WorldWideScience

Sample records for volume shield included

  1. Radiation shielding properties of concretes including quiclime (CaO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özavcı, S.; ćetin, B.

    2017-02-01

    Lime is one of the oldest binder material used for concrete production. In this study, the shielding properties of γ-rays by Quicklime concretes have been investigated for concretes containing different rates of wood ash, küfenki stones, disbudak tree leaf juice and water. Measurements performed using a gamma spectrometer that contains an NaI(Tl) detector and MCA at 662, 1173 and 1332 keV.

  2. Thermal-hydraulic Analysis in the Pool of PGSFR including the Shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jung; Lee, Taeho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Various design issues relate to this region, and one of them is thermal-hydraulic behavior when shielding exists inside the reactor vessel. The shielding is used for the blockage of the radiation emitted by the reactor core. The shielding is installed at the Intermediate Heat eXchanger (IHX), core shroud, and redan region at the top of core. However, this structure disturbs the normal flow path and heat transfer of the primary heat transfer system. In this study, the multi-dimensional thermal-hydraulic characteristics in the pool of PGSFR including the shielding are analyzed. Also these results are compared to a case in which no shielding is installed. A thermal-hydraulic analysis in the pool of the PGSFR considering the shielding structure are performed using STAR-CCM+. The internal major components of the pool inside are modeled, and calculations are performed with a normal operation condition. Also, these results are compared to a no shielding case. The flow and temperature changes owing to the shielding structure at a redan inside are shown, but the overall flow and temperature distributions in both cases are substantially similar. Also the physical properties such as the flow rate, temperature, and static pressure at each major point are almost the same. These results are utilized in the arrangement of the reactor internal structure and design of the shielding structure.

  3. Extended 1D Method for Coherent Synchrotron Radiation including Shielding

    CERN Document Server

    Sagan, David; Mayes, Christopher; Sae-Ueng, Udom

    2008-01-01

    Coherent Synchrotron Radiation can severely limit the performance of accelerators designed for high brightness and short bunch length. Examples include light sources based on ERLs or FELs, and bunch compressors for linear colliders. In order to better simulate Coherent Synchrotron Radiation, the established 1-dimensional formalism is extended to work at lower energies, at shorter bunch lengths, and for an arbitrary configuration of multiple bends. Wide vacuum chambers are simulated by means of vertical image charges. This formalism has been implemented in the general beam dynamics code "Bmad" and its results are here compared to analytical approximations, to numerical solutions of the Maxwell equations, and to the simulation code "elegant".

  4. Bibliography, subject index, and author index of the literature examined by the radiation shielding information center. Volume 6. Reactor and weapons radiation shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-05-01

    An indexed bibliography is presented of literature selected by the Radiation Shielding Information Center since the previous volume was published in 1978 in the area of radiation transport and shielding against radiation from nuclear reactors, x-ray machines, radioisotopes, nuclear weapons (including fallout), and low energy accelerators (e.g., neutron generators). The bibliography was typeset from data processed by computer from magnetic tape files. In addition to lists of literature titles by subject categories (accessions 4951-6200), an author index is given.

  5. Bibliography, subject index, and author index of the literature examined by the Radiation Shielding Information Center. Volume 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trubey, D.K.; Roussin, R.W.; Gustin, A.B.

    1983-08-01

    An indexed bibliography of open literature selected by the Radiation Shielding Information Center since the previous volume was published in 1980 is presented in the area of radiation transport and shielding against radiation from nuclear reactors (fission and fusion), x-ray machines, radioisotopes, nuclear weapons (including fallout, and low energy accelerators (e.g., neutron generators). The bibliography was typeset from computer files constituting the RSIC Storage and Retrieval Information System. In addition to lists of literature titles by subject categories (accessions 6201-10156), an author index is given. Most of the literature selected for Volume VII was published in the years 1977 to 1981.

  6. Including shielding effects in application of the TPCA method for detection of embedded radiation sources.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, William C.; Shokair, Isaac R.

    2011-12-01

    Conventional full spectrum gamma spectroscopic analysis has the objective of quantitative identification of all the radionuclides present in a measurement. For low-energy resolution detectors such as NaI, when photopeaks alone are not sufficient for complete isotopic identification, such analysis requires template spectra for all the radionuclides present in the measurement. When many radionuclides are present it is difficult to make the correct identification and this process often requires many attempts to obtain a statistically valid solution by highly skilled spectroscopists. A previous report investigated using the targeted principal component analysis method (TPCA) for detection of embedded sources for RPM applications. This method uses spatial/temporal information from multiple spectral measurements to test the hypothesis of the presence of a target spectrum of interest in these measurements without the need to identify all the other radionuclides present. The previous analysis showed that the TPCA method has significant potential for automated detection of target radionuclides of interest, but did not include the effects of shielding. This report complements the previous analysis by including the effects of spectral distortion due to shielding effects for the same problem of detection of embedded sources. Two examples, one with one target radionuclide and the other with two, show that the TPCA method can successfully detect shielded targets in the presence of many other radionuclides. The shielding parameters are determined as part of the optimization process using interpolation of library spectra that are defined on a 2D grid of atomic numbers and areal densities.

  7. Including shielding effects in application of the TPCA method for detection of embedded radiation sources.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, William C.; Shokair, Isaac R.

    2011-12-01

    Conventional full spectrum gamma spectroscopic analysis has the objective of quantitative identification of all the radionuclides present in a measurement. For low-energy resolution detectors such as NaI, when photopeaks alone are not sufficient for complete isotopic identification, such analysis requires template spectra for all the radionuclides present in the measurement. When many radionuclides are present it is difficult to make the correct identification and this process often requires many attempts to obtain a statistically valid solution by highly skilled spectroscopists. A previous report investigated using the targeted principal component analysis method (TPCA) for detection of embedded sources for RPM applications. This method uses spatial/temporal information from multiple spectral measurements to test the hypothesis of the presence of a target spectrum of interest in these measurements without the need to identify all the other radionuclides present. The previous analysis showed that the TPCA method has significant potential for automated detection of target radionuclides of interest, but did not include the effects of shielding. This report complements the previous analysis by including the effects of spectral distortion due to shielding effects for the same problem of detection of embedded sources. Two examples, one with one target radionuclide and the other with two, show that the TPCA method can successfully detect shielded targets in the presence of many other radionuclides. The shielding parameters are determined as part of the optimization process using interpolation of library spectra that are defined on a 2D grid of atomic numbers and areal densities.

  8. High Bypass Ratio Jet Noise Reduction and Installation Effects Including Shielding Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Russell H.; Czech, Michael J.; Doty, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to study the propulsion airframe aeroacoustic installation effects of a separate flow jet nozzle with a Hybrid Wing Body aircraft configuration where the engine is installed above the wing. Prior understanding of the jet noise shielding effectiveness was extended to a bypass ratio ten application as a function of nozzle configuration, chevron type, axial spacing, and installation effects from additional airframe components. Chevron types included fan chevrons that are uniform circumferentially around the fan nozzle and T-fan type chevrons that are asymmetrical circumferentially. In isolated testing without a pylon, uniform chevrons compared to T-fan chevrons showed slightly more low frequency reduction offset by more high frequency increase. Phased array localization shows that at this bypass ratio chevrons still move peak jet noise source locations upstream but not to nearly the extent, as a function of frequency, as for lower bypass ratio jets. For baseline nozzles without chevrons, the basic pylon effect has been greatly reduced compared to that seen for lower bypass ratio jets. Compared to Tfan chevrons without a pylon, the combination with a standard pylon results in more high frequency noise increase and an overall higher noise level. Shielded by an airframe surface 2.17 fan diameters from nozzle to airframe trailing edge, the T-fan chevron nozzle can produce reductions in jet noise of as much as 8 dB at high frequencies and upstream angles. Noise reduction from shielding decreases with decreasing frequency and with increasing angle from the jet inlet. Beyond an angle of 130 degrees there is almost no noise reduction from shielding. Increasing chevron immersion more than what is already an aggressive design is not advantageous for noise reduction. The addition of airframe control surfaces, including vertical stabilizers and elevon deflection, showed only a small overall impact. Based on the test results, the best

  9. Four-component relativistic theory for nuclear magnetic shielding: magnetically balanced gauge-including atomic orbitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lan; Xiao, Yunlong; Liu, Wenjian

    2009-12-28

    It is recognized only recently that the incorporation of the magnetic balance condition is absolutely essential for four-component relativistic theories of magnetic properties. Another important issue to be handled is the so-called gauge problem in calculations of, e.g., molecular magnetic shielding tensors with finite bases. It is shown here that the magnetic balance can be adapted to distributed gauge origins, leading to, e.g., magnetically balanced gauge-including atomic orbitals (MB-GIAOs) in which each magnetically balanced atomic orbital has its own local gauge origin placed on its center. Such a MB-GIAO scheme can be combined with any level of theory for electron correlation. The first implementation is done here at the coupled-perturbed Dirac-Kohn-Sham level. The calculated molecular magnetic shielding tensors are not only independent of the choice of gauge origin but also converge rapidly to the basis set limit. Close inspections reveal that (zeroth order) negative energy states are only important for the expansion of first order electronic core orbitals. Their contributions to the paramagnetism are therefore transferable from atoms to molecule and are essentially canceled out for chemical shifts. This allows for simplifications of the coupled-perturbed equations.

  10. Space life sciences: ground-based iron-ion biology and physics, including shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This session of the 35th Scientific Assembly of COSPAR focuses on recent advances in ground-based studies of high-energy (mainly 1 GeV/nucleon) iron ions. The theme is interdisciplinary in nature and encompasses both physics and biology reports. Manned space missions, including those of the International Space Station and the planned Mars mission, will require the extended presence of crew members in space. As such, a better understanding in shielding design--in radiation detection as well as radio-protection based on simulating studies--is much needed. On the other hand, a better understanding of the basic mechanisms that modulate radiation sensitivity; in determining DNA double strand breaks, chromosomal aberrations, and the induction of apoptosis, will provide important information for an interventional approach.

  11. Fractal Prediction of Grouting Volume for Treating Karst Caverns along a Shield Tunneling Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chieh Cheng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Karst geology is common in China, and buried karst formations are widely distributed in Guangdong province. In the process of shield tunneling, the abundant water resources present in karst caverns could lead to the potential for high water ingress, and a subsequent in situ stress change-induced stratum collapse. The development and distribution of karst caverns should therefore be identified and investigated prior to shield tunnel construction. Grouting is an efficient measure to stabilize karst caverns. The total volume of karst caverns along the shield tunneling alignment, and its relationship with the required volume of grouts, should be evaluated in the preliminary design phase. Conventionally, the total volume of karst caverns is empirically estimated based on limited geological drilling hole data; however, accurate results are rarely obtained. This study investigates the hydrogeology and engineering geology of Guangzhou, the capital of Guangdong province, and determines the fractal characteristics of the karst caverns along the tunnel section of Guangzhou metro line no. 9. The karst grouting coefficients (VR were found to vary from 0.11 in the case of inadequate drilling holes to 1.1 in the case where adequate drilling holes are provided. A grouting design guideline was furthermore developed in this study for future projects in karst areas.

  12. Thermodynamic analysis of a Stirling engine including regenerator dead volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puech, Pascal; Tishkova, Victoria [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, CNRS, CEMES, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig, F-31055 Toulouse (France)

    2011-02-15

    This paper provides a theoretical investigation on the thermodynamic analysis of a Stirling engine with linear and sinusoidal variations of the volume. The regenerator in a Stirling engine is an internal heat exchanger allowing to reach high efficiency. We used an isothermal model to analyse the net work and the heat stored in the regenerator during a complete cycle. We show that the engine efficiency with perfect regeneration doesn't depend on the regenerator dead volume but this dead volume strongly amplifies the imperfect regeneration effect. An analytical expression to estimate the improvement due to the regenerator has been proposed including the combined effects of dead volume and imperfect regeneration. This could be used at the very preliminary stage of the engine design process. (author)

  13. Revised Calculated Volumes Of Individual Shield Volcanoes At The Young End Of The Hawaiian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J. E.; Eakins, B. W.

    2003-12-01

    Recent, high-resolution multibeam bathymetry and a digital elevation model of the Hawaiian Islands allow us to recalculate Bargar and Jackson's [1974] volumes of coalesced volcanic edifices (Hawaii, Maui-Nui, Oahu, Kauai, and Niihau) and individual shield volcanoes at the young end of the Hawaiian Ridge, taking into account subsidence of the Pacific plate under the load of the volcanoes as modeled by Watts and ten Brink [1989]. Our volume for the Island of Hawaii (2.48 x105 km3) is twice the previous estimate (1.13 x105 km3), due primarily to crustal subsidence, which had not been accounted for in the earlier work. The volcanoes that make up the Hawaii edifice (Mahukona, Kohala, Mauna Kea, Hualalai, Mauna Loa, Kilauea, and Loihi) are generally considered to have formed within the past million years and our revised volume for Hawaii indicates that either magma-supply rates are greater than previously estimated (0.25 km3/yr as opposed to 0.1 km3/yr) or that Hawaii's volcanoes have erupted over a longer period of time (>1 million years). Our results also indicate that magma supply rates have increased dramatically to build the Hawaiian edifices: the average rate of the past 5 million years (0.096 km3/yr) is substantially greater than the overall average of the Hawaiian Ridge (0.018km3/yr) or Emperor Seamounts (0.012 km3/yr) as calculated by Bargar and Jackson, and that rates within the past million years are greater still (0.25 km3/yr). References: Bargar, K. E., and Jackson, E. D., 1974, Calculated volumes of individual shield volcanoes along the Hawaiian-Emperor Chain, Jour. Research U.S. Geol. Survey, Vol. 2, No. 5, p. 545-550. Watts, A. B., and ten Brink, U. S., 1989, Crustal structure, flexure, and subsidence history of the Hawaiian Islands, Jour. Geophys. Res., Vol. 94, No. B8, p. 10,473-10,500.

  14. Isotope effects on nuclear magnetic shieldings calculated by including zero-point vibration corrections: the VMF approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dransfeld, Alk

    2004-03-08

    As a minimal dynamic correction the 'zero-point vibration', ZPV, was included in the ab initio calculation of the isotropic magnetic shielding of {sup 13}C, {sup 19}F, {sup 29}Si, {sup 31}P, and {sup 35}Cl in some molecules including the references of NMR spectroscopy (f.i. CFCl{sub 3}, CH{sub 3}-NO{sub 2}, and TMS). In contrast to most previous works the ZPV correction is not based on gradients of internal coordinates, but uses derivatives obtained by 'vibration mode following' (VMF, the coordinates of the gradients describing the magnetic shielding hypersurface are the normal coordinates of the ground state vibration motion). The vibrational corrections obtained at the applied DFT level of theory are slightly smaller than those reported for MP2 calculations. Isotope effects computed with the ZPV/VMF correction are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. Contributions from individual vibration modes to the zero-point correction show that rotational motions have a large effect.

  15. Asymmetric dose-volume optimization with smoothness control for rotating-shield brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunlong; Flynn, Ryan T; Kim, Yusung; Wu, Xiaodong

    2014-11-01

    It is important to reduce fluence map complexity in rotating-shield brachytherapy (RSBT) inverse planning to improve delivery efficiency while maintaining plan quality. This study proposes an efficient and effective RSBT dose optimization method which enables to produce smooth fluence maps. Five cervical cancer patients each with a high-risk clinical-target-volume (HR-CTV) larger than 40 cm(3) were considered as the test cases. The RSBT source was a partially shielded electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™). The anchor RSBT plans generated by the asymmetric dose-volume optimization with smoothness control (ADOS) method were compared against those produced by the dose-surface optimization (DSO) method and inverse-planning with simulated annealing (IPSA). Either L1-norm or L2-norm was used to measure the smoothness of a fluence map in the proposed ADOS method as one weighted term of the objective function. Uniform dwell-time scaling was applied to all plans such that HR-CTV D90 was maximized without violating the D2cc tolerances of the rectum, bladder, and sigmoid colon. The quality of the anchor plans was measured with HR-CTV D90 of the anchor plans. Single-shielded RSBT [(S-RSBT), RSBT with single, fix sized delivery window] and dynamic-sheilded RSBT [(D-RSBT), RSBT with dynamically varying sized delivery window] delivery plans generated based on the anchor plans were also measured, with delivery time constraints of 10, 20, and 30 min/fraction (fx). The average HR-CTV D90 values of the anchor plans achieved by the ADOS, DSO, and IPSA methods were 111.5, 94.2, and 107.4 Gy, respectively, where the weighting parameter β used in ADOS with L2-norm was set to be 100. By using S-RSBT sequencing and 20 min/fx delivery time, the corresponding D90 values were 88.8, 81.9, and 83.4 Gy; while using D-RSBT sequencing with 20 min/fx delivery time, the corresponding D90 values were 91.4, 88.3, and 78.9 Gy, respectively. The average optimization times for ADOS, DSO, and

  16. Asymmetric dose–volume optimization with smoothness control for rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunlong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong, E-mail: xiaodong-wu@uiowa.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: It is important to reduce fluence map complexity in rotating-shield brachytherapy (RSBT) inverse planning to improve delivery efficiency while maintaining plan quality. This study proposes an efficient and effective RSBT dose optimization method which enables to produce smooth fluence maps. Methods: Five cervical cancer patients each with a high-risk clinical-target-volume (HR-CTV) larger than 40 cm{sup 3} were considered as the test cases. The RSBT source was a partially shielded electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™). The anchor RSBT plans generated by the asymmetric dose–volume optimization with smoothness control (ADOS) method were compared against those produced by the dose–surface optimization (DSO) method and inverse-planning with simulated annealing (IPSA). Either L{sub 1}-norm or L{sub 2}-norm was used to measure the smoothness of a fluence map in the proposed ADOS method as one weighted term of the objective function. Uniform dwell-time scaling was applied to all plans such that HR-CTV D{sub 90} was maximized without violating the D{sub 2cc} tolerances of the rectum, bladder, and sigmoid colon. The quality of the anchor plans was measured with HR-CTV D{sub 90} of the anchor plans. Single-shielded RSBT [(S-RSBT), RSBT with single, fix sized delivery window] and dynamic-sheilded RSBT [(D-RSBT), RSBT with dynamically varying sized delivery window] delivery plans generated based on the anchor plans were also measured, with delivery time constraints of 10, 20, and 30 min/fraction (fx). Results: The average HR-CTV D{sub 90} values of the anchor plans achieved by the ADOS, DSO, and IPSA methods were 111.5, 94.2, and 107.4 Gy, respectively, where the weighting parameter β used in ADOS with L{sub 2}-norm was set to be 100. By using S-RSBT sequencing and 20 min/fx delivery time, the corresponding D{sub 90} values were 88.8, 81.9, and 83.4 Gy; while using D-RSBT sequencing with 20 min/fx delivery time, the corresponding D{sub 90} values were

  17. Extended one-dimensional method for coherent synchrotron radiation including shielding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sagan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Coherent synchrotron radiation can severely limit the performance of accelerators designed for high brightness and short bunch length. Examples include light sources based on energy recovery LINAC or free-electron lasers, and bunch compressors for linear colliders. In order to better simulate coherent synchrotron radiation, a one-dimensional formalism due to Saldin, Schneidmiller, and Yurkov has been implemented in the general beam dynamics code Bmad. Wide vacuum chambers are simulated by means of vertical image charges. Results from Bmad are here compared to analytical approximations, to numerical solutions of the Maxwell equations, and to the simulation code elegant and the code of Agoh and Yokoya.

  18. Extended one-dimensional method for coherent synchrotron radiation including shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, David; Hoffstaetter, Georg; Mayes, Christopher; Sae-Ueng, Udom

    2009-04-01

    Coherent synchrotron radiation can severely limit the performance of accelerators designed for high brightness and short bunch length. Examples include light sources based on energy recovery LINAC or free-electron lasers, and bunch compressors for linear colliders. In order to better simulate coherent synchrotron radiation, a one-dimensional formalism due to Saldin, Schneidmiller, and Yurkov has been implemented in the general beam dynamics code Bmad. Wide vacuum chambers are simulated by means of vertical image charges. Results from Bmad are here compared to analytical approximations, to numerical solutions of the Maxwell equations, and to the simulation code elegant and the code of Agoh and Yokoya.

  19. Scattering from Star Polymers including Excluded Volume Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xin; Liu, Yun; Sánchez-Diáz, Luis E; Hong, Kunlun; Smith, Gregory S; Chen, Wei-Ren

    2014-01-01

    In this work we present a new model for the form factor of a star polymer consisting of self-avoiding branches. This new model incorporates excluded volume effects and is derived from the two point correlation function for a star polymer.. We compare this model to small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements from polystyrene (PS) stars immersed in a good solvent, tetrahydrofuran (THF). It is shown that this model provides a good description of the scattering signature originating from the excluded volume effect and it explicitly elucidates the connection between the global conformation of a star polymer and the local stiffness of its constituent branch.

  20. Comparison of multileaf collimation and shield alloy blocks on an irregular target volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirican, B.; Beyzadeoglu, M.; Turgay, H.T.; Pak, Y. [Gulhane Military Medical Academy, Ankara (Turkey)

    1996-09-01

    Multileaf collimation (MLC) is a crucial component dynamic conformal radiotherapy and can be used as a replacement for conventional blocks. The most appropriate volumetric approach for the lesion`s shape is achieved by MLC by conforming the prescribed dose to the critical structure or normal tissue dose. In this study, the edge effects of dose profiles on an irregular radiation field obtained by MLC and shield alloy blocks drawn by a water-phantom system were compared. We used a SL25 linac machine with MLC consisting of 40 pairs of opposing leaves and conventional alloy block shielding on a water phantom system. We found no significant edge effect difference between MLC and conventional shielding, but MLC showed clear advantages over conventional blocks in terms of time-saving, repeatability, and reliability. (author)

  1. 29 CFR 779.259 - What is included in annual gross volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is included in annual gross volume. 779.259 Section... Coverage Annual Gross Volume of Sales Made Or Business Done § 779.259 What is included in annual gross volume. (a) The annual gross volume of sales made or business done of an enterprise consists of its...

  2. NMR shielding tensors for density fitted local second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory using gauge including atomic orbitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loibl, Stefan; Schütz, Martin

    2012-08-28

    An efficient method for the calculation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding tensors is presented, which treats electron correlation at the level of second-order Mo̸ller-Plesset perturbation theory. It uses spatially localized functions to span occupied and virtual molecular orbital spaces, respectively, which are expanded in a basis of gauge including atomic orbitals (GIAOs or London atomic orbitals). Doubly excited determinants are restricted to local subsets of the virtual space and pair energies with an interorbital distance beyond a certain threshold are omitted. Furthermore, density fitting is employed to factorize the electron repulsion integrals. Ordinary Gaussians are employed as fitting functions. It is shown that the errors in the resulting NMR shielding constant, introduced (i) by the local approximation and (ii) by density fitting, are very small or even negligible. The capabilities of the new program are demonstrated by calculations on some extended molecular systems, such as the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolesion with adjacent nucleobases in the native intrahelical DNA double strand (ATTA sequence). Systems of that size were not accessible to correlated ab initio calculations of NMR spectra before. The presented method thus opens the door to new and interesting applications in this area.

  3. Movable radiation shields for the CLEO II silicon vertex detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumas, D.J.; Ward, C.W.; Alexander, J.; Cherwinka, J.; Henderson, S. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Cinabro, D. [Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Fast, J. [Purdue University, Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Morrison, R. [University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); O`Neill, M. [CRPP, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ont. (Canada)

    1998-02-11

    Two movable tungsten radiation shields were installed on the beam pipe during the upgrade of the CLEO II detector, operating at the Cornell electron storage ring (CESR). This upgrade included the installation of a silicon vertex detector (SVX) and the purpose of the shields is to protect the SVX readout electronics from synchrotron radiation produced during injection and non-high-energy physics operation of CESR. Shield motion is controlled remotely by cables, keeping the associated motors and controls outside the detection volume. We discuss the design and performance of the radiation shields and the associated control system. (orig.). 8 refs.

  4. Shields-1, A SmallSat Radiation Shielding Technology Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, D. Laurence, III; Kim, Wousik; Cutler, James W.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center Shields CubeSat initiative is to develop a configurable platform that would allow lower cost access to Space for materials durability experiments, and to foster a pathway for both emerging and commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) radiation shielding technologies to gain spaceflight heritage in a relevant environment. The Shields-1 will be Langleys' first CubeSat platform to carry out this mission. Radiation shielding tests on Shields-1 are planned for the expected severe radiation environment in a geotransfer orbit (GTO), where advertised commercial rideshare opportunities and CubeSat missions exist, such as Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1). To meet this objective, atomic number (Z) graded radiation shields (Zshields) have been developed. The Z-shield properties have been estimated, using the Space Environment Information System (SPENVIS) radiation shielding computational modeling, to have 30% increased shielding effectiveness of electrons, at half the thickness of a corresponding single layer of aluminum. The Shields-1 research payload will be made with the Z-graded radiation shields of varying thicknesses to create dose-depth curves to be compared with baseline materials. Additionally, Shields-1 demonstrates an engineered Z-grade radiation shielding vault protecting the systems' electronic boards. The radiation shielding materials' performances will be characterized using total ionizing dose sensors. Completion of these experiments is expected to raise the technology readiness levels (TRLs) of the tested atomic number (Z) graded materials. The most significant contribution of the Z-shields for the SmallSat community will be that it enables cost effective shielding for small satellite systems, with significant volume constraints, while increasing the operational lifetime of ionizing radiation sensitive components. These results are anticipated to increase the development of CubeSat hardware design for increased mission lifetimes, and enable

  5. Two-Particle Elastic Scattering in a Finite Volume Including QED

    CERN Document Server

    Beane, Silas R

    2014-01-01

    The presence of long-range interactions violates a condition necessary to relate the energy of two particles in a finite volume to their S-matrix elements in the manner of Luscher. While in infinite volume, QED contributions to low-energy charged particle scattering must be resummed to all orders in perturbation theory (the Coulomb ladder diagrams), in a finite volume the momentum operator is gapped, allowing for a perturbative treatment. The leading QED corrections to the two-particle finite-volume energy quantization condition below the inelastic threshold, as well as approximate formulas for energy eigenvalues, are obtained. In particular, we focus on two spinless hadrons in the A1+ irreducible representation of the cubic group, and truncate the strong interactions to the s-wave. These results are necessary for the analysis of Lattice QCD+QED calculations of charged-hadron interactions, and can be straightforwardly generalized to other representations of the cubic group, to hadrons with spin, and to includ...

  6. Advantages and disadvantages of 3D ultrasound of thyroid nodules including thin slice volume rendering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slapa Rafal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to assess the advantages and disadvantages of 3D gray-scale and power Doppler ultrasound, including thin slice volume rendering (TSVR, applied for evaluation of thyroid nodules. Methods The retrospective evaluation by two observers of volumes of 71 thyroid nodules (55 benign, 16 cancers was performed using a new TSVR technique. Dedicated 4D ultrasound scanner with an automatic 6-12 MHz 4D probe was used. Statistical analysis was performed with Stata v. 8.2. Results Multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated that independent risk factors of thyroid cancers identified by 3D ultrasound include: (a ill-defined borders of the nodule on MPR presentation, (b a lobulated shape of the nodule in the c-plane and (c a density of central vessels in the nodule within the minimal or maximal ranges. Combination of features provided sensitivity 100% and specificity 60-69% for thyroid cancer. Calcification/microcalcification-like echogenic foci on 3D ultrasound proved not to be a risk factor of thyroid cancer. Storage of the 3D data of the whole nodules enabled subsequent evaluation of new parameters and with new rendering algorithms. Conclusions Our results indicate that 3D ultrasound is a practical and reproducible method for the evaluation of thyroid nodules. 3D ultrasound stores volumes comprising the whole lesion or organ. Future detailed evaluations of the data are possible, looking for features that were not fully appreciated at the time of collection or applying new algorithms for volume rendering in order to gain important information. Three-dimensional ultrasound data could be included in thyroid cancer databases. Further multicenter large scale studies are warranted.

  7. Topical safety analysis report for the transportation of the NUHOMS{reg_sign} dry shielded canister. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1993-08-01

    This Topical Safety Analysis Report (SAR) describes the design and the generic transportation licensing basis for utilizing the NUTECH HORIZONTAL MODULAR STORAGE (NUHOMS{reg_sign}) system dry shielded canister (DSC) containing twenty-four pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel assemblies (SFA) in conjunction with a conceptually designed Transportation Cask. This SAR documents the design qualification of the NUHOMS{reg_sign} DSC as an integral part of a 10CFR71 Fissile Material Class III, Type B(M) Transportation Package. The package consists of the canister and a conceptual transportation cask (NUHOMS{reg_sign} Transportation Cask) with impact limiters. Engineering analysis is performed for the canister to confirm that the existing canister design complies with 10CFR71 transportation requirements. Evaluations and/or analyses is performed for criticality safety, shielding, structural, and thermal performance. Detailed engineering analysis for the transportation cask will be submitted in a future SAR requesting 10CFR71 certification of the complete waste package. Transportation operational considerations describe various operational aspects of the canister/transportation cask system. operational sequences are developed for canister transfer from storage to the transportation cask and interfaces with the cask auxiliary equipment for on- and off-site transport.

  8. Unified aeroacoustics analysis for high speed turboprop aerodynamics and noise. Volume 2: Development of theory for wing shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiet, R. K.

    1991-01-01

    A unified theory for aerodynamics and noise of advanced turboprops is presented. The theory and a computer code developed for evaluation at the shielding benefits that might be expected by an aircraft wing in a wing-mounted propeller installation are presented. Several computed directivity patterns are presented to demonstrate the theory. Recently with the advent of the concept of using the wing of an aircraft for noise shielding, the case of diffraction by a surface in a flow has been given attention. The present analysis is based on the case of diffraction of no flow. By combining a Galilean and a Lorentz transform, the wave equation with a mean flow can be reduced to the ordinary equation. Allowance is also made in the analysis for the case of a swept wing. The same combination of Galilean and Lorentz transforms lead to a problem with no flow but a different sweep. The solution procedures for the cases of leading and trailing edges are basically the same. Two normalizations of the solution are given by the computer program. FORTRAN computer programs are presented with detailed documentation. The output from these programs compares favorably with the results of other investigators.

  9. Thermodynamic analysis of a Stirling engine including dead volumes of hot space, cold space and regenerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kongtragool, Bancha; Wongwises, Somchai [Fluid Mechanics, Thermal Engineering and Multiphase Flow Research Laboratory (FUTURE), Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 91 Suksawas 48, Bangmod, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

    2006-03-01

    This paper provides a theoretical investigation on the thermodynamic analysis of a Stirling engine. An isothermal model is developed for an imperfect regeneration Stirling engine with dead volumes of hot space, cold space and regenerator that the regenerator effective temperature is an arithmetic mean of the heater and cooler temperature. Numerical simulation is performed and the effects of the regenerator effectiveness and dead volumes are studied. Results from this study indicate that the engine net work is affected by only the dead volumes while the heat input and engine efficiency are affected by both the regenerator effectiveness and dead volumes. The engine net work decreases with increasing dead volume. The heat input increases with increasing dead volume and decreasing regenerator effectiveness. The engine efficiency decreases with increasing dead volume and decreasing regenerator effectiveness. (author)

  10. Magnetic shielding for superconducting RF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuzawa, M.; Terashima, A.; Tsuchiya, K.; Ueki, R.

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic shielding is a key technology for superconducting radio frequency (RF) cavities. There are basically two approaches for shielding: (1) surround the cavity of interest with high permeability material and divert magnetic flux around it (passive shielding); and (2) create a magnetic field using coils that cancels the ambient magnetic field in the area of interest (active shielding). The choice of approach depends on the magnitude of the ambient magnetic field, residual magnetic field tolerance, shape of the magnetic shield, usage, cost, etc. However, passive shielding is more commonly used for superconducting RF cavities. The issue with passive shielding is that as the volume to be shielded increases, the size of the shielding material increases, thereby leading to cost increase. A recent trend is to place a magnetic shield in a cryogenic environment inside a cryostat, very close to the cavities, reducing the size and volume of the magnetic shield. In this case, the shielding effectiveness at cryogenic temperatures becomes important. We measured the permeabilities of various shielding materials at both room temperature and cryogenic temperature (4 K) and studied shielding degradation at that cryogenic temperature.

  11. Shielding Effectiveness of Laminated Shields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. P. Rao

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Shielding prevents coupling of undesired radiated electromagnetic energy into equipment otherwise susceptible to it. In view of this, some studies on shielding effectiveness of laminated shields with conductors and conductive polymers using plane-wave theory are carried out in this paper. The plane wave shielding effectiveness of new combination of these materials is evaluated as a function of frequency and thickness of material. Conductivity of the polymers, measured in previous investigations by the cavity perturbation technique, is used to compute the overall reflection and transmission coefficients of single and multiple layers of the polymers. With recent advances in synthesizing stable highly conductive polymers these lightweight mechanically strong materials appear to be viable alternatives to metals for EM1 shielding.

  12. Shielding effect of a customized intraoral mold including lead material in high-dose-rate 192-Ir brachytherapy for oral cavity cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudoh, Takaharu; Ikushima, Hitoshi; Honda, Eiichi

    2012-01-01

    A high-dose-rate (HDR) 192-Ir brachytherapy using a customized intraoral mold is effective for superficial oral cavity cancer, and the surrounding normal tissue is kept away from the radioactive source with gauze pads and/or mouth piece for reducing the dose on the normal tissues. In the Tokushima university hospital, the mold has a lead shield which utilizes the space prepared with sufficient border-molding by a specific dental technique using modeling compound. In HDR 192-Ir brachytherapy using a lead shielded customized intraoral mold, there are no reports measuring the absorbed dose. The purpose of the present study is to measure the absorbed dose and discuss the optimum thickness of lead in HDR 192-Ir brachytherapy using a customized intraoral mold with lead shield using a 1 cm thickness mimic mold. The thickness of lead in the mold could be changed by varying the arrangement of 0.1 cm thickness sheet of the acrylic resin plate and lead. The measured doses at the lateral surface of the mold with thermo-luminescence dosimeter were reduced to 1.12, 0.79, 0.57, 0.41, 0.31, 0.24 and 0.19 Gy and the ratios to the prescription dose were reduced to 56, 40, 29, 21, 16, 12 and 10 percent as lead thickness increased from 0 to 0.6 cm in 0.1 cm increments, respectively. A 0.3 cm thickness lead was considered to be required for a 1 cm thickness mold, and it was necessary to thicken the lead as much as possible with the constraint of limited space in the oral cavity, especially at the fornix vestibule.

  13. Radiation Shielding Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA has relied on the materials to provide radiation shielding for astronauts since the first manned flights. Until very recently existing materials in the structure of manned spacecraft as well as the equipment and consumables onboard have been taken advantage of for radiation shielding. With the advent of the International Space Station and the prospect of extended missions to the Moon or Mars, it has been found that the materials, which were included in the spacecraft for other reasons, do not provide adequate shielding. For the first time materials are being added to manned missions solely to improve the radiation shielding. It is now recognized that dual use materials must be identified/developed. These materials must serve a purpose as part of the spacecraft or its cargo and at the same time be good shielding. This paper will review methods for evaluating the radiation shielding effectiveness of materials and describe the character of materials that have high radiation shielding effectiveness. Some candidate materials will also be discussed.

  14. Thermal neutron shield and method of manufacture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzger, Bert Clayton; Brindza, Paul Daniel

    2014-03-04

    A thermal neutron shield comprising boron shielding panels with a high percentage of the element Boron. The panel is least 46% Boron by weight which maximizes the effectiveness of the shielding against thermal neutrons. The accompanying method discloses the manufacture of boron shielding panels which includes enriching the pre-cursor mixture with varying grit sizes of Boron Carbide.

  15. Adhesive particle shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John; Walton, Christopher; Folta, James

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  16. Overview of the data-acquisition system (including shielding, isolation and grounding) on the Beta II field-reversed plasma-gun experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, H.H. Jr.

    1981-07-01

    Computer-supported acquisition, analysis, and storage of mirror fusion experimental data requires the solution of several problems. The data must be gathered with a minimum amount of noise, and transients must be excluded from the computer so that it can function properly. On Beta II (which was an experiment to produce field-reversed plasma rings from a coaxial plasma gun) the diagnostic system was planned to provide the shielding and isolation necessary to solve these two problems. The Beta II system has been in operation for about two years and provides 300-channel capacity, CAMAC interfaced, to a Hewlett Packard 21MX computer. The system routinely handles signals ranging from 1 mV to 50 kV, with bandwidths from .05 Hz to 10 MHz. The data are captured by transient recorders during a shot, then transferred to the computer. The computer stores the data on disc for immediate processing and on tape for long-term storage. Processed data from any number of channels (usually 20 to 30) is plotted between shots for immediate review. The rest of the data is processed and plotted during off hours.

  17. Program plan for the DOE Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Technology Program. Volume I. Summary, objectives and management. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-08-01

    This document defines a plan for conducting selected aspects of the engineering testing required for magnetic fusion reactor FWBS components and systems. The ultimate product of this program is an established data base that contributes to a functional, reliable, maintainable, economically attractive, and environmentally acceptable commercial fusion reactor first wall, blanket, and shield system. This program plan updates the initial plan issued in November of 1980 by the DOE/Office of Fusion Energy (unnumbered report). The plan consists of two parts. Part I is a summary of activities, responsibilities and program management including reporting and interfaces with other programs. Part II is a compilation of the Detailed Technical Plans for Phase I (1982 to 1984) developed by the participants during Phase 0 of the program (July to December 1981).

  18. Sedimentation-diffusion equilibrium of binary mixtures of charged colloids including volume effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesheuvel, P.M.; Lyklema, J.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the sedimentation-diffusion equilibrium of binary mixtures of charged colloids in the presence of small ions and for non-dilute conditions, by extending the work of Biben and Hansen (1994 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 6 A345). For a monocomponent system, they included a Carnahan-Starling har

  19. Welding shield for coupling heaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menotti, James Louis

    2010-03-09

    Systems for coupling end portions of two elongated heater portions and methods of using such systems to treat a subsurface formation are described herein. A system may include a holding system configured to hold end portions of the two elongated heater portions so that the end portions are abutted together or located near each other; a shield for enclosing the end portions, and one or more inert gas inlets configured to provide at least one inert gas to flush the system with inert gas during welding of the end portions. The shield may be configured to inhibit oxidation during welding that joins the end portions together. The shield may include a hinged door that, when closed, is configured to at least partially isolate the interior of the shield from the atmosphere. The hinged door, when open, is configured to allow access to the interior of the shield.

  20. Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry Concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, R.A.; Cron, J.

    2000-03-29

    This design analysis has shown that, on a conceptual level, the emplacement of drip shields is feasible with current technology and equipment. A plan for drip shield emplacement was presented using a Drip Shield Transporter, a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry, a locomotive, and a Drip Shield Gantry Carrier. The use of a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry as an emplacement concept results in a system that is simple, reliable, and interfaces with the numerous other exising repository systems. Using the Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System design as a basis for the drip shield emplacement concept proved to simplify the system by using existing equipment, such as the gantry carrier, locomotive, Electrical and Control systems, and many other systems, structures, and components. Restricted working envelopes for the Drip Shield Emplacement System require further consideration and must be addressed to show that the emplacement operations can be performed as the repository design evolves. Section 6.1 describes how the Drip Shield Emplacement System may use existing equipment. Depending on the length of time between the conclusion of waste emplacement and the commencement of drip shield emplacement, this equipment could include the locomotives, the gantry carrier, and the electrical, control, and rail systems. If the exisiting equipment is selected for use in the Drip Shield Emplacement System, then the length of time after the final stages of waste emplacement and start of drip shield emplacement may pose a concern for the life cycle of the system (e.g., reliability, maintainability, availability, etc.). Further investigation should be performed to consider the use of existing equipment for drip shield emplacement operations. Further investigation will also be needed regarding the interfaces and heat transfer and thermal effects aspects. The conceptual design also requires further design development. Although the findings of this analysis are accurate for the assumptions made

  1. Shielding synchrotron light sources: Advantages of circular shield walls tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, S.L. [Design and Accelerator Operations Consulting, 568 Wintergreen Ct Ridge, NY 11961 (United States); Ghosh, V.J.; Breitfeller, M. [NSLS-II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2016-08-11

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produce significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than lower energy injection and ramped operations. High energy neutrons produced in the forward direction from thin target beam losses are a major component of the dose rate outside the shield walls of the tunnel. The convention has been to provide thicker 90° ratchet walls to reduce this dose to the beam line users. We present an alternate circular shield wall design, which naturally and cost effectively increases the path length for this forward radiation in the shield wall and thereby substantially decreasing the dose rate for these beam losses. This shield wall design will greatly reduce the dose rate to the users working near the front end optical components but will challenge the beam line designers to effectively utilize the longer length of beam line penetration in the shield wall. Additional advantages of the circular shield wall tunnel are that it's simpler to construct, allows greater access to the insertion devices and the upstream in tunnel beam line components, as well as reducing the volume of concrete and therefore the cost of the shield wall.

  2. Shielding synchrotron light sources: Advantages of circular shield walls tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.

    2016-08-01

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produce significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than lower energy injection and ramped operations. High energy neutrons produced in the forward direction from thin target beam losses are a major component of the dose rate outside the shield walls of the tunnel. The convention has been to provide thicker 90° ratchet walls to reduce this dose to the beam line users. We present an alternate circular shield wall design, which naturally and cost effectively increases the path length for this forward radiation in the shield wall and thereby substantially decreasing the dose rate for these beam losses. This shield wall design will greatly reduce the dose rate to the users working near the front end optical components but will challenge the beam line designers to effectively utilize the longer length of beam line penetration in the shield wall. Additional advantages of the circular shield wall tunnel are that it's simpler to construct, allows greater access to the insertion devices and the upstream in tunnel beam line components, as well as reducing the volume of concrete and therefore the cost of the shield wall.

  3. Advanced Multifunctional MMOD Shield: Radiation Shielding Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Christiansen, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Deep space missions must contend with a harsh radiation environment Impacts to crew and electronics. Need to invest in multifunctionality for spacecraft optimization. MMOD shield. Goals: Increase radiation mitigation potential. Retain overall MMOD shielding performance.

  4. A stereotaxic, population-averaged T1w ovine brain atlas including cerebral morphology and tissue volumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn eNitzsche

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Standard stereotaxic reference systems play a key role in human brain studies. Stereotaxic coordinate systems have also been developed for experimental animals including non-human primates, dogs and rodents. However, they are lacking for other species being relevant in experimental neuroscience including sheep. Here, we present a spatial, unbiased ovine brain template with tissue probability maps (TPM that offer a detailed stereotaxic reference frame for anatomical features and localization of brain areas, thereby enabling inter-individual and cross-study comparability. Three-dimensional data sets from healthy adult Merino sheep (Ovis orientalis aries, 12 ewes and 26 neutered rams were acquired on a 1.5T Philips MRI using a T1w sequence. Data were averaged by linear and non-linear registration algorithms. Moreover, animals were subjected to detailed brain volume analysis including examinations with respect to body weight, age and sex. The created T1w brain template provides an appropriate population-averaged ovine brain anatomy in a spatial standard coordinate system. Additionally, TPM for gray (GM and white (WM matter as well as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF classification enabled automatic prior-based tissue segmentation using statistical parametric mapping (SPM. Overall, a positive correlation of GM volume and body weight explained about 15% of the variance of GM while a positive correlation between WM and age was found. Absolute tissue volume differences were not detected, indeed ewes showed significantly more GM per bodyweight as compared to neutered rams. The created framework including spatial brain template and TPM represent a useful tool for unbiased automatic image preprocessing and morphological characterization in sheep. Therefore, the reported results may serve as a starting point for further experimental and/or translational research aiming at in vivo analysis in this species.

  5. A stereotaxic, population-averaged T1w ovine brain atlas including cerebral morphology and tissue volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzsche, Björn; Frey, Stephen; Collins, Louis D; Seeger, Johannes; Lobsien, Donald; Dreyer, Antje; Kirsten, Holger; Stoffel, Michael H; Fonov, Vladimir S; Boltze, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Standard stereotaxic reference systems play a key role in human brain studies. Stereotaxic coordinate systems have also been developed for experimental animals including non-human primates, dogs, and rodents. However, they are lacking for other species being relevant in experimental neuroscience including sheep. Here, we present a spatial, unbiased ovine brain template with tissue probability maps (TPM) that offer a detailed stereotaxic reference frame for anatomical features and localization of brain areas, thereby enabling inter-individual and cross-study comparability. Three-dimensional data sets from healthy adult Merino sheep (Ovis orientalis aries, 12 ewes and 26 neutered rams) were acquired on a 1.5 T Philips MRI using a T1w sequence. Data were averaged by linear and non-linear registration algorithms. Moreover, animals were subjected to detailed brain volume analysis including examinations with respect to body weight (BW), age, and sex. The created T1w brain template provides an appropriate population-averaged ovine brain anatomy in a spatial standard coordinate system. Additionally, TPM for gray (GM) and white (WM) matter as well as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) classification enabled automatic prior-based tissue segmentation using statistical parametric mapping (SPM). Overall, a positive correlation of GM volume and BW explained about 15% of the variance of GM while a positive correlation between WM and age was found. Absolute tissue volume differences were not detected, indeed ewes showed significantly more GM per bodyweight as compared to neutered rams. The created framework including spatial brain template and TPM represent a useful tool for unbiased automatic image preprocessing and morphological characterization in sheep. Therefore, the reported results may serve as a starting point for further experimental and/or translational research aiming at in vivo analysis in this species.

  6. Light shielding apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Richard Dean; Thom, Robert Anthony

    2017-10-10

    A light shielding apparatus for blocking light from reaching an electronic device, the light shielding apparatus including left and right support assemblies, a cross member, and an opaque shroud. The support assemblies each include primary support structure, a mounting element for removably connecting the apparatus to the electronic device, and a support member depending from the primary support structure for retaining the apparatus in an upright orientation. The cross member couples the left and right support assemblies together and spaces them apart according to the size and shape of the electronic device. The shroud may be removably and adjustably connectable to the left and right support assemblies and configured to take a cylindrical dome shape so as to form a central space covered from above. The opaque shroud prevents light from entering the central space and contacting sensitive elements of the electronic device.

  7. Impact of Including Peritumoral Edema in Radiotherapy Target Volume on Patterns of Failure in Glioblastoma following Temozolomide-based Chemoradiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seo Hee; Kim, Jun Won; Chang, Jee Suk; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Se Hoon; Chang, Jong Hee; Suh, Chang-Ok

    2017-01-01

    We assessed the impact of including peritumoral edema in radiotherapy volumes on recurrence patterns among glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients treated with standard chemoradiotherapy (CRT). We analyzed 167 patients with histologically confirmed GBM who received temozolomide (TMZ)-based CRT between May 2006 and November 2012. The study cohort was divided into edema (+) (n = 130) and edema (−) (n = 37) groups, according to whether the entire peritumoral edema was included. At a median follow-up of 20 months (range, 2–99 months), 118 patients (71%) experienced progression/recurrence (infield: 69%; marginal: 26%; outfield: 16%; CSF seeding: 12%). The median overall survival and progression-free survival were 20 months and 15 months, respectively. The marginal failure rate was significantly greater in the edema (−) group (37% vs. 22%, p = 0.050). Among 33 patients who had a favorable prognosis (total resection and MGMT-methylation), the difference in the marginal failure rates was increased (40% vs. 14%, p = 0.138). Meanwhile, treatment of edema did not significantly increase the incidence of pseudoprogression/radiation necrosis (edema (−) 49% vs. (+) 37%, p = 0.253). Inclusion of peritumoral edema in the radiotherapy volume can reduce marginal failures following TMZ-based CRT without increasing pseudoprogression/radiation necrosis. PMID:28176884

  8. Unified aeroacoustics analysis for high speed turboprop aerodynamics and noise. Volume 3: Application of theory for blade loading, wakes, noise, and wing shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, D. B.; Mccolgan, C. J.; Ladden, R. M.; Klatte, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    Results of the program for the generation of a computer prediction code for noise of advanced single rotation, turboprops (prop-fans) such as the SR3 model are presented. The code is based on a linearized theory developed at Hamilton Standard in which aerodynamics and acoustics are treated as a unified process. Both steady and unsteady blade loading are treated. Capabilities include prediction of steady airload distributions and associated aerodynamic performance, unsteady blade pressure response to gust interaction or blade vibration, noise fields associated with thickness and steady and unsteady loading, and wake velocity fields associated with steady loading. The code was developed on the Hamilton Standard IBM computer and has now been installed on the Cray XMP at NASA-Lewis. The work had its genesis in the frequency domain acoustic theory developed at Hamilton Standard in the late 1970s. It was found that the method used for near field noise predictions could be adapted as a lifting surface theory for aerodynamic work via the pressure potential technique that was used for both wings and ducted turbomachinery. In the first realization of the theory for propellers, the blade loading was represented in a quasi-vortex lattice form. This was upgraded to true lifting surface loading. Originally, it was believed that a purely linear approach for both aerodynamics and noise would be adequate. However, two sources of nonlinearity in the steady aerodynamics became apparent and were found to be a significant factor at takeoff conditions. The first is related to the fact that the steady axial induced velocity may be of the same order of magnitude as the flight speed and the second is the formation of leading edge vortices which increases lift and redistribute loading. Discovery and properties of prop-fan leading edge vortices were reported in two papers. The Unified AeroAcoustic Program (UAAP) capabilites are demonstrated and the theory verified by comparison with the

  9. Adaptive planning using megavoltage fan-beam CT for radiation therapy with testicular shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Poonam; Kozak, Kevin; Tolakanahalli, Ranjini; Ramasubramanian, V; Paliwal, Bhudatt R; Welsh, James S; Rong, Yi

    2012-01-01

    This study highlights the use of adaptive planning to accommodate testicular shielding in helical tomotherapy for malignancies of the proximal thigh. Two cases of young men with large soft tissue sarcomas of the proximal thigh are presented. After multidisciplinary evaluation, preoperative radiation therapy was recommended. Both patients were referred for sperm banking and lead shields were used to minimize testicular dose during radiation therapy. To minimize imaging artifacts, kilovoltage CT (kVCT) treatment planning was conducted without shielding. Generous hypothetical contours were generated on each "planning scan" to estimate the location of the lead shield and generate a directionally blocked helical tomotherapy plan. To ensure the accuracy of each plan, megavoltage fan-beam CT (MVCT) scans were obtained at the first treatment and adaptive planning was performed to account for lead shield placement. Two important regions of interest in these cases were femurs and femoral heads. During adaptive planning for the first patient, it was observed that the virtual lead shield contour on kVCT planning images was significantly larger than the actual lead shield used for treatment. However, for the second patient, it was noted that the size of the virtual lead shield contoured on the kVCT image was significantly smaller than the actual shield size. Thus, new adaptive plans based on MVCT images were generated and used for treatment. The planning target volume was underdosed up to 2% and had higher maximum doses without adaptive planning. In conclusion, the treatment of the upper thigh, particularly in young men, presents several clinical challenges, including preservation of gonadal function. In such circumstances, adaptive planning using MVCT can ensure accurate dose delivery even in the presence of high-density testicular shields. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Adaptive planning using megavoltage fan-beam CT for radiation therapy with testicular shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Poonam [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); School of Advance Sciences, Vellore Institue of Technology University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India); Kozak, Kevin [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Tolakanahalli, Ranjini [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Ramasubramanian, V. [School of Advance Sciences, Vellore Institue of Technology University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India); Paliwal, Bhudatt R. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin, Riverview Cancer Centre, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States); Welsh, James S. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Rong, Yi, E-mail: rong@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin, Riverview Cancer Centre, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This study highlights the use of adaptive planning to accommodate testicular shielding in helical tomotherapy for malignancies of the proximal thigh. Two cases of young men with large soft tissue sarcomas of the proximal thigh are presented. After multidisciplinary evaluation, preoperative radiation therapy was recommended. Both patients were referred for sperm banking and lead shields were used to minimize testicular dose during radiation therapy. To minimize imaging artifacts, kilovoltage CT (kVCT) treatment planning was conducted without shielding. Generous hypothetical contours were generated on each 'planning scan' to estimate the location of the lead shield and generate a directionally blocked helical tomotherapy plan. To ensure the accuracy of each plan, megavoltage fan-beam CT (MVCT) scans were obtained at the first treatment and adaptive planning was performed to account for lead shield placement. Two important regions of interest in these cases were femurs and femoral heads. During adaptive planning for the first patient, it was observed that the virtual lead shield contour on kVCT planning images was significantly larger than the actual lead shield used for treatment. However, for the second patient, it was noted that the size of the virtual lead shield contoured on the kVCT image was significantly smaller than the actual shield size. Thus, new adaptive plans based on MVCT images were generated and used for treatment. The planning target volume was underdosed up to 2% and had higher maximum doses without adaptive planning. In conclusion, the treatment of the upper thigh, particularly in young men, presents several clinical challenges, including preservation of gonadal function. In such circumstances, adaptive planning using MVCT can ensure accurate dose delivery even in the presence of high-density testicular shields.

  11. Relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensor using the regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component. III. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaya, S.; Maeda, H.; Funaki, M.; Fukui, H.

    2008-12-01

    The relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensors in hydrogen halides is performed using the second-order regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component (SORA-NESC) method with the inclusion of the perturbation terms from the metric operator. This computational scheme is denoted as SORA-Met. The SORA-Met calculation yields anisotropies, Δσ =σ∥-σ⊥, for the halogen nuclei in hydrogen halides that are too small. In the NESC theory, the small component of the spinor is combined to the large component via the operator σ⃗ṡπ⃗U/2c, in which π⃗=p⃗+A⃗, U is a nonunitary transformation operator, and c ≅137.036 a.u. is the velocity of light. The operator U depends on the vector potential A⃗ (i.e., the magnetic perturbations in the system) with the leading order c-2 and the magnetic perturbation terms of U contribute to the Hamiltonian and metric operators of the system in the leading order c-4. It is shown that the small Δσ for halogen nuclei found in our previous studies is related to the neglect of the U(0,1) perturbation operator of U, which is independent of the external magnetic field and of the first order with respect to the nuclear magnetic dipole moment. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model is also discussed.

  12. Differences between nipher and slter shielded rain gages at two Colorado deposition monitoring sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, David S.; Denning, A. Scott

    1990-01-01

    In the last decade the United States and Canada have made significant progress in establishing spatial ad temporal estimates of atmospheric deposition throughout North America. Fundamental to the wet-deposition portion of these estimates is the accurate and precise measurement of precipitation amount. Goodison and others (I-3) have reported on a new type of shielded snow gage known as the Canadian MSC Nipher shielded snow gage. Because this shielded snow gage has been shown to be superior to other precipitation gages for the estimation of snowfall amount, its design was adapted to the Universal Belfort precipitation gage (4), the dominant precipitation gage used at deposition monitoring sites in the United States. Favorable results taken from monitoring sites using this modified Nipher shielded snow gage (3-6) have prompted the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Electric Power Research Institute to adopt the Nipher shielded Belfort gage as a standard piece of equipment in the Acid MODES and Operational Evaluation Network (OEN) monitoring programs and to propose that is be included as a standard snow gage in other North American deposition monitoring programs. This communication details preliminary results from two of nine NADP/NTN deposition monitoring sites selected by the Environmental Protection Agency to compare Nipher shielded Belfort precipitation gage volumes to volumes obtained from the standard Belfort gage used in the NADP/NTN monitoring program.

  13. Bibliography, subject index, and author index of the literature examined by the Radiation Shielding Information Center (Reactor and Weapons Radiation Shielding). [1973--1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    An indexed bibliography is presented of literature selected by the Radiation Shielding Information Center since the previous volume was published in 1974 in the area of radiation transport and shielding against radiation from nuclear reactors, x-ray machines, radioisotopes, nuclear weapons (including fallout), and low-energy accelerators (e.g., neutron generators). In addition to lists of literature titles by subject categories (accessions 3501-4950), author and keyword indexes are given. Most of the literature selected for Vol. V was published in the years 1973 to 1976.

  14. A Review of Radiolysis Concerns for Water Shielding in Fission Surface Power Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of radiolysis concerns with regard to water shields for fission surface power. A review of the radiolysis process is presented and key parameters and trends are identified. From this understanding of the radiolytic decomposition of water, shield pressurization and corrosion are identified as the primary concerns. Existing experimental and modeling data addressing concerns are summarized. It was found that radiolysis of pure water in a closed volume results in minimal, if any net decomposition, and therefore reduces the potential for shield pressurization and corrosion. With the space program focus m emphasize more on permanent return to the Moon and eventually manned exploration of Mars, there has been a renewed look at fission power to meet the difficult technical & design challenges associated with this effort. This is due to the ability of fission power to provide a power rich environment that is insensitive to solar intensity and related aspects such as duration of night, dusty environments, and distance from the sun, etc. One critical aspect in the utilization of fission power for these applications of manned exploration is shielding. Although not typically considered for space applications, water shields have been identified as one potential option due to benefits in mass savings and reduced development cost and technical risk (Poston, 2006). However, the water shield option requires demonstration of its ability to meet key technical challenges including such things as adequate natural circulation for thermal management and capability for operational periods up to 8 years. Thermal management concerns have begun to be addressed and are not expected to be a problem (Pearson, 2007). One significant concern remaining is the ability to maintain the shield integrity through its operational lifetime. Shield integrity could be compromised through shield pressurization and corrosion resulting from the radiolytic decomposition of water.

  15. The Active Muon Shield

    CERN Document Server

    Bezshyiko, Iaroslava

    2016-01-01

    In the SHiP beam-dump of the order of 1011 muons will be produced per second. An active muon-shield is used to magnetically deflect these muons out of the acceptance of the spectrom- eter. This note describes how this shield is modelled and optimized. The SHiP spectrometer is being re-optimized using a conical decay-vessel, and utilizing the possibility to magnetize part of the beam-dump shielding iron. A shield adapted to these new conditions is presented which is significantly shorter and lighter than the shield used in the Technical Proposal (TP), while showing a similar performance.

  16. On the morphometry of terrestrial shield volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Pablo; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2016-04-01

    Shield volcanoes are described as low angle edifices that have convex up topographic profiles and are built primarily by the accumulation of lava flows. This generic view of shields' morphology is based on a limited number of monogenetic shields from Iceland and Mexico, and a small set of large oceanic islands (Hawaii, Galapagos). Here, the morphometry of over 150 monogenetic and polygenetic shield volcanoes, identified inthe Global Volcanism Network database, are analysed quantitatively from 90-meter resolution DEMs using the MORVOLC algorithm. An additional set of 20 volcanoes identified as stratovolcanoes but having low slopes and being dominantly built up by accumulation of lava flows are documented for comparison. Results show that there is a large variation in shield size (volumes range from 0.1 to >1000 km3), profile shape (height/basal width ratios range from 0.01 to 0.1), flank slope gradients, elongation and summit truncation. Correlation and principal component analysis of the obtained quantitative database enables to identify 4 key morphometric descriptors: size, steepness, plan shape and truncation. Using these descriptors through clustering analysis, a new classification scheme is proposed. It highlights the control of the magma feeding system - either central, along a linear structure, or spatially diffuse - on the resulting shield volcano morphology. Genetic relationships and evolutionary trends between contrasted morphological end-members can be highlighted within this new scheme. Additional findings are that the Galapagos-type morphology with a central deep caldera and steep upper flanks are characteristic of other shields. A series of large oceanic shields have slopes systematically much steeper than the low gradients (<4-8°) generally attributed to large Hawaiian-type shields. Finally, the continuum of morphologies from flat shields to steeper complex volcanic constructs considered as stratovolcanoes calls for a revision of this oversimplified

  17. Thermal neutron shield and method of manufacture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brindza, Paul Daniel; Metzger, Bert Clayton

    2013-05-28

    A thermal neutron shield comprising concrete with a high percentage of the element Boron. The concrete is least 54% Boron by weight which maximizes the effectiveness of the shielding against thermal neutrons. The accompanying method discloses the manufacture of Boron loaded concrete which includes enriching the concrete mixture with varying grit sizes of Boron Carbide.

  18. Optimal Shielding for Minimum Materials Cost of Mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolley, Robert D. [PPPL

    2014-08-01

    Material costs dominate some shielding design problems. This is certainly the case for manned nuclear power space applications for which shielding is essential and the cost of launching by rocket from earth is high. In such situations or in those where shielding volume or mass is constrained, it is important to optimize the design. Although trial and error synthesis methods may succeed a more systematic approach is warranted. Design automation may also potentially reduce engineering costs.

  19. Electromagnetic shielding. Citations from the NTIS data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, W. E.

    1980-06-01

    The bibliography presents research on electromagnetic shielding of electronic and electrical equipment personnel, and ordnance. The shielding effectiveness of materials and structures is covered. Nuclear electromagnetic pulse shielding is included. This updated bibliography contains 301 abstracts, 19 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  20. Light shield for solar concentrators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plesniak, Adam P.; Martins, Guy L.

