid. The geometry to determine the air kerma rate at the image intensifier is with the copper filter attached to the X-ray tube diaphragm. The ionisation chamber is placed on the surface of the image intensifier housing. Again measurements are performed with different settings and with and without anti-scatter grid. If necessary, the inverse square law correction is applied. Two different radiation beam sizes are used, i.e., a small beam with a diameter of 0.10 m at a distance of 1.00 m from the focus and a large beam with a diameter of 0.23 m at a distance of 1.00 m from the focus. The applied tube voltages and PMMA phantom thickness combinations are 60 kV, 13 cm; 80 kV, 14 cm; 100 kV, 16 cm; 120 kV, 17 cm; 150 kV, 18 cm; 150 kV, 20 cm and 150 kV, 30 cm. The spectra for the different tube voltages are generated with the IPEM Report 78 software at an anode angle of 16 degree, 0% ripple and 2.5 mm added

  3. Prices dip along with volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The summer doldrums took hold in July, with only eight deals taking place, four on the spot concentrates market, two in conversion and two in enrichment. Spot concentrates volume dropped by 23% to nearly 1.2 million lbs U308 equivalent, resulting in slight declines in NUKEM's restricted and unrestricted price ranges. There were four deals on the spot market in July, totaling nearly 1.2 million lbs U3O8 equivalent. One of the buyers, a US utility, bought low-enriched uranium containing up to 440,000 lbs equivalent. Two of the buyers, a European and a US utility, purchased nearly 580,000 lbs of concentrates, with most going to the European utility. And another US utility bought UF6 containing 149,000 lbs equivalent. As for new demand, four buyers - including the European and US utilities that bought concentrates, as well as an East European utility and a non-US producer - entered the market during the month seeking 1.4 million lbs equivalent. The latter two buyers, along with another European utility and another US utility, are now weighing offers for more than 2.2 million lbs U3O8 equivalent. Looking ahead, we anticipate that as many as 17 buyers may enter the market for nearly 5 million lbs equivalent

  4. Study of the equivalent dose distribution in organs and tissues using periapical odontological radiography; Estudo da distribuição de dose equivalente em órgãos e tecidos em procedimento de radiografia odontológica periapical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, H.F.S.; Cipeli, J.F.; Fortes, M.A.B.; Federico, C.A., E-mail: hannasantana.f@gmail.com [Instituto de Estudos Avançados (IEAv), São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Divisão de Física Aplicada; Bissoli, C.F. [Universidade Paulista (UNIP), São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    In this article presents a study of the doses obtained in periapical odontological radiography in main tissues of the head, using thermoluminescent dosemeters of type TLD-700H applied to a anthropomorphic simulator. The results indicate that the skin and salivary glands received the highest doses and the risk of calculated injury was 1.44 x 10{sup -6} Sv{sup -1} per radiograph.

  5. Pressure effect on rate of production of glucose-equivalent in plant ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    C4 Green plants; rate of equivalent production; pressure effect. 1. Introduction ... the photosynthetic process, especially on the activa- tion and ... Section 4 deals with the effect ... the global concentrations of glyceraldehydes-3- ... chloroplast,9a a product of the maximum possible .... as soil, tissue, development stage, etc.

  6. Quality factor and dose equivalent investigations aboard the Soviet Space Station Mir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouisset, P.; Nguyen, V. D.; Parmentier, N.; Akatov, Ia. A.; Arkhangel'Skii, V. V.; Vorozhtsov, A. S.; Petrov, V. M.; Kovalev, E. E.; Siegrist, M.

    1992-07-01

    Since Dec 1988, date of the French-Soviet joint space mission 'ARAGATZ', the CIRCE device, had recorded dose equivalent and quality factor values inside the Mir station (380-410 km, 51.5 deg). After the initial gas filling two years ago, the low pressure tissue equivalent proportional counter is still in good working conditions. Some results of three periods are presented. The average dose equivalent rates measured are respectively 0.6, 0.8 and 0.6 mSv/day with a quality factor equal to 1.9. Some detailed measurements show the increasing of the dose equivalent rates through the SAA and near polar horns. The real time determination of the quality factors allows to point out high linear energy transfer events with quality factors in the range 10-20.

  7. 77 FR 32632 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Three New Equivalent Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    ... Methods: Designation of Three New Equivalent Methods AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION... accordance with 40 CFR Part 53, three new equivalent methods: One for measuring concentrations of nitrogen... INFORMATION: In accordance with regulations at 40 CFR Part 53, the EPA evaluates various methods for...

  8. Confluence Modulo Equivalence in Constraint Handling Rules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henning; Kirkeby, Maja Hanne

    2015-01-01

    Previous results on confluence for Constraint Handling Rules, CHR, are generalized to take into account user-defined state equivalence relations. This allows a much larger class of programs to enjoy the advantages of confluence, which include various optimization techniques and simplified...

  9. Free Fall and the Equivalence Principle Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendrill, Ann-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Free fall is commonly discussed as an example of the equivalence principle, in the context of a homogeneous gravitational field, which is a reasonable approximation for small test masses falling moderate distances. Newton's law of gravity provides a generalisation to larger distances, and also brings in an inhomogeneity in the gravitational field.…

  10. Estimation of Toxicity Equivalent Concentration (TEQ) of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Estimation of Toxicity Equivalent Concentration (TEQ) of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soils from Idu Ekpeye playground and University of Port ... Effective soil remediation and detoxification method like Dispersion by chemical reaction technology should be deployed to clean-up sites to avoid soil toxicity ...

  11. Chemical equivalence assessment of three brands of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assay for content of active ingredients is a critical test of drug quality; failure to meet up the standard for content of active ingredients will result to sub therapeutic quantities. Three brands (A, B and C) of carbamazepine were assayed to determine their chemical equivalence as well as their anticonvulsant activities. This was ...