    2014-08-26

    A solar receiver unit including a housing defining a recess, a cell assembly received in the recess, the cell assembly including a solar cell, and a light shield received in the recess and including a body and at least two tabs, the body defining a window therein, the tabs extending outward from the body and being engaged with the recess, wherein the window is aligned with the solar cell.

  1. The use of nipple shields: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selina Chow

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A nipple shield is a breastfeeding aid with a nipple-shaped shield that is positioned over the nipple and areola prior to nursing. Nipple shields are usually recommended to mothers with flat nipples or in cases in which there is a failure of the baby to effectively latch onto the breast within the first two days postpartum. The use of nipple shields is a controversial topic in the field of lactation. Its use has been an issue in the clinical literature since some older studies discovered reduced breast milk transfer when using nipple shields, while more recent studies reported successful breastfeeding outcomes. The purpose of this review was to examine the evidence and outcomes with nipple shield use. Methods: A literature search was conducted in Ovid MEDLINE, OLDMEDLINE, EMBASE Classic, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and CINAHL. The primary endpoint was any breastfeeding outcome following nipple shield use. Secondary endpoints included the reasons for nipple shield use and the average/median length of use. For the analysis, we examined the effect of nipple shield use on physiological responses, premature infants, mothers’ experiences, and health professionals’ experiences. Results: The literature search yielded 261 articles, 14 of which were included in this review. Of these 14 articles, three reported on physiological responses, two reported on premature infants, eight reported on mothers’ experiences, and one reported on health professionals’ experiences. Conclusion: Through examining the use of nipple shields, further insight is provided on the advantages and disadvantages of this practice, thus allowing clinicians and researchers to address improvements on areas that will benefit mothers and infants the most.

  2. Lightweight concrete with enhanced neutron shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brindza, Paul Daniel; Metzger, Bert Clayton

    2016-09-13

    A lightweight concrete containing polyethylene terephthalate in an amount of 20% by total volume. The concrete is enriched with hydrogen and is therefore highly effective at thermalizing neutrons. The concrete can be used independently or as a component of an advanced neutron radiation shielding system.

  3. Neutron Shielding Effectiveness of Multifunctional Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Neutrons are moderated or reduced in energy by scattering off of nuclei. When cosmic neutrons with high kinetic energy enter earth’s atmosphere...neutron flux. The simulation volume was modeled as a sphere centered at the origin with a radius of 100 cm. The shielding material was modeled as a

  4. Shielding Effectiveness of Composites Containing Flaky Inclusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qingguo; QU Zhaoming; WANG Yilong

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the quantitative relationship between the electromagnetic-shielding property of composites and the distribution of inclusions,a scheme for predicting the shielding effectiveness of composites containing variously-distributed flaky inclusions is proposed.The scheme is based on equivalent parameters of homogeneous comparison materials and the plane-wave shielding theory.It leads to explicit formulas for the shielding effectiveness of multi-layered composites in terms of microstructural parameters that characterize the shape,distribution and orientation of the inclusions.For single layer composite that contains random and aligned flaky silver-coated carbonyl-iron particles with fractions of different volume,the predicted shielding effectiveness agrees well with the experimental data.As for composites containing aligned flaky particles,the shielding effectiveness obtained by the proposed scheme and experiment data is higher than that the random case,e.g.about 20 dB higher at 750 MHz.The proposed scheme is a straightforward method for optimizing future composite designs.

  5. INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY COURSE, INSTRUCTORS' GUIDE. VOLUME 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Engineering Extension Service.

    INFORMATION RELATIVE TO THE LESSON PLANS IN "INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY COURSE, INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE, VOLUME I" (VT 003 565) IS PRESENTED ON 52 INFORMATION SHEETS INCLUDING THE SUBJECTS SHIELDING EQUATIONS AND LOGARITHMS, METAL PROPERTIES, FIELD TRIP INSTRUCTIONS FOR STUDENTS, WELDING SYMBOLS AND SIZES, SAMPLE REPORT FORMS, AND TYPICAL SHIPPING…

  6. Self-shielding Electron Beam Installation for Sterilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linac; Laboratory

    2002-01-01

    China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) has developed a self-shielding electron beam installationfor sterilization as handling letters with anthrax germ or spores which has the least volume and the least

  7. Paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunlong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Dadkhah, Hossein; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Buatti, John M.; Xu, Weiyu; Wu, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The authors present a novel paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy (P-RSBT) method, whose radiation-attenuating shields are formed with a multileaf collimator (MLC), consisting of retractable paddles, to achieve intensity modulation in high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Methods: Five cervical cancer patients using an intrauterine tandem applicator were considered to assess the potential benefit of the P-RSBT method. The P-RSBT source used was a 50 kV electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™). The paddles can be retracted independently to form multiple emission windows around the source for radiation delivery. The MLC was assumed to be rotatable. P-RSBT treatment plans were generated using the asymmetric dose–volume optimization with smoothness control method [Liu et al., Med. Phys. 41(11), 111709 (11pp.) (2014)] with a delivery time constraint, different paddle sizes, and different rotation strides. The number of treatment fractions (fx) was assumed to be five. As brachytherapy is delivered as a boost for cervical cancer, the dose distribution for each case includes the dose from external beam radiotherapy as well, which is 45 Gy in 25 fx. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated until the minimum dose to the hottest 2 cm3 (D2cm3) of either the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached their tolerance doses of 75, 75, and 90 Gy3, respectively, expressed as equivalent doses in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β = 3 Gy). Results: P-RSBT outperformed the two other RSBT delivery techniques, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT) and dynamic-shield RSBT (D-RSBT), with a properly selected paddle size. If the paddle size was angled at 60°, the average D90 increases for the delivery plans by P-RSBT on the five cases, compared to S-RSBT, were 2.2, 8.3, 12.6, 11.9, and 9.1 Gy10, respectively, with delivery times of 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min/fx. The increases in HR-CTV D90, compared to D-RSBT, were 16.6, 12.9, 7.2, 3.7, and 1.7 Gy10

  8. Paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunlong; Xu, Weiyu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Buatti, John M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong, E-mail: xiaodong-wu@uiowa.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: The authors present a novel paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy (P-RSBT) method, whose radiation-attenuating shields are formed with a multileaf collimator (MLC), consisting of retractable paddles, to achieve intensity modulation in high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Methods: Five cervical cancer patients using an intrauterine tandem applicator were considered to assess the potential benefit of the P-RSBT method. The P-RSBT source used was a 50 kV electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™). The paddles can be retracted independently to form multiple emission windows around the source for radiation delivery. The MLC was assumed to be rotatable. P-RSBT treatment plans were generated using the asymmetric dose–volume optimization with smoothness control method [Liu et al., Med. Phys. 41(11), 111709 (11pp.) (2014)] with a delivery time constraint, different paddle sizes, and different rotation strides. The number of treatment fractions (fx) was assumed to be five. As brachytherapy is delivered as a boost for cervical cancer, the dose distribution for each case includes the dose from external beam radiotherapy as well, which is 45 Gy in 25 fx. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated until the minimum dose to the hottest 2 cm{sup 3} (D{sub 2cm{sup 3}}) of either the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached their tolerance doses of 75, 75, and 90 Gy{sub 3}, respectively, expressed as equivalent doses in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β = 3 Gy). Results: P-RSBT outperformed the two other RSBT delivery techniques, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT) and dynamic-shield RSBT (D-RSBT), with a properly selected paddle size. If the paddle size was angled at 60°, the average D{sub 90} increases for the delivery plans by P-RSBT on the five cases, compared to S-RSBT, were 2.2, 8.3, 12.6, 11.9, and 9.1 Gy{sub 10}, respectively, with delivery times of 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min/fx. The increases in HR-CTV D{sub 90}, compared to D-RSBT, were 16

  9. Tank evaluation system shielded annular tank application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freier, D.A.

    1988-10-04

    TEST (Tank Evaluation SysTem) is a research project utilizing neutron interrogation techniques to analyze the content of nuclear poisons and moderators in tank shielding. TEST experiments were performed on an experimental SAT (Shielded Annular Tank) at the Rocky Flats Plant. The purpose of these experiments was threefold: (1) to assess TEST application to SATs, (2) to determine if Nuclear Safety inspection criteria could be met, and (3) to perform a preliminary calibration of TEST for SATs. Several experiments were performed, including measurements of 11 tank shielding configurations, source-simulated holdup experiments, analysis of three detector modes, resolution studies, and TEST scanner geometry experiments. 1 ref., 21 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Hawaii Energy Resource Overviews. Volume 4. Impact of geothermal resource development in Hawaii (including air and water quality)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, S.M.; Siegel, B.Z.

    1980-06-01

    The environmental consequences of natural processes in a volcanic-fumerolic region and of geothermal resource development are presented. These include acute ecological effects, toxic gas emissions during non-eruptive periods, the HGP-A geothermal well as a site-specific model, and the geothermal resources potential of Hawaii. (MHR)

  11. Shielding high energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Stevenson, Graham Roger

    2001-01-01

    After introducing the subject of shielding high energy accelerators, point source, line-of-sight models, and in particular the Moyer model. are discussed. Their use in the shielding of proton and electron accelerators is demonstrated and their limitations noted. especially in relation to shielding in the forward direction provided by large, flat walls. The limitations of reducing problems to those using it cylindrical geometry description are stressed. Finally the use of different estimators for predicting dose is discussed. It is suggested that dose calculated from track-length estimators will generally give the most satisfactory estimate. (9 refs).

  12. Comparison the effect of two ways of tube feeding including bolus and continuous infusion on gastric residual volume and diarrhea in patients hospitalized in Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahriari M

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Proper nutritional support is one of the important caring aspects in patients who were hospitalized in Intensive Care Unit. Although the several studies have been done concerning the selection of proper nutrition method for patients, but there is no agreement on this issue. The aim of current study was the compare the effect of two ways of tube feeding including bolus and continuous infusion on gastric residual volume and diarrhea in patients hospitalized in Intensive Care Unit.  Materials and Method: The current clinical trial was conducted on patients who were hospitalized in intensive care unit in Alzahra hospital in Isfahan, 2013. Fifty patients were selected through convenient sampling and were randomly assigned into two groups of 25 people of intervention and control. Nutrition was done through infusion pump in intervention group and by bolus in control group. Gastric residual volume and diarrhea was assessed each four hours for four days. Data were gathered through checklist and were analyzed by SPSS18 using descriptive and inferential statistics including independent T-test, Fisher's exact test and repeated measures ANOVA.  Results: The results showed that the mean of gastric residual volume in control group was more than the intervention group on the third day (p=0.04. Also, the mean of gastric residual volume did not show significant difference at different times in intervention group, but the mean of gastric residual volume was significantly increased in control group at different times (p=0.04. Fisher's exact test showed no significant difference between two groups concerning the diarrhea frequency.  Conclusion: In nutritional support with continuous infusion method, gastric residual volume was not increased and gastric emptying rate was not diminished. Therefore, this method can be used as an appropriate nutritional support in intensive care unit.

  13. iSHIELD - A Line Source Application of SHIELD11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, W.R.; Rokni, S.H.; /SLAC

    2006-04-27

    iSHIELD11 performs a line-source numerical integration of radiation source terms that are defined by the iSHIELD11 computer code[1] . An example is provided to demonstrate how one can use iSHIELD11 to perform a shielding analysis for a 250 GeV electron linear accelerator.

  14. Study of Gamma-Ray Shielding Properties of Barite Concrete Including CRTs at Different Energies with Monte Carlo Method%重晶石混凝土中混入CRTs的屏蔽性能MC模拟研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程鹏亮; 葛良全; 张庆贤; 李秋实; 严峻; 刘俊

    2014-01-01

    基于MCNP5对重晶石混凝土中混入不同比例的报废阴极X射线管瓶锥部分的屏蔽性能进行模拟研究。通过对不同能量的γ射线穿过屏蔽体的模拟研究,得出四种能量的γ射线在各种比例混凝土中的出射光谱、线衰减系数、透射率及半吸收厚度。模拟结果表明:对于同一种能量的γ射线随着CRTs比例的上升,混凝土的屏蔽性能逐渐减弱,但半吸收厚度相差不超过1cm。研究结果为CRTs型混凝土应用于辐射防护领域的可行性提供了模拟实验支持,同时对新型屏蔽材料的研发提供了一定的参考,从而为报废阴极X射线管的回收利用开辟了新的市场,也为废弃物中重金属的污染提供了治理措施。%This paper compares the shielding capability of the concrete that is produced by mixing different pro-portion of the neck portion of the scrap color cathode X-ray tube into the barite concrete based on MCNP5. The exit spectrum, line attenuation coefficient, transmittance and half thickness of absorption of γ-rays with four kinds of energies (0.662 MeV、1 MeV、2 MeV、3 MeV) can be obtained from the simulation of these fourγ-rays passing though the different concretes.The results suggest that the concrete ’ s shielding capability is gradually weakened with the increase of the proportion of CRTs for the same energyγ-ray, but the half thick-ness of absorption will not exceed more than 1cm.The conclusion provides some supports on the application of CRT-concrete in radiation protection and offers some reference in the development of new shielding materials. Meanwhile, it not only opens new markets for the recycle of the scrap color cathode X-ray tube, but also pro-vides some control measures for the pollution of heavy metal in the garbage.

  15. Neutronic Reactor Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermi, Enrico; Zinn, Walter H.

    The argument of the present Patent is a radiation shield suitable for protection of personnel from both gamma rays and neutrons. Such a shield from dangerous radiations is achieved to the best by the combined action of a neutron slowing material (a moderator) and a neutron absorbing material. Hydrogen is particularly effective for this shield since it is a good absorber of slow neutrons and a good moderator of fast neutrons. The neutrons slowed down by hydrogen may, then, be absorbed by other materials such as boron, cadmium, gadolinium, samarium or steel. Steel is particularly convenient for the purpose, given its effectiveness in absorbing also the gamma rays from the reactor (both primary gamma rays and secondary ones produced by the moderation of neutrons). In particular, in the present Patent a shield is described, made of alternate layers of steel and Masonite (an hydrolized ligno-cellulose material). The object of the present Patent is not discussed in any other published paper.

  16. Shielded cells transfer automation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, J J

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear waste from shielded cells is removed, packaged, and transferred manually in many nuclear facilities. Radiation exposure is absorbed by operators during these operations and limited only through procedural controls. Technological advances in automation using robotics have allowed a production waste removal operation to be automated to reduce radiation exposure. The robotic system bags waste containers out of glove box and transfers them to a shielded container. Operators control the system outside the system work area via television cameras. 9 figures.

  17. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunlong; Flynn, Ryan T; Kim, Yusung; Yang, Wenjun; Wu, Xiaodong

    2013-12-01

    To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process. A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D90 for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and (192)Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D2cc of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α∕β = 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively. For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes∕fraction (min∕fx) assuming a 10 Ci(192)Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D90 was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D90 of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min∕fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min∕fx more. If an additional 20 min∕fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D90 above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively. For cervical cancer patients, D-RSBT can boost HR-CTV D90

  18. Stellar activity and magnetic shielding

    CERN Document Server

    Grießmeier, J -M; Lammer, H; Grenfell, J L; Stadelmann, A; Motschmann, U; 10.1017/S1743921309992961

    2010-01-01

    Stellar activity has a particularly strong influence on planets at small orbital distances, such as close-in exoplanets. For such planets, we present two extreme cases of stellar variability, namely stellar coronal mass ejections and stellar wind, which both result in the planetary environment being variable on a timescale of billions of years. For both cases, direct interaction of the streaming plasma with the planetary atmosphere would entail servere consequences. In certain cases, however, the planetary atmosphere can be effectively shielded by a strong planetary magnetic field. The efficiency of this shielding is determined by the planetary magnetic dipole moment, which is difficult to constrain by either models or observations. We present different factors which influence the strength of the planetary magnetic dipole moment. Implications are discussed, including nonthermal atmospheric loss, atmospheric biomarkers, and planetary habitability.

  19. Monte carlo simulation of innovative neutron and photon shielding material composing of high density concrete, waste rubber, lead and boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aim-O, P.; Wongsawaeng, D.; Phruksarojanakun, P.; Tancharakorn, S.

    2017-06-01

    High-density concrete exhibits high strength and can perform an important role of gamma ray attenuation. In order to upgrade this material’s radiation-shielding performance, hydrogen-rich material can be incorporated. Waste rubber from vehicles has high hydrogen content which is the prominent characteristic to attenuate neutron. The objective of this work was to evaluate the radiation-shielding properties of this composite material against neutron and photon radiations. Monte Carlo transport simulation was conducted to simulate radiation through the composite material. Am-241/Be was utilized for neutron source and Co-60 for photon source. Parameters of the study included volume percentages of waste rubber, lead and boron carbide and thickness of the shielding material. These designs were also fabricated and the radiation shielding properties were experimentally evaluated. The best neutron and gamma ray shielding material was determined to be high-density concrete mixed with 5 vol% crumb rubber and 5 vol% lead powder. This shielding material increased the neutron attenuation by 64% and photon attenuation by 68% compared to ordinary concrete. Also, increasing the waste rubber content to greater than 5% resulted in a decrease in the radiation attenuation. This innovative composite radiation shielding material not only benefits nuclear science and engineering applications, but also helps solve the environmental issue of waste rubber.

  20. Variations in Rectal Volumes and Dosimetry Values Including NTCP due to Interfractional Variability When Administering 2D-Based IG-IMRT for Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Hanada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We estimated variations in rectal volumes and dosimetry values including NTCP with interfractional motion during prostate IG-IMRT. Rectal volumes, DVH parameters, and NTCPs of 20 patients were analyzed. For this patient population, the median (range volume on the initial plan for the rectum was 45.6 cc (31.3–82.0, showing on-treatment spread around the initial prediction based on the initial plan. DVH parameters of on-treatment CBCT analyses showed systematic regularity shift from the prediction based on the initial plan. Using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model, NTCPs of predicted late rectal bleeding toxicity of rectal grade ≥ 2 (RTOG and the QUANTEC update rectal toxicity for the prediction based on the initial plan were 0.09% (0.02–0.24 and 0.02% (0.00–0.07, respectively, with NTCPs from on-treatment CBCT analyses being 0.35% (0.01–6.16 and 0.12% (0.00–4.11, respectively. Using the relative seriality model, for grade ≥ 2 bleeding rectal toxicity, NTCP of the prediction based on the initial plan was 0.64% (0.15–1.22 versus 1.48% (0.18–7.66 for on-treatment CBCT analysis. Interfraction variations in rectal volumes occur in all patients due to physiological changes. Thus, rectal assessment during 2D-based IG-IMRT using NTCP models has the potential to provide useful and practical dosimetric verification.

  1. Latest experiences in inspecting the inside of BWR vessel shields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, R.; Gonzalez, E.

    2001-07-01

    In the last few years, the owners of BWR nuclear power plants have been forced to address new fuel shield inspection requirements, TECNATOM has responded to this situation by launching the TEIDE projects, which include development of an inspection machine and the corresponding Non-Destructive Tests to examine the inside of this shield. With these projects, TECNATOM has performed more than 12 fuel shield inspections in different countries. This article describes the experience gained in the last three years. (Author)

  2. Space Shielding Materials for Prometheus Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Lewis

    2006-01-20

    At the time of Prometheus program restructuring, shield material and design screening efforts had progressed to the point where a down-selection from approximately eighty-eight materials to a set of five ''primary'' materials was in process. The primary materials were beryllium (Be), boron carbide (B{sub 4}C), tungsten (W), lithium hydride (LiH), and water (H{sub 2}O). The primary materials were judged to be sufficient to design a Prometheus shield--excluding structural and insulating materials, that had not been studied in detail. The foremost preconceptual shield concepts included: (1) a Be/B{sub 4}C/W/LiH shield; (2) a Be/B{sub 4}C/W shield; (3) and a Be/B{sub 4}C/H{sub 2}O shield. Since the shield design and materials studies were still preliminary, alternative materials (e.g., {sup nal}B or {sup 10}B metal) were still being screened, but at a low level of effort. Two competing low mass neutron shielding materials are included in the primary materials due to significant materials uncertainties in both. For LiH, irradiation-induced swelling was the key issue, whereas for H{sub 2}O, containment corrosion without active chemistry control was key, Although detailed design studies are required to accurately estimate the mass of shields based on either hydrogenous material, both are expected to be similar in mass, and lower mass than virtually any alternative. Unlike Be, W, and B{sub 4}C, which are not expected to have restrictive temperature limits, shield temperature limits and design accommodations are likely to be needed for either LiH or H{sub 2}O. The NRPCT focused efforts on understanding swelting of LiH, and observed, from approximately fifty prior irradiation tests, that either casting ar thorough out-gassing should reduce swelling. A potential contributor to LiH swelling appears to be LiOH contamination due to exposure to humid air, that can be eliminated by careful processing. To better understand LiH irradiation performance and

  3. Self-Shielding Of Transmission Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christodoulou, Christos [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The use of shielding to contend with noise or harmful EMI/EMR energy is not a new concept. An inevitable trade that must be made for shielding is physical space and weight. Space was often not as much of a painful design trade in older larger systems as they are in today’s smaller systems. Today we are packing in an exponentially growing number of functionality within the same or smaller volumes. As systems become smaller and space within systems become more restricted, the implementation of shielding becomes more problematic. Often, space that was used to design a more mechanically robust component must be used for shielding. As the system gets smaller and space is at more of a premium, the trades starts to result in defects, designs with inadequate margin in other performance areas, and designs that are sensitive to manufacturing variability. With these challenges in mind, it would be ideal to maximize attenuation of harmful fields as they inevitably couple onto transmission lines without the use of traditional shielding. Dr. Tom Van Doren proposed a design concept for transmission lines to a class of engineers while visiting New Mexico. This design concept works by maximizing Electric field (E) and Magnetic Field (H) field containment between operating transmission lines to achieve what he called “Self-Shielding”. By making the geometric centroid of the outgoing current coincident with the return current, maximum field containment is achieved. The reciprocal should be true as well, resulting in greater attenuation of incident fields. Figure’s 1(a)-1(b) are examples of designs where the current centroids are coincident. Coax cables are good examples of transmission lines with co-located centroids but they demonstrate excellent field attenuation for other reasons and can’t be used to test this design concept. Figure 1(b) is a flex circuit design that demonstrate the implementation of self-shielding vs a standard conductor layout.

  4. Hinged Shields for Machine Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallande, J. B.; Poland, W. W.; Tull, S.

    1985-01-01

    Flaps guard against flying chips, but fold away for tool setup. Clear plastic shield in position to intercept flying chips from machine tool and retracted to give operator access to workpiece. Machine shops readily make such shields for own use.

  5. Spacecraft Electrostatic Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This project analyzed the feasibility of placing an electrostatic field around a spacecraft to provide a shield against radiation. The concept was originally proposed in the 1960s and tested on a spacecraft by the Soviet Union in the 1970s. Such tests and analyses showed that this concept is not only feasible but operational. The problem though is that most of this work was aimed at protection from 10- to 100-MeV radiation. We now appreciate that the real problem is 1- to 2-GeV radiation. So, the question is one of scaling, in both energy and size. Can electrostatic shielding be made to work at these high energy levels and can it protect an entire vehicle? After significant analysis and consideration, an electrostatic shield configuration was proposed. The selected architecture was a torus, charged to a high negative voltage, surrounding the vehicle, and a set of positively charged spheres. Van de Graaff generators were proposed as the mechanism to move charge from the vehicle to the torus to generate the fields necessary to protect the spacecraft. This design minimized complexity, residual charge, and structural forces and resolved several concerns raised during the internal critical review. But, it still is not clear if such a system is costeffective or feasible, even though several studies have indicated usefulness for radiation protection at energies lower than that of the galactic cosmic rays. Constructing such a system will require power supplies that can generate voltages 10 times that of the state of the art. Of more concern is the difficulty of maintaining the proper net charge on the entire structure and ensuring that its interaction with solar wind will not cause rapid discharge. Yet, if these concerns can be resolved, such a scheme may provide significant radiation shielding to future vehicles, without the excessive weight or complexity of other active shielding techniques.

  6. Neutron shielding performance of water-extended polyester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega Carrillo, H.R.; Manzanares-Acuna, E.; Hernandez-Davila, V.M. [Zacatecas Univ. Autonoma, Nuclear Studies (Mexico); Vega Carrillo, H.R.; Hernandez-Davila, V.M. [Zacatecas Univ. Autonoma, Electric Engineering Academic Units (Mexico); Gallego, E.; Lorente, A. [Madrid Univ. Politecnica, cNuclear Engineering Department (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    A Monte Carlo study to determine the shielding features to neutrons of water-extended polyester (WEP) was carried out. Materials with low atomic number are predominantly used for neutron shielding because these materials effectively attenuate neutrons, mainly through elastic and inelastic collisions. In addition to neutron attenuation properties, other desirable properties for neutron shielding materials include mechanical strength, stability, low cost, and ease of handling. During the selection of materials to design a neutron shield, prompt gamma production as well as radionuclide induced by neutron activation must be considered. In this investigation the Monte Carlo method (MCNP code) was used to evaluate the performance of a water-extended polyester shield designed for the transportation, storage, and use of a {sup 252}Cf isotopic neutron source, for comparison the calculations were extended to water shielding, the bare source in vacuum and in air. (authors)

  7. Improved ferrous shielding for flat cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drechsler, R. J.

    1969-01-01

    To improve shielding of flat multicore cables, a thin, seamless ferrous shield around all cores optimizes low frequency magnetic shielding. Such shielding is covered with an ultrathin seamless coat of highly conductive nonferrous material.

  8. Shielding Design and Radiation Shielding Evaluation for LSDS System Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Younggook; Kim, Jeongdong; Lee, Yongdeok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    As the system characteristics, the target in the spectrometer emits approximately 1012 neutrons/s. To efficiently shield the neutron, the shielding door designs are proposed for the LSDS system through a comparison of the direct shield and maze designs. Hence, to guarantee the radiation safety for the facility, the door design is a compulsory course of the development of the LSDS system. To improve the shielding rates, 250x250 covering structure was added as a subsidiary around the spectrometer. In this study, the evaluations of the suggested shielding designs were conducted using MCNP code. The suggested door design and covering structures can shield the neutron efficiently, thus all evaluations of all conditions are satisfied within the public dose limits. From the Monte Carlo code simulation, Resin(Indoor type) and Tungsten(Outdoor type) were selected as the shielding door materials. From a comparative evaluation of the door thickness, In and Out door thickness was selected 50 cm.

  9. SOC-DS computer code provides tool for design evaluation of homogeneous two-material nuclear shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disney, R. K.; Ricks, L. O.

    1967-01-01

    SOC-DS Code /Shield Optimization Code-Direc Search/, selects a nuclear shield material of optimum volume, weight, or cost to meet the requirments of a given radiation dose rate or energy transmission constraint. It is applicable to evaluating neutron and gamma ray shields for all nuclear reactors.

  10. Optimization of NTP System Truss to Reduce Radiation Shield Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharber, Luke L.; Kharofa, Adam; Caffrey, Jarvis A.

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of nuclear thermal propulsion are numerous and relevant to the current NASA mission goals involving but not limited to the crewed missions to mars and the moon. They do however also present new and unique challenges to the design and logistics of launching/operating spacecraft. One of these challenges, relevant to this discussion, is the significant mass of the shielding which is required to ensure an acceptable radiation environment for the spacecraft and crew. Efforts to reduce shielding mass are difficult to accomplish from material and geometric design points of the shield itself, however by increasing the distance between the nuclear engines and the main body of the spacecraft the required mass of the shielding is lessened considerably. The mass can be reduced significantly per unit length, though any additional mass added by the structure to create this distance serves to offset those savings, thus the design of a lightweight structure is ideal. The challenges of designing the truss are bounded by several limiting factors including; the loading conditions, the capabilities of the launch vehicle, and achieving the ideal truss length when factoring for the overall mass reduced. Determining the overall set of mass values for a truss of varying length is difficult since to maintain an optimally designed truss the geometry of the truss or its members must change. Thus the relation between truss mass and length for these loading scenarios is not linear, and instead has relation determined by the truss design. In order to establish a mass versus length trend for various truss designs to compare with the mass saved from the shield versus length, optimization software was used to find optimal geometric properties that still met the design requirements at established lengths. By solving for optimal designs at various lengths, mass trends could be determined. The initial design findings show a clear benefit to extending the engines as far from the main

  11. Cosmic Ray Interactions in Shielding Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Ankney, Austin S.; Orrell, John L.; Berguson, Timothy J.; Troy, Meredith D.

    2011-09-08

    This document provides a detailed study of materials used to shield against the hadronic particles from cosmic ray showers at Earth’s surface. This work was motivated by the need for a shield that minimizes activation of the enriched germanium during transport for the MAJORANA collaboration. The materials suitable for cosmic-ray shield design are materials such as lead and iron that will stop the primary protons, and materials like polyethylene, borated polyethylene, concrete and water that will stop the induced neutrons. The interaction of the different cosmic-ray components at ground level (protons, neutrons, muons) with their wide energy range (from kilo-electron volts to giga-electron volts) is a complex calculation. Monte Carlo calculations have proven to be a suitable tool for the simulation of nucleon transport, including hadron interactions and radioactive isotope production. The industry standard Monte Carlo simulation tool, Geant4, was used for this study. The result of this study is the assertion that activation at Earth’s surface is a result of the neutronic and protonic components of the cosmic-ray shower. The best material to shield against these cosmic-ray components is iron, which has the best combination of primary shielding and minimal secondary neutron production.

  12. Asymmetric Electrostatic Radiation Shielding for Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Youngquist, Robert C.; Lane, John E.

    2005-01-01

    A paper describes the types, sources, and adverse effects of energetic-particle radiation in interplanetary space, and explores a concept of using asymmetric electrostatic shielding to reduce the amount of such radiation impinging on spacecraft. Typically, such shielding would include a system of multiple inflatable, electrically conductive spheres deployed in clusters in the vicinity of a spacecraft on lightweight structures that would maintain the spheres in a predetermined multipole geometry. High-voltage generators would maintain the spheres at potential differences chosen in conjunction with the multipole geometry so that the resulting multipole field would gradually divert approaching energetic atomic nuclei from a central region occupied by the spacecraft. The spheres nearest the center would be the most positive, so as to repel the positively charged impinging nuclei from the center. At the same time, the monopole potential of the overall spacecraft-and-shielding system would be made negative so as to repel thermal electrons. The paper presents results of computational simulations of energetic-particle trajectories and shield efficiency for a trial system of 21 spheres arranged in three clusters in an overall linear quadrupole configuration. Further development would be necessary to make this shielding concept practical.

  13. Preliminary Thermal Design of Cryogenic Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyi; Mustafi, Shuvo; Boutte, Alvin

    2015-01-01

    Cryogenic Hydrogen Radiation Shielding (CHRS) is the most mass efficient material radiation shielding strategy for human spaceflight beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). Future human space flight, mission beyond LEO could exceed one year in duration. Previous radiation studies showed that in order to protect the astronauts from space radiation with an annual allowable radiation dose less than 500 mSv, 140 kgm2 of polyethylene is necessary. For a typical crew module that is 4 meter in diameter and 8 meter in length. The mass of polyethylene radiation shielding required would be more than 17,500 kg. The same radiation study found that the required hydrogen shielding for the same allowable radiation dose is 40 kgm2, and the mass of hydrogen required would be 5, 000 kg. Cryogenic hydrogen has higher densities and can be stored in relatively small containment vessels. However, the CHRS system needs a sophisticated thermal system which prevents the cryogenic hydrogen from evaporating during the mission. This study designed a cryogenic thermal system that protects the CHRS from hydrogen evaporation for one to up to three year mission. The design also includes a ground based cooling system that can subcool and freeze liquid hydrogen. The final results show that the CHRS with its required thermal protection system is nearly half of the mass of polyethylene radiation shielding.

  14. Electromagnetic shielding mats: facts and fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitgeb, N; Cech, R

    2007-01-01

    The use of electricity is accompanied by electric and magnetic fields which, intended or not, became a part of our environment. However, fear from environmental electromagnetic fields (EMFs) is widespread and so is business with fear. A number of more or less serious products including miracle products are placed on the market partly at excessive costs. By numerical simulation the efficiency of electromagnetic shielding mats was investigated and claims of manufacturers and their cited expert opinions checked. It could be shown that such products do not fulfil the justified expectations of customers, neither in the extremely low frequency (ELF) nor in the radiofrequency (RF) range. On the contrary, these mats usually make things even worse. The connection to ground, if available, might increase the belief on shielding efficiency, but in fact it even enhances fields instead of improving shielding. The electric conductivity of the mat material plays a minor role in the ELF range and enhances field increase in the RF range. It can not explain the enormous price differences. It could be shown that positive reports can be explained by result picking and exceptional arrangements of selected field sources. Overall, the investigation showed that manufacturer's claims about the shielding effectiveness are misleading and fool the customers about the real situation. Therefore, acquisition and use of electromagnetic shielding mats must be strongly discouraged.

  15. Shielding calculations for SSC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Ginneken, A.

    1990-03-01

    Monte Carlo calculations of hadron and muon shielding for SSC are reviewed with emphasis on their application to radiation safety and environmental protection. Models and algorithms for simulation of hadronic and electromagnetic showers, and for production and transport of muons in the TeV regime are briefly discussed. Capabilities and limitations of these calculations are described and illustrated with a few examples. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Neutron shielding for a {sup 252} Cf source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H.R.; Manzanares A, E.; Hernandez D, V.M. [Unidades Academicas de Estudios Nucleares e Ingenieria Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, C. Cipres 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Eduardo Gallego, Alfredo Lorente [Depto. de Ingenieria Nuclear, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, C. Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)]. e-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com

    2006-07-01

    To determine the neutron shielding features of water-extended polyester a Monte Carlo study was carried out. Materials with low atomic number are predominantly used for neutron shielding because these materials effectively attenuate neutrons, mainly through inelastic collisions and absorption reactions. During the selection of materials to design a neutron shield, prompt gamma production as well as radionuclide production induced by neutron activation must be considered. In this investigation the Monte Carlo method was used to evaluate the performance of a water-extended polyester shield designed for the transportation, storage, and use of a {sup 252}Cf isotopic neutron source. During calculations a detailed model for the {sup 252}Cf and the shield was utilized. To compare the shielding features of water extended polyester, the calculations were also made for the bare {sup 252}Cf in vacuum, air and the shield filled with water. For all cases the calculated neutron spectra was utilized to determine the ambient equivalent neutron dose at four sites around the shielding. In the case of water extended polyester and water shielding the calculations were extended to include the prompt gamma rays produced during neutron interactions, with this information the Kerma in air was calculated at the same locations where the ambient equivalent neutron dose was determined. (Author)

  17. Electronics Shielding and Reliability Design Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W.; ONeill, P. M.; Zang, Thomas A., Jr.; Pandolf, John E.; Koontz, Steven L.; Boeder, P.; Reddell, B.; Pankop, C.

    2006-01-01

    It is well known that electronics placement in large-scale human-rated systems provides opportunity to optimize electronics shielding through materials choice and geometric arrangement. For example, several hundred single event upsets (SEUs) occur within the Shuttle avionic computers during a typical mission. An order of magnitude larger SEU rate would occur without careful placement in the Shuttle design. These results used basic physics models (linear energy transfer (LET), track structure, Auger recombination) combined with limited SEU cross section measurements allowing accurate evaluation of target fragment contributions to Shuttle avionics memory upsets. Electronics shielding design on human-rated systems provides opportunity to minimize radiation impact on critical and non-critical electronic systems. Implementation of shielding design tools requires adequate methods for evaluation of design layouts, guiding qualification testing, and an adequate follow-up on final design evaluation including results from a systems/device testing program tailored to meet design requirements.

  18. Scale-PC shielding analysis sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, S.M.

    1996-05-01

    The SCALE computational system is a modular code system for analyses of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. With the release of SCALE-PC Version 4.3, the radiation shielding analysis community now has the capability to execute the SCALE shielding analysis sequences contained in the control modules SAS1, SAS2, SAS3, and SAS4 on a MS- DOS personal computer (PC). In addition, SCALE-PC includes two new sequences, QADS and ORIGEN-ARP. The capabilities of each sequence are presented, along with example applications.

  19. Shielding in Mental Health Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espen W. Haugom

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Shielding is defined as the confinement of patients to a single room or a separate unit/area inside the ward, accompanied by a member of staff. It is understood as both a treatment and a control. The purpose of this study is to examine how staff in psychiatric hospitals describe and assess shielding. This qualitative study uses a descriptive and exploratory design with an inductive approach. The material was acquired through the Acute Network (in Psychiatry nationwide shielding project. Data collection was carried out by the staff, who described the shielding procedure on a semi-structured form. The analysis was inspired by Graneheim and Lundman’s qualitative content analysis. Shielding has been described as an ambiguous practice, that is, shielding can be understood in several ways. There is a clear tension between shielding as a control and shielding as a treatment, with control being described as more important. The important therapeutic elements of shielding have also been mentioned, and shielding involves isolation to different degrees.

  20. Design and analysis of ITER shield blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohmori, Junji; Hatano, Toshihisa; Ezato, Kouichiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment] [and others

    1998-12-01

    This report includes electromagnetic analyses for ITER shielding blanket modules, fabrication methods for the blanket modules and the back plate, the design and the fabrication methods for port limiter have been investigated. Studies on the runaway electron impact for Be armor have been also performed. (J.P.N.)

  1. EFFECTS OF INTERFACES ON GAMMA SHIELDING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifford, C.E.

    1963-06-15

    A survey is presented of studies of interface effects in gamma shielding problems. These studies are grouped into three types of approaches, viz.: sources at the interface; radiation backscattered from the interface; and radiation transmitted through the interface. A bibliography of 54 references is included. Limitations on the applicability of the results are discussed. (T.F.H.)

  2. A contribution to shielding effectiveness analysis of shielded tents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vranić Zoran M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of shielding effectiveness (SE of the shielded tents made of the metallised fabrics is given. First, two electromagnetic characteristic fundamental for coupling through electrically thin shield, the skin depth break frequency and the surface resistance or transfer impedance, is defined and analyzed. Then, the transfer function and the SE are analyzed regarding to the frequency range of interest to the Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC Community.

  3. Shielding considerations for the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayler, Elaine; Dolney, Derek; Avery, Stephen; Koch, Cameron

    2013-05-01

    The Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) is a commercially available platform designed to deliver conformal, image-guided radiation to small animals using a dual-anode kV x-ray source. At the University of Pennsylvania, a free-standing 2 m enclosure was designed to shield the SARRP according to federal code regulating cabinet x-ray systems. The initial design consisted of 4.0-mm-thick lead for all secondary barriers and proved wholly inadequate. Radiation levels outside the enclosure were 15 times higher than expected. Additionally, the leakage appeared to be distributed broadly within the enclosure, so concern arose that a subject might receive significant doses outside the intended treatment field. Thus, a detailed analysis was undertaken to identify and block all sources of leakage. Leakage sources were identified by Kodak X-OmatV (XV) film placed throughout the enclosure. Radiation inside the enclosure was quantified using Gafchromic film. Outside the enclosure, radiation was measured using a survey meter. Sources of leakage included (1) an unnecessarily broad beam exiting the tube, (2) failure of the secondary collimator to confine the primary beam entirely, (3) scatter from the secondary collimator, (4) lack of beam-stop below the treatment volume, and (5) incomplete shielding of the x-ray tube. The exit window was restricted, and a new collimator was designed to address problems (1-3). A beam-stop and additional tube shielding were installed. These modifications reduced internal scatter by more than 100-fold. Radiation outside the enclosure was reduced to levels compliant with federal regulations, provided the SARRP is operated using tube potentials of 175 kV or less. In addition, these simple and relatively inexpensive modifications eliminate the possibility of exposing a larger animal (such as a rat) to significant doses outside the treatment field.

  4. Measurement of the transient shielding effectiveness of shielding cabinets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Herlemann

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, new definitions of shielding effectiveness (SE for high-frequency and transient electromagnetic fields were introduced by Klinkenbusch (2005. Analytical results were shown for closed as well as for non closed cylindrical shields. In the present work, the shielding performance of different shielding cabinets is investigated by means of numerical simulations and measurements inside a fully anechoic chamber and a GTEM-cell. For the GTEM-cell-measurements, a downscaled model of the shielding cabinet is used. For the simulations, the numerical tools CONCEPT II and COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS were available. The numerical results agree well with the measurements. They can be used to interpret the behaviour of the shielding effectiveness of enclosures as function of frequency. From the measurement of the electric and magnetic fields with and without the enclosure in place, the electric and magnetic shielding effectiveness as well as the transient shielding effectiveness of the enclosure are calculated. The transient SE of four different shielding cabinets is determined and discussed.

  5. Justification for Shielded Receiver Tube Additional Lead Shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOGER, R.M.

    2000-04-11

    In order to reduce high radiation dose rates encountered when core sampling some radioactive waste tanks the addition of 240 lbs. of lead shielding is being considered to the shielded receiver tube on core sample trucks No.1, No.3 and No.4. The lead shielding is 4 inch diameter x 1/2 inch thick half rounds that have been installed around the SR tube over its' full length. Using three unreleased but independently reviewed structural analyses HNF-6018 justifies the addition of the lead shielding.

  6. The axion shield

    CERN Document Server

    Andrianov, A A; Mescia, F; Renau, A

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the propagation of a charged particle in a spatially constant, but time dependent, pseudoscalar background. Physically this pseudoscalar background could be provided by a relic axion density. The background leads to an explicit breaking of Lorentz invariance; as a consequence the process p-> p gamma is possible and the background acts as a shield against extremely energetic cosmic rays, an effect somewhat similar to the GZK cut-off effect. The effect is model independent and can be computed exactly. The hypothetical detection of the photons radiated via this mechanism would provide an indirect way of verifying the cosmological relevance of axions.

  7. Watching a disappearing shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    1988-10-01

    The remote-sensing techniques used to monitor atmospheric ozone levels are reviewed, and recent results are discussed. The importance of the ozone layer as a shield for UV radiation is stressed, and the impact of human activities generating ozone-destroying compounds is considered. Ground-based, airborne, balloon-borne, and satellite remote-sensing methods are shown to complement each other to provide both global coverage and detailed structural information. Data obtained with the Nimbus-7 TOMS and solar-backscatter UV instruments are presented in graphs and briefly characterized.

  8. Evaluation of the efficiency of the shields for reduction of airplane noise effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. Ф. Шило

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic shield is one of the most effective means for reduction of transport noise effect, avia­tion included. Noise shields are widely used in world practice. Acoustic efficiency of shields depends on many factors, therefore it is necessary to use, on the designing stage, complicated methodical and computer means for their substantiation

  9. Interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Quentin E., E-mail: quentin-adams@uiowa.edu; Xu, Jinghzu; Breitbach, Elizabeth K.; Li, Xing; Rockey, William R.; Kim, Yusung; Wu, Xiaodong; Flynn, Ryan T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Enger, Shirin A. [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, 1650 Cedar Ave, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To present a novel needle, catheter, and radiation source system for interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy (I-RSBT) of the prostate. I-RSBT is a promising technique for reducing urethra, rectum, and bladder dose relative to conventional interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT). Methods: A wire-mounted 62 GBq{sup 153}Gd source is proposed with an encapsulated diameter of 0.59 mm, active diameter of 0.44 mm, and active length of 10 mm. A concept model I-RSBT needle/catheter pair was constructed using concentric 50 and 75 μm thick nickel-titanium alloy (nitinol) tubes. The needle is 16-gauge (1.651 mm) in outer diameter and the catheter contains a 535 μm thick platinum shield. I-RSBT and conventional HDR-BT treatment plans for a prostate cancer patient were generated based on Monte Carlo dose calculations. In order to minimize urethral dose, urethral dose gradient volumes within 0–5 mm of the urethra surface were allowed to receive doses less than the prescribed dose of 100%. Results: The platinum shield reduced the dose rate on the shielded side of the source at 1 cm off-axis to 6.4% of the dose rate on the unshielded side. For the case considered, for the same minimum dose to the hottest 98% of the clinical target volume (D{sub 98%}), I-RSBT reduced urethral D{sub 0.1cc} below that of conventional HDR-BT by 29%, 33%, 38%, and 44% for urethral dose gradient volumes within 0, 1, 3, and 5 mm of the urethra surface, respectively. Percentages are expressed relative to the prescription dose of 100%. For the case considered, for the same urethral dose gradient volumes, rectum D{sub 1cc} was reduced by 7%, 6%, 6%, and 6%, respectively, and bladder D{sub 1cc} was reduced by 4%, 5%, 5%, and 6%, respectively. Treatment time to deliver 20 Gy with I-RSBT was 154 min with ten 62 GBq {sup 153}Gd sources. Conclusions: For the case considered, the proposed{sup 153}Gd-based I-RSBT system has the potential to lower the urethral dose relative to HDR-BT by 29

  10. Multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Kim, Yusung; Flynn, Ryan T., E-mail: ryan-flynn@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a novel brachytherapy technique, called multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise angular and linear positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT mechanically enables the dose delivery using only linear translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. The previously proposed approach of serial rotating shield brachytherapy (S-RSBT), in which the partial shield is rotated to several angular positions at each source dwell position [W. Yang et al., “Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3931–3941 (2013)], is mechanically challenging to implement in a curved applicator, and H-RSBT is proposed as a feasible solution. Methods: A Henschke-type applicator, designed for an electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™) and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten partial shield with 180° or 45° azimuthal emission angles and 116° asymmetric zenith angle, is proposed. The interior wall of the applicator contains six evenly spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the partial radiation shield as a function of depth in the applicator. The shield contains three uniformly distributed protruding keys on its exterior wall and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely, thus longitudinal translational motion of the source is transferred to rotational motion of the shield. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients with a diverse range of high-risk target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. For each patient, the total number of emission angles was held nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. Treatment delivery time and tumor coverage (D{sub 90} of HR-CTV) were the two metrics used as the basis for evaluation and

  11. Elective breast radiotherapy including level I and II lymph nodes: A planning study with the humeral head as planning risk volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmann, Kathrin; van der Leer, Jorien; Branje, Tammy; van der Sangen, Maurice; van Lieshout, Maarten; Hurkmans, Coen W

    2017-01-18

    The aim of this study was to assess the dose to the humeral head planning risk volume with the currently used high tangential fields (HTF) and compare different planning techniques for breast radiotherapy including axillary level I and II lymph nodes (PTVn) while sparing the humeral head. Ten patients with left-sided breast cancer were enrolled in a planning study with 16 fractions of 2.66 Gy. Four planning techniques were compared: HTF, HTF with sparing of the humeral head, 6-field IMRT with sparing of the humeral head and VMAT with sparing of the humeral head. The humeral head + 10 mm was spared by restricting V40Gy HTF (V40Gy on average 20.7 cc). When sparing the humeral head in HTF, PTVn V90% decreased significantly from 97.9% to 89.4%. 6-field IMRT and VMAT had a PTVn V90% of 98.2% and 99.5% respectively. However, dose to the lungs, heart and especially the contralateral breast increased with VMAT. The humeral head is rarely spared when using HTF. When sparing the humeral head, the 6-field IMRT technique leads to adequate PTV coverage while not increasing the dose to the OARs.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A HYDRODYNAMIC MODEL OF A HYDROCYCLONE INCLUDING THE SIMULATION OF AIR-CORE EFFECT, USING THE FINITE VOLUME METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Felipe Aguilera

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The hydrocyclone is one of the most used classification equipment in industry, particularly in mineral processing. Maybe its main characteristic is to be a hydrodynamic separation equipment, whereby it has a high production capability and different levels of efficiency are depending on the geometrical configuration, operational parameters and the type of material to be processed. Nevertheless, there are a few successful studies regarding the modelling and simulation of its hydrodynamic principles, because the flow behavior inside is quite complex. Most of the current models are empirical and they are not applicable to all cases and types of minerals. One of the most important problems to be solved, besides the cut size and the effect of the physical properties of the particles, is the distribution of the flow inside the hydrocyclone, because if the work of the equipment is at low slurry densities, very clear for small hydrocyclones, its mechanic behavior is a consequence of the kind of liquid used as continuous phase, being water the most common liquid. This work shows the modelling and simulation of the hydrodynamic behavior of a suspension inside a hydrocyclone, including the air core effect, through the use of finite differences method. For the developing of the model, the Reynolds Stress Model (RSM for the evaluation of turbulence, and the Volume of Fluid (VOF to study the interaction between water and air were used. Finally, the model shows to be significant for experimental data, and for different conditions of an industrial plant.

  13. Utilizing electromagnetic shielding textiles in wireless body area networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Grace H H; Aoyagi, Takahiro; Hernandez, Marco; Hamaguchi, Kiyoshi; Kohno, Ryuji

    2010-01-01

    For privacy and radio propagation controls, electromagnetic shielding textile could be adopted in WBANs. The effect of including a commercially available electromagnetic shielding apron in WBANs was examined in this paper. By having both the coordinator and the sensor covered by the shielding apron, signal could be confined around the body; however signal strength can be greatly influenced by body movements. Placing the shielding apron underneath both antennas, the transmission coefficient could be on average enhanced by at least 10dB, with less variation comparing to the case when apron does not exist. Shielding textiles could be utilized in designing a smart suit to enhance WBANs performance, and to prevent signals travelling beyond its intended area.

  14. Shielding of CO from dissociating radiation in interstellar clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassgold, A. E.; Huggins, P. J.; Langer, W. D.

    1985-01-01

    The paper investigates the photodissociation of CO in interstellar clouds in the light of recent laboratory studies which suggest that line rather than continuum processes dominate its dissociation by ultraviolet radiation. Using a simple radiative transfer model, the shielding of representative dissociating bands is estimated, including self-shielding, mutual shielding between different isotopes, and near coincidences with strong lines of H2. Each of these processes materially affects the photodestruction rates of the various isotopic species in the transition regions of molecular clouds. These results are combined with an appropriate gas phase chemical model to determine how the abundances of the CO isotopes vary with depth into the cloud. It is found that self-shielding and mutual shielding cause significant variations in isotopic ratios. In addition, fractionation enhances species containing C-13. The relationship between the column densities of CO and H2 is found to vary for the different isotopes and to be sensitive to local conditions.

  15. New Toroid shielding design

    CERN Multimedia

    Hedberg V

    On the 15th of June 2001 the EB approved a new conceptual design for the toroid shield. In the old design, shown in the left part of the figure above, the moderator part of the shielding (JTV) was situated both in the warm and cold areas of the forward toroid. It consisted both of rings of polyethylene and hundreds of blocks of polyethylene (or an epoxy resin) inside the toroid vacuum vessel. In the new design, shown to the right in the figure above, only the rings remain inside the toroid. To compensate for the loss of moderator in the toroid, the copper plug (JTT) has been reduced in radius so that a layer of borated polyethylene can be placed around it (see figure below). The new design gives significant cost-savings and is easier to produce in the tight time schedule of the forward toroid. Since the amount of copper is reduced the weight that has to be carried by the toroid is also reduced. Outgassing into the toroid vacuum was a potential problem in the old design and this is now avoided. The main ...

  16. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Hua

    2004-09-16

    The repository design includes a drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]) that provides protection for the waste package both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation, general corrosion, and localized corrosion of the drip shield plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. This document is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The models developed in this report are used by the waste package degradation analyses for TSPA-LA and serve as a basis to determine the performance of the drip shield. The drip shield may suffer from other forms of failure such as the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) or stress corrosion cracking (SCC), or both. Stress corrosion cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]). Hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169847]).

  17. Spacesuit Radiation Shield Design Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W.; Anderson, Brooke M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ware, J.; Zeitlin, Cary J.

    2006-01-01

    Meeting radiation protection requirements during EVA is predominantly an operational issue with some potential considerations for temporary shelter. The issue of spacesuit shielding is mainly guided by the potential of accidental exposure when operational and temporary shelter considerations fail to maintain exposures within operational limits. In this case, very high exposure levels are possible which could result in observable health effects and even be life threatening. Under these assumptions, potential spacesuit radiation exposures have been studied using known historical solar particle events to gain insight on the usefulness of modification of spacesuit design in which the control of skin exposure is a critical design issue and reduction of blood forming organ exposure is desirable. Transition to a new spacesuit design including soft upper-torso and reconfigured life support hardware gives an opportunity to optimize the next generation spacesuit for reduced potential health effects during an accidental exposure.

  18. REACTOR AND SHIELD PHYSICS. Comprehensive Technical Report, General Electric Direct-Air-Cycle, Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, W.E.; Simpson, J.D.

    1962-01-01

    This volume is one of twenty-one summarizing the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program of the General Electric Company. This volume describes the experimental and theoretical work accomplished in the areas of reactor and shield physics.

  19. A novel equation and nomogram including body weight for estimating prostate volumes in men with biopsy-proven benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yasukazu Nakanishi; Iwao Fukui; Kazunori Kihara; Hitoshi Masuda; Satoru Kawakami; Mizuaki Sakura; Yasuhisa Fujii; Kazutaka Saito; Fumitaka Koga; Masaya Ito; Junji Yonese

    2012-01-01

    Anthropometric measurements,e.g.,body weight (BW),body mass index (BMI),as well as serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and percent-free PSA (%fPSA) have been shown to have positive correlations with total prostate volume (TPV).We developed an equation and nomegram for estimating TPV,incorporating these predictors in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).A total of 1852 men,including 1113 at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) Hospital as a training set and 739 at Cancer Institute Hospital (CIH) as a validation set,with PSA levels of up to 20 ng ml-1,who underwent extended prostate biopsy and were proved to have BPH,were enrolled in this study.We developed an equation for continuously coded TPV and a logistic regression-based nomngram for estimating a TPV greater than 40 ml.Predictive accuracy and performance characteristics were assessed using an area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) and calibration plots.The final linear regression model indicated age,PSA,%fPSA and BW as independent predictors of continuously coded TPV.For predictions in the training set,the multiple correlation coefficient was increased from 0.38 for PSA alone to 0.60 in the final model.We developed a novel nomogram incorporating age,PSA,%fPSA and BW for estimating TPV greater than 40 ml.External validation confirmed its predictive accuracy,with AUC value of 0.764.Calibration plots showed good agreement between predicted probability and observed proportion.In conclusion,TPV can be easily estimated using these four independent predictors.

  20. Radiation Shielding Optimization on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Mertens, Chris J.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2013-01-01

    Future space missions to Mars will require radiation shielding to be optimized for deep space transit and an extended stay on the surface. In deep space, increased shielding levels and material optimization will reduce the exposure from most solar particle events (SPE) but are less effective at shielding against galactic cosmic rays (GCR). On the surface, the shielding provided by the Martian atmosphere greatly reduces the exposure from most SPE, and long-term GCR exposure is a primary concern. Previous work has shown that in deep space, additional shielding of common materials such as aluminum or polyethylene does not significantly reduce the GCR exposure. In this work, it is shown that on the Martian surface, almost any amount of aluminum shielding increases exposure levels for humans. The increased exposure levels are attributed to neutron production in the shield and Martian regolith as well as the electromagnetic cascade induced in the Martian atmosphere. This result is significant for optimization of vehicle and shield designs intended for the surface of Mars.

  1. Computational thermo-fluid exploratory design analysis for complex ITER first wall/shield components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youchison, Dennis L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)], E-mail: dlyouch@sandia.gov; Natoni, Greg [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Narula, Manmeet; Ying, Alice [University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    Engineers in the ITER US Party Team used several computational fluid dynamics codes to evaluate design concepts for the ITER first wall panels and the neutron shield modules. The CFdesign code enabled them to perform design studies of modules 7 and 13 very efficiently. CFdesign provides a direct interface to the CAD program, CATIA v5. The geometry input and meshing are greatly simplified. CFdesign is a finite element code, rather than a finite volume code. Flow experiments and finite volume calculations from SC-Tetra, Fluent and CFD2000 verified the CFdesign results. Several new enhancements allow CFdesign to export temperatures, pressures and convective heat transfer coefficients to other finite element models for further analysis. For example, these loads and boundary conditions directly feed into codes such as ABAQUS to perform stress analysis. In this article, we review the use of 2- and 4-mm flow driver gaps in the shield modules and the use of 1-mm gaps along the tee-vane in the front water header to obtain a good flow distribution in both the first wall and shield modules for 7 and 13. Plasma heat flux as well as neutron heating derived from MCNP calculations is included in the first wall and shield module analyses. We reveal the non-uniformity of the convective heat transfer coefficient inside complex 3D geometries exposed to a one-sided heat flux and non-uniform volumetric heating. Most models consisted of 3-4 million tetrahedron elements. We obtained temperature and velocity distributions, as well as pressure drop information, for models of nearly exact geometry compared to the CATIA fabrication models. We also describe the coupling to thermal stress analysis in ABAQUS. The results presented provide confidence that the preliminary design of these plasma facing components will meet ITER requirements.

  2. How stable are the 'stable ancient shields'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Giulio; Mattila, Jussi

    2014-05-01

    "Archean cratons are relatively flat, stable regions of the crust that have remained undeformed since the Precambrian, forming the ancient cores of the continents" (King, EPSL, 2005). While this type of statement is supported by a wealth of constraints in the case of episodes of thoroughgoing ductile deformation affecting shield regions of Archean and also Peleoproterozoic age, a growing amount of research indicates that shields are not nearly as structurally stable within the broad field of environmental conditions leading to brittle deformation. In fact, old crystalline basements usually present compelling evidence of long brittle deformation histories, often very complex and challenging to unfold. Recent structural and geochronological studies point to a significant mechanical instability of the shield areas, wherein large volumes of 'stable' rocks actually can become saturated with fractures and brittle faults soon after regional cooling exhumes them to below c. 300-350° C. How cold, rigid and therefore strong shields respond to applied stresses remains, however, still poorly investigated and understood. This in turn precludes a better definition of the shallow rheological properties of large, old crystalline blocks. In particular, we do not yet have good constraints on the mechanisms of mechanical reactivation that control the partial (if not total) accommodation of new deformational episodes by preexisting structures, which remains a key to untangle brittle histories lasting several hundred Myr. In our analysis, we use the Svecofennian Shield (SS) as an example of a supposedly 'stable' region with Archean nucleii and Paleoproterozoic cratonic areas to show how it is possible to unravel the details of brittle histories spanning more than 1.5 Gyr. New structural and geochronological results from Finland are integrated with a review of existing data from Sweden to explore how the effects of far-field stresses are partitioned within a shield, which was growing

  3. Prediction of Supersonic Store Separation Characteristics Including Fuselage and Stores of Noncircular Cross Section, Volume IV. Appendices C and D, Details of Program II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-01

    VOLUME IV - APPENDICES C AND D, DETAILS OF PROGRAM II Joseph Mullen, Jr. Frederick K. Goodwin Marnix F. E. Dillenius Nielsen Engineering & Research...location in store source panel coordinates of leading edge of wing, feet RAZ semi-axis in vertical direction of elliptic body, feet RBY semi-axis in

  4. Earth pressure balance control for EPB shield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This paper mainly deals with the critical technology of earth pressure balance (EPB) control in shield tunneling. On the assumption that the conditioned soil in the working chamber of the shield is plasticized, a theoretical principle for EPB control is proposed. Dynamic equilibrium of intake volume and discharge volume generated by thrust and discharge is modeled theoretically to simulate the earth pressure variation during excavating. The thrust system and the screw conveyor system for earth pressure control are developed based on the electro-hydraulic technique. The control models of the thrust speed regulation of the cylinders and the rotating speed adjustment of the screw conveyor are also presented. Simulation for earth pressure control is conducted with software AMESim and MATLAB/Simulink to verify the models. Experiments are carried out with intake control in clay soil and discharge control in sandy gravel section, respectively. The experimental results show that the earth pressure variations in the working chamber can be kept at the expected value with a practically acceptable precision by means of real-time tuning the thrust speed or the revolving speed of discharge system.

  5. New Materials for EMI Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Graphite fibers intercalated with bromine or similar mixed halogen compounds have substantially lower resistivity than their pristine counterparts, and thus should exhibit higher shielding effectiveness against electromagnetic interference. The mechanical and thermal properties are nearly unaffected, and the shielding of high energy x-rays and gamma rays is substantially increased. Characterization of the resistivity of the composite materials is subtle, but it is clear that the composite resistivity is substantially lowered. Shielding effectiveness calculations utilizing a simple rule of mixtures model yields results that are consistent with available data on these materials.

  6. Nuclear magnetic shieldings of stacked aromatic and antiaromatic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundholm, Dage; Rauhalahti, Markus; Özcan, Nergiz; Mera-Adasme, Raul; Kussmann, Jörg; Luenser, Arne; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2017-03-13

    Nuclear magnetic shieldings have been calculated at the density functional theory (DFT) level for stacks of benzene, hexadehydro[12]annulene, dodecadehydro[18]annulene and hexabenzocoronene. The magnetic shieldings due to the ring currents in the adjacent molecules have been estimated by calculating nucleus independent molecular shieldings for the monomer in the atomic positions of neighbor molecules. The calculations show that the independent shielding model works reasonable well for the (1)H NMR shieldings of benzene and hexadehydro[12]annulene, whereas for the larger molecules and for the (13)C NMR shieldings the interaction between the molecules leads to shielding effects that are at least of the same size as the ring current contributions from the adjacent molecules. A better agreement is obtained when the nearest neighbors are also considered at full quantum mechanical (QM) level. The calculations suggest that the nearest solvent molecules must be included in the quantum mechanical system, at least when estimating solvent shifts at the molecular mechanics (MM) level. Current density calculations show that the stacking does not significantly affect the ring current strengths of the individual molecules, whereas the shape of the ring current for a single molecule differs from that of the stacked molecules.

  7. Fast dose optimization for rotating shield brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Myung; Wu, Xiaodong; Dadkhah, Hossein; Yi, Jirong; Flynn, Ryan T; Kim, Yusung; Xu, Weiyu

    2017-07-26

    To provide a fast computational method, based on the proximal graph solver (POGS) - a convex optimization solver using the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM), for calculating an optimal treatment plan in rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT). RSBT treatment planning has more degrees of freedom than conventional high-dose-rate brachytherapy due to the addition of emission direction, and this necessitates a fast optimization technique to enable clinical usage. The multi-helix RSBT (H-RSBT) delivery technique(1) was investigated for five representative cervical cancer patients. Treatment plans were generated for all patients using the POGS method and the commercially available solver IBM ILOG CPLEX(2) . The rectum, bladder, sigmoid colon, high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and HR-CTV boundary were the structures included in our optimization, which applied an asymmetric dose-volume optimization with smoothness control. Dose calculation resolution was 1X1X3 mm(3) for all cases. The H-RSBT applicator had 6 helices, with 33:3 mm of translation along the applicator per helical rotation and 1:7 mm spacing between dwell positions, yielding 17.5° emission angle spacing per 5 mm along the applicator. For each patient, HR-CTV D90, HR-CTV D100, rectum D2cc, sigmoid D2cc, and bladder D2cc matched within 1% for CPLEX and POGS methods. Also, similar EQD2 values between CPLEX and POGS methods were obtained. POGS was around 18 times faster than CPLEX. Over all patients, total optimization times were 32.1-65.4 seconds for CPLEX and 2.1-3.9 seconds for POGS. POGS reduced treatment plan optimization time approximately 18 times for RSBT with similar HR-CTV D90, organ at risk (OAR) D2cc values, and EQD2 values compared to CPLEX, which is significant progress toward clinical translation of RSBT. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of tumor dose, volume and overall treatment time on local control after radiochemotherapy including MRI guided brachytherapy of locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Fokdal, Lars Ulrik; Sturdza, Alina;

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Currently, there is no consensus on dose prescription in image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) in locally advanced cervical cancer. The purpose of this study was to provide evidence based recommendations for tumor dose prescription based on results from a multi......-center patient series (retroEMBRACE). Materials and methods This study analyzed 488 locally advanced cervical cancer patients treated with external beam radiotherapy ± chemotherapy combined with IGABT. Brachytherapy contouring and reporting was according to ICRU/GEC-ESTRO recommendations. The Cox Proportional...... Hazards model was applied to analyze the effect on local control of dose-volume metrics as well as overall treatment time (OTT), dose rate, chemotherapy, and tumor histology. Results With a median follow up of 46 months, 43 local failures were observed. Dose (D90) to the High Risk Clinical Target Volume...

  9. Successful public-private partnerships: The NYPD shield model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadeo, Vincent; Iannone, Stephen

    2017-12-01

    This article will identify the challenges that post 9/11 law enforcement faces regarding privatepublic partnerships and describe in detail the NYPD Shield programme, created to combat those challenges. Recommendations made by the 911 Commission included the incorporation of the private sector into future homeland security strategies. One such strategy is NYPD Shield. This programme is a nationally recognized award-winning public-private partnership dedicated to providing counterterrorism training and information sharing with government agencies, non-government organizations, private businesses, and the community. Information is shared through several platforms that include a dedicated website, instruction of counterterrorism training curricula, e-mail alerts, intelligence assessments and the hosting of quarterly conferences. This article also details how the NYPD Shield is providing its successful template to other law enforcement agencies enabling them to initiate similar programmes in their respective jurisdictions, and in doing so joining a National Shield Network.

  10. Neutron shielding and activation of the MASTU device and surrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, David; Turner, Andrew; Davis, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    A significant functional upgrade is planned for the Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) device, located at Culham in the UK, including the implementation of a notably greater neutral beam injection power. This upgrade will cause the emission of a substantially increased intensity of neutron radiation for a substantially increased amount of time upon operation of the device. Existing shielding and activation precautions are shown to prove insufficient in some regards, and recommendations for improvements are made, including the following areas: shielding doors to MAST shielded facility enclosure (known as "the blockhouse"); north access tunnel; blockhouse roof; west cabling duct. In addition, some specific neutronic dose rate questions are addressed and answered; those discussed here relate to shielding penetrations and dose rate reflected from the air above the device ("skyshine").

  11. Ab initio calculation of through-space magnetic shielding of linear polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (acenes): extent of aromaticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ned H; Caldwell, Brian W; Carlson, Katie P; Teague, Matthew R

    2009-02-01

    GIAO-HF within Gaussian 03 was employed to compute the NMR isotropic shielding values of a diatomic hydrogen probe above a series of acenes (linear polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons). Subtraction of the isotropic shielding of diatomic hydrogen by itself allowed the determination of computed through-space proton NMR shielding increment surfaces for these systems. Shielding was observed above the center of each aromatic ring, but the magnitude of calculated shielding above each ring center depends on the number of fused benzenoid rings. The computed shielding increments above each ring center were correlated to other measures of extent of aromaticity, including geometric, energetic, and magnetic measurements.

  12. Hybrid Shielding for Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, David; Royal, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Precision symmetry measurements such as the search for the electric dipole moment of the neutron require magnetic shielding rooms to reduce the ambient field to the pT scale. The massive mu-metal sheets and large separation between layers make these shield rooms bulky and expensive. Active field cancellation systems used to reduce the surrounding field are limited in uniformity of cancellation. A novel approach to reducing the space between shield layers and increasing the effectiveness of active cancellation is to combine the two systems into a hybrid system, with active and passive layers interspersed. We demonstrate this idea in a prototype with an active layer sandwiched between two passive layers of shielding.

  13. Radiation shielding for neutron guides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersez, T.; Braoudakis, G.; Osborn, J. C.

    2006-11-01

    Models of the neutron guide shielding for the out of bunker guides on the thermal and cold neutron beam lines of the OPAL Reactor (ANSTO) were constructed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP 4B. The neutrons that were not reflected inside the guides but were absorbed by the supermirror (SM) layers were noted to be a significant source of gammas. Gammas also arise from neutrons absorbed by the B, Si, Na and K contained in the glass. The proposed shielding design has produced compact shielding assemblies. These arrangements are consistent with safety requirements, floor load limits, and cost constraints. To verify the design a prototype was assembled consisting of 120 mm thick Pb(96%)Sb(4%) walls resting on a concrete block. There was good agreement between experimental measurements and calculated dose rates for bulk shield regions.

  14. Structural/Radiation-Shielding Epoxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, John W.; Smith, Joseph G.; Hinkley, Jeffrey; Blattnig, Steve; Delozier, Donavon M.; Watson, Kent A.; Ghose, Sayata

    2009-01-01

    A development effort was directed toward formulating epoxy resins that are useful both as structural materials and as shielding against heavy-ion radiation. Hydrogen is recognized as the best element for absorbing heavy-ion radiation, and high-hydrogen-content polymers are now in use as shielding materials. However, high-hydrogen-content polymers (e.g. polyethylene) are typically not good structural materials. In contrast, aromatic polymers, which contain smaller amounts of hydrogen, often have the strength necessary for structural materials. Accordingly, the present development effort is based on the concept that an ideal structural/ heavy-ion-radiation-shielding material would be a polymer that contains sufficient hydrogen (e.g., in the form of aliphatic molecular groups) for radiation shielding and has sufficient aromatic content for structural integrity.

  15. Long-lived activation products in TRIGA Mark II research reactor concrete shield: calculation and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagar, Tomaz [Reactor Physics Department, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)]. E-mail: tomaz.zagar@ijs.si; Bozic, Matjaz [Nuklearna elektrarna Krsko, Vrbina 12, 8270 Krsko (Slovenia); Ravnik, Matjaz [Reactor Physics Department, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, a process of long-lived activity determination in research reactor concrete shielding is presented. The described process is a combination of experiment and calculations. Samples of original heavy reactor concrete containing mineral barite were irradiated inside the reactor shielding to measure its long-lived induced radioactivity. The most active long-lived ({gamma} emitting) radioactive nuclides in the concrete were found to be {sup 133}Ba, {sup 60}Co and {sup 152}Eu. Neutron flux, activation rates and concrete activity were calculated for actual shield geometry for different irradiation and cooling times using TORT and ORIGEN codes. Experimental results of flux and activity measurements showed good agreement with the results of calculations. Volume of activated concrete waste after reactor decommissioning was estimated for particular case of Jozef Stefan Institute TRIGA reactor. It was observed that the clearance levels of some important long-lived isotopes typical for barite concrete (e.g. {sup 133}Ba, {sup 41}Ca) are not included in the IAEA and EU basic safety standards.

  16. Using Electronic Neutron Generators in Active Interrogation to Detect Shielded Fissionable Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. L. Chichester; E. H. Seabury

    2008-10-01

    Experiments have been performed at Idaho National Laboratory to study methodology and instrumentation for performing neutron active interrogation die-away analyses for the purpose of detecting shielded fissionable material. Here we report initial work using a portable DT electronic neutron generator with a He-3 fast neutron detector to detect shielded fissionable material including >2 kg quantities of enriched uranium and plutonium. Measurements have been taken of bare material as well as of material hidden within a large plywood cube. Results from this work have demonstrated the efficacy of the die-away neutron measurement technique for quickly detecting the presence of special nuclear material hidden within plywood shields by analyzing the time dependent neutron signals in-between neutron generator pulses. Using a DT electronic neutron generator operating at 300 Hz with a yield of approximately 0.36 x 10**8 neutrons per second, 2.2 kg of enriched uranium hidden within a 0.60 m x 0.60 m x 0.70 m volume of plywood was positively detected with a measurement signal 2-sigma above the passive background within 1 second. Similarly, for a 500 second measurement period a lower detection limit of approaching the gram level could be expected with the same simple set-up.

  17. DARHT : integration of shielding design and analysis with facility design /

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudrie, R. L. (Richard L.); Brown, T. H. (Thomas H.); Gilmore, W. E. (Walter E.); Downing, J. N. (James N.), Jr.; Hack, Alan; McClure, D. A. (Donald A.); Nelson, C. A. (Christine A.); Wadlinger, E. Alan; Zumbro, M. V. (Martha V.)

    2002-01-01

    The design of the interior portions of the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility incorporated shielding and controls from the beginning of the installation of the Accelerators. The purpose of the design and analysis was to demonstrate the adequacy of shielding or to determine the need for additional shielding or controls. Two classes of events were considered: (1) routine operation defined as the annual production of 10,000 2000-ns pulses of electrons at a nominal energy of 20 MeV, some of which are converted to the x-ray imaging beam consisting of four nominal 60-ns pulses over the 2000-ns time frame, and (2) accident case defined as up to 100 2000-ns pulses of electrons accidentally impinging on some metallic surface, thereby producing x rays. Several locations for both classes of events were considered inside and outside of the accelerator hall buildings. The analysis method consisted of the definition of a source term for each case studied and the definition of a model of the shielding and equipment present between the source and the dose areas. A minimal model of the fixed existing or proposed shielding and equipment structures was used for a first approximation. If the resulting dose from the first approximation was below the design goal (1 rem/yr for routine operations, 5 rem for accident cases), then no further investigations were performed. If the result of the first approximation was above our design goals, the model was refined to include existing or proposed shielding and equipment. In some cases existing shielding and equipment were adequate to meet our goals and in some cases additional shielding was added or administrative controls were imposed to protect the workers. It is expected that the radiation shielding design, exclusion area designations, and access control features, will result in low doses to personnel at the DARHT Facility.

  18. Exceptional Volumes of Rejuvenated Volcanism in Samoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konter, J. G.; Jackson, M.; Storm, L.

    2010-12-01

    The internal structure of within-plate volcanoes is typically compared to the stages of volcanic evolution in Hawaii. In Samoa, these stages show some differences with the Hawaiian model, in terms of the duration, volume and geochemical composition of the stages. Particularly, the rejuvenated stage of volcanism in Samoa is significantly more voluminous, with increasing geographic coverage with age, completely repaving the island of Savai’i. This unusual outpouring of rejuvenated lavas has previously been proposed to be related to the tectonic setting, near the northern terminus of the Tonga Trench. Therefore, Samoan volcanism might be caused by lithospheric fracturing, a mantle plume, or potentially a combination of the two. We collected new samples from a deeply eroded canyon on Savai’i to determine a time evolution of the transition from shield to eventual rejuvenated lavas. The canyon exposes several hundred meters of lavas, and we collected samples about 200m vertically down into the canyon. These samples are dominantly olivine basalts, and their Pb isotope compositions fall within the compositional field of young rejuvenated lavas on Savai’i and Upolu. This canyon section, therefore, represents a minimum thickness for the rejuvenated lavas of 200m. Assuming eruption of rejuvenated lavas only occurred subaerially, with a universal thickness of 200m, the new data suggest more than one percent of the volume of Savai’i consists of rejuvenated lavas. This is an order of magnitude greater than the largest relative volumes in Hawaii (Kauai), and implies a different cause for rejuvenated volcanism in Samoa. Another feature that suggests different processes may be important is the transition between the shield and rejuvenated stage. Although Samoan volcanoes do not seem to erupt exactly the same rock types as characteristic Hawaiian post-shield stage lavas, there is a definite shift to more evolved compositions (including trachytes) during the later stages of

  19. Measuring space radiation shielding effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Amir; Semones, Edward; Ewert, Michael; Broyan, James; Walker, Steven

    2017-09-01

    Passive radiation shielding is one strategy to mitigate the problem of space radiation exposure. While space vehicles are constructed largely of aluminum, polyethylene has been demonstrated to have superior shielding characteristics for both galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events due to the high hydrogen content. A method to calculate the shielding effectiveness of a material relative to reference material from Bragg peak measurements performed using energetic heavy charged particles is described. Using accelerated alpha particles at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the method is applied to sample tiles from the Heat Melt Compactor, which were created by melting material from a simulated astronaut waste stream, consisting of materials such as trash and unconsumed food. The shielding effectiveness calculated from measurements of the Heat Melt Compactor sample tiles is about 10% less than the shielding effectiveness of polyethylene. Shielding material produced from the astronaut waste stream in the form of Heat Melt Compactor tiles is therefore found to be an attractive solution for protection against space radiation.

  20. Shielding requirements in helical tomotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baechler, S.; Bochud, F. O.; Verellen, D.; Moeckli, R.

    2007-08-01

    Helical tomotherapy is a relatively new intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment for which room shielding has to be reassessed for the following reasons. The beam-on-time needed to deliver a given target dose is increased and leads to a weekly workload of typically one order of magnitude higher than that for conventional radiation therapy. The special configuration of tomotherapy units does not allow the use of standard shielding calculation methods. A conventional linear accelerator must be shielded for primary, leakage and scatter photon radiations. For tomotherapy, primary radiation is no longer the main shielding issue since a beam stop is mounted on the gantry directly opposite the source. On the other hand, due to the longer irradiation time, the accelerator head leakage becomes a major concern. An analytical model based on geometric considerations has been developed to determine leakage radiation levels throughout the room for continuous gantry rotation. Compared to leakage radiation, scatter radiation is a minor contribution. Since tomotherapy units operate at a nominal energy of 6 MV, neutron production is negligible. This work proposes a synthetic and conservative model for calculating shielding requirements for the Hi-Art II TomoTherapy unit. Finally, the required concrete shielding thickness is given for different positions of interest.

  1. Shielding from cosmic radiation for interplanetary missions Active and passive methods

    CERN Document Server

    Spillantini, P; Durante, M; Müller-Mellin, R; Reitz, G; Rossi, L; Shurshakov, V; Sorbi, M

    2007-01-01

    Shielding is arguably the main countermeasure for the exposure to cosmic radiation during interplanetary exploratory missions. However, shielding of cosmic rays, both of galactic or solar origin, is problematic, because of the high energy of the charged particles involved and the nuclear fragmentation occurring in shielding materials. Although computer codes can predict the shield performance in space, there is a lack of biological and physical measurements to benchmark the codes. An attractive alternative to passive, bulk material shielding is the use of electromagnetic fields to deflect the charged particles from the spacecraft target. Active shielding concepts based on electrostatic fields, plasma, or magnetic fields have been proposed in the past years, and should be revised based on recent technological improvements. To address these issues, the European Space Agency (ESA) established a Topical Team (TT) in 2002 including European experts in the field of space radiation shielding and superconducting magn...

  2. Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balmer, D.K.; Haverty, T.W.; Nordin, C.W.; Tyree, W.H.

    1996-08-20

    An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite. 1 fig.

  3. Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balmer, David K. (155 Coral Way, Broomfield, CO 80020); Haverty, Thomas W. (1173 Logan, Northglenn, CO 80233); Nordin, Carl W. (7203 W. 32nd Ave., Wheatridge, CO 80033); Tyree, William H. (1977 Senda Rocosa, Boulder, CO 80303)

    1996-08-20

    An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite.

  4. EMC Test Report Electrodynamic Dust Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, Lynne M.; Boyette, Carl B.

    2014-01-01

    This report documents the Electromagnetic Interference E M I evaluation performed on the Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS) which is part of the MISSE-X System under the Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center. Measurements are performed to document the emissions environment associated with the EDS units. The purpose of this report is to collect all information needed to reproduce the testing performed on the Electrodynamic Dust Shield units, document data gathered during testing, and present the results. This document presents information unique to the measurements performed on the Bioculture Express Rack payload; using test methods prepared to meet SSP 30238 requirements. It includes the information necessary to satisfy the needs of the customer per work order number 1037104. The information presented herein should only be used to meet the requirements for which it was prepared.

  5. Electrodynamic Dust Shield for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Paul J.; Johansen, Michael R.; Olsen, Robert C.; Raines, Matthew G.; Phillips, James R., III; Cox, Rachel E.; Hogue, Michael D.; Pollard, Jacob R. S.; Calle, Carlos I.

    2016-01-01

    Dust mitigation technology has been highlighted by NASA and the International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) as a Global Exploration Roadmap (GER) critical technology need in order to reduce life cycle cost and risk, and increase the probability of mission success. The Electrostatics and Surface Physics Lab in Swamp Works at the Kennedy Space Center has developed an Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS) to remove dust from multiple surfaces, including glass shields and thermal radiators. Further development is underway to improve the operation and reliability of the EDS as well as to perform material and component testing outside of the International Space Station (ISS) on the Materials on International Space Station Experiment (MISSE). This experiment is designed to verify that the EDS can withstand the harsh environment of space and will look to closely replicate the solar environment experienced on the Moon.

  6. A Launch Requirements Trade Study for Active Space Radiation Shielding for Long Duration Human Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleterry, Robert C., Jr.; Bollweg, Ken; Martin, Trent; Westover, Shayne; Battiston, Roberto; Burger, William J.; Meinke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    A trade study for an active shielding concept based on magnetic fields in a solenoid configuration versus mass based shielding was developed. Monte Carlo simulations were used to estimate the radiation exposure for two values of the magnetic field strength and the mass of the magnetic shield configuration. For each field strength, results were reported for the magnetic region shielding (end caps ignored) and total region shielding (end caps included but no magnetic field protection) configurations. A value of 15 cSv was chosen to be the maximum exposure for an astronaut. The radiation dose estimate over the total shield region configuration cannot be used at this time without a better understanding of the material and mass present in the end cap regions through a detailed vehicle design. The magnetic shield region configuration, assuming the end cap regions contribute zero exposure, can be launched on a single Space Launch System rocket and up to a two year mission can be supported. The magnetic shield region configuration results in two versus nine launches for a comparable mass based shielding configuration. The active shielding approach is clearly more mass efficient because of the reduced number of launches than the mass based shielding for long duration missions.

  7. Determination of dosimetric parameters for shielded 153Gd source in prostate cancer brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Mahdi; Ghatei, Najmeh; Mehrpouyan, Mohammad; Meigooni, Ali S.; Shahraini, Ramin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy (I-RSBT) is a recently developed method for treatment of prostate cancer. In the present study TG-43 dosimetric parameters of a 153Gd source were obtained for use in I-RSBT. Materials and methods A 153Gd source located inside a needle including a Pt shield and an aluminum window was simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. Dosimetric parameters of this source model, including air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function and 2D anisotropy function, with and without the shields were calculated according to the TG-43 report. Results The air kerma strength was found to be 6.71 U for the non-shielded source with 1 GBq activity. This value was found to be 0.04 U and 6.19 U for the Pt shield and Al window cases, respectively. Dose rate constant for the non-shielded source was found to be 1.20 cGy/(hU). However, for a shielded source with Pt and aluminum window, dose rate constants were found to be 0.07 cGy/(hU) and 0.96 cGy/(hU), on the shielded and window sides, respectively. The values of radial dose function and anisotropy function were tabulated for these sources. Additionally, isodose curves were drawn for sources with and without shield, in order to evaluate the effect of shield on dose distribution. Conclusions Existence of the Pt shield may greatly reduce the dose to organs at risk and normal tissues which are located toward the shielded side. The calculated air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function and 2D anisotropy function data for the 153Gd source for the non-shielded and the shielded sources can be used in the treatment planning system (TPS). PMID:28265239

  8. A Study of the Value of Information and the Effect on Value of Intermediary Organizations, Timeliness of Services & Products, and Comprehensiveness of the EDB. Volume 1: The Value of Libraries as an Intermediary Information Service; Volume 2: The Value of the Network Energy Software Center and the Radiation Shielding Information Center; Volume 3: The Effects of Timeliness and Comprehensiveness on Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King Research, Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This document reports in three volumes the results of a series of surveys designed to: (1) determine what contribution intermediary information transfer organizations such as libraries and information analysis centers make to the value of information; (2) assess the value of two somewhat different software information analysis centers and the…

  9. Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenjun; Kim, Yusung; Wu, Xiaodong; Song, Qi; Liu, Yunlong; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Sun, Wenqing; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2013-06-01

    In this treatment planning study, the potential benefits of a rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT) technique based on a partially-shielded electronic brachytherapy source were assessed for treating cervical cancer. Conventional intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT), intracavitary plus supplementary interstitial (IS+ICBT), and RSBT treatment plans for azimuthal emission angles of 180° (RSBT-180) and 45° (RSBT-45) were generated for five patients. For each patient, high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) (α/β = 10 Gy) was escalated until bladder, rectum, or sigmoid colon tolerance EQD2 values were reached. External beam radiotherapy dose (1.8 Gy × 25) was accounted for, and brachytherapy was assumed to have been delivered in 5 fractions. IS+ICBT provided a greater HR-CTV D90 (minimum EQD2 to the hottest 90%) than ICBT. D90 was greater for RSBT-45 than IS+ICBT for all five patients, and greater for RSBT-180 than IS+ICBT for two patients. When the RSBT-45/180 plan with the lowest HR-CTV D90 that was greater than the D90 the ICBT or IS+ICBT plan was selected, the average (range) of D90 increases for RSBT over ICBT and IS+ICBT were 16.2 (6.3-27.2)and 8.5 (0.03-20.16) Gy, respectively. The average (range) treatment time increase per fraction of RSBT was 34.56 (3.68-70.41) min over ICBT and 34.59 (3.57-70.13) min over IS+ICBT. RSBT can increase D90 over ICBT and IS+ICBT without compromising organ-at-risk sparing. The D90 and treatment time improvements from RSBT depend on the patient and shield emission angle.

  10. X-Ray Computed Tomography Inspection of the Stardust Heat Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Karen M.; Schneberk, Daniel J.; Empey, Daniel M.; Koshti, Ajay; Pugel, D. Elizabeth; Cozmuta, Ioana; Stackpoole, Mairead; Ruffino, Norman P.; Pompa, Eddie C.; Oliveras, Ovidio; hide

    2010-01-01

    The "Stardust" heat shield, composed of a PICA (Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator) Thermal Protection System (TPS), bonded to a composite aeroshell, contains important features which chronicle its time in space as well as re-entry. To guide the further study of the Stardust heat shield, NASA reviewed a number of techniques for inspection of the article. The goals of the inspection were: 1) to establish the material characteristics of the shield and shield components, 2) record the dimensions of shield components and assembly as compared with the pre-flight condition, 3) provide flight infonnation for validation and verification of the FIAT ablation code and PICA material property model and 4) through the evaluation of the shield material provide input to future missions which employ similar materials. Industrial X-Ray Computed Tomography (CT) is a 3D inspection technology which can provide infonnation on material integrity, material properties (density) and dimensional measurements of the heat shield components. Computed tomographic volumetric inspections can generate a dimensionally correct, quantitatively accurate volume of the shield assembly. Because of the capabilities offered by X-ray CT, NASA chose to use this method to evaluate the Stardust heat shield. Personnel at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) and Lawrence Livermore National Labs (LLNL) recently performed a full scan of the Stardust heat shield using a newly installed X-ray CT system at JSC. This paper briefly discusses the technology used and then presents the following results: 1. CT scans derived dimensions and their comparisons with as-built dimensions anchored with data obtained from samples cut from the heat shield; 2. Measured density variation, char layer thickness, recession and bond line (the adhesive layer between the PICA and the aeroshell) integrity; 3. FIAT predicted recession, density and char layer profiles as well as bondline temperatures Finally suggestions are made as to future uses

  11. Beta Bremsstrahlung dose in concrete shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunatha, H. C.; Chandrika, B. M.; Rudraswamy, B.; Sankarshan, B. M.

    2012-05-01

    In a nuclear reactor, beta nuclides are released during nuclear reactions. These betas interact with shielding concrete and produces external Bremsstrahlung (EB) radiation. To estimate Bremsstrahlung dose and shield efficiency in concrete, it is essential to know Bremsstrahlung distribution or spectra. The present work formulated a new method to evaluate the EB spectrum and hence Bremsstrahlung dose of beta nuclides (32P, 89Sr, 90Sr-90Y, 90Y, 91Y, 208Tl, 210Bi, 234Pa and 40K) in concrete. The Bremsstrahlung yield of these beta nuclides in concrete is also estimated. The Bremsstrahlung yield in concrete due to 90Sr-90Y is higher than those of other given nuclides. This estimated spectrum is accurate because it is based on more accurate modified atomic number (Zmod) and Seltzer's data, where an electron-electron interaction is also included. Presented data in concrete provide a quick and convenient reference for radiation protection. The present methodology can be used to calculate the Bremsstrahlung dose in nuclear shielding materials. It can be quickly employed to give a first pass dose estimate prior to a more detailed experimental study.

  12. Radiation Shielding Materials and Containers Incorporating Same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; and Murray, Alexander P.

    2005-11-01

    An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound (''PYRUC'') shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

  13. SHIELD: Observations of Three Candidate Interacting Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruvolo, Elizabeth; Miazzo, Masao; Cannon, John M.; McNichols, Andrew; Teich, Yaron; Adams, Elizabeth A.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; McQuinn, Kristen B.; Salzer, John Joseph; Skillman, Evan D.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Elson, Edward C.; Haurberg, Nathalie C.; Huang, Shan; Janowiecki, Steven; Jozsa, Gyula; Leisman, Luke; Ott, Juergen; Papastergis, Emmanouil; Rhode, Katherine L.; Saintonge, Amelie; Van Sistine, Angela; Warren, Steven R.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract:The “Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs” (SHIELD) is a multiwavelength study of local volume low-mass galaxies. Using the now-complete Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) source catalog, 82 systems are identified that meet distance, line width, and HI flux criteria for being gas-rich, low-mass galaxies. These systems harbor neutral gas reservoirs smaller than 3x10^7 M_sun, thus populating the faint end of the HI mass function with statistical confidence for the first time. In a companion poster, we present new Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array D-configuration HI spectral line observations of 32 previously unobserved galaxies. Three galaxies in that study have been discovered to lie in close angular proximity to more massive galaxies. Here we present VLA HI imaging of these candidate interacting systems. We compare the neutral gas morphology and kinematics with optical images from SDSS. We discuss the frequency of low-mass galaxies undergoing tidal interaction in the complete SHIELD sample.Support for this work was provided by NSF grant 1211683 to JMC at Macalester College.

  14. Upgrade of the LHC magnet interconnections thermal shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musso, Andrea; Barlow, Graeme; Bastard, Alain; Charrondiere, Maryline; Deferne, Guy; Dib, Gaëlle; Duret, Max; Guinchard, Michael; Prin, Hervé; Craen, Arnaud Vande; Villiger, Gilles [CERN European Organization for Nuclear Research, Meyrin 1211, Geneva 23, CH (Switzerland); Chrul, Anna [The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul.Radzikowskiego 152, 31-324 Krakow (Poland); Damianoglou, Dimitrios [NTUA National Technical University of Athens, Heeron Polytechniou 9, 15780 Zografou (Greece); Strychalski, Michał [Wroclaw University of Technology, Faculty of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Wyb. Wyspianskiego 27, Wroclaw, 50-370 (Poland); Wright, Loren [Lancaster University, Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4YW (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-29

    The about 1700 interconnections (ICs) between the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) superconducting magnets include thermal shielding at 50-75 K, providing continuity to the thermal shielding of the magnet cryostats to reduce the overall radiation heat loads to the 1.9 K helium bath of the magnets. The IC shield, made of aluminum, is conduction-cooled via a welded bridge to the thermal shield of the adjacent magnets which is actively cooled. TIG welding of these bridges made in the LHC tunnel at installation of the magnets induced a considerable risk of fire hazard due to the proximity of the multi-layer insulation of the magnet shields. A fire incident occurred in one of the machine sectors during machine installation, but fortunately with limited consequences thanks to prompt intervention of the operators. LHC is now undergoing a 2 years technical stop during which all magnet's ICs will have to be opened to consolidate the magnet electrical connections. The IC thermal shields will therefore have to be removed and re-installed after the work is completed. In order to eliminate the risk of fire hazard when re-welding, it has been decided to review the design of the IC shields, by replacing the welded bridges with a mechanical clamping which also preserves its thermal function. An additional advantage of this new solution is the ease in dismantling for maintenance, and eliminating weld-grinding operations at removal needing radioprotection measures because of material activation after long-term operation of the LHC. This paper describes the new design of the IC shields and in particular the theoretical and experimental validation of its thermal performance. Furthermore a status report of the on-going upgrade work in the LHC is given.

  15. Upgrade of the LHC magnet interconnections thermal shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Andrea; Barlow, Graeme; Bastard, Alain; Charrondiere, Maryline; Chrul, Anna; Damianoglou, Dimitrios; Deferne, Guy; Dib, Gaëlle; Duret, Max; Guinchard, Michael; Prin, Hervé; Strychalski, Michał; Craen, Arnaud Vande; Villiger, Gilles; Wright, Loren

    2014-01-01

    The about 1700 interconnections (ICs) between the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) superconducting magnets include thermal shielding at 50-75 K, providing continuity to the thermal shielding of the magnet cryostats to reduce the overall radiation heat loads to the 1.9 K helium bath of the magnets. The IC shield, made of aluminum, is conduction-cooled via a welded bridge to the thermal shield of the adjacent magnets which is actively cooled. TIG welding of these bridges made in the LHC tunnel at installation of the magnets induced a considerable risk of fire hazard due to the proximity of the multi-layer insulation of the magnet shields. A fire incident occurred in one of the machine sectors during machine installation, but fortunately with limited consequences thanks to prompt intervention of the operators. LHC is now undergoing a 2 years technical stop during which all magnet's ICs will have to be opened to consolidate the magnet electrical connections. The IC thermal shields will therefore have to be removed and re-installed after the work is completed. In order to eliminate the risk of fire hazard when re-welding, it has been decided to review the design of the IC shields, by replacing the welded bridges with a mechanical clamping which also preserves its thermal function. An additional advantage of this new solution is the ease in dismantling for maintenance, and eliminating weld-grinding operations at removal needing radioprotection measures because of material activation after long-term operation of the LHC. This paper describes the new design of the IC shields and in particular the theoretical and experimental validation of its thermal performance. Furthermore a status report of the on-going upgrade work in the LHC is given.

  16. Shielding structure analysis for LSDS facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hong Yeop; Kim, Jeong Dong; Lee, Yong Deok; Kim, Ho Dong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The nuclear material (Pyro, Spent nuclear fuel) itself and the target material to generate neutrons is the LSDS system for isotopic fissile assay release of high intensity neutron and gamma rays. This research was performed to shield from various strong radiation. A shielding evaluation was carried out with a facilities model of LSDS system. The MCNPX 2.5 code was used and a shielding evaluation was performed for the shielding structure and location. The radiation dose based on the hole structure and location of the wall was evaluated. The shielding evaluation was performed to satisfy the safety standard for a normal person (1 μSv/h) and to use enough interior space. The MCNPX2.5 code was used and a dose evaluation was performed for the location of the shielding material, shielding structure, and hole structure. The evaluation result differs according to the shielding material location. The dose rate was small when the shielding material was positioned at the center. The dose evaluation result regarding the location of the shielding material was applied to the facility and the shielding thickness was determined (In 50 cm + Borax 5 cm + Out 45cm). In the existing hole structure, the radiation leak is higher than the standard. A hole structure model to prevent leakage of radiation was proposed. The general public dose limit was satisfied when using the concrete reinforcement and a zigzag structure. The shielding result will be of help to the facility shielding optimization.

  17. Radiation shielding design for neutron diffractometers assisted by Monte Carlo methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, John C.; Ersez, Tunay; Braoudakis, George

    2006-11-01

    Monte Carlo simulations may be used to model radiation shielding for neutron diffractometers. The use of the MCNP computer program to assess shielding for a diffractometer is discussed. A comparison is made of shielding requirements for radiation generated by several materials commonly used in neutron optical elements and beam stops, including lithium-6 based absorbers where the Monte Carlo method can model the effects of fast neutrons generated by this material.

  18. Santa Ana River Design Memorandum Number 1. Phase 2. GDM on the Santa Ana River Mainstem Including Santiago Creek. Volume 1. Seven Oaks Dam. Appendixes B Through G

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    approximately 177 square miles, excluding the 32 square miles tributary to Baldwin Lake , has its headwaters in the rugged San Bernardino Mountains. Elevations...include the Newport- Inglewood fault, which caused the 1933 Long Beach earthquake, the Whittier- Elsinore fault zone, and the San Jacinto fault zone...Upper Howell Dam, the Lower Howell Dam and the Lake Ranch Dam. For the latter two dams the fault is reported to have intersected the dam and for the

  19. Reliability-Based Electronics Shielding Design Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; O'Neill, P. J.; Zang, T. A.; Pandolf, J. E.; Tripathi, R. K.; Koontz, Steven L.; Boeder, P.; Reddell, B.; Pankop, C.

    2007-01-01

    Shielding design on large human-rated systems allows minimization of radiation impact on electronic systems. Shielding design tools require adequate methods for evaluation of design layouts, guiding qualification testing, and adequate follow-up on final design evaluation.

  20. A Novel Radiation Shielding Material Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radiation shielding simulations showed that epoxy loaded with 10-70% polyethylene would be an excellent shielding material against GCRs and SEPs. Milling produced an...

  1. Material Effectiveness for Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Materials with a smaller mean atomic mass, such as lithium (Li) hydride and polyethylene, make the best radiation shields for astronauts. The materials have a higher density of nuclei and are better able to block incoming radiation. Also, they tend to produce fewer and less dangerous secondary particles after impact with incoming radiation.

  2. The Battle for Leyte Gulf, October 1944. Strategical and Tactical Analysis. Volume I. Preliminary Operations until 0719 October 17th, 1944 Including Battle off Formosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1953-01-01

    from the mobile forces.* The base air forces included naval -land-based air units and carrier air groups when they operated from shore-bases. Plate " XII ...Mabalaeat and Tablas had estimated capacities of from one hundred to two hundred planes each. The four satellite fields of the Clark Air Base complex...July-Septumber T944, WDC Doc~uentTM-1•Y--A * The Campaigns of the Pacific War USSHS, 1946, Chapter XII , page 280; also USSIOi InterrogationA NAV No. 9

  3. Santa Ana River Design Memorandum Number 1. Phase 2 GDM on the Santa Ana River Mainstem Including Santiago Creek. Volume 2. Prado Dam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    writing that their operation, facility or land is subject to periodic flooding. Current land uses include a variety of recreation uses, agriculture (on... teo hole -SI-TY Shroug @,.y I..., .. i ._~_~ ,A -tt SA ;V- .d.. UA MW -MP COWCT T. . 75 -36 T.N. 75 -37 T.75-36 &0 .t2 OC LL. as -4 -2005 ft46 JL M RC...em 00Gm -.ll * ter. I 543.0090 0.0O 010947 oetaoloadeiit bet.". W5.001 oft j y09I1y some wit9* WCOBW1isee lftfd C0116186 C 41 0.141.1 129 ift Vowel

  4. Gamma self-shielding correction factors calculation for aqueous bulk sample analysis by PGNAA technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasrabadi, M.N. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Faculty of Modern Sciences and Technologies, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 81746-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: mnnasrabadi@ast.ui.ac.ir; Mohammadi, A. [Department of Physics, Payame Noor University (PNU), Kohandej, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jalali, M. [Isfahan Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRT), Reactor and Accelerators Research and Development School, Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-07-15

    In this paper bulk sample prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (BSPGNAA) was applied to aqueous sample analysis using a relative method. For elemental analysis of an unknown bulk sample, gamma self-shielding coefficient was required. Gamma self-shielding coefficient of unknown samples was estimated by an experimental method and also by MCNP code calculation. The proposed methodology can be used for the determination of the elemental concentration of unknown aqueous samples by BSPGNAA where knowledge of the gamma self-shielding within the sample volume is required.

  5. Predictions for Radiation Shielding Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Richard L.

    2002-01-01

    Radiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) is a serious hazard to humans and electronic instruments during space travel, particularly on prolonged missions outside the Earth s magnetic fields. Galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) is composed of approx. 98% nucleons and approx. 2% electrons and positrons. Although cosmic ray heavy ions are 1-2% of the fluence, these energetic heavy nuclei (HZE) contribute 50% of the long-term dose. These unusually high specific ionizations pose a significant health hazard acting as carcinogens and also causing microelectronics damage inside spacecraft and high-flying aircraft. These HZE ions are of concern for radiation protection and radiation shielding technology, because gross rearrangements and mutations and deletions in DNA are expected. Calculations have shown that HZE particles have a strong preference for interaction with light nuclei. The best shield for this radiation would be liquid hydrogen, which is totally impractical. For this reason, hydrogen-containing polymers make the most effective practical shields. Shielding is required during missions in Earth orbit and possibly for frequent flying at high altitude because of the broad GCR spectrum and during a passage into deep space and LunarMars habitation because of the protracted exposure encountered on a long space mission. An additional hazard comes from solar particle events (SPEs) which are mostly energetic protons that can produce heavy ion secondaries as well as neutrons in materials. These events occur at unpredictable times and can deliver a potentially lethal dose within several hours to an unshielded human. Radiation protection for humans requires safety in short-term missions and maintaining career exposure limits within acceptable levels on future long-term exploration missions. The selection of shield materials can alter the protection of humans by an order of magnitude. If improperly selected, shielding materials can actually

  6. Review of ORNL-TSF shielding experiments for the gas-cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, L.S.; Ingersoll, D.T.; Muckenthaler, F.J.; Slater, C.O.

    1982-01-01

    During the period between 1975 and 1980 a series of experiments was performed at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility in support of the shield design for a 300-MW(e) Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Demonstration Plant. This report reviews the experiments and calculations, which included studies of: (1) neutron streaming in the helium coolant passageways in the GCFR core; (2) the effectiveness of the shield designed to protect the reactor grid plate from radiation damage; (3) the adequacy of the radial shield in protecting the PCRV (prestressed concrete reactor vessel) from radiation damage; (4) neutron streaming between abutting sections of the radial shield; and (5) the effectiveness of the exit shield in reducing the neutron fluxes in the upper plenum region of the reactor.

  7. WAVS radiation shielding references and assumptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLean, Adam [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-07

    At ITER, the confluence of a high radiation environment and the requirement for high performance imaging for plasma and plasma-facing surface diagnosis will necessitate extensive application of radiation shielding. Recommended here is a dual-layer shield design composed of lead for gamma attenuation, surrounded by a fire-resistant polyehtylene doped with a thermal neutron absorber for neutron shielding.

  8. A new radiation shielding material: Amethyst ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkut, Turgay, E-mail: turgaykorkut@hotmail.co [Faculty of Science and Art, Department of Physics, Ibrahim Cecen University, Agri (Turkey); Korkut, Hatun [Faculty of Science and Art, Department of Physics, Ibrahim Cecen University, Agri (Turkey); Karabulut, Abdulhalik; Budak, Goekhan [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Atatuerk University, Erzurum (Turkey)

    2011-01-15

    This paper describes a new radiation shielding material, amethyst ore. We have determined the elemental composition of amethyst using WDXRF spectroscopy technique. To see the shielding capability of amethyst for several photon energies, these results have been used in simulation process by FLUKA Monte Carlo radiation transport code. Linear attenuation coefficients have been calculated according to the simulation results. Then, these values have been compared to a fine shielding concrete material. The results show that amethyst shields more gamma beams than concrete. This investigation is the first study about the radiation shielding properties of amethyst ore.

  9. Comparative technique in measurements of Ge detectors effective volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidova, E. V.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Vasenko, A. A.

    1999-01-01

    A simple and quick procedure was proposed for measurements of large coaxial Ge detectors effective volumes. It included a comparison of background spectra collected with several detectors without any shielding in an underground laboratory. Such measurements were performed in Homestake (USA) and Canfranc (Spain) laboratories with several 1 kg and 2 kg detectors. Monte-Carlo calculations confirmed that ratios of numbers of events in continua of the spectra should be either equal or very close to the ratios of the detectors effective volumes.

  10. Shielded attractive shell model again: resummed thermodynamic perturbation theory for central force potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reščič, J.; Kalyuzhnyi, Y. V.; Cummings, P. T.

    2016-10-01

    The approach developed earlier to describe the dimerizing shielded attractive shell (SAS) primitive model of chemical association due to Cummings and Stell is generalized and extended to include a description of a polymerizing SAS model. Our extension is based on the combination of the resummed thermodynamic perturbation theory for central force (RTPT-CF) associating potential and self consistent scheme, which takes into account the changes in the system free volume due to association. Theoretical results for thermodynamical properties of the model at different bonding length, density and temperature are compared against newly generated computer simulation results. The theory gives very accurate predictions for the model with bonding length L * from the range 0  <  L *  <  0.6 at all values of the density and temperature studied, including the limit of infinitely large temperature.

  11. Radiation shielding for diagnostic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Colin J

    2015-07-01

    Scattered radiation makes up the majority of the stray radiation field around an X-ray unit. The scatter is linked to the amount of radiation incident on the patient. It can be estimated from quantities used to assess patient dose such as the kerma-area product, and factors have been established linking this to levels of scattered radiation for radiography and fluoroscopy. In radiography shielding against primary radiation is also needed, but in other modalities this is negligible, as the beam is intercepted by the image receptor. In the same way scatter from CT can be quantified in terms of dose-length product, but because of higher radiation levels, exposure to tertiary scatter from ceilings needs to be considered. Transmission requirements are determined from comparisons between calculated radiation levels and agreed dose criteria, taking into account the occupancy of adjacent areas. Thicknesses of shielding material required can then be calculated from simple equations.

  12. Facility target insert shielding assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mocko, Michal [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-06

    Main objective of this report is to assess the basic shielding requirements for the vertical target insert and retrieval port. We used the baseline design for the vertical target insert in our calculations. The insert sits in the 12”-diameter cylindrical shaft extending from the service alley in the top floor of the facility all the way down to the target location. The target retrieval mechanism is a long rod with the target assembly attached and running the entire length of the vertical shaft. The insert also houses the helium cooling supply and return lines each with 2” diameter. In the present study we focused on calculating the neutron and photon dose rate fields on top of the target insert/retrieval mechanism in the service alley. Additionally, we studied a few prototypical configurations of the shielding layers in the vertical insert as well as on the top.

  13. Paramagnetism shielding in drilling fluid

    OpenAIRE

    Li,Zhuo

    2013-01-01

    In drilling operations, drilling fluid containing magnetic materials is used when drilling a well. The materials can significantly shield the Earth’s magnetic field as measured by magnetic sensors inside the drilling strings. The magnetic property of the drilling fluid is one of the substantial error sources for the determination of magnetic azimuth for wellbores. Both the weight material, cuttings, clay and other formation material plus metal filings from the tubular wear m...

  14. Radiation shielding for future space exploration missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Joel Michael

    Scope and Method of Study. The risk to space crew health and safety posed by exposure to space radiation is regarded as a significant obstacle to future human space exploration. To countermand this risk, engineers and designers in today's aerospace community will require detailed knowledge of a broad range of possible materials suitable for the construction of future spacecraft or planetary surface habitats that provide adequate protection from a harmful space radiation environment. This knowledge base can be supplied by developing an experimental method that provides quantitative information about a candidate material's space radiation shielding efficacy with the understanding that (1) shielding is currently the only practical countermeasure to mitigate the effects of space radiation on human interplanetary missions, (2) any mass of a spacecraft or planetary surface habitat necessarily alters the incident flux of ionizing radiation on it, and (3) the delivery of mass into LEO and beyond is expensive and therefore may benefit from the possible use of novel multifunctional materials that could in principle reduce cost as well as ionizing radiation exposure. The developed method has an experimental component using CR-39 PNTD and Al2O3:C OSLD that exposes candidate space radiation shielding materials of varying composition and depth to a representative sample of the GCR spectrum that includes 1 GeV 1H and 1 GeV/n 16O, 28Si, and 56Fe heavy ion beams at the BNL NSRL. The computer modeling component of the method used the Monte Carlo radiation transport code FLUKA to account for secondary neutrons that were not easily measured in the laboratory. Findings and Conclusions. This study developed a method that quantifies the efficacy of a candidate space radiation shielding material relative to the standard of polyethylene using a combination of experimental and computer modeling techniques. The study used established radiation dosimetry techniques to present an empirical

  15. Nuclear reactor neutron shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speaker, Daniel P; Neeley, Gary W; Inman, James B

    2017-09-12

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel and a nuclear reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel. The lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel is disposed in a reactor cavity. An annular neutron stop is located at an elevation above the uppermost elevation of the nuclear reactor core. The annular neutron stop comprises neutron absorbing material filling an annular gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the wall of the reactor cavity. The annular neutron stop may comprise an outer neutron stop ring attached to the wall of the reactor cavity, and an inner neutron stop ring attached to the reactor pressure vessel. An excore instrument guide tube penetrates through the annular neutron stop, and a neutron plug comprising neutron absorbing material is disposed in the tube at the penetration through the neutron stop.

  16. Estimation of the Performance of Multiple Active Neutron Interrogation Signatures for Detecting Shielded HEU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David L. Chichester; Scott J. Thompson; Scott M. Watson; James T. Johnson; Edward H. Seabury

    2012-10-01

    A comprehensive modeling study has been carried out to evaluate the utility of multiple active neutron interrogation signatures for detecting shielded highly enriched uranium (HEU). The modeling effort focused on varying HEU masses from 1 kg to 20 kg; varying types of shields including wood, steel, cement, polyethylene, and borated polyethylene; varying depths of the HEU in the shields, and varying engineered shields immediately surrounding the HEU including steel, tungsten, and cadmium. Neutron and gamma-ray signatures were the focus of the study and false negative detection probabilities versus measurement time were used as a performance metric. To facilitate comparisons among different approaches an automated method was developed to generate receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for different sets of model variables for multiple background count rate conditions. This paper summarizes results or the analysis, including laboratory benchmark comparisons between simulations and experiments. The important impact engineered shields can play towards degrading detectability and methods for mitigating this will be discussed.

  17. ATLAS Award for Shield Supplier

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ATLAS technical coordinator Dr. Marzio Nessi presents the ATLAS supplier award to Vojtech Novotny, Director General of Skoda Hute.On 3 November, the ATLAS experiment honoured one of its suppliers, Skoda Hute s.r.o., of Plzen, Czech Republic, for their work on the detector's forward shielding elements. These huge and very massive cylinders surround the beampipe at either end of the detector to block stray particles from interfering with the ATLAS's muon chambers. For the shields, Skoda Hute produced 10 cast iron pieces with a total weight of 780 tonnes at a cost of 1.4 million CHF. Although there are many iron foundries in the CERN member states, there are only a limited number that can produce castings of the necessary size: the large pieces range in weight from 59 to 89 tonnes and are up to 1.5 metres thick.The forward shielding was designed by the ATLAS Technical Coordination in close collaboration with the ATLAS groups from the Czech Technical University and Charles University in Prague. The Czech groups a...

  18. Analysis of shielding charged particle beams by thin conductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Gluckstern

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available We present an analysis of shielding of electromagnetic fields excited by beams of charged particles surrounded by thin conducting layers or metal stripes inside an external structure of finite length. The ability of shielding by a layer thinner than the skin depth is explained and expressions for the impedance are derived. A previous result showing preferential penetration through the shielding layer at the resonant frequencies of the surrounding structure is verified and extended to include finite resistivity of the outer structure. Integration over the spectrum of the beam bunch shows that penetration is (nearly independent of the quality factors of the resonances. The transition of these results to those for a geometry of infinite length requires numerical evaluation.

  19. A Radiation Shielding Code for Spacecraft and Its Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, J. L.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Singleterry, R. C.; Wilson, J. W.; Badavi, F. F.; Badhwar, G. D.; Miller, J.; Zeitlin, C.; Heilbronn, L.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2000-01-01

    The HZETRN code, which uses a deterministic approach pioneered at NASA Langley Research Center, has been developed over the past decade to evaluate the local radiation fields within sensitive materials (electronic devices and human tissue) on spacecraft in the space environment. The code describes the interactions of shield materials with the incident galactic cosmic rays, trapped protons, or energetic protons from solar particle events in free space and low Earth orbit. The content of incident radiations is modified by atomic and nuclear reactions with the spacecraft and radiation shield materials. High-energy heavy ions are fragmented into less massive reaction products, and reaction products are produced by direct knockout of shield constituents or from de-excitation products. An overview of the computational procedures and database which describe these interactions is given. Validation of the code with recent Monte Carlo benchmarks, and laboratory and flight measurement is also included.

  20. Detailed mechanical design of the LIPAc beam dump radiological shielding

    OpenAIRE

    Nomen Escoda, Oriol; Mollá, Joaquin; Sanmartí, Manel; José I. Martínez; Arranz, Fernando; Iglesias, Daniel; Barrera, German; Brañas, Beatriz; Ogando, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The LIPAc is a 9 MeV, D+ linear prototype accelerator for the validation of the IFMIF accelerator design. The high intensity, 125 mA CW beam is stopped in a copper cone involving a high production of neutrons and gamma radiation and activation of its surface. The beam stopper is surrounded by a shielding to attenuate the resulting radiation so that dose rate values comply with the limits at the different zones of the installation. The shielding includes for that purpose polyethylene rings...

  1. Recent Improvements in the SHIELD-HIT Code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, David Christoffer; Lühr, Armin Christian; Herrmann, Rochus

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The SHIELD-HIT Monte Carlo particle transport code has previously been used to study a wide range of problems for heavy-ion treatment and has been benchmarked extensively against other Monte Carlo codes and experimental data. Here, an improved version of SHIELD-HIT is developed...... of using accelerator control files as a basis for the primaries. Furthermore, the code has been parallelized and efficiency is improved. The physical description of inelastic ion collisions has been modified. Results: The simulation of an experimental depth-dose distribution including a ripple filter...

  2. Shielding measurements for a 230 MeV proton beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebers, J.V.

    1990-01-01

    Energetic secondary neutrons produced as protons interact with accelerator components and patients dominate the radiation shielding environment for proton radiotherapy facilities. Due to the scarcity of data describing neutron production, attenuation, absorbed dose, and dose equivalent values, these parameters were measured for 230 MeV proton bombardment of stopping length Al, Fe, and Pb targets at emission angles of 0{degree}, 22{degree}, 45{degree}, and 90{degree} in a thick concrete shield. Low pressure tissue-equivalent proportional counters with volumes ranging from 1 cm{sup 3} to 1000 cm{sup 3} were used to obtain microdosimetric spectra from which absorbed dose and radiation quality are deduced. Does equivalent values and attenuation lengths determined at depth in the shield were found to vary sharply with angle, but were found to be independent of target material. Neutron dose and radiation length values are compared with Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations performed using the Los Alamos High Energy Transport Code (LAHET). Calculations used 230 MeV protons incident upon an Fe target in a shielding geometry similar to that used in the experiment. LAHET calculations overestimated measured attenuation values at 0{degree}, 22{degree}, and 45{degree}, yet correctly predicted the attenuation length at 90{degree}. Comparison of the mean radiation quality estimated with the Monte Carlo calculations with measurements suggest that neutron quality factors should be increased by a factor of 1.4. These results are useful for the shielding design of new facilities as well as for testing neutron production and transport calculations.

  3. Large scale mechanical metamaterials as seismic shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miniaci, Marco; Krushynska, Anastasiia; Bosia, Federico; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-08-01

    Earthquakes represent one of the most catastrophic natural events affecting mankind. At present, a universally accepted risk mitigation strategy for seismic events remains to be proposed. Most approaches are based on vibration isolation of structures rather than on the remote shielding of incoming waves. In this work, we propose a novel approach to the problem and discuss the feasibility of a passive isolation strategy for seismic waves based on large-scale mechanical metamaterials, including for the first time numerical analysis of both surface and guided waves, soil dissipation effects, and adopting a full 3D simulations. The study focuses on realistic structures that can be effective in frequency ranges of interest for seismic waves, and optimal design criteria are provided, exploring different metamaterial configurations, combining phononic crystals and locally resonant structures and different ranges of mechanical properties. Dispersion analysis and full-scale 3D transient wave transmission simulations are carried out on finite size systems to assess the seismic wave amplitude attenuation in realistic conditions. Results reveal that both surface and bulk seismic waves can be considerably attenuated, making this strategy viable for the protection of civil structures against seismic risk. The proposed remote shielding approach could open up new perspectives in the field of seismology and in related areas of low-frequency vibration damping or blast protection.

  4. Concrete enclosure to shield a neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villagrana M, L. E.; Rivera P, E.; De Leon M, H. A.; Soto B, T. G.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R., E-mail: emmanuelvillagrana@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    In the aim to design a shielding for a {sup 239}PuBe isotopic neutron source several Monte Carlo calculations were carried out using MCNP5 code. First, a point-like source was modeled in vacuum and the neutron spectrum and the ambient dose equivalent were calculated at several distances ranging from 5 up to 150 cm, these calculations were repeated including air, and a 1 x 1 x 1 m{sup 3} enclosure that was shielded with 5, 15, 20, 25, 30, 50 and 80 cm-thick Portland type concrete walls. At all the points located inside the enclosure neutron spectra from 10{sup -8} up 0.5 MeV were the same regardless the distance from the source showing the room-return effect, for energies larger than 0.5 MeV neutron spectra are diminished as the distance increases. Outside the enclosure it was noticed that neutron spectra becomes -softer- as the concrete thickness increases due to reduction of mean neutron energy. With the ambient dose values the attenuation curve in terms of concrete thickness was calculated. (Author)

  5. MicroShield/ISOCS gamma modeling comparison.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sansone, Kenneth R

    2013-08-01

    Quantitative radiological analysis attempts to determine the quantity of activity or concentration of specific radionuclide(s) in a sample. Based upon the certified standards that are used to calibrate gamma spectral detectors, geometric similarities between sample shape and the calibration standards determine if the analysis results developed are qualitative or quantitative. A sample analyzed that does not mimic a calibrated sample geometry must be reported as a non-standard geometry and thus the results are considered qualitative and not quantitative. MicroShieldR or ISOCSR calibration software can be used to model non-standard geometric sample shapes in an effort to obtain a quantitative analytical result. MicroShieldR and Canberras ISOCSR software contain several geometry templates that can provide accurate quantitative modeling for a variety of sample configurations. Included in the software are computational algorithms that are used to develop and calculate energy efficiency values for the modeled sample geometry which can then be used with conventional analysis methodology to calculate the result. The response of the analytical method and the sensitivity of the mechanical and electronic equipment to the radionuclide of interest must be calibrated, or standardized, using a calibrated radiological source that contains a known and certified amount of activity.

  6. Photon Shielding Features of Quarry Tuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vega-Carrillo Hector Rene

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cantera is a quarry tuff widely used in the building industry; in this work the shielding features of cantera were determined. The shielding characteristics were calculated using XCOM and MCNP5 codes for 0.03, 0.07, 0.1, 0.3, 0.662, 1, 2, and 3 MeV photons. With XCOM the mass interaction coefficients, and the total mass attenuation coefficients, were calculated. With the MCNP5 code a transmission experiment was modelled using a point-like source located 42 cm apart from a point-like detector. Between the source and the detector, cantera pieces with different thickness, ranging from 0 to 40 cm were included. The collided and uncollided photon fluence, the Kerma in air and the Ambient dose equivalent were estimated. With the uncollided fluence the linear attenuation coefficients were determined and compared with those calculated with XCOM. The linear attenuation coefficient for 0.662 MeV photons was compared with the coefficient measured with a NaI(Tl-based γ-ray spectrometer and a 137Cs source.

  7. Photon Shielding Features of Quarry Tuff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene; Hernandez-Adame, Luis; Guzman-Garcia, Karen Arlete; Ortiz-Hernandez, Arturo Agustin; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Jose Antonio; Juarez-Alvarado, Cesar Antonio

    2017-09-01

    Cantera is a quarry tuff widely used in the building industry; in this work the shielding features of cantera were determined. The shielding characteristics were calculated using XCOM and MCNP5 codes for 0.03, 0.07, 0.1, 0.3, 0.662, 1, 2, and 3 MeV photons. With XCOM the mass interaction coefficients, and the total mass attenuation coefficients, were calculated. With the MCNP5 code a transmission experiment was modelled using a point-like source located 42 cm apart from a point-like detector. Between the source and the detector, cantera pieces with different thickness, ranging from 0 to 40 cm were included. The collided and uncollided photon fluence, the Kerma in air and the Ambient dose equivalent were estimated. With the uncollided fluence the linear attenuation coefficients were determined and compared with those calculated with XCOM. The linear attenuation coefficient for 0.662 MeV photons was compared with the coefficient measured with a NaI(Tl)-based γ-ray spectrometer and a 137Cs source.

  8. Analytic Shielding Optimization to Reduce Crew Exposure to Ionizing Radiation Inside Space Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaza, Razvan; Cooper, Tim P.; Hanzo, Arthur; Hussein, Hesham; Jarvis, Kandy S.; Kimble, Ryan; Lee, Kerry T.; Patel, Chirag; Reddell, Brandon D.; Stoffle, Nicholas; Zapp, E. Neal; Shelfer, Tad D.

    2009-01-01

    A sustainable lunar architecture provides capabilities for leveraging out-of-service components for alternate uses. Discarded architecture elements may be used to provide ionizing radiation shielding to the crew habitat in case of a Solar Particle Event. The specific location relative to the vehicle where the additional shielding mass is placed, as corroborated with particularities of the vehicle design, has a large influence on protection gain. This effect is caused by the exponential- like decrease of radiation exposure with shielding mass thickness, which in turn determines that the most benefit from a given amount of shielding mass is obtained by placing it so that it preferentially augments protection in under-shielded areas of the vehicle exposed to the radiation environment. A novel analytic technique to derive an optimal shielding configuration was developed by Lockheed Martin during Design Analysis Cycle 3 (DAC-3) of the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). [1] Based on a detailed Computer Aided Design (CAD) model of the vehicle including a specific crew positioning scenario, a set of under-shielded vehicle regions can be identified as candidates for placement of additional shielding. Analytic tools are available to allow capturing an idealized supplemental shielding distribution in the CAD environment, which in turn is used as a reference for deriving a realistic shielding configuration from available vehicle components. While the analysis referenced in this communication applies particularly to the Orion vehicle, the general method can be applied to a large range of space exploration vehicles, including but not limited to lunar and Mars architecture components. In addition, the method can be immediately applied for optimization of radiation shielding provided to sensitive electronic components.