  12. On Behavioral Equivalence of Rational Representations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trentelman, Harry L.; Willems, JC; Hara, S; Ohta, Y; Fujioka, H

    2010-01-01

    This article deals with the equivalence of representations of behaviors of linear differential systems In general. the behavior of a given linear differential system has many different representations. In this paper we restrict ourselves to kernel representations and image representations Two kernel

  13. Visual Equivalence and Amodal Completion in Cuttlefish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, I-Rong; Chiao, Chuan-Chin

    2017-01-01

    Modern cephalopods are notably the most intelligent invertebrates and this is accompanied by keen vision. Despite extensive studies investigating the visual systems of cephalopods, little is known about their visual perception and object recognition. In the present study, we investigated the visual processing of the cuttlefish Sepia pharaonis , including visual equivalence and amodal completion. Cuttlefish were trained to discriminate images of shrimp and fish using the operant conditioning paradigm. After cuttlefish reached the learning criteria, a series of discrimination tasks were conducted. In the visual equivalence experiment, several transformed versions of the training images, such as images reduced in size, images reduced in contrast, sketches of the images, the contours of the images, and silhouettes of the images, were used. In the amodal completion experiment, partially occluded views of the original images were used. The results showed that cuttlefish were able to treat the training images of reduced size and sketches as the visual equivalence. Cuttlefish were also capable of recognizing partially occluded versions of the training image. Furthermore, individual differences in performance suggest that some cuttlefish may be able to recognize objects when visual information was partly removed. These findings support the hypothesis that the visual perception of cuttlefish involves both visual equivalence and amodal completion. The results from this research also provide insights into the visual processing mechanisms used by cephalopods.

  14. Possibility and necessity measures and integral equivalence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chen, T.; Mesiar, Radko; Li, J.; Stupňanová, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 1 (2017), s. 62-72 ISSN 0888-613X Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Integral equivalence * Necessity measure * Possibility measure * Survival function * Universal integral Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Statistics and probability Impact factor: 2.845, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2017/E/mesiar-0477092.pdf

  15. Fuel Cell Equivalent Electric Circuit Parameter Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Christian; Zhou, Fan; Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    In this work a simple model for a fuel cell is investigated for diagnostic purpose. The fuel cell is characterized, with respect to the electrical impedance of the fuel cell at non-faulty conditions and under variations in load current. Based on this the equivalent electrical circuit parameters can...

  16. Weak equivalence classes of complex vector bundles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Le, Hong-Van

    LXXVII, č. 1 (2008), s. 23-30 ISSN 0862-9544 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : chern classes * complex Grassmannians weak equivalence Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  17. Violation of Equivalence Principle and Solar Neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gago, A.M.; Nunokawa, H.; Zukanovich Funchal, R.

    2001-01-01

    We have updated the analysis for the solution to the solar neutrino problem by the long-wavelength neutrino oscillations induced by a tiny breakdown of the weak equivalence principle of general relativity, and obtained a very good fit to all the solar neutrino data

  18. Bilingual Dictionaries and Communicative Equivalence for a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This implies that a bilingual dictionary becomes a poly functional instrument, presenting more information than just translation equivalents. ... With the emphasis on the user perspective, metalexicographical criteria are used to investigate problems regarding the access structure and the addressing procedures in Afrikaans ...

  19. Equivalent operator preconditioning for elliptic problems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Axelsson, Owe; Karátson, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 3 (2009), s. 297-380 ISSN 1017-1398 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : Elliptic problem * Conjugate gradient method * preconditioning * equivalent operators * compact operators Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.716, year: 2009 http://en.scientificcommons.org/42514649

  20. Superstring field theory equivalence: Ramond sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroyter, Michael

    2009-01-01

    We prove that the finite gauge transformation of the Ramond sector of the modified cubic superstring field theory is ill-defined due to collisions of picture changing operators. Despite this problem we study to what extent could a bijective classical correspondence between this theory and the (presumably consistent) non-polynomial theory exist. We find that the classical equivalence between these two theories can almost be extended to the Ramond sector: We construct mappings between the string fields (NS and Ramond, including Chan-Paton factors and the various GSO sectors) of the two theories that send solutions to solutions in a way that respects the linearized gauge symmetries in both sides and keeps the action of the solutions invariant. The perturbative spectrum around equivalent solutions is also isomorphic. The problem with the cubic theory implies that the correspondence of the linearized gauge symmetries cannot be extended to a correspondence of the finite gauge symmetries. Hence, our equivalence is only formal, since it relates a consistent theory to an inconsistent one. Nonetheless, we believe that the fact that the equivalence formally works suggests that a consistent modification of the cubic theory exists. We construct a theory that can be considered as a first step towards a consistent RNS cubic theory.

  1. Equivalence Scales for the Former West Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charlier, E.

    1997-01-01

    Equivalence scales provide answers to questions like how much a household with four children needs to spend compared to a household with two children or how much a childless couple needs to spend compared to a single person household to attain the same welfare level. These are important questions

  2. Confluence Modulo Equivalence in Constraint Handling Rules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henning; Kirkeby, Maja Hanne

    2014-01-01

    Previous results on confluence for Constraint Handling Rules, CHR, are generalized to take into account user-defined state equivalence relations. This allows a much larger class of programs to enjoy the ad- vantages of confluence, which include various optimization techniques and simplified...

  3. Equivalence of rational representations of behaviors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gottimukkala, Sasanka; Fiaz, Shaik; Trentelman, H.L.