  9. Shielding calculations for a production target for secondary beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehm, K.E.; Back, B.B.; Jiang, C.L. [and others

    1995-08-01

    In order to estimate the amount of shielding required for a radioactive beam facility dose rate were performed. The calculations for production targets with different geometries were performed. The calculations were performed with the MSU shielding code assuming a 500-p{mu}A 200-MeV deuteron beam stopped in a thick Al target. The target and the ion-optical elements for beam extraction are located in a 2 m{sup 3} large volume at the center of the production cell. These dose rate calculations show that with a combination of Fe and concrete it is possible to reduce the dose rate expected at the surface of a 7-m-wide cube housing the production target to less than 2 mrem/hr.

  10. The Feasibility of Multipole Electrostatic Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Lane, John E.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    Although passive shielding appears to be the only workable solution for galactic cosmic radiation (GCR), active shielding may play an important augmenting role to control the dose from solar particle events (SPEs). It has been noted that, to meet the guidelines of NCRP Report No. 98 through the six SPEs of 1989, a crew member would need roughly double the passive shielding that is necessary to control the GCR dose . This would dramatically increase spacecraft mass, and so it has been proposed that a small but more heavily shielded storm shelter may be used to protect the crew during SPEs. Since a gradual SPE may last 5 or more days, staying in a storm shelter may be psychologically and physiologically distressing to the crew. Storm shelters do not provide shielding for the spacecraft itself against the SPE radiation, and radiation damage to critical electronics may result in loss of mission and life. Single-event effects during the radiation storm may require quick crew response to maintain the integrity of the spacecraft, and confining the crew to a storm shelter prohibits their attending to the spacecraft at the precise time when that attention is needed the most. Active shielding cannot protect against GCR because the particle energies are too high. Although lower energy particles are easier to stop in a passive shield, such shielding is more satisfactory against GCR than against SPE radiation because of the tremendous difference in their initial fluences. Even a small fraction of the SPE fluence penetrating the passive shielding may result in an unacceptably high dose. Active shielding is more effective than passive shielding against SPE radiation because it offers 100% shielding effectiveness up to the cutoff energy, and significant shielding effectiveness beyond the cutoff as well.

  11. SHIELDING OF A UNIFORM ALTERNATING MAGNETIC FIELD USING A CIRCULAR PASSIVE LOOP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Grinchenko

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The magnetic and electromagnetic shields are used to reduce the magnetic field in local spaces. Usually these shields are implemented in the form of a box or a cylinder. At the same time the magnetic field reduction in local spaces by means of passive loops is not considered in detail yet. So, the present study considers shielding capabilities of a circular passive loop. The authors have performed an analytical and numerical modeling of a process of a uniform harmonic magnetic field shielding. The simulated results permit to find out the spatial distribution of the shielded magnetic field. Dependencies of shielding effectiveness on the passive loop radius and cross-section are determined. Moreover, the non-monotonic behavior of the loop radius dependence is shown. We have substantiated that the shielded volume of a circular passive loop is advisable to limit by the sphere with a half loop radius. Presented results give parameters of the circular passive loop that reduces the rms value of the magnetic flux density by 30 %.

  12. Volcano morphometry and volume scaling on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, J. B.; Williams, R. S., Jr.

    1994-03-01

    A broad variety of volcanic edifices have been observed on Venus. They ranged in size from the limits of resolution of the Magellan SAR (i.e., hundreds of meters) to landforms over 500 km in basal diameter. One of the key questions pertaining to volcanism on Venus concerns the volume eruption rate or VER, which is linked to crustal productivity over time. While less than 3 percent of the surface area of Venus is manifested as discrete edifices larger than 50 km in diameter, a substantial component of the total crustal volume of the planet over the past 0.5 Ga is related to isolated volcanoes, which are certainly more easily studied than the relatively diffusely defined plains volcanic flow units. Thus, we have focused our efforts on constraining the volume productivity of major volcanic edifices larger than 100 km in basal diameter. Our approach takes advantage of the topographic data returned by Magellan, as well as our database of morphometric statistics for the 20 best known lava shields of Iceland, plus Mauna Loa of Hawaii. As part of this investigation, we have quantified the detailed morphometry of nearly 50 intermediate to large scale edifices, with particular attention to their shape systematics. We found that a set of venusian edifices which include Maat, Sapas, Tepev, Sif, Gula, a feature at 46 deg S, 215 deg E, as well as the shield-like structure at 10 deg N, 275 deg E are broadly representative of the approx. 400 volcanic landforms larger than 50 km. The cross-sectional shapes of these 7 representative edifices range from flattened cones (i.e., Sif) similar to classic terrestrial lava shields such as Mauna Loa and Skjaldbreidur, to rather dome-like structures which include Maat and Sapas. The majority of these larger volcanoes surveyed as part of our study displayed cross-sectional topographies with paraboloidal shaped, in sharp contrast with the cone-like appearance of most simple terrestrial lava shields. In order to more fully explore the

  13. RadWorks Storm Shelter Design for Solar Particle Event Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Matthew A.; Cerro, Jeffrey; Clowdsley, Martha

    2013-01-01

    In order to enable long-duration human exploration beyond low-Earth orbit, the risks associated with exposure of astronaut crews to space radiation must be mitigated with practical and affordable solutions. The space radiation environment beyond the magnetosphere is primarily a combination of two types of radiation: galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE). While mitigating GCR exposure remains an open issue, reducing astronaut exposure to SPEs is achievable through material shielding because they are made up primarily of medium-energy protons. In order to ensure astronaut safety for long durations beyond low-Earth orbit, SPE radiation exposure must be mitigated. However, the increasingly demanding spacecraft propulsive performance for these ambitious missions requires minimal mass and volume radiation shielding solutions which leverage available multi-functional habitat structures and logistics as much as possible. This paper describes the efforts of NASA's RadWorks Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Project to design minimal mass SPE radiation shelter concepts leveraging available resources. Discussion items include a description of the shelter trade space, the prioritization process used to identify the four primary shelter concepts chosen for maturation, a summary of each concept's design features, a description of the radiation analysis process, and an assessment of the parasitic mass of each concept.

  14. Design of Two RadWorks Storm Shelters for Solar Particle Event Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Matthew; Cerro, Jeffery; Latorella, Kara; Clowdsley, Martha; Watson, Judith; Albertson, Cindy; Norman, Ryan; Le Boffe, Vincent; Walker, Steven

    2014-01-01

    In order to enable long-duration human exploration beyond low-Earth orbit, the risks associated with exposure of astronaut crews to space radiation must be mitigated with practical and affordable solutions. The space radiation environment beyond the magnetosphere is primarily a combination of two types of radiation: galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE). While mitigating GCR exposure remains an open issue, reducing astronaut exposure to SPEs is achievable through material shielding because they are made up primarily of medium-energy protons. In order to ensure astronaut safety for long durations beyond low-Earth orbit, SPE radiation exposure must be mitigated. However, the increasingly demanding spacecraft propulsive performance for these ambitious missions requires minimal mass and volume radiation shielding solutions which leverage available multi-functional habitat structures and logistics as much as possible. This paper describes the efforts of NASA's RadWorks Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Project to design two minimal mass SPE radiation shelter concepts leveraging available resources: one based upon reconfiguring habitat interiors to create a centralized protection area and one based upon augmenting individual crew quarters with waterwalls and logistics. Discussion items include the design features of the concepts, a radiation analysis of their implementations, an assessment of the parasitic mass of each concept, and the result of a human in the loop evaluation performed to drive out design and operational issues.

  15. Spin-rotation and NMR shielding constants in HCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaszuński, Michał, E-mail: michal.jaszunski@icho.edu.pl [Institute of Organic Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, 01-224 Warszawa, Kasprzaka 44 (Poland); Repisky, Michal; Demissie, Taye B.; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Malkin, Elena; Ruud, Kenneth [Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, University of Tromsø—The Arctic University of Norway, N-9037 Tromsø (Norway); Garbacz, Piotr; Jackowski, Karol; Makulski, Włodzimierz [Laboratory of NMR Spectroscopy, Department of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland)

    2013-12-21

    The spin-rotation and nuclear magnetic shielding constants are analysed for both nuclei in the HCl molecule. Nonrelativistic ab initio calculations at the CCSD(T) level of approximation show that it is essential to include relativistic effects to obtain spin-rotation constants consistent with accurate experimental data. Our best estimates for the spin-rotation constants of {sup 1}H{sup 35}Cl are C{sub Cl}  = −53.914 kHz and C{sub H}  = 42.672 kHz (for the lowest rovibrational level). For the chlorine shielding constant, the ab initio value computed including the relativistic corrections, σ(Cl) = 976.202 ppm, provides a new absolute shielding scale; for hydrogen we find σ(H) = 31.403 ppm (both at 300 K). Combining the theoretical results with our new gas-phase NMR experimental data allows us to improve the accuracy of the magnetic dipole moments of both chlorine isotopes. For the hydrogen shielding constant, including relativistic effects yields better agreement between experimental and computed values.

  16. Radiation shielding concrete made of Basalt aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhajali, S; Yousef, S; Kanbour, M; Naoum, B

    2013-04-01

    In spite of the fact that Basalt is a widespread type of rock, there is very little available information on using it as aggregates for concrete radiation shielding. This paper investigates the possibility of using Basalt for the aforementioned purpose. The results have shown that Basalt could be used successfully for preparing radiation shielding concrete, but some attention should be paid to the choice of the suitable types of Basalt and for the neutron activation problem that could arise in the concrete shield.

  17. Dique seco, en South Shields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Stott, Peter

    1958-10-01

    Full Text Available La conocida empresa Brigham & Cowan Ltd, de South Shields (Inglaterra, acaba de construir un dique de carena en la desembocadura del río Tyne, destinado a la reparación de tanques y cargas de gran tonelaje y de relativamente poco calado. El vaso tiene 217 m de longitud, 29 de anchura mínima en la entrada, 6,40 de a l tura de agua sobre el umbral de entrada y una compuerta metálica rebatible hacia adelante. En este trabajo se describen las partes que mejor caracterizan esta importante obra.

  18. Multi-functional layered structure having structural and radiation shielding attributes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Raj K. (Inventor); Barghouty, Abdulnasser Fakhri (Inventor); Penn, Benjamin G. (Inventor); Hulcher, Anthony Bruce (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A cosmic and solar radiation shielding structure that also has structural attributes is comprised of three layers. The first layer is 30-42 percent by volume of ultra-high molecular weight (UHMW) polyethylene fibers, 18-30 percent by volume of graphite fibers, and a remaining percent by volume of an epoxy resin matrix. The second layer is approximately 68 percent by volume of UHMW polyethylene fibers and a remaining percent by volume of a polyethylene matrix. The third layer is a ceramic material.

  19. Lithium hydride - A space age shielding material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, F. H.

    1974-01-01

    Men and materials performing in the environment of an operating nuclear reactor require shielding from the escaping neutron particles and gamma rays. For efficient shielding from gamma rays, dense, high atomic number elements such as iron, lead, or tungsten are required, whereas light, low atomic number elements such as hydrogen, lithium, or beryllium are required for efficient neutron shielding. The use of lithium hydride (LiH) as a highly efficient neutron-shielding material is considered. It contains, combined into a single, stable compound, two of the elements most effective in attenuating and absorbing neutrons.

  20. Shielding of emitting dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca Delzanno, Gian; Lapenta, Giovanni; Rosenberg, Marlene

    2003-10-01

    In the present work we focus on the role of electron emission (either thermionic or photoelectric) in charging an object immersed in a plasma. In fact, it is well known that the higher mobility of the plasma electrons (that would lead to negatively charged objects) can be overcome by electron emission, thus reversing the object polarity. Moreover, recent work [1] has shown how electron emission can fundamentally affect the shielding potential around the dust. In particular, depending on the physical parameters of the system (that were chosen such to correspond to common experimental conditions), the shielding potential can develop an attractive potential well. The aim of the present work is two-fold. First, we will present a parametric study in order to enlight the conditions for the formation, as well as the stability of the well. Furthermore, simulations will be presented with physical parameters corresponding to the ionosphere, thus extending our study to the case of meteroids. [1] G.L. Delzanno, G. Lapenta, M. Rosenberg, "Attractive Potential among Thermionically Emitting Microparticles", submitted.

  1. Upgrading the Neutron Radiography Facility in South Africa (SANRAD): Concrete Shielding Design Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beer, F. C.; Radebe, M. J.; Schillinger, B.; Nshimirimana, R.; Ramushu, M. A.; Modise, T.

    A common denominator of all neutron radiography (NRAD) facilities worldwide is that the perimeter of the experimental chamber of the facility is a radiation shielding structure which,in some cases, also includes flight tube and filter chamber structures. These chambers are normally both located on the beam port floor outside the biological shielding of the neutron source. The main function of the NRAD-shielding structure isto maintain a radiological safe working environment in the entire beam hall according to standards set by individual national radiological safety regulations. In addition, the shielding's integrity and capability should not allow, during NRAD operations, an increase in radiation levels in the beam port hall and thus negatively affectadjacent scientific facilities (e.g. neutron diffraction facilities).As a bonus, the shielding for the NRAD facility should also prevent radiation scattering towards the detector plane and doing so, thus increase thecapability of obtaining better quantitative results. This paper addresses Monte Carlo neutron-particletransport simulations to theoretically optimize the shielding capabilities of the biological barrierfor the SANRAD facility at the SAFARI-1 nuclear research reactor in South Africa. The experimental process to develop the shielding, based on the principles of the ANTARES facility, is described. After casting, the homogeneity distribution of these concrete mix materials is found to be near perfect and first order experimental radiation shielding characteristicsthrough film badge (TLD) exposure show acceptable values and trends in neutron- and gamma-ray attenuation.

  2. Lagrange interpolation for the radiation shielding calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Isozumi, Y; Miyatake, H; Kato, T; Tosaki, M

    2002-01-01

    Basing on some formulas of Lagrange interpolation derived in this paper, a computer program for table calculations has been prepared. Main features of the program are as follows; 1) maximum degree of polynomial in Lagrange interpolation is 10, 2) tables with both one variable and two variables can be applied, 3) logarithmic transformations of function and/or variable values can be included and 4) tables with discontinuities and cusps can be applied. The program has been carefully tested by using the data tables in the manual of shielding calculation for radiation facilities. For all available tables in the manual, calculations with the program have been reasonably performed under conditions of 1) logarithmic transformation of both function and variable values and 2) degree 4 or 5 of the polynomial.

  3. Standardized Radiation Shield Design Methods: 2005 HZETRN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Badavi, Francis F.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2006-01-01

    Research committed by the Langley Research Center through 1995 resulting in the HZETRN code provides the current basis for shield design methods according to NASA STD-3000 (2005). With this new prominence, the database, basic numerical procedures, and algorithms are being re-examined with new methods of verification and validation being implemented to capture a well defined algorithm for engineering design processes to be used in this early development phase of the Bush initiative. This process provides the methodology to transform the 1995 HZETRN research code into the 2005 HZETRN engineering code to be available for these early design processes. In this paper, we will review the basic derivations including new corrections to the codes to insure improved numerical stability and provide benchmarks for code verification.

  4. Solar energy apparatus with apertured shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collings, Roger J. (Inventor); Bannon, David G. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A protective apertured shield for use about an inlet to a solar apparatus which includesd a cavity receiver for absorbing concentrated solar energy. A rigid support truss assembly is fixed to the periphery of the inlet and projects radially inwardly therefrom to define a generally central aperture area through which solar radiation can pass into the cavity receiver. A non-structural, laminated blanket is spread over the rigid support truss in such a manner as to define an outer surface area and an inner surface area diverging radially outwardly from the central aperture area toward the periphery of the inlet. The outer surface area faces away from the inlet and the inner surface area faces toward the cavity receiver. The laminated blanket includes at least one layer of material, such as ceramic fiber fabric, having high infra-red emittance and low solar absorption properties, and another layer, such as metallic foil, of low infra-red emittance properties.

  5. Comparative study of radiation shielding parameters for bismuth borate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaundal, Rajinder Singh, E-mail: rajinder_apd@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, School of Physical Sciences, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara, Punjab (India)

    2016-07-15

    Melt and quench technique was used for the preparation of glassy samples of the composition x Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3-}(1-x) B{sub 2}O{sub 3} where x= .05 to .040. XCOM computer program is used for the evaluation of gamma-ray shielding parameters of the prepared glass samples. Further the values of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic number and half value layer for the glassy samples have been calculated in the energy range from 1KeV to 100GeV. Rigidity of the glass samples have been analyzed by molar volume of the prepared glass samples. (author)

  6. Rapid emission angle selection for rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunlong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Yang, Wenjun; Kim, Yusung; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Sun, Wenqing; Wu, Xiaodong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors present a rapid emission angle selection (REAS) method that enables the efficient selection of the azimuthal shield angle for rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT). The REAS method produces a Pareto curve from which a potential RSBT user can select a treatment plan that balances the tradeoff between delivery time and tumor dose conformity. Methods: Two cervical cancer patients were considered as test cases for the REAS method. The RSBT source considered was a Xoft AxxentTM electronic brachytherapy source, partially shielded with 0.5 mm of tungsten, which traveled inside a tandem intrauterine applicator. Three anchor RSBT plans were generated for each case using dose-volume optimization, with azimuthal shield emission angles of 90°, 180°, and 270°. The REAS method converts the anchor plans to treatment plans for all possible emission angles by combining neighboring beamlets to form beamlets for larger emission angles. Treatment plans based on exhaustive dose-volume optimization (ERVO) and exhaustive surface optimization (ERSO) were also generated for both cases. Uniform dwell-time scaling was applied to all plans such that that high-risk clinical target volume D90 was maximized without violating the D2cc tolerances of the rectum, bladder, and sigmoid colon. Results: By choosing three azimuthal emission angles out of 32 potential angles, the REAS method performs about 10 times faster than the ERVO method. By setting D90 to 85–100 Gy10, the delivery times used by REAS generated plans are 21.0% and 19.5% less than exhaustive surface optimized plans used by the two clinical cases. By setting the delivery time budget to 5–25 and 10–30 min/fx, respectively, for two the cases, the D90 contributions for REAS are improved by 5.8% and 5.1% compared to the ERSO plans. The ranges used in this comparison were selected in order to keep both D90 and the delivery time within acceptable limits. Conclusions: The REAS method enables efficient RSBT

  7. Artificial Dielectric Shields for Integrated Transmission Lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Y.; Rejaei, B.; Zhuang, Y.

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel shielding method for on-chip transmission lines built on conductive silicon substrates. The shield consists of an artificial dielectric with a very high in-plane dielectric constant, built from two patterned metal layers isolated by a very thin dielectric film. Inserted below an i

  8. Shielding for beta-gamma radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, J J

    1993-06-01

    The build-up factor, B, for lead was expressed as a polynominal cubic function of the relaxation length, mu x, and incorporated in a "general beta-gamma shielding equation." A computer program was written to determine shielding thickness for polyenergetic beta-gamma sources without resorting to the conventional "add-one-HVL" method.

  9. Alignment modification for pencil eye shields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, M.D.; Pla, M.; Podgorsak, E.B. (McGill Univ., Quebec (Canada))

    1989-01-01

    Accurate alignment of pencil beam eye shields to protect the lens of the eye may be made easier by means of a simple modification of existing apparatus. This involves drilling a small hole through the center of the shield to isolate the rayline directed to the lens and fabricating a suitable plug for this hole.

  10. Engineering models of high speed penetration into geological shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Dor, Gabi; Dubinsky, Anatoly; Elperin, Tov

    2014-03-01

    The survey is dedicated to approximate empirical and analytical models which were suggested for describing high-speed penetration into geological shields. This review differs from the previously published reviews on this topic in the following respects: (i) includes a large number of models; (ii) describes models suggested during recent years; (iii) much attention is given to models which have been originally published in Russian and are not well known in the West. References list includes 81 items.

  11. A new lead-free radiation shielding material for radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Kun; Luo, Wenyun; Dong, Xiaoqing; Wang, Chuanshan; Wu, Guohua; Jiang, Mawei; Zha, Yuanzi

    2009-02-01

    Lead has recently been recognised as a source of environmental pollution, including the lead used for radiation shielding in radiotherapy. The bremsstrahlung radiation caused by the interaction between the electron beam and lead may reduce the accuracy of radiotherapy. To avoid the use of lead, a new material composed of tungsten and hydrogenated styrene-butadiene-styrene copolymer is studied with the Monte Carlo (MC) method and experiment in this paper. The component of the material is chosen after simulation with the MC method and the practical measurement is taken to validate the shielding ability of the material. The result shows that the shielding ability of the new material is good enough to fulfill the requirement for application in radiotherapy. Compared with lead alloy, the present new material is so flexible that can be easily customized into arbitrary shapes. Moreover, the material is environmentally friendly and can be recycled conveniently. Therefore, the material can be used as an effective lead substitute for shielding against electron beams in radiotherapy.

  12. SHIELD II: TRGB Distance Measurements from HST Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, John M.; McQuinn, Kristen B.; Skillman, Evan D.; SHIELD Team

    2016-01-01

    The "Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs II" ("SHIELD II") is a multiwavelength, legacy-class observational campaign that is facilitating the study of both internal and global evolutionary processes in low-mass dwarf galaxies discovered by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. The observations and science expand on the results from detailed studies of 12 similarly low-mass dwarf galaxies from the original SHIELD campaign. New HST observations of 18 SHIELD II galaxies have allowed us to determine their TRGB distances, thus anchoring the physical scales on which our ongoing analysis is based. Combined with the HST observations of the original 12 SHIELD galaxies presented in McQuinn et al. (2014, 2015), these HST optical images enable a holistic study of the fundamental parameters and characteristics of a statistically robust sample of 30 extremely low-mass galaxies. Additional science goals include an accurate census of the dark matter contents of these galaxies, a spatial and temporal study of star formation within them, and a characterization of the fundamental parameters that change as galaxy masses range from "mini-halo" to star-forming dwarf.Support for this work was provided by NSF grant AST-1211683 to JMC at Macalester College, and by NASA through grant GO-13750 from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  13. Shielding in biology and biophysics: Methodology, dosimetry, interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimirsky, B. M.; Temuryants, N. A.

    2016-12-01

    An interdisciplinary review of the publications on the shielding of organisms by different materials is presented. The authors show that some discrepancies between the results of different researchers might be attributed to methodological reasons, including purely biological (neglect of rhythms) and technical (specific features of the design or material of the screen) ones. In some cases, an important factor is the instability of control indices due to the variations in space weather. According to the modern concept of biological exposure to microdoses, any isolation of a biological object by any material necessarily leads to several simultaneous changes in environmental parameters, and this undermines the principle of "all other conditions being equal" in the classical differential scheme of an experiment. The shielding effects of water solution are universally recognized and their influence is to be observed for all organisms. Data on the exposure of living organisms to weak combined magnetic fields and on the influence of space weather enabled the development of theoretical models generally explaining the effect of shielding for bioorganisms. Ferromagnetic shielding results in changes of both the static magnetic field and the field of radio waves within the area protected by the screen. When screens are nonmagnetic, changes are due to the isolation from the radio waves. In both cases, some contribution to the fluctuations of measured parameters can be made by variations in the level of ionizing radiation.

  14. Results of shielding characteristics tests in Monju

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usami, Shin; Suzuoki, Zenro; Deshimaru, Takehide; Nakashima, Fumiaki [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tsuruga, Fukui (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    In the prototype fast breeder reactor Monju, the shielding characteristics tests were made around the reactor core, the primary heat transport system, and the fuel handling and storage system as a part of the system start-up tests from 0% to 45% of rated power from October 1993 through December 1995. The results of the measurements, analyses and evaluations in these tests validated the FBR shielding analysis methods and demonstrated that there was a safe shielding design margin in Monju. The important basic data for use in future FBR shielding design were successfully acquired. In order to obtain more substantial basic data and to improve the accuracy of the analyses, the next shielding measurements are planned for the period of the system start-up tests at the restart of Monju. (author)

  15. Mars Exploration Rover Heat Shield Recontact Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiszadeh, Behzad; Desai, Prasun N.; Michelltree, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The twin Mars Exploration Rover missions landed successfully on Mars surface in January of 2004. Both missions used a parachute system to slow the rover s descent rate from supersonic to subsonic speeds. Shortly after parachute deployment, the heat shield, which protected the rover during the hypersonic entry phase of the mission, was jettisoned using push-off springs. Mission designers were concerned about the heat shield recontacting the lander after separation, so a separation analysis was conducted to quantify risks. This analysis was used to choose a proper heat shield ballast mass to ensure successful separation with low probability of recontact. This paper presents the details of such an analysis, its assumptions, and the results. During both landings, the radar was able to lock on to the heat shield, measuring its distance, as it descended away from the lander. This data is presented and is used to validate the heat shield separation/recontact analysis.

  16. Radiation Shielding for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Jarvis A.

    2016-01-01

    Design and analysis of radiation shielding for nuclear thermal propulsion has continued at Marshall Space Flight Center. A set of optimization tools are in development, and strategies for shielding optimization will be discussed. Considerations for the concurrent design of internal and external shielding are likely required for a mass optimal shield design. The task of reducing radiation dose to crew from a nuclear engine is considered to be less challenging than the task of thermal mitigation for cryogenic propellant, especially considering the likely implementation of additional crew shielding for protection from solar particles and cosmic rays. Further consideration is thus made for the thermal effects of radiation absorption in cryogenic propellant. Materials challenges and possible methods of manufacturing are also discussed.

  17. Background simulations and shielding calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Vitaly A.

    2011-04-01

    Key improvements in the sensitivity of the underground particle astrophysics experiments can only be achieved if the radiation causing background events in detectors is well understood and proper measures are taken to suppress it. The background radiation arising from radioactivity and cosmic-ray muons is discussed here together with the methods of its suppression. Different shielding designs are considered to attenuate gamma-rays and neutrons coming from radioactivity in rock and lab walls. Purity of materials used in detector construction is analysed and the background event rates due to the presence of radioactive isotopes in detector components are discussed. Event rates in detectors caused by muon-induced neutrons with and without active veto systems are presented leading to the requirements for the depth of an underground laboratory and the efficiency of the veto system.

  18. Radiation Shielding Systems Using Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin (Inventor); McKay, Christoper P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A system for shielding personnel and/or equipment from radiation particles. In one embodiment, a first substrate is connected to a first array or perpendicularly oriented metal-like fingers, and a second, electrically conducting substrate has an array of carbon nanostructure (CNS) fingers, coated with an electro-active polymer extending toward, but spaced apart from, the first substrate fingers. An electric current and electric charge discharge and dissipation system, connected to the second substrate, receives a current and/or voltage pulse initially generated when the first substrate receives incident radiation. In another embodiment, an array of CNSs is immersed in a first layer of hydrogen-rich polymers and in a second layer of metal-like material. In another embodiment, a one- or two-dimensional assembly of fibers containing CNSs embedded in a metal-like matrix serves as a radiation-protective fabric or body covering.

  19. Shielding superconductors with thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Posen, Sam; Catelani, Gianluigi; Liepe, Matthias U; Sethna, James P

    2015-01-01

    Determining the optimal arrangement of superconducting layers to withstand large amplitude AC magnetic fields is important for certain applications such as superconducting radiofrequency cavities. In this paper, we evaluate the shielding potential of the superconducting film/insulating film/superconductor (SIS') structure, a configuration that could provide benefits in screening large AC magnetic fields. After establishing that for high frequency magnetic fields, flux penetration must be avoided, the superheating field of the structure is calculated in the London limit both numerically and, for thin films, analytically. For intermediate film thicknesses and realistic material parameters we also solve numerically the Ginzburg-Landau equations. It is shown that a small enhancement of the superheating field is possible, on the order of a few percent, for the SIS' structure relative to a bulk superconductor of the film material, if the materials and thicknesses are chosen appropriately.

  20. Overview of the SHIELDS Project at LANL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordanova, V.; Delzanno, G. L.; Henderson, M. G.; Godinez, H. C.; Jeffery, C. A.; Lawrence, E. C.; Meierbachtol, C.; Moulton, D.; Vernon, L.; Woodroffe, J. R.; Toth, G.; Welling, D. T.; Yu, Y.; Birn, J.; Thomsen, M. F.; Borovsky, J.; Denton, M.; Albert, J.; Horne, R. B.; Lemon, C. L.; Markidis, S.; Young, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    The near-Earth space environment is a highly dynamic and coupled system through a complex set of physical processes over a large range of scales, which responds nonlinearly to driving by the time-varying solar wind. Predicting variations in this environment that can affect technologies in space and on Earth, i.e. "space weather", remains a big space physics challenge. We present a recently funded project through the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program that is developing a new capability to understand, model, and predict Space Hazards Induced near Earth by Large Dynamic Storms, the SHIELDS framework. The project goals are to specify the dynamics of the hot (keV) particles (the seed population for the radiation belts) on both macro- and micro-scale, including important physics of rapid particle injection and acceleration associated with magnetospheric storms/substorms and plasma waves. This challenging problem is addressed using a team of world-class experts in the fields of space science and computational plasma physics and state-of-the-art models and computational facilities. New data assimilation techniques employing data from LANL instruments on the Van Allen Probes and geosynchronous satellites are developed in addition to physics-based models. This research will provide a framework for understanding of key radiation belt drivers that may accelerate particles to relativistic energies and lead to spacecraft damage and failure. The ability to reliably distinguish between various modes of failure is critically important in anomaly resolution and forensics. SHIELDS will enhance our capability to accurately specify and predict the near-Earth space environment where operational satellites reside.

  1. Foam-Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composite Radiation Shields Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — New and innovative lightweight radiation shielding materials are needed to protect humans in future manned exploration vehicles. Radiation shielding materials are...

  2. Improved Metal-Polymeric Laminate Radiation Shielding Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposed Phase I program, a multifunctional lightweight radiation shield composite will be developed and fabricated. This structural radiation shielding will...

  3. Shielding evaluation of neutron generator hall by Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujala, U.; Selvakumaran, T.S.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B. [Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Thilagam, L.; Mohapatra, D.K., E-mail: swathythila2@yahoo.com [Safety Research Institute, Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, Kalpakkam (India)

    2017-04-01

    A shielded hall was constructed for accommodating a D-D, D-T or D-Be based pulsed neutron generator (NG) with 4π yield of 10{sup 9} n/s. The neutron shield design of the facility was optimized using NCRP-51 methodology such that the total dose rates outside the hall areas are well below the regulatory limit for full occupancy criterion (1 μSv/h). However, the total dose rates at roof top, cooling room trench exit and labyrinth exit were found to be above this limit for the optimized design. Hence, additional neutron shielding arrangements were proposed for cooling room trench and labyrinth exits. The roof top was made inaccessible. The present study is an attempt to evaluate the neutron and associated capture gamma transport through the bulk shields for the complete geometry and materials of the NG-Hall using Monte Carlo (MC) codes MCNP and FLUKA. The neutron source terms of D-D, D-T and D-Be reactions are considered in the simulations. The effect of additional shielding proposed has been demonstrated through the simulations carried out with the consideration of the additional shielding for D-Be neutron source term. The results MC simulations using two different codes are found to be consistent with each other for neutron dose rate estimates. However, deviation up to 28% is noted between these two codes at few locations for capture gamma dose rate estimates. Overall, the dose rates estimated by MC simulations including additional shields shows that all the locations surrounding the hall satisfy the full occupancy criteria for all three types of sources. Additionally, the dose rates due to direct transmission of primary neutrons estimated by FLUKA are compared with the values calculated using the formula given in NCRP-51 which shows deviations up to 50% with each other. The details of MC simulations and NCRP-51 methodology for the estimation of primary neutron dose rate along with the results are presented in this paper. (author)

  4. Depleted uranium hexafluoride: The source material for advanced shielding systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quapp, W.J.; Lessing, P.A. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cooley, C.R. [Department of Technology, Germantown, MD (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a management challenge and financial liability problem in the form of 50,000 cylinders containing 555,000 metric tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) that are stored at the gaseous diffusion plants. DOE is evaluating several options for the disposition of this UF{sub 6}, including continued storage, disposal, and recycle into a product. Based on studies conducted to date, the most feasible recycle option for the depleted uranium is shielding in low-level waste, spent nuclear fuel, or vitrified high-level waste containers. Estimates for the cost of disposal, using existing technologies, range between $3.8 and $11.3 billion depending on factors such as the disposal site and the applicability of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Advanced technologies can reduce these costs, but UF{sub 6} disposal still represents large future costs. This paper describes an application for depleted uranium in which depleted uranium hexafluoride is converted into an oxide and then into a heavy aggregate. The heavy uranium aggregate is combined with conventional concrete materials to form an ultra high density concrete, DUCRETE, weighing more than 400 lb/ft{sup 3}. DUCRETE can be used as shielding in spent nuclear fuel/high-level waste casks at a cost comparable to the lower of the disposal cost estimates. Consequently, the case can be made that DUCRETE shielded casks are an alternative to disposal. In this case, a beneficial long term solution is attained for much less than the combined cost of independently providing shielded casks and disposing of the depleted uranium. Furthermore, if disposal is avoided, the political problems associated with selection of a disposal location are also avoided. Other studies have also shown cost benefits for low level waste shielded disposal containers.

  5. International Space Station Radiation Shielding Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualls, G. D.; Wilson, J. W.; Sandridge, C.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Nealy, J. E.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Hugger, C. P.; Verhage, J.; Anderson, B. M.; Atwell, W.

    2001-01-01

    The projected radiation levels within the International Space Station (ISS) have been criticized by the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel in their report to the NASA Administrator. Methods for optimal reconfiguration and augmentation of the ISS shielding are now being developed. The initial steps are to develop reconfigurable and realistic radiation shield models of the ISS modules, develop computational procedures for the highly anisotropic radiation environment, and implement parametric and organizational optimization procedures. The targets of the redesign process are the crew quarters where the astronauts sleep and determining the effects of ISS shadow shielding of an astronaut in a spacesuit. The ISS model as developed will be reconfigurable to follow the ISS. Swapping internal equipment rack assemblies via location mapping tables will be one option for shield optimization. Lightweight shield augmentation materials will be optimally fit to crew quarter areas using parametric optimization procedures to minimize the augmentation shield mass. The optimization process is being integrated into the Intelligence Synthesis Environment s (ISE s) immersive simulation facility at the Langley Research Center and will rely on High Performance Computing and Communication (HPCC) for rapid evaluation of shield parameter gradients.

  6. Nomogram for Determining Shield Thickness for Point and Line Sources of Gamma Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joenemalm, C.; Malen, K

    1966-10-15

    A set of nomograms is given for the determination of the required shield thickness against gamma radiation. The sources handled are point and infinite line sources with shields of Pb, Fe, magnetite concrete (p = 3.6), ordinary concrete (p = 2.3) or water. The gamma energy range covered is 0.5 - 10 MeV. The nomograms are directly applicable for source and dose points on the surfaces of the shield. They can easily be extended to source and dose points in other positions by applying a geometrical correction. Also included are data for calculation of the source strength for the most common materials and for fission product sources.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants in XH4 group XIV hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaszuński, Michał; Ruud, Kenneth

    2006-07-01

    Self-consistent field and multiconfigurational self-consistent field wave functions are used to analyse NMR shielding constants in the XH4 hydrides, X = C, Si, Ge, Sn and Pb. All relativistic corrections to order α4, where α is the fine structure constant, are included in the evaluation of the perturbation corrections to the non-relativistic shielding constants. Each of the relativistic corrections is compared to the results obtained for group XVI and XVII hydrides and noble-gas atoms. For the heavy nuclei, the computed relativistic corrections can be used to improve the absolute shielding scale.

  8. Design, fabrication and test of Load Bearing multilayer insulation to support a broad area cooled shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, S. A.; Johnson, W. L.; Plachta, D. W.; Mills, G. L.; Buchanan, L.; Kopelove, A. B.

    2014-11-01

    Improvements in cryogenic propellant storage are needed to achieve reduced or Zero Boil Off of cryopropellants, critical for long duration missions. Techniques for reducing heat leak into cryotanks include using passive multi-layer insulation (MLI) and vapor cooled or actively cooled thermal shields. Large scale shields cannot be supported by tank structural supports without heat leak through the supports. Traditional MLI also cannot support shield structural loads, and separate shield support mechanisms add significant heat leak. Quest Thermal Group and Ball Aerospace, with NASA SBIR support, have developed a novel Load Bearing multi-layer insulation (LBMLI) capable of self-supporting thermal shields and providing high thermal performance. We report on the development of LBMLI, including design, modeling and analysis, structural testing via vibe and acoustic loading, calorimeter thermal testing, and Reduced Boil-Off (RBO) testing on NASA large scale cryotanks. LBMLI uses the strength of discrete polymer spacers to control interlayer spacing and support the external load of an actively cooled shield and external MLI. Structural testing at NASA Marshall was performed to beyond maximum launch profiles without failure. LBMLI coupons were thermally tested on calorimeters, with superior performance to traditional MLI on a per layer basis. Thermal and structural tests were performed with LBMLI supporting an actively cooled shield, and comparisons are made to the performance of traditional MLI and thermal shield supports. LBMLI provided a 51% reduction in heat leak per layer over a previously tested traditional MLI with tank standoffs, a 38% reduction in mass, and was advanced to TRL5. Active thermal control using LBMLI and a broad area cooled shield offers significant advantages in total system heat flux, mass and structural robustness for future Reduced Boil-Off and Zero Boil-Off cryogenic missions with durations over a few weeks.

  9. Optimization design of electromagnetic shielding composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhaoming; Wang, Qingguo; Qin, Siliang; Hu, Xiaofeng

    2013-03-01

    The effective electromagnetic parameters physical model of composites and prediction formulas of composites' shielding effectiveness and reflectivity were derived based on micromechanics, variational principle and electromagnetic wave transmission theory. The multi-objective optimization design of multilayer composites was carried out using genetic algorithm. The optimized results indicate that material parameter proportioning of biggest absorption ability can be acquired under the condition of the minimum shielding effectiveness can be satisfied in certain frequency band. The validity of optimization design model was verified and the scheme has certain theoretical value and directive significance to the design of high efficiency shielding composites.

  10. Carbon nanostructure composite for electromagnetic interference shielding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anupama Joshi; Suwarna Datar

    2015-06-01

    This communication reviews current developments in carbon nanostructure-based composite materials for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding. With more and more electronic gadgets being used at different frequencies, there is a need for shielding them from one another to avoid interference. Conventionally, metal-based shielding materials have been used. But due to the requirement of light weight, corrosion resistive materials, lot of work is being done on composite materials. In this research the forerunner is the nanocarbon-based composite material whose different forms add different characteristics to the composite. The article focusses on composites based on graphene, graphene oxide, carbon nanotubes, and several other novel forms of carbon.

  11. Instrumentation concepts and requirements for a space vacuum research facility. [molecular shield for spaceborne experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, H. N.

    1979-01-01

    An earth-orbiting molecular shield that offers a unique opportunity for conducting physics, chemistry, and material processing experiments under a combination of environmental conditions that are not available in terrestrial laboratories is equipped with apparatus for forming a molecular beam from the freestream. Experiments are carried out using a moderate energy, high flux density, high purity atomic oxygen beam in the very low density environment within the molecular shield. As a minimum, the following instruments are required for the molecular shield: (1) a mass spectrometer; (2) a multifunction material analysis instrumentation system; and (3) optical spectrometry equipment. The design is given of a furlable molecular shield that allows deployment and retrieval of the system (including instrumentation and experiments) to be performed without contamination. Interfaces between the molecular shield system and the associated spacecraft are given. An in-flight deployment sequence is discussed that minimizes the spacecraft-induced contamination in the vicinity of the shield. Design approaches toward a precursor molecular shield system are shown.

  12. Lessons from shielding retrofits at the LAMPF/LANSCE/PSR accelerator, beam lines and target facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macek, R.J.

    1994-07-01

    The experience in the past 7 years to improve the shielding and radiation control systems at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) and the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) provides important lessons for the design of radiation control systems at future, high beam power proton accelerator facilities. Major issues confronted and insight gained in developing shielding criteria and in the use of radiation interlocks are discussed. For accelerators and beam lines requiring hands-on-maintenance, our experience suggests that shielding criteria based on accident scenarios will be more demanding than criteria based on routinely encountered beam losses. Specification and analysis of the appropriate design basis accident become all important. Mitigation by active protection systems of the consequences of potential, but severe, prompt radiation accidents has been advocated as an alternate choice to shielding retrofits for risk management at both facilities. Acceptance of active protection systems has proven elusive primarily because of the difficulty in providing convincing proof that failure of active systems (to mitigate the accident) is incredible. Results from extensive shielding assessment studies are presented including data from experimental beam spill tests, comparisons with model estimates, and evidence bearing on the limitations of line-of-sight attenuation models in complex geometries. The scope and significant characteristics of major shielding retrofit projects at the LAMPF site are illustrated by the project to improve the shielding beneath a road over a multiuse, high-intensity beam line (Line D).

  13. Preliminary Evaluation of Convective Heat Transfer in a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson J. Boise; Reid, Robert S.

    2007-01-01

    As part of the Vision for Space Exploration, the end of the next decade will bring man back to the surface of the moon. A crucial issue for the establishment of human presence on the moon will be the availability of compact power sources. This presence could require greater than 10's of kWt's in follow on years. Nuclear reactors are well suited to meet the needs for power generation on the lunar or Martian surface. Radiation shielding is a key component of any surface power reactor system. Several competing concepts exist for lightweight, safe, robust shielding systems such as a water shield, lithium hydride (LiH), and boron carbide. Water offers several potential advantages, including reduced cost, reduced technical risk, and reduced mass. Water has not typically been considered for space reactor applications because of the need for gravity to fix the location of any vapor that could form radiation streaming paths. The water shield concept relies on the predictions of passive circulation of the shield water by natural convection to adequately cool the shield. This prediction needs to be experimentally evaluated, especially for shields with complex geometries. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has developed the experience and facilities necessary to do this evaluation in its Early Flight Fission - Test Facility (EFF-TF).

  14. Shielding effectiveness of non-woven carbon fibre sheets

    OpenAIRE

    Dawson, John F.; Flintoft, Ian Dand; Austin, A. N.; Marvin, Andrew C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes work undertaken to understand how the structure of a nonwoven carbon fibre material determines its shielding effectiveness, including the effects of fibre orientation, and contact resistance. In order to facilitate understanding of the material behaviour, software has been written to generate Monte Carlo Models (MCMs) of the material structure. The results of our MCMs are compared with measurements and some empirical expressions.

  15. REPOSITORY LAYOUT SUPPORTING DESIGN FEATURE #13- WASTE PACKAGE SELF SHIELDING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Owen

    1999-04-09

    The objective of this analysis is to develop a repository layout, for Feature No. 13, that will accommodate self-shielding waste packages (WP) with an areal mass loading of 25 metric tons of uranium per acre (MTU/acre). The scope of this analysis includes determination of the number of emplacement drifts, amount of emplacement drift excavation required, and a preliminary layout for illustrative purposes.

  16. Radiation Exposure Effects and Shielding Analysis of Carbon Nanotube Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Richard; Armendariz, Lupita (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanotube materials promise to be the basis for a variety of emerging technologies with aerospace applications. Potential applications to human space flight include spacecraft shielding, hydrogen storage, structures and fixtures and nano-electronics. Appropriate risk analysis on the properties of nanotube materials is essential for future mission safety. Along with other environmental hazards, materials used in space flight encounter a hostile radiation environment for all mission profiles, from low earth orbit to interplanetary space.

  17. OPTIMAL BETA-RAY SHIELDING THICKNESSES FOR DIFFERENT THERAPEUTIC RADIONUCLIDES AND SHIELDING MATERIALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yong In; Kim, Ja Mee; Kim, Jung Hoon

    2016-04-06

    To better understand the distribution of deposited energy of beta and gamma rays according to changes in shielding materials and thicknesses when radionuclides are used for therapeutic nuclear medicine, a simulation was conducted. The results showed that due to the physical characteristics of each therapeutic radionuclide, the thicknesses of shielding materials at which beta-ray shielding takes place varied. Additional analysis of the shielding of gamma ray was conducted for radionuclides that emit both beta and gamma rays simultaneously with results showing shielding effects proportional to the atomic number and density of the shielding materials. Also, analysis of bremsstrahlung emission after beta-ray interactions in the simulation revealed that the occurrence of bremsstrahlung was relatively lower than theoretically calculated and varied depending on different radionuclides.

  18. Investigating Liquid Leak from Pre-Filled Syringes upon Needle Shield Removal: Effect of Air Bubble Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Edwin; Maa, Yuh-Fun; Overcashier, David; Hsu, Chung C

    2011-01-01

    This study is to investigate the effect of headspace air pressure in pre-filled syringes on liquid leak (dripping) from the syringe needle upon needle shield removal. Drip tests to measure drip quantity were performed on syringes manually filled with 0.5 or 1.0 mL of various aqueous solutions. Parameters assessed included temperature (filling and test), bulk storage conditions (tank pressure and the type of the pressurized gas), solution composition (pure water, 0.9% sodium chloride, and a monoclonal antibody formulation), and testing procedures. A headspace pressure analyzer was used to verify the drip test method. Results suggested that leakage is indeed caused by headspace pressure increase, and the temperature effect (ideal gas expansion) is a major, but not the only, factor. The dissolved gases in the liquid bulk prior to or during filling may contribute to leakage, as these gases could be released into the headspace due to solubility changes (in response to test temperature and pressure conditions) and cause pressure increase. Needle shield removal procedures were found to cause dripping, but liquid composition played little role. Overall, paying attention to the processing history (pressure and temperature) of the liquid bulk is the key to minimize leakage. The headspace pressure could be reduced by decreasing liquid bulk storage pressure, filling at a higher temperature, or employing lower solubility gas (e.g., helium) for bulk transfer and storage. Leakage could also be mitigated by simply holding the syringe needle pointing upward during needle shield removal. Substantial advances in pre-filled syringe technology development, particularly in syringe filling accuracy, have been made. However, there are factors, as subtle as how the needle shield (or tip cap) is removed, that may affect dosing accuracy. We recently found that upon removal of the tip cap from a syringe held vertically with needle pointed downwards, a small amount of solution, up to 3-4% of

  19. Performances of Kevlar and Polyethylene as radiation shielding on-board the International Space Station in high latitude radiation environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narici, Livio; Casolino, Marco; Di Fino, Luca; Larosa, Marianna; Picozza, Piergiorgio; Rizzo, Alessandro; Zaconte, Veronica

    2017-05-10

    Passive radiation shielding is a mandatory element in the design of an integrated solution to mitigate the effects of radiation during long deep space voyages for human exploration. Understanding and exploiting the characteristics of materials suitable for radiation shielding in space flights is, therefore, of primary importance. We present here the results of the first space-test on Kevlar and Polyethylene radiation shielding capabilities including direct measurements of the background baseline (no shield). Measurements are performed on-board of the International Space Station (Columbus modulus) during the ALTEA-shield ESA sponsored program. For the first time the shielding capability of such materials has been tested in a radiation environment similar to the deep-space one, thanks to the feature of the ALTEA system, which allows to select only high latitude orbital tracts of the International Space Station. Polyethylene is widely used for radiation shielding in space and therefore it is an excellent benchmark material to be used in comparative investigations. In this work we show that Kevlar has radiation shielding performances comparable to the Polyethylene ones, reaching a dose rate reduction of 32 ± 2% and a dose equivalent rate reduction of 55 ± 4% (for a shield of 10 g/cm(2)).

  20. Shielded ADR Magnets For Space Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An important consideration of the use of superconducting magnets in ADR applications is shielding of the other instruments in the vicinity of the superconducting...

  1. Boron-10 loaded inorganic shielding material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, S. I.; Ryskiewicz, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    Shielding material containing Boron 10 and gadoliunium for neutron absorption has been developed to reduce interference from low energy neutrons in measurement of fission neutron spectrum using Li-6 fast neutron spectrometer.

  2. Shielded ADR Magnets For Space Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase II program will concentrate on manufacturing of qualified low-current, light-weight, 10K ADR magnets for space application. Shielded ADR solenoidal magnets...

  3. Long Duration Space Shelter Shielding Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has developed fiber reinforced ceramic composites for radiation shielding that can be used for external walls in long duration manned...

  4. Passive Magnetic Shielding in Gradient Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Bidinosti, C P

    2013-01-01

    The effect of passive magnetic shielding on dc magnetic field gradients imposed by both external and internal sources is studied. It is found that for concentric cylindrical or spherical shells of high permeability material, higher order multipoles in the magnetic field are shielded progressively better, by a factor related to the order of the multipole. In regard to the design of internal coil systems for the generation of uniform internal fields, we show how one can take advantage of the coupling of the coils to the innermost magnetic shield to further optimize the uniformity of the field. These results demonstrate quantitatively a phenomenon that was previously well-known qualitatively: that the resultant magnetic field within a passively magnetically shielded region can be much more uniform than the applied magnetic field itself. Furthermore we provide formulae relevant to active magnetic compensation systems which attempt to stabilize the interior fields by sensing and cancelling the exterior fields clos...

  5. Long Duration Space Shelter Shielding Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has developed a ceramic composite material system that is more effective for shielding both GCR and SPE than aluminum. The composite...

  6. Monitored Natural Attenuation of Inorganic Contaminants in Ground Water Volume 3 Assessment for Radionuclides IncludingTritium, Radon, Strontium, Technetium, Uranium, Iodine, Radium, Thorium, Cesium, and Plutonium-Americium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The current document represents the third volume of a set of three volumes that address the technical basis and requirements for assessing the potential applicability of MNA as part of a ground-water remedy for plumes with nonradionuclide and/or radionuclide inorganic contamina...

  7. Boron cage compound materials and composites for shielding and absorbing neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, III, Daniel E; Eastwood, Eric A

    2014-03-04

    Boron cage compound-containing materials for shielding and absorbing neutrons. The materials include BCC-containing composites and compounds. BCC-containing compounds comprise a host polymer and a BCC attached thereto. BCC-containing composites comprise a mixture of a polymer matrix and a BCC filler. The BCC-containing materials can be used to form numerous articles of manufacture for shielding and absorbing neutrons.

  8. SU-E-T-474: Improvements to Intra-Oral Shield Design for Electron Beam Treatments: Use of Multi-Layered Metal Foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butson, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Intraoral electron shields used in radiotherapy are designed to minimize radiation exposure to non-treatment tissue. Sites where shields are used include but are not limited to, the treatment of lips, cheeks and ears whilst shielding the underlying oral cavity, tongue, gingival or temporal region. However their use produces an enhancement in dose on the beam side caused by an increase in electron backscatter radiation. This work designs a new shield incorporating copper, aluminium and wax in a step down filter arrangement to minimise backscatter whilst minimizing overall shield thickness. Methods: For electron beams ranging from 6 MeV to 10 MeV, shields of varying designs and thicknesses were assessed to determine the thinnest shield design that could be produced whilst minimising backscattered radiation to a clinically acceptable level. This was performed with conventional lead and wax shields as well as varying quantities of aluminium and copper foils. Results: From tested shield designs, a new shield design of 4 mm lead, 0.6 mm copper, 1.0 mm aluminium and 1.5 mm wax (3.1 mm added filtration, 7.1 mm total thickness) provided a clinically acceptable (no greater than 110% dose) backscatter and transmission reduction and matched a standard 4.5 mm lead and 10 mm wax (total thickness 14.5 mm) electron shield. Dose enhancement values of no more than 10 % were measured utilising this shield design with a 50 % reduction in shield thickness. Conclusion: The thinner layered shield reduced backscattered radiation dose to less than 10% enhancement for beam energies on 10 MeV and less and will allow easier patient set up. The thinner shields are tolerated better by patients when mucosal reactions occur as they place less physical pressure on these sites during treatment due to their smaller size and thickness.

  9. Shielding Design for a Medical Cyclotron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Feng; SONG; Guo-fang; GUAN; Feng-ping; LV; Yin-long; ZHANG; Xing-zhi

    2012-01-01

    <正>A 10 MeV 100 μA medical cyclotron is constructed at CIAE which is used in the production of FDG. The energy of the cyclotron can reach 14 MeV by adjusting the magnetic field and RF system parameters, and the shielding design is in accordance with the 14 MeV beam energy. In this shielding design only neutron is considered, and the neutron source is produced by proton

  10. Enhanced radiation shielding with galena concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Hadad Kamal; Majidi Hosein; Sarshough Samira

    2015-01-01

    A new concrete, containing galena mineral, with enhanced shielding properties for gamma sources is developed. To achieve optimized shielding properties, ten types of galena concrete containing different mixing ratios and a reference normal concrete of 2300 kg/m3 density are studied experimentally and numerically using Monte Carlo and XCOM codes. For building galena concrete, in addition to the main composition, micro-silica and water, galena mineral (contai...

  11. Influence of Shielding Arrangement on ECT Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Fernandez Marron

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a full 3D study of a shielded ECT sensor. The spatialresolution and effective sensing field are obtained by means of Finite Element Methodbased simulations and are the compared to a conventional sensor's characteristics. Aneffective improvement was found in the sensitivity in the pipe cross-section, resulting inenhanced quality of the reconstructed image. The sensing field along the axis of the sensoralso presents better behaviour for a shielded sensor.

  12. Undulator Beam Pipe Magnetic Shielding Effect Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Andrew; Wolf, Zachary; /SLAC

    2010-11-23

    The proposed stainless steel beampipe for the LCLS undulator has a measurable shielding effect on the magnetic field of the LCLS undulators. This note describes the tests used to determine the magnitude of the shielding effect, as well as deviations in the shielding effect caused by placing different phase shims in the undulator gap. The effect of the proposed Steel strongback which will be used to support the beam pipe, was also studied. A hall probe on a 3 axis movement system was set up to measure the main component of the magnetic field in the Prototype Undulator. To account for temperature variations of the magnetic field of the undulator for successive tests, a correction is applied which is described in this technical note. Using this method, we found the shielding effect, the amount which the field inside the gap was reduced due to the placement of the beampipe, to be {approx}10 Gauss. A series of tests was also performed to determine the effect of phase shims and X and Y correction shims on the shielding. The largest effect on shielding was found for the .3 mm phase shims. The effect of the .3 mm phase shims was to increase the shielding effect {approx}4 Gauss. The tolerance for the shielding effect of the phase shims is less than 1 gauss. The effect of the strongback was seen in its permanent magnetic field. It introduced a dipole field across the measured section of the undulator of {approx}3 gauss. This note documents the tests performed to determine these effects, as well as the results of those tests.

  13. Reliability Methods for Shield Design Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, J. W.

    2002-01-01

    Providing protection against the hazards of space radiation is a major challenge to the exploration and development of space. The great cost of added radiation shielding is a potential limiting factor in deep space operations. In this enabling technology, we have developed methods for optimized shield design over multi-segmented missions involving multiple work and living areas in the transport and duty phase of space missions. The total shield mass over all pieces of equipment and habitats is optimized subject to career dose and dose rate constraints. An important component of this technology is the estimation of two most commonly identified uncertainties in radiation shield design, the shielding properties of materials used and the understanding of the biological response of the astronaut to the radiation leaking through the materials into the living space. The largest uncertainty, of course, is in the biological response to especially high charge and energy (HZE) ions of the galactic cosmic rays. These uncertainties are blended with the optimization design procedure to formulate reliability-based methods for shield design processes. The details of the methods will be discussed.

  14. Corrugation Stuffed Shield for Spacecraft and Its Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU You-ying; WANG Hai-fu

    2006-01-01

    A corrugation stuffed shield system protecting spacecrafts against meteoroid and orbital debris (M/OD) is presented. The semi-empirical ballistic limit equations (BLEs)defining the protection capability of the shield system are given, an d the shielding performance is also discussed. The corrugation stuffed shield (CSS) is more effective than stuffed Whipple shield for M/OD protection,and its shielding performance will be improved significantly as increasing the impact angle. Orbital debris up to 1cm in diameter can be shielded effectively as increasing the impact angle to 25° at the corrugated angle of 30°. The results are significant to spacecraft design.

  15. Superconducting shielded core reactor with reduced AC losses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Yung S.; Hull, John R.

    2006-04-04

    A superconducting shielded core reactor (SSCR) operates as a passive device for limiting excessive AC current in a circuit operating at a high power level under a fault condition such as shorting. The SSCR includes a ferromagnetic core which may be either closed or open (with an air gap) and extends into and through a superconducting tube or superconducting rings arranged in a stacked array. First and second series connected copper coils each disposed about a portion of the iron core are connected to the circuit to be protected and are respectively wound inside and outside of the superconducting tube or rings. A large impedance is inserted into the circuit by the core when the shielding capability of the superconducting arrangement is exceeded by the applied magnetic field generated by the two coils under a fault condition to limit the AC current in the circuit. The proposed SSCR also affords reduced AC loss compared to conventional SSCRs under continuous normal operation.

  16. Self-shielded electron linear accelerators designed for radiation technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belugin, V. M.; Rozanov, N. E.; Pirozhenko, V. M.

    2009-09-01

    This paper describes self-shielded high-intensity electron linear accelerators designed for radiation technologies. The specific property of the accelerators is that they do not apply an external magnetic field; acceleration and focusing of electron beams are performed by radio-frequency fields in the accelerating structures. The main characteristics of the accelerators are high current and beam power, but also reliable operation and a long service life. To obtain these characteristics, a number of problems have been solved, including a particular optimization of the accelerator components and the application of a variety of specific means. The paper describes features of the electron beam dynamics, accelerating structure, and radio-frequency power supply. Several compact self-shielded accelerators for radiation sterilization and x-ray cargo inspection have been created. The introduced methods made it possible to obtain a high intensity of the electron beam and good performance of the accelerators.

  17. Nuclear magnetic shielding constants of liquid water: Insights from hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongsted, Jacob; Nielsen, Christian B.; Mikkelsen, Kurt V.; Christiansen, Ove; Ruud, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    We present a gauge-origin independent method for the calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensors of molecules in a structured and polarizable environment. The method is based on a combination of density functional theory (DFT) or Hartree-Fock wave functions with molecular mechanics. The method is unique in the sense that it includes three important properties that need to be fulfilled in accurate calculations of nuclear magnetic shielding constants: (i) the model includes electron correlation effects, (ii) the model uses gauge-including atomic orbitals to give gauge-origin independent results, and (iii) the effect of the environment is treated self-consistently using a discrete reaction-field methodology. The authors present sample calculations of the isotropic nuclear magnetic shielding constants of liquid water based on a large number of solute-solvent configurations derived from molecular dynamics simulations employing potentials which treat solvent polarization either explicitly or implicitly. For both the O17 and H1 isotropic shielding constants the best predicted results compare fairly well with the experimental data, i.e., they reproduce the experimental solvent shifts to within 4ppm for the O17 shielding and 1ppm for the H1 shielding.

  18. Nuclear magnetic shielding constants of liquid water: insights from hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongsted, Jacob; Nielsen, Christian B; Mikkelsen, Kurt V; Christiansen, Ove; Ruud, Kenneth

    2007-01-21

    We present a gauge-origin independent method for the calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensors of molecules in a structured and polarizable environment. The method is based on a combination of density functional theory (DFT) or Hartree-Fock wave functions with molecular mechanics. The method is unique in the sense that it includes three important properties that need to be fulfilled in accurate calculations of nuclear magnetic shielding constants: (i) the model includes electron correlation effects, (ii) the model uses gauge-including atomic orbitals to give gauge-origin independent results, and (iii) the effect of the environment is treated self-consistently using a discrete reaction-field methodology. The authors present sample calculations of the isotropic nuclear magnetic shielding constants of liquid water based on a large number of solute-solvent configurations derived from molecular dynamics simulations employing potentials which treat solvent polarization either explicitly or implicitly. For both the (17)O and (1)H isotropic shielding constants the best predicted results compare fairly well with the experimental data, i.e., they reproduce the experimental solvent shifts to within 4 ppm for the (17)O shielding and 1 ppm for the (1)H shielding.

  19. Micromagnetic modeling of the shielding properties of nanoscale ferromagnetic layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskandarova, I. M.; Knizhnik, A. A.; Popkov, A. F.; Potapkin, B. V.; Stainer, Q.; Lombard, L.; Mackay, K.

    2016-09-01

    Ferromagnetic shields are widely used to concentrate magnetic fields in a target region of space. Such shields are also used in spintronic nanodevices such as magnetic random access memory and magnetic logic devices. However, the shielding properties of nanostructured shields can differ considerably from those of macroscopic samples. In this work, we investigate the shielding properties of nanostructured NiFe layers around a current line using a finite element micromagnetic model. We find that thin ferromagnetic layers demonstrate saturation of magnetization under an external magnetic field, which reduces the shielding efficiency. Moreover, we show that the shielding properties of nanoscale ferromagnetic layers strongly depend on the uniformity of the layer thickness. Magnetic anisotropy in ultrathin ferromagnetic layers can also influence their shielding efficiency. In addition, we show that domain walls in nanoscale ferromagnetic shields can induce large increases and decreases in the generated magnetic field. Therefore, ferromagnetic shields for spintronic nanodevices require careful design and precise fabrication.

  20. A large-scale magnetic shield with 10^6 damping at milli-Hertz frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Altarev, I; Beck, D H; Chupp, T; Fierlinger, K; Fierlinger, P; Kuchler, F; Lins, T; Marino, M G; Niessen, B; Petzoldt, G; Singh, J T; Schläpfer, U; Schnabel, A; Stoepler, R; Stuiber, S; Strum, M; Taubenheim, B; Voigt, J

    2015-01-01

    A magnetically shielded environment with a damping factor larger than one million at the milli-Hertz frequency regime and an extremely low field and gradient over an extended volume is presented. This extraordinary shielding perfomance is to our knowledge unprecedented and represents an improvement of the state of the art in damping the difficult regime of very low-frequency distortions by more than an order of magnitude. Thus, a new generation of high precision measurements in fundamental physics and metrology is enabled with this technology, particularly suitable to find traces of new physics far beyond the reach of accelerator based physics. The technical realization of the shield with its improvements in design is discussed.

  1. Neutron radiation shielding properties of polymer incorporated self compacting concrete mixes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkapur, Santhosh M; Divakar, L; Narasimhan, Mattur C; Karkera, Narayana B; Goverdhan, P; Sathian, V; Prasad, N K

    2017-07-01

    In this work, the neutron radiation shielding characteristics of a class of novel polymer-incorporated self-compacting concrete (PISCC) mixes are evaluated. Pulverized high density polyethylene (HDPE) material was used, at three different reference volumes, as a partial replacement to river sand in conventional concrete mixes. By such partial replacement of sand with polymer, additional hydrogen contents are incorporated in these concrete mixes and their effect on the neutron radiation shielding properties are studied. It has been observed from the initial set of experiments that there is a definite trend of reductions in the neutron flux and dose transmission factor values in these PISCC mixes vis-à-vis ordinary concrete mix. Also, the fact that quite similar enhanced shielding results are recorded even when reprocessed HDPE material is used in lieu of the virgin HDPE attracts further attention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Gamma-ray shielding and structural properties of barium-bismuth-borosilicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bootjomchai, Cherdsak; Laopaiboon, Jintana; Yenchai, Chadet; Laopaiboon, Raewat

    2012-07-01

    The attenuation coefficients of barium-bismuth-borosilicate glasses have been measured for gamma-ray photon energies of 662, 1173 and 1332 keV using a narrow beam transmission geometry. These coefficients were then used to obtain the values of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic number, effective electron density and mean free path. Good agreement has been observed between experimental and theoretical values of these parameters. From the obtained results it is reported here that from the barium-bismuth-borosilicate glasses are better shields to gamma-radiations in comparison to the standard radiation shielding concretes from the shielding point of view. The molar volume, FTIR and acoustic investigations have been used to study the structural properties of the prepared glass system. The obtained results reveal that the formation of non-bridging oxygens occurs at higher concentration of Bi2O3.

  3. Investigation of Radiation Protection Methodologies for Radiation Therapy Shielding Using Monte Carlo Simulation and Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanny, Sean

    The advent of high-energy linear accelerators for dedicated medical use in the 1950's by Henry Kaplan and the Stanford University physics department began a revolution in radiation oncology. Today, linear accelerators are the standard of care for modern radiation therapy and can generate high-energy beams that can produce tens of Gy per minute at isocenter. This creates a need for a large amount of shielding material to properly protect members of the public and hospital staff. Standardized vault designs and guidance on shielding properties of various materials are provided by the National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) Report 151. However, physicists are seeking ways to minimize the footprint and volume of shielding material needed which leads to the use of non-standard vault configurations and less-studied materials, such as high-density concrete. The University of Toledo Dana Cancer Center has utilized both of these methods to minimize the cost and spatial footprint of the requisite radiation shielding. To ensure a safe work environment, computer simulations were performed to verify the attenuation properties and shielding workloads produced by a variety of situations where standard recommendations and guidance documents were insufficient. This project studies two areas of concern that are not addressed by NCRP 151, the radiation shielding workload for the vault door with a non-standard design, and the attenuation properties of high-density concrete for both photon and neutron radiation. Simulations have been performed using a Monte-Carlo code produced by the Los Alamos National Lab (LANL), Monte Carlo Neutrons, Photons 5 (MCNP5). Measurements have been performed using a shielding test port designed into the maze of the Varian Edge treatment vault.

  4. Laboratory tests on neutron shields for gamma-ray detectors in space

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, J; Hailey, C J

    2000-01-01

    Shields capable of suppressing neutron-induced background in new classes of gamma-ray detectors such as CdZnTe are becoming important for a variety of reasons. These include a high cross section for neutron interactions in new classes of detector materials as well as the inefficient vetoing of neutron-induced background in conventional active shields. We have previously demonstrated through Monte-Carlo simulations how our new approach, supershields, is superior to the monolithic, bi-atomic neutron shields which have been developed in the past. We report here on the first prototype models for supershields based on boron and hydrogen. We verify the performance of these supershields through laboratory experiments. These experimental results, as well as measurements of conventional monolithic neutron shields, are shown to be consistent with Monte-Carlo simulations. We discuss the implications of this experiment for designs of supershields in general and their application to future hard X-ray/gamma-ray experiments...

  5. 3D Space Radiation Transport in a Shielded ICRU Tissue Sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W.; Slaba, Tony C.; Badavi, Francis F.; Reddell, Brandon D.; Bahadori, Amir A.

    2014-01-01

    A computationally efficient 3DHZETRN code capable of simulating High Charge (Z) and Energy (HZE) and light ions (including neutrons) under space-like boundary conditions with enhanced neutron and light ion propagation was recently developed for a simple homogeneous shield object. Monte Carlo benchmarks were used to verify the methodology in slab and spherical geometry, and the 3D corrections were shown to provide significant improvement over the straight-ahead approximation in some cases. In the present report, the new algorithms with well-defined convergence criteria are extended to inhomogeneous media within a shielded tissue slab and a shielded tissue sphere and tested against Monte Carlo simulation to verify the solution methods. The 3D corrections are again found to more accurately describe the neutron and light ion fluence spectra as compared to the straight-ahead approximation. These computationally efficient methods provide a basis for software capable of space shield analysis and optimization.

  6. The effects of intramolecular and intermolecular coordination on (31)P nuclear shielding: phosphorylated azoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyshev, Kirill A; Larina, Ludmila I; Chirkina, Elena A; Krivdin, Leonid B

    2012-02-01

    The effects of intramolecular and intermolecular coordination on (31)P nuclear shielding have been investigated in the series of tetracoordinated, pentacoordinated and hexacoordinated N-vinylpyrazoles and intermolecular complexes of N-vinylimidazole and 1-allyl-3,5-dimethylpyrazole with phosphorous pentachloride both experimentally and theoretically. It was shown that either intramolecular or intermolecular coordination involving phosphorous results in a dramatic (31)P nuclear shielding amounting to approximately 150 ppm on changing the phosphorous coordination number by one. A major importance of solvent effects on (31)P nuclear shielding of intramolecular and intermolecular complexes involving N → P coordination bond has been demonstrated. It was found that the zeroth-order regular approximation-gauge-including atomic orbital-B1PW91/DZP method was sufficiently accurate for the calculation of (31)P NMR chemical shifts, provided relativistic corrections are taken into account, the latter being of crucial importance in the description of (31)P nuclear shielding.

  7. Targeted and shielded adenovectors for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedley, Susan J; Chen, Jian; Mountz, John D; Li, Jing; Curiel, David T; Korokhov, Nikolay; Kovesdi, Imre

    2006-11-01

    Conditionally replicative adenovirus (CRAd) vectors are novel vectors with utility as virotherapy agents for alternative cancer therapies. These vectors have already established a broad safety record in humans and overcome some of the limitations of non-replicative adenovirus (Ad) vectors. In addition, one potential problem with these vectors, attainment of tumor or tissue selectivity has widely been addressed. However, two confounding problems limiting efficacy of these drug candidates remains. The paucity of the native Ad receptor on tumor tissues, and host humoral response due to pre-existing titers of neutralizing antibodies against the vector itself in humans have been highlighted in the clinical context. The well-characterized CRAd, AdDelta24-RGD, is infectivity enhanced, thus overcoming the lack of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), and this agent is already rapidly progressing towards clinical translation. However, the perceived host humoral response potentially will limit gains seen from the infectivity enhancement and therefore a strategy to blunt immunity against the vector is required. On the basis of this caveat a novel strategy, termed shielding, has been developed in which the genetic modification of a virion capsid protein would provide uniformly shielded Ad vectors. The identification of the pIX capsid protein as an ideal locale for genetic incorporation of shielding ligands to conceal the Ad vector from pre-existing neutralizing antibodies is a major progression in the development of shielded CRAds. Preliminary data utilizing an Ad vector with HSV-TK fused to the pIX protein indicates that a shield against neutralizing antibodies can be achieved. The utility of various proteins as shielding molecules is currently being addressed. The creation of AdDelta24S-RGD, an infectivity enhanced and shielded Ad vector will provide the next step in the development of clinically and commercially feasible CRAds that can be dosed multiple times for

  8. A NEW ALGORITHM FOR RADIOISOTOPE IDENTIFICATION OF SHIELDED AND MASKED SNM/RDD MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffcoat, R.

    2012-06-05

    Detection and identification of shielded and masked nuclear materials is crucial to national security, but vast borders and high volumes of traffic impose stringent requirements for practical detection systems. Such tools must be be mobile, and hence low power, provide a low false alarm rate, and be sufficiently robust to be operable by non-technical personnel. Currently fielded systems have not achieved all of these requirements simultaneously. Transport modeling such as that done in GADRAS is able to predict observed spectra to a high degree of fidelity; our research is focusing on a radionuclide identification algorithm that inverts this modeling within the constraints imposed by a handheld device. Key components of this work include incorporation of uncertainty as a function of both the background radiation estimate and the hypothesized sources, dimensionality reduction, and nonnegative matrix factorization. We have partially evaluated performance of our algorithm on a third-party data collection made with two different sodium iodide detection devices. Initial results indicate, with caveats, that our algorithm performs as good as or better than the on-board identification algorithms. The system developed was based on a probabilistic approach with an improved approach to variance modeling relative to past work. This system was chosen based on technical innovation and system performance over algorithms developed at two competing research institutions. One key outcome of this probabilistic approach was the development of an intuitive measure of confidence which was indeed useful enough that a classification algorithm was developed based around alarming on high confidence targets. This paper will present and discuss results of this novel approach to accurately identifying shielded or masked radioisotopes with radiation detection systems.

  9. Correlated Uncertainties in Radiation Shielding Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werneth, Charles M.; Maung, Khin Maung; Blattnig, Steve R.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    2013-01-01

    The space radiation environment is composed of energetic particles which can deliver harmful doses of radiation that may lead to acute radiation sickness, cancer, and even death for insufficiently shielded crew members. Spacecraft shielding must provide structural integrity and minimize the risk associated with radiation exposure. The risk of radiation exposure induced death (REID) is a measure of the risk of dying from cancer induced by radiation exposure. Uncertainties in the risk projection model, quality factor, and spectral fluence are folded into the calculation of the REID by sampling from probability distribution functions. Consequently, determining optimal shielding materials that reduce the REID in a statistically significant manner has been found to be difficult. In this work, the difference of the REID distributions for different materials is used to study the effect of composition on shielding effectiveness. It is shown that the use of correlated uncertainties allows for the determination of statistically significant differences between materials despite the large uncertainties in the quality factor. This is in contrast to previous methods where uncertainties have been generally treated as uncorrelated. It is concluded that the use of correlated quality factor uncertainties greatly reduces the uncertainty in the assessment of shielding effectiveness for the mitigation of radiation exposure.

  10. Advances in space radiation shielding codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Qualls, Garry D.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Prael, Richard E.; Norbury, John W.; Heinbockel, John H.; Tweed, John; De Angelis, Giovanni

    2002-01-01

    Early space radiation shield code development relied on Monte Carlo methods and made important contributions to the space program. Monte Carlo methods have resorted to restricted one-dimensional problems leading to imperfect representation of appropriate boundary conditions. Even so, intensive computational requirements resulted and shield evaluation was made near the end of the design process. Resolving shielding issues usually had a negative impact on the design. Improved spacecraft shield design requires early entry of radiation constraints into the design process to maximize performance and minimize costs. As a result, we have been investigating high-speed computational procedures to allow shield analysis from the preliminary concept to the final design. For the last few decades, we have pursued deterministic solutions of the Boltzmann equation allowing field mapping within the International Space Station (ISS) in tens of minutes using standard Finite Element Method (FEM) geometry common to engineering design methods. A single ray trace in such geometry requires 14 milliseconds and limits application of Monte Carlo methods to such engineering models. A potential means of improving the Monte Carlo efficiency in coupling to spacecraft geometry is given.

  11. Multi-objective optimization of a compact pressurized water nuclear reactor computational model for biological shielding design using innovative materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunes, M.A., E-mail: matheus.tunes@usp.br [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Escola Politécnica da Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2463 – CEP 05508 – 030 São Paulo (Brazil); Oliveira, C.R.E. de, E-mail: cassiano@unm.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, The University of New Mexico, Farris Engineering Center, 221, Albuquerque, NM 87131-1070 (United States); Schön, C.G., E-mail: schoen@usp.br [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Escola Politécnica da Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2463 – CEP 05508 – 030 São Paulo (Brazil)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Use of two n-γ transport codes leads to optimized model of compact nuclear reactor. • It was possible to safely reduce both weight and volume of the biological shielding. • Best configuration obtained by using new composites for both γ and n attenuation. - Abstract: The aim of the present work is to develop a computational model of a compact pressurized water nuclear reactor (PWR) to investigate the use of innovative materials to enhance the biological shielding effectiveness. Two radiation transport codes were used: the first one – MCNP – for the PWR design and the GEM/EVENT to simulate (in a 1D slab) the behavior of several materials and shielding thickness on gamma and neutron radiation. Additionally MATLAB Optimization Toolbox was used to provide new geometric configurations of the slab aiming at reducing the volume and weight of the walls by means of a cost/objective function. It is demonstrated in the reactor model that the dose rate outside biological shielding has been reduced by one order of magnitude for the optimized model compared with the initial configuration. Volume and weight of the shielding walls were also reduced. The results indicated that one-dimensional deterministic code to reach an optimized geometry and test materials, combined with a three-dimensional model of a compact nuclear reactor in a stochastic code, is a fast and efficient procedure to test shielding performance and optimization before the experimental assessment. A major outcome of this research is that composite materials (ECOMASS 2150TU96) may replace (with advantages) traditional shielding materials without jeopardizing the nuclear power plant safety assurance.

  12. Progress on Establishing Guidelines for National Ignition Facility (NIF) Experiments to Extend Debris Shield Lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, M; Eder, D; Braun, D; MacGowan, B

    2000-07-26

    The survivability and performance of the debris shields on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are a key factor for the successful conduct and affordable operation of the facility. The improvements required over Nova debris shields are described. Estimates of debris shield lifetimes in the presence of target emissions with 4 - 5 J/cm{sup 2} laser fluences (and higher) indicate lifetimes that may contribute unacceptably to operations costs for NIF. We are developing detailed guidance for target and experiment designers for NIF to assist in minimizing the damage to, and therefore the cost of, maintaining NIF debris shields. The guidance limits the target mass that is allowed to become particulate on the debris shields (300 mg). It also limits the amount of material that can become shrapnel for any given shot (10 mg). Finally, it restricts the introduction of non-volatile residue (NVR) that is a threat to the sol-gel coatings on the debris shields to ensure that the chamber loading at any time is less than 1 pg/cm{sup 2}. We review the experimentation on the Nova chamber that included measuring quantities of particulate on debris shields by element and capturing shrapnel pieces in aerogel samples mounted in the chamber. We also describe computations of x-ray emissions from a likely NIF target and the associated ablation expected from this x-ray exposure on supporting target hardware. We describe progress in assessing the benefits of a pre-shield and the possible impact on the guidance for target experiments on NIF. Plans for possible experimentation on Omega and other facilities to improve our understanding of target emissions and their impacts are discussed. Our discussion of planned future work provides a forum to invite possible collaboration with the IFE community.

  13. Durability and shielding performance of borated Ceramicrete coatings in beta and gamma radiation fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagh, Arun S.; Sayenko, S. Yu.; Dovbnya, A. N.; Shkuropatenko, V. A.; Tarasov, R. V.; Rybka, A. V.; Zakharchenko, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    Ceramicrete™, a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic, was developed for nuclear waste immobilization and nuclear radiation shielding. Ceramicrete products are fabricated by an acid-base reaction between magnesium oxide and mono potassium phosphate. Fillers are used to impart desired properties to the product. Ceramicrete's tailored compositions have resulted in several commercial structural products, including corrosion- and fire-protection coatings. Their borated version, called Borobond™, has been studied for its neutron shielding capabilities and is being used in structures built for storage of nuclear materials. This investigation assesses the durability and shielding performance of borated Ceramicrete coatings when exposed to gamma and beta radiations to predict the composition needed for optimal shielding performance in a realistic nuclear radiation field. Investigations were conducted using experimental data coupled with predictive Monte Carlo computer model. The results show that it is possible to produce products for simultaneous shielding of all three types of nuclear radiations, viz., neutrons, gamma-, and beta-rays. Additionally, because sprayable Ceramicrete coatings exhibit excellent corrosion- and fire-protection characteristics on steel, this research also establishes an opportunity to produce thick coatings to enhance the shielding performance of corrosion and fire protection coatings for use in high radiation environment in nuclear industry.

  14. Durability and shielding performance of borated Ceramicrete coatings in beta and gamma radiation fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagh, Arun S., E-mail: asw@anl.gov [Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Sayenko, S.Yu.; Dovbnya, A.N.; Shkuropatenko, V.A.; Tarasov, R.V.; Rybka, A.V.; Zakharchenko, A.A. [National Science Center, Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • It incorporates all suggestions by the reviewers. • Explanation to each new term is provided and suitable references are given. • Sample identities have been streamlined by revising the text and the tables. • Some figures have been redrawn. - Abstract: Ceramicrete™, a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic, was developed for nuclear waste immobilization and nuclear radiation shielding. Ceramicrete products are fabricated by an acid–base reaction between magnesium oxide and mono potassium phosphate. Fillers are used to impart desired properties to the product. Ceramicrete’s tailored compositions have resulted in several commercial structural products, including corrosion- and fire-protection coatings. Their borated version, called Borobond™, has been studied for its neutron shielding capabilities and is being used in structures built for storage of nuclear materials. This investigation assesses the durability and shielding performance of borated Ceramicrete coatings when exposed to gamma and beta radiations to predict the composition needed for optimal shielding performance in a realistic nuclear radiation field. Investigations were conducted using experimental data coupled with predictive Monte Carlo computer model. The results show that it is possible to produce products for simultaneous shielding of all three types of nuclear radiations, viz., neutrons, gamma-, and beta-rays. Additionally, because sprayable Ceramicrete coatings exhibit excellent corrosion- and fire-protection characteristics on steel, this research also establishes an opportunity to produce thick coatings to enhance the shielding performance of corrosion and fire protection coatings for use in high radiation environment in nuclear industry.

  15. Experimental Evaluation of the Thermal Performance of a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, J. Boise; Stewart, Eric T.; Reid, Robert S.

    2007-01-01

    A water based shielding system is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. The use of water may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a representative lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated at various power levels in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to anchor a CFD model. Performance of a water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted by CFD models anchored to test data. The accompanying viewgraph presentation includes the following topics: 1) Testbed Configuration; 2) Core Heater Placement and Instrumentation; 3) Thermocouple Placement; 4) Core Thermocouple Placement; 5) Outer Tank Thermocouple Placement; 6) Integrated Testbed; 7) Methodology; 8) Experimental Results: Core Temperatures; 9) Experimental Results; Outer Tank Temperatures; 10) CFD Modeling; 11) CFD Model: Anchored to Experimental Results (1-g); 12) CFD MOdel: Prediction for 1/6-g; and 13) CFD Model: Comparison of 1-g to 1/6-g.

  16. Radiation Exposure Analyses Supporting the Development of Solar Particle Event Shielding Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Steven A.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Abston, H. Lee; Simon, Hatthew A.; Gallegos, Adam M.

    2013-01-01

    NASA has plans for long duration missions beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). Outside of LEO, large solar particle events (SPEs), which occur sporadically, can deliver a very large dose in a short amount of time. The relatively low proton energies make SPE shielding practical, and the possibility of the occurrence of a large event drives the need for SPE shielding for all deep space missions. The Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) RadWorks Storm Shelter Team was charged with developing minimal mass SPE storm shelter concepts for missions beyond LEO. The concepts developed included "wearable" shields, shelters that could be deployed at the onset of an event, and augmentations to the crew quarters. The radiation transport codes, human body models, and vehicle geometry tools contained in the On-Line Tool for the Assessment of Radiation In Space (OLTARIS) were used to evaluate the protection provided by each concept within a realistic space habitat and provide the concept designers with shield thickness requirements. Several different SPE models were utilized to examine the dependence of the shield requirements on the event spectrum. This paper describes the radiation analysis methods and the results of these analyses for several of the shielding concepts.

  17. Au Foil Activation Measurement and Simulation of the Concrete Neutron Shielding Ability for the Proposed New SANRAD Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radebe, M. J.; Korochinsky, S.; Strydom, W. J.; De Beer, F. C.

    The purpose of this study was to measure the effective neutron shielding characteristics of the new shielding material designed and manufactured to be used for the construction of the new SANRAD facility at Necsa, South Africa, through Au foil activation as well as MCNP simulations. The shielding capability of the high density shielding material was investigated in the worst case region (the neutron beam axis) of the experimental chamber for two operational modes. The everyday operational mode includes the 15 cm thick poly crystalline Bismuth filter at room temperature (assumed) to filter gamma-rays and some neutron spectrum energies. The second mode, dynamic imaging, will be conducted without the Bi-filter. The objective was achieved through a foil activation measurement at the current SANRAD facility and MCNP calculations. Several Au foilswere imbedded at different thicknesses(two at each position) of shielding material up to 80 cm thick to track the attenuation of the neutron beam over distance within the shielding material. The neutron flux and subsequently the associated dose rates were calculated from the activation levels of the Au foils. The concrete shielding material was found to provide adequate shielding for all energies of neutrons emerging from beam port no-2 of the SAFARI-1 research reactorwithin a thickness of 40 cm of concrete.

  18. Accelerator shielding experts meet at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Fifteen years after its first CERN edition, the Shielding Aspects of Accelerator, Targets and Irradiation Facility (SATIF) conference was held again here from 2-4 June. Now at its 10th edition, SATIF10 brought together experts from all over the world to discuss issues related to the shielding techniques. They set out the scene for an improved collaboration and discussed novel shielding solutions.   This was the most attended meeting of the series with more than 65 participants from 34 institutions and 14 countries. “We welcomed experts from many different laboratories around the world. We come from different contexts but we face similar problems. In this year’s session, among other things, we discussed ways for improving the effectiveness of calculations versus real data, as well as experimental solutions to investigate the damage that radiation produces on various materials and the electronics”, says Marco Silari, Chair of the conference and member of the DGS/RP gro...

  19. Carbohydrate based materials for gamma radiation shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbakh, F.; Babaee, V.; Naghsh-Nezhad, Z.

    2015-05-01

    Due to the limitation in using lead as a shielding material for its toxic properties and limitation in abundance, price or non-flexibility of other commonly used materials, finding new shielding materials and compounds is strongly required. In this conceptual study carbohydrate based compounds were considered as new shielding materials. The simulation of radiation attenuation is performed using MCNP and Geant4 with a good agreement in the results. It is found that, the thickness of 2 mm of the proposed compound may reduce up to 5% and 50% of 1 MeV and 35 keV gamma-rays respectively in comparison with 15% and 100% for the same thickness of lead.

  20. Radiation shielding effectiveness of newly developed superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vishwanath P.; Medhat, M. E.; Badiger, N. M.; Saliqur Rahman, Abu Zayed Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Gamma ray shielding effectiveness of superconductors with a high mass density has been investigated. We calculated the mass attenuation coefficients, the mean free path (mfp) and the exposure buildup factor (EBF). The gamma ray EBF was computed using the Geometric Progression (G-P) fitting method at energies 0.015-15 MeV, and for penetration depths up to 40 mfp. The fast-neutron shielding effectiveness has been characterized by the effective neutron removal cross-section of the superconductors. It is shown that CaPtSi3, CaIrSi3, and Bi2Sr2Ca1Cu2O8.2 are superior shielding materials for gamma rays and Tl0.6Rb0.4Fe1.67Se2 for fast neutrons. The present work should be useful in various applications of superconductors in fusion engineering and design.

  1. Helping the most vulnerable out of the poverty trap and reducing inequality: Policies, strategies, and services for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder, including intellectual and neurodevelopmental disabilities: BASE Project Report (Volume 2) NILT Survey Autism Module

    OpenAIRE

    Dillenburger, Karola; Jordan, Julie-Ann; McKerr, Lynne

    2013-01-01

    The primary purpose of the BASE Project was to establish how to help individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder out of poverty by promoting social inclusion. In order to achieve this, a range of methodologies were utilised that aimed to provide a baseline against which the effect of the Autism Act (NI) 2011 and the associated Autism Strategy (2013-2020) and Action Plans can be measured. The BASE Project is reported in 5 volumes. Volume 2 reports on the analysis of the autism module of the Nort...

  2. Novel Concepts for Radiation Shielding Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J.

    2014-01-01

    It is critical that safety factors be maximized with respect to long duration, extraterrestrial space flight. Any significant improvement in radiation protection will be critical in ensuring the safety of crew and hardware on such missions. The project goal is to study novel concepts for radiation shielding materials that can be used for long-duration space missions. As part of this project we will investigate the use of thin films for the evaluation of a containment system that can retain liquid hydrogen and provide the necessary hydrogen density for effective shielding.

  3. Experimental realization of open magnetic shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, C.; Chen, S.; Pang, T.; Qu, T.-M.

    2017-05-01

    The detection of extremely low magnetic fields has various applications in the area of fundamental research, medical diagnosis, and industry. Extracting the valuable signals from noises often requires magnetic shielding facilities. We demonstrated directly from Maxwell's equations that specifically designed superconductor coils can exactly shield the magnetic field to an extremely low value. We experimentally confirmed this effect in the frequency spectrum of 0.01-10 000 Hz and improved the electromagnetic environment in a hospital, a leading hospital in magnetocardiograph study in China.

  4. Shielding effectiveness of rectangular cavity made of a new shielding material and resonance suppression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    New shielding material has become an alternative to traditional metal to shield boxes from electromagnetic interferences. This article introduces the theory of transmission line method to study the shield boxes made of a new sort of material, and then expands the fundamental formulas to deal with the cases of multiple holes and polarization with arbitrary angle. By means of genetic algorithms with the aid of a three dimensional simulation tool, the damping of electromagnetic resonances in enclosures is researched.The computation indicates that under resonant frequency, electromagnetic resonance results in low, even negative shielding coefficient; whereas, for the same areas, shielding effectiveness of a single hole is worse than that of multiple holes. Shielding coefficient varies when polarization angle increases, and the coupled field through the rectangular aperture with the long side parallel to the thin wire is much weaker than that with the long side vertical to the thin wire. By using the metallic-loss dielectric layer of optimized calculation on the internal surface of the cavity, the best result of resonance suppression has been realized with the same thickness of coating. Finally, according to the calculation result, suggestions for shielding are proposed.

  5. Fabrication and Installation of Radiation Shielded Spent Fuel Fusion System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soon Dal; Park, Yang Soon; Kim, Jong Goo; Ha, Yeong Keong; Song, Kyu Seok

    2010-02-15

    Most of the generated fission gases are retained in the fuel matrix in supersaturated state, thus alter the original physicochemical properties of the fuel. And some of them are released into free volume of a fuel rod and that cause internal pressure increase of a fuel rod. Furthermore, as extending fuel burnup, the data on fission gas generation(FGG) and fission gas release(FGR) are considered very important for fuel safety investigation. Consequently, it is required to establish an experimental facility for handling of highly radioactive sample and to develop an analytical technology for measurement of retained fission gas in a spent fuel. This report describes not only on the construction of a shielded glove box which can handle highly radioactive materials but also on the modifications and instrumentations of spent fuel fusion facilities and collection apparatuses of retained fission gas

  6. Validity of the Aluminum Equivalent Approximation in Space Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badavi, Francis F.; Adams, Daniel O.; Wilson, John W.

    2009-01-01

    The origin of the aluminum equivalent shield approximation in space radiation analysis can be traced back to its roots in the early years of the NASA space programs (Mercury, Gemini and Apollo) wherein the primary radiobiological concern was the intense sources of ionizing radiation causing short term effects which was thought to jeopardize the safety of the crew and hence the mission. Herein, it is shown that the aluminum equivalent shield approximation, although reasonably well suited for that time period and to the application for which it was developed, is of questionable usefulness to the radiobiological concerns of routine space operations of the 21 st century which will include long stays onboard the International Space Station (ISS) and perhaps the moon. This is especially true for a risk based protection system, as appears imminent for deep space exploration where the long-term effects of Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) exposure is of primary concern. The present analysis demonstrates that sufficiently large errors in the interior particle environment of a spacecraft result from the use of the aluminum equivalent approximation, and such approximations should be avoided in future astronaut risk estimates. In this study, the aluminum equivalent approximation is evaluated as a means for estimating the particle environment within a spacecraft structure induced by the GCR radiation field. For comparison, the two extremes of the GCR environment, the 1977 solar minimum and the 2001 solar maximum, are considered. These environments are coupled to the Langley Research Center (LaRC) deterministic ionized particle transport code High charge (Z) and Energy TRaNsport (HZETRN), which propagates the GCR spectra for elements with charges (Z) in the range I shield, and the effects of the aluminum equivalent approximation for a good polymeric shield material such as genetic polyethylene (PE). The shield thickness is represented by a 25 g/cm spherical shell. Although one could

  7. RadShield: semiautomated shielding design using a floor plan driven graphical user interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLorenzo, Matthew C; Wu, Dee H; Yang, Kai; Rutel, Isaac B

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to introduce and describe the development of RadShield, a Java-based graphical user interface (GUI), which provides a base design that uniquely performs thorough, spatially distributed calculations at many points and reports the maximum air-kerma rate and barrier thickness for each barrier pursuant to NCRP Report 147 methodology. Semiautomated shielding design calculations are validated by two approaches: a geometry-based approach and a manual approach. A series of geometry-based equations were derived giving the maximum air-kerma rate magnitude and location through a first derivative root finding approach. The second approach consisted of comparing RadShield results with those found by manual shielding design by an American Board of Radiology (ABR)-certified medical physicist for two clinical room situations: two adjacent catheterization labs, and a radiographic and fluoroscopic (R&F) exam room. RadShield's efficacy in finding the maximum air-kerma rate was compared against the geometry-based approach and the overall shielding recommendations by RadShield were compared against the medical physicist's shielding results. Percentage errors between the geometry-based approach and RadShield's approach in finding the magnitude and location of the maximum air-kerma rate was within 0.00124% and 14 mm. RadShield's barrier thickness calculations were found to be within 0.156 mm lead (Pb) and 0.150 mm lead (Pb) for the adjacent catheterization labs and R&F room examples, respectively. However, within the R&F room example, differences in locating the most sensitive calculation point on the floor plan for one of the barriers was not considered in the medical physicist's calculation and was revealed by the RadShield calculations. RadShield is shown to accurately find the maximum values of air-kerma rate and barrier thickness using NCRP Report 147 methodology. Visual inspection alone of the 2D X-ray exam distribution by a medical physicist may not

  8. Electromagnetic Shielding and Absorption Properties of Fiber Reinforced Cementitious Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiuzhi; SUN Wei

    2012-01-01

    In order to investigate the electromagnetic shielding effectiveness (SE) and absorbing properties of fiber reinforced concrete,steel fiber,carbon fiber and synthetic polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fiber reinforced concrete were researched.The results show that with the increase of fiber volume fraction,the SE and trend of frequency change of corresponding fiber reinforced concrete are enhanced.When the volume content of steel fiber is 3%,the SE of concrete is above 50 dB and its frequency is above 1.8 GHz.Moreover,in the range of 8-18 GHz,steel fiber,carbon fiber and PVA fiber all can improve the microwave absorption properties of concrete.The concrete with 0.5% carbon fiber can achieve the best absorbing property,the minimum reflectivity is about -7 dB; while steel fiber optimal volume fraction is 2%.The reflectivity curve of PVA fiber reinforced concrete fluctuates with the frequency,and the minimum value of the reflectivity is below -10 dB.The results show that fiber reinforced concrete could be used as EMI(electromagnetic interference) prevention buildings by attenuating and reflecting electromagnetic wave energy.

  9. Summary of Prometheus Radiation Shielding Nuclear Design Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Stephens

    2006-01-13

    This report transmits a summary of radiation shielding nuclear design studies performed to support the Prometheus project. Together, the enclosures and references associated with this document describe NRPCT (KAPL & Bettis) shielding nuclear design analyses done for the project.

  10. Neutron shielding material based on colemanite and epoxy resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, Koichi

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a need for compact shielding design such as self-shielding of a PET cyclotron or upgradation of radiation machinery in existing facilities. In these cases, high performance shielding materials are needed. Concrete or polyethylene have been used for a neutron shield. However, for compact shielding, they fall short in terms of performance or durability. Therefore, a new type of neutron shielding material based on epoxy resin and colemanite has been developed. Slab attenuation experiments up to 40 cm for the new shielding material were carried out using a 252Cf neutron source. Measurement was carried out using a REM-counter, and compared with calculation. The results show that the shielding performance is better than concrete and polyethylene mixed with 10 wt% boron oxide. From the result, we confirmed that the performance of the new material is suitable for practical use.

  11. Early test facilities and analytic methods for radiation shielding: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingersoll, D T [comp.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ingersoll, J K [comp.; Tec-Com, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1992-11-01

    This report represents a compilation of eight papers presented at the 1992 American Nuclear Society/European Nuclear Society International Meeting. The meeting is of special significance since it commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the first controlled nuclear chain reaction. The papers contained in this report were presented in a special session organized by the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division in keeping with the historical theme of the meeting. The paper titles are good indicators of their content and are: (1) The origin of radiation shielding research: The Oak Ridge experience, (2) Shielding research at the hanford site, (3) Aircraft shielding experiments at General Dynamics Fort Worth, 1950-1962, (4) Where have the neutrons gone , a history of the tower shielding facility, (5) History and evolution of buildup factors, (6) Early shielding research at Bettis atomic power laboratory, (7) UK reactor shielding: then and now, (8) A very personal view of the development of radiation shielding theory.

  12. Usefulness of a lead shielding device for reducing the radiation dose to tissues outside the primary beams during CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jae-Joon; Cho, Eun-Suk; Kang, Sung Min; Yu, Jeong-Sik; Kim, Dae Jung; Kim, Joo Hee

    2014-12-01

    This study was done to investigate the efficacy of a lead shield in protecting the tissues outside the primary beams, such as the breast and thyroid, by measurement of the entrance skin dose during CT of the brain, neck, abdomen, and lumbar spine. Institutional Review Board approval was obtained. This study included 150 patients (male:female 25:125, age range 15-45 years). In females, brain, lumbar spine, and abdominal CT scans, pre-/post-contrast neck CT scans, and post-contrast liver dynamic CT scans were performed. In males, brain CT scans only were performed. Breast shielding was performed in all females, and thyroid shielding was conducted in patients with brain CT. During all CT studies, the left breast or left thyroid was shielded using a lead shield, and the contralateral side was left unshielded. Thus, each breast or thyroid measurement had its own control for the same demographic data. The efficacy of the shielding of both breasts and thyroids during CT was assessed. During brain, abdominal, lumbar, pre-/post-contrast neck, and post-contrast liver dynamic CT, 33.5, 26.0, 17.4, 26.5, and 16.2 % of the breast skin dose were reduced, respectively. During brain CT, the thyroid skin dose was reduced by 17.9 % (females) and 20.6 % (males). There were statistically significant differences in the skin doses of shielded organs (p shielding during neck and liver dynamic CT was the most effective compared with breast or thyroid shielding during other CT scans. We recommend breast shielding during neck and liver dynamic CT in young female patients to avoid unnecessary radiation exposure.

  13. New shield for gamma-ray spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brar, S. S.; Gustafson, P. F.; Nelson, D. M.

    1969-01-01

    Gamma-ray shield that can be evacuated, refilled with a clean gas, and pressurized for exclusion of airborne radioactive contaminants effectively lowers background noise. Under working conditions, repeated evacuation and filling procedures have not adversely affected the sensitivity and resolution of the crystal detector.

  14. The Tower Shielding Facility: Its glorious past

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muckenthaler, F.J.

    1997-05-07

    The Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) is the only reactor facility in the US that was designed and built for radiation-shielding studies in which both the reactor source and shield samples could be raised into the air to allow measurements to be made without interference from ground scattering or other spurious effects. The TSF proved its usefulness as many different programs were successfully completed. It became active in work for the Defense Atomic Support Agency (DASA) Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power, Defense Nuclear Agency, Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program, the Gas-Cooled and High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor programs, and the Japanese-American Shielding Program of Experimental Research, just to mention a few of the more extensive ones. The history of the TSF as presented in this report describes the various experiments that were performed using the different reactors. The experiments are categorized as to the programs which they supported and placed in corresponding chapters. The experiments are described in modest detail, along with their purpose when appropriate. Discussion of the results is minimal, but references are given to more extensive topical reports.

  15. MPACT Subgroup Self-Shielding Efficiency Improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stimpson, Shane [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Liu, Yuxuan [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Collins, Benjamin S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Clarno, Kevin T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-08-31

    Recent developments to improve the efficiency of the MOC solvers in MPACT have yielded effective kernels that loop over several energy groups at once, rather that looping over one group at a time. These kernels have produced roughly a 2x speedup on the MOC sweeping time during eigenvalue calculation. However, the self-shielding subgroup calculation had not been reevaluated to take advantage of these new kernels, which typically requires substantial solve time. The improvements covered in this report start by integrating the multigroup kernel concepts into the subgroup calculation, which are then used as the basis for further extensions. The next improvement that is covered is what is currently being termed as “Lumped Parameter MOC”. Because the subgroup calculation is a purely fixed source problem and multiple sweeps are performed only to update the boundary angular fluxes, the sweep procedure can be condensed to allow for the instantaneous propagation of the flux across a spatial domain, without the need to sweep along all segments in a ray. Once the boundary angular fluxes are considered to be converged, an additional sweep that will tally the scalar flux is completed. The last improvement that is investigated is the possible reduction of the number of azimuthal angles per octant in the shielding sweep. Typically 16 azimuthal angles per octant are used for self-shielding and eigenvalue calculations, but it is possible that the self-shielding sweeps are less sensitive to the number of angles than the full eigenvalue calculation.

  16. Is Collegiality a Weapon or a Shield?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriano, Robert E.; Buller, Jeffrey L.

    2017-01-01

    There are two primary means to prevent the abuse of collegiality and transform it into a shield to protect the most vulnerable. First, colleges and universities should follow the examples of their peers by developing clear definitions of what types of behavior constitute collegiality and what types of activity are protected as academic freedom or…

  17. Radiation Shielding for Manned Deep Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The arrival of the Expedition 1 Crew at the International Space Station represents the beginning of the continuous presence of man in space. Already we are deploying astronauts and cosmonauts for missions of approx. 6 months onboard the ISS. In the future we can anticipate that more people will be in space and they will be there for longer periods. Even with 6-months deployments to the ISS, the radiation exposure that crew members receive is approaching the exposure limits imposed by the governments of the space- faring nations. In the future we can expect radiation protection to be a dominant consideration for long manned missions. Recognizing this, NASA has expanded their research program on radiation health. This program has three components, bioastronautics, fundamental biology and radiation shielding materials. Bioastronautics is concerned with the investigating the effects of radiation on humans. Fundamental biology investigates the basic mechanisms of radiation damage to tissue. Radiation shielding materials research focuses on developing accurate computational tools to predict the radiation shielding effectiveness of materials. It also investigates new materials that can be used for spacecraft. The radiation shielding materials program will be described and examples of results from the ongoing research will be shown.

  18. Oxygen Abundance Measurements of SHIELD Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Haurberg, Nathalie C; Cannon, John M; Marshall, Melissa V

    2015-01-01

    We have derived oxygen abundances for 8 galaxies from the Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs (SHIELD). The SHIELD survey is an ongoing study of very low-mass galaxies, with M$_{\\rm HI}$ between 10$^{6.5}$ and 10$^{7.5}$ M$_{\\odot}$, that were detected by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. H$\\alpha$ images from the WIYN 3.5m telescope show that these 8 SHIELD galaxies each possess one or two active star-forming regions which were targeted with long-slit spectral observations using the Mayall 4m telescope at KPNO. We obtained a direct measurement of the electron temperature by detection of the weak [O III] $\\lambda$4363 line in 2 of the HII regions. Oxygen abundances for the other HII regions were estimated using a strong-line method. When the SHIELD galaxies are plotted on a B-band luminosity-metallicity diagram they appear to suggest a slightly shallower slope to the relationship than normally seen. However, that offset is systematically reduced when the near-infrared luminosity is used ins...

  19. In-beam background suppression shield

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santoro, V.; Cai, Xiao Xiao; DiJulio, D. D.

    2015-01-01

    , which do not use a bender to help mitigate the fast neutron background, are the most challenging. For these beam lines we propose the innovative shielding of placing blocks of material directly into the guide system, which allow a minimum attenuation of the cold and thermal fluxes relative...

  20. Effective shielding to measure beam current from an ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayle, H., E-mail: bayle@bergoz.com [Bergoz Instrumentation, Saint-Genis-Pouilly (France); Delferrière, O.; Gobin, R.; Harrault, F.; Marroncle, J.; Senée, F.; Simon, C.; Tuske, O. [CEA, Saclay (France)

    2014-02-15

    To avoid saturation, beam current transformers must be shielded from solenoid, quad, and RFQ high stray fields. Good understanding of field distribution, shielding materials, and techniques is required. Space availability imposes compact shields along the beam pipe. This paper describes compact effective concatenated magnetic shields for IFMIF-EVEDA LIPAc LEBT and MEBT and for FAIR Proton Linac injector. They protect the ACCT Current Transformers beyond 37 mT radial external fields. Measurements made at Saclay on the SILHI source are presented.

  1. On New Limits of the Coefficient of Gravitation Shielding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Michele Caputo

    2006-12-01

    New limits of the shielding coefficients in the supposed phenomenon of gravitation shielding have recently become available. The new values are briefly reviewed and discussed in order to update the state of art since some new limits for gravitation shielding are not necessarily the lowest ones which, instead, are those of interest when planning new experimental research or studying theoretically the possible effects of gravitation shielding.

  2. Thyroid dose during neurointerventional procedures: does lead shielding reduce the dose?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortt, C P; Fanning, N F; Malone, L; Thornton, J; Brennan, P; Lee, M J

    2007-01-01

    To assess radiation dose to the thyroid in patients undergoing neurointerventional procedures and to evaluate dose reduction to the thyroid by lead shielding. A randomized patient study was undertaken to evaluate the dose reduction by thyroid lead shields and assess their practicality in a clinical setting. Sixty-five patients attending for endovascular treatment of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and aneurysms were randomized into one of 2 groups a) No Thyroid Shield and b) Thyroid Lead Shield. Two thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed over the thyroid gland (1 on each side) at constant positions on each patient in both groups. A thyroid lead shield (Pb eq. 0.5 mm) was placed around the neck of patients in the thyroid lead shield group after the neurointerventional radiologist had obtained satisfactory working access above the neck. The total dose-area-product (DAP) value, number and type of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) runs and fluoroscopy time were recorded for all patients. Of the 72 patients who initially attended for neurointerventional procedures, 7 were excluded due to failure to consent or because of procedures involving access to the external carotid circulation. Of the remaining 65 who were randomized, a further 9 were excluded due to; procedureabandonment, unfeasible shield placement or shield interference with the procedure. Patient demographics included mean age of 47.9 yrs (15-74), F:M=1.4:1. Mean fluoroscopy time was 25.9 min. Mean DAP value was 13,134.8 cGy x cm(2) and mean number of DSA runs was 13.4. The mean relative thyroid doses were significantly different (pshielded groups (3.77 mSv/cGy2 x 105). A mean thyroid dose reduction of 48% was seen in the shielded group versus the unshielded group. Considerable doses to the thyroid are incurred during neurointerventional procedures, highlighting the need for increased awareness of patient radiation protection. Thyroid lead shielding yields significant radiation protection, is

  3. 30 CFR 56.14213 - Ventilation and shielding for welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ventilation and shielding for welding. 56.14213... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14213 Ventilation and shielding for welding. (a) Welding operations shall be shielded when performed at locations where arc flash could be hazardous...

  4. Telescoping Shield for Point-Focusing Solar Concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argoud, M.; Walker, W.; Butler, L. V.

    1985-01-01

    Telescoping shield normally stowed around solar receiver protects heat engine and supporting structure from overheating when concentrator aimed few degrees away from line to Sun. When extended, shield intercepts off center concentrated solar radiation. Heat spread out over thermally conductive shield and reradiated diffusely not to cause structural damage.

  5. Radiation dose reduction at a price: the effectiveness of a male gonadal shield during helical CT scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdi Yusuf E

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is estimated that 60 million computed tomography (CT scans were performed during 2006, with approximately 11% of those performed on children age 0–15 years. Various types of gonadal shielding have been evaluated for reducing exposure to the gonads. The purpose of this study was to quantify the radiation dose reduction to the gonads and its effect on image quality when a wrap-around male pediatric gonad shield was used during CT scanning. This information is obtained to assist the attending radiologist in the decision to utilize such male gonadal shields in pediatric imaging practice. Methods The dose reduction to the gonads was measured for both direct radiation and for indirect scattered radiation from the abdomen. A 6 cm3 ion chamber (Model 10X5-6, Radcal Corporation, Monrovia, CA was placed on a Humanoid real bone pelvic phantom at a position of the male gonads. When exposure measurements with shielding were made, a 1 mm lead wrap-around gonadal shield was placed around the ion chamber sensitive volume. Results The use of the shields reduced scatter dose to the gonads by a factor of about 2 with no appreciable loss of image quality. The shields reduced the direct beam dose by a factor of about 35 at the expense of extremely poor CT image quality due to severe streak artifacts. Conclusion Images in the direct exposure case are not useful due to these severe artifacts and the difficulties in positioning these shields on patients in the scatter exposure case may not be warranted by the small absolute reduction in scatter dose unless it is expected that the patient will be subjected to numerous future CT scans.

  6. Gamma-ray shielding properties of CaO–SrO–B2O3 glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, K; Singh, H; Sharma, G

    2005-01-01

    Mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and effective electron densities have been determined experimentally for the glass system xCaO . (0.3-x)SrO . 0.7B(2)O(3) at photon energies 511, 662, 1173, and 1332KeV. The results are compared with theoretical calculations. In addition......, the molar volume of the glasses has been derived from density measurements, and the excess volume has been determined as a function of composition. The reported data should be useful for potential applications of these glasses in radiation shielding. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  7. Cardiac catheterization: impact of face and neck shielding on new estimates of effective dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Boetticher, Heiner; Lachmund, Jörn; Hoffmann, Wolfgang

    2009-12-01

    Optimization of radiation protection devices for the operator is achieved by minimizing the effective dose (E) on the basis of the recommendations of Publications 60 and 103 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Radiation exposure dosimetry was performed with thermoluminescence dosimeters using one Alderson phantom in the patient position and a second one in the typical position of the operator. Various types of protective clothing as well as fixed leaded shieldings (table mounted shielding and overhead suspended shields) were considered calculating E. Shielding factors for protective equipment can readily be misinterpreted referring to the reduction of the effective dose because fixed protective barriers as well as radiation protection clothing are shielding only parts of the body. With the ICRP 103 approach relative to the exposure without lead protection, a lead apron of 0.35 or 0.5 mm thickness reduces E to 14.4 or 12.3%, respectively; by using an additional thyroid collar, these values are reduced to 9.7 or 7.5%. A thyroid collar reduces the effective dose by more than an increase of the lead equivalency of the existing apron. Wearing an apron of 0.5 mm lead-equivalent with a thyroid collar and using an additional side shield, E decreases to 6.8%. Using both a fixed side and face shield decreases E to 2.0%. For protective garments including thyroid protection, the values of the effective dose in cardiac catheterization are 47-106% higher with ICRP 103 than with ICRP 60 recommendations. This is essentially caused by the introduction of new factors for organs in the head and neck region in ICRP 103.

  8. Design and Test of a Blast Shield for Boeing 737 Overhead Compartment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinglai Dang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This work demonstrates the feasibility of using a composite blast shield for hardening an overhead bin compartment of a commercial aircraft. If a small amount of explosive escapes detection and is brought onboard and stowed in an overhead bin compartment of a passenger aircraft, the current bins provide no protection against a blast inside the compartment. A blast from the overhead bin will certainly damage the fuselage and likely lead to catastrophic inflight structural failure. The feasibility of using an inner blast shield to harden the overhead bin compartment of a Boeing 737 aircraft to protect the fuselage skin in such a threat scenario has been demonstrated using field tests. The blast shield was constructed with composite material based on the unibody concept. The design was carried out using LS-DYNA finite element model simulations. Material panels were first designed to pass the FAA shock holing and fire tests. The finite element model included the full coupling of the overhead bin with the fuselage structure accounting for all the different structural connections. A large number of iterative simulations were carried out to optimize the fiber stacking sequence and shield thickness to minimize weight and achieve the design criterion. Three designs, the basic, thick, and thin shields, were field-tested using a frontal fuselage section of the Boeing 737–100 aircraft. The basic and thick shields protected the integrity of the fuselage skin with no skin crack. This work provides very encouraging results and useful data for optimization implementation of the blast shield design for hardening overhead compartments against the threat of small explosives.

  9. Regolith Derived Heat Shield for Planetary Body Entry and Descent System with In Situ Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Meuller, Robert P.; Sibille, Laurent; Hintze, Paul E.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    This NIAC project investigated an innovative approach to provide heat shield protection to spacecraft after launch and prior to each EDL thus potentially realizing significant launch mass savings. Heat shields fabricated in situ can provide a thermal-protection system for spacecraft that routinely enter a planetary atmosphere. By fabricating the heat shield with space resources from materials available on moons and asteroids, it is possible to avoid launching the heat-shield mass from Earth. Regolith has extremely good insulating properties and the silicates it contains can be used in the fabrication and molding of thermal-protection materials. Such in situ developed heat shields have been suggested before by Lewis. Prior research efforts have shown that regolith properties can be compatible with very-high temperature resistance. Our project team is highly experienced in regolith processing and thermal protection systems (TPS). Routine access to space and return from any planetary surface requires dealing with heat loads experienced by the spacecraft during reentry. Our team addresses some of the key issues with the EDL of human-scale missions through a highly innovative investigation of heat shields that can be fabricated in space by using local resources on asteroids and moons. Most space missions are one-way trips, dedicated to placing an asset in space for economical or scientific gain. However, for human missions, a very-reliable heat-shield system is necessary to protect the crew from the intense heat experienced at very high entry velocities of approximately 11 km/s at approximately Mach 33 (Apollo). For a human mission to Mars, the return problem is even more difficult, with predicted velocities of up to 14 km/s, at approximately Mach 42 at the Earth-atmosphere entry. In addition to human return, it is very likely that future space-travel architecture will include returning cargo to the Earth, either for scientific purposes or for commercial reasons

  10. Measurement of shielding characteristics in the prototype FBR Monju

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usami, Shin; Sasaki, Kenji; Deshimaru, Takehide; Nakashima, Fumiaki [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Tsuruga, Fukui (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    In the prototype fast breeder reactor Monju, shielding measurements were made around the reactor core, the primary heat transport system (PHTS), and the fuel handling and storage system during the system start-up tests at different power levels between 0% and 45%. The objectives of the tests were to evaluate the margins by which the shielding performance exceeds the original design requirements, to demonstrate the validity of the shielding analysis method, and to acquire basic data for use in future FBR design. This paper summarizes the important features of the Monju shielding structures and the shielding measurement. (author)

  11. Shielding of Electronic Systems against Transient Electromagnetic Interferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Herlemann

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to protect electronic systems against the effects of transient electromagnetic interferences, shields made of electrically conductive material can be used. The subject of this paper is an electrically conductive textile. When applying the shield, a reliable measure is needed in order to determine the effectiveness of the shield to protect against electromagnetic pulses. For this purpose, a time domain measurement technique is presented using double exponential pulses. With these pulses, the susceptibility of an operating electronic device with and without the shield is determined. As a criterion of quality of a shield, the breakdown failure rate found in both cases is compared.

  12. Shield Insertion to Minimize Noise Amplitude in Global Interconnects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana.A.B

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Shield insertion is an effective technique for minimise crosstalk noise and signal delay uncertainty .To reduce the effects of coupling uniform or simultaneous shielding may be used on either or both sides of a signal line. Shields are ground or power lines placed between two signal wires to prevent direct coupling between them as the shield width increases, the noise amplitude decreases, in this paper inserting a shield line between two coupled interconnects is shown to be more effective in reducing crosstalk noise for different technology nodes .

  13. Renormalized Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gover, A. Rod; Waldron, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    We develop a universal distributional calculus for regulated volumes of metrics that are suitably singular along hypersurfaces. When the hypersurface is a conformal infinity we give simple integrated distribution expressions for the divergences and anomaly of the regulated volume functional valid for any choice of regulator. For closed hypersurfaces or conformally compact geometries, methods from a previously developed boundary calculus for conformally compact manifolds can be applied to give explicit holographic formulæ for the divergences and anomaly expressed as hypersurface integrals over local quantities (the method also extends to non-closed hypersurfaces). The resulting anomaly does not depend on any particular choice of regulator, while the regulator dependence of the divergences is precisely captured by these formulæ. Conformal hypersurface invariants can be studied by demanding that the singular metric obey, smoothly and formally to a suitable order, a Yamabe type problem with boundary data along the conformal infinity. We prove that the volume anomaly for these singular Yamabe solutions is a conformally invariant integral of a local Q-curvature that generalizes the Branson Q-curvature by including data of the embedding. In each dimension this canonically defines a higher dimensional generalization of the Willmore energy/rigid string action. Recently, Graham proved that the first variation of the volume anomaly recovers the density obstructing smooth solutions to this singular Yamabe problem; we give a new proof of this result employing our boundary calculus. Physical applications of our results include studies of quantum corrections to entanglement entropies.

  14. Weight Assessment for Fuselage Shielding on Aircraft With Open-Rotor Engines and Composite Blade Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Kelly; Pereira, Michael; Kohlman, Lee; Goldberg, Robert; Envia, Edmane; Lawrence, Charles; Roberts, Gary; Emmerling, William

    2013-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has been engaged in discussions with airframe and engine manufacturers concerning regulations that would apply to new technology fuel efficient "openrotor" engines. Existing regulations for the engines and airframe did not envision features of these engines that include eliminating the fan blade containment systems and including two rows of counter-rotating blades. Damage to the airframe from a failed blade could potentially be catastrophic. Therefore the feasibility of using aircraft fuselage shielding was investigated. In order to establish the feasibility of this shielding, a study was conducted to provide an estimate for the fuselage shielding weight required to provide protection from an open-rotor blade loss. This estimate was generated using a two-step procedure. First, a trajectory analysis was performed to determine the blade orientation and velocity at the point of impact with the fuselage. The trajectory analysis also showed that a blade dispersion angle of 3deg bounded the probable dispersion pattern and so was used for the weight estimate. Next, a finite element impact analysis was performed to determine the required shielding thickness to prevent fuselage penetration. The impact analysis was conducted using an FAA-provided composite blade geometry. The fuselage geometry was based on a medium-sized passenger composite airframe. In the analysis, both the blade and fuselage were assumed to be constructed from a T700S/PR520 triaxially-braided composite architecture. Sufficient test data on T700S/PR520 is available to enable reliable analysis, and also demonstrate its good impact resistance properties. This system was also used in modeling the surrogate blade. The estimated additional weight required for fuselage shielding for a wing- mounted counterrotating open-rotor blade is 236 lb per aircraft. This estimate is based on the shielding material serving the dual use of shielding and fuselage structure. If the

  15. Investigation of Shielding Properties of Yarns, Twisted with Metal Wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra VARNAITĖ-ŽURAVLIOVA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The development level of the modern techniques and information technologies creates diverse nature electromagnetic fields and electric field accumulations in the human environment. Electrically conductive textiles that protect against electromagnetic waves and electric charge accumulations can be usable as protective covers for work in computer equipment rooms, measuring stands, air and gas filters and so on. One of the methods used in increase of electrical conductivity in textiles is the development of their specific structures (including the development of threads with the metal component. In this paper, unlike the currently used in the world conductive material production method, where different metal fibres are used as an additives to the main fibre composition in order to create a variety of fibres and yarns, a spun yarn with metal wire was prototyped as samples for this research and the parameters of protective properties of these samples were investigated (such as surface resistivity, vertical resistance, etc.. The protective and shielding properties of woven network with prototyped twisted electro conductive thread with a wire (metal wire diameter of 15 microns were investigated. During the investigation the influence of the following factors, such as conductive fibre composition, electrically conductive thread distribution frequency of the longitudinal and transverse direction, on the protective shielding properties of conductive network were analyzed. The research enabled the assessment of influence of electrically conductive fibre yarn composition and its distribution in the woven mesh on protective shielding properties. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.1.2492

  16. Investigation of Shielding Properties of Yarns, Twisted with Metal Wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra VARNAITĖ-ŽURAVLIOVA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The development level of the modern techniques and information technologies creates diverse nature electromagnetic fields and electric field accumulations in the human environment. Electrically conductive textiles that protect against electromagnetic waves and electric charge accumulations can be usable as protective covers for work in computer equipment rooms, measuring stands, air and gas filters and so on. One of the methods used in increase of electrical conductivity in textiles is the development of their specific structures (including the development of threads with the metal component. In this paper, unlike the currently used in the world conductive material production method, where different metal fibres are used as an additives to the main fibre composition in order to create a variety of fibres and yarns, a spun yarn with metal wire was prototyped as samples for this research and the parameters of protective properties of these samples were investigated (such as surface resistivity, vertical resistance, etc.. The protective and shielding properties of woven network with prototyped twisted electro conductive thread with a wire (metal wire diameter of 15 microns were investigated. During the investigation the influence of the following factors, such as conductive fibre composition, electrically conductive thread distribution frequency of the longitudinal and transverse direction, on the protective shielding properties of conductive network were analyzed. The research enabled the assessment of influence of electrically conductive fibre yarn composition and its distribution in the woven mesh on protective shielding properties. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.1.2492

  17. A database-informed approach to new plant shielding design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd, T. M. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, 226 Airport Parkway, San Jose, CA 95110 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Document available in abstract form only, full text of document follows: To facilitate the definition and description of radiation dose rates in the numerous rooms and areas of a new nuclear power plant, a database approach was developed. This approach offers a number of benefits over more manual methods. A key benefit is that the selection of an appropriate shielding method to use in each area of the plant is greatly facilitated by virtue of the team's improved ability to grasp the significance of each of the individual sources that are candidates for making a significant contribution to the dose rate in each area. By understanding the level of relevant contribution - if any - of each of these candidate sources, an analyst is able to select a method that will define the contribution without becoming enmired in a model representing inappropriately high degrees of accuracy and modeling time. This database method, by allowing for an evolving understanding of dose rates and sources in the neighboring rooms for each portion of the plant, leads to substantial reductions in the effort of characterizing a plant's radiation environment. As an additional benefit, the database serves as a tool for documenting the shielding calculations themselves, automatically generating formatted sections including drawing and source term references, shielding calculation types, key dimensions, and results; these sections can form the starting point of a full calculation package. The approach offers a final project management benefit: estimating, tracking, and predicting the effort associated with the many calculations involved in such a project are greatly systematized, leading to more reliable manpower estimates. (authors)

  18. Gamma ray shielding and structural properties of PbO-P2O5-Na2WO4 glass system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogra, Mridula; Singh, K. J.; Kaur, Kulwinder; Anand, Vikas; Kaur, Parminder

    2017-05-01

    The present work has been undertaken to study the gamma ray shielding properties of PbO-P2O5-Na2WO4 glass system. The values of mass attenuation coefficient and half value layer parameter at photon energies 511, 662 and 1173 KeV have been determined using XCOM computer software developed by National Institute of Standards and Technology. The density, molar volume, XRD, UV-VIS and Raman studies have been performed to study the structural properties of the prepared glass system to check the possibility of the use of prepared samples as an alternate to conventional concrete for gamma ray shielding applications.