    This article deals with the equivalence of representations of behaviors of linear differential systems. In general, the behavior of a given linear differential system has many different representations. In this paper we restrict ourselves to kernel and image representations. Two kernel

  4. Equivalent physical models and formulation of equivalent source layer in high-resolution EEG imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Dezhong; He Bin

    2003-01-01

    In high-resolution EEG imaging, both equivalent dipole layer (EDL) and equivalent charge layer (ECL) assumed to be located just above the cortical surface have been proposed as high-resolution imaging modalities or as intermediate steps to estimate the epicortical potential. Presented here are the equivalent physical models of these two equivalent source layers (ESL) which show that the strength of EDL is proportional to the surface potential of the layer when the outside of the layer is filled with an insulator, and that the strength of ECL is the normal current of the layer when the outside is filled with a perfect conductor. Based on these equivalent physical models, closed solutions of ECL and EDL corresponding to a dipole enclosed by a spherical layer are given. These results provide the theoretical basis of ESL applications in high-resolution EEG mapping

  5. Equivalent physical models and formulation of equivalent source layer in high-resolution EEG imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao Dezhong [School of Life Science and Technology, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu City, 610054, Sichuan Province (China); He Bin [The University of Illinois at Chicago, IL (United States)

    2003-11-07

    In high-resolution EEG imaging, both equivalent dipole layer (EDL) and equivalent charge layer (ECL) assumed to be located just above the cortical surface have been proposed as high-resolution imaging modalities or as intermediate steps to estimate the epicortical potential. Presented here are the equivalent physical models of these two equivalent source layers (ESL) which show that the strength of EDL is proportional to the surface potential of the layer when the outside of the layer is filled with an insulator, and that the strength of ECL is the normal current of the layer when the outside is filled with a perfect conductor. Based on these equivalent physical models, closed solutions of ECL and EDL corresponding to a dipole enclosed by a spherical layer are given. These results provide the theoretical basis of ESL applications in high-resolution EEG mapping.

  6. Proteomic Analyses of the Acute Tissue Response for Explant Rabbit Corneas and Engineered Corneal Tissue Models Following In Vitro Exposure to 1540 nm Laser Light

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eurell, T. E; Johnson, T. E; Roach, W. P

    2005-01-01

    Two-dimensional electrophoresis and histomorphometry were used to determine if equivalent protein changes occurred within native rabbit corneas and engineered corneal tissue models following in vitro...

  7. Effect of the positron range of 18F, 68Ga and 124I on PET/CT in lung-equivalent materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemerink, Gerrit J; Visser, Mariëlle G W; Franssen, Renee; Beijer, Emiel; Zamburlini, Mariangela; Halders, Servé G E A; Brans, Boudewijn; Mottaghy, Felix M; Teule, Gerrit J J

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of positron range on visualization and quantification in (18)F, (68)Ga and (124)I positron emission tomography (PET)/CT of lung-like tissue. Different sources were measured in air, in lung-equivalent foams and in water, using a clinical PET/CT and a microPET system. Intensity profiles and curves with the cumulative number of annihilations were derived and numerically characterized. (68)Ga and (124)I gave similar results. Their intensity profiles in lung-like foam had a peak similar to that for (18)F, and tails of very low intensity, but extending over distances of centimetres and containing a large fraction of all annihilations. For 90% recovery, volumes of interest with diameters up to 50 mm were required, and recovery within the 10% intensity isocontour was as low as 30%. In contrast, tailing was minor for (18)F. Lung lesions containing (18)F, (68)Ga or (124)I will be visualized similarly, and at least as sharp as in soft tissue. Nevertheless, for quantification of (68)Ga and (124)I large volumes of interest are needed for complete activity recovery. For clinical studies containing noise and background, new quantification approaches may have to be developed.

  8. SWEAT: Snow Water Equivalent with AlTimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agten, Dries; Benninga, Harm-Jan; Diaz Schümmer, Carlos; Donnerer, Julia; Fischer, Georg; Henriksen, Marie; Hippert Ferrer, Alexandre; Jamali, Maryam; Marinaci, Stefano; Mould, Toby JD; Phelan, Liam; Rosker, Stephanie; Schrenker, Caroline; Schulze, Kerstin; Emanuel Telo Bordalo Monteiro, Jorge

    2017-04-01

    To study how the water cycle changes over time, satellite and airborne remote sensing missions are typically employed. Over the last 40 years of satellite missions, the measurement of true water inventories stored in sea and land ice within the cryosphere have been significantly hindered by uncertainties introduced by snow cover. Being able to determine the thickness of this snow cover would act to reduce such error, improving current estimations of hydrological and climate models, Earth's energy balance (albedo) calculations and flood predictions. Therefore, the target of the SWEAT (Snow Water Equivalent with AlTimetry) mission is to directly measure the surface Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) on sea and land ice within the polar regions above 60°and below -60° latitude. There are no other satellite missions currently capable of directly measuring SWE. In order to achieve this, the proposed mission will implement a novel combination of Ka- and Ku-band radioaltimeters (active microwave sensors), capable of penetrating into the snow microstructure. The Ka-band altimeter (λ ≈ 0.8 cm) provides a low maximum snow pack penetration depth of up to 20 cm for dry snow at 37 GHz, since the volume scattering of snow dominates over the scattering caused by the underlying ice surface. In contrast, the Ku-band altimeter (λ ≈ 2 cm) provides a high maximum snowpack penetration depth of up to 15 m in high latitudes regions with dry snow, as volume scattering is decreased by a factor of 55. The combined difference in Ka- and Ku-band signal penetration results will provide more accurate and direct determination of SWE. Therefore, the SWEAT mission aims to improve estimations of global SWE interpreted from passive microwave products, and improve the reliability of numerical snow and climate models.

  9. Tissue types (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are 4 basic types of tissue: connective tissue, epithelial tissue, muscle tissue, and nervous tissue. Connective tissue supports ... binds them together (bone, blood, and lymph tissues). Epithelial tissue provides a covering (skin, the linings of the ...

  10. Strong volume, stable prices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This article is the September-October 1993 market report, providing trading volume and prices in the Uranium market. Activity was brisk, with 15 deals concluded. Six were in the spot concentrates market, with four of the six deals involving U.S. utilities and approximately 1.8M pounds of U3O8 equivalent. There were five conversion deals announced, with four of the five deals involving U.S. utilities. Four deals were concluded in the enrichment market, and the deals involving U.S. utilities were approximately 327k SWUs. On the horizon, there are deals for approximately 4.1M SWU

  11. Dextran derivatives modulate collagen matrix organization in dermal equivalent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Laetitia; Lebreton-Decoster, Corinne; Godeau, Gaston; Coulomb, Bernard; Jozefonvicz, Jacqueline

    2006-01-01

    Dextran derivatives can protect heparin binding growth factor implied in wound healing, such as transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2). The first aim of this study was to investigate the effect of these compounds on human dermal fibroblasts in culture with or without TGF-beta1. Several dextran derivatives obtained by substitution of methylcarboxylate (MC), benzylamide (B) and sulphate (Su) groups were used to determine the effects of each compound on fibroblast growth in vitro. The data indicate that sulphate groups are essential to act on the fibroblast proliferation. The dextran derivative LS21 DMCBSu has been chosen to investigate its effect on dermal wound healing process. Fibroblasts cultured in collagenous matrices named dermal equivalent were treated with the bioactive polymer alone or associated to TGF-beta1 or FGF-2. Cross-sections of dermal equivalent observed by histology or immunohistochemistry, demonstrated that the bioactive polymer accelerates the collagen matrices organization and stimulates the human type-III collagen expression. This bioactive polymer induces apoptosis of myofibroblast, property which may be beneficial in treatment of hypertrophic scar. Culture media analyzed by zymography and Western blot showed that this polymer significantly increases the secretion of zymogen and active form of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), involved in granulation tissue formation. These data suggest that this bioactive polymer has properties which may be beneficial in the treatment of wound healing.

  12. Equivalent Electromagnetic Constants for Microwave Application to Composite Materials for the Multi-Scale Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Fujisaki

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available To connect different scale models in the multi-scale problem of microwave use, equivalent material constants were researched numerically by a three-dimensional electromagnetic field, taking into account eddy current and displacement current. A volume averaged method and a standing wave method were used to introduce the equivalent material constants; water particles and aluminum particles are used as composite materials. Consumed electrical power is used for the evaluation. Water particles have the same equivalent material constants for both methods; the same electrical power is obtained for both the precise model (micro-model and the homogeneous model (macro-model. However, aluminum particles have dissimilar equivalent material constants for both methods; different electric power is obtained for both models. The varying electromagnetic phenomena are derived from the expression of eddy current. For small electrical conductivity such as water, the macro-current which flows in the macro-model and the micro-current which flows in the micro-model express the same electromagnetic phenomena. However, for large electrical conductivity such as aluminum, the macro-current and micro-current express different electromagnetic phenomena. The eddy current which is observed in the micro-model is not expressed by the macro-model. Therefore, the equivalent material constant derived from the volume averaged method and the standing wave method is applicable to water with a small electrical conductivity, although not applicable to aluminum with a large electrical conductivity.

  13. Using FDG-PET activity as a surrogate for tumor cell density and its effect on equivalent uniform dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Sumin; Wong, Terence Z.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2004-01-01

    The concept of equivalent uniform dose (EUD) has been suggested as a means to quantitatively consider heterogeneous dose distributions within targets. Tumor cell density/function is typically assumed to be uniform. We herein propose to use 18 F-labeled 2-deoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) tumor imaging activity as a surrogate marker for tumor cell density to allow the EUD concept to include intratumor heterogeneities and to study its effect on EUD calculation. Thirty-one patients with lung cancer who had computerized tomography (CT)-based 3D planning and PET imaging were studied. Treatment beams were designed based on the information from both the CT and PET scans. Doses were calculated in 3D based on CT images to reflect tissue heterogeneity. The EUD was calculated in two different ways: first, assuming a uniform tumor cell density within the tumor target; second, using FDG-PET activity (counts/cm 3 ) as a surrogate for tumor cell density at different parts of tumor to calculate the functional-imaging-weighted EUD (therefore will be labeled fEUD for convenience). The EUD calculation can be easily incorporated into the treatment planning process. For 28/31 patients, their fEUD and EUD differed by less than 6%. Twenty-one of these twenty-eight patients had tumor volumes 3 . In the three patients with larger tumor volume, the fEUD and EUD differed by 8%-14%. Incorporating information from PET imaging to represent tumor cell density in the EUD calculation is straightforward. This approach provides the opportunity to include heterogeneity in tumor function/metabolism into the EUD calculation. The difference between fEUD and EUD, i.e., whether including or not including the possible tumor cell density heterogeneity within tumor can be significant with large tumor volumes. Further research is needed to assess the usefulness of the fEUD concept in radiation treatment

  14. On the equivalence of GPD representations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Müller, Dieter; Semenov-Tian-Shansky, Kirill

    2016-01-01

    Phenomenological representations of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) implementing the non-trivial field theoretical requirements are employed in the present day strategies for extracting of hadron structure information encoded in GPDs from the observables of hard exclusive reactions. Showing out the equivalence of various GPD representations can help to get more insight into GPD properties and allow to build up flexible GPD models capable of satisfactory description of the whole set of available experimental data. Below we review the mathematical aspects of establishing equivalence between the the double partial wave expansion of GPDs in the conformal partial waves and in the t-channel SO(3) partial waves and the double distribution representation of GPDs

  15. Developing equivalent circuits for radial distribution networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prada, Ricardo; Coelho, Agnelo; Rodrigues, Anselmo [Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Electrical Engineering], Emails: prada@ele.puc-rio.br, agnelo@ele.puc-rio.br, nebulok_99@yahoo.com; Silva, Maria da Guia da [Federal University of Maranhao, Sao Luiz, MA (Brazil). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a method for evaluating External Equivalent in Electric Distribution Networks (EDN).The proposed method has as its main objectives the reduction of the computational costs in distribution network reconfiguration, investigation of the optimal allocation of banks of capacitors, investigation of the allocation of distributed generation, etc. In these sorts of problems a large number of alternative projects must be assessed in order to identify the optimal solution. The optimal solution comes up with the voltage level in the load points within specified limits. Consequently, the EDN must retain the external network load points but without major increasing in the dimension of the equivalent circuit. The proposed method has been tested and validated in a substation of the Electricity Utility of Maranhao - CEMAR, in Brazil. (author)

  16. Thermoluminescence dosemeter for personal dose equivalent assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, T.A. da; Rosa, L.A.R. da; Campos, L.L.