  19. A Shielding Model for an Inflatable Vehicle, TransHab, and the Associated Astronaut Space Radiation Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwell, William; Badhwar, Gautam

    2000-01-01

    TransHab, a habitable inflatable structure, has been proposed as a possible module for the International Space Station that provides significant increase in the available volume compared with the US Hab module and fo r a human Mars mission . A study was undertaken to understand and provide design inputs for crew radiation exposures. The results show that the current design provides sufficient shielding to assure that the crew exposures are below the crew exposure limits currently adopted for the ISS. In addition, the shielding provides adequate protection from the largest solar particle events (SPEs) observed during the last 40 years.

  20. Evaluation of Personal Shields Used in Selected Radiology Departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Salmanvandi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The purpose of this study was to evaluate personal shields in radiation departments of hospitals affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods First, the information related to 109 personal shields was recorded and evaluated by imaging equipment. Afterwards, the equivalent lead thickness (ELT of 62 personal shields was assessed, using dosimeter and standard lead layers at 100 kVp. Results In this study, 109 personal shields were assessed in terms of tears, holes and cracks. The results showed that 18 shields were damaged. Moreover, ELT was evaluated in 62 shields. As the results indicated, ELT was unacceptable in 8 personal shields and lower than expected in 9 shields. Conclusion According to the results, 16.5% of personal shields had defects (tears, holes and cracks and 13% of them were unacceptable in terms of ELT and needed to be replaced. Therefore, regular quality control of personal shields and evaluation of new shields are necessary at any radiation department.

  1. Is the Proterozoic Ladoga Rift (SE Baltic Shield) a rift?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artemieva, Irina; Shulgin, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    The southern part of the Baltic Shield hosts a series of mafic dykes and sills of Mesoproterozoic ages, including a ca. 1.53-1.46 Ga sheet-like gabbro-dolerite sills and the Salmi plateau-basalts from the Lake Ladoga region. Based on chiefly geochemical data, the region is conventionally interpre......The southern part of the Baltic Shield hosts a series of mafic dykes and sills of Mesoproterozoic ages, including a ca. 1.53-1.46 Ga sheet-like gabbro-dolerite sills and the Salmi plateau-basalts from the Lake Ladoga region. Based on chiefly geochemical data, the region is conventionally...... interpreted as an intracratonic Ladoga rift (graben). We question the validity of this geodynamic interpretation by analyzing regional geophysical data (crustal structure, heat flow, Bouguer gravity anomalies, magnetic anomalies, and mantle Vs velocities). We provide a complete list of tectonic, magmatic......, and geophysical characteristics typical of continental rifts in general and demonstrate that, except for magmatic and, perhaps, some gravity signature, the Lake Ladoga region lacks any other rift features. We also compare the geophysical data from the Lake Ladoga region with similar in age Midcontinent and Valday...

  2. Key differentiators influencing the choice of robust shielded containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, Jenny; Wickham, Stephen [Galson Sciences Limited Oakham, Rutland (United Kingdom); Nicholls, David [AREVA Risk Management Consulting Abingdon, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Walsh, Ciara [NDA RWMD, Harwell, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); McKinney, James [NDA Moor Row, Cumbria (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    The NDA's Upstream Optioneering project has examined the potential implications of using an alternative type of waste package and its influence on the waste management lifecycle across the NDA estate. Robust Shielded Containers (RSCs) are radioactive waste packages that provide integral radiological shielding, reducing the need for remote handling. The robustness of the container could remove the need to immobilise waste by cement encapsulation. RSCs are routinely used to package ILW for interim storage in Germany and have fairly recently been considered for use in the UK because RSCs have the potential to simplify the waste management lifecycle and enable risk and hazard reduction. In particular, the current baseline (included in Magnox Limited lifetime plans) follows the strategy set out in the Magnox Operating Decommissioning Programme (MODP), in which Type II MOSAIK and Type VI Ductile Cast Iron Containers (DCICs) are used to package (in non-encapsulated form) most Magnox ILW arising prior to 2050. By considering representative types of Intermediate Level Waste (ILW) and exploring potential packaging options for these wastes, this paper identifies the factors that could differentiate between cases in which RSCs would, or would not, be an appropriate option. The potential role of RSCs across the waste management lifecycle is examined, from retrieval of waste through to emplacement at a Geological Disposal Facility (GDF), including consideration of other potential uses of RSCs, such as temporary storage of raw wastes for which appropriate treatment and conditioning measures have yet to be developed. (authors)

  3. In-Beam Background Suppression Shield

    CERN Document Server

    Santoro, V; DiJulio, D D; Ansell, S; Bentley, P M

    2015-01-01

    The long (3ms) proton pulse of the European Spallation Source (ESS) gives rise to unique and potentially high backgrounds for the instrument suite. In such a source an instrument capabilities will be limited by it's Signal to Noise (S/N) ratio. The instruments with a direct view of the moderator, which do not use a bender to help mitigate the fast neutron background, are the most challenging. For these beam lines we propose the innovative shielding of placing blocks of material directly into the guide system, which allow a minimum attenuation of the cold and thermal fluxes relative to the background suppression. This shielding configuration has been worked into a beam line model using Geant4. We study particularly the advantages of single crystal sapphire and silicon blocks .

  4. Shielding performance of metal fiber composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Gang; WU Bin; CHEN Ze-fei

    2004-01-01

    Metal fibers have been applied to construct composites with desirable electromagnetic interference shiel ding effectiveness and mechanical properties. Copper and stainless steel fibers were prepared with micro-saw fiberpulling combined cutting method. The cross section of the fibers is hook-like, which is beneficial to the improvement of bonding strength. Cement-based composites with copper and stainless steel fibers were fabricated and their electromagnetic shielding effectiveness was measured in the frequency range of 1 - 5 GHz. The results show that the electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness of those composites is enhanced by the addition of metal fibers,which functions mainly due to the absorption. At some frequencies, 20 dB or more difference is obtained between the materials with and without metal fibers.

  5. SHIELD II: WSRT HI Spectral Line Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Alex Jonah Robert; Cannon, John M.; Adams, Elizabeth A.; SHIELD II Team

    2016-01-01

    The "Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs II" ("SHIELD II") is a multiwavelength, legacy-class observational campaign that is facilitating the study of both internal and global evolutionary processes in low-mass dwarf galaxies discovered by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. We present new results from WSRT HI spectral line observations of 22 galaxies in the SHIELD II sample. We explore the morphology and kinematics by comparing images of the HI surface densities and the intensity weighted velocity fields with optical images from HST, SDSS, and WIYN. In most cases the HI and stellar populations are cospatial; projected rotation velocities range from less than 10 km/s to roughly 30 km/s.Support for this work was provided by NSF grant AST-1211683 to JMC at Macalester College, and by NASA through grant GO-13750 from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  6. Thermoforming plastic in lead shield construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrahams, M.E.; Chow, C.H.; Loyd, M.D. (Univ. of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston (USA))

    1989-09-01

    Radiation treatments using low energy X-rays or electrons frequently require a final field defining shield to be placed on the patient's skin. A custom made lead cut-out is used to provide a close fit to a particular patient's surface contours. We have developed a procedure which utilizes POLYFORM thermoplastic to obtain a negative mold of the patient instead of the traditional plaster bandage or dental impression gel. The Polyform is softened in warm water, molded carefully over the patient's surface, and is removed when set or hardened, usually within five minutes. Then lead sheet cut-outs can be formed within this negative. For shielding cut-outs requiring thicker lead sheet, a positive is made from dental stone using this Polyform negative. We have found this procedure to be neat, fast and comfortable for both patient and the dosimetrist.

  7. Thermoforming plastic in lead shield construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahams, M E; Chow, C H; Loyd, M D

    1989-09-01

    Radiation treatments using low energy X-rays or electrons frequently require a final field defining shield to be placed on the patient's skin. A custom made lead cut-out is used to provide a close fit to a particular patient's surface contours. We have developed a procedure which utilizes POLYFORM thermoplastic to obtain a negative mold of the patient instead of the traditional plaster bandage or dental impression gel. The Polyform is softened in warm water, molded carefully over the patient's surface, and is removed when "set" or hardened, usually within five minutes. Then lead sheet cut-outs can be formed within this negative. For shielding cut-outs requiring thicker lead sheet, a positive is made from dental stone using this Polyform negative. We have found this procedure to be neat, fast and comfortable for both patient and the dosimetrist.

  8. Grounding and shielding circuits and interference

    CERN Document Server

    Morrison, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Applies basic field behavior in circuit design and demonstrates how it relates to grounding and shielding requirements and techniques in circuit design This book connects the fundamentals of electromagnetic theory to the problems of interference in all types of electronic design. The text covers power distribution in facilities, mixing of analog and digital circuitry, circuit board layout at high clock rates, and meeting radiation and susceptibility standards. The author examines the grounding and shielding requirements and techniques in circuit design and applies basic physics to circuit behavior. The sixth edition of this book has been updated with new material added throughout the chapters where appropriate. The presentation of the book has also been rearranged in order to reflect the current trends in the field.

  9. Application of MCBEND to PBMR shielding analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, G A; Wall, S J

    2005-01-01

    Shielding analysis of an early design of Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) has been carried out by using the Monte Carlo code MCBEND. The issues of concern were damage to the core barrel and the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), activation of the core barrel, RPV, top plate and bottom plate, and also burn-up of boron in the control layer underneath the core. The analysis below the core was complicated due to the presence of the de-fuelling chute, which meant that multiplication had to be taken into account. The analysis of boron burn-up was particularly challenging and was tackled using a combination of MCBEND and the criticality code MONK in the depletion mode. The application of MCBEND to the shielding analysis of the PBMR is described, with particular attention being paid to the regions below the core.

  10. Optimal Magnetic Field Shielding Method by Metallic Sheets in Wireless Power Transfer System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Wen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available To meet the regulations established to limit human exposure to time-varying electromagnetic fields (EMFs such as the International Committee on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP guidelines, thin metallic sheets are often used to shield magnetic field leakage in high power applications of wireless power transfer (WPT systems based on magnetic field coupling. However, the metals in the vicinity of the WPT coils cause the decrease of self and mutual inductances and increase of effective series resistance; as such, the electric performance including transmission power and the efficiency of the system is affected. With the research objective of further investigating excellent shielding effectiveness associated with system performance, the utilization of the optimal magnetic field shielding method by metallic sheets in magnetic field coupling WPT is carried out in this paper. The circuit and 3D Finite Element Analysis (FEA models are combined to predict the magnetic field distribution and electrical performance. Simulation and experiment results show that the method is very effective by obtaining the largest possible coupling coefficient of the WPT coils within the allowable range and then reducing the value nearest to and no smaller than the critical coupling coefficient via geometric unbroken metallic sheets. The optimal magnetic field shielding method which considers the system efficiency, transmission power, transmission distance, and system size is also achieved using the analytic hierarchy process (AHP. The results can benefit WPT by helping to achieve efficient energy transfer and safe use in metal shielded equipment.

  11. The protective effects of methyl cellulose and conoid shields for lagophthalmos and corneal hypaesthesia in leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaçorlu, M A; Cakiner, T; Sürel, Z; Ersoy, N; Saylan, T; Sütlas, M

    1991-06-01

    Lagophthalmos and corneal hypaesthesia are amongst the most frequently encountered lesions in leprosy and they can easily give rise to blindness. Many measures (such as eye drops, protective conoid shields, muscle exercises, surgical treatment etc.) have been used to protect the eyes under such circumstances and this paper examines the protective role of methyl cellulose and conoid shields in 41 patients. All of them had lagophthalmos (5 mm or more) and corneal hypaesthesia. They were divided into three groups. Group one had 15 leprosy control patients (27 eyes) who did not use methyl cellulose or eye shields. Group two had 16 leprosy patients (28 eyes) and they used methyl cellulose and eye shields when they felt discomfort in their eyes. Group three had 10 leprosy patients (17 eyes) and they used methyl cellulose and eye shields regularly. Statistically significant improvement was seen in group three. Further studies on larger groups of patients including the effects of different concentrations of methyl cellulose, on Schirmer test and tear break up time, may be of value.

  12. Benchmarking study and its application for shielding analysis of large accelerator facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hee-Seock; Kim, Dong-hyun; Oranj, Leila Mokhtari; Oh, Joo-Hee; Lee, Arim; Jung, Nam-Suk [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Shielding Analysis is one of subjects which are indispensable to construct large accelerator facility. Several methods, such as the Monte Carlo, discrete ordinate, and simplified calculation, have been used for this purpose. The calculation precision is overcome by increasing the trial (history) numbers. However its accuracy is still a big issue in the shielding analysis. To secure the accuracy in the Monte Carlo calculation, the benchmarking study using experimental data and the code comparison are adopted fundamentally. In this paper, the benchmarking result for electrons, protons, and heavy ions are presented as well as the proper application of the results is discussed. The benchmarking calculations, which are indispensable in the shielding analysis were performed for different particles: proton, heavy ion and electron. Four different multi-particle Monte Carlo codes, MCNPX, FLUKA, PHITS, and MARS, were examined for higher energy range equivalent to large accelerator facility. The degree of agreement between the experimental data including the SINBAD database and the calculated results were estimated in the terms of secondary neutron production and attenuation through the concrete and iron shields. The degree of discrepancy and the features of Monte Carlo codes were investigated and the application way of the benchmarking results are discussed in the view of safety margin and selecting the code for the shielding analysis. In most cases, the tested Monte Carlo codes give proper credible results except of a few limitation of each codes.

  13. Heavy Metal Pad Shielding during Fluoroscopic Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Dromi, Sergio; Wood, Bradford J.; Oberoi, Jay; Neeman, Ziv

    2006-01-01

    Significant direct and scatter radiation doses to patient and physician may result from routine interventional radiology practice. A lead-free disposable tungsten antimony shielding pad was tested in phantom patients during simulated diagnostic angiography procedures. Although the exact risk of low doses of ionizing radiation is unknown, dramatic dose reductions can be seen with routine use of this simple, sterile pad made from lightweighttungsten antimony material.

  14. Homogeneous Dielectric Equivalents of Composite Material Shields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tobola

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the methodology of replacing complicated parts of an airplane skin by simple homogeneous equivalents, which can exhibit similar shielding efficiency. On one hand, the airplane built from the virtual homogeneous equivalents can be analyzed with significantly reduced CPU-time demands and memory requirements. On the other hand, the equivalent model can estimate the internal fields satisfactory enough to evaluate the electromagnetic immunity of the airplane.

  15. Shielding design for PWR in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champion, G.; Charransol; Le Dieu de Ville, A.; Nimal, J.C.; Vergnaud, T.

    1983-05-01

    Shielding calculation scheme used in France for PWR is presented here for 900 MWe and 1300 MWe plants built by EDF the French utility giving electricity. Neutron dose rate at areas accessible by personnel during the reactor operation is calculated and compared with the measurements which were carried out in 900 MWe units up to now. Measurements on the first French 1300 MWe reactor are foreseen at the end of 1983.

  16. SQUID holder with high magnetic shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, K. W.; Marek, D.; Chui, T. C. P.

    1990-01-01

    A SQUID holder designed for high magnetic shielding is discussed. It is shown how to estimate the attenuation of the magnetic field from the normal magnetic modes for an approximate geometry. The estimate agrees satisfactorily with the attenuation measured with a commercial RF SQUID installed in the holder. The holder attenuates external magnetic fields by more than 10 to the 9th at the SQUID input. With the SQUID input shorted, the response to external fields is 0.00001 Phi(0)/G.

  17. Radiation shielding design for the VISTA space craft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahyn, S.; Pahyn, H.M. [Gazi Univ., Teknik Eoitim Fakultesi, Ankara (Turkey)

    2001-07-01

    An innovative concept for the direct utilisation of fusion energy with laser ignited (D,T) capsules for propulsion is presented with the so called VISTA (Vehicle for Interplanetary Space Transport Applications) concept. VISTA's overall geometry is that of a 50 degrees-half-angle cone to avoid massive radioactive shielding. The 50 degrees-half-angle maximizes the jet efficiency, and is determined by selecting the optimum pellet firing position along the axis of the cone with respect to the plane of the magnet coil. The pellet firing position is in the vacuum. By a total fusion power production of 17 500 MW with a repetition rate of 5 Hz and 3 500 MJ per shot, the propulsion power in form of charged particles has been calculated as {approx} 7 000 MW, making {approx} 40 % of the total fusion power. About 60 % of the fusion energy is carried by the leaking neutrons out of the pellet. Most of them (96 %) escape into vacuum without striking the space ship. Only 4 % enter the frozen hydrogen exhaust cone (about 50 gr.). Total peak nuclear heat generation in the coils is calculated as 4.7 mW/cm{sup 3}. The peak neutron heating is 1.9 mW/cm{sup 3} and the peak {gamma}-ray heating density is 2.8 mW/cm{sup 3}. However, volume averaged nuclear heat generation in the coils is much lower. It is calculated as 0.18, 0.48 and 0.66 mW/cm{sup 3} for neutron, {gamma}-ray and total nuclear heating, respectively. Net shielding mass is found as 170 ton, making < 3 % of the vehicle mass. (authors)

  18. An attenuation Layer for Electromagnetic Shielding in X- Band Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    vida Zaroushani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Uncontrolled exposure to X-band frequency leads to health damage. One of the principles of radiation protection is shielding. But, conventional shielding materials have disadvantages. Therefore, studies of novel materials, as an alternative to conventional shielding materials, are required to obtain new electromagnetic shielding material. Therefore, this study investigated the electromagnetic shielding of two component epoxy thermosetting resin for the X - band frequency with workplace approach. Two components of epoxy resin mixed according to manufacturing instruction with the weight ratio that was 100:10 .Epoxy plates fabricated in three different thicknesses (2, 4 and 6mm and shielding effectiveness measured by Vector Network Analyzer. Then, shielding effectiveness measured by the scattering parameters.The results showed that 6mm thickness of epoxy had the highest and 2mm had the lowest average of shielding effectiveness in X-band frequency that is 4.48 and 1.9 dB, respectively. Also, shielding effectiveness increased by increasing the thickness. But this increasing is useful up to 4mm. Percentage shielding effectiveness of attenuation for 6, 4 and 2mm thicknesses is 64.35%, 63.31% and 35.40%. Also, attenuation values for 4mm and 6mm thicknesses at 8.53 GHz and 8.52 GHz frequency are 77.15% and 82.95%, respectively, and can be used as favourite shields for the above frequency. 4mm-Epoxy is a suitable candidate for shielding application in X-band frequency range but, in the lower section, 6mm thickness is recommended. Finely, the shielding matrix can be used for selecting the proper thickness for electromagnetic shielding in X- Band frequency.

  19. Risk identification and risk mitigation during metro station construction by enlarging shield tunnel combined with cut-and-cover method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Constructing a metro station by enlarging shield tunnels combined with a mining/cut-and-cover method provides a new method to solve the contradictions of construction time limits of shield tunnels and stations. As a new-style construction method, there are several specific risks involved in the construction process. Based on the test section of Sanyuanqiao station on Beijing metro line 10, and combined with the existing methods of risk identification at present, including a review of world-wide operational ...

  20. Beta radiation shielding with lead and plastic: effect on bremsstrahlung radiation when switching the shielding order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Pelt, Wesley R; Drzyzga, Michael

    2007-02-01

    Lead and plastic are commonly used to shield beta radiation. Radiation protection literature is ubiquitous in advising the placement of plastic first to absorb all the beta particles before any lead shielding is used. This advice is based on the well established theory that radiative losses (bremsstrahlung production) are more prevalent in higher atomic number (Z) materials than in low Z materials. Using 32P beta radiation, we measured bremsstrahlung photons transmitted through lead and plastic (Lucite) shielding in different test configurations to determine the relative efficacy of lead alone, plastic alone, and the positional order of lead and plastic. With the source (32P) and detector held at a constant separation distance, we inserted lead and/or plastic absorbers and measured the reduction in bremsstrahlung radiation level measured by the detector. With these test conditions, analysis of measured bremsstrahlung radiation in various thicknesses and configurations of lead and plastic shielding shows the following: placing plastic first vs. lead first reduces the transmitted radiation level only marginally (10% to 40%); 2 mm of additional lead is sufficient to correct the "mistake" of placing the lead first; and for equal thicknesses or weights of lead and plastic, lead is a more efficient radiation shield than plastic.

  1. Mathematical model of thermal shields for long-term stability optical resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Sanjuan, Josep; Braxmaier, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Modern experiments aiming at tests of fundamental physics, like measuring gravitational waves or testing Lorentz Invariance with unprecedented accuracy, require thermal environments that are highly stable over long times. To achieve such a stability, the experiment including typically an optical resonator is nested in a thermal enclosure, which passively attenuates external temperature fluctuations to acceptable levels. These thermal shields are usually designed using tedious numerical simulations or with simple analytical models. In this paper, we propose an accurate analytical method to estimate the performance of passive thermal shields in the frequency domain, which allows for fast evaluation and optimization. The model analysis has also unveil interesting properties of the shields, such as dips in the transfer function for some frequencies under certain combinations of materials and geometries. We validate the results by comparing them to numerical simulations performed with commercial software based on ...

  2. The Shielding Effect of Multi-Pile Structures on Ice Force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史庆增; 黄焱; 宋安

    2004-01-01

    The shielding effect of the front pile-row on the ice force acting on the back pile-row is studied by ice force model tests. In the tests, the front pile-row is designed to model jacket legs and the back pile-row to model the water resisting pipe-phalanx within the jacket. The shielding factor for ice force corresponding to different conditions are given in this paper. The research indicates that there are many factors, including the longitudinal and lateral spacing between the front and back pile-row, ice attacking angle and the ratio of pile diameter to ice thickness, that influence the shielding effect on ice force.

  3. A space radiation shielding model of the Martian radiation environment experiment (MARIE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwell, W.; Saganti, P.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Zeitlin, C. J.

    2004-01-01

    The 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft was launched towards Mars on April 7, 2001. Onboard the spacecraft is the Martian radiation environment experiment (MARIE), which is designed to measure the background radiation environment due to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar protons in the 20-500 MeV/n energy range. We present an approach for developing a space radiation-shielding model of the spacecraft that includes the MARIE instrument in the current mapping phase orientation. A discussion is presented describing the development and methodology used to construct the shielding model. For a given GCR model environment, using the current MARIE shielding model and the high-energy particle transport codes, dose rate values are compared with MARIE measurements during the early mapping phase in Mars orbit. The results show good agreement between the model calculations and the MARIE measurements as presented for the March 2002 dataset. c2003 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Investigation of EBG array performance on decreasing the mutual coupling and improve shield factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahele Ahmadian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper EBG structures including parallel plates of EBGs are being used to reduce the mutual coupling between the two omni-directional antennas. Here, we have chosen the Discone antennas as omni directional antennas and comparisons between uniform and non-uniform structure with conventional array of antenna is presented, and compared with the fractal structure for designing ultra wide band structure. The multi-layer EBG structure have been designed and simulated based on EBG metamaterial characteristics. Our aim is to reduce coupling or reduction of S21 to have better coupling reduction and shielding effectiveness for applying the structure as an absorber or shield and shielding bandwidth in non uniform structure is increased up to 16 GHz.

  5. Mechanical behavior of segment rebar of shield tunnel in construction stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-sheng CHEN; Hai-hong MO

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a 3D finite element (FE) program ADINA was applied to analyzing a tunnel with 9 segment rings. The loads acting on these segment rings included the squeezing action of tail brush of shield machine under attitude deflection, the jacking forces, the grouting pressure and the soil pressure. The analyses focused on the rebar stress in two statuses: (1) normal construction status without shield machine squeezing; (2) squeezing action induced by shield machine under attitude deflection.The analyses indicated that the rebar stress was evidently affected by the construction loads. In different construction status, the rebar stress ranges from -80 MPa to 50 MPa, and the rebar is in elastic status. Even some cracks appear on segments, the stress of segment rebar is still at a low level. It is helpful to incorporate a certain quantity of steel fiber to improve the anti-crack and shock resistance performance.

  6. Experimental study of high-temperature superconductor shield for electron cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, A.; Dorofeev, G.; Drobin, V.; Kulikov, E.; Malinovski, H.

    2016-12-01

    The NICA project includes a system of electron cooling for charged particle beams for total ion energy of 4.5 GeV/n. To achieve the required cooling time, the magnetic field homogeneity in the cooling section should be at least 10-5 for a solenoid length in the cooling system of about 6 m. The cost of such solenoid, however, is very high due to the complexity of high-precision winding. The application of the superconducting shield could help to resolve this problem. In this study we present the results of an experimental investigation of the prototype of the shield manufactured from high-temperature superconductor (HTS) tapes. The measurements were performed at different quasistationary operating conditions. The requirements for the HTS shield and solenoid parameters are formulated.

  7. Neutronic studies for the optimization of shield wall penetrations for laser IFE systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafuente, A., E-mail: Lafuentemazu2@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Latkowski, J.F.; Kramer, K.J.; Dunne, A.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provide insight on the impact of wall shield penetrations for IFE systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We establish guidelines for the selection of different variables linked to the pinhole's design. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identify the requirements to enable manual maintenance during operation and propose the use of non-aligned double shield walls with pinholes. - Abstract: Building upon the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) technology developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), a laser-driven inertial fusion energy (LIFE) power plant is being designed. In this pre-conceptual design, the final optic is exposed to a variety of threats originating from the fusion target. These include prompt neutron and gamma fluxes, x-ray and ionic emissions. While x-rays and ions are stopped by the low-density chamber fill gas (6 {mu}g/cc xenon), neutrons and gamma-rays are not significantly attenuated. In order to limit the consequences of such threats onto the penultimate optic and the rest of the laser systems, a shielding wall stands between the target chamber area and the laser bay. An optical telescope arrangement allows for the laser beam propagation from the penultimate to the final optic, through a pinhole in the shielding wall. These pinholes attenuate the neutron flux and reduce effective dose rates such that laser bay maintenance can be performed by humans. An optimum design of this laser pinhole requires a good understanding of the different design trade-offs that exist between shielding performance and survivability of the laser optical elements and are outlined in this work. This paper provides insight on the impact and influence of the pinholes on the radiation doses in the laser bay, which is located on the opposite side of the concrete shielding wall. After addressing the difficulties of evaluating shields containing penetrations, it establishes a

  8. SUBGR: A Program to Generate Subgroup Data for the Subgroup Resonance Self-Shielding Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Seog [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-06-06

    The Subgroup Data Generation (SUBGR) program generates subgroup data, including levels and weights from the resonance self-shielded cross section table as a function of background cross section. Depending on the nuclide and the energy range, these subgroup data can be generated by (a) narrow resonance approximation, (b) pointwise flux calculations for homogeneous media; and (c) pointwise flux calculations for heterogeneous lattice cells. The latter two options are performed by the AMPX module IRFFACTOR. These subgroup data are to be used in the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) neutronic simulator MPACT, for which the primary resonance self-shielding method is the subgroup method.

  9. SU-C-BRB-06: Utilizing 3D Scanner and Printer for Dummy Eye-Shield: Artifact-Free CT Images of Tungsten Eye-Shield for Accurate Dose Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J; Lee, J [Program in Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, H [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, I [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ye, S [Program in Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of a tungsten eye-shield on the dose distribution of a patient. Methods: A 3D scanner was used to extract the dimension and shape of a tungsten eye-shield in the STL format. Scanned data was transferred into a 3D printer. A dummy eye shield was then produced using bio-resin (3D systems, VisiJet M3 Proplast). For a patient with mucinous carcinoma, the planning CT was obtained with the dummy eye-shield placed on the patient’s right eye. Field shaping of 6 MeV was performed using a patient-specific cerrobend block on the 15 x 15 cm{sup 2} applicator. The gantry angle was 330° to cover the planning target volume near by the lens. EGS4/BEAMnrc was commissioned from our measurement data from a Varian 21EX. For the CT-based dose calculation using EGS4/DOSXYZnrc, the CT images were converted to a phantom file through the ctcreate program. The phantom file had the same resolution as the planning CT images. By assigning the CT numbers of the dummy eye-shield region to 17000, the real dose distributions below the tungsten eye-shield were calculated in EGS4/DOSXYZnrc. In the TPS, the CT number of the dummy eye-shield region was assigned to the maximum allowable CT number (3000). Results: As compared to the maximum dose, the MC dose on the right lens or below the eye shield area was less than 2%, while the corresponding RTP calculated dose was an unrealistic value of approximately 50%. Conclusion: Utilizing a 3D scanner and a 3D printer, a dummy eye-shield for electron treatment can be easily produced. The artifact-free CT images were successfully incorporated into the CT-based Monte Carlo simulations. The developed method was useful in predicting the realistic dose distributions around the lens blocked with the tungsten shield.

  10. DUPIC fuel fabrication in shielded facilities in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.W.; Kim, W.K.; Kim, S.S.; Yang, M.S.; Park, H.S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yusong-ku, Taejon City (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    The DUPIC(Direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors) fuel cycle is to directly refabricate the CANDU fuel from spent PWR fuel materials by thermal and mechanical processes without wet reprocessing process. The concept was proposed and termed DUPIC in joint research program between the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) and the US Departments of State in 1992. The DUPIC fuel cycle has many advantages over direct disposal or wet reprocessing and MOX fuel cycle in terms of proliferation resistance, reduction of spent fuel accumulation and uranium resource utilization, etc. Since the material in the DUPIC fuel fabrication process is highly radioactive due to no separation of uranium, plutonium and fission products, which is an intrinsic characteristic of the DUPIC process, all fabrication and characterization processes should be performed remotely in highly shielded hot cell facilities. KAERI has developed the remote fuel fabrication equipment and has successfully completed the installation of them in the shielded facilities, called DFDF (DUPIC Fuel Development Facility), at KAERI in early 2000. Based on the fuel fabrication technologies, including powder treatment, pelletizing and laser welding, KAERI has successfully fabricated DUPIC fuel pellets and elements with various design specifications to evaluate the performance of DUPIC fuel through irradiation tests at the HANARO research reactor. This paper describes KAERI's progress in DUPIC fuel fabrication. (author)

  11. ISS Radiation Shielding and Acoustic Simulation Using an Immersive Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhage, Joshua E.; Sandridge, Chris A.; Qualls, Garry D.; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2002-01-01

    The International Space Station Environment Simulator (ISSES) is a virtual reality application that uses high-performance computing, graphics, and audio rendering to simulate the radiation and acoustic environments of the International Space Station (ISS). This CAVE application allows the user to maneuver to different locations inside or outside of the ISS and interactively compute and display the radiation dose at a point. The directional dose data is displayed as a color-mapped sphere that indicates the relative levels of radiation from all directions about the center of the sphere. The noise environment is rendered in real time over headphones or speakers and includes non-spatial background noise, such as air-handling equipment, and spatial sounds associated with specific equipment racks, such as compressors or fans. Changes can be made to equipment rack locations that produce changes in both the radiation shielding and system noise. The ISSES application allows for interactive investigation and collaborative trade studies between radiation shielding and noise for crew safety and comfort.

  12. The surface heat flow of the Arabian Shield in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, A.; Förster, H.-J.; Masarweh, R.; Masri, A.; Tarawneh, K.; Desert Group

    2007-04-01

    Surface heat flow in southern Jordan (western part of the Arabian Plate) was determined in a dense cluster of five, up to 900-m-deep boreholes that have encountered sedimentary rocks of Paleozoic (Ordovician and Silurian) age. These rocks are underlain by an igneous and metamorphic basement, which has been studied for its radiogenic heat production, along the eastern margin of the Dead Sea Transform (DST) fault system. The heat flow, calculated from continuous temperature logs and laboratory-measured thermal conductivity of drillcores and surface samples, averages to 60.3 ± 3.4 mW m -2 and contrasts the common view of the late Proterozoic-consolidated Arabian Shield constituting a low heat-flow province of ⩽45 mW m -2. Although only characterizing an area of about 300 km 2, this average is unlikely representing a positive local anomaly caused by voluminous HHP granites/rhyolites at shallow depths. Instead, a heat flow of 60 mW m -2 is considered a robust estimate of the Phanerozoic conductive surface heat flow not only for Jordan, but for the Arabian Shield in areas unaffected by younger reactivation. The large variation in conductive heat flow (36-88 mW m -2) previously observed in Jordan, southern Syria, and Saudi Arabia is irreconcilable with their broad similarity in lithosphere structure and composition and rather reflects a combination of factors including low-quality temperature data and insufficient knowledge on thermal rock properties.

  13. Analysis and improvement of cyclotron thallium target room shield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajiloo, N; Raisali, G; Aslani, G

    2008-01-01

    Because of high neutron and gamma-ray intensities generated during bombardment of a thallium-203 target, a thallium target-room shield and different ways of improving it have been investigated. Leakage of neutron and gamma ray dose rates at various points behind the shield are calculated by simulating the transport of neutrons and photons using the Monte Carlo N Particle transport computer code. By considering target-room geometry, its associated shield and neutron and gamma ray source strengths and spectra, three designs for enhancing shield performance have been analysed: a shielding door at the maze entrance, covering maze walls with layers of some effective materials and adding a shadow-shield in the target room in front of the radiation source. Dose calculations were carried out separately for different materials and dimensions for all the shielding scenarios considered. The shadow-shield has been demonstrated to be one suitable for neutron and gamma dose equivalent reduction. A 7.5-cm thick polyethylene shadow-shield reduces both dose equivalent rate at maze entrance door and leakage from the shield by a factor of 3.

  14. A magnetically shielded room with ultra low residual field and gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Altarev, I.; Beck, D.; Burghoff, M.; Chesnevskaya, S.; Chupp, T.; Degenkolb, S.; Fan, I.; Fierlinger, P.; Frei, A.; Gutsmiedl, E.; Knappe-Grüneberg, S.; Kuchler, F.; Lauer, T.; Link, P.; Lins, T.; Marino, M.; McAndrew, J.; Niessen, B.; Paul, S.; Petzoldt, G.; Schläpfer, U.; Schnabel, A.; Sharma, S.; Singh, J.; Stoepler, R.; Stuiber, S.; Sturm, M.; Taubenheim, B.; Trahms, L.; Voigt, J.; Zechlau, T.

    2014-01-01

    A versatile and portable magnetically shielded room with a field of (700 \\pm 200) pT within a central volume of 1m x 1m x 1m and a field gradient less than 300 pT/m is described. This performance represents more than a hundred-fold improvement of the state of the art for a two-layer magnetic shield and provides an environment suitable for a next generation of precision experiments in fundamental physics at low energies; in particular, searches for electric dipole moments of fundamental systems and tests of Lorentz-invariance based on spin-precession experiments. Studies of the residual fields and their sources enable improved design of future ultra-low gradient environments and experimental apparatus.

  15. Gamma-ray shielding and structural properties of PbO-SiO 2 glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, K. J.; Singh, N.; Kaundal, R. S.; Singh, K.

    2008-03-01

    Gamma-ray attenuation coefficients have been determined experimentally using a narrow beam transmission method for the xPbO(1-x)SiO2 (x = 0.45-0.70) glass system at 662, 1173 and 1332 keV photon energies. These values have also been obtained theoretically using the 'mixture rule' and the 'XCOM' computer software. The results have been used to calculate half value layer parameters. Gamma-ray shielding properties of PbO-SiO2 glass samples have been compared with standard radiation shielding concretes. The molar volume, FTIR and acoustic investigations have been used to study the structural properties of the prepared glass system.

  16. TRIPOLI-2: neutron gamma coupling - applications to shielding benchmarks and designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cramer, S.N.; Dejonghe, G.; Gonnord, J.; Nimal, J.C.; Vergnaud, T.

    1983-05-01

    Recent additions in the on-going development of the TRIPOLI Monte Carlo code system include conversion to the ENDF/B data format and an automated coupling scheme for neutron secondary gamma-ray calculations. Two shielding calculations are presented here which feature these two new developments.

  17. Renormalization shielding effect on the Wannier-ridge mode for double-electron continua in partially ionized dense hydrogen plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2016-01-01

    The influence of renormalization shielding on the Wannier threshold law for the double-electron escapes by the electron-impact ionization is investigated in partially ionized dense plasmas. The renormalized electron charge and Wannier exponent are obtained by considering the equation of motion in the Wannier-ridge including the renormalization shielding effect. It is found that the renormalization shielding effect reduces the magnitude of effective electron charge, especially, within the Bohr radius in partially ionized dense plasmas. The maximum position of the renormalized electron charge approaches to the center of the target atom with an increase of the renormalization parameter. In addition, the Wannier exponent increases with an increase of the renormalization parameter. The variations of the renormalized electron charge and Wannier exponent due to the renormalization shielding effect are also discussed.

  18. Renormalization shielding effect on the Wannier-ridge mode for double-electron continua in partially ionized dense hydrogen plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae [Department of Physics and Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Young-Dae, E-mail: ydjung@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Applied Physics and Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 15588 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180-3590 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The influence of renormalization shielding on the Wannier threshold law for the double-electron escapes by the electron-impact ionization is investigated in partially ionized dense plasmas. The renormalized electron charge and Wannier exponent are obtained by considering the equation of motion in the Wannier-ridge including the renormalization shielding effect. It is found that the renormalization shielding effect reduces the magnitude of effective electron charge, especially, within the Bohr radius in partially ionized dense plasmas. The maximum position of the renormalized electron charge approaches to the center of the target atom with an increase of the renormalization parameter. In addition, the Wannier exponent increases with an increase of the renormalization parameter. The variations of the renormalized electron charge and Wannier exponent due to the renormalization shielding effect are also discussed.

  19. SU-E-T-564: Multi-Helix Rotating Shield Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadkhah, H; Wu, X [University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Flynn, R; Kim, Y [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To present a novel and practical brachytherapy technique, called multi-helix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT enables RSBT delivery using only translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. H-RSBT overcomes the challenges associated with previously proposed RSBT approaches based on a serial (S-RSBT) step-and-shoot delivery technique, which required independent translational and rotational motion. Methods: A Fletcher-type applicator, compatible with the combination of a Xoft Axxent™ electronic brachytherapy source and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten shield, is proposed. The wall of the applicator contains six evenly-spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the shield as a function of depth. The shield contains three protruding keys and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients representative of a wide range of high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. The number of beamlets used in the treatment planning process was nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. For all the treatment plans the EQD2 of the HR-CTV was escalated until the EQD{sub 2cc} tolerance of either the bladder, rectum, or sigmoid colon was reached. Results: Treatment times for H-RSBT tended to be shorter than for S-RSBT, with changes of −38.47% to 1.12% with an average of −8.34%. The HR-CTV D{sub 90} changed by −8.81% to 2.08% with an average of −2.46%. Conclusion: H-RSBT is a mechanically feasible technique in the curved applicators needed for cervical cancer brachytherapy. S-RSBT and H-RSBT dose distributions were clinically equivalent for all patients

  20. Utilization of recycled cathode ray tubes glass in cement mortar for X-ray radiation-shielding applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Tung-Chai; Poon, Chi-Sun; Lam, Wai-Shung; Chan, Tai-Po; Fung, Karl Ka-Lok

    2012-01-15

    Recycled glass derived from cathode ray tubes (CRT) glass with a specific gravity of approximately 3.0 g/cm(3) can be potentially suitable to be used as fine aggregate for preparing cement mortars for X-ray radiation-shielding applications. In this work, the effects of using crushed glass derived from crushed CRT funnel glass (both acid washed and unwashed) and crushed ordinary beverage container glass at different replacement levels (0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% by volume) of sand on the mechanical properties (strength and density) and radiation-shielding performance of the cement-sand mortars were studied. The results show that all the prepared mortars had compressive strength values greater than 30 MPa which are suitable for most building applications based on ASTM C 270. The density and shielding performance of the mortar prepared with ordinary crushed (lead-free) glass was similar to the control mortar. However, a significant enhancement of radiation-shielding was achieved when the CRT glasses were used due to the presence of lead in the glass. In addition, the radiation shielding contribution of CRT glasses was more pronounced when the mortar was subject to a higher level of X-ray energy.

  1. Some folded issues related to over-shielded and unplanned rooms for medical linear accelerators - A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Wazir; Ullah, Asad; Hussain, Amjad; Ali, Nawab; Alam, Khan; Khan, Gulzar; Matiullah; Maeng, Seongjin; Lee, Sang Hoon

    2015-08-01

    A medical linear accelerator (LINAC) room must be properly shielded to limit the outside radiation exposure to an acceptable safe level defined by individual state and international regulations. However, along with this prime objective, some additional issues are also important. The current case-study was designed to unfold the issues related to over-shielded and unplanned treatment rooms for LINACs. In this connection, an apparently unplanned and over-shielded treatment room of 610 × 610 cm2 in size was compared with a properly designed treatment room of 762 × 762 cm2 in size ( i.e., by following the procedures and recommendations of the IAEA Safety Reports Series No. 47 and NCRP 151). Evaluation of the unplanned room indicated that it was over-shielded and that its size was not suitable for total body irradiation (TBI), although the license for such a treatment facility had been acquired for the installed machine. An overall 14.96% reduction in the total shielding volume ( i.e., concrete) for an optimally planned room as compared to a non-planned room was estimated. Furthermore, the inner room's dimensions were increased by 25%, in order to accommodate TBI patients. These results show that planning and design of the treatment rooms are imperative to avoid extra financial burden to the hospitals and to provide enough space for easy and safe handling of the patients. A spacious room is ideal for storing treatment accessories and facilitates TBI treatment.

  2. A generic TG-186 shielded applicator for commissioning model-based dose calculation algorithms for high-dose-rate (192) Ir brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yunzhi; Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa; Granero, Domingo; Haworth, Annette; Mourtada, Firas; Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva; Zourari, Kyveli; Papagiannis, Panagiotis; Rivard, Mark J; Siebert, Frank André; Sloboda, Ron S; Smith, Ryan; Chamberland, Marc J P; Thomson, Rowan M; Verhaegen, Frank; Beaulieu, Luc

    2017-07-19

    displaced" test cases and for the clinically-relevant part of the unshielded volume in the "source centered in applicator" case. Larger local differences appear in the shielded volume or at large distances. Considering clinically-relevant regions, global dose differences are smaller than the local ones. The most disadvantageous case for the MBDCAs is the one including the shielded applicator. In this case, ACUROS agrees with MC within [-4.2%, +4.2%] for the majority of voxels (95%) while presenting dose differences within [-0.12%, +0.12%] of the dose at a clinically relevant reference point. For ACE, 95% of the total volume presents differences with respect to MC in the range [-1.7%, +0.4%] of the dose at the reference point. The combination of the generic source and generic shielded applicator, together with the previously developed test cases and reference datasets (available in the Brachytherapy Source Registry), lay a solid foundation in supporting uniform commissioning procedures and direct comparisons among treatment planning systems for HDR (192) Ir brachytherapy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Mechanical, Electromagnetic, and X-ray Shielding Characterization of a 3D Printable Tungsten-Polycarbonate Polymer Matrix Composite for Space-Based Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemelya, Corey M.; Rivera, Armando; Perez, Angel Torrado; Rocha, Carmen; Liang, Min; Yu, Xiaoju; Kief, Craig; Alexander, David; Stegeman, James; Xin, Hao; Wicker, Ryan B.; MacDonald, Eric; Roberson, David A.

    2015-08-01

    Material-extrusion three-dimensional (3D) printing has recently attracted much interest because of its process flexibility, rapid response to design alterations, and ability to create structures "on-the-go". For this reason, 3D printing has possible applications in rapid creation of space-based devices, for example cube satellites (CubeSat). This work focused on fabrication and characterization of tungsten-doped polycarbonate polymer matrix composites specifically designed for x-ray radiation-shielding applications. The polycarbonate-tungsten polymer composite obtained intentionally utilizes low loading levels to provide x-ray shielding while limiting effects on other properties of the material, for example weight, electromagnetic functionality, and mechanical strength. The fabrication process, from tungsten functionalization to filament extrusion and material characterization, is described, including printability, determination of x-ray attenuation, tensile strength, impact resistance, and gigahertz permittivity, and failure analysis. The proposed materials are uniquely advantageous when implemented in 3D printed structures, because even a small volume fraction of tungsten has been shown to substantially alter the properties of the resulting composite.

  4. Structural Monitoring of Metro Infrastructure during Shield Tunneling Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Shield tunneling construction of metro infrastructure will continuously disturb the soils. The ground surface will be subjected to uplift or subsidence due to the deep excavation and the extrusion and consolidation of the soils. Implementation of the simultaneous monitoring with the shield tunnel construction will provide an effective reference in controlling the shield driving, while how to design and implement a safe, economic, and effective structural monitoring system for metro infrastructure is of great importance and necessity. This paper presents the general architecture of the shield construction of metro tunnels as well as the procedure of the artificial ground freezing construction of the metro-tunnel cross-passages. The design principles for metro infrastructure monitoring of the shield tunnel intervals in the Hangzhou Metro Line 1 are introduced. The detailed monitoring items and the specified alarming indices for construction monitoring of the shield tunneling are addressed, and the measured settlement variations at different monitoring locations are also presented.

  5. Structural monitoring of metro infrastructure during shield tunneling construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, L; Ye, X W; Ming, G; Dong, X B

    2014-01-01

    Shield tunneling construction of metro infrastructure will continuously disturb the soils. The ground surface will be subjected to uplift or subsidence due to the deep excavation and the extrusion and consolidation of the soils. Implementation of the simultaneous monitoring with the shield tunnel construction will provide an effective reference in controlling the shield driving, while how to design and implement a safe, economic, and effective structural monitoring system for metro infrastructure is of great importance and necessity. This paper presents the general architecture of the shield construction of metro tunnels as well as the procedure of the artificial ground freezing construction of the metro-tunnel cross-passages. The design principles for metro infrastructure monitoring of the shield tunnel intervals in the Hangzhou Metro Line 1 are introduced. The detailed monitoring items and the specified alarming indices for construction monitoring of the shield tunneling are addressed, and the measured settlement variations at different monitoring locations are also presented.

  6. Magnetic shielding structure optimization design for wireless power transmission coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhongyu; Wang, Junhua; Long, Mengjiao; Huang, Hong; Sun, Mingui

    2017-09-01

    In order to improve the performance of the wireless power transmission (WPT) system, a novel design scheme with magnetic shielding structure on the WPT coil is presented in this paper. This new type of shielding structure has great advantages on magnetic flux leakage reduction and magnetic field concentration. On the basis of theoretical calculation of coil magnetic flux linkage and characteristic analysis as well as practical application feasibility consideration, a complete magnetic shielding structure was designed and the whole design procedure was represented in detail. The simulation results show that the coil with the designed shielding structure has the maximum energy transmission efficiency. Compared with the traditional shielding structure, the weight of the new design is significantly decreased by about 41%. Finally, according to the designed shielding structure, the corresponding experiment platform is built to verify the correctness and superiority of the proposed scheme.

  7. History and Flight Devleopment of the Electrodynamic Dust Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Michael R.; Mackey, Paul J.; Hogue, Michael D.; Cox, Rachel E.; Phillips, James R., III; Calle, Carlos I.

    2015-01-01

    The surfaces of the moon, Mars, and that of some asteroids are covered with a layer of dust that may hinder robotic and human exploration missions. During the Apollo missions, for example, lunar dust caused a number of issues including vision obscuration, false instrument readings, contamination, and elevated temperatures. In fact, some equipment neared failure after only 75 hours on the lunar surface due to effects of lunar dust. NASA's Kennedy Space Center has developed an active technology to remove dust from surfaces during exploration missions. The Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS), which consists of a series of embedded electrodes in a high dielectric strength substrate, uses a low power, low frequency signal that produces an electric field wave that travels across the surface. This non-uniform electric field generates dielectrophoretic and electrostatic forces capable of moving dust out of these surfaces. Implementations of the EDS have been developed for solar radiators, optical systems, camera lenses, visors, windows, thermal radiators, and fabrics The EDS implementation for transparent applications (solar panels, optical systems, windows, etc.) uses transparent indium tin oxide electrodes on glass or transparent lm. Extensive testing was performed in a roughly simulated lunar environment (one-sixth gravity at 1 mPa atmospheric pressure) with lunar simulant dust. EDS panels over solar radiators showed dust removal that restored solar panel output reaching values very close to their initial output. EDS implementations for thermal radiator protection (metallic spacecraft surfaces with white thermal paint and reflective films) were also extensively tested at similar high vacuum conditions. Reflectance spectra for these types of implementations showed dust removal efficiencies in the 96% to 99% range. These tests indicate that the EDS technology is now at a Technology Readiness Level of 4 to 5. As part of EDS development, a flight version is being prepared for

  8. Options for shielding the hand during dispensing and administration of radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitby, M.; Martin, C. J.

    2002-07-01

    Hospital staff manipulating radiopharmaceuticals may receive significant radiation doses to their hands. A study of hand doses has been carried out in a large radionuclide dispensary and in nuclear medicine departments in the West of Scotland and the implications of different shielding options considered. Doses received for individual manipulation during many routine sessions have been measured with an electronic extremity dose monitor. Doses received from dispensing of radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine were 4 mGy per 10 GBq handled, compared to 0.2 mGy per 10 GBq for radionuclide dispensary staff. There were a number of reasons for the large difference, with one of the most important being the speed with which the manipulations were performed. The actions performed in nuclear medicine consist of dispensing into a syringe and injection. Withdrawal of radiopharmaceuticals made up the higher dose component 5 to 500 {mu}Sv per procedure as a siring shield was not used for this part of the procedure. Doses received from individual injections for which syringe shields were used varied from 1.5 to 300 {mu}Sv depending on the degree of difficulty experienced during the injection. The study has shown the effectiveness of using local shielding in dose reduction. Tungsten vial shields limit the radiation dose and are useful for handling large activities during radiopharmaceutical preparation. Syringe shields substantially reduce doses for individual manipulations and should be used for procedures in which accurate reading of the syringe scale is not required. This includes higher dose manipulations in the radionuclide dispensary and injections in nuclear medicine. (Author)

  9. The heterogeneous anti-radiation shield for spacecraft*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telegin, S. V.; Draganyuk, O. N.

    2016-04-01

    The paper deals with modeling of elemental composition and properties of heterogeneous layers in multilayered shields to protect spacecraft onboard equipment from radiation emitted by the natural Earth’s radiation belt. This radiation causes malfunctioning of semiconductor elements in electronic equipment and may result in a failure of the spacecraft as a whole. We consider four different shield designs and compare them to the most conventional radiation-protective material for spacecraft - aluminum. Out of light and heavy chemical elements we chose the materials with high reaction cross sections and low density. The mass attenuation coefficient of boron- containing compounds is 20% higher than that of aluminum. Heterogeneous shields consist of three layers: a glass cloth, borated material, and nickel. With a protective shield containing heavy metal the output bremsstrahlung can be reduced. The amount of gamma rays that succeed to penetrate the shield is 4 times less compared to aluminum. The shields under study have the thicknesses of 5.95 and 6.2 mm. A comparative analysis of homogeneous and multilayered protective coatings of the same chemical composition has been performed. A heterogeneous protective shield has been found to be advantageous in weight and shielding properties over its homogeneous counterparts and aluminum. The dose characteristics and transmittance were calculated by the Monte Carlo method. The results of our study lead us to conclude that a three-layer boron carbide shield provides the most effective protection from radiation. This shield ensures twice as low absorbed dose and 4 times less the number of penetrated gamma-ray photons compared to its aluminum analogue. Moreover, a heterogeneous shield will have a weight 10% lighter than aluminum, with the same attenuation coefficient of the electron flux. Such heterogeneous shields can be used to protect spacecraft launched to geostationary orbit. Furthermore, a protective boron-containing and

  10. Radiation Shielding at High-Energy Electron and Proton Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokni, Sayed H.; /SLAC; Cossairt, J.Donald; /Fermilab; Liu, James C.; /SLAC

    2007-12-10

    The goal of accelerator shielding design is to protect the workers, general public, and the environment against unnecessary prompt radiation from accelerator operations. Additionally, shielding at accelerators may also be used to reduce the unwanted background in experimental detectors, to protect equipment against radiation damage, and to protect workers from potential exposure to the induced radioactivity in the machine components. The shielding design for prompt radiation hazards is the main subject of this chapter.

  11. Nutrient Shielding in Clusters of Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Lavrentovich, Maxim O; Nelson, David R

    2013-01-01

    Cellular nutrient consumption is influenced by both the nutrient uptake kinetics of an individual cell and the cells' spatial arrangement. Large cell clusters or colonies have inhibited growth at the cluster's center due to the shielding of nutrients by the cells closer to the surface. We develop an effective medium theory that predicts a thickness $\\ell$ of the outer shell of cells in the cluster that receives enough nutrient to grow. The cells are treated as partially absorbing identical spherical nutrient sinks, and we identify a dimensionless parameter $\

  12. Self-shielding clumps in starburst clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Palouš, Jan; Ehlerová, Soňa; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Young and massive star clusters above a critical mass form thermally unstable clumps reducing locally the temperature and pressure of the hot 10$^{7}$~K cluster wind. The matter reinserted by stars, and mass loaded in interactions with pristine gas and from evaporating circumstellar disks, accumulate on clumps that are ionized with photons produced by massive stars. We discuss if they may become self-shielded when they reach the central part of the cluster, or even before it, during their free fall to the cluster center. Here we explore the importance of heating efficiency of stellar winds.

  13. Nanoscale microwave microscopy using shielded cantilever probes

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, Keji

    2011-04-21

    Quantitative dielectric and conductivity mapping in the nanoscale is highly desirable for many research disciplines, but difficult to achieve through conventional transport or established microscopy techniques. Taking advantage of the micro-fabrication technology, we have developed cantilever-based near-field microwave probes with shielded structures. Sensitive microwave electronics and finite-element analysis modeling are also utilized for quantitative electrical imaging. The system is fully compatible with atomic force microscope platforms for convenient operation and easy integration of other modes and functions. The microscope is ideal for interdisciplinary research, with demonstrated examples in nano electronics, physics, material science, and biology.

  14. Radiation-Shielding Polymer/Soil Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Subhayu

    2007-01-01

    It has been proposed to fabricate polymer/ soil composites primarily from extraterrestrial resources, using relatively low-energy processes, with the original intended application being that habitat structures constructed from such composites would have sufficient structural integrity and also provide adequate radiation shielding for humans and sensitive electronic equipment against the radiation environment on the Moon and Mars. The proposal is a response to the fact that it would be much less expensive to fabricate such structures in situ as opposed to transporting them from Earth.

  15. Cerrobend shielding stents for buccal carcinoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karma Yangchen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Buccal carcinoma is one of the most common oral malignant neoplasms, especially in the South Asian region. Radiotherapy, which plays a significant role in the treatment of this carcinoma, has severe adverse effects. Different types of prosthesis may be constructed to protect healthy tissues from the adverse effects of treatment and concentrate radiation in the region of the tumor mass. However, the technique for fabrication of shielding stent with Lipowitz's alloy (cerrobend/Wood's alloy has not been well documented. This article describes detailed technique for fabrication of such a stent for unilateral buccal carcinoma patients to spare the unaffected oral cavity from potential harmful effects associated with radiotherapy.

  16. Geochronologic data for the Arabian Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrich, Lyman Thomas; Brown, G.F.; Hedge, Carl; Marvin, Richard

    1978-01-01

    The radiometric ages reported below were completed during the period 1957-1936. the rock samples were provided and examined petrographically by Glen F. Brown and his associates at the U.S. Geological Survey. The 25 Rb-Sr ages of biotites and feldspars and the 25 K-Ar ages of biotites, hornblendes, and total rock samples constituted the initial suite of ages for the Arabian Shield. Zircons in the quantity required for analysis were not found in any of the rocks examined.

  17. Space Shuttle Orbiter AFT heat shield seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkover, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    The evolution of the orbiter aft heat shield seal (AHSS) design, which involved advancing mechanical seal technology in severe thermal environment is discussed. The baseline design, various improvements for engine access, and technical problem solution are presented. It is a structure and mechanism at the three main propulsion system (MPS) engine interfaces to the aft compartment structure. Access to each MPS engine requires disassembly and removal of the AHSS. Each AHSS accommodates the engine movement, is exposed to an extremely high temperature environment, and is part of the venting control of the aft compartment.

  18. Gamma shielding properties of Tamoxifen drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanberoglu, Gulsah Saydan; Oto, Berna; Gulebaglan, Sinem Erden

    2017-02-01

    Tamoxifen (MW=371 g/mol) is an endocrine therapeutic drug widely prescribed as chemopreventive in women to prevent and to treat all stages of breast cancer. It is also being studied for other types of cancer. In this study, we have calculated some gamma shielding parameters such as mass attenuation coefficient (μρ), effective atomic number (Zeff) and electron density (Nel) for Tamoxifen drug. The values of μρ were calculated using WinXCom computer program and then the values of Zeff and Nel were derived using μρ values in the wide energy range (1 keV - 100 GeV).

  19. InfuShield: a shielded enclosure for administering therapeutic radioisotope treatments using standard syringe pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushforth, Dominic P; Pratt, Brenda E; Chittenden, Sarah J; Murray, Iain S; Causer, Louise; Grey, Matthew J; Gear, Jonathan I; Du, Yong; Flux, Glenn D

    2017-03-01

    The administration of radionuclide therapies presents significant radiation protection challenges. The aim of this work was to develop a delivery system for intravenous radioisotope therapies to substantially moderate radiation exposures to staff and operators. A novel device (InfuShield) was designed and tested before being used clinically. The device consists of a shielded enclosure which contains the therapeutic activity and, through the hydraulic action of back-to-back syringes, allows the activity to be administered using a syringe pump external to the enclosure. This enables full access to the pump controls while simultaneously reducing dose to the operator. The system is suitable for use with all commercially available syringe pumps and does not require specific consumables, maximising both the flexibility and economy of the system. Dose rate measurements showed that at key stages in an I mIBG treatment procedure, InfuShield can reduce dose to operators by several orders of magnitude. Tests using typical syringes and infusion speeds show no significant alteration in administered flow rates (maximum of 1.2%). The InfuShield system provides a simple, safe and low cost method of radioisotope administration.

  20. Mercuric Iodide Anticoincidence Shield for Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to utilize a new detector material, polycrystalline mercuric iodide, for background suppression by active anticoincidence shielding in gamma-ray...

  1. Mercuric Iodide Anticoincidence Shield for Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We utilize a new detector material, polycrystalline mercuric iodide, for background suppression by active anticoincidence shielding in gamma-ray spectrometers. Two...

  2. Graphene shield enhanced photocathodes and methods for making the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Nathan Andrew

    2014-09-02

    Disclosed are graphene shield enhanced photocathodes, such as high QE photocathodes. In certain embodiments, a monolayer graphene shield membrane ruggedizes a high quantum efficiency photoemission electron source by protecting a photosensitive film of the photocathode, extending operational lifetime and simplifying its integration in practical electron sources. In certain embodiments of the disclosed graphene shield enhanced photocathodes, the graphene serves as a transparent shield that does not inhibit photon or electron transmission but isolates the photosensitive film of the photocathode from reactive gas species, preventing contamination and yielding longer lifetime.

  3. Polyolefin-Nanocrystal Composites for Radiation Shielding Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — EIC Laboratories Inc. is proposing a lightweight multifunctional polymer/nanoparticle composite for radiation shielding during long-duration lunar missions. Isolated...

  4. Gravity Scaling of a Power Reactor Water Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Robert S.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2008-01-01

    Water based reactor shielding is being considered as an affordable option for use on initial lunar surface power systems. Heat dissipation in the shield from nuclear sources must be rejected by an auxiliary thermal hydraulic cooling system. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection between the core surface and an array of thermosyphon radiator elements. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design has been previously evaluated at lower power levels (Pearson, 2007). The current baseline assumes that 5.5 kW are dissipated in the water shield, the preponderance on the core surface, but with some volumetric heating in the naturally circulating water as well. This power is rejected by a radiator located above the shield with a surface temperature of 370 K. A similarity analysis on a water-based reactor shield is presented examining the effect of gravity on free convection between a radiation shield inner vessel and a radiation shield outer vessel boundaries. Two approaches established similarity: 1) direct scaling of Rayleigh number equates gravity-surface heat flux products, 2) temperature difference between the wall and thermal boundary layer held constant on Earth and the Moon. Nussult number for natural convection (laminar and turbulent) is assumed of form Nu = CRa(sup n). These combined results estimate similarity conditions under Earth and Lunar gravities. The influence of reduced gravity on the performance of thermosyphon heat pipes is also examined.

  5. Technique for high axial shielding factor performance of large-scale, thin, open-ended, cylindrical Metglas magnetic shields

    CERN Document Server

    Malkowski, S; Hona, B; Mattie, C; Woods, D; Yan, H; Plaster, B; 10.1063/1.3605665

    2011-01-01

    Metglas 2705M is a low-cost commercially-available, high-permeability Cobalt-based magnetic alloy, provided as a 5.08-cm wide and 20.3-$\\mu$m thick ribbon foil. We present an optimized construction technique for single-shell, large-scale (human-size), thin, open-ended cylindrical Metglas magnetic shields. The measured DC axial and transverse magnetic shielding factors of our 0.61-m diameter and 1.83-m long shields in the Earth's magnetic field were 267 and 1500, for material thicknesses of only 122 $\\mu$m (i.e., 6 foil layers). The axial shielding performance of our single-shell Metglas magnetic shields, obtained without the use of magnetic shaking techniques, is comparable to the performance of significantly thicker, multiple-shell, open-ended Metglas magnetic shields in comparable-magnitude, low-frequency applied external fields reported previously in the literature.

  6. Crack tip shielding and anti-shielding effects of parallel cracks for a superconductor slab under an electromagnetic force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Zhi Wen; Zhou, You He [Ministry of Education, Singapore (China); Lee, Kang Yong [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    In this letter, the shielding or anti-shielding effect is firstly applied to obtain the behavior of two parallel cracks in a two-dimensional type-II superconducting under electromagnetic force. Fracture analysis is performed by the finite element method and the magnetic behavior of superconductor is described by the critical state Bean model. The stress intensity factors at the crack tips can be obtained and discussed for decreasing field after zero-field cooling. The shielding or anti-shielding effect at the crack tips depend on the distance between two parallel cracks and the crack length. The results indicate that the shielding effects of the two parallel cracks increase when the distance between the two parallel cracks decreases. It can be also obtained that the superconductors with shorter cracks has more remarkable shielding effect than those with longer cracks.

  7. Fetal shielding combined with state of the art CT dose reduction strategies during maternal chest CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterson, Leslie C., E-mail: lch088@mail.usask.ca [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Saskatchewan (Canada); Leswick, David A.; Fladeland, Derek A. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Saskatchewan (Canada); Hunt, Megan M.; Webster, Stephen [Saskatchewan Ministry of Labour Relations and Workplace Safety (Canada); Lim, Hyun [Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Custom bismuth-antimony shields were previously shown to reduce fetal dose by 53% on an 8DR (detector row) CT scanner without dynamic adaptive section collimation (DASC), automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) or adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR). The purpose of this study is to compare the effective maternal and average fetal organ dose reduction both with and without bismuth-antimony shields on a 64DR CT scanner using DASC, ATCM and ASiR during maternal CTPA. Materials and methods: A phantom with gravid prosthesis and a bismuth-antimony shield were used. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) measured fetal radiation dose. The average fetal organ dose and effective maternal dose were determined using 100 kVp, scanning from the lung apices to the diaphragm utilizing DASC, ATCM and ASiR on a 64DR CT scanner with and without shielding in the first and third trimester. Isolated assessment of DASC was done via comparing a new 8DR scan without DASC to a similar scan on the 64DR with DASC. Results: Average third trimester unshielded fetal dose was reduced from 0.22 mGy ± 0.02 on the 8DR to 0.13 mGy ± 0.03 with the conservative 64DR protocol that included 30% ASiR, DASC and ATCM (42% reduction, P < 0.01). Use of a shield further reduced average third trimester fetal dose to 0.04 mGy ± 0.01 (69% reduction, P < 0.01). The average fetal organ dose reduction attributable to DASC alone was modest (6% reduction from 0.17 mGy ± 0.02 to 0.16 mGy ± 0.02, P = 0.014). First trimester fetal organ dose on the 8DR protocol was 0.07 mGy ± 0.03. This was reduced to 0.05 mGy ± 0.03 on the 64DR protocol without shielding (30% reduction, P = 0.009). Shields further reduced this dose to below accurately detectable levels. Effective maternal dose was reduced from 4.0 mSv on the 8DR to 2.5 mSv on the 64DR scanner using the conservative protocol (38% dose reduction). Conclusion: ASiR, ATCM and DASC combined significantly reduce effective maternal and fetal

  8. An Entropy-Assisted Shielding Function in DDES Formulation for the SST Turbulence Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Zhou

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The intent of shielding functions in delayed detached-eddy simulation methods (DDES is to preserve the wall boundary layers as Reynolds-averaged Navier–Strokes (RANS mode, avoiding possible modeled stress depletion (MSD or even unphysical separation due to grid refinement. An entropy function fs is introduced to construct a DDES formulation for the k-ω shear stress transport (SST model, whose performance is extensively examined on a range of attached and separated flows (flat-plate flow, circular cylinder flow, and supersonic cavity-ramp flow. Two more forms of shielding functions are also included for comparison: one that uses the blending function F2 of SST, the other which adopts the recalibrated shielding function fd_cor of the DDES version based on the Spalart-Allmaras (SA model. In general, all of the shielding functions do not impair the vortex in fully separated flows. However, for flows including attached boundary layer, both F2 and the recalibrated fd_cor are found to be too conservative to resolve the unsteady flow content. On the other side, fs is proposed on the theory of energy dissipation and independent on from any particular turbulence model, showing the generic priority by properly balancing the need of reserving the RANS modeled regions for wall boundary layers and generating the unsteady turbulent structures in detached areas.

  9. Optimization of Shielded Scintillator for Neutron Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belancourt, Patrick; Morrison, John; Akli, Kramer; Freeman, Richard; High Energy Density Physics Team

    2011-10-01

    The High Energy Density Physics group is interested in the basic science of creating a neutron and gamma ray source. The neutrons and gamma rays are produced by accelerating ions via a laser into a target and creating fusion neutrons and gamma rays. A scintillator and photomultiplier tube will be used to detect these neutrons. Neutrons and photons produce ionizing radiation in the scintillator which then activates metastable states. These metastable states have both short and long decay rates. The initial photon count is orders of magnitude higher than the neutron count and poses problems for accurately detecting the neutrons due to the long decay state that is activated by the photons. The effects of adding lead shielding on the temporal response and signal level of the neutron detector will be studied in an effort to minimize the photon count without significant reduction to the temporal resolution of the detector. MCNP5 will be used to find the temporal response and energy deposition into the scintillator by adding lead shielding. Results from the simulations will be shown. Optimization of our scintillator neutron detection system is needed to resolve the neutron energies and neutron count of a novel neutron and gamma ray source.

  10. Enhanced radiation shielding with galena concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadad Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new concrete, containing galena mineral, with enhanced shielding properties for gamma sources is developed. To achieve optimized shielding properties, ten types of galena concrete containing different mixing ratios and a reference normal concrete of 2300 kg/m3 density are studied experimentally and numerically using Monte Carlo and XCOM codes. For building galena concrete, in addition to the main composition, micro-silica and water, galena mineral (containing lead were used. The built samples have high density of 4470 kg/m3 to 5623 kg/m3 and compressive strength of 628 kg/m2 to 685 kg/m2. The half and tenth value layers (half value layer and tenth value layers for the galena concrete, when irradiated with 137Cs gamma source, were found to be 1.45 cm and 4.94 cm, respectively. When irradiated with 60Co gamma source, half value layer was measured to be 2.42 cm. The computation modeling by FLUKA and XCOM shows a good agreement between experimental and computational results.

  11. A superconducting shield to protect astronauts

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    The CERN Superconductors team in the Technology department is involved in the European Space Radiation Superconducting Shield (SR2S) project, which aims to demonstrate the feasibility of using superconducting magnetic shielding technology to protect astronauts from cosmic radiation in the space environment. The material that will be used in the superconductor coils on which the project is working is magnesium diboride (MgB2), the same type of conductor developed in the form of wire for CERN for the LHC High Luminosity Cold Powering project.   Image: K. Anthony/CERN. Back in April 2014, the CERN Superconductors team announced a world-record current in an electrical transmission line using cables made of the MgB2 superconductor. This result proved that the technology could be used in the form of wire and could be a viable solution for both electrical transmission for accelerator technology and long-distance power transportation. Now, the MgB2 superconductor has found another application: it wi...

  12. Discussion on variance reduction technique for shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekawa, Fujio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    As the task of the engineering design activity of the international thermonuclear fusion experimental reactor (ITER), on 316 type stainless steel (SS316) and the compound system of SS316 and water, the shielding experiment using the D-T neutron source of FNS in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has been carried out. However, in these analyses, enormous working time and computing time were required for determining the Weight Window parameter. Limitation or complication was felt when the variance reduction by Weight Window method of MCNP code was carried out. For the purpose of avoiding this difficulty, investigation was performed on the effectiveness of the variance reduction by cell importance method. The conditions of calculation in all cases are shown. As the results, the distribution of fractional standard deviation (FSD) related to neutrons and gamma-ray flux in the direction of shield depth is reported. There is the optimal importance change, and when importance was increased at the same rate as that of the attenuation of neutron or gamma-ray flux, the optimal variance reduction can be done. (K.I.)

  13. Technique and results of cartilage shield tympanoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohil I Vadiya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Use of cartilage for repair of tympanic membrane is recommended by many otologists. The current study aims at evaluating results of cartilage shield tympanoplasty in terms of graft take up and hearing outcomes. Material and Methods: In the current study, cartilage shield tympanoplasty(CST is used in ears with high risk perforations of the tympanic membrane. A total of 40 ears were selected where type I CST was done in 30 ears and type III CST was done in 10 ears. Results: An average of 37.08 dB air bone gap(ABG was present in pre operative time and an average of 19.15 dB of ABG was observed at 6 months after the surgery with hearing gain of 17.28 dB on average was observed. Graft take up rate of 97.5% was observed. The technique is modified to make it easier and to minimize chances of lateralization of graft. Conclusion: The hearing results of this technique are comparable to other methods of tympanic membrane repair.

  14. The AA disappearing under concrete shielding

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1982-01-01

    When the AA started up in July 1980, the machine stood freely in its hall, providing visitors with a view through the large window in the AA Control Room. The target area, in which the high-intensity 26 GeV/c proton beam from the PS hit the production target, was heavily shielded, not only towards the outside but also towards the AA-Hall. However, electrons and pions emanating from the target with the same momentum as the antiprotons, but much more numerous, accompanied these through the injection line into the AA ring. The pions decayed with a half-time corresponding to approximately a revolution period (540 ns), whereas the electrons lost energy through synchrotron radiation and ended up on the vacuum chamber wall. Electrons and pions produced the dominant component of the radiation level in the hall and the control room. With operation times far exceeding original expectations, the AA had to be buried under concrete shielding in order to reduce the radiation level by an order of magnitude.

  15. Design considerations for a Space Station radiation shield for protection from both man-made and natural sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolch, Wesley E.; Peddicord, K. Lee; Felsher, Harry; Smith, Simon

    1994-12-01

    This study was conducted to analyze scenarios involving the use of nuclear-power vehicles in the vicinity of a manned Space Station (SS) in low-earth-orbit (LEO) to quantify their radiological impact to the station crew. In limiting the radiant dose to crew members, mission planners may (1) shut the reactor down prior to reentry, (2) position the vehicle at a prescribed parking distance, and (3) deploy radiation shield about the shutdown reactor. The current report focuses on the third option in which point-kernel gamma-ray shielding calculations were performed for a variety of shield configurations for both nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) and nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) vehicles. For a returning NTR vehicle, calculations indicate that a 14.9 MT shield would be needed to limit the integrated crew exposure to no more than 0.05 Sv over a period of six months (25 percent of the allowable exposure to man-made radiation sources). During periods of low vehicular activity in LEO, the shield may be redeployed about the SS habitation module in order to decrease crew exposures to trapped proton radiations by approximately a factor of 10. The corresponding shield mass required for deployment at a returning NEP vehicle is 2.21 MT. Additional scenarios examined include the radioactivation of various metals as might be found in tools used in EVA activities.

  16. 3-dimensional shielding design for a spallation neutron source facility in the high-intensity proton accelerator project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Masaya; Maekawa, Fujio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    Evaluation of shielding performance for a 1 MW spallation neutron source facility in the Materials and Life Science Facility being constructed in the High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Project (J-PARC) is important from a viewpoint of radiation safety and optimization of arrangement of components. This report describes evaluated results for the shielding performance with modeling three-dimensionally whole structural components including gaps between them in detail. A Monte Carlo calculation method with MCNPX2.2.6 code and LA-150 library was adopted. Streaming and void effects, optimization of shield for cost reduction and optimization of arrangement of structures such as shutters were investigated. The streaming effects were investigated quantitatively by changing the detailed structure of components and gap widths built into the calculation model. Horizontal required shield thicknesses were ranged from about 6.5 m to 7.5 m as a function of neutron beam line angles. A shutter mechanism for a horizontal neutron reflectometer that was directed downward was devised, and it was shown that the shielding performance of the shutter was acceptable. An optimal biological shield configuration was finally determined according to the calculated results. (author)

  17. Design and validation of a large-format transition edge sensor array magnetic shielding system for space application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, A.; van Weers, H. J.; Bruineman, C.; Dhallé, M. M. J.; Krooshoop, H. J. G.; ter Brake, H. J. M.; Ravensberg, K.; Jackson, B. D.; Wafelbakker, C. K.

    2016-10-01

    The paper describes the development and the experimental validation of a cryogenic magnetic shielding system for transition edge sensor based space detector arrays. The system consists of an outer mu-metal shield and an inner superconducting niobium shield. First, a basic comparison is made between thin-walled mu-metal and superconducting shields, giving an off-axis expression for the field inside a cup-shaped superconductor as a function of the transverse external field. Starting from these preliminary analytical considerations, the design of an adequate and realistic shielding configuration for future space flight applications (either X-IFU [D. Barret et al., e-print arXiv:1308.6784 [astro-ph.IM] (2013)] or SAFARI [B. Jackson et al., IEEE Trans. Terahertz Sci. Technol. 2, 12 (2012)]) is described in more detail. The numerical design and verification tools (static and dynamic finite element method (FEM) models) are discussed together with their required input, i.e., the magnetic-field dependent permeability data. Next, the actual manufacturing of the shields is described, including a method to create a superconducting joint between the two superconducting shield elements that avoid flux penetration through the seam. The final part of the paper presents the experimental verification of the model predictions and the validation of the shield's performance. The shields were cooled through the superconducting transition temperature of niobium in zero applied magnetic field (<10 nT) or in a DC field with magnitude ˜100 μT, applied either along the system's symmetry axis or perpendicular to it. After cool-down, DC trapped flux profiles were measured along the shield axis with a flux-gate magnetometer and the attenuation of externally applied AC fields (100 μT, 0.1 Hz, both axial and transverse) was verified along this axis with superconducting quantum interference device magnetometers. The system's measured on-axis shielding factor is greater than 106, well exceeding

  18. Quantum Cavity Optomechanics with Phononic Bandgap Shielded Silicon Nitride Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, William Hvidtfelt Padkær

    Cavity optomechanics, a field which has matured tremendously over the last decade,has conclusively reached the quantum regime. Noteworthy experimentalachievements include cooling of the vibrational motion of macroscopic objects tothe quantum ground state, the observation of shot noise of radiation...... two highly reflective mirrors, all of which are embedded in a helium flowcryostat. In order to reach truly quantum territory, severe shielding of the membranefrom the environment is required, as well as meticulous concern for auxiliarysources of noise, both from the laser and mirrors used.The purpose...... of this thesis is to document the development of the experimentfrom its initial stages to its final quantum enabled incarnation, as well as to providethe necessary theoretical machinery to interpret the experimental results. A strongemphasis is placed on the unique challenges posed by our unique monolithic...

  19. Fiber optic temperature profiling for thermal protection heat shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Richard J.; Costa, Joannes M.; Moslehi, Behzad; Zarnescu, Livia; Hackney, Drew; Peters, Kara

    2014-04-01

    Reliable Thermal Protection System (TPS) sensors are needed to achieve better designs for spacecraft (probe) heatshields for missions requiring atmospheric aero-capture or entry/reentry. In particular, they will allow both reduced risk and heat-shield mass minimization, which will facilitate more missions and allow increased payloads and returns. For thermal measurements, Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS) is providing a temperature monitoring system involving innovative lightweight, EMI-immune, high-temperature resistant Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors with a thermal mass near that of TPS materials together with fast FBG sensor interrogation. The IFOS fiber optic sensing technology is highly sensitive and accurate. It is also low-cost and lends itself to high-volume production. Multiple sensing FBGs can be fabricated as arrays on a single fiber for simplified design and reduced cost. In this paper, we provide experimental results to demonstrate the temperature monitoring system using multi-sensor FBG arrays embedded in small-size Super-Light Ablator (SLA) coupon, which was thermally loaded to temperatures in the vicinity of the SLA charring temperature. In addition, a high temperature FBG array was fabricated and tested for 1000°C operation.

  20. The value of thyroid shielding in intraoral radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazenoot, Bart; Sanderink, Gerard C H; Berkhout, W Erwin R

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the utility of the application of a thyroid shield in intraoral radiography when using rectangular collimation. Methods: Experimental data were obtained by measuring the absorbed dose at the position of the thyroid gland in a RANDO® (The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) male phantom with a dosemeter. Four protocols were tested: round collimation and rectangular collimation, both with and without thyroid shield. Five exposure positions were deployed: upper incisor (Isup), upper canine (Csup), upper premolar (Psup), upper molar (Msup) and posterior bitewing (BW). Exposures were made with 70 kV and 7 mA and were repeated 10 times. The exposure times were as recommended for the exposure positions for the respective collimator type by the manufacturer for digital imaging. The data were statistically analyzed with a three-way ANOVA test. Significance was set at p Isup, thyroid dose levels were comparable with both collimators at a level indicating primary beam exposure. Thyroid shield reduced this dose with circa 75%. For the Csup position, round collimation also revealed primary beam exposure, and thyroid shield yield was 70%. In Csup with rectangular collimation, the thyroid dose was reduced with a factor 4 compared with round collimation and thyroid shield yielded an additional 42% dose reduction. The thyroid dose levels for the Csup, Psup, Msup and BW exposures were lower with rectangular collimation without thyroid shield than with round collimation with thyroid shield. With rectangular collimation, the thyroid shield in Psup, Msup and BW reduced the dose 10% or less, where dose levels were already low, implying no clinical significance. Conclusions: For the exposures in the upper anterior region, thyroid shield results in an important dose reduction for the thyroid. For the other exposures, thyroid shield augments little to the reduction achieved by rectangular collimation. The use of thyroid shield is to be advised, when performing

  1. FEPs Screening of Processes and Issues in Drip Shield and Waste Package Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Mon

    2004-10-11

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of features, events and processes (FEPs) with respect to drip shield and waste package modeling used to support the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). Thirty-three FEPs associated with the waste package and drip shield performance have been identified (DTN: MO0407SEPFEPLA.000 [DIRS 170760]). A screening decision, either ''included'' or ''excluded,'' has been assigned to each FEP, with the technical bases for screening decisions, as required by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 156605]. The FEPs analyses in this report address issues related to the degradation and potential failure of the drip shield and waste package over the post closure regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. For included FEPs, this report summarizes the disposition of the FEP in TSPA-LA. For excluded FEPs, this report provides the technical bases for the screening arguments for exclusion from TSPA-LA. The analyses are for the TSPA-LA base-case design (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]), where a drip shield is placed over the waste package without backfill over the drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]). Each FEP includes one or more specific issues, collectively described by a FEP name and description. The FEP description encompasses a single feature, event, or process, or a few closely related or coupled processes, provided the entire FEP can be addressed by a single specific screening argument or TSPA-LA disposition. The FEPs were assigned to associated Project reports, so the screening decisions reside with the relevant subject-matter experts.

  2. Investigation into the effects of lead shielding for fetal dose reduction in CT pulmonary angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, E V; Iball, G R; Brettle, D S

    2007-08-01

    This work aims to determine whether lead shielding can be used to decrease the radiation dose to the fetus during CT scans for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism during early stage pregnancy. An anthropomorphic phantom was modified to contain a 15 cc ionization chamber at the site of the uterus to enable fetal dose to be measured. The effects of a range of scan parameters, positioning of lead and thicknesses of lead were investigated. Fetal dose was lower with lower values of kV(p) and mAs. An increasing thickness of lead decreased the radiation dose to the uterus, as did increasing the proportion of the patient covered by the lead shielding. Fetal dose increased exponentially as the edge of the scan volume moved closer to the point of measurement. In no experiment was the dose to the fetus increased by the presence of the lead. It was found that the fetal radiation dose from a CT scan following a pulmonary embolism protocol can be effectively reduced by the use of lead shielding.

  3. An anticoincidence-shielded gamma-ray spectrometer for analysis of low level environmental radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Jong In; Choi, Yun Ho; Kwak, Seung Im; Hwang, Han-Yull; Chung, Kun-Ho; Choi, Geun Sik; Park, Doo-Won; Lee, Chang Woo

    2003-05-01

    We developed an ultralow-level background gamma-ray spectrometer, using active and passive shield devices at the same time. Cosmic-ray-induced background is suppressed by means of active shield devices consisting of plastic scintillating plates of 50mm thick and anti-coincidence electronic system. The observed background rate was 0.34 s(-1) (=0.12s(-1) per 100 cm(3) Ge volume) for energy regions between 50 and 3000 ke V. The detection efficiency curve for 10(3)ml Marinelli beaker samples is obtained over all the energy regions. The advantages of the method are demonstrated by measuring the activity of 137Cs in powdered milk sample prepared without taking any chemical procedure. The MDA for 137Cs is estimated to be (17+/-1.7)mBq at a confidence level of 95% and it is about a factor of 10 lower than the MDA obtained from the previous cryostat assembly with 10-cm thick lead shielding.

  4. The magnetic shielding for the neutron decay spectrometer aSPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konrad, Gertrud, E-mail: gkonrad@ati.ac.at [Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik, Staudingerweg 7, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Technische Universität Wien, Atominstitut, Stadionallee 2, A-1020 Wien (Austria); Ayala Guardia, Fidel [Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik, Staudingerweg 7, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Baeßler, Stefan [Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik, Staudingerweg 7, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); University of Virginia, Department of Physics, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Borg, Michael [Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik, Staudingerweg 7, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Glück, Ferenc [Institute for Nuclear Physics (IKP), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, P.O.B. 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Wigner Research Institute for Physics, P.O.B. 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Heil, Werner [Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik, Staudingerweg 7, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Hiebel, Stefan [Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik, Staudingerweg 7, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Sekels GmbH, Dieselstraße 6, D-61239 Ober-Mörlen (Germany); Muñoz Horta, Raquel; Sobolev, Yury [Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik, Staudingerweg 7, D-55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2014-12-11

    Many experiments in nuclear and neutron physics are confronted with the problem that they use a superconducting magnetic spectrometer which potentially affects other experiments by their stray magnetic field. The retardation spectrometer aSPECT consists, inter alia, of a superconducting magnet system that produces a strong longitudinal magnetic field of up to 6.2 T. In order not to disturb other experiments in the vicinity of aSPECT, we had to develop a magnetic field return yoke for the magnet system. While the return yoke must reduce the stray magnetic field, the internal magnetic field and its homogeneity should not be affected. As in many cases, the magnetic shielding for aSPECT must manage with limited space. In addition, we must ensure that the additional magnetic forces on the magnet coils are not destructive. In order to determine the most suitable geometry for the magnetic shielding for aSPECT, we simulated a variety of possible geometries and combinations of shielding materials of non-linear permeability. The results of our simulations were checked through magnetic field measurements both with Hall and nuclear magnetic resonance probes. The experimental data are in good agreement with the simulated values: the mean deviation from the simulated exterior magnetic field is (−1.7±4.8)%. However, in the two critical regions, the internal magnetic field deviates by 0.2% (decay volume) and <1×10{sup −4} (analyzing plane) from the simulated values.

  5. A geological synthesis of the Precambrian shield in Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Robert D.; Roig, J.Y.; Moine, B.; Delor, C.; Peters, S.G.

    2014-01-01

    Available U–Pb geochronology of the Precambrian shield of Madagascar is summarized and integrated into a synthesis of the region’s geological history. The shield is described in terms of six geodynamic domains, from northeast to southwest, the Bemarivo, Antongil–Masora, Antananarivo, Ikalamavony, Androyan–Anosyan, and Vohibory domains. Each domain is defined by distinctive suites of metaigneous rocks and metasedimentary groups, and a unique history of Archean (∼2.5 Ga) and Proterozoic (∼1.0 Ga, ∼0.80 Ga, and ∼0.55 Ga) reworking. Superimposed within and across these domains are scores of Neoproterozoic granitic stocks and batholiths as well as kilometer long zones of steeply dipping, highly strained rocks that record the effects of Gondwana’s amalgamation and shortening in latest Neoproterozoic time (0.560–0.520 Ga). The present-day shield of Madagascar is best viewed as part of the Greater Dharwar Craton, of Archean age, to which three exotic terranes were added in Proterozoic time. The domains in Madagascar representing the Greater Dharwar Craton include the Antongil–Masora domain, a fragment of the Western Dharwar of India, and the Neoarchean Antananarivo domain (with its Tsaratanana Complex) which is broadly analogous to the Eastern Dharwar of India. In its reconstructed position, the Greater Dharwar Craton consists of a central nucleus of Paleo-Mesoarchean age (>3.1 Ga), the combined Western Dharwar and Antongil–Masora domain, flanked by mostly juvenile “granite–greenstone belts” of Neoarchean age (2.70–2.56 Ga). The age of the accretionary event that formed this craton is approximately 2.5–2.45 Ga. The three domains in Madagascar exotic to the Greater Dharwar Craton are the Androyan–Anosyan, Vohibory, and Bemarivo. The basement to the Androyan–Anosyan domain is a continental terrane of Paleoproterozoic age (2.0–1.78 Ga) that was accreted to the southern margin (present-day direction) of the Greater Dharwar Craton in pre

  6. 小型屏蔽体屏蔽效能测试系统全向辐射源设计%The design of omnidirectional radiated source for small shield shielding effectiveness tests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江岩; 钱时祥

    2013-01-01

    针对较小体积的屏蔽体,按照内置辐射法测量屏蔽效能,需将信号源和天线内置到屏蔽体内部.为了将信号源和天线集组合成辐射源,天线的尺寸与信号源的体积是辐射源设计的重要因素.介绍一种基于振荡源激励梳状波发生器获得宽频带的微波信号,结合盘锥天线,实现1~10 GHz频率范围内多频点、高稳定、全方位特性小型辐射源的设计.在屏蔽效能测试系统中,该辐射源作为发射部分,可实现小型屏蔽体的屏蔽效能测量.%For the small size shield, the test of shielding effectiveness in built-in radiation mode needs to set the signal source and the antenna into the shield. In order to combine the source and antenna into the radiation source,the size of the antenna and the volume of the signal source is the important factor in the design of radiant source. This paper introduces a design of small radiant source which based on the oscillator incentive comb generator for the wideband signal and combined with the plate cone antenna,realize such characteristic as the multiple frequency point,high stability and multimode in the frequency range of l~10 GHz. In the shielding effectiveness test system,the radiation source as the emission part, the system can realize the shielding effectiveness test of small shield.

  7. Evidence for bacterially generated hydrocarbon gas in Canadian shield and fennoscandian shield rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood Lollar, B.; Frape, S. K.; Fritz, P.; Macko, S. A.; Welhan, J. A.; Blomqvist, R.; Lahermo, P. W.

    1993-12-01

    Hydrocarbon-rich gases found in crystalline rocks on the Canadian and Fennoscandian shields are isotopically and compositionally similar, suggesting that such gases are a characteristic feature of Precambrian Shield rocks. Gases occure in association with saline groundwaters and brines in pressurized "pockets" formed by sealed fracture systems within the host rocks. When released by drilling activities, gas pressures as high as 5000 kPa have been recorded. Typical gas flow rates for individual boreholes range from 0.25 L/min to 4 L/min. The highest concentrations of CH 4 are found in the deepest levels of the boreholes associated with CaNaCl (and NaCaCl) brines. N 2 is the second major component of the gases and with CH 4 accounts for up to 80 to >90 vol%. Higher hydrocarbon (C 2+) concentrations range from C2 = C3) ratios from 10-1000. Isotopically the gases show a wide range of values overall ( σ 13C = -57.5 to -41.1%; σ D = -245 to -470‰ ) but a relatively tight cluster of values within each sampling locality. The Enonkoski Mine methanes are unique with σ 13C values between -65.4 and -67.3‰ and σD values between -297 and -347‰. The shield gases are not readily reconcilable with conventional theories of methanogenesis. The range of C1/(C2 + C3) ratios for the shield gases is too low to be consistent with an entirely bacterial origin. In addition, σD CH 4 values are in general too depleted in the heavy isotope to be produced by thermogenic methanogenesis or by secondary alteration processes such as bacterial oxidation or migration. However, isotopic and compositional evidence indicates that bacterially derived gas can account for a significant component of the gas at all shield sites. Conventional bacterial gas accounts for 75-94 vol% of the occurrences at Enonkoski Mine in Finland. At each of the other shield sites, bacterial gas can account for up to 30-50 vol% of the total gas accumulation. This study and other recent evidence of active

  8. Open Rotor Noise Shielding by Blended-Wing-Body Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yueping; Czech, Michael J.; Thomas, Russell H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of open rotor noise shielding by Blended Wing Body (BWB) aircraft by using model scale test data acquired in the Boeing Low Speed Aeroacoustic Facility (LSAF) with a legacy F7/A7 rotor model and a simplified BWB platform. The objective of the analysis is the understanding of the shielding features of the BWB and the method of application of the shielding data for noise studies of BWB aircraft with open rotor propulsion. By studying the directivity patterns of individual tones, it is shown that though the tonal energy distribution and the spectral content of the wind tunnel test model, and thus its total noise, may differ from those of more advanced rotor designs, the individual tones follow directivity patterns that characterize far field radiations of modern open rotors, ensuring the validity of the use of this shielding data. Thus, open rotor tonal noise shielding should be categorized into front rotor tones, aft rotor tones and interaction tones, not only because of the different directivities of the three groups of tones, but also due to the differences in their source locations and coherence features, which make the respective shielding characteristics of the three groups of tones distinctly different from each other. To reveal the parametric trends of the BWB shielding effects, results are presented with variations in frequency, far field emission angle, rotor operational condition, engine installation geometry, and local airframe features. These results prepare the way for the development of parametric models for the shielding effects in prediction tools.

  9. 30 CFR 57.14213 - Ventilation and shielding for welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ventilation and shielding for welding. 57.14213... welding. (a) Welding operations shall be shielded when performed at locations where arc flash could be hazardous to persons. (b) All welding operations shall be well-ventilated....

  10. Shield-related signal instability in magnetoresistive heads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamoto, K.; Narumi, S.; Kawabe, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Fukui, H.

    1999-04-01

    Magnetoresistive (MR) heads with various upper shield materials were fabricated and their read-write performance was tested to clarify the shield-related effect on the signal instability in MR heads. Comparison of a head with an upper shield layer of higher magnetostriction and one with lower magnetostriction showed that the latter had better stability in the output signal of a repeated read-write test. The output amplitude of a head with an upper shield layer of Co52Ni27Fe21 film, which had a high magnetostriction of about +3×10-6, was varied by applying a low external longitudinal field, which affected just the shield layers. This change in the output corresponded well to the output variation in the repeated read-write test. The spin scanning electron micrograph image of this head revealed a distinct domain wall in the air bearing surface near the MR sensor. These results indicated that instability of the domain structure in a shield layer was one of the causes of the signal instability in MR heads; an unusual bias field from a domain wall of the shield layer, which could be moved easily by a repeated writing operation, caused a variation in the biased state of the MR layer which resulted in the signal variation, and that low magnetostriction was required for a shield material to achieve a stable head.

  11. Performance study of galactic cosmic ray shield materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Wilson, John W.; Thibeault, Sheila A.; Nealy, John E.; Badavi, Francis F.; Kiefer, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    The space program is faced with two difficult radiation protection issues for future long-term operations. First, retrofit of shield material or conservatism in shield design is prohibitively expensive and often impossible. Second, shielding from the cosmic heavy ions is faced with limited knowledge on the physical properties and biological responses of these radiations. The current status of space shielding technology and its impact on radiation health is discussed herein in terms of conventional protection practice and a test biological response model. The impact of biological response on the selection of optimum materials for cosmic ray shielding is presented in terms of the transmission characteristics of the shield material. Although the systematics of nuclear cross sections are able to demonstrate the relation of exposure risk to shield-material composition, the current uncertainty in-nuclear cross sections will not allow an accurate evaluation of risk reduction. This paper presents a theoretical study of risk-related factors and a pilot experiment to study the effectiveness of choice of shield materials to reduce the risk in space operations.

  12. Estimation of Temperature Patterns in Multiply-Shielded Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1953-01-01

    convenient model to use in estimating the contribution of end radiation to variations in the temnerature natterns of a shield system. The ratio TJ ATw...radiation ma- be imoortant. The cuantitative influence of convection, radiation, the number of shields, etc. on the thermoccuole readina may be seen

  13. Gonad shielding in paediatric pelvic radiography: disadvantages prevail over benefit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frantzen, M.J.; Robben, S.; Postma, A.A.; Zoetelief, J.; Wildberger, J.E.; Kemerink, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To re-evaluate gonad shielding in paediatric pelvic radiography in terms of attainable radiation risk reduction and associated loss of diagnostic information. Methods A study on patient dose and the quality of gonad shielding was performed retrospectively using 500 pelvic radiographs of ch

  14. Preliminary review of Precambrian Shield rocks for potential waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yardley, D.H.; Goldich, S.S.

    1975-11-01

    This review of the Canadian Shield is primarily concerned with the part (such as in the Lake Superior region) that is seismically the least active of the North American continent. The crystalline metamorphic and igneous rocks of the more stable elements of the shield provide excellent possibilities for dry excavations suitable for long-term storage of radioactive waste materials. (DLC)

  15. Late Proterozoic extensional collapse in the Arabian-Nubian Shield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blasband, B.B.; White, S.H.; Brooijmans, P.; Boorder, H. de; Visser, W.

    2000-01-01

    A structural and petrological study of the Late Proterozoic rocks in the Wadi Kid area, Sinai, Egypt indicates the presence of an extensional metamorphic core complex in the northern Arabian–Nubian Shield. Gneissic domes throughout the Arabian–Nubian Shield resemble the core complex of the Wadi Kid

  16. Volume Entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Astuti, Valerio; Rovelli, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Building on a technical result by Brunnemann and Rideout on the spectrum of the Volume operator in Loop Quantum Gravity, we show that the dimension of the space of the quadrivalent states --with finite-volume individual nodes-- describing a region with total volume smaller than $V$, has \\emph{finite} dimension, bounded by $V \\log V$. This allows us to introduce the notion of "volume entropy": the von Neumann entropy associated to the measurement of volume.

  17. Distribution and size of lava shields on the Al Haruj al Aswad and the Al Haruj al Abyad Volcanic Systems, Central Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshaafi, Abdelsalam; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2017-05-01

    The Al Haruj Volcanic Province (AHVP) consists of two distinct volcanic systems. In the north is the system of Al Haruj al Aswad, covering an area of 34,200 km2, while in the south the system of Al Haruj al Abyad, covering an area of 7,850 km2. The systems have produced some 432 monogenetic volcanoes, primarily scoria (cinder) cones, lava shields, and maars. The density distribution of the volcanoes in each system, plotted as eruption points or sites, has a roughly elliptical surface expression, suggesting similar plan-view geometry of the magma sources, here suggested as deep-seated reservoirs. More specifically, the Al Haruj al Aswad magma reservoir has major and minor axes of 210 km and 119 km, respectively, and an area of 19,176 km2, the corresponding figures for the Haruj al Abyad reservoir being 108 km and 74 km, for the axes, and 6209 km2 for the area. We measured 55 lava shields on the AHVP. They are mostly restricted to the northern and southern parts of AHVP and date from late Miocene to (at least) the end of Pleistocene, while some may have been active into Holocene. In fact, although primarily monogenetic, some of the lava shields show evidence of (possibly Holocene) fissure eruptions in the summit parts. The early lava shields tend to be located at the edges of volcanic systems and with greater volumes than later (more central) shields. The average lava shield basal diameter is 4.5 km and height 63 m. There is strong linear correlation between lava shield volume and basal area, the coefficient of determination (R2) being about 0.75. When 22 Holocene Icelandic lava shields are added to the dataset, for comparison, the correlation between volume and basal area becomes R2 = 0.95. Numerical models suggest that the local stress fields favoured rupture and dyke injection at the margins of the source reservoirs during late Miocene - early Pliocene, in agreement with the distribution of the early, large-volume shields.

  18. Prediction of Thermophysical and Thermomechanical Characteristics of Porous Carbon-Ceramic Composite Materials of the Heat Shield of Aerospace Craft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznik, S. V.; Prosuntsov, P. V.; Mikhailovskii, K. V.

    2015-05-01

    A procedure for predicting thermophysical and thermomechanical characteristics of porous carbon-ceramic composite materials of the heat shield of aerospace craft as functions of the type of reinforcement, porosity of the structure, and the characteristics of the material's components has been developed. Results of mathematical modeling of the temperature and stressed-strained states of representative volume elements for determining the characteristics of a carbon-ceramic composite material with account taken of its anisotropy have been given.

  19. Quasi-Static Magnetic Field Shielding Using Longitudinal Mu-Near-Zero Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipworth, Guy; Ensworth, Joshua; Seetharam, Kushal; Lee, Jae Seung; Schmalenberg, Paul; Nomura, Tsuyoshi; Reynolds, Matthew S.; Smith, David R.; Urzhumov, Yaroslav

    2015-08-01

    The control of quasi-static magnetic fields is of considerable interest in applications including the reduction of electromagnetic interference (EMI), wireless power transfer (WPT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The shielding of static or quasi-static magnetic fields is typically accomplished through the use of inherently magnetic materials with large magnetic permeability, such as ferrites, used sometimes in combination with metallic sheets and/or active field cancellation. Ferrite materials, however, can be expensive, heavy and brittle. Inspired by recent demonstrations of epsilon-, mu- and index-near-zero metamaterials, here we show how a longitudinal mu-near-zero (LMNZ) layer can serve as a strong frequency-selective reflector of magnetic fields when operating in the near-field region of dipole-like sources. Experimental measurements with a fabricated LMNZ sheet constructed from an artificial magnetic conductor - formed from non-magnetic, conducting, metamaterial elements - confirm that the artificial structure provides significantly improved shielding as compared with a commercially available ferrite of the same size. Furthermore, we design a structure to shield simultaneously at the fundamental and first harmonic frequencies. Such frequency-selective behavior can be potentially useful for shielding electromagnetic sources that may also generate higher order harmonics, while leaving the transmission of other frequencies unaffected.

  20. [Shielding evaluation of lead-free board for diagnostic X-rays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Yoh; Tsukada, Masaru; Mita, Sogo; Fukushi, Masahiro; Nyui, Yoshiyuki; Abe, Shinji; Kimura, Junichi

    2010-12-20

    For physical foundation data used in the shielding calculation of structural facilities such as a radiation room, there are air kerma transmissions concerning the thickness of shielding objects, and half value layers and tenth value layers concerning a greatly attenuated wide X-ray beam. Accordingly, we evaluated the above-mentioned items with a lead-free board, which is mixed sulfuric acid calcium and barium sulfate with equiponderance for the amount of sulfuric acid calcium included in the usual plasterboard. Permeability in NCRP Report 147 is expressed by 3 parameters, α, β and γ, and shielding objects x. It showed that it corresponds to the measurement point and permeability curve with parameters, α, β and γ obtained by nonlinear regression analysis. Furthermore, we calculated the half value layer and tenth value layer concerning the greatly attenuated wide X-ray beam. The evaluated lead-free board, used in this examination, is useful as the shielding material for the diagnosis X-ray and, moreover, the partition wall materials are hard enough, with a board that is even heavier than the usual plaster board. Besides, the use of lead-free materials is friendly to the general environment.

  1. Nanostructured composite layers for electromagnetic shielding in the GHz frequency range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suchea, M. [Center of Materials Technology and Photonics, School of Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Chemistry and Physics, “Al.I. Cuza” University of Iasi, Iasi (Romania); Tudose, I.V. [Chemistry and Physics, “Al.I. Cuza” University of Iasi, Iasi (Romania); Center of Materials Technology and Photonics, School of Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Tzagkarakis, G. [Center of Materials Technology and Photonics, School of Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Electrical Engineering Department, School of Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Kenanakis, G. [Center of Materials Technology and Photonics, School of Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Institute of Electronic Structure & Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology (FORTH) Hellas, Heraklion (Greece); Katharakis, M. [Center of Materials Technology and Photonics, School of Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Drakakis, E. [Electrical Engineering Department, School of Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Koudoumas, E., E-mail: koudoumas@staff.teicrete.gr [Center of Materials Technology and Photonics, School of Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Electrical Engineering Department, School of Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion (Greece)

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Paint-like nanocomposite layers consisting of graphene nanoplatelets, PANI:HCl and PEDOT:PSS present very effective attenuation of electromagnetic radiation in the frequency range 4–20 GHz. • The shielding performance is based mostly on the graphene nanoplatelets and supported by PANI:HCl. In contrast, PEDOT:PSS plays mainly the role of the binder. • Increasing resistivity was observed to reduce the shielding effect, while increasing thickness to favor it. - Abstract: We report on preliminary results regarding the applicability of nanostructured composite layers for electromagnetic shielding in the frequency range of 4–20 GHz. Various combinations of materials were employed including poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), polyaniline, graphene nanoplatelets, carbon nanotubes, Cu nanoparticles and Poly(vinyl alcohol). As shown, paint-like nanocomposite layers consisting of graphene nanoplatelets, polyaniline PEDOT:PSS and Poly(vinyl alcohol) can offer quite effective electromagnetic shielding, similar or even better than that of commercial products, the response strongly depending on their thickness and resistivity.

  2. Fuel Burnup and Fuel Pool Shielding Analysis for Bushehr Nuclear Reactor VVER-1000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadad, Kamal; Ayobian, Navid

    Bushehr Nuclear power plant (BNPP) is currently under construction. The VVER-1000 reactor will be loaded with 126 tons of about 4% enriched fuel having 3-years life cycle. The spent fuel (SF) will be transferred into the spent fuel pool (SPF), where it stays for 8 years before being transferred to Russia. The SPF plays a crucial role during 8 years when the SP resides in there. This paper investigates the shielding of this structure as it is designed to shield the SF radiation. In this study, the SF isotope inventory, for different cycles and with different burnups, was calculated using WIMS/4D transport code. Using MCNP4C nuclear code, the intensity of γ rays was obtained in different layers of SFP shields. These layers include the water above fuel assemblies (FA) in pool, concrete wall of the pool and water laid above transferring fuels. Results show that γ rays leakage from the shield in the mentioned layers are in agreement with the plant's PSAR data. Finally we analyzed an accident were the water height above the FA in the pool drops to 47 cm. In this case it was observed that exposure dose above pool, 10 and 30 days from the accident, are still high and in the levels of 1000 and 758 R/hr.

  3. Shielding data for hadron-therapy ion accelerators: Attenuation of secondary radiation in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosteo, S.; Mereghetti, A.; Sagia, E.; Silari, M.

    2014-01-01

    The secondary radiation field produced by seven different ion species (from hydrogen to nitrogen), impinging onto thick targets made of either iron or ICRU tissue, was simulated with the FLUKA Monte Carlo code, and transported through thick concrete shields: the ambient dose equivalent was estimated and shielding parameters evaluated. The energy for each ion beam was set in order to reach a maximum penetration in ICRU tissue of 290 mm (equivalent to the therapeutic range of 430 MeV/amu carbon ions). Source terms and attenuation lengths are given as a function of emission angle and ion species, along with fits to the Monte Carlo data, for shallow depth and deep penetration in the shield. Trends of source terms and attenuation lengths as a function of neutron emission angle and ion species impinging on target are discussed. A comparison of double differential distributions of neutrons with results from similar simulation works reported in the literature is also included. The aim of this work is to provide shielding data for the design of future light-ion radiation therapy facilities.

  4. Quasi-Static Magnetic Field Shielding Using Longitudinal Mu-Near-Zero Metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipworth, Guy; Ensworth, Joshua; Seetharam, Kushal; Lee, Jae Seung; Schmalenberg, Paul; Nomura, Tsuyoshi; Reynolds, Matthew S; Smith, David R; Urzhumov, Yaroslav

    2015-08-03

    The control of quasi-static magnetic fields is of considerable interest in applications including the reduction of electromagnetic interference (EMI), wireless power transfer (WPT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The shielding of static or quasi-static magnetic fields is typically accomplished through the use of inherently magnetic materials with large magnetic permeability, such as ferrites, used sometimes in combination with metallic sheets and/or active field cancellation. Ferrite materials, however, can be expensive, heavy and brittle. Inspired by recent demonstrations of epsilon-, mu- and index-near-zero metamaterials, here we show how a longitudinal mu-near-zero (LMNZ) layer can serve as a strong frequency-selective reflector of magnetic fields when operating in the near-field region of dipole-like sources. Experimental measurements with a fabricated LMNZ sheet constructed from an artificial magnetic conductor - formed from non-magnetic, conducting, metamaterial elements - confirm that the artificial structure provides significantly improved shielding as compared with a commercially available ferrite of the same size. Furthermore, we design a structure to shield simultaneously at the fundamental and first harmonic frequencies. Such frequency-selective behavior can be potentially useful for shielding electromagnetic sources that may also generate higher order harmonics, while leaving the transmission of other frequencies unaffected.

  5. Shielding data for hadron-therapy ion accelerators: Attenuation of secondary radiation in concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agosteo, S. [Polytechnic of Milano, Department of Energy, Via Ponzio 34/3, 20133 Milano (Italy); Mereghetti, A. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); University of Manchester, Physics and Astronomy Department, Brunswick Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Sagia, E. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Physics Department, National Technical University of Athens, 9 Heroon Polytechniou, GR 157 80 Athens (Greece); Silari, M., E-mail: marco.silari@cern.ch [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2014-01-15

    The secondary radiation field produced by seven different ion species (from hydrogen to nitrogen), impinging onto thick targets made of either iron or ICRU tissue, was simulated with the FLUKA Monte Carlo code, and transported through thick concrete shields: the ambient dose equivalent was estimated and shielding parameters evaluated. The energy for each ion beam was set in order to reach a maximum penetration in ICRU tissue of 290 mm (equivalent to the therapeutic range of 430 MeV/amu carbon ions). Source terms and attenuation lengths are given as a function of emission angle and ion species, along with fits to the Monte Carlo data, for shallow depth and deep penetration in the shield. Trends of source terms and attenuation lengths as a function of neutron emission angle and ion species impinging on target are discussed. A comparison of double differential distributions of neutrons with results from similar simulation works reported in the literature is also included. The aim of this work is to provide shielding data for the design of future light-ion radiation therapy facilities.

  6. Radiation attenuation by lead and nonlead materials used in radiation shielding garments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, J P; Shen, H; Downton, B; Mainegra-Hing, E

    2007-02-01

    The attenuating properties of several types of lead (Pb)-based and non-Pb radiation shielding materials were studied and a correlation was made of radiation attenuation, materials properties, calculated spectra and ambient dose equivalent. Utilizing the well-characterized x-ray and gamma ray beams at the National Research Council of Canada, air kerma measurements were used to compare a variety of commercial and pre-commercial radiation shielding materials over mean energy ranges from 39 to 205 keV. The EGSnrc Monte Carlo user code cavity. cpp was extended to provide computed spectra for a variety of elements that have been used as a replacement for Pb in radiation shielding garments. Computed air kerma values were compared with experimental values and with the SRS-30 catalogue of diagnostic spectra available through the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine Report 78. In addition to garment materials, measurements also included pure Pb sheets, allowing direct comparisons to the common industry standards of 0.25 and 0.5 mm "lead equivalent." The parameter "lead equivalent" is misleading, since photon attenuation properties for all materials (including Pb) vary significantly over the energy spectrum, with the largest variations occurring in the diagnostic imaging range. Furthermore, air kerma measurements are typically made to determine attenuation properties without reference to the measures of biological damage such as ambient dose equivalent, which also vary significantly with air kerma over the diagnostic imaging energy range. A single material or combination cannot provide optimum shielding for all energy ranges. However, appropriate choice of materials for a particular energy range can offer significantly improved shielding per unit mass over traditional Pb-based materials.

  7. Regional seismic hazard for Revithoussa, Greece: an earthquake early warning Shield and selection of alert signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Xu

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The feasibility of an earthquake early warning Shield in Greece is being explored as a European demonstration project. This will be the first early warning system in Europe. The island of Revithoussa is a liquid natural gas storage facility near Athens from which a pipeline runs to a gas distribution centre in Athens. The Shield is being centred on these facilities. The purpose here is to analyze seismicity and seismic hazard in relation to the Shield centre and the remote sensor sites in the Shield network, eventually to help characterize the hazard levels, seismic signals and ground vibration levels that might be observed or create an alert situation at a station. Thus this paper mainly gives estimation of local seismic hazard in the regional working area of Revithoussa by studying extreme peak ground acceleration (PGA and magnitudes. Within the Shield region, the most important zone to be detected is WNW from the Shield centre and is at a relatively short distance (50 km or less, the Gulf of Corinth (active normal faults region. This is the critical zone for early warning of strong ground shaking. A second key region of seismicity is at an intermediate distance (100 km or more from the centre, the Hellenic seismic zone south or southeast from Peloponnisos. A third region to be detected would be the northeastern region from the centre and is at a relatively long distance (about 150 km, Lemnos Island and neighboring region. Several parameters are estimated to characterize the seismicity and hazard. These include: the 50-year PGA with 90% probability of not being exceeded (pnbe using Theodulidis & Papazachos strong motion attenuation for Greece, PGANTP; the 50-year magnitude and also at the 90% pnbe, M50 and MP50, respectively. There are also estimates of the earthquake that is most likely to be felt at a damaging intensity level, these are the most perceptible earthquakes at intensities VI, VII and VIII with magnitudes MVI, MVII and MVIII

  8. SU-C-16A-07: Sculpting Isodose Lines: Design of An Internally Shielded Tandem for Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, M; Yue, N; Zou, J [Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Mo, X [21st Century Oncology, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: With the prescription method moving from point A to 3D volume based in cervical cancer HDR brachytherapy, the traditional pear-shaped isodose lines are desired to be sculptured to conform to the irregular shaped target. The standard single channel tandem cannot generate asymmetric isodose lines. Most of the directionally shielded sources proposed in literature are challenging to manufacture and operate. In this study, we proposed a novel internally shielded tandem applicator design which gave users more freedom to manipulate isodose lines while planning. Methods: The proposed tandem design has one centrally located lead cylindrical rod of 8 mm in diameter serving as the internal shield. Multiple source channels with the diameter of 2 mm are evenly spaced and engraved on the central cylindrical rod. The overall diameter of the tandem with polymer encapsulation was kept to be 10 mm. Various number of channels and engraving depths have been tested in the design process. Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit was used for dose calculation assuming a Varian VS2000 source was placed inside the applicator. A Monte Carlo based planning system has been developed in-house to generate brachytherapy plans. Test plans by using this internally shielded tandem were generated for 3 clinical cases. Results: Water phantom results shown the dose distribution from a VS2000 source in the tandem was strongly distorted towards one direction due to the presence of shielding material. Conformal plans with asymmetric isodose distributions around the tandem can be generated by optimizing dwell times in different channels. Conclusion: An effective and easy-to-use internally shielded tandem was developed. It gave user the freedom to sculpt isodose lines to generate conformal plans for cervical cancer brachytherapy.

  9. Design of ITER vacuum vessel in-wall shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X., E-mail: xiaoyu.wang@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Ioki, K. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Morimoto, M. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, 1-1, Wadasaki-cho 1-chome, Hyogo-ku, Kobe (Japan); Choi, C.H.; Utin, Y.; Sborchia, C. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); TaiLhardat, O. [Assystem EOS, ZAC SAINT MARTIN, 23 rue Benjamin Franklin, 84120 Pertuis (France); Mille, B.; Terasawa, A.; Gribov, Y.; Barabash, V.; Polunovskiy, E.; Dani, S. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Pathak, H.; Raval, J. [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382025 (India); Liu, S.; Lu, M.; Du, S. [Institute of Plasma Physics, China Academy of Sciences, Shushanhu Road 350, Hefei (China)

    2014-10-15

    The ITER vacuum vessel is a torus-shaped, double wall structure. The space between the double walls of the VV is filled with in-wall shielding (IWS) and cooling water. The main purpose of the in-wall shielding is to provide neutron shielding together with the blanket and VV shells and water during ITER plasma operation and to reduce the ripple of the Toroidal magnetic field. Based on ITER vacuum vessel structure and related requirements, in-wall shielding are designed as about 8900 individual blocks with different sizes and several different materials distributed over nine vessel sectors and nine field joints of vessel sectors. This paper presents the design of the IWS, considering loads, structural stresses and assembly method, and also shows neutron shielding effect and TF ripple reduced by the IWS.

  10. Electromagnetic interference shielding with 2D transition metal carbides (MXenes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Faisal; Alhabeb, Mohamed; Hatter, Christine B.; Anasori, Babak; Man Hong, Soon; Koo, Chong Min; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-09-01

    Materials with good flexibility and high conductivity that can provide electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding with minimal thickness are highly desirable, especially if they can be easily processed into films. Two-dimensional metal carbides and nitrides, known as MXenes, combine metallic conductivity and hydrophilic surfaces. Here, we demonstrate the potential of several MXenes and their polymer composites for EMI shielding. A 45-micrometer-thick Ti3C2Tx film exhibited EMI shielding effectiveness of 92 decibels (>50 decibels for a 2.5-micrometer film), which is the highest among synthetic materials of comparable thickness produced to date. This performance originates from the excellent electrical conductivity of Ti3C2Tx films (4600 Siemens per centimeter) and multiple internal reflections from Ti3C2Tx flakes in free-standing films. The mechanical flexibility and easy coating capability offered by MXenes and their composites enable them to shield surfaces of any shape while providing high EMI shielding efficiency.

  11. Transparent Metal-Salt-Filled Polymeric Radiation Shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, David; Lennhoff, John; Harris, George

    2003-01-01

    "COR-RA" (colorless atomic oxygen resistant -- radiation shield) is the name of a transparent polymeric material filled with x-ray-absorbing salts of lead, bismuth, cesium, and thorium. COR-RA is suitable for use in shielding personnel against bremsstrahlung radiation from electron-beam welding and industrial and medical x-ray equipment. In comparison with lead-foil and leaded-glass shields that give equivalent protection against x-rays (see table), COR-RA shields are mechanically more durable. COR-RA absorbs not only x-rays but also neutrons and rays without adverse effects on optical or mechanical performance. The formulation of COR-RA with the most favorable mechanical-durability and optical properties contains 22 weight percent of bismuth to absorb x-rays, plus 45 atomic percent hydrogen for shielding against neutrons.

  12. Magnetic shielding and exotic spin-dependent interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kimball, D F Jackson; Li, Y; Thulasi, S; Pustelny, S; Budker, D; Zolotorev, M

    2016-01-01

    Experiments searching for exotic spin-dependent interactions typically employ magnetic shielding between the source of the exotic field and the interrogated spins. We explore the question of what effect magnetic shielding has on detectable signals induced by exotic fields. Our general conclusion is that for common experimental geometries and conditions, magnetic shields should not significantly reduce sensitivity to exotic spin-dependent interactions, especially when the technique of comagnetometry is used. However, exotic fields that couple to electron spin can induce magnetic fields in the interior of shields made of a soft ferro- or ferrimagnetic material. This induced magnetic field must be taken into account in the interpretation of experiments searching for new spin-dependent interactions and raises the possibility of using a flux concentrator inside magnetic shields to amplify exotic spin-dependent signals.

  13. Verification of some building materials as gamma-ray shields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Kulwinder Singh; Singla, Jyoti; Kumar, Vipan; Sidhu, G S

    2012-08-01

    The shielding properties for gamma rays of a few low Z materials were investigated. The values of the mass attenuation coefficient, equivalent atomic number, effective atomic number, exposure buildup factor and energy absorption buildup factor were calculated and used to estimate the shielding effectiveness of the samples under investigation. It has been observed that the shielding effectiveness of a sample is directly related to its effective atomic number. The shielding character of any sample is a function of the incident photon energy. Good shielding behaviour has been verified in soil samples in the photon energy region of 0.015-0.30 MeV and of dolomite in 3-15 MeV. The results have been shown graphically with more useful conclusions.

  14. Radiation fields from neutron generators shielded with different materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichester, D. L.; Blackburn, B. W.

    2007-08-01

    As a general guide for assessing radiological conditions around a DT neutron generator numerical modeling has been performed to assess neutron and photon dose profiles for a variety of shield materials ranging from 1 to 100 cm thick. In agreement with accepted radiation safety practices high-Z materials such as bismuth and lead have been found to be ineffective biological shield materials, owing in part to the existence of (n,2n) reaction channels available with 14.1 MeV DT neutrons, while low-Z materials serve as effective shields for these sources. Composite materials such as a mixture of polyethylene and bismuth, or regular concrete, are ideal shield materials for neutron generator radiation because of their ability to attenuate internally generated photon radiation resulting from neutron scattering and capture within the shields themselves.

  15. Shielding Area Optimization Under the Solution of Interconnect Crosstalk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Ci Cai; Xin Zhao; Qiang Zhou; Xian-Long Hong

    2005-01-01

    As the technology advances into deep sub-micron era, crosstalk reduction is of paramount importance for signal integrity. Simultaneous shield insertion and net ordering (SINO) has been shown to be effective to reduce both capacitive and inductive couplings. As it introduces extra shields, area minimization is also critical for an efficient SINO algorithm.In this paper, three novel algorithms using fewer shields to solve crosstalk reduction problem with RLC noise constraint are proposed, namely, net coloring (NC), efficient middle shield insertion (EMSI) and NC+EMSI two-step algorithm. Compared with the corresponding algorithms in previous work, these algorithms can reduce shielding area up to 25.77%, 46.19%, and7.17%, respectively, with short runtime.

  16. A Micromachined Piezoresistive Pressure Sensor with a Shield Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Gang; Wang, Xiaoping; Xu, Yong; Liu, Sheng

    2016-08-13

    This paper presents a piezoresistive pressure sensor with a shield layer for improved stability. Compared with the conventional piezoresistive pressure sensors, the new one reported in this paper has an n-type shield layer that covers p-type piezoresistors. This shield layer aims to minimize the impact of electrical field and reduce the temperature sensitivity of piezoresistors. The proposed sensors have been successfully fabricated by bulk-micromachining techniques. A sensitivity of 0.022 mV/V/kPa and a maximum non-linearity of 0.085% FS are obtained in a pressure range of 1 MPa. After numerical simulation, the role of the shield layer has been experimentally investigated. It is demonstrated that the shield layer is able to reduce the drift caused by electrical field and ambient temperature variation.

  17. Thes - Website for Thermal Shields Upgrade Management

    CERN Document Server

    Micula, Adina

    2013-01-01

    There are a total of 1695 thermal shields (TS) in the interconnections between the superconducting magnets. During LHC Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) all of these TS are being upgraded with a new fixation design. This procedure involves the transport of all the TS from LHC to a workshop on the surface where they are being modified and the subsequent transport of the upgraded TS back to the tunnel where they are laid on the cryostats and await the closure of the interconnection. These operations have to be carefully coordinated in order to ensure that there are always enough modified TS to satisfy the demand in the tunnel and respect the time constraint imposed by the schedule of LS1. As part of my summer project, I developed a database driven website whose aim is to enable the TS upgrade monitoring.

  18. SHIELD: Neutral Gas Kinematics and Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    McNichols, Andrew T; Nims, Elise; Cannon, John M; Adams, Elizabeth A K; Bernstein-Cooper, Elijah Z; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P; Józsa, Gyula I G; McQuinn, Kristen B W; Salzer, John J; Skillman, Evan D; Warren, Steven R; Dolphin, Andrew; Elson, E C; Haurberg, Nathalie; Ott, Jürgen; Saintonge, Amelie; Cave, Ian; Hagen, Cedric; Huang, Shan; Janowiecki, Steven; Marshall, Melissa V; Thomann, Clara M; Van Sistine, Angela

    2016-01-01

    We present kinematic analyses of the 12 galaxies in the "Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs" (SHIELD). We use multi-configuration interferometric observations of the HI 21cm emission line from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to produce image cubes at a variety of spatial and spectral resolutions. Both two- and three-dimensional fitting techniques are employed in an attempt to derive inclination-corrected rotation curves for each galaxy. In most cases, the comparable magnitudes of velocity dispersion and projected rotation result in degeneracies that prohibit unambiguous circular velocity solutions. We thus make spatially resolved position-velocity cuts, corrected for inclination using the stellar components, to estimate the circular rotation velocities. We find circular velocities <30 km/s for the entire survey population. Baryonic masses are calculated using single-dish HI fluxes from Arecibo and stellar masses derived from HST and Spitzer imaging. Comparison is made with total dynamical ...