    1995-01-01

    The possibility was investigated of utilising a Brazilian thermoluminescence individual dosemeter, usually calibrated in terms of photon dose equivalent, for the assessment of the personal dose equivalent, H p (d), at depths of 0.07 and 10 mm. The dosemeter uses four CaSO 4 :Dy thermoluminescent detectors, between different filters, as the sensitive materials. It was calibrated in gamma and X radiation fields in the energy range from 17 to 1250 keV. Linear combinations of the responses of three detectors, in this energy range, allow the evaluation of H p (0.07) and H p (10), for radiation incidence angles varying from 0 to 60 degrees, with an accuracy better than 35%. The method is not applicable to mixed photon-beta fields. (author)

  17. Thevenin Equivalent Method for Dynamic Contingency Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jakob Glarbo; Jóhannsson, Hjörtur; Østergaard, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    A method that exploits Thevenin equivalent representation for obtaining post-contingency steady-state nodal voltages is integrated with a method of detecting post-contingency aperiodic small-signal instability. The task of integrating stability assessment with contingency assessment is challenged...... by the cases of unstable post-contingency conditions. For unstable postcontingency conditions there exists no credible steady-state which can be used for basis of a stability assessment. This paper demonstrates how Thevenin Equivalent methods can be applied in algebraic representation of such bifurcation...... points which may be used in assessment of post-contingency aperiodic small-signal stability. The assessment method is introduced with a numeric example....

  18. The Logic of Equivalence in Academic Discourse?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Dorte

    2017-01-01

    of discourse to distinguish between the scientific field, where interrelationships among academic disciplines are taken as an object of research, and the widespread uses of ‘interdisciplinary’ and ‘interdisciplinarity’ in academic discourse more generally, typically for legitimation purposes. The assumption......-discourses meet. It is suggested that the logics of signification, and the tension between difference and equivalence, may be important tools for theorizing this borderland. It is argued that whereas the logic of equivalence and the production of empty signifiers appears to be of marginal interest...... to the scientific field, the logic of difference as a more complex articulation of elements, seems to be more in line with the ideals of academic discourse....

  19. On equivalent resistance of electrical circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    While the standard (introductory physics) way of computing the equivalent resistance of nontrivial electrical circuits is based on Kirchhoff's rules, there is a mathematically and conceptually simpler approach, called the method of nodal potentials, whose basic variables are the values of the electric potential at the circuit's nodes. In this paper, we review the method of nodal potentials and illustrate it using the Wheatstone bridge as an example. We then derive a closed-form expression for the equivalent resistance of a generic circuit, which we apply to a few sample circuits. The result unveils a curious interplay between electrical circuits, matrix algebra, and graph theory and its applications to computer science. The paper is written at a level accessible by undergraduate students who are familiar with matrix arithmetic. Additional proofs and technical details are provided in appendices.

  20. Symmetry adaptation, operator equivalents and magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibler, M.; Chatterjee, R.

    1977-12-01

    Basic quantities for symmetry adaptation are discussed in connection with molecular and solid state physics. This gives rise to a formalism whose the central elements are operator equivalents adapted to a point group. Such symmetry adapted operator equivalents are defined in terms of Schwinger operators so that they cover the off-diagonal and diagonal cases. Special emphasis is put on the applications of the formalism to magnetic resonance. More specifically, it is shown how to apply the formalism to the construction, the study of the transformation properties, and the determination of the eigenstates of a generalized spin hamiltonian. Numerous examples are given as well as key tables relative to the chain SO(3) for making easy the application of the formalism to electron paramagnetic resonance [fr

  1. A Logical Characterisation of Static Equivalence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hüttel, Hans; Pedersen, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    -order logic for frames with quantification over environment knowledge which, under certain general conditions, characterizes static equivalence and is amenable to construction of characteristic formulae. The logic can be used to reason about environment knowledge and can be adapted to a particular application...... by defining a suitable signature and associated equational theory. The logic can furthermore be extended with modalities to yield a modal logic for e.g. the Applied Pi calculus....

  2. Global equivalent magnetization of the oceanic lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyment, J.; Choi, Y.; Hamoudi, M.; Lesur, V.; Thebault, E.

    2015-11-01

    As a by-product of the construction of a new World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map over oceanic areas, we use an original approach based on the global forward modeling of seafloor spreading magnetic anomalies and their comparison to the available marine magnetic data to derive the first map of the equivalent magnetization over the World's ocean. This map reveals consistent patterns related to the age of the oceanic lithosphere, the spreading rate at which it was formed, and the presence of mantle thermal anomalies which affects seafloor spreading and the resulting lithosphere. As for the age, the equivalent magnetization decreases significantly during the first 10-15 Myr after its formation, probably due to the alteration of crustal magnetic minerals under pervasive hydrothermal alteration, then increases regularly between 20 and 70 Ma, reflecting variations in the field strength or source effects such as the acquisition of a secondary magnetization. As for the spreading rate, the equivalent magnetization is twice as strong in areas formed at fast rate than in those formed at slow rate, with a threshold at ∼40 km/Myr, in agreement with an independent global analysis of the amplitude of Anomaly 25. This result, combined with those from the study of the anomalous skewness of marine magnetic anomalies, allows building a unified model for the magnetic structure of normal oceanic lithosphere as a function of spreading rate. Finally, specific areas affected by thermal mantle anomalies at the time of their formation exhibit peculiar equivalent magnetization signatures, such as the cold Australian-Antarctic Discordance, marked by a lower magnetization, and several hotspots, marked by a high magnetization.

  3. Visual Equivalence and Amodal Completion in Cuttlefish

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, I-Rong; Chiao, Chuan-Chin

    2017-01-01

    Modern cephalopods are notably the most intelligent invertebrates and this is accompanied by keen vision. Despite extensive studies investigating the visual systems of cephalopods, little is known about their visual perception and object recognition. In the present study, we investigated the visual processing of the cuttlefish Sepia pharaonis, including visual equivalence and amodal completion. Cuttlefish were trained to discriminate images of shrimp and fish using the operant conditioning pa...

  4. Canonizing certain Borel equivalences for Silver forcing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doucha, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 159, č. 13 (2012), s. 2973-2979 ISSN 0166-8641. [Prague Symposium on General Topology and its Relations to Modern Analysis and Algebra /11./. Prague, 07.08.2011-12.08.2011] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : Borel equivalence relations * silver ideal * canonical Ramsey theorem Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.562, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0166864112002180#

  5. Quantum mechanics from an equivalence principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraggi, A.E.

    1997-01-01

    The authors show that requiring diffeomorphic equivalence for one-dimensional stationary states implies that the reduced action S 0 satisfies the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation with the Planck constant playing the role of a covariantizing parameter. The construction shows the existence of a fundamental initial condition which is strictly related to the Moebius symmetry of the Legendre transform and to its involutive character. The universal nature of the initial condition implies the Schroedinger equation in any dimension

  6. Equivalency of two-dimensional algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Gildemar Carneiro dos; Pomponet Filho, Balbino Jose S.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Let us consider a vector z = xi + yj over the field of real numbers, whose basis (i,j) satisfy a given algebra. Any property of this algebra will be reflected in any function of z, so we can state that the knowledge of the properties of an algebra leads to more general conclusions than the knowledge of the properties of a function. However structural properties of an algebra do not change when this algebra suffers a linear transformation, though the structural constants defining this algebra do change. We say that two algebras are equivalent to each other whenever they are related by a linear transformation. In this case, we have found that some relations between the structural constants are sufficient to recognize whether or not an algebra is equivalent to another. In spite that the basis transform linearly, the structural constants change like a third order tensor, but some combinations of these tensors result in a linear transformation, allowing to write the entries of the transformation matrix as function of the structural constants. Eventually, a systematic way to find the transformation matrix between these equivalent algebras is obtained. In this sense, we have performed the thorough classification of associative commutative two-dimensional algebras, and find that even non-division algebra may be helpful in solving non-linear dynamic systems. The Mandelbrot set was used to have a pictorial view of each algebra, since equivalent algebras result in the same pattern. Presently we have succeeded in classifying some non-associative two-dimensional algebras, a task more difficult than for associative one. (author)

  7. Cryogenic test of the equivalence principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worden, P.W. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The weak equivalence principle is the hypothesis that the ratio of internal and passive gravitational mass is the same for all bodies. A greatly improved test of this principle is possible in an orbiting satellite. The most promising experiments for an orbital test are adaptations of the Galilean free-fall experiment and the Eotvos balance. Sensitivity to gravity gradient noise, both from the earth and from the spacecraft, defines a limit to the sensitivity in each case. This limit is generally much worse for an Eotvos balance than for a properly designed free-fall experiment. The difference is related to the difficulty of making a balance sufficiently isoinertial. Cryogenic technology is desirable to take full advantage of the potential sensitivity, but tides in the liquid helium refrigerant may produce a gravity gradient that seriously degrades the ultimate sensitivity. The Eotvos balance appears to have a limiting sensitivity to relative difference of rate of fall of about 2 x 10 -14 in orbit. The free-fall experiment is limited by helium tide to about 10 -15 ; if the tide can be controlled or eliminated the limit may approach 10 -18 . Other limitations to equivalence principle experiments are discussed. An experimental test of some of the concepts involved in the orbital free-fall experiment is continuing. The experiment consists in comparing the motions of test masses levitated in a superconducting magnetic bearing, and is itself a sensitive test of the equivalence principle. At present the levitation magnets, position monitors and control coils have been tested and major noise sources identified. A measurement of the equivalence principle is postponed pending development of a system for digitizing data. The experiment and preliminary results are described

  8. Extended equivalent dipole model for radiated emissions

    OpenAIRE

    Obiekezie, Chijioke S.

    2016-01-01

    This work is on the characterisation of radiated fields from electronic devices. An equivalent dipole approach is used. Previous work showed that this was an effective approach for single layer printed circuit boards where an infinite ground plane can be assumed. In this work, this approach is extended for the characterisation of more complex circuit boards or electronic systems.\\ud For complex electronic radiators with finite ground planes, the main challenge is characterising field diffract...

  9. Equivalence of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian BRST quantizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoryan, G.V.; Grigoryan, R.P.; Tyutin, I.V.

    1992-01-01

    Two approaches to the quantization of gauge theories using BRST symmetry are widely used nowadays: the Lagrangian quantization, developed in (BV-quantization) and Hamiltonian quantization, formulated in (BFV-quantization). For all known examples of field theory (Yang-Mills theory, gravitation etc.) both schemes give equivalent results. However the equivalence of these approaches in general wasn't proved. The main obstacle in comparing of these formulations consists in the fact, that in Hamiltonian approach the number of ghost fields is equal to the number of all first-class constraints, while in the Lagrangian approach the number of ghosts is equal to the number of independent gauge symmetries, which is equal to the number of primary first-class constraints only. This paper is devoted to the proof of the equivalence of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian quantizations for the systems with first-class constraints only. This is achieved by a choice of special gauge in the Hamiltonian approach. It's shown, that after integration over redundant variables on the functional integral we come to effective action which is constructed according to rules for construction of the effective action in Lagrangian quantization scheme

  10. Energy conservation and the principle of equivalence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haugan, M.P.