  19. Radiation shielding in dentistry: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, G D; Abbott, P V

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the literature and provide guidelines on the use of radiation protection for patients in the dental setting. There are limited published data on the effects of low radiation doses such as those used in dental radiology. Most of the evidence is subject to bias, with risk models extrapolated from higher dose models such as studies of the Hiroshima bomb survivors. However, the lack of evidence does not denote the absence of risk, as there is no established 'safe' level of radiation exposure. All imaging utilizing ionizing radiation carries a risk for the patient. Hence the patient benefits of imaging must outweigh the potential risk. All diagnostic imaging should adhere to three basic principles, these being justification, optimization and application of dose limits. This article discusses dose reduction techniques and shielding of sensitive organs, particularly the thyroid, during procedures such as intraoral imaging, orthopantomograms and imaging of the pregnant patient. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  20. Scanning electron microscopy of Dalkon Shield tails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bank, H L; Williamson, H O

    1983-09-01

    Scanning electron micrographs of Dalkon Shield tails removed from asymptomatic patients show a variety of microbes and debris throughout their entire length. Apparently, even in undamaged tails, bacterial flora thrive in the protein-rich environment within the multifilament tail. The presence of microbes in the portion of the tail beyond the double knot indicates that an alternative mechanism of microbial transport can occur. Since transient endometritis often occurs immediately after insertion of intrauterine devices, microbes may come in contact with both exposed ends of the multifilament tail and be drawn into the tail by capillary action from the uterine environment down the tail toward the double knot as well as upward from the vagina. Such microorganisms could serve as an inoculum for infection.

  1. Optimized shielding for space radiation protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Kim, M. H.; Schimmerling, W.

    2001-01-01

    Future deep space mission and International Space Station exposures will be dominated by the high-charge and -energy (HZE) ions of the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). A few mammalian systems have been extensively tested over a broad range of ion types and energies. For example, C3H10T1/2 cells, V79 cells, and Harderian gland tumors have been described by various track-structure dependent response models. The attenuation of GCR induced biological effects depends strongly on the biological endpoint, response model used, and material composition. Optimization of space shielding is then driven by the nature of the response model and the transmission characteristics of the given material.

  2. Response to Jakobsson on Human Body Shields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter E. Block

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A grabs B and uses him as a body shield. That is, A hides behind B (A renders B helpless to resist his grasp, and from that vantage point, shoots at C. According to libertarian theory, may B shoot at C, or, is it proper that C pull the trigger at B? In the view of Rothbard (1984, the former is correct: B is entitled to gun down C. In my (Block, forthcoming view, this is incorrect. Rather, it would be lawful to C to properly kill B. (Both Rothbard and I assume that neither B nor C can end A’s reign of terror. Jakobsson (2010 supports the Rothbardian position. The present paper is at an attempt of mine to refute Jakobsson, and, thus, also, Rothbard (1984, once again.

  3. Shielding integral benchmark archive and database (SINBAD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, B.L.; Grove, R.E. [Radiation Safety Information Computational Center RSICC, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6171 (United States); Kodeli, I. [Josef Stefan Inst., Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Gulliford, J.; Sartori, E. [OECD NEA Data Bank, Bd des Iles, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

    2011-07-01

    The shielding integral benchmark archive and database (SINBAD) collection of experiments descriptions was initiated in the early 1990s. SINBAD is an international collaboration between the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development's Nuclear Energy Agency Data Bank (OECD/NEADB) and the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). SINBAD was designed to compile experiments and corresponding computational models with the goal of preserving institutional knowledge and expertise that need to be handed down to future scientists. SINBAD can serve as a learning tool for university students and scientists who need to design experiments or gain expertise in modeling and simulation. The SINBAD database is currently divided into three categories - fission, fusion, and accelerator experiments. Many experiments are described and analyzed using deterministic or stochastic (Monte Carlo) radiation transport software. The nuclear cross sections also play an important role as they are necessary in performing computational analysis. (authors)

  4. Shielding Integral Benchmark Archive and Database (SINBAD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, Bernadette Lugue [ORNL; Grove, Robert E [ORNL; Kodeli, I. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Sartori, Enrico [ORNL; Gulliford, J. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    2011-01-01

    The Shielding Integral Benchmark Archive and Database (SINBAD) collection of benchmarks was initiated in the early 1990 s. SINBAD is an international collaboration between the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development s Nuclear Energy Agency Data Bank (OECD/NEADB) and the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). SINBAD is a major attempt to compile experiments and corresponding computational models with the goal of preserving institutional knowledge and expertise that need to be handed down to future scientists. SINBAD is also a learning tool for university students and scientists who need to design experiments or gain expertise in modeling and simulation. The SINBAD database is currently divided into three categories fission, fusion, and accelerator benchmarks. Where possible, each experiment is described and analyzed using deterministic or probabilistic (Monte Carlo) radiation transport software.

  5. On the accuracy of the Debye shielding

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez-Fuentes, M A

    2012-01-01

    The expression for the Debye shielding in plasma physics is usually derived under the assumptions that the plasma particles are weakly coupled, so their kinetic energy is much larger than the potential energy between them, and that the velocity distributions of the plasma species are Maxwellian. The first assumption also establishes that the plasma parameter ND, the number of particles within a sphere with a Debye radius should be greater than 1, and determines the difference between weakly and strongly coupled plasmas. Under such assumptions, Poisson's equation can be linearised, and a simple analytic expression obtained for the electrostatic potential. However, textbooks rarely discuss the accuracy of this approximation. In this work we compare the linearised solution with the exact one, obtained numerically, and show that the linearisation, which underestimates the exact solution, is reasonably good even for ND ~ 40. We give quantitative criteria to set the limit of the approximation when the number of par...

  6. A questionnaire study about gonadal shield use of urologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Ali Sancaktutar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Our aim is to reflect routines, awareness,and consciousness level of urologists about usage of gonadalshield (GS in Turkey.Materials and methods: Because of this objective aquestionnaire which includes 15 questions was prepared.The questionnaire was delivered to urologists in a TurkishUrology congress. Data derived from 271 urologists byface to face interview were evaluated.Results: Participant were urologists (n=271, consistedof professors (n=33, associate professors (n= 36, assistantprofessors (n= 36, specialists (n=94, and residents(n=81. According to the data obtained from the questionnaires,22% of the participants acquired their first informationabout GS as a medical student, 44% during theirresidency training, and 14% of them had no informationabout GS at all. Besides 64% of them did not read anymedical article about this subject until that time, and 54%them practically hadn’t seen any GS during their urologypractice. In 82% of the hospitals where participants wereworking hadn’t had any GS, and 18% of the urologistshad indicated that GS was available in their hospitals, andthey used them once in a while. Urologists responded favorably(20% or unfavorably (80 % to the question of ‘Doyou find yourself or your colleagues adequately sensitive,and mindful about GS use?Conclusions: Sensitivity and awareness about use ofgonadal shields among Turkish urologists are not at adesired level and for this reason, it is not used widely.The urologists should be informed in urological academicplatforms about gonad protecting devices.Key words: Gonad shield, questionnaire survey, radiation,urologist

  7. Shielding design for a laser-accelerated proton therapy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, J; Luo, W; Fourkal, E; Lin, T; Li, J; Veltchev, I; Ma, C-M

    2007-07-07

    In this paper, we present the shielding analysis to determine the necessary neutron and photon shielding for a laser-accelerated proton therapy system. Laser-accelerated protons coming out of a solid high-density target have broad energy and angular spectra leading to dose distributions that cannot be directly used for therapeutic applications. A special particle selection and collimation device is needed to generate desired proton beams for energy- and intensity-modulated proton therapy. A great number of unwanted protons and even more electrons as a side-product of laser acceleration have to be stopped by collimation devices and shielding walls, posing a challenge in radiation shielding. Parameters of primary particles resulting from the laser-target interaction have been investigated by particle-in-cell simulations, which predicted energy spectra with 300 MeV maximum energy for protons and 270 MeV for electrons at a laser intensity of 2 x 10(21) W cm(-2). Monte Carlo simulations using FLUKA have been performed to design the collimators and shielding walls inside the treatment gantry, which consist of stainless steel, tungsten, polyethylene and lead. A composite primary collimator was designed to effectively reduce high-energy neutron production since their highly penetrating nature makes shielding very difficult. The necessary shielding for the treatment gantry was carefully studied to meet the criteria of head leakage shield neutrons and an outer layer of lead was used to reduce photon dose from neutron capture and electron bremsstrahlung. It is shown that the two-layer shielding design with 10-12 cm thick polyethylene and 4 cm thick lead can effectively absorb the unwanted particles to meet the shielding requirements.

  8. Shielding design for a laser-accelerated proton therapy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, J.; Luo, W.; Fourkal, E.; Lin, T.; Li, J.; Veltchev, I.; Ma, C.-M.

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, we present the shielding analysis to determine the necessary neutron and photon shielding for a laser-accelerated proton therapy system. Laser-accelerated protons coming out of a solid high-density target have broad energy and angular spectra leading to dose distributions that cannot be directly used for therapeutic applications. A special particle selection and collimation device is needed to generate desired proton beams for energy- and intensity-modulated proton therapy. A great number of unwanted protons and even more electrons as a side-product of laser acceleration have to be stopped by collimation devices and shielding walls, posing a challenge in radiation shielding. Parameters of primary particles resulting from the laser-target interaction have been investigated by particle-in-cell simulations, which predicted energy spectra with 300 MeV maximum energy for protons and 270 MeV for electrons at a laser intensity of 2 × 1021 W cm-2. Monte Carlo simulations using FLUKA have been performed to design the collimators and shielding walls inside the treatment gantry, which consist of stainless steel, tungsten, polyethylene and lead. A composite primary collimator was designed to effectively reduce high-energy neutron production since their highly penetrating nature makes shielding very difficult. The necessary shielding for the treatment gantry was carefully studied to meet the criteria of head leakage shield neutrons and an outer layer of lead was used to reduce photon dose from neutron capture and electron bremsstrahlung. It is shown that the two-layer shielding design with 10-12 cm thick polyethylene and 4 cm thick lead can effectively absorb the unwanted particles to meet the shielding requirements.

  9. A user`s manual for MASH 1.0: A Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.O. [ed.

    1992-03-01

    The Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System, MASH, calculates neutron and gamma-ray environments and radiation protection factors for armored military vehicles, structures, trenches, and other shielding configurations by coupling a forward discrete ordinates air-over-ground transport calculation with an adjoint Monte Carlo treatment of the shielding geometry. Efficiency and optimum use of computer time are emphasized. The code system include the GRTUNCL and DORT codes for air-over-ground transport calculations, the MORSE code with the GIFT5 combinatorial geometry package for adjoint shielding calculations, and several peripheral codes that perform the required data preparations, transformations, and coupling functions. MASH is the successor to the Vehicle Code System (VCS) initially developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The discrete ordinates calculation determines the fluence on a coupling surface surrounding the shielding geometry due to an external neutron/gamma-ray source. The Monte Carlo calculation determines the effectiveness of the fluence at that surface in causing a response in a detector within the shielding geometry, i.e., the ``dose importance`` of the coupling surface fluence. A coupling code folds the fluence together with the dose importance, giving the desired dose response. The coupling code can determine the dose response a a function of the shielding geometry orientation relative to the source, distance from the source, and energy response of the detector. This user`s manual includes a short description of each code, the input required to execute the code along with some helpful input data notes, and a representative sample problem (input data and selected output edits) for each code.

  10. A user's manual for MASH 1. 0: A Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.O. (ed.)

    1992-03-01

    The Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System, MASH, calculates neutron and gamma-ray environments and radiation protection factors for armored military vehicles, structures, trenches, and other shielding configurations by coupling a forward discrete ordinates air-over-ground transport calculation with an adjoint Monte Carlo treatment of the shielding geometry. Efficiency and optimum use of computer time are emphasized. The code system include the GRTUNCL and DORT codes for air-over-ground transport calculations, the MORSE code with the GIFT5 combinatorial geometry package for adjoint shielding calculations, and several peripheral codes that perform the required data preparations, transformations, and coupling functions. MASH is the successor to the Vehicle Code System (VCS) initially developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The discrete ordinates calculation determines the fluence on a coupling surface surrounding the shielding geometry due to an external neutron/gamma-ray source. The Monte Carlo calculation determines the effectiveness of the fluence at that surface in causing a response in a detector within the shielding geometry, i.e., the dose importance'' of the coupling surface fluence. A coupling code folds the fluence together with the dose importance, giving the desired dose response. The coupling code can determine the dose response a a function of the shielding geometry orientation relative to the source, distance from the source, and energy response of the detector. This user's manual includes a short description of each code, the input required to execute the code along with some helpful input data notes, and a representative sample problem (input data and selected output edits) for each code.

  11. SHIELD 1.0: development of a shielding calculator program in diagnostic radiology; SHIELD 1.0: desenvolvimento de um programa de calculo de blindagem em radiodiagnostico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Romulo R.; Real, Jessica V.; Luz, Renata M. da [Hospital Sao Lucas (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Friedrich, Barbara Q.; Silva, Ana Maria Marques da, E-mail: ana.marques@pucrs.br [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2013-08-15

    In shielding calculation of radiological facilities, several parameters are required, such as occupancy, use factor, number of patients, source-barrier distance, area type (controlled and uncontrolled), radiation (primary or secondary) and material used in the barrier. The shielding design optimization requires a review of several options about the physical facility design and, mainly, the achievement of the best cost-benefit relationship for the shielding material. To facilitate the development of this kind of design, a program to calculate the shielding in diagnostic radiology was implemented, based on data and limits established by National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 147 and SVS-MS 453/98. The program was developed in C⌗ language, and presents a graphical interface for user data input and reporting capabilities. The module initially implemented, called SHIELD 1.0, refers to calculating barriers for conventional X-ray rooms. The program validation was performed by the comparison with the results of examples of shielding calculations presented in NCRP 147.

  12. Characterization and dosimetry of a practical X-ray alternative to self-shielded gamma irradiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Kishor; Parker, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The Insect Pest Control Laboratory of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture recently purchased an X-ray irradiator as part of their programme to develop the sterile insect technique (SIT). It is a self-contained type with a maximum X-ray beam energy of 150 keV using a newly developed 4 π X-ray tube to provide a very uniform dose to the product. This paper describes the results of our characterization study, which includes determination of dose rate in the centre of a canister as well as establishing absorbed dose distribution in the canister. The irradiation geometry consists of five canisters rotating around an X-ray tube—the volume of each canister being 3.5 l. The dose rate at the maximum allowed power of the tube (about 6.75 kW) in the centre of a canister filled with insects (or a simulated product) is about 14 Gy min -1. The dose uniformity ratio is about 1.3. The dose rate was measured using a Farmer type 0.18-cm 3 ionization chamber calibrated at the relevant low photon energies. Routine absorbed dose measurement and absorbed dose mapping can be performed using a Gafchromic® film dosimetry system. The radiation response of Gafchromic film is almost independent of X-ray energy in the range 100-150 keV, but is very sensitive to the surrounding material with which it is in immediate contact. It is important, therefore, to ensure that all absorbed dose measurements are performed under identical conditions to those used for the calibration of the dosimetry system. Our study indicates that this X-ray irradiator provides a practical alternative to self-shielded gamma irradiators for SIT programmes. Food and Agriculture Organization/International Atomic Energy Agency.

  13. Design of flow chamber with electronic cell volume capability and light detection optics for multilaser flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuette, W H; Shackney, S E; Plowman, F A; Tipton, H W; Smith, C A; MacCollum, M A

    1984-11-01

    A multibeam optical detection system has been developed with a high optical efficiency, achieved through a reduction in the number of optical interfaces employed in the system. This reduction is made possible by a combination of employing simple lenses, gluing the objective lens directly upon the face of the flow cuvette and the extraction of only one fluorescence signal from each laser beam. A modified flow chamber is also described that includes fluidic resistance elements for the elimination of most of the electric shielding normally associated with electronic cell volume measurements.

  14. Flexible neutron shielding composite material of EPDM rubber with boron trioxide: Mechanical, thermal investigations and neutron shielding tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, T.; Güngör, A.; Reyhancan, İ. A.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, EPDM and boron trioxide composite was produced and mechanical, thermal and neutron shielding tests were performed. EPDM rubber (Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer) having a considerably high hydrogen content is an effective neutron shielding material. On the other hand, the materials containing boron components have effective thermal neutron absorption crossection. The composite of EPDM and boron trioxide would be an effective solution for both respects of flexibility and effectiveness for developing a neutron shielding material. Flexible nature of EPDM would be a great asset for the shielding purpose in case of intervention action to a radiation accident. The theoretical calculations and experimental neutron absorption tests have shown that the results were in parallel and an effective neutron shielding has been achieved with the use of the developed composite material.

  15. A Reinforcement for Multifunctional Composites for Non-Parasitic Radiation Shielding Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Innovative lightweight radiation shielding materials are enabling to shield humans in aerospace transportation vehicles and other human habited spaces....

  16. Effects of Breast Shielding during Heart Imaging on DNA Double-Strand-Break Levels: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheezum, Michael K; Redon, Christophe E; Burrell, Allison S; Kaviratne, Anthony S; Bindeman, Jody; Maeda, Daisuke; Balmakhtar, Houria; Pezel, Ashly; Wisniewski, Piotr; Delacruz, Panfilo; Nguyen, Binh; Bonner, William M; Villines, Todd C

    2016-10-01

    Purpose To examine the effect of breast shielding on blood lymphocyte deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-strand-break levels resulting from in vivo radiation and ex vivo radiation at breast-tissue level, and the effect of breast shielding on image quality. Materials and Methods The study was approved by institutional review and commpliant with HIPAA guidelines. Adult women who underwent 64-section coronary computed tomographic (CT) angiography and who provided informed consent were prospectively randomized to the use (n = 50) or absence (n = 51) of bismuth breast shields. Peripheral blood samples were obtained before and 30 minutes after in vivo radiation during CT angiography to compare DNA double-strand-break levels by γ-H2AX immunofluorescence in blood lymphocytes. To estimate DNA double-strand-break induction at breast-tissue level, a blood sample was taped to the sternum for ex vivo radiation with or without shielding. Data were analyzed by linear regression and independent sample t tests. Results Breast shielding had no effect on DNA double-strand-break levels from ex vivo radiation of blood samples under shields at breast-tissue level (unadjusted regression: β = .08; P = .43 versus no shielding), or in vivo radiation of circulating lymphocytes (β = -.07; P = .50). Predictors of increased DNA double-strand-break levels included total radiation dose, increasing tube potential, and tube current (P radiation exposures (median, 3.4 mSv), breast shielding yielded a 33% increase in image noise and 19% decrease in the rate of excellent quality ratings. Conclusion Among women who underwent coronary CT angiography, breast shielding had no effect on DNA double-strand-break levels in blood lymphocytes exposed to in vivo radiation, or ex vivo radiation at breast-tissue level. At present relatively low radiation exposures, breast shielding contributed to an increase in image noise and a decline in image quality. The findings support efforts to minimize radiation by

  17. Design optimization of radiation shielding structure for lead slowing-down spectrometer system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Dong Kim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A lead slowing-down spectrometer (LSDS system is a promising nondestructive assay technique that enables a quantitative measurement of the isotopic contents of major fissile isotopes in spent nuclear fuel and its pyroprocessing counterparts, such as 235U, 239Pu, 241Pu, and, potentially, minor actinides. The LSDS system currently under development at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Daejeon, Korea is planned to utilize a high-flux (>1012 n/cm2·s neutron source comprised of a high-energy (30 MeV/high-current (∼2 A electron beam and a heavy metal target, which results in a very intense and complex radiation field for the facility, thus demanding structural shielding to guarantee the safety. Optimization of the structural shielding design was conducted using MCNPX for neutron dose rate evaluation of several representative hypothetical designs. In order to satisfy the construction cost and neutron attenuation capability of the facility, while simultaneously achieving the aimed dose rate limit (<0.06 μSv/h, a few shielding materials [high-density polyethylene (HDPE–Borax, B4C, and Li2CO3] were considered for the main neutron absorber layer, which is encapsulated within the double-sided concrete wall. The MCNP simulation indicated that HDPE-Borax is the most efficient among the aforementioned candidate materials, and the combined thickness of the shielding layers should exceed 100 cm to satisfy the dose limit on the outside surface of the shielding wall of the facility when limiting the thickness of the HDPE-Borax intermediate layer to below 5 cm. However, the shielding wall must include the instrumentation and installation holes for the LSDS system. The radiation leakage through the holes was substantially mitigated by adopting a zigzag-shape with concrete covers on both sides. The suggested optimized design of the shielding structure satisfies the dose rate limit and can be used for the construction of a facility in the near

  18. Design optimization of radiation shielding structure for lead slowing-down spectrometer system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Dong; Ahn, Sang Joon; Lee, Yong Deok [Nonproliferation System Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chang Je [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    A lead slowing-down spectrometer (LSDS) system is a promising nondestructive assay technique that enables a quantitative measurement of the isotopic contents of major fissile isotopes in spent nuclear fuel and its pyroprocessing counterparts, such as 235U, 239Pu, 241Pu, and, potentially, minor actinides. The LSDS system currently under development at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Daejeon, Korea) is planned to utilize a high-flux (>101{sup 2n}/cm{sup 2}·s) neutron source comprised of a high-energy (30 MeV)/high-current (∼2 A) electron beam and a heavy metal target, which results in a very intense and complex radiation field for the facility, thus demanding structural shielding to guarantee the safety. Optimization of the structural shielding design was conducted using MCNPX for neutron dose rate evaluation of several representative hypothetical designs. In order to satisfy the construction cost and neutron attenuation capability of the facility, while simultaneously achieving the aimed dose rate limit (<0.06 μSv/h), a few shielding materials [high-density polyethylene (HDPE)–Borax, B{sub 4}C, and Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}] were considered for the main neutron absorber layer, which is encapsulated within the double-sided concrete wall. The MCNP simulation indicated that HDPE-Borax is the most efficient among the aforementioned candidate materials, and the combined thickness of the shielding layers should exceed 100 cm to satisfy the dose limit on the outside surface of the shielding wall of the facility when limiting the thickness of the HDPE-Borax intermediate layer to below 5 cm. However, the shielding wall must include the instrumentation and installation holes for the LSDS system. The radiation leakage through the holes was substantially mitigated by adopting a zigzag-shape with concrete covers on both sides. The suggested optimized design of the shielding structure satisfies the dose rate limit and can be used for the construction of a facility in

  19. Multifunctional Hot Structure Heat Shield Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MHSHS concept is unique in integrated TPS with primary load carrying structure. This approach offers the potential to reduce mass and increase volume while...

  20. Spectral analysis of shielded gamma ray sources using precalculated library data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Thomas Wesley; Gardner, Robin P.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, an approach has been developed for determining the intensity of a shielded source by first determining the thicknesses of three different shielding materials from a passively collected gamma-ray spectrum by making comparisons with predetermined shielded spectra. These evaluations are dependent on the accuracy and validity of the predetermined library spectra which were created by changing the thicknesses of the three chosen materials lead, aluminum and wood that are used to simulate any actual shielding. Each of the spectra produced was generated using MCNP5 with a sufficiently large number of histories to ensure a low relative error at each channel. The materials were held in the same respective order from source to detector, where each material consisted of three individual thicknesses and a null condition. This then produced two separate data sets of 27 total shielding material situations and subsequent predetermined libraries that were created for each radionuclide source used. The technique used to calculate the thicknesses of the materials implements a Levenberg-Marquardt nonlinear search that employs a tri-linear interpolation with the respective predetermined libraries within each channel for the supplied input unknown spectrum. Given that the nonlinear parameters require an initial guess for the calculations, the approach demonstrates first that when the correct values are input, the correct thicknesses are found. It then demonstrates that when multiple trials of random values are input for each of the nonlinear parameters, the average of the calculated solutions that successfully converges also produced the correct thicknesses. Under situations with sufficient information known about the detection situation at hand, the method was shown to behave in a manner that produces reasonable results and can serve as a good preliminary solution. This technique has the capability to be used in a variety of full spectrum inverse analysis problems

  1. The assembly of the disk shielding is finished.

    CERN Multimedia

    Vincent Hedberg

    At the end of March, the shielding project engineer, Jan Palla, could draw a sigh of relief when the fourth and final rotation of the disk shielding was carried out without incident. The two 80-ton heavy shielding assemblies were built in a horizontal position and they had to be first turned upside-down and then rotated to a vertical position during the assembly. The relatively thin disk plate with a diameter of 9 meters, made this operation quite delicate and a lot of calculation work and strengthening of the shielding was carried out before the rotations could take place. The disk shielding is being turned upside-down. The stainless steel cylinder in the centre supports the shielding as well as the small muon wheel. The two disk shielding assemblies consist of different materials such as bronze, gray steel, cast iron, stainless steel, boron doped polyethylene and lead. The project is multinational with the major pieces having been made by companies in Armenia, Serbia, Spain, Bulgaria, Italy, Slovaki...

  2. Thick Galactic Cosmic Radiation Shielding Using Atmospheric Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Nurge, Mark A.; Starr, Stanley O.; Koontz, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    NASA is concerned with protecting astronauts from the effects of galactic cosmic radiation and has expended substantial effort in the development of computer models to predict the shielding obtained from various materials. However, these models were only developed for shields up to about 120 g!cm2 in thickness and have predicted that shields of this thickness are insufficient to provide adequate protection for extended deep space flights. Consequently, effort is underway to extend the range of these models to thicker shields and experimental data is required to help confirm the resulting code. In this paper empirically obtained effective dose measurements from aircraft flights in the atmosphere are used to obtain the radiation shielding function of the earth's atmosphere, a very thick shield. Obtaining this result required solving an inverse problem and the method for solving it is presented. The results are shown to be in agreement with current code in the ranges where they overlap. These results are then checked and used to predict the radiation dosage under thick shields such as planetary regolith and the atmosphere of Venus.

  3. Evaluation of syringe shield effectiveness in handling radiopharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho Yong-In

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the radiation shield of radionuclide syringes and the personal dose equivalent by performing a simulation of radionuclides used in nuclear medicine diagnosis. In order to evaluate the dose depending on the distance between the radiation source and the ICRU sphere against the thickness of the shielding device, the distance at which a nuclear medicine worker may inadvertently come into contact with radiation from the radiation source was set at 0 cm to 30 cm according to the thickness of the shield, thus fixing the ICRU sphere. For a dose evaluation, Hp(10, Hp(3, and Hp(0.07 measurable in specific depth of the ICRU were evaluated. It was found that a dose measured on skin surface of nuclear medicine workers was relatively higher, that the dose varied in relation to the thickness of the radiation shield, and that the shielding effect decreased for some radiation sources such as 67Ga and 111In. It proved necessary to increase thickness of shielding device to the radiation sources such as 67Ga and 111In. It is also considered that a study of proper shielding thickness will be needed in future.

  4. Nuclear shielding of openings in ITER Tokamak building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dammann, A., E-mail: alexis.dammann@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Arumugam, A.P.; Beaudoin, V.; Beltran, D.; Benchikhoune, M.; Berruyer, F.; Cortes, P.; Gandini, F. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Ghirelli, N. [ASSYSTEM E.O.S, ZAC Saint Martin, 23, rue Benjamin Franklin, 84120 Pertuis (France); Gray, A.; Hurzlmeier, H.; Le Page, M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Lemée, A. [SOGETI High Tech, 180 Rue René Descartes, 13851 Aix en Provence (France); Lentini, G.; Loughlin, M.; Mita, Y.; Patisson, L.; Rigoni, G.; Rathi, D.; Song, I. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Establishment of a methodology to design shielded opening in external wall of the Tokamak building. ► Analysis of the shielding requirement, case by case, depending on the localization and the context. ► Implementation of an integrated solution for shielded opening. -- Abstract: The external walls of the Tokamak building, made of thick concrete, provide the nuclear shielding for operators working in adjacent buildings and for the environment. There are a series of openings to these external walls, devoted to ducts or pipes for ventilation, waveguides and transmission lines for heating systems and diagnostics, cooling pipes, cable trays or busbars. The shielding properties of the wall shall be preserved by adequate design of the openings in order not to affect the radiological zoning in adjacent areas. For some of them, shielding properties of the wall are not affected because the size of the network is quite small or the source is far from the opening. But for most of the openings, specific features shall be considered. Even if the approach is the same and the ways to shield can be standardized, specific analysis is requested in any case because the constraints are different.

  5. Checklist of the terrestrial vertebrates of the Guiana Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Distributions are given for 1850 species of terrestrial vertebrates in the Guiana Shield region of northeastern South America, with introductory text by the authors of each section. Distributions cover the three Guianas (Guyana, Surinam, and French Guiana), and the states of the Venezuelan Guayna (Amazonas, Bolivar, and Delta Amacuro), and in some cases the states of the Brazilian portion of the Guiana Shield (Amazonas, Roraima, Para, and Amapa), and the Colombian portion of the Guiana Shield. The first section is a checklist of amphibians of the Guiana Shield, by J. Celsa Sefiaris and Ross MacCulloch, detailing the distribution of 269 species. The second section is a checklist of the reptiles of the Guiana Shield by Teresa C. S. de Avila Pires, detailing the distribution of 295 species. The third section is a checklist of the birds of the Guiana Shield, by Chris Milensky, Wiltshire Hinds, Alexandre Aleixo, and Maria de Fatima C. Lima, detailing the distribution of 1004 species. The fourth section is a checklist of the mammals of the Guiana Shield, by Burton K. Lim, Mark D. Engstrom, and Jose Ochoa G., detailing the distribution of 282 species.

  6. TU-AB-201-08: Rotating Shield High Dose Rate Brachytherapy with 153Gd and 75Se Isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renaud, M; Seuntjens, J; Enger, S [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Flynn, R [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To introduce rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT) for different cancer sites with {sup 153}Gd and {sup 75}Se isotopes. RSBT is a form of intensity modulated brachytherapy, using shielded rotating catheters to provide a better dose distribution in the tumour while protecting healthy tissue. Methods: BrachySource, a Geant4-based Monte Carlo dose planning system was developed for investigation of RSBT with {sup 153}Gd and {sup 75}Se for different cancer sites. Dose distributions from {sup 153}Gd, {sup 75}Se and {sup 192}Ir isotopes were calculated in a 40 cm radius water phantom by using the microSelectron-v2 source model. The source was placed inside a cylindrical platinum shield with 1.3 mm diameter. An emission window coinciding with the active core of the source was created by removing half (180°) of the wall of the shield. Relative dose rate distributions of the three isotopes were simulated. As a proof of concept, a breast cancer patient originally treated with Mammosite was re-simulated with unshielded {sup 192}Ir and shielded {sup 153}Gd. Results: The source with the lowest energy, {sup 153}Gd, decreased the dose on the shielded side by 91%, followed by {sup 75}Se and {sup 192}Ir with 36% and 16% reduction at 1 cm from the source. The breast cancer patient simulation showed the ability of shielded {sup 153}Gd to spare the chest wall by a 90% dose reduction when only one emission window angle is considered. In this case, fully covering the PTV would require more delivery angles and the chest wall dose reduction would be less, however, the simulation demonstrates the potential of shielded {sup 153}Gd to selectively isolate organs at risk. Conclusion: Introducing {sup 153}Gd and {sup 75}Se sources combined with RSBT will allow escalation of dose in the target volume while maintaining low doses in radiation sensitive healthy tissue. Tailoring treatments to each individual patient by treating all parts of the tumour without over-irradiation of normal

  7. Construction of a Post-Irradiated Fuel Examination Shielded Enclosure Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael A. Lehto, Ph.D.; Boyd D. Christensen

    2008-05-01

    construction activities, which will include facility modifications and construction of one shielded enclosure. Follow-up activities will be to construct two additional shielded enclosures to complete the suite of three separate but connected remote operated examination areas. Equipment purchases are to be capital procurement spread out over several years on a funded schedule. This paper discusses safety and operational considerations given during the conceptual design phase of the project. The paper considers such things as project material at risk (MAR), new processes and equipment, potential hazards, and the major modification evaluation process to determine if a preliminary Documented Safety Analysis (PDSA) is required. As part of that process, an evaluation was made of the potential hazards with the new project compared to the existing and historical work and associated hazards in the affected facility.

  8. Graphite/Ultra-High Modulus Polyethylene Hybrid Fiber Composites with Epoxy and Polyethylene Matrices for Cosmic Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    One of the most significant technical challenges in long-duration space missions is that of protecting the crew from harmful radiation. Protection against such radiation on a manned Mars mission will be of vital importance both during transit and while on the surface of the planet. The development of multifunctional materials that serve as integral structural members of the space vehicle and provide the necessary radiation shielding for the crew would be both mission enabling and cost effective. Additionally, combining shielding and structure could reduce total vehicle mass. Hybrid laminated composite materials having both ultramodulus polyethylene (PE) and graphite fibers in epoxy and PE matrices could meet such mission requirements. PE fibers have excellent physical properties, including the highest specific strength of any known fiber. Moreover, the high hydrogen (H) content of polyethylene makes the material an excellent shielding material for cosmic radiation. When such materials are incorporated into an epoxy or PE matrix a very effective shielding material is expected. Boron (B) may be added to the matrix resin or used as a coating to further increase the shielding effectiveness due to B s ability to slow thermal neutrons. These materials may also serve as micrometeorites shields due to PE s high impact energy absorption properties. It should be noted that such materials can be fabricated by existing equipment and methods. It is the objective of this work therefore to: (a) perform preliminary analysis of the radiation transport within these materials; (b) fabricate panels for mechanical property testing before and after radiation exposure. Preliminary determination on the effectiveness of the combinations of material components on both shielding and structural efficiency will be made.

  9. Graphite/Ultra-High Modulus Polyethylene Hybrid Fiber Composites with Epoxy and Polyethylene Matrices for Cosmic Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    One of the most significant technical challenges in long-duration space missions is that of protecting the crew from harmful radiation. Protection against such radiation on a manned Mars mission will be of vital importance both during transit and while on the surface of the planet. The development of multifunctional materials that serve as integral structural members of the space vehicle and provide the necessary radiation shielding for the crew would be both mission enabling and cost effective. Additionally, combining shielding and structure could reduce total vehicle mass. Hybrid laminated composite materials having both ultramodulus polyethylene (PE) and graphite fibers in epoxy and PE matrices could meet such mission requirements. PE fibers have excellent physical properties, including the highest specific strength of any known fiber. Moreover, the high hydrogen (H) content of polyethylene makes the material an excellent shielding material for cosmic radiation. When such materials are incorporated into an epoxy or PE matrix a very effective shielding material is expected. Boron (B) may be added to the matrix resin or used as a coating to further increase the shielding effectiveness due to B s ability to slow thermal neutrons. These materials may also serve as micrometeorites shields due to PE s high impact energy absorption properties. It should be noted that such materials can be fabricated by existing equipment and methods. It is the objective of this work therefore to: (a) perform preliminary analysis of the radiation transport within these materials; (b) fabricate panels for mechanical property testing before and after radiation exposure. Preliminary determination on the effectiveness of the combinations of material components on both shielding and structural efficiency will be made.

  10. Simulation of divertor targets shielding during transients in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pestchanyi, Sergey, E-mail: serguei.pestchanyi@kit.edu [KIT, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Pitts, Richard; Lehnen, Michael [ITER Organization,Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We simulated plasma shielding effect during disruption in ITER using the TOKES code. • It has been found that vaporization is unavoidable under action of ITER transients, but plasma shielding drastically reduces the divertor target damage: the melt pool and the vaporization region widths reduced 10–15 times. • A simplified 1D model describing the melt pool depth and the shielded heat flux to the divertor targets have been developed. • The results of the TOKES simulations have been compared with the analytic model when the model is valid. - Abstract: Direct extrapolation of the disruptive heat flux on ITER conditions predicts severe melting and vaporization of the divertor targets causing their intolerable damage. However, tungsten vaporized from the target at initial stage of the disruption can create plasma shield in front of the target, which effectively protects the target surface from the rest of the heat flux. Estimation of this shielding efficiency has been performed using the TOKES code. The shielding effect under ITER conditions is found to be very strong: the maximal depth of the melt layer reduced 4 times, the melt layer width—more than 10 times and vaporization region shrinks 10–15 times due to shielding for unmitigated disruption of 350 MJ discharge. The simulation results show complex, 2D plasma dynamics of the shield under ITER conditions. However, a simplified analytic model, valid for rough estimation of the maximum value for the shielded flux to the target and for the melt depth at the target surface has been developed.

  11. Face shield design against blast-induced head injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Long Bin; Tse, Kwong Ming; Tan, Yuan Hong; Sapingi, Mohamad Ali Bin; Tan, Vincent Beng Chye; Lee, Heow Pueh

    2017-03-22

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury has been on the rise in recent years because of the increasing use of improvised explosive devices in conflict zones. Our study investigates the response of a helmeted human head subjected to a blast of 1 atm peak overpressure, for cases with and without a standard polycarbonate (PC) face shield and for face shields comprising of composite PC and aerogel materials and with lateral edge extension. The novel introduction of aerogel into the laminate face shield is explored and its wave-structure interaction mechanics and performance in blast mitigation is analysed. Our numerical results show that the face shield prevented direct exposure of the blast wave to the face and help delays the transmission of the blast to reduce the intracranial pressures (ICPs) at the parietal lobe. However, the blast wave can diffract and enter the midface region at the bottom and side edges of the face shield, resulting in traumatic brain injury. This suggests that the bottom and sides of the face shield are important regions to focus on to reduce wave ingress. The laminated PC/aerogel/PC face shield yielded higher peak positive and negative ICPs at the frontal lobe, than the original PC one. For the occipital and temporal brain regions, the laminated face shield performed better than the original. The composite face shield with extended edges reduced ICP at the temporal lobe but increases ICP significantly at the parietal lobe, which suggests that a greater coverage may not lead to better mitigating effects. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Orthogonally interdigitated shielded serpentine travelling wave cathode ray tube deflection structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Edward C.; Hudson, Charles L.

    1995-01-01

    A new deflection structure (12) which deflects a beam of charged particles, uch as an electron beam (15), includes a serpentine set (20) for transmitting a deflection field, and a shielding frame (25) for housing the serpentine set (20). The serpentine set (20) includes a vertical serpentine deflection element (22) and a horizontal serpentine deflection element (24). These deflection elements (22, 24) are identical, and are interdigitatedly and orthogonally disposed relative to each other, for forming a central transmission passage (75), through which the electron beam (15) passes, and is deflected by the deflection field, so as to minimize drift space signal distortion. The shielding frame (25) includes a plurality of ground blocks (26, 28, 30, 32), and forms an internal serpentine trough (77) within these ground blocks, for housing the serpentine set (20). The deflection structure (12) further includes a plurality of feedthrough connectors (35, 37, 35I, 37I), which are inserted through the shielding frame (25), and which are electrically connected to the serpentine set (20).

  13. Renormalized Volume

    CERN Document Server

    Gover, A Rod

    2016-01-01

    For any conformally compact manifold with hypersurface boundary we define a canonical renormalized volume functional and compute an explicit, holographic formula for the corresponding anomaly. For the special case of asymptotically Einstein manifolds, our method recovers the known results. The anomaly does not depend on any particular choice of regulator, but the coefficients of divergences do. We give explicit formulae for these divergences valid for any choice of regulating hypersurface; these should be relevant to recent studies of quantum corrections to entanglement entropies. The anomaly is expressed as a conformally invariant integral of a local Q-curvature that generalizes the Branson Q-curvature by including data of the embedding. In each dimension this canonically defines a higher dimensional generalization of the Willmore energy/rigid string action. We show that the variation of these energy functionals is exactly the obstruction to solving a singular Yamabe type problem with boundary data along the...

  14. Extreme-Velocity Quasar Outflows and the Role of X-ray Shielding

    CERN Document Server

    Hamann, Fred; McGraw, Sean; Hidalgo, Paola Rodriguez; Shields, Joseph; Capellupo, Daniel; Charlton, Jane; Eracleous, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Quasar accretion disk winds observed via broad absorption lines (BALs) in the UV produce strong continuous absorption in X-rays. The X-ray absorber is believed to serve critically as a radiative shield to enable radiative driving. However, "mini-BAL" and narrow absorption line outflows have dramatically less X-ray absorption than BALs. Here we examine X-ray and rest-frame UV spectra of 8 mini-BAL quasars with outflow speeds in the range 0.1c to 0.2c to test whether extreme speeds require a strong shield. We find that the X-ray absorption is weak or moderate, with neutral-equivalent column densities N_H ~ 8 x 10^15 cm (based on measured line depths), the outflows have shapes like thin "pancakes" viewed face-on, or they occupy larger volumes like a spray of many dense clouds with a small volume filling factor. These results favor models with magnetic confinement in magnetic disk winds.

  15. Planar quadrature coil design using shielded-loop resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensgaard, A

    1997-01-01

    The shielded-loop resonator is known to have a low capacitive sample loss due to a perfect balancing. In this paper, it is demonstrated that shielded-loop technology also can be used to improve design of planar quadrature coils. Both a dual-loop circuit and especially a dual-mode circuit may...... benefit from use of shielded-loop resonators. Observations in measurements agree with theory for both a dual-loop coil and a dual-mode coil. The coils were designed for use as transmit/receive coil for 1H imaging and spectroscopy at 4.7 T in rat brain....

  16. Monte Carlo based radial shield design of typical PWR reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gul, Anas; Khan, Rustam; Qureshi, M. Ayub; Azeem, Muhammad Waqar; Raza, S.A. [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Stummer, Thomas [Technische Univ. Wien (Austria). Atominst.

    2016-11-15

    Neutron and gamma flux and dose equivalent rate distribution are analysed in radial and shields of a typical PWR type reactor based on the Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code MCNP5. The ENDF/B-VI continuous energy cross-section library has been employed for the criticality and shielding analysis. The computed results are in good agreement with the reference results (maximum difference is less than 56 %). It implies that MCNP5 a good tool for accurate prediction of neutron and gamma flux and dose rates in radial shield around the core of PWR type reactors.

  17. Low permeability asphalt concrete gamma ray shielding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binney, S E; Sykes, K L

    1997-01-01

    Energy-dependent gamma ray shielding properties were measured as a function of gamma ray energy for a low permeability asphalt concrete that is used as a cap to prevent water infiltration into radioactive waste sites. Experimental data were compared to ISO-PC point kernel shielding calculations. Calculated dose equivalent rates compared well with experimental values, especially considering the poor detector resolution involved. The shielding properties of the asphalt concrete closely resembled those of aluminum. The results presented can be used to determine the asphalt concrete thickness required to reduce dose equivalent rates from several gamma ray emitting radionuclides.

  18. Abstracts of digital computer code packages assembled by the Radiation Shielding Information Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, B.J.; Maskewitz, B.F.

    1985-04-01

    This publication, ORNL/RSIC-13, Volumes I to III Revised, has resulted from an internal audit of the first 168 packages of computing technology in the Computer Codes Collection (CCC) of the Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC). It replaces the earlier three documents published as single volumes between 1966 to 1972. A significant number of the early code packages were considered to be obsolete and were removed from the collection in the audit process and the CCC numbers were not reassigned. Others not currently being used by the nuclear R and D community were retained in the collection to preserve technology not replaced by newer methods, or were considered of potential value for reference purposes. Much of the early technology, however, has improved through developer/RSIC/user interaction and continues at the forefront of the advancing state-of-the-art.

  19. Variable volume combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostebee, Heath Michael; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2017-01-17

    The present application provides a variable volume combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The variable volume combustor may include a liner, a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles positioned within the liner, and a linear actuator so as to maneuver the micro-mixer fuel nozzles axially along the liner.

  20. Comparison of some lead and non-lead based glass systems, standard shielding concretes and commercial window glasses in terms of shielding parameters in the energy region of 1 keV-100 GeV: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurudirek, Murat; Özdemir, Yüksel; Şimşek, Önder; Durak, Rıdvan

    2010-12-01

    The effective atomic numbers, Z eff of some glass systems with and without Pb have been calculated in the energy region of 1 keV-100 GeV including the K absorption edges of high Z elements present in the glass. Also, these glass systems have been compared with some standard shielding concretes and commercial window glasses in terms of mean free paths and total mass attenuation coefficients in the continuous energy range. Comparisons with experiments were also provided wherever possible for glasses. It has been observed that the glass systems without Pb have higher values of Z eff than that of Pb based glasses at some high energy regions even if they have lower mean atomic numbers than Pb based glasses. When compared with some standard shielding concretes and commercial window glasses, generally it has been shown that the given glass systems have superior properties than concretes and window glasses with respect to the radiation-shielding properties, thus confirming the availability of using these glasses as substitutes for some shielding concretes and commercial window glasses to improve radiation-shielding properties in the continuous energy region.

  1. Gauge origin independent calculations of nuclear magnetic shieldings in relativistic four-component theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilias, Miroslav; Saue, Trond; Enevoldsen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The use of perturbation-dependent London atomic orbitals, also called gauge including atomic orbitals, has proven efficient for calculations of NMR shielding constants and other magnetic properties in the nonrelativistic framework. In this paper, the theory of London atomic orbitals for NMR...... calculates the diamagnetic contribution as an expectation value, leads to significant errors and is not recommended. (C) 2009 American Institute of Physics. [doi:10.1063/1.3240198]...

  2. X-Ray Micro-Tomography Applied to Nasa's Materials Research: Heat Shields, Parachutes and Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panerai, Francesco; Borner, Arnaud; Ferguson, Joseph C.; Mansour, Nagi N.; Stern, Eric C.; Barnard, Harold S.; Macdowell, Alastair A.; Parkinson, Dilworth Y.

    2017-01-01

    X-ray micro-tomography is used to support the research on materials carried out at NASA Ames Research Center. The technique is applied to a variety of applications, including the ability to characterize heat shield materials for planetary entry, to study the Earth- impacting asteroids, and to improve broadcloths of spacecraft parachutes. From micro-tomography images, relevant morphological and transport properties are determined and validated against experimental data.

  3. Volume Regulated Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Thomas Kjær

    - serves a multitude of functions in the mammalian cell, regulating the membrane potential (Em), cell volume, protein activity and the driving force for facilitated transporters giving Cl- and Cl- channels a major potential of regulating cellular function. These functions include control of the cell cycle...... of volume perturbations evolution have developed system of channels and transporters to tightly control volume homeostasis. In the past decades evidence has been mounting, that the importance of these volume regulated channels and transporters are not restricted to the defense of cellular volume......, controlled cell death and cellular migration. Volume regulatory mechanisms has long been in focus for regulating cellular proliferation and my thesis work have been focusing on the role of Cl- channels in proliferation with specific emphasis on ICl, swell. Pharmacological blockage of the ubiquitously...

  4. Shield Effect Of Functional Interlining Fabric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šaravanja Bosiljka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic interference (EMI have become very serious in a variety of different electronic equipments, such as personal computers (frequency at several GHz, mobile devices (0.9 – 2.4 GHz and similar. This imposes the need for setting boundaries for EM emission of electric and electronic devices in order to minimize the possibility of interference with radio and wireless communications. Functional textiles can offer protective properties against EM radiation. The aim of this study is to investigate the degree of protection against EM radiation provided by polyamide copper-coated interlining fabric before and after dry cleaning treatment. EM protection efficiency of the interlining functional fabric is explored on both sides at the frequencies of 0.9; 1.8; 2.1 and 2.4 GHz. The results obtained have shown that the interlining fabric has good protective properties against EM radiation, but after dry cleaning, treatment reduction is observed. Scanning electron microscopy micrographs of the interlining surface confirms shield effect decline due to degradation and firing of the copper layers during the process of dry cleaning.

  5. Shielded Coaxial Optrode Arrays for Neurophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Jeffrey R; Connolly, Timothy; Varela, Juan A; Lundberg, Jaclyn; Burns, Michael J; Chiles, Thomas C; Christianson, John P; Naughton, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in the study of the brain has been greatly facilitated by the development of new tools capable of minimally-invasive, robust coupling to neuronal assemblies. Two prominent examples are the microelectrode array (MEA), which enables electrical signals from large numbers of neurons to be detected and spatiotemporally correlated, and optogenetics, which enables the electrical activity of cells to be controlled with light. In the former case, high spatial density is desirable but, as electrode arrays evolve toward higher density and thus smaller pitch, electrical crosstalk increases. In the latter, finer control over light input is desirable, to enable improved studies of neuroelectronic pathways emanating from specific cell stimulation. Here, we introduce a coaxial electrode architecture that is uniquely suited to address these issues, as it can simultaneously be utilized as an optical waveguide and a shielded electrode in dense arrays. Using optogenetically-transfected cells on a coaxial MEA, we demonstrate the utility of the architecture by recording cellular currents evoked from optical stimulation. We also show the capability for network recording by radiating an area of seven individually-addressed coaxial electrode regions with cultured cells covering a section of the extent.

  6. Improved Spacecraft Materials for Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Singleterry, R. C.; Tai, H.; Thibeault, S. A.; Simonsen, L. C.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Miller, J.

    1999-01-01

    In the execution of this proposal, we will first examine current and developing spacecraft materials and evaluate their ability to attenuate adverse biological mutational events in mammalian cell systems and reduce the rate of cancer induction in mice harderian glands as a measure of their protective qualities. The HZETRN code system will be used to generate a database on GCR attenuation in each material. If a third year of funding is granted, the most promising and mission-specific materials will be used to study the impact on mission cost for a typical Mars mission scenario as was planned in our original two year proposal at the original funding level. The most promising candidate materials will be further tested as to their transmission characteristics in Fe and Si ion beams to evaluate the accuracy of the HZETRN transmission factors. Materials deemed critical to mission success may also require testing as well as materials developed by industry for their radiation protective qualities (e.g., Physical Sciences Inc.) A study will be made of designing polymeric materials and composite materials with improved radiation shielding properties as well as the possible improvement of mission-specific materials.

  7. Fusion reactor blanket/shield design study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.L.; Clemmer, R.G.; Harkness, S.D.

    1979-07-01

    A joint study of tokamak reactor first-wall/blanket/shield technology was conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company (MDAC). The objectives of this program were the identification of key technological limitations for various tritium-breeding-blanket design concepts, establishment of a basis for assessment and comparison of the design features of each concept, and development of optimized blanket designs. The approach used involved a review of previously proposed blanket designs, analysis of critical technological problems and design features associated with each of the blanket concepts, and a detailed evaluation of the most tractable design concepts. Tritium-breeding-blanket concepts were evaluated according to the proposed coolant. The ANL effort concentrated on evaluation of lithium- and water-cooled blanket designs while the MDAC effort focused on helium- and molten salt-cooled designs. A joint effort was undertaken to provide a consistent set of materials property data used for analysis of all blanket concepts. Generalized nuclear analysis of the tritium breeding performance, an analysis of tritium breeding requirements, and a first-wall stress analysis were conducted as part of the study. The impact of coolant selection on the mechanical design of a tokamak reactor was evaluated. Reference blanket designs utilizing the four candidate coolants are presented.

  8. Shielding analysis of proton therapy accelerators: a demonstration using Monte Carlo-generated source terms and attenuation lengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Bo-Lun; Sheu, Rong-Jiun; Lin, Uei-Tyng

    2015-05-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are generally considered the most accurate method for complex accelerator shielding analysis. Simplified models based on point-source line-of-sight approximation are often preferable in practice because they are intuitive and easy to use. A set of shielding data, including source terms and attenuation lengths for several common targets (iron, graphite, tissue, and copper) and shielding materials (concrete, iron, and lead) were generated by performing Monte Carlo simulations for 100-300 MeV protons. Possible applications and a proper use of the data set were demonstrated through a practical case study, in which shielding analysis on a typical proton treatment room was conducted. A thorough and consistent comparison between the predictions of our point-source line-of-sight model and those obtained by Monte Carlo simulations for a 360° dose distribution around the room perimeter showed that the data set can yield fairly accurate or conservative estimates for the transmitted doses, except for those near the maze exit. In addition, this study demonstrated that appropriate coupling between the generated source term and empirical formulae for radiation streaming can be used to predict a reasonable dose distribution along the maze. This case study proved the effectiveness and advantage of applying the data set to a quick shielding design and dose evaluation for proton therapy accelerators.

  9. Radiation Engineering Analysis of Shielding Materials to Assess Their Ability to Protect Astronauts in Deep Space From Energetic Particle Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleterry, R. C.

    2013-01-01

    An analysis is performed on four typical materials (aluminum, liquid hydrogen, polyethylene, and water) to assess their impact on the length of time an astronaut can stay in deep space and not exceed a design basis radiation exposure of 150 mSv. A large number of heavy lift launches of pure shielding mass are needed to enable long duration, deep space missions to keep astronauts at or below the exposure value with shielding provided by the vehicle. Therefore, vehicle mass using the assumptions in the paper cannot be the sole shielding mechanism for long duration, deep space missions. As an example, to enable the Mars Design Reference Mission 5.0 with a 400 day transit to and from Mars, not including the 500 day stay on the surface, a minimum of 24 heavy lift launches of polyethylene at 89,375 lbm (40.54 tonnes) each are needed for the 1977 galactic cosmic ray environment. With the assumptions used in this paper, a single heavy lift launch of water or polyethylene can protect astronauts for a 130 day mission before exceeding the exposure value. Liquid hydrogen can only protect the astronauts for 160 days. Even a single launch of pure shielding material cannot protect an astronaut in deep space for more than 180 days using the assumptions adopted in the analysis. It is shown that liquid hydrogen is not the best shielding material for the same mass as polyethylene for missions that last longer than 225 days.

  10. Calculation, display, and analysis of the nature of nonsymmetric nuclear magnetic resonance shielding tensors: Application to three-membered rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Aage E.; Bouman, Thomas D.

    1989-09-01

    The components of the full nuclear shielding tensor are analyzed with particular regard to the origins of the antisymmetric component of the shielding of nuclei at low-symmetry molecular sites. As an aid we propose the study and display of the shielding response vector, i.e., the nuclear shielding field per unit applied magnetic field. The analysis is based on ab initio calculations in the localized orbital-local origin method for cyclopropane, cyclopropene, ethylene oxide, ethylene imine, and diazirine, and also includes a discussion of the mechanism for the large antisymmetric component predicted for the unsaturated nuclei in cyclopropene and diazirine, both in terms of bond and lone pair contributions and in terms of a decomposition of the dominant paramagnetic contributions into molecular point group species. Display of the component of the shielding vector parallel to the applied field is shown to be a valuable alternative to the common ellipsoid representations. Display of the components perpendicular to the applied field provides a picture of the relation of the antisymmetry to molecular structure and suggests its direct observation through monitoring the perpendicular response. Finally, we show that, contrary to a recent claim, the eigensolutions of the full tensor in the presence of antisymmetry play no role in the observed anisotropies.

  11. Radiation Engineering Analysis of Shielding Materials to Assess Their Ability to Protect Astronauts in Deep Space From Energetic Particle Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleterry, R. C.

    2013-01-01

    An analysis is performed on four typical materials (aluminum, liquid hydrogen, polyethylene, and water) to assess their impact on the length of time an astronaut can stay in deep space and not exceed a design basis radiation exposure of 150 mSv. A large number of heavy lift launches of pure shielding mass are needed to enable long duration, deep space missions to keep astronauts at or below the exposure value with shielding provided by the vehicle. Therefore, vehicle mass using the assumptions in the paper cannot be the sole shielding mechanism for long duration, deep space missions. As an example, to enable the Mars Design Reference Mission 5.0 with a 400 day transit to and from Mars, not including the 500 day stay on the surface, a minimum of 24 heavy lift launches of polyethylene at 89,375 lbm (40.54 tonnes) each are needed for the 1977 galactic cosmic ray environment. With the assumptions used in this paper, a single heavy lift launch of water or polyethylene can protect astronauts for a 130 day mission before exceeding the exposure value. Liquid hydrogen can only protect the astronauts for 160 days. Even a single launch of pure shielding material cannot protect an astronaut in deep space for more than 180 days using the assumptions adopted in the analysis. It is shown that liquid hydrogen is not the best shielding material for the same mass as polyethylene for missions that last longer than 225 days.

  12. Relativistic heavy-atom effects on heavy-atom nuclear shieldings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantto, Perttu; Romero, Rodolfo H.; Gómez, Sergio S.; Aucar, Gustavo A.; Vaara, Juha

    2006-11-01

    The principal relativistic heavy-atom effects on the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding tensor of the heavy atom itself (HAHA effects) are calculated using ab initio methods at the level of the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. This is the first systematic study of the main HAHA effects on nuclear shielding and chemical shift by perturbational relativistic approach. The dependence of the HAHA effects on the chemical environment of the heavy atom is investigated for the closed-shell X2+, X4+, XH2, and XH3- (X =Si-Pb) as well as X3+, XH3, and XF3 (X =P-Bi) systems. Fully relativistic Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculations are carried out for comparison. It is necessary in the Breit-Pauli approach to include the second-order magnetic-field-dependent spin-orbit (SO) shielding contribution as it is the larger SO term in XH3-, XH3, and XF3, and is equally large in XH2 as the conventional, third-order field-independent spin-orbit contribution. Considering the chemical shift, the third-order SO mechanism contributes two-thirds of the difference of ˜1500ppm between BiH3 and BiF3. The second-order SO mechanism and the numerically largest relativistic effect, which arises from the cross-term contribution of the Fermi contact hyperfine interaction and the relativistically modified spin-Zeeman interaction (FC/SZ-KE), are isotropic and practically independent of electron correlation effects as well as the chemical environment of the heavy atom. The third-order SO terms depend on these factors and contribute both to heavy-atom shielding anisotropy and NMR chemical shifts. While a qualitative picture of heavy-atom chemical shifts is already obtained at the nonrelativistic level of theory, reliable shifts may be expected after including the third-order SO contributions only, especially when calculations are carried out at correlated level. The FC/SZ-KE contribution to shielding is almost completely produced in the s orbitals of the heavy atom, with values diminishing with the principal

  13. Multifunctional B/C Fiber Composites for Radiation Shielding Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radiation shielding is an enabling technology required for extended manned missions to the Moon, Mars and the planets beyond. Multifunctional structural must protect...

  14. Optimization of the National Ignition Facility primary shield design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annese, C.E.; Watkins, E.F.; Greenspan, E.; Miller, W.F. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Latkowski, J.; Lee, J.D.; Soran, P.; Tobin, M.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    Minimum cost design concepts of the primary shield for the National Ignition laser fusion experimental Facility (NIF) are searched with the help of the optimization code SWAN. The computational method developed for this search involves incorporating the time dependence of the delayed photon field within effective delayed photon production cross sections. This method enables one to address the time-dependent problem using relatively simple, time-independent transport calculations, thus significantly simplifying the design process. A novel approach was used for the identification of the optimal combination of constituents that will minimize the shield cost; it involves the generation, with SWAN, of effectiveness functions for replacing materials on an equal cost basis. The minimum cost shield design concept was found to consist of a mixture of polyethylene and low cost, low activation materials such as SiC, with boron added near the shield boundaries.

  15. Shielding efficiency of metal hydrides and borohydrides in fusion reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Vishvanath P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mass attenuation coefficients, mean free paths and exposure buildup factors have been used to characterize the shielding efficiency of metal hydrides and borohydrides, with high density of hydrogen. Gamma ray exposure buildup factors were computed using five-parameter geometric progression fitting at energies 0.015 MeV to15 MeV, and for penetration depths up to 40 mean free paths. Fast-neutron shielding efficiency has been characterized by the effective neutron removal cross-section. It is shown that ZrH2 and VH2 are very good shielding materials for gamma rays and fast neutrons due to their suitable combination of low- and high-Z elements. The present work should be useful for the selection and design of blankets and shielding, and for dose evaluation for components in fusion reactors.

  16. Characterizing and Manufacturing Multifunctional Radiation Shielding Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project addresses two vital problems for long-term space travel activities: radiation shielding and hydrogen storage for power and propulsion. While both...

  17. Electromagnetic shielding of polymer-matrix composites with metallic nanoparticles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jalali, M; Dauterstedt, S; Michaud, A; Wuthrich, R

    2011-01-01

    To improve electromagnetic (EM) shielding and especially absorption of carbon fibre reinforced polymer-matrix composites for aircraft applications in high frequencies, the inclusion of metallic nanoparticles of iron, cobalt, nickel...

  18. PHYSICS UPDATE: Does electrostatic shielding work both ways?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Natthi L.; Reid, David D.

    1998-09-01

    We demonstrate that there is a sense in which electrostatic shielding works both ways and that Richard Feynman's discussion to this effect in The Feynman Lectures on Physics, though ambiguous, is not incorrect.

  19. Low Cost, Lightweight, Multifunctional Structural Shielding Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR involves the development of a lightweight innovative material for use as structure and radiation shielding in one. APS has assembled a uniquely qualified...

  20. RADIO SHIELDING PROPERTIES OF CONCRETE BASED ON SHUNGITE NANOMATERIALS

    OpenAIRE

    BELOUSOVA Elena Sergeevna; LYNKOV Leonid Mihailovich; MAHMOOD Mohammed Shakir; NASONOVA Natalia Viktorovna

    2013-01-01

    Modifications of shielding construction materials based on Portland cement with the addition of powder nanomaterial shungite were developed. Attenuation and re­flection of electromagnetic radiation for obtained materials were studied. Recommen­dations for using are given.