    1979-01-01

    If the equivalence principle is violated, then observers performing local experiments can detect effects due to their position in an external gravitational environment (preferred-location effects) or can detect effects due to their velocity through some preferred frame (preferred frame effects). We show that the principle of energy conservation implies a quantitative connection between such effects and structure-dependence of the gravitational acceleration of test bodies (violation of the Weak Equivalence Principle). We analyze this connection within a general theoretical framework that encompasses both non-gravitational local experiments and test bodies as well as gravitational experiments and test bodies, and we use it to discuss specific experimental tests of the equivalence principle, including non-gravitational tests such as gravitational redshift experiments, Eoetvoes experiments, the Hughes-Drever experiment, and the Turner-Hill experiment, and gravitational tests such as the lunar-laser-ranging ''Eoetvoes'' experiment, and measurements of anisotropies and variations in the gravitational constant. This framework is illustrated by analyses within two theoretical formalisms for studying gravitational theories: the PPN formalism, which deals with the motion of gravitating bodies within metric theories of gravity, and the THepsilonμ formalism that deals with the motion of charged particles within all metric theories and a broad class of non-metric theories of gravity

  11. Hippocampal volume reduction in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Macey

    Full Text Available Children with congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS, a genetic disorder characterized by diminished drive to breathe during sleep and impaired CO(2 sensitivity, show brain structural and functional changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scans, with impaired responses in specific hippocampal regions, suggesting localized injury.We assessed total volume and regional variation in hippocampal surface morphology to identify areas affected in the syndrome. We studied 18 CCHS (mean age+/-std: 15.1+/-2.2 years; 8 female and 32 healthy control (age 15.2+/-2.4 years; 14 female children, and traced hippocampi on 1 mm(3 resolution T1-weighted scans, collected with a 3.0 Tesla MRI scanner. Regional hippocampal volume variations, adjusted for cranial volume, were compared between groups based on t-tests of surface distances to the structure midline, with correction for multiple comparisons. Significant tissue losses emerged in CCHS patients on the left side, with a trend for loss on the right; however, most areas affected on the left also showed equivalent right-sided volume reductions. Reduced regional volumes appeared in the left rostral hippocampus, bilateral areas in mid and mid-to-caudal regions, and a dorsal-caudal region, adjacent to the fimbria.The volume losses may result from hypoxic exposure following hypoventilation during sleep-disordered breathing, or from developmental or vascular consequences of genetic mutations in the syndrome. The sites of change overlap regions of abnormal functional responses to respiratory and autonomic challenges. Affected hippocampal areas have roles associated with memory, mood, and indirectly, autonomic regulation; impairments in these behavioral and physiological functions appear in CCHS.

  12. Gauge equivalence of the Gross Pitaevskii equation and the equivalent Heisenberg spin chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radha, R.; Kumar, V. Ramesh

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, we construct an equivalent spin chain for the Gross-Pitaevskii equation with quadratic potential and exponentially varying scattering lengths using gauge equivalence. We have then generated the soliton solutions for the spin components S3 and S-. We find that the spin solitons for S3 and S- can be compressed for exponentially growing eigenvalues while they broaden out for decaying eigenvalues.

  13. Equivalent models of wind farms by using aggregated wind turbines and equivalent winds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, L.M.; Garcia, C.A.; Saenz, J.R.; Jurado, F.

    2009-01-01

    As a result of the increasing wind farms penetration on power systems, the wind farms begin to influence power system, and therefore the modeling of wind farms has become an interesting research topic. In this paper, new equivalent models of wind farms equipped with wind turbines based on squirrel-cage induction generators and doubly-fed induction generators are proposed to represent the collective behavior on large power systems simulations, instead of using a complete model of wind farms where all the wind turbines are modeled. The models proposed here are based on aggregating wind turbines into an equivalent wind turbine which receives an equivalent wind of the ones incident on the aggregated wind turbines. The equivalent wind turbine presents re-scaled power capacity and the same complete model as the individual wind turbines, which supposes the main feature of the present equivalent models. Two equivalent winds are evaluated in this work: (1) the average wind from the ones incident on the aggregated wind turbines with similar winds, and (2) an equivalent incoming wind derived from the power curve and the wind incident on each wind turbine. The effectiveness of the equivalent models to represent the collective response of the wind farm at the point of common coupling to grid is demonstrated by comparison with the wind farm response obtained from the detailed model during power system dynamic simulations, such as wind fluctuations and a grid disturbance. The present models can be used for grid integration studies of large power system with an important reduction of the model order and the computation time

  14. Computational Modeling in Tissue Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    One of the major challenges in tissue engineering is the translation of biological knowledge on complex cell and tissue behavior into a predictive and robust engineering process. Mastering this complexity is an essential step towards clinical applications of tissue engineering. This volume discusses computational modeling tools that allow studying the biological complexity in a more quantitative way. More specifically, computational tools can help in:  (i) quantifying and optimizing the tissue engineering product, e.g. by adapting scaffold design to optimize micro-environmental signals or by adapting selection criteria to improve homogeneity of the selected cell population; (ii) quantifying and optimizing the tissue engineering process, e.g. by adapting bioreactor design to improve quality and quantity of the final product; and (iii) assessing the influence of the in vivo environment on the behavior of the tissue engineering product, e.g. by investigating vascular ingrowth. The book presents examples of each...

  15. SU-E-T-480: Radiobiological Dose Comparison of Single Fraction SRS, Multi-Fraction SRT and Multi-Stage SRS of Large Target Volumes Using the Linear-Quadratic Formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, C; Hrycushko, B; Jiang, S; Meyer, J; Timmerman, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the radiobiological effect on large tumors and surrounding normal tissues from single fraction SRS, multi-fractionated SRT, and multi-staged SRS treatment. Methods: An anthropomorphic head phantom with a centrally located large volume target (18.2 cm 3 ) was scanned using a 16 slice large bore CT simulator. Scans were imported to the Multiplan treatment planning system where a total prescription dose of 20Gy was used for a single, three staged and three fractionated treatment. Cyber Knife treatment plans were inversely optimized for the target volume to achieve at least 95% coverage of the prescription dose. For the multistage plan, the target was segmented into three subtargets having similar volume and shape. Staged plans for individual subtargets were generated based on a planning technique where the beam MUs of the original plan on the total target volume are changed by weighting the MUs based on projected beam lengths within each subtarget. Dose matrices for each plan were export in DICOM format and used to calculate equivalent dose distributions in 2Gy fractions using an alpha beta ratio of 10 for the target and 3 for normal tissue. Results: Singe fraction SRS, multi-stage plan and multi-fractionated SRT plans had an average 2Gy dose equivalent to the target of 62.89Gy, 37.91Gy and 33.68Gy, respectively. The normal tissue within 12Gy physical dose region had an average 2Gy dose equivalent of 29.55Gy, 16.08Gy and 13.93Gy, respectively. Conclusion: The single fraction SRS plan had the largest predicted biological effect for the target and the surrounding normal tissue. The multi-stage treatment provided for a more potent biologically effect on target compared to the multi-fraction SRT treatments with less biological normal tissue than single-fraction SRS treatment

  16. Tissue Classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Leemput, Koen; Puonti, Oula

    2015-01-01

    Computational methods for automatically segmenting magnetic resonance images of the brain have seen tremendous advances in recent years. So-called tissue classification techniques, aimed at extracting the three main brain tissue classes (white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid), are now...... well established. In their simplest form, these methods classify voxels independently based on their intensity alone, although much more sophisticated models are typically used in practice. This article aims to give an overview of often-used computational techniques for brain tissue classification...

  17. Implementation of an Analytical Model for Leakage Neutron Equivalent Dose in a Proton Radiotherapy Planning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eley, John [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas, 6767 Bertner Ave., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Newhauser, Wayne, E-mail: newhauser@lsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States); Homann, Kenneth; Howell, Rebecca [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas, 6767 Bertner Ave., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Schneider, Christopher [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States); Durante, Marco; Bert, Christoph [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany)

    2015-03-11

    Equivalent dose from neutrons produced during proton radiotherapy increases the predicted risk of radiogenic late effects. However, out-of-field neutron dose is not taken into account by commercial proton radiotherapy treatment planning systems. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of implementing an analytical model to calculate leakage neutron equivalent dose in a treatment planning system. Passive scattering proton treatment plans were created for a water phantom and for a patient. For both the phantom and patient, the neutron equivalent doses were small but non-negligible and extended far beyond the therapeutic field. The time required for neutron equivalent dose calculation was 1.6 times longer than that required for proton dose calculation, with a total calculation time of less than 1 h on one processor for both treatment plans. Our results demonstrate that it is feasible to predict neutron equivalent dose distributions using an analytical dose algorithm for individual patients with irregular surfaces and internal tissue heterogeneities. Eventually, personalized estimates of neutron equivalent dose to organs far from the treatment field may guide clinicians to create treatment plans that reduce the risk of late effects.

  18. CURED I - LENT. Late effects of cancer treatment on normal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, P.; Okunieff, P.; Constine, L.S.; Rochester Univ. School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY; Marks, L.B.

    2008-01-01

    The search for the most favorable therapeutic ratio - at which ablation of cancer is achieved while normal tissues are conserved - has been modern radiation oncology's equivalent of the quest for the Holy Grail. Our awareness of the late effects of radiation grew during the past century as new modalities were introduced. Heightened normal tissue reactions accompanied the higher rates of cancer ablation achieved by escalation of radiation doses, accelerated fractionated radiotherapy, and aggressive concurrent chemotherapy and radiation regimens. This volume is based on the LENT V NCI-sponsored meeting held in May 2004 and the CURED I conference held in 2006. Written by experts in the field, it addresses a number of critical topics relating to late effects, such as mechanisms of injury, the role of screening, options for interventions, second malignancies, and prevention. It is hoped that it will assist the reader in understanding how to prevent and treat the long-term side-effects of irradiation. (orig.)

  19. Equivalent doses in thyroid tissue and residual body dose from radioiodine treatment of benign and malignant disorders of the thyroid as determined under therapeutic conditions. Bestimmung der Aequivalentdosen von Schilddruesengewebe und Restkoerper bei der Radiojodtherapie benigner und maligner Schilddruesenerkrankungen unter Therapiebedingungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schad, K.

    1989-11-08

    The doses actually administered to patients undergoing radiotherapy for hyperthyroidism (104), autonomous adenoma (16) and goiter without functional anomaly (22) averaged 90, 165 and 100 Sv. Attempts were made to elucidate the causes of deviations between the predetermined dose and that actually administered, which occurred quite irrespective of whether a one-staged or split-dose regimen was used. Significant differences were occasionally also seen between the individual doses of fractionation regimens in respect of their uptake and effective half-life in the thyroidal tissue. It was calculated that the mean body dose remaining after each administration of radioactivity amounted to 0.6 mSv/MBq. In the majority of patients examined, clinical follow-up observations could be made for periods ranging from 6 to 41 months. Records were kept of all the results obtained. Further analyses were made to assess the mean residual body dose of carcinoma bearers subjected to wholebody radioiodine scintigraphy in the follow-up (14 patients) as well as of patients, in which secondary radioiodine treatment was carried out after thyroidectomy (59 patients). This was found to vary between 0.05 and 0.07 mSv/MBq. The significant discrepancies formerly determined for uptake rate and effective half-life between the individual sessions of one treatment course were confirmed by these examinations. (VHE).